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Sample records for macromolecular mri cas

  1. Dendrimer-based Macromolecular MRI Contrast Agents: Characteristics and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisataka Kobayashi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous macromolecular MRI contrast agents prepared employing relatively simple chemistry may be readily available that can provide sufficient enhancement for multiple applications. These agents operate using a ~100-fold lower concentration of gadolinium ions in comparison to the necessary concentration of iodine employed in CT imaging. Herein, we describe some of the general potential directions of macromolecular MRI contrast agents using our recently reported families of dendrimer-based agents as examples. Changes in molecular size altered the route of excretion. Smaller-sized contrast agents less than 60 kDa molecular weight were excreted through the kidney resulting in these agents being potentially suitable as functional renal contrast agents. Hydrophilic and larger-sized contrast agents were found better suited for use as blood pool contrast agents. Hydrophobic variants formed with polypropylenimine diaminobutane dendrimer cores created liver contrast agents. Larger hydrophilic agents are useful for lymphatic imaging. Finally, contrast agents conjugated with either monoclonal antibodies or with avidin are able to function as tumor-specific contrast agents, which also might be employed as therapeutic drugs for either gadolinium neutron capture therapy or in conjunction with radioimmunotherapy.

  2. Polydisulfide Manganese(II) Complexes as Non-Gadolinium Biodegradable Macromolecular MRI Contrast Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhen; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Wu, Xueming; Tan, Mingqian; Yin, Shouyu; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To develop safe and effective manganese(II) based biodegradable macromolecular MRI contrast agents. Materials and Methods In this study, we synthesized and characterized two polydisulfide manganese(II) complexes, Mn-DTPA cystamine copolymers and Mn-EDTA cystamine copolymers, as new biodegradable macromolecular MRI contrast agents. The contrast enhancement of the two manganese based contrast agents were evaluated in mice bearing MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma xenografts, in comparison with MnCl2. Results The T1 and T2 relaxivities were 4.74 and 10.38 mM−1s−1 per manganese at 3T for Mn-DTPA cystamine copolymers (Mn=30.50 kDa) and 6.41 and 9.72 mM−1s−1 for Mn-EDTA cystamine copolymers (Mn= 61.80 kDa). Both polydisulfide Mn(II) complexes showed significant liver, myocardium and tumor enhancement. Conclusion The manganese based polydisulfide contrast agents have a potential to be developed as alternative non-gadolinium contrast agents for MR cancer and myocardium imaging. PMID:22031457

  3. Permeability to macromolecular contrast media quantified by dynamic MRI correlates with tumor tissue assays of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cyran, Clemens C.; Sennino, Barbara; Fu, Yanjun; Rogut, Victor; Shames, David M.; Chaopathomkul, Bundit; Wendland, Michael F.; McDonald, Donald M.; Brasch, Robert C.; Raatschen, Hans-Juergen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate dynamic MRI assays of macromolecular endothelial permeability with microscopic area–density measurements of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in tumors. Methods and material: This study compared tumor xenografts from two different human cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 tumors (n = 5), and MDA-MB-435 (n = 8), reported to express respectively higher and lower levels of VEGF. Dynamic MRI was enhanced by a prototype macromolecular contrast medium (MMCM), albumin-(Gd-DTPA)35. Quantitative estimates of tumor microvascular permeability (K PS ; μl/min × 100 cm 3 ), obtained using a two-compartment kinetic model, were correlated with immunohistochemical measurements of VEGF in each tumor. Results: Mean K PS was 2.4 times greater in MDA-MB-231 tumors (K PS = 58 ± 30.9 μl/min × 100 cm 3 ) than in MDA-MB-435 tumors (K PS = 24 ± 8.4 μl/min × 100 cm 3 ) (p < 0.05). Correspondingly, the area–density of VEGF in MDA-MB-231 tumors was 2.6 times greater (27.3 ± 2.2%, p < 0.05) than in MDA-MB-435 cancers (10.5 ± 0.5%, p < 0.05). Considering all tumors without regard to cell type, a significant positive correlation (r = 0.67, p < 0.05) was observed between MRI-estimated endothelial permeability and VEGF immunoreactivity. Conclusion: Correlation of MRI assays of endothelial permeability to a MMCM and VEGF immunoreactivity of tumors support the hypothesis that VEGF is a major contributor to increased macromolecular permeability in cancers. When applied clinically, the MMCM-enhanced MRI approach could help to optimize the appropriate application of VEGF-inhibiting therapy on an individual patient basis.

  4. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of VEGFR-targeted macromolecular MRI contrast agent based on biotin–avidin-specific binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongjun; Wu, Xiaoyun; Sun, Xiaohe; Wang, Dan; Zhong, Ying; Jiang, Dandan; Wang, Tianqi; Yu, Dexin; Zhang, Na

    2017-01-01

    Developing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents with high relaxivity and specificity was essential to increase MRI diagnostic sensitivity and accuracy. In this study, the MRI contrast agent, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-targeted poly (l-lysine) (PLL)-diethylene triamine pentacetate acid (DTPA)-gadolinium (Gd) (VEGFR-targeted PLL-DTPA-Gd, VPDG), was designed and prepared to enhance the MRI diagnosis capacity of tumor. Biotin-PLL-DTPA-Gd was synthesized first, then, VEGFR antibody was linked to biotin-PLL-DTPA-Gd using biotin–avidin reaction. In vitro cytotoxicity study results showed that VPDG had low toxicity to MCF-7 cells and HepG2 cells at experimental concentrations. In cell uptake experiments, VPDG could significantly increase the internalization rates (61.75%±5.22%) in VEGFR-positive HepG2 cells compared to PLL-DTPA-Gd (PDG) (25.16%±4.71%, P<0.05). In MRI studies in vitro, significantly higher T1 relaxivity (14.184 mM−1 s−1) was observed compared to Magnevist® (4.9 mM−1 s−1; P<0.01). Furthermore, in vivo MRI study results showed that VPDG could significantly enhance the tumor signal intensity and prolong the diagnostic time (from <1 h to 2.5 h). These results indicated that macromolecular VPDG was a promising MRI contrast agent and held great potential for molecular diagnosis of tumor. PMID:28765707

  5. Implementation of fast macromolecular proton fraction mapping on 1.5 and 3 Tesla clinical MRI scanners: preliminary experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnykh, V.; Korostyshevskaya, A.

    2017-08-01

    Macromolecular proton fraction (MPF) is a biophysical parameter describing the amount of macromolecular protons involved into magnetization exchange with water protons in tissues. MPF represents a significant interest as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) biomarker of myelin for clinical applications. A recent fast MPF mapping method enabled clinical translation of MPF measurements due to time-efficient acquisition based on the single-point constrained fit algorithm. However, previous MPF mapping applications utilized only 3 Tesla MRI scanners and modified pulse sequences, which are not commonly available. This study aimed to test the feasibility of MPF mapping implementation on a 1.5 Tesla clinical scanner using standard manufacturer’s sequences and compare the performance of this method between 1.5 and 3 Tesla scanners. MPF mapping was implemented on 1.5 and 3 Tesla MRI units of one manufacturer with either optimized custom-written or standard product pulse sequences. Whole-brain three-dimensional MPF maps obtained from a single volunteer were compared between field strengths and implementation options. MPF maps demonstrated similar quality at both field strengths. MPF values in segmented brain tissues and specific anatomic regions appeared in close agreement. This experiment demonstrates the feasibility of fast MPF mapping using standard sequences on 1.5 T and 3 T clinical scanners.

  6. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of VEGFR-targeted macromolecular MRI contrast agent based on biotin–avidin-specific binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu YJ

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Yongjun Liu,1 Xiaoyun Wu,1 Xiaohe Sun,1 Dan Wang,1 Ying Zhong,1 Dandan Jiang,1 Tianqi Wang,1 Dexin Yu,2 Na Zhang1 1School of Pharmaceutical Science, Shandong University, 2Department of Radiology Medicine, Qilu Hospital, Jinan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Developing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agents with high relaxivity and specificity was essential to increase MRI diagnostic sensitivity and accuracy. In this study, the MRI contrast agent, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR-targeted poly (l-lysine (PLL-diethylene triamine pentacetate acid (DTPA-gadolinium (Gd (VEGFR-targeted PLL-DTPA-Gd, VPDG, was designed and prepared to enhance the MRI diagnosis capacity of tumor. Biotin-PLL-DTPA-Gd was synthesized first, then, VEGFR antibody was linked to biotin-PLL-DTPA-Gd using biotin–avidin reaction. In vitro cytotoxicity study results showed that VPDG had low toxicity to MCF-7 cells and HepG2 cells at experimental concentrations. In cell uptake experiments, VPDG could significantly increase the internalization rates (61.75%±5.22% in VEGFR-positive HepG2 cells compared to PLL-DTPA-Gd (PDG (25.16%±4.71%, P<0.05. In MRI studies in vitro, significantly higher T1 relaxivity (14.184 mM-1 s-1 was observed compared to Magnevist® (4.9 mM-1 s-1; P<0.01. Furthermore, in vivo MRI study results showed that VPDG could significantly enhance the tumor signal intensity and prolong the diagnostic time (from <1 h to 2.5 h. These results indicated that macromolecular VPDG was a promising MRI contrast agent and held great potential for molecular diagnosis of tumor. Keywords: MRI, contrast agent, VEGFR, biotin–avidin reaction, relaxivity

  7. A neutral polydisulfide containing Gd(III) DOTA monoamide as a redox-sensitive biodegradable macromolecular MRI contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhen; Zhou, Zhuxian; Ayat, Nadia; Wu, Xueming; Jin, Erlei; Shi, Xiaoyue; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2016-01-01

    This work aims to develop safe and effective gadolinium (III)-based biodegradable macromolecular MRI contrast agents for blood pool and cancer imaging. A neutral polydisulfide containing macrocyclic Gd-DOTA monoamide (GOLS) was synthesized and characterized. In addition to studying the in vitro degradation of GOLS, its kinetic stability was also investigated in an in vivo model. The efficacy of GOLS for contrast-enhanced MRI was examined with female BALB/c mice bearing 4T1 breast cancer xenografts. The pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, and metabolism of GOLS were also determined in mice. GOLS has an apparent molecular weight of 23.0 kDa with T1 relaxivities of 7.20 mM(-1) s(-1) per Gd at 1.5 T, and 6.62 mM(-1) s(-1) at 7.0 T. GOLS had high kinetic inertness against transmetallation with Zn(2+) ions, and its polymer backbone was readily cleaved by L-cysteine. The agent showed improved efficacy for blood pool and tumor MR imaging. The structural effect on biodistribution and in vivo chelation stability was assessed by comparing GOLS with Gd(HP-DO3A), a negatively charged polydisulfide containing Gd-DOTA monoamide GODC, and a polydisulfide containing Gd-DTPA-bisamide (GDCC). GOLS showed high in vivo chelation stability and minimal tissue deposition of gadolinium. The biodegradable macromolecular contrast agent GOLS is a promising polymeric contrast agent for clinical MR cardiovascular imaging and cancer imaging. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Investigation of a potential macromolecular MRI contrast agent prepared from PPI (G = 2, polypropyleneimine, generation 2) dendrimer bifunctional chelates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianxin Steven

    The long-term objective is to develop magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents that actively and passively target tumors for diagnosis and therapy. Many diagnostic imaging techniques for cancer lack specificity. A dendrimer based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent has been developed with large proton relaxation enhancements and high molecular relaxivities. A new type of linear dendrimer based MRI contrast agent that is built from the polypropyleneimine and polyamidoamine dendrimers in which free amines have been conjugated to the chelate DTPA, which further formed the complex with Gadolinium (Gd) was studied. The specific research goals were to test the hypothesis that a linear chelate with macromolecular agents can be used in vitro and in vivo. This work successfully examined the adequacy and viability of the application for this agent in vitro and in vivo. A small animal whole body counter was designed and constructed to allow us to monitor biodistribution and kinetic mechanisms using a radioisotope labeled complex. The procedures of metal labeling, separation and purification have been established from this work. A biodistribution study has been performed using radioisotope induced organ/tissue counting and gamma camera imaging. The ratio of percentage of injected dose per gram organ/tissue for kidney and liver is 3.71 from whole body counter and 3.77 from the gamma camera. The results suggested that retention of Gd (III) is too high and a more kinetically stable chelate should be developed. The pharmacokinetic was evaluated in the whole animal model with the whole body clearance, and a kinetics model was developed. The pharmacokinetic results showed a bi-exponential decay in the animal model with two component excretion constants 1.43e(-5) and 0.0038511, which give half-lives of 3 hours and 33.6 days, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging of this complex resulted in a 52% contrast enhancement in the rat kidney following the agents' administration in

  9. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI using a macromolecular MR contrast agent (P792): Evaluation of antivascular drug effect in a rabbit VX2 liver tumor model

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    Park, Hee Sun [Dept. of Radiology, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Joon Koo; Lee, Jeong Min; Woo, Sung Min; Choi, Byung Ihn [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Il [Dept. of Radiology, Sheikh Khalifa Specialty Hospital, Ras Al Khaimah (United Arab Emirates); Choi, Jin Young [Dept. of Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To evaluate the utility of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) using macromolecular contrast agent (P792) for assessment of vascular disrupting drug effect in rabbit VX2 liver tumor models. This study was approved by our Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. DCE-MRI was performed with 3-T scanner in 13 VX2 liver tumor-bearing rabbits, before, 4 hours after, and 24 hours after administration of vascular disrupting agent (VDA), using gadomelitol (P792, n = 7) or low molecular weight contrast agent (gadoterate meglumine [Gd-DOTA], n = 6). P792 was injected at a of dose 0.05 mmol/kg, while that of Gd-DOTA was 0.2 mmol/kg. DCE-MRI parameters including volume transfer coefficient (Ktrans) and initial area under the gadolinium concentration-time curve until 60 seconds (iAUC) of tumors were compared between the 2 groups at each time point. DCE-MRI parameters were correlated with tumor histopathology. Reproducibility in measurement of DCE-MRI parameters and image quality of source MR were compared between groups. P792 group showed a more prominent decrease in Ktrans and iAUC at 4 hours and 24 hours, as compared to the Gd-DOTA group. Changes in DCE-MRI parameters showed a weak correlation with histologic parameters (necrotic fraction and microvessel density) in both groups. Reproducibility of DCE-MRI parameters and overall image quality was not significantly better in the P792 group, as compared to the Gd-DOTA group. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging using a macromolecular contrast agent shows changes of hepatic perfusion more clearly after administration of the VDA. Gadolinium was required at smaller doses than a low molecular contrast agent.

  10. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI using a macromolecular MR contrast agent (P792): Evaluation of antivascular drug effect in a rabbit VX2 liver tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hee Sun; Han, Joon Koo; Lee, Jeong Min; Woo, Sung Min; Choi, Byung Ihn; Kim, Young Il; Choi, Jin Young

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the utility of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) using macromolecular contrast agent (P792) for assessment of vascular disrupting drug effect in rabbit VX2 liver tumor models. This study was approved by our Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. DCE-MRI was performed with 3-T scanner in 13 VX2 liver tumor-bearing rabbits, before, 4 hours after, and 24 hours after administration of vascular disrupting agent (VDA), using gadomelitol (P792, n = 7) or low molecular weight contrast agent (gadoterate meglumine [Gd-DOTA], n = 6). P792 was injected at a of dose 0.05 mmol/kg, while that of Gd-DOTA was 0.2 mmol/kg. DCE-MRI parameters including volume transfer coefficient (Ktrans) and initial area under the gadolinium concentration-time curve until 60 seconds (iAUC) of tumors were compared between the 2 groups at each time point. DCE-MRI parameters were correlated with tumor histopathology. Reproducibility in measurement of DCE-MRI parameters and image quality of source MR were compared between groups. P792 group showed a more prominent decrease in Ktrans and iAUC at 4 hours and 24 hours, as compared to the Gd-DOTA group. Changes in DCE-MRI parameters showed a weak correlation with histologic parameters (necrotic fraction and microvessel density) in both groups. Reproducibility of DCE-MRI parameters and overall image quality was not significantly better in the P792 group, as compared to the Gd-DOTA group. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging using a macromolecular contrast agent shows changes of hepatic perfusion more clearly after administration of the VDA. Gadolinium was required at smaller doses than a low molecular contrast agent

  11. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of VEGFR-targeted macromolecular MRI contrast agent based on biotin?avidin-specific binding

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yongjun; Wu, Xiaoyun; Sun, Xiaohe; Wang, Dan; Zhong, Ying; Jiang, Dandan; Wang, Tianqi; Yu, Dexin; Zhang, Na

    2017-01-01

    Yongjun Liu,1 Xiaoyun Wu,1 Xiaohe Sun,1 Dan Wang,1 Ying Zhong,1 Dandan Jiang,1 Tianqi Wang,1 Dexin Yu,2 Na Zhang1 1School of Pharmaceutical Science, Shandong University, 2Department of Radiology Medicine, Qilu Hospital, Jinan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Developing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents with high relaxivity and specificity was essential to increase MRI diagnostic sensitivity and accuracy. In this study, the MRI contrast agent, vascular endotheli...

  12. Macromolecular therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiyuan; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2014-09-28

    This review covers water-soluble polymer-drug conjugates and macromolecules that possess biological activity without attached low molecular weight drugs. The main design principles of traditional and backbone degradable polymer-drug conjugates as well as the development of a new paradigm in nanomedicines - (low molecular weight) drug-free macromolecular therapeutics are discussed. To address the biological features of cancer, macromolecular therapeutics directed to stem/progenitor cells and the tumor microenvironment are deliberated. Finally, the future perspectives of the field are briefly debated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of VEGFR-targeted macromolecular MRI contrast agent based on biotin-avidin-specific binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongjun; Wu, Xiaoyun; Sun, Xiaohe; Wang, Dan; Zhong, Ying; Jiang, Dandan; Wang, Tianqi; Yu, Dexin; Zhang, Na

    2017-01-01

    Developing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents with high relaxivity and specificity was essential to increase MRI diagnostic sensitivity and accuracy. In this study, the MRI contrast agent, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-targeted poly (l-lysine) (PLL)-diethylene triamine pentacetate acid (DTPA)-gadolinium (Gd) (VEGFR-targeted PLL-DTPA-Gd, VPDG), was designed and prepared to enhance the MRI diagnosis capacity of tumor. Biotin-PLL-DTPA-Gd was synthesized first, then, VEGFR antibody was linked to biotin-PLL-DTPA-Gd using biotin-avidin reaction. In vitro cytotoxicity study results showed that VPDG had low toxicity to MCF-7 cells and HepG2 cells at experimental concentrations. In cell uptake experiments, VPDG could significantly increase the internalization rates (61.75%±5.22%) in VEGFR-positive HepG2 cells compared to PLL-DTPA-Gd (PDG) (25.16%±4.71%, P contrast agent and held great potential for molecular diagnosis of tumor.

  14. A gadolinium(III) complex of a carboxylic-phosphorus acid derivative of diethylenetriamine covalently bound to inulin, a potential macromolecular MRI contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebdusková, Petra; Kotek, Jan; Hermann, Petr; Vander Elst, Luce; Muller, Robert N; Lukes, Ivan; Peters, Joop A

    2004-01-01

    A novel conjugate of a polysaccharide and a Gd(III) chelate with potential as contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was synthesized. The structure of the chelate was derived from H5DTPA by replacing the central pendant arm by a phosphinic acid functional group, which was covalently bound to the polysaccharide inulin. On the average, each monosaccharide unit of the inulin was attached to approximately one (0.9) chelate moiety. The average molecular weight is 23110 and the average number of Gd3+ ions per molecule is 24. The ligand binds the Gd3+ ion in an octadentate fashion via three nitrogen atoms, four carboxylate oxygen atoms, and one P-O oxygen atom, and its first coordination sphere is completed by a water molecule. This compound shows promising properties for application as a contrast agent for MRI thanks to a favorable residence lifetime of this water molecule (170 ns at 298 K), a relatively long rotational correlation time (866 ps at 298 K), and the presence of two water molecules in the second coordination sphere of the Gd3+ ion. Furthermore, its stability toward transmetalation with Zn(II) is as high as that of the clinically used [Gd(DTPA)(H2O)]2-.

  15. Rhabdomyolysis and truncular sciatic pain. MRI study of 2 cases; Rhabdomyolyse et sciatique tronculaire. Deux cas etudies en IRM

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    Le Friant, G.; Brinquin, L.; Soulie, D.; Sarrazin, J.L.; Cosnard, G.; Cordoliani, Y.S. [Hopital des Armees du Val-de-Grace, 75 - Paris (France)

    1995-02-01

    We report two cases of acute rhabdomyolysis in pelvic girdle muscles with sciatic palsy secondary to compression of the sciatic nerve trunk, with clinical and MRI correlation. The diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis is based on clinical and biological data, but diagnosis of compression complications secondary to swelling of the muscles, especially the compression of nerve trunk, is done by imaging. T2 weighted images give a definite anatomical evaluation. They show enlarged high signal intensity muscles and anatomic relationship with the sciatic nerve from its emergence out of pelvis, giving a good correlation between rhabdomyolysis and the compressed nervous trunk. It helps for planning a possible surgical fasciotomy. However, MRI provides only morphological informations, but not differentiates edema from necrosis in involved muscles. (authors). 7 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Practical macromolecular cryocrystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pflugrath, J. W., E-mail: jim.pflugrath@gmail.com [Rigaku Americas Corp., 9009 New Trails Drive, The Woodlands, TX 77381 (United States)

    2015-05-27

    Current methods, reagents and experimental hardware for successfully and reproducibly flash-cooling macromolecular crystals to cryogenic temperatures for X-ray diffraction data collection are reviewed. Cryocrystallography is an indispensable technique that is routinely used for single-crystal X-ray diffraction data collection at temperatures near 100 K, where radiation damage is mitigated. Modern procedures and tools to cryoprotect and rapidly cool macromolecular crystals with a significant solvent fraction to below the glass-transition phase of water are reviewed. Reagents and methods to help prevent the stresses that damage crystals when flash-cooling are described. A method of using isopentane to assess whether cryogenic temperatures have been preserved when dismounting screened crystals is also presented.

  17. Macromolecular crystallization in microgravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snell, Edward H; Helliwell, John R

    2005-01-01

    Density difference fluid flows and sedimentation of growing crystals are greatly reduced when crystallization takes place in a reduced gravity environment. In the case of macromolecular crystallography a crystal of a biological macromolecule is used for diffraction experiments (x-ray or neutron) so as to determine the three-dimensional structure of the macromolecule. The better the internal order of the crystal then the greater the molecular structure detail that can be extracted. It is this structural information that enables an understanding of how the molecule functions. This knowledge is changing the biological and chemical sciences, with major potential in understanding disease pathologies. In this review, we examine the use of microgravity as an environment to grow macromolecular crystals. We describe the crystallization procedures used on the ground, how the resulting crystals are studied and the knowledge obtained from those crystals. We address the features desired in an ordered crystal and the techniques used to evaluate those features in detail. We then introduce the microgravity environment, the techniques to access that environment and the theory and evidence behind the use of microgravity for crystallization experiments. We describe how ground-based laboratory techniques have been adapted to microgravity flights and look at some of the methods used to analyse the resulting data. Several case studies illustrate the physical crystal quality improvements and the macromolecular structural advances. Finally, limitations and alternatives to microgravity and future directions for this research are covered. Macromolecular structural crystallography in general is a remarkable field where physics, biology, chemistry and mathematics meet to enable insight to the fundamentals of life. As the reader will see, there is a great deal of physics involved when the microgravity environment is applied to crystallization, some of it known, and undoubtedly much yet to

  18. MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeter, Aileen; Rudin, Markus; Gianolio, Eliana

    2017-01-01

    This chapter discusses principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and MRI followed by a survey on the major classes of MRI contrast agents (CA), their modes of action, and some of the most significative applications. The two more established classes of MRI-CA are represented by paramagnetic...... been attained that markedly increase the number and typology of systems with CEST properties. Currently much attention is also devoted to hyperpolarized molecules that display a sensitivity enhancement sufficient for their direct exploitation for the formation of the MR image. A real breakthrough...

  19. MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the room. Pins, hairpins, metal zippers, and similar metallic items can distort the images. Removable dental work ... an MRI can cause heart pacemakers and other implants not to work as well. The magnets can ...

  20. Cas Wepener

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    Dubbelfoto is die eerste kortverhaalbundel van die teoloog Cas Wepener wat tot dusver veral akademiese artikels en godsdienstige boeke geskryf het. Die bundel se titel gee besondere prominensie aan die gegewe van die foto ter- wyl die motto wat gehaal is uit Roland Barthes se Camera Lucida die aandag vestig op die ...

  1. Macromolecular crystallography using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartunik, H.D.; Phillips, J.C.; Fourme, R.

    1982-01-01

    The use of synchrotron X-ray sources in macromolecular crystallography is described. The properties of synchrotron radiation relevant to macromolecular crystallography are examined. The applications discussed include anomalous dispersion techniques, the acquisition of normal and high resolution data, and kinetic studies of structural changes in macromolecules; protein data are presented illustrating these applications. The apparatus used is described including information on the electronic detectors, the monitoring of the incident beam and crystal cooling. (U.K.)

  2. Recent advances in macromolecular prodrugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Camilla Frich; Zelikin, Alexander N.

    2017-01-01

    Macromolecular prodrugs (MP) are high molar mass conjugates, typically carrying several copies of a drug or a drug combination, designed to optimize delivery of the drug, that is — its pharmacokinetics. From its advent several decades ago, design of MP has undergone significant development and es...

  3. Optimizing Water Exchange Rates and Rotational Mobility for High-Relaxivity of a Novel Gd-DO3A Derivative Complex Conjugated to Inulin as Macromolecular Contrast Agents for MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granato, Luigi; Vander Elst, Luce; Henoumont, Celine; Muller, Robert N; Laurent, Sophie

    2018-02-01

    Thanks to the understanding of the relationships between the residence lifetime τ M of the coordinated water molecules to macrocyclic Gd-complexes and the rotational mobility τ R of these structures, and according to the theory for paramagnetic relaxation, it is now possible to design macromolecular contrast agents with enhanced relaxivities by optimizing these two parameters through ligand structural modification. We succeeded in accelerating the water exchange rate by inducing steric compression around the water binding site, and by removing the amide function from the DOTA-AA ligand [1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid mono(p-aminoanilide)] (L) previously designed. This new ligand 10[2(1-oxo-1-p-propylthioureidophenylpropyl]-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclodecane-1,4,7-tetraacetic acid (L 1 ) was then covalently conjugated to API [O-(aminopropyl)inulin] to get the complex API-(GdL 1 )x with intent to slow down the rotational correlation time (τ R ) of the macromolecular complex. The evaluation of the longitudinal relaxivity at different magnetic fields and the study of the 17 O-NMR at variable temperature of the low-molecular-weight compound (GdL 1 ) showed a slight decrease of the τ M value (τM310 = 331 ns vs. τM310 = 450 ns for the GdL complex). Consequently to the increase of the size of the API-(GdL 1 )x complex, the rotational correlation time becomes about 360 times longer compared to the monomeric GdL 1 complex (τ R  = 33,700 ps), which results in an enhanced proton relaxivity. © 2018 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  4. The CAS Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Sue

    2004-01-01

    The Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority (VCAA) Computer Algebra System (CAS)Pilot study (2001-2005) is monitoring the use of CAS in senior secondary mathematics. This article explores the author's experiences in the CAS classroom and delineates changes in teaching style, as a result of the introduction of CAS into the senior mathematics…

  5. Structure studies of macromolecular systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hašek, Jindřich; Dohnálek, Jan; Skálová, Tereza; Dušková, Jarmila; Kolenko, Petr

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2006), s. 136 ISSN 1211-5894. [Czech and Slovak Crystallographic Colloquium. 22.06.2006-24.06.2006, Grenoble] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4050811; GA MŠk 1K05008 Keywords : structure * X-ray diffraction * synchrotron Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry http://www. xray .cz/ms/default.htm

  6. Macromolecular systems for vaccine delivery

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mužíková, Gabriela; Laga, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, Suppl. 2 (2016), S203-S216 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : vaccine delivery * cellular and humoral immunity * polymer immunostimulants Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.461, year: 2016 http://www.biomed.cas.cz/physiolres/pdf/65%20Suppl%202/65_S203.pdf

  7. Macromolecular systems for vaccine delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MuŽíková, G; Laga, R

    2016-10-20

    Vaccines have helped considerably in eliminating some life-threatening infectious diseases in past two hundred years. Recently, human medicine has focused on vaccination against some of the world's most common infectious diseases (AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, etc.), and vaccination is also gaining popularity in the treatment of cancer or autoimmune diseases. The major limitation of current vaccines lies in their poor ability to generate a sufficient level of protective antibodies and T cell responses against diseases such as HIV, malaria, tuberculosis and cancers. Among the promising vaccination systems that could improve the potency of weakly immunogenic vaccines belong macromolecular carriers (water soluble polymers, polymer particels, micelles, gels etc.) conjugated with antigens and immunistumulatory molecules. The size, architecture, and the composition of the high molecular-weight carrier can significantly improve the vaccine efficiency. This review includes the most recently developed (bio)polymer-based vaccines reported in the literature.

  8. Collagen macromolecular drug delivery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine collagen for use as a macromolecular drug delivery system by determining the mechanism of release through a matrix. Collagen membranes varying in porosity, crosslinking density, structure and crosslinker were fabricated. Collagen characterized by infrared spectroscopy and solution viscosity was determined to be pure and native. The collagen membranes were determined to possess native vs. non-native quaternary structure and porous vs. dense aggregate membranes by electron microscopy. Collagen monolithic devices containing a model macromolecule (inulin) were fabricated. In vitro release rates were found to be linear with respect to t 1/2 and were affected by crosslinking density, crosslinker and structure. The biodegradation of the collagen matrix was also examined. In vivo biocompatibility, degradation and 14 C-inulin release rates were evaluated subcutaneously in rats

  9. Macromolecular crystallography research at Trombay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannan, K.K.; Chidamrabam, R.

    1983-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of hydrogen positions in small molecules of biological interest at Trombay have provided valuable information that has been used in protein and enzyme structure model-building and in developing hydrogen bond potential functions. The new R-5 reactor is expected to provide higher neutron fluxes and also make possible small-angle neutron scattering studies of large biomolecules and bio-aggregates. In the last few years infrastructure facilities have also been established for macromolecular x-ray crystallography research. Meanwhile, the refinement of carbonic hydrases and lyysozyme structures have been carried out and interesting results obtained on protein dynamics and structure-function relationships. Some interesting presynaptic toxin phospholipases have also taken up for study. (author)

  10. Status and prospects of macromolecular crystallography

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    technique that could be completely automated in most cases. ... major challenge in macromolecular crystallography today is ... tial characterization of crystals in the home source and make a ... opportunities for a generation of structural biolo-.

  11. Macromolecular synthesis in algal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, M.R.; Kikuchi, Tadatoshi

    1980-01-01

    The present paper is a review of our experimental results obtained previously on the macromolecular biosyntheses in the cells of blue-green alga Anacystis nidulans as a representative species of prokaryote, and also in those of three species of eukaryotic algae, i.e. Euglena gracilis strain Z, Chlamydomonas reinhardi, and Cyanidium caldarium. In these algal cells, the combined methods consisting of pulse-labelling using 32 P, 3 H- and 14 C-labelled precursors for macromolecules, of their chasing and of the use of inhibitors which block specifically the syntheses of macromolecules such as proteins, RNA and DNA in living cells were very effectively applied for the analyses of the regulatory mechanism in biosyntheses of macromolecules and of the mode of their assembly into the cell structure, especially organelle constituents. Rased on the results obtained thus, the following conclusions are reached: (1) the metabolic pool for syntheses of macromolecules in the cells of prokaryotic blue-green alga is limited to the small extent and such activities couple largely with the photosynthetic mechanism; (2) 70 S ribosomes in the blue-green algal cells are assembled on the surface of thylakoid membranes widely distributed in their cytoplasm; and (3) the cells of eukaryotic unicellular algae used here have biochemical characters specific for already differentiated enzyme system involving in transcription and translation machineries as the same as in higher organisms, but the control mechanism concerning with such macromolecule syntheses are different among each species. (author)

  12. Macromolecular and dendrimer-based magnetic resonance contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bumb, Ambika; Brechbiel, Martin W. (Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Inst., National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)), e-mail: pchoyke@mail.nih.gov; Choyke, Peter (Molecular Imaging Program, National Cancer Inst., National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    2010-09-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful imaging modality that can provide an assessment of function or molecular expression in tandem with anatomic detail. Over the last 20-25 years, a number of gadolinium-based MR contrast agents have been developed to enhance signal by altering proton relaxation properties. This review explores a range of these agents from small molecule chelates, such as Gd-DTPA and Gd-DOTA, to macromolecular structures composed of albumin, polylysine, polysaccharides (dextran, inulin, starch), poly(ethylene glycol), copolymers of cystamine and cystine with GD-DTPA, and various dendritic structures based on polyamidoamine and polylysine (Gadomers). The synthesis, structure, biodistribution, and targeting of dendrimer-based MR contrast agents are also discussed

  13. Macromolecular contrast agents for MR mammography: current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daldrup-Link, Heike E.; Brasch, Robert C.

    2003-01-01

    Macromolecular contrast media (MMCM) encompass a new class of diagnostic drugs that can be applied with dynamic MRI to extract both physiologic and morphologic information in breast lesions. Kinetic analysis of dynamic MMCM-enhanced MR data in breast tumor patients provides useful estimates of tumor blood volume and microvascular permeability, typically increased in cancer. These tumor characteristics can be applied to differentiate benign from malignant lesions, to define the angiogenesis status of cancers, and to monitor tumor response to therapy. The most immediate challenge to the development of MMCM-enhanced mammography is the identification of those candidate compounds that demonstrate the requisite long intravascular distribution and have the high tolerance necessary for clinical use. Potential mammographic applications and limitations of various MMCM, defined by either experimental animal testing or clinical testing in patients, are reviewed in this article. (orig.)

  14. The design of macromolecular crystallography diffraction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Gwyndaf; Axford, Danny; Owen, Robin L.

    2011-01-01

    Thoughts about the decisions made in designing macromolecular X-ray crystallography experiments at synchrotron beamlines are presented. The measurement of X-ray diffraction data from macromolecular crystals for the purpose of structure determination is the convergence of two processes: the preparation of diffraction-quality crystal samples on the one hand and the construction and optimization of an X-ray beamline and end station on the other. Like sample preparation, a macromolecular crystallography beamline is geared to obtaining the best possible diffraction measurements from crystals provided by the synchrotron user. This paper describes the thoughts behind an experiment that fully exploits both the sample and the beamline and how these map into everyday decisions that users can and should make when visiting a beamline with their most precious crystals

  15. Automated data collection for macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Graeme; McAuley, Katherine E

    2011-09-01

    An overview, together with some practical advice, is presented of the current status of the automation of macromolecular crystallography (MX) data collection, with a focus on MX beamlines at Diamond Light Source, UK. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Asteroid named after CAS scientist

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ An asteroid has been named after CAS astronomy historian XI Zezong with the approval of the International Minor Planet Nomenclature Committee (IMPNC), announced China's National Astronomical Observatories at CAS (NAOC) on 17 August.

  17. In situ macromolecular crystallography using microbeams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axford, Danny; Owen, Robin L; Aishima, Jun; Foadi, James; Morgan, Ann W; Robinson, James I; Nettleship, Joanne E; Owens, Raymond J; Moraes, Isabel; Fry, Elizabeth E; Grimes, Jonathan M; Harlos, Karl; Kotecha, Abhay; Ren, Jingshan; Sutton, Geoff; Walter, Thomas S; Stuart, David I; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2012-05-01

    Despite significant progress in high-throughput methods in macromolecular crystallography, the production of diffraction-quality crystals remains a major bottleneck. By recording diffraction in situ from crystals in their crystallization plates at room temperature, a number of problems associated with crystal handling and cryoprotection can be side-stepped. Using a dedicated goniometer installed on the microfocus macromolecular crystallography beamline I24 at Diamond Light Source, crystals have been studied in situ with an intense and flexible microfocus beam, allowing weakly diffracting samples to be assessed without a manual crystal-handling step but with good signal to noise, despite the background scatter from the plate. A number of case studies are reported: the structure solution of bovine enterovirus 2, crystallization screening of membrane proteins and complexes, and structure solution from crystallization hits produced via a high-throughput pipeline. These demonstrate the potential for in situ data collection and structure solution with microbeams. © 2012 International Union of Crystallography

  18. Macromolecular Networks Containing Fluorinated Cyclic Moieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-12

    Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 17 Nov 2015 – 12 Dec 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Macromolecular Networks Containing Fluorinated Cyclic... FLUORINATED CYCLIC MOIETIES 12 December 2015 Andrew J. Guenthner,1 Scott T. Iacono,2 Cynthia A. Corley,2 Christopher M. Sahagun,3 Kevin R. Lamison,4...Reinforcements Good Flame, Smoke, & Toxicity Characteristics Low Water Uptake with Near Zero Coefficient of Hygroscopic Expansion ∆ DISTRIBUTION A

  19. CRISPR-Cas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jackson, Simon A.; McKenzie, Rebecca E.; Fagerlund, Robert D.; Kieper, Sebastian N.; Fineran, Peter C.; Brouns, Stan J.J.

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria and archaea are engaged in a constant arms race to defend against the ever-present threats of viruses and invasion by mobile genetic elements. The most flexible weapons in the prokaryotic defense arsenal are the CRISPR-Cas adaptive immune systems. These systems are capable of selective

  20. Macromolecular nanotheranostics for multimodal anticancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huis in't Veld, Ruben; Storm, Gert; Hennink, Wim E.; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2011-10-01

    Macromolecular carrier materials based on N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) are prototypic and well-characterized drug delivery systems that have been extensively evaluated in the past two decades, both at the preclinical and at the clinical level. Using several different imaging agents and techniques, HPMA copolymers have been shown to circulate for prolonged periods of time, and to accumulate in tumors both effectively and selectively by means of the Enhanced Permeability and Retention (EPR) effect. Because of this, HPMA-based macromolecular nanotheranostics, i.e. formulations containing both drug and imaging agents within a single formulation, have been shown to be highly effective in inducing tumor growth inhibition in animal models. In patients, however, as essentially all other tumor-targeted nanomedicines, they are generally only able to improve the therapeutic index of the attached active agent by lowering its toxicity, and they fail to improve the efficacy of the intervention. Bearing this in mind, we have recently reasoned that because of their biocompatibility and their beneficial biodistribution, nanomedicine formulations might be highly suitable systems for combination therapies. In the present manuscript, we briefly summarize several exemplary efforts undertaken in this regard in our labs in the past couple of years, and we show that long-circulating and passively tumor-targeted macromolecular nanotheranostics can be used to improve the efficacy of radiochemotherapy and of chemotherapy combinations.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of Chiral Dendrimer-Triamine-Coordinated Gd-MRI Contrast Agents Evaluated by in Vivo MRI and Estimated by in Vitro QCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Miyake

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, we developed novel chiral dendrimer-triamine-coordinated Gd-MRI contrast agents (Gd-MRI CAs, which showed longitudinal relaxivity (r1 values about four times higher than that of clinically used Gd-DTPA (Magnevist®, Bayer. In our continuing study of pharmacokinetic differences derived from both the chirality and generation of Gd-MRI CAs, we found that the ability of chiral dendrimer Gd-MRI CAs to circulate within the body can be directly evaluated by in vitro MRI (7 T. In this study, the association constants (Ka of chiral dendrimer Gd-MRI CAs to bovine serum albumin (BSA, measured and calculated with a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM in vitro, were found to be an extremely easy means for evaluating the body-circulation ability of chiral dendrimer Gd-MRI CAs. The Ka values of S-isomeric dendrimer Gd-MRI CAs were generally greater than those of R-isomeric dendrimer Gd-MRI CAs, which is consistent with the results of our previous MRI study in vivo.

  2. A public database of macromolecular diffraction experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Marek; Langner, Karol M; Cymborowski, Marcin; Porebski, Przemyslaw J; Sroka, Piotr; Zheng, Heping; Cooper, David R; Zimmerman, Matthew D; Elsliger, Marc André; Burley, Stephen K; Minor, Wladek

    2016-11-01

    The low reproducibility of published experimental results in many scientific disciplines has recently garnered negative attention in scientific journals and the general media. Public transparency, including the availability of `raw' experimental data, will help to address growing concerns regarding scientific integrity. Macromolecular X-ray crystallography has led the way in requiring the public dissemination of atomic coordinates and a wealth of experimental data, making the field one of the most reproducible in the biological sciences. However, there remains no mandate for public disclosure of the original diffraction data. The Integrated Resource for Reproducibility in Macromolecular Crystallography (IRRMC) has been developed to archive raw data from diffraction experiments and, equally importantly, to provide related metadata. Currently, the database of our resource contains data from 2920 macromolecular diffraction experiments (5767 data sets), accounting for around 3% of all depositions in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), with their corresponding partially curated metadata. IRRMC utilizes distributed storage implemented using a federated architecture of many independent storage servers, which provides both scalability and sustainability. The resource, which is accessible via the web portal at http://www.proteindiffraction.org, can be searched using various criteria. All data are available for unrestricted access and download. The resource serves as a proof of concept and demonstrates the feasibility of archiving raw diffraction data and associated metadata from X-ray crystallographic studies of biological macromolecules. The goal is to expand this resource and include data sets that failed to yield X-ray structures in order to facilitate collaborative efforts that will improve protein structure-determination methods and to ensure the availability of `orphan' data left behind for various reasons by individual investigators and/or extinct structural genomics

  3. Celebrating macromolecular crystallography: A personal perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abad-Zapatero, Celerino

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The twentieth century has seen an enormous advance in the knowledge of the atomic structures that surround us. The discovery of the first crystal structures of simple inorganic salts by the Braggs in 1914, using the diffraction of X-rays by crystals, provided the critical elements to unveil the atomic structure of matter. Subsequent developments in the field leading to macromolecular crystallography are presented with a personal perspective, related to the cultural milieu of Spain in the late 1950’s. The journey of discovery of the author, as he developed professionally, is interwoven with the expansion of macromolecular crystallography from the first proteins (myoglobin, hemoglobin to the ‘coming of age’ of the field in 1971 and the discoveries that followed, culminating in the determination of the structure of the ribosomes at the turn of the century. A perspective is presented exploring the future of the field and also a reflection about the future generations of Spanish scientists.El siglo XX ha sido testigo del increíble avance que ha experimentado el conocimiento de la estructura atómica de la materia que nos rodea. El descubrimiento de las primeras estructuras atómicas de sales inorgánicas por los Bragg en 1914, empleando difracción de rayos X con cristales, proporcionó los elementos clave para alcanzar tal conocimiento. Posteriores desarrollos en este campo, que condujeron a la cristalografía macromolecular, se presentan aquí desde una perspectiva personal, relacionada con el contexto cultural de la España de la década de los 50. La experiencia del descubrimiento científico, durante mi desarrollo profesional, se integra en el desarrollo de la cristalografía macromolecular, desde las primeras proteínas (míoglobina y hemoglobina, hasta su madurez en 1971 que, con los posteriores descubrimientos, culmina con la determinación del la estructura del ribosoma. Asimismo, se explora el futuro de esta disciplina y se

  4. How type II CRISPR-Cas establish immunity through Cas1-Cas2-mediated spacer integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yibei; Ng, Sherwin; Nam, Ki Hyun; Ke, Ailong

    2017-10-05

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) and the nearby Cas (CRISPR-associated) operon establish an RNA-based adaptive immunity system in prokaryotes. Molecular memory is created when a short foreign DNA-derived prespacer is integrated into the CRISPR array as a new spacer. Whereas the RNA-guided CRISPR interference mechanism varies widely among CRISPR-Cas systems, the spacer integration mechanism is essentially identical. The conserved Cas1 and Cas2 proteins form an integrase complex consisting of two distal Cas1 dimers bridged by a Cas2 dimer. The prespacer is bound by Cas1-Cas2 as a dual-forked DNA, and the terminal 3'-OH of each 3' overhang serves as an attacking nucleophile during integration. The prespacer is preferentially integrated into the leader-proximal region of the CRISPR array, guided by the leader sequence and a pair of inverted repeats inside the CRISPR repeat. Spacer integration in the well-studied Escherichia coli type I-E CRISPR system also relies on the bacterial integration host factor. In type II-A CRISPR, however, Cas1-Cas2 alone integrates spacers efficiently in vitro; other Cas proteins (such as Cas9 and Csn2) have accessory roles in the biogenesis phase of prespacers. Here we present four structural snapshots from the type II-A system of Enterococcus faecalis Cas1 and Cas2 during spacer integration. Enterococcus faecalis Cas1-Cas2 selectively binds to a splayed 30-base-pair prespacer bearing 4-nucleotide 3' overhangs. Three molecular events take place upon encountering a target: first, the Cas1-Cas2-prespacer complex searches for half-sites stochastically, then it preferentially interacts with the leader-side CRISPR repeat, and finally, it catalyses a nucleophilic attack that connects one strand of the leader-proximal repeat to the prespacer 3' overhang. Recognition of the spacer half-site requires DNA bending and leads to full integration. We derive a mechanistic framework to explain the stepwise spacer

  5. Heart MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  6. In situ macromolecular crystallography using microbeams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axford, Danny; Owen, Robin L.; Aishima, Jun [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Foadi, James [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Morgan, Ann W.; Robinson, James I. [University of Leeds, Leeds LS9 7FT (United Kingdom); Nettleship, Joanne E.; Owens, Raymond J. [Research Complex at Harwell, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory R92, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Moraes, Isabel [Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Fry, Elizabeth E.; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Harlos, Karl; Kotecha, Abhay; Ren, Jingshan; Sutton, Geoff; Walter, Thomas S. [University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Stuart, David I. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Evans, Gwyndaf, E-mail: gwyndaf.evans@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2012-04-17

    A sample environment for mounting crystallization trays has been developed on the microfocus beamline I24 at Diamond Light Source. The technical developments and several case studies are described. Despite significant progress in high-throughput methods in macromolecular crystallography, the production of diffraction-quality crystals remains a major bottleneck. By recording diffraction in situ from crystals in their crystallization plates at room temperature, a number of problems associated with crystal handling and cryoprotection can be side-stepped. Using a dedicated goniometer installed on the microfocus macromolecular crystallography beamline I24 at Diamond Light Source, crystals have been studied in situ with an intense and flexible microfocus beam, allowing weakly diffracting samples to be assessed without a manual crystal-handling step but with good signal to noise, despite the background scatter from the plate. A number of case studies are reported: the structure solution of bovine enterovirus 2, crystallization screening of membrane proteins and complexes, and structure solution from crystallization hits produced via a high-throughput pipeline. These demonstrate the potential for in situ data collection and structure solution with microbeams.

  7. In situ macromolecular crystallography using microbeams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axford, Danny; Owen, Robin L.; Aishima, Jun; Foadi, James; Morgan, Ann W.; Robinson, James I.; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Owens, Raymond J.; Moraes, Isabel; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Harlos, Karl; Kotecha, Abhay; Ren, Jingshan; Sutton, Geoff; Walter, Thomas S.; Stuart, David I.; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2012-01-01

    A sample environment for mounting crystallization trays has been developed on the microfocus beamline I24 at Diamond Light Source. The technical developments and several case studies are described. Despite significant progress in high-throughput methods in macromolecular crystallography, the production of diffraction-quality crystals remains a major bottleneck. By recording diffraction in situ from crystals in their crystallization plates at room temperature, a number of problems associated with crystal handling and cryoprotection can be side-stepped. Using a dedicated goniometer installed on the microfocus macromolecular crystallography beamline I24 at Diamond Light Source, crystals have been studied in situ with an intense and flexible microfocus beam, allowing weakly diffracting samples to be assessed without a manual crystal-handling step but with good signal to noise, despite the background scatter from the plate. A number of case studies are reported: the structure solution of bovine enterovirus 2, crystallization screening of membrane proteins and complexes, and structure solution from crystallization hits produced via a high-throughput pipeline. These demonstrate the potential for in situ data collection and structure solution with microbeams

  8. The role of macromolecular stability in desiccation tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolkers, W.F.

    1998-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis concerns a study on the molecular interactions that play a role in the macromolecular stability of desiccation-tolerant higher plant organs. Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy was used as the main experimental technique to assess macromolecular

  9. Generalized Born Models of Macromolecular Solvation Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashford, Donald; Case, David A.

    2000-10-01

    It would often be useful in computer simulations to use a simple description of solvation effects, instead of explicitly representing the individual solvent molecules. Continuum dielectric models often work well in describing the thermodynamic aspects of aqueous solvation, and approximations to such models that avoid the need to solve the Poisson equation are attractive because of their computational efficiency. Here we give an overview of one such approximation, the generalized Born model, which is simple and fast enough to be used for molecular dynamics simulations of proteins and nucleic acids. We discuss its strengths and weaknesses, both for its fidelity to the underlying continuum model and for its ability to replace explicit consideration of solvent molecules in macromolecular simulations. We focus particularly on versions of the generalized Born model that have a pair-wise analytical form, and therefore fit most naturally into conventional molecular mechanics calculations.

  10. CAS School in Germany

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Accelerator School

    The CERN Accelerator School (CAS), the Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research GmbH (GSI) and the Technische Universität Darmstadt (TU Darmstadt) jointly organised a course on General Accelerator Physics, at intermediate level, at TU Darmstadt from 27 September to 9 October 2009.   Participants in the CERN Accelerator School in Darmstadt, Germany. The Intermediate-level course followed established practice, with lectures on core topics in the mornings and specialised courses in the afternoons. The latter provided "hands-on" education and experience in the three selected topics: "RF Measurement Techniques", "Beam Instrumentation and Diagnostics" and "Optics Design and Correction". These proved to be highly successful, with participants choosing one course and following the topic throughout the school. Guided studies, tutorials, seminars and a poster session completed the programme. A visit to GSI and the F...

  11. Sequential recovery of macromolecular components of the nucleolus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Baoyan; Laiho, Marikki

    2015-01-01

    The nucleolus is involved in a number of cellular processes of importance to cell physiology and pathology, including cell stress responses and malignancies. Studies of macromolecular composition of the nucleolus depend critically on the efficient extraction and accurate quantification of all macromolecular components (e.g., DNA, RNA, and protein). We have developed a TRIzol-based method that efficiently and simultaneously isolates these three macromolecular constituents from the same sample of purified nucleoli. The recovered and solubilized protein can be accurately quantified by the bicinchoninic acid assay and assessed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or by mass spectrometry. We have successfully applied this approach to extract and quantify the responses of all three macromolecular components in nucleoli after drug treatments of HeLa cells, and conducted RNA-Seq analysis of the nucleolar RNA.

  12. Macromolecular Crystal Growth by Means of Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanderWoerd, Mark; Ferree, Darren; Spearing, Scott; Monaco, Lisa; Molho, Josh; Spaid, Michael; Brasseur, Mike; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have performed a feasibility study in which we show that chip-based, microfluidic (LabChip(TM)) technology is suitable for protein crystal growth. This technology allows for accurate and reliable dispensing and mixing of very small volumes while minimizing bubble formation in the crystallization mixture. The amount of (protein) solution remaining after completion of an experiment is minimal, which makes this technique efficient and attractive for use with proteins, which are difficult or expensive to obtain. The nature of LabChip(TM) technology renders it highly amenable to automation. Protein crystals obtained in our initial feasibility studies were of excellent quality as determined by X-ray diffraction. Subsequent to the feasibility study, we designed and produced the first LabChip(TM) device specifically for protein crystallization in batch mode. It can reliably dispense and mix from a range of solution constituents into two independent growth wells. We are currently testing this design to prove its efficacy for protein crystallization optimization experiments. In the near future we will expand our design to incorporate up to 10 growth wells per LabChip(TM) device. Upon completion, additional crystallization techniques such as vapor diffusion and liquid-liquid diffusion will be accommodated. Macromolecular crystallization using microfluidic technology is envisioned as a fully automated system, which will use the 'tele-science' concept of remote operation and will be developed into a research facility for the International Space Station as well as on the ground.

  13. Atomic force microscopy imaging of macromolecular complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sergio; Billingsley, Daniel; Thomson, Neil

    2013-01-01

    This chapter reviews amplitude modulation (AM) AFM in air and its applications to high-resolution imaging and interpretation of macromolecular complexes. We discuss single DNA molecular imaging and DNA-protein interactions, such as those with topoisomerases and RNA polymerase. We show how relative humidity can have a major influence on resolution and contrast and how it can also affect conformational switching of supercoiled DNA. Four regimes of AFM tip-sample interaction in air are defined and described, and relate to water perturbation and/or intermittent mechanical contact of the tip with either the molecular sample or the surface. Precise control and understanding of the AFM operational parameters is shown to allow the user to switch between these different regimes: an interpretation of the origins of topographical contrast is given for each regime. Perpetual water contact is shown to lead to a high-resolution mode of operation, which we term SASS (small amplitude small set-point) imaging, and which maximizes resolution while greatly decreasing tip and sample wear and any noise due to perturbation of the surface water. Thus, this chapter provides sufficient information to reliably control the AFM in the AM AFM mode of operation in order to image both heterogeneous samples and single macromolecules including complexes, with high resolution and with reproducibility. A brief introduction to AFM, its versatility and applications to biology is also given while providing references to key work and general reviews in the field.

  14. Time-efficient, high-resolution, whole brain three-dimensional macromolecular proton fraction mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnykh, Vasily L

    2016-05-01

    Macromolecular proton fraction (MPF) mapping is a quantitative MRI method that reconstructs parametric maps of a relative amount of macromolecular protons causing the magnetization transfer (MT) effect and provides a biomarker of myelination in neural tissues. This study aimed to develop a high-resolution whole brain MPF mapping technique using a minimal number of source images for scan time reduction. The described technique was based on replacement of an actually acquired reference image without MT saturation by a synthetic one reconstructed from R1 and proton density maps, thus requiring only three source images. This approach enabled whole brain three-dimensional MPF mapping with isotropic 1.25 × 1.25 × 1.25 mm(3) voxel size and a scan time of 20 min. The synthetic reference method was validated against standard MPF mapping with acquired reference images based on data from eight healthy subjects. Mean MPF values in segmented white and gray matter appeared in close agreement with no significant bias and small within-subject coefficients of variation (maps demonstrated sharp white-gray matter contrast and clear visualization of anatomical details, including gray matter structures with high iron content. The proposed synthetic reference method improves resolution of MPF mapping and combines accurate MPF measurements with unique neuroanatomical contrast features. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Complex Macromolecular Architectures by Living Cationic Polymerization

    KAUST Repository

    Alghamdi, Reem D.

    2015-05-01

    Poly (vinyl ether)-based graft polymers have been synthesized by the combination of living cationic polymerization of vinyl ethers with other living or controlled/ living polymerization techniques (anionic and ATRP). The process involves the synthesis of well-defined homopolymers (PnBVE) and co/terpolymers [PnBVE-b-PCEVE-b-PSiDEGVE (ABC type) and PSiDEGVE-b-PnBVE-b-PSiDEGVE (CAC type)] by sequential living cationic polymerization of n-butyl vinyl ether (nBVE), 2-chloroethyl vinyl ether (CEVE) and tert-butyldimethylsilyl ethylene glycol vinyl ether (SiDEGVE), using mono-functional {[n-butoxyethyl acetate (nBEA)], [1-(2-chloroethoxy) ethyl acetate (CEEA)], [1-(2-(2-(t-butyldimethylsilyloxy)ethoxy) ethoxy) ethyl acetate (SiDEGEA)]} or di-functional [1,4-cyclohexanedimethanol di(1-ethyl acetate) (cHMDEA), (VEMOA)] initiators. The living cationic polymerizations of those monomers were conducted in hexane at -20 0C using Et3Al2Cl3 (catalyst) in the presence of 1 M AcOEt base.[1] The PCEVE segments of the synthesized block terpolymers were then used to react with living macroanions (PS-DPE-Li; poly styrene diphenyl ethylene lithium) to afford graft polymers. The quantitative desilylation of PSiDEGVE segments by n-Bu4N+F- in THF at 0 °C led to graft co- and terpolymers in which the polyalcohol is the outer block. These co-/terpolymers were subsequently subjected to “grafting-from” reactions by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of styrene to afford more complex macromolecular architectures. The base assisted living cationic polymerization of vinyl ethers were also used to synthesize well-defined α-hydroxyl polyvinylether (PnBVE-OH). The resulting polymers were then modified into an ATRP macro-initiator for the synthesis of well-defined block copolymers (PnBVE-b-PS). Bifunctional PnBVE with terminal malonate groups was also synthesized and used as a precursor for more complex architectures such as H-shaped block copolymer by “grafting-from” or

  16. Macromolecular crystallography beamline X25 at the NSLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Héroux, Annie; Allaire, Marc; Buono, Richard; Cowan, Matthew L.; Dvorak, Joseph; Flaks, Leon; LaMarra, Steven; Myers, Stuart F.; Orville, Allen M.; Robinson, Howard H.; Roessler, Christian G.; Schneider, Dieter K.; Shea-McCarthy, Grace; Skinner, John M.; Skinner, Michael; Soares, Alexei S.; Sweet, Robert M.; Berman, Lonny E., E-mail: berman@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, PO Box 5000, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)

    2014-04-08

    A description of the upgraded beamline X25 at the NSLS, operated by the PXRR and the Photon Sciences Directorate serving the Macromolecular Crystallography community, is presented. Beamline X25 at the NSLS is one of the five beamlines dedicated to macromolecular crystallography operated by the Brookhaven National Laboratory Macromolecular Crystallography Research Resource group. This mini-gap insertion-device beamline has seen constant upgrades for the last seven years in order to achieve mini-beam capability down to 20 µm × 20 µm. All major components beginning with the radiation source, and continuing along the beamline and its experimental hutch, have changed to produce a state-of-the-art facility for the scientific community.

  17. Macromolecular crystallography beamline X25 at the NSLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Héroux, Annie; Allaire, Marc; Buono, Richard; Cowan, Matthew L.; Dvorak, Joseph; Flaks, Leon; LaMarra, Steven; Myers, Stuart F.; Orville, Allen M.; Robinson, Howard H.; Roessler, Christian G.; Schneider, Dieter K.; Shea-McCarthy, Grace; Skinner, John M.; Skinner, Michael; Soares, Alexei S.; Sweet, Robert M.; Berman, Lonny E.

    2014-01-01

    A description of the upgraded beamline X25 at the NSLS, operated by the PXRR and the Photon Sciences Directorate serving the Macromolecular Crystallography community, is presented. Beamline X25 at the NSLS is one of the five beamlines dedicated to macromolecular crystallography operated by the Brookhaven National Laboratory Macromolecular Crystallography Research Resource group. This mini-gap insertion-device beamline has seen constant upgrades for the last seven years in order to achieve mini-beam capability down to 20 µm × 20 µm. All major components beginning with the radiation source, and continuing along the beamline and its experimental hutch, have changed to produce a state-of-the-art facility for the scientific community

  18. Control of Macromolecular Architectures for Renewable Polymers: Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chuanbing

    The development of sustainable polymers from nature biomass is growing, but facing fierce competition from existing petrochemical-based counterparts. Controlling macromolecular architectures to maximize the properties of renewable polymers is a desirable approach to gain advantages. Given the complexity of biomass, there needs special consideration other than traditional design. In the presentation, I will talk about a few case studies on how macromolecular architectures could tune the properties of sustainable bioplastics and elastomers from renewable biomass such as resin acids (natural rosin) and plant oils.

  19. Analytical model for macromolecular partitioning during yeast cell division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinkhabwala, Ali; Khmelinskii, Anton; Knop, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division, whereby a parent cell generates two sibling cells with unequal content and thereby distinct fates, is central to cell differentiation, organism development and ageing. Unequal partitioning of the macromolecular content of the parent cell — which includes proteins, DNA, RNA, large proteinaceous assemblies and organelles — can be achieved by both passive (e.g. diffusion, localized retention sites) and active (e.g. motor-driven transport) processes operating in the presence of external polarity cues, internal asymmetries, spontaneous symmetry breaking, or stochastic effects. However, the quantitative contribution of different processes to the partitioning of macromolecular content is difficult to evaluate. Here we developed an analytical model that allows rapid quantitative assessment of partitioning as a function of various parameters in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This model exposes quantitative degeneracies among the physical parameters that govern macromolecular partitioning, and reveals regions of the solution space where diffusion is sufficient to drive asymmetric partitioning and regions where asymmetric partitioning can only be achieved through additional processes such as motor-driven transport. Application of the model to different macromolecular assemblies suggests that partitioning of protein aggregates and episomes, but not prions, is diffusion-limited in yeast, consistent with previous reports. In contrast to computationally intensive stochastic simulations of particular scenarios, our analytical model provides an efficient and comprehensive overview of partitioning as a function of global and macromolecule-specific parameters. Identification of quantitative degeneracies among these parameters highlights the importance of their careful measurement for a given macromolecular species in order to understand the dominant processes responsible for its observed partitioning

  20. Spacer capture and integration by a type I-F Cas1-Cas2-3 CRISPR adaptation complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerlund, Robert D; Wilkinson, Max E; Klykov, Oleg; Barendregt, Arjan; Pearce, F Grant; Kieper, Sebastian N; Maxwell, Howard W R; Capolupo, Angela; Heck, Albert J R; Krause, Kurt L; Bostina, Mihnea; Scheltema, Richard A; Staals, Raymond H J; Fineran, Peter C

    2017-06-27

    CRISPR-Cas adaptive immune systems capture DNA fragments from invading bacteriophages and plasmids and integrate them as spacers into bacterial CRISPR arrays. In type I-E and II-A CRISPR-Cas systems, this adaptation process is driven by Cas1-Cas2 complexes. Type I-F systems, however, contain a unique fusion of Cas2, with the type I effector helicase and nuclease for invader destruction, Cas3. By using biochemical, structural, and biophysical methods, we present a structural model of the 400-kDa Cas1 4 -Cas2-3 2 complex from Pectobacterium atrosepticum with bound protospacer substrate DNA. Two Cas1 dimers assemble on a Cas2 domain dimeric core, which is flanked by two Cas3 domains forming a groove where the protospacer binds to Cas1-Cas2. We developed a sensitive in vitro assay and demonstrated that Cas1-Cas2-3 catalyzed spacer integration into CRISPR arrays. The integrase domain of Cas1 was necessary, whereas integration was independent of the helicase or nuclease activities of Cas3. Integration required at least partially duplex protospacers with free 3'-OH groups, and leader-proximal integration was stimulated by integration host factor. In a coupled capture and integration assay, Cas1-Cas2-3 processed and integrated protospacers independent of Cas3 activity. These results provide insight into the structure of protospacer-bound type I Cas1-Cas2-3 adaptation complexes and their integration mechanism.

  1. Expanding CRISPR/Cas9 Genome Editing Capacity in Zebrafish Using SaCas9

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Yan; Chen, Cheng; Han, Yuxiang; Chen, Zelin; Lu, Xiaochan; Liang, Fang; Li, Song; Qin, Wei; Lin, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    The type II CRISPR/Cas9 system has been used widely for genome editing in zebrafish. However, the requirement for the 5′-NGG-3′ protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) of Cas9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) limits its targeting sequences. Here, we report that a Cas9 ortholog from Staphylococcus aureus (SaCas9), and its KKH variant, successfully induced targeted mutagenesis with high frequency in zebrafish. Confirming previous findings, the SpCas9 variant, VQR, can also induce targeted mutation...

  2. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform 13 C, 15 N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific 13 C and 15 N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions

  3. Crowding-facilitated macromolecular transport in attractive micropost arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Fan-Tso; Lin, Po-Keng; Chien, Wei; Hung, Cheng-Hsiang; Yu, Ming-Hung; Chou, Chia-Fu; Chen, Yeng-Long

    2017-05-02

    Our study of DNA dynamics in weakly attractive nanofabricated post arrays revealed crowding enhances polymer transport, contrary to hindered transport in repulsive medium. The coupling of DNA diffusion and adsorption to the microposts results in more frequent cross-post hopping and increased long-term diffusivity with increased crowding density. We performed Langevin dynamics simulations and found maximum long-term diffusivity in post arrays with gap sizes comparable to the polymer radius of gyration. We found that macromolecular transport in weakly attractive post arrays is faster than in non-attractive dense medium. Furthermore, we employed hidden Markov analysis to determine the transition of macromolecular adsorption-desorption on posts and hopping between posts. The apparent free energy barriers are comparable to theoretical estimates determined from polymer conformational fluctuations.

  4. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, P.E. [Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  5. Stochastic reaction-diffusion algorithms for macromolecular crowding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturrock, Marc

    2016-06-01

    Compartment-based (lattice-based) reaction-diffusion algorithms are often used for studying complex stochastic spatio-temporal processes inside cells. In this paper the influence of macromolecular crowding on stochastic reaction-diffusion simulations is investigated. Reaction-diffusion processes are considered on two different kinds of compartmental lattice, a cubic lattice and a hexagonal close packed lattice, and solved using two different algorithms, the stochastic simulation algorithm and the spatiocyte algorithm (Arjunan and Tomita 2010 Syst. Synth. Biol. 4, 35-53). Obstacles (modelling macromolecular crowding) are shown to have substantial effects on the mean squared displacement and average number of molecules in the domain but the nature of these effects is dependent on the choice of lattice, with the cubic lattice being more susceptible to the effects of the obstacles. Finally, improvements for both algorithms are presented.

  6. Diffusion accessibility as a method for visualizing macromolecular surface geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yingssu; Holton, Thomas; Yeates, Todd O

    2015-10-01

    Important three-dimensional spatial features such as depth and surface concavity can be difficult to convey clearly in the context of two-dimensional images. In the area of macromolecular visualization, the computer graphics technique of ray-tracing can be helpful, but further techniques for emphasizing surface concavity can give clearer perceptions of depth. The notion of diffusion accessibility is well-suited for emphasizing such features of macromolecular surfaces, but a method for calculating diffusion accessibility has not been made widely available. Here we make available a web-based platform that performs the necessary calculation by solving the Laplace equation for steady state diffusion, and produces scripts for visualization that emphasize surface depth by coloring according to diffusion accessibility. The URL is http://services.mbi.ucla.edu/DiffAcc/. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  7. Modeling the multi-scale mechanisms of macromolecular resource allocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Laurence; Yurkovich, James T; King, Zachary A

    2018-01-01

    As microbes face changing environments, they dynamically allocate macromolecular resources to produce a particular phenotypic state. Broad 'omics' data sets have revealed several interesting phenomena regarding how the proteome is allocated under differing conditions, but the functional consequen...... and detail how mathematical models have aided in our understanding of these processes. Ultimately, such modeling efforts have helped elucidate the principles of proteome allocation and hold promise for further discovery....

  8. What Macromolecular Crowding Can Do to a Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Irina M.; Turoverov, Konstantin K.; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular environment represents an extremely crowded milieu, with a limited amount of free water and an almost complete lack of unoccupied space. Obviously, slightly salted aqueous solutions containing low concentrations of a biomolecule of interest are too simplistic to mimic the “real life” situation, where the biomolecule of interest scrambles and wades through the tightly packed crowd. In laboratory practice, such macromolecular crowding is typically mimicked by concentrated solutions of various polymers that serve as model “crowding agents”. Studies under these conditions revealed that macromolecular crowding might affect protein structure, folding, shape, conformational stability, binding of small molecules, enzymatic activity, protein-protein interactions, protein-nucleic acid interactions, and pathological aggregation. The goal of this review is to systematically analyze currently available experimental data on the variety of effects of macromolecular crowding on a protein molecule. The review covers more than 320 papers and therefore represents one of the most comprehensive compendia of the current knowledge in this exciting area. PMID:25514413

  9. Macromolecular target prediction by self-organizing feature maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Gisbert; Schneider, Petra

    2017-03-01

    Rational drug discovery would greatly benefit from a more nuanced appreciation of the activity of pharmacologically active compounds against a diverse panel of macromolecular targets. Already, computational target-prediction models assist medicinal chemists in library screening, de novo molecular design, optimization of active chemical agents, drug re-purposing, in the spotting of potential undesired off-target activities, and in the 'de-orphaning' of phenotypic screening hits. The self-organizing map (SOM) algorithm has been employed successfully for these and other purposes. Areas covered: The authors recapitulate contemporary artificial neural network methods for macromolecular target prediction, and present the basic SOM algorithm at a conceptual level. Specifically, they highlight consensus target-scoring by the employment of multiple SOMs, and discuss the opportunities and limitations of this technique. Expert opinion: Self-organizing feature maps represent a straightforward approach to ligand clustering and classification. Some of the appeal lies in their conceptual simplicity and broad applicability domain. Despite known algorithmic shortcomings, this computational target prediction concept has been proven to work in prospective settings with high success rates. It represents a prototypic technique for future advances in the in silico identification of the modes of action and macromolecular targets of bioactive molecules.

  10. Design and application of a C++ macromolecular class library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, W; Shindyalov, I N; Pu, C; Bourne, P E

    1994-01-01

    PDBlib is an extensible object oriented class library written in C++ for representing the 3-dimensional structure of biological macromolecules. PDBlib forms the kernel of a larger software framework being developed for assiting in knowledge discovery from macromolecular structure data. The software design strategy used by PDBlib, how the library may be used and several prototype applications that use the library are summarized. PDBlib represents the structural features of proteins, DNA, RNA, and complexes thereof, at a level of detail on a par with that which can be parsed from a Protein Data Bank (PDB) entry. However, the memory resident representation of the macromolecule is independent of the PDB entry and can be obtained from other back-end data sources, for example, existing relational databases and our own object oriented database (OOPDB) built on top of the commercial object oriented database, ObjectStore. At the front-end are several prototype applications that use the library: Macromolecular Query Language (MMQL) is based on a separate class library (MMQLlib) for building complex queries pertaining to macromolecular structure; PDBtool is an interactive structure verification tool; and PDBview, is a structure rendering tool used either as a standalone tool or as part of another application. Each of these software components are described. All software is available via anonymous ftp from cuhhca.hhmi.columbia.edu.

  11. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI Patient Instructions ... Gotway MB, Panse PM, Gruden JF, Elicker BM. Thoracic radiology. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et ...

  12. Semiotic and discursive variables in cas-based didactical engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winsløw, Carl

    2003-01-01

    CAS, didactical engeneering, Maple, semiotics, undergraduate teaching, mathematics, education, didactics......CAS, didactical engeneering, Maple, semiotics, undergraduate teaching, mathematics, education, didactics...

  13. CRISPR-Cas: Adapting to change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Simon A; McKenzie, Rebecca E; Fagerlund, Robert D; Kieper, Sebastian N; Fineran, Peter C; Brouns, Stan J J

    2017-04-07

    Bacteria and archaea are engaged in a constant arms race to defend against the ever-present threats of viruses and invasion by mobile genetic elements. The most flexible weapons in the prokaryotic defense arsenal are the CRISPR-Cas adaptive immune systems. These systems are capable of selective identification and neutralization of foreign DNA and/or RNA. CRISPR-Cas systems rely on stored genetic memories to facilitate target recognition. Thus, to keep pace with a changing pool of hostile invaders, the CRISPR memory banks must be regularly updated with new information through a process termed CRISPR adaptation. In this Review, we outline the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing CRISPR adaptation. Specifically, the conserved protein machinery Cas1-Cas2 is the cornerstone of adaptive immunity in a range of diverse CRISPR-Cas systems. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Using CRISPR-Cas systems as antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikard, David; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2017-06-01

    Although CRISPR-Cas systems naturally evolved to provide adaptive immunity in bacteria and archaea, Cas nucleases can be co-opted to target chromosomal sequences rather than invasive genetic elements. Although genome editing is the primary outcome of self-targeting using CRISPR-based technologies in eukaryotes, self-targeting by CRISPR is typically lethal in bacteria. Here, we discuss how DNA damage introduced by Cas nucleases in bacteria can efficiently and specifically lead to plasmid curing or drive cell death. Specifically, we discuss how various CRISPR-Cas systems can be engineered and delivered using phages or phagemids as vectors. These principles establish CRISPR-Cas systems as potent and programmable antimicrobials, and open new avenues for the development of CRISPR-based tools for selective removal of bacterial pathogens and precise microbiome composition alteration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. CasA mediates Cas3-catalyzed target degradation during CRISPR RNA-guided interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstrasser, Megan L; Taylor, David W; Bhat, Prashant; Guegler, Chantal K; Sternberg, Samuel H; Nogales, Eva; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2014-05-06

    In bacteria, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated (Cas) DNA-targeting complex Cascade (CRISPR-associated complex for antiviral defense) uses CRISPR RNA (crRNA) guides to bind complementary DNA targets at sites adjacent to a trinucleotide signature sequence called the protospacer adjacent motif (PAM). The Cascade complex then recruits Cas3, a nuclease-helicase that catalyzes unwinding and cleavage of foreign double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) bearing a sequence matching that of the crRNA. Cascade comprises the CasA-E proteins and one crRNA, forming a structure that binds and unwinds dsDNA to form an R loop in which the target strand of the DNA base pairs with the 32-nt RNA guide sequence. Single-particle electron microscopy reconstructions of dsDNA-bound Cascade with and without Cas3 reveal that Cascade positions the PAM-proximal end of the DNA duplex at the CasA subunit and near the site of Cas3 association. The finding that the DNA target and Cas3 colocalize with CasA implicates this subunit in a key target-validation step during DNA interference. We show biochemically that base pairing of the PAM region is unnecessary for target binding but critical for Cas3-mediated degradation. In addition, the L1 loop of CasA, previously implicated in PAM recognition, is essential for Cas3 activation following target binding by Cascade. Together, these data show that the CasA subunit of Cascade functions as an essential partner of Cas3 by recognizing DNA target sites and positioning Cas3 adjacent to the PAM to ensure cleavage.

  16. [Detection of CRSPR-Cas system in Streptococcus thermophiles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wan; Liang, Hongzhang; Zhang, Danqing; Wang, Nana; Tang, Yaru; Li, Bailiang; Huo, Guicheng

    2016-04-14

    We aimed to detect the CRSPR-Cas system of six Streptococcus thermophilus. Bioinformatics method was used to predict CRSPR-Cas system of nine S. thermophilus that published in National Center for Biotechnology Information. Four primers were designed according to the flanking sequences of standard strains and the CRISPR-Cas system of six S. thermophilus have been detected by PCR method. S. thermophilus S4 had a Cas9 gene, others all had Cas9 gene, Cas10 gene and Cas9* gene. In addition, 79 and KLDS3.0207 still had Cas3 gene. Signature genes amplification of CRSPR-Cas system could predict the type of CRSPR-Cas system in unsequenced strains, these findings will help establish the foundation for the study of CRSPR-Cas system in lactic acid bacteria.

  17. Workshop on algorithms for macromolecular modeling. Final project report, June 1, 1994--May 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leimkuhler, B.; Hermans, J.; Skeel, R.D.

    1995-07-01

    A workshop was held on algorithms and parallel implementations for macromolecular dynamics, protein folding, and structural refinement. This document contains abstracts and brief reports from that workshop.

  18. The contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on amyloid fibril formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Ma

    Full Text Available Amyloid fibrils associated with neurodegenerative diseases can be considered biologically relevant failures of cellular quality control mechanisms. It is known that in vivo human Tau protein, human prion protein, and human copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1 have the tendency to form fibril deposits in a variety of tissues and they are associated with different neurodegenerative diseases, while rabbit prion protein and hen egg white lysozyme do not readily form fibrils and are unlikely to cause neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we have investigated the contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on fibril formation of different proteins.As revealed by assays based on thioflavin T binding and turbidity, human Tau fragments, when phosphorylated by glycogen synthase kinase-3β, do not form filaments in the absence of a crowding agent but do form fibrils in the presence of a crowding agent, and the presence of a strong crowding agent dramatically promotes amyloid fibril formation of human prion protein and its two pathogenic mutants E196K and D178N. Such an enhancing effect of macromolecular crowding on fibril formation is also observed for a pathological human SOD1 mutant A4V. On the other hand, rabbit prion protein and hen lysozyme do not form amyloid fibrils when a crowding agent at 300 g/l is used but do form fibrils in the absence of a crowding agent. Furthermore, aggregation of these two proteins is remarkably inhibited by Ficoll 70 and dextran 70 at 200 g/l.We suggest that proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases are more likely to form amyloid fibrils under crowded conditions than in dilute solutions. By contrast, some of the proteins that are not neurodegenerative disease-associated are unlikely to misfold in crowded physiological environments. A possible explanation for the contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on these two sets of proteins (amyloidogenic proteins and non-amyloidogenic proteins has been

  19. Fragmentation of the CRISPR-Cas Type I-B signature protein Cas8b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Hagen; Rompf, Judith; Wiegel, Julia; Rau, Kristina; Randau, Lennart

    2017-11-01

    CRISPR arrays are transcribed into long precursor RNA species, which are further processed into mature CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs). Cas proteins utilize these crRNAs, which contain spacer sequences that can be derived from mobile genetic elements, to mediate immunity during a reoccurring virus infection. Type I CRISPR-Cas systems are defined by the presence of different Cascade interference complexes containing large and small subunits that play major roles during target DNA selection. Here, we produce the protein and crRNA components of the Type I-B CRISPR-Cas complex of Clostridium thermocellum and Methanococcus maripaludis. The C. thermocellum Cascade complexes were reconstituted and analyzed via size-exclusion chromatography. Activity of the heterologous M. maripaludis CRISPR-Cas system was followed using phage lambda plaques assays. The reconstituted Type-I-B Cascade complex contains Cas7, Cas5, Cas6b and the large subunit Cas8b. Cas6b can be omitted from the reconstitution protocol. The large subunit Cas8b was found to be represented by two tightly associated protein fragments and a small C-terminal Cas8b segment was identified in recombinant complexes and C. thermocellum cell lysate. Production of Cas8b generates a small C-terminal fragment, which is suggested to fulfill the role of the missing small subunit. A heterologous, synthetic M. maripaludis Type I-B system is active in E. coli against phage lambda, highlighting a potential for genome editing using endogenous Type-I-B CRISPR-Cas machineries. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Biochemistry of Synthetic Biology - Recent Developments" Guest Editor: Dr. Ilka Heinemann and Dr. Patrick O'Donoghue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Structural analysis of nanoparticulate carriers for encapsulation of macromolecular drugs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Angelov, Borislav; Garamus, V.M.; Drechsler, M.; Angelova, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 235, Jun (2017), s. 83-89 ISSN 0167-7322 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_003/0000447; GA MŠk EF15_008/0000162 Grant - others:OP VVV - ELIBIO(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_003/0000447; ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : self-assembled nanocarriers * liquid crystalline phase transitions * cationic lipids * macromolecular drugs Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics OBOR OECD: Biophysics Impact factor: 3.648, year: 2016

  1. Bringing macromolecular machinery to life using 3D animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, Janet H

    2015-04-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a rapid rise in the use of three-dimensional (3D) animation to depict molecular and cellular processes. Much of the growth in molecular animation has been in the educational arena, but increasingly, 3D animation software is finding its way into research laboratories. In this review, I will discuss a number of ways in which 3d animation software can play a valuable role in visualizing and communicating macromolecular structures and dynamics. I will also consider the challenges of using animation tools within the research sphere. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Protein crystal growth studies at the Center for Macromolecular Crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLucas, Lawrence J.; Long, Marianna M.; Moore, Karen M.; Harrington, Michael; McDonald, William T.; Smith, Craig D.; Bray, Terry; Lewis, Johanna; Crysel, William B.; Weise, Lance D.

    2000-01-01

    The Center for Macromolecular Crystallography (CMC) has been involved in fundamental studies of protein crystal growth (PCG) in microgravity and in our earth-based laboratories. A large group of co-investigators from academia and industry participated in these experiments by providing protein samples and by performing the x-ray crystallographic analysis. These studies have clearly demonstrated the usefulness of a microgravity environment for enhancing the quality and size of protein crystals. Review of the vapor diffusion (VDA) PCG results from nineteen space shuttle missions is given in this paper

  3. CAS at the Cockcroft Institute

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The CERN Accelerator School (CAS) and the UK’s new centre for accelerator science, the Cockcroft Institute, jointly organised a course on General Accelerator Physics, at intermediate level, at the Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury, UK, from 16 to 28 September 2007. The venue took advantage of the excellent new facilities in the Institute and the existing infrastructure of the adjacent Daresbury Laboratory. The intermediate level course followed established practice, with lectures on core topics in the mornings and specialised courses in the afternoons. The latter provided "hands-on" education and experience in the three selected topics: "RF Measurements Techniques", "Beam Instrumentation and Diagnostics" and "Optics Design and Correction". These proved to be highly successful, with participants choosing one course and following the topic throughout the school. Guided studies, tutorials, seminars and a poster session completed the prog...

  4. Thiomers for oral delivery of hydrophilic macromolecular drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas; Hoffer, Martin H; Kafedjiiski, Krum

    2004-11-01

    In recent years thiolated polymers (thiomers) have appeared as a promising new tool in oral drug delivery. Thiomers are obtained by the immobilisation of thio-bearing ligands to mucoadhesive polymeric excipients. By the formation of disulfide bonds with mucus glycoproteins, the mucoadhesive properties of thiomers are up to 130-fold improved compared with the corresponding unmodified polymers. Owing to the formation of inter- and intramolecular disulfide bonds within the thiomer itself, matrix tablets and particulate delivery systems show strong cohesive properties, resulting in comparatively higher stability, prolonged disintegration times and a more controlled drug release. The permeation of hydrophilic macromolecular drugs through the gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa can be improved by the use of thiomers. Furthermore, some thiomers exhibit improved inhibitory properties towards GI peptidases. The efficacy of thiomers in oral drug delivery has been demonstrated by various in vivo studies. A pharmacological efficacy of 1%, for example, was achieved in rats by oral administration of calcitonin tablets comprising a thiomer. Furthermore, tablets comprising a thiomer and pegylated insulin resulted in a pharmacological efficacy of 7% after oral application to diabetic mice. Low-molecular-weight heparin embedded in thiolated polycarbophil led to an absolute bioavailability of > or = 20% after oral administration to rats. In these studies, formulations comprising the corresponding unmodified polymer had only a marginal or no effect. These results indicate drug carrier systems based on thiomers appear to be a promising tool for oral delivery of hydrophilic macromolecular drugs.

  5. Outrunning free radicals in room-temperature macromolecular crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, Robin L., E-mail: robin.owen@diamond.ac.uk; Axford, Danny [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Nettleship, Joanne E.; Owens, Raymond J. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); The Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Robinson, James I.; Morgan, Ann W. [University of Leeds, Leeds LS9 7FT (United Kingdom); Doré, Andrew S. [Heptares Therapeutics Ltd, BioPark, Welwyn Garden City AL7 3AX (United Kingdom); Lebon, Guillaume; Tate, Christopher G. [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom); Fry, Elizabeth E.; Ren, Jingshan [The Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Stuart, David I. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); The Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Evans, Gwyndaf [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-15

    A systematic increase in lifetime is observed in room-temperature protein and virus crystals through the use of reduced exposure times and a fast detector. A significant increase in the lifetime of room-temperature macromolecular crystals is reported through the use of a high-brilliance X-ray beam, reduced exposure times and a fast-readout detector. This is attributed to the ability to collect diffraction data before hydroxyl radicals can propagate through the crystal, fatally disrupting the lattice. Hydroxyl radicals are shown to be trapped in amorphous solutions at 100 K. The trend in crystal lifetime was observed in crystals of a soluble protein (immunoglobulin γ Fc receptor IIIa), a virus (bovine enterovirus serotype 2) and a membrane protein (human A{sub 2A} adenosine G-protein coupled receptor). The observation of a similar effect in all three systems provides clear evidence for a common optimal strategy for room-temperature data collection and will inform the design of future synchrotron beamlines and detectors for macromolecular crystallography.

  6. Outrunning free radicals in room-temperature macromolecular crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, Robin L.; Axford, Danny; Nettleship, Joanne E.; Owens, Raymond J.; Robinson, James I.; Morgan, Ann W.; Doré, Andrew S.; Lebon, Guillaume; Tate, Christopher G.; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Ren, Jingshan; Stuart, David I.; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2012-01-01

    A systematic increase in lifetime is observed in room-temperature protein and virus crystals through the use of reduced exposure times and a fast detector. A significant increase in the lifetime of room-temperature macromolecular crystals is reported through the use of a high-brilliance X-ray beam, reduced exposure times and a fast-readout detector. This is attributed to the ability to collect diffraction data before hydroxyl radicals can propagate through the crystal, fatally disrupting the lattice. Hydroxyl radicals are shown to be trapped in amorphous solutions at 100 K. The trend in crystal lifetime was observed in crystals of a soluble protein (immunoglobulin γ Fc receptor IIIa), a virus (bovine enterovirus serotype 2) and a membrane protein (human A 2A adenosine G-protein coupled receptor). The observation of a similar effect in all three systems provides clear evidence for a common optimal strategy for room-temperature data collection and will inform the design of future synchrotron beamlines and detectors for macromolecular crystallography

  7. Variable effects of soman on macromolecular secretion by ferret trachea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBride, R.K.; Zwierzynski, D.J.; Stone, K.K.; Culp, D.J.; Marin, M.G.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the anticholinesterase agent, soman, on macromolecular secretion by ferret trachea, in vitro. We mounted pieces of ferret trachea in Ussing-type chambers. Secreted sulfated macromolecules were radiolabeled by adding 500 microCi of 35 SO 4 to the submucosal medium and incubating for 17 hr. Soman added to the submucosal side produced a concentration-dependent increase in radiolabeled macromolecular release with a maximal secretory response (mean +/- SD) of 202 +/- 125% (n = 8) relative to the basal secretion rate at a concentration of 10 - 7 M. The addition of either 10 -6 M pralidoxime (acetylcholinesterase reactivator) or 10 -6 M atropine blocked the response to 10 -7 M soman. At soman concentrations greater than 10 -7 M, secretion rate decreased and was not significantly different from basal secretion. Additional experiments utilizing acetylcholine and the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, physostigmine, suggest that inhibition of secretion by high concentrations of soman may be due to a secondary antagonistic effect of soman on muscarinic receptors

  8. PRIGo: a new multi-axis goniometer for macromolecular crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltersperger, Sandro; Olieric, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.olieric@psi.ch; Pradervand, Claude [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Glettig, Wayne [Centre Suisse d’Electronique et Microtechnique SA, Neuchâtel 2002 (Switzerland); Salathe, Marco; Fuchs, Martin R.; Curtin, Adrian; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Ebner, Simon; Panepucci, Ezequiel; Weinert, Tobias [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Schulze-Briese, Clemens [Dectris Ltd, Baden 5400 (Switzerland); Wang, Meitian, E-mail: vincent.olieric@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2015-05-09

    The design and performance of the new multi-axis goniometer PRIGo developed at the Swiss Light Source at Paul Scherrer Institute is described. The Parallel Robotics Inspired Goniometer (PRIGo) is a novel compact and high-precision goniometer providing an alternative to (mini-)kappa, traditional three-circle goniometers and Eulerian cradles used for sample reorientation in macromolecular crystallography. Based on a combination of serial and parallel kinematics, PRIGo emulates an arc. It is mounted on an air-bearing stage for rotation around ω and consists of four linear positioners working synchronously to achieve x, y, z translations and χ rotation (0–90°), followed by a ϕ stage (0–360°) for rotation around the sample holder axis. Owing to the use of piezo linear positioners and active correction, PRIGo features spheres of confusion of <1 µm, <7 µm and <10 µm for ω, χ and ϕ, respectively, and is therefore very well suited for micro-crystallography. PRIGo enables optimal strategies for both native and experimental phasing crystallographic data collection. Herein, PRIGo hardware and software, its calibration, as well as applications in macromolecular crystallography are described.

  9. Data Management System at the Photon Factory Macromolecular Crystallography Beamline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Y; Matsugaki, N; Chavas, L M G; Hiraki, M; Igarashi, N; Wakatsuki, S

    2013-01-01

    Macromolecular crystallography is a very powerful tool to investigate three-dimensional structures of macromolecules at the atomic level, and is widely spread among structural biology researchers. Due to recent upgrades of the macromolecular crystallography beamlines at the Photon Factory, beamline throughput has improved, allowing more experiments to be conducted during a user's beam time. Although the number of beamlines has increased, so has the number of beam time applications. Consequently, both the experimental data from users' experiments and data derived from beamline operations have dramatically increased, causing difficulties in organizing these diverse and large amounts of data for the beamline operation staff and users. To overcome this problem, we have developed a data management system by introducing commercial middleware, which consists of a controller, database, and web servers. We have prepared several database projects using this system. Each project is dedicated to a certain aspect such as experimental results, beam time applications, beam time schedule, or beamline operation reports. Then we designed a scheme to link all the database projects.

  10. Enzymes as Green Catalysts for Precision Macromolecular Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoda, Shin-ichiro; Uyama, Hiroshi; Kadokawa, Jun-ichi; Kimura, Shunsaku; Kobayashi, Shiro

    2016-02-24

    The present article comprehensively reviews the macromolecular synthesis using enzymes as catalysts. Among the six main classes of enzymes, the three classes, oxidoreductases, transferases, and hydrolases, have been employed as catalysts for the in vitro macromolecular synthesis and modification reactions. Appropriate design of reaction including monomer and enzyme catalyst produces macromolecules with precisely controlled structure, similarly as in vivo enzymatic reactions. The reaction controls the product structure with respect to substrate selectivity, chemo-selectivity, regio-selectivity, stereoselectivity, and choro-selectivity. Oxidoreductases catalyze various oxidation polymerizations of aromatic compounds as well as vinyl polymerizations. Transferases are effective catalysts for producing polysaccharide having a variety of structure and polyesters. Hydrolases catalyzing the bond-cleaving of macromolecules in vivo, catalyze the reverse reaction for bond forming in vitro to give various polysaccharides and functionalized polyesters. The enzymatic polymerizations allowed the first in vitro synthesis of natural polysaccharides having complicated structures like cellulose, amylose, xylan, chitin, hyaluronan, and chondroitin. These polymerizations are "green" with several respects; nontoxicity of enzyme, high catalyst efficiency, selective reactions under mild conditions using green solvents and renewable starting materials, and producing minimal byproducts. Thus, the enzymatic polymerization is desirable for the environment and contributes to "green polymer chemistry" for maintaining sustainable society.

  11. Progress in rational methods of cryoprotection in macromolecular crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcorn, Thomas; Juers, Douglas H.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of the average thermal contractions (294→72 K) of 26 different cryosolutions are presented and discussed in conjunction with other recent advances in the rational design of protocols for cryogenic cooling in macromolecular crystallography. Cryogenic cooling of macromolecular crystals is commonly used for X-ray data collection both to reduce crystal damage from radiation and to gather functional information by cryogenically trapping intermediates. However, the cooling process can damage the crystals. Limiting cooling-induced crystal damage often requires cryoprotection strategies, which can involve substantial screening of solution conditions and cooling protocols. Here, recent developments directed towards rational methods for cryoprotection are described. Crystal damage is described in the context of the temperature response of the crystal as a thermodynamic system. As such, the internal and external parts of the crystal typically have different cryoprotection requirements. A key physical parameter, the thermal contraction, of 26 different cryoprotective solutions was measured between 294 and 72 K. The range of contractions was 2–13%, with the more polar cryosolutions contracting less. The potential uses of these results in the development of cryocooling conditions, as well as recent developments in determining minimum cryosolution soaking times, are discussed

  12. A newly discovered Bordetella species carries a transcriptionally active CRISPR-Cas with a small Cas9 endonuclease

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cas9 endonuclease of the Type II-a clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), of Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) has been adapted as a widely used tool for genome editing and genome engineering. Herein, we describe a gene encoding a novel Cas9 ortholog (BpsuCas9) and th...

  13. Cas9 specifies functional viral targets during CRISPR-Cas adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heler, Robert; Samai, Poulami; Modell, Joshua W; Weiner, Catherine; Goldberg, Gregory W; Bikard, David; Marraffini, Luciano A

    2015-03-12

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) loci and their associated (Cas) proteins provide adaptive immunity against viral infection in prokaryotes. Upon infection, short phage sequences known as spacers integrate between CRISPR repeats and are transcribed into small RNA molecules that guide the Cas9 nuclease to the viral targets (protospacers). Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 cleavage of the viral genome requires the presence of a 5'-NGG-3' protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) sequence immediately downstream of the viral target. It is not known whether and how viral sequences flanked by the correct PAM are chosen as new spacers. Here we show that Cas9 selects functional spacers by recognizing their PAM during spacer acquisition. The replacement of cas9 with alleles that lack the PAM recognition motif or recognize an NGGNG PAM eliminated or changed PAM specificity during spacer acquisition, respectively. Cas9 associates with other proteins of the acquisition machinery (Cas1, Cas2 and Csn2), presumably to provide PAM-specificity to this process. These results establish a new function for Cas9 in the genesis of prokaryotic immunological memory.

  14. A thermostable Cas9 with increased lifetime in human plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Harrington, LB; Paez-Espino, D; Staahl, BT; Chen, JS; Ma, E; Kyrpides, NC; Doudna, JA

    2017-01-01

    © 2017 The Author(s). CRISPR-Cas9 is a powerful technology that has enabled genome editing in a wide range of species. However, the currently developed Cas9 homologs all originate from mesophilic bacteria, making them susceptible to degradation and unsuitable for applications requiring cleavage at elevated temperatures. Here, we show that the Cas9 protein from the thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus (GeoCas9) catalyzes RNA-guided DNA cleavage at elevated temperatures. GeoCas...

  15. AKRO/SF: Catch Accounting System (CAS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Catch Accounting System (CAS) creates total catch estimates for the groundfish fisheries in the Bering Sea/Aleutian Islands and Gulf of Alaska. Each year, quotas...

  16. The new CAS-DIS digital ionosonde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Shun

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A high quality digital ionosonde called the Chinese Academy of Sciences digital ionosonde (CAS-DIS has been developed for investigations of the ionosphere. Two important features are used for the CAS-DIS; first, the technique of analog down-conversion has been replaced by the new approach of digital down-conversion technology. Secondly, to solve the problem of large instantaneous receiving bandwidth in digital receivers, an analog narrowband tracking filter is used for the CAS-DIS. The center frequency of the filter tracks the carrier frequency transmitted in real-time, to ensure that the frequency components are filtered out of the effective bandwidth. This report describes the system architecture of the CAS-DIS, its main features, and its test results for ionosphere detection. 

  17. Phylogeny of Cas9 determines functional exchangeability of dual-RNA and Cas9 among orthologous type II CRISPR-Cas systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonfara, Ines; Le Rhun, Anaïs; Chylinski, Krzysztof; Makarova, Kira S.; Lécrivain, Anne-Laure; Bzdrenga, Janek; Koonin, Eugene V.; Charpentier, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas-derived RNA-guided Cas9 endonuclease is the key element of an emerging promising technology for genome engineering in a broad range of cells and organisms. The DNA-targeting mechanism of the type II CRISPR-Cas system involves maturation of tracrRNA:crRNA duplex (dual-RNA), which directs Cas9 to cleave invading DNA in a sequence-specific manner, dependent on the presence of a Protospacer Adjacent Motif (PAM) on the target. We show that evolution of dual-RNA and Cas9 in bacteria produced remarkable sequence diversity. We selected eight representatives of phylogenetically defined type II CRISPR-Cas groups to analyze possible coevolution of Cas9 and dual-RNA. We demonstrate that these two components are interchangeable only between closely related type II systems when the PAM sequence is adjusted to the investigated Cas9 protein. Comparison of the taxonomy of bacterial species that harbor type II CRISPR-Cas systems with the Cas9 phylogeny corroborates horizontal transfer of the CRISPR-Cas loci. The reported collection of dual-RNA:Cas9 with associated PAMs expands the possibilities for multiplex genome editing and could provide means to improve the specificity of the RNA-programmable Cas9 tool. PMID:24270795

  18. Macromolecular crowding directs extracellular matrix organization and mesenchymal stem cell behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam S Zeiger

    Full Text Available Microenvironments of biological cells are dominated in vivo by macromolecular crowding and resultant excluded volume effects. This feature is absent in dilute in vitro cell culture. Here, we induced macromolecular crowding in vitro by using synthetic macromolecular globules of nm-scale radius at physiological levels of fractional volume occupancy. We quantified the impact of induced crowding on the extracellular and intracellular protein organization of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs via immunocytochemistry, atomic force microscopy (AFM, and AFM-enabled nanoindentation. Macromolecular crowding in extracellular culture media directly induced supramolecular assembly and alignment of extracellular matrix proteins deposited by cells, which in turn increased alignment of the intracellular actin cytoskeleton. The resulting cell-matrix reciprocity further affected adhesion, proliferation, and migration behavior of MSCs. Macromolecular crowding can thus aid the design of more physiologically relevant in vitro studies and devices for MSCs and other cells, by increasing the fidelity between materials synthesized by cells in vivo and in vitro.

  19. Macromolecular crowding directs extracellular matrix organization and mesenchymal stem cell behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiger, Adam S; Loe, Felicia C; Li, Ran; Raghunath, Michael; Van Vliet, Krystyn J

    2012-01-01

    Microenvironments of biological cells are dominated in vivo by macromolecular crowding and resultant excluded volume effects. This feature is absent in dilute in vitro cell culture. Here, we induced macromolecular crowding in vitro by using synthetic macromolecular globules of nm-scale radius at physiological levels of fractional volume occupancy. We quantified the impact of induced crowding on the extracellular and intracellular protein organization of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) via immunocytochemistry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and AFM-enabled nanoindentation. Macromolecular crowding in extracellular culture media directly induced supramolecular assembly and alignment of extracellular matrix proteins deposited by cells, which in turn increased alignment of the intracellular actin cytoskeleton. The resulting cell-matrix reciprocity further affected adhesion, proliferation, and migration behavior of MSCs. Macromolecular crowding can thus aid the design of more physiologically relevant in vitro studies and devices for MSCs and other cells, by increasing the fidelity between materials synthesized by cells in vivo and in vitro.

  20. CRISPR-Cas9 Structures and Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fuguo; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2017-05-22

    Many bacterial clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated (Cas) systems employ the dual RNA-guided DNA endonuclease Cas9 to defend against invading phages and conjugative plasmids by introducing site-specific double-stranded breaks in target DNA. Target recognition strictly requires the presence of a short protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) flanking the target site, and subsequent R-loop formation and strand scission are driven by complementary base pairing between the guide RNA and target DNA, Cas9-DNA interactions, and associated conformational changes. The use of CRISPR-Cas9 as an RNA-programmable DNA targeting and editing platform is simplified by a synthetic single-guide RNA (sgRNA) mimicking the natural dual trans-activating CRISPR RNA (tracrRNA)-CRISPR RNA (crRNA) structure. This review aims to provide an in-depth mechanistic and structural understanding of Cas9-mediated RNA-guided DNA targeting and cleavage. Molecular insights from biochemical and structural studies provide a framework for rational engineering aimed at altering catalytic function, guide RNA specificity, and PAM requirements and reducing off-target activity for the development of Cas9-based therapies against genetic diseases.

  1. CRISPR-Cas: biology, mechanisms and relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hille, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Prokaryotes have evolved several defence mechanisms to protect themselves from viral predators. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and their associated proteins (Cas) display a prokaryotic adaptive immune system that memorizes previous infections by integrating short sequences of invading genomes—termed spacers—into the CRISPR locus. The spacers interspaced with repeats are expressed as small guide CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) that are employed by Cas proteins to target invaders sequence-specifically upon a reoccurring infection. The ability of the minimal CRISPR-Cas9 system to target DNA sequences using programmable RNAs has opened new avenues in genome editing in a broad range of cells and organisms with high potential in therapeutical applications. While numerous scientific studies have shed light on the biochemical processes behind CRISPR-Cas systems, several aspects of the immunity steps, however, still lack sufficient understanding. This review summarizes major discoveries in the CRISPR-Cas field, discusses the role of CRISPR-Cas in prokaryotic immunity and other physiological properties, and describes applications of the system as a DNA editing technology and antimicrobial agent. This article is part of the themed issue ‘The new bacteriology’. PMID:27672148

  2. Liposomes Loaded with Hydrophobic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Suitable T2 Contrast Agents for MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Raquel Martínez-González; Joan Estelrich; Maria Antònia Busquets

    2016-01-01

    There has been a recent surge of interest in the use of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as contrast agents (CAs) for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), due to their tunable properties and their low toxicity compared with other CAs such as gadolinium. SPIONs exert a strong influence on spin-spin T 2 relaxation times by decreasing the MR signal in the regions to which they are delivered, consequently yielding darker images or negative contrast. Given the potential of these na...

  3. Quantitative rotating frame relaxometry methods in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilani, Irtiza Ali; Sepponen, Raimo

    2016-06-01

    Macromolecular degeneration and biochemical changes in tissue can be quantified using rotating frame relaxometry in MRI. It has been shown in several studies that the rotating frame longitudinal relaxation rate constant (R1ρ ) and the rotating frame transverse relaxation rate constant (R2ρ ) are sensitive biomarkers of phenomena at the cellular level. In this comprehensive review, existing MRI methods for probing the biophysical mechanisms that affect the rotating frame relaxation rates of the tissue (i.e. R1ρ and R2ρ ) are presented. Long acquisition times and high radiofrequency (RF) energy deposition into tissue during the process of spin-locking in rotating frame relaxometry are the major barriers to the establishment of these relaxation contrasts at high magnetic fields. Therefore, clinical applications of R1ρ and R2ρ MRI using on- or off-resonance RF excitation methods remain challenging. Accordingly, this review describes the theoretical and experimental approaches to the design of hard RF pulse cluster- and adiabatic RF pulse-based excitation schemes for accurate and precise measurements of R1ρ and R2ρ . The merits and drawbacks of different MRI acquisition strategies for quantitative relaxation rate measurement in the rotating frame regime are reviewed. In addition, this review summarizes current clinical applications of rotating frame MRI sequences. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. In-vacuum long-wavelength macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Armin; Duman, Ramona; Henderson, Keith; Mykhaylyk, Vitaliy

    2016-03-01

    Structure solution based on the weak anomalous signal from native (protein and DNA) crystals is increasingly being attempted as part of synchrotron experiments. Maximizing the measurable anomalous signal by collecting diffraction data at longer wavelengths presents a series of technical challenges caused by the increased absorption of X-rays and larger diffraction angles. A new beamline at Diamond Light Source has been built specifically for collecting data at wavelengths beyond the capability of other synchrotron macromolecular crystallography beamlines. Here, the theoretical considerations in support of the long-wavelength beamline are outlined and the in-vacuum design of the endstation is discussed, as well as other hardware features aimed at enhancing the accuracy of the diffraction data. The first commissioning results, representing the first in-vacuum protein structure solution, demonstrate the promising potential of the beamline.

  5. Efficient analysis of macromolecular rotational diffusion from heteronuclear relaxation data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosset, Patrice; Hus, Jean-Christophe; Blackledge, Martin; Marion, Dominique

    2000-01-01

    A novel program has been developed for the interpretation of 15 N relaxation rates in terms of macromolecular anisotropic rotational diffusion. The program is based on a highly efficient simulated annealing/minimization algorithm, designed specifically to search the parametric space described by the isotropic, axially symmetric and fully anisotropic rotational diffusion tensor models. The high efficiency of this algorithm allows extensive noise-based Monte Carlo error analysis. Relevant statistical tests are systematically applied to provide confidence limits for the proposed tensorial models. The program is illustrated here using the example of the cytochrome c' from Rhodobacter capsulatus, a four-helix bundle heme protein, for which data at three different field strengths were independently analysed and compared

  6. Macromolecular Crystallization in Microfluidics for the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, Lisa A.; Spearing, Scott

    2003-01-01

    At NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, the Iterative Biological Crystallization (IBC) project has begun development on scientific hardware for macromolecular crystallization on the International Space Station (ISS). Currently ISS crystallization research is limited to solution recipes that were prepared on the ground prior to launch. The proposed hardware will conduct solution mixing and dispensing on board the ISS, be fully automated, and have imaging functions via remote commanding from the ground. Utilizing microfluidic technology, IBC will allow for on orbit iterations. The microfluidics LabChip(R) devices that have been developed, along with Caliper Technologies, will greatly benefit researchers by allowing for precise fluid handling of nano/pico liter sized volumes. IBC will maximize the amount of science return by utilizing the microfluidic approach and be a valuable tool to structural biologists investigating medically relevant projects.

  7. The monitoring system for macromolecular crystallography beamlines at BSRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xian; Chang Guangcai; Gan Quan; Shi Hong; Liu Peng; Sun Gongxing

    2012-01-01

    The monitoring system for macromolecular crystallography beamlines at BSRF (Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility) based on LabVIEW is introduced. In order to guarantee a safe, stable, and reliable running for the beamline devices, the system monitors the state of vacuum, cooling-water, optical components, beam, Liquid nitrogen in the beamlines in real time, detects faults and gives the alarm timely. System underlying uses the driver developed for the field devices for data acquisition, Data of collection is uploaded to the data-sharing platform makes it accessible via a network share. The upper system divides modules according to the actual function, and establishes the main interface of the monitoring system of beamline. To Facilitate data storage, management and inquiry, the system use LabSQL toolkit to achieve the interconnection with MySQL database which data of collection is sent to. (authors)

  8. 129 Xe NMR Relaxation-Based Macromolecular Sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Muller D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Dao, Phuong [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Jeong, Keunhong [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Slack, Clancy C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Vassiliou, Christophoros C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Finbloom, Joel A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Francis, Matthew B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Wemmer, David E. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Physical Biosciences Division; Pines, Alexander [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2016-07-29

    A 129Xe NMR relaxation-based sensing approach is reported on that exploits changes in the bulk xenon relaxation rate induced by slowed tumbling of a cryptophane-based sensor upon target binding. The amplification afforded by detection of the bulk dissolved xenon allows sensitive detection of targets. The sensor comprises a xenon-binding cryptophane cage, a target interaction element, and a metal chelating agent. Xenon associated with the target-bound cryptophane cage is rapidly relaxed and then detected after exchange with the bulk. Here we show that large macromolecular targets increase the rotational correlation time of xenon, increasing its relaxation rate. Upon binding of a biotin-containing sensor to avidin at 1.5 μM concentration, the free xenon T2 is reduced by a factor of 4.

  9. E-MSD: the European Bioinformatics Institute Macromolecular Structure Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutselakis, H; Dimitropoulos, D; Fillon, J; Golovin, A; Henrick, K; Hussain, A; Ionides, J; John, M; Keller, P A; Krissinel, E; McNeil, P; Naim, A; Newman, R; Oldfield, T; Pineda, J; Rachedi, A; Copeland, J; Sitnov, A; Sobhany, S; Suarez-Uruena, A; Swaminathan, J; Tagari, M; Tate, J; Tromm, S; Velankar, S; Vranken, W

    2003-01-01

    The E-MSD macromolecular structure relational database (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/msd) is designed to be a single access point for protein and nucleic acid structures and related information. The database is derived from Protein Data Bank (PDB) entries. Relational database technologies are used in a comprehensive cleaning procedure to ensure data uniformity across the whole archive. The search database contains an extensive set of derived properties, goodness-of-fit indicators, and links to other EBI databases including InterPro, GO, and SWISS-PROT, together with links to SCOP, CATH, PFAM and PROSITE. A generic search interface is available, coupled with a fast secondary structure domain search tool.

  10. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Evolving Methods for Macromolecular Gystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Read, Randy J

    2007-01-01

    X-ray crystallography is the pre-eminent technique for visualizing the structures of macromolecules at atomic resolution. These structures are central to understanding the detailed mechanisms of biological processes, and to discovering novel therapeutics using a structure-based approach. As yet, structures are known for only a small fraction of the proteins encoded by human and pathogenic genomes. To counter the myriad modern threats of disease, there is an urgent need to determine the structures of the thousands of proteins whose structure and function remain unknown. This volume draws on the expertise of leaders in the field of macromolecular crystallography to illuminate the dramatic developments that are accelerating progress in structural biology. Their contributions span the range of techniques from crystallization through data collection, structure solution and analysis, and show how modern high-throughput methods are contributing to a deeper understanding of medical problems.

  11. MR lymphography with macromolecular Gd-DTPA compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, B.; Wagner, S.; Branding, G.; Taupitz, M.; Wolf, K.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper investigates the suitability of macromolecular Gd-DTPA compounds as signal-enhancing lymphographic agents in MR imaging. Two Gd-DTPA polylysin compounds and Gd-DTPA albumin, with molecular weights of 48,000,170,000, and 87,000 daltons, respectively, were tested in rabbits at gadolinium doses of 5 and 15 μmol per animal. Three animals were examined at each dose with T1-weighted sequences. The iliac lymph nodes were imaged prior to and during unilateral endolymphatic infusion into a femoral lymph vessel as well as over a period of 2 hours thereafter. All contrast media showed a homogeneous and pronounced signal enhancement in the lymph nodes during infusion at both doses

  12. THESEUS: maximum likelihood superpositioning and analysis of macromolecular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobald, Douglas L; Wuttke, Deborah S

    2006-09-01

    THESEUS is a command line program for performing maximum likelihood (ML) superpositions and analysis of macromolecular structures. While conventional superpositioning methods use ordinary least-squares (LS) as the optimization criterion, ML superpositions provide substantially improved accuracy by down-weighting variable structural regions and by correcting for correlations among atoms. ML superpositioning is robust and insensitive to the specific atoms included in the analysis, and thus it does not require subjective pruning of selected variable atomic coordinates. Output includes both likelihood-based and frequentist statistics for accurate evaluation of the adequacy of a superposition and for reliable analysis of structural similarities and differences. THESEUS performs principal components analysis for analyzing the complex correlations found among atoms within a structural ensemble. ANSI C source code and selected binaries for various computing platforms are available under the GNU open source license from http://monkshood.colorado.edu/theseus/ or http://www.theseus3d.org.

  13. Extracting trends from two decades of microgravity macromolecular crystallization history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Russell A; Snell, Edward H; van der Woerd, Mark J

    2005-06-01

    Since the 1980s hundreds of macromolecular crystal growth experiments have been performed in the reduced acceleration environment of an orbiting spacecraft. Significant enhancements in structural knowledge have resulted from X-ray diffraction of the crystals grown. Similarly, many samples have shown no improvement or degradation in comparison to those grown on the ground. A complex series of interrelated factors affect these experiments and by building a comprehensive archive of the results it was aimed to identify factors that result in success and those that result in failure. Specifically, it was found that dedicated microgravity missions increase the chance of success when compared with those where crystallization took place as a parasitic aspect of the mission. It was also found that the chance of success could not be predicted based on any discernible property of the macromolecule available to us.

  14. Macromolecular organization of xyloglucan and cellulose in pea epicotyls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, T.; Maclachlan, G.

    1984-01-01

    Xyloglucan is known to occur widely in the primary cell walls of higher plants. This polysaccharide in most dicots possesses a cellulose-like main chain with three of every four consecutive residues substituted with xylose and minor addition of other sugars. Xyloglucan and cellulose metabolism is regulated by different processes; since different enzyme systems are probably required for the synthesis of their 1,4-β-linkages. A macromolecular complex composed of xyloglucan and cellulose only was obtained from elongating regions of etiolated pea stems. It was examined by light microscopy using iodine staining, by radioautography after labeling with [ 3 H]fructose, by fluorescence microscopy using a fluorescein-lectin (fructose-binding) as probe, and by electron microscopy after shadowing. The techniques all demonstrated that the macromolecule was present in files of cell shapes, referred to here as cell-wall ghosts, in which xyloglucan was localized both on and between the cellulose microfibrils

  15. Probing the hydration water diffusion of macromolecular surfaces and interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortony, Julia H; Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Franck, John M; Pavlova, Anna; Hunt, Jasmine; Han, Songi; Kausik, Ravinath

    2011-01-01

    We probe the translational dynamics of the hydration water surrounding the macromolecular surfaces of selected polyelectrolytes, lipid vesicles and intrinsically disordered proteins with site specificity in aqueous solutions. These measurements are made possible by the recent development of a new instrumental and methodological approach based on Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This technique selectively amplifies 1 H NMR signals of hydration water around a spin label that is attached to a molecular site of interest. The selective 1 H NMR amplification within molecular length scales of a spin label is achieved by utilizing short-distance range (∼r -3 ) magnetic dipolar interactions between the 1 H spin of water and the electron spin of a nitroxide radical-based label. Key features include the fact that only minute quantities (<10 μl) and dilute (≥100 μM) sample concentrations are needed. There is no size limit on the macromolecule or molecular assembly to be analyzed. Hydration water with translational correlation times between 10 and 800 ps is measured within ∼10 A distance of the spin label, encompassing the typical thickness of a hydration layer with three water molecules across. The hydration water moving within this time scale has significant implications, as this is what is modulated whenever macromolecules or molecular assemblies undergo interactions, binding or conformational changes. We demonstrate, with the examples of polymer complexation, protein aggregation and lipid-polymer interaction, that the measurements of interfacial hydration dynamics can sensitively and site specifically probe macromolecular interactions.

  16. Radiation damage to nucleoprotein complexes in macromolecular crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bury, Charles; Garman, Elspeth F.; Ginn, Helen Mary; Ravelli, Raimond B. G.; Carmichael, Ian; Kneale, Geoff; McGeehan, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative X-ray induced radiation damage studies employing a model protein–DNA complex revealed a striking partition of damage sites. The DNA component was observed to be far more resistant to specific damage compared with the protein. Significant progress has been made in macromolecular crystallography over recent years in both the understanding and mitigation of X-ray induced radiation damage when collecting diffraction data from crystalline proteins. In contrast, despite the large field that is productively engaged in the study of radiation chemistry of nucleic acids, particularly of DNA, there are currently very few X-ray crystallographic studies on radiation damage mechanisms in nucleic acids. Quantitative comparison of damage to protein and DNA crystals separately is challenging, but many of the issues are circumvented by studying pre-formed biological nucleoprotein complexes where direct comparison of each component can be made under the same controlled conditions. Here a model protein–DNA complex C.Esp1396I is employed to investigate specific damage mechanisms for protein and DNA in a biologically relevant complex over a large dose range (2.07–44.63 MGy). In order to allow a quantitative analysis of radiation damage sites from a complex series of macromolecular diffraction data, a computational method has been developed that is generally applicable to the field. Typical specific damage was observed for both the protein on particular amino acids and for the DNA on, for example, the cleavage of base-sugar N 1 —C and sugar-phosphate C—O bonds. Strikingly the DNA component was determined to be far more resistant to specific damage than the protein for the investigated dose range. At low doses the protein was observed to be susceptible to radiation damage while the DNA was far more resistant, damage only being observed at significantly higher doses

  17. MRI Primer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldendorf, W.; Oldendorf, W. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Designed for studies, radiologists, and clinicians at all levels of training, this book provides a basic introduction to the principles, physics, and instrumentation of magnetic resonance imaging. The fundamental concepts that are essential for the optimal clinical use of MRI are thoroughly explained in easily accessible terms. To facilitate the reader's comprehension, the material is presented nonmathematically, using no equations and a minimum of symbols and abbreviations. MRI Primer presents a clear account of the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and the use of gradient magnetic fields to create clinically useful images of cross-sectional slices. Close attention is given to the magnetization vector as a means of expressing nuclear behavior, the role of T 1 and T 2 weighing in imaging, the use of contrast agents, and the pulse sequences most often used in clinical practice, as well as to the relative capabilities and limitations of MRI and CT. The basic hardware components of an MRI scanner are described in detail. Sample MRI scans illustrate how MRI characterizes tissue. An appendix provides a brief introduction to quantum processes in MRI

  18. [CRISPR/CAS9, the King of Genome Editing Tools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannikov, A V; Lavrov, A V

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of CRISPR/Cas9 brought a hope for having an efficient, reliable, and readily available tool for genome editing. CRISPR/Cas9 is certainly easy to use, while its efficiency and reliability remain the focus of studies. The review describes the general principles of the organization and function of Cas nucleases and a number of important issues to be considered while planning genome editing experiments with CRISPR/Cas9. The issues include evaluation of the efficiency and specificity for Cas9, sgRNA selection, Cas9 variants designed artificially, and use of homologous recombination and nonhomologous end joining in DNA editing.

  19. Head MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hearing aids Pins, hairpins, metal zippers, and similar metallic items Removable dental work How the Test will ... an MRI can make heart pacemakers and other implants not work as well. It can also cause ...

  20. Pediatric MRI

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIH Study of Normal Brain Development is a longitudinal study using anatomical MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS) to map pediatric...

  1. A review of MRI evaluation of demyelination in cuprizone murine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krutenkova, E., E-mail: len--k@yandex.ru; Pan, E.; Khodanovich, M., E-mail: khodanovich@mail.tsu.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, Lenina pr., 36, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    The cuprizone mouse model of non-autoimmune demyelination reproduces some phenomena of multiple sclerosis and is appropriate for validation and specification of a new method of non-invasive diagnostics. In the review new data which are collected using the new MRI method are compared with one or more conventional MRI tools. Also the paper reviewed the validation of MRI approaches using histological or immunohistochemical methods. Luxol fast blue histological staining and myelin basic protein immunostaining is widespread. To improve the accuracy of non-invasive conventional MRI, multimodal scanning could be applied. The new quantitative MRI method of fast mapping of the macromolecular proton fraction is a reliable biomarker of myelin in the brain and can be used for research of demyelination in animals. To date, a validation of MPF method on the CPZ mouse model of demyelination is not performed, although this method is probably the best way to evaluate demyelination using MRI.

  2. A Broad-Spectrum Inhibitor of CRISPR-Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Lucas B; Doxzen, Kevin W; Ma, Enbo; Liu, Jun-Jie; Knott, Gavin J; Edraki, Alireza; Garcia, Bianca; Amrani, Nadia; Chen, Janice S; Cofsky, Joshua C; Kranzusch, Philip J; Sontheimer, Erik J; Davidson, Alan R; Maxwell, Karen L; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2017-09-07

    CRISPR-Cas9 proteins function within bacterial immune systems to target and destroy invasive DNA and have been harnessed as a robust technology for genome editing. Small bacteriophage-encoded anti-CRISPR proteins (Acrs) can inactivate Cas9, providing an efficient off switch for Cas9-based applications. Here, we show that two Acrs, AcrIIC1 and AcrIIC3, inhibit Cas9 by distinct strategies. AcrIIC1 is a broad-spectrum Cas9 inhibitor that prevents DNA cutting by multiple divergent Cas9 orthologs through direct binding to the conserved HNH catalytic domain of Cas9. A crystal structure of an AcrIIC1-Cas9 HNH domain complex shows how AcrIIC1 traps Cas9 in a DNA-bound but catalytically inactive state. By contrast, AcrIIC3 blocks activity of a single Cas9 ortholog and induces Cas9 dimerization while preventing binding to the target DNA. These two orthogonal mechanisms allow for separate control of Cas9 target binding and cleavage and suggest applications to allow DNA binding while preventing DNA cutting by Cas9. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Evolution and classification of the CRISPR-Cas systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Makarova, Kira; H. Haft, Daniel; Barrangou, Rodolphe; J. J. Brouns, Stan; Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Horvath, Philippe; Moineau, Sylvain; J. M. Mojica, Francisco; I. Wolf, Yuri; Yakunin, Alexander F.; van der Oost, John; V. Koonin, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    The CRISPR–Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats–CRISPR-associated proteins) modules are adaptive immunity systems that are present in many archaea and bacteria. These defence systems are encoded by operons that have an extraordinarily diverse architecture and a high rate of evolution for both the cas genes and the unique spacer content. Here, we provide an updated analysis of the evolutionary relationships between CRISPR–Cas systems and Cas proteins. Three major types of CRISPR–Cas system are delineated, with a further division into several subtypes and a few chimeric variants. Given the complexity of the genomic architectures and the extremely dynamic evolution of the CRISPR–Cas systems, a unified classification of these systems should be based on multiple criteria. Accordingly, we propose a `polythetic' classification that integrates the phylogenies of the most common cas genes, the sequence and organization of the CRISPR repeats and the architecture of the CRISPR–cas loci. PMID:21552286

  4. Fluid Physics and Macromolecular Crystal Growth in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helliwell, John R.; Snell, Edward H.; Chayen, Naomi E.; Judge, Russell A.; Boggon, Titus J.; Pusey, M. L.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The first protein crystallization experiment in microgravity was launched in April, 1981 and used Germany's Technologische Experimente unter Schwerelosigkeit (TEXUS 3) sounding rocket. The protein P-galactosidase (molecular weight 465Kda) was chosen as the sample with a liquid-liquid diffusion growth method. A sliding device brought the protein, buffer and salt solution into contact when microgravity was reached. The sounding rocket gave six minutes of microgravity time with a cine camera and schlieren optics used to monitor the experiment, a single growth cell. In microgravity a strictly laminar diffusion process was observed in contrast to the turbulent convection seen on the ground. Several single crystals, approx 100micron in length, were formed in the flight which were of inferior but of comparable visual quality to those grown on the ground over several days. A second experiment using the same protocol but with solutions cooled to -8C (kept liquid with glycerol antifreeze) again showed laminar diffusion. The science of macromolecular structural crystallography involves crystallization of the macromolecule followed by use of the crystal for X-ray diffraction experiments to determine the three dimensional structure of the macromolecule. Neutron protein crystallography is employed for elucidation of H/D exchange and for improved definition of the bound solvent (D20). The structural information enables an understanding of how the molecule functions with important potential for rational drug design, improved efficiency of industrial enzymes and agricultural chemical development. The removal of turbulent convection and sedimentation in microgravity, and the assumption that higher quality crystals will be produced, has given rise to the growing number of crystallization experiments now flown. Many experiments can be flown in a small volume with simple, largely automated, equipment - an ideal combination for a microgravity experiment. The term "protein crystal growth

  5. Engineered CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases with altered PAM specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinstiver, Benjamin P; Prew, Michelle S; Tsai, Shengdar Q; Topkar, Ved V; Nguyen, Nhu T; Zheng, Zongli; Gonzales, Andrew P W; Li, Zhuyun; Peterson, Randall T; Yeh, Jing-Ruey Joanna; Aryee, Martin J; Joung, J Keith

    2015-07-23

    Although CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases are widely used for genome editing, the range of sequences that Cas9 can recognize is constrained by the need for a specific protospacer adjacent motif (PAM). As a result, it can often be difficult to target double-stranded breaks (DSBs) with the precision that is necessary for various genome-editing applications. The ability to engineer Cas9 derivatives with purposefully altered PAM specificities would address this limitation. Here we show that the commonly used Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9) can be modified to recognize alternative PAM sequences using structural information, bacterial selection-based directed evolution, and combinatorial design. These altered PAM specificity variants enable robust editing of endogenous gene sites in zebrafish and human cells not currently targetable by wild-type SpCas9, and their genome-wide specificities are comparable to wild-type SpCas9 as judged by GUIDE-seq analysis. In addition, we identify and characterize another SpCas9 variant that exhibits improved specificity in human cells, possessing better discrimination against off-target sites with non-canonical NAG and NGA PAMs and/or mismatched spacers. We also find that two smaller-size Cas9 orthologues, Streptococcus thermophilus Cas9 (St1Cas9) and Staphylococcus aureus Cas9 (SaCas9), function efficiently in the bacterial selection systems and in human cells, suggesting that our engineering strategies could be extended to Cas9s from other species. Our findings provide broadly useful SpCas9 variants and, more importantly, establish the feasibility of engineering a wide range of Cas9s with altered and improved PAM specificities.

  6. Functionalization of Planet-Satellite Nanostructures Revealed by Nanoscopic Localization of Distinct Macromolecular Species

    KAUST Repository

    Rossner, Christian; Roddatis, Vladimir; Lopatin, Sergei; Vana, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    The development of a straightforward method is reported to form hybrid polymer/gold planet-satellite nanostructures (PlSNs) with functional polymer. Polyacrylate type polymer with benzyl chloride in its backbone as a macromolecular tracer

  7. Versatile Cas9-driven subpopulation selection toolbox for Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Els, van der Simon; James, Jennelle K.; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Bron, Peter A.

    2018-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 technology has been exploited for the removal or replacement of genetic elements in a wide range of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Here, we describe the extension of the Cas9 application toolbox to the industrially important dairy species Lactococcus lactis. The Cas9 expression vector

  8. Rational Design of Mini-Cas9 for Transcriptional Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dacheng; Peng, Shuguang; Huang, Weiren; Cai, Zhiming; Xie, Zhen

    2018-04-20

    Nuclease dead Cas9 (dCas9) has been widely used for modulating gene expression by fusing with different activation or repression domains. However, delivery of the CRISPR/Cas system fused with various effector domains in a single adeno-associated virus (AAV) remains challenging due to the payload limit. Here, we engineered a set of downsized variants of Cas9 including Staphylococcus aureus Cas9 (SaCas9) that retained DNA binding activity by deleting conserved functional domains. We demonstrated that fusing FokI nuclease domain to the N-terminal of the minimal SaCas9 (mini-SaCas9) or to the middle of the split mini-SaCas9 can trigger efficient DNA cleavage. In addition, we constructed a set of compact transactivation domains based on the tripartite VPR activation domain and self-assembled arrays of split SpyTag:SpyCatch peptides, which are suitable for fusing to the mini-SaCas9. Lastly, we produced a single AAV containing the mini-SaCas9 fused with a downsized transactivation domain along with an optimized gRNA expression cassette, which showed efficient transactivation activity. Our results highlighted a practical approach to generate down-sized CRISPR/Cas9 and gene activation systems for in vivo applications.

  9. Nitrogen isotopic composition of macromolecular organic matter in interplanetary dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aléon, Jérôme; Robert, François; Chaussidon, Marc; Marty, Bernard

    2003-10-01

    Nitrogen concentrations and isotopic compositions were measured by ion microprobe scanning imaging in two interplanetary dust particles L2021 K1 and L2036 E22, in which imaging of D/H and C/H ratios has previously evidenced the presence of D-rich macromolecular organic components. High nitrogen concentrations of 10-20 wt% and δ 15N values up to +400‰ are observed in these D-rich macromolecular components. The previous study of D/H and C/H ratios has revealed three different D-rich macromolecular phases. The one previously ascribed to macromolecular organic matter akin the insoluble organic matter (IOM) from carbonaceous chondrites is enriched in nitrogen by one order of magnitude compared to the carbonaceous chondrite IOM, although its isotopic composition is still similar to what is known from Renazzo (δ 15N = +208‰). The correlation observed in macromolecular organic material between the D- and 15N-excesses suggests that the latter originate probably from chemical reactions typical of the cold interstellar medium. These interstellar materials preserved to some extent in IDPs are therefore macromolecular organic components with various aliphaticity and aromaticity. They are heavily N-heterosubstituted as shown by their high nitrogen concentrations >10 wt%. They have high D/H ratios >10 -3 and δ 15N values ≥ +400‰. In L2021 K1 a mixture is observed at the micron scale between interstellar and chondritic-like organic phases. This indicates that some IDPs contain organic materials processed at various heliocentric distances in a turbulent nebula. Comparison with observation in comets suggests that these molecules may be cometary macromolecules. A correlation is observed between the D/H ratios and δ 15N values of macromolecular organic matter from IDPs, meteorites, the Earth and of major nebular reservoirs. This suggests that most macromolecular organic matter in the inner solar system was probably issued from interstellar precursors and further processed

  10. Timely deposition of macromolecular structures is necessary for peer review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joosten, Robbie P.; Soueidan, Hayssam; Wessels, Lodewyk F. A.; Perrakis, Anastassis

    2013-01-01

    Deposition of crystallographic structures should be concurrent with or prior to manuscript submission for peer review, enabling validation and increasing reliability of the PDB. Most of the macromolecular structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), which are used daily by thousands of educators and scientists alike, are determined by X-ray crystallography. It was examined whether the crystallographic models and data were deposited to the PDB at the same time as the publications that describe them were submitted for peer review. This condition is necessary to ensure pre-publication validation and the quality of the PDB public archive. It was found that a significant proportion of PDB entries were submitted to the PDB after peer review of the corresponding publication started, and many were only submitted after peer review had ended. It is argued that clear description of journal policies and effective policing is important for pre-publication validation, which is key in ensuring the quality of the PDB and of peer-reviewed literature

  11. Timely deposition of macromolecular structures is necessary for peer review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joosten, Robbie P. [Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Soueidan, Hayssam; Wessels, Lodewyk F. A. [Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Perrakis, Anastassis, E-mail: a.perrakis@nki.nl [Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-12-01

    Deposition of crystallographic structures should be concurrent with or prior to manuscript submission for peer review, enabling validation and increasing reliability of the PDB. Most of the macromolecular structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), which are used daily by thousands of educators and scientists alike, are determined by X-ray crystallography. It was examined whether the crystallographic models and data were deposited to the PDB at the same time as the publications that describe them were submitted for peer review. This condition is necessary to ensure pre-publication validation and the quality of the PDB public archive. It was found that a significant proportion of PDB entries were submitted to the PDB after peer review of the corresponding publication started, and many were only submitted after peer review had ended. It is argued that clear description of journal policies and effective policing is important for pre-publication validation, which is key in ensuring the quality of the PDB and of peer-reviewed literature.

  12. JBluIce-EPICS control system for macromolecular crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, S.; Makarov, O.; Hilgart, M.; Pothineni, S.; Urakhchin, A.; Devarapalli, S.; Yoder, D.; Becker, M.; Ogata, C.; Sanishvili, R.; Nagarajan, V.; Smith, J.L.; Fischetti, R.F.

    2011-01-01

    The trio of macromolecular crystallography beamlines constructed by the General Medicine and Cancer Institutes Collaborative Access Team (GM/CA-CAT) in Sector 23 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) have been in growing demand owing to their outstanding beam quality and capacity to measure data from crystals of only a few micrometres in size. To take full advantage of the state-of-the-art mechanical and optical design of these beamlines, a significant effort has been devoted to designing fast, convenient, intuitive and robust beamline controls that could easily accommodate new beamline developments. The GM/CA-CAT beamline controls are based on the power of EPICS for distributed hardware control, the rich Java graphical user interface of Eclipse RCP and the task-oriented philosophy as well as the look and feel of the successful SSRL BluIce graphical user interface for crystallography. These beamline controls feature a minimum number of software layers, the wide use of plug-ins that can be written in any language and unified motion controls that allow on-the-fly scanning and optimization of any beamline component. This paper describes the ways in which BluIce was combined with EPICS and converted into the Java-based JBluIce, discusses the solutions aimed at streamlining and speeding up operations and gives an overview of the tools that are provided by this new open-source control system for facilitating crystallographic experiments, especially in the field of microcrystallography.

  13. Structural changes in the ordering processes of macromolecular compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Tashiro, K.

    1998-01-01

    In order to clarify the microscopically-viewed relationship between the conformational ordering process and the aggregation process of the macromolecular chains in the phase transitions from melt to solid or from solution to gel, the time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared spectra and small-angle X-ray or neutron scattering data have been analyzed in an organized manner. Two concrete examples were presented. (1) In the gelation phenomenon of syndiotactic polystyrene-organic solvent system, the ordered TTGG conformation is formed and develops with time. This conformational ordering is accelerated by the aggregation of these chain segments, resulting in the formation of macroscopic gel network. (2) In the isothermal crystallization process from the melt of polyethylene, the following ordering mechanism was revealed. The conformationally-disordered short trans conformers appear at first in the random coils of the melt. These disordered trans sequences grow to longer and more regular trans sequences of the orthorhombic-type crystal and then the isolated lamellae are formed. Afterwards, the stacked lamellar structure is developed without change of lamellar thickness but with small decrease in the long period, indicating an insertion of new lamellae between the already produced lamellar layers

  14. On macromolecular refinement at subatomic resolution with interatomic scatterers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afonine, Pavel V., E-mail: pafonine@lbl.gov; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Adams, Paul D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, BLDG 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lunin, Vladimir Y. [Institute of Mathematical Problems of Biology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino 142290 (Russian Federation); Urzhumtsev, Alexandre [IGMBC, 1 Rue L. Fries, 67404 Illkirch and IBMC, 15 Rue R. Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg (France); Faculty of Sciences, Nancy University, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, BLDG 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2007-11-01

    Modelling deformation electron density using interatomic scatters is simpler than multipolar methods, produces comparable results at subatomic resolution and can easily be applied to macromolecules. A study of the accurate electron-density distribution in molecular crystals at subatomic resolution (better than ∼1.0 Å) requires more detailed models than those based on independent spherical atoms. A tool that is conventionally used in small-molecule crystallography is the multipolar model. Even at upper resolution limits of 0.8–1.0 Å, the number of experimental data is insufficient for full multipolar model refinement. As an alternative, a simpler model composed of conventional independent spherical atoms augmented by additional scatterers to model bonding effects has been proposed. Refinement of these mixed models for several benchmark data sets gave results that were comparable in quality with the results of multipolar refinement and superior to those for conventional models. Applications to several data sets of both small molecules and macromolecules are shown. These refinements were performed using the general-purpose macromolecular refinement module phenix.refine of the PHENIX package.

  15. Polycapillary x-ray optics for macromolecular crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owens, S.M.; Gibson, W.M.; Carter, D.C.; Sisk, R.C.; Ho, J.X.

    1996-01-01

    Polycapillary x-ray optics have found potential application in many different fields, including antiscatter and magnification in mammography, radiography, x-ray fluorescence, x-ray lithography, and x-ray diffraction techniques. In x-ray diffraction, an optic is used to collect divergent x-rays from a point source and redirect them into a quasi-parallel, or slightly focused beam. Monolithic polycapillary optics have been developed recently for macromolecular crystallography and have already shown considerable gains in diffracted beam intensity over pinhole collimation. Development is being pursued through a series of simulations and prototype optics. Many improvements have been made over the stage 1 prototype reported previously, which include better control over the manufacturing process, reducing the diameter of the output beam, and addition of a slight focusing at the output of the optic to further increase x-ray flux at the sample. The authors report the characteristics and performance of the stage 1 and stage 2 optics

  16. A beamline for macromolecular crystallography at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padmore, H.A.; Earnest, T.; Kim, S.H.; Thompson, A.C.; Robinson, A.L.

    1994-08-01

    A beamline for macromolecular crystallography has been designed for the ALS. The source will be a 37-pole wiggler with a, 2-T on-axis peak field. The wiggler will illuminate three beamlines, each accepting 3 mrad of horizontal aperture. The central beamline will primarily be used for multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion measurements in the wavelength range from 4 to 0.9 angstrom. The beamline optics will comprise a double-crystal monochromator with a collimating pre-mirror and a double-focusing mirror after the monochromator. The two side stations will be used for fixed-wavelength experiments within the wavelength range from 1.5 to 0.95 angstrom. The optics will consist of a conventional vertically focusing cylindrical mirror followed by an asymmetrically cut curved-crystal monochromator. This paper presents details of the optimization of the wiggler source for crystallography, gives a description of the beamline configuration, and discusses the reasons for the choices made

  17. Macromolecular crystallization in microgravity generated by a superconducting magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakayama, N I; Yin, D C; Harata, K; Kiyoshi, T; Fujiwara, M; Tanimoto, Y

    2006-09-01

    About 30% of the protein crystals grown in space yield better X-ray diffraction data than the best crystals grown on the earth. The microgravity environments provided by the application of an upward magnetic force constitute excellent candidates for simulating the microgravity conditions in space. Here, we describe a method to control effective gravity and formation of protein crystals in various levels of effective gravity. Since 2002, the stable and long-time durable microgravity generated by a convenient type of superconducting magnet has been available for protein crystal growth. For the first time, protein crystals, orthorhombic lysozyme, were grown at microgravity on the earth, and it was proved that this microgravity improved the crystal quality effectively and reproducibly. The present method always accompanies a strong magnetic field, and the magnetic field itself seems to improve crystal quality. Microgravity is not always effective for improving crystal quality. When we applied this microgravity to the formation of cubic porcine insulin and tetragonal lysozyme crystals, we observed no dependence of effective gravity on crystal quality. Thus, this kind of test will be useful for selecting promising proteins prior to the space experiments. Finally, the microgravity generated by the magnet is compared with that in space, considering the cost, the quality of microgravity, experimental convenience, etc., and the future use of this microgravity for macromolecular crystal growth is discussed.

  18. Macromolecular crystallography with a large format CMOS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nix, Jay C., E-mail: jcnix@lbl.gov [Molecular Biology Consortium 12003 S. Pulaski Rd. #166 Alsip, IL 60803 U.S.A (United States)

    2016-07-27

    Recent advances in CMOS technology have allowed the production of large surface area detectors suitable for macromolecular crystallography experiments [1]. The Molecular Biology Consortium (MBC) Beamline 4.2.2 at the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley, CA, has installed a 2952 x 2820 mm RDI CMOS-8M detector with funds from NIH grant S10OD012073. The detector has a 20nsec dead pixel time and performs well with shutterless data collection strategies. The sensor obtains sharp point response and minimal optical distortion by use of a thin fiber-optic plate between the phosphor and sensor module. Shutterless data collections produce high-quality redundant datasets that can be obtained in minutes. The fine-sliced data are suitable for processing in standard crystallographic software packages (XDS, HKL2000, D*TREK, MOSFLM). Faster collection times relative to the previous CCD detector have resulted in a record number of datasets collected in a calendar year and de novo phasing experiments have resulted in publications in both Science and Nature [2,3]. The faster collections are due to a combination of the decreased overhead requirements of shutterless collections combined with exposure times that have decreased by over a factor of 2 for images with comparable signal to noise of the NOIR-1 detector. The overall increased productivity has allowed the development of new beamline capabilities and data collection strategies.

  19. Macromolecular refinement by model morphing using non-atomic parameterizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowtan, Kevin; Agirre, Jon

    2018-02-01

    Refinement is a critical step in the determination of a model which explains the crystallographic observations and thus best accounts for the missing phase components. The scattering density is usually described in terms of atomic parameters; however, in macromolecular crystallography the resolution of the data is generally insufficient to determine the values of these parameters for individual atoms. Stereochemical and geometric restraints are used to provide additional information, but produce interrelationships between parameters which slow convergence, resulting in longer refinement times. An alternative approach is proposed in which parameters are not attached to atoms, but to regions of the electron-density map. These parameters can move the density or change the local temperature factor to better explain the structure factors. Varying the size of the region which determines the parameters at a particular position in the map allows the method to be applied at different resolutions without the use of restraints. Potential applications include initial refinement of molecular-replacement models with domain motions, and potentially the use of electron density from other sources such as electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) as the refinement model.

  20. Gd-DTPA L-cystine bisamide copolymers as novel biodegradable macromolecular contrast agents for MR blood pool imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneshiro, Todd L; Ke, Tianyi; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Parker, Dennis L; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to synthesize biodegradable Gd-DTPA L-cystine bisamide copolymers (GCAC) as safe and effective, macromolecular contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to evaluate their biodegradability and efficacy in MR blood pool imaging in an animal model. Three new biodegradable GCAC with different substituents at the cystine bisamide [R = H (GCAC), CH2CH2CH3 (Gd-DTPA L-cystine bispropyl amide copolymers, GCPC), and CH(CH3)2 (Gd-DTPA cystine bisisopropyl copolymers, GCIC)] were prepared by the condensation copolymerization of diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) dianhydride with cystine bisamide or bisalkyl amides, followed by complexation with gadolinium triacetate. The degradability of the agents was studied in vitro by incubation in 15 microM cysteine and in vivo with Sprague-Dawley rats. The kinetics of in vivo contrast enhancement was investigated in Sprague-Dawley rats on a Siemens Trio 3 T scanner. The apparent molecular weight of the polydisulfide Gd(III) chelates ranged from 22 to 25 kDa. The longitudinal (T1) relaxivities of GCAC, GCPC, and GCIC were 4.37, 5.28, and 5.56 mM(-1) s(-1) at 3 T, respectively. The polymeric ligands and polymeric Gd(III) chelates readily degraded into smaller molecules in incubation with 15 microM cysteine via disulfide-thiol exchange reactions. The in vitro degradation rates of both the polymeric ligands and macromolecular Gd(III) chelates decreased as the steric effect around the disulfide bonds increased. The agents readily degraded in vivo, and the catabolic degradation products were detected in rat urine samples collected after intravenous injection. The agents showed strong contrast enhancement in the blood pool, major organs, and tissues at a dose of 0.1 mmol Gd/kg. The difference of their in vitro degradability did not significantly alter the kinetics of in vivo contrast enhancement of the agents. These novel GCAC are promising contrast agents for cardiovascular and tumor MRI

  1. Portable MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espy, Michelle A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  2. Portable MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espy, Michelle A.

    2012-01-01

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  3. Hypoxic tumor environments exhibit disrupted collagen I fibers and low macromolecular transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samata M Kakkad

    Full Text Available Hypoxic tumor microenvironments result in an aggressive phenotype and resistance to therapy that lead to tumor progression, recurrence, and metastasis. While poor vascularization and the resultant inadequate drug delivery are known to contribute to drug resistance, the effect of hypoxia on molecular transport through the interstitium, and the role of the extracellular matrix (ECM in mediating this transport are unexplored. The dense mesh of fibers present in the ECM can especially influence the movement of macromolecules. Collagen 1 (Col1 fibers form a key component of the ECM in breast cancers. Here we characterized the influence of hypoxia on macromolecular transport in tumors, and the role of Col1 fibers in mediating this transport using an MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenograft model engineered to express red fluorescent protein under hypoxia. Magnetic resonance imaging of macromolecular transport was combined with second harmonic generation microscopy of Col1 fibers. Hypoxic tumor regions displayed significantly decreased Col1 fiber density and volume, as well as significantly lower macromolecular draining and pooling rates, than normoxic regions. Regions adjacent to severely hypoxic areas revealed higher deposition of Col1 fibers and increased macromolecular transport. These data suggest that Col1 fibers may facilitate macromolecular transport in tumors, and their reduction in hypoxic regions may reduce this transport. Decreased macromolecular transport in hypoxic regions may also contribute to poor drug delivery and tumor recurrence in hypoxic regions. High Col1 fiber density observed around hypoxic regions may facilitate the escape of aggressive cancer cells from hypoxic regions.

  4. Boosting plant immunity with CRISPR/Cas

    OpenAIRE

    Chaparro-Garcia, Angela; Kamoun, Sophien; Nekrasov, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas has recently been transferred to plants to make them resistant to geminiviruses, a damaging family of DNA viruses. We discuss the potential and the limitations of this method. See related Research: http://www.genomebiology.com/2015/16/1/238

  5. CRISPR-Cas : Adapting to change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jackson, Simon A.; McKenzie, R.E.; Fagerlund, Robert D.; Kieper, S.N.; Fineran, Peter C.; Brouns, S.J.J.

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria and archaea are engaged in a constant arms race to defend against the ever-present threats of viruses and invasion by mobile genetic elements. The most flexible weapons in the prokaryotic defense arsenal are the CRISPR-Cas adaptive immune systems. These systems are capable of selective

  6. CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Blenke, Erik; Evers, Martijn J.W.; Mastrobattista, Enrico; Oost, van der John

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing system has taken the biomedical science field by storm, initiating rumors about future Nobel Prizes and heating up a fierce patent war, but also making significant scientific impact. The Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR), together with

  7. Fetal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayer, D.; Brugger, P.C.

    2004-01-01

    New, ultrafast sequences have made it possible to obtain MR images of the fetus without maternal sedation or immobilization of the fetus itself. While fetal MRI began as an adjunct to ultrasound, it has now been shown that MRI can provide additional information that may change prognosis, the management of pregnancy, or the treatment of the newborn child. It is of particular value in the assessment of malformations of the central nervous system. The steady development and adaptation of MR-sequences to the needs of fetal imaging has led to new indications that can support prognostic and therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  8. Interventional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, Junta; Dohi, Michiko; Yoshihiro, Akiko; Mogami, Takuji; Kuwada, Tomoko; Nakata, Norio [Jikei Univ., Chiba (Japan). Kashiwa Hospital

    2000-06-01

    Open type MR system and fast sequence is now available and MRI becomes a new modality for interventional Radiology, including biopsy, drainage operation, and monitoring for minimally invasive therapy. Experimental studies of temperature monitoring were performed under hot and cold status. Signal changes of porcine disc and meat under microwave and laser ablation were observed as low signal area by signal intensity method. Using proton chemical shift method, signal change by laser ablation was displaced color imaging and correlated with thermometric temperature measurement. The very T2 relaxation time of ice affords excellent contrast between ice and surrounding gelatin tissue allowing acute depiction of the extent of the iceball under MRI. (author)

  9. Fetal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prayer, D.; Brugger, P.C. [University Hospital of Vienna (Austria). Division of Neuroradiology

    2004-07-01

    New, ultrafast sequences have made it possible to obtain MR images of the fetus without maternal sedation or immobilization of the fetus itself. While fetal MRI began as an adjunct to ultrasound, it has now been shown that MRI can provide additional information that may change prognosis, the management of pregnancy, or the treatment of the newborn child. It is of particular value in the assessment of malformations of the central nervous system. The steady development and adaptation of MR-sequences to the needs of fetal imaging has led to new indications that can support prognostic and therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  10. Cas9-triggered chain ablation of cas9 as a gene drive brake

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Bing; Luo, Liqun; Gao, Xiaojing J.

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)–CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) technology, researchers can construct gene drives that can bias the inheritance of edited alleles to alter entire populations. As demonstrated with the mutagenic chain reaction in Drosophila4, the CRISPR-Cas9 system can propagate genomic modification together with the genome-editing machinery itself. Although gene drives might have the potential to control insect-borne di...

  11. Cas9 versus Cas12a/Cpf1: Structure-function comparisons and implications for genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarts, Daan C; Jinek, Martin

    2018-05-22

    Cas9 and Cas12a are multidomain CRISPR-associated nucleases that can be programmed with a guide RNA to bind and cleave complementary DNA targets. The guide RNA sequence can be varied, making these effector enzymes versatile tools for genome editing and gene regulation applications. While Cas9 is currently the best-characterized and most widely used nuclease for such purposes, Cas12a (previously named Cpf1) has recently emerged as an alternative for Cas9. Cas9 and Cas12a have distinct evolutionary origins and exhibit different structural architectures, resulting in distinct molecular mechanisms. Here we compare the structural and mechanistic features that distinguish Cas9 and Cas12a, and describe how these features modulate their activity. We discuss implications for genome editing, and how they may influence the choice of Cas9 or Cas12a for specific applications. Finally, we review recent studies in which Cas12a has been utilized as a genome editing tool. This article is categorized under: RNA Interactions with Proteins and Other Molecules > Protein-RNA Interactions: Functional Implications Regulatory RNAs/RNAi/Riboswitches > Biogenesis of Effector Small RNAs RNA Interactions with Proteins and Other Molecules > RNA-Protein Complexes. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Naturally Occurring Off-Switches for CRISPR-Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawluk, April; Amrani, Nadia; Zhang, Yan; Garcia, Bianca; Hidalgo-Reyes, Yurima; Lee, Jooyoung; Edraki, Alireza; Shah, Megha; Sontheimer, Erik J; Maxwell, Karen L; Davidson, Alan R

    2016-12-15

    CRISPR-Cas9 technology would be enhanced by the ability to inhibit Cas9 function spatially, temporally, or conditionally. Previously, we discovered small proteins encoded by bacteriophages that inhibit the CRISPR-Cas systems of their host bacteria. These "anti-CRISPRs" were specific to type I CRISPR-Cas systems that do not employ the Cas9 protein. We posited that nature would also yield Cas9 inhibitors in response to the evolutionary arms race between bacteriophages and their hosts. Here, we report the discovery of three distinct families of anti-CRISPRs that specifically inhibit the CRISPR-Cas9 system of Neisseria meningitidis. We show that these proteins bind directly to N. meningitidis Cas9 (NmeCas9) and can be used as potent inhibitors of genome editing by this system in human cells. These anti-CRISPR proteins now enable "off-switches" for CRISPR-Cas9 activity and provide a genetically encodable means to inhibit CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing in eukaryotes. VIDEO ABSTRACT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Macromolecular query language (MMQL): prototype data model and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindyalov, I N; Chang, W; Pu, C; Bourne, P E

    1994-11-01

    Macromolecular query language (MMQL) is an extensible interpretive language in which to pose questions concerning the experimental or derived features of the 3-D structure of biological macromolecules. MMQL portends to be intuitive with a simple syntax, so that from a user's perspective complex queries are easily written. A number of basic queries and a more complex query--determination of structures containing a five-strand Greek key motif--are presented to illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of the language. The predominant features of MMQL are a filter and pattern grammar which are combined to express a wide range of interesting biological queries. Filters permit the selection of object attributes, for example, compound name and resolution, whereas the patterns currently implemented query primary sequence, close contacts, hydrogen bonding, secondary structure, conformation and amino acid properties (volume, polarity, isoelectric point, hydrophobicity and different forms of exposure). MMQL queries are processed by MMQLlib; a C++ class library, to which new query methods and pattern types are easily added. The prototype implementation described uses PDBlib, another C(++)-based class library from representing the features of biological macromolecules at the level of detail parsable from a PDB file. Since PDBlib can represent data stored in relational and object-oriented databases, as well as PDB files, once these data are loaded they too can be queried by MMQL. Performance metrics are given for queries of PDB files for which all derived data are calculated at run time and compared to a preliminary version of OOPDB, a prototype object-oriented database with a schema based on a persistent version of PDBlib which offers more efficient data access and the potential to maintain derived information. MMQLlib, PDBlib and associated software are available via anonymous ftp from cuhhca.hhmi.columbia.edu.

  14. Macromolecular weight specificity in covalent binding of bromobenzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, J.D.; Dent, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    Bromobenzene is a hepatotoxicant that causes centrilobular necrosis. Pretreatment of animals with 3-methylcholanthrene decreases and phenobarbital pretreatment enhances the hepatotoxic action of this compound. We have investigated the macromolecular weight specificity of the covalent interactions of bromobenzene with liver macromolecules following incubation of [ 14 C]bromobenzene in isolated hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were prepared from Fischer-344 rats treated for 3 days with 3-methylcholanthrene, phenobarbital, or normal saline. After a 1-hr incubation, total covalent binding, as measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate-equilibrium dialysis, was twofold less in hepatocytes from 3-methylcholanthrene-treated rats and sixfold greater in hepatocytes from phenobarbital-treated rats, as compared to hepatocytes from control animals. Analysis of the arylated macromolecules by electrophoresis on 15% sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide disc gels indicated that in the first 1 to 3 min of incubation substantial amounts of covalently bound radiolabel were associated with macromolecules of between 20,000 and 40,000. The amount of radioactivity associated with these macromolecules rapidly diminished in hepatocytes from control and 3-methylcholanthrene-treated animals. In hepatocytes from phenobarbital-treated animals, the amount of radioactivity associated with macromolecules, 20,000, increased throughout the incubation. The amount of radiolabel associated with macromolecules, 20,000, increased in all incubations. When nontoxic doses of phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, a specific inhibitor of serine proteases, were added to control hepatocytes incubated with [ 14 C]-bromobenzene, the decrease in radioactivity associated with larger (greater than 20,000) macromolecules was inhibited and a corresponding lack of increase in radioactivity associated with smaller macromolecules was observed

  15. Unification of Cas protein families and a simple scenario for the origin and evolution of CRISPR-Cas systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Yuri I

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The CRISPR-Cas adaptive immunity systems that are present in most Archaea and many Bacteria function by incorporating fragments of alien genomes into specific genomic loci, transcribing the inserts and using the transcripts as guide RNAs to destroy the genome of the cognate virus or plasmid. This RNA interference-like immune response is mediated by numerous, diverse and rapidly evolving Cas (CRISPR-associated proteins, several of which form the Cascade complex involved in the processing of CRISPR transcripts and cleavage of the target DNA. Comparative analysis of the Cas protein sequences and structures led to the classification of the CRISPR-Cas systems into three Types (I, II and III. Results A detailed comparison of the available sequences and structures of Cas proteins revealed several unnoticed homologous relationships. The Repeat-Associated Mysterious Proteins (RAMPs containing a distinct form of the RNA Recognition Motif (RRM domain, which are major components of the CRISPR-Cas systems, were classified into three large groups, Cas5, Cas6 and Cas7. Each of these groups includes many previously uncharacterized proteins now shown to adopt the RAMP structure. Evidence is presented that large subunits contained in most of the CRISPR-Cas systems could be homologous to Cas10 proteins which contain a polymerase-like Palm domain and are predicted to be enzymatically active in Type III CRISPR-Cas systems but inactivated in Type I systems. These findings, the fact that the CRISPR polymerases, RAMPs and Cas2 all contain core RRM domains, and distinct gene arrangements in the three types of CRISPR-Cas systems together provide for a simple scenario for origin and evolution of the CRISPR-Cas machinery. Under this scenario, the CRISPR-Cas system originated in thermophilic Archaea and subsequently spread horizontally among prokaryotes. Conclusions Because of the extreme diversity of CRISPR-Cas systems, in-depth sequence and structure

  16. Ex vivo assessment of polyol coated-iron oxide nanoparticles for MRI diagnosis applications: toxicological and MRI contrast enhancement effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomati-Miguel, Oscar; Miguel-Sancho, Nuria; Abasolo, Ibane; Candiota, Ana Paula; Roca, Alejandro G.; Acosta, Milena; Schwartz, Simó; Arus, Carles; Marquina, Clara; Martinez, Gema; Santamaria, Jesus

    2014-03-01

    Polyol synthesis is a promising method to obtain directly pharmaceutical grade colloidal dispersion of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). Here, we study the biocompatibility and performance as T2-MRI contrast agents (CAs) of high quality magnetic colloidal dispersions (average hydrodynamic aggregate diameter of 16-27 nm) consisting of polyol-synthesized SPIONs (5 nm in mean particle size) coated with triethylene glycol (TEG) chains (TEG-SPIONs), which were subsequently functionalized to carboxyl-terminated meso-2-3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) coated-iron oxide nanoparticles (DMSA-SPIONs). Standard MTT assays on HeLa, U87MG, and HepG2 cells revealed that colloidal dispersions of TEG-coated iron oxide nanoparticles did not induce any loss of cell viability after 3 days incubation with dose concentrations below 50 μg Fe/ml. However, after these nanoparticles were functionalized with DMSA molecules, an increase on their cytotoxicity was observed, so that particles bearing free terminal carboxyl groups on their surface were not cytotoxic only at low concentrations (MRI studies in mice indicated that both types of coated-iron oxide nanoparticles produced higher negative T2-MRI contrast enhancement than that measured for a similar commercial T2-MRI CAs consisting in dextran-coated ultra-small iron oxide nanoparticles (Ferumoxtran-10). In conclusion, the above attributes make both types of as synthesized coated-iron oxide nanoparticles, but especially DMSA-SPIONs, promising candidates as T2-MRI CAs for nanoparticle-enhanced MRI diagnosis applications.

  17. A simple quantitative model of macromolecular crowding effects on protein folding: Application to the murine prion protein(121-231)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergasa-Caceres, Fernando; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2013-06-01

    A model of protein folding kinetics is applied to study the effects of macromolecular crowding on protein folding rate and stability. Macromolecular crowding is found to promote a decrease of the entropic cost of folding of proteins that produces an increase of both the stability and the folding rate. The acceleration of the folding rate due to macromolecular crowding is shown to be a topology-dependent effect. The model is applied to the folding dynamics of the murine prion protein (121-231). The differential effect of macromolecular crowding as a function of protein topology suffices to make non-native configurations relatively more accessible.

  18. MRI angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poncelet, B.; Baleriiaux, D.; struyven, J.; Segebarth, C.

    1989-01-01

    In MRI angiography two basis images are measured which only differ by the signal intensity of the flowing blood in the vessels. Subtraction of these two images produces a high contrast-to-noise representation of the vessels. Contrast between stationary tissues and flowing blood is changed, for one image compared to the second one, using a selective modification of the phase of the signal from the flowing blood, and/or using a selective modification of its longitudinal magnetization: The macroscopic spin motions along the selection and the measurement gradient directions affect the phase of the nuclear signal; assuming constant velocity, the phase is proportional to the velocity and to the first moment of the gradient waveforms applied. This work concentrates on the generarion of MRI angiograms, following a phase-based approach, of the carotid bifurcation and of different intracranical regions including the carotid syphon and the circle of Willis. (author). 21 refs.; 3 figs

  19. CAS Introduction to Accelerator Physics in Bulgaria

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    The CERN Accelerator School (CAS) and the Institute for Nuclear Research & Nuclear Energy (INRNE – Bulgarian Academy of Sciences) jointly organised a course on Introduction to Accelerators, at the Grand Hotel Varna, Bulgaria, from 19 September to 1 October, 2010.   CERN Accelerator School group photo. The course was extremely well attended with 109 participants representing 34 different nationalities, coming from countries as far away as Australia, Canada and Vietnam. The intensive programme comprised 39 lectures, 3 seminars, 4 tutorials where the students were split into three groups, a poster session where students could present their own work, and 7 hours of guided and private study. Feedback from the participants was extremely positive, praising the expertise and enthusiasm of the lecturers, as well as the high standard and excellent quality of their lectures. For the first time at CAS, the CERN Director-General, Rolf Heuer, visited the school and presented a seminar entitled...

  20. CAS - Great success for the DSP course

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The CERN Accelerator School (CAS) and the Uppsala University jointly organized a specialized school on "Digital Signal Processing" in Sigtuna, Sweden from 1-9 June, 2007. This course was a "première" in many ways: firstly the topic had never been addressed by CAS, and secondly the structure of the course differed from the usual specialized courses in the sense that it was composed of 32 hours of theoretical lectures in the mornings and 16 hours "hands-on" courses in the afternoons. The latter, which have been designed by CERN experts, had some logistic implications in transporting computers and circuit boards (DSP and FPGA) to Sweden. The principle of this new approach was extremely well received by the accelerator community and 97 participants representing 23 different nationalities (80% of the participants originating from the CERN Member States) attended the course. As illustrated by the very positive feedback received from th...

  1. MRI zoo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Christoffer

    The basic idea was to use MRI to produce a sequence of 3D gray scale image slices of various animals, subsequentlyimaged with a clinical CT system. For this purpose, these animals were used: toad, lungfish, python snake and a horseshoe crab. Each animal was sacrificed according to standard...... visually inspected, both in 2D and 3D, and compared with photographs and anatomy atlases found at library and on the internet....

  2. Annotation and Classification of CRISPR-Cas Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, Kira S; Koonin, Eugene V

    2015-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas (CRISPR-associated proteins) is a prokaryotic adaptive immune system that is represented in most archaea and many bacteria. Among the currently known prokaryotic defense systems, the CRISPR-Cas genomic loci show unprecedented complexity and diversity. Classification of CRISPR-Cas variants that would capture their evolutionary relationships to the maximum possible extent is essential for comparative genomic and functional characterization of this theoretically and practically important system of adaptive immunity. To this end, a multipronged approach has been developed that combines phylogenetic analysis of the conserved Cas proteins with comparison of gene repertoires and arrangements in CRISPR-Cas loci. This approach led to the current classification of CRISPR-Cas systems into three distinct types and ten subtypes for each of which signature genes have been identified. Comparative genomic analysis of the CRISPR-Cas systems in new archaeal and bacterial genomes performed over the 3 years elapsed since the development of this classification makes it clear that new types and subtypes of CRISPR-Cas need to be introduced. Moreover, this classification system captures only part of the complexity of CRISPR-Cas organization and evolution, due to the intrinsic modularity and evolutionary mobility of these immunity systems, resulting in numerous recombinant variants. Moreover, most of the cas genes evolve rapidly, complicating the family assignment for many Cas proteins and the use of family profiles for the recognition of CRISPR-Cas subtype signatures. Further progress in the comparative analysis of CRISPR-Cas systems requires integration of the most sensitive sequence comparison tools, protein structure comparison, and refined approaches for comparison of gene neighborhoods.

  3. Annotation and Classification of CRISPR-Cas Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, Kira S.; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2018-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas (CRISPR-associated proteins) is a prokaryotic adaptive immune system that is represented in most archaea and many bacteria. Among the currently known prokaryotic defense systems, the CRISPR-Cas genomic loci show unprecedented complexity and diversity. Classification of CRISPR-Cas variants that would capture their evolutionary relationships to the maximum possible extent is essential for comparative genomic and functional characterization of this theoretically and practically important system of adaptive immunity. To this end, a multipronged approach has been developed that combines phylogenetic analysis of the conserved Cas proteins with comparison of gene repertoires and arrangements in CRISPR-Cas loci. This approach led to the current classification of CRISPR-Cas systems into three distinct types and ten subtypes for each of which signature genes have been identified. Comparative genomic analysis of the CRISPR-Cas systems in new archaeal and bacterial genomes performed over the 3 years elapsed since the development of this classification makes it clear that new types and subtypes of CRISPR-Cas need to be introduced. Moreover, this classification system captures only part of the complexity of CRISPR-Cas organization and evolution, due to the intrinsic modularity and evolutionary mobility of these immunity systems, resulting in numerous recombinant variants. Moreover, most of the cas genes evolve rapidly, complicating the family assignment for many Cas proteins and the use of family profiles for the recognition of CRISPR-Cas subtype signatures. Further progress in the comparative analysis of CRISPR-Cas systems requires integration of the most sensitive sequence comparison tools, protein structure comparison, and refined approaches for comparison of gene neighborhoods. PMID:25981466

  4. Recent topics in NMR imaging and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Tokuko

    2002-01-01

    NMR and NMR imaging (MRI) are finding increasing use not only in the clinical and medical fields, but also in material, physicochemical, biological, geological, industrial and environmental applications. This short review is limited to two topics: new techniques and pulse sequences and their application to non-clinical fields that may have clinical application; and new trends in MR contrast agents. The former topic addresses pulse sequence and data analysis; dynamics such as diffusion, flow, velocity and velocimetry; chemometrics; pharmacological agents; and chemotherapy; the latter topic addresses contrast agents (CA) sensitive to biochemical activity; CA based on water exchange; molecular interactions and stability of CA; characteristics of emerging CA; superparamagnetic CA; and macromolecular CA. (author)

  5. Towards a compact and precise sample holder for macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Gergely; Rossi, Christopher; Janocha, Robert; Sorez, Clement; Lopez-Marrero, Marcos; Astruc, Anthony; McCarthy, Andrew; Belrhali, Hassan; Bowler, Matthew W; Cipriani, Florent

    2017-10-01

    Most of the sample holders currently used in macromolecular crystallography offer limited storage density and poor initial crystal-positioning precision upon mounting on a goniometer. This has now become a limiting factor at high-throughput beamlines, where data collection can be performed in a matter of seconds. Furthermore, this lack of precision limits the potential benefits emerging from automated harvesting systems that could provide crystal-position information which would further enhance alignment at beamlines. This situation provided the motivation for the development of a compact and precise sample holder with corresponding pucks, handling tools and robotic transfer protocols. The development process included four main phases: design, prototype manufacture, testing with a robotic sample changer and validation under real conditions on a beamline. Two sample-holder designs are proposed: NewPin and miniSPINE. They share the same robot gripper and allow the storage of 36 sample holders in uni-puck footprint-style pucks, which represents 252 samples in a dry-shipping dewar commonly used in the field. The pucks are identified with human- and machine-readable codes, as well as with radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags. NewPin offers a crystal-repositioning precision of up to 10 µm but requires a specific goniometer socket. The storage density could reach 64 samples using a special puck designed for fully robotic handling. miniSPINE is less precise but uses a goniometer mount compatible with the current SPINE standard. miniSPINE is proposed for the first implementation of the new standard, since it is easier to integrate at beamlines. An upgraded version of the SPINE sample holder with a corresponding puck named SPINEplus is also proposed in order to offer a homogenous and interoperable system. The project involved several European synchrotrons and industrial companies in the fields of consumables and sample-changer robotics. Manual handling of mini

  6. Effects of macromolecular crowding on protein conformational changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Dong

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Many protein functions can be directly linked to conformational changes. Inside cells, the equilibria and transition rates between different conformations may be affected by macromolecular crowding. We have recently developed a new approach for modeling crowding effects, which enables an atomistic representation of "test" proteins. Here this approach is applied to study how crowding affects the equilibria and transition rates between open and closed conformations of seven proteins: yeast protein disulfide isomerase (yPDI, adenylate kinase (AdK, orotidine phosphate decarboxylase (ODCase, Trp repressor (TrpR, hemoglobin, DNA beta-glucosyltransferase, and Ap(4A hydrolase. For each protein, molecular dynamics simulations of the open and closed states are separately run. Representative open and closed conformations are then used to calculate the crowding-induced changes in chemical potential for the two states. The difference in chemical-potential change between the two states finally predicts the effects of crowding on the population ratio of the two states. Crowding is found to reduce the open population to various extents. In the presence of crowders with a 15 A radius and occupying 35% of volume, the open-to-closed population ratios of yPDI, AdK, ODCase and TrpR are reduced by 79%, 78%, 62% and 55%, respectively. The reductions for the remaining three proteins are 20-44%. As expected, the four proteins experiencing the stronger crowding effects are those with larger conformational changes between open and closed states (e.g., as measured by the change in radius of gyration. Larger proteins also tend to experience stronger crowding effects than smaller ones [e.g., comparing yPDI (480 residues and TrpR (98 residues]. The potentials of mean force along the open-closed reaction coordinate of apo and ligand-bound ODCase are altered by crowding, suggesting that transition rates are also affected. These quantitative results and qualitative trends will

  7. MacSyFinder: a program to mine genomes for molecular systems with an application to CRISPR-Cas systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie S Abby

    Full Text Available Biologists often wish to use their knowledge on a few experimental models of a given molecular system to identify homologs in genomic data. We developed a generic tool for this purpose.Macromolecular System Finder (MacSyFinder provides a flexible framework to model the properties of molecular systems (cellular machinery or pathway including their components, evolutionary associations with other systems and genetic architecture. Modelled features also include functional analogs, and the multiple uses of a same component by different systems. Models are used to search for molecular systems in complete genomes or in unstructured data like metagenomes. The components of the systems are searched by sequence similarity using Hidden Markov model (HMM protein profiles. The assignment of hits to a given system is decided based on compliance with the content and organization of the system model. A graphical interface, MacSyView, facilitates the analysis of the results by showing overviews of component content and genomic context. To exemplify the use of MacSyFinder we built models to detect and class CRISPR-Cas systems following a previously established classification. We show that MacSyFinder allows to easily define an accurate "Cas-finder" using publicly available protein profiles.MacSyFinder is a standalone application implemented in Python. It requires Python 2.7, Hmmer and makeblastdb (version 2.2.28 or higher. It is freely available with its source code under a GPLv3 license at https://github.com/gem-pasteur/macsyfinder. It is compatible with all platforms supporting Python and Hmmer/makeblastdb. The "Cas-finder" (models and HMM profiles is distributed as a compressed tarball archive as Supporting Information.

  8. Cas4 Facilitates PAM-Compatible Spacer Selection during CRISPR Adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastian N. Kieper; Cristóbal Almendros; Juliane Behler; Rebecca E. McKenzie; Franklin L. Nobrega; Anna C. Haagsma; Jochem N.A. Vink; Wolfgang R. Hess; Stan J.J. Brouns

    2018-01-01

    Summary: CRISPR-Cas systems adapt their immunological memory against their invaders by integrating short DNA fragments into clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) loci. While Cas1 and Cas2 make up the core machinery of the CRISPR integration process, various class I and II CRISPR-Cas systems encode Cas4 proteins for which the role is unknown. Here, we introduced the CRISPR adaptation genes cas1, cas2, and cas4 from the type I-D CRISPR-Cas system of Synechocystis sp....

  9. New Paradigm for Macromolecular Crystallography Experiments at SSRL: Automated Crystal Screening And Remote Data Collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soltis, S.M.; Cohen, A.E.; Deacon, A.; Eriksson, T.; Gonzalez, A.; McPhillips, S.; Chui, H.; Dunten, P.; Hollenbeck, M.; Mathews, I.; Miller, M.; Moorhead, P.; Phizackerley, R.P.; Smith, C.; Song, J.; Bedem, H. van dem; Ellis, P.; Kuhn, P.; McPhillips, T.; Sauter, N.; Sharp, K.

    2009-01-01

    Complete automation of the macromolecular crystallography experiment has been achieved at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) through the combination of robust mechanized experimental hardware and a flexible control system with an intuitive user interface. These highly reliable systems have enabled crystallography experiments to be carried out from the researchers' home institutions and other remote locations while retaining complete control over even the most challenging systems. A breakthrough component of the system, the Stanford Auto-Mounter (SAM), has enabled the efficient mounting of cryocooled samples without human intervention. Taking advantage of this automation, researchers have successfully screened more than 200 000 samples to select the crystals with the best diffraction quality for data collection as well as to determine optimal crystallization and cryocooling conditions. These systems, which have been deployed on all SSRL macromolecular crystallography beamlines and several beamlines worldwide, are used by more than 80 research groups in remote locations, establishing a new paradigm for macromolecular crystallography experimentation.

  10. CRISPR-Cas9 Based Engineering of Actinomycetal Genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tong, Yaojun; Charusanti, Pep; Zhang, Lixin

    2015-01-01

    . To facilitate the genetic manipulation of actinomycetes, we developed a highly efficient CRISPR-Cas9 system to delete gene(s) or gene cluster(s), implement precise gene replacements, and reversibly control gene expression in actinomycetes. We demonstrate our system by targeting two genes, actIORF1 (SCO5087......) and actVB (SCO5092), from the actinorhodin biosynthetic gene cluster in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). Our CRISPR-Cas9 system successfully inactivated the targeted genes. When no templates for homology-directed repair (HDR) were present, the site-specific DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) introduced by Cas9....... Moreover, we developed a system to efficiently and reversibly control expression of target genes, deemed CRISPRi, based on a catalytically dead variant of Cas9 (dCas9). The CRISPR-Cas9 based system described here comprises a powerful and broadly applicable set of tools to manipulate actinomycetal genomes....

  11. Disabling Cas9 by an anti-CRISPR DNA mimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jiyung; Jiang, Fuguo; Liu, Jun-Jie; Bray, Nicolas L; Rauch, Benjamin J; Baik, Seung Hyun; Nogales, Eva; Bondy-Denomy, Joseph; Corn, Jacob E; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2017-07-01

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas9 gene editing technology is derived from a microbial adaptive immune system, where bacteriophages are often the intended target. Natural inhibitors of CRISPR-Cas9 enable phages to evade immunity and show promise in controlling Cas9-mediated gene editing in human cells. However, the mechanism of CRISPR-Cas9 inhibition is not known, and the potential applications for Cas9 inhibitor proteins in mammalian cells have not been fully established. We show that the anti-CRISPR protein AcrIIA4 binds only to assembled Cas9-single-guide RNA (sgRNA) complexes and not to Cas9 protein alone. A 3.9 Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy structure of the Cas9-sgRNA-AcrIIA4 complex revealed that the surface of AcrIIA4 is highly acidic and binds with a 1:1 stoichiometry to a region of Cas9 that normally engages the DNA protospacer adjacent motif. Consistent with this binding mode, order-of-addition experiments showed that AcrIIA4 interferes with DNA recognition but has no effect on preformed Cas9-sgRNA-DNA complexes. Timed delivery of AcrIIA4 into human cells as either protein or expression plasmid allows on-target Cas9-mediated gene editing while reducing off-target edits. These results provide a mechanistic understanding of AcrIIA4 function and demonstrate that inhibitors can modulate the extent and outcomes of Cas9-mediated gene editing.

  12. Dexamethasone attenuates grain sorghum dust extract-induced increase in macromolecular efflux in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, S R; Ikezaki, H; Gao, X P; Rubinstein, I

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether dexamethasone attenuates grain sorghum dust extract-induced increase in macromolecular efflux from the in situ hamster cheek pouch and, if so, whether this response is specific. By using intravital microscopy, we found that an aqueous extract of grain sorghum dust elicited significant, concentration-dependent leaky site formation and increase in clearance of FITC-labeled dextran (FITC-dextran; mol mass, 70 kDa) from the in situ hamster cheek pouch (P grain sorghum dust extract- and substance P-induced increases in macromolecular efflux from the in situ hamster cheek pouch in a specific fashion.

  13. An acoustic on-chip goniometer for room temperature macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, C G; Axford, D; Edwards, A M J; Gildea, R J; Morris, R H; Newton, M I; Orville, A M; Prince, M; Topham, P D; Docker, P T

    2017-12-05

    This paper describes the design, development and successful use of an on-chip goniometer for room-temperature macromolecular crystallography via acoustically induced rotations. We present for the first time a low cost, rate-tunable, acoustic actuator for gradual in-fluid sample reorientation about varying axes and its utilisation for protein structure determination on a synchrotron beamline. The device enables the efficient collection of diffraction data via a rotation method from a sample within a surface confined droplet. This method facilitates efficient macromolecular structural data acquisition in fluid environments for dynamical studies.

  14. The Joint Structural Biology Group beam lines at the ESRF: Modern macromolecular crystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell, E P

    2001-01-01

    Macromolecular crystallography has evolved considerably over the last decade. Data sets in under an hour are now possible on high throughput beam lines leading to electron density and, possibly, initial models calculated on-site. There are five beam lines currently dedicated to macromolecular crystallography: the ID14 complex and BM-14 (soon to be superseded by ID-29). These lines handle over five hundred projects every six months and demand is increasing. Automated sample handling, alignment and data management protocols will be required to work efficiently with this demanding load. Projects developing these themes are underway within the JSBG.

  15. Aging changes of macromolecular synthesis in the mitochondria of mouse hepatocytes as revealed by microscopic radioautography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Tetsuji [Shinshu University, Matsumoto (Japan). Dept. of Anatomy and Cell Biology

    2007-07-01

    This mini-review reports aging changes of macromolecular synthesis in the mitochondria of mouse hepatocytes. We have observed the macromolecular synthesis, such as DNA, RNA and proteins, in the mitochondria of various mammalian cells by means of electron microscopic radioautography technique developed in our laboratory. The number of mitochondria per cell, number of labeled mitochondria per cell with 3H-thymidine, 3H-uridine and 3H-leucine, precursors for DNA, RNA and proteins, respectively, were counted and the labeling indices at various ages, from fetal to postnatal early days and several months to 1 and 2 years in senescence, were calculated, which showed variations due to aging. (author)

  16. Control of gene expression by CRISPR-Cas systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) loci and their associated cas (CRISPR-associated) genes provide adaptive immunity against viruses (phages) and other mobile genetic elements in bacteria and archaea. While most of the early work has largely been dominated by examples of CRISPR-Cas systems directing the cleavage of phage or plasmid DNA, recent studies have revealed a more complex landscape where CRISPR-Cas loci might be involved in gene regulation. In this review, we summarize the role of these loci in the regulation of gene expression as well as the recent development of synthetic gene regulation using engineered CRISPR-Cas systems. PMID:24273648

  17. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... affecting the MRI images, these objects can become projectiles within the MRI scanner room and may cause ... MRI has proven valuable in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and vascular disease, ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open units are especially helpful for examining larger patients or those with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for ...

  19. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... does not completely surround you. Some newer MRI machines have a larger diameter bore which can be ... size patients or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam ... the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  3. Play the MRI Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teachers' Questionnaire MRI Play MRI the Magnetic Miracle Game About the game In the MRI imaging technique, strong magnets and ... last will in Paris. Play the Blood Typing Game Try to save some patients and learn about ...

  4. Animal MRI Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Animal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Core develops and optimizes MRI methods for cardiovascular imaging of mice and rats. The Core provides imaging expertise,...

  5. Tenth anniversary of CAS ONLINE service : What CAS services should be in the new era of chemical information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostakos, Charles N.

    Chemical Abstracts Service celebrated 10th anniversary of CAS online information service in 1990. A speech given on the occasion reviewed history of the CAS ONLINE, in relation to its most important benefits for scientists and engineers. The development of STN international, the network through which CAS ONLINE is accessible around the world, was also discussed in the speech. The CAS ONLINE now contains a wide variety of files relating to chemical field including CA file, Registry file. CA previews,. CASREACT, CIN. MARPAT, etc for supplying chemical information worldwide.

  6. CAS - CERN Accelerator School: Power Converters

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    These proceedings collate lectures given at the twenty-eighth specialized course organised by the CERN Accelerator School (CAS). The course was held at the Hotel du Parc, Baden, Switzerland from 7 - 14 May 2014, in collaboration with the Paul Scherrer Institute. Following introductory lectures on accelerators and the requirements on power converters, the course covered components and topologies of the different types of power converters needed for particle accelerators. Issues of design, control and exploitation in a sometimes-hostile environment were addressed. Site visits to ABB and PSI provided an insight into state-of-the-art power converter production and operation, while topical seminars completed the programme.

  7. Recent Advances in Genome Editing Using CRISPR/Cas9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yuduan; Li, Hong; Chen, Ling-Ling; Xie, Kabin

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat)-Cas9 (CRISPR-associated nuclease 9) system is a versatile tool for genome engineering that uses a guide RNA (gRNA) to target Cas9 to a specific sequence. This simple RNA-guided genome-editing technology has become a revolutionary tool in biology and has many innovative applications in different fields. In this review, we briefly introduce the Cas9-mediated genome-editing method, summarize the recent advances in CRISPR/Cas9 technology, and discuss their implications for plant research. To date, targeted gene knockout using the Cas9/gRNA system has been established in many plant species, and the targeting efficiency and capacity of Cas9 has been improved by optimizing its expression and that of its gRNA. The CRISPR/Cas9 system can also be used for sequence-specific mutagenesis/integration and transcriptional control of target genes. We also discuss off-target effects and the constraint that the protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) puts on CRISPR/Cas9 genome engineering. To address these problems, a number of bioinformatic tools are available to help design specific gRNAs, and new Cas9 variants and orthologs with high fidelity and alternative PAM specificities have been engineered. Owing to these recent efforts, the CRISPR/Cas9 system is becoming a revolutionary and flexible tool for genome engineering. Adoption of the CRISPR/Cas9 technology in plant research would enable the investigation of plant biology at an unprecedented depth and create innovative applications in precise crop breeding. PMID:27252719

  8. New CRISPR-Cas systems from uncultivated microbes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burstein, David; Harrington, Lucas B.; Strutt, Steven C.; Probst, Alexander J.; Anantharaman, Karthik; Thomas, Brian C.; Doudna, Jennifer A.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2017-02-01

    CRISPR-Cas systems provide microbes with adaptive immunity by employing short DNA sequences, termed spacers, that guide Cas proteins to cleave foreign DNA. Class 2 CRISPR-Cas systems are streamlined versions, in which a single RNA-bound Cas protein recognizes and cleaves target sequences. The programmable nature of these minimal systems has enabled researchers to repurpose them into a versatile technology that is broadly revolutionizing biological and clinical research. However, current CRISPR-Cas technologies are based solely on systems from isolated bacteria, leaving the vast majority of enzymes from organisms that have not been cultured untapped. Metagenomics, the sequencing of DNA extracted directly from natural microbial communities, provides access to the genetic material of a huge array of uncultivated organisms. Here, using genome-resolved metagenomics, we identify a number of CRISPR-Cas systems, including the first reported Cas9 in the archaeal domain of life, to our knowledge. This divergent Cas9 protein was found in little-studied nanoarchaea as part of an active CRISPR-Cas system. In bacteria, we discovered two previously unknown systems, CRISPR-CasX and CRISPR-CasY, which are among the most compact systems yet discovered. Notably, all required functional components were identified by metagenomics, enabling validation of robust in vivo RNA-guided DNA interference activity in Escherichia coli. Interrogation of environmental microbial communities combined with in vivo experiments allows us to access an unprecedented diversity of genomes, the content of which will expand the repertoire of microbe-based biotechnologies.

  9. MRI monitoring of tumor response following angiogenesis inhibition in an experimental human breast cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turetschek, Karl; Preda, Anda; Shames, David M.; Novikov, Viktor; Roberts, Timothy P.L.; Fu, Yanjun; Brasch, Robert C.; Floyd, Eugenia; Carter, Wayne O.; Wood, Jeanette M.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enhanced by macromolecular contrast agents to monitor noninvasively the therapeutic effect of an anti-angiogenesis VEGF receptor kinase inhibitor in an experimental cancer model. MDA-MB-435, a poorly differentiated human breast cancer cell line, was implanted into the mammary fat pad in 20 female homozygous athymic rats. Animals were assigned randomly to a control (n=10) or drug treatment group (n=10). Baseline dynamic MRI was performed on sequential days using albumin-(GdDTPA) 30 (6.0 nm diameter) and ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles (30 nm diameter). Subjects were treated either with PTK787/ZK 222584, a VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, or saline given orally twice daily for 1 week followed by repeat MRI examinations serially using each contrast agent. Employing a unidirectional kinetic model comprising the plasma and interstitial water compartments, tumor microvessel characteristics including fractional plasma volume and transendothelial permeability (K PS ) were estimated for each contrast medium. Tumor growth and the microvascular density, a histologic surrogate of angiogenesis, were also measured. Control tumors significantly increased (P PS ) based on MRI assays using both macromolecular contrast media. In contrast, tumor growth was significantly reduced (P PS values declined slightly. Estimated values for the fractional plasma volume did not differ significantly between treatment groups or contrast agents. Microvascular density counts correlated fairly with the tumor growth rate (r=0.64) and were statistically significant higher (P PS ), using either of two macromolecular contrast media, were able to detect effects of treatment with a VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor on tumor vascular permeability. In a clinical setting such quantitative MRI measurements could be used to monitor tumor anti-angiogenesis therapy. (orig.)

  10. Human brain functional MRI and DTI visualization with virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Moreland, John; Zhang, Jingyu

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and functional MRI (fMRI) are two active research areas in neuroimaging. DTI is sensitive to the anisotropic diffusion of water exerted by its macromolecular environment and has been shown useful in characterizing structures of ordered tissues such as the brain white matter, myocardium, and cartilage. The diffusion tensor provides two new types of information of water diffusion: the magnitude and the spatial orientation of water diffusivity inside the tissue. This information has been used for white matter fiber tracking to review physical neuronal pathways inside the brain. Functional MRI measures brain activations using the hemodynamic response. The statistically derived activation map corresponds to human brain functional activities caused by neuronal activities. The combination of these two methods provides a new way to understand human brain from the anatomical neuronal fiber connectivity to functional activities between different brain regions. In this study, virtual reality (VR) based MR DTI and fMRI visualization with high resolution anatomical image segmentation and registration, ROI definition and neuronal white matter fiber tractography visualization and fMRI activation map integration is proposed. Rationale and methods for producing and distributing stereoscopic videos are also discussed.

  11. The Postgraduate Study of Macromolecular Sciences at the University of Zagreb (1971-1980

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunst, B.

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The postgraduate study of macromolecular sciences (PSMS was established at the University of Zagreb in 1971 as a university study in the time of expressed interdisciplinary permeation of natural sciences - physics, chemistry and biology, and application of their achievements in technologicaldisciplines. PSMS was established by a group of prominent university professors from the schools of Science, Chemical Technology, Pharmacy and Medicine, as well as from the Institute of Biology. The study comprised basic fields of macromolecular sciences: organic chemistry of synthetic macromolecules, physical chemistry of macromolecules, physics of macromolecules, biological macromolecules and polymer engineering with polymer application and processing, and teaching was performed in 29 lecture courses lead by 30 professors with their collaborators. PSMS ceased to exist with the change of legislation in Croatia in 1980, when the attitude prevailed to render back postgraduate studies to the university schools. During 9 years of existence of PSMS the MSci grade was awarded to 37 macromolecular experts. It was assessed that the PSMS some thirty years ago was an important example of modern postgraduate education as compared with the international postgraduate development. In concordance with the recent introduction of similar interdisciplinary studies in macromolecular sciences elsewhere in the world, the establishment of a modern interdisciplinary study in the field would be of importance for further development of these sciences in Croatia.

  12. MMTF-An efficient file format for the transmission, visualization, and analysis of macromolecular structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R Bradley

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in experimental techniques have led to a rapid growth in complexity, size, and number of macromolecular structures that are made available through the Protein Data Bank. This creates a challenge for macromolecular visualization and analysis. Macromolecular structure files, such as PDB or PDBx/mmCIF files can be slow to transfer, parse, and hard to incorporate into third-party software tools. Here, we present a new binary and compressed data representation, the MacroMolecular Transmission Format, MMTF, as well as software implementations in several languages that have been developed around it, which address these issues. We describe the new format and its APIs and demonstrate that it is several times faster to parse, and about a quarter of the file size of the current standard format, PDBx/mmCIF. As a consequence of the new data representation, it is now possible to visualize structures with millions of atoms in a web browser, keep the whole PDB archive in memory or parse it within few minutes on average computers, which opens up a new way of thinking how to design and implement efficient algorithms in structural bioinformatics. The PDB archive is available in MMTF file format through web services and data that are updated on a weekly basis.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of macromolecular rhodamine tethers and their interactions with P-glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Lindsey; Putnam, David

    2014-08-20

    Rhodamine dyes are well-known P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrates that have played an important role in the detection of inhibitors and other substrates of P-gp, as well as in the understanding of P-gp function. Macromolecular conjugates of rhodamines could prove useful as tethers for further probing of P-gp structure and function. Two macromolecular derivatives of rhodamine, methoxypolyethylene glycol-rhodamine6G and methoxypolyethylene glycol-rhodamine123, were synthesized through the 2'-position of rhodamine6G and rhodamine123, thoroughly characterized, and then evaluated by inhibition with verapamil for their ability to interact with P-gp and to act as efflux substrates. To put the results into context, the P-gp interactions of the new conjugates were compared to the commercially available methoxypolyethylene glycol-rhodamineB. FACS analysis confirmed that macromolecular tethers of rhodamine6G, rhodamine123, and rhodamineB were accumulated in P-gp expressing cells 5.2 ± 0.3%, 26.2 ± 4%, and 64.2 ± 6%, respectively, compared to a sensitive cell line that does not overexpress P-gp. Along with confocal imaging, the efflux analysis confirmed that the macromolecular rhodamine tethers remain P-gp substrates. These results open potential avenues for new ways to probe the function of P-gp both in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Interplay between the bacterial nucleoid protein H-NS and macromolecular crowding in compacting DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wintraecken, C.H.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    In this dissertation we discuss H-NS and its connection to nucleoid compaction and organization. Nucleoid formation involves a dramatic reduction in coil volume of the genomic DNA. Four factors are thought to influence coil volume: supercoiling, DNA charge neutralization, macromolecular

  15. Effect of macromolecular crowding on the rate of diffusion-limited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The enzymatic reaction rate has been shown to be affected by the presence of such macromolecules. A simple numerical model is proposed here based on percolation and diffusion in disordered systems to study the effect of macromolecular crowding on the enzymatic reaction rates. The model qualitatively explains some ...

  16. Detection and cellular localisation of the synthetic soluble macromolecular drug carrier pHPMA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kissel, M.; Peschke, P.; Šubr, Vladimír; Ulbrich, Karel; Strunz, A. M.; Kühnlein, R.; Debus, J.; Friedrich, E.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 8 (2002), s. 1055-1062 ISSN 1619-7070 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV307/96/K226 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : EPR effect * Radiolabelled macromolecules * Pharmacokinetic Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.568, year: 2002

  17. Atomic Scale Structural Studies of Macromolecular Assemblies by Solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loquet, Antoine; Tolchard, James; Berbon, Melanie; Martinez, Denis; Habenstein, Birgit

    2017-09-17

    Supramolecular protein assemblies play fundamental roles in biological processes ranging from host-pathogen interaction, viral infection to the propagation of neurodegenerative disorders. Such assemblies consist in multiple protein subunits organized in a non-covalent way to form large macromolecular objects that can execute a variety of cellular functions or cause detrimental consequences. Atomic insights into the assembly mechanisms and the functioning of those macromolecular assemblies remain often scarce since their inherent insolubility and non-crystallinity often drastically reduces the quality of the data obtained from most techniques used in structural biology, such as X-ray crystallography and solution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). We here present magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy (SSNMR) as a powerful method to investigate structures of macromolecular assemblies at atomic resolution. SSNMR can reveal atomic details on the assembled complex without size and solubility limitations. The protocol presented here describes the essential steps from the production of 13 C/ 15 N isotope-labeled macromolecular protein assemblies to the acquisition of standard SSNMR spectra and their analysis and interpretation. As an example, we show the pipeline of a SSNMR structural analysis of a filamentous protein assembly.

  18. Thermodynamics of Macromolecular Association in Heterogeneous Crowding Environments: Theoretical and Simulation Studies with a Simplified Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Tadashi; Yu, Isseki; Feig, Michael; Sugita, Yuji

    2016-11-23

    The cytoplasm of a cell is crowded with many different kinds of macromolecules. The macromolecular crowding affects the thermodynamics and kinetics of biological reactions in a living cell, such as protein folding, association, and diffusion. Theoretical and simulation studies using simplified models focus on the essential features of the crowding effects and provide a basis for analyzing experimental data. In most of the previous studies on the crowding effects, a uniform crowder size is assumed, which is in contrast to the inhomogeneous size distribution of macromolecules in a living cell. Here, we evaluate the free energy changes upon macromolecular association in a cell-like inhomogeneous crowding system via a theory of hard-sphere fluids and free energy calculations using Brownian dynamics trajectories. The inhomogeneous crowding model based on 41 different types of macromolecules represented by spheres with different radii mimics the physiological concentrations of macromolecules in the cytoplasm of Mycoplasma genitalium. The free energy changes of macromolecular association evaluated by the theory and simulations were in good agreement with each other. The crowder size distribution affects both specific and nonspecific molecular associations, suggesting that not only the volume fraction but also the size distribution of macromolecules are important factors for evaluating in vivo crowding effects. This study relates in vitro experiments on macromolecular crowding to in vivo crowding effects by using the theory of hard-sphere fluids with crowder-size heterogeneity.

  19. Highly specific targeted mutagenesis in plants using Staphylococcus aureus Cas9

    OpenAIRE

    Hidetaka Kaya; Masafumi Mikami; Akira Endo; Masaki Endo; Seiichi Toki

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is an efficient and convenient tool for genome editing in plants. Cas9 nuclease derived from Streptococcus pyogenes (Sp) is commonly used in this system. Recently, Staphylococcus aureus Cas9 (SaCas9)-mediated genome editing was reported in human cells and Arabidopsis. Because SaCas9 (1053 a.a.) is smaller than SpCas9 (1368 a.a.), SaCas9 could have substantial advantages for delivering and expressing Cas9 protein, especially using virus vectors. Since the protospacer adj...

  20. A newly discovered Bordetella species carries a transcriptionally active CRISPR-Cas with a small Cas9 endonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Yury V; Shariat, Nikki; Register, Karen B; Linz, Bodo; Rivera, Israel; Hu, Kai; Dudley, Edward G; Harvill, Eric T

    2015-10-26

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated genes (cas) are widely distributed among bacteria. These systems provide adaptive immunity against mobile genetic elements specified by the spacer sequences stored within the CRISPR. The CRISPR-Cas system has been identified using Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) against other sequenced and annotated genomes and confirmed via CRISPRfinder program. Using Polymerase Chain Reactions (PCR) and Sanger DNA sequencing, we discovered CRISPRs in additional bacterial isolates of the same species of Bordetella. Transcriptional activity and processing of the CRISPR have been assessed via RT-PCR. Here we describe a novel Type II-C CRISPR and its associated genes-cas1, cas2, and cas9-in several isolates of a newly discovered Bordetella species. The CRISPR-cas locus, which is absent in all other Bordetella species, has a significantly lower GC-content than the genome-wide average, suggesting acquisition of this locus via horizontal gene transfer from a currently unknown source. The CRISPR array is transcribed and processed into mature CRISPR RNAs (crRNA), some of which have homology to prophages found in closely related species B. hinzii. Expression of the CRISPR-Cas system and processing of crRNAs with perfect homology to prophages present in closely related species, but absent in that containing this CRISPR-Cas system, suggest it provides protection against phage predation. The 3,117-bp cas9 endonuclease gene from this novel CRISPR-Cas system is 990 bp smaller than that of Streptococcus pyogenes, the 4,017-bp allele currently used for genome editing, and which may make it a useful tool in various CRISPR-Cas technologies.

  1. Production of Purified CasRNPs for Efficacious Genome Editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingeman, Emily; Jeans, Chris; Corn, Jacob E

    2017-10-02

    CRISPR-Cas systems have been harnessed as modular genome editing reagents for functional genomics and show promise to cure genetic diseases. Directed by a guide RNA, a Cas effector introduces a double stranded break in DNA and host cell DNA repair leads to the introduction of errors (e.g., to knockout a gene) or a programmed change. Introduction of a Cas effector and guide RNA as a purified Cas ribonucleoprotein complex (CasRNP) has recently emerged as a powerful approach to alter cell types and organisms. Not only does CasRNP editing exhibit increased efficacy and specificity, it avoids optimization and iteration of species-specific factors such as codon usage, promoters, and terminators. CasRNP editing has been rapidly adopted for research use in many contexts and is quickly becoming a popular method to edit primary cells for therapeutic application. This article describes how to make a Cas9 RNP and outlines its use for gene editing in human cells. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. Engineering the Caenorhabditis elegans genome with CRISPR/Cas9

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waaijers, Selma; Boxem, Mike

    2014-01-01

    The development in early 2013 of CRISPR/Cas9-based genome engineering promises to dramatically advance our ability to alter the genomes of model systems at will. A single, easily produced targeting RNA guides the Cas9 endonuclease to a specific DNA sequence where it creates a double strand break.

  3. CATO--A Guided User Interface for Different CAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janetzko, Hans-Dieter

    2017-01-01

    CATO is a new user interface, written in Java and developed by the author as a response to the significant difficulties faced by students who only sporadically use computer algebra systems (CAS). The usage of CAS in mathematical lectures should be an integral part of mathematical instruction. However, difficulties arise for those students who have…

  4. From Calculus to Dynamical Systems through DGS and CAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Jeanett López; Zamudio, Jorge Javier Jiménez

    2015-01-01

    Several factors have motivated the use of CAS or DGS in the teaching-learning process, such as: the development of new technologies, the availability of computers, and the widespread use of the Internet, among others. Even more, the trend to include CAS and DGS in the curricula of some undergraduate studies has resulted in the instruction of the…

  5. NSP-CAS Protein Complexes: Emerging Signaling Modules in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallez, Yann; Mace, Peter D; Pasquale, Elena B; Riedl, Stefan J

    2012-05-01

    The CAS (CRK-associated substrate) family of adaptor proteins comprises 4 members, which share a conserved modular domain structure that enables multiple protein-protein interactions, leading to the assembly of intracellular signaling platforms. Besides their physiological role in signal transduction downstream of a variety of cell surface receptors, CAS proteins are also critical for oncogenic transformation and cancer cell malignancy through associations with a variety of regulatory proteins and downstream effectors. Among the regulatory partners, the 3 recently identified adaptor proteins constituting the NSP (novel SH2-containing protein) family avidly bind to the conserved carboxy-terminal focal adhesion-targeting (FAT) domain of CAS proteins. NSP proteins use an anomalous nucleotide exchange factor domain that lacks catalytic activity to form NSP-CAS signaling modules. Additionally, the NSP SH2 domain can link NSP-CAS signaling assemblies to tyrosine-phosphorylated cell surface receptors. NSP proteins can potentiate CAS function by affecting key CAS attributes such as expression levels, phosphorylation state, and subcellular localization, leading to effects on cell adhesion, migration, and invasion as well as cell growth. The consequences of these activities are well exemplified by the role that members of both families play in promoting breast cancer cell invasiveness and resistance to antiestrogens. In this review, we discuss the intriguing interplay between the NSP and CAS families, with a particular focus on cancer signaling networks.

  6. Teaching Undergraduate Mathematics Using CAS Technology: Issues and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Patrick C.; Weiss, Vida

    2016-01-01

    The use of handheld CAS technology in undergraduate mathematics courses in Australia is paradoxically shrinking under sustained disapproval or disdain from the professional mathematics community. Mathematics education specialists argue with their mathematics colleagues over a range of issues in course development and this use of CAS or even…

  7. CRISPR/Cas13 as a Tool for RNA Interference

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Zahir

    2018-03-28

    Almost all biological processes involve RNA, making it crucial to develop tools for manipulation of the transcriptome. The bacterial CRISPR/Cas13 system was recently rewired to facilitate RNA manipulation in eukaryotes, including plants. We discuss here the opportunities and limitations of using CRISPR/Cas13 in plants for various types of RNA manipulation.

  8. Progress Scored in Management Information System at CAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ CAS initiative to upgrade its management information system (MIS) is making significant progress. Recently, 116 CAS subordinates have completed their online trial operation of a MIS project at the Academy, called Academia Resource Planning (ARP), marking an important phased achievement of the initiative.

  9. Class 2 CRISPR-Cas RNA-guided endonucleases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stella, Stefano; Alcón, Pablo; Montoya, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas is a bacterial defense system against phage infection and nucleic acid invasion. Class 2 type II CRISPR-Cas9 has also been widely used for genome engineering. Here, we review novel insights into the CRISPR class 2 type V enzymes, specifically Cpf1 and C2c1, which display different DNA-...

  10. CRISPR/Cas9 based genome editing of Penicillium chrysogenum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pohl, Carsten; Kiel, Jan A K W; Driessen, Arnold J M; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Nygård, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 based systems have emerged as versatile platforms for precision genome editing in a wide range of organisms. Here we have developed powerful CRISPR/Cas9 tools for marker-based and marker-free genome modifications in Penicillium chrysogenum, a model filamentous fungus and industrially

  11. Hyperbranched Polyethylenebased Macromolecular Architectures: Synthesis, Characterization, and Selfassembly

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Sulami, Ahlam

    2018-05-01

    "Chain walking” catalytic polymerization CWCP is a powerful tool for the one-pot synthesis of a unique class of hyperbranched polyethylene HBPE-based macromolecules with a controllable molecular weight, topology, and composition. This dissertation focuses on new synthetic routes to prepare HBPE-based macromolecular architectures by combining the CWCP technique with ring opening polymerization ROP, atom–transfer radical polymerization ATRP, and “click” chemistry. Taking advantage of end-functionalized HBPE, and a new ethynyl-soketal star-shape agent, we were able to synthesize different types of the HBPE-based architectures including hyperbranched-on-hyperbranched core-shell nanostructure, and miktoarm-star-HBPE-based block copolymers. The first part of the dissertation provides a general introduction to the synthesis of polyethylene types with controllable structures. Well-defined polyethylene with different macromolecule architectures were synthesized either for academic or industrial purposes. In the second part, the HBPE with different topologies was synthesized by CWCP, using a α-diimine Pd (II) catalyst. The effect of the temperature and pressure on the catalyst activity and polymer properties, including branch content, molecular weight, distribution, and thermal properties were studied. Two series of samples were synthesized: a) serial samples (A) under pressures of 1, 5, and 27 atm at 5˚C, and b) serial samples (B) at temperatures of 5, 15, and 35 ˚C under 5 atm. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, 1H NMR, and gel permeation chromatography, GPC, analysis were used to calculate the branching content, molecular weight, and distribution, whereas differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, was used to record the melting and glass transition temperatures as well as the degree of the crystallinity. Well-defined HBPE-based core diblock copolymers with predictable amphiphilic properties are studied in the third part of the project. Hyperbranched

  12. CAS CERN Accelerator School vacuum technology. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, S.

    1999-01-01

    These proceedings present the lectures given at the twelfth specialized course organized by the CERN Accelerator School (CAS), the topic this time being 'Vacuum Technology'. Despite the importance of vacuum technology in the design and operation of particle accelerators at CERN and at the many other accelerators already installed around the world, this was the first time that CAS has organized a course devoted entirely to this topic. Perhaps this reflects the facts that vacuum has become one of the more critical aspects of future accelerators, and that many of the pioneers in the accelerator field are being replaced by new, younger personnel. The lectures start with the basic concepts of the physics and technology of vacuum followed by detailed descriptions of the many different types of gas-pumping devices and methods to measure the pressures achieved. The outgassing characteristics of the different materials used in the construction of vacuum systems and the optimisation of cleaning methods to reduce this outgassing are then explained together with the effects of the residual gases on the particle beams. Then follow chapters on leak detection, materials and vacuum system engineering. Finally, seminars are presented on designing vacuum systems, the history of vacuum devices, the LHC (large hadron collider) vacuum system, vacuum systems for electron storage rings, and quality assurance for vacuum. (orig.)

  13. CRISPR-Cas Technologies and Applications in Food Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Emily; Klaenhammer, Todd; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2017-02-28

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins form adaptive immune systems that occur in many bacteria and most archaea. In addition to protecting bacteria from phages and other invasive mobile genetic elements, CRISPR-Cas molecular machines can be repurposed as tool kits for applications relevant to the food industry. A primary concern of the food industry has long been the proper management of food-related bacteria, with a focus on both enhancing the outcomes of beneficial microorganisms such as starter cultures and probiotics and limiting the presence of detrimental organisms such as pathogens and spoilage microorganisms. This review introduces CRISPR-Cas as a novel set of technologies to manage food bacteria and offers insights into CRISPR-Cas biology. It primarily focuses on the applications of CRISPR-Cas systems and tools in starter cultures and probiotics, encompassing strain-typing, phage resistance, plasmid vaccination, genome editing, and antimicrobial activity.

  14. Coaching and engaging. Developing teaching with CAS in High School

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Henrik Peter; Grønbæk, Niels; Larsen, Claus Richard

    The extensive use of CAS at upper secondary school in Denmark provides a laboratory for research on the development of standards for CAS teaching. The poster focuses on action research into teachers developing lessons and student activities in an ongoing collaboration between university and high ...... schools on use of CAS in mathematics teaching. Coaches1 mediate design processes, reflection and documentation, and enable sharing. We discuss coaching as a valuable part of action research, and how to draw findings from the collaboration.......The extensive use of CAS at upper secondary school in Denmark provides a laboratory for research on the development of standards for CAS teaching. The poster focuses on action research into teachers developing lessons and student activities in an ongoing collaboration between university and high...

  15. Exploiting CRISPR-Cas to manipulate Enterococcus faecalis populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hullahalli, Karthik; Rodrigues, Marinelle; Palmer, Kelli L

    2017-06-23

    CRISPR-Cas provides a barrier to horizontal gene transfer in prokaryotes. It was previously observed that functional CRISPR-Cas systems are absent from multidrug-resistant (MDR) Enterococcus faecalis , which only possess an orphan CRISPR locus, termed CRISPR2, lacking cas genes. Here, we investigate how the interplay between CRISPR-Cas genome defense and antibiotic selection for mobile genetic elements shapes in vitro E. faecalis populations. We demonstrate that CRISPR2 can be reactivated for genome defense in MDR strains. Interestingly, we observe that E. faecalis transiently maintains CRISPR targets despite active CRISPR-Cas systems. Subsequently, if selection for the CRISPR target is present, toxic CRISPR spacers are lost over time, while in the absence of selection, CRISPR targets are lost over time. We find that forced maintenance of CRISPR targets induces a fitness cost that can be exploited to alter heterogeneous E. faecalis populations.

  16. Not all predicted CRISPR-Cas systems are equal: isolated cas genes and classes of CRISPR like elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Quan; Ye, Yuzhen

    2017-02-06

    The CRISPR-Cas systems in prokaryotes are RNA-guided immune systems that target and deactivate foreign nucleic acids. A typical CRISPR-Cas system consists of a CRISPR array of repeat and spacer units, and a locus of cas genes. The CRISPR and the cas locus are often located next to each other in the genomes. However, there is no quantitative estimate of the co-location. In addition, ad-hoc studies have shown that some non-CRISPR genomic elements contain repeat-spacer-like structures and are mistaken as CRISPRs. Using available genome sequences, we observed that a significant number of genomes have isolated cas loci and/or CRISPRs. We found that 11%, 22% and 28% of the type I, II and III cas loci are isolated (without CRISPRs in the same genomes at all or with CRISPRs distant in the genomes), respectively. We identified a large number of genomic elements that superficially reassemble CRISPRs but don't contain diverse spacers and have no companion cas genes. We called these elements false-CRISPRs and further classified them into groups, including tandem repeats and Staphylococcus aureus repeat (STAR)-like elements. This is the first systematic study to collect and characterize false-CRISPR elements. We demonstrated that false-CRISPRs could be used to reduce the false annotation of CRISPRs, therefore showing them to be useful for improving the annotation of CRISPR-Cas systems.

  17. Sulfonamide inhibition studies of two β-carbonic anhydrases from the ascomycete fungus Sordaria macrospora, CAS1 and CAS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vullo, Daniela; Lehneck, Ronny; Pöggeler, Stefanie; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2018-12-01

    The two β-carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) recently cloned and purified from the ascomycete fungus Sordaria macrospora, CAS1 and CAS2, were investigated for their inhibition with a panel of 39 aromatic, heterocyclic, and aliphatic sulfonamides and one sulfamate, many of which are clinically used agents. CAS1 was efficiently inhibited by tosylamide, 3-fluorosulfanilamide, and 3-chlorosulfanilamide (K I s in the range of 43.2-79.6 nM), whereas acetazolamide, methazolamide, topiramate, ethoxzolamide, dorzolamide, and brinzolamide were medium potency inhibitors (K I s in the range of 360-445 nM). CAS2 was less sensitive to sulfonamide inhibitors. The best CAS2 inhibitors were 5-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-2-sulfonamide (the deacetylated acetazolamide precursor) and 4-hydroxymethyl-benzenesulfonamide, with K I s in the range of 48.1-92.5 nM. Acetazolamide, dorzolamide, ethoxzolamide, topiramate, sulpiride, indisulam, celecoxib, and sulthiame were medium potency CAS2 inhibitors (K I s of 143-857 nM). Many other sulfonamides showed affinities in the high micromolar range or were ineffective as CAS1/2 inhibitors. Small changes in the structure of the inhibitor led to important differences of the activity. As these enzymes may show applications for the removal of anthropically generated polluting gases, finding modulators of their activity may be crucial for designing environmental-friendly CO 2 capture processes.

  18. Interference activity of a minimal Type I CRISPR–Cas system from Shewanella putrefaciens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwarakanath, Srivatsa; Brenzinger, Susanne; Gleditzsch, Daniel; Plagens, André; Klingl, Andreas; Thormann, Kai; Randau, Lennart

    2015-01-01

    Type I CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)–Cas (CRISPR-associated) systems exist in bacterial and archaeal organisms and provide immunity against foreign DNA. The Cas protein content of the DNA interference complexes (termed Cascade) varies between different CRISPR-Cas subtypes. A minimal variant of the Type I-F system was identified in proteobacterial species including Shewanella putrefaciens CN-32. This variant lacks a large subunit (Csy1), Csy2 and Csy3 and contains two unclassified cas genes. The genome of S. putrefaciens CN-32 contains only five Cas proteins (Cas1, Cas3, Cas6f, Cas1821 and Cas1822) and a single CRISPR array with 81 spacers. RNA-Seq analyses revealed the transcription of this array and the maturation of crRNAs (CRISPR RNAs). Interference assays based on plasmid conjugation demonstrated that this CRISPR-Cas system is active in vivo and that activity is dependent on the recognition of the dinucleotide GG PAM (Protospacer Adjacent Motif) sequence and crRNA abundance. The deletion of cas1821 and cas1822 reduced the cellular crRNA pool. Recombinant Cas1821 was shown to form helical filaments bound to RNA molecules, which suggests its role as the Cascade backbone protein. A Cascade complex was isolated which contained multiple Cas1821 copies, Cas1822, Cas6f and mature crRNAs. PMID:26350210

  19. Interference activity of a minimal Type I CRISPR-Cas system from Shewanella putrefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwarakanath, Srivatsa; Brenzinger, Susanne; Gleditzsch, Daniel; Plagens, André; Klingl, Andreas; Thormann, Kai; Randau, Lennart

    2015-10-15

    Type I CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)-Cas (CRISPR-associated) systems exist in bacterial and archaeal organisms and provide immunity against foreign DNA. The Cas protein content of the DNA interference complexes (termed Cascade) varies between different CRISPR-Cas subtypes. A minimal variant of the Type I-F system was identified in proteobacterial species including Shewanella putrefaciens CN-32. This variant lacks a large subunit (Csy1), Csy2 and Csy3 and contains two unclassified cas genes. The genome of S. putrefaciens CN-32 contains only five Cas proteins (Cas1, Cas3, Cas6f, Cas1821 and Cas1822) and a single CRISPR array with 81 spacers. RNA-Seq analyses revealed the transcription of this array and the maturation of crRNAs (CRISPR RNAs). Interference assays based on plasmid conjugation demonstrated that this CRISPR-Cas system is active in vivo and that activity is dependent on the recognition of the dinucleotide GG PAM (Protospacer Adjacent Motif) sequence and crRNA abundance. The deletion of cas1821 and cas1822 reduced the cellular crRNA pool. Recombinant Cas1821 was shown to form helical filaments bound to RNA molecules, which suggests its role as the Cascade backbone protein. A Cascade complex was isolated which contained multiple Cas1821 copies, Cas1822, Cas6f and mature crRNAs. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Mr.CAS-A minimalistic (pure) Ruby CAS for fast prototyping and code generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragni, Matteo

    There are Computer Algebra System (CAS) systems on the market with complete solutions for manipulation of analytical models. But exporting a model that implements specific algorithms on specific platforms, for target languages or for particular numerical library, is often a rigid procedure that requires manual post-processing. This work presents a Ruby library that exposes core CAS capabilities, i.e. simplification, substitution, evaluation, etc. The library aims at programmers that need to rapidly prototype and generate numerical code for different target languages, while keeping separated mathematical expression from the code generation rules, where best practices for numerical conditioning are implemented. The library is written in pure Ruby language and is compatible with most Ruby interpreters.

  1. Flexibility damps macromolecular crowding effects on protein folding dynamics: Application to the murine prion protein (121-231)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergasa-Caceres, Fernando; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2014-01-01

    A model of protein folding kinetics is applied to study the combined effects of protein flexibility and macromolecular crowding on protein folding rate and stability. It is found that the increase in stability and folding rate promoted by macromolecular crowding is damped for proteins with highly flexible native structures. The model is applied to the folding dynamics of the murine prion protein (121-231). It is found that the high flexibility of the native isoform of the murine prion protein (121-231) reduces the effects of macromolecular crowding on its folding dynamics. The relevance of these findings for the pathogenic mechanism are discussed.

  2. CAS Introduction to Accelerator Physics in Spain

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2012-01-01

    The CERN Accelerator School (CAS) and the University of Granada jointly organised a course called "Introduction to Accelerator Physics" in Granada, Spain, from 28 October to 9 November, 2012.   The course attracted over 200 applicants, of whom 139 were selected to attend. The students were of 25 different nationalities, coming from countries as far away as Australia, China, Guatemala and India. The intensive programme comprised 38 lectures, 3 seminars, 4 tutorials where the students were split into three groups, a poster session and 7 hours of guided and private study. Feedback from the students was very positive, praising the expertise of the lecturers, as well as the high standard and quality of their lectures. CERN's Director-General, Rolf Heuer, gave a public lecture at the Parque de las Ciencias entitled "The Large Hadron Collider: Unveiling the Universe". In addition to the academic programme, the students had the opportunity to visit the well...

  3. The ultraviolet variations of iota Cas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, M. R.; Mallama, A. D.; Soskey, D. G.; Holm, A. V.

    1976-01-01

    The Ap variable star iota Cas was observed with the photometers on OAO-2 covering the spectral range 1430-4250 A. The ultraviolet light curves show a double wave with primary minimum and maximum at phase ? 0.00 and 0.35, respectively. Secondary minimum light is at phase ? 0.65 with secondary maximum at phase ? 0.85. The light curves longward of 3150 A vary in opposition to those shortward of this 'null region'. Ground-based coude spectra show that the Fe II and Cr II line strengths have a double-wave variation such that maximum strength occurs at minimum ultraviolet light. We suggest that the strong ultraviolet opacities due to photoionization and line blanketing by these metals may cause the observed photometric variations. We have also constructed an oblique-rotator model which shows iron and chromium lying in a great circle band rather than in circular spots.

  4. CAS Accelerator Physics held in Erice, Italy

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Accelerator School

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Accelerator School (CAS) recently organised a specialised course on Superconductivity for Accelerators, held at the Ettore Majorana Foundation and Centre for Scientific Culture in Erice, Italy from 24 April-4 May, 2013.   Photo courtesy of Alessandro Noto, Ettore Majorana Foundation and Centre for Scientific Culture. Following a handful of summary lectures on accelerator physics and the fundamental processes of superconductivity, the course covered a wide range of topics related to superconductivity and highlighted the latest developments in the field. Realistic case studies and topical seminars completed the programme. The school was very successful with 94 participants representing 23 nationalities, coming from countries as far away as Belorussia, Canada, China, India, Japan and the United States (for the first time a young Ethiopian lady, studying in Germany, attended this course). The programme comprised 35 lectures, 3 seminars and 7 hours of case study. The case studies were p...

  5. CAS Accelerator Physics (Ion Sources) in Slovakia

    CERN Multimedia

    CAS School

    2012-01-01

    The CERN Accelerator School (CAS) and the Slovak University of Technology jointly organised a specialised course on ion sources, held at the Hotel Senec, Senec, Slovakia, from 29 May to 8 June, 2012.   Following some background lectures on accelerator physics and the fundamental processes of atomic and plasma physics, the course covered a wide range of topics related to ion sources and highlighted the latest developments in the field. Realistic case studies and topical seminars completed the programme. The school was very successful, with 69 participants representing 25 nationalities. Feedback from the participants was extremely positive, reflecting the high standard of the lectures. The case studies were performed with great enthusiasm and produced some excellent results. In addition to the academic programme, the participants were able to take part in a one-day excursion consisting of a guided tour of Bratislava and free time. A welcome event was held at the Hotel Senec, with s...

  6. CAS course on Plasma Wake Acceleration

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Accelerator School

    2015-01-01

    The CERN Accelerator School (CAS) recently organised a specialised course on Plasma Wake Acceleration, held at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland, from 23 to 29 November 2014.    Following a number of introductory lectures on laser and plasma physics, as well as an overview of conventional accelerators and their limitations, the course covered a large number of aspects of plasma wake acceleration schemes: the creation of plasma by high power lasers or particle beams, a description of the plasma creation process through simulations and the characteristics of the accelerated particle beams, including results of the latest achievements. Lectures on beam diagnostics, the applications of plasma accelerated beams, and topical seminars completed the programme.  The course was very successful, with 109 students of 26 nationalities attending; most participants coming from European counties, but also from the US, Israel, India, South Korea, Russia and Ukraine. Feedback from the participants was...

  7. Adaptation in CRISPR-Cas Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Samuel H; Richter, Hagen; Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Qimron, Udi

    2016-03-17

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins constitute an adaptive immune system in prokaryotes. The system preserves memories of prior infections by integrating short segments of foreign DNA, termed spacers, into the CRISPR array in a process termed adaptation. During the past 3 years, significant progress has been made on the genetic requirements and molecular mechanisms of adaptation. Here we review these recent advances, with a focus on the experimental approaches that have been developed, the insights they generated, and a proposed mechanism for self- versus non-self-discrimination during the process of spacer selection. We further describe the regulation of adaptation and the protein players involved in this fascinating process that allows bacteria and archaea to harbor adaptive immunity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. CAS medium-size nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogelweith, L.; Weiss, A.

    1977-01-01

    CEA has developed a range of pressurized water reactors of the type CAS Compact, which are adapted to civil ship propulsion, or to electric power production, combined possibly with heat production, up to outputs equivalent to 125MW(e). Nuclear plants equipped with these reactors are suitable for medium-size electric networks, especially in developing countries, because they are easily adaptable, owing to their flexibility; they can be installed and used in a variety of ways (on land, floating installation, combination of electric power and other production, etc.); they can be used as training reactors by countries wishing to limit their investment plans before undertaking a wider nuclear development. Examples of two possible realizations are presented: as a floating plant, and as a combined electric and desalting plant. (author)

  9. Nucleosome breathing and remodeling constrain CRISPR-Cas9 function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, R Stefan; Jiang, Fuguo; Doudna, Jennifer A; Lim, Wendell A; Narlikar, Geeta J; Almeida, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas9 bacterial surveillance system has become a versatile tool for genome editing and gene regulation in eukaryotic cells, yet how CRISPR-Cas9 contends with the barriers presented by eukaryotic chromatin is poorly understood. Here we investigate how the smallest unit of chromatin, a nucleosome, constrains the activity of the CRISPR-Cas9 system. We find that nucleosomes assembled on native DNA sequences are permissive to Cas9 action. However, the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA to Cas9 is variable over several orders of magnitude depending on dynamic properties of the DNA sequence and the distance of the PAM site from the nucleosome dyad. We further find that chromatin remodeling enzymes stimulate Cas9 activity on nucleosomal templates. Our findings imply that the spontaneous breathing of nucleosomal DNA together with the action of chromatin remodelers allow Cas9 to effectively act on chromatin in vivo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13450.001 PMID:27130520

  10. CRISPR/Cas9 for cancer research and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Tianzuo; Rindtorff, Niklas; Betge, Johannes; Ebert, Matthias P; Boutros, Michael

    2018-04-16

    CRISPR/Cas9 has become a powerful method for making changes to the genome of many organisms. First discovered in bacteria as part of an adaptive immune system, CRISPR/Cas9 and modified versions have found a widespread use to engineer genomes and to activate or to repress the expression of genes. As such, CRISPR/Cas9 promises to accelerate cancer research by providing an efficient technology to dissect mechanisms of tumorigenesis, identify targets for drug development, and possibly arm cells for cell-based therapies. Here, we review current applications of the CRISPR/Cas9 technology for cancer research and therapy. We describe novel Cas9 variants and how they are used in functional genomics to discover novel cancer-specific vulnerabilities. Furthermore, we highlight the impact of CRISPR/Cas9 in generating organoid and mouse models of cancer. Finally, we provide an overview of the first clinical trials that apply CRISPR/Cas9 as a therapeutic approach against cancer. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. CRISPR/Cas9 in Genome Editing and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haifeng; La Russa, Marie; Qi, Lei S

    2016-06-02

    The Cas9 protein (CRISPR-associated protein 9), derived from type II CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) bacterial immune systems, is emerging as a powerful tool for engineering the genome in diverse organisms. As an RNA-guided DNA endonuclease, Cas9 can be easily programmed to target new sites by altering its guide RNA sequence, and its development as a tool has made sequence-specific gene editing several magnitudes easier. The nuclease-deactivated form of Cas9 further provides a versatile RNA-guided DNA-targeting platform for regulating and imaging the genome, as well as for rewriting the epigenetic status, all in a sequence-specific manner. With all of these advances, we have just begun to explore the possible applications of Cas9 in biomedical research and therapeutics. In this review, we describe the current models of Cas9 function and the structural and biochemical studies that support it. We focus on the applications of Cas9 for genome editing, regulation, and imaging, discuss other possible applications and some technical considerations, and highlight the many advantages that CRISPR/Cas9 technology offers.

  12. CRISPR/Cas9 Based Genome Editing of Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, C; Kiel, J A K W; Driessen, A J M; Bovenberg, R A L; Nygård, Y

    2016-07-15

    CRISPR/Cas9 based systems have emerged as versatile platforms for precision genome editing in a wide range of organisms. Here we have developed powerful CRISPR/Cas9 tools for marker-based and marker-free genome modifications in Penicillium chrysogenum, a model filamentous fungus and industrially relevant cell factory. The developed CRISPR/Cas9 toolbox is highly flexible and allows editing of new targets with minimal cloning efforts. The Cas9 protein and the sgRNA can be either delivered during transformation, as preassembled CRISPR-Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) or expressed from an AMA1 based plasmid within the cell. The direct delivery of the Cas9 protein with in vitro synthesized sgRNA to the cells allows for a transient method for genome engineering that may rapidly be applicable for other filamentous fungi. The expression of Cas9 from an AMA1 based vector was shown to be highly efficient for marker-free gene deletions.

  13. Engineering Plant Immunity via CRISPR/Cas13a System

    KAUST Repository

    Aljedaani, Fatimah R.

    2018-05-01

    Viral diseases constitute a major threat to the agricultural production and food security throughout the world. Plants cope with the invading viruses by triggering immune responses and small RNA interference (RNAi) systems. In prokaryotes, CRISPR/Cas systems function as an adaptive immune system to provide bacteria with resistance against invading phages and conjugative plasmids. Interestingly, CRISPR/Cas9 system was shown to interfere with eukaryotic DNA viruses and confer resistance against plant DNA viruses. The majority of the plant viruses have RNA genomes. The aim of this study is to test the ability of the newly discovered CRISPR/Cas13a immune system, that targets and cleaves single stranded RNA (ssRNA) in prokaryotes, to provide resistance against RNA viruses in plants. Here, I employ the CRISPR/Cas13a system for molecular interference against Turnip Mosaic Virus (TuMV), a plant RNA virus. The results of this study established the CRISPR/Cas13a as a molecular interference machinery against RNA viruses in plants. Specifically, my data show that the CRISPR/Cas13a machinery is able to interfere with and degrade the TuMV (TuMV-GFP) RNA genome. In conclusion, these data indicate that the CRISPR/Cas13 systems can be employed for engineering interference and durable resistance against RNA viruses in diverse plant species.

  14. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated viral interference in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Zahir

    2015-11-11

    Background The CRISPR/Cas9 system provides bacteria and archaea with molecular immunity against invading phages and conjugative plasmids. Recently, CRISPR/Cas9 has been used for targeted genome editing in diverse eukaryotic species. Results In this study, we investigate whether the CRISPR/Cas9 system could be used in plants to confer molecular immunity against DNA viruses. We deliver sgRNAs specific for coding and non-coding sequences of tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) into Nicotiana benthamiana plants stably overexpressing the Cas9 endonuclease, and subsequently challenge these plants with TYLCV. Our data demonstrate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system targeted TYLCV for degradation and introduced mutations at the target sequences. All tested sgRNAs exhibit interference activity, but those targeting the stem-loop sequence within the TYLCV origin of replication in the intergenic region (IR) are the most effective. N. benthamiana plants expressing CRISPR/Cas9 exhibit delayed or reduced accumulation of viral DNA, abolishing or significantly attenuating symptoms of infection. Moreover, this system could simultaneously target multiple DNA viruses. Conclusions These data establish the efficacy of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for viral interference in plants, thereby extending the utility of this technology and opening the possibility of producing plants resistant to multiple viral infections.

  15. Tumeur de Frantz: deux nouveaux cas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellarbi, Salma; Sina, Mohamed; Jahid, Ahmed; Zouaidia, Fouad; Bernoussi, Zakia; Mahassini, Najat

    2013-01-01

    A travers cet article, nous détaillons les caractéristiques clinico-pathologiques et discutons l'histogenèse de la tumeur de Frantz. Deux patients opérés pour tumeur de Frantz. Ils ont eu un traitement chirurgical seul. L'étude morphologique était couplée à un examen immuno-histochimique (IHC) utilisant les anticorps anti CD10, anti- vimentine, anti-énolase neuronale spécifique (NSE), anti-synaptophysine, anti-chromogranine A et anti-cytokératine. Un immuno-marquage à l'anti-oestrogène et l'anti-progestérone a été réalisé dans un cas. Il s'agissait d'une femme âgée de 45ans et d'un garçon de 12 ans. Les aspects échographiques et scannographiques étaient non spécifiques. Une exérèse chirurgicale complète a été réalisée dans les deux cas. L'analyse histologique évoquait une tumeur de Frantz. Le diagnostic a été retenu après étude immuno-histohimique. L'évolution était favorable sans récidive avec respectivement un recul de 18 et 16 mois. La tumeur de Frantz est une entité rare. Son diagnostic repose sur l'examen anatomopathologique complété par l'étude immuno-histochimique. Son pronostic est excellent après résection chirurgicale. PMID:23503717

  16. Programmable RNA recognition and cleavage by CRISPR/Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Mitchell R; Oakes, Benjamin L; Sternberg, Samuel H; East-Seletsky, Alexandra; Kaplan, Matias; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2014-12-11

    The CRISPR-associated protein Cas9 is an RNA-guided DNA endonuclease that uses RNA-DNA complementarity to identify target sites for sequence-specific double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) cleavage. In its native context, Cas9 acts on DNA substrates exclusively because both binding and catalysis require recognition of a short DNA sequence, known as the protospacer adjacent motif (PAM), next to and on the strand opposite the twenty-nucleotide target site in dsDNA. Cas9 has proven to be a versatile tool for genome engineering and gene regulation in a large range of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell types, and in whole organisms, but it has been thought to be incapable of targeting RNA. Here we show that Cas9 binds with high affinity to single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) targets matching the Cas9-associated guide RNA sequence when the PAM is presented in trans as a separate DNA oligonucleotide. Furthermore, PAM-presenting oligonucleotides (PAMmers) stimulate site-specific endonucleolytic cleavage of ssRNA targets, similar to PAM-mediated stimulation of Cas9-catalysed DNA cleavage. Using specially designed PAMmers, Cas9 can be specifically directed to bind or cut RNA targets while avoiding corresponding DNA sequences, and we demonstrate that this strategy enables the isolation of a specific endogenous messenger RNA from cells. These results reveal a fundamental connection between PAM binding and substrate selection by Cas9, and highlight the utility of Cas9 for programmable transcript recognition without the need for tags.

  17. CRISPR/Cas9 advances engineering of microbial cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakociunas, Tadas; Jensen, Michael Krogh; Keasling, Jay D.

    2016-01-01

    interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and its associated proteins (Cas) have become the method of choice for precision genome engineering in many organisms due to their orthogonality, versatility and efficacy. Here we review the strategies adopted for implementation of RNA-guided CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing......-RNAs will be highlighted. Finally, this review will provide a perspective on the immediate challenges and opportunities foreseen by the use of CRISPR/Cas9 genome engineering and regulation in the context of metabolic engineering....

  18. Optimizing CRISPR/Cas9 for the Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Stukenberg

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available CRISPR/Cas9 is a powerful tool for genome editing. We constructed an easy-to-handle expression vector for application in the model organism Phaeodactylum tricornutum and tested its capabilities in order to apply CRISPR/Cas9 technology for our purpose. In our experiments, we targeted two different genes, screened for mutations and analyzed mutated diatoms in a three-step process. In the end, we identified cells, showing either monoallelic or homo-biallelic targeted mutations. Thus, we confirm that application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for P. tricornutum is very promising, although, as discussed, overlooked pitfalls have to be considered.

  19. Coevolutionary constraints in the sequence-space of macromolecular complexes reflect their self-assembly pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Saurav; Kundu, Sudip

    2017-07-01

    Is the order in which biomolecular subunits self-assemble into functional macromolecular complexes imprinted in their sequence-space? Here, we demonstrate that the temporal order of macromolecular complex self-assembly can be efficiently captured using the landscape of residue-level coevolutionary constraints. This predictive power of coevolutionary constraints is irrespective of the structural, functional, and phylogenetic classification of the complex and of the stoichiometry and quaternary arrangement of the constituent monomers. Combining this result with a number of structural attributes estimated from the crystal structure data, we find indications that stronger coevolutionary constraints at interfaces formed early in the assembly hierarchy probably promotes coordinated fixation of mutations that leads to high-affinity binding with higher surface area, increased surface complementarity and elevated number of molecular contacts, compared to those that form late in the assembly. Proteins 2017; 85:1183-1189. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Clustering procedures for the optimal selection of data sets from multiple crystals in macromolecular crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foadi, James; Aller, Pierre; Alguel, Yilmaz; Cameron, Alex; Axford, Danny; Owen, Robin L.; Armour, Wes; Waterman, David G.; Iwata, So; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2013-01-01

    A systematic approach to the scaling and merging of data from multiple crystals in macromolecular crystallography is introduced and explained. The availability of intense microbeam macromolecular crystallography beamlines at third-generation synchrotron sources has enabled data collection and structure solution from microcrystals of <10 µm in size. The increased likelihood of severe radiation damage where microcrystals or particularly sensitive crystals are used forces crystallographers to acquire large numbers of data sets from many crystals of the same protein structure. The associated analysis and merging of multi-crystal data is currently a manual and time-consuming step. Here, a computer program, BLEND, that has been written to assist with and automate many of the steps in this process is described. It is demonstrated how BLEND has successfully been used in the solution of a novel membrane protein

  1. Variationally optimal selection of slow coordinates and reaction coordinates in macromolecular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noe, Frank

    To efficiently simulate and generate understanding from simulations of complex macromolecular systems, the concept of slow collective coordinates or reaction coordinates is of fundamental importance. Here we will introduce variational approaches to approximate the slow coordinates and the reaction coordinates between selected end-states given MD simulations of the macromolecular system and a (possibly large) basis set of candidate coordinates. We will then discuss how to select physically intuitive order paremeters that are good surrogates of this variationally optimal result. These result can be used in order to construct Markov state models or other models of the stationary and kinetics properties, in order to parametrize low-dimensional / coarse-grained model of the dynamics. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, European Research Council.

  2. Local analysis of strains and rotations for macromolecular electron microscopy maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Ramos, A.; Prieto, F.; Melero, R.; Martin-Benito, J.; Jonic, S.; Navas-Calvente, J.; Vargas, J.; Oton, J.; Abrishami, V.; Rosa-Trevin, J.L. de la; Gomez-Blanco, J.; Vilas, J.L.; Marabini, R.; Carazo, R.; Sorzano, C.O.S.

    2016-07-01

    Macromolecular complexes can be considered as molecular nano-machines that must have mobile parts in order to perform their physiological functions. The reordering of their parts is essential to execute their task. These rearrangements induce local strains and rotations which, after analyzing them, may provide relevant information about how the proteins perform their function. In this project these deformations of the macromolecular complexes are characterized, translating into a “mathematical language” the conformational changes of the complexes when they perform their function. Electron Microscopy (EM) volumes are analyzed using a method that uses B-splines as its basis functions. It is shown that the results obtained are consistent with the conformational changes described in their corresponding reference publications. (Author)

  3. Macromolecularly crowded in vitro microenvironments accelerate the production of extracellular matrix-rich supramolecular assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pramod; Satyam, Abhigyan; Fan, Xingliang; Collin, Estelle; Rochev, Yury; Rodriguez, Brian J; Gorelov, Alexander; Dillon, Simon; Joshi, Lokesh; Raghunath, Michael; Pandit, Abhay; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I

    2015-03-04

    Therapeutic strategies based on the principles of tissue engineering by self-assembly put forward the notion that functional regeneration can be achieved by utilising the inherent capacity of cells to create highly sophisticated supramolecular assemblies. However, in dilute ex vivo microenvironments, prolonged culture time is required to develop an extracellular matrix-rich implantable device. Herein, we assessed the influence of macromolecular crowding, a biophysical phenomenon that regulates intra- and extra-cellular activities in multicellular organisms, in human corneal fibroblast culture. In the presence of macromolecules, abundant extracellular matrix deposition was evidenced as fast as 48 h in culture, even at low serum concentration. Temperature responsive copolymers allowed the detachment of dense and cohesive supramolecularly assembled living substitutes within 6 days in culture. Morphological, histological, gene and protein analysis assays demonstrated maintenance of tissue-specific function. Macromolecular crowding opens new avenues for a more rational design in engineering of clinically relevant tissue modules in vitro.

  4. Atomic force microscopy applied to study macromolecular content of embedded biological material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsko, Nadejda B. [Electron Microscopy Centre, Institute of Applied Physics, HPM C 15.1, ETH-Hoenggerberg, CH-8093, Zurich (Switzerland)]. E-mail: matsko@iap.phys.ethz.ch

    2007-02-15

    We demonstrate that atomic force microscopy represents a powerful tool for the estimation of structural preservation of biological samples embedded in epoxy resin, in terms of their macromolecular distribution and architecture. The comparison of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of a biosample (Caenorhabditis elegans) prepared following to different types of freeze-substitution protocols (conventional OsO{sub 4} fixation, epoxy fixation) led to the conclusion that high TEM stainability of the sample results from a low macromolecular density of the cellular matrix. We propose a novel procedure aimed to obtain AFM and TEM images of the same particular organelle, which strongly facilitates AFM image interpretation and reveals new ultrastructural aspects (mainly protein arrangement) of a biosample in addition to TEM data.

  5. Extraction of cobalt ion from textile using a complexing macromolecular surfactant in supercritical carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirat, Mathieu; Ribaut, Tiphaine; Clerc, Sebastien; Lacroix-Desmazes, Patrick; Charton, Frederic; Fournel, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt ion under the form of cobalt nitrate is removed from a textile lab coat using supercritical carbon dioxide extraction. The process involves a macromolecular additive of well-defined architecture, acting both as a surfactant and a complexing agent. The extraction efficiency of cobalt reaches 66% when using a poly(1,1,2,2-tetrahydroperfluoro-decyl-acrylate-co-vinyl-benzylphosphonic diacid) gradient copolymer in the presence of water at 160 bar and 40 C. The synergy of the two additives, namely the copolymer and water which are useless if used separately, is pointed out. The potential of the supercritical carbon dioxide process using complexing macromolecular surfactant lies in the ability to modulate the complexing unit as a function of the metal as well as the architecture of the surface-active agent for applications ranging for instance from nuclear decontamination to the recovery of strategic metals. (authors)

  6. Clustering procedures for the optimal selection of data sets from multiple crystals in macromolecular crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foadi, James [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Aller, Pierre [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Alguel, Yilmaz; Cameron, Alex [Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Axford, Danny; Owen, Robin L. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Armour, Wes [Oxford e-Research Centre (OeRC), Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3QG (United Kingdom); Waterman, David G. [Research Complex at Harwell (RCaH), Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Iwata, So [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Evans, Gwyndaf, E-mail: gwyndaf.evans@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-01

    A systematic approach to the scaling and merging of data from multiple crystals in macromolecular crystallography is introduced and explained. The availability of intense microbeam macromolecular crystallography beamlines at third-generation synchrotron sources has enabled data collection and structure solution from microcrystals of <10 µm in size. The increased likelihood of severe radiation damage where microcrystals or particularly sensitive crystals are used forces crystallographers to acquire large numbers of data sets from many crystals of the same protein structure. The associated analysis and merging of multi-crystal data is currently a manual and time-consuming step. Here, a computer program, BLEND, that has been written to assist with and automate many of the steps in this process is described. It is demonstrated how BLEND has successfully been used in the solution of a novel membrane protein.

  7. Pi sampling: a methodical and flexible approach to initial macromolecular crystallization screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorrec, Fabrice; Palmer, Colin M.; Lebon, Guillaume; Warne, Tony

    2011-01-01

    Pi sampling, derived from the incomplete factorial approach, is an effort to maximize the diversity of macromolecular crystallization conditions and to facilitate the preparation of 96-condition initial screens. The Pi sampling method is derived from the incomplete factorial approach to macromolecular crystallization screen design. The resulting ‘Pi screens’ have a modular distribution of a given set of up to 36 stock solutions. Maximally diverse conditions can be produced by taking into account the properties of the chemicals used in the formulation and the concentrations of the corresponding solutions. The Pi sampling method has been implemented in a web-based application that generates screen formulations and recipes. It is particularly adapted to screens consisting of 96 different conditions. The flexibility and efficiency of Pi sampling is demonstrated by the crystallization of soluble proteins and of an integral membrane-protein sample

  8. Macromolecular Engineering: New Routes Towards the Synthesis of Well-??Defined Polyethers/Polyesters Co/Terpolymers with Different Architectures

    KAUST Repository

    Alamri, Haleema

    2016-01-01

    Macromolecular engineering (as discussed in the first chapter) of homo/copolymers refers to the specific tailoring of these materials for achieving an easy and reproducible synthesis that results in precise molecular

  9. A guild of 45 CRISPR-associated (Cas protein families and multiple CRISPR/Cas subtypes exist in prokaryotic genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H Haft

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs are a family of DNA direct repeats found in many prokaryotic genomes. Repeats of 21-37 bp typically show weak dyad symmetry and are separated by regularly sized, nonrepetitive spacer sequences. Four CRISPR-associated (Cas protein families, designated Cas1 to Cas4, are strictly associated with CRISPR elements and always occur near a repeat cluster. Some spacers originate from mobile genetic elements and are thought to confer "immunity" against the elements that harbor these sequences. In the present study, we have systematically investigated uncharacterized proteins encoded in the vicinity of these CRISPRs and found many additional protein families that are strictly associated with CRISPR loci across multiple prokaryotic species. Multiple sequence alignments and hidden Markov models have been built for 45 Cas protein families. These models identify family members with high sensitivity and selectivity and classify key regulators of development, DevR and DevS, in Myxococcus xanthus as Cas proteins. These identifications show that CRISPR/cas gene regions can be quite large, with up to 20 different, tandem-arranged cas genes next to a repeat cluster or filling the region between two repeat clusters. Distinctive subsets of the collection of Cas proteins recur in phylogenetically distant species and correlate with characteristic repeat periodicity. The analyses presented here support initial proposals of mobility of these units, along with the likelihood that loci of different subtypes interact with one another as well as with host cell defensive, replicative, and regulatory systems. It is evident from this analysis that CRISPR/cas loci are larger, more complex, and more heterogeneous than previously appreciated.

  10. The Postgraduate Study of Macromolecular Sciences at the University of Zagreb (1971-1980)

    OpenAIRE

    Kunst, B.; Dezelic, D.; Veksli, Z.

    2008-01-01

    The postgraduate study of macromolecular sciences (PSMS) was established at the University of Zagreb in 1971 as a university study in the time of expressed interdisciplinary permeation of natural sciences - physics, chemistry and biology, and application of their achievements in technologicaldisciplines. PSMS was established by a group of prominent university professors from the schools of Science, Chemical Technology, Pharmacy and Medicine, as well as from the Institute of Biology. The study...

  11. The Postgraduate Study of Macromolecular Sciences at the University of Zagreb (1971– 1980)

    OpenAIRE

    Deželić, D.; Kunst, B.; Veksli, Zorica

    2008-01-01

    The postgraduate study of macromolecular sciences (PSMS) was established at the University of Zagreb in 1971 as a university study in the time of expressed interdisciplinary permeation of natural sciences - physics, chemistry and biology, and application of their achievements in technological disciplines. PSMS was established by a group of prominent university professors from the schools of Science, Chemical Technology, Pharmacy and Medicine, as well as from the Institute of Biology. The s...

  12. Measurement and Interpretation of Diffuse Scattering in X-Ray Diffraction for Macromolecular Crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, Michael E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-16

    X-ray diffraction from macromolecular crystals includes both sharply peaked Bragg reflections and diffuse intensity between the peaks. The information in Bragg scattering reflects the mean electron density in the unit cells of the crystal. The diffuse scattering arises from correlations in the variations of electron density that may occur from one unit cell to another, and therefore contains information about collective motions in proteins.

  13. Fully automated data collection and processing system on macromolecular crystallography beamlines at the PF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Yusuke; Hiraki, Masahiko; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Chavas, Leonard M.G.; Igarashi, Noriyuki; Wakatsuki, Soichi

    2012-01-01

    Fully automated data collection and processing system has been developed on macromolecular crystallography beamlines at the Photon Factory. In this system, the sample exchange, centering and data collection are sequentially performed for all samples stored in the sample exchange system at a beamline without any manual operations. Data processing of collected data sets is also performed automatically. These results are stored into the database system, and users can monitor the progress and results of automated experiment via a Web browser. (author)

  14. Macromolecular shape and interactions in layer-by-layer assemblies within cylindrical nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzara, Thomas D; Lau, K H Aaron; Knoll, Wolfgang; Janshoff, Andreas; Steinem, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition of polyelectrolytes and proteins within the cylindrical nanopores of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes was studied by optical waveguide spectroscopy (OWS). AAO has aligned cylindrical, nonintersecting pores with a defined pore diameter d(0) and functions as a planar optical waveguide so as to monitor, in situ, the LbL process by OWS. The LbL deposition of globular proteins, i.e., avidin and biotinylated bovine serum albumin was compared with that of linear polyelectrolytes (linear-PEs), both species being of similar molecular weight. LbL deposition within the cylindrical AAO geometry for different pore diameters (d(0) = 25-80 nm) for the various macromolecular species, showed that the multilayer film growth was inhibited at different maximum numbers of LbL steps (n(max)). The value of n(max) was greatest for linear-PEs, while proteins had a lower value. The cylindrical pore geometry imposes a physical limit to LbL growth such that n(max) is strongly dependent on the overall internal structure of the LbL film. For all macromolecular species, deposition was inhibited in native AAO, having pores of d(0) = 25-30 nm. Both, OWS and scanning electron microscopy showed that LbL growth in larger AAO pores (d(0) > 25-30 nm) became inhibited when approaching a pore diameter of d(eff,n_max) = 25-35 nm, a similar size to that of native AAO pores, with d(0) = 25-30 nm. For a reasonable estimation of d(eff,n_max), the actual volume occupied by a macromolecular assembly must be taken into consideration. The results clearly show that electrostatic LbL allowed for compact macromolecular layers, whereas proteins formed loosely packed multilayers.

  15. Tuning the properties of an anthracene-based PPE-PPV copolymer by fine variation of its macromolecular parameters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tinti, F.; Sabir, F. K.; Gazzano, M.; Righi, S.; Ulbricht, C.; Usluer, Ö.; Pokorná, Veronika; Cimrová, Věra; Yohannes, T.; Egbe, D. A. M.; Camaioni, N.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 19 (2013), s. 6972-6980 ISSN 2046-2069 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP106/12/0827; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-26542S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : anthracene-containing PPE-PPV copolymer * macromolecular parameters * structural and transport properties Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.708, year: 2013

  16. Macromolecular diffusion in crowded media beyond the hard-sphere model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Pablo M; Garcés, Josep Lluís; Madurga, Sergio; Mas, Francesc

    2018-04-25

    The effect of macromolecular crowding on diffusion beyond the hard-core sphere model is studied. A new coarse-grained model is presented, the Chain Entanglement Softened Potential (CESP) model, which takes into account the macromolecular flexibility and chain entanglement. The CESP model uses a shoulder-shaped interaction potential that is implemented in the Brownian Dynamics (BD) computations. The interaction potential contains only one parameter associated with the chain entanglement energetic cost (Ur). The hydrodynamic interactions are included in the BD computations via Tokuyama mean-field equations. The model is used to analyze the diffusion of a streptavidin protein among different sized dextran obstacles. For this system, Ur is obtained by fitting the streptavidin experimental long-time diffusion coefficient Dlongversus the macromolecular concentration for D50 (indicating their molecular weight in kg mol-1) dextran obstacles. The obtained Dlong values show better quantitative agreement with experiments than those obtained with hard-core spheres. Moreover, once parametrized, the CESP model is also able to quantitatively predict Dlong and the anomalous exponent (α) for streptavidin diffusion among D10, D400 and D700 dextran obstacles. Dlong, the short-time diffusion coefficient (Dshort) and α are obtained from the BD simulations by using a new empirical expression, able to describe the full temporal evolution of the diffusion coefficient.

  17. Homogenization Theory for the Prediction of Obstructed Solute Diffusivity in Macromolecular Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Preston; Chehreghanianzabi, Yasaman; Rathinam, Muruhan; Zustiak, Silviya Petrova

    2016-01-01

    The study of diffusion in macromolecular solutions is important in many biomedical applications such as separations, drug delivery, and cell encapsulation, and key for many biological processes such as protein assembly and interstitial transport. Not surprisingly, multiple models for the a-priori prediction of diffusion in macromolecular environments have been proposed. However, most models include parameters that are not readily measurable, are specific to the polymer-solute-solvent system, or are fitted and do not have a physical meaning. Here, for the first time, we develop a homogenization theory framework for the prediction of effective solute diffusivity in macromolecular environments based on physical parameters that are easily measurable and not specific to the macromolecule-solute-solvent system. Homogenization theory is useful for situations where knowledge of fine-scale parameters is used to predict bulk system behavior. As a first approximation, we focus on a model where the solute is subjected to obstructed diffusion via stationary spherical obstacles. We find that the homogenization theory results agree well with computationally more expensive Monte Carlo simulations. Moreover, the homogenization theory agrees with effective diffusivities of a solute in dilute and semi-dilute polymer solutions measured using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Lastly, we provide a mathematical formula for the effective diffusivity in terms of a non-dimensional and easily measurable geometric system parameter.

  18. Principles and Overview of Sampling Methods for Modeling Macromolecular Structure and Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximova, Tatiana; Moffatt, Ryan; Ma, Buyong; Nussinov, Ruth; Shehu, Amarda

    2016-04-01

    Investigation of macromolecular structure and dynamics is fundamental to understanding how macromolecules carry out their functions in the cell. Significant advances have been made toward this end in silico, with a growing number of computational methods proposed yearly to study and simulate various aspects of macromolecular structure and dynamics. This review aims to provide an overview of recent advances, focusing primarily on methods proposed for exploring the structure space of macromolecules in isolation and in assemblies for the purpose of characterizing equilibrium structure and dynamics. In addition to surveying recent applications that showcase current capabilities of computational methods, this review highlights state-of-the-art algorithmic techniques proposed to overcome challenges posed in silico by the disparate spatial and time scales accessed by dynamic macromolecules. This review is not meant to be exhaustive, as such an endeavor is impossible, but rather aims to balance breadth and depth of strategies for modeling macromolecular structure and dynamics for a broad audience of novices and experts.

  19. In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of Microparticulate Drug Delivery Systems Composed of Macromolecular Prodrugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiharu Machida

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Macromolecular prodrugs are very useful systems for achieving controlled drug release and drug targeting. In particular, various macromolecule-antitumor drug conjugates enhance the effectiveness and improve the toxic side effects. Also, polymeric micro- and nanoparticles have been actively examined and their in vivo behaviors elucidated, and it has been realized that their particle characteristics are very useful to control drug behavior. Recently, researches based on the combination of the concepts of macromolecular prodrugs and micro- or nanoparticles have been reported, although they are limited. Macromolecular prodrugs enable drugs to be released at a certain controlled release rate based on the features of the macromolecule-drug linkage. Micro- and nanoparticles can control in vivo behavior based on their size, surface charge and surface structure. These merits are expected for systems produced by the combination of each concept. In this review, several micro- or nanoparticles composed of macromolecule-drug conjugates are described for their preparation, in vitro properties and/or in vivo behavior.

  20. Homogenization Theory for the Prediction of Obstructed Solute Diffusivity in Macromolecular Solutions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preston Donovan

    Full Text Available The study of diffusion in macromolecular solutions is important in many biomedical applications such as separations, drug delivery, and cell encapsulation, and key for many biological processes such as protein assembly and interstitial transport. Not surprisingly, multiple models for the a-priori prediction of diffusion in macromolecular environments have been proposed. However, most models include parameters that are not readily measurable, are specific to the polymer-solute-solvent system, or are fitted and do not have a physical meaning. Here, for the first time, we develop a homogenization theory framework for the prediction of effective solute diffusivity in macromolecular environments based on physical parameters that are easily measurable and not specific to the macromolecule-solute-solvent system. Homogenization theory is useful for situations where knowledge of fine-scale parameters is used to predict bulk system behavior. As a first approximation, we focus on a model where the solute is subjected to obstructed diffusion via stationary spherical obstacles. We find that the homogenization theory results agree well with computationally more expensive Monte Carlo simulations. Moreover, the homogenization theory agrees with effective diffusivities of a solute in dilute and semi-dilute polymer solutions measured using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Lastly, we provide a mathematical formula for the effective diffusivity in terms of a non-dimensional and easily measurable geometric system parameter.

  1. MxCuBE: a synchrotron beamline control environment customized for macromolecular crystallography experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabadinho, José; Beteva, Antonia; Guijarro, Matias; Rey-Bakaikoa, Vicente; Spruce, Darren

    2010-01-01

    MxCuBE is a beamline control environment optimized for the needs of macromolecular crystallography. This paper describes the design of the software and the features that MxCuBE currently provides. The design and features of a beamline control software system for macromolecular crystallography (MX) experiments developed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) are described. This system, MxCuBE, allows users to easily and simply interact with beamline hardware components and provides automated routines for common tasks in the operation of a synchrotron beamline dedicated to experiments in MX. Additional functionality is provided through intuitive interfaces that enable the assessment of the diffraction characteristics of samples, experiment planning, automatic data collection and the on-line collection and analysis of X-ray emission spectra. The software can be run in a tandem client-server mode that allows for remote control and relevant experimental parameters and results are automatically logged in a relational database, ISPyB. MxCuBE is modular, flexible and extensible and is currently deployed on eight macromolecular crystallography beamlines at the ESRF. Additionally, the software is installed at MAX-lab beamline I911-3 and at BESSY beamline BL14.1

  2. A smooth and differentiable bulk-solvent model for macromolecular diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenn, T. D. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Schnieders, M. J. [Department of Chemistry, Stanford, California (United States); Brunger, A. T., E-mail: brunger@stanford.edu [Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Departments of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Structural Biology and Photon Science, Stanford, California (United States)

    2010-09-01

    A new method for modeling the bulk solvent in macromolecular diffraction data based on Babinet’s principle is presented. The proposed models offer the advantage of differentiability with respect to atomic coordinates. Inclusion of low-resolution data in macromolecular crystallography requires a model for the bulk solvent. Previous methods have used a binary mask to accomplish this, which has proven to be very effective, but the mask is discontinuous at the solute–solvent boundary (i.e. the mask value jumps from zero to one) and is not differentiable with respect to atomic parameters. Here, two algorithms are introduced for computing bulk-solvent models using either a polynomial switch or a smoothly thresholded product of Gaussians, and both models are shown to be efficient and differentiable with respect to atomic coordinates. These alternative bulk-solvent models offer algorithmic improvements, while showing similar agreement of the model with the observed amplitudes relative to the binary model as monitored using R, R{sub free} and differences between experimental and model phases. As with the standard solvent models, the alternative models improve the agreement primarily with lower resolution (>6 Å) data versus no bulk solvent. The models are easily implemented into crystallographic software packages and can be used as a general method for bulk-solvent correction in macromolecular crystallography.

  3. A smooth and differentiable bulk-solvent model for macromolecular diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenn, T. D.; Schnieders, M. J.; Brunger, A. T.

    2010-01-01

    A new method for modeling the bulk solvent in macromolecular diffraction data based on Babinet’s principle is presented. The proposed models offer the advantage of differentiability with respect to atomic coordinates. Inclusion of low-resolution data in macromolecular crystallography requires a model for the bulk solvent. Previous methods have used a binary mask to accomplish this, which has proven to be very effective, but the mask is discontinuous at the solute–solvent boundary (i.e. the mask value jumps from zero to one) and is not differentiable with respect to atomic parameters. Here, two algorithms are introduced for computing bulk-solvent models using either a polynomial switch or a smoothly thresholded product of Gaussians, and both models are shown to be efficient and differentiable with respect to atomic coordinates. These alternative bulk-solvent models offer algorithmic improvements, while showing similar agreement of the model with the observed amplitudes relative to the binary model as monitored using R, R free and differences between experimental and model phases. As with the standard solvent models, the alternative models improve the agreement primarily with lower resolution (>6 Å) data versus no bulk solvent. The models are easily implemented into crystallographic software packages and can be used as a general method for bulk-solvent correction in macromolecular crystallography

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how ... What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a way of obtaining ...

  5. Engineering Plant Immunity via CRISPR/Cas13a System

    KAUST Repository

    Aljedaani, Fatimah R.

    2018-01-01

    systems function as an adaptive immune system to provide bacteria with resistance against invading phages and conjugative plasmids. Interestingly, CRISPR/Cas9 system was shown to interfere with eukaryotic DNA viruses and confer resistance against plant DNA

  6. CRISPR/Cas13 as a Tool for RNA Interference

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Zahir; Mahas, Ahmed; Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2018-01-01

    Almost all biological processes involve RNA, making it crucial to develop tools for manipulation of the transcriptome. The bacterial CRISPR/Cas13 system was recently rewired to facilitate RNA manipulation in eukaryotes, including plants. We discuss

  7. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated viral interference in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Zahir; Abulfaraj, Aala A.; Idris, Ali; Ali, Shawkat; Tashkandi, Manal; Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2015-01-01

    These data establish the efficacy of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for viral interference in plants, thereby extending the utility of this technology and opening the possibility of producing plants resistant to multiple viral infections.

  8. CRISPR-Cas systems: prokaryotes upgrade to adaptive immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrangou, Rodolphe; Marraffini, Luciano A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR), and associated proteins (Cas) comprise the CRISPR-Cas system, which confers adaptive immunity against exogenic elements in many bacteria and most archaea. CRISPR-mediated immunization occurs through the uptake of DNA from invasive genetic elements such as plasmids and viruses, followed by its integration into CRISPR loci. These loci are subsequently transcribed and processed into small interfering RNAs that guide nucleases for specific cleavage of complementary sequences. Conceptually, CRISPR-Cas shares functional features with the mammalian adaptive immune system, while also exhibiting characteristics of Lamarckian evolution. Because immune markers spliced from exogenous agents are integrated iteratively in CRISPR loci, they constitute a genetic record of vaccination events and reflect environmental conditions and changes over time. Cas endonucleases, which can be reprogrammed by small guide RNAs have shown unprecedented potential and flexibility for genome editing, and can be repurposed for numerous DNA targeting applications including transcriptional control. PMID:24766887

  9. Gaussian-Based Smooth Dielectric Function: A Surface-Free Approach for Modeling Macromolecular Binding in Solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arghya Chakravorty

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Conventional modeling techniques to model macromolecular solvation and its effect on binding in the framework of Poisson-Boltzmann based implicit solvent models make use of a geometrically defined surface to depict the separation of macromolecular interior (low dielectric constant from the solvent phase (high dielectric constant. Though this simplification saves time and computational resources without significantly compromising the accuracy of free energy calculations, it bypasses some of the key physio-chemical properties of the solute-solvent interface, e.g., the altered flexibility of water molecules and that of side chains at the interface, which results in dielectric properties different from both bulk water and macromolecular interior, respectively. Here we present a Gaussian-based smooth dielectric model, an inhomogeneous dielectric distribution model that mimics the effect of macromolecular flexibility and captures the altered properties of surface bound water molecules. Thus, the model delivers a smooth transition of dielectric properties from the macromolecular interior to the solvent phase, eliminating any unphysical surface separating the two phases. Using various examples of macromolecular binding, we demonstrate its utility and illustrate the comparison with the conventional 2-dielectric model. We also showcase some additional abilities of this model, viz. to account for the effect of electrolytes in the solution and to render the distribution profile of water across a lipid membrane.

  10. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... examination poses almost no risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed. If sedation is used, there ... patient story here Images × ... Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials MRI Safety During Pregnancy Images related ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed pictures ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... images and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the ... This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a few types. ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... interfere with the magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in ... does the equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings ... tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms that ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... women should not have this exam in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the ... not to have an MRI exam during the first trimester unless medically necessary. MRI may not always ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... important to assess the health and function of these structures (heart, valves, great vessels, etc.). top of ... room. In addition to affecting the MRI images, these objects can become projectiles within the MRI scanner ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... heart, valves, great vessels, etc.). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ... MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven valuable in ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... used in MRI exams is less likely to produce an allergic reaction than the iodine-based contrast ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played ... the limitations of MRI of the Chest? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

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    ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ... might be obscured by bone with other imaging methods. The contrast material used in MRI exams is ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that ... risking the side effects of conventional (catheter) angiography . Risks The MRI examination poses almost no risk to ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI examination poses almost no risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed. If ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... other internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians ... computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography ( ...

  11. Canalis basilaris medianus: MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquemin, C.; Bosley, T.M.; Al Saleh, M.; Mullaney, P.

    2000-01-01

    We report the MRI appearances of an developmental anatomical variant of the basiocciput, with neuroimaging findings (CT and MRI). Such variants are commonly asymptomatic, but may be associated with episodes of meningitis. (orig.)

  12. Cas4-Dependent Prespacer Processing Ensures High-Fidelity Programming of CRISPR Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hayun; Zhou, Yi; Taylor, David W; Sashital, Dipali G

    2018-04-05

    CRISPR-Cas immune systems integrate short segments of foreign DNA as spacers into the host CRISPR locus to provide molecular memory of infection. Cas4 proteins are widespread in CRISPR-Cas systems and are thought to participate in spacer acquisition, although their exact function remains unknown. Here we show that Bacillus halodurans type I-C Cas4 is required for efficient prespacer processing prior to Cas1-Cas2-mediated integration. Cas4 interacts tightly with the Cas1 integrase, forming a heterohexameric complex containing two Cas1 dimers and two Cas4 subunits. In the presence of Cas1 and Cas2, Cas4 processes double-stranded substrates with long 3' overhangs through site-specific endonucleolytic cleavage. Cas4 recognizes PAM sequences within the prespacer and prevents integration of unprocessed prespacers, ensuring that only functional spacers will be integrated into the CRISPR array. Our results reveal the critical role of Cas4 in maintaining fidelity during CRISPR adaptation, providing a structural and mechanistic model for prespacer processing and integration. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. CRISPR/Cas9: Transcending the Reality of Genome Editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chira, Sergiu; Gulei, Diana; Hajitou, Amin; Zimta, Alina-Andreea; Cordelier, Pierre; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana

    2017-06-16

    With the expansion of the microbiology field of research, a new genome editing tool arises from the biology of bacteria that holds the promise of achieving precise modifications in the genome with a simplicity and versatility that surpasses previous genome editing methods. This new technique, commonly named CRISPR/Cas9, led to a rapid expansion of the biomedical field; more specifically, cancer characterization and modeling have benefitted greatly from the genome editing capabilities of CRISPR/Cas9. In this paper, we briefly summarize recent improvements in CRISPR/Cas9 design meant to overcome the limitations that have arisen from the nuclease activity of Cas9 and the influence of this technology in cancer research. In addition, we present challenges that might impede the clinical applicability of CRISPR/Cas9 for cancer therapy and highlight future directions for designing CRISPR/Cas9 delivery systems that might prove useful for cancer therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Applications of CRISPR/Cas System to Bacterial Metabolic Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhyung Cho

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated (CRISPR/Cas adaptive immune system has been extensively used for gene editing, including gene deletion, insertion, and replacement in bacterial and eukaryotic cells owing to its simple, rapid, and efficient activities in unprecedented resolution. Furthermore, the CRISPR interference (CRISPRi system including deactivated Cas9 (dCas9 with inactivated endonuclease activity has been further investigated for regulation of the target gene transiently or constitutively, avoiding cell death by disruption of genome. This review discusses the applications of CRISPR/Cas for genome editing in various bacterial systems and their applications. In particular, CRISPR technology has been used for the production of metabolites of high industrial significance, including biochemical, biofuel, and pharmaceutical products/precursors in bacteria. Here, we focus on methods to increase the productivity and yield/titer scan by controlling metabolic flux through individual or combinatorial use of CRISPR/Cas and CRISPRi systems with introduction of synthetic pathway in industrially common bacteria including Escherichia coli. Further, we discuss additional useful applications of the CRISPR/Cas system, including its use in functional genomics.

  15. Editing plants for virus resistance using CRISPR-Cas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, J C; Hu, J S

    This minireview summarizes recent advancements using the clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats-associated nuclease systems (CRISPR-Cas) derived from prokaryotes to breed plants resistant to DNA and RNA viruses. The CRISPR-Cas system represents a powerful tool able to edit and insert novel traits into plants precisely at chosen loci offering enormous advantages to classical breeding. Approaches to engineering plant virus resistance in both transgenic and non-transgenic plants are discussed. Iterations of the CRISPR-Cas system, FnCas9 and C2c2 capable of editing RNA in eukaryotic cells offer a particular advantage for providing resistance to RNA viruses which represent the great majority of known plant viruses. Scientists have obtained conflicting results using gene silencing technology to produce transgenic plants resistant to geminiviruses. CRISPR-Cas systems engineered in plants to target geminiviruses have consistently reduced virus accumulation providing increased resistance to virus infection. CRISPR-Cas may provide novel and reliable approaches to control geminiviruses and other ssDNA viruses such as Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV).

  16. Efficient CRISPR/Cas9-based gene knockout in watermelon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Shouwei; Jiang, Linjian; Gao, Qiang; Zhang, Jie; Zong, Mei; Zhang, Haiying; Ren, Yi; Guo, Shaogui; Gong, Guoyi; Liu, Fan; Xu, Yong

    2017-03-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 system can precisely edit genomic sequence and effectively create knockout mutations in T0 generation watermelon plants. Genome editing offers great advantage to reveal gene function and generate agronomically important mutations to crops. Recently, RNA-guided genome editing system using the type II clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein 9 (Cas9) has been applied to several plant species, achieving successful targeted mutagenesis. Here, we report the genome of watermelon, an important fruit crop, can also be precisely edited by CRISPR/Cas9 system. ClPDS, phytoene desaturase in watermelon, was selected as the target gene because its mutant bears evident albino phenotype. CRISPR/Cas9 system performed genome editing, such as insertions or deletions at the expected position, in transfected watermelon protoplast cells. More importantly, all transgenic watermelon plants harbored ClPDS mutations and showed clear or mosaic albino phenotype, indicating that CRISPR/Cas9 system has technically 100% of genome editing efficiency in transgenic watermelon lines. Furthermore, there were very likely no off-target mutations, indicated by examining regions that were highly homologous to sgRNA sequences. Our results show that CRISPR/Cas9 system is a powerful tool to effectively create knockout mutations in watermelon.

  17. MRI in acute poliomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornreich, L. [Imaging Department, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Kaplan Street, Petah Tiqva 49202 (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Dagan, O. [The Intensive Care Unit, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Beilinson Medical Campus, Petah Tiqva (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Grunebaum, M. [Imaging Department, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Kaplan Street, Petah Tiqva 49202 (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    1996-05-01

    MRI can be used in the diagnosis of anterior horn infection and for assessing the extent of disease. There are no specific MRI signs to differentiate between the various possible pathogens. This is demonstrated in the present case of poliomyelitis, in which MRI of the spine played an important role in establishing the diagnosis. (orig.). With 1 fig.

  18. MRI in acute poliomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornreich, L.; Dagan, O.; Grunebaum, M.

    1996-01-01

    MRI can be used in the diagnosis of anterior horn infection and for assessing the extent of disease. There are no specific MRI signs to differentiate between the various possible pathogens. This is demonstrated in the present case of poliomyelitis, in which MRI of the spine played an important role in establishing the diagnosis. (orig.). With 1 fig

  19. Effects of MRI-assayed microvascular permeability on the accumulation of vinorelbine in xenograft tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raatschen, H.J.; Fu, Y.; Rogut, V.; Brasch, R.C.; Simon, G.H.; Sennino, B.; Wolf, K.J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effects of MRI-assayed vascular leakiness on the delivery of macro-molecular therapeutics to tumors. Materials and Methods: MDA-MB 435 tumors, subcutaneously implanted into nude rats were treated with a single dose of bevacizumab at levels of 0.1 mg (n = 5) or 1.0 mg (n = 10) or received saline (control animals, n = 8). After 24 hours, albumin-(Gd-DTPA) 30 -enhanced MRI was performed. Just prior to MRI, the cytotoxic drug vinorelbine was administered intravenously. Upon completion of the MR experiment, tumor vinorelbine concentrations were quantified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Vascular leakiness (K PS ) was calculated based on the MRI data using a pharmacokinetic model. Results: K PS was calculated as 3.70 ± 1.12 (control tumors), 1.95 ± 0.70 (0.1 mg group) and 0.75 ± 0.46 μl min -1 cm -3 (1.0 mg group). K PS was significantly higher in the control group compared to the 1.0 mg bevacizumab group. Vinorelbine concentrations were measured as 409.4 ± 109.7 (control tumors), 387.5 ± 47.5 (0.1 mg group) and 250.7 ± 71.9 (1.0 mg group). These differences were not significant. A moderate and significant correlation was found between K PS and Vinorelbine concentrations in tumors (r = 0.49, p PS based on dynamic MRI enhanced by albumin-(Gd-DTPA) 30 correlated significantly with vinorelbine accumulation in experimental xenograft tumors under angiogenesis inhibition. Thus, the MRI technique applied in our study could potentially help to predict accumulation of macromolecular cytotoxic drugs and to optimize individual therapeutic regimes in tumors. (orig.)

  20. Mutations in Cas9 Enhance the Rate of Acquisition of Viral Spacer Sequences during the CRISPR-Cas Immune Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heler, Robert; Wright, Addison V; Vucelja, Marija; Bikard, David; Doudna, Jennifer A; Marraffini, Luciano A

    2017-01-05

    CRISPR loci and their associated (Cas) proteins encode a prokaryotic immune system that protects against viruses and plasmids. Upon infection, a low fraction of cells acquire short DNA sequences from the invader. These sequences (spacers) are integrated in between the repeats of the CRISPR locus and immunize the host against the matching invader. Spacers specify the targets of the CRISPR immune response through transcription into short RNA guides that direct Cas nucleases to the invading DNA molecules. Here we performed random mutagenesis of the RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease to look for variants that provide enhanced immunity against viral infection. We identified a mutation, I473F, that increases the rate of spacer acquisition by more than two orders of magnitude. Our results highlight the role of Cas9 during CRISPR immunization and provide a useful tool to study this rare process and develop it as a biotechnological application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Examination of CRISPR/Cas9 design tools and the effect of target site accessibility on Cas9 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ciaran M; Davis, Timothy H; Bao, Gang

    2018-04-01

    What is the topic of this review? In this review, we analyse the performance of recently described tools for CRISPR/Cas9 guide RNA design, in particular, design tools that predict CRISPR/Cas9 activity. What advances does it highlight? Recently, many tools designed to predict CRISPR/Cas9 activity have been reported. However, the majority of these tools lack experimental validation. Our analyses indicate that these tools have poor predictive power. Our preliminary results suggest that target site accessibility should be considered in order to develop better guide RNA design tools with improved predictive power. The recent adaptation of the clustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system for targeted genome engineering has led to its widespread application in many fields worldwide. In order to gain a better understanding of the design rules of CRISPR/Cas9 systems, several groups have carried out large library-based screens leading to some insight into sequence preferences among highly active target sites. To facilitate CRISPR/Cas9 design, these studies have spawned a plethora of guide RNA (gRNA) design tools with algorithms based solely on direct or indirect sequence features. Here, we demonstrate that the predictive power of these tools is poor, suggesting that sequence features alone cannot accurately inform the cutting efficiency of a particular CRISPR/Cas9 gRNA design. Furthermore, we demonstrate that DNA target site accessibility influences the activity of CRISPR/Cas9. With further optimization, we hypothesize that it will be possible to increase the predictive power of gRNA design tools by including both sequence and target site accessibility metrics. © 2017 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  2. A Cas9 transgenic Plasmodium yoelii parasite for efficient gene editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Pengge; Wang, Xu; Yang, Zhenke; Li, Zhenkui; Gao, Han; Su, Xin-Zhuan; Cui, Huiting; Yuan, Jing

    2018-06-01

    The RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 has applied as an efficient gene-editing method in malaria parasite Plasmodium. However, the size (4.2 kb) of the commonly used Cas9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) limits its utility for genome editing in the parasites only introduced with cas9 plasmid. To establish the endogenous and constitutive expression of Cas9 protein in the rodent malaria parasite P. yoelii, we replaced the coding region of an endogenous gene sera1 with the intact SpCas9 coding sequence using the CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing method, generating the cas9-knockin parasite (PyCas9ki) of the rodent malaria parasite P. yoelii. The resulted PyCas9ki parasite displays normal progression during the whole life cycle and possesses the Cas9 protein expression in asexual blood stage. By introducing the plasmid (pYCs) containing only sgRNA and homologous template elements, we successfully achieved both deletion and tagging modifications for different endogenous genes in the genome of PyCas9ki parasite. This cas9-knockin PyCas9ki parasite provides a new platform facilitating gene functions study in the rodent malaria parasite P. yoelii. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Cas9 in Genetically Modified Food Is Unlikely to Cause Food Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Osamu; Nishimaki-Mogami, Tomoko; Kondo, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing has undergone rapid development during the last three years. It is anticipated that genetically modified organisms (GMOs) for food purposes will be widely produced using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat/Cas9 (CRISPR)/Cas9 system in the near future. However, the Cas9 gene may then enter the genomes of GMOs for food if the breeding process is not strictly managed, which could lead to the Cas9 protein or associated peptides being produced within these organisms. A variety of peptides could theoretically be produced from the Cas9 gene by using open reading frames different from that of Cas9 in the GMOs. In this study, Cas9 and the peptides potentially encoded by Cas9 genes were studied regarding their immunogenicity, in terms of the digestibility of Cas9 and the homology of the peptides to food allergens. First, the digestibility and thermal stability of Cas9 were studied. Digestibility was tested with natural or heat-denatured Cas9 in simulated gastric fluid in vitro. The two types of Cas9 were digested rapidly. Cas9 was also gradually degraded during heat treatment. Second, the peptides potentially encoded by Cas9 genes were examined for their homology to food allergens. Specifically, an 8-mer exact match search and a sliding 80-mer window search were performed using allergen databases. One of the peptides was found to have homology with a food allergen.

  4. Comparative analysis of CRISPR-Cas systems in Klebsiella genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Juntao; Lv, Li; Wang, Xudong; Xiu, Zhilong; Chen, Guoqiang

    2017-04-01

    Prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas system provides adaptive immunity against invasive genetic elements. Bacteria of the genus Klebsiella are important nosocomial opportunistic pathogens. However, information of CRISPR-Cas system in Klebsiella remains largely unknown. Here, we analyzed the CRISPR-Cas systems of 68 complete genomes of Klebsiella representing four species. All the elements for CRISPR-Cas system (cas genes, repeats, leader sequences, and PAMs) were characterized. Besides the typical Type I-E and I-F CRISPR-Cas systems, a new Subtype I system located in the ABC transport system-glyoxalase region was found. The conservation of the new subtype CRISPR system between different species showed new evidence for CRISPR horizontal transfer. CRISPR polymorphism was strongly correlated both with species and multilocus sequence types. Some results indicated the function of adaptive immunity: most spacers (112 of 124) matched to prophages and plasmids and no matching housekeeping genes; new spacer acquisition was observed within the same sequence type (ST) and same clonal complex; the identical spacers were observed only in the ancient position (far from the leader) between different STs and clonal complexes. Interestingly, a high ratio of self-targeting spacers (7.5%, 31 of 416) was found in CRISPR-bearing Klebsiella pneumoniae (61%, 11 of 18). In some strains, there even were multiple full matching self-targeting spacers. Some self-targeting spacers were conserved even between different STs. These results indicated that some unknown mechanisms existed to compromise the function of self-targets of CRISPR-Cas systems in K. pneumoniae. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Complementary Information Derived from CRISPR Cas9 Mediated Gene Deletion and Suppression. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    CRISPR-Cas9 provides the means to perform genome editing and facilitates loss-of-function screens. However, we and others demonstrated that expression of the Cas9 endonuclease induces a gene-independent response that correlates with the number of target sequences in the genome. An alternative approach to suppressing gene expression is to block transcription using a catalytically inactive Cas9 (dCas9). Here we directly compare genome editing by CRISPR-Cas9 (cutting, CRISPRc) and gene suppression using KRAB-dCas9 (CRISPRi) in loss-of-function screens to identify cell essential genes.

  6. Crystal Structure of the Minimal Cas9 from Campylobacter jejuni Reveals the Molecular Diversity in the CRISPR-Cas9 Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Mari; Watanabe, Yuto; Gootenberg, Jonathan S; Hirano, Hisato; Ran, F Ann; Nakane, Takanori; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Zhang, Feng; Nishimasu, Hiroshi; Nureki, Osamu

    2017-03-16

    The RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 generates a double-strand break at DNA target sites complementary to the guide RNA and has been harnessed for the development of a variety of new technologies, such as genome editing. Here, we report the crystal structures of Campylobacter jejuni Cas9 (CjCas9), one of the smallest Cas9 orthologs, in complex with an sgRNA and its target DNA. The structures provided insights into a minimal Cas9 scaffold and revealed the remarkable mechanistic diversity of the CRISPR-Cas9 systems. The CjCas9 guide RNA contains a triple-helix structure, which is distinct from known RNA triple helices, thereby expanding the natural repertoire of RNA triple helices. Furthermore, unlike the other Cas9 orthologs, CjCas9 contacts the nucleotide sequences in both the target and non-target DNA strands and recognizes the 5'-NNNVRYM-3' as the protospacer-adjacent motif. Collectively, these findings improve our mechanistic understanding of the CRISPR-Cas9 systems and may facilitate Cas9 engineering. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Localization of protein aggregation in Escherichia coli is governed by diffusion and nucleoid macromolecular crowding effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Sophie Coquel

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aggregates of misfolded proteins are a hallmark of many age-related diseases. Recently, they have been linked to aging of Escherichia coli (E. coli where protein aggregates accumulate at the old pole region of the aging bacterium. Because of the potential of E. coli as a model organism, elucidating aging and protein aggregation in this bacterium may pave the way to significant advances in our global understanding of aging. A first obstacle along this path is to decipher the mechanisms by which protein aggregates are targeted to specific intercellular locations. Here, using an integrated approach based on individual-based modeling, time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and automated image analysis, we show that the movement of aging-related protein aggregates in E. coli is purely diffusive (Brownian. Using single-particle tracking of protein aggregates in live E. coli cells, we estimated the average size and diffusion constant of the aggregates. Our results provide evidence that the aggregates passively diffuse within the cell, with diffusion constants that depend on their size in agreement with the Stokes-Einstein law. However, the aggregate displacements along the cell long axis are confined to a region that roughly corresponds to the nucleoid-free space in the cell pole, thus confirming the importance of increased macromolecular crowding in the nucleoids. We thus used 3D individual-based modeling to show that these three ingredients (diffusion, aggregation and diffusion hindrance in the nucleoids are sufficient and necessary to reproduce the available experimental data on aggregate localization in the cells. Taken together, our results strongly support the hypothesis that the localization of aging-related protein aggregates in the poles of E. coli results from the coupling of passive diffusion-aggregation with spatially non-homogeneous macromolecular crowding. They further support the importance of "soft" intracellular structuring (based on

  8. A Web Resource for Standardized Benchmark Datasets, Metrics, and Rosetta Protocols for Macromolecular Modeling and Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane Ó Conchúir

    Full Text Available The development and validation of computational macromolecular modeling and design methods depend on suitable benchmark datasets and informative metrics for comparing protocols. In addition, if a method is intended to be adopted broadly in diverse biological applications, there needs to be information on appropriate parameters for each protocol, as well as metrics describing the expected accuracy compared to experimental data. In certain disciplines, there exist established benchmarks and public resources where experts in a particular methodology are encouraged to supply their most efficient implementation of each particular benchmark. We aim to provide such a resource for protocols in macromolecular modeling and design. We present a freely accessible web resource (https://kortemmelab.ucsf.edu/benchmarks to guide the development of protocols for protein modeling and design. The site provides benchmark datasets and metrics to compare the performance of a variety of modeling protocols using different computational sampling methods and energy functions, providing a "best practice" set of parameters for each method. Each benchmark has an associated downloadable benchmark capture archive containing the input files, analysis scripts, and tutorials for running the benchmark. The captures may be run with any suitable modeling method; we supply command lines for running the benchmarks using the Rosetta software suite. We have compiled initial benchmarks for the resource spanning three key areas: prediction of energetic effects of mutations, protein design, and protein structure prediction, each with associated state-of-the-art modeling protocols. With the help of the wider macromolecular modeling community, we hope to expand the variety of benchmarks included on the website and continue to evaluate new iterations of current methods as they become available.

  9. Versatile Cas9-Driven Subpopulation Selection Toolbox for Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Els, Simon; James, Jennelle K; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Bron, Peter A

    2018-04-15

    CRISPR-Cas9 technology has been exploited for the removal or replacement of genetic elements in a wide range of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Here, we describe the extension of the Cas9 application toolbox to the industrially important dairy species Lactococcus lactis The Cas9 expression vector pLABTarget, encoding the Streptocccus pyogenes Cas9 under the control of a constitutive promoter, was constructed, allowing plug and play introduction of short guide RNA (sgRNA) sequences to target specific genetic loci. Introduction of a pepN -targeting derivative of pLABTarget into L. lactis strain MG1363 led to a strong reduction in the number of transformants obtained, which did not occur in a pepN deletion derivative of the same strain, demonstrating the specificity and lethality of the Cas9-mediated double-strand breaks in the lactococcal chromosome. Moreover, the same pLABTarget derivative allowed the selection of a pepN deletion subpopulation from its corresponding single-crossover plasmid integrant precursor, accelerating the construction and selection of gene-specific deletion derivatives in L. lactis Finally, pLABTarget, which contained sgRNAs designed to target mobile genetic elements, allowed the effective curing of plasmids, prophages, and integrative conjugative elements (ICEs). These results establish that pLABTarget enables the effective exploitation of Cas9 targeting in L. lactis , while the broad-host-range vector used suggests that this toolbox could readily be expanded to other Gram-positive bacteria. IMPORTANCE Mobile genetic elements in Lactococcus lactis and other lactic acid bacteria (LAB) play an important role in dairy fermentation, having both positive and detrimental effects during the production of fermented dairy products. The pLABTarget vector offers an efficient cloning platform for Cas9 application in lactic acid bacteria. Targeting Cas9 toward mobile genetic elements enabled their effective curing, which is of particular interest in the

  10. Tuning CRISPR-Cas9 Gene Drives in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggenkamp, Emily; Giersch, Rachael M.; Schrock, Madison N.; Turnquist, Emily; Halloran, Megan; Finnigan, Gregory C.

    2018-01-01

    Control of biological populations is an ongoing challenge in many fields, including agriculture, biodiversity, ecological preservation, pest control, and the spread of disease. In some cases, such as insects that harbor human pathogens (e.g., malaria), elimination or reduction of a small number of species would have a dramatic impact across the globe. Given the recent discovery and development of the CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing technology, a unique arrangement of this system, a nuclease-based “gene drive,” allows for the super-Mendelian spread and forced propagation of a genetic element through a population. Recent studies have demonstrated the ability of a gene drive to rapidly spread within and nearly eliminate insect populations in a laboratory setting. While there are still ongoing technical challenges to design of a more optimal gene drive to be used in wild populations, there are still serious ecological and ethical concerns surrounding the nature of this powerful biological agent. Here, we use budding yeast as a safe and fully contained model system to explore mechanisms that might allow for programmed regulation of gene drive activity. We describe four conserved features of all CRISPR-based drives and demonstrate the ability of each drive component—Cas9 protein level, sgRNA identity, Cas9 nucleocytoplasmic shuttling, and novel Cas9-Cas9 tandem fusions—to modulate drive activity within a population. PMID:29348295

  11. [Macromolecular aromatic network characteristics of Chinese power coal analyzed by synchronous fluorescence and X-ray diffraction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Cui-Ping; Feng, Jie; Li, Wen-Ying

    2012-07-01

    Coal structure, especially the macromolecular aromatic skeleton structure, has a strong influence on coke reactivity and coal gasification, so it is the key to grasp the macromolecular aromatic skeleton coal structure for getting the reasonable high efficiency utilization of coal. However, it is difficult to acquire their information due to the complex compositions and structure of coal. It has been found that the macromolecular aromatic network coal structure would be most isolated if small molecular of coal was first extracted. Then the macromolecular aromatic skeleton coal structure would be clearly analyzed by instruments, such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), fluorescence spectroscopy with synchronous mode (Syn-F), Gel permeation chromatography (GPC) etc. Based on the previous results, according to the stepwise fractional liquid extraction, two Chinese typical power coals, PS and HDG, were extracted by silica gel as stationary phase and acetonitrile, tetrahydrofuran (THF), pyridine and 1-methyl-2-pyrollidinone (NMP) as a solvent group for sequential elution. GPC, Syn-F and XRD were applied to investigate molecular mass distribution, condensed aromatic structure and crystal characteristics. The results showed that the size of aromatic layers (La) is small (3-3.95 nm) and the stacking heights (Lc) are 0.8-1.2 nm. The molecular mass distribution of the macromolecular aromatic network structure is between 400 and 1 130 amu, with condensed aromatic numbers of 3-7 in the structure units.

  12. Grain sorghum dust increases macromolecular efflux from the in situ nasal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, X P

    1998-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether an aqueous extract of grain sorghum dust increases macromolecular efflux from the nasal mucosa in vivo and, if so, whether this response is mediated, in part, by substance P. Suffusion of grain sorghum dust extract on the in situ nasal mucosa of anesthetized hamsters elicits a significant increase in clearance of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran (FITC-dextran; mol mass, 70 kDa; P grain sorghum dust elicits neurogenic plasma exudation from the in situ nasal mucosa.

  13. Evaluation of quantum-chemical methods of radiolysis stability for macromolecular structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postolache, Cristian; Matei, Lidia

    2005-01-01

    The behavior of macromolecular structures in ionising fields was analyzed by quantum-chemical methods. In this study the primary radiolytic effect was analyzed using a two-step radiolytic mechanism: a) ionisation of molecule and spatial redistribution of atoms in order to reach a minimum value of energy, characteristic to the quantum state; b) neutralisation of the molecule by electron capture and its rapid dissociation into free radicals. Chemical bonds suspected to break are located in the distribution region of LUMO orbital and have minimal homolytic dissociation energies. Representative polymer structures (polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene, poly α and β polystyrene, polyisobutylene, polytetrafluoroethylene, poly methylsiloxanes) were analyzed. (authors)

  14. Clustering procedures for the optimal selection of data sets from multiple crystals in macromolecular crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foadi, James; Aller, Pierre; Alguel, Yilmaz; Cameron, Alex; Axford, Danny; Owen, Robin L.; Armour, Wes; Waterman, David G.; Iwata, So; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2013-01-01

    The availability of intense microbeam macromolecular crystallography beamlines at third-generation synchrotron sources has enabled data collection and structure solution from microcrystals of sets from many crystals of the same protein structure. The associated analysis and merging of multi-crystal data is currently a manual and time-consuming step. Here, a computer program, BLEND, that has been written to assist with and automate many of the steps in this process is described. It is demonstrated how BLEND has successfully been used in the solution of a novel membrane protein. PMID:23897484

  15. Remote Access to the PXRR Macromolecular Crystallography Facilities at the NSLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A Soares; D Schneider; J Skinner; M Cowan; R Buono; H Robinson; A Heroux; M Carlucci-Dayton; A Saxena; R Sweet

    2011-12-31

    The most recent surge of innovations that have simplified and streamlined the process of determining macromolecular structures by crystallography owes much to the efforts of the structural genomics community. However, this was only the last step in a long evolution that saw the metamorphosis of crystallography from an heroic effort that involved years of dedication and skill into a straightforward measurement that is occasionally almost trivial. Many of the steps in this remarkable odyssey involved reducing the physical labor that is demanded of experimenters in the field. Other steps reduced the technical expertise required for conducting those experiments.

  16. Clustering procedures for the optimal selection of data sets from multiple crystals in macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foadi, James; Aller, Pierre; Alguel, Yilmaz; Cameron, Alex; Axford, Danny; Owen, Robin L; Armour, Wes; Waterman, David G; Iwata, So; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2013-08-01

    The availability of intense microbeam macromolecular crystallography beamlines at third-generation synchrotron sources has enabled data collection and structure solution from microcrystals of structure. The associated analysis and merging of multi-crystal data is currently a manual and time-consuming step. Here, a computer program, BLEND, that has been written to assist with and automate many of the steps in this process is described. It is demonstrated how BLEND has successfully been used in the solution of a novel membrane protein.

  17. Remote Access to the PXRR Macromolecular Crystallography Facilities at the NSLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, A.; Schneider, D.; Skinner, J.; Cowan, M.; Buono, R.; Robinson, H.; Heroux, A.; Carlucci-Dayton, M.; Saxena, A.; Sweet, R.

    2008-01-01

    The most recent surge of innovations that have simplified and streamlined the process of determining macromolecular structures by crystallography owes much to the efforts of the structural genomics community. However, this was only the last step in a long evolution that saw the metamorphosis of crystallography from an heroic effort that involved years of dedication and skill into a straightforward measurement that is occasionally almost trivial. Many of the steps in this remarkable odyssey involved reducing the physical labor that is demanded of experimenters in the field. Other steps reduced the technical expertise required for conducting those experiments.

  18. Comparison of Various Nuclear Localization Signal-Fused Cas9 Proteins and Cas9 mRNA for Genome Editing in Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Peinan; Zhao, Xueying; Zhang, Qinghua; Li, Weiming; Zu, Yao

    2018-03-02

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 system has been proven to be an efficient and precise genome editing technology in various organisms. However, the gene editing efficiencies of Cas9 proteins with a nuclear localization signal (NLS) fused to different termini and Cas9 mRNA have not been systematically compared. Here, we compared the ability of Cas9 proteins with NLS fused to the N-, C-, or both the N- and C-termini and N-NLS-Cas9-NLS-C mRNA to target two sites in the tyr gene and two sites in the gol gene related to pigmentation in zebrafish. Phenotypic analysis revealed that all types of Cas9 led to hypopigmentation in similar proportions of injected embryos. Genome analysis by T7 Endonuclease I (T7E1) assays demonstrated that all types of Cas9 similarly induced mutagenesis in four target sites. Sequencing results further confirmed that a high frequency of indels occurred in the target sites ( tyr1 > 66%, tyr2 > 73%, gol1 > 50%, and gol2 > 35%), as well as various types (more than six) of indel mutations observed in all four types of Cas9-injected embryos. Furthermore, all types of Cas9 showed efficient targeted mutagenesis on multiplex genome editing, resulting in multiple phenotypes simultaneously. Collectively, we conclude that various NLS-fused Cas9 proteins and Cas9 mRNAs have similar genome editing efficiencies on targeting single or multiple genes, suggesting that the efficiency of CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing is highly dependent on guide RNAs (gRNAs) and gene loci. These findings may help to simplify the selection of Cas9 for gene editing using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Copyright © 2018 Hu et al.

  19. MRI in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulert, Christoph; Shenton, Martha E.

    2014-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive textbook on the use of MRI in psychiatry covering imaging techniques, brain systems and a review of findings in different psychiatric disorders. The book is divided into three sections, the first of which covers in detail all the major MRI-based methodological approaches available today, including fMRI, EEG-fMRI, DTI, and MR spectroscopy. In addition, the role of MRI in imaging genetics and combined brain stimulation and imaging is carefully explained. The second section provides an overview of the different brain systems that are relevant for psychiatric disorders, including the systems for perception, emotion, cognition, and reward. The final part of the book presents the MRI findings that are obtained in all the major psychiatric disorders using the previously discussed techniques. Numerous carefully chosen images support the informative text, making this an ideal reference work for all practitioners and trainees with an interest in this flourishing field.

  20. MRI in psychiatry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulert, Christoph [UKE, Hamburg (Germany). Psychiatry Neuroimaging Branch; Shenton, Martha E. (ed.) [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry and Radiology

    2014-07-01

    This is the first comprehensive textbook on the use of MRI in psychiatry covering imaging techniques, brain systems and a review of findings in different psychiatric disorders. The book is divided into three sections, the first of which covers in detail all the major MRI-based methodological approaches available today, including fMRI, EEG-fMRI, DTI, and MR spectroscopy. In addition, the role of MRI in imaging genetics and combined brain stimulation and imaging is carefully explained. The second section provides an overview of the different brain systems that are relevant for psychiatric disorders, including the systems for perception, emotion, cognition, and reward. The final part of the book presents the MRI findings that are obtained in all the major psychiatric disorders using the previously discussed techniques. Numerous carefully chosen images support the informative text, making this an ideal reference work for all practitioners and trainees with an interest in this flourishing field.

  1. Superconductive MRI system, FLEXARTTM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hirokazu; Nishikawa, Mineki; Goro, Takehiko

    1994-01-01

    Since the establishment of TAMI (Toshiba America MRI Inc.) in 1989, it has been jointly working with Toshiba on developing a new infrastructure for computer and software technologies to be applied to new MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) systems. As a result of these efforts, the first product of a new series of MRI systems has been introduced on the market. Known as FLEXART TM (a newly created word combining FLEXible and ART), this MRI system incorporates a new 32-bit RISC computer and a new controller for pulse sequences and data acquisition. The product concepts of FLEXART TM are high image quality, high patient throughput, and ease of use, all of which are necessary features for an MRI system in the premium mid-field MRI market segment. (author)

  2. MRI of meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshio; Hiraki, Yoshio; Kaji, Mitumasa

    1988-01-01

    MRI has gained a prominent position in the diagnosis of brain tumors. We examined 30 cases of meningiomas and distinguished their subtype according to the criteria of Rubinic histology. We discussed the MRI findings and compared then with X-CT findings so to their intensity, delination of tumors, whether accompanied by peripheral edema, and T 1 values. MRI delinated the tumors as well as CE-CT. No remarkable difference was found between the subtypes. (author)

  3. Harnessing CRISPR-Cas systems for bacterial genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selle, Kurt; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2015-04-01

    Manipulation of genomic sequences facilitates the identification and characterization of key genetic determinants in the investigation of biological processes. Genome editing via clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated (Cas) constitutes a next-generation method for programmable and high-throughput functional genomics. CRISPR-Cas systems are readily reprogrammed to induce sequence-specific DNA breaks at target loci, resulting in fixed mutations via host-dependent DNA repair mechanisms. Although bacterial genome editing is a relatively unexplored and underrepresented application of CRISPR-Cas systems, recent studies provide valuable insights for the widespread future implementation of this technology. This review summarizes recent progress in bacterial genome editing and identifies fundamental genetic and phenotypic outcomes of CRISPR targeting in bacteria, in the context of tool development, genome homeostasis, and DNA repair. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. CRISPR-Cas adaptation: insights into the mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitai, Gil; Sorek, Rotem

    2016-02-01

    Since the first demonstration that CRISPR-Cas systems provide bacteria and archaea with adaptive immunity against phages and plasmids, numerous studies have yielded key insights into the molecular mechanisms governing how these systems attack and degrade foreign DNA. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the adaptation stage, in which new immunological memory is formed, have until recently represented a major unresolved question. In this Progress article, we discuss recent discoveries that have shown both how foreign DNA is identified by the CRISPR-Cas adaptation machinery and the molecular basis for its integration into the chromosome to form an immunological memory. Furthermore, we describe the roles of each of the specific CRISPR-Cas components that are involved in memory formation, and consider current models for their evolutionary origin.

  5. Exploiting CRISPR/Cas: Interference Mechanisms and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Plagens

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of biological concepts can often provide a framework for the development of novel molecular tools, which can help us to further understand and manipulate life. One recent example is the elucidation of the prokaryotic adaptive immune system, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/CRISPR-associated (Cas that protects bacteria and archaea against viruses or conjugative plasmids. The immunity is based on small RNA molecules that are incorporated into versatile multi-domain proteins or protein complexes and specifically target viral nucleic acids via base complementarity. CRISPR/Cas interference machines are utilized to develop novel genome editing tools for different organisms. Here, we will review the latest progress in the elucidation and application of prokaryotic CRISPR/Cas systems and discuss possible future approaches to exploit the potential of these interference machineries.

  6. Applications of CRISPR/Cas9 in retinal degenerative diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ying-Qian; Tang, Luo-Sheng; Yoshida, Shigeo; Zhou, Ye-Di

    2017-01-01

    Gene therapy is a potentially effective treatment for retinal degenerative diseases. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system has been developed as a new genome-editing tool in ophthalmic studies. Recent advances in researches showed that CRISPR/Cas9 has been applied in generating animal models as well as gene therapy in vivo of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). It has also been shown as a potential attempt for clinic by combining with other technologies such as adeno-associated virus (AAV) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In this review, we highlight the main points of further prospect of using CRISPR/Cas9 in targeting retinal degeneration. We also emphasize the potential applications of this technique in treating retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:28503441

  7. CRISPR/Cas9 mediates efficient conditional mutagenesis in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhaoyu; Wu, Menghua; Wen, Kejia; Ren, Menda; Long, Li; Zhang, Xuedi; Gao, Guanjun

    2014-09-05

    Existing transgenic RNA interference (RNAi) methods greatly facilitate functional genome studies via controlled silencing of targeted mRNA in Drosophila. Although the RNAi approach is extremely powerful, concerns still linger about its low efficiency. Here, we developed a CRISPR/Cas9-mediated conditional mutagenesis system by combining tissue-specific expression of Cas9 driven by the Gal4/upstream activating site system with various ubiquitously expressed guide RNA transgenes to effectively inactivate gene expression in a temporally and spatially controlled manner. Furthermore, by including multiple guide RNAs in a transgenic vector to target a single gene, we achieved a high degree of gene mutagenesis in specific tissues. The CRISPR/Cas9-mediated conditional mutagenesis system provides a simple and effective tool for gene function analysis, and complements the existing RNAi approach. Copyright © 2014 Xue et al.

  8. CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing in honeybee and pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pen, Anja

    2018-01-01

    Creating animal models by using genome modification has gotten significantly more accessible thanks to the CRISPR-Cas9 technique. In this study, we aimed to the implement the CRISPR-Cas9 methodology in the European honeybee (Apis mellifera) and pig (Sus scrofa) for generation of animal models. We...... want to use these animal models to study the development of honeybees and the pathology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in a pig model of human disease. In order to simplify the production of these animal models, we test the use of sperm mediated gene transfer (SMGT) in combination with CRISPR...... mechanisms of honeybee development using genome modification will aid in uncovering these complex genetic regulatory systems. In honeybees, we have attempted to induce genome modification in the cinnabar gene through microinjection and feeding of CRISPR-Cas9 components to larvae. Additionally, we tested...

  9. Determination of local chromatin composition by CasID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtmann, Elisabeth; Anton, Tobias; Rombaut, Pascaline; Herzog, Franz; Leonhardt, Heinrich

    2016-09-02

    Chromatin structure and function are determined by a plethora of proteins whose genome-wide distribution is typically assessed by immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Here, we developed a novel tool to investigate the local chromatin environment at specific DNA sequences. We combined the programmable DNA binding of dCas9 with the promiscuous biotin ligase BirA* (CasID) to biotinylate proteins in the direct vicinity of specific loci. Subsequent streptavidin-mediated precipitation and mass spectrometry identified both known and previously unknown chromatin factors associated with repetitive telomeric, major satellite and minor satellite DNA. With super-resolution microscopy, we confirmed the localization of the putative transcription factor ZNF512 at chromocenters. The versatility of CasID facilitates the systematic elucidation of functional protein complexes and locus-specific chromatin composition.

  10. Exploiting CRISPR/Cas: Interference Mechanisms and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Hagen; Randau, Lennart; Plagens, André

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of biological concepts can often provide a framework for the development of novel molecular tools, which can help us to further understand and manipulate life. One recent example is the elucidation of the prokaryotic adaptive immune system, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) that protects bacteria and archaea against viruses or conjugative plasmids. The immunity is based on small RNA molecules that are incorporated into versatile multi-domain proteins or protein complexes and specifically target viral nucleic acids via base complementarity. CRISPR/Cas interference machines are utilized to develop novel genome editing tools for different organisms. Here, we will review the latest progress in the elucidation and application of prokaryotic CRISPR/Cas systems and discuss possible future approaches to exploit the potential of these interference machineries. PMID:23857052

  11. MRI assessment program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    Usage, cost and efficacy data from the MRI Assessment Program to 30 March 1988 is presented, as a continuation of an earlier analysis. Analysis has been performed on data from 8565 examinations relating to 7997 patients at 4 hospitals. MRI was used mainly for examination of the head and spine. Some details of the follow up studies being conducted on selected patients and disease categories are given. A consensus statement is included which summaries the view of the Technical Committee on the potential applications of MRI in Australia. The MRI unit quench incident at Royal Adelaide Hospital is described. Refs., 10 figs., tabs

  12. CAS – A Journey Has Begun in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Smith

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores a journey through hand-held technology changes in mathematics teaching and learning and raises questions we as mathematics educators should be considering in the shorter and longer term. New Zealand is embarking on a Computer Algebraic Systems (CAS Pilot Programme in secondary school mathematics. The Ministry of Education and the New Zealand Qualifications Authority have selected secondary schools to be part of a pilot programme in the use of CAS technology in mathematics classes. The aim of the pilot programme is to improve teaching and learning of mathematics through the use of this technology. Six schools in 2005 used CAS technology with Year 9 (13-14 year olds students and, an additional 16 schools joined the programme in 2006. The pilot is planned to continue with an increasing number of schools in subsequent years. By the time students in the pilot schools reach Years 11, 12 and 13, alternative external assessments using the CAS technology will be available. Professional development support and assistance in obtaining and using the technology will be provided to the pilot schools. The project's emphasis in 2005 was on the Geometry and Algebra strands; the Statistics strand was added in 2006. By 2010 the first cohort of project programme students will have been through their secondary mathematics education via a CAS environment. New Zealand teachers have only a finite time to get into CAS technology and integrate it into their teaching practice. This paper discusses a research project based on a mathematics department professional development that is linked to the pilot.

  13. Characterizing a thermostable Cas9 for bacterial genome editing and silencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mougiakos, Ioannis; Mohanraju, Prarthana; Bosma, Elleke F.; Vrouwe, Valentijn; Finger Bou, Max; Naduthodi, Mihris I.S.; Gussak, Alex; Brinkman, Rudolf B.L.; Kranenburg, Van Richard; Oost, Van Der John

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas9-based genome engineering tools have revolutionized fundamental research and biotechnological exploitation of both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. However, the mesophilic nature of the established Cas9 systems does not allow for applications that require enhanced stability, including

  14. Characterizing a thermostable Cas9 for bacterial genome editing and silencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mougiakos, Ioannis; Mohanraju, Prarthana; Bosma, Elleke Fenna

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas9-based genome engineering tools have revolutionized fundamental research and biotechnological exploitation of both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. However, the mesophilic nature of the established Cas9 systems does not allow for applications that require enhanced stability, including...

  15. A brief history of macromolecular crystallography, illustrated by a family tree and its Nobel fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskolski, Mariusz; Dauter, Zbigniew; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    As a contribution to the celebration of the year 2014, declared by the United Nations to be 'The International Year of Crystallography', the FEBS Journal is dedicating this issue to papers showcasing the intimate union between macromolecular crystallography and structural biology, both in historical perspective and in current research. Instead of a formal editorial piece, by way of introduction, this review discusses the most important, often iconic, achievements of crystallographers that led to major advances in our understanding of the structure and function of biological macromolecules. We identified at least 42 scientists who received Nobel Prizes in Physics, Chemistry or Medicine for their contributions that included the use of X-rays or neutrons and crystallography, including 24 who made seminal discoveries in macromolecular sciences. Our spotlight is mostly, but not only, on the recipients of this most prestigious scientific honor, presented in approximately chronological order. As a summary of the review, we attempt to construct a genealogy tree of the principal lineages of protein crystallography, leading from the founding members to the present generation. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  16. Long-wavelength macromolecular crystallography - First successful native SAD experiment close to the sulfur edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurelius, O.; Duman, R.; El Omari, K.; Mykhaylyk, V.; Wagner, A.

    2017-11-01

    Phasing of novel macromolecular crystal structures has been challenging since the start of structural biology. Making use of anomalous diffraction of natively present elements, such as sulfur and phosphorus, for phasing has been possible for some systems, but hindered by the necessity to access longer X-ray wavelengths in order to make most use of the anomalous scattering contributions of these elements. Presented here are the results from a first successful experimental phasing study of a macromolecular crystal structure at a wavelength close to the sulfur K edge. This has been made possible by the in-vacuum setup and the long-wavelength optimised experimental setup at the I23 beamline at Diamond Light Source. In these early commissioning experiments only standard data collection and processing procedures have been applied, in particular no dedicated absorption correction has been used. Nevertheless the success of the experiment demonstrates that the capability to extract phase information can be even further improved once data collection protocols and data processing have been optimised.

  17. Organ specific acute toxicity of the carcinogen trans-4-acetylaminostilbene is not correlated with macromolecular binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, A; Neumann, H G

    1986-09-01

    trans-4-Acetylaminostilbene (trans-AAS) is acutely toxic in rats and lesions are produced specifically in the glandular stomach. Toxicity is slightly increased by pretreating the animals with phenobarbital (PB) and is completely prevented by pretreatment with methylcholanthrene (MC). The prostaglandin inhibitors, indomethacin and acetyl salicylic acid, do not reduce toxicity. The high efficiency of MC suggested that toxicity is caused by reactive metabolites. trans-[3H]-AAS was administered orally to untreated and to PB- or MC-pretreated female Wistar rats and target doses in different tissues were measured by means of covalent binding to proteins, RNA and DNA. Macromolecular binding in the target tissue of poisoned animals was significantly lower than in liver and kidney and comparable to other non-target tissues. Pretreatment with MC lowered macromolecular binding in all extrahepatic tissues but not in liver. These findings are not in line with tissue specific metabolic activation. The only unique property of the target tissue, glandular stomach, that we observed was a particular affinity for the systemically available parent compound. In the early phase of poisoning, tissue concentrations were exceedingly high and the stomach function was impaired.

  18. Can visco-elastic phase separation, macromolecular crowding and colloidal physics explain nuclear organisation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iborra Francisco J

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cell nucleus is highly compartmentalized with well-defined domains, it is not well understood how this nuclear order is maintained. Many scientists are fascinated by the different set of structures observed in the nucleus to attribute functions to them. In order to distinguish functional compartments from non-functional aggregates, I believe is important to investigate the biophysical nature of nuclear organisation. Results The various nuclear compartments can be divided broadly as chromatin or protein and/or RNA based, and they have very different dynamic properties. The chromatin compartment displays a slow, constrained diffusional motion. On the other hand, the protein/RNA compartment is very dynamic. Physical systems with dynamical asymmetry go to viscoelastic phase separation. This phase separation phenomenon leads to the formation of a long-lived interaction network of slow components (chromatin scattered within domains rich in fast components (protein/RNA. Moreover, the nucleus is packed with macromolecules in the order of 300 mg/ml. This high concentration of macromolecules produces volume exclusion effects that enhance attractive interactions between macromolecules, known as macromolecular crowding, which favours the formation of compartments. In this paper I hypothesise that nuclear compartmentalization can be explained by viscoelastic phase separation of the dynamically different nuclear components, in combination with macromolecular crowding and the properties of colloidal particles. Conclusion I demonstrate that nuclear structure can satisfy the predictions of this hypothesis. I discuss the functional implications of this phenomenon.

  19. ISPyB: an information management system for synchrotron macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delagenière, Solange; Brenchereau, Patrice; Launer, Ludovic; Ashton, Alun W; Leal, Ricardo; Veyrier, Stéphanie; Gabadinho, José; Gordon, Elspeth J; Jones, Samuel D; Levik, Karl Erik; McSweeney, Seán M; Monaco, Stéphanie; Nanao, Max; Spruce, Darren; Svensson, Olof; Walsh, Martin A; Leonard, Gordon A

    2011-11-15

    Individual research groups now analyze thousands of samples per year at synchrotron macromolecular crystallography (MX) resources. The efficient management of experimental data is thus essential if the best possible experiments are to be performed and the best possible data used in downstream processes in structure determination pipelines. Information System for Protein crystallography Beamlines (ISPyB), a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) with an underlying data model allowing for the integration of analyses down-stream of the data collection experiment was developed to facilitate such data management. ISPyB is now a multisite, generic LIMS for synchrotron-based MX experiments. Its initial functionality has been enhanced to include improved sample tracking and reporting of experimental protocols, the direct ranking of the diffraction characteristics of individual samples and the archiving of raw data and results from ancillary experiments and post-experiment data processing protocols. This latter feature paves the way for ISPyB to play a central role in future macromolecular structure solution pipelines and validates the application of the approach used in ISPyB to other experimental techniques, such as biological solution Small Angle X-ray Scattering and spectroscopy, which have similar sample tracking and data handling requirements.

  20. A new paradigm for macromolecular crystallography beamlines derived from high-pressure methodology and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourme, Roger, E-mail: roger.fourme@synchrotron-soleil.fr [Synchrotron SOLEIL, BP 48, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Girard, Eric [IBS (UMR 5075 CEA-CNRS-UJF-PSB), 41 rue Jules Horowitz, 38027 Grenoble Cedex (France); Dhaussy, Anne-Claire [CRISMAT, ENSICAEN, 6 Boulevard du Maréchal Juin, 14000 Caen (France); Medjoubi, Kadda [Synchrotron SOLEIL, BP 48, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Prangé, Thierry [LCRB (UMR 8015 CNRS), Université Paris Descartes, Faculté de Pharmacie, 4 avenue de l’Observatoire, 75270 Paris (France); Ascone, Isabella [ENSCP (UMR CNRS 7223), 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Mezouar, Mohamed [ESRF, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Kahn, Richard [IBS (UMR 5075 CEA-CNRS-UJF-PSB), 41 rue Jules Horowitz, 38027 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2011-01-01

    Macromolecular crystallography at high pressure (HPMX) is a mature technique. Shorter X-ray wavelengths increase data collection efficiency on cryocooled crystals. Extending applications and exploiting spin-off of HPMX will require dedicated synchrotron radiation beamlines based on a new paradigm. Biological structures can now be investigated at high resolution by high-pressure X-ray macromolecular crystallography (HPMX). The number of HPMX studies is growing, with applications to polynucleotides, monomeric and multimeric proteins, complex assemblies and even a virus capsid. Investigations of the effects of pressure perturbation have encompassed elastic compression of the native state, study of proteins from extremophiles and trapping of higher-energy conformers that are often of biological interest; measurements of the compressibility of crystals and macromolecules were also performed. HPMX results were an incentive to investigate short and ultra-short wavelengths for standard biocrystallography. On cryocooled lysozyme crystals it was found that the data collection efficiency using 33 keV photons is increased with respect to 18 keV photons. This conclusion was extended from 33 keV down to 6.5 keV by exploiting previously published data. To be fully exploited, the potential of higher-energy photons requires detectors with a good efficiency. Accordingly, a new paradigm for MX beamlines was suggested, using conventional short and ultra-short wavelengths, aiming at the collection of very high accuracy data on crystals under standard conditions or under high pressure. The main elements of such beamlines are outlined.

  1. MX1: a bending-magnet crystallography beamline serving both chemical and macromolecular crystallography communities at the Australian Synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowieson, Nathan Philip; Aragao, David; Clift, Mark; Ericsson, Daniel J.; Gee, Christine; Harrop, Stephen J.; Mudie, Nathan; Panjikar, Santosh; Price, Jason R.; Riboldi-Tunnicliffe, Alan; Williamson, Rachel; Caradoc-Davies, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The macromolecular crystallography beamline MX1 at the Australian Synchrotron is described. MX1 is a bending-magnet crystallography beamline at the 3 GeV Australian Synchrotron. The beamline delivers hard X-rays in the energy range from 8 to 18 keV to a focal spot at the sample position of 120 µm FWHM. The beamline endstation and ancillary equipment facilitate local and remote access for both chemical and biological macromolecular crystallography. Here, the design of the beamline and endstation are discussed. The beamline has enjoyed a full user program for the last seven years and scientific highlights from the user program are also presented

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open units are especially helpful for examining larger patients or those with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... does not completely surround you. Some newer MRI machines have a larger diameter bore which can be ... size patients or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam ... the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information on the chemicals present in the body's cells, may also be performed during the MRI exam ... medically necessary. MRI may not always distinguish between cancer tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically ...

  6. CRISPR-Cas9-Mediated Genome Editing in Leishmania donovani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Wei; Matlashewski, Greg

    2015-07-21

    The prokaryotic CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat)-Cas9, an RNA-guided endonuclease, has been shown to mediate efficient genome editing in a wide variety of organisms. In the present study, the CRISPR-Cas9 system has been adapted to Leishmania donovani, a protozoan parasite that causes fatal human visceral leishmaniasis. We introduced the Cas9 nuclease into L. donovani and generated guide RNA (gRNA) expression vectors by using the L. donovani rRNA promoter and the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme. It is demonstrated within that L. donovani mainly used homology-directed repair (HDR) and microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ) to repair the Cas9 nuclease-created double-strand DNA break (DSB). The nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway appears to be absent in L. donovani. With this CRISPR-Cas9 system, it was possible to generate knockouts without selection by insertion of an oligonucleotide donor with stop codons and 25-nucleotide homology arms into the Cas9 cleavage site. Likewise, we disrupted and precisely tagged endogenous genes by inserting a bleomycin drug selection marker and GFP gene into the Cas9 cleavage site. With the use of Hammerhead and HDV ribozymes, a double-gRNA expression vector that further improved gene-targeting efficiency was developed, and it was used to make precise deletion of the 3-kb miltefosine transporter gene (LdMT). In addition, this study identified a novel single point mutation caused by CRISPR-Cas9 in LdMT (M381T) that led to miltefosine resistance, a concern for the only available oral antileishmanial drug. Together, these results demonstrate that the CRISPR-Cas9 system represents an effective genome engineering tool for L. donovani. Leishmania donovani is the causative agent of fatal visceral leishmaniasis. To understand Leishmania infection and pathogenesis and identify new drug targets for control of leishmaniasis, more-efficient ways to manipulate this parasite genome are required. In this

  7. Les synovites villonodulaires du genou: à propos de 20 cas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margad, Omar; Boukhris, Jalal; Azriouil, Ouahb; Daoudi, Mohamed; Mortaji, Aziz; Koulali, Khalid

    2017-01-01

    La synovite villonodulaire pigmentée (SVNP) est une prolifération bénigne rare de la synoviale des articulations, des bourses séreuses et des gaines tendineuses, d'étiopathogénie inconnue. Notre travail porte sur 20 cas de SVN du genou colligés à l'hôpital militaire Avicenne de Marrakech sur une période de 9 ans allant de janvier 2000 au décembre 2009 Il vise à identifier les spécificités de cette lésion, et à étudier ses principaux aspects anatomocliniques et pronostiques. L'incidence annuelle était de 2,2 cas par an. Ils étaient 15 hommes et 5 femmes, d'âge moyen de 32,5 ans, atteints du coté droit dans 55%des cas sous un mode mono articulaire chez 18 patients et bi articulaire chez un seul. La douleur et la tuméfaction étaient présentes dans 80% des cas, une masse palpable dans un cas, un syndrome méniscal a été retenu dans un cas, une mono arthrite septique dans 3 circonstances de même qu'un kyste poplité dans 2 autres. L'atteinte était diffuse dans 14 cas (70%), localisée dans 6 cas. L'imagerie par résonnance magnétique(IRM) pratiquée chez 5 patients était évocatrice chez 3, l'arthroscopie diagnostique a été utilisée chez 2 malades. La confirmation s'est faite à chaque fois à l'examen anatomopathlogique. Le traitement a consisté en une synovectomie subtotale dans 15 cas et en l'exérèse de la tumeur dans les autres formes localisées, 2 cas présentant une destruction ostéocartilagineuse ont nécessité une arthroplastie. L'évolution a été marquée par la survenue de 2 récidives sous la forme diffuse avec un recul de 3, 7 ans. On a noté une raideur avec atrophie quadricipitale chez 3 patients et une arthrolyse a été réalisée. Un cas de SVN confirmé par l'histologie s'est révélé être 5 mois après la synovectomie totale un Synovialosarcome monophasique envahissant l'os d'où l'indication de l'amputation. PMID:29255556

  8. Mismatch Negativity Responses in Children with a Diagnosis of Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froud, Karen; Khamis-Dakwar, Reem

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether a hypothesis suggesting that apraxia of speech results from phonological overspecification could be relevant for childhood apraxia of speech (CAS). Method: High-density EEG was recorded from 5 children with CAS and 5 matched controls, ages 5-8 years, with and without CAS, as they listened to randomized sequences of CV…

  9. Suppression of HBV replication by the expression of nickase- and nuclease dead-Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Takeshi; Fukuhara, Takasuke; Ono, Chikako; Yamamoto, Satomi; Uemura, Kentaro; Okamoto, Toru; Sugiyama, Masaya; Motooka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shota; Ikawa, Masato; Mizokami, Masashi; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Matsuura, Yoshiharu

    2017-07-21

    Complete removal of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA from nuclei is difficult by the current therapies. Recent reports have shown that a novel genome-editing tool using Cas9 with a single-guide RNA (sgRNA) system can cleave the HBV genome in vitro and in vivo. However, induction of a double-strand break (DSB) on the targeted genome by Cas9 risks undesirable off-target cleavage on the host genome. Nickase-Cas9 cleaves a single strand of DNA, and thereby two sgRNAs are required for inducing DSBs. To avoid Cas9-induced off-target mutagenesis, we examined the effects of the expressions of nickase-Cas9 and nuclease dead Cas9 (d-Cas9) with sgRNAs on HBV replication. The expression of nickase-Cas9 with a pair of sgRNAs cleaved the target HBV genome and suppressed the viral-protein expression and HBV replication in vitro. Moreover, nickase-Cas9 with the sgRNA pair cleaved the targeted HBV genome in mouse liver. Interestingly, d-Cas9 expression with the sgRNAs also suppressed HBV replication in vitro without cleaving the HBV genome. These results suggest the possible use of nickase-Cas9 and d-Cas9 with a pair of sgRNAs for eliminating HBV DNA from the livers of chronic hepatitis B patients with low risk of undesirable off-target mutation on the host genome.

  10. The role of Cas8 in type I CRISPR interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cass, Simon D B; Haas, Karina A; Stoll, Britta; Alkhnbashi, Omer S; Sharma, Kundan; Urlaub, Henning; Backofen, Rolf; Marchfelder, Anita; Bolt, Edward L

    2015-05-05

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat) systems provide bacteria and archaea with adaptive immunity to repel invasive genetic elements. Type I systems use 'cascade' [CRISPR-associated (Cas) complex for antiviral defence] ribonucleoprotein complexes to target invader DNA, by base pairing CRISPR RNA (crRNA) to protospacers. Cascade identifies PAMs (protospacer adjacent motifs) on invader DNA, triggering R-loop formation and subsequent DNA degradation by Cas3. Cas8 is a candidate PAM recognition factor in some cascades. We analysed Cas8 homologues from type IB CRISPR systems in archaea Haloferax volcanii (Hvo) and Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus (Mth). Cas8 was essential for CRISPR interference in Hvo and purified Mth Cas8 protein responded to PAM sequence when binding to nucleic acids. Cas8 interacted physically with Cas5-Cas7-crRNA complex, stimulating binding to PAM containing substrates. Mutation of conserved Cas8 amino acid residues abolished interference in vivo and altered catalytic activity of Cas8 protein in vitro. This is experimental evidence that Cas8 is important for targeting Cascade to invader DNA. © 2015 Authors.

  11. 41 CFR 102-33.130 - If we hire CAS, what are our management responsibilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false If we hire CAS, what are our management responsibilities? 102-33.130 Section 102-33.130 Public Contracts and Property... § 102-33.130 If we hire CAS, what are our management responsibilities? If you hire CAS, you are...

  12. Cas4 Facilitates PAM-Compatible Spacer Selection during CRISPR Adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieper, S.N.; Almendros, Cristóbal; Behler, Juliane; McKenzie, R.E.; Luzia De Nóbrega, F.; van Eijkeren-Haagsma, A.C.; Vink, J.N.A.; Hess, Wolfgang R.; Brouns, S.J.J.

    2018-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas systems adapt their immunological memory against their invaders by integrating short DNA fragments into clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) loci. While Cas1 and Cas2 make up the core machinery of the CRISPR integration process, various class I and II

  13. Cas4 Facilitates PAM-Compatible Spacer Selection during CRISPR Adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieper, Sebastian N.; Almendros, Cristóbal; Behler, Juliane; McKenzie, Rebecca E.; Nobrega, Franklin L.; Haagsma, Anna C.; Vink, Jochem N.A.; Hess, Wolfgang R.; Brouns, Stan J.J.

    2018-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas systems adapt their immunological memory against their invaders by integrating short DNA fragments into clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) loci. While Cas1 and Cas2 make up the core machinery of the CRISPR integration process, various class I and II

  14. On the Integration of Computer Algebra Systems (CAS) by Canadian Mathematicians: Results of a National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buteau, Chantal; Jarvis, Daniel H.; Lavicza, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we outline the findings of a Canadian survey study (N = 302) that focused on the extent of computer algebra systems (CAS)-based technology use in postsecondary mathematics instruction. Results suggest that a considerable number of Canadian mathematicians use CAS in research and teaching. CAS use in research was found to be the…

  15. Inconclusive studies on possible CRISPR-Cas off-targets should ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sandeep Chakraborty

    Published online: 30 April 2018. Keywords. ... in gene-editing technologies have resulted from the simplicity of the single effector (Cas9) class 2 CRISPR-Cas ... a Cas9/gRNA concentration dependence on off-target activity (Pattanayak et al.

  16. MRI in sarcoglycanopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tasca, Giorgio; Monforte, Mauro; Díaz-Manera, Jordi

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To characterise the pattern and spectrum of involvement on muscle MRI in a large cohort of patients with sarcoglycanopathies, which are limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD2C-2F) caused by mutations in one of the four genes coding for muscle sarcoglycans. METHODS: Lower limb MRI sca...

  17. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info About Us News Physician ... absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various ... seen by other imaging modalities, such as chest x-ray or CT. A special form of MRI called ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fitting and has no metal fasteners. Guidelines about eating and drinking before an MRI exam vary with the specific exam and with the imaging facility. Unless you are told otherwise, you may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a few types. People with the ...

  2. MRI of neonatal encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khong, P.L.; Lam, B.C.C.; Tung, H.K.S.; Wong, V.; Chan, F.L.; Ooi, G.C.

    2003-01-01

    We present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in neonatal encephalopathy, including hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy, perinatal/neonatal stroke, metabolic encephalopathy from inborn errors of metabolism, congenital central nervous system infections and birth trauma. The applications of advanced MRI techniques, such as diffusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are emphasized

  3. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various ... seen by other imaging modalities, such as chest x-ray or CT. A special form of MRI called ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... structure of an organ and how it is working. MRI enables the discovery of abnormalities that might be obscured by bone with other imaging methods. The contrast material used in MRI exams is less likely to produce an allergic reaction than the ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. MRI ... cancer, heart and vascular disease, heart valve abnormalities, bone and other soft tissue abnormalities of the chest. MRI is also useful ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to ... computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms that ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. ...

  8. Apport de l'imagerie dans le diagnostic des sacroiliites infectieuses : à propos de 19 cas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, Hanen; Chaabouni, Salim; Frikha, Faten; Toumi, Nozha; Souissi, Basma; Lahiani, Dorra; Bahloul, Zouhir; Ben Mahfoudh, Khaireddine

    2014-01-01

    Les sacro-iliites infectieuses méritent d’être mieux connues. Leur diagnostic est souvent retardé en raison d'une symptomatologie trompeuse et des diffcultés d'exploration de l'articulation sacro-iliaque. Notre travail est basé sur une étude rétrospective portant sur les cas de SII, recueillis sur une période comprise entre 1997 et 2008 dans notre centre universitaire Sfax-Tunisie. Le diagnostic de sacro-iliite était retenu en présence d'arguments cliniques et radiologiques d'atteinte sacroiliaque. Nous rapportons dix neuf cas de sacroiliites infectieuses (10 hommes et 9 femmes), avec un âge moyen de 32 ans. L'atteinte était unilatérale dans tous les cas. Les radiographies standard faites dans tous les cas ont été suggestives dans 14 cas et normales dans les autres cas. La TDM faite dans 13 cas a montré, un abcès des parties molles dans 8 cas et un séquestre osseux dans 2 cas. L'IRM réalisée dans 8 cas, a objectivé une infiltration des parties molles dans tous les cas et un abcès dans 3 cas. Le germe a été identifié dans 9 cas (3 cas de tuberculose, 3 cas de brucellose, 2 sacro-iliites à pyogène et un cas de candidose). Cette identification était faite par biopsie dans 3 cas, hémocultures dans 2 cas, prélèvement au niveau de la porte d'entrée dans 1 cas et sérodiagnostic dans 3 cas. Pour les autres cas, l'origine pyogène a été retenue sur des arguments cliniques et biologiques. L'imagerie joue un rôle primordial dans le diagnostic précoce et l'orientation étiologique d'une sacroiliite infectieuse. PMID:25120884

  9. MRI in head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jin Kyo [Shin Wha Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-02-15

    In the diagnosis of head injury, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), like CT, is an effective method of distinguishing between intracerebral and extracerebral lesions. In our experience of MRI, early hematomas are almost isointense by Saturation Recovery (SR) method, so these must be performed with Spin Echo (SE) method for better visualization of hematomas. Isodense subdural hematomas, which is a diagnostic dilemma on CT images, are clearly seen on MRI. Delayed hematomas or residual parenchymal lesions are better demonstrated on MRI than on CT. Direct cornal, sagittal images and multiplanar facility of MRI provides excellent visualization of the the location and shape of extracerebral collection of hematoma. For the screening of head traumas, SE method is a technique of choice because of its excellent sensitivity within limited time.

  10. Mobius syndrome: MRI features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markarian, Maria F.; Villarroel, Gonzalo M.; Nagel, Jorge R.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Mobius Syndrome or congenital facial diplegia is associated with paralysis of the lateral gaze movements. This syndrome may include other cranial nerve palsies and be associated to musculoskeletal anomalies. Our objective is to show the MRI findings in Mobius Syndrome. Material and methods: MRI study was performed in 3 patients with clinic diagnosis of Mobius Syndrome. RMI (1.5T); exams included axial FSE (T1 and T2), FLAIR, SE/EPI, GRE/20, sagittal FSE T2 , coronal T1, diffusion, angio MRI and Spectroscopy sequences. Results: The common features of this syndrome found in MRI were: depression or straightening of the floor of the fourth ventricle, brainstem anteroposterior diameter diminution, morphologic alteration of the pons and medulla oblongata and of the hypoglossal nuclei as well as severe micrognathia. Conclusion: The morphologic alterations of Mobius Syndrome can be clearly identified by MRI; this method has proved to be a useful diagnostic examination. (author)

  11. MRI in head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jin Kyo

    1986-01-01

    In the diagnosis of head injury, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), like CT, is an effective method of distinguishing between intracerebral and extracerebral lesions. In our experience of MRI, early hematomas are almost isointense by Saturation Recovery (SR) method, so these must be performed with Spin Echo (SE) method for better visualization of hematomas. Isodense subdural hematomas, which is a diagnostic dilemma on CT images, are clearly seen on MRI. Delayed hematomas or residual parenchymal lesions are better demonstrated on MRI than on CT. Direct cornal, sagittal images and multiplanar facility of MRI provides excellent visualization of the the location and shape of extracerebral collection of hematoma. For the screening of head traumas, SE method is a technique of choice because of its excellent sensitivity within limited time.

  12. Genome Editing in Penicillium chrysogenum Using Cas9 Ribonucleoprotein Particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pohl, Carsten; Mózsik, László; Driessen, Arnold J M; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Nygård, Yvonne I; Braman, Jeffrey Carl

    Several CRISPR/Cas9 tools have been recently established for precise genome editing in a wide range of filamentous fungi. This genome editing platform offers high flexibility in target selection and the possibility of introducing genetic deletions without the introduction of transgenic sequences .

  13. CRISPR-Cas systems: Prokaryotes upgrade to adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrangou, Rodolphe; Marraffini, Luciano A

    2014-04-24

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), and associated proteins (Cas) comprise the CRISPR-Cas system, which confers adaptive immunity against exogenic elements in many bacteria and most archaea. CRISPR-mediated immunization occurs through the uptake of DNA from invasive genetic elements such as plasmids and viruses, followed by its integration into CRISPR loci. These loci are subsequently transcribed and processed into small interfering RNAs that guide nucleases for specific cleavage of complementary sequences. Conceptually, CRISPR-Cas shares functional features with the mammalian adaptive immune system, while also exhibiting characteristics of Lamarckian evolution. Because immune markers spliced from exogenous agents are integrated iteratively in CRISPR loci, they constitute a genetic record of vaccination events and reflect environmental conditions and changes over time. Cas endonucleases, which can be reprogrammed by small guide RNAs have shown unprecedented potential and flexibility for genome editing and can be repurposed for numerous DNA targeting applications including transcriptional control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Methods for Optimizing CRISPR-Cas9 Genome Editing Specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tycko, Josh; Myer, Vic E.; Hsu, Patrick D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Advances in the development of delivery, repair, and specificity strategies for the CRISPR-Cas9 genome engineering toolbox are helping researchers understand gene function with unprecedented precision and sensitivity. CRISPR-Cas9 also holds enormous therapeutic potential for the treatment of genetic disorders by directly correcting disease-causing mutations. Although the Cas9 protein has been shown to bind and cleave DNA at off-target sites, the field of Cas9 specificity is rapidly progressing with marked improvements in guide RNA selection, protein and guide engineering, novel enzymes, and off-target detection methods. We review important challenges and breakthroughs in the field as a comprehensive practical guide to interested users of genome editing technologies, highlighting key tools and strategies for optimizing specificity. The genome editing community should now strive to standardize such methods for measuring and reporting off-target activity, while keeping in mind that the goal for specificity should be continued improvement and vigilance. PMID:27494557

  15. 48 CFR 9903.201-2 - Types of CAS coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET PROCUREMENT PRACTICES AND COST... to the same cost accounting practices. The term includes Government-owned contractor-operated (GOCO... would prime contracts awarded to the same business unit. In measuring total net CAS-covered awards for a...

  16. Maximizing mutagenesis with solubilized CRISPR-Cas9 ribonucleoprotein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Alexa; Lindsay, Helen; Felker, Anastasia; Hess, Christopher; Anders, Carolin; Chiavacci, Elena; Zaugg, Jonas; Weber, Lukas M; Catena, Raul; Jinek, Martin; Robinson, Mark D; Mosimann, Christian

    2016-06-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 enables efficient sequence-specific mutagenesis for creating somatic or germline mutants of model organisms. Key constraints in vivo remain the expression and delivery of active Cas9-sgRNA ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) with minimal toxicity, variable mutagenesis efficiencies depending on targeting sequence, and high mutation mosaicism. Here, we apply in vitro assembled, fluorescent Cas9-sgRNA RNPs in solubilizing salt solution to achieve maximal mutagenesis efficiency in zebrafish embryos. MiSeq-based sequence analysis of targeted loci in individual embryos using CrispRVariants, a customized software tool for mutagenesis quantification and visualization, reveals efficient bi-allelic mutagenesis that reaches saturation at several tested gene loci. Such virtually complete mutagenesis exposes loss-of-function phenotypes for candidate genes in somatic mutant embryos for subsequent generation of stable germline mutants. We further show that targeting of non-coding elements in gene regulatory regions using saturating mutagenesis uncovers functional control elements in transgenic reporters and endogenous genes in injected embryos. Our results establish that optimally solubilized, in vitro assembled fluorescent Cas9-sgRNA RNPs provide a reproducible reagent for direct and scalable loss-of-function studies and applications beyond zebrafish experiments that require maximal DNA cutting efficiency in vivo. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Cas A-A Y2K status report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnick, L.

    2001-05-01

    Cas A has continued to be a rich source of information as new telescopes and detailed observations have become available. In this Y2K update, I focus on the observational findings over the last five years in the areas of ejecta mapping, hydrodynamic structure and kinematics, and high energy particles. Readers are unfortunately left to their own devices on the intriguing point source. .

  18. Application of the nanobiotechnology with the system CRISP-Cas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liceth Xiomara Sáenz-Castiblanco

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nanobiotechnology and synthetic biology are sciences that impact today with the launching of innovative and beneficial applications for the human being. These sciences have been amalgamated to manufacture new components for the construction of totally artificial cells and the creation of synthetic biomolecules. Objective: To know the applications of nanobiotechnology related to the use of the system CRISPR/Cas in the storage of bacterial DNA and therapeutic alternatives. Materials and methods: A bibliographical review on the main applications of nanobiotechnology was carried out in ScienceDirect, SciELO, PubMed databases and in magazines such as: Nature Biotechnology, Biochemistry, Science and Journal Microbiology. Results: The literature review describes and analyzes the new nanobiotechnology applications used to write information in the genetic code of bacterial cells, in which the system is used based on short grouped and regularly interspaced palindromic repetitions (CRISPR/Cas and the production of synthetic DNA, as well as therapeutic alternatives related to gene therapy. Conclusion: Among the nanobiotechnology applications, two methods to record information in the DNA of bacterial cells Escherichia coli and Sulfolobus Tokodai have been shown, which are linked to the use of the system CRISPR/Cas and the production of synthetic DNA, as well as the use of CRISPR/Cas in gene and cellular therapy.

  19. Phage Genetic Engineering Using CRISPR–Cas Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Hatoum-Aslan

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Since their discovery over a decade ago, the class of prokaryotic immune systems known as CRISPR–Cas have afforded a suite of genetic tools that have revolutionized research in model organisms spanning all domains of life. CRISPR-mediated tools have also emerged for the natural targets of CRISPR–Cas immunity, the viruses that specifically infect bacteria, or phages. Despite their status as the most abundant biological entities on the planet, the majority of phage genes have unassigned functions. This reality underscores the need for robust genetic tools to study them. Recent reports have demonstrated that CRISPR–Cas systems, specifically the three major types (I, II, and III, can be harnessed to genetically engineer phages that infect diverse hosts. Here, the mechanisms of each of these systems, specific strategies used, and phage editing efficacies will be reviewed. Due to the relatively wide distribution of CRISPR–Cas systems across bacteria and archaea, it is anticipated that these immune systems will provide generally applicable tools that will advance the mechanistic understanding of prokaryotic viruses and accelerate the development of novel technologies based on these ubiquitous organisms.

  20. CRISPR/CAS9 based engineering of actinomycetal genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates to CRISPR/Cas-based methods for generating random-sized deletions around at least one target nucleic acid sequence, or for generating precise indels around at least one target nucleic acid sequence, or for modulating transcription of at least one target nucleic acid...

  1. Evolution and classification of the CRISPR-Cas systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makarova, K.S.; Brouns, S.J.J.; Oost, van der J.

    2011-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated proteins) modules are adaptive immunity systems that are present in many archaea and bacteria. These defence systems are encoded by operons that have an extraordinarily diverse architecture and a high rate of

  2. Research Needed on the Use of CAS Standards and Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creamer, Don G.

    2003-01-01

    This article suggests research projects that would extend the knowledge base about the use of Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education (CAS) standards and guidelines in useful ways. Included are five research questions and specific research methodologies to guide researchers. (Contains 20 references.) (Author)

  3. Preparing Students to Take SOA/CAS Exam FM/2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides suggestions for preparing students to take the actuarial examination on financial mathematics, SOA/CAS Exam FM/2. It is based on current practices employed at Slippery Rock University, a small public liberal arts university. Detailed descriptions of our Theory of Interest course and subsequent Exam FM/2 prep course are provided…

  4. Les tuberculomes intracraniens: à propos de 125 cas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moufid, Faycal; Oulali, Noureddine; El Fatemi, Nizare; Gana, Rachid; Maaqili, Rachid; Bellakhdar, Fouad

    2012-01-01

    Les tuberculomes intracrâniens représentent l'une des localisations les plus graves de la tuberculose, leur incidence varie en fonction du contexte représentant 0,2% des processus intracrâniens dans les pays occidentaux et 5 à 10% des masses intracrâniennes dans les pays en voie de développement. Nous rapportons une étude rétrospective de 125 cas. L'hypertension intracrânienne (45%) et le déficit neurologique (36%) sont les signes cliniques les plus fréquents. La lésion était localisée dans 60% des cas en sus-tentoriel et dans 40% des cas en sous-tentoriel. L'approche thérapeutique a consisté en un abord direct du tuberculome dans 67 cas (53%), une biopsie stéréotaxique dans 32 cas (25%), le traitement médical en première intention sans confirmation histologique dans 26 cas (20%). Avant 1993 notre service ne disposait pas de cadre de stéréotaxie, notre attitude thérapeutique consistait soit en un abord direct de la lésion dans 70% des cas, soit un traitement antituberculeux en première intention sans confirmation histologique (30%). Cette attitude était corrélée à une mortalité et morbidité non négligeables respectivement 3% et 10%. Après 1993; le taux d'abords direct a chuté a 38%, avec 47% de biopsies stéréotaxiques et seulement 13% des patients traités par antibacillaires sans preuve histologique. Ceci s'est accompagné d'une réduction significative de mortalité a 1,4% (p = 0,0003) et de morbidité a 2% (p = 0,0027). PMID:22937196

  5. Spectral Time Series of the Cas A Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rest, Armin

    2016-10-01

    We propose to obtain time-resolved spectroscopy of the outburst of the enigmatic historical supernova Cas A using STIS spectroscopy of light scattered by a narrow filament of interstellar dust. Our group has identified recent, high-surface brightness filaments that are likely to provide high signal-to-noise reproduction of the evolving spectrum of the Cas A outburst using verified, published techniques developed by us.The timescales to see any appreciable evolution in individual astrophysical objects are typically many orders of magnitudes larger than a human life. As a result, astronomers study large numbers of objects at different stages of their evolution to connect how a single object should change with time. Cas A can provide us with the ability, to look back in time to the point of explosion by observing its light echoes - SN light scattered off of dust in the Milky Way, which causes a time delay in reaching us. In obtaining spectra of light echoes, we have been able to determine the maximum-light characteristics of the SN. Our goal here is to obtain a single STIS spectrum of a bright Cas A LE, which will provide us a time series of spectra and a spatially resolved light curve of the Cas A SN. With these data, we will measure the properties of the cooling envelope after the shock breakout of the SN to estimate the radius of the progenitor star. We will then be able to connect the progenitor star to the explosion to the SN to the SNR.

  6. SD-CAS: Spin Dynamics by Computer Algebra System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, Xenia; Filip, Claudiu

    2010-11-01

    A computer algebra tool for describing the Liouville-space quantum evolution of nuclear 1/2-spins is introduced and implemented within a computational framework named Spin Dynamics by Computer Algebra System (SD-CAS). A distinctive feature compared with numerical and previous computer algebra approaches to solving spin dynamics problems results from the fact that no matrix representation for spin operators is used in SD-CAS, which determines a full symbolic character to the performed computations. Spin correlations are stored in SD-CAS as four-entry nested lists of which size increases linearly with the number of spins into the system and are easily mapped into analytical expressions in terms of spin operator products. For the so defined SD-CAS spin correlations a set of specialized functions and procedures is introduced that are essential for implementing basic spin algebra operations, such as the spin operator products, commutators, and scalar products. They provide results in an abstract algebraic form: specific procedures to quantitatively evaluate such symbolic expressions with respect to the involved spin interaction parameters and experimental conditions are also discussed. Although the main focus in the present work is on laying the foundation for spin dynamics symbolic computation in NMR based on a non-matrix formalism, practical aspects are also considered throughout the theoretical development process. In particular, specific SD-CAS routines have been implemented using the YACAS computer algebra package (http://yacas.sourceforge.net), and their functionality was demonstrated on a few illustrative examples. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A non-inheritable maternal Cas9-based multiple-gene editing system in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Takayuki Sakurai; Akiko Kamiyoshi; Hisaka Kawate; Chie Mori; Satoshi Watanabe; Megumu Tanaka; Ryuichi Uetake; Masahiro Sato; Takayuki Shindo

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is capable of editing multiple genes through one-step zygote injection. The preexisting method is largely based on the co-injection of Cas9 DNA (or mRNA) and guide RNAs (gRNAs); however, it is unclear how many genes can be simultaneously edited by this method, and a reliable means to generate transgenic (Tg) animals with multiple gene editing has yet to be developed. Here, we employed non-inheritable maternal Cas9 (maCas9) protein derived from Tg mice with systemic Cas9...

  8. Production of genome-edited pluripotent stem cells and mice by CRISPR/Cas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horii, Takuro; Hatada, Izuho

    2016-01-01

    Clustered regularly at interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) nucleases, so-called CRISPR/Cas, was recently developed as an epoch-making genome engineering technology. This system only requires Cas9 nuclease and single-guide RNA complementary to a target locus. CRISPR/Cas enables the generation of knockout cells and animals in a single step. This system can also be used to generate multiple mutations and knockin in a single step, which is not possible using other methods. In this review, we provide an overview of genome editing by CRISPR/Cas in pluripotent stem cells and mice.

  9. All-in-One CRISPR-Cas9/FokI-dCas9 Vector-Mediated Multiplex Genome Engineering in Cultured Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Tetsushi; Sakamoto, Takuya; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 enables highly convenient multiplex genome engineering in cultured cells, because it utilizes generic Cas9 nuclease and an easily customizable single-guide RNA (sgRNA) for site-specific DNA double-strand break induction. We previously established a multiplex CRISPR-Cas9 assembly system for constructing an all-in-one vector simultaneously expressing multiple sgRNAs and Cas9 nuclease or other Cas9 variants including FokI-dCas9, which supersedes the wild-type Cas9 with regard to high specificity. In this chapter, we describe a streamlined protocol to design and construct multiplex CRISPR-Cas9 or FokI-dCas9 vectors, to introduce them into cultured cells by lipofection or electroporation, to enrich the genomically edited cells with a transient puromycin selection, to validate the mutation efficiency by Surveyor nuclease assay, and to perform off-target analyses. We show that our protocol enables highly efficient multiplex genome engineering even in hard-to-transfect HepG2 cells.

  10. Proceedings of a one-week course on exploiting anomalous scattering in macromolecular structure determination (EMBO'07)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, M.S.; Shepard, W.; Dauter, Z.; Leslie, A.; Diederichs, K.; Evans, G.; Svensson, O.; Schneider, T.; Bricogne, G.; Dauter, Z.; Flensburg, C.; Terwilliger, T.; Lamzin, V.; Leslie, A.; Kabsch, W.; Flensburg, C.; Terwilliger, T.; Lamzin, V.; Read, R.; Panjikar, S.; Pannu, N.S.; Dauter, Z.; Weiss, M.S.; McSweeney, S

    2007-07-01

    This course, which was directed to young scientists, illustrated both theoretical and practical aspects of macromolecular crystal structure solution using synchrotron radiation. Some software dedicated to data collection, processing and analysis were presented. This document gathers only the slides of the presentations.

  11. Macromolecular crowding compacts unfolded apoflavodoxin and causes severe aggregation of the off-pathway intermediate during apoflavodoxin folding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel, R.; Westphal, A.H.; Huberts, D.; Nabuurs, S.M.; Lindhoud, S.; Visser, A.J.W.G.; Mierlo, van C.P.M.

    2008-01-01

    To understand how proteins fold in vivo, it is important to investigate the effects of macromolecular crowding on protein folding. Here, the influence of crowding on in vitro apoflavodoxin folding, which involves a relatively stable off-pathway intermediate with molten globule characteristics, is

  12. Proceedings of a one-week course on exploiting anomalous scattering in macromolecular structure determination (EMBO'07)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, M.S.; Shepard, W.; Dauter, Z.; Leslie, A.; Diederichs, K.; Evans, G.; Svensson, O.; Schneider, T.; Bricogne, G.; Dauter, Z.; Flensburg, C.; Terwilliger, T.; Lamzin, V.; Leslie, A.; Kabsch, W.; Flensburg, C.; Terwilliger, T.; Lamzin, V.; Read, R.; Panjikar, S.; Pannu, N.S.; Dauter, Z.; Weiss, M.S.; McSweeney, S.

    2007-01-01

    This course, which was directed to young scientists, illustrated both theoretical and practical aspects of macromolecular crystal structure solution using synchrotron radiation. Some software dedicated to data collection, processing and analysis were presented. This document gathers only the slides of the presentations

  13. Probing the Interplay of Size, Shape, and Solution Environment in Macromolecular Diffusion Using a Simple Refraction Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankidy, Bijith D.; Coutinho, Cecil A.; Gupta, Vinay K.

    2010-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient of polymers is a critical parameter in biomedicine, catalysis, chemical separations, nanotechnology, and other industrial applications. Here, measurement of macromolecular diffusion in solutions is described using a visually instructive, undergraduate-level optical refraction experiment based on Weiner's method. To…

  14. Proceedings of a one-week course on exploiting anomalous scattering in macromolecular structure determination (EMBO'07)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, M S; Shepard, W; Dauter, Z; Leslie, A; Diederichs, K; Evans, G; Svensson, O; Schneider, T; Bricogne, G; Dauter, Z; Flensburg, C; Terwilliger, T; Lamzin, V; Leslie, A; Kabsch, W; Flensburg, C; Terwilliger, T; Lamzin, V; Read, R; Panjikar, S; Pannu, N S; Dauter, Z; Weiss, M S; McSweeney, S

    2007-07-01

    This course, which was directed to young scientists, illustrated both theoretical and practical aspects of macromolecular crystal structure solution using synchrotron radiation. Some software dedicated to data collection, processing and analysis were presented. This document gathers only the slides of the presentations.

  15. CasEMBLR: Cas9-Facilitated Multiloci Genomic Integration of in Vivo Assembled DNA Parts in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakociunas, Tadas; Rajkumar, Arun Stephen; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    , we present a method for marker-free multiloci integration of in vivo assembled DNA parts. By the use of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated one-step double-strand breaks at single, double and triple integration sites we report the successful in vivo assembly and chromosomal integration of DNA parts. We call our...

  16. Indications for body MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dujardin, M. [Department of Radiology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, BEFY, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: martine.dujardin@gmail.com; Vandenbroucke, F. [Department of Radiology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: frederik.vandenbroucke@az.vub.ac.be; Boulet, C. [Department of Radiology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: cedric.boulet@az.vub.ac.be; Op de Beeck, B. [Department of Radiology, UZA and Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: bart.op.de.beeck@uza.be; Mey, J. de [Department of Radiology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, BEFY, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: johan.demey@az.vub.ac.be

    2008-02-15

    The lack of ionizing radiation use in MRI makes the high spatial resolution technique very appealing. Also, the easy access to multiplanar imaging and the fact that gadolinium-DTPA is well tolerated and not nephrotoxic makes MRI a robust alternative in the healthy as well as the renal compromised patient. Furthermore, MRI adds advanced possibility for tissue characterization and pathology detection and dynamic imaging can be performed. Specific contrast agents specific to the hepatobiliary or the reticuloendothelial system can help with additional information in problem cases. The role of MRI for different organs is discussed and a review of the literature is given. We concluded that MRI is considered a useful and non-invasive diagnostic tool for the detection of hepatic iron concentration, to correct misdiagnosis (pseudolesions) from US and CT in focal steatosis and to help with focal lesion detection and characterization, in the healthy and especially in the cirrhotic liver, where MRI is superior to CT. Moreover, MRCP is excellent for identifying the presence and the level of biliary obstruction in malignant invasion and is considered in the literature as a non-invasive screening tool for common bile duct stones, appropriately selecting candidates for preoperative ERCP and sparing others the need for an endoscopic procedure with its associated complications. MRI is the first choice modality for adrenal evaluation in contemporary medical imaging. It is a useful examination in renal as well as splenic pathology and best assesses loco-regional staging, i.e. arterial involvement in pancreatic cancer.

  17. A Test of Macromolecular Crystallization in Microgravity: Large, Well-Ordered Insulin Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgstahl, Gloria E. O.; Vahedi-Faridi, Ardeschir; Lovelace, Jeff; Bellamy, Henry D.; Snell, Edward H.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Crystals of insulin grown in microgravity on space shuttle mission STS-95 were extremely well-ordered and unusually large (many > 2 mm). The physical characteristics of six microgravity and six earth-grown crystals were examined by X-ray analysis employing superfine f slicing and unfocused synchrotron radiation. This experimental setup allowed hundreds of reflections to be precisely examined for each crystal in a short period of time. The microgravity crystals were on average 34 times larger, had 7 times lower mosaicity, had 54 times higher reflection peak heights and diffracted to significantly higher resolution than their earth grown counterparts. A single mosaic domain model could account for reflections in microgravity crystals whereas reflections from earth crystals required a model with multiple mosaic domains. This statistically significant and unbiased characterization indicates that the microgravity environment was useful for the improvement of crystal growth and resultant diffraction quality in insulin crystals and may be similarly useful for macromolecular crystals in general.

  18. Acoustic methods for high-throughput protein crystal mounting at next-generation macromolecular crystallographic beamlines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessler, Christian G; Kuczewski, Anthony; Stearns, Richard; Ellson, Richard; Olechno, Joseph; Orville, Allen M; Allaire, Marc; Soares, Alexei S; Héroux, Annie

    2013-09-01

    To take full advantage of advanced data collection techniques and high beam flux at next-generation macromolecular crystallography beamlines, rapid and reliable methods will be needed to mount and align many samples per second. One approach is to use an acoustic ejector to eject crystal-containing droplets onto a solid X-ray transparent surface, which can then be positioned and rotated for data collection. Proof-of-concept experiments were conducted at the National Synchrotron Light Source on thermolysin crystals acoustically ejected onto a polyimide `conveyor belt'. Small wedges of data were collected on each crystal, and a complete dataset was assembled from a well diffracting subset of these crystals. Future developments and implementation will focus on achieving ejection and translation of single droplets at a rate of over one hundred per second.

  19. Proteome-wide dataset supporting the study of ancient metazoan macromolecular complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadhna Phanse

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Our analysis examines the conservation of multiprotein complexes among metazoa through use of high resolution biochemical fractionation and precision mass spectrometry applied to soluble cell extracts from 5 representative model organisms Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Mus musculus, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, and Homo sapiens. The interaction network obtained from the data was validated globally in 4 distant species (Xenopus laevis, Nematostella vectensis, Dictyostelium discoideum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and locally by targeted affinity-purification experiments. Here we provide details of our massive set of supporting biochemical fractionation data available via ProteomeXchange (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD002319-http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD002328, PPIs via BioGRID (185267; and interaction network projections via (http://metazoa.med.utoronto.ca made fully accessible to allow further exploration. The datasets here are related to the research article on metazoan macromolecular complexes in Nature [1]. Keywords: Proteomics, Metazoa, Protein complexes, Biochemical, Fractionation

  20. Functionalization of Planet-Satellite Nanostructures Revealed by Nanoscopic Localization of Distinct Macromolecular Species

    KAUST Repository

    Rossner, Christian

    2016-09-26

    The development of a straightforward method is reported to form hybrid polymer/gold planet-satellite nanostructures (PlSNs) with functional polymer. Polyacrylate type polymer with benzyl chloride in its backbone as a macromolecular tracer is synthesized to study its localization within PlSNs by analyzing the elemental distribution of chlorine. The functionalized nanohybrid structures are analyzed by scanning transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and spectrum imaging. The results show that the RAFT (reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer) polymers\\' sulfur containing end groups are colocalized at the gold cores, both within nanohybrids of simple core-shell morphology and within higher order PlSNs, providing microscopic evidence for the affinity of the RAFT group toward gold surfaces. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA., Weinheim.

  1. Integration and global analysis of isothermal titration calorimetry data for studying macromolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brautigam, Chad A; Zhao, Huaying; Vargas, Carolyn; Keller, Sandro; Schuck, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a powerful and widely used method to measure the energetics of macromolecular interactions by recording a thermogram of differential heating power during a titration. However, traditional ITC analysis is limited by stochastic thermogram noise and by the limited information content of a single titration experiment. Here we present a protocol for bias-free thermogram integration based on automated shape analysis of the injection peaks, followed by combination of isotherms from different calorimetric titration experiments into a global analysis, statistical analysis of binding parameters and graphical presentation of the results. This is performed using the integrated public-domain software packages NITPIC, SEDPHAT and GUSSI. The recently developed low-noise thermogram integration approach and global analysis allow for more precise parameter estimates and more reliable quantification of multisite and multicomponent cooperative and competitive interactions. Titration experiments typically take 1-2.5 h each, and global analysis usually takes 10-20 min.

  2. Recent Major Improvements to the ALS Sector 5 Macromolecular Crystallography Beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, Simon A.; Glossinger, James; Smith-Baumann, Alexis; McKean, John P.; Trame, Christine; Dickert, Jeff; Rozales, Anthony; Dauz, Azer; Taylor, John; Zwart, Petrus; Duarte, Robert; Padmore, Howard; McDermott, Gerry; Adams, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Although the Advanced Light Source (ALS) was initially conceived primarily as a low energy (1.9GeV) 3rd generation source of VUV and soft x-ray radiation it was realized very early in the development of the facility that a multipole wiggler source coupled with high quality, (brightness preserving), optics would result in a beamline whose performance across the optimal energy range (5-15keV) for macromolecular crystallography (MX) would be comparable to, or even exceed, that of many existing crystallography beamlines at higher energy facilities. Hence, starting in 1996, a suite of three beamlines, branching off a single wiggler source, was constructed, which together formed the ALS Macromolecular Crystallography Facility. From the outset this facility was designed to cater equally to the needs of both academic and industrial users with a heavy emphasis placed on the development and introduction of high throughput crystallographic tools, techniques, and facilities--such as large area CCD detectors, robotic sample handling and automounting facilities, a service crystallography program, and a tightly integrated, centralized, and highly automated beamline control environment for users. This facility was immediately successful, with the primary Multiwavelength Anomalous Diffraction beamline (5.0.2) in particular rapidly becoming one of the foremost crystallographic facilities in the US--responsible for structures such as the 70S ribosome. This success in-turn triggered enormous growth of the ALS macromolecular crystallography community and spurred the development of five additional ALS MX beamlines all utilizing the newly developed superconducting bending magnets ('superbends') as sources. However in the years since the original Sector 5.0 beamlines were built the performance demands of macromolecular crystallography users have become ever more exacting; with growing emphasis placed on studying larger complexes, more difficult structures, weakly diffracting or smaller

  3. Mix and Inject: Reaction Initiation by Diffusion for Time-Resolved Macromolecular Crystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Schmidt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-resolved macromolecular crystallography unifies structure determination with chemical kinetics, since the structures of transient states and chemical and kinetic mechanisms can be determined simultaneously from the same data. To start a reaction in an enzyme, typically, an initially inactive substrate present in the crystal is activated. This has particular disadvantages that are circumvented when active substrate is directly provided by diffusion. However, then it is prohibitive to use macroscopic crystals because diffusion times become too long. With small micro- and nanocrystals diffusion times are adequately short for most enzymes and the reaction can be swiftly initiated. We demonstrate here that a time-resolved crystallographic experiment becomes feasible by mixing substrate with enzyme nanocrystals which are subsequently injected into the X-ray beam of a pulsed X-ray source.

  4. OCTOPUS: an innovative multimodal diffractometer for neutron macromolecular crystallography across the length scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blakeley, M.P.; Andersen, K.; Kreuz, M.; Giroud, B.; McSweeney, S.; Mitchell, E.; Teixeira, S.C.M.; Forsyth, V.T.

    2011-01-01

    We propose to construct a novel protein diffractometer at position H112B. The new instrument will deliver major efficiency gains, as well as offering greatly extended flexibility through the option of several easily interchangeable modes of operation. This proposal builds on the demonstrable need to extend ILL's capacity for high resolution structural studies of protein systems, as well as a need to widen the scope of biological crystallography - in particular for monochromatic studies at both high and low resolution. The development will be carried out in close collaboration with structural biologists at the ESRF, and engineered in such a way that the user interface of the instrument (from sample to software) will be transparently identifiable to a large, dynamic, and driven community of European synchrotron X-ray macromolecular crystallographers. (authors)

  5. C1 Polymerization: a unique tool towards polyethylene-based complex macromolecular architectures

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, De

    2017-05-09

    The recent developments in organoborane initiated C1 polymerization (chain grows by one atom at a time) of ylides opens unique horizons towards well-defined/perfectly linear polymethylenes (equivalent to polyethylenes, PE) and PE-based complex macromolecular architectures. The general mechanism of C1 polymerization (polyhomologation) involves the formation of a Lewis complex between a methylide (monomer) and a borane (initiator), followed by migration/insertion of a methylene into the initiator and after oxidation/hydrolysis to afford OH-terminated polyethylenes. This review summarizes efforts towards conventional and newly discovered borane-initiators and ylides (monomers), as well as a combination of polyhomologation with other polymerization methods. Initial efforts dealing with C3 polymerization and the synthesis of the first C1/C3 copolymers are also given. Finally, some thoughts for the future of these polymerizations are presented.

  6. Control and data acquisition system for the macromolecular crystallography beamline of SSRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qisheng; Huang Sheng; Sun Bo; Tang Lin; He Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    The macromolecular crystallography beamline BL17U1 of Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) is an important platform for structure biological science. High performance of the beamline would benefit the users greatly in their experiment and data acquisition. To take full advantage of the state-of-the-art mechanical and physical design of the beamline, we have made a series of efforts to develop a robust control and data acquisition system, with user-friendly GUI. These were done by adopting EPICS and Blu-Ice systems on the BL17U1 beamline, with considerations on easy accommodation of new beeline components. In this paper, we report the integration of EPICS and Blu-Ice systems. By using the EPICS gateway interface and several new DHS, Blu-Ice was successfully established for the BL17U1 beamline. As a result, the experiment control and data acquisition system is reliable and functional for users. (authors)

  7. Reliable and efficient solution of genome-scale models of Metabolism and macromolecular Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ding; Yang, Laurence; Fleming, Ronan M. T.

    2017-01-01

    orders of magnitude. Data values also have greatly varying magnitudes. Standard double-precision solvers may return inaccurate solutions or report that no solution exists. Exact simplex solvers based on rational arithmetic require a near-optimal warm start to be practical on large problems (current ME......Constraint-Based Reconstruction and Analysis (COBRA) is currently the only methodology that permits integrated modeling of Metabolism and macromolecular Expression (ME) at genome-scale. Linear optimization computes steady-state flux solutions to ME models, but flux values are spread over many...... models have 70,000 constraints and variables and will grow larger). We have developed a quadrupleprecision version of our linear and nonlinear optimizer MINOS, and a solution procedure (DQQ) involving Double and Quad MINOS that achieves reliability and efficiency for ME models and other challenging...

  8. Site-selective electroless nickel plating on patterned thin films of macromolecular metal complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Mutsumi; Yamagiwa, Hiroki; Asakawa, Daisuke; Noguchi, Makoto; Kurashina, Tadashi; Fukawa, Tadashi; Shirai, Hirofusa

    2010-12-01

    We demonstrate a simple route to depositing nickel layer patterns using photocross-linked polymer thin films containing palladium catalysts, which can be used as adhesive interlayers for fabrication of nickel patterns on glass and plastic substrates. Electroless nickel patterns can be obtained in three steps: (i) the pattern formation of partially quaterized poly(vinyl pyridine) by UV irradiation, (ii) the formation of macromolecular metal complex with palladium, and (iii) the nickel metallization using electroless plating bath. Metallization is site-selective and allows for a high resolution. And the resulting nickel layered structure shows good adhesion with glass and plastic substrates. The direct patterning of metallic layers onto insulating substrates indicates a great potential for fabricating micro/nano devices.

  9. Structure, function and folding of phosphoglycerate kinase are strongly perturbed by macromolecular crowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiotakis, Antonios; Dhar, Apratim; Ebbinghaus, Simon; Nienhaus, Lea; Homouz, Dirar; Gruebele, Martin; Cheung, Margaret

    2010-10-01

    We combine experiment and computer simulation to show how macromolecular crowding dramatically affects the structure, function and folding landscape of phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK). Fluorescence labeling shows that compact states of yeast PGK are populated as the amount of crowding agents (Ficoll 70) increases. Coarse-grained molecular simulations reveal three compact ensembles: C (crystal structure), CC (collapsed crystal) and Sph (spherical compact). With an adjustment for viscosity, crowded wild type PGK and fluorescent PGK are about 15 times or more active in 200 mg/ml Ficoll than in aqueous solution. Our results suggest a new solution to the classic problem of how the ADP and diphosphoglycerate binding sites of PGK come together to make ATP: rather than undergoing a hinge motion, the ADP and substrate sites are already located in proximity under crowded conditions that mimic the in vivo conditions under which the enzyme actually operates.

  10. Macromolecular contrast media. A new approach for characterising breast tumors with MR-mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daldrup, H.E.; Gossmann, A.; Koeln Univ.; Wendland, M.; Brasch, R.C.; Rosenau, W.

    1997-01-01

    The value of macromolecular contrast agents (MMCM) for the characterization of benign and malignant breast tumors will be demonstrated in this review. Animal studies suggest a high potential of MMCM to increase the specificity of MR-mammography. The concept of tumor differentiation is based on the pathological hyperpermeability of microvessels in malignant tumors. MMCM show a leak into the interstitium of carcinomas, whereas they are confined to the intravascular space in benign tumors. Capabilities and limitations of the MMCM-prototype. Albumin-Gd-DTPA, for breast tumor characterization will be summarized and compared to the standard low molecular weight contrast agent Gd-DTPA. Initial experience with new MMCM, such as Dendrimers, Gd-DTPA-Polylysine and MS-325 will be outlined. The potential of 'blood-pool'-iron oxides, such as AMI-227 for the evaluation of tumor microvascular permeabilities will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  11. DA+ data acquisition and analysis software at the Swiss Light Source macromolecular crystallography beamlines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojdyla, Justyna Aleksandra; Kaminski, Jakub W; Panepucci, Ezequiel; Ebner, Simon; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Gabadinho, Jose; Wang, Meitian

    2018-01-01

    Data acquisition software is an essential component of modern macromolecular crystallography (MX) beamlines, enabling efficient use of beam time at synchrotron facilities. Developed at the Paul Scherrer Institute, the DA+ data acquisition software is implemented at all three Swiss Light Source (SLS) MX beamlines. DA+ consists of distributed services and components written in Python and Java, which communicate via messaging and streaming technologies. The major components of DA+ are the user interface, acquisition engine, online processing and database. Immediate data quality feedback is achieved with distributed automatic data analysis routines. The software architecture enables exploration of the full potential of the latest instrumentation at the SLS MX beamlines, such as the SmarGon goniometer and the EIGER X 16M detector, and development of new data collection methods.

  12. C1 Polymerization: a unique tool towards polyethylene-based complex macromolecular architectures

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, De; Zhang, Zhen; Hadjichristidis, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    The recent developments in organoborane initiated C1 polymerization (chain grows by one atom at a time) of ylides opens unique horizons towards well-defined/perfectly linear polymethylenes (equivalent to polyethylenes, PE) and PE-based complex macromolecular architectures. The general mechanism of C1 polymerization (polyhomologation) involves the formation of a Lewis complex between a methylide (monomer) and a borane (initiator), followed by migration/insertion of a methylene into the initiator and after oxidation/hydrolysis to afford OH-terminated polyethylenes. This review summarizes efforts towards conventional and newly discovered borane-initiators and ylides (monomers), as well as a combination of polyhomologation with other polymerization methods. Initial efforts dealing with C3 polymerization and the synthesis of the first C1/C3 copolymers are also given. Finally, some thoughts for the future of these polymerizations are presented.

  13. Versatile High-Throughput Fluorescence Assay for Monitoring Cas9 Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seamon, Kyle J; Light, Yooli K; Saada, Edwin A; Schoeniger, Joseph S; Harmon, Brooke

    2018-06-05

    The RNA-guided DNA nuclease Cas9 is now widely used for the targeted modification of genomes of human cells and various organisms. Despite the extensive use of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) systems for genome engineering and the rapid discovery and engineering of new CRISPR-associated nucleases, there are no high-throughput assays for measuring enzymatic activity. The current laboratory and future therapeutic uses of CRISPR technology have a significant risk of accidental exposure or clinical off-target effects, underscoring the need for therapeutically effective inhibitors of Cas9. Here, we develop a fluorescence assay for monitoring Cas9 nuclease activity and demonstrate its utility with S. pyogenes (Spy), S. aureus (Sau), and C. jejuni (Cje) Cas9. The assay was validated by quantitatively profiling the species specificity of published anti-CRISPR (Acr) proteins, confirming the reported inhibition of Spy Cas9 by AcrIIA4 and Cje Cas9 by AcrIIC1 and no inhibition of Sau Cas9 by either anti-CRISPR. To identify drug-like inhibitors, we performed a screen of 189 606 small molecules for inhibition of Spy Cas9. Of 437 hits (0.2% hit rate), six were confirmed as Cas9 inhibitors in a direct gel electrophoresis secondary assay. The high-throughput nature of this assay makes it broadly applicable for the discovery of additional Cas9 inhibitors or the characterization of Cas9 enzyme variants.

  14. Cas9, Cpf1 and C2c1/2/3-What's next?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakade, Shota; Yamamoto, Takashi; Sakuma, Tetsushi

    2017-05-04

    Since the rapid emergence of clustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system, developed as a genome engineering tool in 2012-2013, most researchers in the life science field have had a fixated interest in this fascinating technology. CRISPR-Cas9 is an RNA-guided DNA endonuclease system, which consists of Cas9 nuclease defining a few targeting base via protospacer adjacent motif complexed with easily customizable single guide RNA targeting around 20-bp genomic sequence. Although Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9), one of the Cas9 proteins that applications in genome engineering were first demonstrated, still has wide usage because of its high nuclease activity and broad targeting range, there are several limitations such as large molecular weight and potential off-target effect. In this commentary, we describe various improvements and alternatives of CRISPR-Cas systems, including engineered Cas9 variants, Cas9 homologs, and novel Cas proteins other than Cas9. These variations enable flexible genome engineering with high efficiency and specificity, orthogonal genetic control at multiple gene loci, gene knockdown, or fluorescence imaging of transcripts mediated by RNA targeting, and beyond.

  15. The Revolution Continues: Newly Discovered Systems Expand the CRISPR-Cas Toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, Karthik; Babu, Kesavan; Sundaresan, Ramya; Rajan, Rakhi; Sashital, Dipali G

    2017-10-05

    CRISPR-Cas systems defend prokaryotes against bacteriophages and mobile genetic elements and serve as the basis for revolutionary tools for genetic engineering. Class 2 CRISPR-Cas systems use single Cas endonucleases paired with guide RNAs to cleave complementary nucleic acid targets, enabling programmable sequence-specific targeting with minimal machinery. Recent discoveries of previously unidentified CRISPR-Cas systems have uncovered a deep reservoir of potential biotechnological tools beyond the well-characterized Type II Cas9 systems. Here we review the current mechanistic understanding of newly discovered single-protein Cas endonucleases. Comparison of these Cas effectors reveals substantial mechanistic diversity, underscoring the phylogenetic divergence of related CRISPR-Cas systems. This diversity has enabled further expansion of CRISPR-Cas biotechnological toolkits, with wide-ranging applications from genome editing to diagnostic tools based on various Cas endonuclease activities. These advances highlight the exciting prospects for future tools based on the continually expanding set of CRISPR-Cas systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Structural Basis for the Altered PAM Specificities of Engineered CRISPR-Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Seiichi; Nishimasu, Hiroshi; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Nureki, Osamu

    2016-03-17

    The RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 cleaves double-stranded DNA targets bearing a PAM (protospacer adjacent motif) and complementarity to the guide RNA. A recent study showed that, whereas wild-type Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9) recognizes the 5'-NGG-3' PAM, the engineered VQR, EQR, and VRER SpCas9 variants recognize the 5'-NGA-3', 5'-NGAG-3', and 5'-NGCG-3' PAMs, respectively, thus expanding the targetable sequences in Cas9-mediated genome editing applications. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structures of the three SpCas9 variants in complexes with a single-guide RNA and its altered PAM-containing, partially double-stranded DNA targets. A structural comparison of the three SpCas9 variants with wild-type SpCas9 revealed that the multiple mutations synergistically induce an unexpected displacement in the phosphodiester backbone of the PAM duplex, thereby allowing the SpCas9 variants to directly recognize the altered PAM nucleotides. Our findings explain the altered PAM specificities of the SpCas9 variants and establish a framework for further rational engineering of CRISPR-Cas9. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evolved Cas9 variants with broad PAM compatibility and high DNA specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Johnny H; Miller, Shannon M; Geurts, Maarten H; Tang, Weixin; Chen, Liwei; Sun, Ning; Zeina, Christina M; Gao, Xue; Rees, Holly A; Lin, Zhi; Liu, David R

    2018-04-05

    A key limitation of the use of the CRISPR-Cas9 system for genome editing and other applications is the requirement that a protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) be present at the target site. For the most commonly used Cas9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9), the required PAM sequence is NGG. No natural or engineered Cas9 variants that have been shown to function efficiently in mammalian cells offer a PAM less restrictive than NGG. Here we use phage-assisted continuous evolution to evolve an expanded PAM SpCas9 variant (xCas9) that can recognize a broad range of PAM sequences including NG, GAA and GAT. The PAM compatibility of xCas9 is the broadest reported, to our knowledge, among Cas9 proteins that are active in mammalian cells, and supports applications in human cells including targeted transcriptional activation, nuclease-mediated gene disruption, and cytidine and adenine base editing. Notably, despite its broadened PAM compatibility, xCas9 has much greater DNA specificity than SpCas9, with substantially lower genome-wide off-target activity at all NGG target sites tested, as well as minimal off-target activity when targeting genomic sites with non-NGG PAMs. These findings expand the DNA targeting scope of CRISPR systems and establish that there is no necessary trade-off between Cas9 editing efficiency, PAM compatibility and DNA specificity.

  18. Explaining MRI examinations DVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takatsu, Yasuo; Komeda, Takuya

    2010-01-01

    When conducting MRI examinations, there are various things to be careful of. There is often stress related to the MRI examinations, so in order to perform an examination safely and smoothly, sufficient explanation must be given. An explanation of what to do and what not to do during an examination should be outlined in a brochure given to patients before the examination. There may be many patients who have misgivings about their MRI examinations, so to reduce their anxiousness and deepen their understanding of MRI examinations and to improve the safety and effiency of MRI examinations,; we created a DVD about MRI examinations. We gathered MRI-related safety information and instructions, and assessed the effect that the information might have on patients. We started a workgroup for a project to plan and record a video according to the Storyboard. When editing, we reviewed the length of each segment, the amount of information on screen, and the overall length of the DVD. We discussed the issue within the workgroup and had hospital approval. It was possible for us to complete it without depending on the supplier and the cost was kept to a minimum. Finally, we decided on a viewing location. We asked a hospital volunteers to see a complete DVD and we evaluated their responses by questionnaires. As the result, their understanding and anxieties related to MRI examinations were alleviated, as expected. Their anxiety seemed to be eased. Patients also seemed to have a deeper understanding of MRI examinations having seen an examination being conducted. (author)

  19. MRI of 'brain death'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Shigeki; Itoh, Takahiko; Tuchida, Shohei; Kinugasa, Kazushi; Asari, Shoji; Nishimoto, Akira; Sanou, Kazuo.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was undertaken for two patients who suffered from severe cerebrovascular diseases and were clinically brain dead. The MRI system we used was Resona (Yokogawa Medical Systems, superconductive system 0.5 T) and the CT apparatus was Toshiba TCT-300. Initial CT and MRI were undertaken as soon as possible after admission, and repeated sequentially. After diagnosis of brain death, we performed angiography to determine cerebral circulatory arrest, and MRI obtained at the same time was compared with the angiogram and CT. Case 1 was a 77-year-old man who was admitted in an unconscious state. CT and MRI on the second day after hospitalization revealed cerebellar infarction. He was diagnosed as brain dead on day 4. Case 2 was a 35-year-old man. When he was transferred to our hospital, he was in cardiorespiratory arrested. Cardiac resuscitation was successful but no spontaneous respiration appeared. CT and MRI on admission revealed right intracerebral hemorrhage. Angiography revealed cessation of contrast medium in intracranial vessels in both of the patients. We found no 'flow signal void sign' in the bilateral internal carotid and basilar arteries on MRI images in both cases after brain death. MRI, showing us the anatomical changes of the brain, clearly revealed brain herniations, even though only nuclear findings of 'brain tamponade' were seen on CT. But in Case 1, we could not see the infarct lesions in the cerebellum on MR images obtained after brain death. This phenomenon was caused by the whole brain ischemia masking the initial ischemic lesions. We concluded that MRI was useful not only the anatomical display of lesions and brain herniation with high contrast resolution but for obtaining information on cerebral circulation of brain death. (author)

  20. Chemical and Biophysical Modulation of Cas9 for Tunable Genome Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuñez, James K; Harrington, Lucas B; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2016-03-18

    The application of the CRISPR-Cas9 system for genome engineering has revolutionized the ability to interrogate genomes of mammalian cells. Programming the Cas9 endonuclease to induce DNA breaks at specified sites is achieved by simply modifying the sequence of its cognate guide RNA. Although Cas9-mediated genome editing has been shown to be highly specific, cleavage events at off-target sites have also been reported. Minimizing, and eventually abolishing, unwanted off-target cleavage remains a major goal of the CRISPR-Cas9 technology before its implementation for therapeutic use. Recent efforts have turned to chemical biology and biophysical approaches to engineer inducible genome editing systems for controlling Cas9 activity at the transcriptional and protein levels. Here, we review recent advancements to modulate Cas9-mediated genome editing by engineering split-Cas9 constructs, inteins, small molecules, protein-based dimerizing domains, and light-inducible systems.

  1. Methods for decoding Cas9 protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) sequences: A brief overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvelis, Tautvydas; Gasiunas, Giedrius; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2017-05-15

    Recently the Cas9, an RNA guided DNA endonuclease, emerged as a powerful tool for targeted genome manipulations. Cas9 protein can be reprogrammed to cleave, bind or nick any DNA target by simply changing crRNA sequence, however a short nucleotide sequence, termed PAM, is required to initiate crRNA hybridization to the DNA target. PAM sequence is recognized by Cas9 protein and must be determined experimentally for each Cas9 variant. Exploration of Cas9 orthologs could offer a diversity of PAM sequences and novel biochemical properties that may be beneficial for genome editing applications. Here we briefly review and compare Cas9 PAM identification assays that can be adopted for other PAM-dependent CRISPR-Cas systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A 3D Image Filter for Parameter-Free Segmentation of Macromolecular Structures from Electron Tomograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Rubbiya A.; Landsberg, Michael J.; Knauth, Emily; Morgan, Garry P.; Marsh, Brad J.; Hankamer, Ben

    2012-01-01

    3D image reconstruction of large cellular volumes by electron tomography (ET) at high (≤5 nm) resolution can now routinely resolve organellar and compartmental membrane structures, protein coats, cytoskeletal filaments, and macromolecules. However, current image analysis methods for identifying in situ macromolecular structures within the crowded 3D ultrastructural landscape of a cell remain labor-intensive, time-consuming, and prone to user-bias and/or error. This paper demonstrates the development and application of a parameter-free, 3D implementation of the bilateral edge-detection (BLE) algorithm for the rapid and accurate segmentation of cellular tomograms. The performance of the 3D BLE filter has been tested on a range of synthetic and real biological data sets and validated against current leading filters—the pseudo 3D recursive and Canny filters. The performance of the 3D BLE filter was found to be comparable to or better than that of both the 3D recursive and Canny filters while offering the significant advantage that it requires no parameter input or optimisation. Edge widths as little as 2 pixels are reproducibly detected with signal intensity and grey scale values as low as 0.72% above the mean of the background noise. The 3D BLE thus provides an efficient method for the automated segmentation of complex cellular structures across multiple scales for further downstream processing, such as cellular annotation and sub-tomogram averaging, and provides a valuable tool for the accurate and high-throughput identification and annotation of 3D structural complexity at the subcellular level, as well as for mapping the spatial and temporal rearrangement of macromolecular assemblies in situ within cellular tomograms. PMID:22479430

  3. Optimization of selective inversion recovery magnetization transfer imaging for macromolecular content mapping in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dortch, Richard D; Bagnato, Francesca; Gochberg, Daniel F; Gore, John C; Smith, Seth A

    2018-03-24

    To optimize a selective inversion recovery (SIR) sequence for macromolecular content mapping in the human brain at 3.0T. SIR is a quantitative method for measuring magnetization transfer (qMT) that uses a low-power, on-resonance inversion pulse. This results in a biexponential recovery of free water signal that can be sampled at various inversion/predelay times (t I/ t D ) to estimate a subset of qMT parameters, including the macromolecular-to-free pool-size-ratio (PSR), the R 1 of free water (R 1f ), and the rate of MT exchange (k mf ). The adoption of SIR has been limited by long acquisition times (≈4 min/slice). Here, we use Cramér-Rao lower bound theory and data reduction strategies to select optimal t I /t D combinations to reduce imaging times. The schemes were experimentally validated in phantoms, and tested in healthy volunteers (N = 4) and a multiple sclerosis patient. Two optimal sampling schemes were determined: (i) a 5-point scheme (k mf estimated) and (ii) a 4-point scheme (k mf assumed). In phantoms, the 5/4-point schemes yielded parameter estimates with similar SNRs as our previous 16-point scheme, but with 4.1/6.1-fold shorter scan times. Pair-wise comparisons between schemes did not detect significant differences for any scheme/parameter. In humans, parameter values were consistent with published values, and similar levels of precision were obtained from all schemes. Furthermore, fixing k mf reduced the sensitivity of PSR to partial-volume averaging, yielding more consistent estimates throughout the brain. qMT parameters can be robustly estimated in ≤1 min/slice (without independent measures of ΔB 0 , B1+, and T 1 ) when optimized t I -t D combinations are selected. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  4. Macromolecular composition of terrestrial and marine organic matter in sediments across the East Siberian Arctic Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparkes, Robert B.; Doğrul Selver, Ayça; Gustafsson, Örjan; Semiletov, Igor P.; Haghipour, Negar; Wacker, Lukas; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Talbot, Helen M.; van Dongen, Bart E.

    2016-10-01

    Mobilisation of terrestrial organic carbon (terrOC) from permafrost environments in eastern Siberia has the potential to deliver significant amounts of carbon to the Arctic Ocean, via both fluvial and coastal erosion. Eroded terrOC can be degraded during offshore transport or deposited across the wide East Siberian Arctic Shelf (ESAS). Most studies of terrOC on the ESAS have concentrated on solvent-extractable organic matter, but this represents only a small proportion of the total terrOC load. In this study we have used pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (py-GCMS) to study all major groups of macromolecular components of the terrOC; this is the first time that this technique has been applied to the ESAS. This has shown that there is a strong offshore trend from terrestrial phenols, aromatics and cyclopentenones to marine pyridines. There is good agreement between proportion phenols measured using py-GCMS and independent quantification of lignin phenol concentrations (r2 = 0.67, p radiocarbon data for bulk OC (14COC) which, when coupled with previous measurements, allows us to produce the most comprehensive 14COC map of the ESAS to date. Combining the 14COC and py-GCMS data suggests that the aromatics group of compounds is likely sourced from old, aged terrOC, in contrast to the phenols group, which is likely sourced from modern woody material. We propose that an index of the relative proportions of phenols and pyridines can be used as a novel terrestrial vs. marine proxy measurement for macromolecular organic matter. Principal component analysis found that various terrestrial vs. marine proxies show different patterns across the ESAS, and it shows that multiple river-ocean transects of surface sediments transition from river-dominated to coastal-erosion-dominated to marine-dominated signatures.

  5. Development of an online UV–visible microspectrophotometer for a macromolecular crystallography beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Nobutaka, E-mail: nobutaka.shimizu@kek.jp [SPring-8/JASRI, 1-1-1 Koto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Shimizu, Tetsuya [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Koto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Baba, Seiki; Hasegawa, Kazuya [SPring-8/JASRI, 1-1-1 Koto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Yamamoto, Masaki [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Koto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Kumasaka, Takashi [SPring-8/JASRI, 1-1-1 Koto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    An online UV–visible microspectrophotometer has been developed for the macromolecular crystallography beamline at SPring-8. Details of this spectrophotometer are reported. Measurement of the UV–visible absorption spectrum is a convenient technique for detecting chemical changes of proteins, and it is therefore useful to combine spectroscopy and diffraction studies. An online microspectrophotometer for the UV–visible region was developed and installed on the macromolecular crystallography beamline, BL38B1, at SPring-8. This spectrophotometer is equipped with a difference dispersive double monochromator, a mercury–xenon lamp as the light source, and a photomultiplier as the detector. The optical path is mostly constructed using mirrors, in order to obtain high brightness in the UV region, and the confocal optics are assembled using a cross-slit diaphragm like an iris to eliminate stray light. This system can measure optical densities up to a maximum of 4.0. To study the effect of radiation damage, preliminary measurements of glucose isomerase and thaumatin crystals were conducted in the UV region. Spectral changes dependent on X-ray dose were observed at around 280 nm, suggesting that structural changes involving Trp or Tyr residues occurred in the protein crystal. In the case of the thaumatin crystal, a broad peak around 400 nm was also generated after X-ray irradiation, suggesting the cleavage of a disulfide bond. Dose-dependent spectral changes were also observed in cryo-solutions alone, and these changes differed with the composition of the cryo-solution. These responses in the UV region are informative regarding the state of the sample; consequently, this device might be useful for X-ray crystallography.

  6. Superhydrophobic hybrid membranes by grafting arc-like macromolecular bridges on graphene sheets: Synthesis, characterization and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Zhao-Hua; Luo, Zheng; Huang, Qiang; Deng, Jian-Ping; Wu, Yi-Xian

    2018-05-01

    Grafting single end-tethered polymer chains on the surface of graphene is a conventional way to modify the surface properties of graphene oxide. However, grafting arc-like macromolecular bridges on graphene surfaces has been barely reported. Herein, a novel arc-like polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) macromolecular bridges grafted graphene sheets (GO-g-Arc PDMS) was successfully synthesized via a confined interface reaction at 90 °C. Both the hydrophilic α- and ω-amino groups of linear hydrophobic NH2-PDMS-NH2 macromolecular chains rapidly reacted with epoxy and carboxyl groups on the surfaces of graphene oxide in water suspension to form arc-like PDMS macromolecular bridges on graphene sheets. The grafting density of arc-like PDMS bridges on graphene sheets can reach up to 0.80 mmol g-1 or 1.32 arc-like bridges per nm2 by this confined interface reaction. The water contact angle (WCA) of the hybrid membrane could be increased with increasing both the grafting density and content of covalent arc-like bridges architecture. The superhydrophobic hybrid membrane with a WCA of 153.4° was prepared by grinding of the above arc-like PDMS bridges grafted graphene hybrid, dispersing in ethanol and filtrating by organic filter membrane. This superhydrophobic hybrid membrane shows good self-cleaning and complete oil-water separation properties, which provides potential applications in anticontamination coating and oil-water separation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the synthesis of functional hybrid membranes by grafting arc-like PDMS macromolecular bridges on graphene sheets via a confined interface reaction.

  7. Quantification of the effect of water exchange in dynamic contrast MRI perfusion measurements in the brain and heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Rosenbaum, S; Fritz-Hansen, T

    2001-01-01

    Measurement of myocardial and brain perfusion when using exogenous contrast agents (CAs) such as gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) and MRI is affected by the diffusion of water between compartments. This water exchange may have an impact on signal enhancement, or, equivalently, on the longitudinal...... exchange can have a significant effect on perfusion estimation (F) in the brain when using Gd-DTPA, where it acts as an intravascular contrast agent....

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  10. Liposomes Loaded with Hydrophobic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Suitable T2 Contrast Agents for MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Martínez-González

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available There has been a recent surge of interest in the use of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs as contrast agents (CAs for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, due to their tunable properties and their low toxicity compared with other CAs such as gadolinium. SPIONs exert a strong influence on spin-spin T2 relaxation times by decreasing the MR signal in the regions to which they are delivered, consequently yielding darker images or negative contrast. Given the potential of these nanoparticles to enhance detection of alterations in soft tissues, we studied the MRI response of hydrophobic or hydrophilic SPIONs loaded into liposomes (magnetoliposomes of different lipid composition obtained by sonication. These hybrid nanostructures were characterized by measuring several parameters such as size and polydispersity, and number of SPIONs encapsulated or embedded into the lipid systems. We then studied the influence of acyl chain length as well as its unsaturation, charge, and presence of cholesterol in the lipid bilayer at high field strength (7 T to mimic the conditions used in preclinical assays. Our results showed a high variability depending on the nature of the magnetic particles. Focusing on the hydrophobic SPIONs, the cholesterol-containing samples showed a slight reduction in r2, while unsaturation of the lipid acyl chain and inclusion of a negatively charged lipid into the bilayer appeared to yield a marked increase in negative contrast, thus rendering these magnetoliposomes suitable candidates as CAs, especially as a liver CA.

  11. A Microfluidic Platform to design crosslinked Hyaluronic Acid Nanoparticles (cHANPs) for enhanced MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Maria; Bevilacqua, Paolo; Netti, Paolo Antonio; Torino, Enza

    2016-11-01

    Recent advancements in imaging diagnostics have focused on the use of nanostructures that entrap Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Contrast Agents (CAs), without the need to chemically modify the clinically approved compounds. Nevertheless, the exploitation of microfluidic platforms for their controlled and continuous production is still missing. Here, a microfluidic platform is used to synthesize crosslinked Hyaluronic Acid NanoParticles (cHANPs) in which a clinically relevant MRI-CAs, gadolinium diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA), is entrapped. This microfluidic process facilitates a high degree of control over particle synthesis, enabling the production of monodisperse particles as small as 35 nm. Furthermore, the interference of Gd-DTPA during polymer precipitation is overcome by finely tuning process parameters and leveraging the use of hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) of surfactants and pH conditions. For both production strategies proposed to design Gd-loaded cHANPs, a boosting of the relaxation rate T1 is observed since a T1 of 1562 is achieved with a 10 μM of Gd-loaded cHANPs while a similar value is reached with 100 μM of the relevant clinical Gd-DTPA in solution. The advanced microfluidic platform to synthesize intravascularly-injectable and completely biocompatible hydrogel nanoparticles entrapping clinically approved CAs enables the implementation of straightforward and scalable strategies in diagnostics and therapy applications.

  12. Hyaluronic acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes as tumor-targeting MRI contrast agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou L

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lin Hou,* Huijuan Zhang,* Yating Wang, Lili Wang, Xiaomin Yang, Zhenzhong ZhangSchool of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: A tumor-targeting carrier, hyaluronic acid (HA-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs, was explored to deliver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agents (CAs targeting to the tumor cells specifically. In this system, HA surface modification for SWCNTs was simply accomplished by amidation process and could make this nanomaterial highly hydrophilic. Cellular uptake was performed to evaluate the intracellular transport capabilities of HA-SWCNTs for tumor cells and the uptake rank was HA-SWCNTs> SWCNTs owing to the presence of HA, which was also evidenced by flow cytometry. The safety evaluation of this MRI CAs was investigated in vitro and in vivo. It revealed that HA-SWCNTs could stand as a biocompatible nanocarrier and gadolinium (Gd/HA-SWCNTs demonstrated almost no toxicity compared with free GdCl3. Moreover, GdCl3 bearing HA-SWCNTs could significantly increase the circulation time for MRI. Finally, to investigate the MRI contrast enhancing capabilities of Gd/HA-SWCNTs, T1-weighted MR images of tumor-bearing mice were acquired. The results suggested Gd/HA-SWCNTs had the highest tumor-targeting efficiency and T1-relaxivity enhancement, indicating HA-SWCNTs could be developed as a tumor-targeting carrier to deliver the CAs, GdCl3, for the identifiable diagnosis of tumor.Keywords: gadolinium, magnetic resonance, SWCNTs, hyaluronic acid, contrast agent

  13. Rapid and tunable method to temporally control gene editing based on conditional Cas9 stabilization. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is a powerful tool for studying gene function. Here, we describe a method that allows temporal control of CRISPR/Cas9 activity based on conditional Cas9 destabilization. We demonstrate that fusing an FKBP12-derived destabilizing domain to Cas9 (DD-Cas9) enables conditional Cas9 expression and temporal control of gene editing in the presence of an FKBP12 synthetic ligand. This system can be easily adapted to co-express, from the same promoter, DD-Cas9 with any other gene of interest without co-modulation of the latter.

  14. Insights into the CRISPR/Cas system of Gardnerella vaginalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pleckaityte Milda

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gardnerella vaginalis is identified as the predominant colonist of the vaginal tracts of women diagnosed with bacterial vaginosis (BV. G. vaginalis can be isolated from healthy women, and an asymptomatic BV state is also recognised. The association of G. vaginalis with different clinical phenotypes could be explained by different cytotoxicity of the strains, presumably based on disparate gene content. The contribution of horizontal gene transfer to shaping the genomes of G. vaginalis is acknowledged. The CRISPR loci of the recently discovered CRISPR/Cas microbial defence system provide a historical view of the exposure of prokaryotes to a variety of foreign genetic elements. Results The CRISPR/Cas loci were analysed using available sequence data from three G. vaginalis complete genomes and 18 G. vaginalis draft genomes in the NCBI database, as well as PCR amplicons of the genomic DNA of 17 clinical isolates. The cas genes in the CRISPR/Cas loci of G. vaginalis belong to the E. coli subtype. Approximately 20% of the spacers had matches in the GenBank database. Sequence analysis of the CRISPR arrays revealed that nearly half of the spacers matched G. vaginalis chromosomal sequences. The spacers that matched G. vaginalis chromosomal sequences were determined to not be self-targeting and were presumably neither constituents of mobile-element-associated genes nor derived from plasmids/viruses. The protospacers targeted by these spacers displayed conserved protospacer-adjacent motifs. Conclusions The CRISPR/Cas system has been identified in about one half of the analysed G. vaginalis strains. Our analysis of CRISPR sequences did not reveal a potential link between their presence and the virulence of the G. vaginalis strains. Based on the origins of the spacers found in the G. vaginalis CRISPR arrays, we hypothesise that the transfer of genetic material among G. vaginalis strains could be regulated by the CRISPR/Cas mechanism. The

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... has any questions. Some implanted devices require a short period of time after placement (usually six weeks) ... center of the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... any recent surgeries. Some conditions, such as severe kidney disease, may prevent you from being given gadolinium contrast ... an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will be necessary to ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... told otherwise, take your regular medications as usual. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. ... contrast material except when absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the MRI Safety page for more information ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... told otherwise, take your regular medications as usual. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. ... contrast material except when absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the MRI ... pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... imaging modalities (typically CT) or which are particularly well-suited to MR imaging. determine tumor size, extent, ... the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings ... and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the results ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will ... abnormalities where Chest CT is a preferred imaging test. MR imaging can assess blood flow without risking ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms that naturally exist ... thumping sounds when the coils that generate the radiofrequency pulses are activated. Some centers provide earplugs, while ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven valuable in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and vascular disease, heart valve abnormalities, bone and other soft tissue ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... Infants and young children usually require sedation or anesthesia to complete an MRI exam without moving. Whether ... A physician or nurse specializing in sedation or anesthesia for children should be available during the exam ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no risk, but you should ... or if you have asthma. The contrast material most commonly used for an MRI exam contains a ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... six weeks) before being safe for MRI examinations. Examples include but are not limited to: artificial heart ... usually completed within one hour but may occasionally take longer. top of page What will I experience ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... devices or metal in your body. Guidelines about eating and drinking before your exam vary between facilities. ... fitting and has no metal fasteners. Guidelines about eating and drinking before an MRI exam vary with ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed pictures ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam is assumed to outweigh the potential risks. Pregnant women should not receive injections of ...

  11. MRI features of chondroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Xiaoguang; Liu Xia; Cheng Kebin; Liu Wei

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the MR imaging features of chondroblastoma. Methods: MRI examinations of 20 patients with histological proven chondmblastoma were reviewed retrospectively. The MRI findings of chondroblastoma including the signal intensity, the shape, the growth patterns, and the surrounding bone marrow edema and the adjacent soft tissue edema, the periosteal reaction, the adjacent joint effusion were analyzed. Results: All 20 cases demonstrated heterogeneous MR signal intensity on T 1 WI and T 2 WI images and showed lobular margins. Sixteen cases demonstrated expansive growth patterns. Surrounding bone marrow edema was found in 18 cases and adjacent soft tissue edema in 14 cases. Periosteal reaction was identified in 6 cases. In 7 cases the tumor extended to adjacent soft tissue. Adjacent joint effusion was visible on MRI in 6 cases. Conclusion: Heterogeneous signal intensity, lobular margins and expansive growth pattern, adjacent bone marrow and soft tissue edema were the common features of chondroblastoma on MRI. (authors)

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... also provides movie-like sequential imaging of the cardiovascular system that is important to assess the health ... invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven valuable in diagnosing a ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... prior obstruction of blood flow). determine blood flow dynamics in the vessels and heart chambers. display lymph ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... an MRI scan, but this is rare. Tooth fillings and braces usually are not affected by the magnetic field, but they may distort images of the facial area or brain, so you should let the ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed pictures of ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie ... your skin at the site of the IV tube insertion. Some patients may sense a temporary metallic ...

  18. MRI of the Breast

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    ... in evaluating women at high risk for breast cancer. MRI can successfully image the dense breast tissue common in younger women, and it can successfully image breast implants. Both of these are difficult to image using ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... metal in your body. Guidelines about eating and drinking before your exam vary between facilities. Unless you ... has no metal fasteners. Guidelines about eating and drinking before an MRI exam vary with the specific ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI examinations may require you to receive an injection of contrast material into the bloodstream. The radiologist , ... the potential risks. Pregnant women should not receive injections of gadolinium contrast material except when absolutely necessary ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... will be removed. MRI exams generally include multiple runs (sequences), some of which may last several minutes. ... top of page Who interprets the results and how do I get them? A radiologist, a physician ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... others nearby harm. These items include: jewelry, watches, credit cards and hearing aids, all of which can ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that ...

  3. Arm MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI and ultrasound. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ... Magnetic resonance imaging: In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ...

  4. Sinus MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CT, and MRI. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ... Magnetic resonance imaging. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ...

  5. Leg MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI and ultrasound. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ... Magnetic resonance imaging: In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ...

  6. Knee MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI and ultrasound. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ... Magnetic resonance imaging. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... provides movie-like sequential imaging of the cardiovascular system that is important to assess the health and ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... you should let the radiologist know about them. Parents or family members who accompany patients into the ... intercom. Many MRI centers allow a friend or parent to stay in the room as long as ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. MRI ... of the chest. assess disorders of the chest bones (vertebrae, ribs and sternum) and chest wall soft ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... Thus, the child remains motionless allowing for good quality images. Jewelry and other accessories should be left ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... will hear and feel loud tapping or thumping sounds when the coils that generate the radiofrequency pulses ... use headphones to reduce the intensity of the sounds made by the MRI machine. You may be ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. The contrast material most commonly used for an ... Infants and young children usually require sedation or anesthesia to complete an MRI exam without moving. Whether ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... are not limited to: artificial heart valves implanted drug infusion ports artificial limbs or metallic joint prostheses ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may require you to receive an injection of ... for a mild sedative prior to your scheduled examination. Infants and young children usually require sedation or ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in the exam room. ... tell the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. ... signals that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... have any devices or metal in your body. Guidelines about eating and drinking before your exam vary ... is loose-fitting and has no metal fasteners. Guidelines about eating and drinking before an MRI exam ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... Most MRI exams are painless. However, some patients find it uncomfortable to remain still during MR imaging. ... anxious, confused or in severe pain, you may find it difficult to lie still during imaging. A ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ... patient to have an allergy to a gadolinium-based contrast agent used for MRI than the iodine- ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... procedure performed? MRI examinations may be performed on outpatients or inpatients. You will be positioned on the ... and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the results ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... used in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is ... injection. If you do not require sedation, no recovery period is necessary. You may resume your usual ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... prior to your scheduled examination. Infants and young children usually require sedation or anesthesia to complete an MRI exam without moving. Whether a child requires sedation depends on the child's age, intellectual ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI exam, a physician, nurse or technologist will insert an intravenous (IV) catheter, also known as an ... physicians with expertise in several radiologic areas. Outside links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... used in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is ... a preferred imaging test. MR imaging can assess blood flow without risking the side effects of conventional ( ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety ... the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... you have any devices or metal in your body. Guidelines about eating and drinking before your exam ... soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x- ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... usual. Some MRI examinations may require you to receive an injection of contrast material into the bloodstream. ... outweigh the potential risks. Pregnant women should not receive injections of gadolinium contrast material except when absolutely ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI) of the chest uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... allergies and whether there’s a possibility you are pregnant. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it ... if there is any possibility that they are pregnant. MRI has been used for scanning patients since ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... vessels, from almost any angle. MRI also provides movie-like sequential imaging of the cardiovascular system that ... headsets so that the child can watch a movie while the scan is being performed. Thus, the ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... to assess the anatomy and function of the heart and its blood flow. Tell your doctor about ... chest cavity, including the mediastinum , chest wall, pleura, heart and vessels, from almost any angle. MRI also ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... and how it is working. MRI enables the discovery of abnormalities that might be obscured by bone ... Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), comprising physicians with expertise in several radiologic ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... it is useful to bring that to the attention of the scheduler before the exam and bring ... patient for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help you pass the time. In some cases, intravenous injection of contrast material ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... contrast for an MRI. If you have a history of kidney disease or liver transplant, it will ... and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the results ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... may have. top of page What does the equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a ... traction devices and many types of life support equipment may distort the MR images and as a ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. The contrast material most commonly used for an ... complete an MRI exam without moving. Whether a child requires sedation depends on the child's age, intellectual ...