WorldWideScience

Sample records for macular degeneration cataracts

  1. Cataracts and macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoch, D

    1979-09-01

    The intraocular lens restores general vision and some degree of independence and mobility to patients with dense cataracts and macular degeneration. The patient, however, must be repeatedly warned that fine central vision, particularly reading, will not be possible after the surgery. An aphakic spectacle leaves such patients a narrow band of vision when superimposed over the macular lesion, and contact lenses are too small for the patient to manage insertion without help.

  2. Geriatric vision loss due to cataracts, macular degeneration, and glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenbaum, Joseph W

    2012-01-01

    The major causes of impaired vision in the elderly population of the United States are cataracts, macular degeneration, and open-angle glaucoma. Cataracts and macular degeneration usually reduce central vision, especially reading and near activities, whereas chronic glaucoma characteristically attacks peripheral vision in a silent way, impacting balance, walking, and driving. Untreated, these visual problems lead to issues with regard to taking medications, keeping track of finances and personal information, walking, watching television, and attending the theater, and often create social isolation. Thus, visually impaired individuals enter nursing homes 3 years earlier, have twice the risk of falling, and have 4× the risk of hip fracture. Consequently, many elderly with low vision exercise greater demands on community services. With the prospect of little improvement and sustained visual loss, in the face of poor tolerance of low-vision services and not accepting magnification as the only way to read, clinical depression is common. In many instances, however, early and accurate diagnosis can result in timely treatment and can preserve quality of life. This review will look at current diagnostic and therapeutic considerations. Currently, about 20.5 million people in the United States have cataracts. The number will reach 30 million by 2020. About 1.75 million Americans currently have some form of macular degeneration, and the number is estimated to increase to 2.95 million in 2020. Approximately 2.2 million Americans have glaucoma, and by 2020 that number is estimated to be close to 3.4 million people. It is projected that by 2030 there will be 72.1 million seniors. With some overlap of the above 3 groups conservatively estimated (if you add the 2030 cataract group to the macular degeneration and glaucoma groups), then about 1 in 2 senior individuals by 2030 may have some significant ocular disease, which could account for about 50% of the healthcare budget for the

  3. The potential preventive effects of vitamins for cataract and age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, P F

    1999-05-01

    Age-related cataract and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are important public health problems. Approximately 50% of the 30 to 50 million cases of blindness worldwide result from unoperated cataract. In the US and other developed countries AMD is the leading cause of blindness, but age-related cataract remains the leading cause of visual disability. Age-related cataract and AMD represent an enormous economic burden. In the United States more than 1.3 million cataract extractions are performed annually at a cost of approximately $3.5 billion. Much of the experimental research on the etiology of cataract and AMD has focused on the role of nutritional antioxidants (vitamin C, vitamin E, and carotenoids). Evidence from epidemiologic studies support a role for nutritional antioxidants in delaying the onset of these age-related vision disorders. Although it is not yet possible to conclude that antioxidant nutrients have a role in prevention of cataract or AMD, a summary of the epidemiologic evidence suggests that it is prudent to consume diets high in vitamins C and E and carotenoids, particularly the xanthophylls, as insurance against the development of cataract and AMD.

  4. Contribution of the Nurses’ Health Study to the Epidemiology of Cataract, Age-Related Macular Degeneration, and Glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Juan; Cho, Eunyoung; Ogata, Soshiro; Jacques, Paul; Taylor, Allen; Chiu, Chung-Jung; Wiggs, Janey L.; Seddon, Johanna M.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Schaumberg, Debra A.; Pasquale, Louis R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To review the contribution of the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) to understanding the genetic and lifestyle factors that influence the risk of cataract, age-related macular degeneration, and glaucoma. Methods. We performed a narrative review of the publications of the NHS between 1976 and 2016. Results. The NHS has helped to elucidate the roles of genetics, lifestyle factors (e.g., cigarette smoking associated with cataract extraction and age-related macular degeneration), medical conditions (e.g., diabetes associated with cataract extraction and glaucoma), and dietary factors (e.g., greater carotenoid intake and lower glycemic diet associated with lower risk of age-related macular degeneration) in the etiology of degree and progression of lens opacities, cataract extraction, age-related macular degeneration, primary open-angle glaucoma, and exfoliation glaucoma. Conclusions. The findings from the NHS, combined with those of other studies, have provided compelling evidence to support public health recommendations for helping to prevent age-related eye diseases: abstinence from cigarette smoking, maintenance of healthy weight and diabetes prevention, and a healthy diet rich in fruits and vegetables. PMID:27459452

  5. [Therapeutic approach in patients with age-related macular degeneration and cataract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomi, Anca; Moldoveanu, A; Marin, Irina

    2011-01-01

    Management of the patient with coexisting cataract and AMD presents unique challenges to the cataract surgeon, the retina specialist, and the patient. A common clinical scenario is the patient in whom both the cataract and macular pathology appear to be contributing to decreased visual acuity. As with any surgery, the expectations from cataract removal must be evaluated thoroughly and understood clearly by both the patient and the cataract surgeon. Most patients with AMD who undergo cataract surgery feel that the surgery is worthwhile, and they report improvement of visual function and quality of life. In patients with mild AMD, improvement in central visual acuity and attainment of driving vision are realistic and achievable goals. In an eye with central disciform scarring or geographic atrophy there may be potential for improvement in color discrimination, contrast, or clarity of peripheral vision. In cases of dense cataract obscuring macular detail, cataract removal may be necessary to allow for adequate biomicroscopy and angiography, especially in an eye that may be at high risk for the development of choroidal neovascularization. It is often challenging to estimate the relative impact on visual impairment made by the lens opacities and the macular changes and the benefits and risks of cataract surgery in eyes with AMD should be carefully evaluated. Is cataract surgery justified in these patients? Does cataract surgery aggravate AMD in some patients?

  6. Repeatability of contrast sensitivity testing in patients with age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, and cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selcuk Kara

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To analyze the intrasession and intersession repeatability of contrast sensitivity (CS measurements in patients with glaucoma, cataract, or age-related macular degeneration (AMD and healthy controls. Methods: CS measurements were performed using the OPTEC-Functional Vision Analyzer (FVA, which uses a standardized and closed (view-in system. Measurements for patients with glaucoma, cataract, or AMD and healthy controls were repeated within 30 minutes (intrasession and during two sessions (intersession, separated by one week to one month. Test-retest reliability and correlation were measured using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC and coefficient of repeatability (COR. Results: Ninety subjects (90 eyes with visual acuity of 0.17 logMAR or higher in the cataract group or 0.00 logMAR in the other groups were included. During the first session, the ICC values were 0.87, 0.90, 0.76, and 0.69, and COR values were 0.24, 0.20, 0.38, and 0.25 for the control, glaucoma, cataract, and AMD groups, respectively. The reliability scores significantly improved during the second session, except in the glaucoma group. There was an acceptable floor effect and no ceiling effect at higher frequencies in the glaucoma and AMD groups. Conclusion: In subjects with good visual acuity, the FVA system is useful for evaluating CS and demonstrates good repeatability, as shown by ICC and COR. Because there is no ceiling effect, this system is beneficial for evaluation of early changes in CS, particularly in patients with glaucoma or AMD.

  7. Ethical issues with cataract surgery in patients with macular degeneration. A graduating resident’s view poin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv D. Sha

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Modern cataract surgery is considered to be a successful procedure, with a low complication rate. During cataract surgery, a patient's cloudy natural lens is removed and replaced with an artificial intraocular lens implant to restore the lens's transparency. The goal of cataract surgery is to achieve improvement in visual acuity necessary to help the patient with activities of daily living and improve the quality of their life. Macular degeneration is a multifactorial syndrome with different causative factors that results in a loss of vision in the center of the visual field (the macula because of damage to the retina, being a major cause of blindness in the elderly over 50 years in the western world. Macular degeneration can make it difficult or impossible to read or recognize faces, although enough peripheral vision remains to allow the development of other everyday activities. It occurs in “dry” and “wet” forms. The decision to perform cataract surgery in patients with macular degeneration presents with ethical issues and dilemmas for the surgeons involved in the care of the patient with posterior segment problems like macular degeneration. Good doctor-patient communication is essential to get the most benefit from the ophthalmologist, who provides care that is scientific, considerate, and compassionate. The ophthalmologist should serve as the patient’s advocate, marshaling his resources for the patient’s benefit, to maintain the quality of patient life. A biopsychosocial approach is philosophically very close to a systemic view and the development of adequate communication skills is now an aim of training programs, because a good medical care should be a partnership between patient and doctor

  8. What effects has the cataract surgery on the development and progression of Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willich, Stefan N.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The cataract (Cataracta senilis is the most frequent eye disease of elderly people worldwide. In Germany, the cataract operation - with currently 450,000 interventions each year the most frequent operation in ophthalmology – can be seen as routine surgery. The age related macular degeneration (AMD is a further one of the most common, age-related eye diseases and the most frequent cause of blindness of elderly people in industrial nations. Due to demographic changes an increasing number of patients will suffer from cataract and AMD at the same time. This coincidence leads to a greater interest in the question of a mutual influence of both diseases, respectively their therapies, on each other. Objectives: The aim of this report was the evaluation of the medical and health economic effects of cataract operations on the development and progression of an age related macular degeneration (AMD. It was differentiated between first manifestations of AMD, progression of early stages of AMD and influence on further impairment in late stages of AMD. Methods: The relevant publications for this report were identified by DIMDI via structured database enquiry as well as common, self-made enquiry and were evaluated, based on the criteria of evidence based medicine. The present report included German and English literature published since 1983. Results: The database enquiry generated a record of 2769 issue-related publications. Eight medical publications were eligible for analysis in the course of the present HTA report. No relevant studies on health economical, ethical, social or legal issues could be included. Three epidemiological cohort studies provided some evidence for a promoting influence of cataract extractions on the progression of early types of AMD. Two of the epidemiological studies assessed the risk of first manifestation of AMD after cataract extraction. Both came up with up with increased incidences that did not reach statistical

  9. Wet Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... macular degeneration Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Wet macular degeneration is a chronic eye disease that causes blurred vision or a blind spot in your visual field. It's generally caused by abnormal blood vessels that leak fluid or blood into ... macular degeneration is one of two types of age-related ...

  10. Implantation of multifocal intraocular lenses using a magnification strategy in cataractous eyes with age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayton, Johnny L; Mackool, Richard J; Ernest, Paul H; Seabolt, ReBecca A; Dumont, Susan

    2012-03-01

    To examine visual function after targeting -2.0 diopter (D) spherical equivalent (SE) when implanting a multifocal intraocular lens (IOL) in eyes with cataract and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Three private practices. Case series. Lenses of cataractous eyes with AMD were replaced with the Acrysof Restor SN60D3 multifocal IOL, targeting an SE of -2.0 D, which yielded +5.2 D near addition. Near and distance visual acuities were examined. Patients completed a visual function questionnaire preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively. At 6 months, 13 patients with 20 eligible eyes were examined. The uncorrected near visual acuity improved in 18 eyes (90%) and was unchanged in 2 eyes. The corrected distance visual acuity improved in 14 eyes (70%), was unchanged in 4 eyes (20%), and decreased (≤ 3 lines) in 2 eyes (10%). All vision-related questionnaire items improved. For cataractous eyes with AMD, replacing the crystalline lens with this myopia-targeted multifocal IOL improved or maintained near vision without severely compromising distance vision. Drs. Mackool and Ernest are consultants to Alcon. Dr. Mackool is an inventor in the patent of the IOLs related to this strategy. No other author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2012 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Care of Older Adults: Role of Primary Care Physicians in the Treatment of Cataracts and Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Kyle V; Wagley, Sushant; Kuperwaser, Mark C; Campo, Rafael; Arroyo, Jorge G

    2016-02-01

    This article aims to facilitate optimal management of cataracts and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) by providing information on indications, risk factors, referral guidelines, and treatments and to describe techniques to maximize quality of life (QOL) for people with irreversible vision loss. A review of PubMed and other online databases was performed for peer-reviewed English-language articles from 1980 through August 2012 on visual impairment in elderly adults. Search terms included vision loss, visual impairment, blind, low vision, QOL combined with age-related, elderly, and aging. Articles were selected that discussed vision loss in elderly adults, effects of vision impairment on QOL, and care strategies to manage vision loss in older adults. The ability of primary care physicians (PCPs) to identify early signs of cataracts and AMD in individuals at risk of vision loss is critical to early diagnosis and management of these common age-related eye diseases. PCPs can help preserve vision by issuing aptly timed referrals and encouraging behavioral modifications that reduce risk factors. With knowledge of referral guidelines for soliciting low-vision rehabilitation services, visual aids, and community support resources, PCPs can considerably increase the QOL of individuals with uncorrectable vision loss. By offering appropriately timed referrals, promoting behavioral modifications, and allocating low-vision care resources, PCPs may play a critical role in preserving visual health and enhancing the QOL for the elderly population.

  12. Cataract surgery in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Koefoed Theil, Pernille; Lykke Sørensen, Torben;

    2016-01-01

    being treated with a median of 10 (range 3-36) anti-VEGF injections for neovascular AMD. Visual acuity improved by a mean of 7.1 [95% confidence interval (CI) 4.6-9.6] ETDRS letters in the first 6 months after cataract surgery. The need of anti-VEGF injections did not change after cataract surgery...... in electronic databases managing anti-VEGF injections and cataract surgery. We compared Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) visual acuity and frequency of anti-VEGF injections before and after cataract surgery. RESULTS: We identified 89 eyes from 89 patients who had cataract surgery after...... AMD. Cataract surgery was not associated with an increased need for anti-VEGF treatment and patients who were in active anti-VEGF treatment had better visual outcomes than patients who had cataract surgery after long injection-free periods....

  13. Cataract surgery and age-related macular degeneration. An evidence-based update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Erngaard, Ditte; Flesner, Per

    2015-01-01

    concerning progression of AMD in patients undergoing cataract surgery. METHODS: We performed a systematic literature search in the PubMed, Medline, Cochrane Library and CINAHL databases. Two randomized trials and two case-control trials were identified. Quality of the studies was assessed using the Cochrane...

  14. X-82 to Treat Age-related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-12

    Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD); Macular Degeneration; Exudative Age-related Macular Degeneration; AMD; Macular Degeneration, Age-related, 10; Eye Diseases; Retinal Degeneration; Retinal Diseases

  15. Functional visual improvement after cataract surgery in eyes with age-related macular degeneration; Results of the Ophthalmic Surgical Outcomes Data (OSOD) Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Michael V; Vollman, David E; Baze, Elizabeth F; Chomsky, Amy S; Daly, Mary K; Lawrence, Mary

    2015-03-03

    Purpose: To determine if cataract surgery on eyes with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) confers as much functional visual improvement as on eyes without retinal pathology. Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of 4,924 cataract surgeries from the VA Ophthalmic Surgical Outcomes Data Project. We included cases of eyes with AMD which had both preoperative and postoperative NEI-VFQ-25 questionnaires submitted and compared their outcomes to controls without retinal pathology. We excluded patients with other retinal pathologies. The analyses compared changes in visual acuity and overall functional visual improvement and its subscales. Results: Preoperative and postoperative questionnaires were submitted by 58.3% of AMD and 63.8% of controls. Analysis of overall score showed that cataract surgery on eyes with AMD led to increased visual function (13.8± 2.4 NEI-VFQ units, PNEI-VFQ units, PAMD was predictive of postoperative visual function (r=-0.38, PAMD patients with vision of 20/40 or better had overall outcomes similar to controls (-2.2± 4.7 NEI-VFQ units, P=0.37). Conclusions: Cataract surgery on eyes with AMD offers an increase in functional visual improvement; however, the amount of benefit is associated with the eye's preBCVA. For eyes with preBCVA ≥20/40, the improvement is similar to that of patients without retinal pathology. However, if preBCVA is <20/40, the amount of improvement was shown to be significantly less and decreased with decreasing preBCVA.

  16. Facts about Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Degeneration (AMD) > Facts About Age-Related Macular Degeneration Facts About Age-Related Macular Degeneration This information was ... an Eye Care Professional Last Reviewed: September 2015 Fact Sheet Blurb The National Eye Institute (NEI) is ...

  17. Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Age-related Macular Degeneration About AMD Click for more ... a leading cause of vision loss among people age 60 and older. It causes damage to the ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources (3 links) BrightFocus Foundation: Macular Degeneration Treatment Macular Degeneration Partnership: Low Vision Rehabilitation Prevent Blindness America: Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) ...

  19. [Age related macular degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayen, Alexandra; Hubert, Isabelle; Berrod, Jean-Paul

    2011-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is a multifactorial disease caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. It is the first cause of blindness in patients over 50 in the western world. The disease has been traditionally classified into early and late stages with dry (atrophic) and wet (neovascular) forms: neovascular form is characterized by new blood vessels development under the macula (choroidal neovascularisation) which lead to a rapid decline of vision associated with metamorphopsia and requiring an urgent ophtalmological examination. Optical coherence tomography is now one of the most important part of the examination for diagnosis and treatment. Patient with age related maculopathy should consider taking a dietary supplement such that used in AREDS. The treatment of the wet ARMD has largely beneficied since year 2006 of anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) molecules such as ranibizumab or bevacizumab given as repeated intravitreal injections. A systematic follow up each 4 to 8 week in required for several years. There is no effective treatment at the moment for dry AMD. For patients with binocular visual acuity under 60/200 rehabilitation includes low vision specialist, vision aids and psychological support.

  20. Macular Degeneration Prevention and Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Grant Terms & Conditions Patent & Intellectual Property Policy For Current Awardees FAQs Our Funding Philosophy ... Alzheimer’s Disease Research Macular Degeneration Research National Glaucoma Research ...

  1. [Pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaarniranta, Kai; Seitsonen, Sanna; Paimela, Tuomas; Meri, Seppo; Immonen, Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a multiform disease of the macula, the region responsible for detailed central vision. In recent years, plenty of new knowledge of the pathogenesis of this disease has been obtained, and the treatment of exudative macular degeneration has greatly progressed. The number of patients with age-related macular degeneration will multiply in the following decades, because knowledge of mechanisms of development of macular degeneration that could be subject to therapeutic measures is insufficient. Central underlying factors are genetic inheritance, exposure of the retina to chronic oxidative stress and accumulation of inflammation-inducing harmful proteins into or outside of retinal cells.

  2. Aging and Health: Cataracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Problems Glaucoma Macular Degeneration Join our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Cataracts Basic Facts & Information ... Are Cataracts? Cataracts are a common result of aging and occur frequently in older people. About one ...

  3. AMO Teledioptric System for age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Jim-Son; Ting, Albert C.

    1994-05-01

    A 2.5 X magnification system consisting of a two-zone intraocular implant and a spectacle was developed, tested, and clinically tried by fifty patients with cataract ad age-related macular degeneration. Optical bench testing results and clinical data confirmed that the field of view of the system was 2.6 times wider than an equivalent external telescope. The study also demonstrated that the implant itself was clinically equivalent to a standard monofocal intraocular lens for cataract. The clinical study indicated that higher magnification without compromising the compactness and optical quality was needed as the disease progressed. Also, a sound vision rehabilitation process is important to provide patients the full benefits of the system.

  4. [New aspects in age related macular degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlea, C

    2012-01-01

    Being the leading cause of blindness in modern world Age Related Macular Degeneration has beneficiated in the last decade of important progress in diagnosis, classification and the discovery of diverse factors who contribute to the etiology of this disease. Treatments have arised who can postpone the irreversible evolution of the disease and thus preserve vision. Recent findings have identified predisposing genetic factors and also inflamatory and imunological parameters that can be modified trough a good and adequate prevention and therapy This articole reviews new aspects of patology of Age Related Macular Degeneration like the role of complement in maintaining inflamation and the role of oxidative stress on different structures of the retina.

  5. Driving and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the research literature on driving and age-related macular degeneration, which is motivated by the link between driving and the quality of life of older adults and their increased collision rate. It addresses the risk of crashes, driving performance, driving difficulty, self-regulation, and interventions to enhance, safety,…

  6. Depression in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casten, Robin; Rovner, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of disability in the elderly, substantially degrades the quality of their lives, and is a risk factor for depression. Rates of depression in AMD are substantially greater than those found in the general population of older people, and are on par with those of other chronic and disabling…

  7. Precursors of age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Inger Christine; Toft, Ulla; Linneberg, Allan;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate associations of very early age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with daily intake of vitamin A, beta-carotene, vitamin E, vitamin C, zinc and copper and interactions with AMD-associated polymorphisms in complement factor H (CFHY402H) and ARMS2/LOC387715. METHODS: Cross......: In this cross-sectional study, a higher intake of vitamin A increased the risk of macular drusen >63 μm in subjects with CFHY402H. The study supports that vitamin A may be a risk factor for early AMD....

  8. Immunology of age related macular degeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kijlstra Aize; Yang Peizeng

    2011-01-01

    @@ Age-related macular degeneration(AMD)is the most important cause of blindness in persons over 55 years of age in the Western world.In view of the increasing life expectancy we can assume that the problem will increase dramatically over the coming decades unless preventive or therapeutic measures are developed.Towards this goal many groups all over the world have performed epidemiological studies to identify potential risk factors for AMD.

  9. Depression in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Casten,Robin; Rovner,Barry

    2008-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of disability in the elderly, substantially degrades the quality of their lives, and is a risk factor for depression. Rates of depression in AMD are substantially greater than those found in the general population of older people, and are on par with those of other chronic and disabling diseases. This article discusses the effect of depression on vision-related disability in patients with AMD, suggests methods for screening for depressio...

  10. Rehabilitation Approaches in Macular Degeneration Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Maniglia, Marcello; Benoit R Cottereau; Soler, Vincent; Trotter, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is a visual disease that affects elderly population. It entails a progressive loss of central vision whose consequences are dramatic for the patient’s quality of life. Current rehabilitation programs are restricted to technical aids based on visual devices. They only temporarily improve specific visual functions such as reading skills. Considering the rapid increase of the aging population worldwide, it is crucial to intensify clinical research on AMD in...

  11. Animal models of age related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Pennesi, Mark E.; Neuringer, Martha; Courtney, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss of those over the age of 65 in the industrialized world. The prevalence and need to develop effective treatments for AMD has lead to the development of multiple animal models. AMD is a complex and heterogeneous disease that involves the interaction of both genetic and environmental factors with the unique anatomy of the human macula. Models in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs and non-human primates have recreated many of the ...

  12. Visual hallucinations in patients with macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holroyd, S; Rabins, P V; Finkelstein, D; Nicholson, M C; Chase, G A; Wisniewski, S C

    1992-12-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of visual hallucinations in patients with macular degeneration, describe such hallucinations phenomenologically, and possibly determine factors predisposing to their development. Using a case-control design, the authors screened 100 consecutive patients with age-related macular degeneration for visual hallucinations. Each patient with visual hallucinations was matched to the next three patients without hallucinations. The patients and comparison subjects were compared in terms of scores on the Beck Depression Inventory, Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status, and a structured questionnaire including demographic characteristics, family history, and medical and psychiatric history. Ophthalmologic data were obtained by chart review. Of the 100 patients, 13 experienced visual hallucinations. Four variables were significantly associated with having hallucinations: living alone, lower cognition score, history of stroke, and bilaterally worse visual acuity. Hallucinations were not associated with family or personal history of psychiatric disorder or with personality traits. In 11 (84.6%) of the 13 patients, the hallucinations had begun in association with an acute change in vision. These results indicate that visual hallucinations are prevalent among patients with macular degeneration. They appear unrelated to primary psychiatric disorder. The predisposing factors of bilaterally worse vision and living alone support an association with sensory deprivation, while history of stroke and worse cognition support a decreased cortical inhibition theory.

  13. Age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Morten; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    2002-01-01

    (exudative cases); the remainder has only geographic atrophy. In cross-sectional population-based studies about 45% of eyes with AMD have visual acuity reduced to 20/200 or worse. This is true both for exudative AMD and pure geographic atrophy. Age and genetic predisposition are known risk factors for AMD...... a fluorescein angiographic study and a physician capable of interpreting it. For CNV not involving the foveal centre, the only evidence-based treatment is laser photocoagulation. For AMD cases with subfoveal CNV, good visual acuity, and predominantly classic fluorescence pattern on fluorescein angiography....... Smoking is probably also a risk factor. Preventive strategies using macular laser photocoagulation are under investigation, but their efficacy in preventing visual loss is as yet unproven. There is no treatment with proven efficacy for geographic atrophy. Optimal treatment for exudative AMD requires...

  14. Microbiota bacteriana da conjuntiva no pré-operatório de injeção intravítrea de antiangiogênico por degeneração macular relacionada à idade comparada com a de cirurgia de catarata Preoperative conjunctival bacterial microbiota of antiangiogenic intravitreous injection for age-related macular degeneration compared to cataract surgery preoperative microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Diniz

    2010-06-01

    pacientes no pré-operatório de cirurgia de catarata.Purpose: To evaluate the conjunctival bacterial microbiota and antibiogram profile in the preoperative of antiangiogenic intravitreous injection for age-related macular degeneration, and compare to the preoperative microbiota of patients submitted to cataract surgery. Methods: Cross-sectional, observational, case series study. Two groups were organized: group I (macular degeneration with 26 eyes from 26 patients (12 men/14 women with mean age of 69.2 ± 11.5 years; group II (cataract with 27 eyes from 27 patients (9 men/18 women with mean age of 67.6 ± 7.9 years. The groups were similar regarding age (p=0.538 and gender (p=0.787. The lower conjunctival sac was swabbed and the obtained material was immediately put in a tube filled with liquid culture media BHI ("brain heart infusion". Samples were processed according to standard laboratory techniques and antibiogram was determined for each bacterial colony. Results: Twenty-six bacterial colonies growth in group I, with 2 eyes showing no growth and 30 colonies growth in group II. Gram positive bacteria were more prevalent in both groups: 23/26 colonies (88.4% in group I and 29/30 colonies (96.7% in group II, with a Staphylococcus aureus predominance in both groups, with 16 samples (61.5% and 17 (56.7%, respectively. Coagulase negative Staphylococcus was the second most common identified bacteria, with 19.2% in group I and 20.0% in group II. No differences between the groups reached statistical significance. No statistically significant difference was noted on the antibiotic sensibility between both groups. Conclusions: There was no difference in the distribution of bacteria and antibiogram profile of the conjunctival microbiota in the preoperative of intravitreous injection of antiangiogenic for macular degeneration compared to the preoperative of cataract surgery.

  15. [Age-related macular degeneration (AMD)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Stephan; Kurz-Levin, Malaika

    2009-03-01

    Today age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most frequent cause for legal blindness in western industrialized countries. The prevalence of this disease rises with increasing age. A multifactorial pathogenesis of AMD is postulated including genetic predisposition and environmental risk factors. The most relevant modifiable risk factor is smoking. Up to today there is no cure of this chronic disease. Prophylaxis, including a healthy diet and antioxidants as nutrional supplements for selected patients, aims to slow down the disease progression. Significant progress has been made in the treatment of the neovascular form of the disease using inhibitors of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF).

  16. Prevalence of age-related macular degeneration in elderly Caucasians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erke, Maja G; Bertelsen, Geir; Peto, Tunde;

    2012-01-01

    To describe the sex- and age-specific prevalence of drusen, geographic atrophy, and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD).......To describe the sex- and age-specific prevalence of drusen, geographic atrophy, and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD)....

  17. [Depression in Patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narváez, Yamile Reveiz; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos

    2012-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a cause for disability in the elderly since it greatly affects their quality of life and increases depression likelihood. This article discusses the negative effect depression has on patients with age-related macular degeneration and summarizes the interventions available for decreasing their depression index. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. CKD Increases the Risk of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Liew, Gerald; Mitchell, Paul; Wong, Tien Yin; Iyengar, Sudha K; Wang, Jie Jin

    2008-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the United States and often coexists with chronic kidney disease. Both conditions share common genetic and environmental risk factors. A total of 1183 participants aged 54+ were examined in the population-based, prospective cohort Blue Mountains Eye Study (Australia) to determine if chronic kidney disease increases the risk of age-related macular degeneration. Moderate chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerul...

  19. CKD increases the risk of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Gerald; Mitchell, Paul; Wong, Tien Yin; Iyengar, Sudha K; Wang, Jie Jin

    2008-04-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the United States and often coexists with chronic kidney disease. Both conditions share common genetic and environmental risk factors. A total of 1183 participants aged 54+ were examined in the population-based, prospective cohort Blue Mountains Eye Study (Australia) to determine if chronic kidney disease increases the risk of age-related macular degeneration. Moderate chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate macular degeneration was 3.9% in participants with no/mild chronic kidney disease (35 of 897) and 17.5% in those with moderate chronic kidney disease (50 of 286). After adjusting for age, sex, cigarette smoking, hypertension, complement factor H polymorphism, and other risk factors, persons with moderate chronic kidney disease were 3 times more likely to develop early age-related macular degeneration than persons with no/mild chronic kidney disease (odds ratio = 3.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.8 to 5.7, P macular degeneration (odds ratio = 2.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.5 to 2.8, P chronic kidney disease have a higher risk of early age-related macular degeneration, suggesting the possibility of shared pathophysiologic mechanisms between the two conditions.

  20. Perceptual learning in patients with macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina ePlank

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD or hereditary macular dystrophies (JMD rely on an efficient use of their peripheral visual field. We trained eight AMD and five JMD patients to perform a texture-discrimination task (TDT at their preferred retinal locus (PRL used for fixation. Six training sessions of approximately one hour duration were conducted over a period of approximately 3 weeks. Before, during and after training twelve patients and twelve age-matched controls (the data from two controls had to be discarded later took part in three functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI sessions to assess training-related changes in the BOLD response in early visual cortex. Patients benefited from the training measurements as indexed by significant decrease (p=.001 in the stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA between the presentation of the texture target on background and the visual mask, and in a significant location specific effect of the PRL with respect to hit rate (p=.014. The following trends were observed: (i Improvement in Vernier acuity for an eccentric line-bisection task; (ii positive correlation between the development of BOLD signals in early visual cortex and initial fixation stability (r=0.531; (iii positive correlation between the increase in task performance and initial fixation stability (r=0.730. The first two trends were non-significant, whereas the third trend was significant at p=.014, Bonferroni corrected. Consequently, our exploratory study suggests that training on the TDT can enhance eccentric vision in patients with central vision loss. This enhancement is accompanied by a modest alteration in the BOLD response in early visual cortex.

  1. Age related macular degeneration and visual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoforidis, John B; Tecce, Nicola; Dell'Omo, Roberto; Mastropasqua, Rodolfo; Verolino, Marco; Costagliola, Ciro

    2011-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of central blindness or low vision among the elderly in industrialized countries. AMD is caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Among modifiable environmental risk factors, cigarette smoking has been associated with both the dry and wet forms of AMD and may increase the likelihood of worsening pre-existing AMD. Despite advances, the treatment of AMD has limitations and affected patients are often referred for low vision rehabilitation to help them cope with their remaining eyesight. The characteristic visual impairment for both forms of AMD is loss of central vision (central scotoma). This loss results in severe difficulties with reading that may be only partly compensated by magnifying glasses or screen-projection devices. The loss of central vision associated with the disease has a profound impact on patient quality of life. With progressive central visual loss, patients lose their ability to perform the more complex activities of daily living. Common vision aids include low vision filters, magnifiers, telescopes and electronic aids. Low vision rehabilitation (LVR) is a new subspecialty emerging from the traditional fields of ophthalmology, optometry, occupational therapy, and sociology, with an ever-increasing impact on the usual concepts of research, education, and services for visually impaired patients. Relatively few ophthalmologists practise LVR and fewer still routinely use prismatic image relocation (IR) in AMD patients. IR is a method of stabilizing oculomotor functions with the purpose of promoting better function of preferred retinal loci (PRLs). The aim of vision rehabilitation therapy consists in the achievement of techniques designed to improve PRL usage. The use of PRLs to compensate for diseased foveae has offered hope to these patients in regaining some function. However, in a recently published meta-analysis, prism spectacles were found to be unlikely to be of

  2. Risk factors of age-related macular degeneration in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia Nano

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSES: To assess the risk factors of age-related macular degeneration in Argentina using a case-control study. METHODS: Surveys were used for subjects' antioxidant intake, age/gender, race, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes (and type of treatment, smoking, sunlight exposure, red meat consumption, fish consumption, presence of age-related macular degeneration and family history of age-related macular degeneration. Main effects models for logistic regression and ordinal logistic regression were used to analyze the results. RESULTS: There were 175 cases and 175 controls with a mean age of 75.4 years and 75.5 years, respectively, of whom 236 (67.4% were female. Of the cases with age-related macular degeneration, 159 (45.4% had age-related macular degeneration in their left eyes, 154 (44.0% in their right eyes, and 138 (39.4% in both eyes. Of the cases with age-related macular degeneration in their left eyes, 47.8% had the dry type, 40.3% had the wet type, and the type was unknown for 11.9%. The comparable figures for right eyes were: 51.9%, 34.4%, and 13.7%, respectively. The main effects model was dominated by higher sunlight exposure (OR [odds ratio]: 3.3 and a family history of age-related macular degeneration (OR: 4.3. Other factors included hypertension (OR: 2.1, smoking (OR: 2.2, and being of the Mestizo race, which lowered the risk of age-related macular degeneration (OR: 0.40. Red meat/fish consumption, body mass index, and iris color did not have an effect. Higher age was associated with progression to more severe age-related macular degeneration. CONCLUSION: Sunlight exposure, family history of age-related macular degeneration, and an older age were the significant risk factors. There may be other variables, as the risk was not explained very well by the existing factors. A larger sample may produce different and better results.

  3. Animal models of age related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennesi, Mark E; Neuringer, Martha; Courtney, Robert J

    2012-08-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss of those over the age of 65 in the industrialized world. The prevalence and need to develop effective treatments for AMD has lead to the development of multiple animal models. AMD is a complex and heterogeneous disease that involves the interaction of both genetic and environmental factors with the unique anatomy of the human macula. Models in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs and non-human primates have recreated many of the histological features of AMD and provided much insight into the underlying pathological mechanisms of this disease. In spite of the large number of models developed, no one model yet recapitulates all of the features of human AMD. However, these models have helped reveal the roles of chronic oxidative damage, inflammation and immune dysregulation, and lipid metabolism in the development of AMD. Models for induced choroidal neovascularization have served as the backbone for testing new therapies. This article will review the diversity of animal models that exist for AMD as well as their strengths and limitations.

  4. Age-related macular degeneration: current treatment and future options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutray, Tanya; Chakravarthy, Usha

    2011-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of visual impairment among older adults in the developed world. Epidemiological studies have revealed a number of genetic, ocular and environmental risk factors for this condition, which can be addressed by disease reduction strategies. We discuss the various treatment options for dry and exudative age-related macular degeneration available and explain how the recommended treatment depends on the exact type, location and extent of the degeneration. Currently, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibition therapy is the best available treatment for exudative age-related macular degeneration but is limited by the need for repeated intravitreal injections. The current treatment regime is being refined through research on optimal treatment frequency and duration and type of anti-VEGF drug. Different modes of drug delivery are being developed and in the future other methods of VEGF inhibition may be used.

  5. Precursors of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Inger Christine; Linneberg, Allan; Larsen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    by questionnaire. Digital grayscale fundus photographs were recorded in red-free illumination and graded for the presence of macular drusen >63µm in either eye and the presence of 20 or more small, hard macular drusen as a mean of both eyes. RESULTS: Macular drusen >63µm were associated with the level of physical...... macular drusen per eye. These findings support that a physically active, heart-healthy lifestyle prevents the earliest manifestation of AMD.......PURPOSE: To investigate associations of small, hard macular drusen and larger macular drusen with obesity-related risk factors. METHODS: Cross-sectional study of 888 subjects aged 30-60 years characterized using anthropometric measurements and blood sample analyses. Physical activity was assessed...

  6. Treatment of macular degeneration, according to Bangerter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, K D

    1997-10-30

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common cause of visual loss among elderly patients. Although some risk factors have been determined, the ultimate cause of the disease is not known. For a long time, therapeutic nihilism has been the rule among ophthalmologists confronted with such patients. Bangerter has not shared this attitude, especially since the time that he incidentally discovered, more than 40 years ago, the beneficial effects of radiotherapy, in discouraging the growth of new vessels at the posterior pole of the eye. A variety of approaches are combined and used by Bangerter in the treatment of the different types of AMD, including retrobulbar injections of either vasodilating medications (in the dry - or atrophic - type) or corticosteroids (in the wet - or exudative - type), general medical measures aimed at improving metabolic and vascular functions such as supplementation with trace elements, antioxidants, and vitamins; ozone therapy; advice to increase physical fitness, improve nutrition, and abstain from smoking; and protection from excessive light exposure. Being convinced of the usefulness of his type of combination treatment, he has always rejected undertaking controlled clinical trials, of only single aspects of the therapy, as unethical and invalid. For this reason, scientific journals have not proven cooperative in several attempts at publishing his results, as collected in retrospective surveys. Recently, however, some of the several approaches combined by Bangerter in treating AMD have been pronounced effective by other investigators. We present here an overview of his treatment approaches, as few people are aware of them, to clear up misconceptions and to set records straight.

  7. Rehabilitation Approaches in Macular Degeneration Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniglia, Marcello; Cottereau, Benoit R; Soler, Vincent; Trotter, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is a visual disease that affects elderly population. It entails a progressive loss of central vision whose consequences are dramatic for the patient's quality of life. Current rehabilitation programs are restricted to technical aids based on visual devices. They only temporarily improve specific visual functions such as reading skills. Considering the rapid increase of the aging population worldwide, it is crucial to intensify clinical research on AMD in order to develop simple and efficient methods that improve the patient's visual performances in many different contexts. One very promising approach to face this challenge is based on perceptual learning (PL). Through intensive practice, PL can induce neural plasticity in sensory cortices and result in long-lasting enhancements for various perceptual tasks in both normal and visually impaired populations. A growing number of studies showed how appropriate PL protocols improve visual functions in visual disorders, namely amblyopia, presbyopia or myopia. In order to successfully apply these approaches to more severe conditions such as AMD, numerous challenges have to be overcome. Indeed, the overall elderly age of patients and the reduced cortical surface that is devoted to peripheral vision potentially limit neural plasticity in this population. In addition, ocular fixation becomes much less stable because patients have to rely on peripheral fixation spots outside the scotoma whose size keeps on evolving. The aim of this review article is to discuss the recent literature on this topic and to offer a unified approach for developing new rehabilitation programs of AMD using PL. We argue that with an appropriate experimental and training protocol that is adapted to each patient needs, PL can offer fascinating opportunities for the development of simple, non-expensive rehabilitation approaches a large spectrum of visual functions in AMD patients.

  8. Rehabilitation Approaches in Macular Degeneration Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniglia, Marcello; Cottereau, Benoit R.; Soler, Vincent; Trotter, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is a visual disease that affects elderly population. It entails a progressive loss of central vision whose consequences are dramatic for the patient’s quality of life. Current rehabilitation programs are restricted to technical aids based on visual devices. They only temporarily improve specific visual functions such as reading skills. Considering the rapid increase of the aging population worldwide, it is crucial to intensify clinical research on AMD in order to develop simple and efficient methods that improve the patient’s visual performances in many different contexts. One very promising approach to face this challenge is based on perceptual learning (PL). Through intensive practice, PL can induce neural plasticity in sensory cortices and result in long-lasting enhancements for various perceptual tasks in both normal and visually impaired populations. A growing number of studies showed how appropriate PL protocols improve visual functions in visual disorders, namely amblyopia, presbyopia or myopia. In order to successfully apply these approaches to more severe conditions such as AMD, numerous challenges have to be overcome. Indeed, the overall elderly age of patients and the reduced cortical surface that is devoted to peripheral vision potentially limit neural plasticity in this population. In addition, ocular fixation becomes much less stable because patients have to rely on peripheral fixation spots outside the scotoma whose size keeps on evolving. The aim of this review article is to discuss the recent literature on this topic and to offer a unified approach for developing new rehabilitation programs of AMD using PL. We argue that with an appropriate experimental and training protocol that is adapted to each patient needs, PL can offer fascinating opportunities for the development of simple, non-expensive rehabilitation approaches a large spectrum of visual functions in AMD patients. PMID:28082876

  9. Decreased fixation stability of the preferred retinal location in juvenile macular degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bethlehem, Richard A I; Dumoulin, Serge O.; Dalmaijer, Edwin S.; Smit, Miranda; Berendschot, Tos T J M; Nijboer, Tanja C W; Van Der Stigchel, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Macular degeneration is the main cause for diminished visual acuity in the elderly. The juvenile form of macular degeneration has equally detrimental consequences on foveal vision. To compensate for loss of foveal vision most patients with macular degeneration adopt an eccentric preferred retinal lo

  10. Role of ranibizumab in management of macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Rishi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is one of the most common causes of severe vision loss in the western world. Both animal and human studies have established that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF plays an important role in the pathogenesis of this process. Ranibizumab (Lucentis™, Genentech, South San Francisco, CA is a monoclonal antibody fragment (Fab directed toward all isoforms of VEGF-A that was specifically designed to target wet AMD. The human antibody fragment is produced by an E. coli expression system and has a molecular weight of 48kD allowing for excellent retinal penetration. The most common ocular complaints of patients receiving ranibizumab injections in randomized clinical trials were transient conjunctival hemorrhage, vitreous floaters, intraocular inflammation, increased intraocular pressure and eye pain. The rates of serious adverse events such as retinal detachment, cataract and endophthalmitis were similar to those that have been reported with other intravitreal injections and patients should always be treated under strict aseptic conditions to reduce this risk. There were no significant non-ocular events found during any study so far and the risk of thromboembolic events was less than 4% and not different than sham. The MARINA, ANCHOR and PIER studies validated the safety and efficacy of ranibizumab amongst a large population with different choroidal neovascular membrane lesion types against sham or standard of care treatment. These studies recommended monthly intravitreal ranibizumab for patients. However, the PIER study reported that an alternative dosing of every three months is acceptable but less effective than monthly injections.

  11. What Is Age-Related Macular Degeneration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Qué es la degeneración macular relacionada con la edad? Find an Ophthalmologist Advanced Search Ask an Ophthalmologist ... Privacy Policy Terms of Service For Advertisers For Media Ophthalmology Job Center © American Academy of Ophthalmology 2017 ...

  12. Long-term effectiveness of ranibizumab for age-related macular degeneration and diabetic macular edema

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Timothy Y. Y.; Fong

    2013-01-01

    Angie HC Fong,1 Timothy YY Lai1,2 1Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Eye Hospital, Kowloon, Hong Kong; 22010 Retina and Macula Centre, Tsimshatsui, Kowloon, Hong Kong Abstract: Neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic macular edema (DME) are major causes of visual impairment in the elderly population worldwide. With the aging population, the prevalence of neovascular AMD and DME has increased substantially o...

  13. Relationship between macular pigment and visual function in subjects with early age-related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Akuffo, Kwadwo Owusu; Nolan, John M.; Peto, Tunde; Stack, Jim; Leung, Irene; Corcoran, Laura; Beatty, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the relationship between macular pigment (MP) and visual function in subjects with early age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods 121 subjects with early AMD enrolled as part of the Central Retinal Enrichment Supplementation Trial (CREST; ISRCTN13894787) were assessed using a range of psychophysical measures of visual function, including best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), letter contrast sensitivity (CS), mesopic and photopic CS, mesopic and photopic glare disa...

  14. Long-term effectiveness of ranibizumab for age-related macular degeneration and diabetic macular edema

    OpenAIRE

    Fong, Angie HC; Lai, Timothy YY

    2013-01-01

    Neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic macular edema (DME) are major causes of visual impairment in the elderly population worldwide. With the aging population, the prevalence of neovascular AMD and DME has increased substantially over the recent years. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been implicated as playing an important role in the pathogenesis of both neovascular AMD and DME. Since its introduction in 2006, ranibizumab, a recombinant, humanized, mon...

  15. Diabetic macular edema, retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration as inflammatory conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Undurti N

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) are complications affecting about 25% of all patients with long-standing type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus and are a major cause of significant decrease in vision and quality of life. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is not uncommon, and diabetes mellitus affects the incidence and progression of AMD through altering hemodynamics, increasing oxidative stress, accumulating advanced glycation end products, etc. Recent studies sug...

  16. Awareness, Knowledge, and Concern about Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimarolli, Verena R.; Laban-Baker, Allie; Hamilton, Wanda S.; Stuen, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD)--a common eye disease causing vision loss--can be detected early through regular eye-health examinations, and measures can be taken to prevent visual decline. Getting eye examinations requires certain levels of awareness, knowledge, and concern related to AMD. However, little is known about AMD-related…

  17. The Experience of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Elaine Y. H.; Guymer, Robyn H.; Hassell, Jennifer B.; Keeffe, Jill E.

    2004-01-01

    This qualitative article describes the impact of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) among 15 participants: how a person makes sense of ARMD, the effect of ARMD on the person's quality of life, the psychological disturbances associated with the limitations of ARMD, and the influence of ARMD on social interactions. Such in-depth appreciation of…

  18. Complement factor d in age-related macular degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanton, C.M.; Yates, J.R.W.; Hollander, A.I. den; Seddon, J.M.; Swaroop, A.; Stambolian, D.; Fauser, S.; Hoyng, C.B.; Yu, Y.; Atsuhiro, K.; Branham, K.; Othman, M.; Chen, W.; Kortvely, E.; Chalmers, K.; Hayward, C.; Moore, A.T.; Dhillon, B.; Ueffing, M.; Wright, A.F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To examine the role of complement factor D (CFD) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) by analysis of genetic association, copy number variation, and plasma CFD concentrations. Methods. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CFD gene were genotyped and the results analyzed by

  19. Estrogen signalling in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaarniranta, Kai; Machalińska, Anna; Veréb, Zoltán; Salminen, Antero; Petrovski, Goran; Kauppinen, Anu

    2015-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial eye disease that is associated with aging, family history, smoking, obesity, cataract surgery, arteriosclerosis, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and unhealthy diet. Gender has commonly been classified as a weak or inconsistent risk factor for AMD. This disease is characterized by degeneration of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, Bruch's membrane, and choriocapillaris, which secondarily lead to damage and death of photoreceptor cells and central visual loss. Pathogenesis of AMD involves constant oxidative stress, chronic inflammation, and increased accumulation of lipofuscin and drusen. Estrogen has both anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory capacity and it regulates signaling pathways that are involved in the pathogenesis of AMD. In this review, we discuss potential cellular signaling targets of estrogen in retinal cells and AMD pathology.

  20. Efficacy of vitrectomy and epiretinal membrane peeling in eyes with dry age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mason III JO

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available John O Mason III,1,2 Shyam A Patel11Department of Ophthalmology, University of Alabama School of Medicine, Birmingham, AL, USA; 2Retina Consultants of Alabama, Callahan Eye Foundation Hospital, Birmingham, AL, USAObjective: To study the efficacy of epiretinal membrane (ERM peeling in eyes with dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD.Methods: We retrospectively analyzed patient charts on 17 eyes (16 patients that underwent ERM peeling with a concurrent diagnosis of dry AMD.Results: Eyes with concurrent dry AMD and with a good preoperative best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA (better than or equal to 20/50 had a statistically significant mean BCVA improvement at 6 months after ERM peeling. There was a statistical increase in mean BCVA from 20/95 to 20/56 in dry AMD eyes, and no eyes showed worsening in BCVA at 6 months or at most recent follow-up. Five/seventeen (29.4% eyes had cataract formation or progression. There were no other complications, reoperations, or reoccurrences.Conclusion: ERM peeling in eyes with dry AMD may show significant improvement, especially in eyes with good preoperative BCVA. The procedure is relatively safe with low complications and reoccurrences.Keywords: macular pucker, epiretinal membrane peeling, epimacular membrane, macular degeneration

  1. Lipids, lipid genes, and incident age-related macular degeneration: The three continent age-related macular degeneration consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Klein (Ronald); C.E. Myers (Chelsea); G.H.S. Buitendijk (Gabrielle); E. Rochtchina (Elena); X. Gao (Xiaoyi); P.T.V.M. de Jong (Paulus); T.A. Sivakumaran (Theru); G. Burlutsky (George); R. McKean-Cowdin (Roberta); A. Hofman (Albert); S.K. Iyengar (Sudha); K.E. Lee (Kristine); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); J.R. Vingerling (Hans); P. Mitchell (Paul); B.E.K. Klein (Barbara); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline); J.J. Wang (Jie Jin)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractPurpose To describe associations of serum lipid levels and lipid pathway genes to the incidence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design Meta-analysis. Methods setting: Three population-based cohorts. population: A total of 6950 participants from the Beaver Dam Eye Study (BDES),

  2. Lipids, lipid genes, and incident age-related macular degeneration : the three continent age-related macular degeneration consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Ronald; Myers, Chelsea E; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H S; Rochtchina, Elena; Gao, Xiaoyi; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Sivakumaran, Theru A; Burlutsky, George; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Hofman, Albert; Iyengar, Sudha K; Lee, Kristine E; Stricker, Bruno H; Vingerling, Johannes R; Mitchell, Paul; Klein, Barbara E K; Klaver, Caroline C W; Wang, Jie Jin

    PURPOSE: To describe associations of serum lipid levels and lipid pathway genes to the incidence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). DESIGN: Meta-analysis. METHODS: setting: Three population-based cohorts. population: A total of 6950 participants from the Beaver Dam Eye Study (BDES), Blue

  3. New developments in age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyndon da Cruz

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization (WHO estimates that over 3 million people (9% of global blindness are blinded by age-related macular degeneration (AMD. AMD affects people over the age of 55. There are two main types of AMD, dry and wet. In dry AMD, patients slowly lose vision through progressive atrophy of the macular tissue. Wet, or exudative, AMD, is associated with new blood vessels called subretinal neovascular membranes (or SRNVM and affected patients lose vision more rapidly due to fluid leakage and haemorrhage at the macula.

  4. Vitelliform macular degeneration associated with mitochondrial myopathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Modi, G; Heckman, J M; Saffer, D

    1992-01-01

    A patient with mitochondrial myopathy is described. Examination of his fundus revealed bilateral vitelliform degeneration of the maculae. This lesion is a focal abnormality of the retinal pigment epithelium and may be a manifestation of the underlying mitochondrial disease.

  5. Smoking and Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Review and Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velilla, Sara; García-Medina, José Javier; García-Layana, Alfredo; Pons-Vázquez, Sheila; Pinazo-Durán, M. Dolores; Gómez-Ulla, Francisco; Arévalo, J. Fernando; Díaz-Llopis, Manuel; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the main socioeconomical health issues worldwide. AMD has a multifactorial etiology with a variety of risk factors. Smoking is the most important modifiable risk factor for AMD development and progression. The present review summarizes the epidemiological studies evaluating the association between smoking and AMD, the mechanisms through which smoking induces damage to the chorioretinal tissues, and the relevance of advising patients to quit smoking for their visual health. PMID:24368940

  6. The role of epigenetics in age-related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Gemenetzi, M; Lotery, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that epigenetic mechanisms influence gene expression and can explain how interactions between genetics and the environment result in particular phenotypes during development. The extent to which this epigenetic effect contributes to phenotype heritability in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is currently ill defined. However, emerging evidence suggests that epigenetic changes are relevant to AMD and as such provide an exciting new avenue of research fo...

  7. Binocular Refraction in Patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Skrbek, Matěj

    2013-01-01

    We’ve been finding possible association of central vision damage with binocular vision disorders in our clients suffering from age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), but whose visual acuity still allowed us to examine their binocular vision. Our findings show that there is a significant number of patients with heterophoria in horizontal, as well as vertical direction. The clients rate the vision with prismatic correction as more comfortable, clearer and long-term tolerable. Getting used ...

  8. Vitreomacular traction and age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green-Simms, Amy E; Bakri, Sophie J

    2011-05-01

    The interaction between the vitreous and the internal limiting membrane of the retina is important in the pathoetiology of numerous ocular disease processes. Recent studies have focused on the vitreo-retinal interface in the context of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), linking vitreo-retinal adhesion to exudative AMD in particular. This review summarizes our knowledge of vitreous anatomy and recent investigations regarding vitreomacular adhesion and AMD.

  9. Pinpointing the Earliest Defects in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Magnusson, Kristinn P; Shan Duan; Haraldur Sigurdsson; Hjorvar Petursson; Zhenglin Yang; Yu Zhao; Bernstein, Paul S.; Jian Ge; Fridbert Jonasson; Einar Stefansson; Gudleif Helgadottir; Norman A Zabriskie; Thorlakur Jonsson; Asgeir Björnsson; Theodora Thorlacius

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment in the developed world. The two forms of advanced AMD, geographic atrophy and neovascular AMD, represent different pathological processes in the macula that lead to loss of central vision. Soft drusen, characterized by deposits in the macula without visual loss, are considered to be a precursor of advanced AMD. Recently, it has been proposed that a common missense variant, Y402H, in t...

  10. Stereotactic radiotherapy in neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Ranjbar, Mahdy; Kurz, Maximilian; Holzhey, Annekatrin; Melchert, Corinna; Rades, Dirk; Grisanti, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) is a new approach to treat neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). The INTREPID trial suggested that SRT could reduce the frequency of regular intravitreal injections (IVIs) with antivascular endothelial growth factor drugs, which are necessary to control disease activity. However, the efficacy of SRT in nAMD and resulting morphological changes have not been validated under real-life circumstances, an issue, which we would like to address ...

  11. The Burden of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Jordana K. Schmier; Mechelle L. Jones; Halpern, Michael T.

    2006-01-01

    As age-related macular degeneration (AMD) becomes more prevalent as a result of longer life expectancy and the number of elderly people worldwide, it will become increasingly important to understand its potential health and economic impact for appropriate healthcare planning. This review identified published literature on costs and resource use associated with AMD. Despite the increasing prevalence of AMD, the worldwide burden of illness is unknown. Several studies of direct medical costs, bo...

  12. An Immunologic Study on Age-related Macular Degeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    Forty-one patients with age-related macular degeneration(AMD) were detected for serum autoantibodies against normal humanretinal protein by means of Western immunoblot analysis.Twenty-sevenout of the 41 patients showed positive response,with a rate of 66 percent.The positive rate of antiretinal antibody in the AMD patients wassignificantly higher than that in normal controls (18%) and in patients withother retinal diseases (24%) (p<0.0005).These antiretinal antibodies fromthe AMD patients partly reacted...

  13. Present and Possible Therapies for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Khan; Ketan Agarwal; Mohamed Loutfi; Ahmed Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of blindness in the elderly population worldwide and is defined as a chronic, progressive disorder characterized by changes occurring within the macula reflective of the ageing process. At present, the prevalence of AMD is currently rising and is estimated to increase by a third by 2020. Although our understanding of the several components underpinning the pathogenesis of this condition has increased significantly, the treatment ...

  14. Smoking and Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Review and Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Velilla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is one of the main socioeconomical health issues worldwide. AMD has a multifactorial etiology with a variety of risk factors. Smoking is the most important modifiable risk factor for AMD development and progression. The present review summarizes the epidemiological studies evaluating the association between smoking and AMD, the mechanisms through which smoking induces damage to the chorioretinal tissues, and the relevance of advising patients to quit smoking for their visual health.

  15. Early detection of age related macular degeneration: current status

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, Roy; Loewenstein, Anat

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of choroidal neovascularization (CNV), a main cause of severe vision loss in age related macular degeneration (AMD), is crucial in order to preserve vision and the quality of life of patients. This review summarizes current literature on the subject of early detection of CNV, both in the clinic setting and mainly in the patient’s home. New technologies are evolving to allow for earlier detection and thus vision preservation in AMD patients.

  16. Early detection of age related macular degeneration: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Roy; Loewenstein, Anat

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of choroidal neovascularization (CNV), a main cause of severe vision loss in age related macular degeneration (AMD), is crucial in order to preserve vision and the quality of life of patients. This review summarizes current literature on the subject of early detection of CNV, both in the clinic setting and mainly in the patient's home. New technologies are evolving to allow for earlier detection and thus vision preservation in AMD patients.

  17. An overview on age related macular degeneration and recent advances in its management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOBIA N.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a condition characterized, in the early stages, by slow development and progression, absence of symptoms over a number of years, and extensive retinal deposits called drusen, often associated with pigmentary abnormalities (early AMD.There is strong and consistent evidence that increasing age, family history, obesity/high body mass index, and cataract surgery are associated with late AMD. Smoking is the strongest and most consistently found modifiable risk factor for late AMD.Age-related macular degeneration remains one of the most severe and profound disabilities encountered in medicine, particularly due to the loss of the central vision and the high economic burden it places on patients and societies.Recent advances in management of AMD is anti-angiogenic drugs. The identification of the crucial role played by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF in the pathogenesis of wet AMD hasallowed the development of VEGF-blocking agents such as bevacizumab, pegaptanib and ranibizumab.

  18. [Urgent action needed to raise public awareness of age-related macular degeneration in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, You-xin

    2009-05-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in developed countries. The impact of AMD to the economics, society and the patients are huge. However, the awareness of AMD is alarmingly low. Even in developed countries, the awareness of AMD is below 30%. In terms of the risk factors of AMD, the awareness is also quite low, e.g., only 32% were aware of the causal link between smoking and AMD. Although cataract is the leading cause of the blindness in China, as the economic and social progress, as the coming of the aging society, as people pursuing higher quality of life, AMD will become a unignoring public health problem. Thus, it is urgent to take action now to increase the public awareness of AMD.

  19. Post-cataract prevention of inflammation and macular edema by steroid and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory eye drops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Tendal, Britta; Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Favorable outcome after cataract surgery depends on proper control of the inflammatory response induced by cataract surgery. Pseudophakic cystoid macular edema is an important cause of visual decline after uncomplicated cataract surgery. DESIGN: We compared the efficacy of topical steroids...... with topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in controlling inflammation and preventing pseudophakic cystoid macular edema (PCME) after uncomplicated cataract surgery. PARTICIPANTS: Patients undergoing uncomplicated surgery for age-related cataract. METHODS: We performed a systematic literature...... for age-related cataract. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Postoperative inflammation and pseudophakic cystoid macular edema. RESULTS: Fifteen randomized trials were identified. Postoperative inflammation was less in patients randomized to NSAIDs. The prevalence of PCME was significantly higher in the steroid group...

  20. Wearable diagnostic system for age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohaghegh, N; Zadeh, E Ghafar; Magierowski, S

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a novel head-mounted point-of-care diagnostic system for detection and continuous monitoring of Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD). This wearable embedded open-source platform enables accurate monitoring of AMD by taking advantage of multiple standard graphical interface techniques such as Amsler Grid, Threshold Amsler Grid, Macular Computerized Psychophysical Test and Preferential Hyperacuity Perimeter (PHP). Here, we describe the proposed multi-Grid or so-called NGRID software and elaborate on the hardware prototype. This prototype includes a commercially available Oculus HMD incorporated with a single board computer. As the first step towards a fully integrated wearable system, this paper successfully proves the functionality of head-mounted graphical interface device ready for a live demonstration. Participants can experience this device and take a 10-minute AMD eye-exam. Furthermore, NGRID has been approved and permitted for an in-hospital clinical trial.

  1. The role of epigenetics in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemenetzi, M; Lotery, A J

    2014-12-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that epigenetic mechanisms influence gene expression and can explain how interactions between genetics and the environment result in particular phenotypes during development. The extent to which this epigenetic effect contributes to phenotype heritability in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is currently ill defined. However, emerging evidence suggests that epigenetic changes are relevant to AMD and as such provide an exciting new avenue of research for AMD. This review addresses information on the impact of posttranslational modification of the genome on the pathogenesis of AMD, such as DNA methylation changes affecting antioxidant gene expression, hypoxia-regulated alterations in chromatin structure, and histone acetylation status in relation to angiogenesis and inflammation. It also contains information on the role of non-coding RNA-mediated gene regulation in AMD at a posttranscriptional (before translation) level. Our aim was to review the epigenetic mechanisms that cause heritable changes in gene activity without changing the DNA sequence. We also describe some long-term alterations in the transcriptional potential of a cell, which are not necessarily heritable but remains to be defined in the future. Increasing understanding of the significance of common and rare genetic variants and their relationship to epigenetics and environmental influences may help in establishing methods to assess the risk of AMD. This in turn may allow new therapeutic interventions for the leading cause of central vision impairment in patients over the age of 50 years in developed countries. Search strategy We searched the MEDLINE/PubMed database following MeSH suggestions for articles including the terms: 'ocular epigenetic mechanisms', 'human disease epigenetics', and 'age-related macular degeneration genetics'. The headline used to locate related articles in PubMed was 'epigenetics in ocular disease', and to restrict search, we used the

  2. Future Therapies of Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Ishikawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly population, and the prevalence of the disease increases exponentially with every decade after the age of 50 years. While VEGF inhibitors are promising drugs for treating patients with ocular neovascularization, there are limitations to their potential for improving vision in AMD patients. Thus, future therapies are required to have the potential to improve visual outcomes. This paper will summarize the future strategies and therapeutic targets that are aimed at enhancing the efficacy and duration of effect of antiangiogenic strategies.

  3. Preventing depression in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovner, Barry W; Casten, Robin J; Hegel, Mark T; Leiby, Benjamin E; Tasman, William S

    2007-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a prevalent disease of aging that may cause irreversible vision loss, disability, and depression. The latter is rarely recognized or treated in ophthalmologic settings. To determine whether problem-solving treatment can prevent depressive disorders in patients with recent vision loss. Randomized, controlled trial. Outpatient ophthalmology offices in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Two hundred six patients aged 65 years or older with recent diagnoses of neovascular age-related macular degeneration in one eye and pre-existing age-related macular degeneration in the fellow eye. Patients were randomly assigned to problem-solving treatment (n = 105) or usual care (n = 101). Problem-solving treatment therapists delivered 6 sessions during 8 weeks in subjects' homes. Outcomes were assessed at 2 months for short-term effects and 6 months for maintenance effects. These included DSM-IV-defined diagnoses of depressive disorders, National Eye Institute Vision Function Questionnaire-17 scores, and rates of relinquishing valued activities. The 2-month incidence rate of depressive disorders in problem-solving-treated subjects was significantly lower than controls (11.6% vs 23.2%, respectively; odds ratio, 0.39; 95% confidence interval, 0.17-0.92; P = .03). Problem-solving treatment also reduced the odds of relinquishing a valued activity (odds ratio, 0.48; 95% confidence interval, 0.25-0.96; P = .04). This effect mediated the relationship between treatment group and depression. By 6 months, most earlier observed benefits had diminished, though problem-solving treatment subjects were less likely to suffer persistent depression (chi2(1,3) = 8.46; P = .04). Problem-solving treatment prevented depressive disorders and loss of valued activities in patients with age-related macular degeneration as a short-term treatment, but these benefits were not maintained over time. Booster or rescue treatments may be necessary to sustain problem-solving treatment

  4. Age-related macular degeneration: Complement in action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lookeren Campagne, Menno; Strauss, Erich C; Yaspan, Brian L

    2016-06-01

    The complement system plays a key role in host-defense against common pathogens but must be tightly controlled to avoid inflammation and tissue damage. Polymorphisms in genes encoding two important negative regulators of the alternative complement pathway, complement factor H (CFH) and complement factor I (CFI), are associated with the risk for Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of vision impairment in the ageing population. In this review, we will discuss the genetic basis of AMD and the potential impact of complement de-regulation on disease pathogenesis. Finally, we will highlight recent therapeutic approaches aimed at controlling complement activation in patients with AMD.

  5. Vision rehabilitation of persons with age related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemsen, Dennis W; Brown, William L

    2011-05-01

    As the population of the United States ages, there is an increase in the number of persons with age related macular degeneration (ARMD). Even as new prevention and treatment techniques are developed, the vision loss associated with ARMD may lead to loss of independence and quality of life. Low vision is a rehabilitative process designed to improve visual function and restore independence. This paper is a review of the current research related to low vision in the areas of magnification, contrast and illumination, reading, training, driving and outcomes assessment.

  6. Binocular refraction in patients with age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrbek, Matej

    2013-04-01

    We've been finding possible association of central vision damage with binocular vision disorders in our clients suffering from age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), but whose visual acuity still allowed us to examine their binocular vision. Our findings show that there is a significant number of patients with heterophoria in horizontal, as well as vertical direction. The clients rate the vision with prismatic correction as more comfortable, clearer and long-term tolerable. Getting used to prismatic correction was spontaneous and non-problematic. Based on these results we expect to find possibly the most effective rehabilitation of vision in patients suffering from ARMD.

  7. Squalamine lactate for exudative age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Brian; Desai, Avinash; Garcia, Charles A; Thomas, Edgar; Gast, Michael J

    2006-09-01

    Squalamine lactate inhibits angiogenesis by a long-lived, intracellular mechanism of action. The drug is taken up into activated endothelial cells through caveolae, small invaginations in the cellular membrane. Subsequently, the drug binds to and "chaperones" calmodulin to an intracellular membrane compartment and blocks angiogenesis at several levels. A series of basic investigations, preclinical studies, and human clinical trials have begun to establish the proof of concept, efficacy, and safety parameters for use of squalamine lactate as a therapeutic agent for exudative age-related macular degeneration and several types of malignancies.

  8. Nutritional Modulation of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Weikel, Karen A; Taylor, Allen

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly worldwide. It affects 30–50 million individuals and clinical hallmarks of AMD are observed in at least one third of persons over the age of 75 in industrialized countries (Gehrs et al., 2006). Costs associated with AMD are in excess of $340 billion US (American-Health-Assistance-Foundation, 2012). The majority of AMD patients in the United States are not eligible for clinical treatments (Biarnes et al., 20...

  9. Imaging geographic atrophy in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göbel, Arno P; Fleckenstein, Monika; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; Brinkmann, Christian K; Holz, Frank G

    2011-01-01

    Advances in retinal imaging technology have largely contributed to the understanding of the natural history, prognostic markers and disease mechanisms of geographic atrophy (GA) due to age-related macular degeneration. There is still no therapy available to halt or slow the disease process. In order to evaluate potential therapeutic effects in interventional trials, there is a need for precise quantification of the GA progression rate. Fundus autofluorescence imaging allows for accurate identification and segmentation of atrophic areas and currently represents the gold standard for evaluating progressive GA enlargement. By means of high-resolution spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, distinct microstructural alterations related to GA can be visualized.

  10. Three Studies Point to Same Risk Gene for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... related macular degeneration.” Nature Genetics , September 2013. DOI: 10.1038/ng.2758. Seddon JM et al . “Rare variants ... related macular degeneration.” Nature Genetics , September 2013. DOI: 10.1038/ng.2741. Helgason H et al . “A rare ...

  11. Quality of Life and Health Economic Assessments of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Covert, D.; Berdeaux, G; Mitchell, J; Bradley, Clare; Barnes, R.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we review measures of patient-reported outcomes that can show whether a treatment for age-related macular degeneration also provides patient-perceived benefits. In addition, we look at health economic measurements currently being used to develop cost-effectiveness models for age-related macular degeneration.

  12. Radiation therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Petrarca

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Robert Petrarca, Timothy L JacksonDepartment of Ophthalmology, King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UKAbstract: Antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF therapies represent the standard of care for most patients presenting with neovascular (wet age-related macular degeneration (neovascular AMD. Anti-VEGF drugs require repeated injections and impose a considerable burden of care, and not all patients respond. Radiation targets the proliferating cells that cause neovascular AMD, including fibroblastic, inflammatory, and endothelial cells. Two new neovascular AMD radiation treatments are being investigated: epimacular brachytherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery. Epimacular brachytherapy uses beta radiation, delivered to the lesion via a pars plana vitrectomy. Stereotactic radiosurgery uses low voltage X-rays in overlapping beams, directed onto the lesion. Feasibility data for epimacular brachytherapy show a greatly reduced need for anti-VEGF therapy, with a mean vision gain of 8.9 ETDRS letters at 12 months. Pivotal trials are underway (MERLOT, CABERNET. Preliminary stereotactic radiosurgery data suggest a mean vision gain of 8 to 10 ETDRS letters at 12 months. A large randomized sham controlled stereotactic radiosurgery feasibility study is underway (CLH002, with pivotal trials to follow. While it is too early to conclude on the safety and efficacy of epimacular brachytherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, preliminary results are positive, and these suggest that radiation offers a more durable therapeutic effect than intraocular injections.Keywords: wet age-related macular degeneration, neovascular, radiation therapy, epimacular brachytherapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, anti-VEGF

  13. Pharmacogenetics and nutritional supplementation in age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hampton BM

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Blake M Hampton, Jaclyn L Kovach, Stephen G Schwartz Department of Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA Abstract: The Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS recommended treatment with antioxidants plus zinc in patients with intermediate or advanced age-related macular degeneration in order to reduce progression risks. Recent pharmacogenetic studies have reported differences in treatment outcomes with respect to variants in genes for CFH and ARMS2, although the treatment recommendations based on these differences are controversial. Different retrospective analyses of subsets of patients from the same AREDS trial have drawn different conclusions. The practicing clinician, who is not an expert on genetics, clinical trial design, or statistical analysis, may be uncertain how to interpret these results. Based on the balance of the available literature, we suggest not changing established practice recommendations until additional evidence from clinical trials becomes available. Keywords: Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS, age-related macular degeneration, age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2, complement factor H (CFH, pharmacogenetics, randomized clinical trial (RCT

  14. [Future methods of treatment in age related macular degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlea, C

    2012-01-01

    In the present time the treatment of Age Related Macular Degeneration (ARMD) begins to develop. Many medical therapies are presently tested in the two types of ARMD, geographic atrophy and exudative ARMD. In atrophic ARMD, new drugs are aimed to spare photoreceptors and the retinal pigment epithelium, to prevent oxidative damage on the retina and to suppress the inflammation process. In exudative ARMD, new therapies are already in use and in progress, especially the anti-VEGF factors, and others try to improve visual prognosis in targeting other mechanism or cells involved in the angiogenesis process. This article reviews and summarizes the available data, presented in several scientific meetings, congresses or given directly by the companies involved.

  15. Mediated-reality magnification for macular degeneration rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Gonzalez, Anabel; Kotliar, Konstantin; Rios-Martinez, Jorge; Lanzl, Ines; Navab, Nassir

    2014-10-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a gradually progressive eye condition, which is one of the leading causes of blindness and low vision in the Western world. Prevailing optical visual aids compensate part of the lost visual function, but omitting helpful complementary information. This paper proposes an efficient magnification technique, which can be implemented on a head-mounted display, for improving vision of patients with AMD, by preserving global information of the scene. Performance of the magnification approach is evaluated by simulating central vision loss in normally sighted subjects. Visual perception was measured as a function of text reading speed and map route following speed. Statistical analysis of experimental results suggests that our magnification method improves reading speed 1.2 times and spatial orientation to find routes on a map 1.5 times compared to a conventional magnification approach, being capable to enhance peripheral vision of AMD subjects along with their life quality.

  16. The genetics of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guymer, Robyn

    2001-07-01

    AIM: To review the genetics of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The pathogenesis of AMD, the leading cause of severe visual disability and blindness in our community, remains unknown. However, AMD is regarded as a genetic disease where family history of AMD is a significant risk factor for the disease. Understanding the genetic factors associated with AMD offers the greatest chance for understanding the underlying disease processes. METHODS: Through a review of the literature and the use of original research findings, the current knowledge of the genetics of AMD is explored. CONCLUSION: AMD is increasing in prevalence and remains a major challenge for eye heath providers. Finding the genes that are associated with AMD offers the greatest chance for the development of preventative strategies and treatments.

  17. [Etiology and pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, P; Holz, F G; Charbel Issa, P

    2013-04-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of blindness in Germany. Due to the demographic development a further increase of affected patients is to be expected. Improved understanding of AMD pathogenesis resulted from the molecular biological approaches in recent years and showed an association of genetic factors with AMD. The complement factor H gene and the second high-risk locus ARMS2 in particular were found to contribute a significant risk for development of the disease. Ageing and environmental factors, such as smoking, modulate the individual genetic risk profile. A detailed understanding of the complex AMD pathogenesis is also relevant in ophthalmological practice to understand new treatment strategies. In this review we aim to give an overview of the interplay of ageing, external environmental factors and genetic risk variants leading to AMD.

  18. Mechanisms of age-related macular degeneration and therapeutic opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lookeren Campagne, Menno; LeCouter, Jennifer; Yaspan, Brian L; Ye, Weilan

    2014-01-01

    As the age of the population increases in many nations, age-related degenerative diseases pose significant socioeconomic challenges. One of the key degenerative diseases that compromise quality of life is age-related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is a multi-faceted condition that affects the central retina, which ultimately leads to blindness in millions of people worldwide. The pathophysiology and risk factors for AMD are complex, and the symptoms manifest in multiple related but distinct forms. The ability to develop effective treatments for AMD will depend on a thorough understanding of the underlying pathophysiology, risk factors, and driver molecular pathways, as well as the ability to develop useful animal models. This review provides an overview of the aforementioned aspects in AMD.

  19. Ranibizumab vs. aflibercept for wet age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabo, Shelagh M; Hedegaard, Morten; Chan, Keith;

    2015-01-01

    , a Bayesian network meta-analysis (NMA) was conducted to indirectly compare posologies of aflibercept and ranibizumab (0.5 mg). The efficacy outcome, mean change from baseline in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) on the ETDRS chart, was evaluated at 3 and 12 months; and safety data at 12 months. Standard...... for wet AMD. Reduced frequency aflibercept was associated with the poorest visual outcomes, and sample sizes were small. Findings from these analyses provide novel evidence of the comparative efficacy and safety of aflibercept and ranibizumab for wet AMD.......OBJECTIVE: Although a reduced aflibercept (2.0 mg) injection frequency relative to the approved dosing posology is included in national treatment guidelines for wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD), there is limited evidence of its comparative efficacy. The objective was to compare...

  20. Age-related macular degeneration: prevention and treatment. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Mirzabekova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a multifactorial disease. Age, light exposure, smoking, melanin levels and low-antioxidant diet are contributed to AMD development and progression. Cardiovascular disorders are of considerable importance as well. In macula, photoreceptor outer segments that are rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (FA, particularly, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, are susceptible to free radicals damage. High blood flow velocity and oxygen partial pressure as well as direct sunlight exposure induce oxidative processes. The source of free radicals in photoreceptor cells and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE is an extensive mitochondrial metabolism, photoreceptor outer segments phagocytosis, lipofuscin phototoxic activity and hemoglobin or protoporphyrin precursors photosensitization. Oxidative stress is considered as an universal component of cell depth in necrosis, apoptosis and toxic damage. Antioxidant protective system consists of enzymes (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase and non-enzymatic factors (ascorbic acid, alpha tocopherol, retinol, carotenoids. Specific antioxidant food supplement containing ascorbic acid (500 mg, vitamin E (400 IU and beta carotene (15 mg coupled with zinc (80 mg of zinc oxide and copper (2 mg of copper oxide results in 25 % decrease in late-stage AMD development rate. Amongst the agents that can protect retina from oxidative stress and AMD development, carotenoids are of special importance. Lutein and zeaxanthin containing in retina and lens screen blue light from central area of the retina. They also absorb blue light and inhibit free radicals generation thus preventing polyunsaturated FA light destruction. Association between lutein and zeaxanthin intake and late-stage AMD risk was revealed. Amongst the most important factors which deficiency favors macular degeneration are omega-3 FAs, i.e., DHA. DHA is the key component of visual pigment rhodopsin transformation. It

  1. Age-related macular degeneration: prevention and treatment. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Mirzabekova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a multifactorial disease. Age, light exposure, smoking, melanin levels and low-antioxidant diet are contributed to AMD development and progression. Cardiovascular disorders are of considerable importance as well. In macula, photoreceptor outer segments that are rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (FA, particularly, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, are susceptible to free radicals damage. High blood flow velocity and oxygen partial pressure as well as direct sunlight exposure induce oxidative processes. The source of free radicals in photoreceptor cells and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE is an extensive mitochondrial metabolism, photoreceptor outer segments phagocytosis, lipofuscin phototoxic activity and hemoglobin or protoporphyrin precursors photosensitization. Oxidative stress is considered as an universal component of cell depth in necrosis, apoptosis and toxic damage. Antioxidant protective system consists of enzymes (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase and non-enzymatic factors (ascorbic acid, alpha tocopherol, retinol, carotenoids. Specific antioxidant food supplement containing ascorbic acid (500 mg, vitamin E (400 IU and beta carotene (15 mg coupled with zinc (80 mg of zinc oxide and copper (2 mg of copper oxide results in 25 % decrease in late-stage AMD development rate. Amongst the agents that can protect retina from oxidative stress and AMD development, carotenoids are of special importance. Lutein and zeaxanthin containing in retina and lens screen blue light from central area of the retina. They also absorb blue light and inhibit free radicals generation thus preventing polyunsaturated FA light destruction. Association between lutein and zeaxanthin intake and late-stage AMD risk was revealed. Amongst the most important factors which deficiency favors macular degeneration are omega-3 FAs, i.e., DHA. DHA is the key component of visual pigment rhodopsin transformation. It

  2. Evaluation of nepafenac in prevention of macular edema following cataract surgery in patients with diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh R

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Rishi Singh,1 Louis Alpern,2 Glenn J Jaffe,3 Robert P Lehmann,4 John Lim,5 Harvey J Reiser,6 Kenneth Sall,7 Thomas Walters,8 Dana Sager91Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, 2The Cataract, Glaucoma, and Refractive Surgery Center, El Paso, TX, 3Duke Eye Center, Duke Reading Center, Duke University, Durham, NC, 4Lehmann Eye Center, Nacogdoches, TX, 5Houston Eye Associates, Houston, TX, 6Eye Care Specialists, Kingston, PA, 7Sall Research Medical Center, Artesia, CA, 8Texan Eye, Austin, TX, 9Alcon Research Ltd, Fort Worth, TX, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate nepafenac ophthalmic suspension 0.1% (Nevanac®; Alcon Research Ltd in the prevention of macular edema following cataract surgery in diabetic retinopathy patients.Methods: This was a multicenter, randomized, double-masked, vehicle-controlled study of 263 adult diabetic patients with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy requiring cataract surgery. Patients were randomized (1:1 to instill nepafenac or vehicle three times daily beginning 1 day prior to surgery through day 90. Efficacy included the percentage of patients who developed macular edema (≥30% increase in central subfield macular thickness from baseline and the percentage of patients with decreases of more than five letters in best-corrected visual acuity from day 7 to 90.Results: A significantly lower percentage of patients in the nepafenac group developed macular edema relative to patients in the vehicle group (3.2% versus 16.7%; P < 0.001. A significantly lower percentage of patients in the nepafenac group had best-corrected visual acuity decreases of more than five letters relative to patients in the vehicle group on day 30 (P < 0.001, day 60 (P = 0.002, and day 90 (P = 0.006. The mean central subfield macular thickness and mean percent change from baseline in macular volume were also significantly lower in the nepafenac group versus the vehicle group at days 14 through 90 (P

  3. Augmentation of macular pigment following implantation of blue light-filtering intraocular lenses at the time of cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, John M; O'Reilly, Philip; Loughman, James; Stack, Jim; Loane, Edward; Connolly, Eithne; Beatty, Stephen

    2009-10-01

    (Photo)-oxidative stress is believed to play a role in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), with the threshold for retinal damage being lowest for short-wavelength (blue) light. Macular pigment (MP), consisting of the carotenoids lutein (L), zeaxanthin (Z) and meso-Z, has a maximum absorption at 460 nm and protects the retina from (photo)-oxidative injury. This study was designed to investigate whether the blue light-filtering properties of the Alcon AcrySof Natural intraocular lens (ANIOL) implanted during cataract surgery affects MP optical density (MPOD). Forty-two patients scheduled for cataract surgery were recruited for the study. These patients all had a preoperative best corrected visual acuity rating (BCVAR) of at least 0.5 (logMAR) in the study eye. The patients were randomized to have either the standard Alcon AcrySof three-piece acrylic intraocular lens (AIOL) (controls) or the ANIOL implanted at the time of cataract surgery. The spatial profile of MPOD (i.e., at 0.25 degrees, 0.5 degrees, 1.0 degrees, and 1.75 degrees eccentricity) was measured with customized heterochromatic flicker photometry (cHFP) 1 week before and 1 week after surgery, and at 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. Serum concentrations of L and Z were also measured at each study visit. There was a highly significant and positive correlation between all MPODs (e.g., at 0.25 degrees) recorded 1 week before and after surgery in eyes with an AIOL implant (r = 0.915, P 0.05). There were no significant time or lens effects observed for serum L over the study period (P > 0.05). There was a significant time effect for serum Z over the study period (P 0.05). Customized HFP can reliably measure the MPOD spatial profile in the presence of lens opacity, and cataract surgery does not artifactually alter MPOD readings. This study also provides evidence that implanting an IOL that filters blue light is associated with augmentation of MPOD in the absence of raised serum

  4. CHARACTERISTICS OF MACULAR REGION AND VISUAL ACUITY IN GLAUCOMA PATIENTS AFTER PHACOEMULSIFICATION CATARACT SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Mityaeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To improve safety of phacoemulsification cataract surgery, innovative technologies have been developed. Assessment of macular region status after the use of routine and innovative phaco technologies is of great interest. Aim: To compare effects of different phaco technologies on macular retina, visual acuity and intraocular pressure in patients with compensated glaucoma after uncomplicated phaco with intraocular lens implantation. Materials and methods: Phacoemulsification of immature cataract was performed in 52  patients (52 eyes using Oertli machine and uniform method. Patients were divided into 3 groups. Group 1 included 20  patients (20  eyes with simple (primary openangle glaucoma (POAG after phaco using easyPhaco technology. Group 2 included 20  POAG patients (20  eyes after phaco using routine technology. Group  3 included 12  patients without glaucoma after routine phaco. EasyPhaco technology involves using of the new Oertli machine parameters, phaco tip with new geometry, flow rate/vacuum setting of 1:10. Preoperatively, in all 40 patients with glaucoma, normal values of intraocular pressure were achieved using antiglaucomatous therapies. Visual acuity, intraocular pressure and macular thickness by optical coherent tomography were measured before the surgery, in 1 and 6 weeks after the procedure. Results: Increase of macular thickness (by 12–30  mcm compared to baseline was observed postoperatively in patients with and without glaucoma. After 1 week, mean macular thickness was significantly less in the easyPhaco group compared to routine phaco groups with and without glaucoma (221.5±15.4;238.3 ± 11.5 and 229.3 ± 16.9 mcm,respectively, p < 0.05. In the groups 1 and 3, macular thickness returned to preoperative values after 6 weeks (group 1: 210.5 ± 13.8 and 209.7 ± 16.3 mcm; group  3: 211.1 ± 14.4 and 211.1 ± 15.8  mcm,respectively. By contrast, after routine phaco technology in POAG

  5. Genetics of Immunological and Inflammatory Components in Age-related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Tuo, Jingsheng; Grob, Seanna; Zhang, Kang; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), affecting 30 to 50 million elder individuals worldwide, is a disease affecting the macular retina and choroid that can lead to irreversible central vision loss and blindness. Recent findings support a role for immunologic processes in AMD pathogenesis, including generation of inflammatory related molecules in the Bruch’s membrane, recruitment of macrophages, complement activation, microglial activation and accumulation in the macular lesions. Pro-inflam...

  6. Long-term effectiveness of ranibizumab for age-related macular degeneration and diabetic macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fong AH

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Angie HC Fong,1 Timothy YY Lai1,2 1Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Eye Hospital, Kowloon, Hong Kong; 22010 Retina and Macula Centre, Tsimshatsui, Kowloon, Hong Kong Abstract: Neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD and diabetic macular edema (DME are major causes of visual impairment in the elderly population worldwide. With the aging population, the prevalence of neovascular AMD and DME has increased substantially over the recent years. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF has been implicated as playing an important role in the pathogenesis of both neovascular AMD and DME. Since its introduction in 2006, ranibizumab, a recombinant, humanized, monoclonal antibody fragment against all isoforms of VEGF-A, has revolutionized the treatment of neovascular AMD and DME. The efficacy and safety of ranibizumab in neovascular AMD has been demonstrated in the ANCHOR and MARINA trials. Further studies including the PIER, PrONTO, and SUSTAIN trials have also evaluated the optimal dosing regimen of ranibizumab in neovascular AMD. The CATT and IVAN trials compared the safety and efficacy of ranibizumab with off-label use of bevacizumab. Studies such as SUSTAIN and HORIZON have shown that ranibizumab has a good safety profile and is well tolerated for over 4 years with very few serious ocular and systemic adverse events. For DME, Phase II RESOLVE study and Phase III RISE and RIDE studies have demonstrated superiority of ranibizumab treatment in improving vision over placebo controls. Phase II READ and Phase III RESOLVE and REVEAL studies have shown that ranibizumab is more effective both as monotherapy and in combination with laser compared with laser monotherapy. The 3-year results from the DRCRnet protocol I study found that ranibizumab with deferred laser resulted in better long-term visual outcome compared with ranibizumab with prompt laser. This review summarizes various

  7. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: New Eye Treatment Saves Former Math Teacher's Sight

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... related Macular Degeneration New Eye Treatment Saves Former Math Teacher's Sight Past Issues / Summer 2016 Table of ... Courtesy of: Rebecca Hatcher Rebecca Hatcher, a retired math teacher from Virginia, is an example of the ...

  8. Verteporfin plus ranibizumab for choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Michael; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula; Lanzetta, Paolo;

    2012-01-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of same-day verteporfin photodynamic therapy (PDT) and intravitreal ranibizumab combination treatment versus ranibizumab monotherapy in neovascular age-related macular degeneration....

  9. New approaches and potential treatments for dry age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damico, Francisco Max; Gasparin, Fabio; Scolari, Mariana Ramos; Pedral, Lycia Sampaio; Takahashi, Beatriz Sayuri

    2012-01-01

    Emerging treatments for dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and geographic atrophy focus on two strategies that target components involved in physiopathological pathways: prevention of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium loss (neuroprotection induction, oxidative damage prevention, and visual cycle modification) and suppression of inflammation. Neuroprotective drugs, such as ciliary neurotrophic factor, brimonidine tartrate, tandospirone, and anti-amyloid β antibodies, aim to prevent apoptosis of retinal cells. Oxidative stress and depletion of essential micronutrients are targeted by the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) formulation. Visual cycle modulators reduce the activity of the photoreceptors and retinal accumulation of toxic fluorophores and lipofuscin. Eyes with dry age-related macular degeneration present chronic inflammation and potential treatments include corticosteroid and complement inhibition. We review the current concepts and rationale of dry age-related macular degeneration treatment that will most likely include a combination of drugs targeting different pathways involved in the development and progression of age-related macular degeneration.

  10. The macular photostress test in diabetes, glaucoma, and cataract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, António M. G.; Sousa, Raul A. R. C.; Rocha, Filomena A. S. Q.; Fernandes, Paula Sepúlveda; Macedo, António F.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose. The photostress recovery time test (PSRT) has been widely reported as a helpful screening clinical tool. However, the poor standardization of its measurement technique remains to be a limitation among clinicians. The purpose of this study is to apply a recommended clinical technique to measure the PSRT in some of the most commons eye diseases to ascertain whether these diseases affect the PSRT values. Methods. One hundred and one controls and 105 patients, with diagnosed diabetes (without visible signs of diabetic retinopathy), primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) or cataracts underwent photostress testing. The test was performed with a direct ophthalmoscope for illuminating the macula for 30 seconds. Participants belonged to three age classes: A, B and C; and were divided into four groups: control, diabetic, POAG and cataract. The age range for A, B and C classes were respectively 43-54, 55-64 and 65-74 years. The groups were also further compared within each age class. In addition, the influence of age on PSRT was evaluated using the control group. Results. Results demonstrate that PSRT changes with age (p<0.02). In class A, diabetic group had a faster PSRT than control group, (mean +/- standard deviation) 20.22+/-7.51 and 26.14+/-8.34 seconds. The difference between these groups was statistical significant (t-test, p=0.012). Cataract and POAG groups did not affect the PSRT significantly. Conclusions. The technique used for the Photostress showed that diabetics, younger than 54 years, may have faster PSRT and that, aging delays PSRT.

  11. Incidence of legal blindness from age-related macular degeneration in denmark: year 2000 to 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, Sara Brandi; Larsen, Michael; Munch, Inger Christine

    2012-01-01

    To report incidence rates of legal blindness from age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and other causes in Denmark from years 2000 to 2010 in the age group at risk of AMD aged 50 years and older.......To report incidence rates of legal blindness from age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and other causes in Denmark from years 2000 to 2010 in the age group at risk of AMD aged 50 years and older....

  12. Quality of life in age-related macular degeneration: a review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Jan; Bradley, Clare

    2006-01-01

    The Age-related Macular Degeneration Alliance International commissioned a review of the literature on quality of life (QoL) in macular degeneration (MD) with a view to increasing awareness of MD, reducing its impact and improving services for people with MD worldwide. Method: A systematic review was conducted using electronic databases, conference proceedings and key journal hand search checks. The resulting 'White Paper' was posted on the AMD Alliance website and is reproduced here. ...

  13. AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION: CURRENT ASPECTS OF PATHOGENESIS AND TREATMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H; P; Heidenkummer

    1991-01-01

    About 1.1 million people are estimated to have age-related macular degeneration in West Germany. Anatomical aspects of the normal macula and physiological ageing processes in the retina will be discribed including alterations in the choroid, in Bruch's membrane, the pigment epithelium and the sensory retina. Risk factors for the development of age-related macular degeneration are age per se, perhaps ethnologic characteristics, ocular characteristics, and perhaps environmental factors. The histopathology...

  14. Comparison of life quality scores of ranibizumab-treated patients with age-related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Saadet Arslan; Merih Soylu; ilter Varinli

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the visual acuity, fluorescein angiography, optic coherence tomography and life quality of patients diagnosed with exudative age-related macular degeneration and administered with intravitreal Ranibizumab injection. Material and Methods: This study included of 48 different patients who were diagnosed as exudative age-related macular degeneration and administered with ranibizumab injection. In this study, demographic characteristics, pre- and post-injection corrected v...

  15. Prostaglandin-Induced Cystoid Macular Edema Following Routine Cataract Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Agange

    2010-01-01

    patient first developed CME OD 4-months post uncomplicated cataract extraction. XALATAN (Latanoprost had been restarted after surgery and discontinued at onset of CME. While off XALATAN (Latanoprost, the patient's CME resolved, but his IOP rose. The patient was started on LUMIGAN (Bimatoprost to control the IOP, but within weeks his CME recurred. The patient's CME was again treated and his IOP remained acceptable, but then progressively increased. TRAVATAN (Travoprost was attempted, but he presented with a third round of CME. Definitive conclusions about causal relationships cannot be made without well-designed, prospective clinical trials addressing this issue.

  16. Choroidal and macular thickness changes induced by cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falcão MS

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Manuel S Falcão,1,2 Nuno M Gonçalves,2 Paulo Freitas-Costa,1,3 João B Beato,2 Amândio Rocha-Sousa,1,2 Ângela Carneiro,1,2 Elisete M Brandão,2 Fernando M Falcão-Reis1,21Department of Sense Organs, Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, 2Department of Ophthalmology of Hospital de São João, 3Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, Porto, PortugalBackground: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of uneventful phacoemulsification on the morphology and thickness of the macula, the submacular choroid, and the peripapillary choroid.Methods: In 14 eyes from 14 patients, retinal macular thickness, choroidal submacular thickness, and choroidal peripapillary thickness were measured preoperatively and at one week and one month after phacoemulsification using enhanced depth imaging spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Changes in thickness of the different ocular tissues were evaluated.Results: There was a statistically significant increase in mean retinal macular thickness at one month. In horizontal scans, the mean increase was +8.67±6.75 µm (P<0.001, and in vertical scans, the mean increase was +8.80±7.07 µm (P=0.001. However, there were no significant changes in choroidal morphology in the submacular and peripapillary areas one month after surgery. In vertical scans, there was a nonsignificant increase in choroidal thickness (+4.21±20.2 µm; P=0.47 whilst in horizontal scans a nonsignificant decrease was recorded (−9.11±39.59 µm; P=0.41. In peripapillary scans, a nonsignificant increase in mean choroidal thickness was registered (+3.25±11.80 µm; P=0.36.Conclusion: Uncomplicated phacoemulsification induces nonpathologic increases in retinal macular thickness probably due to the inflammatory insult of the surgery; however these changes are not accompanied by significant changes in choroidal thickness. In the posterior segment, the morphologic response to the inflammatory insult of

  17. [Age-related macular degeneration as a local manifestation of atherosclerosis - a novel insight into pathogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machalińska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of irreversible visual impairment and disability among the elderly in developed countries. There is compelling evidence that atherosclerosis and age-related macular degeneration share a similar pathogenic process. The association between atherosclerosis and age-related macular degeneration has been inferred from histological, biochemical and epidemiological studies. Many published data indicate that drusen are similar in molecular composition to plaques in atherosclerosis. Furthermore, a great body of evidence has emerged over the past decade that implicates the chronic inflammatory processes in the pathogenesis and progression of both disorders. We speculate that vascular atherosclerosis and age-related macular degeneration may represent different manifestations of the same disease induced by a pathologic tissue response to the damage caused by oxidative stress and local ischemia. In this review, we characterise in detail a strong association between age-related macular degeneration and atherosclerosis development, and we postulate the hypothesis that age-related macular degeneration is a local manifestation of a systemic disease. This provides a new approach for understanding the aspects of pathogenesis and might improve the prevention and treatment of both diseases which both result from ageing of the human body.

  18. Static and flicker perimetry in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Chi D; Dimitrov, Peter N; Wu, Zhichao; Ayton, Lauren N; Makeyeva, Galina; Aung, Khin-Zaw; Varsamidis, Mary; Robman, Luba; Vingrys, Algis J; Guymer, Robyn H

    2013-05-01

    The relationship between clinical severity of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and macular function has not been well established. In this study, we investigated the correlation between clinical severity and functional deficits as detected by static and flicker perimetry. This cross-sectional study consisted of 279 AMD subjects and 24 control participants. AMD subjects were allocated into 1 of 10 AMD severity groups depending on the status of the designated study eye and the fellow eye, as assessed by color fundus photographs. Visual acuity, and static and flicker perimetry were tested on one eye during the same session. The geometric means, SDs, and percentage of abnormal eyes of static and flicker sensitivity of each AMD severity group were determined and compared. The pattern of change in sensitivity and percentage of abnormal eyes for static perimetry across all AMD severity groups were similar to flicker perimetry. Eyes with drusen > 125 μm (P[static] = 0.018, P[flicker] = 0.024), drusenoid epithelial detachment (P[static and flicker] static and flicker] static and flicker sensitivities compared to normal eyes. Static (β-coefficient -1.59, 95% confidence interval [CI] -4.78-1.60) and flicker (β-coefficient -1.29, 95% CI -4.66-2.08) sensitivities declined at a similar rate in eyes that showed clinical signs of progression. Static and flicker perimetry were affected similarly across the spectrum of AMD severity, and methods appeared to be valid techniques for assessing retinal sensitivity in AMD once drusen > 125 μm are present, but before the development of late AMD.

  19. Diabetic macular edema, retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration as inflammatory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Undurti N

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) are complications affecting about 25% of all patients with long-standing type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus and are a major cause of significant decrease in vision and quality of life. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is not uncommon, and diabetes mellitus affects the incidence and progression of AMD through altering hemodynamics, increasing oxidative stress, accumulating advanced glycation end products, etc. Recent studies suggest that DME, DR and AMD are inflammatory conditions characterized by a breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier, inflammatory processes and an increase in vascular permeability. Key factors that seem to have a dominant role in DME, DR and AMD are angiotensin II, prostaglandins and the vascular endothelial growth factor and a deficiency of anti-inflammatory bioactive lipids. The imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory eicosanoids and enhanced production of pro-angiogenic factors may initiate the onset and progression of DME, DR and AMD. This implies that bioactive lipids that possess anti-inflammatory actions and suppress the production of angiogenic factors could be employed in the prevention and management of DME, DR and AMD.

  20. Phacoemulsification Surgery in Eyes with Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papavasileiou, Evangelia; Kumar, Balakrishna Vineeth; Prasad, Som

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the visual outcomes and effect of phacoemulsification surgery on the progression of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods. Retrospective, noncomparative, and interventional case series. Thirty eyes from 29 subjects with neovascular AMD treated with intravitreal antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) injections who underwent phacoemulsification and had a postsurgery follow-up of 6 months were included. LogMAR best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was assessed preoperatively; 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months postoperatively; and finally at the last visit. The frequency of anti-VEGF therapy, calculated as the number of intravitreal injections per month, and central macular thickness (CMT) before and after cataract surgery were determined. Results. Median (range) logMAR BCVA was 0.69 (0.16 to 1.32) preoperatively; 0.55 (−0.04 to 1.32) at 1 month, 0.52 (−0.1 to 1.32) at 3 months, and 0.50 (0.0 to 1.32) at 6 months postoperatively; and 0.6 (0.0 to 1.4) at final visit (P = 0.0011). There was no difference in the frequency of anti-VEGF injections between the immediate 6 months before and after phacoemulsification, which was equal to 0.1667 injections per month (P = 0.6377). Median CMT measured 203 μm preoperatively, which temporarily increased to 238 μm at 1 month after surgery (P = 0.0093) and then spontaneously returned to baseline, measuring 212.5 μm at 3 months postoperatively (P = 0.3811). Conclusion. Phacoemulsification surgery significantly improved vision in patients with neovascular AMD, with no increased need for anti-VEGF injections to keep the macula dry postoperatively. PMID:24719771

  1. Age-related macular degeneration: beyond anti-angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, David L

    2014-01-06

    Recently, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapies for neovascular age-related macular degeneration have been developed. These agents, originally developed for their anti-angiogenic mechanism of action, probably also work through an anti-permeability effect in preventing or reducing the amount of leakage from submacular neovascular tissue. Other treatment modalities include laser photocoagulation, photodynamic therapy with verteporfin, and submacular surgery. In reality, these latter treatments can be similarly categorized as anti-angiogenic because their sole aim is destroying or removing choroidal neovascularization (CNV). At the cellular level, CNV resembles stereotypical tissue repair that consists of several matricellular components in addition to neovascularization. In the retina, the clinical term CNV is a misnomer since the term may more appropriately be referred to as aberrant submacular repair. Furthermore, CNV raises a therapeutic conundrum: To complete or correct any reparative process in the body, angiogenesis becomes an essential component. Anti-angiogenic therapy, in all its guises, arrests repair and causes the hypoxic environment to persist, thus fueling pro-angiogenesis and further development of CNV as a component of aberrant repair. However, we realize that anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy preserves vision in patients with age-related macular degeneration, albeit temporarily and therefore, repeated treatment is needed. More importantly, however, anti-angiogenic therapy demonstrates that we can at the very least tolerate neovascular tissue beneath the macula and preserve vision in contrast to our historical approach of total vascular destruction. In this clinical scenario, it may be possible to look beyond anti-angiogenesis if our goal is facilitating submacular repair without destroying the neurosensory retina. Thus, in this situation of neovascular tolerance, it may be timely to consider treatments that facilitate

  2. Inflammation and its role in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppinen, Anu; Paterno, Jussi J; Blasiak, Janusz; Salminen, Antero; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation is a cellular response to factors that challenge the homeostasis of cells and tissues. Cell-associated and soluble pattern-recognition receptors, e.g. Toll-like receptors, inflammasome receptors, and complement components initiate complex cellular cascades by recognizing or sensing different pathogen and damage-associated molecular patterns, respectively. Cytokines and chemokines represent alarm messages for leukocytes and once activated, these cells travel long distances to targeted inflamed tissues. Although it is a crucial survival mechanism, prolonged inflammation is detrimental and participates in numerous chronic age-related diseases. This article will review the onset of inflammation and link its functions to the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which is the leading cause of severe vision loss in aged individuals in the developed countries. In this progressive disease, degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) results in the death of photoreceptors, leading to a loss of central vision. The RPE is prone to oxidative stress, a factor that together with deteriorating functionality, e.g. decreased intracellular recycling and degradation due to attenuated heterophagy/autophagy, induces inflammation. In the early phases, accumulation of intracellular lipofuscin in the RPE and extracellular drusen between RPE cells and Bruch's membrane can be clinically detected. Subsequently, in dry (atrophic) AMD there is geographic atrophy with discrete areas of RPE loss whereas in the wet (exudative) form there is neovascularization penetrating from the choroid to retinal layers. Elevations in levels of local and systemic biomarkers indicate that chronic inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of both disease forms.

  3. [Pharmacological therapy of age-related macular degeneration based on etiopathogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Tamás

    2015-11-15

    It is of great therapeutic significance that disordered function of the vascular endothelium which supply the affected ocular structures plays a major role in the pathogenesis and development of age-related macular degeneration. Chronic inflammation is closely linked to diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction, and age-related macular degeneration is accompanied by a general inflammatory response. According to current concept, age-related macular degeneration is a local manifestation of systemic vascular disease. This recognition could have therapeutic implications because restoration of endothelial dysfunction can restabilize the condition of chronic vascular disease including age-related macular degeneration as well. Restoration of endothelial dysfunction by pharmaacological or non pharmacological interventions may prevent the development or improve endothelial dysfunction, which result in prevention or improvement of age related macular degeneration as well. Medicines including inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system (converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-receptor blockers and renin inhibitors), statins, acetylsalicylic acid, trimetazidin, third generation beta-blockers, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists, folate, vitamin D, melatonin, advanced glycation end-product crosslink breaker alagebrium, endothelin-receptor antagonist bosentan, coenzyme Q10; "causal" antioxidant vitamins, N-acetyl-cysteine, resveratrol, L-arginine, serotonin receptor agonists, tumor necrosis factor-alpha blockers, specific inhibitor of the complement alternative pathway, curcumin and doxycyclin all have beneficial effects on endothelial dysfunction. Restoration of endothelial dysfunction can restabilize chronic vascular disease including age-related macular degeneration as well. Considering that the human vascular system is consubstantial, medicines listed above should be given to patients (1) who have no macular degeneration but have risk factors

  4. Durable recovery of the macular architecture and functionality of a diagnosed age-related macular degeneration 1 year after a single intravitreal injection of dobesilate

    OpenAIRE

    Cuevas, P; Outeiriño, L A; Azanza, C; Giménez-Gallego, G

    2013-01-01

    Among the age-related diseases that affect vision, age-related macular degeneration is the most frequent cause of blindness in patients older than 60 years. In this communication, we report the full anatomical and functional recovery of a patient diagnosed with wet age-related macular degeneration 1 year after a single intravitreal injection of dobesilate.

  5. Durable recovery of the macular architecture and functionality of a diagnosed age-related macular degeneration 1 year after a single intravitreal injection of dobesilate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, P; Outeiriño, L A; Azanza, C; Giménez-Gallego, G

    2013-11-13

    Among the age-related diseases that affect vision, age-related macular degeneration is the most frequent cause of blindness in patients older than 60 years. In this communication, we report the full anatomical and functional recovery of a patient diagnosed with wet age-related macular degeneration 1 year after a single intravitreal injection of dobesilate.

  6. Durable recovery of the macular architecture and functionality of a diagnosed age-related macular degeneration 1 year after a single intravitreal injection of dobesilate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, P; Outeiriño, L A; Azanza, C; Giménez-Gallego, G

    2013-01-01

    Among the age-related diseases that affect vision, age-related macular degeneration is the most frequent cause of blindness in patients older than 60 years. In this communication, we report the full anatomical and functional recovery of a patient diagnosed with wet age-related macular degeneration 1 year after a single intravitreal injection of dobesilate. PMID:24225910

  7. Treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration: Current therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert J Augustin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Albert J Augustin, Stefan Scholl, Janna KirchhofDepartment of Ophthalmology, Klinikum Karlsruhe, GermanyAbstract: Choroidal neovascularization (CNV secondary to age-related macular degeneration (AMD is now the leading cause of blindness and severe vision loss among people over the age of 40 in the Western world. Its prevalence is certain to increase substantially as the population ages. Treatments currently available for the disease include laser photocoagulation, verteporfin photodynamic therapy, and intravitreal injections of corticosteroids and anti-angiogenic agents. Many studies have reported the benefits of each of these treatments, although none is without its risks. No intervention actually cures AMD, nor the neovascularization associated with it. However, its symptoms are treated with varying degrees of success. Some treatments stabilize or arrest the progress of the disease. Others have been shown to reverse some of the damage that has already been done. These treatments can even lead to visual improvement. This paper will review the major classes of drugs and therapies designed to treat this condition.Keywords: wet AMD, neovascularization, PDT, steroids, anti-angiogenesis

  8. Sunlight exposure, antioxidants, and age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Astrid E; Bentham, Graham C; Agnew, Maureen; Young, Ian S; Augood, Cristina; Chakravarthy, Usha; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Rahu, Mati; Seland, Johan; Soubrane, Gisele; Tomazzoli, Laura; Topouzis, Fotis; Vingerling, Johannes R; Vioque, Jesus

    2008-10-01

    To examine the association of sunlight exposure and antioxidant level with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Four thousand seven hundred fifty-three participants aged 65 years or older in the European Eye Study underwent fundus photography, were interviewed for adult lifetime sunlight exposure, and gave blood for antioxidant analysis. Blue light exposure was estimated by combining meteorologic and questionnaire data. Data on sunlight exposure and antioxidants were available in 101 individuals with neovascular AMD, 2182 with early AMD, and 2117 controls. No association was found between blue light exposure and neovascular or early AMD. Significant associations were found between blue light exposure and neovascular AMD in individuals in the quartile of lowest antioxidant level-vitamin C, zeaxanthin, vitamin E, and dietary zinc-with an odds ratio of about 1.4 for 1 standard deviation unit increase in blue light exposure. Higher odds ratios for blue light were observed with combined low antioxidant levels, especially vitamin C, zeaxanthin, and vitamin E (odds ratio, 3.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-8.9), which were also associated with early stages of AMD. Although it is not possible to establish causality between sunlight exposure and neovascular AMD, our results suggest that people in the general population should use ocular protection and follow dietary recommendations for the key antioxidant nutrients.

  9. Ocular Surface Temperature in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Sodi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study is to investigate the ocular thermographic profiles in age-related macular degeneration (AMD eyes and age-matched controls to detect possible hemodynamic abnormalities, which could be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Methods. 32 eyes with early AMD, 37 eyes with atrophic AMD, 30 eyes affected by untreated neovascular AMD, and 43 eyes with fibrotic AMD were included. The control group consisted of 44 healthy eyes. Exclusion criteria were represented by any other ocular diseases other than AMD, tear film abnormalities, systemic cardiovascular abnormalities, diabetes mellitus, and a body temperature higher than 37.5°C. A total of 186 eyes without pupil dilation were investigated by infrared thermography (FLIR A320. The ocular surface temperature (OST of three ocular points was calculated by means of an image processing technique from the infrared images. Two-sample t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA test were used for statistical analyses. Results. ANOVA analyses showed no significant differences among AMD groups (P value >0.272. OST in AMD patients was significantly lower than in controls (P>0.05. Conclusions. Considering the possible relationship between ocular blood flow and OST, these findings might support the central role of ischemia in the pathogenesis of AMD.

  10. Imaging polarimetry in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Masahiro; Yamanari, Masahiro; Iwasaki, Takuya; Elsner, Ann E; Makita, Shuichi; Yatagai, Toyohiko; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2008-06-01

    To evaluate the birefringence properties of eyes with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). To compare the information from two techniques--scanning laser polarimetry (GDx) and polarization-sensitive spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT)--and investigate how they complement each other. The authors prospectively examined the eyes of two healthy subjects and 13 patients with exudative AMD. Using scanning laser polarimetry, they computed phase-retardation maps, average reflectance images, and depolarized light images. To obtain polarimetry information with improved axial resolution, they developed a fiber-based, polarization-sensitive, spectral-domain OCT system and measured the phase retardation associated with birefringence in the same eyes. Both GDx and polarization-sensitive spectral-domain optical coherence tomography detected abnormal birefringence at the locus of exudative lesions. Polarization-sensitive, spectral-domain OCT showed that in the old lesions with fibrosis, phase-retardation values were significantly larger than in the new lesions (P = 0.020). Increased scattered light and altered polarization scramble were associated with portions of the lesions. GDx and polarization-sensitive spectral-domain OCT are complementary in probing birefringence properties in exudative AMD. Polarimetry findings in exudative AMD emphasized different features and were related to the progression of the disease, potentially providing a noninvasive tool for microstructure in exudative AMD.

  11. [Age-related macular degeneration: paradigm shift from recent findings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, Yasuo

    2015-03-01

    This review describes recent advances in age-related macular degeneration (AMD), based mainly on our own research findings. First, we investigated the effect of choroidal abnormality and found that choroidal hyperpermeability was observed more often in eyes with polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV) than in eyes with typical AMD; however, even in eyes with typical AMD, substantial proportion of eyes showed hyperpermeability. Exudative AMD eyes with choroidal hyperpermeability showed thickened choroid more widely than previously demonstrated, and there were more frequent abnormalities with fundus autofluorescence examination. Thus, rather than classifying exudative AMD into PCV and typical AMD, AMD classification by choroidal hyperpermeability may be useful in illustrating the difference of certain clinical characteristics. Second, we investigated the importance of vitreomacular adhesion in the treatment outcome of exudative AMD. The currently prevailing hypothesis is that premacular VEGF concentration is lower in eyes with posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) than in eyes without PVD, thus leading to good treatment outcomes; however, in the current study, we showed that not only VEGF but also anti-angiogenic factor, interferon-inducible protein 10 (IP-10), is affected according to PVD. These results suggest that the effect of PVD on the intraocular environment is more complicated than previously thought, and may have diverse functions. Last, we explained the mechanism of AMD progression based mainly on our basic research. Our research showed that age-related decline of autophagic activity may, at least partly, contribute to the precursor lesion of AMD.

  12. Fundus Autofluorescence in Age-related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Angelica; Nivison-Smith, Lisa; Assaad, Nagi; Kalloniatis, Michael

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) provides detailed insight into the health of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). This is highly valuable in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) as RPE damage is a hallmark of the disease. The purpose of this paper is to critically appraise current clinical descriptions regarding the appearance of AMD using FAF and to integrate these findings into a chair-side reference. A wide variety of FAF patterns have been described in AMD, which is consistent with the clinical heterogeneity of the disease. In particular, FAF imaging in early to intermediate AMD has the capacity to reveal RPE alterations in areas that appear normal on funduscopy, which aids in the stratification of cases and may have visually significant prognostic implications. It can assist in differential diagnoses and also represents a reliable, sensitive method for distinguishing reticular pseudodrusen. FAF is especially valuable in the detection, evaluation, and monitoring of geographic atrophy and has been used as an endpoint in clinical trials. In neovascular AMD, FAF reveals distinct patterns of classic choroidal neovascularization noninvasively and may be especially useful for determining which eyes are likely to benefit from therapeutic intervention. FAF represents a rapid, effective, noninvasive imaging method that has been underutilized, and incorporation into the routine assessment of AMD cases should be considered. However, the practicing clinician should also be aware of the limitations of the modality, such as in the detection of foveal involvement and in the distinction of phenotypes (hypo-autofluorescent drusen from small areas of geographic atrophy). PMID:27668639

  13. Stereotactic radiotherapy in neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Mahdy; Kurz, Maximilian; Holzhey, Annekatrin; Melchert, Corinna; Rades, Dirk; Grisanti, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) is a new approach to treat neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). The INTREPID trial suggested that SRT could reduce the frequency of regular intravitreal injections (IVIs) with antivascular endothelial growth factor drugs, which are necessary to control disease activity. However, the efficacy of SRT in nAMD and resulting morphological changes have not been validated under real-life circumstances, an issue, which we would like to address in this retrospective analysis. Patients who met the INTREPID criteria for best responders were eligible for SRT. A total of 32 eyes of 32 patients were treated. Thereafter, patients were examined monthly for 12 months and received pro re nata IVI of aflibercept or ranibizumab. Outcome measures were: mean number of injections, best-corrected visual acuity, and morphological changes of the outer retina-choroid complex as well as patient safety. Mean number of IVI decreased by almost 50% during the 12 months after SRT compared to the year before, whereas visual acuity increased by one line (logMAR). Morphological evaluation showed that most changes affect outer retinal layers. Stereotactic radiotherapy significantly reduced IVI retreatment in nAMD patients under real-life circumstances. Therefore, SRT might be the first step to stop visual loss as a result of IVI undertreatment, which is a major risk. PMID:28033280

  14. Activity loss and depression in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovner, Barry W; Casten, Robin J

    2002-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most frequent cause of severe vision loss in older persons and is associated with high rates of disability and depression. The authors evaluated 51 patients with bilateral AMD to investigate the interrelationships of disease severity, disability, and depression and focused on loss of valued activities as an emblematic disabling consequence of AMD. They characterized depression by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) score, a syndromal state based on the CES-D, and as a level of distress (Index of Affective Suffering; IAS). Thirty subjects (58.8%) had loss of a valued, discretionary activity. They had worse visual acuity and more depressive symptoms and were represented in higher IAS levels than other subjects. Visual acuity was significantly correlated with IAS levels, but not with CES-D scores or syndromal depression. A regression model demonstrated that activity loss mediated the relationship between visual acuity and IAS level. Affective distress occurs in AMD, largely to the extent that valued activities are relinquished because of vision loss. IAS levels best illuminated this relationship, suggesting the value of this dimension of affective functioning in studies of the consequences of chronic disease.

  15. Imaging Polarimetry in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Masahiro; Yamanari, Masahiro; Iwasaki, Takuya; Elsner, Ann E.; Makita, Shuichi; Yatagai, Toyohiko; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the birefringence properties of eyes with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). To compare the information from two techniques—scanning laser polarimetry (GDx) and polarization-sensitive spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT)—and investigate how they complement each other. METHODS The authors prospectively examined the eyes of two healthy subjects and 13 patients with exudative AMD. Using scanning laser polarimetry, they computed phase-retardation maps, average reflectance images, and depolarized light images. To obtain polarimetry information with improved axial resolution, they developed a fiber-based, polarization-sensitive, spectral-domain OCT system and measured the phase retardation associated with birefringence in the same eyes. RESULTS Both GDx and polarization-sensitive spectral-domain optical coherence tomography detected abnormal birefringence at the locus of exudative lesions. Polarization-sensitive, spectral-domain OCT showed that in the old lesions with fibrosis, phase-retardation values were significantly larger than in the new lesions (P = 0.020). Increased scattered light and altered polarization scramble were associated with portions of the lesions. CONCLUSIONS GDx and polarization-sensitive spectral-domain OCT are complementary in probing birefringence properties in exudative AMD. Polarimetry findings in exudative AMD emphasized different features and were related to the progression of the disease, potentially providing a noninvasive tool for microstructure in exudative AMD. PMID:18515594

  16. Mechanism of Inflammation in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Parmeggiani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a multifactorial disease that represents the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment among people over the age of 50 in Europe, the United States, and Australia, accounting for up to 50% of all cases of central blindness. Risk factors of AMD are heterogeneous, mainly including increasing age and different genetic predispositions, together with several environmental/epigenetic factors, that is, cigarette smoking, dietary habits, and phototoxic exposure. In the aging retina, free radicals and oxidized lipoproteins are considered to be major causes of tissue stress resulting in local triggers for parainflammation, a chronic status which contributes to initiation and/or progression of many human neurodegenerative diseases such as AMD. Experimental and clinical evidences strongly indicate the pathogenetic role of immunologic processes in AMD occurrence, consisting of production of inflammatory related molecules, recruitment of macrophages, complement activation, microglial activation and accumulation within those structures that compose an essential area of the retina known as macula lutea. This paper reviews some attractive aspects of the literature about the mechanisms of inflammation in AMD, especially focusing on those findings or arguments more directly translatable to improve the clinical management of patients with AMD and to prevent the severe vision loss caused by this disease.

  17. Mechanism of inflammation in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmeggiani, Francesco; Romano, Mario R; Costagliola, Ciro; Semeraro, Francesco; Incorvaia, Carlo; D'Angelo, Sergio; Perri, Paolo; De Palma, Paolo; De Nadai, Katia; Sebastiani, Adolfo

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial disease that represents the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment among people over the age of 50 in Europe, the United States, and Australia, accounting for up to 50% of all cases of central blindness. Risk factors of AMD are heterogeneous, mainly including increasing age and different genetic predispositions, together with several environmental/epigenetic factors, that is, cigarette smoking, dietary habits, and phototoxic exposure. In the aging retina, free radicals and oxidized lipoproteins are considered to be major causes of tissue stress resulting in local triggers for parainflammation, a chronic status which contributes to initiation and/or progression of many human neurodegenerative diseases such as AMD. Experimental and clinical evidences strongly indicate the pathogenetic role of immunologic processes in AMD occurrence, consisting of production of inflammatory related molecules, recruitment of macrophages, complement activation, microglial activation and accumulation within those structures that compose an essential area of the retina known as macula lutea. This paper reviews some attractive aspects of the literature about the mechanisms of inflammation in AMD, especially focusing on those findings or arguments more directly translatable to improve the clinical management of patients with AMD and to prevent the severe vision loss caused by this disease.

  18. Cost-effectiveness of smoking cessation to prevent age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthews Jane P

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tobacco smoking is a risk factor for age-related macular degeneration, but studies of ex-smokers suggest quitting can reduce the risk. Methods We fitted a function predicting the decline in risk of macular degeneration after quitting to data from 7 studies involving 1,488 patients. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of smoking cessation in terms of its impact on macular degeneration-related outcomes for 1,000 randomly selected U.S. smokers. We used a computer simulation model to predict the incidence of macular degeneration and blindness, the number of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs, and direct costs (in 2004 U.S. dollars until age 85 years. Cost-effectiveness ratios were based on the cost of the Massachusetts Tobacco Control Program. Costs and QALYs were discounted at 3% per year. Results If 1,000 smokers quit, our model predicted 48 fewer cases of macular degeneration, 12 fewer cases of blindness, and a gain of 1,600 QALYs. Macular degeneration-related costs would decrease by $2.5 million if the costs of caregivers for people with vision loss were included, or by $1.1 million if caregiver costs were excluded. At a cost of $1,400 per quitter, smoking cessation was cost-saving when caregiver costs were included, and cost about $200 per QALY gained when caregiver costs were excluded. Sensitivity analyses had a negligible impact. The cost per quitter would have to exceed $77,000 for the cost per QALY for smoking cessation to reach $50,000, a threshold above which interventions are sometimes viewed as not cost-effective. Conclusion Smoking cessation is unequivocally cost-effective in terms of its impact on age-related macular degeneration outcomes alone.

  19. Long-term effectiveness of ranibizumab for age-related macular degeneration and diabetic macular edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Angie H C; Lai, Timothy Y Y

    2013-01-01

    Neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic macular edema (DME) are major causes of visual impairment in the elderly population worldwide. With the aging population, the prevalence of neovascular AMD and DME has increased substantially over the recent years. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been implicated as playing an important role in the pathogenesis of both neovascular AMD and DME. Since its introduction in 2006, ranibizumab, a recombinant, humanized, monoclonal antibody fragment against all isoforms of VEGF-A, has revolutionized the treatment of neovascular AMD and DME. The efficacy and safety of ranibizumab in neovascular AMD has been demonstrated in the ANCHOR and MARINA trials. Further studies including the PIER, PrONTO, and SUSTAIN trials have also evaluated the optimal dosing regimen of ranibizumab in neovascular AMD. The CATT and IVAN trials compared the safety and efficacy of ranibizumab with off-label use of bevacizumab. Studies such as SUSTAIN and HORIZON have shown that ranibizumab has a good safety profile and is well tolerated for over 4 years with very few serious ocular and systemic adverse events. For DME, Phase II RESOLVE study and Phase III RISE and RIDE studies have demonstrated superiority of ranibizumab treatment in improving vision over placebo controls. Phase II READ and Phase III RESOLVE and REVEAL studies have shown that ranibizumab is more effective both as monotherapy and in combination with laser compared with laser monotherapy. The 3-year results from the DRCRnet protocol I study found that ranibizumab with deferred laser resulted in better long-term visual outcome compared with ranibizumab with prompt laser. This review summarizes various important clinical trials on the long-term efficacy and safety of ranibizumab in the treatment of neovascular AMD and DME. The pharmacological properties of ranibizumab, its cost effectiveness, and impact on quality of life will also be discussed.

  20. Health state utilities in patients with diabetic retinopathy, diabetic macular oedema and age-related macular degeneration: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Poku, E.; Brazier, J; Carlton, J; Ferreira, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background\\ud \\ud Health state utility values (HSUVs) are important in the assessment of the cost effectiveness of new interventions. In the case of visual conditions, models generally tend have tended to be built around a set of health states defined by visual acuity (VA). The aim of this review was to assess the impact of VA on HSUVs in patients with diabetic retinopathy, diabetic macular oedema or age-related macular degeneration.\\ud \\ud Methods\\ud \\ud A systematic literature search was un...

  1. Aflibercept in exudative age related macular degeneration refractory to ranibizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Ramos, J; Pascual-Camps, I; Cuéllar-Monreal, M J; Dolz-Marco, R; Fenoll, M A; Font-Noguera, I; Poveda-Andrés, J L; Gallego-Pinazo, R

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness, safety and cost of aflibercept in the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) refractory to ranibizumab. Retrospective observational study was conducted on patients diagnosed with wet ARMD, and previously treated with ranibizumab. Efficacy variables assessed were changes in visual acuity (BCVA) and anatomical improvements in the most affected eye. Factors associated with improvement of BCVA with aflibercept were also studied. Adverse events related to the aflibercept administration were recorded. Cost analysis data were collected from the hospital perspective, and only taking the direct medical costs into account. Cost-effectiveness analysis was calculated using the aflibercept treatment cost, and effectiveness calculated as BCVA gained. A total of 50 eyes corresponding to 46 patients were included. The median follow-up period was 4.6 months (range: 1.0-6.0). Improvement in visual acuity after the first 2 doses and at the end of the follow-up period was observed in 32.0 and 28.0% of treated eyes, respectively. None of the variables studied was associated with an improvement in the BCVA after treatment. No significant differences were found in the average monthly cost between treatments. Aflibercept is shown to be an effective treatment in a significant number of patients resistant to treatment with ranibizumab, presenting a cost similar to that generated during the final stages of treatment with ranibizumab. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Modelling the genetic risk in age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Grassmann

    Full Text Available Late-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a common sight-threatening disease of the central retina affecting approximately 1 in 30 Caucasians. Besides age and smoking, genetic variants from several gene loci have reproducibly been associated with this condition and likely explain a large proportion of disease. Here, we developed a genetic risk score (GRS for AMD based on 13 risk variants from eight gene loci. The model exhibited good discriminative accuracy, area-under-curve (AUC of the receiver-operating characteristic of 0.820, which was confirmed in a cross-validation approach. Noteworthy, younger AMD patients aged below 75 had a significantly higher mean GRS (1.87, 95% CI: 1.69-2.05 than patients aged 75 and above (1.45, 95% CI: 1.36-1.54. Based on five equally sized GRS intervals, we present a risk classification with a relative AMD risk of 64.0 (95% CI: 14.11-1131.96 for individuals in the highest category (GRS 3.44-5.18, 0.5% of the general population compared to subjects with the most common genetic background (GRS -0.05-1.70, 40.2% of general population. The highest GRS category identifies AMD patients with a sensitivity of 7.9% and a specificity of 99.9% when compared to the four lower categories. Modeling a general population around 85 years of age, 87.4% of individuals in the highest GRS category would be expected to develop AMD by that age. In contrast, only 2.2% of individuals in the two lowest GRS categories which represent almost 50% of the general population are expected to manifest AMD. Our findings underscore the large proportion of AMD cases explained by genetics particularly for younger AMD patients. The five-category risk classification could be useful for therapeutic stratification or for diagnostic testing purposes once preventive treatment is available.

  3. Macular degeneration affects eye movement behaviour during visual search

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    Stefan eVan Der Stigchel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with a scotoma in their central vision (e.g. due to macular degeneration, MD commonly adopt a strategy to direct the eyes such that the image falls onto a peripheral location on the retina. This location is referred to as the preferred retinal locus (PRL. Although previous research has investigated the characteristics of this PRL, it is unclear whether eye movement metrics are modulated by peripheral viewing with a PRL as measured during a visual search paradigm. To this end, we tested four MD patients in a visual search paradigm and contrasted their performance with a healthy control group and a healthy control group performing the same experiment with a simulated scotoma. The experiment contained two conditions. In the first condition the target was an unfilled circle hidden among c-shaped distractors (serial condition and in the second condition the target was a filled circle (pop-out condition. Saccadic search latencies for the MD group were significantly longer in both conditions compared to both control groups. Results of a subsequent experiment indicated that this difference between the MD and the control groups could not be explained by a difference in target selection sensitivity. Furthermore, search behaviour of MD patients was associated with saccades with smaller amplitudes towards the scotoma, an increased intersaccadic interval and an increased number of eye movements necessary to locate the target. Some of these characteristics, such as the increased intersaccadic interval, were also observed in the simulation group, which indicate that these characteristics are related to the peripheral viewing itself. We suggest that the combination of the central scotoma and peripheral viewing can explain the altered search behaviour and no behavioural evidence was found for a possible reorganization of the visual system associated with the use of a PRL. Thus the switch from a fovea-based to a PRL-based reference frame impairs search

  4. The burden of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmier, Jordana K; Jones, Mechelle L; Halpern, Michael T

    2006-01-01

    As age-related macular degeneration (AMD) becomes more prevalent as a result of longer life expectancy and the number of elderly people worldwide, it will become increasingly important to understand its potential health and economic impact for appropriate healthcare planning. This review identified published literature on costs and resource use associated with AMD. Despite the increasing prevalence of AMD, the worldwide burden of illness is unknown. Several studies of direct medical costs, both those associated with ophthalmic care and those associated with other care, have been conducted and have identified increased medical care associated with AMD. Direct non-medical costs include the cost for vision aids; while these costs may be substantial, they are difficult to quantify as no comprehensive sources track the distribution or use of vision aids. Because AMD is uncommon among people of working age, there is less concern regarding the impact of indirect (workplace) costs among AMD patients. However, indirect costs are incurred by caregivers who leave the workforce early or change their work patterns in order to provide assistance to AMD patients; the magnitude of caregiver-related costs is unknown. The cost effectiveness of some interventions for AMD has been explored. Supplementation with zinc and antioxidants for non-exudative (dry) AMD has been shown to result in an acceptable cost per QALY and is considered cost effective. Studies suggest that laser photocoagulation is cost effective but that photodynamic therapy with verteporfin appears to be cost effective only among patients with good visual acuity at baseline or when models extend longer than 5 years. Further research is needed to integrate the information on various components of AMD-related costs into a comprehensive burden of illness estimate and to evaluate basic utility assumptions in existing models.

  5. Nutritional modulation of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weikel, Karen A; Chiu, Chung-Jung; Taylor, Allen

    2012-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly worldwide. It affects 30-50 million individuals and clinical hallmarks of AMD are observed in at least one third of persons over the age of 75 in industrialized countries (Gehrs et al., 2006). Costs associated with AMD are in excess of $340 billion US (American-Health-Assistance-Foundation, 2012). The majority of AMD patients in the United States are not eligible for clinical treatments (Biarnes et al., 2011; Klein et al., 2011). Preventive interventions through dietary modulation are attractive strategies because many studies suggest a benefit of micro- and macronutrients with respect to AMD, as well as other age-related debilities, and with few, if any, adverse effects (Chiu, 2011). Preservation of vision would enhance quality of life for millions of elderly people, and alleviate the personal and public health financial burden of AMD (Frick et al., 2007; Wood et al., 2011). Observational studies indicate that maintaining adequate levels of omega-3 fatty acids (i.e. with 2 servings/week of fish) or a low glycemic index diet may be particularly beneficial for early AMD and that higher levels of carotenoids may be protective, most probably, against neovascular AMD. Intervention trials are needed to better understand the full effect of these nutrients and/or combinations of nutrients on retinal health. Analyses that describe effects of a nutrient on onset and/or progress of AMD are valuable because they indicate the value of a nutrient to arrest AMD at the early stages. This comprehensive summary provides essential information about the value of nutrients with regard to diminishing risk for onset or progress of AMD and can serve as a guide until data from ongoing intervention trials are available.

  6. Systemic complement activation in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Hendrik P N; Charbel Issa, Peter; Walier, Maja; Janzer, Stefanie; Pollok-Kopp, Beatrix; Börncke, Florian; Fritsche, Lars G; Chong, Ngaihang V; Fimmers, Rolf; Wienker, Thomas; Holz, Frank G; Weber, Bernhard H F; Oppermann, Martin

    2008-07-02

    Dysregulation of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement cascade has been implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. To further test the hypothesis that defective control of complement activation underlies AMD, parameters of complement activation in blood plasma were determined together with disease-associated genetic markers in AMD patients. Plasma concentrations of activation products C3d, Ba, C3a, C5a, SC5b-9, substrate proteins C3, C4, factor B and regulators factor H and factor D were quantified in patients (n = 112) and controls (n = 67). Subjects were analyzed for single nucleotide polymorphisms in factor H (CFH), factor B-C2 (BF-C2) and complement C3 (C3) genes which were previously found to be associated with AMD. All activation products, especially markers of chronic complement activation Ba and C3d (pAMD patients compared to controls. Similar alterations were observed in factor D, but not in C3, C4 or factor H. Logistic regression analysis revealed better discriminative accuracy of a model that is based only on complement activation markers Ba, C3d and factor D compared to a model based on genetic markers of the complement system within our study population. In both the controls' and AMD patients' group, the protein markers of complement activation were correlated with CFH haplotypes.This study is the first to show systemic complement activation in AMD patients. This suggests that AMD is a systemic disease with local disease manifestation at the ageing macula. Furthermore, the data provide evidence for an association of systemic activation of the alternative complement pathway with genetic variants of CFH that were previously linked to AMD susceptibility.

  7. Systemic complement activation in age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik P N Scholl

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of the alternative pathway (AP of complement cascade has been implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD, the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. To further test the hypothesis that defective control of complement activation underlies AMD, parameters of complement activation in blood plasma were determined together with disease-associated genetic markers in AMD patients. Plasma concentrations of activation products C3d, Ba, C3a, C5a, SC5b-9, substrate proteins C3, C4, factor B and regulators factor H and factor D were quantified in patients (n = 112 and controls (n = 67. Subjects were analyzed for single nucleotide polymorphisms in factor H (CFH, factor B-C2 (BF-C2 and complement C3 (C3 genes which were previously found to be associated with AMD. All activation products, especially markers of chronic complement activation Ba and C3d (p<0.001, were significantly elevated in AMD patients compared to controls. Similar alterations were observed in factor D, but not in C3, C4 or factor H. Logistic regression analysis revealed better discriminative accuracy of a model that is based only on complement activation markers Ba, C3d and factor D compared to a model based on genetic markers of the complement system within our study population. In both the controls' and AMD patients' group, the protein markers of complement activation were correlated with CFH haplotypes.This study is the first to show systemic complement activation in AMD patients. This suggests that AMD is a systemic disease with local disease manifestation at the ageing macula. Furthermore, the data provide evidence for an association of systemic activation of the alternative complement pathway with genetic variants of CFH that were previously linked to AMD susceptibility.

  8. Wet age related macular degeneration management and follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandru, Malciolu Radu; Alexandra, Nica Maria

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is referred to as the leading cause of irreversible visual loss in developed countries, with a profound effect on the quality of life. The neovascular form of AMD is characterized by the formation of subretinal choroidal neovascularization, leading to sudden and severe visual loss. Research has identified the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as an important pathophysiological component in neovascular AMD and its intraocular inhibition as one of the most efficient therapies in medicine. The introduction of anti-VEGF as a standard treatment in wet AMD has led to a great improvement in the prognosis of patients, allowing recovery and maintenance of visual function in the vast majority of cases. However, the therapeutic benefit is accompanied by a difficulty in maintaining the treatment schedule due to the increase in the amount of patients, stress of monthly assessments, as well as the associated economic burden. Therefore, treatment strategies have evolved from fixed monthly dosing, to individualized regimens, aiming for comparable results, with fewer injections. One such protocol is called "pro re nata", or "treat and observe". Patients are given a loading dose of 3 monthly injections, followed by an as-needed decision to treat, based on the worsening of visual acuity, clinical evidence of the disease activity on fundoscopy, or OCT evidence of retinal thickening in the presence of intra or subretinal fluid. A different regimen is called "treat and extend", in which the interval between injections is gradually increased, once the disease stabilization is achieved. This paper aims to review the currently available anti-VEGF agents--bevacizumab, ranibizumab, aflibercept, and the aforementioned treatment strategies.

  9. Red blood cell antioxidant enzymes in age-related macular degeneration.

    OpenAIRE

    De La Paz, M A; Zhang, J; Fridovich, I

    1996-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND: Oxidative damage has been proposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether red blood cell antioxidant enzyme activity correlates with severity of aging maculopathy in affected individuals. METHODS: Blood samples were obtained from 54 patients with varying severity of aging maculopathy and 12 similarly aged individuals with normal ophthalmoscopic examination. Macular findings were graded a...

  10. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Clinical Findings following Treatment with Antiangiogenic Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Casaroli-Marano; Roberto Gallego-Pinazo; Clemencia Torrón Fernández-Blanco; Figueroa, Marta S.; Begoña Pina Marín; Gustavo Fernández-Baca Vaca; Antonio Piñero-Bustamante; Juan Donate López; José García-Arumí; Jordi Farrés Martí

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To survey the management of patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nvAMD) in Spain. Methods. An observational retrospective multicenter study was conducted. The variables analyzed were sociodemographic characteristics, foveal and macular thickness, visual acuity (VA), type of treatment, number of injections, and the initial administration of a loading dose of an antiangiogenic drug. Results. 208 patients were followed up during 23.4 months in average. During the ...

  11. Emerging therapies for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration and diabetic macular edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, M Vaughn; Lauer, Andreas K

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) and choroidal neovascularization (CNV) associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are the leading causes of vision loss in the industrialized world. The mainstay of treatment for both conditions has been thermal laser photocoagulation, while there have been recent advances in the treatment of CNV using photodynamic therapy with verteporfin. While both of these treatments have prevented further vision loss in a subset of patients, vision improvement is rare. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A therapy has revolutionized the treatment of both conditions. Pegaptanib, an anti-VEGF aptamer, prevents vision loss in CNV, although the performance is similar to that of photodynamic therapy. Ranibizumab, an antibody fragment, and bevacizumab, a full-length humanized monoclonal antibody against VEGF, have both shown promising results, with improvements in visual acuity in the treatment of both diseases. VEGF trap, a modified soluble VEGF receptor analog, binds VEGF more tightly than all other anti-VEGF therapies, and has also shown promising results in early trials. Other treatment strategies to decrease the effect of VEGF have used small interfering RNA to inhibit VEGF production and VEGF receptor production. Corticosteroids have shown efficacy in controlled trials, including anacortave acetate in the treatment and prevention of CNV, and intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide and the fluocinolone acetonide implant in the treatment of DME. Receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as vatalanib, inhibit downstream effects of VEGF, and have been effective in the treatment of CNV in early studies. Squalamine lactate inhibits plasma membrane ion channels with downstream effects on VEGF, and has shown promising results with systemic administration. Initial results are also encouraging for other growth factors, including pigment epithelium-derived factor administered via an adenoviral vector. Ruboxistaurin, which decreases protein

  12. Macular morphology and response to ranibizumab treatment in patients with wet age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dervenis N

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nikolaos Dervenis, Saad Younis Western Eye Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess whether specific characteristics of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT affect structural and functional outcomes and number of injections needed in ranibizumab (0.05 mL of 10 mg/mL Lucentis solution-treated wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD patients. Patients and methods: This retrospective case series included 62 newly diagnosed wet AMD patients treated with three monthly intravitreal ranibizumab injections followed by monthly follow-up and pro re nata retreatment. The presence of dome-shaped pigment epithelial detachment (PED, disruption of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE, and subretinal and intraretinal fluid was associated with changes in Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study visual acuity, central macular thickness (CMT, and number of injections needed during the 6-month follow-up. Results: The presence of PED was associated with lower values of CMT at presentation (399 µm [±132 µm] vs 310 µm [±51 µm], P=0.005. The presence of RPE disruption was associated with worse visual acuity in month 6 (0.36 [±0.22] vs 0.61 [0.45], P=0.027 and fewer injections (4.23 [±0.92] vs 3.55 [±0.60], P=0.007. The presence of intraretinal fluid at presentation was associated with worse visual acuity outcomes in month 4 (P=0.045 but not in month 6. Conclusion: The dome-shaped PED was associated with lower CMT at presentation, but it did not affect response to treatment. RPE disruption was associated with worse functional outcomes with fewer injections. Intraretinal fluid at presentation may suggest delayed response to treatment. Individualized SD-OCT analysis could lead to individualized approach to wet AMD patients. SD-OCT can offer imaging biomarkers to assess the prognosis of anti-VEGF treatment in AMD patients. Keywords: AMD, spectral domain optical

  13. My father's experience with macular degeneration: implications for the home healthcare nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schexnaydre, Mary; Carruth, Ann K

    2008-01-01

    Macular degeneration has become a problem of substantial proportions for older adults. This article can help the home health nurse gain a greater understanding of macular degeneration and therefore be more effective in the home setting. The addition of vision rehabilitation also can prolong older adults' independent years and enhance their satisfaction with life. Using Parse's human-becoming theory as a theoretical framework, the home health nurse can coparticipate in the older adult's experience of living and thus enhance the probability that the last years will be a rewarding time of life.

  14. Are chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms associated with age-related macular degeneration?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, M.; Sorensen, T. L.; Flachs, E. M.

    2015-01-01

    of the eye have not been thoroughly investigated in these patients. Previously reported studies show signs of systemic inflammation in patients with MPN as well as in patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD). Our hypothesis is that the presence of MPN predisposes some individuals to develop AMD...... and this might be explained by the degree of systemic inflammation. Objective. To describe the prevalence of Age-Related Macular Degeneration in patients with Chronic Myeloproliferative cancer at time of diagnosis compared to the general population in Denmark. Materials and Methods. We conducted a retrospective...

  15. Prevalence and determinants of age related macular degeneration in north Indian city of Dehradun, Uttarakhand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megha Luthra

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is among the fourth leading cause of blindness in India after cataract, refractive errors and glaucoma. Aim and Objective: To find out magnitude and determinants of blinding AMD among patients presenting at a tertiary level eye care centre in Dehradun with this condition. Material and methods: This was a study of eye patients above age 45 years seen from July 2010 to October 2013. After taking preliminary information, optometrist noted the best-corrected vision. Ophthalmologists examined eyes using a slit-lamp bio-microscope. AMD was confirmed by fluorescein angiography and optical coherence tomography. The age, sex, history of smoking, sun exposure, family history of AMD, diet, body mass index (BMI, history of hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes were noted.  Results: Of the 14,698 patients seen, 221 had AMD (dry or wet in at least one eye, the overall proportion of AMD being 1.50%. Of all AMD patients, 103 had blinding wet AMD (46.61%.Further analysis revealed that old age (71-80 years, male sex and history of hypertension, diabetes etc were significant risk factors of  wet AMD. Of the 221 patients with AMD, nearly a third, that is 71 patients (32.13% had visual acuity of better eye < 3/60, which was taken as criteria for blindness. Conclusions: AMD does not seem to be a problem of public health magnitude in the study area. Age, being male, history of hypertension, diabetes etc are significant risk factors for wet AMD.

  16. Progress on retinal image analysis for age related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagasingam, Yogesan; Bhuiyan, Alauddin; Abràmoff, Michael D; Smith, R Theodore; Goldschmidt, Leonard; Wong, Tien Y

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in those over the age of 50 years in the developed countries. The number is expected to increase by ∼1.5 fold over the next ten years due to an increase in aging population. One of the main measures of AMD severity is the analysis of drusen, pigmentary abnormalities, geographic atrophy (GA) and choroidal neovascularization (CNV) from imaging based on color fundus photograph, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and other imaging modalities. Each of these imaging modalities has strengths and weaknesses for extracting individual AMD pathology and different imaging techniques are used in combination for capturing and/or quantification of different pathologies. Current dry AMD treatments cannot cure or reverse vision loss. However, the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) showed that specific anti-oxidant vitamin supplementation reduces the risk of progression from intermediate stages (defined as the presence of either many medium-sized drusen or one or more large drusen) to late AMD which allows for preventative strategies in properly identified patients. Thus identification of people with early stage AMD is important to design and implement preventative strategies for late AMD, and determine their cost-effectiveness. A mass screening facility with teleophthalmology or telemedicine in combination with computer-aided analysis for large rural-based communities may identify more individuals suitable for early stage AMD prevention. In this review, we discuss different imaging modalities that are currently being considered or used for screening AMD. In addition, we look into various automated and semi-automated computer-aided grading systems and related retinal image analysis techniques for drusen, geographic atrophy and choroidal neovascularization detection and/or quantification for measurement of AMD severity using these imaging modalities. We also review the existing telemedicine studies which

  17. The ERCC6 gene and age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique C Baas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of irreversible visual loss in the developed countries and is caused by both environmental and genetic factors. A recent study (Tuo et al., PNAS reported an association between AMD and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP (rs3793784 in the ERCC6 (NM_000124 gene. The risk allele also increased ERCC6 expression. ERCC6 is involved in DNA repair and mutations in ERCC6 cause Cockayne syndrome (CS. Amongst others, photosensitivity and pigmentary retinopathy are hallmarks of CS. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Separate and combined data from three large AMD case-control studies and a prospective population-based study (The Rotterdam Study were used to analyse the genetic association between ERCC6 and AMD (2682 AMD cases and 3152 controls. We also measured ERCC6 mRNA levels in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells of healthy and early AMD affected human donor eyes. Rs3793784 conferred a small increase in risk for late AMD in the Dutch population (The Rotterdam and AMRO-NL study, but this was not replicated in two non-European studies (AREDS, Columbia University. In addition, the AMRO-NL study revealed no significant association for 9 other variants spanning ERCC6. Finally, we determined that ERCC6 expression in the human RPE did not depend on rs3793784 genotype, but, interestingly, on AMD status: Early AMD-affected donor eyes had a 50% lower ERCC6 expression than healthy donor eyes (P = 0.018. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our meta-analysis of four Caucasian cohorts does not replicate the reported association between SNPs in ERCC6 and AMD. Nevertheless, our findings on ERCC6 expression in the RPE suggest that ERCC6 may be functionally involved in AMD. Combining our data with those of the literature, we hypothesize that the AMD-related reduced transcriptional activity of ERCC6 may be caused by diverse, small and heterogeneous genetic and/or environmental determinants.

  18. Oxidative stress, innate immunity, and age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Fan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a leading cause of vision loss affecting tens of millions of elderly worldwide. Early AMD is characterized by the appearance of soft drusen, as well as pigmentary changes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. These soft, confluent drusen can progress into two forms of advanced AMD: geographic atrophy (GA, or dry AMD or choroidal neovascularization (CNV, or wet AMD. Both forms of AMD result in a similar clinical progression in terms of loss of central vision. The exact mechanism for developing early AMD, as well as triggers responsible for progressing to advanced stage of disease, is still largely unknown. However, significant evidence exists demonstrating a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors as causes of AMD progression. Multiple genes and/or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs have been found associated with AMD, including various genes involved in the complement pathway, lipid metabolism and extracellular matrix (ECM remodeling. Of the known genetic contributors to disease risk, the CFH Y402H and HTRA1/ARMS polymorphisms contribute to more than 50% of the genetic risk for AMD. Environmentally, oxidative stress plays a critical role in many aging diseases including cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and AMD. Due to the exposure to sunlight and high oxygen concentration, the oxidative stress burden is higher in the eye than other tissues, which can be further complicated by additional oxidative stressors such as smoking. Increasingly, evidence is accumulating suggesting that functional abnormalities of the innate immune system incurred via high risk genotypes may be contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD by altering the inflammatory homeostasis in the eye, specifically in the handling of oxidation products. As the eye in non-pathological instances maintains a low level of inflammation despite the presence of a relative abundance of potentially inflammatory

  19. Oxidative stress, innate immunity, and age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Peter X; Stiles, Travis; Douglas, Christopher; Ho, Daisy; Fan, Wei; Du, Hongjun; Xiao, Xu

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss affecting tens of millions of elderly worldwide. Early AMD is characterized by the appearance of soft drusen, as well as pigmentary changes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). These soft, confluent drusen can progress into two forms of advanced AMD: geographic atrophy (GA, or dry AMD) or choroidal neovascularization (CNV, or wet AMD). Both forms of AMD result in a similar clinical progression in terms of loss of central vision. The exact mechanism for developing early AMD, as well as triggers responsible for progressing to advanced stage of disease, is still largely unknown. However, significant evidence exists demonstrating a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors as causes of AMD progression. Multiple genes and/or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been found associated with AMD, including various genes involved in the complement pathway, lipid metabolism and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Of the known genetic contributors to disease risk, the CFH Y402H and HTRA1/ARMS polymorphisms contribute to more than 50% of the genetic risk for AMD. Environmentally, oxidative stress plays a critical role in many aging diseases including cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer's disease and AMD. Due to the exposure to sunlight and high oxygen concentration, the oxidative stress burden is higher in the eye than other tissues, which can be further complicated by additional oxidative stressors such as smoking. Increasingly, evidence is accumulating suggesting that functional abnormalities of the innate immune system incurred via high risk genotypes may be contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD by altering the inflammatory homeostasis in the eye, specifically in the handling of oxidation products. As the eye in non-pathological instances maintains a low level of inflammation despite the presence of a relative abundance of potentially inflammatory molecules, we have

  20. The macular degeneration and aging study: Design and research protocol of a randomized trial for a psychosocial intervention with macular degeneration patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sörensen, Silvia; White, Katherine; Mak, Wingyun; Zanibbi, Katherine; Tang, Wan; O'Hearn, Amanda; Hegel, Mark T

    2015-05-01

    Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible and predictable blindness among older adults with serious physical and mental health consequences. Visual impairment is associated with negative future outlook and depression and has serious consequences for older adults' quality of life and, by way of depression, on long-term survival. Psychosocial interventions have the potential to alleviate and prevent depression symptoms among older AMD patients. We describe the protocol of the Macular Degeneration and Aging Study, a randomized clinical trial of a psychosocial Preventive Problem-Solving Intervention. The intervention is aimed at enhancing well-being and future planning among older adults with macular degeneration by increasing preparation for future care. Adequate randomization and therapeutic fidelity were achieved. Current retention rates were acceptable, given the vulnerability of the population. Acceptability (adherence and satisfaction) was high. Given the high public health significance and impact on quality of life among older adults with vision loss, this protocol contributes a valid test of a promising intervention for maintaining mental and physical health in this population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Machine learning based detection of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic macular edema (DME) from optical coherence tomography (OCT) images

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yu; Zhang, Yaonan; Yao, Zhaomin; Zhao, Ruixue; Zhou, Fengfeng

    2016-01-01

    Non-lethal macular diseases greatly impact patients’ life quality, and will cause vision loss at the late stages. Visual inspection of the optical coherence tomography (OCT) images by the experienced clinicians is the main diagnosis technique. We proposed a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) model to discriminate age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic macular edema (DME) and healthy macula. The linear configuration pattern (LCP) based features of the OCT images were screened by the Corr...

  2. Influence of Phacoemulsification on the Visual Function and Life Quality of Patients With Cataract Complicated With Age-related Macular Degeneration%晶状体超声乳化联合人工晶体植入术对合并年龄相关黄斑变性的白内障患者视功能和生存质量的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵玉红; 陈肖; 赵海岚; 吴苗琴

    2015-01-01

    提高视力、改善VF和QOL的有效手段,且AMD早中期患者术后效果优于AMD晚期患者,并未发现AMD晚期进展率提高。%Objective To investigate the influence of phacoemulsification on the visual function and life quality of patients with age-related cataract complicated with age-related macular degeneration( AMD ). Methods We enrolled 710 patients with age-related cataract who received treatment in Zhejiang Provincial People′s Hospital from July 2009 to December 2013. We assigned the subjects who had age-related cataract with AMD that could be clearly diagnosed by stage and didn′t received any eye operation in the past two years into group A(n=239);we assigned the subjects who had age-related cataract with AMD that could be clearly diagnosed by stage,and underwent phacoemulsification into group B(n=163);we assigned the subjects who had age-related cataract without AMD and underwent phacoemulsification into group C(n=308). logMAR,VF and QOL assessments were made at baseline( one week before surgery for group B and group C)and two years later. Results The three groups were significantly different(P0. 05)in the rate of progressing into advance AMD. In group C,AMD occurred in 12 subjects,among which 10 subjects( 3. 2%) were in early or middle stage, 2 subjects ( 0. 6%) were in advanced stage. Conclusion Phacoemulsification is effective in improving eyesight,VF and QOL in patients with age-related cataract complicated with AMD. Phacoemulsification during the early or middle stage of AMD is more effective than that during the advance stage,and no increase in the rate of progressing into advanced stage is found after surgery.

  3. HISTORY OF SUNLIGHT EXPOSURE IS A RISK FACTOR FOR AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schick, T.; Ersoy, L.; Lechanteur, Y.T.; Saksens, N.T.; Hoyng, C.B.; Hollander, A.I. den; Kirchhof, B.; Fauser, S.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate effects of current and past sunlight exposure and iris color on early and late age-related macular degeneration (AMD). METHODS: Of 3,701 individuals from the EUGENDA database, 752 (20.3%) showed early AMD, 1,179 (31.9%) late AMD, and 1,770 (47.8%) were controls. Information abou

  4. Prediction of age-related macular degeneration in the general population: The three continent AMD consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.H.S. Buitendijk (Gabrielle); E. Rochtchina (Elena); C.E. Myers (Chelsea); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); K.E. Lee (Kristine); B.E.K. Klein (Barbara); S.M. Meuer (Stacy); P.T.V.M. de Jong (Paulus); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); A.G. Tan (Ava); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); T.A. Sivakumaran (Theru); J. Attia (John); A. Hofman (Albert); P. Mitchell (Paul); J.R. Vingerling (Hans); S.K. Iyengar (Sudha); A.C.J.W. Janssens (Cécile); J.J. Wang (Jie Jin); B.E.K. Klein (Barbara); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPurpose Prediction models for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) based on case-control studies have a tendency to overestimate risks. The aim of this study is to develop a prediction model for late AMD based on data from population-based studies. Design Three population-based studies

  5. HISTORY OF SUNLIGHT EXPOSURE IS A RISK FACTOR FOR AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schick, T.; Ersoy, L.; Lechanteur, Y.T.; Saksens, N.T.; Hoyng, C.B.; Hollander, A.I. den; Kirchhof, B.; Fauser, S.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate effects of current and past sunlight exposure and iris color on early and late age-related macular degeneration (AMD). METHODS: Of 3,701 individuals from the EUGENDA database, 752 (20.3%) showed early AMD, 1,179 (31.9%) late AMD, and 1,770 (47.8%) were controls. Information abou

  6. Association of diabetes with age-related macular degeneration in the EUREYE study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Topouzis, F.; Anastasopoulos, E.; Augood, C.; Bentham, G.C.; Chakravarthy, U.; de Jong, P.T.V.M.; Rahu, M.; Seland, J.; Soubrane, G.; Tomazzoli, L.; Vingerling, J.R.; Vioque, J.; Young, I.S.; Fletcher, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To examine the association between self-reported diabetes history and early or late age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in the European population. Methods: Participants aged 65 years and over in the cross-sectional population-based EUREYE study underwent an eye examination including d

  7. Training eye movements for visual search in individuals with macular degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, C.P.; Verghese, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    We report a method to train individuals with central field loss due to macular degeneration improve the efficiency of visual search. Our method requires participants to make a same/different judgment on two simple silhouettes. One silhouette is presented in an area that falls within the binocular sc

  8. The relationship of major American dietary patterns to age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    We hypothesized that major American dietary patterns are associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) risk. This was a cross-sectional study with 8,103 eyes from 4,088 eligible participants in the baseline Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) were classified into control (n=2,739), early ...

  9. A Qualitative Analysis of Reading Rehabilitation of Persons with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feely, Mary; Vetere, Arlene; Myers, Lynn B.

    2007-01-01

    One of the most prevalent visual impairments of people aged 60 and older is age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which ranks third globally as a cause of visual impairment (World Health Organization, 2006). The purpose of this study was to conduct a tentative subjective assessment of eccentric viewing by persons with AMD. The authors recruited…

  10. Rehabilitation of reading in older individuals with macular degeneration: a review of effective training programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijnacker, J.; Verstraten, P.; Damme, W. van; Vandermeulen, J.; Steenbergen, B.

    2011-01-01

    Macular degeneration (MD) is the most common cause of visual impairment among older adults. It severely affects reading performance. People with MD have to rely on peripheral vision for reading. In this review, we considered several training programs that aim to improve peripheral reading, with a fo

  11. Rehabilitation of reading in older individuals with macular degeneration: A review of effective training programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijnacker, J.; Verstraten, P.G.M.; Damme, W. Van; Vandermeulen, J.; Steenbergen, B.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Macular degeneration (MD) is the most common cause of visual impairment among older adults. It severely affects reading performance. People with MD have to rely on peripheral vision for reading. In this review, we considered several training programs that aim to improve peripheral reading,

  12. The short-wavelength mechanisms of Stiles in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubschman, J P; Vola, J L; Conrath, J; Berros, P; Hougrand, F

    1998-11-01

    Clinical measurements by the increment-threshold technique of W.S. Stiles are reported in five cases of age-related macular degeneration. Measurements were made on a modified Tübingen perimeter using 1 degree, short-wavelength targets presented on a red field.

  13. Zinc supplementation inhibits complement activation in age-related macular degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smailhodzic, D.; Asten, F. van; Blom, A.M.; Mohlin, F.C.; Hollander, A.I. den; Ven, J.P.H. van de; Huet, R.A.C. van; Groenewoud, J.M.M.; Tian, Y.; Berendschot, T.T.; Lechanteur, Y.T.E.; Fauser, S.; Bruijn, C. de; Daha, M.R.; Wilt, G.J. van der; Hoyng, C.B.; Klevering, B.J.

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the Western world. AMD is a multifactorial disorder but complement-mediated inflammation at the level of the retina plays a pivotal role. Oral zinc supplementation can reduce the progression of AMD but the precise mechanism

  14. Suspected macular degeneration in a captive Western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, Andrea; Bernhard, Andreas; Sahr, Sabine; Oechtering, Gerhard

    2012-09-01

    The case of a 31-year-old captive female Western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) with decreased near vision but good distance vision is presented. Examination of the fundus revealed drusen-like bodies in the macula presumably because of an age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

  15. Single-Chain Antibody Fragment VEGF Inhibitor RTH258 for Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holz, Frank G; Dugel, Pravin U; Weissgerber, Georges

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the safety and efficacy of different doses of RTH258 applied as single intravitreal administration compared with ranibizumab 0.5 mg in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). DESIGN: Six-month, phase 1/2, prospective, multicenter, double-masked, random...

  16. The Psychosocial Impact of Closed-Circuit Televisions on Persons with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Jessica G.; Jutai, Jeffrey W.; Strong, J. Graham; Plotkin, Ann D.

    2008-01-01

    Closed-circuit televisions (CCTVs) are used by many elderly people who have age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The functional vision of 68 participants, which was measured immediately after they adopted CCTVs, suggested successful outcomes, but the psychosocial impact of the use of CCTVs did not peak until a month later. The findings help…

  17. Knowledge and Use of Low Vision Services Among Persons with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casten, Robin J.; Maloney, Eileen K.; Rovner, Barry W.

    2005-01-01

    Visual impairment (blindness or low vision) is a leading cause of disability among older adults and is most often due to age-related macular degeneration (AMD). It is predicted that 2.95 million people will have AMD by 2020 (Eye Diseases Prevalence Research Group, 2004). Unfortunately, there is no cure for AMD, nor can lost vision be restored.…

  18. Clinical characteristics of familial and sporadic age-related macular degeneration: differences and similarities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saksens, N.T.M.; Kersten, E.; Groenewoud, J.M.M.; Grinsven, M.J.J.P. van; Ven, J.P.H. van de; Sanchez, C.I.; Schick, T.; Fauser, S.; Hollander, A.I. den; Hoyng, C.B.; Boon, C.J.F.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: We describe the differences and similarities in clinical characteristics and phenotype of familial and sporadic patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). METHODS: We evaluated data of 1828 AMD patients and 1715 controls enrolled in the European Genetic Database. All subjects

  19. New approaches and potential treatments for dry age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Max Damico

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Emerging treatments for dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD and geographi c atrophy focus on two strategies that target components involved in physiopathological pathways: prevention of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium loss (neuroprotection induction, oxidative damage prevention, and visual cycle modification and suppression of inflammation. Neuroprotective drugs, such as ciliary neurotrophic factor, brimonidine tartrate, tandospirone, and anti-amyloid β antibodies, aim to prevent apoptosis of retinal cells. Oxidative stress and depletion of essential micronutrients are targeted by the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS formulation. Visual cycle modulators reduce the activity of the photoreceptors and retinal accumulation of toxic fluorophores and lipofuscin. Eyes with dry age-related macular degeneration present chronic inflammation and potential treatments include corticosteroid and complement inhibition. We review the current concepts and rationale of dry age-related macular degeneration treatment that will most likely include a combination of drugs targeting different pathways involved in the development and progression of age-related macular degeneration.

  20. New approaches and potential treatments for dry age-related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco Max Damico; Fabio Gasparin; Mariana Ramos Scolari; Lycia Sampaio Pedral; Beatriz Sayuri Takahashi

    2012-01-01

    Emerging treatments for dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and geographi c atrophy focus on two strategies that target components involved in physiopathological pathways: prevention of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium loss (neuroprotection induction, oxidative damage prevention, and visual cycle modification) and suppression of inflammation. Neuroprotective drugs, such as ciliary neurotrophic factor, brimonidine tartrate, tandospirone, and anti-amyloid β antibodies, ...

  1. Automatic Drusen Quantification and Risk Assessment of Age-related Macular Degeneration on Color Fundus Images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grinsven, M.J.J.P. van; Lechanteur, Y.T.E.; Ven, J.P.H. van de; Ginneken, B. van; Hoyng, C.B.; Theelen, T.; Sanchez, C.I.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate a machine learning algorithm that allows for computer aided diagnosis (CAD) of non-advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD) by providing an accurate detection and quantification of drusen location, area and size. METHODS: Color fundus photographs of 407 eyes without AMD

  2. Assessment of the quality of life of patients with age-related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    BAKHRITDINOVA FAZILAT ARIFOVNA; YUSUPOV AZAMAT FARKHADOVICH; MUKHANOV SHAVKAT ABDUVALIYEVICH

    2016-01-01

    This article is dedicated to the study of the quality of life of patients with the help of an adapted questionnaire VFQ-25 in Uzbek language and assessment of complex treatment of early and late manifestations of age-related macular degeneration.

  3. Predicting Non-response to Ranibizumab in Patients with Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asten, F. van; Rovers, M.M.; Lechanteur, Y.T.E.; Smailhodzic, D.; Muether, P.S.; Chen, J.; Hollander, A.I. den; Fauser, S.; Hoyng, C.B.; Wilt, G.J. van der; Klevering, B.J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To validate known and determine new predictors of non-response to ranibizumab in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and to incorporate these factors into a prediction rule. METHODS: This multicenter, observational cohort study included 391 patients tre

  4. Clinical characteristics of familial and sporadic age-related macular degeneration: differences and similarities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saksens, N.T.M.; Kersten, E.; Groenewoud, J.M.M.; Grinsven, M.J.J.P. van; Ven, J.P.H. van de; Sanchez, C.I.; Schick, T.; Fauser, S.; Hollander, A.I. den; Hoyng, C.B.; Boon, C.J.F.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: We describe the differences and similarities in clinical characteristics and phenotype of familial and sporadic patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). METHODS: We evaluated data of 1828 AMD patients and 1715 controls enrolled in the European Genetic Database. All subjects und

  5. Degeneração macular relacionada à idade: novas perspectivas Age-related macular degeneration: new perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Bittar Nehemy

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A degeneração macular relacionada à idade (DMRI é a principal causa de cegueira legal em indivíduos acima de 50 anos de idade. Embora estudos recentes tenham mostrado que o fator genético é significativo, a patogênese da degeneração macular relacionada à idade permanece obscura, e os fatores de risco não estão ainda completamente estabelecidos. Estudos multicêntricos randomizados, publicados nos últimos anos, demonstraram que uma combinação de vitaminas e minerais é eficaz na redução do risco de desenvolvimento de neovascularização e de progressão para os estágios mais avançados da degeneração macular relacionada à idade. De maneira análoga, a terapia fotodinâmica (PDT e a terapia antiangiogênica também tiveram sua eficácia comprovada no tratamento de membrana neovascular coroideana subfoveal associada à degeneração macular relacionada à idade. Ambas reduzem o risco de perda de visão e, eventualmente, permitem melhora temporária da acuidade visual. Outras modalidades de tratamento, tais como fotocoagulação a laser, remoção cirúrgica da membrana e termoterapia transpupilar (TTT, podem beneficiar apenas um pequeno subgrupo de pacientes. Uma melhor compreensão dos mecanismos fisiopatológicos e dos eventos moleculares nas diversas fases da doença deverão propiciar, em futuro próximo, melhores estratégias para o controle e tratamento da degeneração macular relacionada à idade.Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD is a major source of legal blindness in individuals older than 50 years. Even though recent reports suggest that genetics plays an important role, its pathogenesis remains puzzling and the risk factors for its occurrence are not completely established. Vitamin and mineral supplementation reduced the risk of development of choroidal neovascularization (CNV or progression to the most advanced stages of age-related macular degeneration. Photodynamic therapy (PDT and antiangiogenic therapy

  6. Visual function 5 years or more after macular translocation surgery for myopic choroidal neovascularisation and age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, K; Kachi, S; Iwata, E; Ishikawa, K; Terasaki, H

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the changes in the best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) after 1 year and after ≥5 years after macular translocation for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) or myopic choroidal neovascularisation (mCNV). Methods The medical records of 61 consecutive patients who underwent macular translocation with 360° retinotomy for AMD (35 eyes) or mCNV (26 eyes) were reviewed. Overall, 40 patients, 17 mCNV and 23 AMD, were followed for at least 5 years. BCVA and area of the Goldmann visual field (VF) measured before, 12 months after surgery, and at the final visit. Results In the 23 AMD eyes followed for ≥5 years, the mean preoperative BCVA was 1.149±0.105 logMAR units, which significantly improved to 0.69±0.06 logMAR units at 1 year (P142 logMAR units on their final examination. The area of the VF was significantly decreased at 12 months and did not change significantly thereafter. Conclusions Our results show that macular translocation surgery significantly improves the BCVA and significantly decreases the VF area of eyes with mCNV or AMD after first 1 year. The BCVA and VF area do not change significantly from the values at 1 year for at least 5 years. PMID:22173070

  7. Microcurrent stimulation in the treatment of dry and wet macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaikin L

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Laurie Chaikin,1 Kellen Kashiwa,2 Michael Bennet,2 George Papastergiou,3 Walter Gregory4 1Private practice, Alameda, CA, USA; 2Retina Institute of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, USA; 3California Retinal Associates, San Diego, CA, USA; 4Clinical Trials Research Unit, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK Purpose: To determine the safety and efficacy of the application of transcutaneous (transpalpebral microcurrent stimulation to slow progression of dry and wet macular degeneration or improve vision in dry and wet macular degeneration. Methods: Seventeen patients aged between 67 and 95 years with an average age of 83 years were selected to participate in the study over a period of 3 months in two eye care centers. There were 25 eyes with dry age-related macular degeneration (DAMD and six eyes with wet age-related macular degeneration (WAMD. Frequency-specific microcurrent stimulation was applied in a transpalpebral manner, using two programmable dual channel microcurrent units delivering pulsed microcurrent at 150 µA for 35 minutes once a week. The frequency pairs selected were based on targeting tissues, which are typically affected by the disease combined with frequencies that target disease processes. Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study or Snellen visual acuity (VA was measured before and after each treatment session. All treatment was administered in a clinical setting. Results: Significant increases were seen in VA in DAMD (P=0.012, Wilcoxon one-sample test, but in WAMD, improvements did not reach statistical significance (P=0.059. In DAMD eyes, twice as many patients showed increase in VA (52% compared to those showing deterioration (26%, with improvements being often sizeable, whereas deteriorations were usually very slight. In WAMD eyes, five of six (83% patients showed an increase and none showed deterioration. Conclusion: The substantial changes observed over this period, combined with continued improvement for

  8. Two siblings with late-onset cone–rod dystrophy and no visible macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakuramoto H

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Hiroyuki Sakuramoto,1 Kazuki Kuniyoshi,1 Kazushige Tsunoda,2 Masakazu Akahori,2 Takeshi Iwata,2 Yoshikazu Shimomura1 1Department of Ophthalmology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka-Sayama City, Osaka, Japan; 2National Institute of Sensory Organs, National Hospital Organization Tokyo Medical Center, Tokyo, Japan Background: We report our findings in two siblings with late-onset cone–rod dystrophy (CRD with no visible macular degeneration. Cases and methods: Case 1 was an 82-year-old man who first noticed a decrease in vision and color blindness in his early seventies. His mother and younger sister also had visual disturbances. His decimal visual acuity was 0.3 in the right eye and 0.2 in the left eye. Ophthalmoscopy showed normal fundi, and fluorescein angiography was also normal in both eyes. The photopic single flash and flicker eletroretinograms (ERGs were severely attenuated and the scotopic ERGs were slightly reduced in both eyes. Case 2 was the 80-year-old younger sister of Case 1. She first noticed a decline in vision and photophobia in both eyes in her early seventies. Her decimal visual acuity was 0.4 in the right eye and 0.2 in the left eye. Ophthalmoscopy showed mottling of the retinal pigment epithelium in the midperiphery with no visible macular degeneration. The photopic single flash and flicker ERGs were severely attenuated, and the scotopic ERGs were slightly reduced in both eyes. Conclusion: These siblings are the oldest reported cases of CRD with no visible macular degeneration. Thus, CRD should be considered in patients with reduced visual acuity, color blindness, and photophobia even if they are older than 70 years. Keywords: cone–rod dystrophy, peripheral cone dystrophy, occult macular dystrophy, late onset, macular degeneration, negative ERG

  9. Potential role of retinal pigment epithelial lipofuscin accumulation in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Martin L

    2002-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of severe visual impairment in developed countries. The vision loss associated with AMD is the result of degenerative changes in the central region of the retina called the macula. Maintenance of normal structure and function of the macular retina, and of the remainder of the retina as well, is critically dependent on the supporting role of the adjacent retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Impairment of normal RPE functions is known to result in retinal degeneration and loss of visual function. Thus, it has been hypothesized that the retinal degeneration that characterizes AMD is secondary to age-related deterioration in RPE support functions. Like many other postmitotic cell types, the RPE accumulates autofluorescent lysosomal storage bodies (lipofuscin) during senescence. In human eyes, lipofuscin comes to occupy a substantial fraction of the RPE cytoplasmic volume in the elderly. Does this lipofuscin accumulation contribute to the development of AMD? This question is a specific case of the broader question of whether lipofuscin accumulation in general is detrimental to cells. Unfortunately, definitive data do not exist to allow these questions to be answered. Although a correlation between RPE lipofuscin content and AMD has been reported, a cause-and-effect relationship between RPE lipofuscin accumulation and the development of this disease has not been established. It has been reported that a mutation in a gene encoding a photoreceptor-specific protein results in massive RPE lipofuscin accumulation and early-onset macular degeneration. However, again the accelerated RPE lipofuscin accumulation has not been shown to be the cause of the accompanying macular degeneration. The lack of a definitive link between RPE lipofuscin accumulation and AMD illustrates one of the biggest challenges remaining in lipofuscin research-determining whether lipofuscin accumulation per se has an impact on cell function.

  10. A 4-Year Longitudinal Study of 555 Patients Treated with Ranibizumab for Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Annette; Bloch, Sara B; Fuchs, Josefine;

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the visual outcome, pattern of discontinuation, ocular complications, and mortality of patients treated with a variable ranibizumab dosing regimen for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) for 4 years....

  11. Adherence to a Mediterranean diet, genetic susceptibility, and progression to advanced macular degeneration: a prospective cohort study123

    OpenAIRE

    Merle, Bénédicte MJ; Silver, Rachel E; Rosner, Bernard; Johanna M Seddon

    2015-01-01

    Background: Adherence to a Mediterranean-type diet is linked to a lower risk of mortality and chronic disease, but the association with the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and genetic susceptibility is unknown.

  12. Genetics of immunological and inflammatory components in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuo, Jingsheng; Grob, Seanna; Zhang, Kang; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2012-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), affecting 30 to 50 million elder individuals worldwide, is a disease affecting the macular retina and choroid that can lead to irreversible central vision loss and blindness. Recent findings support a role for immunologic processes in AMD pathogenesis, including generation of inflammatory related molecules in the Bruch's membrane, recruitment of macrophages, complement activation, microglial activation and accumulation in the macular lesions. Pro-inflammatory effects of chronic inflammation and oxidative stress can result in abnormal retinal pigment epithelium, photoreceptor atrophy and choroidal neovascularization. The associations of immunological and inflammatory genes, in particular the genes related to innate immunity with AMD support the involvement of various immunological pathways in the AMD pathogenesis. We review the literature on the involvements of inflammatory genes in AMD, highlight recent genetic discoveries, and discuss the potential application of such knowledge in the management of patients with AMD.

  13. Resistance to antivascular endothelial growth factor treatment in age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tranos P

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Paris Tranos,1 Athanasios Vacalis,1 Solon Asteriadis,1 Stavrenia Koukoula,1 Athanasios Vachtsevanos,1 Georgia Perganta,1 Ilias Georgalas21Retina Centre, Thessaloniki, Greece; 2Department of Ophthalmology, "G Gennimatas" Hospital of Athens, University of Athens, Athens, GreeceAbstract: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the main cause of visual impairment and blindness in people aged over 65 years in developed countries. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is a positive regulator of angiogenesis and its proven role in the pathological neovascularization in wet AMD has provided evidence for the use of anti-VEGF agents as potential therapies. In this study, we review the literature for the possible causes of failure after treatment with anti-VEGF agents and attempt to propose an algorithm of suggestive actions to increase the chances of successful management of such difficult cases.Keywords: antiVEGF, age related macular degeneration, treatment

  14. Classification of wet aged related macular degeneration using optical coherence tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Anam; Mir, Fouwad Jamil; Yasin, Ubaid Ullah; Khan, Shoab A.

    2013-12-01

    Wet Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is a type of age related macular degeneration. In order to detect Wet AMD we look for Pigment Epithelium detachment (PED) and fluid filled region caused by choroidal neovascularization (CNV). This form of AMD can cause vision loss if not treated in time. In this article we have proposed an automated system for detection of Wet AMD in Optical coherence tomographic (OCT) images. The proposed system extracts PED and CNV from OCT images using segmentation and morphological operations and then detailed feature set are extracted. These features are then passed on to the classifier for classification. Finally performance measures like accuracy, sensitivity and specificity are calculated and the classifier delivering the maximum performance is selected as a comparison measure. Our system gives higher performance using SVM as compared to other methods.

  15. The rapidly evolving diagnosis and treatment of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Breakthrough research on age-related macular degeneration is stimulating the development of treatments, improving diagnosis, facilitating prevention through proper nutrition, and providing long-sought documentation on the effectiveness of low vision rehabilitation.Optometrists must take the lead in ensuring that patients reap the benefits. The February observance of Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD)/Low Vision Awareness Month provides a good time for optometrists to review their approach to age-related vision loss,ensure that they are ready to provide, or refer patients for, the best possible care, and prepare to conduct education efforts to ensure that their patients, communities, and other healthcare providers are aware of recent advancements.

  16. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery treatments and specific targeting therapy for age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tai-Chi; Hung, Kuo-Hsuan; Peng, Chi-Hsien; Liu, Jorn-Hon; Woung, Lin-Chung; Tsai, Ching-Yao; Chen, Shih-Jen; Chen, Yan-Ting; Hsu, Chih-Chien

    2015-11-01

    Nanoparticles combined with cells, drugs, and specially designed genes provide improved therapeutic efficacy in studies and clinical setting, demonstrating a new era of treatment strategy, especially in retinal diseases. Nanotechnology-based drugs can provide an essential platform for sustaining, releasing and a specific targeting design to treat retinal diseases. Poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid is the most widely used biocompatible and biodegradable polymer approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Many studies have attempted to develop special devices for delivering small-molecule drugs, proteins, and other macromolecules consistently and slowly. In this article, we first review current progress in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration. Then, we discuss the function of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the pharmacological effects of anti-VEGF-A antibodies and soluble or modified VEGF receptors. Lastly, we summarize the combination of antiangiogenic therapy and nanomedicines, and review current potential targeting therapy in age-related macular degeneration.

  17. Are chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms associated with age-related macular degeneration?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, M.; Sorensen, T. L.; Flachs, E. M.

    2015-01-01

    , including smoking-related conditions (yes/no), were registered. We calculated number of events in all groups, including only patients' and controls' first AMD diagnosis. Prevalence of AMD at time of diagnosis was calculated using descriptive statistics. Results. We included 9679 patients (ET=2714; PV=3170...... of the eye have not been thoroughly investigated in these patients. Previously reported studies show signs of systemic inflammation in patients with MPN as well as in patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD). Our hypothesis is that the presence of MPN predisposes some individuals to develop AMD...... and this might be explained by the degree of systemic inflammation. Objective. To describe the prevalence of Age-Related Macular Degeneration in patients with Chronic Myeloproliferative cancer at time of diagnosis compared to the general population in Denmark. Materials and Methods. We conducted a retrospective...

  18. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery treatments and specific targeting therapy for age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Chi Lin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles combined with cells, drugs, and specially designed genes provide improved therapeutic efficacy in studies and clinical setting, demonstrating a new era of treatment strategy, especially in retinal diseases. Nanotechnology-based drugs can provide an essential platform for sustaining, releasing and a specific targeting design to treat retinal diseases. Poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid is the most widely used biocompatible and biodegradable polymer approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Many studies have attempted to develop special devices for delivering small-molecule drugs, proteins, and other macromolecules consistently and slowly. In this article, we first review current progress in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration. Then, we discuss the function of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and the pharmacological effects of anti-VEGF-A antibodies and soluble or modified VEGF receptors. Lastly, we summarize the combination of antiangiogenic therapy and nanomedicines, and review current potential targeting therapy in age-related macular degeneration.

  19. Combined treatment of exudative age related macular degeneration with photodynamic therapy and intravitreal triamcinolone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Mª Ruiz-Moreno

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available José Mª Ruiz-Moreno1,2, Javier A Montero21Department of Ophthalmology, Miguel Hernández University School of Medicine, Alicante, Spain; 2Vitreo-Retinal Unit, Alicante Institute of Ophthalmology, Alicante, SpainAbstract: Choroidal neovascularization (CNV secondary to age related macular degeneration is among the leading causes of legal blindness in developed countries. Photodynamic therapy (PDT with verteporfin induces CNV closure causing little damage to healthy tissue, but the need to re-treat may lead to low final visual acuity at an unacceptable cost. The association of intravitreous triamcinolone or antiangiogenic drugs with PDT has been used in order to reduce these limitations of the therapy. The combination of PDT and intravitreous triamcinolone, its complications and outcome at one and two-year follow-up are discussed.Keywords: age related macular degeneration, choroidal neovascularization, photodynamic therapy, steroid, triamcinolone

  20. The Application of Genetic Risk Scores in Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica N. Cooke Bailey

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD, a highly prevalent and impactful disease of aging, is inarguably influenced by complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Various risk scores have been tested that assess measurable genetic and environmental contributions to disease. We herein summarize and review the ability and utility of these numerous models for prediction of AMD and suggest additional risk factors to be incorporated into clinically useful predictive models of AMD.

  1. Evaluation of real-world mobility in age-related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Sengupta, Sabyasachi; Nguyen, Angeline M.; van Landingham, Suzanne W.; Solomon, Sharon D.; Do, Diana V.; Ferrucci, Luigi; David S Friedman; Ramulu, Pradeep Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous research has suggested an association between poor vision and decreased mobility, including restricted levels of physical activity and travel away from home. We sought to determine the impact of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) on these measures of mobility. Methods Fifty-seven AMD patients with bilateral, or severe unilateral, visual impairment were compared to 59 controls with normal vision. All study subjects were between the ages of 60 and 80. Subjects wore accel...

  2. The chronic care for wet age related macular degeneration (CHARMED) study: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Markun, Stefan; Dishy, Avraham; Neuner-Jehle, Stefan; Rosemann, Thomas; Frei, Anja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In real life, outcomes in wet age related macular degeneration (W-AMD) continue to fall behind the results from randomized controlled trials. The aim of this trial was to assess if outcomes can be improved by an intervention in healthcare organization following recommendations of the Chronic Care Model (CCM). METHODS: Multi-centered randomized controlled clinical trial. The multifaceted intervention consisted in reorganization of care (delivery by trained chronic care coaches, ...

  3. The Chronic Care for Wet Age Related Macular Degeneration (CHARMED) Study: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Stefan Markun; Avraham Dishy; Stefan Neuner-Jehle; Thomas Rosemann; Anja Frei

    2015-01-01

    Background In real life, outcomes in wet age related macular degeneration (W-AMD) continue to fall behind the results from randomized controlled trials. The aim of this trial was to assess if outcomes can be improved by an intervention in healthcare organization following recommendations of the Chronic Care Model (CCM). Methods Multi-centered randomized controlled clinical trial. The multifaceted intervention consisted in reorganization of care (delivery by trained chronic care coaches, using...

  4. Decreased fixation stability of the preferred retinal location in juvenile macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A I Bethlehem

    Full Text Available Macular degeneration is the main cause for diminished visual acuity in the elderly. The juvenile form of macular degeneration has equally detrimental consequences on foveal vision. To compensate for loss of foveal vision most patients with macular degeneration adopt an eccentric preferred retinal location that takes over tasks normally performed by the healthy fovea. It is unclear however, whether the preferred retinal locus also develops properties typical for foveal vision. Here, we investigated whether the fixation characteristics of the preferred retinal locus resemble those of the healthy fovea. For this purpose, we used the fixation-offset paradigm and tracked eye-position using a high spatial and temporal resolution infrared eye-tracker. The fixation-offset paradigm measures release from fixation under different fixation conditions and has been shown useful to distinguish between foveal and non-foveal fixation. We measured eye-movements in nine healthy age-matched controls and five patients with juvenile macular degeneration. In addition, we performed a simulation with the same task in a group of five healthy controls. Our results show that the preferred retinal locus does not adopt a foveal type of fixation but instead drifts further away from its original fixation and has overall increased fixation instability. Furthermore, the fixation instability is most pronounced in low frequency eye-movements representing a slow drift from fixation. We argue that the increased fixation instability cannot be attributed to fixation under an unnatural angle. Instead, diminished visual acuity in the periphery causes reduced oculomotor control and results in increased fixation instability.

  5. Enhanced low vision rehabilitation for people with age related macular degeneration: a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Reeves, B C; Harper, R. A.; Russell, W B

    2004-01-01

    Aim: To compare the effectiveness of three models of low vision rehabilitation for people with age related macular degeneration (AMD) referred for low vision rehabilitation (LVR): (a) an enhanced low vision rehabilitation model (ELVR) including supplementary home based low vision rehabilitation; (b) conventional low vision rehabilitation (CLVR) based in a hospital clinic; (c) CLVR with home visits that did not include rehabilitation (CELVR), intended to act as a control for the additional con...

  6. Update on Clinical Trials in Dry Age-related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim Taskintuna; M.E. A. Abdalla Elsayed; Patrik Schatz

    2016-01-01

    This review article summarizes the most recent clinical trials for dry age.related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of vision loss in the elderly in developed countries. A literature search through websites https://www.pubmed.org and https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/, both accessed no later than November 04, 2015, was performed. We identified three Phase III clinical trials that were completed over the recent 5 years Age.Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2), implantable miniatu...

  7. Tachyphylaxis during ranibizumab treatment of exudative age-related macular degeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sibel; Doguizi; Sengul; Ozdek; Selcen; Yuksel

    2015-01-01

    <正>Dear Editor,We are intestigators from Turkey primarily studying exudative age-related macular degeneration(AMD).Here we present the results of our retrospective clinical study on tachyphylaxis development during the treatment of exudative AMD with ranibizumab,which,we believe,will form a basis for further prospective studies to predict the drug response in anti-vascular endothelial growth factor

  8. CCR3 is a therapeutic and diagnostic target for neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness worldwide, is as prevalent as cancer in industrialized nations. Most blindness in AMD results from invasion of the retina by choroidal neovascularization (CNV). We report that the eosinophil/mast cell chemokine receptor CCR3 is specifically expressed in CNV endothelial cells in humans with AMD, and that, despite the expression of its ligands eotaxin-1, -2, and -3, neither eosinophils nor mast cells are present in human CNV. ...

  9. Cost effectiveness of treatments for wet age-related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Paul; Annemans, Lieven; White, Richard; Gallagher, Meghan; Thomas, Simu

    2011-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of blindness in people aged >= 50 years. Wet AMD in particular has a major impact on patient quality of life and imposes substantial burdens on healthcare systems. This systematic review examined the cost-effectiveness data for current therapeutic options for wet AMD. PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched for all articles reporting original cost-effectiveness analyses of wet AMD treatments. The Centre for Reviews and Dissemination ...

  10. Cost Effectiveness of Treatments for Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Mitchell; Lieven Annemans; Richard White; Meghan Gallagher; Simu Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of blindness in people aged ≥50 years. Wet AMD in particular has a major impact on patient quality of life and imposes substantial burdens on healthcare systems. This systematic review examined the cost-effectiveness data for current therapeutic options for wet AMD. PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched for all articles reporting original cost-effectiveness analyses of wet AMD treatments. The Centre for Reviews and Dissemination an...

  11. Management of neovascular Age-related macular degeneration: A review on landmark randomized controlled trials

    OpenAIRE

    Aniruddha Agarwal; Kanika Aggarwal; Vishali Gupta

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, a number of prospective clinical trials with carefully designed study protocols have been conducted for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). These landmark clinical trials such as ANCHOR and MARINA and, more recently, the Comparison of AMD Treatment Trials and VIEW studies have revolutionized the management of neovascular AMD. While AMD continues to remain a leading cause of severe visual loss worldwide, advances in pharmacotherapeutics have...

  12. Economic Burden of Bilateral Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Multi-Country Observational Study

    OpenAIRE

    Alan F. Cruess; Gergana Zlateva; Xiao Xu; Gisele Soubrane; Daniel Pauleikhoff; Andrew Lotery; Jordi Mones; Ronald Buggage; Caroline Schaefer; Tyler Knight; Goss, Thomas F

    2008-01-01

    Background: There is limited previous research examining the healthcare costs of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (NV-AMD), which constrains our understanding of the economic impact of this condition. With aging populations, this leading cause of rapid vision loss in Western countries is expected to become a pressing health predicament, requiring decision makers to evaluate alternative treatment strategies for AMD. Objective: To document the economic burden of bilateral NV-AMD, th...

  13. Dry age-related macular degeneration: A currently unmet clinical need

    OpenAIRE

    Girmens, Jean-François; Sahel, José-Alain; Marazova, Katia

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of severe visual impairment and disability in older people worldwide. Although considerable advances in the management of the neovascular form of AMD have been made in the last decade, no therapy is yet available for the advanced dry form of AMD (geographic atrophy). This review focuses on current trends in the development of new therapies targeting specific pathophysiological pathways of dry AMD. Increased understanding of the complex...

  14. Further Evidence for an Association of ABCR Alleles with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Allikmets, Rando

    2000-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) accounts for >50% of the registered visual disability among North American and Western European populations and has been associated both with environmental factors, such as smoking, and with genetic factors. Previously we have reported disease-associated variants in the ABCR (also called ABCA4) gene in a subset of patients affected with this complex disorder. We have now tested our original hypothesis, that ABCR is a dominant susceptibility locus for AMD...

  15. Prevalence of depression and its effect on disability in patients with age-related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee Anindya; Kumar Suresh; Kulhara Parmanand; Gupta Amod

    2008-01-01

    Aims: To estimate depression in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and study the relationships among depression, visual acuity, and disability. Materials and Methods: It was a cross-sectional study with consecutive sampling (n = 53) of patients with AMD aged 50 years and above attending the retina clinic of a tertiary care hospital in North India. Depression, general disability and vision-specific disability were assessed in subjects meeting selection criteria. Assessment...

  16. Structural and functional findings in exudative age-related long-term macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Riusala, Aila

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of visual disability. During past years, new treatments have been studied frequently. However, only some studies have examined its long-term natural outcome. In the future, these kinds of studies are no longer possible because all the AMD lesions are treated. The purpose of this project was to investigate the end-stage structural and functional components of wet AMD and their connection to the fresh exudative lesion stage. The s...

  17. he Effects of Glaucoma and Age-Related Macular Degeneration on Quality of Life

    OpenAIRE

    Nilüfer Koçak; Behice Elif Onur; Hüseyin Aslankara; Hasan Can Cimilli; Süleyman Kaynak

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to assess the depressive and anxiety symptoms and the quality of life (QofL) in patients treated for glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Materials and Methods: Between March 1 and June 30, 2008, 60 outpatients with glaucoma and AMD were included into the study. As controls, sixty patients with similar sociodemographic features and who applied to the Ophthalmology Clinics with refractive errors only were taken. All patients and ...

  18. Nutritional and Lifestyle Interventions for Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Carneiro, Ângela; Andrade, José Paulo

    2017-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the developed world. In this narrative review, we will summarize the nutritional interventions evaluated in numerous observational studies and a few randomized clinical trials. The AREDS and AREDS2 studies demonstrated that supplements including vitamins C and E, beta-carotene, and zinc may reduce the progression to advanced AMD, in some patients, by 25% in five years. This is one of the few nutritional supplements kn...

  19. Aflibercept for age-related macular degeneration: a game-changer or quiet addition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, David J; Kaiser, Peter K; Rosenfeld, Philip J; Stewart, Michael W

    2012-08-01

    To describe the pharmacokinetics, preclinical studies, and clinical trials of the newly approved anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) drug aflibercept (Eylea (VEGF Trap-Eye); Regeneron; and Bayer). Review with editorial commentary. A review of the medical literature and pertinent Internet postings combined with analysis of key studies with expert opinion regarding the use of aflibercept for the treatment of exudative age-related macular degeneration. Aflibercept, a fusion protein with binding domains from native VEGF receptors, binds VEGF-A, VEGF-B, and placental growth factors 1 and 2 with high affinity. Preclinical ophthalmologic studies demonstrated that aflibercept suppresses choroidal neovascularization in several animal models. The results of phase 1 and 2 trials showed excellent short-term suppression of choroidal neovascularization in patients with exudative age-related macular degeneration and suggested a longer durability of aflibercept compared with other anti-VEGF drugs. The pivotal phase 3 Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Trap-Eye: Investigation of Efficacy and Safety in Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration 1 and 2 trials showed that monthly and bimonthly aflibercept were noninferior to monthly ranibizumab at preventing vision loss (pro re nata injections with required injections every 3 months and maintained vision gains from the first year, with an average of 4.2 injections of aflibercept and 4.7 injections of ranibizumab. Aflibercept promises to deliver excellent visual outcomes for exudative age-related macular degeneration patients while undergoing fewer injections compared with ranibizumab. With a wholesale cost of $1850 per dose, the cost per patient with aflibercept treatment promises to be lower than with ranibizumab. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Oxidative Stress, Hypoxia, and Autophagy in the Neovascular Processes of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Blasiak, Janusz; Petrovski, Goran; Veréb, Zoltán; Facskó, Andrea; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of severe and irreversible loss of vision in the elderly in developed countries. AMD is a complex chronic neurodegenerative disease associated with many environmental, lifestyle, and genetic factors. Oxidative stress and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) seem to play a pivotal role in AMD pathogenesis. It is known that the macula receives the highest blood flow of any tissue in the body when related to size, and anythin...

  1. Is Age-Related Macular Degeneration Associated with Stroke Among Elderly Americans?§

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Duanping; Mo, Jingping; Duan, Yinkang; Klein, Ronald; Scott, Ingrid U.; Huang, Kui A; Zhou, Haibo

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with the development of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke among elderly Americans. Design: Population-based cohort study. Participants: The five percent random sample of 2000-2003 Medicare enrollees was obtained. The cohort (n=1,519,086) consisted of enrollees who were aged 65 or older at the first two-year (January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2001). Methods: Baseline demographic variables and chronic conditions ...

  2. Aging Is Not a Disease: Distinguishing Age-Related Macular Degeneration from Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Ardeljan, Daniel; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a disease of the outer retina, characterized most significantly by atrophy of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium accompanied with or without choroidal neovascularization. Development of AMD has been recognized as contingent on environmental and genetic risk factors, the strongest being advanced age. In this review, we highlight pathogenic changes that destabilize ocular homeostasis and promote AMD development. With normal aging, photorecept...

  3. Cellular and Molecular Pathology of Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Potential Role for Proteoglycans

    OpenAIRE

    Othman Al Gwairi; Lyna Thach; Wenhua Zheng; Narin Osman; Little, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a retinal disease evident after the age of 50 that damages the macula in the centre of retina. It leads to a loss of central vision with retained peripheral vision but eventual blindness occurs in many cases. The initiation site of AMD development is Bruch’s membrane (BM) where multiple changes occur including the deposition of plasma derived lipids, accumulation of extracellular debris, changes in cell morphology, and viability and the formation of d...

  4. Photodegradation of retinal bisretinoids in mouse models and implications for macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Ueda, Keiko; Zhao, Jin; Kim, Hye Jin; Sparrow, Janet R.

    2016-01-01

    Visual cycle adducts having bisretinoid structures accumulate in retinal pigment epithelial cells as lipofuscin. These light-sensitive compounds are implicated in disease mechanisms leading to visual impairment in some inherited and age-related forms of macular degeneration. The means by which these diretinal adducts impart chronic damage is not fully understood. By studying mice raised under varying levels of intraocular light and by analyzing mice treated with vitamin E, we provide evidence...

  5. Do Nutritional Supplements Have a Role in Age Macular Degeneration Prevention?

    OpenAIRE

    Pinazo-Durán, Maria D.; Francisco Gómez-Ulla; Luis Arias; Javier Araiz; Ricardo Casaroli-Marano; Roberto Gallego-Pinazo; García-Medina, Jose J.; Maria Isabel López-Gálvez; Lucía Manzanas; Anna Salas; Miguel Zapata; Manuel Diaz-Llopis; Alfredo García-Layana

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To review the proposed pathogenic mechanisms of age macular degeneration (AMD), as well as the role of antioxidants (AOX) and omega-3 fatty acids (omega-3) supplements in AMD prevention. Materials and Methods. Current knowledge on the cellular/molecular mechanisms of AMD and the epidemiologic/experimental studies on the effects of AOX and omega-3 were addressed all together with the scientific evidence and the personal opinion of professionals involved in the Retina Group of the OFTA...

  6. Combined treatment of exudative age related macular degeneration with photodynamic therapy and intravitreal triamcinolone

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz-Moreno , Jose

    2008-01-01

    José Mª Ruiz-Moreno1,2, Javier A Montero21Department of Ophthalmology, Miguel Hernández University School of Medicine, Alicante, Spain; 2Vitreo-Retinal Unit, Alicante Institute of Ophthalmology, Alicante, SpainAbstract: Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) secondary to age related macular degeneration is among the leading causes of legal blindness in developed countries. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with verteporfin induces CNV closure causing little damage to healt...

  7. Comparison of life quality scores of ranibizumab-treated patients with age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadet Arslan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the visual acuity, fluorescein angiography, optic coherence tomography and life quality of patients diagnosed with exudative age-related macular degeneration and administered with intravitreal Ranibizumab injection. Material and Methods: This study included of 48 different patients who were diagnosed as exudative age-related macular degeneration and administered with ranibizumab injection. In this study, demographic characteristics, pre- and post-injection corrected visual acuity, angiography, optic coherence tomography alteration and the scores of quality of life questionnaire were prospectively analyzed. Results: The patients were followed up for 20+/-1 months on average. After ranibizumab injection, 12 patients (25% gained and #8805;3 lines of visual acuity, 28 patients (58.3% gained and #8804;3 lines of visual acuity, 6 patients (12.5% lost and #8804;3 lines of visual acuity and 2 patients (4.2% lost and #8805;3 lines of visual acuity. The increase in Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study was lower in patients with Hypertension and positive family history In this study, it was determined that The National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire score increased in patients with improving visual acuity after ranibizumab injection and the difference was statistically significant. Conclusion: Visual acuity was found to improve in patients with exudative age-related macular degeneration and treated with intravitreal ranibizumab injection. The National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire provided reliable results in patients with age-related macular degeneration and the questionnaire score was determined to increase following the treatment. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(1.000: 61-68

  8. Epidemiology and quality of life of patients with age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synek, Svatopluk; Vojniković, Bozo; Pahor, Dana

    2010-04-01

    It is well known that age-related macular degeneration (AMD), besides glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, represents a major cause of low vision and blindness throughout the world. In this study, specific causal factors of AMD are analyzed, emphasizing the causal role and effects of sunlight, no matter which part of its spectrum, in a longer exposition through life. The accent is also put on the influence of lifestyle as well as vitamin and antioxidants supplementation in development or prevention of AMD.

  9. Epidemiology and Quality of Life of Patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Synek, Svatopluk; Vojniković, Božo; Pahor, Đana

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that age-related macular degeneration (AMD), besides glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, represents a major cause of low vision and blindness throughout the world. In this study, specific causal factors of AMD are analyzed, emphasizing the causal role and effects of sunlight, no matter which part of its spectrum, in a longer exposition through life. The accent is also put on the influence of lifestyle as well as vitamin and antioxidants supplementation in development or preven...

  10. Flying Blind: Aeromedical Certification and Undiagnosed Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    or becomes worse over time Vision loss may be severe and rapid with wet AMD compared to dry AMD Distorted vision (i.e., metamorphopsia) - A grid of...Although.vision.loss.can.occur,.it. is.usually.minimal.and.progresses.slowly.(12) . The.“ wet ”.form.of.macular.degeneration.is.responsible. for.10...564-72 . 14 .. Michels. S,. Kurz-Levin. M .. [Age-related. macu- lar. degeneration. ( AMD )]. Ther Umsch .. 2009. Mar;66(3):189-95 . 15 .. Age-Related

  11. Cystoid macular edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tryfon G Rotsos

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Tryfon G Rotsos1, Marilita M Moschos21Medical Retina Service, Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, UK; 2Department of Ophthalmology, University of Athens, GreeceAbstract: We review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and etiology of cystoid macular edema (CME. Inflammatory, diabetic, post-cataract, and macular edema due to age-related macular degeneration is described. The role of chronic inflammation and hypoxia and direct macular traction is evaluated in each case according to different views from the literature. The different diagnostic methods for evaluating the edema are described. Special attention is given to fluoroangiography and the most modern methods of macula examination, such as ocular coherence tomography and multifocal electroretinography. Finally, we discuss the treatment of cystoid macular edema in relation to its etiology. In this chapter we briefly refer to the therapeutic value of laser treatment especially in diabetic maculopathy or vitrectomy in some selected cases. Our paper is focused mainly on recent therapeutic treatment with intravitreal injection of triamcinolone acetonide and anti-VEGF factors like bevacizumab (Avastin, ranibizumab (Lucentis, pegaptamid (Macugen, and others. The goal of this paper is to review the current status of this treatment for macular edema due to diabetic maculopathy, central retinal vein occlusion and post-cataract surgery. For this reason the results of recent multicenter clinical trials are quoted, as also our experience on the use of intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF factors and we discuss its value in clinical practice.Keywords: cystoid macular edema, anti-VEGF, fluoroangiography, OCT, multifocal electroretinography

  12. Two siblings with late-onset cone–rod dystrophy and no visible macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuramoto, Hiroyuki; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Tsunoda, Kazushige; Akahori, Masakazu; Iwata, Takeshi; Shimomura, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    Background We report our findings in two siblings with late-onset cone–rod dystrophy (CRD) with no visible macular degeneration. Cases and methods Case 1 was an 82-year-old man who first noticed a decrease in vision and color blindness in his early seventies. His mother and younger sister also had visual disturbances. His decimal visual acuity was 0.3 in the right eye and 0.2 in the left eye. Ophthalmoscopy showed normal fundi, and fluorescein angiography was also normal in both eyes. The photopic single flash and flicker eletroretinograms (ERGs) were severely attenuated and the scotopic ERGs were slightly reduced in both eyes. Case 2 was the 80-year-old younger sister of Case 1. She first noticed a decline in vision and photophobia in both eyes in her early seventies. Her decimal visual acuity was 0.4 in the right eye and 0.2 in the left eye. Ophthalmoscopy showed mottling of the retinal pigment epithelium in the midperiphery with no visible macular degeneration. The photopic single flash and flicker ERGs were severely attenuated, and the scotopic ERGs were slightly reduced in both eyes. Conclusion These siblings are the oldest reported cases of CRD with no visible macular degeneration. Thus, CRD should be considered in patients with reduced visual acuity, color blindness, and photophobia even if they are older than 70 years. PMID:24039390

  13. Genetics and age-related macular degeneration: a practical review for the clinician

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwartz SG

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Stephen G Schwartz,1 Blake M Hampton,1 Jaclyn L Kovach,1 Milam A Brantley Jr2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Vanderbilt Eye Institute, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: Age-related macular degeneration is a complex disease, with both genetic and environmental risk factors interacting in unknown ways. Currently, 52 gene variants within 34 loci have been significantly associated with age-related macular degeneration. Two well-studied major genes are complement factor H (CFH and age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2. There exist several commercially available tests that are proposed to stratify patients into high-risk and low-risk groups, as well as predict response to nutritional supplementation. However, at present, the bulk of the available peer-reviewed evidence suggests that genetic testing is more useful as a research tool than for clinical management of patients. Keywords: age-related macular degeneration, age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2, ARMS2, complement factor H, CFH, pharmacogenetics, vascular endothelial growth factor

  14. Influence of anti-VEGF about cardiovascular biomarkers in age related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manresa, N; Mulero, J; Losada, M; Zafrilla, P

    2015-02-01

    Systemic VEGF inhibition disrupts endothelial homeostasis and accelerates the atherogenesis, suggesting that these events contribute to the clinical cardiovascular adverse events of VEGF-inhibiting therapies. The objective of the current study was to analyze the effect of anti-VEGF therapy on cardiovascular risk factors in patients with exudative age related macular degeneration. A total of 73 patients with exudative age related macular degeneration (without previous anti-VEGF therapy) were treated with two anti-VEGF: Ranibizumab and Pegaptanib sodium. The follow up was 6 months. The following parameters were determined before and after treatment: homocysteine, lipids (total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL-c, LDL-c), C-Reactive Protein and fibrinogen. There were not statistically significant differences in parameters studied before and after treatment with both Pegaptanib sodium and Ranibizumab, except C-Reactive Protein. Of all patients analyzed, only 3 of them have initially C-Reactive Protein levels above normal levels and after antiangiogenic therapy, there was a significant increase in C-Reactive Protein. We have not found results in our study who to suspect that treatment with anti-VEGF in the patients with exudative age related macular degeneration increases cardiovascular risk predictors. However, after therapy was increased the CRP and fibrinogen may mean that anti-VEGF contribute an alteration of endothelial homeostasis in exudative AMD.

  15. Stereotactic radiotherapy for wet age-related macular degeneration: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neffendorf JE

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available James E Neffendorf, Timothy L Jackson Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom Abstract: Neovascular age-related macular degeneration is a leading cause of blindness in the developed world. Currently, the treatment of choice is intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF medications. These require frequent dosing, up to monthly, and impose a substantial burden on patients and the health economy. Ionizing radiation was proposed as a possible treatment for age-related macular degeneration due to its anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic properties. Stereotactic radiotherapy is an outpatient-based radiotherapy platform that provides stereotactic application of low energy X-ray to the retina in three highly collimated beams that cross the inferior sclera to overlap at the macula. A randomized, double-masked, sham-controlled trial of 230 patients (INTREPID showed that a single dose of stereotactic radiotherapy significantly reduces the number of intravitreal anti-VEGF injections needed over 2 years. A larger randomized controlled trial (STAR is underway. Keywords: wet age-related macular degeneration, radiation therapy, stereotactic radiotherapy, vascular endothelial growth factor

  16. The utility of using customized heterochromatic flicker photometry (cHFP) to measure macular pigment in patients with age-related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Stringham, J.M; Hammond, BR; Nolan, John,; Wooten, BR; Mammen, A.; Smollen, W

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the utility and validity of using customized heterochromatic flicker photometry (cHFP) to measure macular pigment optical density (MPOD) in patients with intermediate stages of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The measurement procedure was optimized to accommodate individual differences in temporal vision related to age, disease, or other factors. The validity criteria were based on the similarity of the spectral absorption curves to ex vivo curv...

  17. Age-related macular degeneration: epidemiology and optimal treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Morten; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    2002-01-01

    (exudative cases); the remainder has only geographic atrophy. In cross-sectional population-based studies about 45% of eyes with AMD have visual acuity reduced to 20/200 or worse. This is true both for exudative AMD and pure geographic atrophy. Age and genetic predisposition are known risk factors for AMD...... a fluorescein angiographic study and a physician capable of interpreting it. For CNV not involving the foveal centre, the only evidence-based treatment is laser photocoagulation. For AMD cases with subfoveal CNV, good visual acuity, and predominantly classic fluorescence pattern on fluorescein angiography....... Smoking is probably also a risk factor. Preventive strategies using macular laser photocoagulation are under investigation, but their efficacy in preventing visual loss is as yet unproven. There is no treatment with proven efficacy for geographic atrophy. Optimal treatment for exudative AMD requires...

  18. Machine learning based detection of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic macular edema (DME) from optical coherence tomography (OCT) images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Zhang, Yaonan; Yao, Zhaomin; Zhao, Ruixue; Zhou, Fengfeng

    2016-12-01

    Non-lethal macular diseases greatly impact patients' life quality, and will cause vision loss at the late stages. Visual inspection of the optical coherence tomography (OCT) images by the experienced clinicians is the main diagnosis technique. We proposed a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) model to discriminate age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic macular edema (DME) and healthy macula. The linear configuration pattern (LCP) based features of the OCT images were screened by the Correlation-based Feature Subset (CFS) selection algorithm. And the best model based on the sequential minimal optimization (SMO) algorithm achieved 99.3% in the overall accuracy for the three classes of samples.

  19. Macular epiretinal brachytherapy in treated age-related macular degeneration: MERITAGE study: twelve-month safety and efficacy results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugel, Pravin U; Petrarca, Robert; Bennett, Michael; Barak, Adiel; Weinberger, Dov; Nau, Jeffrey; Jackson, Timothy L

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of epimacular brachytherapy (EMB) for the treatment of chronic, active, neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Prospective, multicenter, interventional, noncontrolled clinical trial. Fifty-three eyes of 53 participants with neovascular AMD requiring frequent anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) retreatment. Participants underwent pars plana vitrectomy with a single 24-Gy dose of EMB delivered using an intraocular, handheld cannula containing a strontium 90/yttrium 90 source positioned over the active lesion. Participants were retreated with ranibizumab administered monthly as needed, using predefined retreatment criteria. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was undertaken monthly, with images assessed by an independent reading center. Coprimary outcomes at 12 months were proportion of participants with stable vision (losing brachytherapy produces stable visual acuity in most participants with previously treated, active disease. Epimacular brachytherapy may reduce the need for frequent anti-VEGF retreatment. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Analysing the Progression Rates of Macular Lesions with Autofluorescence Imaging Modes in Dry Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Olcay

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In this study we aimed to compare the sensitivity of blue-light fundus autofluorescence (FAF and near-infrared autofluorescence (NI-AF imaging for determining the progression rates of macular lesions in dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Materials and Methods: The study was designed retrospectively and included patients diagnosed with intermediate and advanced stage dry AMD. Best corrected visual acuities and FAF and NI-AF images were recorded in 46 eyes of 33 patients. Lesion borders were drawn manually on the images using Heidelberg Eye Explorer software and lesion areas were calculated by using Microsoft Excel software. BCVA and lesion areas were compared with each other. Results: Patients’ mean follow-up time was 30.98±13.30 months. The lesion area progression rates were 0.85±0.93 mm2/y in FAF and 0.93±1.01 mm2/y in NI-AF, showing statistically significant correlation with each other (r=0.883; p<0.01. Both imaging methods are moderately correlated with visual acuity impairment (r=0.362; p<0.05 and r=0.311; p<0.05, respectively. In addition, larger lesions showed higher progression rates than smaller ones in both imaging methods. Conclusion: NI-AF imaging is as important and effective as FAF imaging for follow-up of dry AMD patients.

  1. [NUTRITIONAL COMPONENTS AND MACULAR DEGENERATION AGE-RELATED].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Montalvo, Iván Antonio; Matías-Pérez, Diana

    2015-04-28

    Objetivo: componentes nutricionales como los antioxidantes pueden modificar el riesgo de padecer Degeneración Macular Relacionada con la Edad (DMRE). Este es un artículo de revisión sistemática de estudios publicados relacionados con la modificación del estilo de vida, la nutrición y la ingesta de vitaminas para prevenir o retrasar la aparición o progresión de la DMRE. Resultados: el análisis de los resultados de investigación consultados pone de manifiesto que la DMRE es una de las causas de ceguera más frecuentes en sujetos mayores de 55 años. La DMRE se caracteriza por disminución de la visión, metamorfosias, macropsias, micropsias y escotoma central. Es una enfermedad que debe ser diagnosticada a tiempo, ya que puede conducir a la ceguera irreversible. Entre los componentes de la dieta que en numerosos estudios epidemiológicos han mostrado una asociación inversa con la DMRE y que se revisan en este trabajo se encuentran: vitaminas (E y C), minerales (ej. zinc, selenio, manganeso y cobre) y carotenoides. Conclusiones: existe una evidencia importante de que puede aplicarse un soporte nutricional a pacientes con DMRE. Esto requiere de la determinación de los beneficios nutricionales de estos nutrientes (vitaminas, minerales y carotenoides), o bien de alimentos nutracéuticos en pro de la salud de este grupo de enfermos.

  2. Age related macular degeneration and drusen: neuroinflammation in the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschini, Elisa; Piras, Antonio; Nuzzi, Raffaele; Vercelli, Alessandro

    2011-09-15

    Inflammation protects from dangerous stimuli, restoring normal tissue homeostasis. Inflammatory response in the nervous system ("neuroinflammation") has distinct features, which are shared in several diseases. The retina is an immune-privileged site, and the tight balance of immune reaction can be disrupted and lead to age-related macular disease (AMD) and to its peculiar sign, the druse. Excessive activation of inflammatory and immunological cascade with subsequent induction of damage, persistent activation of resident immune cells, accumulation of byproducts that exceeds the normal capacity of clearance giving origin to a chronic local inflammation, alterations in the activation of the complement system, infiltration of macrophages, T-lymphocytes and mast-cells from the bloodstream, participate in the mechanisms which originate the drusen. In addition, aging of the retina and AMD involve also para-inflammation, by which immune cells react to persistent stressful stimuli generating low-grade inflammation, aimed at restoring function and maintaining tissue homeostasis by varying the set point in relation to the new altered conditions. This mechanism is also seen in the normal aging retina, but, in the presence of noxious stimuli as in AMD, it can become chronic and have an adverse outcome. Finally, autophagy may provide new insights to understand AMD pathology, due to its contribution in the removal of defective proteins. Therefore, the AMD retina can represent a valuable model to study neuroinflammation, its mechanisms and therapy in a restricted and controllable environment. Targeting these pathways could represent a new way to treat and prevent both exudative and dry forms of AMD.

  3. Preliminary study of Conbercept injected intravitreally for the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Qin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To observe the preliminary efficacy of conbercept injected intravitreally for the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration(wAMD.METHODS:Seventeen wAMD patients(18 eyeswere selected to receive conbercept injection. All patients were given a single conbercept injection every month, 3 times. Before and after 1, 2, 3mo of the injection, the best corrected visual acuity(BCVA, intraocular pressure(IOP, measured by Non-contact tonometer, fundus photography, fundus fluorescein angiography(FFA, indocyanine green angiography(ICG, optical coherence tomography(OCTexamination and the complications incidence were compared.RESULTS:Three months after conbercept injection, the BCVA improved in 15 eyes(83%, stable in 3 eyes(17%. Before treatment, the average central macular thickness was 421.72±54.43μm, at 1 and 2 and 3mo after treatment, the average central macular thickness was 337.89±25.88μm, 293.56±26.87μm, 266.89±19.10μm respectively. There were significant differences compared with before and after injection(PCONCLUSION:Intravitreal injection conbercept for wAMD can significantly improve the visual function, reduce the macular edema and the leakage with higher safety and less complications. However the prolonged efficacy needs further observation.

  4. Age Related Macular Degeneration and Total Hip Replacement Due to Osteoarthritis or Fracture: Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine W Chong

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of total hip replacement, accounting for more than 80% of all total hip replacements. Emerging evidence suggests that osteoarthritis has a chronic inflammatory component to its pathogenesis similar to age-related macular degeneration. We evaluated the association between age-related macular degeneration and total hip replacement as proxy for severe osteoarthritis or fractured neck of femur in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. 20,744 participants had complete data on both age-related macular degeneration assessed from colour fundus photographs taken during 2003-2007 and total hip replacement. Total hip replacements due to hip osteoarthritis and fractured neck of femur during 2001-2011 were identified by linking the cohort records to the Australian Orthopedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between age-related macular degeneration and risk of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis and fracture separately, adjusted for confounders. There were 791 cases of total hip replacement for osteoarthritis and 102 cases of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, and grouped country of birth, intermediate age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement for osteoarthritis (odds ratio 1.22, 95% CI 1.00-1.49. Late age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur (odds ratio 5.21, 95% CI2.25-12.02. The association between intermediate age-related macular degeneration and an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis suggests the possibility of similar inflammatory processes underlying both chronic diseases. The association of late age-related macular degeneration with an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to fractured

  5. Age Related Macular Degeneration and Total Hip Replacement Due to Osteoarthritis or Fracture: Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Elaine W; Wang, Yuanyuan; Robman, Liubov D; Aung, Khin Zaw; Makeyeva, Galina A; Giles, Graham G; Graves, Stephen; Cicuttini, Flavia M; Guymer, Robyn H

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of total hip replacement, accounting for more than 80% of all total hip replacements. Emerging evidence suggests that osteoarthritis has a chronic inflammatory component to its pathogenesis similar to age-related macular degeneration. We evaluated the association between age-related macular degeneration and total hip replacement as proxy for severe osteoarthritis or fractured neck of femur in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. 20,744 participants had complete data on both age-related macular degeneration assessed from colour fundus photographs taken during 2003-2007 and total hip replacement. Total hip replacements due to hip osteoarthritis and fractured neck of femur during 2001-2011 were identified by linking the cohort records to the Australian Orthopedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between age-related macular degeneration and risk of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis and fracture separately, adjusted for confounders. There were 791 cases of total hip replacement for osteoarthritis and 102 cases of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, and grouped country of birth, intermediate age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement for osteoarthritis (odds ratio 1.22, 95% CI 1.00-1.49). Late age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur (odds ratio 5.21, 95% CI2.25-12.02). The association between intermediate age-related macular degeneration and an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis suggests the possibility of similar inflammatory processes underlying both chronic diseases. The association of late age-related macular degeneration with an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur may be

  6. Macular epiretinal brachytherapy in treated age-related macular degeneration (MERITAGE): month 12 optical coherence tomography and fluorescein angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrarca, Robert; Dugel, Pravin U; Nau, Jeffrey; Slakter, Jason S; Jaffe, Glenn J; Jackson, Timothy L

    2013-02-01

    To report the optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA) results of the Macular Epiretinal Brachytherapy in Treated Age-Related Macular Degeneration study. Prospective, multicenter, interventional, noncontrolled clinical trial. Fifty-three eyes of 53 participants with chronic, active neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) requiring frequent anti-vascular endothelial growth factor retreatment. Participants underwent pars plana vitrectomy with a single 24-gray dose of epimacular brachytherapy (EMB), delivered with an intraocular, handheld, cannula containing a strontium 90/yttrium 90 source positioned over the active lesion. Participants were retreated with ranibizumab administered monthly as needed, using predefined retreatment criteria. Patients underwent FFA at baseline, month 1, and month 12. Patients underwent optical coherence tomography (OCT) at baseline and then monthly for 12 months. The FFA and OCT images were evaluated by independent, central reading facilities. Change in OCT centerpoint thickness and angiographic lesion size 12 months after EMB. Mean centerpoint thickness increased by 50 μm, from 186 to 236 μm (P = 0.292), but 70% of participants had an increase of less than the mean, with a median increase of only 1.8 μm. The FFA total lesion size increased slightly by 0.79 mm(2), from 14.69 to 15.48 mm(2) (P = 0.710). Total choroidal neovascularization (CNV) area increased by 1.17 mm(2), from 12.94 to 14.12 mm(2) (P = 0.556). The classic CNV area decreased substantially by 3.70 mm(2), from 3.90 to 0.20 mm(2) (P<0.01). Predominantly classic lesions showed the greatest response, with mean Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study visual acuity improving by 1.5 letters (versus -4.0 for all participants combined); mean centerpoint thickness decreased by 43 μm (P = 0.875). The angiographic and OCT response did not correlate with lesion size at baseline. In chronic, active, neovascular AMD, EMB is associated

  7. Macular atrophy in patients with long-term anti-VEGF treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, Marion R; Ceklic, Lala; Ebneter, Andreas; Huf, Wolfgang; Wolf, Sebastian; Zinkernagel, Martin S

    2016-12-01

    To identify the prevalence and progression of macular atrophy (MA) in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) patients under long-term anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy and to determine risk factors. This retrospective study included patients with neovascular AMD and ≥30 anti-VEGF injections. Macular atrophy (MA) was measured using near infrared and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Yearly growth rate was estimated using square-root transformation to adjust for baseline area and allow for linearization of growth rate. Multiple regression with Akaike information criterion (AIC) as model selection criterion was used to estimate the influence of various parameters on MA area. Forty-nine eyes (47 patients, mean age 77 ± 14) were included with a mean of 48 ± 13 intravitreal anti-VEGF injections (ranibizumab:37 ± 11, aflibercept:11 ± 6, mean number of injections/year 8 ± 2.1) over a mean treatment period of 6.2 ± 1.3 years (range 4-8.5). Mean best-corrected visual acuity improved from 57 ± 17 letters at baseline (= treatment start) to 60 ± 16 letters at last follow-up. The MA prevalence within and outside the choroidal neovascularization (CNV) border at initial measurement was 45% and increased to 74%. Mean MA area increased from 1.8 ± 2.7 mm(2) within and 0.5 ± 0.98 mm(2) outside the CNV boundary to 2.7 ± 3.4 mm(2) and 1.7 ± 1.8 mm(2) , respectively. Multivariate regression determined posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) and presence/development of intraretinal cysts (IRCs) as significant factors for total MA size (R(2) = 0.16, p = 0.02). Macular atrophy (MA) area outside the CNV border was best explained by the presence of reticular pseudodrusen (RPD) and IRC (R(2) = 0.24, p = 0.02). A majority of patients show MA after long-term anti-VEGF treatment. Reticular pseudodrusen (RPD), IRC and PVD but not number of injections or treatment duration seem to be associated with the

  8. The quality of life impact of peripheral versus central vision loss with a focus on glaucoma versus age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Evans

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Keith Evans1, Simon K Law2, John Walt3, Patricia Buchholz4, Jan Hansen31Global Health Outcomes, Wolters Kluwer Health, Chester, United Kingdom; 2Jules Stein Eye Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 3Global Health Outcomes Strategy and Research, Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA, USA; 4Health Economics, Pricing, and Reimbursement, Allergan GmbH, Ettlingen, GermanyPurpose: It is well accepted that conditions that cause central vision loss (CVL have a negative impact on functional ability and quality of life (QoL, but the impact of diseases that cause peripheral vision loss (PVL is less well understood. Focusing on glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration (ARMD, the effects of CVL and PVL on QoL were compared. Methods: A systematic literature review of publications reporting QoL in patients with CVL or PVL identified 87 publications using four generic (Short-Form Health Survey-36 and -12, EuroQoL EQ-5D and Sickness Impact Profile and five vision-specific (National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire-51, -39, and -25, Impact of Vision Impairment and Visual Function-14 QoL instruments; 33 and 15 publications reported QoL in ARMD and glaucoma, respectively.Results: QoL was impaired to a similar extent by diseases associated with PVL and CVL, but different domains were affected. In contrast to ARMD, mental aspects appeared to be affected more than physical aspects in patients with glaucoma.Conclusions: The differential impact upon QoL might be a function of the pathology of the diseases, for example potential for blindness and better ability to perform physical tasks due to retention of central vision may explain these observations in glaucoma.Keywords: vision loss, quality of life, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, diabetic macular edema, cataracts

  9. Suitability and repeatability of a photostress recovery test device, the macular test device, macular degeneration TEST DEVICE, detector (MDD-2), for diabetes and diabetic retinopathy assessment

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Loughman, James

    2013-10-16

    Diabetic retinopathy can result in impaired photostress recovery time despite normal visual acuity and fundoscopic appearance. The Macular Degeneration Detector (MDD-2) is a novel flash photostress recovery time device. In this study, we examine the repeatability of the MDD-2 in normal and diabetic subjects.

  10. Molecular response of chorioretinal endothelial cells to complement injury: implications for macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Shemin; Whitmore, S Scott; Sohn, Elliott H; Riker, Megan J; Wiley, Luke A; Scheetz, Todd E; Stone, Edwin M; Tucker, Budd A; Mullins, Robert F

    2016-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common, blinding disease of the elderly in which macular photoreceptor cells, retinal pigment epithelium and choriocapillaris endothelial cells ultimately degenerate. Recent studies have found that degeneration of the choriocapillaris occurs early in this disease and that endothelial cell drop-out is concomitant with increased deposition of the complement membrane attack complex (MAC) at the choroidal endothelium. However, the impact of MAC injury to choroidal endothelial cells is poorly understood. To model this event in vitro, and to study the downstream consequences of MAC injury, endothelial cells were exposed to complement from human serum, compared to heat-inactivated serum, which lacks complement components. Cells exposed to complement components in human serum showed increased labelling with antibodies directed against the MAC, time- and dose-dependent cell death, as assessed by lactate dehydrogenase assay and increased permeability. RNA-Seq analysis following complement injury revealed increased expression of genes associated with angiogenesis including matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 and -9, and VEGF-A. The MAC-induced increase in MMP9 RNA expression was validated using C5-depleted serum compared to C5-reconstituted serum. Increased levels of MMP9 were also established, using western blot and zymography. These data suggest that, in addition to cell lysis, complement attack on choroidal endothelial cells promotes an angiogenic phenotype in surviving cells.

  11. Results of Intravitreal Ranibizumab Treatment for Exudative Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umut Karaca

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pur po se: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of intravitreal ranibizumab injection for exudative age-related macular degeneration. Ma te ri al and Met hod: In this study, we included forty-eight eyes of 43 age-related macular degeneration patients followed for at least twelve months. Mean age was 73.65±8.93 years and mean follow-up time was 14.2 months. All patients received three consecutive monthly intravitreal ranibizumab injections and then were followed up with clinical examination and optic coherence tomography monthly. Re-injection was executed as needed. Re sults: Twenty patients were male (46.5% and twenty-three patients were female (53.5%. The average number of ranibizumab injection was 3.7 (3-7 per eye. Twenty-six lesions (54.2% were classic (predominantly and minimally and twenty-two (45.8% were occult. Mean best-corrected visual acuity was 46.8 letters with ETDRS chart at the initial examination and 55.5 letters at twelfth month. Mean central foveal thickness decreased from 320 microns to 269 microns. There was a statistically significant improvement in visual acuity and central foveal thickness. On the other hand, this improvement was not significant between lesion types. During follow-up, there were no systemic or serious ocular complications determined. Dis cus si on: Intravitreal ranibizumab injection is safe and effective, both anatomically and functionally, for age-related macular degeneration. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2012; 42: 25-9

  12. A PROSPECTIVE CLINICAL STUDY TO EVALUATE RISK FACTORS FOR AGE RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION IN CENTRAL INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Age related macular degeneration (AMD is a leadi ng cause of irreversible blindness among the elderly worldwide affecting 30 - 50 million individuals. AMD is more common in developed world. AMD is characterized by central visual loss. Advanced AMD can be classified in broadly into two types: dry and wet fo rm. Several clear risk factors for the development and progression of age related macular degeneration have been established are advancing age, genetic factors, history of smoking ,white race, obesity, high dietary intake of vegetable fat, low dietary inta ke of antioxidants and zinc. This prospective non - interventional study was conducted from February 2011 to October 2012 in the Regional Institute of Ophthalmology, Hamidia Hospital, Bhopal, included patients who attended the eye OPD, retina clinic and eye ward and were diagnosed as a case of AMD. Present study included 174 patients out of which patients 79(45.39% were above the age of 70 years, with 51 (29.31% patients between 61 - 70 years and 44 cases (25.28% in the sixth decade. Male: female ratio was 0 .75: 1. 21 (12.06% patients have a positive family history of AMD. Most common risk factor identified in our study was chronic sun exposure (49.42% followed by hypertension in 41.8% patients. 25.26% cases gave history of smoking and raised serum cholest erol levels were seen in 14.28% cases. History of alcoholism was positive in 19.54% patients. Of the 174 cases in our present study 90 patients (51.72% were hypermetropic. Conclusion: Age related macular degeneration is a disease of elderly with risk fact ors, most of them are preventable. If timely proper measures are taken, a major cause of blindness can be prevented in elderly age group.

  13. Depressive symptoms and quality of life in people with age-related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Mathew, Remy Sheena; Delbaere, Kim; Lord, Stephen R; Beaumont, Paul; Vaegan; Madigan, Michele C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To examine quality of life and associated factors in people with Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD). Methods: One hundred and forty-five AMD participants (mean age 78.0 +/- 7.7 years) and 104 age- and gender- matched controls (mean age 78.1 +/- 5.8 years) comprised the study populations for this case-control study. Depressive symptoms were measured with the Goldberg Anxiety and Depression (GAD) scale; general health and daily functioning was assessed with the Medical Outcomes Stu...

  14. Rehabilitation of reading in older individuals with macular degeneration: a review of effective training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijnacker, Judith; Verstraten, Peter; van Damme, Wim; Vandermeulen, Jo; Steenbergen, Bert

    2011-11-01

    Macular degeneration (MD) is the most common cause of visual impairment among older adults. It severely affects reading performance. People with MD have to rely on peripheral vision for reading. In this review, we considered several training programs that aim to improve peripheral reading, with a focus on eccentric viewing, oculomotor control, or perceptual learning. There was no strong support in favor of one particular training method for rehabilitation of reading in MD, but there is evidence that older individuals with MD can be trained to improve reading performance, even within limited time.

  15. The association between Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration and Regulatory T cells in peripheral blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madelung, Christopher Fugl; Falk, Mads; Sørensen, Torben Lykke

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate regulatory T cells (Tregs) and subsets of the Treg population in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twenty-one neovascular AMD cases and 12 age-matched controls without retinal pathology were selected. Patients were recr...... were found in the percentages of CD4(+) lymphocytes, CD25(high)CD127(low) Tregs, CD45RA(+) naïve Tregs, or CD31(+) recent thymic emigrant Tregs. CONCLUSION: Our data does not indicate an altered state of systemic Treg cells in neovascular AMD....

  16. [Progression of treatment and researches in dry age related macular degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaiyan; Tang, Shibo

    2015-03-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness and visual disability among old patients in Europe and North America. AMD has been divided into two broad clinical categories depending on whether there is a presence of abnormal neovascularization: neovascular (exudative or wet) AMD and dry (or geographic atrophic) AMD. VEGF has been understood as a pathogenesis of wet AMD which allows us to get breakthroughs in treatment. While the progression of dry AMD treatment is very slow because the lack of pathogenesis, no acute loss of vision, and without appropriate standards for treatment. This review tries to introduce about the recent researches and progressions for dry AMD treatment.

  17. Dry age-related macular degeneration: A currently unmet clinical need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girmens, Jean-François; Sahel, José-Alain; Marazova, Katia

    2012-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of severe visual impairment and disability in older people worldwide. Although considerable advances in the management of the neovascular form of AMD have been made in the last decade, no therapy is yet available for the advanced dry form of AMD (geographic atrophy). This review focuses on current trends in the development of new therapies targeting specific pathophysiological pathways of dry AMD. Increased understanding of the complex mechanisms that underlie dry AMD will help to address this largely unmet clinical need.

  18. VISUAL REHABILITATION IN LOW VISION PATIENTS WITH AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1991-01-01

    Using optical visual aids, visual rehabilitation was performed in 14 low vision patients(25 eyes) with age-related macular degeneration. With distance aids, visual acuity improvement appeared in 24 eyes(95%) out of the 25 eyes. Twelve eyes(48%) obtained a visual acuity equal to or better than 0.4. With near visual aids, near acuity of all eyes(100%) was improved. Thirteen eyes(52%) got the near vision equal to or better than 0.5. Ten patients could read No.5 Chinese Reading Card. The reading success rat...

  19. Contrast sensitivity function and mobility in elderly patients with macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, D T; Burdett, R

    1989-07-01

    Eleven control subjects, 64-79 years of age, and 10 subjects with macular degeneration, 70-82 years of age, were included in this study. Each participant was tested for visual acuity, spatial and temporal contrast sensitivity, and mobility in an unfamiliar environment. The course was designed with a pair of steps, ramps, and a level pathway. The subjects were timed and videotaped. The number of errors was recorded. Visual acuity and contrast sensitivity were significantly different between groups. The time to complete the course was significantly different between groups; however, the difference did not remain significant after age-adjustment.

  20. Imaging polarimetry in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, Ann E.; Weber, Anke; Cheney, Michael C.; VanNasdale, Dean A.; Miura, Masahiro

    2007-01-01

    Imaging polarimetry was used to examine different components of neovascular membranes in age-related macular degeneration. Retinal images were acquired with a scanning laser polarimeter. An innovative pseudo-color scale, based on cardinal directions of color, displayed two types of image information: relative phases and magnitudes of birefringence. Membranes had relative phase changes that did not correspond to anatomical structures in reflectance images. Further, membrane borders in depolarized light images had significantly higher contrasts than those in reflectance images. The retinal birefringence in neovascular membranes indicates optical activity consistent with molecular changes rather than merely geometrical changes. PMID:17429494

  1. Subfoveal choroidal thickness changes after intravitreal bevacizumab therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cihan; ünlü; Gurkan; Erdogan; Betul; Onal; Gunay; Betul; Ilkay; Sezgin; Akcay; Esra; Kardes

    2015-01-01

    <正>Dear Sir,Iam Dr.Cihanünlü,from the Department of Opthalmology,ümraniye Training and Research Hospital,Istanbul,Turkey.I write to present our study findings on subfoveal choroidal thickness(SFCT)changes after intravitreal bevacizumab(IVB)therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration(AMD).AMD is the leading cause of severe visual loss in adults older than 60y[1].Visual loss in late stages of AMD may be the result of one of the two processes:geographic atrophy(GA)or choroidal neovascularization(CNV).Many types of

  2. Evaluation of the siRNA PF-04523655 versus ranibizumab for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (MONET Study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Quan Dong; Schachar, Ronald A; Nduaka, Chudy I;

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of different dosing paradigms of PF-04523655 (PF) versus ranibizumab (comparator) in subjects with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD).......To evaluate the efficacy of different dosing paradigms of PF-04523655 (PF) versus ranibizumab (comparator) in subjects with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD)....

  3. [Non-pharmacologic therapy of age-related macular degeneration, based on the etiopathogenesis of the disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Tamás

    2015-07-12

    It has a great therapeutic significance that the disorder of the vascular endothelium, which supplies the affected ocular structures, plays a major role in the development of age-related macular degeneration. Chronic inflammation is closely linked to diseases associated with endothelial dysfuncition and age-related macular degeneration is accompanied by a general inflammatory response. The vascular wall including those in chorioids may be activated by several repeated and/or prolonged mechanical, physical, chemical, microbiological, immunologic and genetic factors causing a protracted host defence response with a consequent vascular damage, which leads to age-related macular degeneration. Based on this concept, age-related macular degeneration is a local manifestation of the systemic vascular disease. This recognition should have therapeutic implications because restoration of endothelial dysfunction can stabilize the condition of chronic vascular disease including age-related macular degeneration, as well. Restoration of endothelial dysfunction by non-pharmacological or pharmacological interventions may prevent the development or improve endothelial dysfunction resulting in prevention or improvement of age-related macular degeneration. Non-pharmacological interventions which may have beneficial effect in endothelial dysfunction include (1) smoking cessation; (2) reduction of increased body weight; (3) adequate physical activity; (4) appropriate diet (a) proper dose of flavonoids, polyphenols and kurcumin; (b) omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids: docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid; (c) carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthins), (d) management of dietary glycemic index, (e) caloric restriction, and (5) elimination of stressful lifestyle. Non-pharmacological interventions should be preferable even if medicaments are also used for the treatment of endothelial dysfunction.

  4. Exposure to Chlamydia pneumoniae infection and progression of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robman, Luba; Mahdi, Olaimatu; McCarty, Catherine; Dimitrov, Peter; Tikellis, Gabriella; McNeil, John; Byrne, Gerald; Taylor, Hugh; Guymer, Robyn

    2005-06-01

    Recent studies have found an association between exposure to Chlamydia pneumoniae infection and risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). To assess a potential risk of AMD progression posed by exposure to C. pneumoniae, the authors reexamined Australian residents in 2001-2002 who were aged 51-89 years with early AMD at baseline (1992-1995). Examination included macular photography and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to determine antibody titers to the elementary bodies from C. pneumoniae AR39. AMD progression was assessed quantitatively, using both coarse and fine progression steps following an international classification for AMD grading, and also qualitatively, by side-by-side comparison of baseline and follow-up macular photographs. Serologic data were available for 246 of 254 (97%) subjects. AMD progression was associated with a higher antibody titer. After adjustment for age, smoking, family history of AMD, history of cardiovascular diseases, and source study, the subjects in the upper tertiles of antibody titers were 2.1 (95% confidence interval: 0.92, 4.69), 2.6 (95% confidence interval: 1.24, 5.41), and 3.0 (95% confidence interval: 1.46, 6.37) times more at risk of progression than those in the lowest tertile, using three definitions of progression, respectively. The fact that seroreactivity to C. pneumoniae was independently associated with the risk of AMD progression suggests that C. pneumoniae infection may be an additional risk factor for AMD progression.

  5. Fatores modificáveis da degeneração macular relacionada à idade Modifiable risk factors for age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogil José de Almeida Torres

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Os autores apresentam os principais fatores modificáveis considerados de risco para o desencadeamento e/ou agravamento da degeneração macular relacionada com a idade. São abordados os mecanismos de ação destes fatores, assim como medidas preventivas e eficácia de eventuais intervenções.The authors present the main modifiable risk factors that may trigger and/or worsen age-related macular degeneration. Mechanisms of action related to these factors as well as preventive measures and intervention effectiveness are discussed.

  6. A STUDY TO COMPARE FUNDUS FLUORESCEIN ANGIOGRAPHY AND OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY IN AGE RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani Sujatha

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE To compare the diagnostic accuracy of optical coherence tomography with Fundus Fluorescein Angiography in diagnosing Age related macular degeneration. METHODS A total 25 patients newly diagnosed as Age related macular degeneration were included in the study. The study was done during the time period between August 2013 to November 2015 this is a prospective randomized hospital based study. RESULTS Maximum no of patients affected belonged to the age group of 50-70 years and 60% were females. The most common symptom was defective vision accounting for 92%. Hypertension and hyperlipidemia were the most common risk factors. 12% of the cases had unilateral disease and 88% had bilateral disease. 6% of eyes were normal in both FFA and OCT. 62% of the eyes by FFA and 61% of the eyes by OCT had dry ARMD and 32 % of the eye by FFA and 33 % by OCT had wet ARMD. CONCLUSION Fundus Fluorescein Angiography is the gold standard tool for screening ARMD and OCT is more specific in detecting early subretinal neovascular membrane and also to assess the activity of the neovascular membranes. Hence OCT is superior to FFA in diagnosing early wet ARMD and thus helps in early management of patients with ARMD.

  7. Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Incident Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Antonio B.; Panza, Gregory A.; Cramer, Benjamin; Chatterjee, Saurav; Jayaraman, Ramya; Wu, Wen-Chih

    2015-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss and blindness in people over 65 years old in the United States and has been associated with cardiovascular risk and decreased survival. There is conflicting data, however, regarding the contribution of AMD to the prediction of stroke. Aim To determine whether AMD is a risk indicator for incident stroke in a meta-analysis of available prospective and retrospective cohort studies published in the English literature. Methods We performed a systematic literature search of all studies published in English with Pub Med and other databases from 1966 to August 2014, reporting stroke incidence in patients with macular degeneration. Two investigators independently extracted the data. A random effects model was used to report Odds ratios (OR), with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). Meta-regression using a mixed linear model was used to understand potential heterogeneity amongst studies. Results We identified 9 studies that reported stroke incidence in patients with and without early AMD (N = 1,420,978). No significant association was found between early AMD with incident stroke. Combined, these 9 studies demonstrated random effects (OR, 1.12; CI, 0.86–1.47; I2 = 96%). Meta-regression on baseline covariates of age, sex, and year of publication did not significantly relate to heterogeneity. Conclusions We found no significant relationship between AMD and incident stroke. Further studies are needed to clarify other causes of decreased survival in patients with AMD. PMID:26580396

  8. ROCK-Isoform-Specific Polarization of Macrophages Associated with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souska Zandi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Age is a major risk factor in age-related macular degeneration (AMD, but the underlying cause is unknown. We find increased Rho-associated kinase (ROCK signaling and M2 characteristics in eyes of aged mice, revealing immune changes in aging. ROCK isoforms determine macrophage polarization into M1 and M2 subtypes. M2-like macrophages accumulated in AMD, but not in normal eyes, suggesting that these macrophages may be linked to macular degeneration. M2 macrophages injected into the mouse eye exacerbated choroidal neovascular lesions, while M1 macrophages ameliorated them, supporting a causal role for macrophage subtypes in AMD. Selective ROCK2 inhibition with a small molecule decreased M2-like macrophages and choroidal neovascularization. ROCK2 inhibition upregulated M1 markers without affecting macrophage recruitment, underlining the plasticity of these macrophages. These results reveal age-induced innate immune imbalance as underlying AMD pathogenesis. Targeting macrophage plasticity opens up new possibilities for more effective AMD treatment.

  9. Does Vertical Reading Help People with Macular Degeneration: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrèse, Aurélie; Liu, Tingting; Legge, Gordon E.

    2017-01-01

    Individuals with macular degeneration often develop a Preferred Retinal Locus (PRL) used in place of the impaired fovea. It is known that many people adopt a PRL left of the scotoma, which is likely to affect reading by occluding text to the right of fixation. For such individuals, we examined the possibility that reading vertical text, in which words are rotated 90° with respect to the normal horizontal orientation, would be beneficial for reading. Vertically oriented words would be tangential to the scotoma instead of being partially occluded by it. Here we report the results of an exploratory study that aimed at investigating this hypothesis. We trained individuals with macular degeneration who had PRLs left of their scotoma to read text rotated 90° clockwise and presented using rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP). Although training resulted in improved reading of vertical text, the training did not result in reading speeds that appreciably exceeded reading speeds following training with horizontal text. These results do not support the hypothesis that people with left PRLs read faster with vertical text. PMID:28114373

  10. Resistance to anti-VEGF therapy in neovascular age-related macular degeneration: a comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang S

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Shiqi Yang,1 Jingke Zhao,1 Xiaodong Sun1–3 1Department of Ophthalmology, Shanghai General Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 2Eye Research Institute of Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 3Shanghai Key Laboratory of Fundus Disease, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Abstract: As a progressive chronic disease, age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of irreversible vision impairment worldwide. Experimental and clinical evidence has demonstrated that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF plays a vital role in the formation of choroidal neovascularization. Intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF agents have been recommended as a first-line treatment for neovascular AMD. However, persistent fluid or recurrent exudation still occurs despite standardized anti-VEGF therapy. Patients suffering from refractory or recurrent neovascular AMD may develop mechanisms of resistance to anti-VEGF therapy, which results in a diminished therapeutic effect. Until now, there has been no consensus on the definitions of refractory neovascular AMD and recurrent neovascular AMD. This article aims at clarifying these concepts to evaluate the efficacy of switching drugs, which contributes to making clinical decision more scientifically. Furthermore, insight into the causes of resistance to anti-VEGF therapy would be helpful for developing possible therapeutic approaches, such as combination therapy and multi-target treatment that can overcome this resistance. Keywords: age-related macular degeneration, vascular endothelial growth factor, choroidal neovascularization, resistance

  11. Aging is not a disease: distinguishing age-related macular degeneration from aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardeljan, Daniel; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2013-11-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a disease of the outer retina, characterized most significantly by atrophy of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium accompanied with or without choroidal neovascularization. Development of AMD has been recognized as contingent on environmental and genetic risk factors, the strongest being advanced age. In this review, we highlight pathogenic changes that destabilize ocular homeostasis and promote AMD development. With normal aging, photoreceptors are steadily lost, Bruch's membrane thickens, the choroid thins, and hard drusen may form in the periphery. In AMD, many of these changes are exacerbated in addition to the development of disease-specific factors such as soft macular drusen. Para-inflammation, which can be thought of as an intermediate between basal and robust levels of inflammation, develops within the retina in an attempt to maintain ocular homeostasis, reflected by increased expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 coupled with shifts in macrophage plasticity from the pro-inflammatory M1 to the anti-inflammatory M2 polarization. In AMD, imbalances in the M1 and M2 populations together with activation of retinal microglia are observed and potentially contribute to tissue degeneration. Nonetheless, the retina persists in a state of chronic inflammation and increased expression of certain cytokines and inflammasomes is observed. Since not everyone develops AMD, the vital question to ask is how the body establishes a balance between normal age-related changes and the pathological phenotypes in AMD.

  12. Interaction of complement factor h and fibulin3 in age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Keith Wyatt

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a major cause of vision loss. It is associated with development of characteristic plaque-like deposits (soft drusen in Bruch's membrane basal to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. A sequence variant (Y402H in short consensus repeat domain 7 (SCR7 of complement factor H (CFH is associated with risk for "dry" AMD. We asked whether the eye-targeting of this disease might be related to specific interactions of CFH SCR7 with proteins expressed in the aging human RPE/choroid that could contribute to protein deposition in drusen. Yeast 2-hybrid (Y2H screens of a retinal pigment epithelium/choroid library derived from aged donors using CFH SCR7 baits detected an interaction with EFEMP1/Fibulin 3 (Fib3, which is the locus for an inherited macular degeneration and also accumulates basal to macular RPE in AMD. The CFH/Fib3 interaction was validated by co-immunoprecipitation of native proteins. Quantitative Y2H and ELISA assays with different recombinant protein constructs both demonstrated higher affinity for Fib3 for the disease-related CFH 402H variant. Immuno-labeling revealed colocalization of CFH and Fib3 in globular deposits within cholesterol-rich domains in soft drusen in two AMD donors homozygous for CFH 402H (H/H. This pattern of labeling was quite distinct from those seen in examples of eyes with Y/Y and H/Y genotypes. The CFH 402H/Fib3 interaction could contribute to the development of pathological aggregates in soft drusen in some patients and as such might provide a target for therapeutic intervention in some forms of AMD.

  13. Lifestyle modification, nutritional and vitamins supplements for age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Helena P Y; Liu, David T L; Lam, Dennis S C

    2013-02-01

    To provide a systematic review of the published studies pertaining to the lifestyle modification, dietary, nutritional and vitamins supplements for preventing occurrence or halting deterioration of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The literature searches from 1990 to December 2010 with following keywords, 'age related macular degeneration', 'nutrition', 'antioxidant', 'diet' and 'vitamins supplements' using search engines Pubmed, Google Scholar, Medline and the Cochrane Library. Meta-analyses, population-based cohort studies and case-controlled trials were reviewed, whereas small cases series, case reports, commentaries, abstracts in proceedings or personal observations were excluded. Smoking and obesity are identified risk factors for AMD. High dietary intakes of omega-3 fatty acids, and macular xanthophylls lutein and zeaxanthin have been associated with a lower risk of prevalence and incidence in AMD. Vitamin B and extracts from wolfberry, Gingko biloba and berry anthocyanins were also subjects of intense research interests, but there has been no concluding scientific evidence yet. The Age-Related Eye Disease study (AREDS) is the only large-scale randomized controlled clinical trial to show beneficial effect of AREDS formulation of vitamins C, E, beta-carotene and zinc with copper in reducing the risk progression to advanced AMD in patients with intermediate AMD or with advanced AMD in one eye. Quit smoking is an important advice to patients to prevent or slow the progress of AMD. There is no recommendation for routine nutritional or vitamins supplementation for primary prevention. However, patients with documented intermediate risk of AMD or advanced AMD in one eye are recommended to take AREDS-type vitamin supplements. © 2012 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2012 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  14. Diabetic Macular Edema at the time of Cataract Surgery trial: a prospective, randomized clinical trial of intravitreous bevacizumab versus triamcinolone in patients with diabetic macular oedema at the time of cataract surgery - preliminary 6 month results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Lyndell L; Morrison, Julie L; Constantinou, Marios; Rogers, Sophie; Sandhu, Sukhpal S; Wickremasinghe, Sanjeewa S; Kawasaki, Ryo; Al-Qureshi, Salmaan

    2016-05-01

    To compare visual and anatomical outcomes between intravitreous bevacizumab (BVB, Avastin) and triamcinolone (TA, Triesence) when administered at the time of cataract surgery in patients with diabetic macular oedema (DME). Prospective, single-masked, randomized clinical trial at The Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, Melbourne. Patients with clinically significant cataract and either centre-involving DME or DME treated within the previous 24 months. Participants were randomized 1:1 to receive intravitreous BVB 1.25 mg or TA 4 mg during cataract surgery, and at subsequent review if required over 6 months. Change in central macular thickness (CMT) and best corrected visual acuity at 6 months. Forty-one patients (mean age 66.4 years, 73.2% male) were recruited. Visual acuity and CMT were similar between groups at baseline (P > 0.2).After six months, both groups gained vision (mean +21.4 letters in TA group P < 0.0001, +12.5 letters in BVB, P = 0.002), with no significant difference between groups (P = 0.085). In addition, 60.9% of eyes receiving TA achieved a VA of ≥6/12 compared to 73.3% in the BVB group (P = 0.501). However, only TA was associated with a sustained reduction in CMT (-43.8-µm reduction TA vs. +37.3-µm increase BVB, P = 0.006 over 6 months). Following surgery, additional injections were required in 70.6% of participants in the BVB group, compared to 16.7% in the TA group (P < 0.0001). Three patients in the TA group experienced a rise of IOP over 21 mmHg (12.5%) during the 6-month follow-up; BVB had no cases (P = 0.130). There were no cases of endophthalmitis in either group. When administered at the time of cataract surgery in patients with DME, at 6 months both TA and BVB improve visual acuity; however, only TA results in a sustained reduction in CMT. Further follow-up will determine whether this translates into better long-term visual outcomes in the TA group. © 2016 Royal Australian and New

  15. Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... die. There are two types: wet and dry. Wet AMD happens when abnormal blood vessels grow under the ... new blood vessels often leak blood and fluid. Wet AMD damages the macula quickly. Blurred vision is a ...

  16. A large genome-wide association study of age-related macular degeneration highlights contributions of rare and common variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fritsche, L.G.; Igl, W.; Bailey, J.N.; Grassmann, F.; Sengupta, S; Bragg-Gresham, J.L.; Burdon, K.P.; Hebbring, S.J.; Wen, C.; Gorski, M.; Kim, I.K.; Cho, D.; Zack, D.; Souied, E.; Scholl, H.P.; Bala, E.; Lee, K.E.; Hunter, D.J.; Sardell, R.J.; Mitchell, P.; Merriam, J.E.; Cipriani, V.; Hoffman, J.D.; Schick, T.; Lechanteur, Y.T.; Guymer, R.H.; Johnson, M.P.; Jiang, Y.; Stanton, C.M.; Buitendijk, G.H.; Zhan, X.; Kwong, A.M.; Boleda, A.; Brooks, M.; Gieser, L.; Ratnapriya, R.; Branham, K.E.; Foerster, J.R.; Heckenlively, J.R.; Othman, M.I.; Vote, B.J.; Liang, H.H.; Souzeau, E.; McAllister, I.L.; Isaacs, T.; Hall, J.; Lake, S.; Mackey, D.A.; Constable, I.J.; Craig, J.E.; Kitchner, T.E.; Yang, Z; Su, Z.; Luo, H.; Chen, D.; Ouyang, H.; Flagg, K.; Lin, D.; Mao, G.; Ferreyra, H.; Stark, K.; Strachwitz, C.N. von; Wolf, A.; Brandl, C.; Rudolph, G.; Olden, M.; Morrison, M.A.; Morgan, D.J.; Schu, M.; Ahn, J.; Silvestri, G.; Tsironi, E.E.; Park, K.H.; Farrer, L.A.; Orlin, A.; Brucker, A.; Li, M.; Curcio, C.A.; Mohand-Said, S.; Sahel, J.A.; Audo, I.; Benchaboune, M.; Cree, A.J.; Rennie, C.A.; Goverdhan, S.V.; Grunin, M.; Hagbi-Levi, S.; Campochiaro, P.; Katsanis, N.; Holz, F.G.; Blond, F.; Blanche, H.; Deleuze, J.F.; Igo, R.P., Jr.; Truitt, B.; Peachey, N.S.; Meuer, S.M.; Myers, C.E.; Moore, E.L.; Klein, R.; Hollander, A.I. den; Saksens, N.T.M.; Hoyng, C.B.; Jong, E.K.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly, with limited therapeutic options. Here we report on a study of >12 million variants, including 163,714 directly genotyped, mostly rare, protein-altering variants. Analyzing 16,144 patients and 17,832

  17. Autologous Translocation of the Retinal Pigment Epithelium and Choroid in the Treatment of Exudative Age-related Macular Degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.J.M. Maaijwee (Kristel Johanna Maria)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAge-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most important cause of irreversible legal blindness in elderly persons in industrialized countries. AMD has two forms: atrophic (dry) and exudative (wet). In the wet form, abnormal blood vessels, arising from the choriocapillaris (choroidal

  18. Common variants near FRK/COL10A1 and VEGFA are associated with advanced age-related macular degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Yu (Yi); T. Bhangale (Tushar); J. Fagerness (Jesen); S. Ripke (Stephan); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); P.L. Tan (Perciliz); E.H. Souied (Eric); A.J. Richardson (Andrea); J.E. Merriam (Joanna); G.H.S. Buitendijk (Gabrielle); R. Reynolds (Robyn); S. Raychaudhuri (Soumya); K.A. Chin (Kimberly); L. Sobrin (Lucia); E. Evangelou (Evangelos); P.H. Lee (Phil); N. Leveziel (Nicolas); D.J. Zack (Donald); B. Campochiaro (Betsy); R.T. Smith (Theodore); G.R. Barile (Gaetano); R.H. Guymer (Robyn); R. Hogg (Ruth); U. Chakravarthy (Usha); L.D. Robman (Luba); O. Gustafsson (Omar); H. Sigurdsson (Haraldur); W. Ortmann (Ward); T.W. Behrens (Timothy); K. Stefansson (Kari); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); J.R. Vingerling (Hans); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline); R. Allikmets (Rando); M.A. Brantley (Milam); P.N. Baird (Paul); N. Katsanis (Nicholas); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); J.P.A. Ioannidis (John); M.J. Daly (Mark); R.R. Graham (Robert); J.M. Seddon (Johanna)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractDespite significant progress in the identification of genetic loci for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), not all of the heritability has been explained. To identify variants which contribute to the remaining genetic susceptibility, we performed the largest meta-analysis of genome-w

  19. The Difference that Age Makes: Cultural Factors that Shape Older Adults' Responses to Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogk, Marja

    2008-01-01

    This article suggests that approaching vision loss from age-related macular degeneration from a sociocultural perspective, specifically considering perceptions of aging, blindness, disability, and generational viewpoints and norms, may be critical to understanding older adults' responses to vision loss and visual rehabilitation.

  20. Memory Loss, Dementia, and Stroke: Implications for Rehabilitation of Older Adults with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Older adults with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are not immune to the other diseases of aging. Although AMD is the leading cause of low vision in older Americans, stroke is the leading cause of disability, and dementias affect another 2.5 million older Americans. Each condition alone can significantly impair a person's ability to…

  1. Association analysis of genetic and environmental risk factors in the cuticular drusen subtype of age-related macular degeneration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, J.P.H. van de; Smailhodzic, D.; Boon, C.J.F.; Fauser, S.; Groenewoud, J.M.M.; Chong, N.V.; Hoyng, C.B.; Klevering, B.J.; Hollander, A.I. den

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the association of gender, cigarette smoking, body-mass index, and nine genetic risk variants with cuticular drusen (CD), a well recognized subtype of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). METHODS: A total of 757 patients with AMD, including 217 patients with CD, and 553 control

  2. The SECURE study: long-term safety of ranibizumab 0.5 mg in neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, R. de; Axer-Siegel, R.; Eldem, B.; Guymer, R.; Kirchhof, B.; Papp, A.; Seres, A.; Gekkieva, M.; Nieweg, A.; Pilz, S.; Hoyng, C.B.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate long-term safety of intravitreal ranibizumab 0.5-mg injections in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). DESIGN: Twenty-four-month, open-label, multicenter, phase IV extension study. PARTICIPANTS: Two hundred thirty-four patients previously treated with ranibizum

  3. Face recognition in age related macular degeneration: perceived disability, measured disability, and performance with a bioptic device

    OpenAIRE

    Tejeria, L; Harper, R. A.; Artes, P H; Dickinson, C M

    2002-01-01

    Aims: (1) To explore the relation between performance on tasks of familiar face recognition (FFR) and face expression difference discrimination (FED) with both perceived disability in face recognition and clinical measures of visual function in subjects with age related macular degeneration (AMD). (2) To quantify the gain in performance for face recognition tasks when subjects use a bioptic telescopic low vision device.

  4. A large genome-wide association study of age-related macular degeneration highlights contributions of rare and common variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.G. Fritsche (Lars); W. Igl (Wilmar); J.N. Cooke Bailey (Jessica N.); F. Grassmann (Felix); S. Sengupta (Sebanti); J.L. Bragg-Gresham (Jennifer L.); Burdon, K.P. (Kathryn P.); S.J. Hebbring (Scott J.); Wen, C. (Cindy); M. Gorski (Mathias); I.K. Kim (Ivana); Cho, D. (David); Zack, D. (Donald); E.H. Souied (Eric); H.P.N. Scholl (Hendrik); E. Bala (Elisa); ELee, K. (Kristine); D. Hunter (David); Sardell, R.J. (Rebecca J.); P. Mitchell (Paul); J.E. Merriam (Joanna); F. Cipriani (Francesco); Hoffman, J.D. (Joshua D.); T. Schick (Tina); Y.T.E. Lechanteur (Yara T. E.); R.H. Guymer (Robyn); M.P. Johnson (Matthew); Y. Jiang; C.M. Stanton (Chloe); G.H.S. Buitendijk (Gabrielle); X. Zhan (Xiaowei); Kwong, A.M. (Alan M.); A. Boleda (Alexis); M. Brooks (Matthew); L. Gieser (Linn); R. Ratna Priya (Rinki); K.E. Branham (Kari); Foerster, J.R. (Johanna R.); J.R. Heckenlively (John); M.I. Othman (Mohammad); B.J. Vote (Brendan J.); Liang, H.H. (Helena Hai); E. Souzeau (Emmanuelle); McAllister, I.L. (Ian L.); T. Isaacs (Timothy); Hall, J. (Janette); Lake, S. (Stewart); D.A. Mackey (David); Constable, I.J. (Ian J.); J.E. Craig (Jamie E.); T.E. Kitchner (Terrie E.); Yang, Z. (Zhenglin); Su, Z. (Zhiguang); Luo, H. (Hongrong); Chen, D. (Daniel); Ouyang, H. (Hong); K. Flagg (Ken); Lin, D. (Danni); Mao, G. (Guanping); H.A. Ferreyra (Henry); K. Stark (Klaus); C. von Strachwitz (Claudia); Wolf, A. (Armin); C. Brandl (Caroline); Rudolph, G. (Guenther); M. Olden (Matthias); M.A. Morrison (Margaux); D.J. Morgan (Denise); M. Schu (Matthew); Ahn, J. (Jeeyun); G. Silvestri (Giuliana); E.E. Tsironi (Evangelia); Park, K.H. (Kyu Hyung); L.A. Farrer (Lindsay); A. Orlin (Anton); Brucker, A. (Alexander); X. Li (Xiaohui); C.A. Curcio (Christine A.); Mohand-Sa'd, S. (Saddek); J.-A. Sahel (José-Alain); I. Audo (Isabelle); M. Benchaboune (Mustapha); A.J. Cree (Angela); Rennie, C.A. (Christina A.); Goverdhan, S.V. (Srinivas V.); M. Grunin (Michelle); S. Hagbi-Levi (Shira); B. Campochiaro (Betsy); N. Katsanis (Nicholas); J.-B. Holz; F. Blond (Frédéric); Blanché, H. (Hél'ne); Deleuze, J.-F. (Jean-Fran'ois); R.P. Igo Jr. (Robert); B.J. Truitt (Barbara); N.S. Peachey (Neal ); S.M. Meuer (Stacy); C.E. Myers (Chelsea); Moore, E.L. (Emily L.); R. Klein (Ronald); M.A. Hauser (Michael); E.A. Postel (Eric); M.D. Courtenay (Monique D.); S.M. Schwartz (Stephen); J.L. Kovach (Jaclyn); W.K. Scott (William); Liew, G. (Gerald); Tan, A.G. (Ava G.); B. Gopinath (Bamini); J.E. Merriam (Joanna); T. Smith (Tim); J.C. Khan (Jane); M. Shahid (Mohammad); A.T. Moore (Anthony); J.A. McGrath (J Allie); R. Laux (Reneé); M.A. Brantley (Milam); A. Agarwal (Anita); L. Ersoy (Lebriz); A. Caramoy (Albert); T. Langmann (Thomas); N.T.M. Saksens (Nicole T.); Jong, E.K. (Eiko Kde); C. Hoyng (Carel); M.S. Cain (Melinda); A.J. Richardson (Andrea); T.M. Martin (Tammy M.); J. Blangero (John); D.E. Weeks (Daniel); Dhillon, B. (Bal); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); K.F. Doheny (Kimberly); Romm, J. (Jane); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline); C. Hayward (Caroline); Gorin, M.B. (Michael B.); M.L. Klein (Michael); P.N. Baird (Paul); A.I. Hollander (Anneke); Fauser, S. (Sascha); WYates, J.R. (John R.); R. Allikmets (Rando); J.J. Wang (Jie Jin); D.A. Schaumberg (Debra); B.E.K. Klein (Barbara); S.A. Hagstrom (Stephanie); Y. Chowers (Yehuda); A.J. Lotery (Andrew); T. Léveillard (Thierry); K. Zhang (Kang); M.H. Brilliant (Murray H.); A.W. Hewit (Alex); A. Swaroop (Anand); Chew, E.Y. (Emily Y.); M.A. Pericak-Vance (Margaret); M.M. DeAngelis (Margaret); D. Stambolian (Dwight); J.L. Haines (Jonathan); S.K. Iyengar (Sudha); B.H.F. Weber (Bernhard); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); I.M. Heid (Iris)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAdvanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly, with limited therapeutic options. Here we report on a study of >12 million variants, including 163,714 directly genotyped, mostly rare, protein-altering variants. Analyzing 16,144 patients a

  5. Electrophysiological assessment of retinal function during 6 months of bevacizumab treatment in neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karen Bjerg; Møller, Flemming; Sjølie, Anne Katrin;

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to assess the alteration of retinal function by multifocal electroretinography and full-field electroretinography in patients with age-related macular degeneration treated with bevacizumab. METHODS: We performed a prospective pilot study of 26 eyes of 26...

  6. A large genome-wide association study of age-related macular degeneration highlights contributions of rare and common variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.G. Fritsche (Lars); W. Igl (Wilmar); J.N. Cooke Bailey (Jessica N.); F. Grassmann (Felix); S. Sengupta (Sebanti); J.L. Bragg-Gresham (Jennifer L.); Burdon, K.P. (Kathryn P.); S.J. Hebbring (Scott J.); Wen, C. (Cindy); M. Gorski (Mathias); I.K. Kim (Ivana); Cho, D. (David); Zack, D. (Donald); E.H. Souied (Eric); H.P.N. Scholl (Hendrik); E. Bala (Elisa); ELee, K. (Kristine); D. Hunter (David); Sardell, R.J. (Rebecca J.); P. Mitchell (Paul); J.E. Merriam (Joanna); F. Cipriani (Francesco); Hoffman, J.D. (Joshua D.); T. Schick (Tina); Y.T.E. Lechanteur (Yara T. E.); R.H. Guymer (Robyn); M.P. Johnson (Matthew); Y. Jiang; C.M. Stanton (Chloe); G.H.S. Buitendijk (Gabrielle); X. Zhan (Xiaowei); Kwong, A.M. (Alan M.); A. Boleda (Alexis); M. Brooks (Matthew); L. Gieser (Linn); R. Ratna Priya (Rinki); K.E. Branham (Kari); Foerster, J.R. (Johanna R.); J.R. Heckenlively (John); M.I. Othman (Mohammad); B.J. Vote (Brendan J.); Liang, H.H. (Helena Hai); E. Souzeau (Emmanuelle); McAllister, I.L. (Ian L.); T. Isaacs (Timothy); Hall, J. (Janette); Lake, S. (Stewart); D.A. Mackey (David); Constable, I.J. (Ian J.); J.E. Craig (Jamie E.); T.E. Kitchner (Terrie E.); Yang, Z. (Zhenglin); Su, Z. (Zhiguang); Luo, H. (Hongrong); Chen, D. (Daniel); Ouyang, H. (Hong); K. Flagg (Ken); Lin, D. (Danni); Mao, G. (Guanping); H.A. Ferreyra (Henry); K. Stark (Klaus); C. von Strachwitz (Claudia); Wolf, A. (Armin); C. Brandl (Caroline); Rudolph, G. (Guenther); M. Olden (Matthias); M.A. Morrison (Margaux); D.J. Morgan (Denise); M. Schu (Matthew); Ahn, J. (Jeeyun); G. Silvestri (Giuliana); E.E. Tsironi (Evangelia); Park, K.H. (Kyu Hyung); L.A. Farrer (Lindsay); A. Orlin (Anton); Brucker, A. (Alexander); X. Li (Xiaohui); C.A. Curcio (Christine A.); Mohand-Sa'd, S. (Saddek); J.-A. Sahel (José-Alain); I. Audo (Isabelle); M. Benchaboune (Mustapha); A.J. Cree (Angela); Rennie, C.A. (Christina A.); Goverdhan, S.V. (Srinivas V.); M. Grunin (Michelle); S. Hagbi-Levi (Shira); B. Campochiaro (Betsy); N. Katsanis (Nicholas); J.-B. Holz; F. Blond (Frédéric); Blanché, H. (Hél'ne); Deleuze, J.-F. (Jean-Fran'ois); R.P. Igo Jr. (Robert); B.J. Truitt (Barbara); N.S. Peachey (Neal ); S.M. Meuer (Stacy); C.E. Myers (Chelsea); Moore, E.L. (Emily L.); R. Klein (Ronald); M.A. Hauser (Michael); E.A. Postel (Eric); M.D. Courtenay (Monique D.); S.M. Schwartz (Stephen); J.L. Kovach (Jaclyn); W.K. Scott (William); Liew, G. (Gerald); Tan, A.G. (Ava G.); B. Gopinath (Bamini); J.E. Merriam (Joanna); T. Smith (Tim); J.C. Khan (Jane); M. Shahid (Mohammad); A.T. Moore (Anthony); J.A. McGrath (J Allie); R. Laux (Reneé); M.A. Brantley (Milam); A. Agarwal (Anita); L. Ersoy (Lebriz); A. Caramoy (Albert); T. Langmann (Thomas); N.T.M. Saksens (Nicole T.); Jong, E.K. (Eiko Kde); C. Hoyng (Carel); M.S. Cain (Melinda); A.J. Richardson (Andrea); T.M. Martin (Tammy M.); J. Blangero (John); D.E. Weeks (Daniel); Dhillon, B. (Bal); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); K.F. Doheny (Kimberly); Romm, J. (Jane); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline); C. Hayward (Caroline); Gorin, M.B. (Michael B.); M.L. Klein (Michael); P.N. Baird (Paul); A.I. Hollander (Anneke); Fauser, S. (Sascha); WYates, J.R. (John R.); R. Allikmets (Rando); J.J. Wang (Jie Jin); D.A. Schaumberg (Debra); B.E.K. Klein (Barbara); S.A. Hagstrom (Stephanie); Y. Chowers (Yehuda); A.J. Lotery (Andrew); T. Léveillard (Thierry); K. Zhang (Kang); M.H. Brilliant (Murray H.); A.W. Hewit (Alex); A. Swaroop (Anand); Chew, E.Y. (Emily Y.); M.A. Pericak-Vance (Margaret); M.M. DeAngelis (Margaret); D. Stambolian (Dwight); J.L. Haines (Jonathan); S.K. Iyengar (Sudha); B.H.F. Weber (Bernhard); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); I.M. Heid (Iris)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAdvanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly, with limited therapeutic options. Here we report on a study of >12 million variants, including 163,714 directly genotyped, mostly rare, protein-altering variants. Analyzing 16,144 patients

  7. Memory Loss, Dementia, and Stroke: Implications for Rehabilitation of Older Adults with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Older adults with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are not immune to the other diseases of aging. Although AMD is the leading cause of low vision in older Americans, stroke is the leading cause of disability, and dementias affect another 2.5 million older Americans. Each condition alone can significantly impair a person's ability to…

  8. Repeatability of swept-source optical coherence tomography retinal and choroidal thickness measurements in neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanumunthadu, Daren; Ilginis, Tomas; Restori, Marie

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim was to determine the intrasession repeatability of swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT)-derived retinal and choroidal thickness measurements in eyes with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). METHODS: A prospective study consisting of patients with...

  9. Cfh genotype interacts with dietary glycemic index to modulate age-related macular degeneration-like features in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of visual impairment worldwide. Genetics and diet contribute to the relative risk for developing AMD, but their interactions are poorly understood. Genetic variations in Complement Factor H (CFH), and dietary glycemic index (GI) are major ris...

  10. Comparing the effectiveness of bevacizumab to ranibizumab in patients with exudative age-related macular degeneration. The BRAMD study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M.E. Schauwvlieghe; G. Dijkman; J.M.M. Hooymans (Johanna); F.D. Verbraak; C. Hoyng (Carel); M.G.W. Dijkgraaf (Marcel); T. Peto (Tünde); J.R. Vingerling (Hans); R.O. Schlingemann (Reinier)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To compare the effectiveness of bevacizumab and ranibizumab in the treatment of exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Design: Multicentre, randomized, controlled, double-masked clinical trial in 327 patients. The noninferiority margin was 4 letters. Patients: Patient

  11. Year 2 efficacy results of 2 randomized controlled clinical trials of pegaptanib for neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chakravarthy, U.; Adamis, A.P.; Cunningham Jr, E.T.; Goldbaum, M.; Guyer, D.R.; Katz, B.; Patel, M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of a second year of pegaptanib sodium therapy in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). DESIGN: Two concurrent, multicenter, randomized, double-masked, sham-controlled studies (V.I.S.I.O.N. [Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Inhibition

  12. Comparing the Effectiveness of Bevacizumab to Ranibizumab in Patients with Exudative Age-Related Macular Degeneration. The BRAMD Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schauwvlieghe, A M E; Dijkman, G; Hooymans, J M; Verbraak, F D; Hoyng, C B; Dijkgraaf, M G W; Peto, T; Vingerling, J R; Schlingemann, R O

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the effectiveness of bevacizumab and ranibizumab in the treatment of exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD). DESIGN: Multicentre, randomized, controlled, double-masked clinical trial in 327 patients. The non-inferiority margin was 4 letters. PATIENTS: Patients ≥ 60 year

  13. Comparing the Effectiveness of Bevacizumab to Ranibizumab in Patients with Exudative Age-Related Macular Degeneration. The BRAMD Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schauwvlieghe, A.M.; Dijkman, G.; Hooymans, J.M.; Verbraak, F.D.; Hoyng, C.B.; Dijkgraaf, M.G.; Peto, T.; Vingerling, J.R.; Schlingemann, R.O.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the effectiveness of bevacizumab and ranibizumab in the treatment of exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD). DESIGN: Multicentre, randomized, controlled, double-masked clinical trial in 327 patients. The non-inferiority margin was 4 letters. PATIENTS: Patients >/= 60

  14. Current and emerging therapies for the treatment of age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Vaughn Emerson

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available M Vaughn Emerson, Andreas K LauerCasey Eye Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USAAbstract: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of vision loss in the industrialized world. In the last few decades, the mainstay of treatment for choroidal neovascularization (CNV due to AMD has been thermal laser photocoagulation. In the last decade, photodynamic therapy with verteporfin extended treatment for more patients. While both of these treatments have prevented further vision loss in a subset of patients, improvement in visual acuity is rare. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF therapy has revolutionized the treatment of AMD-related CNV. Pegaptanib, an anti-VEGF aptamer prevents vision loss in CNV, although the performance is similar to that of photodynamic therapy. Ranibizumab, an antibody fragment and bevacizumab, a full-length humanized monoclonal antibody against VEGF have both shown promising results with improvements in visual acuity with either agent. VEGF trap, a modified soluble VEGF receptor analogue, binds VEGF more tightly than all other anti-VEGF agents and has also shown promising results in early trials. Other treatment strategies to decrease the effect of VEGF have used small interfering ribonucleic acid (RNA to inhibit VEGF production and VEGF receptor production. Steroids, including anecortave acetate in the treatment and prevention of CNV, have shown promise in controlled trials. Receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as vatalanib, inhibit downstream effects of VEGF, and have been effective in the treatment of CNV in early studies. Squalamine lactate inhibits plasma membrane ion channels with downstream effects on VEGF, and has shown promising results with systemic administration. Other growth factors, including pigment epithelium-derived growth factor that has been administered via an adenoviral vector has shown promising initial results. In some patients ciliary

  15. Role of intravitreal Bevacizumab Injection for Management of Neovascular Age Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha K Desai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Age related macular degeneration ( ARMD is the major cause of severe visual loss in older adults. Different treatment modalities are available such as: Laser photocoagulation, photodynamic therapy,transpupillary thermotherapy,submacular surgery and anti-veg. Aims and Objectives: The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intravitreally administered Bevacizumab a humanized monoclonal anti and ndash;VEGF in Neovascular Age related Macular Degeneration. Methodology: This non randomized, prospective study was carried out on 75 eyes of 75 patients attending the OPD at M and J Institute Of Ophthalmology and diagnosed as having Neovascular ARMD confirmed on FFA and SD-OCT . After taking written informed consent all patients were injected with intravitreal Bevacizumab 1.25 mg/0.05 ml. Follow up visits were scheduled one week, one month post procedure and every monthly thereafter. Results: 75 eyes of 75 patients were included in this non randomized prospective study. and 29.33% patients required 2 injections. Visual acuity is improved more than 3 lines from baseline in 21.33% patient, 64% patient have 2-3 lines gain and 6.66% patients showed 0-1 line gain in snellen's visual acuity. 5.33% patients have a loss of 1 line from baseline and 2.66% patients showed loss of 2-3 lines. Central foveal thickness decreased more than 200 microns from baseline in 52% patients, 28% patients have decreased of 100-200 microns and 20% patients have decreased of less than 100 microns. Discussion: Approximately 10 % of ARMD patients manifest the neovascular form of the disease. 12 weeks. Our study showed that 80% patients had decrease in central foveal thickness more than 100 microns from baseline at the end of one year. 85% patients had gain of 2 or more lines on Snellen's visual acuity chart from baseline.No patient had any serious local or systemic adverse reactions.Limitations of our study is small number of patients,ICG not done

  16. [The age-related macular degeneration as a vascular disease/part of systemic vasculopathy: contributions to its pathogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Tamás

    2015-03-01

    The wall of blood vessels including those in choroids may be harmed by several repeated and/or prolonged mechanical, physical, chemical, microbiological, immunologic, and genetic impacts (risk factors), which may trigger a protracted response, the so-called host defense response. As a consequence, pathological changes resulting in vascular injury (e. g. atherosclerosis, age-related macular degeneration) may be evolved. Risk factors can also act directly on the endothelium through an increased production of reactive oxygen species promoting an endothelial activation, which leads to endothelial dysfunction, the onset of vascular disease. Thus, endothelial dysfunction is a link between the harmful stimulus and vascular injury; any kind of harmful stimuli may trigger the defensive chain that results in inflammation that may lead to vascular injury. It has been shown that even early age-related macular degeneration is associated with the presence of diffuse arterial disease and patients with early age-related macular degeneration demonstrate signs of systemic and retinal vascular alterations. Chronic inflammation, a feature of AMD, is tightly linked to diseases associated with ED: AMD is accompanied by a general inflammatory response, in the form of complement system activation, similar to that observed in degenerative vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. All these facts indicate that age-related macular degeneration may be a vascular disease (or part of a systemic vasculopathy). This recognition could have therapeutic implications because restoration of endothelial dysfunction may prevent the development or improve vascular disease resulting in prevention or improvement of age-related macular degeneration as well.

  17. Individualized Treatment of Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration: What are Patients Gaining? Or Losing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W. Stewart

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The widespread use of drugs that bind diffusible vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF has revolutionized the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD. The pivotal ranibizumab and aflibercept registration trials featured monthly intravitreal injections for 12 months, during which visual acuities and macular edema rapidly improved for the first 3 months and modest gains or stabilization continued until the primary endpoint. In many subsequent trials, patients were evaluated monthly and treated as-needed (PRN according to the results of visual acuity (VA testing, fundus examinations and optical coherence tomography scans. Compared to monthly-treated control groups, PRN treated patients require fewer injections during the first year but they also experience smaller VA gains (1–3 letters. A small number of prospective trials that directly compared monthly with PRN therapy showed that VA gains with discontinuous therapy lag slightly behind those achieved with monthly injections. Physicians recognize that monthly office visits with frequent intraocular injections challenge patients’ compliance, accrue high drug and professional service costs, and clog office schedules with frequently returning patients. To decrease the numbers of both office visits and anti-VEGF injections without sacrificing VA gains, physicians have embraced the treat-and-extend strategy. Treat-and-extend has not been studied as rigorously as PRN but it has become popular among both vitreoretinal specialists and patients. Despite the possible risks associated with discontinuous therapy (decreased VA and increased macular fluid, most physicians individualize treatment (PRN or treat-and-extend for the majority of their patients. This review chapter explores the many advantages of individualized therapy, while balancing these against suboptimal responses due to the decreased frequency of anti-VEGF injections.

  18. The role of molecular genetic factors in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Luciana Negrão Frota de; Carolino, Rachel Melilo; Sperandio, Diogo Cazelli; Nehemy, Márcio Bittar; De Marco, L A

    2009-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most frequent cause of irreversible blindness in the elderly in developed countries. Although the etiology of AMD remains largely unknown, numerous studies have suggested that both genes and environmental risk factors significantly influence the risk of developing AMD. Recently, single nucleotide polymorphisms, DNA sequence variations found within the complement factor H (CFH) gene, have been found to be strongly associated with the development of AMD. Several other genes have had at least one positive association finding and deserve further exploration. The purpose of this review is to provide an extensive report of the current data of AMD genetics and the contribution of this knowledge helps to the better understanding of its pathophysiology.

  19. New approaches in the management of choroidal neovascular membrane in age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verma Lalit

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a leading cause of blindness in the elderly population. The prevalence is reported to be 1.2-1.4% in several population-based epidemiological studies. Currently 25-30 million people worldwide are blind due to AMD. With the aging world population it is bound to increase significantly, and could become a significant public health problem in next two decades, with serious socio-economic implications. Several strategies are today available to treat the wet form of AMD, which is responsible for significant visual loss. These were until recently confined to laser photocoagulation, and subretinal surgery, but today two other modalities, namely, radiation and photodynamic therapy, are available. These treatment modalities however, are aimed at preservation of vision only, and not at reversing the process of the disease. Further research on antiangiogenic drugs and gene therapy could significantly help AMD patients.

  20. Knowledge discovery in ophthalmology: analysis of wet form of age-related macular degeneration treatment outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulińska, Magdalena; Tataj, Emanuel; Mulawka, Jan J.; Szaflik, Jerzy

    2009-06-01

    Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD), according to epidemiological data, is a main reason of social blindness among elderly people in developed countries. There are two forms of AMD: dry and wet. The first one is of good prognosis with low possibility of serious visual deterioration, while the second one usually leads to quick and severe visual impairment. The aim of our investigations is to analyse results of so called real-life treatment of wet AMD. We analysed outcomes of our patients treated with intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF drugs: Lucentis (61 patients) and Avastin (78 patients). We analysed changes in visual acuity (functional effect) and central retinal thickness (anatomic effect). Both drugs occurred to be efficient in treatment of wet form of AMD, however results were more satisfying in patients with better baseline visual acuity. In our approach we used R environment - an integrated suite of software facilities for data analysis and graphics.

  1. Gene ontology and KEGG enrichment analyses of genes related to age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Xing, ZhiHao; Ma, Mingming; Wang, Ning; Cai, Yu-Dong; Chen, Lei; Xu, Xun

    2014-01-01

    Identifying disease genes is one of the most important topics in biomedicine and may facilitate studies on the mechanisms underlying disease. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a serious eye disease; it typically affects older adults and results in a loss of vision due to retina damage. In this study, we attempt to develop an effective method for distinguishing AMD-related genes. Gene ontology and KEGG enrichment analyses of known AMD-related genes were performed, and a classification system was established. In detail, each gene was encoded into a vector by extracting enrichment scores of the gene set, including it and its direct neighbors in STRING, and gene ontology terms or KEGG pathways. Then certain feature-selection methods, including minimum redundancy maximum relevance and incremental feature selection, were adopted to extract key features for the classification system. As a result, 720 GO terms and 11 KEGG pathways were deemed the most important factors for predicting AMD-related genes.

  2. Physical activity patterns in patients with early and late age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subhi, Yousif; Sørensen, Torben Lykke

    2016-01-01

    best-corrected visual acuity in the best-seeing and the worse-seeing eye was associated with less engagement in physical activities that would work up sweat and a lower number of steps taken daily. Patients with bilateral vision loss from late AMD engaged in physical activities that were more......INTRODUCTION: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) leads to visual impairment that affects visual functioning and thereby the ability to be physically active. We investigated physical activity patterns in patients with AMD. METHODS: Patients with early and late AMD and elderly controls were...... recruited for this hospital-based cross-sectional study. All participants had their best-corrected visual acuity measured and were interviewed about their physical activity based on questions that covered regular physical activity, physical activity that would work up sweat, climbing the stairs and time...

  3. Genetic and functional dissection of HTRA1 and LOC387715 in age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenglin Yang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A common haplotype on 10q26 influences the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD and encompasses two genes, LOC387715 and HTRA1. Recent data have suggested that loss of LOC387715, mediated by an insertion/deletion (in/del that destabilizes its message, is causally related with the disorder. Here we show that loss of LOC387715 is insufficient to explain AMD susceptibility, since a nonsense mutation (R38X in this gene that leads to loss of its message resides in a protective haplotype. At the same time, the common disease haplotype tagged by the in/del and rs11200638 has an effect on the transcriptional upregulation of the adjacent gene, HTRA1. These data implicate increased HTRA1 expression in the pathogenesis of AMD and highlight the importance of exploring multiple functional consequences of alleles in haplotypes that confer susceptibility to complex traits.

  4. Age-related macular degeneration: genetic and environmental factors of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuhong; Bedell, Matthew; Zhang, Kang

    2010-10-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of visual impairment among the elderly in developed countries, and its prevalence is thus increasing as the population ages; however, treatment options remain limited because the etiology and pathogenesis of AMD are incompletely defined. Recently, much progress has been made in gene discovery and mechanistic studies, which clearly indicate that AMD involves the interaction of multiple genetic and environmental factors. The identification of genes that have a substantial impact on the risk for AMD is not only facilitating the diagnosis and screening of populations at risk but is also elucidating key molecular pathways of pathogenesis. Pharmacogenetic studies of treatment responsiveness among patients with the "wet" form of AMD are increasingly proving to be clinically relevant; pharmacogenetic approaches hold great promise for both identifying patients with the best chance for vision recovery as well as tailoring individualized therapies.

  5. Pluripotent stem cells: A therapeutic source for age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowmya Parameswaran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD leads to progressive loss of central vision in the elderly. At a cellular level, there is aging of the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells, and accumulation of lipofuscin that interferes with the proper functioning of RPE which eventually leads to apoptosis. Treatment depends on the stage of the disease. Wet AMD which has neovascularization is managed by local therapies such as laser photocoagulation and photodynamic therapy and is managed with injections of antivascular endothelial growth factor-based therapy. Unlike the wet AMD, an effective therapy does not exist for dry AMD and geographic atrophy. Cell replacement therapy has shown promise. This review discusses the opportunities in the various types of cell-based therapy, their limitations, and what is possible for India.

  6. Age-related macular degeneration: a guide for the primary care physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazin, Ribhi; Freeman, P David; Kahook, Malik Y

    2009-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of visual loss in Americans over the age of 50 years. AMD often results in profound disability due to the disease destroying the macula, the part of the retina responsible for central visual acuity and color vision. Risk factors for AMD include age greater than 50, female gender, Caucasian race, cigarette smoking, and family history of AMD. African Americans and other racial or ethnic groups can be affected by AMD. Although there is no cure for AMD, early diagnosis and treatment may slow disease progression and minimize irreversible visual dysfunction. Individuals suffering from central vision loss from AMD often retain peripheral vision. These affected individuals can benefit from low vision therapy, visual rehabilitation, or both to maintain or enhance activities of daily living.

  7. Anxiety and depression in patients with advanced macular degeneration: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimarolli, Verena R; Casten, Robin J; Rovner, Barry W; Heyl, Vera; Sörensen, Silvia; Horowitz, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) - despite advances in prevention and medical treatment options - remains prevalent among older adults, often resulting in functional losses that negatively affect the mental health of older adults. In particular, the prevalence of both anxiety and depression in patients with AMD is high. Along with medical treatment options, low vision rehabilitation and AMD-specific behavioral and self-management programs have been developed and have demonstrated effectiveness in improving the mental health of AMD patients. This article reviews the prevalence of anxiety and depression in patients with advanced AMD, discusses potential mechanisms accounting for the development of depression and anxiety in AMD patients, presents the state-of the-art of available interventions for addressing anxiety and depression in AMD patients, and delineates recommendations for eye care professionals regarding how to screen for these two prevalent mental health problems and how to facilitate appropriate treatment for patients with AMD.

  8. The Use of Intravitreal Aflibercept in the Treatment of Wet Type of Age Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejith Rag

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aflibercept, an anti vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF which was originally developed in the treatment of large bowel cancers, has been found to be effective in the treatment of wet type of age related macular degeneration (ARMD, a potentially sight threatening condition affecting the retina. Chemically this biological drug is C4318 H6788 N1164 O1304 S12 with a molecular weight of 96.9 KDa. This is manufactured as a lipid soluble recombinant fusion glycoprotein that binds with both forms of vascular endothelial growth factors, i.e. A and B as well as placental growth factors, thus blocking the angiogenic action and consequent neovascular membrane growth, the pathognomonic feature of wet ARMD.

  9. Diminishing risk for age-related macular degeneration with nutrition: a current view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, Molly; Weikel, Karen; Garber, Caren; Taylor, Allen

    2013-07-02

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Clinical hallmarks of AMD are observed in one third of the elderly in industrialized countries. Preventative interventions through dietary modification are attractive strategies, because they are more affordable than clinical therapies, do not require specialists for administration and many studies suggest a benefit of micro- and macro-nutrients with respect to AMD with few, if any, adverse effects. The goal of this review is to provide information from recent literature on the value of various nutrients, particularly omega-3 fatty acids, lower glycemic index diets and, perhaps, some carotenoids, with regard to diminishing risk for onset or progression of AMD. Results from the upcoming Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) II intervention trial should be particularly informative.

  10. Relationship between the complement system, risk factors and prediction models in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Nalini S; Matta, Bharati; Lyzogubov, Valeriy V; Bora, Puran S

    2015-02-01

    Studies performed over the past decade in humans and experimental animals have been a major source of information and improved our understanding of how dysregulation of the complement system contributes to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) pathology. Drusen, the hall-mark of dry-type AMD are reported to be the by-product of complement mediated inflammatory processes. In wet AMD, unregulated complement activation results in increased production of angiogenic growth factors leading to choroidal neovascularization both in humans and in animal models. In this review article we have linked the complement system with modifiable and non-modifiable AMD risk factors as well as with prediction models of AMD. Understanding the association between the complement system, risk factors and prediction models will help improve our understanding of AMD pathology and management of this disease.

  11. HLA B27 as Predisposition Factor to Suffer Age Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril, Enrique Villegas; Fernández, Rafael González; Torres, Luis Pérula; Lacomba, Manuel Santos; Galera, José María Gallardo

    2009-01-01

    To research whether specific alleles HLA class I (HLA-A and HLA-B) and class II (HLA-DR) are risk factors for the development of exudative type of Age Related Macular Degeneration (ARMD), HLA antigens are expressed both in normal and affected eyes with ARMD. We designed a prospective case-controlled study. We recruited 75 patients with choroidal neovascularization predominantly classic or occult, secondary to ARMD, and treated with photodynamic therapy. Two hundred and fifty patients over 55 years old, without ophthalmologic pathology who went to hospital for an analytical routine check were used as control. The analysis of the data shows a significant difference between two groups. Allele HLA-B27 correlated positively with ARMD (p < 0.0113). However, we didn't find alleles negatively associated. Thus HLA-B27 is an allele predisposed to suffer ARMD. PMID:19728932

  12. Patients’ knowledge and perspectives on wet age-related macular degeneration and its treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Kandula

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Sushma Kandula1, Jeffrey C Lamkin1, Teresa Albanese2, Deepak P Edward11Department of Ophthalmology, 2Health Service Research and Education Institute, SUMMA Health System, Akron OH, USASummary: There have been no studies examining the level of understanding age-related macular degeneration (ARMD patients have about their disease, or their perceptions about intraocular injections as treatment. In this study, patient knowledge about ARMD risk factors was low but patients appeared more optimistic than fearful when confronted with intraocular antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF injections as treatment.Purpose: In recent years there has been an increase in our understanding of wet ARMD, and a dramatic shift in the treatment paradigm. However, to our knowledge, no studies have examined how much ARMD patients understand their disease, or how they feel about receiving intraocular injections as treatment. The primary objectives of this study are to identify areas in which ARMD patients may be uninformed about their disease, and to recognize specific fears or expectations that patients may have regarding treatment with intraocular anti-VEGF injections.Design: Prospective, survey-based study.Methods: This is a prospective survey-based study. An anonymous 32-item questionnaire was compiled and distributed to patients with wet ARMD who underwent at least one intraocular anti-VEGF injection. Eighty-three patients from a retina practice in a suburban setting completed the questionnaire that gauged both their knowledge of ARMD and their perspectives on its treatment. Data was analyzed using chi-square testing.Results: Seventy-eight percent of patients received most of their knowledge of ARMD from their physician. Eighty-nine percent of patients prefer to receive more information on ARMD, if needed, directly from their physician. Only 21%, 48%, 37%, 48%, and 36%, respectively, correctly identified how diet, special vitamins, high blood pressure

  13. Potential role of dietary n-3 fatty acids in the prevention of dementia and macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Elizabeth J; Schaefer, Ernst J

    2006-06-01

    Dementia and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are major causes of disability in the elderly. n-3 Fatty acids, particularly docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are highly concentrated in brain and retinal tissue and may prevent or delay the progression of dementia and AMD. Low dietary intakes and plasma concentrations have been reported to be associated with dementia, cognitive decline, and AMD risk. The major dietary sources of DHA are fish and fish oils, although dietary supplements are available. At this point, it is not possible to make firm recommendations regarding n-3 fatty acids and the prevention of dementia and AMD. Our own unpublished observations from the Framingham Heart Study suggest that > or =180 mg/d of dietary DHA (approximately 2.7 fish servings/wk) is associated with an approximately 50% reduction in dementia risk. At least this amount of DHA is generally found in one commercially available 1-g fish oil capsule given daily.

  14. The role of the ERG in the diagnosis and treatment of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerth, Christina

    2009-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is affecting an increasing number of people, with 2.95 million people estimated to be affected in the USA by 2020. Possible preventive agents, such as vitamins and supplements have been studied and new treatment options for AMD have been developed in recent years. What role does electrophysiology play as a sensitive outcome measure? The most commonly used tests are the full-field electroretinogram (ffERG) and the multifocal ERG (mfERG). Test results from patients with AMD and reduced central vision need special attention in respect to fixation pattern, age-matched control data, and retinal luminance. Advantages, disadvantages and limitations of techniques will be considered, together with a review of published studies.

  15. New research progress on the epidemiology of age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Xing Wu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration(AMDis a kind of age-related blinding degenerative fundus lesions, totally about 30 million patients suffering from AMD all over the world, with about 500 000 people blind for it yearly. As the development of economy and the aging of the population intensified, incidence of AMD indicates a trend of rising year by year, being the third major cause of blindness in our country. At present, the pathogenesis of AMD is not fully clear, as reported it may be related to oxidative stress, inflammatory immune response, VEGF and genetic manipulation. Clinical treatments mainly include photodynamic therapy, drug therapy, radiation therapy, laser photocoagulaory operation, the pupil warm treatments, Chinese medicine and intravitreous injection VEGF antagonists such as Ranibizumab, Conbercept and so on. In this issue, we mainly expound on the progress in the epidemiological studies of AMD, especially elaborate the progress made on genetic manipulation in recent years.

  16. Autophagy regulating kinases as potential therapeutic targets for age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaarniranta, Kai; Kauppinen, Anu; Blasiak, Janusz; Salminen, Antero

    2012-11-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of central vision loss in the elderly in the developed countries. The number of AMD patients will double during the next decades due to increasing number of aged people. Chronic oxidative stress, inflammation and accumulation of protein-rich deposits both in the retinal pigment epithelium lysosomes and under the retinal pigment epithelium herald the onset of AMD. The disease can be divided into dry and wet AMD forms. The dry form of the disease is more prevalent accounting for up to 90% of all cases. Continued intraocular injections are the current treatment strategy to prevent progression of wet AMD. It is a major challenge to develop new drugs that could prevent or at least ease the symptoms of the increasing population of AMD patients. Since AMD pathology is clearly associated with accumulated protein deposits, the autophagy clearance system might represent a potential future therapeutic target for AMD as is thoroughly discussed here.

  17. Endoplasmic reticulum stress as a primary pathogenic mechanism leading to age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libby, Richard T; Gould, Douglas B

    2010-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multi-factorial disease and a leading cause of blindness. Proteomic and genetic data suggest that activation or de-repression of the alternate complement cascade of innate immunity is involved in end-stage disease. Several lines of evidence suggest that production of reactive oxygen species and chronic oxidative stress lead to protein and lipid modifications that initiate the complement cascade. Understanding the triggers of these pathogenic pathways and the site of the primary insult will be important for development of targeted therapeutics. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress from misfolded mutant proteins and other sources are an important potential tributary mechanism. We propose that misfolded-protein-induced ER stress in the retinal-pigmented epithelium and/or choroid could lead to chronic oxidative stress, complement deregulation and AMD. Small molecules targeted to ER stress and oxidative stress could allow for a shift from disease treatment to disease prevention.

  18. Interrelation Between Oxidative Stress and Complement Activation in Models of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol-Lereis, Luciana M; Schäfer, Nicole; Kuhn, Laura B; Rohrer, Bärbel; Pauly, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Millions of individuals older than 50-years suffer from age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Associated with this multifactorial disease are polymorphisms of complement factor genes and a main environmental risk factor-oxidative stress. Until now the linkage between these risk factors for AMD has not been fully understood. Recent studies, integrating results on oxidative stress, complement activation, epidemiology and ocular pathology suggested the following sequence in AMD-etiology: initially, chronic oxidative stress results in modification of proteins and lipids in the posterior of the eye; these tissue alterations trigger chronic inflammation, involving the complement system; and finally, invasive immune cells facilitate pathology in the retina. Here, we summarize the results for animal studies which aim to elucidate this molecular interplay of oxidative events and tissue-specific complement activation in the eye.

  19. Transpupillary thermotherapy for choroidal neovascular membrane in age related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal Manisha

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of transpupillary thermotherapy (TTT in choroidal neovasularisation (CNVM secondary to age related macular degeneration ( AMD. Material and methods: Retrospective, non-randomized study of 28 eyes of 28 patients with subfoveal CNVM (classic, occult or mixed secondary to AMD. Results: Fifteen patients (53.57% maintained their pre-treatment vision, 2 (7.14% patients showed improvement of more than 2 lines and 11(39.28% patients showed deterioration of vision by> 2 lines. Angiographic and clinical regression of CNVM was noted in 19 patients (67.8% on an average follow up of 15.32 ± 3.31 months. Conclusion: TTT leads to stabilisation of vision in 60% of treated eyes with CNVM due to AMD.

  20. Diminishing Risk for Age-Related Macular Degeneration with Nutrition: A Current View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Taylor

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Clinical hallmarks of AMD are observed in one third of the elderly in industrialized countries. Preventative interventions through dietary modification are attractive strategies, because they are more affordable than clinical therapies, do not require specialists for administration and many studies suggest a benefit of micro- and macro-nutrients with respect to AMD with few, if any, adverse effects. The goal of this review is to provide information from recent literature on the value of various nutrients, particularly omega-3 fatty acids, lower glycemic index diets and, perhaps, some carotenoids, with regard to diminishing risk for onset or progression of AMD. Results from the upcoming Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS II intervention trial should be particularly informative.

  1. Visual outcomes in relation to time to treatment in neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Annette; Bloch, Sara Brandi; Fuchs, Josefine;

    2015-01-01

    1185 eyes in 1099 patients who began vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor treatment for nAMD during four separate periods in 2007, 2009, 2011 and 2012 using a fixed loading-dose regimen of three ranibizumab injections. RESULTS: Mean best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) at presentation remained......PURPOSE: To study the relation between the interval from diagnosis to initiation of intravitreal injection therapy and visual outcome in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) and to report changes over time in fellow-eye status. METHODS: Retrospective chart review. The study included....... CONCLUSION: In this study, 2-week-earlier injection was associated with the equivalent of a 5-Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study letter-gain in mean visual acuity at 3 months after presentation. The difference is larger than expected from the 2-week-longer duration of disease at the study end...

  2. Physical activity patterns in patients with early and late age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subhi, Yousif; Sørensen, Torben Lykke

    2016-01-01

    best-corrected visual acuity in the best-seeing and the worse-seeing eye was associated with less engagement in physical activities that would work up sweat and a lower number of steps taken daily. Patients with bilateral vision loss from late AMD engaged in physical activities that were more......INTRODUCTION: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) leads to visual impairment that affects visual functioning and thereby the ability to be physically active. We investigated physical activity patterns in patients with AMD. METHODS: Patients with early and late AMD and elderly controls were...... recruited for this hospital-based cross-sectional study. All participants had their best-corrected visual acuity measured and were interviewed about their physical activity based on questions that covered regular physical activity, physical activity that would work up sweat, climbing the stairs and time...

  3. Microperimetry biofeedback training in a patient with bilateral myopic macular degeneration with central scotoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Raman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microperimetry-1 (MP-1 evaluation and MP-1 biofeedback training were done in a case of bilateral myopic macular degeneration with a central scotoma. Fixation behavior, location and stability of preferred retinal locus, eye movement speed, and mean sensitivity were assessed. The mean retinal sensitivities before, after and at 1-year after training in the right eye were 2.9 dB, 2.9 dB and 3.7 dB and in the left eye were 3.5 dB, 3.7 dB and 1.8 dB. The fixation point in the 2° gravitation circle, improved from 40% to 50% in the right eye and from 43% to 67% in the left eye. The average eye speed before, after and at 1-year after training in right eye were 0.19°/s, 0.26°/s and 0.25°/s and in left eye were 0.36°/s, 0.25°/s and 0.27°/s. Thus, biofeedback training using MP-1 can improve the visual function in patients with macular diseases and central scotoma.

  4. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Clinical Findings following Treatment with Antiangiogenic Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto; Fernández-Blanco, Clemencia Torrón; Figueroa, Marta S.; Pina Marín, Begoña; Fernández-Baca Vaca, Gustavo; Piñero-Bustamante, Antonio; Donate López, Juan; García-Arumí, José; Farrés Martí, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To survey the management of patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nvAMD) in Spain. Methods. An observational retrospective multicenter study was conducted. The variables analyzed were sociodemographic characteristics, foveal and macular thickness, visual acuity (VA), type of treatment, number of injections, and the initial administration of a loading dose of an antiangiogenic drug. Results. 208 patients were followed up during 23.4 months in average. During the first and second years, patients received a mean of 4.5 ± 1.8 and 1.6 ± 2.1 injections of antiangiogenic drugs, and 5.4 ± 2.8 and 3.6 ± 2.2 follow-up visits were performed, respectively. The highest improvement in VA was observed at 3 months of follow-up, followed by a decrease in the response that stabilized above baseline values until the end of the study. Patients who received an initial loading dose presented greater VA gains than those without. Conclusions. Our results suggest the need for a more standardized approach in the management and diagnosis of nvAMD receiving VEGF inhibitors. To achieve the visual outcomes reported in pivotal trials, an early diagnosis, proactive approach (more treating than follow-up visits), and a close monitoring might be the key to successfully manage nvAMD. PMID:24693418

  5. Do Nutritional Supplements Have a Role in Age Macular Degeneration Prevention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinazo-Durán, Maria D.; Gómez-Ulla, Francisco; Arias, Luis; Araiz, Javier; Casaroli-Marano, Ricardo; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto; García-Medina, Jose J.; López-Gálvez, Maria Isabel; Manzanas, Lucía; Salas, Anna; Zapata, Miguel; Diaz-Llopis, Manuel; García-Layana, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To review the proposed pathogenic mechanisms of age macular degeneration (AMD), as well as the role of antioxidants (AOX) and omega-3 fatty acids (ω-3) supplements in AMD prevention. Materials and Methods. Current knowledge on the cellular/molecular mechanisms of AMD and the epidemiologic/experimental studies on the effects of AOX and ω-3 were addressed all together with the scientific evidence and the personal opinion of professionals involved in the Retina Group of the OFTARED (Spain). Results. High dietary intakes of ω-3 and macular pigments lutein/zeaxanthin are associated with lower risk of prevalence and incidence in AMD. The Age-Related Eye Disease study (AREDS) showed a beneficial effect of high doses of vitamins C, E, beta-carotene, and zinc/copper in reducing the rate of progression to advanced AMD in patients with intermediate AMD or with one-sided late AMD. The AREDS-2 study has shown that lutein and zeaxanthin may substitute beta-carotene because of its potential relationship with increased lung cancer incidence. Conclusion. Research has proved that elder people with poor diets, especially with low AOX and ω-3 micronutrients intake and subsequently having low plasmatic levels, are more prone to developing AMD. Micronutrient supplementation enhances antioxidant defense and healthy eyes and might prevent/retard/modify AMD. PMID:24672708

  6. Pharmacogenetics of antiangiogenic and antineovascular therapies of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Elisa; Lazzeri, Stefano; Orlandi, Paola; Figus, Michele; Fioravanti, Anna; Di Desidero, Teresa; Sartini, Maria Sole; Nardi, Marco; Danesi, Romano; Bocci, Guido

    2012-07-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common age-related disease causing irreversible visual loss in industrialized countries, is a complex and multifactorial illness. Researchers have found components of the complement alternative pathway inside drusen and Bruch's membrane of AMD patients, underlying a possible important role of complement factor H in the pathogenesis of AMD. The neovascular (wet) AMD is the most destructive form and it is characterized by invasion of new blood vessels into subretinal spaces with subsequent exudation and bleeding, resulting in scarring of the macular region and loss of the central vision. The hallmark of the neovascular form is the choroidal neovascularization, where VEGF-A has an important role in the pathogenesis of the disease. SNPs of these genes have recently been investigated as potential pharmacogenetic markers of the antiangiogenic and antineovascular therapy of AMD, which includes verteporfin photodynamic therapy and anti-VEGF-A drugs, such as pegaptanib, bevacizumab and ranibizumab. The CFH rs1061170 CT and TT genotypes have been associated with an improvement of visual acuity in bevacizumab or ranibizumab treated patients, whereas patients harboring VEGF-A rs699946 G allele responded better to bevacizumab-based therapy if compared with patients carrying the A allele. In conclusion, the discovery of pharmacogenetic markers for the personalization of the antiangiogenic and/or antineovascular therapy could be, in the future, a key issue in ophthalmology to obtain a personalization of the therapy and to avoid unnecessary costs and adverse drug reactions.

  7. The molecular genetic basis of age-related macular degeneration: an overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saritha Katta; Inderjeet Kaur; Subhabrata Chakrabarti

    2009-12-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex disorder of the eye and the third leading cause of blindness worldwide. With a multifactorial etiology, AMD results in progressive loss of central vision affecting the macular region of the eye in elderly. While the prevalence is relatively higher in the Caucasian populations, it has gradually become a major public health issue among the non-Caucasian populations (including Indians) as well due to senescence, rapidly changing demographics and life-style factors. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on large case–control cohorts have helped in mapping genes in the complement cascade that are involved in the regulation of innate immunity with AMD susceptibility. Genes involved with mitochondrial oxidative stress and extracellular matrix regulation also play a role in AMD pathogenesis. Majority of the associations observed in complement (CFH, CFB, C2 and C3) and other (ARMS2 and HTRA1) genes have been replicated in diverse populations worldwide. Gene–gene (CFH with ARMS2 and HTRA1) interactions and correlations with environmental traits (smoking and body mass index) have been established as significant covariates in AMD pathology. In this review, we have provided an overview on the underlying molecular genetic mechanisms in AMD worldwide and highlight the AMD-associated-candidate genes and their potential role in disease pathogenesis.

  8. Do Nutritional Supplements Have a Role in Age Macular Degeneration Prevention?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria D. Pinazo-Durán

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To review the proposed pathogenic mechanisms of age macular degeneration (AMD, as well as the role of antioxidants (AOX and omega-3 fatty acids (ω-3 supplements in AMD prevention. Materials and Methods. Current knowledge on the cellular/molecular mechanisms of AMD and the epidemiologic/experimental studies on the effects of AOX and ω-3 were addressed all together with the scientific evidence and the personal opinion of professionals involved in the Retina Group of the OFTARED (Spain. Results. High dietary intakes of ω-3 and macular pigments lutein/zeaxanthin are associated with lower risk of prevalence and incidence in AMD. The Age-Related Eye Disease study (AREDS showed a beneficial effect of high doses of vitamins C, E, beta-carotene, and zinc/copper in reducing the rate of progression to advanced AMD in patients with intermediate AMD or with one-sided late AMD. The AREDS-2 study has shown that lutein and zeaxanthin may substitute beta-carotene because of its potential relationship with increased lung cancer incidence. Conclusion. Research has proved that elder people with poor diets, especially with low AOX and ω-3 micronutrients intake and subsequently having low plasmatic levels, are more prone to developing AMD. Micronutrient supplementation enhances antioxidant defense and healthy eyes and might prevent/retard/modify AMD.

  9. Do nutritional supplements have a role in age macular degeneration prevention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinazo-Durán, Maria D; Gómez-Ulla, Francisco; Arias, Luis; Araiz, Javier; Casaroli-Marano, Ricardo; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto; García-Medina, Jose J; López-Gálvez, Maria Isabel; Manzanas, Lucía; Salas, Anna; Zapata, Miguel; Diaz-Llopis, Manuel; García-Layana, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To review the proposed pathogenic mechanisms of age macular degeneration (AMD), as well as the role of antioxidants (AOX) and omega-3 fatty acids ( ω -3) supplements in AMD prevention. Materials and Methods. Current knowledge on the cellular/molecular mechanisms of AMD and the epidemiologic/experimental studies on the effects of AOX and ω -3 were addressed all together with the scientific evidence and the personal opinion of professionals involved in the Retina Group of the OFTARED (Spain). Results. High dietary intakes of ω -3 and macular pigments lutein/zeaxanthin are associated with lower risk of prevalence and incidence in AMD. The Age-Related Eye Disease study (AREDS) showed a beneficial effect of high doses of vitamins C, E, beta-carotene, and zinc/copper in reducing the rate of progression to advanced AMD in patients with intermediate AMD or with one-sided late AMD. The AREDS-2 study has shown that lutein and zeaxanthin may substitute beta-carotene because of its potential relationship with increased lung cancer incidence. Conclusion. Research has proved that elder people with poor diets, especially with low AOX and ω -3 micronutrients intake and subsequently having low plasmatic levels, are more prone to developing AMD. Micronutrient supplementation enhances antioxidant defense and healthy eyes and might prevent/retard/modify AMD.

  10. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Clinical Findings following Treatment with Antiangiogenic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Casaroli-Marano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To survey the management of patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nvAMD in Spain. Methods. An observational retrospective multicenter study was conducted. The variables analyzed were sociodemographic characteristics, foveal and macular thickness, visual acuity (VA, type of treatment, number of injections, and the initial administration of a loading dose of an antiangiogenic drug. Results. 208 patients were followed up during 23.4 months in average. During the first and second years, patients received a mean of 4.5±1.8 and 1.6±2.1 injections of antiangiogenic drugs, and 5.4±2.8 and 3.6±2.2 follow-up visits were performed, respectively. The highest improvement in VA was observed at 3 months of follow-up, followed by a decrease in the response that stabilized above baseline values until the end of the study. Patients who received an initial loading dose presented greater VA gains than those without. Conclusions. Our results suggest the need for a more standardized approach in the management and diagnosis of nvAMD receiving VEGF inhibitors. To achieve the visual outcomes reported in pivotal trials, an early diagnosis, proactive approach (more treating than follow-up visits, and a close monitoring might be the key to successfully manage nvAMD.

  11. Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Clinical Findings following Treatment with Antiangiogenic Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casaroli-Marano, Ricardo; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto; Fernández-Blanco, Clemencia Torrón; Figueroa, Marta S; Pina Marín, Begoña; Fernández-Baca Vaca, Gustavo; Piñero-Bustamante, Antonio; Donate López, Juan; García-Arumí, José; Farrés Martí, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To survey the management of patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nvAMD) in Spain. Methods. An observational retrospective multicenter study was conducted. The variables analyzed were sociodemographic characteristics, foveal and macular thickness, visual acuity (VA), type of treatment, number of injections, and the initial administration of a loading dose of an antiangiogenic drug. Results. 208 patients were followed up during 23.4 months in average. During the first and second years, patients received a mean of 4.5 ± 1.8 and 1.6 ± 2.1 injections of antiangiogenic drugs, and 5.4 ± 2.8 and 3.6 ± 2.2 follow-up visits were performed, respectively. The highest improvement in VA was observed at 3 months of follow-up, followed by a decrease in the response that stabilized above baseline values until the end of the study. Patients who received an initial loading dose presented greater VA gains than those without. Conclusions. Our results suggest the need for a more standardized approach in the management and diagnosis of nvAMD receiving VEGF inhibitors. To achieve the visual outcomes reported in pivotal trials, an early diagnosis, proactive approach (more treating than follow-up visits), and a close monitoring might be the key to successfully manage nvAMD.

  12. Visual Acuity, Retinal Sensitivity, and Macular Thickness Changes in Diabetic Patients without Diabetic Retinopathy after Cataract Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irman Grčar, Irena; Grčar, Rok; Pfeifer, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Aim. Functional and morphological macular study after cataract surgery in a group of diabetics without diabetic retinopathy compared to nondiabetics to evaluate the effect of surgical oxidative stress on diabetic retina. Methods. Prospective, comparative study. Preoperative eye exam, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) measured by ETDRS letters, and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were followed by standard cataract surgery. The follow-up visits at 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively included BCVA, OCT, and microperimetry, to analyze changes within and between the groups. Results. The BCVA improved significantly in diabetics and controls: 64.2 to 81.0 and 61.9 to 82.1 ETDRS at 6 months, respectively. The central macula at OCT significantly thickened in both groups, while the central 5 fields, corresponding to the microperimetry area, subclinically thickened from 284.20 to 291.18 μm at 6 months only in diabetics (p = 0.026). A matching slight decrease in the microperimetry sensitivity from 1 to 6 months was found also only in diabetics, with mean average difference −0.75 dB (p = 0.04). Conclusion. Underlying diabetes does not influence the surgical outcome in diabetics without diabetic retinopathy. However, slight thickening of wider macula and corresponding decrease in retinal sensitivity observed in diabetics 6 months postoperatively might influence visual function on long term. PMID:28243608

  13. Generic and disease-specific estimates of quality of life in macular degeneration:Mapping the MacDQoL onto the EQ-5D-3L

    OpenAIRE

    Dixon, Padraig; Dakin, Helen; Wordsworth, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The macular degeneration quality of life (MacDQoL) instrument is a validated condition-specific measure of quality of life in patients with macular degeneration. This paper presents the first mapping algorithm to predict EQ-5D from responses to the MacDQoL instrument. Methods Responses to the MacDQoL and EQ-5D-3L instruments from 482 patients were collected from the IVAN multicentre trial of two alternative drug treatments for neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Regression ...

  14. Stem cell therapies for age-related macular degeneration: the past, present, and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dang Y

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Yalong Dang,1–3 Chun Zhang,1,2 Yu Zhu31Department of Ophthalmology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 2Clinical Stem Cell Research Center, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Ophthalmology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: In the developed world, age-related macular degeneration (AMD is one of the major causes of irreversible blindness in the elderly. Although management of neovascular AMD (wet AMD has dramatically progressed, there is still no effective treatment for nonneovascular AMD (dry AMD, which is characterized by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cell death (or dysfunction and microenvironmental disruption in the retina. Therefore, RPE replacement and microenvironmental regulation represent viable treatments for dry AMD. Recent advances in cell biology have demonstrated that RPE cells can be easily generated from several cell types (pluripotent stem cells, multipotent stem cells, or even somatic cells by spontaneous differentiation, coculturing, defined factors or cell reprogramming, respectively. Additionally, in vivo studies also showed that the restoration of visual function could be obtained by transplanting functional RPE cells into the subretinal space of recipient. More importantly, clinical trials approved by the US government have shown promising prospects in RPE transplantation. However, key issues such as implantation techniques, immune rejection, and xeno-free techniques are still needed to be further investigated. This review will summarize recent advances in cell transplantation for dry AMD. The obstacles and prospects in this field will also be discussed.Keywords: stem cell, age-related macular degeneration, retinal pigment epithelium, cell reprogramming, clinical trial

  15. Evaluation of peripheral fundus autofluorescence in eyes with wet age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suetsugu T

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Tetsuyuki Suetsugu,1,2 Aki Kato,1 Munenori Yoshida,1 Tsutomu Yasukawa,1 Akiko Nishiwaki,1,3 Norio Hasegawa,1 Hideaki Usui,1 Yuichiro Ogura1 1Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 2Department of Ophthalmology, General Kamiiida Daiichi Hospital, 3Nishiwaki Eye Clinic, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan Purpose: We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of abnormal peripheral fundus autofluorescence (FAF in wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD using wide-field imaging instrument. Patients and methods: A retrospective, case-controlled study involving 66 eyes of 46 Japanese wet AMD patients and 32 eyes of 20 control patients was performed. Wide-field FAF images were obtained for typical AMD (37 eyes/28 patients, polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV (22 eyes/20 patients, and retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP (seven eyes/four patients. Two masked ophthalmologists independently graded the images for mottled, granular, and nummular patterns. Main outcome measures were abnormal peripheral FAF frequencies and relative risks by disease subgroups and treatments. Results: Abnormal peripheral FAF patterns were found in 51.5% of wet AMD eyes compared with 18.8% of control eyes (P<0.001. Mottled, granular, and nummular patterns were found in 45.5%, 31.8%, and 16.7%, respectively, of wet AMD eyes. Each disease subgroup (typical AMD, 54.1%; PCV, 36.4%; and RAP, 85.7% showed significantly higher frequencies of peripheral FAF (P<0.001, P=0.03, and P<0.001, respectively than control eyes (18.8%. There were no significant differences (P=0.76 between the frequencies in untreated and treated eyes. Conclusion: Eyes of Japanese wet AMD patients had a higher abnormal FAF prevalence compared with control eyes. Among the three disease subtypes, abnormal patterns were least prevalent in PCV eyes. Keywords: age-related macular degeneration, fundus autofluorescence, polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy, retinal

  16. Changes in neurophysiologic markers of visual processing following beneficial anti-VEGF treatment in macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vottonen P

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Pasi Vottonen,1 Kai Kaarniranta,1,2 Ari Pääkkönen,3 Ina M Tarkka41Department of Ophthalmology, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland; 3Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland; 4Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, FinlandPurpose: Antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF agents have been shown to improve visual acuity and prevent vision loss in exudative age-related macular degeneration. As the vision improves relatively quickly in response to intravitreal injections, we wanted to know whether this improvement is reflected in electrophysiological markers of visual cortical processing.Patients and methods: Our interventional case series included six elderly patients who underwent injection treatment to the affected eye. Their visual acuity, tomographic images of retinal thickness, and visual evoked potentials (VEP were assessed before treatment and six weeks after the last injection.Results: All patients showed improved visual acuity and reduced retinal fluid after the treatment. All but one patient showed increased VEP P100 component amplitudes and/or shortened latencies in the treated eye. These VEP changes were consistent with improved vision while the untreated eyes showed no changes.Conclusions: Our results indicate that antivascular endothelial growth factor injections improved visual function of the treated eyes both in the level of the retina and in the level of visual cortical processing.Keywords: age-related eye diseases, exudative age-related macular degeneration, visual evoked potentials, scalp-recorded EEG, visual acuity

  17. Complement factor H and hemicentin-1 in age-related macular degeneration and renal phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Cheryl L; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Xu, Zhiying; Capriotti, Jennifer; Joshi, Tripti; Leontiev, Dmitry; Lee, Kristine E; Elston, Robert C; Iyengar, Sudha K

    2007-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the associations of complement factor H (CFH) and hemicentin-1 (HMCN1) with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and renal function. Three scales, measuring the course of AMD and drusen development, were examined in two samples: the Family Age-Related Macular degeneration Study (FARMS), consisting of families ascertained through a single individual with severe AMD, and an unascertained population-based family cohort, the Beaver Dam Eye Study (BDES), which was also used to assess longitudinal changes in AMD and associations with renal function. Associations were performed by a regression accounting for known risk factors as well as familial and sibling effects. Strong evidence of the association of rs1061170 (Y402H) variation with AMD was confirmed (P = 9.15 x 10(-5) in BDES, P = 0.016 in FARMS). This association was observed in multiple AMD scales, suggesting that its role is not phenotype-specific. Polymorphisms in both CFH and HMCN1 appeared to influence the longitudinal rate of change of AMD. The rs1061170 polymorphism was also associated with a reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (P = 0.046). Another CFH polymorphism, rs800292, was similarly associated with eGFR [beta = -0.90 (P = 0.022)]. Associations between rs743137 (P = 0.05) and rs680638 (P = 0.022) in HMCN1 with calculated creatinine clearance progression were also observed. Both genes appear to play a role in both AMD and renal pathophysiology. These findings support evidence for common pathways influencing ocular and renal function and suggest that further work is required on their common determinants.

  18. Macular Pigment and Lutein Supplementation in ABCA4-associated Retinal Degenerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Tomas S.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Windsor, Elizabeth A. M.; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Swider, Malgorzata; Chico, John D.; Sumaroka, Alexander; Pantelyat, Alexander Y.; Duncan, Keith G.; Gardner, Leigh M.; Emmons, Jessica M.; Steinberg, Janet D.; Stone, Edwin M.; Jacobson, Samuel G.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine macular pigment (MP) optical density (OD) in patients with ABCA4-associated retinal degenerations (ABCA4-RD) and the response of MP and vision to supplementation with lutein. METHODS Stargardt disease or cone-rod dystrophy patients with foveal fixation and with known or suspected disease-causing mutations in the ABCA4 gene were included. MPOD profiles were measured with heterochromatic flicker photometry. Serum carotenoids, visual acuity, foveal sensitivity and retinal thickness were quantified. Changes in MPOD and central vision were determined in a subset of patients receiving oral supplementation with lutein for 6 months. RESULTS MPOD in patients ranged from normal to markedly abnormal. As a group, ABCA4-RD patients had reduced foveal MPOD and there was strong correlation with retinal thickness. Average foveal tissue concentration of MP, estimated by dividing MPOD by retinal thickness, was normal in patients whereas serum concentration of lutein and zeaxanthin was significantly lower than normal. After oral lutein supplementation for 6 months, 91% of the patients showed significant increases in serum lutein and 63% of the patient eyes showed a significant augmentation in MPOD. The retinal responders tended to be female, and have lower serum lutein and zeaxanthin, lower MPOD and greater retinal thickness at baseline. Responding eyes had significantly lower baseline MP concentration compared to non-responding eyes. Central vision was unchanged after the period of supplementation. CONCLUSIONS MP is strongly affected by the stage of ABCA4 disease leading to abnormal foveal architecture. MP could be augmented by supplemental lutein in some patients. There was no change in central vision after 6 months of lutein supplementation. Long-term influences on the natural history of this supplement on macular degenerations require further study. PMID:17325179

  19. Treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration in patients with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Cummings

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Michael Cummings1, José Cunha-Vaz21Academic Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Queen Alexandra Hospital, Portsmouth, UK; 2Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital of Coimbra, Centre of Ophthalmology, Institute of Biomedical Research on Light and Image, Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, and Association for Innovation and Biomedical Research on Light and Image, Coimbra, PortugalAbstract: The number of patients with type 2 diabetes continues to rise; an anticipated 300 million people will be affected by 2025. The immense social and economic burden of the condition is exacerbated by the initial asymptomatic nature of type 2 diabetes, resulting in a high prevalence of micro- and macrovascular complications at presentation. Diabetic retinopathy, one of the potential microvascular complications associated with diabetes, and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD are the two most frequent retinal degenerative diseases, and are responsible for the majority of blindness due to retinal disease. Both conditions predominantly affect the central macula, and are associated with the presence of retinal edema and an aggressive inflammatory repair process that accelerates disease progression. The associated retinal edema and the inflammatory repair process are directly involved in the breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier (BRB. Yet, the underlying alterations to the BRB caused by the diseases are very different. The coexistence of the two conditions appears to be relatively uncommon, suggesting that diabetes may even protect patients from developing neovascular AMD. However, it is thought that the inflammatory repair responses associated with diabetic retinopathy and neovascular AMD may be cumulative and, in patients affected by both, could result in chronic diffuse cystoid edema. Treatment considerations in such patients should, therefore, include the role of retinal edema and the increased susceptibility of patients with

  20. Effects of Disseminated Mycobacterial Infection on Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Geoffrey; Lopez, Natalia; Lopez, Pedro F

    2016-01-01

    Our patient, in the 7th decade of life, presented with worsening blurry vision over 3 weeks. The pertinent history included nonexudative age-related macular degeneration, recent pulmonary mycobacterial infection, and autoimmune pancreatitis. The patient had decreased visual acuity in both eyes; the remaining findings of our examination were relatively benign. The diagnosis of bilateral exudative age-related macular degeneration was aided by ocular imaging. Not only were exudative changes confirmed, but one modality suggested an underlying occult choroiditis, which presumably fueled a local inflammatory drive leading to evolution of the disease. Given the choroiditis developed in the setting of a recent Mycobacterium chelonae infection, dissemination of the organism must be considered a potential culprit. Additionally, a chronic inflammatory state perhaps played a simultaneous immunologic role. We feel the proposed pathogenic mechanism outlined sufficiently accounts for the rare event, that is, development of subacute bilateral exudative maculopathy. The patient responded well to bilateral intravitreal aflibercept injections. After 1 month, visual acuity was found to be near baseline and ocular imaging showed significant resolution of the exudative changes. An additional follow-up 3 months after confirmed similar stability. This case required thorough investigation of seemingly unrelated components within the patient's history. We stress the importance of obtaining appropriate documentation from fellow health care teams when suspicious clinical presentations arise. During our investigation, we identified cryptic retinal lesions by way of angiography - leading us to recommend usage of such methods in complex cases. We also summarize the implemented aflibercept course and the favorable response to such treatment.

  1. Effects of Disseminated Mycobacterial Infection on Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Collett

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Our patient, in the 7th decade of life, presented with worsening blurry vision over 3 weeks. The pertinent history included nonexudative age-related macular degeneration, recent pulmonary mycobacterial infection, and autoimmune pancreatitis. The patient had decreased visual acuity in both eyes; the remaining findings of our examination were relatively benign. The diagnosis of bilateral exudative age-related macular degeneration was aided by ocular imaging. Not only were exudative changes confirmed, but one modality suggested an underlying occult choroiditis, which presumably fueled a local inflammatory drive leading to evolution of the disease. Given the choroiditis developed in the setting of a recent Mycobacterium chelonae infection, dissemination of the organism must be considered a potential culprit. Additionally, a chronic inflammatory state perhaps played a simultaneous immunologic role. We feel the proposed pathogenic mechanism outlined sufficiently accounts for the rare event, that is, development of subacute bilateral exudative maculopathy. The patient responded well to bilateral intravitreal aflibercept injections. After 1 month, visual acuity was found to be near baseline and ocular imaging showed significant resolution of the exudative changes. An additional follow-up 3 months after confirmed similar stability. This case required thorough investigation of seemingly unrelated components within the patient’s history. We stress the importance of obtaining appropriate documentation from fellow health care teams when suspicious clinical presentations arise. During our investigation, we identified cryptic retinal lesions by way of angiography – leading us to recommend usage of such methods in complex cases. We also summarize the implemented aflibercept course and the favorable response to such treatment.

  2. Ranibizumab: the evidence of its therapeutic value in neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter K. Kaiser

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Peter K. KaiserCole Eye Institute, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio, USAIntroduction: Neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of severe, irreversible visual impairment in people over 60 years of age. Neovascular AMD is characterized by abnormal growth of blood vessels under the retina, specifically the macula. These vessels leak blood and fluids, damaging the retina and its photoreceptors, resulting in permanent loss of central vision. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A has been shown to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of neovascular AMD. In the US, ranibizumab, a VEGF-A blocker, is approved and indicated for the treatment of patients with neovascular AMD.Aims: To review the clinical evidence for ranibizumab in the treatment of neovascular AMD.Evidence review: Phase III clinical trial data have established ranibizumab as a safe and well-tolerated treatment for neovascular AMD. Monthly intravitreal injections of ranibizumab result in a statistically significantly greater proportion of patients losing <15 letters of visual acuity (VA and statistically significant increases in the mean number of letters gained compared with controls. Anatomically, ranibizumab results in stabilization in the mean area of choroidal neovascularization (CNV and statistically significant reductions in the mean area of leakage compared with controls. Although there is limited economic evidence available, ranibizumab therapy for neovascular AMD appears to deliver a significant degree of value gain in terms of quality of life when compared with other neovascular AMD interventions.Place in therapy: Clinical evidence establishes ranibizumab as a first-line therapy option for virtually all treatable neovascular AMD patients. Updating neovascular AMD treatment guidelines to reflect the evidence base for ranibizumab as a preferred first-line therapy would be beneficial for physicians in making informed treatment

  3. Changing from bevacizumab to ranibizumab in age-related macular degeneration. Is it safe?

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    Dimitrios A Karagiannis

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Dimitrios A Karagiannis1, Ioannis D Ladas2, Efstratios Parikakis1, Ilias Georgalas2, Athanasios Kotsolis2, Giorgos Amariotakis1, Vasileios Soumplis1, Panagiotis Mitropoulos11Ophthalmiatrio Eye Hospital of Athens, Athens, Greece; 2First Department of Ophthalmology, Medical School of Athens University, General Hospital of Athens, Athens, GreeceObjective: To report our experiences in changing from intravitreal bevacizumab to ranibizumab in age-related macular degeneration (AMD.Design: Retrospective case series.Participants and methods: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 34 patients (36 eyes who were treated with monthly injections of intravitreal bevacizumab for six months and then switched to monthly injections of ranibizumab for 12 months. Best-corrected visual acuity measurements (BCVA, contact lens biomicroscopy, optical coherence tomography (OCT, and fluorescein angiography were performed at the baseline examination and then monthly. Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis.Results: Following bevacizumab treatment, retinal thickness decreased (P = 0.033 while BCVA improved (P = 0.040. Changing from bevacizumab to ranibizumab resulted in a transient decrease in BCVA (P = 0.045 and an increase in retinal thickness (P = 0.042. In addition, three eyes presented with a large subretinal hemorrhage. However, final retinal thickness was better than the initial thickness and the value following the bevacizumab course. No major ocular or systemic side effects were noted.Conclusions: Ranibizumab was clinically effective in the long term but the change of treatment from bevacizumab to a half-size molecule with less half-life in the vitreous such as ranibizumab contributed to a transient “instability” in the eye which may have triggered the large subretinal hemorrhage. There is insufficient experience reported in the literature in switching from one agent to another. A prospective study with controls is necessary to determine whether

  4. Pegaptanib sodium for neovascular age-related macular degeneration: clinical experience in the UK

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    Sobha Sivaprasad

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Sobha Sivaprasad, Nachiketa Acharya, Phil HykinMoorfields Eye Hospital, London, UKAbstract: The pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD is unclear, but it can take either a neovascular/exudative/wet form, characterized by choroidal neovascularization (CNV, or a dry form. No treatments are available for the dry form, but there are a number of pharmacological interventions that inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, which is central to the pathogenesis of CNV and neovascular AMD. Available anti-VEGF agents either target all active VEGF isoforms (eg, ranibizumab, or take a more selective approach and inhibit only VEGF165 (eg, pegaptantib sodium. Current guidance on their use is equivocal and restrictive at best, resulting in associated difficulties in securing adequate, timely funding for treatment. The Moorfields Eye Hospital undertook an audit of 70 patients receiving intravitreal (ITV pegaptanib sodium on a pro re nata (prn dosing schedule. Despite initial funding delays, the audit recorded superior treatment outcomes compared with those reported in the VISION trials at 12 weeks: 88% of audit patients maintained stable vision, 29% gained vision and 6% experienced severe vision loss compared with 70%, ≥6% and ≤10% of patients in VISION at 54 weeks, respectively. The audit indicates a positive correlation between patients with better baseline visual acuity (VA and improved therapeutic benefits, including a greater likelihood of both vision gain and vision preservation. Experience at Moorfields also suggests that pegaptanib sodium is more useful in occult lesions than minimally classic lesions, and clinical experience suggests that combination therapies may offer the best approach with anti-VEGF therapies. Further randomized clinical trials will help better determine the optimal treatment strategies with pegaptanib sodium in neovascular AMD.Keywords: age-related macular degeneration, choroidal neovascularization

  5. Profile of ranibizumab: efficacy and safety for the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration

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    Chen Y

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Youxin Chen, Fei HanDepartment of Ophthalmology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, ChinaAbstract: Wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD causes severe vision loss due to the development of choroidal neovascularization (CNV. The critical role of vascular endothelial growth factor in the pathogenesis of CNV is well understood. Ranibizumab plays an inhibitory role with CNV and reduces vascular permeability by binding to vascular endothelial growth factor. Intravitreal ranibizumab reduces the risk of visual acuity (VA loss and increases the chance of VA gain compared with no treatment or photodynamic therapy for CNV in AMD. Some high-quality research has shown that the optimal timing for ranibizumab treating wet AMD is the first 3 months. It is recommended that ranibizumab is intravitreally injected monthly in the initiation for at least 3 months. Subsequent managing of regimens should be made dependent on the VA change, fundus examination, and image of optical coherence topography. An individualized strategy or combined method with photodynamic therapy is beneficial to the active lesion in the consecutive treatment of ranibizumab for CNV, and may be a good choice in order to decrease injection times. Regarding the safety profile, ranibizumab has been well tolerated in clinical trials. The principal ocular adverse event detected in clinical trials is a low frequency of ocular inflammation. Key serious ocular adverse events occurred in <5% of ranibizumab-treated patients in large-scale clinical trials. It appears unlikely that treatment with ranibizumab increases the risk of vascular events significantly. Less frequent injections on an as-needed schedule, based on monthly monitoring may have the most optimal risk:benefit ratio.Keywords: age-related macular degeneration, choroidal neovascularization, ranibizumab, efficacy, safety

  6. Stem cell based therapies for age-related macular degeneration: The promises and the challenges.

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    Nazari, Hossein; Zhang, Li; Zhu, Danhong; Chader, Gerald J; Falabella, Paulo; Stefanini, Francisco; Rowland, Teisha; Clegg, Dennis O; Kashani, Amir H; Hinton, David R; Humayun, Mark S

    2015-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness among the elderly in developed countries. AMD is classified as either neovascular (NV-AMD) or non-neovascular (NNV-AMD). Cumulative damage to the retinal pigment epithelium, Bruch's membrane, and choriocapillaris leads to dysfunction and loss of RPE cells. This causes degeneration of the overlying photoreceptors and consequential vision loss in advanced NNV-AMD (Geographic Atrophy). In NV-AMD, abnormal growth of capillaries under the retina and RPE, which leads to hemorrhage and fluid leakage, is the main cause of photoreceptor damage. Although a number of drugs (e.g., anti-VEGF) are in use for NV-AMD, there is currently no treatment for advanced NNV-AMD. However, replacing dead or dysfunctional RPE with healthy RPE has been shown to rescue dying photoreceptors and improve vision in animal models of retinal degeneration and possibly in AMD patients. Differentiation of RPE from human embryonic stem cells (hESC-RPE) and from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC-RPE) has created a potentially unlimited source for replacing dead or dying RPE. Such cells have been shown to incorporate into the degenerating retina and result in anatomic and functional improvement. However, major ethical, regulatory, safety, and technical challenges have yet to be overcome before stem cell-based therapies can be used in standard treatments. This review outlines the current knowledge surrounding the application of hESC-RPE and iPSC-RPE in AMD. Following an introduction on the pathogenesis and available treatments of AMD, methods to generate stem cell-derived RPE, immune reaction against such cells, and approaches to deliver desired cells into the eye will be explored along with broader issues of efficacy and safety. Lastly, strategies to improve these stem cell-based treatments will be discussed.

  7. ALGORITHM OF DIAGNOSTICS AND TREATMENT OF AN AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION AT PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC PERIPHERAL UVEITIS

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    Yu. I. Khoroshikh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of clinical trial of various approaches in treatment the exudative forms of macular degenerations, including age-related, against chronic slow intensity inflammatory process on the extreme retinal periphery of an eye are described in represented material. There were 91 patients (105 eyes in the research with different types of an exudative macular degeneration. The general criteria of inclusion were: age of 18–80 years old, complaints to discomfort in eyes, a spot before an eye, distortions and decrease in the central sight, ophthalmoscopic symptoms of hypostasis in the central and peripheral areas of a retina. It is analyzed the general criteria of diagnostics and treatment of the disease in the article. Considering defeat of the chorioretinal structures located near the ora serrata at persons of young and advanced age. Practical recommendations to a choice of methods of diagnostics and treatment of various clinical and morphological forms of the disease are made. Screening methods of identification of patients with the peripheral uveitis are offered. The scheme of risk calculation of development the macular pathology at persons with changes on the extreme periphery of a retina, that can be used as a method of prevention of development predictively adverse of “wet" forms of an age-related macular degeneration, by means of timely sparing treatment at patients with chronic inflammatory diseases of eyes is given.

  8. Clinical experience with fixed bimonthly aflibercept dosing in treatment-experienced patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration

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    Khanani AM

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Arshad M Khanani Sierra Eye Associates, Reno, NV, USA Purpose: To evaluate the durability of fixed bimonthly dosing of intravitreal aflibercept for neovascular age-related macular degeneration.Methods: Records of 16 patients were retrospectively reviewed. Patients received three initial 2.0 mg monthly doses of aflibercept then 8-weekly doses according to the product label. Best-corrected visual acuity (Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study [ETDRS] letters, central macular thickness, fluid on optical coherence tomography, and pigment epithelial detachment (PED were measured.Results: Prior to starting aflibercept, 13 patients had subretinal fluid (SRF, five had intraretinal fluid (IRF, four had PED, and baseline visual acuity (VA was 62 approximate ETDRS letters. Following the monthly dosing, seven patients had no improvement or decreased VA, ten patients still had SRF/IRF, and PED had worsened in one patient. At Visit 4, an average of 6.8 weeks after Visit 3, VA had decreased in seven patients, SRF/IRF had increased in 12 patients, and PED had returned in all patients who initially responded. Based on the presence of fluid after the initial monthly injections, 12 patients could not be extended to fixed bimonthly dosing.Conclusion: This case series adds to the growing body of evidence on the need for flexible dosing schedules for the personalized treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Keywords: age-related macular degeneration, AMD, bimonthly, regimen, aflibercept, case studies, retinal fluid

  9. Hyperhomocysteinemia disrupts retinal pigment epithelial structure and function with features of age-related macular degeneration.

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    Ibrahim, Ahmed S; Mander, Suchreet; Hussein, Khaled A; Elsherbiny, Nehal M; Smith, Sylvia B; Al-Shabrawey, Mohamed; Tawfik, Amany

    2016-02-23

    The disruption of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) function and the degeneration of photoreceptors are cardinal features of age related macular degeneration (AMD); however there are still gaps in our understanding of underlying biological processes. Excess homocysteine (Hcy) has been reported to be elevated in plasma of patients with AMD. This study aimed to evaluate the direct effect of hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) on structure and function of RPE. Initial studies in a mouse model of HHcy, in which cystathionine-β-synthase (cbs) was deficient, revealed abnormal RPE cell morphology with features similar to that of AMD upon optical coherence tomography (OCT), fluorescein angiography (FA), histological, and electron microscopic examinations. These features include atrophy, vacuolization, hypopigmentation, thickened basal laminar membrane, hyporeflective lucency, choroidal neovascularization (CNV), and disturbed RPE-photoreceptor relationship. Furthermore, intravitreal injection of Hcy per se in normal wild type (WT) mice resulted in diffuse hyper-fluorescence, albumin leakage, and CNV in the area of RPE. In vitro experiments on ARPE-19 showed that Hcy dose-dependently reduced tight junction protein expression, increased FITC dextran leakage, decreased transcellular electrical resistance, and impaired phagocytic activity. Collectively, our results demonstrated unreported effects of excess Hcy levels on RPE structure and function that lead to the development of AMD-like features.

  10. Structural and molecular changes in the aging choroid: implications for age-related macular degeneration.

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    Chirco, K R; Sohn, E H; Stone, E M; Tucker, B A; Mullins, R F

    2017-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a devastating disease-causing vision loss in millions of people around the world. In advanced stages of disease, death of photoreceptor cells, retinal pigment epithelial cells, and choroidal endothelial cells (CECs) are common. Loss of endothelial cells of the choriocapillaris is one of the earliest detectable events in AMD, and, because the outer retina relies on the choriocapillaris for metabolic support, this loss may be the trigger for progression to more advanced stages. Here we highlight evidence for loss of CECs, including changes to vascular density within the choriocapillaris, altered abundance of CEC markers, and changes to overall thickness of the choroid. Furthermore, we review the key components and functions of the choroid, as well as Bruch's membrane, both of which are vital for healthy vision. We discuss changes to the structure and molecular composition of these tissues, many of which develop with age and may contribute to AMD pathogenesis. For example, a crucial event that occurs in the aging choriocapillaris is accumulation of the membrane attack complex, which may result in complement-mediated CEC lysis, and may be a primary cause for AMD-associated choriocapillaris degeneration. The actions of elevated monomeric C-reactive protein in the choriocapillaris in at-risk individuals may also contribute to the inflammatory environment in the choroid and promote disease progression. Finally, we discuss the progress that has been made in the development of AMD therapies, with a focus on cell replacement.

  11. Physics of Lipofuscin Formation and Growth in Age Related Macular Degeneration

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    Family, Fereydoon; Mazzitello, K. I.; Arizmendi, C. M.; Grossniklaus, Hans E.

    2010-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness beyond the age of 50 years. The most common pathogenic mechanism that leads to AMD is choroidal neovascularization (CNV). CNV is produced by accumulation of residual material caused by aging of retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPE). With time, incompletely degraded membrane material builds up in the RPE in the form of lipofuscin. Lipofuscin is made of free-radical-damaged protein and fat, which forms not only in AMD, but also Alzheimer disease, and Parkinson disease. We will present the results of a study of the kinetics of lipofuscin growth in RPE cells using Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and scaling theory on a cluster aggregation model. The model captures the essential physics of lipofuscin growth in the cells. A remarkable feature is that small particles may be removed from the cells while the larger ones become fixed and grow by aggregation. We compare our results to the number of lipofuscin granules in eyes with early age-related degeneration. )

  12. Inflammation and Cell Death in Age-Related Macular Degeneration: An Immunopathological and Ultrastructural Model

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    Christopher P. Ardeljan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD remains elusive despite the characterization of many factors contributing to the disease in its late-stage phenotypes. AMD features an immune system in flux, as shown by changes in macrophage polarization with age, expression of cytokines and complement, microglial accumulation with age, etc. These point to an allostatic overload, possibly due to a breakdown in self vs. non-self when endogenous compounds and structures acquire the appearance of non-self over time. The result is inflammation and inflammation-mediated cell death. While it is clear that these processes ultimately result in degeneration of retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptor, the prevalent type of cell death contributing to the various phenotypes is unknown. Both molecular studies as well as ultrastructural pathology suggest pyroptosis, and perhaps necroptosis, are the predominant mechanisms of cell death at play, with only minimal evidence for apoptosis. Herein, we attempt to reconcile those factors identified by experimental AMD models and integrate these data with pathology observed under the electron microscope—particularly observations of mitochondrial dysfunction, DNA leakage, autophagy, and cell death.

  13. NLRP3 Inflammasome: Activation and Regulation in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

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    Jiangyuan Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of legal blindness in the elderly in industrialized countries. AMD is a multifactorial disease influenced by both genetic and environmental risk factors. Progression of AMD is characterized by an increase in the number and size of drusen, extracellular deposits, which accumulate between the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE and Bruch’s membrane (BM in outer retina. The major pathways associated with its pathogenesis include oxidative stress and inflammation in the early stages of AMD. Little is known about the interactions among these mechanisms that drive the transition from early to late stages of AMD, such as geographic atrophy (GA or choroidal neovascularization (CNV. As part of the innate immune system, inflammasome activation has been identified in RPE cells and proposed to be a causal factor for RPE dysfunction and degeneration. Here, we will first review the classic model of inflammasome activation, then discuss the potentials of AMD-related factors to activate the inflammasome in both nonocular immune cells and RPE cells, and finally introduce several novel mechanisms for regulating the inflammasome activity.

  14. The chronic care for age-related macular degeneration study (CHARMED: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

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    Held Ulrike

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neovascular age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in people 50 years of age or older in the developed world. As in other chronic diseases, several effective treatments are available, but in clinical daily practice there is an evidence performance gap. The Chronic Care Model represents an evidence-based framework for the care of chronically ill patients and aims at closing that gap. However, no data are available regarding patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Methods/Design CHARMED is a multicenter randomized controlled trial. The study challenges the hypothesis that the implementation of core elements of the Chronic Care Model (patient empowerment, delivering evidence based information, clinical information system, reminder system with structured follow up and frequent monitoring via a specially trained Chronic Care Coach in Swiss centres for neovascular age-related macular degeneration results in better visual acuity (primary outcome and an increased disease specific quality of life (secondary outcome in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration. According to the power calculation, a total sample size of 352 patients is needed (drop out rate of 25%. 14 specialised medical doctors from leading ophtalmologic centres in Switzerland will include 25 patients. In each centre, a Chronic Care Coach will provide disease specific care according to the Chronic Care Model for intervention group. Patients from the control group will be treated as usual. Baseline measurements will be taken in month III - XII, starting in March 2011. Follow-up data will be collected after 6 months and 1 year. Discussion Multiple studies have shown that implementing Chronic Care Model elements improve clinical outcomes as well as process parameters in different chronic diseases as osteoarthritis, depression or e.g. the cardiovascular risk profile of diabetes patients. This

  15. Repeatability of swept-source optical coherence tomography retinal and choroidal thickness measurements in neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

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    Hanumunthadu, Daren; Ilginis, Tomas; Restori, Marie; Sagoo, Mandeep S; Tufail, Adnan; Balaggan, Kamaljit S; Patel, Praveen J

    2017-05-01

    The aim was to determine the intrasession repeatability of swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT)-derived retinal and choroidal thickness measurements in eyes with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). A prospective study consisting of patients with active nAMD enrolled in the Distance of Choroid Study at Moorfields Eye Hospital, London. Patients underwent three 12×9 mm macular raster scans using the deep range imaging (DRI) OCT-1 SS-OCT (Topcon) device in a single imaging session. Retinal and choroidal thicknesses were calculated for the ETDRS macular subfields. Repeatability was calculated according to methods described by Bland and Altman. 39 eyes of 39 patients with nAMD were included with a mean (±SD) age of 73.9 (±7.2) years. The mean (±SD) retinal thickness of the central macular subfield was 225.7 μm (±12.4 μm). The repeatability this subfield, expressed as a percentage of the mean central macular subfield thickness, was 23.2%. The percentage repeatability of the other macular subfields ranged from 13.2% to 28.7%. The intrasession coefficient of repeatability of choroidal thickness of the central macular subfield was 57.2 μm with a mean choroidal thickness (±SD) of 181 μm (±15.8 μm). This study suggests that a change >23.2% of retinal thickness and 57.2 μm choroidal thickness in the central macular subfield is required to distinguish true clinical change from measurement variability when using the DRI OCT-1 device to manage patients with nAMD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Prevalence of age-related maculopathy and age-related macular degeneration among the inuit in Greenland. The Greenland Inuit Eye Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Varis Nis; Rosenberg, Thomas; la Cour, Morten

    2008-01-01

    To examine the age- and gender-specific prevalence and describe the common phenotype of early age-related maculopathy (ARM) and late-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD) among the Inuit in Greenland....

  17. Computational assessment of effective dose and patient specific doses for kilovoltage stereotactic radiosurgery of wet age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Justin Mitchell

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss and a major health problem for people over the age of 50 in industrialized nations. The current standard of care, ranibizumab, is used to help slow and in some cases stabilize the process of AMD, but requires frequent invasive injections into the eye. Interest continues for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), an option that provides a non-invasive treatment for the wet form of AMD, through the development of the IRay(TM) (Oraya Therapeutics, Inc., Newark, CA). The goal of this modality is to destroy choroidal neovascularization beneath the pigment epithelium via delivery of three 100 kVp photon beams entering through the sclera and overlapping on the macula delivering up to 24 Gy of therapeutic dose over a span of approximately 5 minutes. The divergent x-ray beams targeting the fovea are robotically positioned and the eye is gently immobilized by a suction-enabled contact lens. Device development requires assessment of patient effective dose, reference patient mean absorbed doses to radiosensitive tissues, and patient specific doses to the lens and optic nerve. A series of head phantoms, including both reference and patient specific, was derived from CT data and employed in conjunction with the MCNPX 2.5.0 radiation transport code to simulate treatment and evaluate absorbed doses to potential tissues-at-risk. The reference phantoms were used to evaluate effective dose and mean absorbed doses to several radiosensitive tissues. The optic nerve was modeled with changeable positions based on individual patient variability seen in a review of head CT scans gathered. Patient specific phantoms were used to determine the effect of varying anatomy and gaze. The results showed that absorbed doses to the non-targeted tissues were below the threshold levels for serious complications; specifically the development of radiogenic cataracts and radiation induced optic neuropathy (RON). The effective dose

  18. Surface-Based Analyses of Anatomical Properties of the Visual Cortex in Macular Degeneration

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    Prins, Doety; Plank, Tina; Baseler, Heidi A.; Gouws, André D.; Beer, Anton; Morland, Antony B.; Greenlee, Mark W.; Cornelissen, Frans W.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Macular degeneration (MD) can cause a central visual field defect. In a previous study, we found volumetric reductions along the entire visual pathways of MD patients, possibly indicating degeneration of inactive neuronal tissue. This may have important implications. In particular, new therapeutic strategies to restore retinal function rely on intact visual pathways and cortex to reestablish visual function. Here we reanalyze the data of our previous study using surface-based morphometry (SBM) rather than voxel-based morphometry (VBM). This can help determine the robustness of the findings and will lead to a better understanding of the nature of neuroanatomical changes associated with MD. Methods The metrics of interest were acquired by performing SBM analysis on T1-weighted MRI data acquired from 113 subjects: patients with juvenile MD (JMD; n = 34), patients with age-related MD (AMD; n = 24) and healthy age-matched controls (HC; n = 55). Results Relative to age-matched controls, JMD patients showed a thinner cortex, a smaller cortical surface area and a lower grey matter volume in V1 and V2, while AMD patients showed thinning of the cortex in V2. Neither patient group showed a significant difference in mean curvature of the visual cortex. Discussion The thinner cortex, smaller surface area and lower grey matter volume in the visual cortex of JMD patients are consistent with our previous results showing a volumetric reduction in their visual cortex. Finding comparable results using two rather different analysis techniques suggests the presence of marked cortical degeneration in the JMD patients. In the AMD patients, we found a thinner cortex in V2 but not in V1. In contrast to our previous VBM analysis, SBM revealed no volumetric reductions of the visual cortex. This suggests that the cortical changes in AMD patients are relatively subtle, as they apparently can be missed by one of the methods. PMID:26789126

  19. Pentraxin 3 serum levels in wet-type age-related macular degeneration

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    Alireza javadzadeh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD has become a catastrophic health problem throughout the world because of the aging population. Destruction of the macular architecture in the wet type form is a major problem that results from AMD and is irreversible. Working on preventive measures is, therefore, of critical importance. Because pentraxins (PTX become elevated in the body in stressful, oxidized conditions, this study examines the role they play in AMD. The similarity between the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and AMD and the role of PTX3 in atheromas were also factors that support conducting this study. Methods: This case-control study used 40 eyes that were at different stages of wet type AMD. The eyes were from patients who were over the age of 50 and had not had intraocular surgery or choroidal neovascularization (CNV due to non-AMD causes. The control group included 49 eyes with normal macula. These study groups were matched according to age and gender, and the serum levels of PTX3 were analyzed. Results: The mean ages of the patients were 70.7 ± 9.0 and 69.6 ± 7.4 years among the case group and the control group, respectively (P = 0.540 while the male to female ratios were 2.64 and 1.19, respectively (P = 0.091. The PTX3 (P = 0.002, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP (P = 0.008 and triglyceride (TGs (P = 0.032 were significantly higher among the wet type AMD cases. Conclusion: PTX3 appears to be a component in the pathogenesis of AMD and, therefore, could be a target for possible pharmaceutical interventions to stop or reduce the progression of this ominous disease.

  20. The Chronic Care for Wet Age Related Macular Degeneration (CHARMED Study: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

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    Stefan Markun

    Full Text Available In real life, outcomes in wet age related macular degeneration (W-AMD continue to fall behind the results from randomized controlled trials. The aim of this trial was to assess if outcomes can be improved by an intervention in healthcare organization following recommendations of the Chronic Care Model (CCM.Multi-centered randomized controlled clinical trial. The multifaceted intervention consisted in reorganization of care (delivery by trained chronic care coaches, using reminder systems, performing structured follow-up, empowering patients in self-monitoring and giving decision-support. In the control usual care was continued. Main outcome measures were changes in ETDRS visual acuity, optical coherence tomography (OCT macular retinal thickness and quality of life (NEI VFQ-25 questionnaire.169 consecutive patients in Swiss ophthalmology centers were included. Mean ETDRS baseline visual acuity of eyes with W-AMD was 57.8 (± 18.7. After 12 months, the between-group difference in mean change of ETDRS visual acuity was -4.8 (95%CI: -10.8 to +1.2, p = 0.15; difference in mean change of OCT was +14.0 (95% CI -39.6 to 67.6, p = 0.60; difference in mean change of NEI VFQ-25 composite score mean change was +2.1(95%CI: -1.3 to +5.5, p = 0.19.The intervention aiming at improving chronic care was not associated with favorable outcomes within 12 months. Other approaches need to be tested to close the evidence-performance gap in W-AMD.Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN32507927.

  1. Early and exudative age-related macular degeneration is associated with increased plasma levels of soluble TNF receptor II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Carsten; Jehs, Tina Maria Ludowika; Juel, Helene Baek;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: We have recently identified homeostatic alterations in the circulating T cells of patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In cultures of retinal pigment epithelial cells, we have demonstrated that T-cell-derived cytokines induced the upregulation of complement, chemokines...... and other proteins implicated in AMD pathogenesis. The purpose of this study was to test whether increased plasma levels of cytokines were present in patients with AMD. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study. Age-related macular degeneration status was assessed using standardized multimodal imaging...... techniques. Plasma was isolated from freshly drawn peripheral venous blood samples and analysed for interleukin (IL)15, IL18, interferon (IFN)γ, soluble tumour necrosis factor (TNF) receptor II (sTNFRII) and complement factor H (CFH) Y402H genotype. RESULTS: We included 136 individuals with early or late...

  2. ROLE OF DIETARY SUPPLEMENTATION IN PREVENTING PROGRESSION OF AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION

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    N. A. Ermakova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a chronic, progressive, degenerative eye disease affecting the central retina. It is the leading cause of blindness among individuals of 65 years and older. In the early stage patients have drusen and/or alterations of pigmentation in the macular region. This disease can progress to geographic atrophy and/or choroidal neovascularization. It has been shown that oxidative stress and hypoxia are important in the pathogenesis of AMD. Patients may gain some visual improvement with inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor, but complete restoration of visual function is achieved only in small cases. No effective therapies are known for atrophic AMD. Many large observational studies have shown that dietary antioxidant supplementation is beneficial in preventing the progression of AMD from early to late stages. The Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS demonstrated that daily oral supplementation with vitamins C (500 mg and E (400 IU, beta carotene (15 mg, zinc (80 mg and copper (2 mg reduced the risk of progression to advanced AMD by 25% at 5 years. In primary analyses AREDS II failed to show further reduce of this risk by addition of lutein (10 mg and zeaxanthin (2mg, or/and omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids [docosahexaenoic acid (350 mg DHA and eicosapentaenoic acid 650 mg (EPA] to the AREDS formulation. But there was no true placebo group. The simultaneous administration of beta carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin may suppress tissue level of the both laters because of competitive absorption of carotenoids. Subgroup analyses revealed that dietary supplementation with lutein, zeaxanthin and AREDS formulation without beta carotene may reduce the risk of progression to advanced AMD.The LUNA (Lutein nutrition effects measured by autofluorescence study demonstrated that supplementation with lutein (12 mg, zeaxanthin (1 mg, vitamin C (120 mg, vitamin E (17,6 mg, zinc (10 mg, selenium (40 mg resulted

  3. Intravitreal dobesilate in the treatment of choroidal neovascularisation associated with age-related macular degeneration: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Pedro; Outeiriño, Luis; Azanza, Carlos; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo

    2012-09-03

    This case report presents the effectiveness of intravitreal administration of dobesilate, a synthetic fibroblast growth factor inhibitor, in two patients showing neovascular age-related macular degeneration of the classic, and of the occult choroidal neovascularisation types, respectively. Our study demonstrates that the treatment induces the regression of both forms of this pathology, as assessed by spectral optical coherence tomography. Improvement of the lesions was accompanied of visual acuity improvement.

  4. The MacDQoL individualized measure of the impact of macular degeneration on quality of life: reliability and responsiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Bradley, Clare; Mitchell, Jan; Woodcock, Alison; Wolffsohn, James; Anderson, Stephen; Ffytche, Timothy; Rubinstein, Martin; Amoaku, Winfried

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the MacDQoL test-retest reliability and sensitivity to change in vision over a period of one year in a sample of patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). DESIGN: A prospective, observational study. METHOD: Patients with AMD from an ophthalmologist's list (n = 135) completed the MacDQoL questionnaire by telephone interview and underwent a vision assessment on two occasions, one year apart. RESULTS: Among participants whose vision was stable over one year (n...

  5. Visual Function and Its Relationship with Severity of Early, and Activity of Neovascular, Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Loughman, James; Sabour-Pickett, Sarah; Nolan, John M.; Klein, Barbara; Klein, Ron; Beatty, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between visual function and severity of early age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and activity of neovascular (nv-) AMD. Methods: The following data was collected from 66 eyes of 66 subjects with early AMD and 47 eyes of 47 subjects with active nv-AMD: corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA); contrast sensitivity (CS); glare disability (GD); and retinotopic ocular sensitivity (ROS) of the central 5° of the retina, by microperimetry. Fundus photog...

  6. How does age-related macular degeneration affect real-world visual ability and quality of life? A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Deanna J; Hobby, Angharad E; Binns, Alison M; Crabb, David P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To review systematically the evidence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) affecting real-world visual ability and quality of life (QoL). To explore trends in specific topics within this body of the literature. Design Systematic review. Methods A systematic literature search was carried out using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, PsychARTICLES and Health and Psychosocial Instruments for articles published up to January 2015 for studies including people diagnosed with AMD, ass...

  7. A review of the evidence for dietary interventions in preventing or slowing the progression of age-related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, J. R.; Lawrenson, J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To summarise the results of recent Cochrane systematic reviews that have investigated whether nutritional supplements prevent or slow the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD).\\ud \\ud Recent findings: There is no good evidence from randomised controlled trials that the general population should be taking antioxidant vitamin supplements to reduce their risk of developing AMD later on in life. By contrast, there is moderate quality evidence that people with AMD may expe...

  8. Microglia in the Outer Retina and their Relevance to Pathogenesis of Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD)

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the largest cause of legal blindness in the elderly in the Western world, is a disease whose pathogenesis is incompletely understood and for which therapeutic challenges remain. The etiology of AMD is thought to involve chronic neuroinflammation of the retina but the details of relevant cellular mechanisms are still not fully understood. Retinal microglia are the primary resident immune cell in the retina and are normally absent from the outer retina, t...

  9. Mechanism of Inflammation in Age-Related Macular Degeneration: An Up-to-Date on Genetic Landmarks

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Parmeggiani; Sorrentino, Francesco S; Mario R. Romano; Ciro Costagliola; Francesco Semeraro; Carlo Incorvaia; Sergio D'Angelo; Paolo Perri; Katia De Nadai; Elia Bonomo Roversi; Paola Franceschelli; Adolfo Sebastiani; Michele Rubini

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment among people over 50 years of age, accounting for up to 50% of all cases of legal blindness in Western countries. Although the aging represents the main determinant of AMD, it must be considered a multifaceted disease caused by interactions among environmental risk factors and genetic backgrounds. Mounting evidence and/or arguments document the crucial role of inflammation and immune-mediated pro...

  10. The Chronic Care for age-related macular degeneration study (CHARMED): Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Frei, A.; Woitzek, K; M. Wang; Held, U; Rosemann, T

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neovascular age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in people 50 years of age or older in the developed world. As in other chronic diseases, several effective treatments are available, but in clinical daily practice there is an evidence performance gap. The Chronic Care Model represents an evidence-based framework for the care of chronically ill patients and aims at closing that gap. However, no data are available regarding patients with neo...

  11. The chronic care for age-related macular degeneration study (CHARMED): Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Held Ulrike; Wang Mathyas; Woitzek Katja; Frei Anja; Rosemann Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Neovascular age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in people 50 years of age or older in the developed world. As in other chronic diseases, several effective treatments are available, but in clinical daily practice there is an evidence performance gap. The Chronic Care Model represents an evidence-based framework for the care of chronically ill patients and aims at closing that gap. However, no data are available regarding patients ...

  12. Progress and perspectives on the role of RPE cell inflammatory responses in the development of age-related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Suofu Qin; Gerard A Rodrigues

    2008-01-01

    Suofu Qin, Gerard A RodriguesRetinal Disease Research, Department of Biological Sciences, Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA, USAAbstract: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in developed countries. The etiology of AMD remains poorly understood and no treatment is currently available for the atrophic form of AMD. Atrophic AMD has been proposed to involve abnormalities of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), which lies beneath the photoreceptor cells and normally ...

  13. Increased fundus autofluorescence and progression of geographic atrophy secondary to age-related macular degeneration. The GAIN study.

    OpenAIRE

    Biarnés Pérez, Marc, 1973-; Arias, Luis; Alonso Caballero, Jordi; García, Míriam; Hijano, Míriam; Rodríguez, Anabel; Serrano, Anna; Badal, Josep; Muhtaseb, Hussein; Verdaguer, Paula; Monés, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To define the role of increased fundus autofluorescence (FAF), a surrogate for lipofuscin content, as a risk factor for progression of geographic atrophy (GA). DESIGN: Prospective natural history cohort study, the GAIN (Characterization of geographic atrophy progression in patients with age-related macular degeneration). METHODS: setting: Single-center study conducted in Barcelona, Spain. PATIENTS: After screening of 211 patients, 109 eyes of 82 patients with GA secondary to age-rela...

  14. Age-Related Macular Degeneration Is Associated with Less Physical Activity among US Adults: Cross-Sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Paul D. Loprinzi; Swenor, Bonnielin K.; Ramulu, Pradeep Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background We have a limited understanding of the effects of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) on physical activity (PA), and we have no prevalence estimates of the daily movement patterns among Americans with AMD. Therefore, we examined the association between AMD and PA and provided estimates of the daily movement patterns of Americans with AMD. Methods Data from the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were used, including 1,656 adults (40-85 yrs). Retinal imagin...

  15. Modelling Cost Effectiveness in Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration: The Impact of Using Contrast Sensitivity vs. Visual Acuity.

    OpenAIRE

    Butt, T.; Patel,P J; Tufail, A; Rubin, G. S.

    2014-01-01

    The cost utility of treatments of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is commonly assessed using health state transition models defined by levels of visual acuity. However, there is evidence that another measure of visual function, contrast sensitivity, may be better associated with utility than visual acuity. This paper investigates the difference in cost effectiveness resulting from models based on visual acuity and contrast sensitivity using the example of bevacizumab (Avastin) for neov...

  16. Cystoid macular edema after cataract surgery in a patient with previous severe iritis following argon laser peripheral iridoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagnis A

    2011-04-01

    cataract surgery should be considered in such cases in order to prevent potentially sight-threatening conditions.Keywords: cystoid macular edema, inflammation, laser surgery, plateau iris configuration

  17. What associates Charles Bonnet syndrome with age-related macular degeneration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojniković, Bozo; Radeljak, Sanja; Dessardo, Sandro; Zarković-Palijan, Tija; Bajek, Goran; Linsak, Zeljko

    2010-04-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) is a condition related to patients with visual loss due to age related macular degeneration or glaucoma that are having complex visual hallucinations. The CBS was first described by Swiss physician Charles Bonnet in 1760. Affected patients, who are otherwise mentally healthy people with significant visual loss, have vivid, complex recurrent visual hallucinations (VHs). One characteristic of these hallucinations is that they usually are "Lilliputian hallucinations" as patients experience micropsia (hallucinations in which the characters or objects are distorted and much smaller than normal). The prevalence of Charles Bonnet Syndrome has been reported to be between 10% and 40%; a recent Australian study has found the prevalence to be 17.5%. The high incidence of non-reported CBS is thought to be as a result of patient's fear to report the symptoms as they could be labeled as mentally insane since those type of visual hallucinations could be found in variety of psychiatric and neurological disorders such as drug or alcohol abuse (delirium tremens), Alice in Wonderland syndrome (AIWS), psychosis, schizophrenia, dementia, narcolepsy, epilepsy, Parkinson disease, brain tumors, migraine, as well as, in long term sleep deprivation. VHs can also be presented as the initial sign of the Epstein-Barr virus infection in infectious mononucleosis. Patients who suffer from CBS usually possess insight into the unreality of their visual experiences, which are commonly pleasant but may sometimes cause distress. The hallucinations consist of well-defined, organized, and clear images over which the subject has little control. It is believed that they represent release phenomena due to deafferentiation of the visual association areas of the cerebral cortex, leading to a form of phantom vision. Cognitive defects, social isolation, and sensory deprivation have also been implicated in the etiology of this condition. This study was conducted on 350 patients

  18. Lower cognitive function in patients with age-related macular degeneration: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou LX

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Li-Xiao Zhou,1 Cheng-Lin Sun,1 Li-Juan Wei,1 Zhi-Min Gu,1 Liang Lv,1 Yalong Dang21Department of Ophthalmology, The Fifth Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, 2Department of Ophthalmology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of ChinaObjective: To investigate the cognitive impairment in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD.Methods: Relevant articles were identified through a search of the following electronic databases through October 2015, without language restriction: 1 PubMed; 2 the Cochrane Library; 3 EMBASE; 4 ScienceDirect. Meta-analysis was conducted using STATA 12.0 software. Standardized mean differences with corresponding 95% confidence intervals were calculated. All of the included studies met the following four criteria: 1 the study design was a case–control or randomized controlled trial (RCT study; 2 the study investigated cognitive function in the patient with AMD; 3 the diagnoses of AMD must be provided; 4 there were sufficient scores data to extract for evaluating cognitive function between cases and controls. The Newcastle–Ottawa Scale criteria were used to assess the methodological quality of the studies.Results: Of the initial 278 literatures, only six case–control and one RCT studies met all of the inclusion criteria. A total of 794 AMD patients and 1,227 controls were included in this study. Five studies were performed with mini-mental state examination (MMSE, two studies with animal fluency, two studies with trail making test (TMT-A and -B, one study with Mini-Cog. Results of the meta-analysis revealed lower cognitive function test scores in patients with AMD, especially with MMSE and Mini-Cog test (P≤0.001 for all. The results also showed that differences in the TMT-A (except AMD [total] vs controls and TMT-B test had no statistical significance (P>0.01. The Newcastle–Ottawa Scale score was ≥5 for all of the included studies. Based on the

  19. Quality of life in age-related macular degeneration: a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley Clare

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Age-related Macular Degeneration Alliance International commissioned a review of the literature on quality of life (QoL in macular degeneration (MD with a view to increasing awareness of MD, reducing its impact and improving services for people with MD worldwide. Method A systematic review was conducted using electronic databases, conference proceedings and key journal hand search checks. The resulting 'White Paper' was posted on the AMD Alliance website and is reproduced here. Review MD is a chronic, largely untreatable eye condition which leads to loss of central vision needed for tasks such as reading, watching TV, driving, recognising faces. It is the most common cause of blindness in the Western world. Shock of diagnosis, coupled with lack of information and support are a common experience. Incidence of depression is twice that found in the community-dwelling elderly, fuelled by functional decline and loss of leisure activities. Some people feel suicidal. MD threatens independence, especially when comorbidity exacerbates functional limitations. Rehabilitation, including low vision aid (LVA provision and training, peer support and education, can improve functional and psychological outcomes but many people do not receive services likely to benefit them. Medical treatments, suitable for only a small minority of people with MD, can improve vision but most limit progress of MD, at least for a time, rather than cure. The White Paper considers difficulties associated with inappropriate use of health status measures and misinterpretation of utility values as QoL measures: evidence suggests they have poor validity in MD. Conclusion There is considerable evidence for the major damage done to QoL by MD which is underestimated by health status and utility measures. Medical treatments are limited to a small proportion of people. However, much can be done to improve QoL by early diagnosis of MD with good communication of

  20. Anxiety and depression in patients with advanced macular degeneration: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cimarolli VR

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Verena R Cimarolli,1 Robin J Casten,2 Barry W Rovner,3–5 Vera Heyl,6 Silvia Sörensen,7,8 Amy Horowitz9 1Research Institute on Aging, Jewish Home Lifecare, New York, NY, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 3Department of Neurology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 4Department of Psychiatry, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 5Department of Ophthalmology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 6Institute of Special Education, University of Education, Heidelberg, Germany; 7Warner School of Education and Human Development, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA; 8Department of Ophthalmology, Flaum Eye Institute, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY, USA; 9Graduate School of Social Service, Fordham University, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD – despite advances in prevention and medical treatment options – remains prevalent among older adults, often resulting in functional losses that negatively affect the mental health of older adults. In particular, the prevalence of both anxiety and depression in patients with AMD is high. Along with medical treatment options, low vision rehabilitation and AMD-specific behavioral and self-management programs have been developed and have demonstrated effectiveness in improving the mental health of AMD patients. This article reviews the prevalence of anxiety and depression in patients with advanced AMD, discusses potential mechanisms accounting for the development of depression and anxiety in AMD patients, presents the state-of the-art of available interventions for addressing anxiety and depression in AMD patients, and delineates recommendations for eye care professionals regarding how to

  1. Evaluation of cardiovascular biomarkers in patients with age-related wet macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keles S

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Sadullah Keles,1 Orhan Ates,1 Baki Kartal,2 Hamit Hakan Alp,3 Metin Ekinci,4 Erdinc Ceylan,2 Osman Ondas,5 Eren Arpali,2 Semih Dogan,6 Kenan Yildirim,7 Mevlut Sait Keles8 1Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, Ataturk University, Erzurum, Turkey; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Regional Training and Research Hospital, Erzurum, Turkey; 3Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Yuzuncu Yil University, Van, Turkey; 4Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, Kafkas University, Kars, Turkey; 5Department of Ophthalmology, Erbaa Government Hospital, Tokat, Turkey; 6Department of Ophthalmology, Kolan Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey; 7Department of Ophthalmology, Igdir Government Hospital, Igdir, Turkey; 8Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Ataturk University, Erzurum, Turkey Aim: To evaluate levels of homocysteine, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA, and nitric oxide (NO, as well as activity of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS, in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD.Methods: The levels of homocysteine, ADMA, and NO and activity of eNOS in patients who were diagnosed with wet AMD by fundus fluorescein angiography (n=30 were compared to a control group with no retinal pathology (n=30.Results: Levels of homocysteine and ADMA were found to be significantly higher in the wet AMD group than in the control group (P<0.001, whereas NO levels and eNOS activity were higher in the control group (P<0.001. In the wet AMD group, we detected a 2.64- and 0.33-fold increase in the levels of ADMA and homocysteine, respectively, and a 0.49- and 2.41-fold decrease in the eNOS activity and NO level, respectively.Conclusion: Elevated levels of homocysteine and ADMA were observed in patients with wet AMD. Increased ADMA may be responsible for the diminished eNOS activity found in these patients, which in turn contributes to the decrease in NO levels, which likely plays a role in the pathogenesis of AMD. Keywords: age-related macular

  2. Pegaptanib sodium treatment in neovascular age-related macular degeneration: clinical experience in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaus Feucht

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Nikolaus Feucht, Huebner Matthias, Chris P Lohmann, Mathias MaierAugenklinik rechts der Isar, Technical University Munich, GermanyBackground: The VEGF Inhibition Study In Ocular Neovascularisation (VISION reported the efficacy of intravitreal (ITV vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF inhibition with pegaptanib sodium (Macugen® for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD. This paper reports clinical experience with pegaptanib sodium for the treatment of occult or minimally classic choroidal neovascularization (CNV due to AMD.Material and methods: The study included 50 eyes (in 49 patients with either occult CNV or minimally classic CNV secondary to neovascular AMD who were not eligible for photodynamic therapy (PDT. Study data were analyzed retrospectively. During the 6-month study, patients were administered an average 2.74 injections of 0.3 mg ITV pegaptanib sodium. Angiography and optical coherence tomography (OCT examinations were carried out and intraocular pressure (IOP and visual acuity (VA were measured at baseline, at 3 months and at 6 months. An eye examination was performed and VA was measured the 2 days following treatment and then again at weeks 4–6, and at 3 and 6 months. OCT, VA, and IOP were also assessed at 1 month.Results: ITV pegaptanib sodium was well tolerated and no treatment complications arose. Mean VA was measured as: 0.37 ± 0.24 at baseline; 0.37 ± 0.25 at 1 month; 0.37 ± 0.25 at 3 months and 0.40 ± 0.26 at 6 months. VA was stabilized in approximately 90% of eyes treated with pegaptanib sodium. OCT examination showed a minimal change in central retinal thickness (CRT during the course of the study, from 251.19 µm at baseline to 251.63 µm at 6 months. No elevation in IOP was measured during treatment at 4–6 months in patients receiving pegaptanib sodium.Conclusions: ITV therapy with pegaptanib sodium for occult and minimally classic CNV secondary to neovascular AMD offered good

  3. Circulating monocytes and B-lymphocytes in neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector SM

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sven Magnus Hector,1 Torben Lykke Sørensen1,2 1Clinical Eye Research Unit, Zealand University Hospital, Roskilde, 2Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Background: Individuals with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD have altered number and distribution of retinal macrophages and show changes in circulating antibodies. We wanted to investigate the corresponding precursors, with subpopulations. We therefore measured monocyte and B-lymphocyte populations in individuals with neovascular AMD.Design: This was an observational case–control study.Participants or samples: A total of 31 individuals with neovascular AMD and 30 healthy age-matched controls were included.Methods: Patients and controls were interviewed, and ophthalmological examination included visual acuity assessment using the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS chart, spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT, slit-lamp examination and fundus photography. Moreover, venous blood was drawn and prepared for flow cytometry. Cells were gated and measured for surface markers.Main outcome measures: Relative amounts of monocytes and B-lymphocytes with subsets, as well as selected surface markers, were measured.Results: The two groups did not significantly differ in age, smoking history, body mass index, physical activity or C-reactive protein (CRP. Total monocytes (percentage of all leukocytes were lower in the neovascular AMD group (median 5.5% compared with the level in the control group (6.5%; P-value: 0.028. The percentage of intermediate monocytes positive for cluster of differentiation 11b (CD11b was lower for AMD patients (99.4% compared with 100% for the control group (P-value: 0.032.Conclusion: We observed lower numbers of monocytes, which show a potentially impaired ability to migrate across the endothelial wall in patients with neovascular AMD. These subtle changes could potentially lead to an

  4. Visual outcome of intravitreal ranibizumab for exudative age-related macular degeneration: timing and prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canan H

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Handan Canan,1 Selçuk Sizmaz,2 Rana Altan-Yaycioğlu,1 Çağla Saritürk,3 Gürsel Yilmaz41Department of Ophthalmology, Adana Teaching and Medical Research Center, Baskent University School of Medicine, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Çukurova University School of Medicine, 3Department of Biostatistics, Adana Teaching and Medical Research Center, Baskent University School of Medicine, 4Department of Ophthalmology, Baskent University School of Medicine, Ankara, TurkeyPurpose: To describe 1-year clinical results of intravitreal ranibizumab treatment in patients with choroidal neovascularization secondary to exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD and to evaluate whether early treatment is a predictive value for prognosis of the disease.Materials and methods: Clinical records were retrospectively reviewed of 104 eyes that underwent intravitreal ranibizumab therapy for exudative AMD. Patients were divided into two groups according to their symptom duration: group 1, <1 month; and group 2, 1–3 months. After three monthly injections, patients were examined monthly, and subsequent injections were performed as needed.Results: There were 43 female (48.9% and 45 males (51.1%. The follow-up time was 13.7±1.9 (12–19 months. The mean logarithm of minimum angle of resolution best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA improved significantly, from 0.45±0.639 at baseline to 0.08±0.267 at 12 months in group 1, and from 1.06±0.687 at baseline to 0.75±0.563 at 12 months in group 2. The increase in BCVA was statistically significant in group 1 (P=0.009. The mean central retinal thickness (CRT decreased significantly, from 355.13±119.93 µm at baseline to 250.85±45.48 µm at 12 months in group 1, and from 371.88±91.047 µm at baseline to 268.61±53.51 µm at 12 months in group 2. The decrease in CRT was statistically significant in group 1 (P=0.001.Conclusion: Intravitreal ranibizumab therapy was effective in significantly increasing mean BVCA and

  5. OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY–BASED CORRELATION BETWEEN CHOROIDAL THICKNESS AND DRUSEN LOAD IN DRY AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    KO, ASHLEY; CAO, SIJIA; PAKZAD-VAEZI, KAIVON; BRASHER, PENELOPE M.; MERKUR, ANDREW B.; ALBIANI, DAVID A.; KIRKER, ANDREW W.; CUI, JING; MATSUBARA, JOANNE; FOROOGHIAN, FARZIN

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Spectral domain optical coherence tomography can be used to measure both choroidal thickness and drusen load. The authors conducted an exploratory study using spectral domain optical coherence tomography to determine if a correlation between choroidal thickness and drusen load exists in patients with dry age-related macular degeneration. Methods Forty-four patients with dry age-related macular degeneration were recruited. The drusen area and volume were determined using the automated software algorithm of the spectral domain optical coherence tomography device, and choroidal thickness was measured using enhanced depth imaging. Correlations were determined using multivariable and univariable analyses. Results The authors found an inverse correlation between choroidal thickness and drusen load (r = −0.35, P = 0.04). Drusen load was also correlated with visual acuity (r = 0.32, P = 0.04). A correlation between choroidal thickness and visual acuity was suggested (r = −0.22, P = 0.21). Conclusion Spectral domain optical coherence tomography can be used to assess the correlation between drusen load and choroidal thickness, both of which show a relationship with visual acuity. The measurement of these outcomes may serve as important outcome parameters in routine clinical care and in clinical trials for patients with dry age-related macular degeneration. PMID:23474546

  6. Quality of Life with Macular Degeneration Is Not as Dark as It May Seem: Patients’ Perceptions of the MacDQoL Questionnaire

    OpenAIRE

    Ord, Lisa M.; Wright, JoAnne; Margaret M. DeAngelis; Feehan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    To determine the perceived relevance and value of an individualized measure of the impact of macular degeneration on quality of life (QoL) for elderly people with Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) in the USA, through the assessment of the suitability of the measure’s domains and by gaining a deeper insight into the impact of AMD on patients’ QoL vis-á-vis these domains, community-dwelling older adults in the metropolitan Salt Lake City, Utah area were interviewed using the macular degene...

  7. Intravitreal ranibizumab for symptomatic drusenoid pigment epithelial detachment without choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gallego-Pinazo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Roberto Gallego-Pinazo1,2, Ana Marina Suelves-Cogollos1, Ester Francés-Muñoz1, J María Millán2,3, J Fernando Arevalo4, J Luis Mullor5, Manuel Díaz-Llopis1,2,61Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia, Spain; 2Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Raras, Valencia, Spain; 3Department of Genetics, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia, Spain; 4Retina and Vitreous Service, Clínica Oftalmológica Centro Caracas, Caracas, Venezuela; 5Unit of Experimental Ophthalmology, Fundación para la Investigación del Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia, Spain; 6University of Valencia, Faculty of Medicine, Valencia, SpainBackground: The aim of our study was to evaluate the functional and anatomic outcomes of intravitreal ranibizumab for the treatment of symptomatic drusenoid pigment epithelial detachment without choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration.Methods: This was a prospective, single-center, uncontrolled, interventional pilot study. Six consecutive eyes (six patients with drusenoid pigment epithelial detachment with a visual acuity of 20/63 to 20/100 and no evidence of choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration participated. Patients were given at least one intravitreal ranibizumab injection and were followed for a mean of 66.67 ± 10.3 weeks. Main outcome measures included best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA measured by Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study charts and optical coherence tomography, and central macular thickness measured by optical coherence tomography.Results: The mean number of intravitreal ranibizumab injections was 3.0 at the end of follow-up. Regarding BCVA and optical coherence tomography, 33.3% of eyes gained between 19 and 21 letters of BCVA, with a median decrease in central macular thickness of 21 µm. There was a statistically significant difference between baseline and final BCVA (P = 0.046. There was a positive

  8. Decision Support System for Age-Related Macular Degeneration Using Convolutional Neural Networks

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    Mostafa Langarizadeh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is one of the major causes of visual loss among the elderly. It causes degeneration of cells in the macula. Early diagnosis can be helpful in preventing blindness. Drusen are the initial symptoms of AMD. Since drusen have a wide variety, locating them in screening images is difficult and time-consuming. An automated digital fundus photography-based screening system help overcome such drawbacks. The main objective of this study was to suggest a novel method to classify AMD and normal retinal fundus images. Materials and Methods: The suggested system was developed using convolutional neural networks. Several methods were adopted for increasing data such as horizontal reflection, random crop, as well as transfer and combination of such methods. The suggested system was evaluated using images obtained from STARE database and a local dataset. Results: The local dataset contained 3195 images (2070 images of AMD suspects and 1125 images of healthy retina and the STARE dataset comprised of 201 images (105 images of AMD suspects and 96 images of healthy retina. According to the results, the accuracies of the local and standard datasets were 0.95 and 0.81, respectively. Conclusion: Diagnosis and screening of AMD is a time-consuming task for specialists. To overcome this limitation, we attempted to design an intelligent decision support system for the diagnosis of AMD fundus using retina images. The proposed system is an important step toward providing a reliable tool for supervising patients. Early diagnosis of AMD can lead to timely access to treatment.

  9. Local configuration pattern features for age-related macular degeneration characterization and classification.

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    Mookiah, Muthu Rama Krishnan; Acharya, U Rajendra; Fujita, Hamido; Koh, Joel E W; Tan, Jen Hong; Noronha, Kevin; Bhandary, Sulatha V; Chua, Chua Kuang; Lim, Choo Min; Laude, Augustinus; Tong, Louis

    2015-08-01

    Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is an irreversible and chronic medical condition characterized by drusen, Choroidal Neovascularization (CNV) and Geographic Atrophy (GA). AMD is one of the major causes of visual loss among elderly people. It is caused by the degeneration of cells in the macula which is responsible for central vision. AMD can be dry or wet type, however dry AMD is most common. It is classified into early, intermediate and late AMD. The early detection and treatment may help one to stop the progression of the disease. Automated AMD diagnosis may reduce the screening time of the clinicians. In this work, we have introduced LCP to characterize normal and AMD classes using fundus images. Linear Configuration Coefficients (CC) and Pattern Occurrence (PO) features are extracted from fundus images. These extracted features are ranked using p-value of the t-test and fed to various supervised classifiers viz. Decision Tree (DT), Nearest Neighbour (k-NN), Naive Bayes (NB), Probabilistic Neural Network (PNN) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) to classify normal and AMD classes. The performance of the system is evaluated using both private (Kasturba Medical Hospital, Manipal, India) and public domain datasets viz. Automated Retinal Image Analysis (ARIA) and STructured Analysis of the Retina (STARE) using ten-fold cross validation. The proposed approach yielded best performance with a highest average accuracy of 97.78%, sensitivity of 98.00% and specificity of 97.50% for STARE dataset using 22 significant features. Hence, this system can be used as an aiding tool to the clinicians during mass eye screening programs to diagnose AMD.

  10. Decoding simulated neurodynamics predicts the perceptual consequences of age-related macular degeneration.

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    Shi, Jianing V; Wielaard, Jim; Smith, R Theodore; Sajda, Paul

    2011-12-05

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the major cause of blindness in the developed world. Though substantial work has been done to characterize the disease, it is difficult to predict how the state of an individual's retina will ultimately affect their high-level perceptual function. In this paper, we describe an approach that couples retinal imaging with computational neural modeling of early visual processing to generate quantitative predictions of an individual's visual perception. Using a patient population with mild to moderate AMD, we show that we are able to accurately predict subject-specific psychometric performance by decoding simulated neurodynamics that are a function of scotomas derived from an individual's fundus image. On the population level, we find that our approach maps the disease on the retina to a representation that is a substantially better predictor of high-level perceptual performance than traditional clinical metrics such as drusen density and coverage. In summary, our work identifies possible new metrics for evaluating the efficacy of treatments for AMD at the level of the expected changes in high-level visual perception and, in general, typifies how computational neural models can be used as a framework to characterize the perceptual consequences of early visual pathologies.

  11. Estimation of antioxidants dietary intake in wet age-related macular degeneration patients.

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    Bibiloni, Maria del Mar; Zapata, Maria Elisa; Aragón, Juan A; Pons, Antoni; Olea, José Luis; Tur, Josep A

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the intake of antioxidant nutrients in wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) patients, a degenerative and progressive disorder of the macula, which is the central part of the retina, associated with central vision loss. A sample (n = 52, 78.9 ± 6.6 years old, 40.4% females and 59.6% males) of patients diagnosed of AMD was interviewed. Anthropometric measurements, two 24- h recalls, a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire and a general questionnaire incorporating questions related to socio-demographic and lifestyle variables were used. Most of wet AMD patients showed inadequate antioxidant nutrient intake (foods only represented low contributions to antioxidant intake. Although adiposity is a factor risk for AMD progression; the fat and saturated fatty acids (SFA) intake of study participants were higher than the recommendations; the prevalence of overweight was 61.9% men and 58.1% in women; and 83% of patients (90.5% men and 77.4% women) showed fat mass over the cut-off limits. The food pattern of wet AMD patients should be improved by means of an increase in the consumption of antioxidant rich foods, and a decrease in SFA rich foods.L. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  12. Netrin-1 - DCC Signaling Systems and Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

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    John Paul SanGiovanni

    Full Text Available We conducted a nested candidate gene study and pathway-based enrichment analysis on data from a multi-national 77,000-person project on the molecular genetics of age-related macular degeneration (AMD to identify AMD-associated DNA-sequence variants in genes encoding constituents of a netrin-1 (NTN1-based signaling pathway that converges on DNA-binding transcription complexes through a 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate-calcineurin (cAMP-CN-dependent axis. AMD-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs existed in 9 linkage disequilibrium-independent genomic regions; these included loci overlapping NTN1 (rs9899630, P ≤ 9.48 x 10(-5, DCC (Deleted in Colorectal Cancer--the gene encoding a primary NTN1 receptor (rs8097127, P ≤ 3.03 x 10(-5, and 6 other netrin-related genes. Analysis of the NTN1-DCC pathway with exact methods demonstrated robust enrichment with AMD-associated SNPs (corrected P-value = 0.038, supporting the idea that processes driven by NTN1-DCC signaling systems operate in advanced AMD. The NTN1-DCC pathway contains targets of FDA-approved drugs and may offer promise for guiding applied clinical research on preventive and therapeutic interventions for AMD.

  13. The past, present, and future of exudative age-related macular degeneration treatment

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    Yoreh Barak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of exudative age-related macular degeneration has been revolutionized within the last 6 years with the introduction of vascular endothelial growth factor neutralizing agents. Previously popular "destructive treatments," such as laser photocoagulation and photodynamic treatment have either been abandoned or used as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy. Despite the increase in vision after antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF agents, they require repetitive and costly intravitreal injections that also carry the inherit risks of infection, retinal tears, and detachment. Several new and more potent VEGF inhibitors are at different stages of development. The goal of evolving pharmacotherapy is to preserve the therapeutic effect while reducing or eliminating the discomfort of intravitreal drug delivery, as well as identify new therapeutic targets. Complement inhibitors, immunomodulators, integrin inhibitors are a few of the new class of drugs that are expected to be in our armamentarium soon. Current medications act to decrease leakage through abnormal subretinal choroidal vasculature and promote involution. However, these medications are only effective in treating the active stage of the choroidal neovascular membrane. Restoration of vision of a large number of patients with involuted choroidal neovascular membranes is warranted. For this purpose, tissue engineering techniques have been employed to reconstruct the subretinal anatomy. Discovery of biomarkers, pharmacogenetics, and very specific targeting holds the promise of increased potency and safety in the future.

  14. Superoxide Dismutase1 Levels in North Indian Population with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

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    Akshay Anand

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of the study was to estimate the levels of superoxide dismutase1 (SOD1 in patients of age-related macular degeneration (AMD and examine the role of oxidative stress, smoking, hypertension, and other factors involved in the pathogenesis of AMD. Methods. 115 AMD patients and 61 healthy controls were recruited for this study. Serum SOD1 levels were determined by ELISA and were correlated to various risk factors. Logistic regression model of authenticity, by considering SOD1 as independent variable, has been developed along with ROC curve. Results. The SOD1 levels were significantly higher in AMD patients as compared to those of the controls. The difference was not significant for wet and dry AMD. However, the difference was significant between wet AMD subtypes. Nonsignificance of the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness of fit statistic (χ2=10.516, df=8, P=0.231 indicates the appropriateness of logistic regression model to predict AMD. Conclusion. Oxidative stress in AMD patients may mount compensatory response resulting in increased levels of SOD1 in AMD patients. To predict the risk of AMD on the basis of SOD1, a logistic regression model shows authenticity of 78%, and area under the ROC curve (0.827, P=.0001 with less standard error of 0.033 coupled with 95% confidence interval of 0.762–0.891 further validates the model.

  15. Bevasiranib for the treatment of wet, age-related macular degeneration.

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    Garba, Adinoyi O; Mousa, Shaker A

    2010-01-01

    Age- related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of severe visual impairment in people 65 years and older in industrialized nations. Exudative, or "wet", AMD is a late form of AMD (as distinguished from atrophic, so-called dry, AMD) and is responsible for over 60% of all cases of blindness due to AMD. It is widely accepted that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key component in the pathogenesis of choroidal neo-vascularization (CNV), which is a precursor to wet AMD. The current gold-standard for treating wet AMD is the monoclonal antibody fragment ranibizumab (trade name Lucentis), which targets VEGF. Other agents used to treat wet AMD include pegaptanib (Macugen), bevacizumab (Avastin; off-label use), and several other experimental agents. The advent of small interfering RNA (siRNA) has presented a whole new approach to inhibiting VEGF. This article reviews the status of a novel siRNA-based therapeutic, bevasiranib, for the treatment of wet AMD. Bevasiranib is believed to work by down regulating VEGF production in the retina. Studies in human cell-lines and animal models have shown that VEGF siRNAs are effective in inhibiting VEGF production. Although there is a lack of sufficient published data on human studies supporting the use of bevasiranib for wet AMD, available data indicates that due to its unique mechanism of action, bevasiranib might hold some promise as a primary or adjunct treatment for wet AMD.

  16. Use of intravitreal injection of triamcinolone acetonide in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration

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    Gopal Lekha

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is now considered an important and leading cause of blindness among elderly patients in developed and developing countries. AMD has two forms, dry and wet; both can lead to visual loss. However, occurrence of subfoveal choroidal neovascular (CNV membrane in the wet form results in severe visual impairment. Treatment options for choroidal neovascularization are available in order to maintain and in some cases improve vision. Photodynamic therapy (PDT has been used to treat both classic and occult membranes. It has known to cause choroidal hypoperfusion and production of vascular endothelial growth factor. Intravitreal steroid can possibly reduce the damage caused due to these undesirable effects. In the recent past, intravitreal injection of triamcinolone acetonide (IVTA has been used extensively as an adjunct to PDT in AMD in order to reduce the number of PDT sessions and evaluate possible beneficial effects on vision. This article reviews the pharmacological attributes of triamcinolone, available evidence of its use as monotherapy or combination therapy to treat AMD, ocular side-effects thereof and ongoing clinical trials on IVTA.

  17. The vitreomacular interface in different types of age-related macular degeneration

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    El-Hifnawy, Mohamed Abd ElMonaem; Ibrahim, Hisham Ali; Gomaa, Amir Ramadan; Elmasry, Mohamed A

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the vitreomacular interface in cases with wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and to compare them to eyes with dry AMD and normal eyes. METHODS This was a cross-sectional comparative study that included 87 eyes with wet AMD, 42 eyes with dry AMD and 40 eyes without AMD as a control group. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) examination was performed for all patients to assess the vitreomacular interface. RESULTS In the wet AMD group, 34.5% of cases had vitreomacular adhesion (VMA). Only 14.3% of dry AMD cases and 10% of control cases had VMA. There was a significant difference between the control group and the wet AMD group (P=0.004) as well as the dry and wet AMD group (P=0.017). There was also a significant difference between the incidence of VMA in patients with subretinal choroidal neovascularization (CNV, type 1) and intraretinal CNV (type 2 or type 3) (P=0.020). CONCLUSION There is an association between posterior vitreous attachment and AMD. There is also an increased incidence of VMA with intra-retinal CNV. PMID:28251084

  18. Is age-related macular degeneration a problem in Ibadan, Sub-Saharan Africa?

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    Oluleye TS

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Tunji Sunday OluleyeRetina and Vitreous Unit, Department of Ophthalmology, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria, West AfricaBackground: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is considered uncommon in black populations including those of Sub-Saharan Africa. The aim of this review was to determine the pattern of presentation of AMD in our hospital located in Ibadan, the largest city in Sub-Saharan Africa.Methods: A retrospective review of all cases with AMD presenting to the Eye and Retinal Clinic of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, West Africa was undertaken between October 2007 and September 2010.Results: In the 3 years reviewed, 768 retinal cases were seen in the hospital, 101 (14% of which were diagnosed with AMD. The peak age was 60–79 years. The male to female ratio was approximately 2:3. More males presented with the advanced form of dry AMD than females (odds ratio = 2.33. However, more females had advanced wet AMD than males (odds ratio = 1.85. Wet AMD was seen in 40 cases (40%.Conclusion: The review determined that, as AMD is not uncommon and wet AMD is relatively more common in our hospital than has been reported previously, this is probably true of Ibadan in general.Keywords: age-related maculopathy, choroidal neovascular membrane, retinal, vitreoretinal, drusen

  19. NLRP3 Inflammasome Blockade Inhibits VEGF-A-Induced Age-Related Macular Degeneration

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    Alexander G. Marneros

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The NLRP3 inflammasome is activated in age-related macular degeneration (AMD, but it remains unknown whether its activation contributes to AMD pathologies. VEGF-A is increased in neovascular (“wet” AMD, but it is not known whether it plays a role in inflammasome activation, whether an increase of VEGF-A by itself is sufficient to cause neovascular AMD and whether it can contribute to nonexudative (“dry” AMD that often co-occurs with the neovascular form. Here, it is shown that an increase in VEGF-A results in NLRP3 inflammasome activation and is sufficient to cause both forms of AMD pathologies. Targeting NLRP3 or the inflammasome effector cytokine IL-1β inhibits but does not prevent VEGF-A-induced AMD pathologies, whereas targeting IL-18 promotes AMD. Thus, increased VEGF-A provides a unifying pathomechanism for both forms of AMD; combining therapeutic inhibition of both VEGF-A and IL-1β or the NLRP3 inflammasome is therefore likely to suppress both forms of AMD.

  20. PPAR-α Ligands as Potential Therapeutic Agents for Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration

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    Marisol del V Cano

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR's are members of the steroid/thyroid nuclear receptor, superfamily of transcription factors. There are currently three known PPAR subtypes, α, β, and γ. The PPARs are now recognized participants in a number of biological pathways some of which are implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD. These include immune modulation, lipid regulation, and oxidant/antioxidant pathways important to the onset and progression of “dry” AMD, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF mediated pathways that stimulate choroidal neovascularization (CNV, characteristic of “wet” AMD. PPAR-α is found in retina and also on vascular cells important to formation of CNV. At this time, however, relatively little is known about potential contributions of PPAR-α to the pathogenesis of dry and wet AMD. This review examines current literature for potential roles of PPAR-α in the pathogenesis and potential treatment of AMD with emphasis on prevention and treatment of wet AMD.

  1. Gene Ontology and KEGG Enrichment Analyses of Genes Related to Age-Related Macular Degeneration

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    Jian Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying disease genes is one of the most important topics in biomedicine and may facilitate studies on the mechanisms underlying disease. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a serious eye disease; it typically affects older adults and results in a loss of vision due to retina damage. In this study, we attempt to develop an effective method for distinguishing AMD-related genes. Gene ontology and KEGG enrichment analyses of known AMD-related genes were performed, and a classification system was established. In detail, each gene was encoded into a vector by extracting enrichment scores of the gene set, including it and its direct neighbors in STRING, and gene ontology terms or KEGG pathways. Then certain feature-selection methods, including minimum redundancy maximum relevance and incremental feature selection, were adopted to extract key features for the classification system. As a result, 720 GO terms and 11 KEGG pathways were deemed the most important factors for predicting AMD-related genes.

  2. A Method for En Face OCT Imaging of Subretinal Fluid in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

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    Fatimah Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of the study is to report a method for en face imaging of subretinal fluid (SRF due to age-related macular degeneration (AMD based on spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT. Methods. High density SDOCT imaging was performed at two visits in 4 subjects with neovascular AMD and one healthy subject. En face OCT images of a retinal layer anterior to the retinal pigment epithelium were generated. Validity, repeatability, and utility of the method were established. Results. En face OCT images generated by manual and automatic segmentation were nearly indistinguishable and displayed similar regions of SRF. En face OCT images displayed uniform intensities and similar retinal vascular patterns in a healthy subject, while the size and appearance of a hypopigmented fibrotic scar in an AMD subject were similar at 2 visits. In AMD subjects, dark regions on en face OCT images corresponded to reduced or absent light reflectance due to SRF. On en face OCT images, a decrease in SRF areas with treatment was demonstrated and this corresponded with a reduction in the central subfield retinal thickness. Conclusion. En face OCT imaging is a promising tool for visualization and monitoring of SRF area due to disease progression and treatment.

  3. In vivo imaging of retinal pigment epithelium cells in age related macular degeneration.

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    Rossi, Ethan A; Rangel-Fonseca, Piero; Parkins, Keith; Fischer, William; Latchney, Lisa R; Folwell, Margaret A; Williams, David R; Dubra, Alfredo; Chung, Mina M

    2013-01-01

    Morgan and colleagues demonstrated that the RPE cell mosaic can be resolved in the living human eye non-invasively by imaging the short-wavelength autofluorescence using an adaptive optics (AO) ophthalmoscope. This method, based on the assumption that all subjects have the same longitudinal chromatic aberration (LCA) correction, has proved difficult to use in diseased eyes, and in particular those affected by age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In this work, we improve Morgan's method by accounting for chromatic aberration variations by optimizing the confocal aperture axial and transverse placement through an automated iterative maximization of image intensity. The increase in image intensity after algorithmic aperture placement varied depending upon patient and aperture position prior to optimization but increases as large as a factor of 10 were observed. When using a confocal aperture of 3.4 Airy disks in diameter, images were obtained using retinal radiant exposures of less than 2.44 J/cm(2), which is ~22 times below the current ANSI maximum permissible exposure. RPE cell morphologies that were strikingly similar to those seen in postmortem histological studies were observed in AMD eyes, even in areas where the pattern of fluorescence appeared normal in commercial fundus autofluorescence (FAF) images. This new method can be used to study RPE morphology in AMD and other diseases, providing a powerful tool for understanding disease pathogenesis and progression, and offering a new means to assess the efficacy of treatments designed to restore RPE health.

  4. Visual Performance in Patients with Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration Undergoing Treatment with Intravitreal Ranibizumab

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    Sarah Sabour-Pickett

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess visual function and its response to serial intravitreal ranibizumab (Lucentis, Genentech in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nv-AMD. Methods. Forty-seven eyes of 47 patients with nv-AMD, and corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA logMAR 0.7 or better, undergoing intravitreal injections of ranibizumab, were enrolled into this prospective study. Visual function was assessed using a range of psychophysical tests, while mean foveal thickness (MFT was determined by optical coherence tomography (OCT. Results. Group mean (±sd MFT reduced significantly from baseline (233 (±59 to exit (205 (±40 (P=0.001. CDVA exhibited no change between baseline and exit visits (P=0.48 and P=0.31, resp.. Measures of visual function that did exhibit statistically significant improvements (P<0.05 for all included reading acuity, reading speed, mesopic and photopic contrast sensitivity (CS, mesopic and photopic glare disability (GD, and retinotopic ocular sensitivity (ROS at all eccentricities. Conclusion. Eyes with nv-AMD undergoing intravitreal ranibizumab injections exhibit improvements in many parameters of visual function. Outcome measures other than CDVA, such as CS, GD, and ROS, should not only be considered in the design of studies investigating nv-AMD, but also in treatment and retreatment strategies for patients with the condition.

  5. Quantification of visual field loss in age-related macular degeneration.

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    Jennifer H Acton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An evaluation of standard automated perimetry (SAP and short wavelength automated perimetry (SWAP for the central 10-2 visual field test procedure in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD is presented in order to determine methods of quantifying the central sensitivity loss in patients at various stages of AMD. METHODS: 10-2 SAP and SWAP Humphrey visual fields and stereoscopic fundus photographs were collected in 27 eyes of 27 patients with AMD and 22 eyes of 22 normal subjects. RESULTS: Mean Deviation and Pattern Standard Deviation (PSD varied significantly with stage of disease in SAP (both p<0.001 and SWAP (both p<0.001, but post hoc analysis revealed overlap of functional values among stages. In SWAP, indices of focal loss were more sensitive to detecting differences in AMD from normal. SWAP defects were greater in depth and area than those in SAP. Central sensitivity (within 1° changed by -3.9 and -4.9 dB per stage in SAP and SWAP, respectively. Based on defect maps, an AMD Severity Index was derived. CONCLUSIONS: Global indices of focal loss were more sensitive to detecting early stage AMD from normal. The SWAP sensitivity decline with advancing stage of AMD was greater than in SAP. A new AMD Severity Index quantifies visual field defects on a continuous scale. Although not all patients are suitable for SWAP examinations, it is of value as a tool in research studies of visual loss in AMD.

  6. Disturbed Matrix Metalloproteinase Pathway in Both Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Alzheimer's Disease

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    Lee, Yunhee; Zhang, Jin-Jun; Francis, Paul T.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Abnormal protein deposits including β-amyloid, found in ageing Bruch's membrane and brain, are susceptible to degradation by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In ageing Bruch's membrane, these MMPs become less effective due to polymerisation and aggregation reactions (constituting the MMP Pathway), a situation much advanced in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The likely presence of this MMP Pathway in brain with the potential to compromise the degradation of β-amyloid associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been investigated. Methods. Presence of high molecular weight MMP species (HMW1 and HMW2) together with the much larger aggregate termed LMMC was determined by standard zymographic techniques. Centrigugation and gel filtration techniques were used to separate and quantify the distribution between bound and free MMP species. Results. The MMP Pathway, initially identified in Bruch's membrane, was also present in brain tissue. The various MMP species displayed bound-free equilibrium and in AD samples, the amount of bound HMW1 and pro-MMP9 species was significantly reduced (p < 0.05). The abnormal operation of the MMP Pathway in AD served to reduce the degradation potential of the MMP system. Conclusion. The presence and abnormalities of the MMP Pathway in both brain and ocular tissues may therefore contribute to the anomalous deposits associated with AD and AMD.

  7. Minimal depression and vision function in age-related macular degeneration.

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    Rovner, Barry W; Casten, Robin J; Hegel, Mark T; Tasman, William S

    2006-10-01

    To evaluate the impact of minimal depression on subjective and objective vision function measures in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Prospective cross-sectional study. Two hundred six outpatients with newly diagnosed neovascular AMD in one eye and preexisting AMD in the fellow eye. Structured clinical evaluations of visual acuity (VA), contrast sensitivity, vision function, and depression. The 17-item National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire (NEI VFQ 17), Melbourne Low-Vision Index (MLVI), Chronic Disease Score, and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Minimally depressed subjects had significantly worse vision function on both the NEI VFQ 17 and performance-based tasks of the MLVI than nondepressed subjects, independent of severity of VA, contrast sensitivity, and medical status. Minimally depressed patients with AMD, who would not be considered depressed according to current diagnostic standards, suffer decrements in vision function that cannot be accounted for by the severity of their eye disease or general medical problems. These data emphasize the need to assess depressive symptoms in research studies that use vision function outcome measures and in clinical practice to identify excess vision-related disability in patients with AMD.

  8. Dissatisfaction with performance of valued activities predicts depression in age-related macular degeneration.

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    Rovner, Barry W; Casten, Robin J; Hegel, Mark T; Hauck, Walter W; Tasman, William S

    2007-08-01

    To determine whether dissatisfaction with performance of valued activities predicts depression in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Two hundred and six patients with newly diagnosed neovascular AMD in one eye and pre-existing AMD in the fellow eye who were participating in a clinical trial of a psychosocial intervention to prevent depression. Structured clinical evaluations of vision function, depression, visual acuity, contrast sensitivity and medical morbidity. Subjects were classified as dissatisfied if they indicated that they were dissatisfied with their performance of a valued activity. Subjects who were dissatisfied with performance of valued activities (n = 71) had similar demographic characteristics to satisfied subjects (n = 135) but had worse visual acuity (p < 0.054), greater medical comorbidity (p < 0.006), and lower vision function (p < 0.001). Dissatisfied subjects were almost 2.5 times more likely (OR = 2.41; [95% CI 1.02, 5.65]; p = 0.044) to become depressed within 2 months than satisfied subjects independent of baseline visual acuity, vision function, and medical comorbidity. Dissatisfaction with performance of valued activities in older persons with AMD predicts depression over a 2-month period. Assessing the ability to pursue valued activities may identify patients at risk for depression and prompt clinicians to initiate rehabilitative interventions and careful surveillance for depression.

  9. Improving function in age-related macular degeneration: design and methods of a randomized clinical trial.

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    Rovner, Barry W; Casten, Robin J; Hegel, Mark T; Massof, Robert W; Leiby, Benjamin E; Tasman, William S

    2011-03-01

    Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of severe vision loss in older adults and impairs the ability to read, drive, and live independently and increases the risk for depression, falls, and earlier mortality. Although new medical treatments have improved AMD's prognosis, vision-related disability remains a major public health problem. Improving Function in AMD (IF-AMD) is a two-group randomized, parallel design, controlled clinical trial that compares the efficacy of Problem-Solving Therapy (PST) with Supportive Therapy (ST) (an attention control treatment) to improve vision function in 240 patients with AMD. PST and ST therapists deliver 6 one-hour respective treatment sessions to subjects in their homes over 2 months. Outcomes are assessed masked to treatment assignment at 3 months (main trial endpoint) and 6 months (maintenance effects). The primary outcome is targeted vision function (TVF), which refers to specific vision-dependent functional goals that subjects highly value but find difficult to achieve. TVF is an innovative outcome measure in that it is targeted and tailored to individual subjects yet is measured in a standardized way. This paper describes the research methods, theoretical and clinical aspects of the study treatments, and the measures used to evaluate functional and psychiatric outcomes in this population. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Regulation of age-related macular degeneration-like pathology by complement factor H.

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    Toomey, Christopher B; Kelly, Una; Saban, Daniel R; Bowes Rickman, Catherine

    2015-06-09

    Complement factor H (CFH) is a major susceptibility gene for age-related macular degeneration (AMD); however, its impact on AMD pathobiology is unresolved. Here, the role of CFH in the development of AMD pathology in vivo was interrogated by analyzing aged Cfh(+/-) and Cfh(-/-) mice fed a high-fat, cholesterol-enriched diet. Strikingly, decreased levels of CFH led to increased sub-retinal pigmented epithelium (sub-RPE) deposit formation, specifically basal laminar deposits, following high-fat diet. Mechanistically, our data show that deposits are due to CFH competition for lipoprotein binding sites in Bruch's membrane. Interestingly and despite sub-RPE deposit formation occurring in both Cfh(+/-) and Cfh(-/-) mice, RPE damage accompanied by loss of vision occurred only in old Cfh(+/-) mice. We demonstrate that such pathology is a function of excess complement activation in Cfh(+/-) mice versus complement deficiency in Cfh(-/-) animals. Due to the CFH-dependent increase in sub-RPE deposit height, we interrogated the potential of CFH as a previously unidentified regulator of Bruch's membrane lipoprotein binding and show, using human Bruch's membrane explants, that CFH removes endogenous human lipoproteins in aged donors. Thus, advanced age, high-fat diet, and decreased CFH induce sub-RPE deposit formation leading to complement activation, which contributes to RPE damage and visual function impairment. This new understanding of the complicated interactions of CFH in AMD-like pathology provides an improved foundation for the development of targeted therapies for AMD.

  11. Use of Prescribed Optical Devices in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

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    DeCarlo, Dawn K.; McGwin, Gerald; Searcey, Karen; Gao, Liyan; Snow, Marsha; Stevens, Lynne; Owsley, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate prescribed optical device use in terms of frequency and perceived usefulness among people with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We also sought to determine the tasks for which they were using their prescribed low vision device. Methods 199 patients with AMD presenting for the first time to the low vision service were recruited from a university-based clinic. Prior to the low vision evaluation and device prescription, they completed the NEI-VFQ 25, Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire and a general health questionnaire. The low vision evaluation included best-corrected ETDRS visual acuity, MNRead testing, microperimetry, prescription and dispensing of optical low vision devices. Telephone follow-up interviews were conducted about device usage 1-week, 1-month and 3-months post-intervention. Results 181 participants were prescribed low vision devices. 93% completed all 3 follow-up interviews. Intensive users (≥ 1hour/day) of devices were similar in demographic and visual characteristics to non-intensive users (AMD who are provided with prescribed optical low vision devices do use them and perceive them as useful, especially for leisure reading activities. High rates of usage were maintained over 3 months. PMID:22902420

  12. Assessment of polygenic effects links primary open-angle glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Craig, Jamie E; Burdon, Kathryn P; Wang, Jie Jin; Vote, Brendan J; Souzeau, Emmanuelle; McAllister, Ian L; Isaacs, Timothy; Lake, Stewart; Mackey, David A; Constable, Ian J; Mitchell, Paul; Hewitt, Alex W; MacGregor, Stuart

    2016-05-31

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are leading causes of irreversible blindness. Several loci have been mapped using genome-wide association studies. Until very recently, there was no recognized overlap in the genetic contribution to AMD and POAG. At genome-wide significance level, only ABCA1 harbors associations to both diseases. Here, we investigated the genetic architecture of POAG and AMD using genome-wide array data. We estimated the heritability for POAG (h(2)g = 0.42 ± 0.09) and AMD (h(2)g = 0.71 ± 0.08). Removing known loci for POAG and AMD decreased the h(2)g estimates to 0.36 and 0.24, respectively. There was evidence for a positive genetic correlation between POAG and AMD (rg = 0.47 ± 0.25) which remained after removing known loci (rg = 0.64 ± 0.31). We also found that the genetic correlation between sexes for POAG was likely to be less than 1 (rg = 0.33 ± 0.24), suggesting that differences of prevalence among genders may be partly due to heritable factors.

  13. Reorganization of visual processing in macular degeneration is not specific to the "preferred retinal locus".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilks, Daniel D; Baker, Chris I; Peli, Eli; Kanwisher, Nancy

    2009-03-04

    Recent work has shown that foveal cortex, deprived of its normal bottom-up input as a result of macular degeneration (MD), begins responding to stimuli presented to a peripheral retinal location. However, these studies have only presented stimuli to the "preferred retinal location," or PRL, a spared part of the peripheral retina used by individuals with MD for fixating, face recognition, reading, and other visual tasks. Thus, previous research has not yet answered a question critical for understanding the mechanisms underlying this reorganization: Does formerly foveal cortex respond only to stimuli presented at the PRL, or does it also respond to other peripheral locations of similar eccentricity? If foveal cortex responds to stimuli at PRL because it is the long-term habitual use of this region as a functional fovea that drives the formerly foveal cortex to respond to stimuli presented at the PRL (the "use-dependent reorganization" hypothesis), then foveal cortex will not respond to stimuli presented at other locations. Alternatively, it may be that foveal cortex responds to any peripheral retinal input, independent of whether input at that retinal location has been chronically attended for months or years (the "use-independent reorganization" hypothesis). Using fMRI, we found clear activation of formerly foveal cortex to stimuli presented at either the PRL or an isoeccentric non-PRL location in two individuals with MD, supporting the use-independent reorganization hypothesis. This finding suggests that reorganization is driven by passive, not use-dependent mechanisms.

  14. Vascular endothelial growth factor gene polymorphisms in age-related macular degeneration in a Turkish population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunus; Bulgu; Gokhan; Ozan; Cetin; Vildan; Caner; Ebru; Nevin; Cetin; Volkan; Yaylali; Cem; Yildirim

    2014-01-01

    AIM:To assess the association between age-related macular degeneration(AMD) and three single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPS) related to the vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGF) gene.METHODS:The patients who were diagnosed with AMD were included in this prospective study. Three SNPs(rs1413711, rs2146323, and rs3025033) of the VEGF gene were genotyped by real-time polymerase chain reaction in the genomic DNA isolated from peripheral blood samples of the 82 patients and 80 controls.RESULTS:The genotype frequencies of rs1413711 and rs2146323 were not significantly different between the study group and the control group(P =0.072 and P =0.058).However, there was a significant difference in the genotype frequencies of these SNPs between the wet type AMD and dry type AMD(P =0.005 and P =0.010,respectively). One of the SNPs(rs1413711) was also found to be associated with the severity of AMD(P =0.001)with significant genotype distribution between early,intermediate, and advanced stages of the disease. The ancestral alleles were protective for both SNPs while the polymorphic alleles increased the risk for dry AMD.CONCLUSION:VEGF SNPs rs1413711 and rs2146323 polymorphisms are significantly associated with AMD subtypes in our population.

  15. Association of the Intestinal Microbiome with the Development of Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinkernagel, Martin S.; Zysset-Burri, Denise C.; Keller, Irene; Berger, Lieselotte E.; Leichtle, Alexander B.; Largiadèr, Carlo R.; Fiedler, Georg M.; Wolf, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most frequent cause of blindness in the elderly. There is evidence that nutrition, inflammation and genetic risk factors play an important role in the development of AMD. Recent studies suggest that the composition of the intestinal microbiome is associated with metabolic diseases through modulation of inflammation and host metabolism. To investigate whether compositional and functional alterations of the intestinal microbiome are associated with AMD, we sequenced the gut metagenomes of patients with AMD and controls. The genera Anaerotruncus and Oscillibacter as well as Ruminococcus torques and Eubacterium ventriosum were relatively enriched in patients with AMD, whereas Bacteroides eggerthii was enriched in controls. Patient’s intestinal microbiomes were enriched in genes of the L-alanine fermentation, glutamate degradation and arginine biosynthesis pathways and decreased in genes of the fatty acid elongation pathway. These findings suggest that modifications in the intestinal microbiome are associated with AMD, inferring that this common sight threatening disease may be targeted by microbiome-altering interventions. PMID:28094305

  16. The genetics of age-related macular degeneration (AMD)--Novel targets for designing treatment options?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassmann, Felix; Fauser, Sascha; Weber, Bernhard H F

    2015-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive disease of the central retina and the main cause of legal blindness in industrialized countries. Risk to develop the disease is conferred by both individual as well as genetic factors with the latter being increasingly deciphered over the last decade. Therapeutically, striking advances have been made for the treatment of the neovascular form of late stage AMD while for the late stage atrophic form of the disease, which accounts for almost half of the visually impaired, there is currently no effective therapy on the market. This review highlights our current knowledge on the genetic architecture of early and late stage AMD and explores its potential for the discovery of novel, target-guided treatment options. We reflect on current clinical and experimental therapies for all forms of AMD and specifically note a persisting lack of efficacy for treatment in atrophic AMD. We further explore the current insight in AMD-associated genes and pathways and critically question whether this knowledge is suited to design novel treatment options. Specifically, we point out that known genetic factors associated with AMD govern the risk to develop disease and thus may not play a role in its severity or progression. Treatments based on such knowledge appear appropriate rather for prevention than treatment of manifest disease. As a consequence, future research in AMD needs to be greatly focused on approaches relevant to the patients and their medical needs.

  17. Biofeedback stimulation in patients with age-related macular degeneration: comparison between 2 different methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amore, Filippo M; Paliotta, Silvia; Silvestri, Valeria; Piscopo, Paola; Turco, Simona; Reibaldi, Alfredo

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate changes in patient's visual performance after rehabilitation training with 2 different biofeedback training programs offered by the MP-1 microperimeter. Spontaneous retinal location of preferred retinal loci (PRLs) and fixation stability are not always optimal for best visual performances. MP-1 microperimeter biofeedback techniques have been suggested as modalities for training for better fixation stability and to find a better location of the new PRL in a more useful area of the retina in nonoptimal cases. The MP-1 microperimeter offers different biofeedback strategies, such as acoustic biofeedback and structured light stimulus plus acoustic biofeedback. Retrospective study. Thirty subjects affected by age-related macular degeneration with absolute central scotoma. A standard protocol of examination before and after visual rehabilitation training was performed on all study subjects. Assessment included demographics data, visual acuity, fixation stability, retinal sensitivity, and reading speed. Rehabilitation training was performed with standard and structured stimulus biofeedback. The whole sample was divided into 2 groups of 15 patients attending the 2 different stimulation training biofeedback. Mean reading speed was found to be significantly increased for both groups (p biofeedback stimulation increased retinal sensitivity (p biofeedback and flickering pattern biofeedback training seem to improve visual functions. More benefits seem to be accrued, however, with flickering pattern biofeedback training. © 2013 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The effect of normal aging and age-related macular degeneration on perceptual learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astle, Andrew T; Blighe, Alan J; Webb, Ben S; McGraw, Paul V

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether perceptual learning could be used to improve peripheral word identification speed. The relationship between the magnitude of learning and age was established in normal participants to determine whether perceptual learning effects are age invariant. We then investigated whether training could lead to improvements in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Twenty-eight participants with normal vision and five participants with AMD trained on a word identification task. They were required to identify three-letter words, presented 10° from fixation. To standardize crowding across each of the letters that made up the word, words were flanked laterally by randomly chosen letters. Word identification performance was measured psychophysically using a staircase procedure. Significant improvements in peripheral word identification speed were demonstrated following training (71% ± 18%). Initial task performance was correlated with age, with older participants having poorer performance. However, older adults learned more rapidly such that, following training, they reached the same level of performance as their younger counterparts. As a function of number of trials completed, patients with AMD learned at an equivalent rate as age-matched participants with normal vision. Improvements in word identification speed were maintained at least 6 months after training. We have demonstrated that temporal aspects of word recognition can be improved in peripheral vision with training across a range of ages and these learned improvements are relatively enduring. However, training targeted at other bottlenecks to peripheral reading ability, such as visual crowding, may need to be incorporated to optimize this approach.

  19. Inferring diagnosis and trajectory of wet age-related macular degeneration from OCT imagery of retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, John M.; Ghadar, Nastaran; Duncan, Steve; Floyd, David; O'Dowd, David; Lin, Kristie; Chang, Tom

    2017-03-01

    Quantitative biomarkers for assessing the presence, severity, and progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) would benefit research, diagnosis, and treatment. This paper explores development of quantitative biomarkers derived from OCT imagery of the retina. OCT images for approximately 75 patients with Wet AMD, Dry AMD, and no AMD (healthy eyes) were analyzed to identify image features indicative of the patients' conditions. OCT image features provide a statistical characterization of the retina. Healthy eyes exhibit a layered structure, whereas chaotic patterns indicate the deterioration associated with AMD. Our approach uses wavelet and Frangi filtering, combined with statistical features that do not rely on image segmentation, to assess patient conditions. Classification analysis indicates clear separability of Wet AMD from other conditions, including Dry AMD and healthy retinas. The probability of correct classification of was 95.7%, as determined from cross validation. Similar classification analysis predicts the response of Wet AMD patients to treatment, as measured by the Best Corrected Visual Acuity (BCVA). A statistical model predicts BCVA from the imagery features with R2 = 0.846. Initial analysis of OCT imagery indicates that imagery-derived features can provide useful biomarkers for characterization and quantification of AMD: Accurate assessment of Wet AMD compared to other conditions; image-based prediction of outcome for Wet AMD treatment; and features derived from the OCT imagery accurately predict BCVA; unlike many methods in the literature, our techniques do not rely on segmentation of the OCT image. Next steps include larger scale testing and validation.

  20. Nutritional and Lifestyle Interventions for Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Ângela

    2017-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the developed world. In this narrative review, we will summarize the nutritional interventions evaluated in numerous observational studies and a few randomized clinical trials. The AREDS and AREDS2 studies demonstrated that supplements including vitamins C and E, beta-carotene, and zinc may reduce the progression to advanced AMD, in some patients, by 25% in five years. This is one of the few nutritional supplements known to have beneficial effects in any eye disease. Lutein/zeaxanthin supplementation may have beneficial effects in some individuals whereas omega-3 fatty acids supplementation needs to be further investigated and supported by more evidence. Genetic factors may explain the different patterns of response and explain differences found among individuals. More importantly, a combination of lifestyle behaviors such as the avoidance of smoking, physical activity, and the adoption of a healthy dietary pattern like the Mediterranean diet was associated with a lower prevalence of AMD. The adoption of these lifestyles may reduce the prevalence of the early stages of AMD and decrease the number of individuals who develop advanced AMD and consequently the onerous and climbing costs associated with the treatment of this disease.

  1. Update on clinical trials in dry Age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Taskintuna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This review article summarizes the most recent clinical trials for dry age.related macular degeneration (AMD, the most common cause of vision loss in the elderly in developed countries. A literature search through websites https://www.pubmed.org and https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/, both accessed no later than November 04, 2015, was performed. We identified three Phase III clinical trials that were completed over the recent 5 years Age.Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2, implantable miniature telescope and tandospirone, and several other trials targeting a variety of mechanisms including, oxidative stress, complement inhibition, visual cycle inhibition, retinal and choroidal blood flow, stem cells, gene therapy, and visual rehabilitation. To date, none of the biologically oriented therapies have resulted in improved vision. Vision improvement was reported with an implantable mini telescope. Stem cells therapy holds a potential for vision improvement. The AREDS2 formulas did not add any further reduced risk of progression to advanced AMD, compared to the original AREDS formula. Several recently discovered pathogenetic mechanisms in dry AMD have enabled development of new treatment strategies, and several of these have been tested in recent clinical trials and are currently being tested in ongoing trials. The rapid development and understanding of pathogenesis holds promise for the future.

  2. MP-1 biofeedback: luminous pattern stimulus versus acoustic biofeedback in age related macular degeneration (AMD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vingolo, Enzo M; Salvatore, Serena; Limoli, Paolo G

    2013-03-01

    In this study we evaluated the efficacy of visual rehabilitation by means of two different types of biofeedback techniques in patients with age related macular degeneration (AMD). Thirty patients, bilaterally affected by AMD, were randomly divided in two groups: one group was treated with an acoustic biofeedback (AB group), the other was treated with luminous biofeedback of a black and white checkerboard flickering during the examination (LB group). All patients underwent a complete ophthalmological examination. Rehabilitation consisted of 12 training sessions of 10 min for each eye performed once a week for both groups. Both groups showed better visual performance after rehabilitation and luminous flickering biofeedback stimulus showed a statistically significant improvement in training the patients to modify their preferred retinal locus in comparison to acoustic biofeedback. This suggests that it might be possible in the damaged retina to override dead photoreceptor and outer retinal layers and involve residual surviving cells, as well as amplify and integrate retinal and brain cortex plasticity by using other spared channels towards associative pathways.

  3. Balance training and visual rehabilitation of age-related macular degeneration patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radvay, Xavier; Duhoux, Stéphanie; Koenig-Supiot, Françoise; Vital-Durand, François

    2007-01-01

    Patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) experience a large scotoma precluding central vision. In addition, 2/3 of these patients present visuomotor and balance deficits resulting in clumsiness and increased risk of falls. On the basis of previous work demonstrating that visual, vestibular and somatosensory functions involved in balance control can be rehabilitated by training, we attempted to improve these functions by balance training. We measured the impact of balance training on several visuomotor functions and reading speed. We compared balance status of 54 AMD patients to 55 normal controls. Sixteen of these patients and 14 controls subsequently received balance training sessions on a postural platform (Multitest) stressing sensorimotor coordination by selectively inhibiting or disturbing either, visual, vestibular or somatosensory input. Producing a conflict between two inputs reinforces the use of the third. We assessed postural sway, pointing accuracy, reading performance and, for the patients, the effect of low vision training and balance training on the shift from several spontaneous Preferred Retinal Loci (PRLs) to one or more Trained Retinal Loci (TRL). Even after a limited number of sessions of cross-modal balance training, the results show a significant improvement for the vestibular input and fixation stability. A decrease of visual dependency was observed only in the control group. Apart from these improvements, pointing accuracy and reading speed were not significantly improved compared to controls, leading to the conclusion that more training sessions may be necessary to gain more significant improvement of visuo-motor functions.

  4. Update on Clinical Trials in Dry Age-related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskintuna, Ibrahim; Elsayed, M E A Abdalla; Schatz, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    This review article summarizes the most recent clinical trials for dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of vision loss in the elderly in developed countries. A literature search through websites https://www.pubmed.org and https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/, both accessed no later than November 04, 2015, was performed. We identified three Phase III clinical trials that were completed over the recent 5 years Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2), implantable miniature telescope and tandospirone, and several other trials targeting a variety of mechanisms including, oxidative stress, complement inhibition, visual cycle inhibition, retinal and choroidal blood flow, stem cells, gene therapy, and visual rehabilitation. To date, none of the biologically oriented therapies have resulted in improved vision. Vision improvement was reported with an implantable mini telescope. Stem cells therapy holds a potential for vision improvement. The AREDS2 formulas did not add any further reduced risk of progression to advanced AMD, compared to the original AREDS formula. Several recently discovered pathogenetic mechanisms in dry AMD have enabled development of new treatment strategies, and several of these have been tested in recent clinical trials and are currently being tested in ongoing trials. The rapid development and understanding of pathogenesis holds promise for the future.

  5. Update on current and future novel therapies for dry age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ella; Landa, Gennady

    2013-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in developed countries. There are currently no cures, but there are promising potential therapies that target the underlying disease mechanisms of dry ARMD. Stem cells, ciliary neurotrophic factor, rheopheresis, ozonated autohemotherapy and prostaglandins show promise in stabilizing or improving visual acuity. Age-Related Eye Disease Study vitamins may reduce progression to severe ARMD. Adjuvant therapy like low vision rehabilitation and implantable miniature telescopes may help patients adjust to the sequelae of their disease, and herbal supplementation with saffron, zinc monocysteine and phototrop may be helpful. Therapies that are currently in clinical trials include brimonidine, doxycycline, anti-amyloid antibodies (GSK933776 and RN6G), RPE65 inhibitor (ACU-4429), complement inhibitors (ARC1905, FCFD4514S), hydroxychloroquine, intravitreal fluocinolone acetate and vasodilators like sildenafil, moxaverine and MC-1101. Therapies that have not been shown to be effective include POT-4, eculizumab, tandospirone, anecortave acetate, the antioxidant OT-551, sirolimus and vitamin E.

  6. CCR3 is a target for age-related macular degeneration diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Atsunobu; Baffi, Judit Z; Kleinman, Mark E; Cho, Won Gil; Nozaki, Miho; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Kaneko, Hiroki; Albuquerque, Romulo J C; Dridi, Sami; Saito, Kuniharu; Raisler, Brian J; Budd, Steven J; Geisen, Pete; Munitz, Ariel; Ambati, Balamurali K; Green, Martha G; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Wright, John D; Humbles, Alison A; Gerard, Craig J; Ogura, Yuichiro; Pan, Yuzhen; Smith, Justine R; Grisanti, Salvatore; Hartnett, M Elizabeth; Rothenberg, Marc E; Ambati, Jayakrishna

    2009-07-09

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness worldwide, is as prevalent as cancer in industrialized nations. Most blindness in AMD results from invasion of the retina by choroidal neovascularisation (CNV). Here we show that the eosinophil/mast cell chemokine receptor CCR3 is specifically expressed in choroidal neovascular endothelial cells in humans with AMD, and that despite the expression of its ligands eotaxin-1, -2 and -3, neither eosinophils nor mast cells are present in human CNV. Genetic or pharmacological targeting of CCR3 or eotaxins inhibited injury-induced CNV in mice. CNV suppression by CCR3 blockade was due to direct inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation, and was uncoupled from inflammation because it occurred in mice lacking eosinophils or mast cells, and was independent of macrophage and neutrophil recruitment. CCR3 blockade was more effective at reducing CNV than vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) neutralization, which is in clinical use at present, and, unlike VEGF-A blockade, is not toxic to the mouse retina. In vivo imaging with CCR3-targeting quantum dots located spontaneous CNV invisible to standard fluorescein angiography in mice before retinal invasion. CCR3 targeting might reduce vision loss due to AMD through early detection and therapeutic angioinhibition.

  7. Mitochondrial DNA polymorphism A4917G is independently associated with age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Canter

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine if MTND2*LHON4917G (4917G, a specific non-synonymous polymorphism in the mitochondrial genome previously associated with neurodegenerative phenotypes, is associated with increased risk for age-related macular degeneration (AMD. A preliminary study of 393 individuals (293 cases and 100 controls ascertained at Vanderbilt revealed an increased occurrence of 4917G in cases compared to controls (15.4% vs.9.0%, p = 0.11. Since there was a significant age difference between cases and controls in this initial analysis, we extended the study by selecting Caucasian pairs matched at the exact age at examination. From the 1547 individuals in the Vanderbilt/Duke AMD population association study (including 157 in the preliminary study, we were able to match 560 (280 cases and 280 unaffected on exact age at examination. This study population was genotyped for 4917G plus specific AMD-associated nuclear genome polymorphisms in CFH, LOC387715 and ApoE. Following adjustment for the listed nuclear genome polymorphisms, 4917G independently predicts the presence of AMD (OR = 2.16, 95%CI 1.20-3.91, p = 0.01. In conclusion, a specific mitochondrial polymorphism previously implicated in other neurodegenerative phenotypes (4917G appears to convey risk for AMD independent of recently discovered nuclear DNA polymorphisms.

  8. HTRA1 variant confers similar risks to geographic atrophy and neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, D Joshua; Yang, Zhenglin; Gibbs, Daniel; Chen, Haoyu; Kaminoh, Yuuki; Jorgensen, Adam; Zeng, Jiexi; Luo, Ling; Brinton, Eric; Brinton, Gregory; Brand, John M; Bernstein, Paul S; Zabriskie, Norman A; Tang, Shibo; Constantine, Ryan; Tong, Zongzhong; Zhang, Kang

    2007-05-02

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment in the developed world. The two forms of advanced AMD, geographic atrophy (GA) and choroidal neovascularization (wet AMD), represent two types of degenerative processes in the macula that lead to loss of central vision. Soft confluent drusen, characterized by deposits in macula without visual loss are considered a precursor of advanced AMD. A single nucleotide polymorphism, rs11200638, in the promoter of HTRA1 has been shown to increases the risk for wet AMD. However, its impact on soft confluent drusen and GA or the relationship between them is unclear. To better understand the role the HTRA1 polymorphism plays in AMD subtypes, we genotyped an expanded Utah population with 658 patients having advanced AMD or soft confluent drusen and 294 normal controls and found that the rs11200638 was significantly associated with GA. This association remains significant conditional on LOC387715 rs10490924. In addition, rs11200638 was significantly associated with soft confluent drusen, which are strongly immunolabeled with HTRA1 antibody in an AMD eye with GA similar to wet AMD. Two-locus analyses were performed for CFH Y402H variant at 1q31 and the HTRA1 polymorphism. Together CFH and HTRA1 risk variants increase the odds of having AMD by more than 40 times. These findings expand the role of HTRA1 in AMD. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanism will provide an important insight in pathogenesis of AMD.

  9. A Validated Phenotyping Algorithm for Genetic Association Studies in Age-related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonett, Joseph M.; Sohrab, Mahsa A.; Pacheco, Jennifer; Armstrong, Loren L.; Rzhetskaya, Margarita; Smith, Maureen; Geoffrey Hayes, M.; Fawzi, Amani A.

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a multifactorial, neurodegenerative disease, is a leading cause of vision loss. With the rapid advancement of DNA sequencing technologies, many AMD-associated genetic polymorphisms have been identified. Currently, the most time consuming steps of these studies are patient recruitment and phenotyping. In this study, we describe the development of an automated algorithm to identify neovascular (wet) AMD, non-neovascular (dry) AMD and control subjects using electronic medical record (EMR)-based criteria. Positive predictive value (91.7%) and negative predictive value (97.5%) were calculated using expert chart review as the gold standard to assess algorithm performance. We applied the algorithm to an EMR-linked DNA bio-repository to study previously identified AMD-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), using case/control status determined by the algorithm. Risk alleles of three SNPs, rs1061170 (CFH), rs1410996 (CFH), and rs10490924 (ARMS2) were found to be significantly associated with the AMD case/control status as defined by the algorithm. With the rapid growth of EMR-linked DNA biorepositories, patient selection algorithms can greatly increase the efficiency of genetic association study. We have found that stepwise validation of such an algorithm can result in reliable cohort selection and, when coupled within an EMR-linked DNA biorepository, replicates previously published AMD-associated SNPs. PMID:26255974

  10. Management of Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration: A Review on Landmark Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Aniruddha; Aggarwal, Kanika; Gupta, Vishali

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, a number of prospective clinical trials with carefully designed study protocols have been conducted for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). These landmark clinical trials such as ANCHOR and MARINA and, more recently, the Comparison of AMD Treatment Trials and VIEW studies have revolutionized the management of neovascular AMD. While AMD continues to remain a leading cause of severe visual loss worldwide, advances in pharmacotherapeutics have led to substantial improvements in the outcome of these patients. The introduction of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents has resulted in improvement of visual outcomes and has had a positive impact on the quality of life among elderly population. While the contemporary management of neovascular AMD has been successful in tremendously reducing the visual morbidity, the financial burden of therapy has increased exponentially. To overcome these challenges, newer pharmacologic agents are evaluated for their efficacy and safety in AMD. Ground-breaking advances in bench to bedside research have led to discovery of new pathways that appear to be viable targets for preventing visual loss in AMD. In this review, study designs and results of landmark clinical trials in AMD from the past decade have been summarized.

  11. Recent patents relating to diagnostic advances in age related macular degeneration (AMD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantsilieris, Stuart; Schache, Maria; Ashdown, M Luisa; Baird, Paul N

    2009-01-01

    Age Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder accounting for 50% of blind registrations in the western world. Its substantial impact on quality of life has been a main driver in research to understand its etiology, which up until recently was mostly unknown. In the last three years our understanding of the molecular pathology of AMD has increased dramatically with the identification of two major AMD loci comprising of, Complement Factor H (CFH) and a chromosome 10q26 locus consisting of the Heat Shock Serine Protease (HTRA1) and LOC387715 genes. These two loci have been described as associated with over 50% of disease in certain ethnicities. The rapid pace in our understanding of the complex biology of this disease has placed a large emphasis on gene patenting, especially with the licensing of the CFH and chromosome 10 patents to a private life science company called Optherion Inc. The patents discussed in this review highlight the important discoveries that have contributed to our understanding of AMD and provide valuable information as to where research in this area will be heading in the future.

  12. Management of neovascular Age-related macular degeneration: A review on landmark randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniruddha Agarwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, a number of prospective clinical trials with carefully designed study protocols have been conducted for the treatment of neovascular age.related macular degeneration (AMD. These landmark clinical trials such as ANCHOR and MARINA and, more recently, the Comparison of AMD Treatment Trials and VIEW studies have revolutionized the management of neovascular AMD. While AMD continues to remain a leading cause of severe visual loss worldwide, advances in pharmacotherapeutics have led to substantial improvements in the outcome of these patients. The introduction of anti.vascular endothelial growth factor agents has resulted in improvement of visual outcomes and has had a positive impact on the quality of life among elderly population. While the contemporary management of neovascular AMD has been successful in tremendously reducing the visual morbidity, the financial burden of therapy has increased exponentially. To overcome these challenges, newer pharmacologic agents are evaluated for their efficacy and safety in AMD. Ground.breaking advances in bench to bedside research have led to discovery of new pathways that appear to be viable targets for preventing visual loss in AMD. In this review, study designs and results of landmark clinical trials in AMD from the past decade have been summarized.

  13. Photo-damage, photo-protection and age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquioni-Ramella, Melisa D; Suburo, Angela M

    2015-09-26

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a degenerative retinal disease that causes blindness in people 60-65 years and older, with the highest prevalence appearing in people 90 years-old or more. Epidemiological estimates indicate that the number of cases is increasing, and will almost double in the next 20 years. Preventive measures require precise etiological knowledge. This is quite difficult, since AMD is a multifactorial condition with intricate relationships between causes and risk factors. In this review, we describe the impact of light on the structure and physiology of the retina and the pigment epithelium, taking into account the continuous exposure to natural and artificial light sources along the life of an individual. A large body of experimental evidence demonstrates the toxic effects of some lighting conditions on the retina and the pigment epithelium, and consensus exists about the importance of photo-oxidation phenomena in the causality chain between light and retinal damage. Here, we analyzed the transmission of light to the retina, and compared the aging human macula in healthy and diseased retinas, as shown by histology and non-invasive imaging systems. Finally, we have compared the putative retinal photo-sensitive molecular structures that might be involved in the genesis of AMD. The relationship between these compounds and retinal damage supports the hypothesis of light as an important initiating cause of AMD.

  14. Prevalence of depression and its effect on disability in patients with age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banerjee Anindya

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To estimate depression in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD and study the relationships among depression, visual acuity, and disability. Materials and Methods: It was a cross-sectional study with consecutive sampling (n = 53 of patients with AMD aged 50 years and above attending the retina clinic of a tertiary care hospital in North India. Depression, general disability and vision-specific disability were assessed in subjects meeting selection criteria. Assessments were done using the fourth edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of mental disorders (DSM- IV Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS, Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis -I Disorders, Clinical Version (SCID-CV, World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule-II (WHODAS-II and Daily Living Tasks dependent on Vision scale (DLTV. Non-parametric correlation analyses and regression analyses were performed. Results: Out of 53 participants, 26.4% (n = 14 met DSM-IV criteria for the diagnosis of depressive disorder. Depressed patients had significantly greater levels of general and vision-specific disability than non-depressed patients. General disability was predicted better by depression and vision-specific disability than by visual acuity. Conclusion: Depression is a major concern in patients with AMD and contributes more to disability than visual impairment.

  15. Visual performance in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration undergoing treatment with intravitreal ranibizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabour-Pickett, Sarah; Loughman, James; Nolan, John M; Stack, Jim; Pesudovs, Konrad; Meagher, Katherine A; Beatty, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To assess visual function and its response to serial intravitreal ranibizumab (Lucentis, Genentech) in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nv-AMD). Methods. Forty-seven eyes of 47 patients with nv-AMD, and corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) logMAR 0.7 or better, undergoing intravitreal injections of ranibizumab, were enrolled into this prospective study. Visual function was assessed using a range of psychophysical tests, while mean foveal thickness (MFT) was determined by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Results. Group mean (±sd) MFT reduced significantly from baseline (233 (±59)) to exit (205 (±40)) (P = 0.001). CDVA exhibited no change between baseline and exit visits (P = 0.48 and P = 0.31, resp.). Measures of visual function that did exhibit statistically significant improvements (P disability (GD), and retinotopic ocular sensitivity (ROS) at all eccentricities. Conclusion. Eyes with nv-AMD undergoing intravitreal ranibizumab injections exhibit improvements in many parameters of visual function. Outcome measures other than CDVA, such as CS, GD, and ROS, should not only be considered in the design of studies investigating nv-AMD, but also in treatment and retreatment strategies for patients with the condition.

  16. Individualized Therapy with Ranibizumab in Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Layana, Alfredo; Figueroa, Marta S.; Arias, Luis; Araiz, Javier; Ruiz-Moreno, José María; García-Arumí, José; Gómez-Ulla, Francisco; López-Gálvez, María Isabel; Cabrera-López, Francisco; García-Campos, José Manuel; Monés, Jordi; Cervera, Enrique; Armadá, Felix; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Individualized treatment regimens may reduce patient burden with satisfactory patient outcomes in neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Intravitreal anti-VEGF drugs are the current gold standard. Fixed monthly injections offer the best visual outcome but this regimen is not commonly followed outside clinical trials. A PRN regimen requires monthly visits where the patient is treated in the presence of signs of lesion activity. Therefore, an early detection of reactivation of the disease with immediate retreatment is crucial to prevent visual acuity loss. Several trials suggest that “treat and extend” and other proactive regimens provide a reasonable approach. The rationale of the proactive regimens is to perform treatment anticipating relapses or recurrences and therefore avoid drops in vision while individualizing patient followup. Treat and extend study results in significant direct medical cost savings from fewer treatments and office visits compared to monthly treatment. Current data suggest that, for one year, PRN is less expensive, but treat and extend regimen would likely be less expensive for subsequent years. Once a patient is not a candidate to continue with treatment, he/she should be sent to an outpatient unit with adequate resources to follow nAMD patients in order to reduce the burden of specialized ophthalmologist services. PMID:26491550

  17. Antivascular Endothelial Growth Factor Agents for Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration

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    Ilias Zampros

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of severe visual loss and blindness over the age of 50 in developed countries. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is considered as a critical molecule in the pathogenesis of choroidal neovascularization (CNV, which characterizes the neovascular AMD. Anti-VEGF agents are considered the most promising way of effectively inhibition of the neovascular AMD process. VEGF is a heparin-binding glycoprotein with potent angiogenic, mitogenic and vascular permeability-enhancing activities specific for endothelial cells. Two anti-VEGF agents have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA for the treatment of neovascular AMD. Pegaptanib sodium, which is an aptamer and ranibizumab, which is a monoclonal antibody fragment. Another humanized monoclonal antibody is currently off-label used, bevacizumab. This paper aims to discuss in details the effectiveness, the efficacy and safety of these three anti-VEGF agents. New anti-VEGF compounds which are recently investigated for their clinical usage (VEGF-trap, small interfering RNA are also discussed for their promising outcomes.

  18. Behavior of the Age Related Macular Degeneration in Sancti Spiritus province.

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    Yanelis Emilia Tabio Henry

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The age-related macular degeneration (ARMD is a bilateral maculopathy that affect central vision and has a social, scientific and economic repercussion due to the visual discapacity that causes.With the objective of characterizing the behaviour of the AMD, it was done a study of 49 patients that went to the retina consultation of the oftalmological service from the General Hospital Camilo Cienfuegos of Sancti Spíritus the period of january 1 st , 2006 to december 31 st 2008. Different variables were used like: age, sex, skin color, risk factors, general deseases, clinical forms and treatment. It prevailed the male sex (53,0%, the age group of 80 years plus (57,1 %, the white race (93,8%, the arterial hypertension as a general desease (38,7%, and the dry clynical form (89.7%. It was found the advance age and the white race as main risk factors and prevailed the dry clinic form of the desease.

  19. The Association between the Lipids Levels in Blood and Risk of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

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    Yafeng Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lipid metabolism may be involved in the pathogenic mechanism of age-related macular degeneration (AMD. However, conflicting results have been reported in the associations of AMD with blood lipids. We performed a meta-analysis including a total of 19 studies to evaluate associations between blood lipids and this disease. The result reported that the high level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C obtained with an increment of 1 mmol/L could result in a significantly increase in the AMD risk of approximately 18% (relative risk (RR, 1.18; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.01 to 1.35; I2 = 53.8%; p = 0.007. High levels of total cholesterol (TC, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, and triglycerides (TG were significantly associated with a decreased risk of AMD (RRs ranging from 0.92 to 0.95; all p < 0.05. The stratified analysis based on AMD subtypes showed that these blood lipids were only significantly associated with the risk of early AMD (all p < 0.05. The association between the blood lipids and AMD risk did not differ substantially based on the other characteristics of the participants. A high HDL-C level was associated with an increased AMD risk, whereas participants with high TC, LDL-C, and TG concentrations may show a decreased risk for this disease. Further well-designed large studies are warranted to confirm the conclusions.

  20. A Method for En Face OCT Imaging of Subretinal Fluid in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Fatimah; Wanek, Justin; Zelkha, Ruth; Lim, Jennifer I; Chen, Judy; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of the study is to report a method for en face imaging of subretinal fluid (SRF) due to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) based on spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT). Methods. High density SDOCT imaging was performed at two visits in 4 subjects with neovascular AMD and one healthy subject. En face OCT images of a retinal layer anterior to the retinal pigment epithelium were generated. Validity, repeatability, and utility of the method were established. Results. En face OCT images generated by manual and automatic segmentation were nearly indistinguishable and displayed similar regions of SRF. En face OCT images displayed uniform intensities and similar retinal vascular patterns in a healthy subject, while the size and appearance of a hypopigmented fibrotic scar in an AMD subject were similar at 2 visits. In AMD subjects, dark regions on en face OCT images corresponded to reduced or absent light reflectance due to SRF. On en face OCT images, a decrease in SRF areas with treatment was demonstrated and this corresponded with a reduction in the central subfield retinal thickness. Conclusion. En face OCT imaging is a promising tool for visualization and monitoring of SRF area due to disease progression and treatment.

  1. Nutritional and Lifestyle Interventions for Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Review

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    Ângela Carneiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of blindness in the developed world. In this narrative review, we will summarize the nutritional interventions evaluated in numerous observational studies and a few randomized clinical trials. The AREDS and AREDS2 studies demonstrated that supplements including vitamins C and E, beta-carotene, and zinc may reduce the progression to advanced AMD, in some patients, by 25% in five years. This is one of the few nutritional supplements known to have beneficial effects in any eye disease. Lutein/zeaxanthin supplementation may have beneficial effects in some individuals whereas omega-3 fatty acids supplementation needs to be further investigated and supported by more evidence. Genetic factors may explain the different patterns of response and explain differences found among individuals. More importantly, a combination of lifestyle behaviors such as the avoidance of smoking, physical activity, and the adoption of a healthy dietary pattern like the Mediterranean diet was associated with a lower prevalence of AMD. The adoption of these lifestyles may reduce the prevalence of the early stages of AMD and decrease the number of individuals who develop advanced AMD and consequently the onerous and climbing costs associated with the treatment of this disease.

  2. Nutritional and Lifestyle Interventions for Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Ângela; Andrade, José Paulo

    2017-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the developed world. In this narrative review, we will summarize the nutritional interventions evaluated in numerous observational studies and a few randomized clinical trials. The AREDS and AREDS2 studies demonstrated that supplements including vitamins C and E, beta-carotene, and zinc may reduce the progression to advanced AMD, in some patients, by 25% in five years. This is one of the few nutritional supplements known to have beneficial effects in any eye disease. Lutein/zeaxanthin supplementation may have beneficial effects in some individuals whereas omega-3 fatty acids supplementation needs to be further investigated and supported by more evidence. Genetic factors may explain the different patterns of response and explain differences found among individuals. More importantly, a combination of lifestyle behaviors such as the avoidance of smoking, physical activity, and the adoption of a healthy dietary pattern like the Mediterranean diet was associated with a lower prevalence of AMD. The adoption of these lifestyles may reduce the prevalence of the early stages of AMD and decrease the number of individuals who develop advanced AMD and consequently the onerous and climbing costs associated with the treatment of this disease.

  3. Critical Appraisal of Clinical Practice Guidelines for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

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    Annie M. Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the methodological quality of age-related macular degeneration (AMD clinical practice guidelines (CPGs. Methods. AMD CPGs published by the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO and Royal College of Ophthalmologists (RCO were appraised by independent reviewers using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II instrument, which comprises six domains (Scope and Purpose, Stakeholder Involvement, Rigor of Development, Clarity of Presentation, Applicability, and Editorial Independence, and an Overall Assessment score summarizing methodological quality across all domains. Results. Average domain scores ranged from 35% to 83% for the AAO CPG and from 17% to 83% for the RCO CPG. Intraclass correlation coefficients for the reliability of mean scores for the AAO and RCO CPGs were 0.74 and 0.88, respectively. The strongest domains were Scope and Purpose and Clarity of Presentation. The weakest were Stakeholder Involvement (AAO and Editorial Independence (RCO. Conclusions. Future AMD CPGs can be improved by involving all relevant stakeholders in guideline development, ensuring transparency of guideline development and review methodology, improving guideline applicability with respect to economic considerations, and addressing potential conflict of interests within the development group.

  4. Cellular and Molecular Pathology of Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Potential Role for Proteoglycans

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    Othman Al Gwairi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a retinal disease evident after the age of 50 that damages the macula in the centre of retina. It leads to a loss of central vision with retained peripheral vision but eventual blindness occurs in many cases. The initiation site of AMD development is Bruch’s membrane (BM where multiple changes occur including the deposition of plasma derived lipids, accumulation of extracellular debris, changes in cell morphology, and viability and the formation of drusen. AMD manifests as early and late stage; the latter involves cell proliferation and neovascularization in wet AMD. Current therapies target the later hyperproliferative and invasive wet stage whilst none target early developmental stages of AMD. In the lipid deposition disease atherosclerosis modified proteoglycans bind and retain apolipoproteins in the artery wall. Chemically modified trapped lipids are immunogenic and can initiate a chronic inflammatory process manifesting as atherosclerotic plaques and subsequent artery blockages, heart attacks, or strokes. As plasma derived lipoprotein deposits are found in BM in early AMD, it is possible that they arise by a similar process within the macula. In this review we consider aspects of the pathological processes underlying AMD with a focus on the potential role of modifications to secreted proteoglycans being a cause and therefore a target for the treatment of early AMD.

  5. Cellular and Molecular Pathology of Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Potential Role for Proteoglycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Gwairi, Othman; Thach, Lyna; Zheng, Wenhua; Osman, Narin; Little, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a retinal disease evident after the age of 50 that damages the macula in the centre of retina. It leads to a loss of central vision with retained peripheral vision but eventual blindness occurs in many cases. The initiation site of AMD development is Bruch's membrane (BM) where multiple changes occur including the deposition of plasma derived lipids, accumulation of extracellular debris, changes in cell morphology, and viability and the formation of drusen. AMD manifests as early and late stage; the latter involves cell proliferation and neovascularization in wet AMD. Current therapies target the later hyperproliferative and invasive wet stage whilst none target early developmental stages of AMD. In the lipid deposition disease atherosclerosis modified proteoglycans bind and retain apolipoproteins in the artery wall. Chemically modified trapped lipids are immunogenic and can initiate a chronic inflammatory process manifesting as atherosclerotic plaques and subsequent artery blockages, heart attacks, or strokes. As plasma derived lipoprotein deposits are found in BM in early AMD, it is possible that they arise by a similar process within the macula. In this review we consider aspects of the pathological processes underlying AMD with a focus on the potential role of modifications to secreted proteoglycans being a cause and therefore a target for the treatment of early AMD.

  6. Oxidative Stress, Hypoxia, and Autophagy in the Neovascular Processes of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

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    Janusz Blasiak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of severe and irreversible loss of vision in the elderly in developed countries. AMD is a complex chronic neurodegenerative disease associated with many environmental, lifestyle, and genetic factors. Oxidative stress and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS seem to play a pivotal role in AMD pathogenesis. It is known that the macula receives the highest blood flow of any tissue in the body when related to size, and anything that can reduce the rich blood supply can cause hypoxia, malfunction, or disease. Oxidative stress can affect both the lipid rich retinal outer segment structure and the light processing in the macula. The response to oxidative stress involves several cellular defense reactions, for example, increases in antioxidant production and proteolysis of damaged proteins. The imbalance between production of damaged cellular components and degradation leads to the accumulation of detrimental products, for example, intracellular lipofuscin and extracellular drusen. Autophagy is a central lysosomal clearance system that may play an important role in AMD development. There are many anatomical changes in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE, Bruch’s membrane, and choriocapillaris in response to chronic oxidative stress, hypoxia, and disturbed autophagy and these are estimated to be crucial components in the pathology of neovascular processes in AMD.

  7. Oxidative stress, hypoxia, and autophagy in the neovascular processes of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasiak, Janusz; Petrovski, Goran; Veréb, Zoltán; Facskó, Andrea; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of severe and irreversible loss of vision in the elderly in developed countries. AMD is a complex chronic neurodegenerative disease associated with many environmental, lifestyle, and genetic factors. Oxidative stress and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) seem to play a pivotal role in AMD pathogenesis. It is known that the macula receives the highest blood flow of any tissue in the body when related to size, and anything that can reduce the rich blood supply can cause hypoxia, malfunction, or disease. Oxidative stress can affect both the lipid rich retinal outer segment structure and the light processing in the macula. The response to oxidative stress involves several cellular defense reactions, for example, increases in antioxidant production and proteolysis of damaged proteins. The imbalance between production of damaged cellular components and degradation leads to the accumulation of detrimental products, for example, intracellular lipofuscin and extracellular drusen. Autophagy is a central lysosomal clearance system that may play an important role in AMD development. There are many anatomical changes in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), Bruch's membrane, and choriocapillaris in response to chronic oxidative stress, hypoxia, and disturbed autophagy and these are estimated to be crucial components in the pathology of neovascular processes in AMD.

  8. Resistance to anti-VEGF therapy in neovascular age-related macular degeneration: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shiqi; Zhao, Jingke; Sun, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    As a progressive chronic disease, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible vision impairment worldwide. Experimental and clinical evidence has demonstrated that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a vital role in the formation of choroidal neovascularization. Intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF agents have been recommended as a first-line treatment for neovascular AMD. However, persistent fluid or recurrent exudation still occurs despite standardized anti-VEGF therapy. Patients suffering from refractory or recurrent neovascular AMD may develop mechanisms of resistance to anti-VEGF therapy, which results in a diminished therapeutic effect. Until now, there has been no consensus on the definitions of refractory neovascular AMD and recurrent neovascular AMD. This article aims at clarifying these concepts to evaluate the efficacy of switching drugs, which contributes to making clinical decision more scientifically. Furthermore, insight into the causes of resistance to anti-VEGF therapy would be helpful for developing possible therapeutic approaches, such as combination therapy and multi-target treatment that can overcome this resistance.

  9. Association between macular degeneration and mild to moderate chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Yu; Dai, Ciou-Sia; Lee, Chin-Chan; Shyu, Yu-Chiau; Huang, Ting-Shuo; Yeung, Ling; Sun, Chi-Chin; Yang, Huang-Yu; Wu, I-Wen

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and macular degeneration (MD) are 2 grave diseases leading to significant disability secondary to renal failure and blindness. The 2 diseases share not only common risk factors but also similar pathogenic mechanisms to renal and retinal injuries. Previous epidemiological studies indicated association between these 2 diseases. However, this concept is challenged by recent investigations. Patients with mild to moderate CKD (n = 30,696) between January 1, 1995 and December 31, 2005 were selected from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database. Controls (n = 122,784) were matched by age, gender, diabetes mellitus type 2, and hypertension status (1:4 ratios). The risk of MD was compared between the 2 groups. The mean age of patients was 54.9 ± 15.7 years. The proportion of MD was 2.7% in mild to moderate CKD patients and 1.9% in normal controls (P disease, and peripheral vascular disease, model 2; OR: 1.369; 95% CI: 1.264–1.484; P < 0.001) and all these factors (model 3; OR: 1.320, 95% CI: 1.218–1.431, P < 0.001). This association was consistent in the subanalysis, excluding those patients with diabetic retinopathy. Proper diagnosis and timely intervention should be warranted to retard visual loss of these patients. PMID:28296786

  10. Alterations in Circulating Immune Cells in Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Judith; Chen, Mei; Hogg, Ruth E; Toth, Levente; Silvestri, Giuliana; Chakravarthy, Usha; Xu, Heping

    2015-11-17

    Neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in developed countries. Recent advances have highlighted the essential role of inflammation in the development of the disease. In addition to local retinal chronic inflammatory response, systemic immune alterations have also been observed in AMD patients. In this study we investigated the association between the frequency of circulating leukocyte populations and the prevalence as well as clinical presentations of nAMD. Leukocyte subsets of 103 nAMD patients (most of them were receiving anti-VEGF therapy prior to enrolment) and 26 controls were analysed by flow cytometry by relative cell size, granularity and surface markers. Circulating CD11b(+) cells and CD16(hi)HLA-DR(-) neutrophils were significantly increased (P = 0.015 and 0.009 respectively) in nAMD when compared to controls. The percentage of circulating CD4(+) T-cells was reduced in nAMD patients without subretinal fibrosis (P = 0.026) compared to patients with subretinal fibrosis. There was no correlation between the percentage of circulating leukocytes and the responsiveness to anti-VEGF therapy in nAMD patients. Our results suggest that higher levels of circulating CD11b(+) cells and neutrophils are associated with nAMD and that reduced levels of CD4(+) T-cells are associated with the absence of subretinal fibrosis in nAMD.

  11. Genetic control of the alternative pathway of complement in humans and age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Laura A; Edwards, Albert O; Ryu, Euijung; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Baratz, Keith H; Brown, William L; Charbel Issa, Peter; Scholl, Hendrik P; Pollok-Kopp, Beatrix; Schmid-Kubista, Katharina E; Bailey, Kent R; Oppermann, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Activation of the alternative pathway of complement is implicated in common neurodegenerative diseases including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We explored the impact of common variation in genes encoding proteins of the alternative pathway on complement activation in human blood and in AMD. Genetic variation across the genes encoding complement factor H (CFH), factor B (CFB) and component 3 (C3) was determined. The influence of common haplotypes defining transcriptional and translational units on complement activation in blood was determined in a quantitative genomic association study. Individual haplotypes in CFH and CFB were associated with distinct and novel effects on plasma levels of precursors, regulators and activation products of the alternative pathway of complement in human blood. Further, genetic variation in CFH thought to influence cell surface regulation of complement did not alter plasma complement levels in human blood. Plasma markers of chronic activation (split-products Ba and C3d) and an activating enzyme (factor D) were elevated in AMD subjects. Most of the elevation in AMD was accounted for by the genetic variation controlling complement activation in human blood. Activation of the alternative pathway of complement in blood is under genetic control and increases with age. The genetic variation associated with increased activation of complement in human blood also increased the risk of AMD. Our data are consistent with a disease model in which genetic variation in the complement system increases the risk of AMD by a combination of systemic complement activation and abnormal regulation of complement activation in local tissues.

  12. Therapeutic targeting of the complement system in age-related macular degeneration: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troutbeck, Robyn; Al-Qureshi, Salmaan; Guymer, Robyn H

    2012-01-01

    The last decade has produced pivotal change in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of global blindness. In this time, the complement system has featured as a unifying theme for several elements of new evidence: initially, the discovery of complement proteins within drusen and subsequently, the association between AMD and mutations in various complement pathway genes, most notably complement factor H. Increasingly, a wealth of data are pointing towards a role for chronic local inflammation and complement activation in the patho-aetiology of AMD. These findings have paved the way for the exploration of a new paradigm of therapy in AMD management; targeting of specific molecular constituents in the complement pathway thus producing dampening or inhibition of the inflammatory response. Such an approach has the potential to intervene earlier in the disease process and ideally before vision is compromised. In this review we discuss the role of the complement system in AMD, novel therapies in preclinical evaluation and clinical trial, and whether these have a part to play in reducing the burden of disease.

  13. Individualized Therapy with Ranibizumab in Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration

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    Alfredo García-Layana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Individualized treatment regimens may reduce patient burden with satisfactory patient outcomes in neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Intravitreal anti-VEGF drugs are the current gold standard. Fixed monthly injections offer the best visual outcome but this regimen is not commonly followed outside clinical trials. A PRN regimen requires monthly visits where the patient is treated in the presence of signs of lesion activity. Therefore, an early detection of reactivation of the disease with immediate retreatment is crucial to prevent visual acuity loss. Several trials suggest that “treat and extend” and other proactive regimens provide a reasonable approach. The rationale of the proactive regimens is to perform treatment anticipating relapses or recurrences and therefore avoid drops in vision while individualizing patient followup. Treat and extend study results in significant direct medical cost savings from fewer treatments and office visits compared to monthly treatment. Current data suggest that, for one year, PRN is less expensive, but treat and extend regimen would likely be less expensive for subsequent years. Once a patient is not a candidate to continue with treatment, he/she should be sent to an outpatient unit with adequate resources to follow nAMD patients in order to reduce the burden of specialized ophthalmologist services.

  14. Estimation of antioxidants dietary intake in wet age-related macular degeneration patients

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    María del Mar Bibiloni

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study was to estimate the intake of antioxidant nutrients in wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD patients, a degenerative and progressive disorder of the macula, which is the central part of the retina, associated with central vision loss. Methods: A sample (n = 52, 78.9 ± 6.6 years old, 40.4% females and 59.6% males of patients diagnosed of AMD was interviewed. Anthropometric measurements, two 24-h recalls, a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire and a general questionnaire incorporating questions related to socio-demographic and lifestyle variables were used. Results: Most of wet AMD patients showed inadequate antioxidant nutrient intake (< 2/3 of Recommended Dietary Intake, RDI, and more than 60% of patients showed serious deficient intake (< 1/3 RDI of lutein and zeaxanthin. Most consumed antioxidant rich foods only represented low contributions to antioxidant intake. Although adiposity is a factor risk for AMD progression; the fat and saturated fatty acids (SFA intake of study participants were higher than the recommendations; the prevalence of overweight was 61.9% men and 58.1% in women; and 83% of patients (90.5% men and 77.4% women showed fat mass over the cut-off limits. Conclusions: The food pattern of wet AMD patients should be improved by means of an increase in the consumption of antioxidant rich foods, and a decrease in SFA rich foods.

  15. Small Drusen and Age-Related Macular Degeneration: The Beaver Dam Eye Study

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    Ronald Klein

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We tested the hypothesis that large areas of small hard drusen (diameter <63 µm and intermediate drusen (diameter 63–124 µm are associated with the incidence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Eyes of 3344 older adults with at least two consecutive visits spaced five years apart over a 20-year period were included. A 6-level severity scale, including no drusen, four levels of increasing area (from minimal (<2596 µm² to large (>9086 µm² of only small hard drusen, and intermediate drusen, was used. The five-year incidence of AMD was 3% in eyes at the start of the interval with no, minimal, small, and moderate areas of only small drusen and 5% and 25% for eyes with large area of only small drusen and intermediate drusen, respectively. Compared to eyes with a moderate area of small drusen, the odds ratio (OR of developing AMD in eyes with a large area of only small drusen was 1.8 (p < 0.001. Compared to eyes with large area of only small drusen, eyes with intermediate drusen had an OR of 5.5 (p < 0.001 of developing AMD. Our results are consistent with our hypothesis that large areas of only small drusen are associated with the incidence of AMD.

  16. Different Strategies for the Treatment of Age-Related Macular Degeneration in China: An Economic Evaluation

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    Bin Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess the cost-effectiveness of bevacizumab compared to ranibizumab, verteporfin photodynamic therapy (PDT, and usual care for the treatment of age-related macular degeneration (AMD in China. Methods. A Markov model was developed according to patient visual acuity (VA in the better-seeing eye (Snellen scale. Four cohorts of patients were treated with one of the following therapies: bevacizumab, ranibizumab, PDT, or usual care. Clinical data related to treatments were obtained from published randomized clinical trials. Direct medical costs and resource utilization in the Chinese health care setting were taken into account. Health and economic outcomes were evaluated over a lifetime horizon. Sensitivity analyses were performed. Results. Treatment with ranibizumab provided the greatest gains in quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs. The cost per marginal QALY gained with bevacizumab over usual care was $1,258, $3,803, and $2,066 for the predominantly classic, minimally classic, and occult lesions, respectively. One-way sensitivity analysis showed considerably influential factors, such as utility values and effectiveness data. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis indicated that, compared to usual care, PDT and ranibizumab most cases would be cost-effective in the bevacizumab arm at a threshold of $7,480/QALY. Conclusion. Bevacizumab can be a cost-effective option for the treatment of AMD in the Chinese setting.

  17. he Effects of Glaucoma and Age-Related Macular Degeneration on Quality of Life

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    Nilüfer Koçak

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the study was to assess the depressive and anxiety symptoms and the quality of life (QofL in patients treated for glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Materials and Methods: Between March 1 and June 30, 2008, 60 outpatients with glaucoma and AMD were included into the study. As controls, sixty patients with similar sociodemographic features and who applied to the Ophthalmology Clinics with refractive errors only were taken. All patients and controls were applied the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS, the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF Turkish version. Results: The mean HDRS and HARS scores of the glaucoma and AMD patients were significantly higher than those of the controls (p0.05. In the glaucoma and AMD groups, WHOQOL-BREF scores in the physical, social, environmental, and psychological domains were significantly lower than in the controls (p0.05. Conclusion: It was shown that the QofL was impaired in patients with glaucoma and AMD who were more depressive and anxious. So that, we believe that it is very important to keep under observation the psychiatric symptoms of patients who have chronic eye diseases like glaucoma and AMD to increase the quality of their lives and to improve the prognosis. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 83-7

  18. Health State Utility Values for Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Review and Advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Thomas; Tufail, Adnan; Rubin, Gary

    2017-02-01

    Health state utility values are a major source of uncertainty in economic evaluations of interventions for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This review identifies and critiques published utility values and methods for eliciting de novo utility values in AMD. We describe how utility values have been used in healthcare decision making and provide guidance on the choice of utility values for future economic evaluations for AMD. Literature was searched using PubMed, and health technology assessments (HTA) were searched using HTA agency websites to identify articles reporting utility values or approaches to derive utility values in AMD and articles applying utilities for use in healthcare decision making relating to treatments for AMD. A total of 70 studies qualified for data extraction, 22 of which were classified as containing utility values and/or elicitation methods, and 48 were classified as using utility values in decision making. A large number of studies have elicited utility values for AMD, although those applied to decision making have focused on a few of these. There is an appreciation of the challenges in the measurement and valuation of health states, with recent studies addressing challenges such as the insensitivity of generic health-related quality of life (HRQoL) questionnaires and utility in the worse-seeing eye. We would encourage careful consideration when choosing utility values in decision making and an explicit critique of their applicability to the decision problem.

  19. Proteomics of vitreous humor of patients with exudative age-related macular degeneration.

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    Michael Janusz Koss

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is absence of specific biomarkers and an incomplete understanding of the pathophysiology of exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Eighty-eight vitreous samples (73 from patients with treatment naïve AMD and 15 control samples from patients with idiopathic floaters were analyzed with capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry in this retrospective case series to define potential candidate protein markers of AMD. Nineteen proteins were found to be upregulated in vitreous of AMD patients. Most of the proteins were plasma derived and involved in biological (ion transport, acute phase inflammatory reaction, and blood coagulation. A number of proteins have not been previously associated to AMD including alpha-1-antitrypsin, fibrinogen alpha chain and prostaglandin H2-D isomerase. Alpha-1-antitrypsin was validated in vitreous of an independent set of AMD patients using Western blot analysis. Further systems biology analysis of the data indicated that the observed proteomic changes may reflect upregulation of immune response and complement activity. CONCLUSIONS: Proteome analysis of vitreous samples from patients with AMD, which underwent an intravitreal combination therapy including a core vitrectomy, steroids and bevacizumab, revealed apparent AMD-specific proteomic changes. The identified AMD-associated proteins provide some insight into the pathophysiological changes associated with AMD.

  20. Comparative effectiveness of aflibercept for the treatment of patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration

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    Thomas M

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Michael Thomas,1 Shaymaa S Mousa,2 Shaker A Mousa1 1Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Albany, NY, USA; 2The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the most common reason for vision loss in the United States. Many treatments, such as laser therapy and photodynamic therapies, have been used but their efficacy is limited. Emerging anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF therapies are now considered the standard of care. Anti-VEGF agents inhibit angiogenesis in the eye by suppressing abnormal blood vessel growth, leading to vision improvement. Ranibizumab and bevacizumab are two examples of anti-VEGF drugs that have been approved; both showed promise based on the visual acuity scale. Aflibercept, another new therapy known to trap VEGF and inhibit multiple growth factors, is promising not only because it can be taken bimonthly based on year 1 of the VIEW trials, but it can also be extended, as demonstrated in year 2 of the VIEW trials. Based on a cost–effect analysis, aflibercept is comparable to other leading therapies. This is a review of relevant clinical trials that have proven the non-inferiority and safety of aflibercept compared to the standard of care and its unique role in the current management of wet AMD. Keywords: aflibercept, VEGF, anti-VEGF, pegatanib, bevacizumab, ranibizumab, VIEW trials

  1. [Correctly evaluate the role of visual acuity in age-related macular degeneration treatment].

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    Zhang, Feng

    2012-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible visual loss in aged population. As the aging of population, the prevalence of AMD increases gradually. Anti-VEGF medication intravitreal injection, which can obtain good therapeutic efficiency and is relatively safe, becomes the main therapy for neovascular AMD. However, high-frequency repeated treatment increases the intravitreal injections risk, as well as the costs. In clinical practice, to pursue the best-corrected visual acuity, high-frequency repeated injections are implemented and inflict psychological pressure and economic burden on patients. The author believes that to pursue the best corrected visual acuity is the ultimate aim but not the only one for every ophthalmologist and patient. The activity of lesions should be overall evaluated with fundus imaging technologies. Being people-oriented is the principle in clinical medicine. A treatment plan is made according to the patients' sickness and economy and to coordinate the relation between the best corrected visual acuity and the numbers of treatment. Based on the stabilized lesion, patient should be benefited at the lowest risk and cost with the best effect.

  2. Transpupillary thermotherapy in subfoveal choroidal neovascular membrane secondary to age-related macular degeneration

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    Verma Lalit

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report our initial experience in the treatment of subfoveal choroidal neovascular membrane, secondary to age-related macular degeneration (AMD by transpupillary thermotherapy (TTT. Methods: Fifty consecutive patients with subfoveal choroidal neovascularisation (CNV secondary to AMD, were included in the study. The parameters assessed before the TTT were visual acuity by ETDRS chart, scotoma score by Amsler grid chart, reading speed, fundus examination by direct and indirect ophthalmoscope as well as +90 Diopter lens followed by digital fundus photography and fluorescein angiography (FA. Results: The letter visual acuity improved or stabilized in 72% cases up to 12 weeks after TTT. Mean scotoma score decreased from a mean of 47.56, to 43.56 at 6 weeks and to 37 at 12 weeks. Mean reading speed increased from 27.04 words/minute at pretreatment to 34.52 words/minute at 6 weeks and 37.33 words/minute 12 weeks after TTT. Conclusion: TTT is not only a cheaper alternative to photodynamic therapy (PDT, but also is an efficacious tool in stabilisation or improvement of visual acuity in the management of subfoveal choroidal neovascular membrane due to AMD.

  3. Predictors of Visual Response to Intravitreal Bevacizumab for Treatment of Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration

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    Kai Fang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To identify the predictors of visual response to the bevacizumab treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Design. A cohort study within the Neovascular AMD Treatment Trial Using Bevacizumab (NATTB. Methods. This was a multicenter trial including 144 participants from the NATTB study. Visual outcomes measured by change in visual acuity (VA score, proportion gaining ≥15 letters, and change in central retinal thickness (CRT were compared among groups according to the baseline, demographic, and ocular characteristics and genotypes. Results. Mean change in the VA score was 9.2 ± 2.3 SD letters with a total of 46 participants (31.9% gaining ≥15 letters. Change in median CRT was −81.5 μm. Younger age, lower baseline VA score, shorter duration of neovascular AMD, and TT genotype in rs10490924 were significantly associated with greater VA score improvement (P=0.028, P<0.001, P=0.02, and P=0.039, resp.. Lower baseline VA score and TT genotype in rs10490924 were significantly associated with a higher likelihood of gaining ≥15 letters (P=0.028, and P=0.021, resp.. Conclusions. Baseline VA and genotype of rs10490924 were both important predictors for visual response to bevacizumab at 6 months. This trial is registered with the Registration no. NCT01306591.

  4. The Relationship between Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Erectile Dysfunction

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    Harun Çakmak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate association between erectile dysfunction (ED and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Methods. 195 men enrolled in this cross-sectional study. 90 of them had neovascular AMD and 105 of them were healthy volunteers. The International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF questionnaire’s erectile function (EF domain was used to assess ED. The patients in the study and control groups were statistically compared according to visual acuity, EF score, and body mass index. Results. The mean ages were 62 (54.5–73 and 60 (54–68, in the neovascular AMD and control groups, respectively. The total EF scores were 9 (6–16 in neovascular AMD and 18 (9.5–27 in control group. The results of IIEF questionnaire on neovascular AMD patients revealed that 85 men (94.4% had some degree of ED, whereas 68 men (64.8% had some degree of ED on control group. Patients with neovascular AMD had a significantly higher incidence of ED than control patients (. There was a significant association between ED and neovascular AMD (. Conclusions. Our results suggested that neovascular AMD has a high association with ED.

  5. Is monthly retreatment with intravitreal bevacizumab (Avastin® necessary in neovascular age-related macular degeneration?

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    Nicola G Ghazi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Nicola G Ghazi, Tyler Q Kirk, Robert M Knape, James S Tiedeman, Brian P ConwayDepartment of Ophthalmology, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, USAPurpose: To report our short-term experience with bevacizumab in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD and recommend a new treatment strategy.Methods: Retrospective chart review of 29 consecutive patients receiving 1.25 mg of intravitreal bevacizumab for AMD and completing 12 weeks of follow up. Outcome measures were best corrected visual acuity (BCVA and optical coherence tomography (OCT central macular thickness. Injections were repeated if no further improvement was observed.Results: Twenty-nine eyes of 29 patients were included. The average BCVA improved from 20/148 at baseline to 20/106 at twelve weeks (P = 0.041. Of the 29 eyes, 25 (86.2% had stable or improved BCVA. Average mean central macular thickness measured by OCT improved from 351 μm at baseline to 278 μm at 12 weeks (P = 0.003. Stabilization of vision and improved OCT central macular thickness were maintained for at least eight weeks following only a single injection in the majority of eyes. During the three months of follow up, only five eyes (17.2% required repeat injections, with only three (10.3% requiring retreatment at eight weeks and none at four weeks. No significant ocular or systemic side effects were observed. Conclusion: This short-term data suggests that bevacizumab appears to be a safe and effective treatment for neovascular AMD. Injections as frequent as every month do not appear to be necessary since initial treatment effect appears to be maintained for at least eight weeks in almost all of our patients.Keywords: retina, Avastin®, bevacizumab, neovascular age-related macular degeneration, AMD

  6. THE MACULAR HOLE AFTER INTRAVITREAL INJECTIONS OF RANIBIZUMAB IN A PATIENT WITH EXUDATIVE AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION – A CASE STUDY

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    Magdalena Kal

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available There are two forms of age-related macular degeneration (AMD, the dry one and the exudative one. The exudative form of AMD can be treated using repeated intravitreal injections of antibodies against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Optical coherence tomography (OCT of the retina is a standard examination in monitoring patients treated with ranibizumab due to an exudative form of AMD. VEGF plays a key role in the development of choroidal neovascularization in the exudative form of AMD. The subject-matter of our observation was to present the development of the macular hole after treatment of the exudative form of AMD through repeated intravitreal injections of ranibizumab. Ranibizumab is an antibody against VEGF. This substance is registered for the treatment of the exudative form of AMD. Ranibizumab may produce focal sites with traction forces on the surface of the retina during the contraction of the choroidal neovascular membrane. Both of these effects may cause contraction and delamination of the retina causing the macular hole to form.

  7. Effect of Supplemental Lutein and Zeaxanthin on Serum, Macular Pigmentation, and Visual Performance in Patients with Early Age-Related Macular Degeneration

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    Yang-Mu Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare the 2-year effect of multiple doses of lutein/zeaxanthin on serum, macular pigmentation, and visual performance on patients with early age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Methods. In this randomized, double-blinded, and placebo-controlled trial, 112 early AMD patients randomly received either 10 mg lutein, 20 mg lutein, a combination of lutein (10 mg and zeaxanthin (10 mg, or placebo daily for 2 years. Serum concentration of lutein/zeaxanthin, macular pigment optical density (MPOD, visual functions including best-spectacle corrected visual acuity (BCVA, contrast sensitivity (CS, flash recovery time (FRT, and vision-related quality of life (VFQ25 was quantified. Results. Serum lutein concentration and MPOD significantly increased in all the active treatment groups. Supplementation with 20 mg lutein was the most effective in increasing MPOD and CS at 3 cycles/degree for the first 48 weeks. However, they both significantly increased to the same peak value following supplementation with either 10 mg or 20 mg lutein during the intervention. No statistical changes of BCVA or FRT were observed during the trial. Conclusions. Long-term lutein supplementation could increase serum lutein concentration, MPOD, and visual sensitivities of early AMD patients. 10 mg lutein daily might be an advisable long-term dosage for early AMD treatment.

  8. The effect of intravitreal administration of bevacizumab on macular edema and visual acuity in age-related macular degeneration with subfoveolar choroidal neovascularisation

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    Ristić Dragana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a leading cause of the loss of central visual acuity in population older than 70 years. We can distinguish wet and dry form of AMD. The aim of the study was to present our early results in treatment of the wet (neovascular form of AMD with intravitreal administration of bevacizumab. Methods. The study included 39 patients. Each patient underwent a complete ophthalmological examination, fluorescein angiography (FA and optical coherence tomography (OCT. All the patients received 1.25 mg of intravitreal bevacizumab (0.05 mL of commercial phial of Avastin®. The total of three doses was given with a one-month interval between doses. Results. Among 39 patients, 24 were women and 15 men. The average best corrected visual acuity (BCVA was improved from 0.09 before the therapy to 0.24 after the administration of all the three doses of bevacizumab (p < 0.001. The average central macular thickness (CMT measured by OCT was improved from 474 μm in the beginning to 341 μm after the administration of all the three doses of the drug (p < 0.001. There were no side effects. Conclusions. Our short-term experience indicates that intravitreal administration of three doses of bevacizumab in one-month intervals between the doses leads to a significant reduction of macular edema and improvement of BCVA in patients with neovascular AMD.

  9. Progress and perspectives on the role of RPE cell inflammatory responses in the development of age-related macular degeneration

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    Suofu Qin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Suofu Qin, Gerard A RodriguesRetinal Disease Research, Department of Biological Sciences, Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA, USAAbstract: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of blindness in developed countries. The etiology of AMD remains poorly understood and no treatment is currently available for the atrophic form of AMD. Atrophic AMD has been proposed to involve abnormalities of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE, which lies beneath the photoreceptor cells and normally provides critical metabolic support to these light-sensing cells. Cumulative oxidative stress and local inflammation are thought to represent pathological processes involved in the etiology of atrophic AMD. Studies of tissue culture and animal models reveal that oxidative stress-induced injury to the RPE results in a chronic inflammatory response, drusen formation, and RPE atrophy. RPE degeneration in turn causes a progressive degeneration of photoreceptors, leading to the irreversible loss of vision. This review describes some of the potential major molecular and cellular events contributing to RPE death and inflammatory responses. In addition, potential target areas for therapeutic intervention will be discussed and new experimental therapeutic strategies for atrophic AMD will be presented.Keywords: age-related macular degeneration, danger signals, complement, inflammation, retinal pigment epithelial cells

  10. Quality of life in patients with age-related macular degeneration with monocular and binocular legal blindness Qualidade de vida de pacientes com degeneração macular relacionada à idade com cegueira legal monocular e binocular

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    Roberta Ferrari Marback

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the quality of life for persons affected by age-related macular degeneration that results in monocular or binocular legal blindness. METHODS: An analytic transversal study using the National Eye Institute Visual Functioning Questionnaire (NEI VFQ-25 was performed. Inclusion criteria were persons of both genders, aged more than 50 years old, absence of cataracts, diagnosis of age-related monocular degeneration in at least one eye and the absence of other macular diseases. The control group was paired by sex, age and no ocular disease. RESULTS: Group 1 (monocular legal blindness was composed of 54 patients (72.22% females and 27.78% males, aged 51 to 87 years old, medium age 74.61 ± 7.27 years; group 2 (binocular legal blindness was composed of 54 patients (46.30% females and 53.70% males aged 54 to 87 years old, medium age 75.61 ± 6.34 years. The control group was composed of 40 patients (40% females and 60% males, aged 50 to 81 years old, medium age 65.65 ± 7.56 years. The majority of the scores were statistically significantly higher in group 1 and the control group in relation to group 2 and higher in the control group when compared to group 1. CONCLUSIONS: It was evident that the quality of life of persons with binocular blindness was more limited in relation to persons with monocular blindness. Both groups showed significant impairment in quality of life when compared to normal persons.OBJETIVO: Avaliar a qualidade de vida de portadores de degeneração macular relacionada à idade com cegueira legal monocular e binocular. MÉTODOS: Foi realizado estudo transversal analítico por meio do questionário National Eye Institute Visual Functioning Questionnaire (NEI VFQ-25. Os critérios de inclusão foram: indivíduos de ambos os sexos, idade maior que 50 anos, ausência de catarata, diagnóstico de degeneração macular relacionada à idade avançada em pelo menos um dos olhos, sem outras maculopatias. O Grupo Controle

  11. Efficacy of aflibercept on exudative age-related macular degeneration in patients exhibiting complete ranibizumab resistance and tachyphylaxis

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    Gokcen Gokce

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: The present study compared the efficacy of aflibercept for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (NV-AMD in patients with complete ranibizumab resistance and tachyphylaxis. Methods: Forty-four eyes of 38 neovascular age-related macular degeneration patients were evaluated. Eyes were divided into a complete resistance group (n=23 eyes and tachyphylaxis group (n=21 eyes. Results: After three injections, eight (38.1% patients in the tachyphylaxis group and nine (39.1% in the complete resistance group presented with macular dryness. After the first injection of aflibercept, the mean visual acuity improved significantly in the tachyphylaxis group (p=0.018 but remained unchanged in the complete resistance group (p=0.37. There was a non-significant trend towards improved mean visual acuity in both groups after the second and third injections relative to the acuity at the final visit for ranibizumab treatment. In the tachyphylaxis group, the presence of subfoveal pigmented epithelium detachment (PED decreased significantly after intravitreal aflibercept treatment. Conclusions: Although treatment with aflibercept yielded generally positive anatomical results in both groups, no significant increase in visual acuity was achieved.

  12. Edema quístico macular diagnosticado por tomografía de coherencia óptica en pacientes operados de catarata Cystoid macular edema diagnosed with optical coherente tomography in patients operated on from cataract

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    Omar Díaz Arencibia

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Describir la frecuencia de edema quístico macular diagnosticado por tomografía de coherencia óptica en pacientes operados de catarata senil en el Instituto Cubano de Oftalmología "Ramón Pando Ferrer", de diciembre 2006 a febrero 2007. MÉTODOS: Se realizó un estudio descriptivo, prospectivo en 108 ojos de 94 pacientes operados, a los que se les realizó un examen con el Stratus OCT 3000 de Zeiss Meditec AG. RESULTADOS: El 20,3 % de los pacientes presentó edema quístico macular. El 59,1 % de pacientes con edema quístico macular no manifestaron sintomatología alguna. Existió mayor probabilidad de desarrollar edema quístico macular cuando ocurrieron complicaciones durante la cirugía. Se observó por biomicroscopia del polo posterior, quistes intrarretiniales perifoveolares en el 81,8 % de los operados, y una relación inversamente proporcional entre el grosor macular y la agudeza visual alcanzada. CONCLUSIONES: Un número apreciable de pacientes con edema quístico macular fueron diagnosticados por tomografía de coherencia óptica. Se presentó de manera asintomática en la mayoría de los pacientes. Existe mayor probabilidad de desarrollar edema quístico macular cuando ocurren complicaciones durante la cirugía, en especial la ruptura de la cápsula posterior con vitreorragia. Los cambios morfológicos que se presentan en estos pacientes determinan que exista una relación inversamente proporcional entre el grosor macular y la agudeza visual alcanzada.OBJECTIVES: To describe the frequency of cystoid macular edema diagnosed with optical coherence tomography in patients operated on from senile cataract at "Ramón Pando Ferrer" Cuban Institute of Ophthalmology in the period from December 2006 to February 2007. METHODS: A prospective and descriptive study of 106 eyes from 94 surgical patients was conducted; they were examined with Zeiss Meditec AG Stratus OCT 3000. RESULTS: Of the total number of patients, 20,3 % presented

  13. Ethnic Differences in the Association Between Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Vision-Specific Functioning.

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    Fenwick, Eva K; Man, Ryan E K; Cheung, Chui Ming Gemmy; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Neelam, Kumari; Chua, Jacqueline; Gan, Alfred T L; Mitchell, Paul; Wong, Tien Y; Lamoureux, Ecosse L

    2017-05-01

    Understanding the link between ethnicity and health is critical to making appropriate public policy decisions. Few population-level data are available about this connection, however, including the influence of ethnicity on the association between age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and vision-specific functioning (VSF). To identify the influence of ethnicity on VSF among Chinese, Malay, and Indian patients with AMD. This cross-sectional, population-based study relied on patients and their data from 3 population-based studies in 3 ethnic groups: Chinese, Malay and Indian. Of 10 033 Chinese, Malay, and Indian adults who participated in the study, 9962 (99.3%) who had gradable fundus images and Visual Function Index (VF-11) data available were included in the analyses for the present study. Uniocular presenting distance visual acuity was measured using the logMAR chart. Separate multiple linear regression models examined the association between AMD and VSF in the 3 ethnic groups, adjusting for age, sex, presenting visual acuity in the better-seeing eye, educational level, income, smoking status, hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, total cholesterol level, and other eye conditions. Data were collected between January 20, 2004, and December 19, 2011; data analysis was conducted between November 12, 2015, and December 28, 2016. Age-related macular degeneration according to fundus photographs graded using a modified Wisconsin Age-Related Maculopathy Grading System. Rasch analysis was used to convert VF-11 questionnaire scores to estimated interval measures of VSF. Of the 9962 participants, the mean (SD) age was 58.8 (10.4) years; 4909 (49.3%) were male; 590 (5.9%) had early AMD (241 Chinese, 161 Malays, and 188 Indians) and 60 (0.6%) had late AMD (25 Chinese, 21 Malays, and 14 Indians). In the adjusted models, compared with no AMD, early AMD was associated with a small reduction in VSF (2.9%; β = -0.12; 95% CI, -0.23 to -0.00; P = .046) in the

  14. Immediate Postoperative Intraocular Pressure Adjustment Reduces Risk of Cystoid Macular Edema after Uncomplicated Micro Incision Coaxial Phacoemulsification Cataract Surgery

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    Jarstad, Allison R.; Chung, Gary W.; Tester, Robert A.; Day, Linda E.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To determine the accuracy of visual estimation of immediate postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP) following microincision cataract surgery (MICS) and the effect of immediate postoperative IOP adjustment on prevention of cystoid macular edema (CME). Setting Ambulatory surgical center. Methods Prospective, randomized analysis of 170 eyes in 135 patients with MICS, performed in a Medicare approved outpatient ambulatory surgery center. Surgical parameters included a keratome incision of 1.5 mm to 2.8 mm, topical anesthetic, case completion IOP estimation by palpation and patient visualization of light, and IOP adjustment before exiting the operating theater. IOPs were classified into three groups: low (21 to 30 mmHg). IOP measurements were repeated 1 day after surgery. Optical coherence tomography (Stratus OCT, Zeiss) was measured at 2 weeks. An increase in foveal thickness greater than 15 µm was used to indicate CME. Statistical analysis was performed using one- and two-tailed Student's t-tests. Results Mean minimal foveal thickness averaged 207.15 µm in the low pressure group, 205.14 µm in the normal IOP group, and 210.48 µm in the elevated IOP group 2 weeks following surgery. CME occurred in 14 of 170 eyes (8.2%) at 2 weeks (low IOP, 35.7%; normal IOP, 14.2%; elevated IOP, 50.0%). Change in IOP from the operating theater to 1 day after surgery was within +/−5 mmHg in 54 eyes (31.7%), elevated by 6 to 15 mmHg in 22 eyes (12.9%), and elevated more than 15 mmHg in four eyes (2.3%). IOP was reduced by 6 mmHg to 15 mmHg in 39 eyes (22.9%) and reduced by more than 15 mmHg in nine eyes (5.3%). Conclusions Immediate postoperative adjustment of IOP may prevent CME in MICS. Physicians can improve their ability to estimate postoperative IOP with experience in tonometry to verify immediate postoperative IOP. There are patient safety and economic benefits to immediate IOP adjustment in the operating theater. Synopsis Immediate postoperative IOP adjustment

  15. Training eye movements for visual search in individuals with macular degeneration

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    Janssen, Christian P.; Verghese, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    We report a method to train individuals with central field loss due to macular degeneration to improve the efficiency of visual search. Our method requires participants to make a same/different judgment on two simple silhouettes. One silhouette is presented in an area that falls within the binocular scotoma while they are fixating the center of the screen with their preferred retinal locus (PRL); the other silhouette is presented diametrically opposite within the intact visual field. Over the course of 480 trials (approximately 6 hr), we gradually reduced the amount of time that participants have to make a saccade and judge the similarity of stimuli. This requires that they direct their PRL first toward the stimulus that is initially hidden behind the scotoma. Results from nine participants show that all participants could complete the task faster with training without sacrificing accuracy on the same/different judgment task. Although a majority of participants were able to direct their PRL toward the initially hidden stimulus, the ability to do so varied between participants. Specifically, six of nine participants made faster saccades with training. A smaller set (four of nine) made accurate saccades inside or close to the target area and retained this strategy 2 to 3 months after training. Subjective reports suggest that training increased awareness of the scotoma location for some individuals. However, training did not transfer to a different visual search task. Nevertheless, our study suggests that increasing scotoma awareness and training participants to look toward their scotoma may help them acquire missing information. PMID:28027382

  16. Functional Outcomes of the Low Vision Depression Prevention Trial in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

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    Deemer, Ashley D.; Massof, Robert W.; Rovner, Barry W.; Casten, Robin J.; Piersol, Catherine V.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To compare the efficacy of behavioral activation (BA) plus low vision rehabilitation with an occupational therapist (OT-LVR) with supportive therapy (ST) on visual function in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods Single-masked, attention-controlled, randomized clinical trial with AMD patients with subsyndromal depressive symptoms (n = 188). All subjects had two outpatient low vision rehabilitation optometry visits, then were randomized to in-home BA + OT-LVR or ST. Behavioral activation is a structured behavioral treatment aiming to increase adaptive behaviors and achieve valued goals. Supportive therapy is a nondirective, psychological treatment that provides emotional support and controls for attention. Functional vision was assessed with the activity inventory (AI) in which participants rate the difficulty level of goals and corresponding tasks. Participants were assessed at baseline and 4 months. Results Improvements in functional vision measures were seen in both the BA + OT-LVR and ST groups at the goal level (d = 0.71; d = 0.56 respectively). At the task level, BA + OT-LVR patients showed more improvement in reading, inside-the-home tasks and outside-the-home tasks, when compared to ST patients. The greatest effects were seen in the BA + OT-LVR group in subjects with a visual acuity ≥20/70 (d = 0.360 reading; d = 0.500 inside the home; d = 0.468 outside the home). Conclusions Based on the trends of the AI data, we suggest that BA + OT-LVR services, provided by an OT in the patient's home following conventional low vision optometry services, are more effective than conventional optometric low vision services alone for those with mild visual impairment. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00769015.) PMID:28273318

  17. Choroidal Thickness Changes After Intravitreal Ranibizumab for Exudative Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnella, Angelo Maria; Federici, Matteo; Falsini, Benedetto; Barbano, Lucilla; Gambini, Gloria; Lanza, Angela; Caporossi, Aldo; Savastano, Maria Cristina

    2016-08-01

    The results regarding changes of choroidal thickness following intravitreal ranibizumab injections in the literature are controversial. Vascular endothelial growth factor A is implicated in pathogenesis of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The suspected unchanged choroidal layer thickness after intravitreal injections of ranibizumab suggests a possible protection of the outer blood-retinal barrier in the human eye. The aim was to evaluate choroidal thickness following the first administration of the study drug ranibizumab into the eyes of naïve wet AMD patients (nAMD). In this open label, 3-month, prospective, single-center, interventional, single-arm pilot study, 20 nAMD eyes were included and underwent three consecutive monthly injections of ranibizumab (0.5 mg/0.05 ml). Vital signs (i.e., blood pressure and pulse), ophthalmic examinations, intraocular pressure, best correct visual acuity and subfoveal choroidal thickness as examined with optical coherence tomography using enhanced depth imaging (OCT-EDI) were assessed at each visit. All patients were evaluated at baseline and at 15, 30 60 and 90 days after intravitreal injection. Ten eyes with fibrotic AMD lesions were evaluated as the control group. In all eyes, the choroidal thicknesses (µm) exhibited no significant changes from the baseline visit to the visits at 15, 30, 60 and 90 days post-injection (P > 0.05). The intravitreal treatment with ranibizumab was well tolerated, and no adverse events were registered. Choroidal thickness appeared to be unmodified following the intravitreal injection of ranibizumab into nAMD eyes. Intravitreal ranibizumab injections probably elicit a pharmacologic effect only in the choroidal neovascularization and not in the choroid circulation under neovascular lesions. Clinical Trials Eudract Registration #: 2013-005091-17.

  18. HISTORY OF SUNLIGHT EXPOSURE IS A RISK FACTOR FOR AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION.

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    Schick, Tina; Ersoy, Lebriz; Lechanteur, Yara T E; Saksens, Nicole T M; Hoyng, Carel B; den Hollander, Anneke I; Kirchhof, Bernd; Fauser, Sascha

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate effects of current and past sunlight exposure and iris color on early and late age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Of 3,701 individuals from the EUGENDA database, 752 (20.3%) showed early AMD, 1,179 (31.9%) late AMD, and 1,770 (47.8%) were controls. Information about current and past sunlight exposure, former occupation type, subdivided in indoor working and outdoor working, and iris color were obtained by standardized interviewer-assisted questionnaires. Associations between environmental factors adjusted for age, gender, and smoking and early and late AMD were performed by multivariate regression analysis. Current sunlight exposure showed no association with early AMD or late AMD, but past sunlight exposure (≥8 hours outside daily) was significantly associated with early AMD (odds ratio: 5.54, 95% confidence interval 1.25-24.58, P = 0.02) and late AMD (odds ratio: 2.77, 95% confidence interval 1.25-6.16, P = 0.01). Outside working was found to be associated with late AMD (odds ratio: 2.57, 95% confidence interval 1.89-3.48, P = 1.58 × 10). No association was observed between iris color and early or late AMD. Sunlight exposure during working life is an important risk factor for AMD, whereas sunlight exposure after retirement seems to have less influence on the disease development. Therefore, preventive measures, for example, wearing sunglasses to minimize sunlight exposure, should start early to prevent development of AMD later in life.

  19. The role of complement Factor H in age-related macular degeneration: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoso, Larry A; Vrabec, Tamara; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2010-01-01

    Factor H is a 155kDa sialic acid containing glycoprotein that plays an integral role in the regulation of the complement-mediated immune system that is involved in microbial defense, immune complex processing, and programmed cell death. These events take place primarily in fluid phase and on the cell surface and are particularly important in the context of distinguishing self from non-self. Activation of the complement system occurs within seconds and results in a proteolytic cascade eventually forming the membrane attack complex leading to cell lysis. Factor H protects host cells from injury resulting from unrestrained complement activation. Mutations and SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) in Factor H have been implicated in a variety of human conditions including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, and membranoproliferative glomuleronephritis type II or dense deposit disease. It should not be surprising that these seemingly unrelated diseases involving mutations in Factor H may share common features. Because the immune process involves, in part, an inflammatory response and common or similar surface antigens, it is also not unexpected to observe features of inflammation, including deposition of bioactive complement fragments such as C3a and C5a, a cellular influx of immune related cells such as lymphocytes, and the potential for multiple organ involvement. We review recent developments in molecular genetics; SNPs, including Y402H; the three-dimensional structure; and mass spectroscopy of Factor H as it relates to the pathogenesis of eye disease. In addition, we discuss the concepts of molecular mimicry, sequestered or hidden antigens, and antigenic cross reactivity, and propose that AMD should not simply be considered to be an eye disease, but rather a systemic vascular disease where the eye has the ability to self regulate a local immune response. Identification of the initial event or inciting antigen has yet to be

  20. Evaluation of choroidal thickness in cases with age-related macular degeneration

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    Erkan Unsal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare subfoveal choroidal thickness(SFCTbetween cases with non-neovascular age-related macular degeneration(AMDand neovascular AMD by optical coherence tomography(OCTand to evaluate the contribution of choroidal thickness(CTmeasurements to the understanding of pathogenesis of neovascularization in AMD.METHODS: Fourty-eigth eyes of 24 patients who had neovascular AMD in one eye and non-neovascular AMD in the other eye were included in this retrospective, cross- sectional study as study group. Forty eyes of healthy,age and axial length matched individuals were selected as the control group. Eyes with drusen and/or pigmentary changes were included in the non-neovascular AMD subgroup. Eyes with subretinal or intraretinal fluid and/orlipid exudation due to the choroidal neovascularization were included in the neovascular AMD subgroup. OCT measurements were performed with RTVue 100-2(V 5.1, Optovue, Fremont, CA, USAperpendicularly from the outer part of the hyperreflective line(retinal pigment epithelial layerto the line corresponding to the choroido- scleral junction. Choroidal thickness was measured at 7 different points, 500μm intervals up to 1500μm temporal and nasal to the fovea in the study group and compared statistically between subgroups.RESULTS: The mean age of patients was 72.4±8.97(60- 82y. The mean age of healthy individuals was 71.2±8.8(58-81y. Mean SFCT of neovascular AMD group were significantly thicker than non-neovascular AMD group(PP>0.05. In neovascular AMD group, there was a statistically significant difference between the mean SFCT and the mean temporal-nasal choroid thickness(PCONCLUSION: Choroidal thickness measurements with OCT device can make a contribution to the understanding the phatophysiology of AMD and large prospective studies should be conducted to understand why SFCT was thicker in neovascular AMD.

  1. The effect of normal aging and age-related macular degeneration on perceptual learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astle, Andrew T.; Blighe, Alan J.; Webb, Ben S.; McGraw, Paul V.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether perceptual learning could be used to improve peripheral word identification speed. The relationship between the magnitude of learning and age was established in normal participants to determine whether perceptual learning effects are age invariant. We then investigated whether training could lead to improvements in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Twenty-eight participants with normal vision and five participants with AMD trained on a word identification task. They were required to identify three-letter words, presented 10° from fixation. To standardize crowding across each of the letters that made up the word, words were flanked laterally by randomly chosen letters. Word identification performance was measured psychophysically using a staircase procedure. Significant improvements in peripheral word identification speed were demonstrated following training (71% ± 18%). Initial task performance was correlated with age, with older participants having poorer performance. However, older adults learned more rapidly such that, following training, they reached the same level of performance as their younger counterparts. As a function of number of trials completed, patients with AMD learned at an equivalent rate as age-matched participants with normal vision. Improvements in word identification speed were maintained at least 6 months after training. We have demonstrated that temporal aspects of word recognition can be improved in peripheral vision with training across a range of ages and these learned improvements are relatively enduring. However, training targeted at other bottlenecks to peripheral reading ability, such as visual crowding, may need to be incorporated to optimize this approach. PMID:26605694

  2. Localization of age-related macular degeneration-associated ARMS2 in cytosol, not mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gaofeng; Spencer, Kylee L.; Court, Brenda L.; Olson, Lana M.; Scott, William K.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE To analyze the relationship between ARMS2 and HTRA1 in the association with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in an independent case-control dataset, and to investigate the subcellular localization of the ARMS2 protein in an in vitro system. METHOD Two SNPs in ARMS2 and HTRA1 were genotyped in 685 cases and 269 controls by Taqman Assay. Allelic association was tested by a χ2 test. A likelihood ratio test (LRT) of full vs. reduced models was utilized to analyze the interaction between ARMS2 and smoking and HTRA1 and smoking, after adjusting for CFH and age. Immunofluorescence and immunoblot were applied to localize ARMS2 in retinal epithelial ARPE-19 cells and COS7 cell transfected by ARMS2 constructs. RESULT Both significantly associated SNP rs10490924 and rs11200638 (P<0.0001) are in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) (D′=0.97, r2=0.93) that generates virtually identical association test and odds ratios. In separate logistic regression models the interaction effect for both smoking with ARMS2 and with HTRA1 was not statistically significant. Immunofluorescence and immunoblot show that both endogenous and exogenous ARMS2 are mainly distributed in the cytosol, not the mitochondria. Comparing to wild type, ARMS2 A69S is more likely to be associated with cytoskeleton in COS7 cells. CONCLUSIONS The significant associations in ARMS2 and HTRA1 are with polymorphisms in strong LD that confer virtually identical risks, preventing differentiation at the statistical level. We found that ARMS2 was mainly distributed in the cytosol, not in mitochondrial outer membrane as previously reported, suggesting that ARMS2 may not confer risk to AMD through the mitochondrial pathway. PMID:19255159

  3. Residual abilities in age-related macular degeneration to process spatial frequencies during natural scene categorization.

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    Musel, Benoit; Hera, Ruxandra; Chokron, Sylvie; Alleysson, David; Chiquet, Christophe; Romanet, Jean-Paul; Guyader, Nathalie; Peyrin, Carole

    2011-11-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is characterized by a central vision loss. We explored the relationship between the retinal lesions in AMD patients and the processing of spatial frequencies in natural scene categorization. Since the lesion on the retina is central, we expected preservation of low spatial frequency (LSF) processing and the impairment of high spatial frequency (HSF) processing. We conducted two experiments that differed in the set of scene stimuli used and their exposure duration. Twelve AMD patients and 12 healthy age-matched participants in Experiment 1 and 10 different AMD patients and 10 healthy age-matched participants in Experiment 2 performed categorization tasks of natural scenes (Indoors vs. Outdoors) filtered in LSF and HSF. Experiment 1 revealed that AMD patients made more no-responses to categorize HSF than LSF scenes, irrespective of the scene category. In addition, AMD patients had longer reaction times to categorize HSF than LSF scenes only for indoors. Healthy participants' performance was not differentially affected by spatial frequency content of the scenes. In Experiment 2, AMD patients demonstrated the same pattern of errors as in Experiment 1. Furthermore, AMD patients had longer reaction times to categorize HSF than LSF scenes, irrespective of the scene category. Again, spatial frequency processing was equivalent for healthy participants. The present findings point to a specific deficit in the processing of HSF information contained in photographs of natural scenes in AMD patients. The processing of LSF information is relatively preserved. Moreover, the fact that the deficit is more important when categorizing HSF indoors, may lead to new perspectives for rehabilitation procedures in AMD.

  4. Predictors of anti-VEGF treatment response in neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Robert P; Wickremasinghe, Sanjeewa S; Baird, Paul N; Guymer, Robyn H

    2014-01-01

    Currently available evidence on predictors of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) treatment response in neovascular age-related macular degeneration was reviewed. No meta-analysis of results is possible because of a lack of controlled and randomized trials, varying treatment regimes and outcome measures used, as well as suboptimal reporting. For genetic factors, most evidence to date has been generated for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the complement factor H (CFH), and VEGF-A genes. Just under half of the SNPs assessed in the CFH gene and 15% of the SNPs assessed in the VEGF gene were found to be associated with visual outcomes or the number of injections required during follow-up. Some evidence suggests association of worse treatment outcomes as well as a younger age at treatment onset with an increasing number of risk alleles in known risk genes (CFH and ARMS2/HTRA1) and polymorphisms in the VEGF-A gene. Clinical factors such as higher age, a better visual acuity (VA), a larger choroidal neovascularization (CNV) lesion at baseline, and a delay between symptom onset and initiation of treatment of more than 3 weeks also impact outcomes. Conversely, a worse acuity at baseline predicted more gain in vision. Overall, patients presenting with good acuity at baseline were more likely to have good VA at follow up, but the gain afforded by treatment was impacted by a ceiling effect. Most available evidence suggests a strong association of clinical factors such as age, baseline VA, and CNV lesion size with anti-VEGF treatment outcomes. No behavioral factors such as smoking influence treatment outcomes. Based on the studies conducted so far, the evidence suggests that underlying genotype of known AMD risk associated genes or of the VEGF-A gene have a limited effect, whereas presenting clinical factors appear to be more important in determining treatment outcomes.

  5. Stereotactic targeting and dose verification for age-related macular degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gertner, Michael; Chell, Erik; Pan, Kuang-Hung; Hansen, Steve; Kaiser, Peter K.; Moshfeghi, Darius M. [Oraya Therapeutics, Inc., Newark, California 94560 (United States); Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio 44915 (United States); Department of Ophthalmology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Validation of the targeting and dose delivery of the IRay low voltage age-related macular degeneration treatment system. Methods: Ten human cadaver eyes were obtained for this study and mounted in the IRay system. Using gel and vacuum, an I-Guide immobilization device was coupled to the eyes and radiochromic film was affixed to the posterior aspect of the globes. Three narrow x-ray beams were delivered through the pars plana to overlap on the predicted nominal fovea. A needle was placed through the center of the film's beam spot and into the eye to register the film and the inner retina. The process was performed three times for each of the ten eyes (30 simulated treatments; 90 individual beams). The globes were dissected to assess the targeting accuracy by measuring the distances from the needles to the fovea. The dose to the fovea was calculated from the radiochromic film. Results: X-ray targeting on the retina averaged 0.6{+-}0.4 mm from the fovea. Repeated treatments on the same eye showed a reproducibility of 0.4{+-}0.4 mm. The optic nerve was safely avoided, with the 90% isodose edge of the beam spot between 0.4 and 2.6 mm from the edge of the optic disk. Measured dose matched that prescribed. Conclusions: This study provides confidence that the IRay, with an average accuracy of 0.6 mm and a precision of 0.4 mm, can reliably treat most AMD lesions centered on the fovea. With the exception of motion, all sources of error are included.

  6. Copy number variation of age-related macular degeneration relevant genes in the Korean population.

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    Jung Hyun Park

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Studies that analyzed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP in various genes have shown that genetic factors are strongly associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD susceptibility. Copy number variation (CNV may be an additional type of genetic variation that contributes to AMD pathogenesis. This study investigated CNV in 4 AMD-relevant genes in Korean AMD patients and control subjects. METHODS: Four CNV candidate regions located in AMD-relevant genes (VEGFA, ARMS2/HTRA1, CFH and VLDLR, were selected based on the outcomes of our previous study which elucidated common CNVs in the Asian populations. Real-time PCR based TaqMan Copy Number Assays were performed on CNV candidates in 273 AMD patients and 257 control subjects. RESULTS: The predicted copy number (PCN, 0, 1, 2 or 3+ of each region was called using the CopyCaller program. All candidate genes except ARMS2/HTRA1 showed CNV in at least one individual, in which losses of VEGFA and VLDLR represent novel findings in the Asian population. When the frequencies of PCN were compared, only the gain in VLDLR showed significant differences between AMD patients and control subjects (p = 0.025. Comparisons of the raw copy values (RCV revealed that 3 of 4 candidate genes showed significant differences (2.03 vs. 1.92 for VEGFA, p<0.01; 2.01 vs. 1.97 for CFH, p<0.01; 1.97 vs. 2.01, p<0.01 for ARMS2/HTRA1. CONCLUSION: CNVs located in AMD-relevant genes may be associated with AMD susceptibility. Further investigations encompassing larger patient cohorts are needed to elucidate the role of CNV in AMD pathogenesis.

  7. Age-related macular degeneration--emerging pathogenetic and therapeutic concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrs, Karen M; Anderson, Don H; Johnson, Lincoln V; Hageman, Gregory S

    2006-01-01

    Today, the average life expectancy in developed nations is over 80 years and climbing. And yet, the quality of life during those additional years is often significantly diminished by the effects of age-related, degenerative diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in the elderly worldwide. AMD is characterized by a progressive loss of central vision attributable to degenerative and neovascular changes in the macula, a highly specialized region of the ocular retina responsible for fine visual acuity. Estimates gathered from the most recent World Health Organization (WHO) global eye disease survey conservatively indicate that 14 million persons are blind or severely visually impaired because of AMD. The disease has a tremendous impact on the physical and mental health of the geriatric population and their families and is becoming a major public health burden. Currently, there is neither a cure nor a means to prevent AMD. Palliative treatment options for the less prevalent, late-stage 'wet' form of the disease include anti-neovascular agents, photodynamic therapy and thermal laser. There are no current therapies for the more common 'dry' AMD, except for the use of antioxidants that delay progression in 20%-25% of eyes. New discoveries, however, are beginning to provide a much clearer picture of the relevant cellular events, genetic factors, and biochemical processes associated with early AMD. Recently, compelling evidence has emerged that the innate immune system and, more specifically, uncontrolled regulation of the complement alternative pathway plays a central role in the pathobiology of AMD. The complement Factor H gene--which encodes the major inhibitor of the complement alternative pathway--is the first gene identified in multiple independent studies that confers a significant genetic risk for the development of AMD. The emergence of this new paradigm of AMD pathogenesis should hasten the development of novel

  8. Current and emerging therapies for the treatment of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, M Vaughn; Lauer, Andreas K

    2008-06-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in the industrialized world. In the last few decades, the mainstay of treatment for choroidal neovascularization (CNV) due to AMD has been thermal laser photocoagulation. In the last decade, photodynamic therapy with verteporfin extended treatment for more patients. While both of these treatments have prevented further vision loss in a subset of patients, improvement in visual acuity is rare. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF) therapy has revolutionized the treatment of AMD-related CNV. Pegaptanib, an anti-VEGF aptamer prevents vision loss in CNV, although the performance is similar to that of photodynamic therapy. Ranibizumab, an antibody fragment and bevacizumab, a full-length humanized monoclonal antibody against VEGF have both shown promising results with improvements in visual acuity with either agent. VEGF trap, a modified soluble VEGF receptor analogue, binds VEGF more tightly than all other anti-VEGF agents and has also shown promising results in early trials. Other treatment strategies to decrease the effect of VEGF have used small interfering ribonucleic acid (RNA) to inhibit VEGF production and VEGF receptor production. Steroids, including anecortave acetate in the treatment and prevention of CNV, have shown promise in controlled trials. Receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as vatalanib, inhibit downstream effects of VEGF, and have been effective in the treatment of CNV in early studies. Squalamine lactate inhibits plasma membrane ion channels with downstream effects on VEGF, and has shown promising results with systemic administration. Other growth factors, including pigment epithelium-derived growth factor that has been administered via an adenoviral vector has shown promising initial results. In some patients ciliary neurotrophic factor is currently being studied for the inhibition of progression of geographic atrophy. Combination therapy has been

  9. One year results of anti-VEGF treatment in pigment epithelial detachment secondary to macular degeneration

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    Harun Yüksel

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE:Pigment epithelial detachment (PED may be seen in all stages of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD and may lead to poor prognosis. In this study, we retrospectively examined the effect of anti-VEGF treatments in ARMD patients with vascularized PED. METHODS:Medical records of 15 patients with PED secondary to ARMD were reviewed retrospectively. The diagnosis of PED was made with fundoscopy, fundus fluorescein angiography and optical coherence tomography. Patients were treated with intravitreal ranibizumab or/and bevacizumab and followed up for a minimum of one year. PED height and best corrected visual acuity (BCVA was obtained before the first intravitreal anti-VEGF injection and again at the 1st, 3rd, 6th and 12th month after the injection. RESULTS: The mean baseline BCVA was 0.71 ± 0.48 logarithm of the minimal angle of resolution (logMAR unit and the mean baseline PED height was 361 ± 153 µ. The mean injection count per eye was 3.9 ± 2.9. There was a significant reduce in mean PED height (247 ± 177 µ also in 2 eyes PED completely resolved at the end of the follow up period. The mean BCVA at 12th month (0,69 ± 0,37 were not different from the baseline record. CONCLUSIONS: This retrospective case series showed that intravitreal anti-VEGF therapy preserved vision and reduced PED height in PED patients in a one-year follow-up period.

  10. Association of Vision Loss in Glaucoma and Age-Related Macular Degeneration with IADL Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Chad; Maul, Eugenio; Chan, Emilie S.; Van Landingham, Suzanne; Ferrucci, Luigi; Friedman, David S.; Ramulu, Pradeep Y.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To determine if glaucoma and/or age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are associated with disability in instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs). Methods. Glaucoma subjects (n = 84) with bilateral visual field (VF) loss and AMD subjects (n = 47) with bilateral or severe unilateral visual acuity (VA) loss were compared with 60 subjects with normal vision (controls). Subjects completed a standard IADL disability questionnaire, with disability defined as an inability to perform one or more IADLs unassisted. Results. Disability in one or more IADLs was present in 18.3% of controls as compared with 25.0% of glaucoma subjects (P = 0.34) and 44.7% of AMD subjects (P = 0.003). The specific IADL disabilities occurring more frequently in both AMD and glaucoma subjects were preparing meals, grocery shopping, and out-of-home travelling (P AMD (odds ratio [OR] = 3.4, P = 0.02) but not glaucoma (OR = 1.4, P = 0.45) was associated with IADL disability. However, among glaucoma and control patients, the odds of IADL disability increased 1.6-fold with every 5 dB of VF loss in the better-seeing eye (P = 0.001). Additionally, severe glaucoma subjects (better-eye MD worse than −13.5 dB) had higher odds of IADL disability (OR = 4.2, P = 0.02). Among AMD and control subjects, every Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study line of worse acuity was associated with a greater likelihood of IADL disability (OR = 1.3). Conclusions. VA loss in AMD and severe VF loss in glaucoma are associated with self-reported difficulties with IADLs. These limitations become more likely with increasing magnitude of VA or VF loss. PMID:22491415

  11. Relationship between Retinal Layer Thickness and the Visual Field in Early Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, Jennifer H.; Smith, R. Theodore; Hood, Donald C.; Greenstein, Vivienne C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To quantify and compare the structural and functional changes in subjects with early age-related macular degeneration (AMD), using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and microperimetry. Methods. Twenty-one eyes of 21 subjects with early AMD were examined. MP-1 10-2 visual fields (VFs) and SD-OCT line and detail volume scans were acquired. The thicknesses of the outer segment (OS; distance between inner segment ellipsoid band and upper retinal pigment epithelium [RPE] border) and RPE layers and elevation of the RPE from Bruch's membrane were measured using a computer-aided manual segmentation technique. Thickness values were compared with those for 15 controls, and values at locations with VF total deviation defects were compared with values at nondefect locations at equivalent eccentricities. Results. Sixteen of 21 eyes with AMD had VF defects. Compared with controls, line scans showed significant thinning of the OS layer (P = 0.006) and thickening and elevation of the RPE (P = 0.037, P = 0.002). The OS layer was significantly thinner in locations with VF defects compared with locations without defects (P = 0.003). There was a negligible difference between the retinal layer thickness values of the 5 eyes without VF defects and the values of normal controls. Conclusions. In early AMD, when VF defects were present, there was significant thinning of the OS layer and thickening and elevation of the RPE. OS layer thinning was significantly associated with decreased visual sensitivity, consistent with known photoreceptor loss in early AMD. For AMD subjects without VF defects, thickness values were normal. The results highlight the clinical utility of both SD-OCT retinal layer quantification and VF testing in early AMD. PMID:23074210

  12. Differences in the Genetic Susceptibility to Age-Related Macular Degeneration Clinical Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ling; Hoffmann, Thomas J.; Melles, Ronald B.; Sakoda, Lori C.; Kvale, Mark N.; Banda, Yambazi; Schaefer, Catherine; Risch, Neil; Jorgenson, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We compared across age-related macular degeneration (AMD) subtypes the effect of AMD risk variants, their predictive power, and heritability. Methods The prevalence of AMD was estimated among active non-Hispanic white Kaiser Permanente Northern California members who were at least 65 years of age as of June 2013. The genetic analysis included 5,170 overall AMD cases ascertained from electronic health records (EHR), including 1,239 choroidal neovascularization (CNV) cases and 1,060 nonexudative AMD cases without CNV, and 23,130 controls of non-Hispanic white ancestry from the Kaiser Permanente Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) cohort. Imputation was based on the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel. Results The narrow-sense heritability due to common autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was 0.37 for overall AMD, 0.19 for AMD unspecified, 0.20 for nonexudative AMD, and 0.60 for CNV. For the 19 previously reported AMD risk loci, the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.675 for overall AMD, 0.640 for AMD unspecified, 0.678 for nonexudative AMD, and 0.766 for CNV. The individual effects on the risk of AMD for 18 of the 19 SNPs were in a consistent direction with those previously reported, including a protective effect of the APOE ε4 allele. Conversely, the risk of AMD was significantly increased in carriers of the ε2 allele. Conclusions These findings provide an independent confirmation of many of the previously identified AMD risk loci, and support a potentially greater role of genetic factors in the development of CNV. The replication of established associations validates the use of EHR in genetic studies of ophthalmologic traits. PMID:26176866

  13. Dietary and lifestyle risk factors associated with age-related macular degeneration: A hospital based study

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    Bhatiwada Nidhi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : To establish the frequency, associations and risk factors for age-related macular degeneration (AMD in hospital population of South India. Materials and Methods : In this cross-sectional hospital based study, 3549 subjects (2090 men and 1459 women above 45 years of age were screened randomly for AMD. Participants underwent ocular evaluation and were interviewed for lifestyle variables and dietary intake of carotenoids by structured food frequency questionnaire. AMD was defined according to the international classifications and grading system. Results : Either form of AMD was detected in 77 (2.2% participants. Of which, early and late AMD was present in 63 (1.8% and 14 (0.4% subjects, respectively. Binary logistic analysis showed that the incidence of AMD was significantly higher with increasing age (Odds ratio [OR] 1.17; 95% CI 1.13-1.22 and diabetes (OR 3.97; 95% CI 2.11-7.46. However, AMD was significant among heavy cigarette smokers (OR 5.58; 95% CI 0.88-7.51 and alcoholics (OR 4.85; 95% CI 2.45-12.22. Dietary lutein/zeaxanthin (L/Z and β-carotene intake were associated (P < 0.001 with the reduction in risk for AMD, with an OR of 0.38 and 0.65, respectively. Conclusions : Higher dietary intake of carotenoids, especially L/Z, was associated with lower risk for AMD. Risk of AMD is higher with increasing age and was prevalent among subjects with diabetes. Cessation of smoking and alcohol may reduce the risk of AMD in this population.

  14. Association of neovascular age-related macular degeneration with month and season of birth in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Antonio; Casuccio, Alessandra; Pani, Luca; Avitabile, Teresio; Cillino, Salvatore; Uva, Maurizio G.; Bonfiglio, Vincenza; Russo, Andrea; Parisi, Guglielmo; Cennamo, Gilda; Furino, Claudio; Parravano, Mariacristina; Xoxi, Entela; Reibaldi, Michele

    2017-01-01

    In order to investigate the influence of season and month of birth on the risk of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (n-AMD) in Italy, we evaluated the month birth and sex of all patients, recorded in the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) monitoring registry of the Italian Medicines Agency, born between 1925–1944, who received intravitreal anti-VEGF injections for n-AMD between January 1, 2013 and July 29, 2015. The numbers of all births in Italy in the same years, extracted from the Italian National Institute of Statistics, were used to calculate the expected number of n-AMD cases. Overall, 45,845 patients (19,207 men, 26,638 women) received intravitreal anti-VEGF for n-AMD; in the same years, 20,140,426 people (10,334,262 male, 9,806,164 female) were born in Italy. Comparing the observed number of n-AMD cases with the expected number of n- AMD cases in each season, we found that the season-specific risk for n-AMD was 2.5% higher for those born in summer (OR=1.03, Bonferroni-corrected P=0.008) and 3% lower for those born in winter (OR=0.96, Bonferroni-corrected P=0.0004). When considering the month of birth, the risk of n-AMD was 5.9% lower for people born in January (OR=0.93, Bonferroni-corrected P=0.0012). The factors causing such differences should be determined. PMID:27997361

  15. Dietary and lifestyle risk factors associated with age-related macular degeneration: a hospital based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidhi, Bhatiwada; Mamatha, Bangera Sheshappa; Padmaprabhu, Chamrajnagar Anantharajiah; Pallavi, Prabhu; Vallikannan, Baskaran

    2013-12-01

    To establish the frequency, associations and risk factors for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in hospital population of South India. In this cross-sectional hospital based study, 3549 subjects (2090 men and 1459 women) above 45 years of age were screened randomly for AMD. Participants underwent ocular evaluation and were interviewed for lifestyle variables and dietary intake of carotenoids by structured food frequency questionnaire. AMD was defined according to the international classifications and grading system. Either form of AMD was detected in 77 (2.2%) participants. Of which, early and late AMD was present in 63 (1.8%) and 14 (0.4%) subjects, respectively. Binary logistic analysis showed that the incidence of AMD was significantly higher with increasing age (Odds ratio [OR] 1.17; 95% CI 1.13-1.22) and diabetes (OR 3.97; 95% CI 2.11-7.46). However, AMD was significant among heavy cigarette smokers (OR 5.58; 95% CI 0.88-7.51) and alcoholics (OR 4.85; 95% CI 2.45-12.22). Dietary lutein/zeaxanthin (L/Z) and β-carotene intake were associated (P < 0.001) with the reduction in risk for AMD, with an OR of 0.38 and 0.65, respectively. Higher dietary intake of carotenoids, especially L/Z, was associated with lower risk for AMD. Risk of AMD is higher with increasing age and was prevalent among subjects with diabetes. Cessation of smoking and alcohol may reduce the risk of AMD in this population.

  16. Tissue plasminogen activator-assisted vitrectomy for submacular hemorrhage due to age-related macular degeneration

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    Mustafa Gok

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the treatment efficacy of vitrectomy combined with subretinal recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA and factors affecting visual improvement in patients with submacular hemorrhage (SMH due to neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD. Materials and Methods: Medical records of 17 consecutive patients diagnosed with SMH secondary to nAMD were retrospectively reviewed. The initial surgical procedure involved a 23-gauge transconjunctival vitrectomy, subretinal r-tPA application through a self-sealing inferior retinotomy, and sulfur hexafluoride gas for tamponade in all patients. The duration, size, and thickness of the hemorrhage and the pre- and post-operative visual acuity (VA using a Snellen chart were recorded. VA was converted to logMAR for statistical analysis. Results: The average duration and size of the SMH were 12.8 ± 18.2 days and 8.6 ± 5.3 disc areas, respectively. The mean follow-up time was 16.9 ± 4.7 months. A statistically significant visual improvement was found when comparing initial VA with postoperative best-corrected VA (BCVA and final BCVA (Wilcoxon rank test, P ≤ 0.01. There was no significant correlation between the size of the hemorrhage and postoperative BCVA and final BCVA (Spearman's rho test. There was no statistically significant correlation between the initial VA and postoperative BCVA and final BCVA (Spearman's rho test. There was no significant correlation between the duration of hemorrhage and postoperative BCVA and final BCVA (Spearman's rho test. The preoperative thickness of hemorrhage (747.5 ± 30 μm was not correlated with postoperative BCVA or final BCVA (Pearson's test. Conclusions: Vitrectomy combined with subretinal r-tPA injection and gas tamponade is an effective surgical intervention to preserve VA in selected patients with apparent SMH.

  17. Bevacizumab vs ranibizumab for neovascular age-related macular degeneration in Chinese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe-Li Liu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To compare the clinical efficacy of intravitreal injections of bevacizumab and ranibizumab for treating Chinese patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD. METHODS: Among 60 Chinese patients with exudative AMD (60 eyes, 28 received intravitreal bevacizumab injections (1.25mg and 32 received intravitreal ranibizumab injections (0.5mg, once a month for 3 months and were followed for a total of 6 months. Monthly optical coherence tomography (OCT was used to determine whether the patients received additional treatments during the follow-up. We compared the baseline and 6-month follow-up values of mean best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA and central retinal thickness (CRT in both groups of patients. We also compared the occurrence of adverse events. RESULTS:At the 6-month follow-up, the mean BCVA (logMAR of the bevacizumab and ranibizumab treatment groups improved from the baseline measurements of 0.72±0.23 and 0.73±0.22 to 0.47±0.14 and 0.45±0.20, respectively (P<0.05 for both groups. However, the change was not significantly different between the two groups. As evaluated by OCT, CRT decreased from 366.71±34.72μm and 352±36.9μm at baseline to 250.86±41.51μm and 243.22±41.38μm in the bevacizumab and ranibizumab groups, respectively (P<0.05 for both groups. However, the change was not significantly different between the two groups. There were no severe local adverse reactions or systemic adverse events. CONCLUSION:Intravitreal bevacizumab and ranibizumab have equivalent effects on BCVA and CRT and appeare safe over the short-term.

  18. Current status of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibition in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Shaker A; Mousa, Shaymaa S

    2010-06-01

    Angiogenesis, the process by which new vessels are created from pre-existing vasculature, has become the subject of intense research in recent years. Increased rates of angiogenesis are associated with several disease states, including cancer, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, and diabetic retinopathy. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important modulator of angiogenesis, and has been implicated in the pathology of a number of conditions, including AMD, diabetic retinopathy, and cancer. AMD is a progressive disease of the macula and the third major cause of blindness worldwide. If not treated appropriately, AMD can progress to involve both eyes. Until recently, the treatment options for AMD have been limited, with photodynamic therapy (PDT) the mainstay of treatment. Although PDT is effective at slowing disease progression, it rarely results in improved vision. Several therapies have been or are now being developed for neovascular AMD, with the goal of inhibiting VEGF. These VEGF inhibitors include the RNA aptamer pegaptanib, partial and full-length antibodies ranibizumab and bevacizumab, the VEGF receptor decoy aflibercept, small interfering RNA-based therapies bevasiranib and AGN 211745, sirolimus, and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including vatalanib, pazopanib, TG 100801, TG 101095, AG 013958, and AL 39324. At present, established therapies have met with great success in reducing the vision loss associated with neovascular AMD, whereas those still under investigation offer the potential for further advances. In AMD patients, these therapies slow the rate of vision loss and in some cases increase visual acuity. Although VEGF-inhibitor therapies are a milestone in the treatment of these disease states, several concerns need to be addressed before their impact can be fully realized.

  19. Visual factors and mobility in persons with age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuyk, T; Elliott, J L

    1999-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of reducing light level on mobility performance in persons with age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and how performance relates to measures of visual sensory and perceptual function. ARMD results in the loss of central, high-acuity vision and is the leading cause of vision loss in veterans participating in the blind rehabilitation programs of the Department of Veterans Affairs. In 41 subjects with ARMD acuity, peak letter contrast sensitivity, visual field extent, glare disability, color confusion, spatio-temporal contrast sensitivity, motion sensitivity, scanning ability, and figure-ground discrimination were measured to determine their ability to predict mobility performance. Mobility performance was assessed under photopic (high illumination) and mesopic (low illumination) lighting conditions on a laboratory obstacle course and two real-world courses, an indoor hallway and an outdoor residential route. Reducing illumination resulted in significant increases in the time to complete each course and the number of mobility incidents (errors) that occurred. Two measures of overall performance, total time and total mobility incidents, were calculated for each course by summing time and incidents over the two illumination levels. Combinations of vision variables were able to account for 30 to 60% of the variance in the measures of overall performance. Log contrast sensitivity measured with the Pelli-Robson chart test and visual field extent were the most important predictors of performance. Other variables making significant contributions to prediction in multi-predictor models included: scanning ability, glare sensitivity, color confusion, and peak contrast sensitivity to drifting gratings.

  20. Rate of vision loss in neovascular age-related macular degeneration explored.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, Juan P; Granero, Gladys E; De Santis, Mariana O; Juarez, Claudio P; Palma, Santiago D; Kelly, Simon P; Luna, José D

    2015-11-01

    To explore decline in visual acuity in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (n-AMD) awaiting intravitreal bevacizumab or ranibizumab treatment following initial diagnosis and after disease reactivation. Retrospective analysis of 74 treatment-naïve patients (84 eyes) in two centers in Córdoba, Argentina. The time between treatment indication and intravitreal injection, and the changes in BCVA produced during this delay were studied in both periods. A linear regression model to search the impact of time on progression visual impairment was conducted. In both periods, a significant reduction in vision occurred awaiting intravitreal injection. The longer the delay, the greater the vision loss (R2 = 0.55 p < 0.01) and the less improvement following treatment (Pearson coefficient -0.26). The result of the model shows that the change in vision as a function of initial delay were best described by a polynomic model with a mean loss of 5 letters in the first 3 weeks, a slowdown in the rate of change of VA, and a dependence of visual acuity at the moment of diagnosis . The loss of visual acuity after reactivation shows the same behavior as at the onset of the disease but independent of visual acuity prior to reactivation. Visual loss awaiting injection intravitreal anti-VEGF is clinically significant and with an asymptotic pattern, with early rapid loss of vision in both the onset of the disease and the reactivation. Initiation of anti-VEGF treatment must be undertaken urgently, as should retreatment of disease activation to reduce visual loss.