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Sample records for macrolides quinolones amikacin

  1. Macrolides vs. quinolones for community-acquired pneumonia: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

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    Skalsky, K; Yahav, D; Lador, A; Eliakim-Raz, N; Leibovici, L; Paul, M

    2013-04-01

    The relative efficacy, safety and ecological implications of macrolides vs. quinolones in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are debatable. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing any macrolide vs. any quinolone for the treatment of CAP among adult inpatients or outpatients, as monotherapy or both in combination with a beta-lactam. We did not limit inclusion by pneumonia severity, publication status, language or date of publication. The primary outcomes assessed were 30-day all-cause mortality and treatment failure. Two authors independently extracted the data. Fixed effect meta-analysis of risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals was performed. Sixteen trials (4989 patients) fulfilling inclusion criteria were identified, mostly assessing outpatients with mild to moderate CAP. All-cause mortality was not significantly different for macrolides vs. quinolones, RR 1.03 (0.63-1.68, seven trials), with a low event rate (2%). Treatment failure was significantly lower with quinolones, RR 0.78 (0.67-0.91, 16 trials). The definition of failure used in the primary studies was not clearly representative of patients' benefit. Microbiological failure was lower with quinolones, RR 0.63 (0.49-0.81, 13 trials). All adverse events, adverse events requiring discontinuation and any premature antibiotic discontinuation were significantly more frequent with macrolides, mainly on account of gastrointestinal adverse events. Resistance development was not assessed in the trials. Randomized controlled trials show an advantage of quinolones in the treatment of CAP with regard to clinical cure without need for antibiotic modification at end of treatment and gastrointestinal adverse events. The clinical significance of this advantage is unclear.

  2. Quinolone and macrolide resistance in Campylobacter jejuni and C-coli: Resistance mechanisms and trends in human isolates

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    Engberg, J.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Taylor, D. E.

    2001-01-01

    The incidence of human Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli infections has increased markedly in many parts of the world in the last decade as has the number of quinolone-resistant and, to a lesser extent, macrolide-resistant Campylobacter strains causing infections. We review macrolide and quinolone...... maintained, but fluoroquinolones may now be of limited use in the empiric treatment of Campylobacter infections in many regions....

  3. Quinolone and macrolide resistance in Campylobacter jejuni and C-coli: Resistance mechanisms and trends in human isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, J.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Taylor, D. E.

    2001-01-01

    The incidence of human Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli infections has increased markedly in many parts of the world in the last decade as has the number of quinolone-resistant and, to a lesser extent, macrolide-resistant Campylobacter strains causing infections. We review macrolide and quinolone...... resistance in Campylobacter and track resistance trends in human clinical isolates in relation to use of these agents in food animals. Susceptibility data suggest that erythromycin and other macrolides should remain the drugs of choice in most regions, with systematic surveillance and central measures...... maintained, but fluoroquinolones may now be of limited use in the empiric treatment of Campylobacter infections in many regions....

  4. Genetic analysis of a pediatric clinical isolate of Moraxella catarrhalis with resistance to macrolides and quinolones.

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    Iwata, Satoshi; Sato, Yoshitake; Toyonaga, Yoshikiyo; Hanaki, Hideaki; Sunakawa, Keisuke

    2015-04-01

    During the surveillance conducted in 2012 by the Drug-resistant Pathogen Surveillance Group in Pediatric Infectious Disease, we isolated a strain of Moraxella catarrhalis that demonstrated resistance to both macrolides and quinolones from a male pediatric patient aged 1.5 years who had developed acute bronchitis. Then we evaluated the susceptibility of this strain to different types of antibacterial agents and conducted a genetic analysis. The results of the susceptibility evaluation showed that the MIC values of azithromycin, clarithromycin, and rokitamycin were >64 μg/mL, >64 μg/mL, and 4 μg/mL, respectively; clearly demonstrating resistance to macrolides. The MIC values of the quinolones levofloxacin, tosufloxacin, and garenoxacin were 4 μg/mL, 2 μg/mL, and 1 μg/mL, respectively; indicating decreased susceptibility. The genetic analysis of this strain revealed one mutation in 23s rRNA with a replacement of adenine by thymine at nucleotide position 2330 (A2330T) and another mutation in gyrB at nucleotide position 1481 by replacement of adenine with guanine (A1481G) that caused a substitution of the 494 th asparagine acid by glycine, as being associated with the observed resistance to macrolides and quinolones, respectively. Similar to drug-resistant bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae, the prevalence of which has recently increased, the treatment of drug-resistant M. catarrhalis infections is considered difficult due to the development of resistance to different types of antibacterial agents. It is vital to maintain an unwavering focus on the trend toward an increasing number of drug-resistant M. catarrhalis strains and ensure the proper use of each antibacterial agent.

  5. Different Dynamic Patterns of β-Lactams, Quinolones, Glycopeptides and Macrolides on Mouse Gut Microbial Diversity.

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    Yin, Jia; M, Prabhakar; Wang, Shan; Liao, Shuo-Xi; Peng, Xin; He, Yan; Chen, Yi-Ran; Shen, Hua-Fang; Su, Jin; Chen, Ye; Jiang, Yun-Xia; Zhang, Guo-Xia; Zhou, Hong-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The adverse impact of antibiotics on the gut microbiota has attracted extensive interest, particularly due to the development of microbiome research techniques in recent years. However, a direct comparison of the dynamic effects of various types of antibiotics using the same animal model has not been available. In the present study, we selected six antibiotics from four categories with the broadest clinical usage, namely, β-lactams (Ceftriaxone Sodium, Cefoperazone/Sulbactam and meropenem), quinolones (ofloxacin), glycopeptides (vancomycin), and macrolides (azithromycin), to treat BALB/c mice. Stool samples were collected during and after the administration of antibiotics, and microbial diversity was analyzed through Illumina sequencing and bioinformatics analyses using QIIME. Both α and β diversity analyses showed that ceftriaxone sodium, cefoperazone/sulbactam, meropenem and vancomycin changed the gut microbiota dramatically by the second day of antibiotic administration whereas the influence of ofloxacin was trivial. Azithromycin clearly changed the gut microbiota but much less than vancomycin and the β-lactams. In general, the community changes induced by the three β-lactam antibiotics showed consistency in inhibiting Papillibacter, Prevotella and Alistipes while inducing massive growth of Clostridium. The low diversity and high Clostridium level might be an important cause of Clostridium difficile infection after usage of β-lactams. Vancomycin was unique in that it inhibited Firmicutes, mainly the genus Clostridium. On the other hand, it induced the growth of Escherichia and effect lasted for months afterward. Azithromycin and meropenem induced the growth of Enterococcus. These findings will be useful for understanding the potential adverse effects of antibiotics on the gut microbiome and ensuring their better usage.

  6. The Nonantibiotic Macrolide EM703 Improves Survival in a Model of Quinolone-Treated Pseudomonas aeruginosa Airway Infection.

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    Kasetty, Gopinath; Bhongir, Ravi K V; Papareddy, Praveen; Herwald, Heiko; Egesten, Arne

    2017-09-01

    Macrolide antibiotics are used as anti-inflammatory agents, e.g., for prevention of exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis. Several studies have shown improved outcomes after the addition of macrolides to β-lactam antibiotics for treatment of severe community-acquired pneumonia. However, a beneficial effect of macrolides in treating Gram-negative bacterial airway infections, e.g., those caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, remains to be shown. Macrolide antibiotics have significant side effects, in particular, motility-stimulating activity in the gastrointestinal tract and promotion of bacterial resistance. In this study, EM703, a modified macrolide lacking antibiotic and motility-stimulating activities but with retained anti-inflammatory properties, was used as an adjunct treatment for experimental P. aeruginosa lung infection, in combination with a conventional antibiotic. Airway infections in BALB/cJRj mice were induced by nasal instillation of P. aeruginosa; this was followed by treatment with the quinolone levofloxacin in the absence or presence of EM703. Survival, inflammatory responses, and cellular influx to the airways were monitored. Both pretreatment and simultaneous administration of EM703 dramatically improved survival in levofloxacin-treated mice with P. aeruginosa airway infections. In addition, EM703 reduced the levels of proinflammatory cytokines, increased the numbers of leukocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and reduced the numbers of neutrophils present in lung tissue. In summary, the findings of this study show that the immunomodulatory properties of the modified macrolide EM703 can be important when treating Gram-negative pneumonia, as exemplified by P. aeruginosa infection in this study. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. [Susceptibility of Streptococcus pyogenes to macrolides and quinolones in Guadalajara, Spain].

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    Rodríguez-Zurita, M E; Solís del Baño, S; Robres Guillén, P; González Praetorius, A; Gimeno Fernández, C; Pérez Pomata, M T; Bisquert Santiago, J

    2003-03-01

    We carried out a retrospective study of the susceptibility of 104 Streptococcus pyogenes strains, which were isolated in 2000 and 2001 from clinical samples of different origins, to penicillin, erythromycin, clindamycin, ofloxacin and levofloxacin. The susceptibility testing was performed using the agar difusion method according to the guidelines of the NCCLS. All of the isolates showed susceptibility to penicillin and clindamycin. However, we detected 11 strains that were resistant to erythromycin (10.6%) and 4 strains resistant to ofloxacin (3.8%). We studied the resistance phenotypes of macrolides and lincosamides using erythromycin and clindamycin discs. Nine of the eleven strains that were resistant to erythromycin showed an M phenotype, while the remaining two showed inducible resistance to clindamycin, thus suggesting an MLS(B) inducible phenotype. No strains with constitutive resistance to erythromycin or clindamycin (MLS(B) constitutive phenotype) were identified. While penicillin is still uniformly active against S. pyogenes, in Guadalajara, there are 10.6% strains that are resistant to 14- and 15-atoms macrolides.

  8. Trace analysis of trimethoprim and sulfonamide, macrolide, quinolone, and tetracycline antibiotics in chlorinated drinking water using liquid chromatography electrospray tandem mass spectrometry

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    Ye, Z.; Weinberg, H.S.; Meyer, M.T.

    2007-01-01

    A multirun analytical method has been developed and validated for trace determination of 24 antibiotics including 7 sulfonamides, 3 macrolides, 7 quinolones, 6 tetracyclines, and trimethoprim in chlorine-disinfected drinking water using a single solid-phase extraction method coupled to liquid chromatography with positive electrospray tandem mass spectrometry detection. The analytes were extracted by a hydrophilic-lipophilic balanced resin and eluted with acidified methanol (0.1% formic acid), resulting in analyte recoveries generally above 90%. The limits of quantitation were mostly below 10 ng/L in drinking water. Since the concentrated sample matrix typically caused ion suppression during electrospray ionization, the method of standard addition was used for quantitation. Chlorine residuals in drinking water can react with some antibiotics, but ascorbic acid was found to be an effective chlorine quenching agent without affecting the analysis and stability of the antibiotics in water. A preliminary occurrence study using this method revealed the presence of some antibiotics in drinking waters, including sulfamethoxazole (3.0-3.4 ng/L), macrolides (1.4-4.9 ng/L), and quinolones (1.2-4.0 ng/L). ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  9. Experimental pleurodesis induced by antibiotics (macrolides or quinolones Pleurodese experimental induzida por antibióticos (macrolídeos e quinolonas

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    Lisete R. Teixeira

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Chemical pleurodesis is a therapeutic tool for the treatment of recurrent pleural effusions, mainly those of neoplastic etiology. In the past, tetracycline was the sclerosant agent of choice in clinical practice, but presently, there is no consensus about an ideal agent. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of macrolides (azithromycin and clarithromycin or quinolones (levofloxacin and gatifloxacin in inducing experimental pleurodesis in rabbits. METHOD: Forty New Zealand rabbits randomized into groups of 10 received (at a total volume of 2 mL for each animal 1 of the 4 drugs by intrapleural injection. After 28 days, the animals were euthanized and the pleural cavity was evaluated macroscopically and microscopically. RESULTS: The intensity of the macroscopic adhesions was mild in all groups. On microscopic analysis, minimal pleural fibrosis and inflammation were observed in all animals. CONCLUSION: The macrolides (azithromycin or clarithromycin and the quinolones (levofloxacin or gatifloxacin when injected into the normal pleural space of rabbits are not effective in promoting pleurodesis. Additional research is required to identify sclerosing agents capable of inducing pleurodesis.OBJETIVO: A pleurodese química representa uma ferramenta terapêutica utilizada no tratamento dos processos pleurais recidivantes, principalmente nos derrames neoplásicos. A escolha do melhor esclerosante pleural é ainda motivo de controvérsia, não havendo consenso com relação ao agente considerado ideal. O objetivo deste estudo é avaliar a efetividade dos macrolídeos (azitromicina e claritromicina e das quinolonas (levofloxacina e gatifloxacina na indução de pleurodese experimental em coelhos. MÉTODOS: Quarenta animais randomizados em grupos de 10, receberam, em volume total de 2 mL, estas drogas através de injeção intrapleural. RESULTADOS: Após 28 dias, os animais foram sacrificados sendo avaliada a cavidade pleural. A

  10. New Role of Quinolones in Respiratory Tract Infections

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    Ronald F Grossman

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of limited activity of the standard quinolones such as ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin against some clinically important organisms including Streptococcus pneumoniae and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, new quinolones have been developed. In addition to their improved activity against S pneumoniae, some also demonstrate excellent anaerobic activity. None of the quinolones have a role to play in the treatment of paediatric infections. Quinolones (both older and newer agents have demonstrated equivalent efficacy to standard antimicrobials in the treatment of acute sinusitis. Several groups have suggested that quinolones are excellent agents in the treatment of high risk patients with acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis. These patients include the elderly, and those with frequent exacerbations, significant comorbid conditions. long duration of chronic bronchitis and major impairment of lung function. There is no evidence to suggest that the newer quinolones will differ from the currently available agents for th is disease. The major advantage of the newer quinolones appears to be in the treatment of patients with community-acquired pneumonia where pneumococcal infection is a real concern. A new parenteral quinolone with pneumococcal activity may replace the standard macrolide/cephalosporin combination that is commonly prescribed. For patients with nosocomial pneumonia, the newer agents are alternative choices, especially among patients with early onset pneumonia (less than five days of hospitalization, but are unlikely to replace ciprofloxacin in the intensive care unit setting because of poor Pseudomonas aeruginosa coverage.

  11. Quinolone pharmacokinetics.

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    Robson, R A

    1992-12-01

    Fluoroquinolones have broad antibacterial spectra and are active against most Gram-negative and many Gram-positive species. They exhibit excellent oral bioavailability, extensive tissue penetration, low protein binding, and a long elimination half-life. This review compares and contrasts the pharmakonetics of some quinolone antibiotics - especially pefloxacin, ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, fleroxacin and lomefloxacin - in terms of their adsorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination, and interactions with other drugs and with food. In addition, the pharmacokinetics of these agents in the elderly and in patients with renal or hepatic impairment is discussed. The fluoroquinolones are established as a major class of antibiotics in the treatment of infections but pharmacokinetics factors should be considered when deciding on the most appropriate of these agents to use in individual patients.

  12. The macrolide antibiotic renaissance.

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    Dinos, George P

    2017-09-01

    Macrolides represent a large family of protein synthesis inhibitors of great clinical interest due to their applicability to human medicine. Macrolides are composed of a macrocyclic lactone of different ring sizes, to which one or more deoxy-sugar or amino sugar residues are attached. Macrolides act as antibiotics by binding to bacterial 50S ribosomal subunit and interfering with protein synthesis. The high affinity of macrolides for bacterial ribosomes, together with the highly conserved structure of ribosomes across virtually all of the bacterial species, is consistent with their broad-spectrum activity. Since the discovery of the progenitor macrolide, erythromycin, in 1950, many derivatives have been synthesised, leading to compounds with better bioavailability and acid stability and improved pharmacokinetics. These efforts led to the second generation of macrolides, including well-known members such as azithromycin and clarithromycin. Subsequently, in order to address increasing antibiotic resistance, a third generation of macrolides displaying improved activity against many macrolide resistant strains was developed. However, these improvements were accompanied with serious side effects, leading to disappointment and causing many researchers to stop working on macrolide derivatives, assuming that this procedure had reached the end. In contrast, a recent published breakthrough introduced a new chemical platform for synthesis and discovery of a wide range of diverse macrolide antibiotics. This chemical synthesis revolution, in combination with reduction in the side effects, namely, 'Ketek effects', has led to a macrolide renaissance, increasing the hope for novel and safe therapeutic agents to combat serious human infectious diseases. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  13. Dysglycemia associated with quinolones.

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    El Ghandour, Sarah; Azar, Sami T

    2015-06-01

    Antimicrobial therapy is well known to be associated with fluctuations of blood glucose levels. This review aims at exploring the association between glycemic fluctuations and antibiotics mainly focusing on quinolones. Quinolones are associated with hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. Several mechanism are proposed to explain this causality.

  14. Contribution of topoisomerase IV mutation to quinolone resistance in Mycoplasma genitalium.

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    Yamaguchi, Yuko; Takei, Masaya; Kishii, Ryuta; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Deguchi, Takashi

    2013-04-01

    The mechanism of quinolone resistance in Mycoplasma genitalium remains poorly understood due to difficulties with in vitro culture, especially of clinical isolates. In this study, to confirm the association between mutations in topoisomerases and antimicrobial susceptibilities to quinolones, ciprofloxacin-resistant mutant strains were selected using the cultivable type strain ATCC 33530. Sequence analysis revealed that the mutant strains harbored mutations in topoisomerase IV: Gly81Cys in ParC, Pro261Thr in ParC, or Asn466Lys in ParE. The MICs of all quinolones tested against the mutant strains were 2- to 16-fold higher than those against the wild-type strain. No cross-resistance was observed with macrolides or tetracyclines. We determined the inhibitory activities of quinolones against DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV in order to investigate the correlation between antimicrobial susceptibility and inhibitory activity against the target enzymes, considered the primary targets of quinolones. Furthermore, using enzymatic analysis, we confirmed that Gly81Cys in the ParC quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) contributed to quinolone resistance. This is the first study to isolate quinolone-resistant mutant strains of M. genitalium harboring substitutions in the parC or parE gene in vitro and to measure the inhibitory activities against the purified topoisomerases of M. genitalium.

  15. Macrolide Hybrid Compounds: Drug Discovery Opportunities in Anti- Infective and Anti-inflammatory Area.

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    Paljetak, Hana Cipcic; Tomaskovic, Linda; Matijasic, Mario; Bukvic, Mirjana; Fajdetic, Andrea; Verbanac, Donatella; Peric, Mihaela

    2017-01-01

    Macrolides, polyketide natural products, and their 15-membered semi-synthetic derivatives are composed of substituted macrocyclic lactone ring and used primarily as potent antibiotics. Recently their usefulness was extended to antimalarial and anti-inflammatory area. Hybrid macrolides presented in this article are the next generation semi-synthetic compounds that combine pharmacophores from antibacterial, antimalarial and anti-inflammatory area with 14- and 15-membered azalide scaffolds. Antibacterial azalide hybrids with sulphonamides showed improved activity against resistant streptococci while quinolone conjugates demonstrated full coverage of respiratory pathogens including macrolide resistant strains and their efficacy was confirmed in mouse pneumonia model. Antimalarial macrolide hybrids, mainly involving (chloro)quinoline pharmacophores, showed outstanding activity against chloroquine resistant strains, favourable pharmacokinetics, promising in vivo efficacy as well as encouraging developmental potential. Anti-inflammatory hybrids were obtained by combining macrolides with corticosteroid and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. They were found active in in vivo animal models of locally induced inflammation, asthma, inflammatory bowel disease and rheumatoid arthritis and demonstrated improved safety over parent steroid drugs. Overall, macrolide hybrids possess significant potential to be developed as potent novel medicines in therapeutic areas of utmost pharmaceutical interest. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Photoprocesses in quinolone substituted

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    Vasilyeva, N. Y.; Vusovich, O. V.

    2002-03-01

    In the present work the analysis of the possible ways of energy degradation of electron excited states of 4-methyl-7- hydxyquinolone-2 (Q) and its protolytic species is presented (Figure 1); a ratio of radiative and nonradiative channels of deactivation of energy of electronic excitation is established; constants of photophysical processes (internal and intercrossing conversion), proceeding after act of absorption of light are designed. Study of exited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) in quinolones is interesting as a source of information on the relative importance of these processes in the photophysics and photochemistry of such molecular systems.

  17. The evidence for clonal spreading of quinolone resistance with a particular clonal complex of Campylobacter jejuni.

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    Kovač, J; Cadež, N; Lušicky, M; Nielsen, E Møller; Ocepek, M; Raspor, P; Možina, S Smole

    2014-12-01

    Campylobacter is the most prevalent cause of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide and it represents a significant public health risk of increasing severity due to its escalating resistance to clinically important quinolone and macrolide antibiotics. As a zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter is transmitted along the food chain and naturally cycles from environmental waters, feedstuff, animals and food to humans. We determined antibiotic resistance profiles, as well as multilocus sequence types and flaA-SVR types for 52 C. jejuni isolated in Slovenia from human, animal, raw and cured chicken meat and water samples. Twenty-eight different sequence types, arranged in ten clonal complexes, three new allele types and five new sequence types were identified, indicating the relatively high diversity in a small group of strains. The assignment of strains from different sources to the same clonal complexes indicates their transmission along the food supply chain. The most prevalent clonal complex was CC21, which was also the genetic group with 95% of quinolone-resistant strains. Based on the genetic relatedness of these quinolone-resistant strains identified by polymerase chain reaction with a mismatch amplification mutation assay and sequencing of the quinolone resistance-determining region of the gyrA gene, we conclude that the high resistance prevalence observed indicates the local clonal spread of quinolone resistance with CC21.

  18. Biodistribution of Amikacin Solid Lipid Nanoparticles after Pulmonary Delivery

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    J. Varshosaz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the present work was studying the biodistribution of amikacin solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs after pulmonary delivery to increase its concentration in the lungs for treatment of cystic fibrosis lung infections and also providing a new method for clinical application of amikacin. To achieve this aim, 99mTc labelled amikacin was loaded in cholesterol SLNs and after in vitro optimization, the desired SLNs and free drug were administered through pulmonary and i.v. routes to male rats and qualitative and biodistribution studies were done. Results showed that pulmonary delivery of SLNs of amikacin by microsprayer caused higher drug concentration in lungs than kidneys while i.v. administration of free drug caused reverse conditions. It seems that pulmonary delivery of SLNs may improve patients' compliance due to reduction of drug side effects in kidneys and elongation of drug dosing intervals due to the sustained drug release from SLNs.

  19. [Pharmacokinetics of amikacin in infants and children].

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    Takimoto, M; Yano, K; Fujita, K; Yoshioka, H; Sanae, N; Maruyama, S

    1987-06-01

    Twenty-one children, from 41 hours to 12 years of age, were given amikacin (AMK) for suspected bacterial infections. In the 41 hours old newborn infant, the half-life of AMK was 6.9 hours. As infants' ages increase, half-lives of AMK became shorter. The trend toward a shorter half-life in an older child was the most marked during neonatal period. At an age of 7 days, the half-life was shorter than 3 hours. In infants exceeding 6 months of age, ages did not make differences in the length of half-lives. The apparent volume of distribution in newborn was, as average, 350.6 ml/kg body weight. The average for children 5 years and older was smaller, 280.7 ml/kg. The peak level-dose ratio was 2.8 (micrograms X ml-1 X mg-1 X kg) in newborns. There was a tendency that this ratio increased with age. The average ratio for children over 5 years was 4.5 (micrograms X ml-1 X mg-1 X kg). In summary, the 2 remarkable observations obtained from the present study were; 1) The trend that the half-life of AMK shortens as the child grows older was clearest in neonatal period. 2) Peak serum level produced by the same dose per kilogram body weight had a tendency to increase with ages of children.

  20. [Bactericidal activity of sitafloxacin and other new quinolones against antimicrobial resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae].

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    Kobayashi, Intetsu; Kanayama, Akiko; Hasegawa, Miyuki; Kaneko, Akihiro

    2013-02-01

    We conducted a study assess the bactericidal activity of sitafloxacin (STFX) against Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates recovered from respiratory infections including penicillin-resistant (PRSP) isolates, macrolide resistant isolates possessing mefA and ermB resistance genes and quinolone resistance isolates with mutations in gyrA or gyrA and parC. Each isolate tested was grown in hemosupplemented Mueller-Hinton broth and adjusted to approximately 10(5) CFU/ mL. Isolates were than exposed to a Cmax antimicrobial blood level that would be attained with routine antimicrobial administration and an antimicrobial level that would be expected 4 hours post-Cmax (Cmax 4hr). Bactericidal activity was measured for up to 8 hours. Excluding a subset of S. pneumoniae isolates with mutations in the quinolone resistance determining region (QRDR), all quinolones showed bactericidal activity at Cmax and Cmax 4 hr antimicrobial concentrations for up to 8 hours. Against S. pneumoniae isolates with either gyrA or gyrA and parC mutations, bactericidal activity of STFX was shown for up to 4 to 8 hours following Cmax based on a limit of detection of quinolones tested where adjusted to concentrations corresponding to their MICs, STFX showed the most rapid bactericidal activity against PRSP. This rapid bactericidal activity in PRSP is a key to the effectiveness of STFX. Our findings show that beyond inhibition of bacterial replication by blocking their DNA replication pathway and synthesis of proteins, STFX demonstrated characteristics contributing to greater bactericidal activity compared to GRNX. In conclusion, of the newer quinolones, STFX showed the strongest bactericidal activity against S. pneumoniae isolates with mutations in the QRDR which indicates that it may show the most effective clinical utility among the quinolones in respiratory infections.

  1. Amikacin Population Pharmacokinetics in Critically Ill Kuwaiti Patients

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    Kamal M. Matar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Amikacin pharmacokinetic data in Kuwaiti (Arab intensive care unit (ICU patients are lacking. Fairly sparse serum amikacin peak and trough concentrations data were obtained from adult Kuwaiti ICU patients. The data were analysed using a nonparametric adaptive grid (NPAG maximum likelihood algorithm. The estimations of the developed model were assessed using mean error (ME as a measure of bias and mean squared error (MSE as a measure of precision. A total of 331 serum amikacin concentrations were obtained from 56 patients. The mean (±SD model parameter values found were Vc = 0.2302 ± 0.0866 L/kg, kslope = 0.004045 ± 0.00705 min per unit of creatinine clearance, k12 = 2.2121 ± 5.506 h−1, and k21 = 1.431 ± 2.796 h−1. The serum concentration data were estimated with little bias (ME = −0.88 and good precision (MSE = 13.08. The present study suggests that amikacin pharmacokinetics in adult Kuwaiti ICU patients are generally rather similar to those found in other patients. This population model would provide useful guidance in developing initial amikacin dosage regimens for such patients, especially using multiple model (MM dosage design, followed by appropriate Bayesian adaptive control, to optimize amikacin dosage regimens for each individual patient.

  2. Quinolone resistance: much more than predicted

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    Alvaro eHernandez

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Since quinolones are synthetic antibiotics, it was predicted that mutations in target genes would be the only mechanism through which resistance could be acquired, because there will not be quinolone resistance genes in nature. Contrary to this prediction, a variety of elements ranging from efflux pumps, target-protecting proteins and even quinolone-modifying enzymes have been shown to contribute to quinolone resistance. The finding of some of these elements in plasmids indicates that quinolone resistance can be transferable. As a result, there has been a developing interest on the reservoirs for quinolone resistance genes and on the potential risks associated with the use of these antibiotics in non-clinical environments. As a matter of fact, plasmid-encoded, quinolone-resistance qnr genes originated in the chromosome of aquatic bacteria, thus the use of quinolones in fish farming might constitute a risk for the emergence of resistance. Failure to predict the development of quinolone resistance reinforces the need of taking into consideration the wide plasticity of biological systems for future predictions. This plasticity allows pathogens to deal with toxic compounds, including those with a synthetic origin as quinolones.

  3. Relationship between serum ferritin level and amikacin ototoxicity.

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    Shayaninasab, Mohammad; Fatololoomi, Mohammadreza; Behnood, Fatollah; Alizamir, Azam

    2012-07-01

    Aminoglycosides are highly effective against bacteria but have serious side-effects including ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity. One of the theories in aminoglycosides ototoxicity is that Iron-aminoglycoside complex causes ototoxicity by creating free radicals. Based on this theory, the relationship between serum iron level and amikacin ototoxicity was studied to determine whether more iron results in more ototoxcity. This prospective cohort study was conducted from August 2005 to October 2008. Patients with amikacin prescription and different serum-ferritin levels were examined. Burned patients with amikacin prescription were divided into Group1 (89 patients; serum-ferritin >150) and Group2 (92 patients, serum-ferritin ototoxicity. More iron can create more ototoxicity, and iron deficiency may inhibit aminoglycoside ototoxicity. An increase in MCV may be due to higher serum ferritin and an indication of more ototoxicity.

  4. In vitro susceptibility pattern of acinetobacter species to commonly used cephalosporins, quinolones, and aminoglycosides

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    Prashanth K

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Acinetobacter spp. is an emerging important nosocomial pathogen. Clinical isolates of this genus are often resistant to many antibiotics. The in vitro susceptibility of Acinetobacter isolates obtained from patients were tested for currently used antibiotics. In addition, the study aimed at biotyping of Acinetobacter baumannii. METHODS: A total of 66 isolates were phenotypically characterised through a large panel of 25 carbon assimilation tests and susceptibility through disc diffusion method with 10 antimicrobial agents were tested. MICs were determined only for second line broad-spectrum drugs such as cefotaxime, ceftazidime, amikacin, ciprofloxacin, and ofloxacin using NCCLS guidelines. RESULTS: Multiple drug resistance (MDR was only witnessed in A. baumannii and not in other Acinetobacter species. Aminoglycosides such as amikacin, netilmicin were most active against the MDR isolates tested (60% susceptibility. Ceftazidime was more active than cefotaxime. MDR A. baumannii strains were susceptible only to amikacin, netilmicin and ceftadizime. Ciprofloxacin had poor activity irrespective of isolates belonging to different DNA groups tested (58% resistance overall, 79% among A. baumannii. Strains of Biotypes 6 and 19 of A. baumannii showed broader resistance than those of biotype 10 and others. CONCLUSIONS: Strains of A. baumannii from patients in our hospital, were generally more resistant to quinolones, -lactam antibiotics, first and second generation cephalosporins and partially resistant to third generation cephalosporins and aminoglycosides. The strains belonging to other DNA groups of Acinetobacter were comparatively less resistant than A.baumannii, except ciprofloxacin. This study suggests that, a combination therapy, using a third generation cephalosporin and amikacin, would be best choice for treating Acinetobacter infections.

  5. [The history of the development and changes of quinolone antibacterial agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hisashi; Hayakawa, Isao; Akimoto, Takeshi

    2003-01-01

    The quinolones, especially the new quinolones (the 6-fluoroquinolones), are the synthetic antibacterial agents to rival the Beta-lactam and the macrolide antibacterials for impact in clinical usage in the antibacterial therapeutic field. They have a broad antibacterial spectrum of activity against Gram-positive, Gram-negative and mycobacterial pathogens as well as anaerobes. Further, they show good-to-moderate oral absorption and tissue penetration with favorable pharmacokinetics in humans resulting in high clinical efficacy in the treatment of many kinds of infections. They also exhibit excellent safety profiles as well as those of oral Beta-lactam antibiotics. The bacterial effects of quinolones inhibit the function of bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. The history of the development of the quinolones originated from nalidixic acid (NA), developed in 1962. In addition, the breakthrough in the drug design for the scaffold and the basic side chains have allowed improvements to be made to the first new quinolone, norfloxacin (NFLX), patented in 1978. Although currently more than 10,000 compounds have been already synthesized in the world, only two percent of them were developed and tested in clinical studies. Furthermore, out of all these compounds, only twenty have been successfully launched into the market. In this paper, the history of the development and changes of the quinolones are described from the first quinolone, NA, via, the first new quinolone (6-fluorinated quinolone) NFLX, to the latest extended-spectrum quinolone antibacterial agents against multi-drug resistant bacterial infections. NA has only modest activity against Gram-negative bacteria and low oral absorption, therefore a suitable candidate for treatment of systemic infections (UTIs) is required. Since the original discovery of NA, a series of quinolones, which are referred to as the old quinolones, have been developed leading to the first new quinolone, NFLX, with moderate improvements

  6. Mechanism of quinolone action and resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldred, Katie J; Kerns, Robert J; Osheroff, Neil

    2014-03-18

    Quinolones are one of the most commonly prescribed classes of antibacterials in the world and are used to treat a variety of bacterial infections in humans. Because of the wide use (and overuse) of these drugs, the number of quinolone-resistant bacterial strains has been growing steadily since the 1990s. As is the case with other antibacterial agents, the rise in quinolone resistance threatens the clinical utility of this important drug class. Quinolones act by converting their targets, gyrase and topoisomerase IV, into toxic enzymes that fragment the bacterial chromosome. This review describes the development of the quinolones as antibacterials, the structure and function of gyrase and topoisomerase IV, and the mechanistic basis for quinolone action against their enzyme targets. It will then discuss the following three mechanisms that decrease the sensitivity of bacterial cells to quinolones. Target-mediated resistance is the most common and clinically significant form of resistance. It is caused by specific mutations in gyrase and topoisomerase IV that weaken interactions between quinolones and these enzymes. Plasmid-mediated resistance results from extrachromosomal elements that encode proteins that disrupt quinolone-enzyme interactions, alter drug metabolism, or increase quinolone efflux. Chromosome-mediated resistance results from the underexpression of porins or the overexpression of cellular efflux pumps, both of which decrease cellular concentrations of quinolones. Finally, this review will discuss recent advancements in our understanding of how quinolones interact with gyrase and topoisomerase IV and how mutations in these enzymes cause resistance. These last findings suggest approaches to designing new drugs that display improved activity against resistant strains.

  7. In vitro activity of Ozenoxacin against quinolone-susceptible and quinolone-resistant gram-positive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Y; Tato, M; Espinal, P; Garcia-Alonso, F; Gargallo-Viola, D; Cantón, R; Vila, J

    2013-12-01

    In vitro activity of ozenoxacin, a novel nonfluorinated topical (L. D. Saravolatz and J. Leggett, Clin. Infect. Dis. 37:1210-1215, 2003) quinolone, was compared with the activities of other quinolones against well-characterized quinolone-susceptible and quinolone-resistant Gram-positive bacteria. Ozenoxacin was 3-fold to 321-fold more active than other quinolones. Ozenoxacin could represent a first-in-class nonfluorinated quinolone for the topical treatment of a broad range of dermatological infections.

  8. Macrolides in Chronic Inflammatory Skin Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullateef A. Alzolibani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term therapy with the macrolide antibiotic erythromycin was shown to alter the clinical course of diffuse panbronchiolitis in the late 1980s. Since that time, macrolides have been found to have a large number of anti-inflammatory properties in addition to being antimicrobials. These observations provided the rationale for many studies performed to assess the usefulness of macrolides in other inflammatory diseases including skin and hair disorders, such as rosacea, psoriasis, pityriasis rosea, alopecia areata, bullous pemphigoid, and pityriasis lichenoides. This paper summarizes a collection of clinical studies and case reports dealing with the potential benefits of macrolides antibiotics in the treatment of selected dermatoses which have primarily been classified as noninfectious and demonstrating their potential for being disease-modifying agents.

  9. DRUG-INTERACTIONS WITH QUINOLONE ANTIBACTERIALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROUWERS, JRBJ

    1992-01-01

    The quinolone antibacterials are prone to many interactions with other drugs. Quinolone absorption is markedly reduced with antacids containing aluminium, magnesium and/or calcium and therapeutic failure may result. Other metallic ion-containing drugs, such as sucralfate, iron salts, and zinc salts,

  10. [Quinolones. Nowadays perspectives and mechanisms of resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Hernández, Diego Abelardo; Garza-Mayén, Gilda Sofía; Vázquez-López, Rosalno

    2015-10-01

    Quinolones are a family of synthetic broad-spectrum antimicrobial drugs whose target is the synthesis of DNA. They directly inhibit DNA replication by interacting with two enzymes; DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. They have been widely used for the treatment of several community and hospital acquired infections, in the food processing industry and in the agricultural field, making the increasing incidence of quinolone resistance a frequent problem associated with constant exposition to diverse microorganisms. Resistance may be achieved by three non-exclusive mechanisms; through chromosomic mutations in the Quinolone Resistance-Determining Regions of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, by reducing the intracytoplasmic concentrations of quinolones actively or passively and by Plasmid-Mediated Quinolones-Resistance genes, [Qnr determinant genes of resistance to quinolones, variant gene of the aminoglycoside acetyltransferase (AAC(6')-Ib-c)] and encoding genes of efflux pumps (qepA and oqxAB)]. The future of quinolones is uncertain, however, meanwhile they continue to be used in an irrational way, increasing resistance to quinolones should remain as an area of primary priority for research.

  11. DRUG-INTERACTIONS WITH QUINOLONE ANTIBACTERIALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROUWERS, JRBJ

    1992-01-01

    The quinolone antibacterials are prone to many interactions with other drugs. Quinolone absorption is markedly reduced with antacids containing aluminium, magnesium and/or calcium and therapeutic failure may result. Other metallic ion-containing drugs, such as sucralfate, iron salts, and zinc salts,

  12. [Review and categorization of quinolone antibiotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benes, Jirí

    2005-02-01

    No standard categorization of quinolone antibiotics into generations may be found in either Czech or world literature. The author recommends a categorization into four groups defined according to their spectrum of action and utilization: 1) preparations for the treatment of urinary tract infections; 2) systemically acting quinolones chiefly efficacious against Gram-negative bacteria; 3) so-called respiratory quinolones; and 4) quinolones with a very broad spectrum of action suitable for the treatment of very complicated infections. The author describes the chief characteristics of the most important quinolone antibiotics, including preparations either in their development stage or whose development has been prematurely interrupted because of adverse side-effects. The list includes all preparations that are or were temporarily registered in the Czech Republic.

  13. Evaluation of quinolone antibacterial consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Bernaz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Quinolones are broad-spectrum antibiotics that play an important role in the treatment of serious bacterial infections, especially hospital-acquired infections and others in which resistance to older antibacterial classes is suspected and as first-line therapy is recommended. To determine the place, compare and analyze the use of quinolone antibacterial in the most important departments of EMI during 2009 to 2014 and to assess their results for improvement of patients treatment quality was designed this study. In the evaluated period consumption of quinolone antibacterial in EMI recorded a decline from 91 to 46 DDD/1000 or by 49.45%, in IC departaments from 338.6 to 132.07 or by 61%, and vice versa in SSOT departments an increase from 41.28 to 57.59 DDD/1000 or by 31.51%. Medium annual consumption in all institution recorded 63.03 DDD/1000, respectvely 174.90 in IC and 45.10 in SSOT departments. In 2014 IC departments recorded 2439.8 lei per DDD/1000, that was 8.72 times more than cost of 279.9 lei in SSOT departments and 7.51 times than 324.96 lei per DDD/1000 in all EMI. The yearly medium in EMI is around the same with all other international hospitals of 66.13 DDD/1000 and by 27.23% higher than 49.54 DDD/1000 recorded in large acute Australian public hospitals. The obtained results will be an important data for optimization in planning annual hospital necessities and rational antimicrobial prescribing as well as suggest the idea for expansion development and support antimicrobial stewardship initiatives.

  14. Effect of Fluoroquinolones and Macrolides on Eradication and Resistance of Haemophilus influenzae in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Melinda M; Tsuji, Brian T; Gent, Janneane F; Kong, Yong; Holden, Patricia N; Sethi, Sanjay; Murphy, Timothy F

    2016-07-01

    Little is known about the effect of antibiotics on eradication of carriage and development of resistance in Haemophilus influenzae in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Our goals were to assess antibiotic susceptibilities, prevalence of resistance genes, and development of resistance in H. influenzae and to evaluate the effect of macrolide and fluoroquinolone administration on H. influenzae eradication. Data were from a 15-year longitudinal study of COPD. Genome sequence data were used to determine genotype and identify resistance genes. MICs of antibiotics were determined by reference broth microdilution. Generalized linear mixed models were used to evaluate associations between antibiotic use and H. influenzae eradication. We examined 267 H. influenzae isolates from 77 individuals. All newly acquired H. influenzae isolates were susceptible to azithromycin. Five of 27 (19%) strains developed 4-fold increases in azithromycin MICs and reached or exceeded the susceptibility breakpoint (≤4 μg/ml) during exposure. H. influenzae isolates were uniformly susceptible to ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, and moxifloxacin (MIC90s of 0.015, 0.015, and 0.06, respectively); there were no mutations in quinolone resistance-determining regions. Fluoroquinolone administration was associated with increased H. influenzae eradication compared to macrolides (odds ratio [OR], 16.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.67 to 104.09). There was no difference in H. influenzae eradication when comparing macrolide administration to no antibiotic (OR, 1.89; 95% CI, 0.43 to 8.30). Fluoroquinolones are effective in eradicating H. influenzae in individuals with COPD. Macrolides are ineffective in eradicating H. influenzae, and their use in COPD patients may lead to decreased macrolide susceptibility and resistance.

  15. Impact of infusion method on amikacin serum levels in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, N; Décaudin, B; Lannoy, D; Odou, M F; De Broucker, M; Barthélémy, C; Poret, E; Dubreuil, L; Odou, P

    2010-08-01

    Aminoglycosides are broad-spectrum antibiotics with peak-dependent bactericidal activity, administered by gravity infusion or for more accuracy by electronic pump infusion. The aim of this study was to assess the difference between the two systems and its pharmacokinetic impact. Twenty-four patients hospitalised for community-acquired pulmonary infections received amikacin by IV route over 1 h with a targeted peak concentration of 35 mg/L. They were randomly distributed into two groups, one receiving infusion through a pump system, the other by gravity. Amikacin serum levels were determined at the end of infusion and 24 h later. C(max) values were significantly lower with gravity than pump (40.2 +/- 12.3 vs. 50.6 +/- 17.6 mg/L, respectively; p = 0.04). Elimination half-life time, volume of distribution and clearance did not differ significantly from one group to the other. The percentage of patients who failed to achieve the targeted peak concentration was significantly higher with gravity than pump (41.7% vs. 16.7%, respectively; p infusion flow-rate provides better control over amikacin C(max). This study underlines the fact that infusion device characteristics should be added to the physiopathological information of a patient if we are to make a better estimation of pharmacokinetic parameters.

  16. Active pulmonary tuberculosis: Role for amikacin in early treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méchaï, F; Figoni, J; Leblanc, C; Gousseff, M; Vignier, N; Bouchaud, O

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of amikacin on sputum conversion during initial sputum smear positive tuberculosis treatment. Single-center observational cohort study (2012-2013) evaluating time to sputum smear conversion with standard treatment (ST) versus standard treatment+amikacin (IV 15mg/kg/day) for seven days (STamK). Forty-five patients were included. Median time to smear negative samples was 26.5 days (14-56) for the 30 (66.7%) patients included in the ST group and 48 days (19.5-69.5) for the 15 patients (33.3%) included in the STamK group (P=0.76). Time to negative culture was only known for 27 patients (61.4%): 47.5 days (26-58) for 18 patients in the ST group and 40 days (14-77) for nine patients in the STamK group. Despite our small sample size, the addition of amikacin in active tuberculosis treatment did not seem to impact time to smear conversion or period of contagiousness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. An Evaluation of the Protective Effects of Thymoquinone on Amikacin-Induced Ototoxicity in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Fadlullah; Ozturan, Orhan; Tugrul, Selahattin; Veyseller, Bayram; Ozer, Omer Faruk; Pektas, Alev

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In this study we investigated the probable protective effects of thymoquinone on amikacin-induced ototoxicity in rats. Methods Thirty-two healthy rats were divided into four groups (amikacin, amikacin+thymoquinone, thymoquinone, and no treatment). Thymoquinone was fed to the rats via oral gavage in a dose of 40 mg/kg/day throughout the study period of 14 days. Amikacin was given by the intramuscular route in a dose of 600 mg/kg/day. Audiological assessment was conducted by the distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) and auditory brainstem response (ABR) tests, administered to all rats at the beginning of the study, and also on days 7 and 15. Biochemical parameters were calculated at the termination of the study to evaluate the oxidative status. Results There were significant decreases in DPOAE values and significant increases in ABR thresholds of the amikacin group on days 7 and 15, as compared to the amikacin+thymoquinone group. While ABR thresholds of the amikacin group increased significantly on days 7 and 15 as compared to their initial values, there were no significant differences between the initial and the 7th and 15th day values of ABR thresholds in the amikacin+thymoquinone group. Total oxidant status and oxidative stress index values of the amikacin+thymoquinone group were significantly lower than those of the amikacin group. Total antioxidant status values of the amikacin+thymoquinone group were significantly higher than those of the amikacin group. Conclusion Our study has demonstrated that the ototoxic effect brought forth by amikacin could be overcome with the concurrent use of thymoquinone. PMID:26622947

  18. New macrolides active against Streptococcus pyogenes with inducible or constitutive type of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance.

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, P B; Baker, W.R.; Freiberg, L A; Hardy, D. J.; McDonald, E J

    1989-01-01

    Macrolide-resistant bacteria can be classified as inducibly resistant or constitutively resistant. Inducibly resistant bacteria are resistant to 14-membered macrolides, such as erythromycin and clarithromycin (A-56268), but are susceptible to the 16-membered macrolides, such as tylosin and spiramycin, as well as to clindamycin. Constitutively resistant bacteria are resistant to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B antibiotics. In this study, the MICs of several erythromycin and clarithromyci...

  19. Conjugation between quinolone-susceptible bacteria can generate mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region, inducing quinolone resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitondo-Silva, André; Martins, Vinicius Vicente; Silva, Carolina Fávero da; Stehling, Eliana Guedes

    2015-02-01

    Quinolones are an important group of antibacterial agents that can inhibit DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV activity. DNA gyrase is responsible for maintaining bacteria in a negatively supercoiled state, being composed of subunits A and B. Topoisomerase IV is a homologue of DNA gyrase and consists of two subunits codified by the parC and parE genes. Mutations in gyrA and gyrB of DNA gyrase may confer resistance to quinolones, and the majority of resistant strains show mutations between positions 67 and 106 of gyrA, a region denoted the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR). The most frequent substitutions occur at positions 83 and 87, but little is known about the mechanisms promoting appearance of mutations in the QRDR. The present study proposes that some mutations in the QRDR could be generated as a result of the natural mechanism of conjugation between bacteria in their natural habitat. This event was observed following conjugation in vitro of two different isolates of quinolone-susceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which transferred plasmids of different molecular weights to a recipient strain of Escherichia coli (HB101), also quinolone-susceptible, generating two different transconjugants that presented mutations in DNA gyrase and acquisition of resistance to all quinolones tested.

  20. Mechanisms of drug resistance: quinolone resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, David C; Jacoby, George A

    2015-09-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are synthetic and widely used in clinical medicine. Resistance emerged with clinical use and became common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include two categories of mutation and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes, DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV, are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParE subunits of the respective enzymes and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include quinolones as well as other antimicrobials, disinfectants, and dyes. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids can confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is due to Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, one mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Thus, the bacterial quinolone resistance armamentarium is large.

  1. Synthesis of novel 15-membered macrolide derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Qing Xian; Shu Tao Ma; Bo Jiao

    2008-01-01

    In order to develop new antibiotics effective against resistant bacteria,a series of novel 15-membered macrolide derivatives were designed and synthesized by the modification of hydroxyl groups at C-11,C-12 and C-4" positions.Their structures were confirmed by MS,IR,1H NMR or 13C NMR.

  2. Synthesis of novel 15-membered macrolide dimers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu Tao Ma; Rui Xin Ma; Rui Qing Xian; Bo Jiao

    2009-01-01

    A series of novel dimers of 15-memhered macrolides was synthesized and evaluated. The directs exhibited excellent activity against erythromycin-susceptible S. pneumonia, but did not show any improved activity against erythromycin-resistant S. pneumoniae encoded by erm gene.

  3. Kinetics and dose calculations of amikacin in the newborn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sardemann, H; Colding, H; Hendel, J;

    1976-01-01

    compartment model. The absorption was evaluated in 8 of the infants after intramuscular injection of 7.5 mg amikacin per kilogram of body weight. The absorption rate, estimated by the tmax, was significantly faster than reported in adults. The total body clearance and apparent volume of distribution were...... weight. The volume of distribution per kilogram was significantly greater than in adults. On the basis of the derived kinetic parameters, a dose schedule is presented. In 5 children there was a reasonable agreement between the measured and predicted serum levels....

  4. Reagent-free determination of amikacin content in amikacin sulfate injections by FTIR derivative spectroscopy in a continuous flow system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    José F. Ovalles; Máximo Gallignani; María R. Brunetto; Rebeca A. Rondón; Carlos Ayala

    2014-01-01

    The quantitative estimation of amikacin (AMK) in AMK sulfate injection samples is reported using FTIR-derivative spectrometric method in a continuous flow system. Fourier transform of mid-IR spectra were recorded without any sample pretreatment. A good linear calibration (r40.999, %RSDo 2.0) in the range of 7.7-77.0 mg/mL was found. The results showed a good correlation with the manufacturer's and overall they all fell within acceptable limits of most pharmacopoeial monographs on AMK sulfate.

  5. Reagent-free determination of amikacin content in amikacin sulfate injections by FTIR derivative spectroscopy in a continuous flow system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José F. Ovalles

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The quantitative estimation of amikacin (AMK in AMK sulfate injection samples is reported using FTIR-derivative spectrometric method in a continuous flow system. Fourier transform of mid-IR spectra were recorded without any sample pretreatment. A good linear calibration (r>0.999, %RSD<2.0 in the range of 7.7–77.0 mg/mL was found. The results showed a good correlation with the manufacturer's and overall they all fell within acceptable limits of most pharmacopoeial monographs on AMK sulfate.

  6. Severe pneumococcal pneumonia: impact of new quinolones on prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meybeck Agnes

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most guidelines have been proposing, for more than 15 years, a β-lactam combined with either a quinolone or a macrolide as empirical, first-line therapy of severe community acquired pneumonia (CAP requiring ICU admission. Our goal was to evaluate the outcome of patients with severe CAP, focusing on the impact of new rather than old fluoroquinolones combined with β-lactam in the empirical antimicrobial treatments. Methods Retrospective study of consecutive patients admitted in a 16-bed general intensive care unit (ICU, between January 1996 and January 2009, for severe (Pneumonia Severity Index > or = 4 community-acquired pneumonia due to non penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and treated with a β-lactam combined with a fluoroquinolone. Results We included 70 patients of whom 38 received a β-lactam combined with ofloxacin or ciprofloxacin and 32 combined with levofloxacin. Twenty six patients (37.1% died in the ICU. Three independent factors associated with decreased survival in ICU were identified: septic shock on ICU admission (AOR = 10.6; 95% CI 2.87-39.3; p = 0.0004, age > 70 yrs. (AOR = 4.88; 95% CI 1.41-16.9; p = 0.01 and initial treatment with a β-lactam combined with ofloxacin or ciprofloxacin (AOR = 4.1; 95% CI 1.13-15.13; p = 0.03. Conclusion Our results suggest that, when combined to a β-lactam, levofloxacin is associated with lower mortality than ofloxacin or ciprofloxacin in severe pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia.

  7. Synthesis of Quinolone Analogues:7-[(2S, 4R)-2-Aminomethyl-4- hydroxypyrrolidin-1-yl] Quinolones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiu Yu LIU; Hui Yuan GUO

    2004-01-01

    New quinolone derivatives of 7-[(2S, 4R)-2-aminomethyl-4-hydroxypyrrolidin-1-yl] quinolone-3-carboxylic acids were synthesized by condensation of 7-halo substituted quinolone-3-carboxylic acids with (2S, 4R)-2-aminomethyl-4-hydroxypyrrolidine. These compounds were characterized by FAB-MS and 1H NMR.

  8. The safety of quinolones in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yefet, Enav; Salim, Raed; Chazan, Bibiana; Akel, Hiba; Romano, Shabtai; Nachum, Zohar

    2014-11-01

    Quinolones and fluoroquinolones are highly efficient antibiotics. However, concerns regarding possible harmful effects have limited their use during pregnancy. Nevertheless, accumulating clinical data suggest that they may be safe during pregnancy. This review aimed to explore the mechanisms of action of the quinolones and fluoroquinolones, which set the stage for concerns regarding possible teratogenic and mutagenic effects; to clarify the clinical dilemmas that brought forth the necessity in reevaluating the use of those medications during pregnancy; and to review the accumulated data regarding their safety during pregnancy in animal models and humans.

  9. Amikacin resistance in Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolated from dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, R M; Cohen, N D; Lawhon, S D

    2014-10-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is the most common microorganism isolated from canine pyoderma and postoperative wound infections. The prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius (MRSP) has increased, and recently, isolates that are resistant not only to methicillin but also to other classes of antibiotic drugs, including aminoglycosides, have become common. A total of 422 S. pseudintermedius isolates collected from 413 dogs were analyzed for amikacin and methicillin resistance using broth microdilution and disk diffusion testing. Methicillin-resistant isolates were significantly (P Staphylococcus aureus, the most prevalent gene detected was aph(3')-IIIa found in 75% (24/32) of isolates followed by aac(6')/aph(2") and ant(4')-Ia in 12% (4/32) and 3% (1/32), respectively. Understanding the differences in antimicrobial resistance gene carriage between different species of Staphylococcus may improve antimicrobial drug selection for clinical therapy and provide insights into how resistance develops in S. pseudintermedius.

  10. Quantification of amikacin and kanamycin in serum using a simple and validated LC-MS/MS method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Jacob A.; Sturkenboom, Marieke G. G.; van Hateren, Kai; Koster, Remco A.; Greijdanus, Ben; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Amikacin and kanamycin are frequently used in the treatment of multidrug-resistant TB. The current commercially available immunoassay is unable to analyze kanamycin and trough levels of amikacin. The objective was therefore to develop a LC-MS/MS method for the quantification of amikacin

  11. The effects of hyperbaric oxygen therapy upon ototoxic injuries produced by amikacin in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amora, Luciana de Albuquerque Salviano; Murashima, Adriana de Andrade Batista; Rossato, Maria; Moreira, Márcia Bento; Hyppolito, Miguel Ângelo; Fagundes, Djalma José

    2013-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) has enhanced the prevention and treatment of auditory ailments such as ototoxicity. To study the effects of HBOT upon ototoxic injuries produced by amikacin. This experimental study included 12 albino guinea pigs, whose auditory function was assessed through distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) and brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) before and after the administration of amikacin (600 mg/kg/day) and HBOT sessions (2 ATA, 60 minutes). Morphological features were analyzed through scanning electron microscopy. Subjects were divided into four groups, as follows: group 1 - saline solution + HBOT; group 2 - amikacin for 8 days; group 3 - amikacin + seven days of rest; and group 4 - amikacin + HBOT. Group 1 subjects had preserved function and morphology throughout the experiment; Group 2 subjects had statistically significant levels of hair cell injury and functional impairment; Subjects on groups 3 and 4 had statistically significant functional and morphological impairment after the administration of amikacin, which were still present after the proposed procedures had been carried out. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy did not change the cochlear hair cell morphology or the electro-physiological thresholds of the guinea pigs given amikacin.

  12. Plasmid mediated quinolone resistance in Enterobacteriaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, K.T.; LS Klinisch Onderzoek Wagenaar

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes the occurrence of Plasmid Mediated Quinolone Resistance (PMQR) in Salmonella and E. coli from The Netherlands and other European countries. Furthermore, the genetic background of these genes was characterized. Fluoroquinolones are widely used antibiotics in both human and

  13. Plasmid mediated quinolone resistance in Enterobacteriaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, K.T.; LS Klinisch Onderzoek Wagenaar

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes the occurrence of Plasmid Mediated Quinolone Resistance (PMQR) in Salmonella and E. coli from The Netherlands and other European countries. Furthermore, the genetic background of these genes was characterized. Fluoroquinolones are widely used antibiotics in both human and veter

  14. Proficiency study for quinolones in egg

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, B.J.A.; Stolker, A.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Studie naar het voorkomen van quinolonen in eieren, beschrijving van de testmaterialen, evaluatie van de toegepaste methoden, resultaten en discussieThe aim of this proficiency study was to give laboratories the possibility to evaluate or demonstrate their competence for the analysis of quinolones i

  15. Plasmid mediated quinolone resistance in Enterobacteriaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, K.T.; LS Klinisch Onderzoek Wagenaar

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes the occurrence of Plasmid Mediated Quinolone Resistance (PMQR) in Salmonella and E. coli from The Netherlands and other European countries. Furthermore, the genetic background of these genes was characterized. Fluoroquinolones are widely used antibiotics in both human and veter

  16. The Current Case of Quinolones: Synthetic Approaches and Antibacterial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Naeem

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Quinolones are broad-spectrum synthetic antibacterial drugs first obtained during the synthesis of chloroquine. Nalidixic acid, the prototype of quinolones, first became available for clinical consumption in 1962 and was used mainly for urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli and other pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. Recently, significant work has been carried out to synthesize novel quinolone analogues with enhanced activity and potential usage for the treatment of different bacterial diseases. These novel analogues are made by substitution at different sites—the variation at the C-6 and C-8 positions gives more effective drugs. Substitution of a fluorine atom at the C-6 position produces fluroquinolones, which account for a large proportion of the quinolones in clinical use. Among others, substitution of piperazine or methylpiperazine, pyrrolidinyl and piperidinyl rings also yields effective analogues. A total of twenty six analogues are reported in this review. The targets of quinolones are two bacterial enzymes of the class II topoisomerase family, namely gyrase and topoisomerase IV. Quinolones increase the concentration of drug-enzyme-DNA cleavage complexes and convert them into cellular toxins; as a result they are bactericidal. High bioavailability, relative low toxicity and favorable pharmacokinetics have resulted in the clinical success of fluoroquinolones and quinolones. Due to these superior properties, quinolones have been extensively utilized and this increased usage has resulted in some quinolone-resistant bacterial strains. Bacteria become resistant to quinolones by three mechanisms: (1 mutation in the target site (gyrase and/or topoisomerase IV of quinolones; (2 plasmid-mediated resistance; and (3 chromosome-mediated quinolone resistance. In plasmid-mediated resistance, the efflux of quinolones is increased along with a decrease in the interaction of the drug with gyrase (topoisomerase IV. In the case of

  17. The Current Case of Quinolones: Synthetic Approaches and Antibacterial Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, Abdul; Badshah, Syed Lal; Muska, Mairman; Ahmad, Nasir; Khan, Khalid

    2016-03-28

    Quinolones are broad-spectrum synthetic antibacterial drugs first obtained during the synthesis of chloroquine. Nalidixic acid, the prototype of quinolones, first became available for clinical consumption in 1962 and was used mainly for urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli and other pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. Recently, significant work has been carried out to synthesize novel quinolone analogues with enhanced activity and potential usage for the treatment of different bacterial diseases. These novel analogues are made by substitution at different sites--the variation at the C-6 and C-8 positions gives more effective drugs. Substitution of a fluorine atom at the C-6 position produces fluroquinolones, which account for a large proportion of the quinolones in clinical use. Among others, substitution of piperazine or methylpiperazine, pyrrolidinyl and piperidinyl rings also yields effective analogues. A total of twenty six analogues are reported in this review. The targets of quinolones are two bacterial enzymes of the class II topoisomerase family, namely gyrase and topoisomerase IV. Quinolones increase the concentration of drug-enzyme-DNA cleavage complexes and convert them into cellular toxins; as a result they are bactericidal. High bioavailability, relative low toxicity and favorable pharmacokinetics have resulted in the clinical success of fluoroquinolones and quinolones. Due to these superior properties, quinolones have been extensively utilized and this increased usage has resulted in some quinolone-resistant bacterial strains. Bacteria become resistant to quinolones by three mechanisms: (1) mutation in the target site (gyrase and/or topoisomerase IV) of quinolones; (2) plasmid-mediated resistance; and (3) chromosome-mediated quinolone resistance. In plasmid-mediated resistance, the efflux of quinolones is increased along with a decrease in the interaction of the drug with gyrase (topoisomerase IV). In the case of chromosome

  18. Population pharmacokinetic characteristics of amikacin in suspected cases of neonatal sepsis in a low-resource African setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amponsah, Seth K; Adjei, George O; Enweronu-Laryea, Christabel C

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Amikacin exhibits marked pharmacokinetic (PK) variability and is commonly used in combination with other drugs in the treatment of neonatal sepsis. There is a paucity of amikacin PK information in neonates from low-resource settings. OBJECTIVES: To determine the PK parameters...... of amikacin, and explore the influence of selected covariates, including coadministration with aminophylline, on amikacin disposition in neonates of African origin. METHODS: Neonates with suspected sepsis admitted to an intensive care unit in Accra, Ghana, and treated with amikacin (15 mg/kg loading followed...... by 7.5 mg/kg every 12 hours), were recruited. Serum amikacin concentration was measured at specified times after treatment initiation and analyzed using a population PK modeling approach. RESULTS: A total of 419 serum concentrations were available for 247 neonates. Mean (SD) trough amikacin...

  19. Genomic Epidemiology of Gonococcal Resistance to Extended-Spectrum Cephalosporins, Macrolides, and Fluoroquinolones in the United States, 2000-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grad, Yonatan H; Harris, Simon R; Kirkcaldy, Robert D; Green, Anna G; Marks, Debora S; Bentley, Stephen D; Trees, David; Lipsitch, Marc

    2016-11-15

     Treatment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection is empirical and based on population-wide susceptibilities. Increasing antimicrobial resistance underscores the potential importance of rapid diagnostic tests, including sequence-based tests, to guide therapy. However, the usefulness of sequence-based diagnostic tests depends on the prevalence and dynamics of the resistance mechanisms.  We define the prevalence and dynamics of resistance markers to extended-spectrum cephalosporins, macrolides, and fluoroquinolones in 1102 resistant and susceptible clinical N. gonorrhoeae isolates collected from 2000 to 2013 via the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Gonococcal Isolate Surveillance Project.  Reduced extended-spectrum cephalosporin susceptibility is predominantly clonal and associated with the mosaic penA XXXIV allele and derivatives (sensitivity 98% for cefixime and 91% for ceftriaxone), but alternative resistance mechanisms have sporadically emerged. Reduced azithromycin susceptibility has arisen through multiple mechanisms and shows limited clonal spread; the basis for resistance in 36% of isolates with reduced azithromycin susceptibility is unclear. Quinolone-resistant N. gonorrhoeae has arisen multiple times, with extensive clonal spread.  Quinolone-resistant N. gonorrhoeae and reduced cefixime susceptibility appear amenable to development of sequence-based diagnostic tests, whereas the undefined mechanisms of resistance to ceftriaxone and azithromycin underscore the importance of phenotypic surveillance. The identification of multidrug-resistant isolates highlights the need for additional measures to respond to the threat of untreatable gonorrhea. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  20. Macrolide Resistance in the Syphilis Spirochete, Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum: Can We Also Expect Macrolide-Resistant Yaws Strains?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šmajs, David; Paštěková, Lenka; Grillová, Linda

    2015-10-01

    Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum (TPA) causes over 10 million new cases of syphilis worldwide whereas T. pallidum ssp. pertenue (TPE), the causative agent of yaws, affects about 2.5 million people. Although penicillin remains the drug of choice in the treatment of syphilis, in penicillin-allergic patients, macrolides have been used in this indication since the 1950s. Failures of macrolides in syphilis treatment have been well documented in the literature and since 2000, there has been a dramatic increase in a number of clinical samples with macrolide-resistant TPA. Scarce data regarding the genetics of macrolide-resistant mutations in TPA suggest that although macrolide-resistance mutations have emerged independently several times, the increase in the proportion of TPA strains resistant to macrolides is mainly due to the spread of resistant strains, especially in developed countries. The emergence of macrolide resistance in TPA appears to require a two-step process including either A2058G or A2059G mutation in one copy of the 23S rRNA gene and a subsequent gene conversion unification of both rRNA genes. Given the enormous genetic similarity that was recently revealed between TPA and TPE strains, there is a low but reasonable risk of emergence and spread of macrolide-resistant yaws strains following azithromycin treatment.

  1. New macrolides active against Streptococcus pyogenes with inducible or constitutive type of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, P B; Baker, W R; Freiberg, L A; Hardy, D J; McDonald, E J

    1989-01-01

    Macrolide-resistant bacteria can be classified as inducibly resistant or constitutively resistant. Inducibly resistant bacteria are resistant to 14-membered macrolides, such as erythromycin and clarithromycin (A-56268), but are susceptible to the 16-membered macrolides, such as tylosin and spiramycin, as well as to clindamycin. Constitutively resistant bacteria are resistant to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B antibiotics. In this study, the MICs of several erythromycin and clarithromycin analogs against macrolide-susceptible and macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pyogenes strains were determined. Four 11,12-carbamate analogs of clarithromycin had lower MICs than erythromycin did against S. pyogenes with the inducible or constitutive type of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance. Five 11,12-carbonate analogs of erythromycin with modifications at the 4" position of cladinose had lower MICs than did erythromycin against S. pyogenes with the constitutive type of resistance, and one of these compounds, which had a naphthyl-glycyl substitution at the 4" position, had a lower MIC than erythromycin against both the inducibly resistant and constitutively resistant strains. Two analogs of erythromycin with a modification on the 4" position of cladinose had lower MICs than erythromycin did against the constitutively resistant organisms but not against the inducibly resistant organisms. Thus, 14-membered macrolides can be modified so as to confer a low MIC when tested in vitro.

  2. Stability and antimicrobial effect of amikacin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles

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    Solmaz Ghaffari

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Solmaz Ghaffari1, Jaleh Varshosaz1, Afrooz Saadat2, Fatemeh Atyabi21Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy and Isfahan Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran; 2Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IranAbstract: Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs of amikacin were designed in this study for pulmonary delivery to reduce the dose or its administration intervals leading to reduction of its toxicities especially in long term treatment. Nanoparticles of amikacin were prepared from cholesterol by solvent diffusion technique and homogenization. The size, zeta potential, loading efficiency, and release profile of the nanoparticles were studied. The conventional broth macrodilution tube method was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bacteriostatic concentration (MBC of amikacin SLNs with respect to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro. To guarantee the stability of desired SLNs, they were lyophilized using cryoprotectants. Results showed that considering the release profile of amikacin from the studied nanocarrier, MIC and MBC of amikacin could be about two times less in SLNs of amikacin compared to the free drug. Therefore, fewer doses of amikacin in SLNs can clear the infection with less adverse effects and more safety. Particle size enlargement after lyophilization of desired SLNs after two months storage was limited in comparison with non-lyophilized particles, 996 and 194 nm, respectively. Zeta potential of lyophilized particles was increased to +17 mV from +4 mV before lyophilization. Storage of particles in higher temperature caused accelerated drug release.Keywords: amikacin, antimicrobial effects, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, solid lipid nanoparticles, stability

  3. Artificial Intelligence and Amikacin Exposures Predictive of Outcomes in Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modongo, Chawangwa; Pasipanodya, Jotam G; Magazi, Beki T; Srivastava, Shashikant; Zetola, Nicola M; Williams, Scott M; Sirugo, Giorgio; Gumbo, Tawanda

    2016-10-01

    Aminoglycosides such as amikacin continue to be part of the backbone of treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). We measured amikacin concentrations in 28 MDR-TB patients in Botswana receiving amikacin therapy together with oral levofloxacin, ethionamide, cycloserine, and pyrazinamide and calculated areas under the concentration-time curves from 0 to 24 h (AUC0-24). The patients were followed monthly for sputum culture conversion based on liquid cultures. The median duration of amikacin therapy was 184 (range, 28 to 866) days, at a median dose of 17.30 (range 11.11 to 19.23) mg/kg. Only 11 (39%) patients had sputum culture conversion during treatment; the rest failed. We utilized classification and regression tree analyses (CART) to examine all potential predictors of failure, including clinical and demographic features, comorbidities, and amikacin peak concentrations (Cmax), AUC0-24, and trough concentrations. The primary node for failure had two competing variables, Cmax of 41 kg was a secondary node with a score of 35% relative to the primary node. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the CART model was an R(2) = 0.90 on posttest. In patients weighing >41 kg, sputum conversion was 3/3 (100%) in those with an amikacin Cmax of ≥67 mg/liter versus 3/15 (20%) in those with a Cmax of <67 mg/liter (relative risk [RR] = 5.00; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.82 to 13.76). In all patients who had both amikacin Cmax and AUC0-24 below the threshold, 7/7 (100%) failed, compared to 7/15 (47%) of those who had these parameters above threshold (RR = 2.14; 95% CI, 1.25 to 43.68). These amikacin dose-schedule patterns and exposures are virtually the same as those identified in the hollow-fiber system model.

  4. Quinolones in the treatment of Salmonella carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Noriega, E; Andrade-Villanueva, J; Amaya-Tapia, G

    1989-01-01

    Infections caused by Salmonella typhi are commonly followed by a chronic carrier state despite positive clinical and initial bacteriologic responses. The use of primary antibiotics like chloramphenicol, ampicillin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole has several major drawbacks, including in some instances the failure to prevent the carrier state. The appearance worldwide of strains with multiple resistance to the most commonly used regimens has prompted the search for new forms of therapy. Among the agents studied have been third-generation cephalosporins and quinolones, which are active in vitro against bacterial enteropathogens like S. typhi. Resolution of chronic carriage of S. typhi and other salmonellae is difficult, and regimens commonly fail (including those that combine antibiotic administration with removal of the gallbladder). In addition to being active in vitro against Salmonella species, the newer quinolones adequately penetrate the intestinal lumen, liver, bile, and gallbladder. Initial experience with norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin in oral treatment of the chronic S. typhi carrier state in adults has been promising.

  5. Macrolide antibiotics and the risk of cardiac arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Richard K; Schuller, Joseph L

    2014-05-15

    Randomized, controlled trials have demonstrated that chronic therapy with macrolide antibiotics reduces the morbidity of patients with cystic fibrosis, non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections. Lower levels of evidence indicate that chronic macrolides are also effective in treating patients with panbronchiolitis, bronchiolitis obliterans, and rejection after lung transplant. Macrolides are known to cause torsade des pointes and other ventricular arrhythmias, and a recent observational study prompted the FDA to strengthen the Warnings and Precautions section of azithromycin drug labels. This summary describes the electrophysiological effects of macrolides, reviews literature indicating that the large majority of subjects experiencing cardiac arrhythmias from macrolides have coexisting risk factors and that the incidence of arrhythmias in absence of coexisting risk factors is very low, examines recently published studies describing the relative risk of arrhythmias from macrolides, and concludes that this risk has been overestimated and suggests an approach to patient evaluation that should reduce the relative risk and the incidence of arrhythmias to the point that chronic macrolides can be used safely in the majority of subjects for whom they are recommended.

  6. Topoisomerase IV-quinolone interactions are mediated through a water-metal ion bridge: mechanistic basis of quinolone resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldred, Katie J; McPherson, Sylvia A; Turnbough, Charles L; Kerns, Robert J; Osheroff, Neil

    2013-04-01

    Although quinolones are the most commonly prescribed antibacterials, their use is threatened by an increasing prevalence of resistance. The most common causes of quinolone resistance are mutations of a specific serine or acidic residue in the A subunit of gyrase or topoisomerase IV. These amino acids are proposed to serve as a critical enzyme-quinolone interaction site by anchoring a water-metal ion bridge that coordinates drug binding. To probe the role of the proposed water-metal ion bridge, we characterized wild-type, GrlA(E85K), GrlA(S81F/E85K), GrlA(E85A), GrlA(S81F/E85A) and GrlA(S81F) Bacillus anthracis topoisomerase IV, their sensitivity to quinolones and related drugs and their use of metal ions. Mutations increased the Mg(2+) concentration required to produce maximal quinolone-induced DNA cleavage and restricted the divalent metal ions that could support quinolone activity. Individual mutation of Ser81 or Glu85 partially disrupted bridge function, whereas simultaneous mutation of both residues abrogated protein-quinolone interactions. Results provide functional evidence for the existence of the water-metal ion bridge, confirm that the serine and glutamic acid residues anchor the bridge, demonstrate that the bridge is the primary conduit for interactions between clinically relevant quinolones and topoisomerase IV and provide a likely mechanism for the most common causes of quinolone resistance.

  7. The pharmacokinetics of a single intramuscular dose of amikacin in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, R B; Brooks, D; Vulliet, R

    1997-03-01

    The pharmacokinetic parameters of amikacin were determined in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) following the i.m. administration of a single 20 mg/kg dose. After a rapid absorption phase, mean amikacin serum concentrations peaked at 65 +/- 12 micrograms/ML 30-45 min following injection. The serum amikacin concentrations decreased to 2.3 +/- 2 micrograms/ml at 12 hr postinjection. Amikacin was eliminated with first-order kinetics characteristic of a single-compartment model with a half-life of 2.02 +/- 0.63 hr. The volume of distribution was estimated to be 0.28 +/- 0.03 L/kg. Forty-two isolates of gram-negative bacteria and coagulase-positive Staphylococcus species were cultured from birds of prey presented to the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital at the University of California-Davis. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MICs) of amikacin ranged from 0.5 to 8.0 micrograms/ml (mean = 2.5 micrograms/ml). The 20 mg/kg dose used in this study resulted in serum concentrations at or above the MICs for > 12 hr for most of the isolates examined. The heaviest birds had the lowest peak serum amikacin concentrations, and the lightest birds had the highest, despite exact volume replacement for each sample drawn. This observation suggests that doses should be based on factors other than weight alone. Amikacin administered at 15-20 mg/kg/day, either as a single dose or divided into two or three doses, is effective in treating sensitive pathogens of the red-tailed hawk.

  8. From penicillin-streptomycin to amikacin-vancomycin: antibiotic decontamination of cardiovascular homografts in Singapore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wee Ling Heng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In February 2012, the National Cardiovascular Homograft Bank (NCHB became the first tissue bank outside of North America to receive accreditation from the American Association of Tissue Banks. From 2008 to 2009, NCHB had been decontaminating its cardiovascular homografts with penicillin and streptomycin. The antibiotic decontamination protocol was changed in January 2010 as amikacin and vancomycin were recommended, in order to cover bacteria isolated from post-recovery and post- antibiotic incubation tissue cultures. AIM: The objective of this study is to determine the optimal incubation conditions for decontamination of homografts by evaluating the potencies of amikacin and vancomycin in different incubation conditions. Retrospective reviews of microbiological results were also performed for homografts recovered from 2008 to 2012, to compare the effectiveness of penicillin-streptomycin versus the amikacin-vancomycin regimens. METHODS: Based on microbiological assays stated in United States Pharmacopeia 31, potency of amikacin was evaluated by turbidimetric assay using Staphylococcus aureus, while vancomycin was by diffusion assay using Bacillus subtilis sporulate. Experiments were performed to investigate the potencies of individual antibiotic 6-hours post incubation at 4°C and 37°C and 4°C for 24 hours, after the results suggested that amikacin was more potent at lower temperature. FINDINGS: Tissue incubation at 4°C for 24 hours is optimal for both antibiotics, especially for amikacin, as its potency falls drastically at 37°C. CONCLUSION: The decontamination regimen of amikacin-vancomycin at 4°C for 24 hours is effective. Nevertheless, it is imperative to monitor microbiological trends closely and evaluate the efficacy of current antibiotics regimen against emerging strains of micro-organisms.

  9. In vitro activity effects of combinations of cephalothin, dicloxacillin, imipenem, vancomycin and amikacin against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solórzano-Santos Fortino

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background combinations of drugs has been proposed as an alternative for oxacillin-resistant staphylococci infections, however, limited information about in vitro combinations are available for multi-resistant strains. The objective of this study was to describe the interaction of beta-lactams in combination with vancomycin or amikacin against 26 oxacillin and amikacin-resistant nosocomial Staphylococcus spp. isolates. Methods activity of dicloxacillin plus amikacin, cephalothin plus amikacin, cephalothin plus vancomycin, imipenem plus vancomycin and vancomycin plus amikacin was evaluated by checkerboard synergy tests and the fractional inhibitory concentration index (FIC was calculated. Results: dicloxacillin plus amikacin, and cephalothin plus amikacin were synergistic or partially synergistic in 84.6% and 100% respectively. For nearly half of the isolates the mean concentrations of dicloxacillin, cephalothin and amikacin at which FIC indexes were calculated were achievable therapeutically. Vancomycin plus amikacin had synergistic effect only against two isolates, and partially synergistic in 38.6%. For the combinations vancomycin plus cephalothin and vancomycin plus imipenem the effect was additive in 76.9% and 80.7% respectively. Conclusion in this study the checkerboard analysis showed that amikacin in combination with cephalothin or dicloxacillin was synergistic against most of the resistant strains of S. aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus. Vancomycin in combination with a beta-lactam (cephalothin or imipenem showed additivity. An indifferent effect predominated for the combination vancomycin plus amikacin. Even though a synergistic effect is expected when using a beta-lactam plus amikacin combination, it is possible that the effect cannot be clinically achievable. Careful selection of antimicrobial combinations and initial MICs are mandatory for future evaluations.

  10. A platform for the discovery of new macrolide antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiple, Ian B.; Zhang, Ziyang; Jakubec, Pavol; Langlois-Mercier, Audrey; Wright, Peter M.; Hog, Daniel T.; Yabu, Kazuo; Allu, Senkara Rao; Fukuzaki, Takehiro; Carlsen, Peter N.; Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Zhou, Xiang; Condakes, Matthew L.; Szczypiński, Filip T.; Green, William D.; Myers, Andrew G.

    2016-05-01

    The chemical modification of structurally complex fermentation products, a process known as semisynthesis, has been an important tool in the discovery and manufacture of antibiotics for the treatment of various infectious diseases. However, many of the therapeutics obtained in this way are no longer effective, because bacterial resistance to these compounds has developed. Here we present a practical, fully synthetic route to macrolide antibiotics by the convergent assembly of simple chemical building blocks, enabling the synthesis of diverse structures not accessible by traditional semisynthetic approaches. More than 300 new macrolide antibiotic candidates, as well as the clinical candidate solithromycin, have been synthesized using our convergent approach. Evaluation of these compounds against a panel of pathogenic bacteria revealed that the majority of these structures had antibiotic activity, some efficacious against strains resistant to macrolides in current use. The chemistry we describe here provides a platform for the discovery of new macrolide antibiotics and may also serve as the basis for their manufacture.

  11. Is Ceftizoxime an Appropriate Surrogate for Amikacin in Neonatal Sepsis Treatment? A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyman Salamati

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal sepsis, a life-threatening condition, presents with non-specific clinical manifestations and needs immediate empirical antimicrobial therapy. Choosing an appropriate antibiotic regimen covering the most probable pathogens is an important issue. In this study we compared the effectiveness of ceftizoxime and amikacin in the treatment of neonatal sepsis both in combination with ampicillin. In a randomized clinical trial, all term neonates with suspected sepsis referred to Bahrami hospital during March 2008 to March 2010 were evaluated. Patients were randomly recruited into two groups; one group receiving ampicillin and amikacin and the other ampicillin and ceftizoxime. Blood, urine and cerebrospinal fluid cultures, leukocyte count and C-reactive protein level were measured in all neonates. A total of 135 neonates were evaluated, 65 in amikacin group and 70 in ceftizoxime group. 60 neonates (85.7% in ceftizoxime group and 54 neonates (83.1% in amikacin group responded to the treatment (P= 0.673 and χ2 = 0.178. Only 24 (18% blood samples had a report of positive blood culture. The most frequent pathogen was coagulase negative staphylococcus with the frequency of 58.32% of all positive blood samples. Ceftizoxime in combination with ampicillin is an appropriate antimicrobial regimen for surrogating the combination of ampicillin and amikacin to prevent bacterial resistance against them.

  12. Study of relationship between volume of distribution and body weight application to amikacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rughoo, L; Bourguignon, L; Maire, P; Ducher, M

    2014-06-01

    Amikacin use is difficult because of its narrow therapeutic and its pharmacokinetic variability. This variability of amikacin is not well known. To adapt amikacin the physician assumes that there is a linear and continuous relation between the volume of distribution and the body weight. The objective of our study was to evaluate the relationship between the volume of distribution (Vd) and the body weight (BW) using a non parametric statistical analysis of dependence so called Z method. Retrospective pharmacokinetic population study and statistic analysis. 872 patients receiving intravenous amikacin. The volume of distribution was modelled using the Non Parametric Adaptive Grid algorithm (NPAG) for a two-compartment model with intravenous infusion. Z coefficient was performed to evaluate the relationships between Vd and BW. For the 872 patients (mean age of 73 ± 17 years) dispatched as follow 53 % female and 47 % male, the analysis of the statistical relationships by the non parametric Z analysis showed a scattered linkage between Vd and BW. For the whole population, the relationship between Vd and BW was not linear (regression analysis). Z analysis demonstrated that only for 80 % of patients there is a relationship between Vd and BW. For these patients, regression analysis give a significant adjustment of a linear model (r = 0.47, p < 0.001). In the whole studied population there is not a continuous and linear relationship between Vd estimated by NPAG and the BW. These results underline the difficulties to adapt doses of amikacin with only BW information.

  13. Amikacin can be added to blood to reduce the fall in platelet count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaomian; Wu, Xiaoli; Deng, Weixiong; Li, Jieqiu; Luo, Wenshen

    2011-10-01

    Our objective was to develop an effective method to prevent the fall in platelet count for patients with anticoagulant-dependent (AD) pseudothrombocytopenia, a spurious phenomenon due to anticoagulant-induced aggregation of platelets. We report a case of insidious multianticoagulant-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia in which AD pseudothrombocytopenia may be caused by 4 anticoagulants, eg, EDTA, sodium citrate, heparin, and sodium fluoride (NaF). Multianticoagulant-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia was confirmed by finding clumped platelets on microscopic evaluation in 4 anticoagulated blood samples. With this case, we tried a variety of reagents, including aminoglycosides, eg, gentamicin and amikacin, vitamin B(6), and aminophylline to inhibit pseudothrombocytopenia. Except for amikacin, all reagents failed to prevent pseudothrombocytopenia. Microscopic examination of K(2)-EDTA-, heparin-, sodium citrate-, and NaF-anticoagulated blood samples showed massive platelet clumping, but no aggregate was seen in the anticoagulated blood with amikacin. When amikacin was added within 1 hour after blood sample withdrawal, platelet, WBC, and RBC counts and hemoglobin level, mean corpuscular volume, and mean platelet volume remained unchanged for up to 4 hours at room temperature. These findings suggest that amikacin could inhibit and dissociate pseudo platelet aggregation in multianticoagulant-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia and EDTA-induced pseudothrombocytopenia.

  14. Metal Complexes of Quinolone Antibiotics and Their Applications: An Update

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    Valentina Uivarosi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Quinolones are synthetic broad-spectrum antibiotics with good oral absorption and excellent bioavailability. Due to the chemical functions found on their nucleus (a carboxylic acid function at the 3-position, and in most cases a basic piperazinyl ring (or another N-heterocycle at the 7-position, and a carbonyl oxygen atom at the 4-position quinolones bind metal ions forming complexes in which they can act as bidentate, as unidentate and as bridging ligand, respectively. In the polymeric complexes in solid state, multiple modes of coordination are simultaneously possible. In strongly acidic conditions, quinolone molecules possessing a basic side nucleus are protonated and appear as cations in the ionic complexes. Interaction with metal ions has some important consequences for the solubility, pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of quinolones, and is also involved in the mechanism of action of these bactericidal agents. Many metal complexes with equal or enhanced antimicrobial activity compared to the parent quinolones were obtained. New strategies in the design of metal complexes of quinolones have led to compounds with anticancer activity. Analytical applications of complexation with metal ions were oriented toward two main directions: determination of quinolones based on complexation with metal ions or, reversely, determination of metal ions based on complexation with quinolones.

  15. Metal complexes of quinolone antibiotics and their applications: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uivarosi, Valentina

    2013-09-11

    Quinolones are synthetic broad-spectrum antibiotics with good oral absorption and excellent bioavailability. Due to the chemical functions found on their nucleus (a carboxylic acid function at the 3-position, and in most cases a basic piperazinyl ring (or another N-heterocycle) at the 7-position, and a carbonyl oxygen atom at the 4-position) quinolones bind metal ions forming complexes in which they can act as bidentate, as unidentate and as bridging ligand, respectively. In the polymeric complexes in solid state, multiple modes of coordination are simultaneously possible. In strongly acidic conditions, quinolone molecules possessing a basic side nucleus are protonated and appear as cations in the ionic complexes. Interaction with metal ions has some important consequences for the solubility, pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of quinolones, and is also involved in the mechanism of action of these bactericidal agents. Many metal complexes with equal or enhanced antimicrobial activity compared to the parent quinolones were obtained. New strategies in the design of metal complexes of quinolones have led to compounds with anticancer activity. Analytical applications of complexation with metal ions were oriented toward two main directions: determination of quinolones based on complexation with metal ions or, reversely, determination of metal ions based on complexation with quinolones.

  16. Regional variations in quinolone use in France and associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallini, A; Taboulet, F; Bourrel, R

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate geographic variations in the use of quinolones in France and their associated factors. All reimbursement claims of antimicrobials were collected for 90 % of the French population for the year 2007. Dispensed quantities were then converted into defined daily doses (DDD) and adjusted for the age structure of the national population. Correlations between quinolone use and total antimicrobial use and some morbidity and socio-economic factors were studied using Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. On average, 2.05 DDD of quinolones per 1,000 inhabitants per day (DID) were dispensed in 2007 in France, accounting for 10.2 % of the total antimicrobial consumption in adults. A 40 % variation was observed between the regions with the lowest (1.73 DID) and the highest use (2.44 DID). This variation was more important for anti-pneumococcal quinolones than for quinolones directed against urinary tract infections (coefficients of variation: 26 vs. 6 %). Quinolone use was correlated with some regional socio-economic factors (unemployment, growth domestic product, health expenditures) and physician density, but was independent of the total antimicrobial use. After adjustment for age, large variations in quantitative and qualitative quinolone use were observed across French regions, especially for anti-pneumococcal fluoroquinolones. These results, though not controlled for potential epidemics variations, argue in favour of a possible improvement in quinolone prescribing to be achieved in some regions.

  17. Antibacterial action of quinolones: from target to network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Guyue; Hao, Haihong; Dai, Menghong; Liu, Zhenli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2013-08-01

    Quinolones are widely used broad-spectrum antibacterials with incomplete elucidated mechanism of action. Here, molecular basis for the antibacterial action of quinolones, from target to network, is fully discussed and updated. Quinolones trap DNA gyrase or topoisomerase IV to form reversible drug-enzyme-DNA cleavage complexes, resulting in bacteriostasis. Cell death arises from chromosome fragmentation in protein synthesis-dependent or -independent pathways according to distinguished quinolone structures. In the former pathway, irreversible oxidative DNA damage caused by reactive oxygen species kills bacteria eventually. Toxin-antitoxin mazEF is triggered as an additional lethal action. Bacteria survive and develop resistance by SOS and other stress responses. Enlarged knowledges of quinolone actions and bacterial response will provide new targets for drug design and approaches to prevent bacterial resistance.

  18. Vibrational spectra study on quinolones antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Yu, Ke; Wang, Sihuan

    2006-09-01

    In order to be able to fully understand and easily identify the quilonoles, we collected IR and Raman spectra of six quinolones, and attempted to assign the attribution of the observed frequencies and their association with specific modes of vibration. According to the structure, the compounds were divided into the groups, and the similarities and differences were further studied by comparing. The result of the study shows that the frequency and intensity are comparable to the corresponding structure. The spectra not only have the commonness but also the individualities.

  19. Apigenin as an anti-quinolone-resistance antibiotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Yuh; Baba, Tadashi; Sasaki, Takashi; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2015-12-01

    We previously reported the first 'reverse antibiotic' (RA), nybomycin (NYB), which showed a unique antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus strains. NYB specifically suppressed the growth of quinolone-resistant S. aureus strains but was not effective against quinolone-susceptible strains. Although NYB was first reported in 1955, little was known about its unique antimicrobial activity because it was before the synthesis of the first quinolone ('old quinolone'), nalidixic acid, in 1962. Following our re-discovery of NYB, we looked for other RAs among natural substances that act on quinolone-resistant bacteria. Commercially available flavones were screened against S. aureus, including quinolone-resistant strains, and their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were compared using the microbroth dilution method. Some of the flavones screened showed stronger antimicrobial activity against quinolone-resistant strains than against quinolone-susceptible ones. Amongst them, apigenin (API) was the most potent in its RA activity. DNA cleavage assay showed that API inhibited DNA gyrase harbouring the quinolone resistance mutation gyrA(Ser84Leu) but did not inhibit 'wild-type' DNA gyrase that is sensitive to levofloxacin. An API-susceptible S. aureus strain Mu50 was also selected using agar plates containing 20mg/L API. Whole-genome sequencing of selected mutant strains was performed and frequent back-mutations (reverse mutations) were found among API-resistant strains derived from the API-susceptible S. aureus strains. Here we report that API represents another molecular class of natural antibiotic having RA activity against quinolone-resistant bacteria.

  20. [Amikacin pharmacokinetics in adults: a variability that question the dose calculation based on weight].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourguignon, Laurent; Goutelle, Sylvain; Gérard, Cécile; Guillermet, Anne; Burdin de Saint Martin, Julie; Maire, Pascal; Ducher, Michel

    2009-01-01

    The use of amikacin is difficult because of its toxicity and its pharmacokinetic variability. This variability is almost ignored in adult standard dosage regimens since only the weight is used in the dose calculation. Our objective is to test if the pharmacokinetic of amikacin can be regarded as homogenous, and if the method for calculating the dose according to patients' weight is appropriate. From a cohort of 580 patients, five groups of patients were created by statistical data partitioning. A population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed in each group. The adult population is not homogeneous in term of pharmacokinetics. The doses required to achieve a maximum concentration of 60 mg/L are strongly different (585 to 1507 mg) between groups. The exclusive use of the weight to calculate the dose of amikacine appears inappropriate for 80% of the patients, showing the limits of the formulae for calculating doses of aminoglycosides.

  1. In vitro activity of six macrolides, clindamycin and tetracycline on Streptococcus pneumoniae with different penicillin susceptibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, R L; Knudsen, J D; Petersen, M B; Fuursted, K; Espersen, F; Frimodt-Møller, N

    1996-03-01

    A collection of 99 clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae, chosen due to their different susceptibilities to penicillin, were investigated with respect to their susceptibility to the macrolides azithromycin, clarithromycin, dirithromycin, erythromycin, roxithromycin, spiramycin, and to clindamycin and tetracycline by the agar dilution method. We found complete cross resistance among the macrolides. The pneumococci were either susceptible, MIC MIC > or = 16 micrograms/ml, to the tested macrolides, giving a bimodal distribution. In addition, complete cross resistance was observed between clindamycin and macrolides. Pneumococci resistant to macrolides were also resistant to tetracycline, and 26% of the macrolide-susceptible strains were tetracycline resistant.

  2. Amikacin Pharmacokinetics/Pharmacodynamics in a Novel Hollow-Fiber Mycobacterium abscessus Disease Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Beatriz E; Srivastava, Shashikant; Deshpande, Devyani; Sherman, Carleton M; Pasipanodya, Jotam G; van Soolingen, Dick; Mouton, Johan W; van Ingen, Jakko; Gumbo, Tawanda

    2015-12-07

    The treatment of pulmonary Mycobacterium abscessus disease is associated with very high failure rates and easily acquired drug resistance. Amikacin is the key drug in treatment regimens, but the optimal doses are unknown. No good preclinical model exists to perform formal pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics experiments to determine these optimal doses. We developed a hollow-fiber system model of M. abscessus disease and studied amikacin exposure effects and dose scheduling. We mimicked amikacin human pulmonary pharmacokinetics. Both amikacin microbial kill and acquired drug resistance were linked to the peak concentration-to-MIC ratios; the peak/MIC ratio associated with 80% of maximal kill (EC80) was 3.20. However, on the day of the most extensive microbial kill, the bacillary burden did not fall below the starting inoculum. We performed Monte Carlo simulations of 10,000 patients with pulmonary M. abscessus infection and examined the probability that patients treated with one of 6 doses from 750 mg to 4,000 mg would achieve or exceed the EC80. We also examined these doses for the ability to achieve a cumulative area under the concentration-time curve of 82,232 mg · h/liter × days, which is associated with ototoxicity. The standard amikacin doses of 750 to 1,500 mg a day achieved the EC80 in ≤ 21% of the patients, while a dose of 4 g/day achieved this in 70% of the patients but at the cost of high rates of ototoxicity within a month or two. The susceptibility breakpoint was an MIC of 8 to 16 mg/liter. Thus, amikacin, as currently dosed, has limited efficacy against M. abscessus. It is urgent that different antibiotics be tested using our preclinical model and new regimens developed.

  3. A molecular analysis of quinolone-resistant Haemophilus influenzae: validation of the mutations in Quinolone Resistance-Determining Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Hisashi; Shirakura, Tetsuro; Fukuchi, Kunihiko; Takuma, Takahiro; Hanaki, Hideaki; Tanaka, Kazuo; Niki, Yoshihito

    2014-04-01

    The mechanism of quinolone-resistance is considered to be amino acid mutations in the type II topoisomerase. We validated the genetic mechanisms of quinolone resistance in Haemophilus influenzae. We obtained 29 H. influenzae strains from a nationwide surveillance program in Japan (including 11 quinolone-resistant strains [moxifloxacin: MFLX or levofloxacin MIC ≥2 μg/ml]). We analyzed the sequences of the Quinolone Resistance-Determining Regions (QRDRs) in GyrA, GyrB, ParC and ParE. Furthermore, we induced resistance in susceptible strains by exposing them to quinolone, and investigated the relationship between mutations in the QRDRs and the MICs. Five amino acid substitutions in GyrA (at Ser84 and Asp88) and ParC (at Gly82, Ser84 and Glu88) were found to be closely related to the MICs. The strains with a MFLX MIC of 0.125-1 and 2-4 μg/ml had one and two mutations, respectively. The strains with a MFLX MIC of ≥8 μg/ml had three or more mutations. The strains with induced resistance with MFLX MICs of 0.5-1 and ≥2 μg/ml also had one and two mutations, respectively. We confirmed that these five mutations strongly contribute to quinolone resistance and found that the degree of resistance is related to the number of the mutations. In addition, the three strains of 18 susceptible strains (16.7%) also had a single mutation. These strains may therefore be in the initial stage of quinolone resistance. Currently, the frequency of quinolone-resistant H. influenzae is still low. However, as has occurred with β-lactams, an increase in quinolone use may lead to more quinolone-resistant strains.

  4. Population pharmacokinetic characteristics of amikacin in suspected cases of neonatal sepsis in a low-resource African setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amponsah, Seth K; Adjei, George O; Enweronu-Laryea, Christabel C

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Amikacin exhibits marked pharmacokinetic (PK) variability and is commonly used in combination with other drugs in the treatment of neonatal sepsis. There is a paucity of amikacin PK information in neonates from low-resource settings. OBJECTIVES: To determine the PK parameters of amika...

  5. Quinolone-containing therapies in the eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuah, Seng-Kee; Tai, Wei-Chen; Lee, Chen-Hsiang; Liang, Chih-Ming; Hu, Tsung-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones, especially levofloxacin, are used in the eradication of Helicobacter pylori worldwide. Many consensus guidelines recommend that the second-line rescue therapy for H. pylori eradication consists of a proton pump inhibitor, a quinolone, and amoxicillin as an option. Unfortunately, quinolone is well associated with a risk of developing bacterial resistance. In this paper, we review quinolone-containing H. pylori eradication regimens and the challenges that influence the efficacy of eradication. It is generally suggested that the use of levofloxacin should be confined to "rescue" therapy only, in order to avoid a further rapid increase in the resistance of H. pylori to quinolone. The impact of quinolone-containing H. pylori eradication regimens on public health issues such as tuberculosis treatment must always be taken into account. Exposure to quinolone is relevant to delays in diagnosing tuberculosis and the development of drug resistance. Extending the duration of treatment to 14 days improves eradication rates by >90%. Tailored therapy to detect fluoroquinolone-resistant strains can be done by culture-based and molecular methods to provide better eradication rates. Molecular methods are achieved by using a real-time polymerase chain reaction to detect the presence of a gyrA mutation, which is predictive of treatment failure with quinolones-containing triple therapy.

  6. Microbial transformations of antimicrobial quinolones and related drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshikov, Igor A; Sutherland, John B

    2012-12-01

    The quinolones are an important group of synthetic antimicrobial drugs used for treating bacterial diseases of humans and animals. Microorganisms transform antimicrobial quinolones (including fluoroquinolones) and the pharmacologically related naphthyridones, pyranoacridones, and cinnolones to a variety of metabolites. The biotransformation processes involve hydroxylation of methyl groups; hydroxylation of aliphatic and aromatic rings; oxidation of alcohols and amines; reduction of carboxyl groups; removal of methyl, carboxyl, fluoro, and cyano groups; addition of formyl, acetyl, nitrosyl, and cyclopentenone groups; and cleavage of aliphatic and aromatic rings. Most of these reactions greatly reduce or eliminate the antimicrobial activity of the quinolones.

  7. Effects of carbapenems and their combination with amikacin on murine gut colonisation by Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samonis, George; Galanakis, Emmanouil; Ntaoukakis, Markos; Sarchianaki, Emmanouela; Spathopoulou, Thomai; Dimopoulou, Dimitra; Kofteridis, Diamantis P; Maraki, Sofia

    2013-03-01

    Carbapenems are broad-spectrum antibiotics increasingly used for the treatment of severe infections. We evaluated the effects of four carbapenems given as monotherapies or in combination with amikacin on the level of gastrointestinal colonisation by Candida albicans in a previously established mouse model. Adult male Crl : CD1 (ICR) BR mice were fed chow containing C. albicans or regular chow. The mice fed with Candida chow had their gut colonised by the yeast. Both groups were subsequently given imipenem, meropenem, ertapenem, doripenem or their combination with amikacin or normal saline subcutaneously for 10 days. Stool cultures were performed immediately before, at the end and 1 week after discontinuation of treatment. Candida-colonised mice treated with the antibiotics had higher counts of the yeast in their stools than control C. albicans-colonised animals treated with saline. All four carbapenems and their combination with amikacin caused a significant increase in C. albicans concentration. Mice fed regular chow and treated with the study antibiotics or saline did not have any Candida in their stools. Dissemination of Candida was not detected in any animal. These data suggest that carbapenems and carbapenem plus amikacin induce substantial increases in the murine intestinal concentration of C. albicans.

  8. The Incidence of Amikacin Ototoxicity in Multidrug-ResistantTuberculosis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, Mohammad Reza; Abtahi, Bahareh; Gholami, Kheirollah; Safari Moghadam, Behzad; Tabarsi, Payam; Salamzadeh, Jamshid

    2011-01-01

    Amikacin has been shown to irreversibly suppressCochlear activity.The aim of this study is to assess the incidence of amikacinototoxicity in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients and riskfactors associated withthis ototoxicity.In this cross-sectional study, 41 patientswith multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) were included.All patients received fixed dose of intravenous amikacin(500 mg/day) and anti-TB medications for six months. Baseline Pure-Tone Audiometry (PTA) was performed on all patients,before and during the drug treatment with the frequency range between 250 Hz and 8000 Hz. Patients were closely observed for the occurrence of symptomatic ototoxicity using a questionnaire .To find an association between the incidence of cochlear damage and patients’ demographics, all patients’ data were recorded. A total of 29 patients suffered from hearing loss (70.1%) (Male: n = 18; Female: n = 20).Using logistic regression, the incidence ofamikacinototoxicity was higher in men than in women. There was a negative correlation between the duration of the amikacin treatment and the difference in hearing thresholds(r = -0.34, p = 0.03). The mean of hearing threshold was significantly increased before and after the amikacin treatment((23.68 ± 19.26 vs. 38.93 ± 22.80) (p ototoxicity. PMID:24250429

  9. Once-Daily Amikacin Dosing in Burn Patients Treated with Continuous Venovenous Hemofiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    previously documented inaccuracies with the Vitek 2 instrument (1), all Acinetobacter baumannii isolates reported as susceptible to amikacin were confirmed...64 Acinetobacter baumannii (35) 39.1% 23 64/64 Other Enterobacteriaciae (43) Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (11), Enterobacter aerogenes (9...al. 2010. Aminoglycoside resistance and susceptibility testing errors in Acinetobacter baumannii -calcoaceticus complex. J. Clin. Microbiol. 48:1132

  10. Long-wavelength fluorescence polarization immunoassay: determination of amikacin on solid surface and gliadins in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Martínez, María Lourdes; Aguilar-Caballos, María Paz; Gómez-Hens, Agustina

    2007-10-01

    The versatility of the fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA) is increased by using two long-wavelength labels, Nile Blue and a ruthenium(II) chelate. The first label has been used to study the potential of FPIA on a solid surface using dry reagent technology. The aminoglycoside antibiotic amikacin has been used as an analyte model, and the method has been applied to the analysis of serum samples. The second label has been used to show the practical application of FPIA to the determination of macromolecules, using gliadins as an analyte model, which have been determined in gluten-free food. Very low amounts of anti-amikacin antibodies and amikacin-Nile Blue tracer were immobilized onto nitrocellulose membranes, for the development of the amikacin method, and the consumption of reagents is lower than in conventional FPIA. Only the addition of the standard or sample extract at an adequate pH is required at the analysis time. The analyte displaces the tracer from the tracer-antibody immunocomplex, obtaining a decrease in the fluorescence polarization proportional to the analyte concentration. The gliadin-Ru(II) chelate tracer shows a relatively long lifetime, which allows the observation of differences in fluorescence polarization values between the tracer-antibody complex and the tracer alone. The dynamic range of the calibration graphs for both analytes is 0.5-10 microg mL-1 and the detection limits are 0.1 and 0.09 microg mL-1 for amikacin and gliadins, respectively. The study of the precision gave values of relative standard deviations lower than 5 and 1.5% for the amikacin and gliadin methods, respectively. Amikacin was determined in human serum samples using a previous deproteinization step with acetonitrile, obtaining recovery values in the range 83.4-122.8%. The gliadin method was applied to the analysis of gluten-free food samples by using a previous extraction step. The recovery study gave values between 94.3 and 105.0%.

  11. Paricalcitol may improve oxidative DNA damage on experimental amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, Gulay; Basbugan, Yildiray; Ari, Elif; Erten, Remzi; Bektas, Havva; Alp, Hamit Hakan; Bayram, Irfan

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the possible protective effect of paricalcitol on experimental amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity model in rats. Wistar albino rats (n = 32) were allocated into four equal groups of eight each, the control (Group C), paricalcitol (Group P), amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity (Group A), and paricalcitol-treated amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity (Group A + P) groups. Paricalcitol was given intra-peritoneally at a dose of 0.4 μg/kg/d for 5 consecutive days prior to induction of amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity. Intra-peritoneal amikacin (1.2 g/kg) was used to induce nephrotoxicity at day 4. Renal function parameters, oxidative stress biomarkers, oxidative DNA damage (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine/deoxyguanosine ratio), kidney histology, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) immunoexpression were determined. Group A + P had lower mean fractional sodium excretion (p < 0.001) as well as higher creatinine clearance (p = 0.026) than the amikacin group (Group A). Renal tissue malondialdehyde levels (p = 0.035) and serum 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine/deoxyguanosine ratio (8-OHdG/dG ratio) (p < 0.001) were significantly lower; superoxide dismutase (p = 0.024) and glutathione peroxidase (p = 0.007) activities of renal tissue were significantly higher in group A + P than in group A. The mean scores of tubular necrosis (p = 0.024), proteinaceous casts (p = 0.038), medullary congestion (p = 0.035), and VEGF immunoexpression (p = 0.018) were also lower in group A + P when compared with group A. This study demonstrates the protective effect of paricalcitol in the prevention of amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity in an experimental model. Furthermore, it is the first study to demonstrate that paricalcitol improves oxidative DNA damage in an experimental acute kidney injury model.

  12. Population Pharmacokinetic Characteristics of Amikacin in Suspected Cases of Neonatal Sepsis in a Low-Resource African Setting: A Prospective Nonrandomized Single-Site Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth K. Amponsah, PhD

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The V and half-life of amikacin in this cohort varied from that reported in non-African populations, and the high trough and low peak amikacin concentrations in both term and preterm neonates suggest strategies to optimize amikacin dosing are required in this population.

  13. Insight into Prodrugs of Quinolones and Fluoroquinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prabodh Chander; Piplani, Mona; Mittal, Monika; Pahwa, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Quinolones and fluoroquinolones are principal weapons against variety of bacterial infections and exert their antibacterial potential by interfering the activities of bacterial enzymes. As these agents are associated with some limitations, an important approach to overcome these major constraints is to prepare covalent derivatives, i.e. prodrugs. Prodrug design has been employed to improve the limitations of these drugs such as less aqueous solubility, poor absorption and distribution, toxicity, disagreeable taste, poor lipophilicity etc and for improving their pharmacological profile. This paper highlights the utility of various prodrug strategies in optimizing the therapeutic index of these antibacterial agents and their recent patents. Some of their prodrugs being utilized at preclinical and clinical levels have also been discussed. Hence, this paper has been prepared to present the significant findings of various research papers that would be helpful in motivating scientific researchers to forward the research in direction of utilization of prodrugs in clinical therapy.

  14. Amikacin Concentrations Predictive of Ototoxicity in Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modongo, Chawangwa; Pasipanodya, Jotam G; Zetola, Nicola M; Williams, Scott M; Sirugo, Giorgio; Gumbo, Tawanda

    2015-10-01

    Aminoglycosides, such as amikacin, are used to treat multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. However, ototoxicity is a common problem and is monitored using peak and trough amikacin concentrations based on World Health Organization recommendations. Our objective was to identify clinical factors predictive of ototoxicity using an agnostic machine learning method. We used classification and regression tree (CART) analyses to identify clinical factors, including amikacin concentration thresholds that predicted audiometry-confirmed ototoxicity among 28 multidrug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Botswana. Amikacin concentrations were measured for all patients. The quantitative relationship between predictive factors and the probability of ototoxicity were then identified using probit analyses. The primary predictors of ototoxicity on CART analyses were cumulative days of therapy, followed by cumulative area under the concentration-time curve (AUC), which improved on the primary predictor by 87%. The area under the receiver operating curve was 0.97 on the test set. Peak and trough were not predictors in any tree. When algorithms were forced to pick peak and trough as primary predictors, the area under the receiver operating curve fell to 0.46. Probit analysis revealed that the probability of ototoxicity increased sharply starting after 6 months of therapy to near maximum at 9 months. A 10% probability of ototoxicity occurred with a threshold cumulative AUC of 87,232 days · mg · h/liter, while that of 20% occurred at 120,000 days · mg · h/liter. Thus, cumulative amikacin AUC and duration of therapy, and not peak and trough concentrations, should be used as the primary decision-making parameters to minimize the likelihood of ototoxicity in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Copyright © 2015, Modongo et al.

  15. Use of antibiotics and about quinolones in veterinary therapy (ro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crina L. Mosneang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In Romania are being done extensively efforts in the veterinarians education to emphasize the importance and the European regulations familiar behavior, relating to veterinary drugs prescribing, the issues of residues, of antibacterial resistance and of judicious use of the veterinary conditionigs. In this respect, the present synthesis presents an overview, a useful and necessary bibliographical remembrance to veterinary practitioner about antibiotics and quinolones in particular. Are summarized: bacterial antagonism, methods for studying the effectiveness of antibiotics, the mode of action of antibiotics, the phenomenon of resistance to antibiotics and toxic secondary phenomena caused by antibiotics, continued by information about quinolone-carbonic acid derivatives (quinolones them action mechanism, classification and presentation of the main representatives, indications and contraindications, etc. Referate is conceived in two parts about antibiotics and about quinolones.

  16. Oxidation of quinolones with peracids (an in situ EPR study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staško, Andrej; Milata, Viktor; Barbieriková, Zuzana; Brezová, Vlasta

    2014-01-01

    4-Oxoquinoline derivatives (quinolones) represent heterocyclic compounds with a variety of biological activities, along with interesting chemical reactivity. The quinolone derivatives possessing secondary amino hydrogen at the nitrogen of the enaminone system are oxidized with 3-chloroperbenzoic acid to nitroxide radicals in the primary step while maintaining their 4-pyridone ring. Otherwise, N-methyl substituted quinolones also form nitroxide radicals coupled with the opening of the 4-pyridone ring in a gradual oxidation of the methyl group via the nitrone-nitroxide spin-adduct cycle. This was confirmed in an analogous oxidation using N,N-dimethylaniline as a model compound. N-Ethyl quinolones in contrast to its N-methyl analog form only one nitroxide radical without a further degradation.

  17. Macrolide resistance mechanisms in Enterobacteriaceae: Focus on azithromycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Cláudia; Martínez-Puchol, Sandra; Palma, Noemí; Horna, Gertrudis; Ruiz-Roldán, Lidia; Pons, Maria J; Ruiz, Joaquim

    2017-02-01

    From its introduction in 1952 onwards, the clinical use of macrolides has been steadily increasing, both in human and veterinary medicine. Although initially designed to the treatment of Gram-positive microorganisms, this antimicrobial family has also been used to treat specific Gram-negative bacteria. Some of them, as azithromycin, are considered in the armamentarium against Enterobacteriaceae infections. However, the facility that this bacterial genus has to gain or develop mechanisms of antibiotic resistance may compromise the future usefulness of these antibiotics to fight against Enterobacteriaceae infections. The present review is focused on the mechanisms of macrolide resistance, currently described in Enterobacteriaceae.

  18. Increasing quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica serotype enteritidis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølbak, K.; Gerner-Smidt, P.; Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    2002-01-01

    Until recently, Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis has remained sensitive to most antibiotics. However, national surveillance data from Denmark show that quinolone resistance in S. Enteritidis has increased from 0.8% in 1995 to 8.5% in 2000. These data support concerns that the current use...... of quinolone in food animals leads to increasing resistance in S. Enteritidis and that action should be taken to limit such use....

  19. New cytotoxic quinolone alkaloids from fruits of Evodia rutaecarpa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin; Li, Wei; Yang, Xiu-Wei

    2012-06-01

    Three new quinolone alkaloids, 1-methyl-2-[7-hydroxy-(E)-9-tridecenyl]-4(1H)-quinolone (1), 1-methyl-2-[(Z)-4-nonenyl]-4(1H)-quinolone (2), 1-methyl-2-[(1E,5Z)-1,5-undecadienyl]-4(1H)-quinolone (3) and one new natural product, 1-methyl-2-[(E)-1-undecenyl]-4(1H)-quinolone (4), were isolated from the dried and nearly ripe fruits of Evodia rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth., along with thirteen known compounds (5-17). In addition, one new artificial product, 1-methyl-2-[7-carbonyl-(E)-9-tridecenyl]-4(1H)-quinolone (1A) was also obtained. The structures of these compounds were determined by spectroscopic analyses. The cytotoxic activities of all of the compounds against the human cancer cell lines HL-60, N-87, H-460, and Hep G(2) cells were evaluated by MTT assay. The results showed that these alkaloids inhibited cell proliferation with IC(50) values between 14μM and 22μM.

  20. Pharmacokinetics of a combination of amikacin sulfate and penicillin G sodium for intravenous regional limb perfusion in adult horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Jorge E; Trela, Jan; Stanley, Scott D; Yamout, Sawsan; Snyder, Jack R

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics of amikacin and penicillin G sodium when administered in combination as an intravenous regional limb perfusion (IVRLP) to horses. Seven healthy adult horses underwent an IVRLP in the cephalic vein with 2 g of amikacin sulfate and 10 mill IU of penicillin G sodium diluted to 60 mL in 0.9% saline. A pneumatic tourniquet set at 450 mmHg was left in place for 30 min. Synovial fluid was collected from the metacarpophalangeal joint 35 min and 2, 6, 12, and 24 h after infusion of the antimicrobials. Concentrations of amikacin and penicillin in synovial fluid were quantitated by liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry analysis. Therapeutic concentrations of amikacin and penicillin for equine-susceptible pathogens were achieved in the synovial fluid. Maximum synovial concentrations (Cmax) (mean ± SE) for amikacin and penicillin were 132 ± 33 μg/mL and 8474 ± 5710 ng/mL, respectively. Only 3 horses had detectable levels of penicillin at 6 h and 1 at the 12 h sample. The combination of amikacin with penicillin G sodium via IVDLP resulted in reported therapeutic concentrations of both antibiotics in the synovial fluid. The Cmax:MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) ratio for amikacin was 8:1 and Time > MIC for penicillin was 6 h. At 24 h, the mean concentration of amikacin was still above 4 μg/mL. Terminal elimination rate constants (T1/2 lambdaz) were 13.6 h and 2.8 h for amikacin and penicillin, respectively. The use of IVDLP with penicillin may therefore not be practical as rapid clearance of penicillin from the synovial fluid requires frequent perfusions to maintain acceptable therapeutic concentrations.

  1. Tigecycline-Amikacin Combination Effectively Suppresses the Selection of Resistance in Clinical Isolates of KPC-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Wentao; Wei, Chuanqi; Zhou, Chufei; Zhao, Jin; Liang, Beibei; Cui, Junchang; Wang, Rui; Liu, Youning

    2016-01-01

    By far, only tigecycline, colistin, and some aminoglycosides still show favorable in vitro activities against carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. However, rapid emergence of resistance often occurs during long-term treatment in clinic, challenging these last resort antimicrobials. In this study, we measured mutant prevention concentration (MPC) and mutant selection window (MSW) of tigecycline, colistin and amikacin alone and in combination for clinical isolates of KPC-producing K. pneumoniae, and characterized the resistant mutants recovered. The MPC90 of 30 tested isolates for tigecycline, colistin, and amikacin were 16, >128, and 128 mg/L, respectively. The average MSW of tigecycline-amikacin, tigecycline-colistin, and amikacin-colistin combinations for four representative strains were 11.99, 200.13, and 372.38, respectively. A strong correlation was found between the MSW combination and the product of MSW of each single drug. Combinations of 1 minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) multiple tigecycline and 1 MIC multiple amikacin could result in 1000- to 10000-fold reduction in mutational frequency relative to their individual mutational frequencies, and combinations of 1 MIC multiple amikacin and 1.5-2 MIC multiple tigecycline could successfully restrict the recovery of resistant mutants on agar plates. However, 2 MIC multiple colistin in combination with 2 MIC multiple tigecycline or amikacin merely resulted in approximately 10-fold decrease in the mutational frequency. In conclusion, this study showed tigecycline-amikacin combination could effectively suppress the selection of resistance at low concentrations compared with the colistin-tigecycline and colistin-amikacin combinations, suggesting that this combination may be useful in clinical therapy.

  2. Tigecycline-amikacin combination effectively suppresses the selection of resistance in clinical isolates of KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wentao Ni

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available By far, only tigecycline, colistin and some aminoglycosides still show favorable in vitro activities against carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. However, rapid emergence of resistance often occurs during long-term treatment in clinic, challenging these last resort antimicrobials. In this study, we measured mutant prevention concentration (MPC and mutant selection window (MSW of tigecycline, colistin and amikacin alone and in combination for clinical isolates of KPC-producing K. pneumoniae, and characterized the resistant mutants recovered. The MPC90 of 30 tested isolates for tigecycline, colistin and amikacin were 16, >128 and 128 mg/L, respectively. The average MSW of tigecycine-amikacin, tigecycline-colisitn, and amikacin-colistin combinations for 4 representative strains were 11.99, 200.13 and 372.38, respectively. A strong correlation was found between the MSWcombination and the product of MSW of each single drug. Combinations of 1MIC multiple tigecycline and 1MIC multiple amikacin could result in 1000-10000 fold reduction in mutational frequency relative to their individual mutational frequencies, and combinations of 1 MIC multiple amikacin and 1.5-2 MIC multiple tigecycline could successfully restrict the recovery of resistant mutants on agar plates. However, 2 MIC multiple colistin in combination with 2 MIC multiple tigecycline or amikacin merely resulted in approximately 10 fold decrease in the mutational frequency. In conclusion, this study showed tigecycline-amikacin combination could effectively suppress the selection of resistance at low concentrations compared with the colistin-tigecycline and colistin-amikacin combinations, suggesting that this combination may be useful in clinical therapy.

  3. Quinolones: review of psychiatric and neurological adverse reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomé, Ana M; Filipe, Augusto

    2011-06-01

    Quinolones are a class of antibacterial agents for the treatment of several infectious diseases (e.g. urinary and respiratory tract infections). They are used worldwide due to their broad spectrum of activity, high bioavailability and good safety profile. The safety profile varies from quinolone to quinolone. The aim of this article was to review the neurological and psychiatric adverse drug reaction (ADR) profile of quinolones, using a literature search strategy designed to identify case reports and case series. A literature search using PubMed/MEDLINE (from inception to 31 October 2010) was performed to identify case reports and case series related to quinolone-associated neurological and psychiatric ADRs. The search was conducted in two phases: the first phase was the literature search and in the second phase relevant articles were identified through review of the references of the selected articles. Relevant articles were defined as articles referring to adverse events/reactions associated with the use of any quinolone. Abstracts referring to animal studies, clinical trials and observational studies were excluded. Identified case reports were analysed by age group, sex, active substances, dosage, concomitant medication, ambulatory or hospital-based event and seriousness, after Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA®) coding. From a total of 828 articles, 83 were identified as referring to nervous system and/or psychiatric disorders induced by quinolones. 145 individual case reports were extracted from the 83 articles. 40.7% of the individual case reports belonged to psychiatric disorders only, whereas 46.9% related to neurological disorders only. Eight (5.5%) individual case reports presented both neurological and psychiatric ADRs. Ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin and pefloxacin were the quinolones with more neurological and psychiatric ADRs reported in the literature. Ciprofloxacin has been extensively used worldwide, which may explain the higher number

  4. Macrolides resistance of common bacteria isolated from Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, S C; Chen, Y C; Luh, K T; Hsieh, W C

    1995-12-01

    To determine the susceptibility to macrolides of common pathogenic bacteria isolated from Taiwan, the in vitro activities of erythromycin, roxithromycin, azithromycin, clarithromycin, and dirithromycin were tested against 492 clinical isolates of eight different bacteria, collected from the National Taiwan University Hospital. The results showed high minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) against most of the tested bacteria. The MIC90s for Staphylococcus aureus (both methicillin-resistant and -sensitive strains), coagulase-negative staphylococci (both methicillin-resistant and -sensitive strains), Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, enterococci, peptostreptococci, and Bacteroides fragilis were all > or = 256 micrograms/ml. The MIC50s for methicillin-resistant strains of S. aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci, and enterococci were > or = 256 micrograms/ml. For S. pneumoniae, peptostreptococci, and B. fragilis, the MIC50s were > 8 micrograms/ml. The resistance rates to macrolides were 80% or more in methicillin-resistant staphylococci and about 30% in methicillin-sensitive staphylococci. Around 55% of S. pneumoniae strains and 37 approximately 42% of S. pyogenes strains were resistant to macrolides. Cross-resistance to different macrolides was clearly demonstrated in most of the resistant strains.

  5. Topical macrolide immunomodulators: a role in the treatment of vitiligo?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjioe, M.; Vissers, W.H.P.M.; Gerritsen, M.J.P.

    2006-01-01

    Recently, topical macrolide immunomodulators have been successfully introduced in the treatment of atopic dermatitis. With the growing interest in this new line of topical immunosuppressants, research into the efficacy of these medicines in other T-cell-mediated skin diseases, such as psoriasis, lic

  6. [Comparative study of intramacrophagic penetration and action on phagocytosis of a macrolide (spiramycin) and a fluoroquinolone (pefloxacin)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desnottes, J F; Diallo, N

    1990-04-01

    Antibiotic-phagocyte interaction is an important parameter involved in the elimination process of intracellular bacteria. The aim of the present study was to compare, using the same model, the phagocytic uptake and the intracellular activity of a macrolide and a quinolone. Accumulation of spiramycin and pefloxacin by guinea pig peritoneal macrophages (GPpM) was studied by means of a velocity-gradient centrifugation technique and expression of the ratio of the cellular concentration of antibiotic to the extracellular concentration (IC-EC). Three aspects of Staphylococcus aureus (209-P) phagocytosis were studied: 1) the phagocytic capacity (PC), mean number of ingested cocci by GpPM; 2) the phagocytic activity (PA), percentage of phagocyting GpPM with at least one bacterium; 3) the number of intracellular viable bacteria (IVB). Phagocytic capacity and phagocytic activity were determined by fluorescence microscopy using S. aureus stained with acridine orange. Intracellular viable bacteria were quantified by standard colony counts (CFU). The ratios of intracellular to extracellular concentration of pefloxacin and spiramycin are respectively 9 and 23. Pretreatment of guinea-pig peritoneal macrophages with 10 mg/l of each antibiotic does not modify phagocytic capacity and phagocytic activity, but lead to a decrease of intracellular viable bacteria. S. aureus pretreatment with 1/4 the MIC of each antibiotic increased phagocytic capacity and phagocytic activity and decrease intracellular viable bacteria (especially spiramycin).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. [Post-antibiotic effect of imipenem, amikacin and ciprofloxacin against various strains of Serratia marcescens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollet, C; Mallet, M N; Bouchemal, H; de Micco, P

    1990-05-01

    The authors compared the post-antibiotic effect (PAE) of imipenem, amikacin, ciprofloxacin, and latamoxef against Serratia marcescens ATCC 13880 (type strain) and against 12 clinical strains belonging to Grimont's most frequent biotypes: A2a, A3a, A3b, A4a, A4b, A5, A6a, A8a, A8b, A8c, TT, TCT. PAE was determined by measuring bacterial growth kinetics after one hour exposure to concentration of 2 x MIC of 10(6) CFUs in Mueller-Hinton broth. Drug removal was by 10-3 dilution of the exposed culture. A PAE was consistently present with imipenem (range 0.8-2.9 hrs), amikacin (range 1.0-4.9 hrs), ciprofloxacin (range 1.4-2.8 hrs). The duration of PAE did not correlate with MIC or Grimont's biotypes.

  8. Evaluation of genetic mutations associated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance to amikacin, kanamycin and capreomycin: a systematic review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Georghiou, Sophia B; Magana, Marisa; Garfein, Richard S; Catanzaro, Donald G; Catanzaro, Antonino; Rodwell, Timothy C

    2012-01-01

    ...%. While this relationship is well established and reliable for first-line anti-TB drugs, rifampin and isoniazid, it is less well-studied and understood for second-line, injectable drugs, amikacin (AMK), kanamycin (KAN) and capreomycin (CAP...

  9. [Sample preprocessing method for residual quinolones in honey using immunoaffinity resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Yoshiharu; Kato, Mihoko; Kodaira, Tsukasa; Itoh, Shinji; Terakawa, Mika; Horie, Masakazu; Saito, Koichi; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki

    2009-06-01

    A sample preparation method was developed for determination of quinolones in honey using immunoaffinity resin. For this purpose, an immunoaffinity resin for quinolones was prepared by coupling a quinolone-specific monoclonal antibody to agarose resin. Honey samples diluted with phosphate buffer were reacted with immunoaffinity resin. After the resin was washed, quinolones were eluted with glycine-HCl. Quinolones in the eluate were determined by HPLC with fluorescence detection. No interfering peak was found on the chromatograms of honey samples. The recoveries of quinolones from samples were over 70% at fortification levels of 20 ng/g (for norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin) and 10 ng/g (for danofloxacin). The quantification limits of quinolones were 2 ng/g. This sample preprocessing method using immunoaffinity resin was found to be effective and suitable for determining residual quinolones in honey.

  10. Amikacin therapy for urinary tract infections caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Yeon; Choi, Su-Mi; Park, Sun Hee; Lee, Dong-Gun; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yoo, Jin-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: The number of urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-EC) is increasing. In an outpatient setting, there are limited therapeutic options to treat ESBL-producing pathogens. We evaluated the outcomes of amikacin outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) for UTIs caused by ESBL-EC in patients not pre-treated with carbapenem. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the outcomes of amikacin OPAT for UTIs caused by ESBL-EC. Results: From November 2011 to October 2012, eight females, who could not be hospitalized for carbapenem treatment, were treated with amikacin OPAT for nine episodes of non-bacteremic ESBL-EC UTIs. Seven of the eight patients had one or more comorbidities. Of the nine UTI cases, three had symptomatic lower UTIs and six had non-bacteremic upper UTIs. In all of the cases, symptomatic and laboratory improvements were observed following amikacin OPAT. One patient showed a delayed relapse with bilateral microabscesses 3 weeks after treatment cessation; however, a clinical and microbiological cure was eventually reached. All of the patients were able to tolerate amikacin OPAT without any significant nephrotoxicity or ototoxicity. Conclusions: Amikacin OPAT represents a feasible therapeutic option for non-bacteremic UTIs caused by ESBL-EC in settings with limited resources. PMID:26767869

  11. Amikacin therapy for urinary tract infections caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Yeon; Choi, Su-Mi; Park, Sun Hee; Lee, Dong-Gun; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yoo, Jin-Hong

    2016-01-01

    The number of urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-EC) is increasing. In an outpatient setting, there are limited therapeutic options to treat ESBL-producing pathogens. We evaluated the outcomes of amikacin outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) for UTIs caused by ESBL-EC in patients not pre-treated with carbapenem. We retrospectively evaluated the outcomes of amikacin OPAT for UTIs caused by ESBL-EC. From November 2011 to October 2012, eight females, who could not be hospitalized for carbapenem treatment, were treated with amikacin OPAT for nine episodes of non-bacteremic ESBL-EC UTIs. Seven of the eight patients had one or more comorbidities. Of the nine UTI cases, three had symptomatic lower UTIs and six had non-bacteremic upper UTIs. In all of the cases, symptomatic and laboratory improvements were observed following amikacin OPAT. One patient showed a delayed relapse with bilateral microabscesses 3 weeks after treatment cessation; however, a clinical and microbiological cure was eventually reached. All of the patients were able to tolerate amikacin OPAT without any significant nephrotoxicity or ototoxicity. Amikacin OPAT represents a feasible therapeutic option for non-bacteremic UTIs caused by ESBL-EC in settings with limited resources.

  12. Single daily amikacin versus cefotaxime in the short-course treatment of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in cirrhotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tai-An Chen; Gin-Ho Lo; Kwok-Hung Lai; Whey-Jen Lin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To compare the efficacy and safety of single daily amikacin vs. cefotaxime in the 5-d treatment of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP).METHODS: Thirty-seven cirrhotic patients with SBP,19 in group A and 18 in group B, were studied. Group A received 1 g of cefotaxime every 6 h, and group B received 500 mg of amikacin qd. Both antibiotics were administered up to 5 d and the responses were compared.RESULTS: Infection was cured in 15 of 19 patients (78.9%) treated with cefotaxime and in 11 of 18 (61.1%)treated with amikacin. Four patients of the Cefotaxime group (21.1%) and five patients of the Amikacin group (27.8%) died. Two in each group (10.5% vs 11.1%)had renal impairment during study period. One in each group (5.3% vs 5.6%) may be considered to suffer from nephrotoxicity due to increased urinary β2-microglobulin concentration.CONCLUSION: In this study, single daily doses of amikacin in the treatment of SBP in cirrhotics were not associated with an increased incidence of renal impairment or nephrotoxicity. However, a 5-d regimen of amikacin is less effective than a 5-d regimen of cefotaxime in the SBP treatment.

  13. Past, present and future of macrolide therapy for chronic rhinosinusitis in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Takeshi; Suzaki, Harumi

    2016-04-01

    In 1984, the effectiveness of low-dose, long-term erythromycin treatment (macrolide therapy) for diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB) was first reported in Japan. The 5-year survival rate for DPB improved from 62.9 to 91.4% after implementation of macrolide therapy. The usefulness of this treatment has since been demonstrated in patients with other chronic airway diseases, such as chronic bronchitis, cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis, bronchial asthma, and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). The new 14-membered macrolides clarithromycin and roxithromycin and the 15-membered macrolide azithromycin are also effective for treating these inflammatory diseases. The mechanism of action of the 14- and 15-membered macrolides may involve anti-inflammatory rather than anti-bacterial activities. Macrolide therapy is now widely used for the treatment of CRS in Japan; it is particularly effective for treating neutrophil-associated CRS and is useful for suppressing mucus hypersecretion. However, macrolide therapy is not effective for eosinophil-predominant CRS, which is characterized by serum and tissue eosinophilia, high serum IgE levels, multiple polyposis, and bronchial asthma. Recent reports have described the clinical efficacy of macrolides in treating other inflammatory diseases and new biological activities (e.g., anti-viral). New macrolide derivatives exhibiting anti-inflammatory but not anti-bacterial activity thus have therapeutic potential as immunomodulatory drugs. The history, current state, and future perspectives of macrolide therapy for treating CRS in Japan will be discussed in this review.

  14. Prevalence and characterisation of quinolone resistance mechanisms in Salmonella spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasyl, Dariusz; Hoszowski, Andrzej; Zając, Magdalena

    2014-07-16

    The study was focused on characterisation of quinolone resistance mechanisms in Salmonella isolated from animals, food, and feed between 2008 and 2011. Testing of Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations revealed 6.4% of 2680 isolates conferring ciprofloxacin resistance. Simultaneously 37.7% and 40.8% were accounted for, respectively, nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin Non Wild-Type populations. Amplification and sequencing of quinolone resistance determining region of topoisomerases genes in 44 isolates identified multiple amino-acid substitutions in gyrA at positions Ser83 (N=22; → Leu, → Phe, → Tyr), Asp87 (N=22; → Asn, → Gly, → Tyr) and parC (Thr57Ser, N=23; Ala141Ser, N=1). No relevant mutations were identified in gyrB and parE. Twelve patterns combining one or two substitutions were related to neither serovar nor ciprofloxacin MIC. In 92 isolates suspected for plasmid mediated quinolone resistance two qnr alleles were found: qnrS1 (or qnrS3; N=50) and qnrB19 (or qnrB10; N=24). Additionally, two isolates with chromosomally encoded mechanisms carried qnrS1 and qnrS2. All tested isolates were negative for qnrA, qnrC, qnrD, qepA, aac(6')-Ib-cr. Both chromosomal and plasmid mediated quinolone resistance determinants were found in several Salmonella serovars and Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis was used to assess phylogenetic similarity of selected isolates (N=82). Salmonella Newport was found to accumulate quinolone resistance determinants and the serovar was spreading clonally with either variable gyrA mutations, qnrS1/S3, or qnrB10/B19. Alternatively, various determinants are dispersed among related S. Enteritidis isolates. Antimicrobial selection pressure, multiple resistance determinants and scenarios for their acquisition and spread make extremely difficult to combat quinolone resistance.

  15. Neutral Complex Extraction and Synergistic Extraction of Macrolide Antibiotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on the theory of reactive extraction, new solvent systems were developed to replace butylacetate for extraction of macrolide antibiotics (erythromycin, kitasamycin, spiramycin meleumycin etc.). A new neutral complex solvent extraction system, fatty alcohol-kerosene (marked by E1), was used for extraction of erythromycin, one of the macrolide antibiotics. The extraction equilibrium equation is obtained, and the extraction distribution is as follows The effects of several parameters on extraction equilibrium were investigated. Furthermore, a new synergistic extraction system (marked by E2) was developed, in which another solvent was used as synergistic agent to replace the diluent kerosene in the neutral complex extraction system. Based on these new extraction systems, an improved process for extraction of erythromycin was developed, showing remarkable advantages in technology and economics owing to its low solvent consumption of 3kg per billion unit compared with 9-10 for butylacetate. The recovery process of solvent from raffinate may be eliminated.

  16. The regioselective iodination of quinolines, quinolones, pyridones, pyridines and uracil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Uttam; Deb, Arghya; Lupton, David W; Maiti, Debabrata

    2015-12-28

    A radical based direct C-H iodination protocol for quinolines, quinolones, pyridones, pyridines, and uracil has been developed. The iodination occurs in a C3 selective manner for quinolines and quinolones. Pyridones and pyridines undergo C3 and C5 iodination, while dimethyl uracil undergoes C5 iodination. Scope of the method was demonstrated through the rapid synthesis of both electron rich as well as electron poor heteroaromatic iodides. The protocol was found to be scalable and general, while a mechanism has been proposed.

  17. Acute toxicity evaluation for quinolone antibiotics and their chlorination disinfection processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Wei, Dongbin; Du, Yuguo

    2014-09-01

    Acute toxicity of 21 quinolone antibiotics was monitored using photobacterium Vibrio fischeri assay. The minimum IC20 (inhibitory concentration for 20% luminescence elimination) was obtained at the least 18.86μmol/L for the tested quinolones. A quantitative structure-activity relationship model was established to investigate the possible mechanism for the acute toxicity. The critical physicochemical descriptors, describing σ and π atom electronegativity, implied that the electron transfer might occur between the quinolones and photobacterium V. fischeri. Although the quinolones exhibited limited acute toxicity to photobacterium, toxicity elevation was detected after their chlorination. Hence, chlorination disinfection treatment of quinolone-containing water should be of concerns.

  18. The Effects of Mepivacaine Hydrochloride on Antimicrobial Activity and Mechanical Nociceptive Threshold During Amikacin Sulfate Regional Limb Perfusion in the Horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbath, Aimée C; Wittenburg, Luke A; Gold, Jenifer R; McIlwraith, C Wayne; Moorman, Valerie J

    2016-08-01

    To determine the effect of intravenous regional limb perfusion (IVRLP) with a combination of mepivacaine hydrochloride and amikacin sulfate on synovial fluid amikacin sulfate concentration, antimicrobial activity, and mechanical nociceptive threshold (MNT). Experimental study. Healthy adult horses (n=9). One IVRLP treatment was randomly administered by cephalic vein of each limb: amikacin alone (1 g amikacin in 60 mL saline) or amikacin with mepivacaine (1 g amikacin and 500 mg mepivacaine in 60 mL saline). Opposite treatments were repeated after a 24 hour wash-out period. Amikacin concentration and antimicrobial activity were determined for synovial fluid from middle carpal joints at tourniquet removal and 30 minutes following. Zone of inhibition was determined for Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. MNT was determined at 3 dorsal metacarpal locations prior to and after sedation, after Esmarch tourniquet application, and 30 minutes after IVRLP prior to and after tourniquet removal. Two limbs from each treatment group were removed because of undetectable amikacin concentrations for a total of 14 data sets analyzed. Synovial fluid amikacin concentrations and zone of inhibition were not significantly different between treatments at any time point. MNT were significantly increased 30 minutes after IVRLP prior to and following tourniquet removal using amikacin and mepivacaine (median, range; 40.0 µg/mL, 38.7-40.0 and 40.0, 25.8-40.0, respectively) compared to amikacin alone (19.5 µg/mL, 18.7-25.6 and 15.3, 13.2-20.5, respectively). Addition of mepivacaine to amikacin for IVRLP in the horse as a means of providing analgesia without decreasing antimicrobial activity. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  19. A review of macrolide treatment of atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Stovring, Jette; Andersen, Paul Lehm;

    2003-01-01

    groups, a significant reduction in serious end-points were noticed in patients receiving macrolide. Similarly, two other minor randomized trials showed that macrolide treatment inhibited growth of small AAA. Macrolide therapy thus seems potential to improve the outcome of severe ischaemic heart disease......, and growth of AAA. If true, it not known whether this is transient because of macrolide's non-specific anti-inflammatory effect or latent infection, or permanent because of eradicating C. pneumoniae organisms. In order to clarify this, large and long term randomized trials are needed, as well as diagnostic...

  20. [Calculation of the first dose of amikacine: evaluation of the current dosage recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Bart, E; Debeurme, G; Ducher, M; Bourguignon, L

    2013-01-01

    Aminoglycosides, including amikacin, are antibiotics with major interest in the management of sepsis, but with a high potential toxicity. The French national recommendations revised in 2011 recommend a dose of amikacin ranging from 15 to 30 mg/kg. The objective was to assess if such a dose interval allows reaching the efficiency target concentrations of 64 mg/L without exceeding the toxic threshold of 2.5mg/L. From a cohort of 100 patients treated with amikacin, the individual pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated using pharmacokinetic software (MM-USCPACK). Peak and residual concentrations obtained after simulated doses ranging from 15 to 30 mg/kg were estimated and compared with the effective and toxic thresholds. The optimum dose to achieve precisely the efficiency target was calculated for each patient. Patients studied had a mean age of 79 years, mean weight of 58 kg, and mean creatinine clearance of 45 mL/min. The dose of 30 mg/kg allows the achievement of an effective peak in 98.7% of patients, but led to a potentially toxic through for 72.4% of them. The optimal dose was at mean of 1264 mg, significantly different than doses calculated with weight (P<0.0001). A weak correlation was found between weight and the optimal dose. A fixed dose of 30 mg/kg seems to be effective for most patients, but often excessive and leads to a toxic residual to 72% of patients, whereas 15 mg/kg was insufficient for most patients. The low correlation between optimal dose and patient weight shows that weight does not explain fully the interindividual variability.

  1. Amikacin Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infections that are caused by bacteria such as meningitis (infection of the membranes that surround the brain ... also sometimes used with other medications to treat tuberculosis (TB; a serious infection that affects the lungs ...

  2. Optimization of freeze-drying condition of amikacin solid lipid nanoparticles using D-optimal experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshosaz, Jaleh; Ghaffari, Solmaz; Khoshayand, Mohammad Reza; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Dehkordi, Abbas Jafarian; Kobarfard, Farzad

    2012-01-01

    Amikacin as an aminoglycoside antibiotic was chosen to be loaded in a cholesterol carrier with nanoparticle size and sustained release profile to increase the dose interval of amikacin and reduce side-effects. To support the stability of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs), freeze-drying was suggested. Factors affecting the freeze-drying process in the present study included the type and concentration of cryoprotectants. Pre-freezing temperature effects were also studied on particle size of SLNs of amikacin. In some preliminary experiments, important factors which influenced the particle size of SLNs after lyophilization were selected and a D-optimal design was applied to optimize the freeze-drying conditions in the production of SLNs with minimum particle size growth after freeze-drying. Zeta potential, DSC thermograms, release profiles and morphology of the optimized particles were studied before and after freeze-drying. Results showed sucrose changed the particle size of SLNs of amikacin from 149 ± 4 nm to 23.9 ± 16.7 nm; in that situation, the absolute value of zeta potential changed from 1 ± 0.7 mV to 13 ± 4 mV. The release profiles showed a sustained release behavior of the loaded drug that did not change significantly before and after freeze-drying, but a burst effect was seen after it in the first 2 h. DSC analysis showed chemical interaction between amikacin and cholesterol.

  3. Novel transferable erm(46) determinant responsible for emerging macrolide resistance in Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasi, Elisa; Giguère, Steeve; Berghaus, Londa J; Hondalus, Mary K; Willingham-Lane, Jennifer M; MacArthur, Iain; Cohen, Noah D; Roberts, Marilyn C; Vazquez-Boland, Jose A

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the molecular mechanism of macrolide resistance in the actinomycete Rhodococcus equi, a major equine pathogen and zoonotic agent causing opportunistic infections in people. Macrolide-resistant (n = 62) and macrolide-susceptible (n = 62) clinical isolates of R. equi from foals in the USA were studied. WGS of 18 macrolide-resistant and 6 macrolide-susceptible R. equi was performed. Representative sequences of all known macrolide resistance genes identified to date were used to search the genome assemblies for putative homologues. PCR was used to screen for the presence of the identified resistance determinant in the rest of the isolates. Mating experiments were performed to verify mobility of the gene. A novel erm gene, erm(46), was identified in all sequenced resistant isolates, but not in susceptible isolates. There was complete association between macrolide resistance and the presence of erm(46) as detected by PCR screening of all 124 clinical isolates of R. equi. Expression of erm(46) in a macrolide-susceptible strain of R. equi induced high-level resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins B, but not to other classes of antimicrobial agents. Transfer of erm(46) to macrolide-susceptible R. equi was confirmed. The transfer frequency ranged from 3 × 10(-3) to 1 × 10(-2). This is the first molecular characterization of resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins B in R. equi. Resistance was due to the presence of a novel erm(46) gene mobilizable likely by conjugation, which has spread among equine isolates of R. equi in the USA. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Crystal structure of the bacterial ribosomal decoding site complexed with amikacin containing the gamma-amino-alpha-hydroxybutyryl (haba) group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Jiro; François, Boris; Russell, Rupert J M; Murray, James B; Westhof, Eric

    2006-08-01

    Amikacin is the 4,6-linked aminoglycoside modified at position N1 of the 2-deoxystreptamine ring (ring II) by the L-haba group. In the present study, the crystal structure of a complex between oligonucleotide containing the bacterial ribosomal A site and amikacin has been solved at 2.7 A resolution. Amikacin specifically binds to the A site in practically the same way as its parent compound kanamycin. In addition, the L-haba group interacts with the upper side of the A site through two direct contacts, O2*...H-N4(C1496) and N4*-H...O6(G1497). The present crystal structure shows how the introduction of the L-haba group on ring II of aminoglycoside is an effective mutation for obtaining a higher affinity to the bacterial A site.

  5. Pharmacokinetics of amikacin and chloramphenicol in the aqueous humor of rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayers, M; Rush, D; Madu, A; Motyl, M; Miller, M H

    1991-01-01

    Composite data describing ocular pharmacokinetics are unreliable because of intersubject variation. To address this problem, an animal model was developed in which multiple aqueous samples from single subjects were obtained. Following direct anterior chamber or intravenous administration of amikacin or chloramphenicol, pharmacokinetic analysis of drug concentrations in the serum and anterior chamber was performed by using a nonlinear least-squares regression program. The number of anterior chamber paracenteses performed did not alter the beta elimination rates or percent penetration into the anterior chamber. The aqueous humor and peripheral-compartment terminal slopes were identical. These data indicate that complete ocular concentration-time curves can be obtained without altering antibiotic pharmacokinetics. Following direct injection into the anterior chamber, the elimination rates for both antibiotics followed a one-compartment model, whereas those following intravenous administration best fit an open, first-order, two-compartment model. Following intravenous administration, the anterior chamber elimination rate constants for both drugs were equal to that of the serum and significantly longer than that following direct injection. The elimination rates of both drugs following direct injection were similar. Systemic administration resulted in drug levels in aqueous humor that persisted longer than those following direct injection. Chloramphenicol, a lipophilic compound, gave higher mean concentrations in aqueous humor than did amikacin. Our model provides a new approach which rigorously examines ocular pharmacokinetics and provides data which suggest that for selected compounds the parenteral route of administration is preferable. PMID:1952850

  6. Increased activity of colistin in combination with amikacin against Escherichia coli co-producing NDM-5 and MCR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu-Feng; Tao, Meng-Ting; Feng, Youjun; Yang, Run-Shi; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Ya-Hong; Sun, Jian

    2017-06-01

    Colistin and carbapenem are two lines of last-resort antibiotics against lethal infections caused by MDR Gram-negative pathogens. The emergence of carbapenemase-positive Escherichia coli with colistin resistance poses a serious threat to public health worldwide. Here we report, for the first time (to the best of our knowledge), a novel combination therapy used for the treatment of E. coli co-producing MCR-1 and NDM-5. The MICs of colistin were determined alone and with 1-4 mg/L amikacin. A 7-by-4 time-kill array of colistin (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16 mg/L) and amikacin (0, 1, 2 and 4 mg/L) over 48 h was designed to characterize the in vitro activity of these agents alone and in combination against each E. coli isolate at an inoculum of 10 6 and 10 8 cfu/mL. The sigmoid E max model was utilized for better delineation of the concentration-effect relationship of each combination. In vivo effectiveness was investigated using a mouse model (combination therapy with intraperitoneal colistin plus amikacin compared with monotherapy). For colistin-resistant isolates, the addition of amikacin demonstrated augmented susceptibility, reducing colistin MICs below the current susceptibility breakpoint. A concentration-dependent decrease in the EC 50 values of colistin was observed for all study isolates in the presence of increasing amikacin concentrations. Further in vivo treatment experiments demonstrated that this combination could achieve 1.5-2.8 log 10 killing after 24 h of therapy, while monotherapy was unable to achieve such a killing effect. The combination of colistin and amikacin may be a promising therapeutic option for the treatment of lethal infections caused by NDM-5-bearing MCR-1-positive superbugs.

  7. Drug interactions with Bacillus anthracis topoisomerase IV: biochemical basis for quinolone action and resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldred, Katie J; McPherson, Sylvia A; Wang, Pengfei; Kerns, Robert J; Graves, David E; Turnbough, Charles L; Osheroff, Neil

    2012-01-10

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, is considered a serious threat as a bioweapon. The drugs most commonly used to treat anthrax are quinolones, which act by increasing the levels of DNA cleavage mediated by topoisomerase IV and gyrase. Quinolone resistance most often is associated with specific serine mutations in these enzymes. Therefore, to determine the basis for quinolone action and resistance, we characterized wild-type B. anthracis topoisomerase IV, the GrlA(S81F) and GrlA(S81Y) quinolone-resistant mutants, and the effects of quinolones and a related quinazolinedione on these enzymes. Ser81 is believed to anchor a water-Mg(2+) bridge that coordinates quinolones to the enzyme through the C3/C4 keto acid. Consistent with this hypothesized bridge, ciprofloxacin required increased Mg(2+) concentrations to support DNA cleavage by GrlA(S81F) topoisomerase IV. The three enzymes displayed similar catalytic activities in the absence of drugs. However, the resistance mutations decreased the affinity of topoisomerase IV for ciprofloxacin and other quinolones, diminished quinolone-induced inhibition of DNA religation, and reduced the stability of the enzyme-quinolone-DNA ternary complex. Wild-type DNA cleavage levels were generated by mutant enzymes at high quinolone concentrations, suggesting that increased drug potency could overcome resistance. 8-Methyl-quinazoline-2,4-dione, which lacks the quinolone keto acid (and presumably does not require the water-Mg(2+) bridge to mediate protein interactions), was more potent than quinolones against wild-type topoisomerase IV and was equally efficacious. Moreover, it maintained high potency and efficacy against the mutant enzymes, effectively inhibited DNA religation, and formed stable ternary complexes. Our findings provide an underlying biochemical basis for the ability of quinazolinediones to overcome clinically relevant quinolone resistance mutations in bacterial type II topoisomerases.

  8. Influence of a macrolide antibiotic, roxithromycin, on mast cell growth and activation in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshikazu Shimane

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Long-term administration of macrolide antibiotics is recognized to be able to favorably modify the clinical condition of inflammatory diseases, such as diffuse panbronchiolitis and cystic fibrosis. However, the precise mechanisms by which macrolide antibiotics could improve clinical conditions of the patients are not well understood.

  9. Inhibition of protein synthesis on the ribosome by tildipirosin compared with other veterinary macrolides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Niels Møller; Poehlsgaard, Jacob; Warrass, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    on the ribosome (50% inhibitory concentration [IC(50)], 0.23 ± 0.01 μM) and compared it with the established veterinary macrolides tylosin, tilmicosin, and tulathromycin. Mutation and methylation at key rRNA nucleotides revealed differences in the interactions of these macrolides within their common ribosomal...

  10. [Macrolide resistance in Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum in the Czech Republic and in other countries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillová, L; Mikalová, L; Zákoucká, H; Židlická, J; Šmajs, D

    2015-03-01

    Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (TPA) is the causative agent of the sexually transmitted disease syphilis. In the Czech Republic, several hundred cases of syphilis are reported annually; e.g. in 2012, 696 syphilis cases were documented. In the last decades, an increasing prevalence of macrolide resistant TPA strains harboring A2058G or A2059G mutations in the 23S rRNA gene has been reported. Macrolides were used (and rarely are still being used) in the Czech Republic for the treatment of syphilis in patients allergic to penicillin. While 37% of TPA strains were resistant to macrolides between 2004 and 2010, this rate increased to 67% between 2011-2013. High prevalence of A2058G or A2059G mutations and increasing rates of macrolide resistant TPA strains have also been documented in other developed countries. Therefore, macrolides should not be used in the treatment of syphilis.

  11. Amikacin Dosing and Monitoring in Spinal Cord Injury Patients: Variation in Clinical Practice Between Spinal Injury Units and Differences in Experts' Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Vaidyanathan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article was to determine the current practice on amikacin dosing and monitoring in spinal cord injury patients from spinal cord physicians and experts. Physicians from spinal units and clinical pharmacologists were asked to provide protocol for dosing and monitoring of amikacin therapy in spinal cord injury patients. In a spinal unit in Poland, amikacin is administered usually 0.5 g twice daily. A once-daily regimen of amikacin is never used and amikacin concentrations are not determined. In Belgium, Southport (U.K., Spain, and the VA McGuire Medical Center (Richmond, Virginia, amikacin is given once daily. Whereas peak and trough concentrations are determined in Belgium, only trough concentration is measured in Southport. In both these spinal units, modification of the dose is not routinely done with a nomogram. In Spain and the VA McGuire Medical Center, monitoring of serum amikacin concentration is not done unless a patient has renal impairment. In contrast, the dose/interval of amikacin is adjusted according to pharmacokinetic parameters at the Edward Hines VA Hospital (Hines, Illinois, where amikacin is administered q24h or q48h, depending on creatinine clearance. Spinal cord physicians from Denmark, Germany, and the Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation (West Orange, New Jersey state that they do not use amikacin in spinal injury patients. An expert from Canada does not recommend determining serum concentrations of amikacin, but emphasizes the value of monitoring ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity. Experts from New Zealand recommend amikacin in conventional twice- or thrice-daily dosing because of the theoretical increased risk of neuromuscular blockade and apnea with larger daily doses in spinal cord injury patients. On the contrary, experts from Greece, Israel, and the U.S. recommend once-daily dosing and determining amikacin pharmacokinetic parameters for each patient. As there is considerable variation in clinical

  12. Effect of mannitol on the pharmacokinetics of amikacin in wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Juárez Olguín

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The study analyzed the effect of mannitol on the pharmacokinetics (PK of amikacin. Adult Wistar rats were treated as follows: Group 1 (G1 received mannitol for three days, Group 2 (G2 received mannitol plus 10 mg/kg of amikacin simultaneously, and Group 3 only amikacin. The PK study was conducted on the 4th day. For which, blood samples were drawn at fixed times during 24 h and immunoenzymatically analyzed. Results revealed significant differences (pO estudo analisa o efeito do manitol na farmacocinética (PK da amicacina . Ratos adultos Wistar foram tratadas da seguinte maneira: o grupo 1 (G1 recebeu manitol durante três días. Ao grupo 2 (G2 se administrou manitol e 10 mg/kg de amicacina, ao mesmo tempo. Finalmente, o grupo 3 (G3 recebeu somente amicacina. No quarto día se realizou o estudo de PK nos três grupos. Para isso, foram retiradas amostras de sangue, em tempos pre-determinados, durante 24 horas, que foram analisadas por métodos imunoenzimáticos. Os resultados mostraram diferencas significativas (p < 0.05 entre os grupos. Po exemplo, os valores obtidos de Cmax foram 62.26 ± 15.75 µg/ml para G1, 72.63 ± 24.80 µg/ml para G2 e 68.61 ± 27.40 µg/ml para o Grupo 3. A AUC foi também diferente entre os três grupos: a maior para G2, com, 222.52 ± 47.30 µg/ml/h, e a menor para G1, com um valor de 135.59 ± 39.00 µg/ml/h. A alteraçäo dos parámetros de PK entre os grupos debe ser considerada quando se administram os dois farmacos simultaneamente. No entanto, é necessario realizar estudos em seres humanos para confirmar os nossos resultados.

  13. Treatment of chronic bacterial prostatits with amikacin through anal submucosal injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-LieHU; Shi-ZhenZHONG; 等

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Aim:To assess the efficacy and safety of anal submucosal injection(ASI)of amikacin in chronic bacterial prostatitis(CBP).Methods:Fifty male outpatients with CBP were randomly diided into two groups.Thirty cases of ASI group were given amikacin 400mg daily by ASI for ten times and the other twenty cases of intramuscular injection(IM)group were given the same drug daily by IM,All patients were evaluated with NIH-Chronic prostatitis symptom index(NIH-CPSI),the bacteria culture of the expressed prostate secretion(EPS),proctoscopic examination,rectal biopsy and the clinical manifestation were checked at pretreatment and on day 7and 90after cessation of therapy,Results:The cure rate ,apparent effective rate and effective rate of ASI group and IM group were 33.3%vs5%(P0.05).respectively.The score of NIH-CPSI in both of ASI group and IM group decreased significantly 7days after cessation of therapy,both ASI and IMof amikacin could relieve symptoms within a short time,However,3months after cessation of therapy the score of NIH-CPSIin ASIgroup continued own in spite of no significant differences compared with 7days after cessation of theragy,but the score of IMgroup was rebound nearly colsed to level of pretreatment at23.8±8.5and significantly higher than that of ASI group.The amount of white blood cell(WBC)of EPS in ASIgroup increased slightly at7days after cessation of therapy without significant difference with pretreatment(P>0.050,but it significantly decreased at 3months after cessation of therapy,the amount of WBCof EPS in ASIgroup was lower than that of IM group at 3months after cessation of therapy(P<0.05).Proctoscopic examination of anal canal were normal after ASI therapy and the rectum biopsy showed no obvious histopathologic abnormality at the site of injection except mild focal submucosal infiltration of lymphocytes and plasma cells at 7days after cessation of therapy which disappeared on 3months after cessation of therapy.All patients had no evident

  14. Macrolides: A Canadian Infectious Disease Society Position Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S McKenna

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the introduction of erythromycin in 1965, no new compounds from the macrolide antimicrobial class were licensed in Canada until the 1990s. Clarithromycin and azithromycin, since their introduction, have become important agents for treating a number of common and uncommon infectious diseases. They have become prime agents in the treatment of respiratory tract infections, and have revolutionized the management of both genital chlamydial infections, by the use of single-dose therapy with azithromycin, and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections, by the use of clarithromycin. The improvement of clarithromycin and azithromycin over the gastrointestinal intolerability of erythromycin has led to supplanting the use of the latter for many primary care physicians. Unfortunately, the use of these agents has also increased the likelihood for misuse and has raised concerns about a resultant increase in the rates of macrolide resistance in many important pathogens, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. This paper reviews the pharmacology and evidence for the current indications for use of these newer agents, and provides recommendations for appropriate use.

  15. Synthesis and anticancer activity of novel curcumin-quinolone hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Saiharish; Manogaran, Prasath; Gadepalli Narasimha, Krishna Kumari; Kalpattu Kuppusami, Balasubramanian; Mariyappan, Palanivelu; Gopalakrishnan, Anjana; Venkatraman, Ganesh

    2015-09-01

    A number of new curcumin-quinolone hybrids were synthesised from differently substituted 3-formyl-2-quinolones and vanillin and their in vitro cytotoxicity was determined on a panel of representative cell lines (A549, MCF7, SKOV3 and H460) using MTT assay. The most potent compound 14, was analysed for its mode of action using various cell biology experiments. SKOV3 cells treated with compound 14 showed distorted cell morphology under phase contrast imaging and induction of apoptosis was confirmed by Annexin V/PE assay. Further experiments on generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell cycle analysis revealed that these hybrids induce apoptosis by ROS generation and arrest cell cycle progression in S and G2/M phase.

  16. Recent progress in the development of anti-malarial quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beteck, Richard M; Smit, Frans J; Haynes, Richard K; N'Da, David D

    2014-08-30

    Available anti-malarial tools have over the ten-year period prior to 2012 dramatically reduced the number of fatalities due to malaria from one million to less than six-hundred and thirty thousand. Although fewer people now die from malaria, emerging resistance to the first-line anti-malarial drugs, namely artemisinins in combination with quinolines and arylmethanols, necessitates the urgent development of new anti-malarial drugs to curb the disease. The quinolones are a promising class of compounds, with some demonstrating potent in vitro activity against the malaria parasite. This review summarizes the progress made in the development of potential anti-malarial quinolones since 2008. The efficacy of these compounds against both asexual blood stages and other stages of the malaria parasite, the nature of putative targets, and a comparison of these properties with anti-malarial drugs currently in clinical use, are discussed.

  17. Antagonism of vitamin C and vitamin E on action of quinolones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius E. Surdjawidjaja

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The quinolone antibiotics are potent drugs for combating infections caused by various bacterial species with satisfactory results and relatively minimal adverse effects. Antioxidant dietary supplements, such as vitamin C (ascorbic acid and vitamin E (a-tocopherol, are occasionally prescribed along with quinolone antibiotics during the course of treatment of an infection. Therefore it is important to understand the effects of these antioxidants on the antibacterial action of quinolone antibiotics.

  18. 尿道感染大肠埃希菌对喹诺酮耐药性及相关因素分析%Drug Resistance and Risk Factors Analysis of Escherichia Coli Isolated from Urinary Tract Infection to Quinolone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张昭勇; 张吉才; 杜毅

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the drug resistance and risk factors of Escherichia coli isolated from urinary tract infection (UTI) to quinolone. Methods Drug resistance of 705 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from 749 urine specimens of UTI from 2010 to 2011 in our hospital were detected and divided into the resistance group and the sensitive group according to sensitiveness to quinolone, and the risk factors of the quinolone resistance strains were analyzed. Results In 705 strains isolates E. coli, there were 474 strains (67. 2% ) of quinolone resistance in the resistance group, 231 strains (32. 8% ) of quinolone sensitiveness in the sensitive group and there was no carbapenem resistant strain. The differences in resistance rates of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, aztreonam, piperacillin, amikacin, bactrim, gentamicin and cefepime of the two groups were statistically significant (P<0. 05) . Logistic regression analysis showed that the proportion of female patients, drug use of tert-cephalosporins and quinolones, urinary drainage and bacterium producing extended spectrum β lactamases (ESBLS) were independent risk factors of quinolone resistance E. coli. The differences in hospital stay and cost of the two groups were statistically significant (P<0. 05). Conclusion The detection rate of quinolone resistance escherichia coli isolated from UIT is high. The emergence of resistant strains is related to antibiotic application, invasive handling and bacterial variation. To strengthen the independent risk factors regulation can effectively prevent and control spread of infection.%目的 探讨尿道感染(urinary tract infection,UIT)大肠埃希菌对喹诺酮耐药性及其相关因素.方法 对我院2010-2011年749例UIT尿液标本中分离的705株大肠埃希菌的耐药性进行检测,以对喹诺酮敏感与否分为耐药株组和敏感株组,分析耐药株感染的相关因素.结果 705株大肠埃希菌中对喹诺酮耐药474株(67.2

  19. Quinolone-based drugs against Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anquetin, Guillaume; Greiner, Jacques; Vierling, Pierre

    2005-09-01

    Owing to the rapid emergence of multi-resistant strains of Plasmodium spp. (the causative agents of malaria) and the limitations of drugs used against Toxoplasma gondii (an important opportunistic pathogen associated with AIDS and congenital birth defects), the discovery of new therapeutical targets and the development of new drugs are needed. The presence of the prokaryotic-like organelle in apicomplexan parasites (i.e. plastids), which comprise these major human pathogens, may represent a unique target for antibiotics against these protozoa. Quinolones which are known to be highly potent against bacteria were also found to specifically disrupt these parasites. They inhibit DNA replication by interacting with two essential bacterial type II topoisomerases, DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. There are some clues that quinolones act on plastids with a similar mechanism of action. After a brief presentation of plasmodium and toxoplasma dedicated to their life cycle, the chemotherapies presently used in clinics to fight against these protozoa and the potential new targets and drugs, we will focus our attention on their plastid which is one of these promising new targets. Then, we will present the various drugs and generations of quinolones, the leading molecules, and their inhibitory effects against these parasites together with their pharmacological properties that have been established from in vitro and in vivo studies. We will also discuss their possible mode of action.

  20. Spray dried amikacin powder for inhalation in cystic fibrosis patients: a quality by design approach for product construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belotti, Silvia; Rossi, Alessandra; Colombo, Paolo; Bettini, Ruggero; Rekkas, Dimitrios; Politis, Stavros; Colombo, Gaia; Balducci, Anna Giulia; Buttini, Francesca

    2014-08-25

    An amikacin product for convenient and compliant inhalation in cystic fibrosis patients was constructed by spray-drying in order to produce powders of pure drug having high respirability and flowability. An experimental design was applied as a statistical tool for the characterization of amikacin spray drying process, through the establishment of mathematical relationships between six Critical Quality Attributes (CQAs) of the finished product and five Critical Process Parameters (CPPs). The surface-active excipient, PEG-32 stearate, studied for particle engineering, in general did not benefit the CQAs of the spray dried powders for inhalation. The spray drying feed solution required the inclusion of 10% (v/v) ethanol in order to reach the desired aerodynamic performance of powders. All desirable function solutions indicated that the favourable concentration of amikacin in the feed solution had to be kept at 1% w/v level. It was found that when the feed rate of the sprayed solution was raised, an increase in the drying temperature to the maximum value (160 °C) was required to maintain good powder respirability. Finally, the increase in drying temperature always led to an evident increase in emitted dose (ED) without affecting the desirable fine particle dose (FPD) values. The application of the experimental design enabled us to obtain amikacin powders with both ED and FPD, well above the regulatory and scientific references. The finished product contained only the active ingredient, which keeps low the mass to inhale for dose requirement.

  1. Limited sampling strategies for therapeutic drug monitoring of amikacin and kanamycin in patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, J.A.; van Altena, R.; Akkerman, O. W.; de Lange, W. C. M.; Proost, J. H.; van der Werf, T. S.; Kosterink, J. G. W.; Alffenaar, J. W. C.

    2015-01-01

    Amikacin and kanamycin are considered important and effective drugs in the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Unfortunately, the incidence of toxicity is high and is related to elevated drug exposure. In order to achieve a balance between efficacy and toxicity, a population phar

  2. Design of a surface plasmon resonance immunoassay for therapeutic drug monitoring of amikacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losoya-Leal, Adrian; Estevez, M-Carmen; Martínez-Chapa, Sergio O; Lechuga, Laura M

    2015-08-15

    The therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of pharmaceutical drugs with narrow therapeutic ranges is of great importance in the clinical setting. It provides useful information towards the enhancement of drug therapies, aiding in dosage control and toxicity risk management. Amikacin is an aminoglycoside antibiotic commonly used in neonatal therapies that is indicated for TDM due to the toxicity risks inherent in its use. Current techniques for TDM such as high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) are costly, time consuming, and cannot be performed at the site of action. Over the last decades, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors have become increasingly popular in clinical diagnostics due to their ability to detect biomolecular interactions in real-time. We present an SPR-based competitive immunoassay for the detection of the antibiotic amikacin, suitable for TDM in both adults and neonates. We have obtained high specificity and sensitivity levels with an IC50 value of 1.4ng/mL and a limit of detection of 0.13ng/mL, which comfortably comply with the drug's therapeutic range. Simple dilution of serum can therefore be sufficient to analyze low-volume real samples from neonates, increasing the potential of the methodology for TDM. Compared to current TDM conventional methods, this SPR-based immunoassay can provide advantages such as simplicity, potential portability, and label-free measurements with the possibility of high throughput. This work is the foundation towards the development of an integrated, simple use, highly sensitive, fast, and point-of-care sensing platform for the opportune TDM of antibiotics and other drugs in a clinical setting.

  3. Multiplex PCR to identify macrolide resistance determinants in Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Simon; Desmolaize, Benoit; Jaju, Puneet; Wilhelm, Cornelia; Warrass, Ralf; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2012-07-01

    The bacterial pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida are major etiological agents in respiratory tract infections of cattle. Although these infections can generally be successfully treated with veterinary macrolide antibiotics, a few recent isolates have shown resistance to these drugs. Macrolide resistance in members of the family Pasteurellaceae is conferred by combinations of at least three genes: erm(42), which encodes a monomethyltransferase and confers a type I MLS(B) (macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B) phenotype; msr(E), which encodes a macrolide efflux pump; and mph(E), which encodes a macrolide-inactivating phosphotransferase. Here, we describe a multiplex PCR assay that detects the presence of erm(42), msr(E), and mph(E) and differentiates between these genes. In addition, the assay distinguishes P. multocida from M. haemolytica by amplifying distinctive fragments of the 23S rRNA (rrl) genes. One rrl fragment acts as a general indicator of gammaproteobacterial species and confirms whether the PCR assay has functioned as intended on strains that are negative for erm(42), msr(E), and mph(E). The multiplex system has been tested on more than 40 selected isolates of P. multocida and M. haemolytica and correlated with MICs for the veterinary macrolides tulathromycin and tilmicosin, and the newer compounds gamithromycin and tildipirosin. The multiplex PCR system gives a rapid and robustly accurate determination of macrolide resistance genotypes and bacterial genus, matching results from microbiological methods and whole-genome sequencing.

  4. Phenotypes and genotypes of macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadnađev Mirjana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although macrolides are widely used for treating pneumococcal infections, an increase in macrolide resistance might compromise their use. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of macrolide-resistant phenotypes and genotypes in macrolide-resistant S. pneumoniae isolates in Serbia. A total of 228 macrolide-resistant strains isolated during the period of 2009-2012, were analyzed. Macrolide resistance phenotypes were determined by a double disk diffusion test. The presence of macrolide resistance genes was detected by PCR. Antibiotics susceptibilities were tested using the VITEK2 system and E test. Among the examined isolates, the MLSB phenotype which is linked to the presence of the erm(B gene dominated (83.3%, while the mef(A gene which is associated with the M phenotype, was identified in 16.7% isolates. Over 40% of isolates expressed co-resistance to penicillin. A multiple-resistant pattern was found in 36.4% strains, more frequently in children. However, all strains were susceptible to telithromycin, vancomycin, linezolid, fluoroquinolones and rifampicin. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175039

  5. Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance (PMQR) Genes and Class 1 Integrons in Quinolone-Resistant Marine Bacteria and Clinical Isolates of Escherichia coli from an Aquacultural Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomova, Alexandra; Ivanova, Larisa; Buschmann, Alejandro H; Godfrey, Henry P; Cabello, Felipe C

    2017-06-23

    Antimicrobial usage in aquaculture selects for antimicrobial-resistant microorganisms in the marine environment. The relevance of this selection to terrestrial animal and human health is unclear. Quinolone-resistance genes qnrA, qnrB, and qnrS were chromosomally located in four randomly chosen quinolone-resistant marine bacteria isolated from an aquacultural area with heavy quinolone usage. In quinolone-resistant uropathogenic clinical isolates of Escherichia coli from a coastal area bordering the same aquacultural region, qnrA was chromosomally located in two E. coli isolates, while qnrB and qnrS were located in small molecular weight plasmids in two other E. coli isolates. Three quinolone-resistant marine bacteria and three quinolone-resistant E. coli contained class 1 integrons but without physical association with PMQR genes. In both marine bacteria and uropathogenic E. coli, class 1 integrons had similar co-linear structures, identical gene cassettes, and similarities in their flanking regions. In a Marinobacter sp. marine isolate and in one E. coli clinical isolate, sequences immediately upstream of the qnrS gene were homologous to comparable sequences of numerous plasmid-located qnrS genes while downstream sequences were different. The observed commonality of quinolone resistance genes and integrons suggests that aquacultural use of antimicrobials might facilitate horizontal gene transfer between bacteria in diverse ecological locations.

  6. A gamma scintigraphy study to investigate lung deposition and clearance of inhaled amikacin-loaded liposomes in healthy male volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weers, Jeffry; Metzheiser, Beth; Taylor, Glyn; Warren, Simon; Meers, Paul; Perkins, Walter R

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the inhalation of a liposomal formulation of amikacin in healthy male volunteers in terms of pulmonary deposition, clearance, and safety following nebulization with a commercial jet nebulizer. Amikacin was encapsulated in liposomes comprised of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and cholesterol via a proprietary manufacturing process (20 mg/mL final amikacin concentration). The liposomes were radiolabeled with (99m)Tc using the tin chloride labeling method. A nominal dose of 120 mg of drug product was loaded into a PARI LC STAR nebulizer, aerosolized using a PARI Boy compressor where subjects inhaled for 20 min. Lung deposition was determined by gamma scintigraphy in three healthy male volunteers at the following time points (0, 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h post-administration). Total lung deposition, expressed as a percentage of the emitted dose, was 32.3 +/- 3.4%. The time-dependent retention of radiolabeled liposomes was biphasic with an initial rapid reduction in counts, followed by a slower phase to 48 h. The overall mean retention at 24 and 48 h was 60.4 and 38.3% of the initial dose deposited, respectively. The observed clearance of radiolabel is consistent with clearance of amikacin following aerosol delivery to rats. There were no clinically significant changes in laboratory parameters, vital signs, or ECG. No adverse events including cough or bronchospasm were reported. Inhalation of a single nominal dose of 120 mg liposomal amikacin results in prolonged retention of drug-loaded liposomes in the lungs of healthy volunteers. The treatment was well tolerated.

  7. Genotyping and serotyping of macrolide and multidrug resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from carrier children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S F Swedan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Streptococcus pneumoniae, an opportunistic pathogen commonly carried asymptomatically in the nasopharynx of children, is associated with increasing rates of treatment failures due to a worldwide increase in drug resistance. We investigated the carriage of S. pneumoniae in children 5 years or younger, the identity of prevalent serotypes, the rates of resistance to macrolides and other antimicrobial agents and the genotypes responsible for macrolide resistance. Materials and Methods: Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from 157 children under 5 years for cultural isolation of S. pneumoniae. Antibiogram of isolates  was determined using the disk diffusion test, and the minimal inhibitory concentration to macrolides was determined using the E-test. Isolate serotypes and macrolide resistance genes, erm(B and mef(E, were identified using multiplex polymerase chain reactions. Results: S. pneumoniae was recovered from 33.8% of children; 41.9% among males and 21.9% among females (P = 0.009. The highest carriage rate occurred among age groups 7-12 months and 49-60 months. Most frequent serotypes were 19F, 6A/B, 11A, 19A, 14 and 15B/C.  Resistance to macrolides was 60.4%. Resistance to oxacillin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and clindamycin was present among 90.6%, 54.7% and 32.1% of isolates, respectively. All isolates were susceptible to chloramphenicol, levofloxacin and vancomycin. Isolates resistant to one or more macrolide drugs were more likely to be multidrug resistant. Resistance to clindamycin or oxacillin coexisted with macrolide resistance. Among the erythromycin-resistant isolates, erm(B, mef(E and erm(B and mef(E genes were present at rates of 43.8%, 37.5% and 6.3%, respectively. Erm(B and mef(E were associated with very high level and moderate-to-high level resistance to macrolides, respectively. Conclusion: A significant proportion of children harboured macrolide and multidrug-resistant S. pneumoniae.

  8. Inhibition of protein synthesis on the ribosome by tildipirosin compared with other veterinary macrolides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Niels Møller; Poehlsgaard, Jacob; Warrass, Ralf; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2012-11-01

    Tildipirosin is a 16-membered-ring macrolide developed to treat bacterial pathogens, including Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida, that cause respiratory tract infections in cattle and swine. Here we evaluated the efficacy of tildipirosin at inhibiting protein synthesis on the ribosome (50% inhibitory concentration [IC(50)], 0.23 ± 0.01 μM) and compared it with the established veterinary macrolides tylosin, tilmicosin, and tulathromycin. Mutation and methylation at key rRNA nucleotides revealed differences in the interactions of these macrolides within their common ribosomal binding site.

  9. Combinations of macrolide resistance determinants in field isolates of Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desmolaize, Benoit; Rose, Simon; Wilhelm, Cornelia

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections in cattle are commonly associated with the bacterial pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida. These infections can generally be successfully treated in the field with one of several groups of antibiotics, including macrolides. A few recent isolates...... of these species exhibit resistance to veterinary macrolides with phenotypes that fall into three distinct classes. The first class has type I macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B antibiotic resistance and, consistent with this, the 23S rRNA nucleotide A2058 is monomethylated by the enzyme product...

  10. Characterization of Campylobacter jejuni DNA gyrase as the target of quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changkwanyeun, Ruchirada; Usui, Masaru; Kongsoi, Siriporn; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Kim, Hyun; Suthienkul, Orasa; Changkaew, Kanjana; Nakajima, Chie; Tamura, Yutaka; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2015-08-01

    Quinolones have long been used as the first-line treatment for Campylobacter infections. However, an increased resistance to quinolones has raised public health concerns. The development of new quinolone-based antibiotics with high activity is critical for effective, as DNA gyrase, the target of quinolones, is an essential enzyme for bacterial growth in several mechanisms. The evaluation of antibiotic activity against Campylobacter jejuni largely relies on drug susceptibility tests, which require at least 2 days to produce results. Thus, an in vitro method for studying the activity of quinolones against the C. jejuni DNA gyrase is preferred. To identify potent quinolones, we investigated the interaction of C. jejuni DNA gyrase with a number of quinolones using recombinant subunits. The combination of purified subunits exhibited DNA supercoiling activity in an ATP dependent manner. Drug concentrations that inhibit DNA supercoiling by 50% (IC50s) of 10 different quinolones were estimated to range from 0.4 (sitafloxacin) to >100 μg/mL (nalidixic acid). Sitafloxacin showed the highest inhibitory activity, and the analysis of the quinolone structure-activity relationship demonstrated that a fluorine atom at R-6 might play the important role in the inhibitory activity against C. jejuni gyrase. Measured quinolone IC50s correlated well with minimum inhibitory concentrations (R = 0.9943). These suggest that the in vitro supercoiling inhibition assay on purified recombinant C. jejuni DNA gyrase is a useful and predictive technique to monitor the antibacterial potency of quinolones. And furthermore, these data suggested that sitafloxacin might be a good candidate for clinical trials on campylobacteriosis.

  11. Prevalence and characteristics of quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli in veal calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hordijk, Joost; Veldman, Kees; Dierikx, Cindy; van Essen-Zandbergen, Alieda; Wagenaar, Jaap A; Mevius, Dik

    2012-04-23

    Quinolone resistance is studied and reported increasingly in isolates from humans, food-producing animals and companion animals. Resistance can be caused by chromosomal mutations in topoisomerase genes, plasmid-mediated resistance genes, and active transport through efflux pumps. Cross sectional data on quinolone resistance mechanisms in non-pathogenic bacteria from healthy veal calves is limited. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and characteristics of quinolone resistance mechanisms in Escherichia coli isolates from veal calves, after more than 20 years of quinolone usage in veal calves. MIC values were determined for all isolates collected as part of a national surveillance program on antimicrobial resistance in commensal bacteria in food-producing animals in The Netherlands. From the strains collected from veal calves in 2007 (n=175) all isolates with ciprofloxacin MIC ≥ 0.125 mg/L (n=25) were selected for this study, and screened for the presence of known quinolone resistance determinants. In this selection only chromosomal mutations in the topoisomerase type II and IV genes were detected. The number of mutations found per isolate correlated with an increasing ciprofloxacin MIC. No plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes were found. The contribution of efflux pumps varied from no contribution to a 16-fold increase in susceptibility. No correlation was found with the presence of resistance genes of other antimicrobial classes, even though all quinolone non-wild type isolates were resistant to 3 or more classes of antibiotics other than quinolones. Over twenty years of quinolone usage in veal calves in The Netherlands did not result in a widespread occurrence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance, limiting the transmission of quinolone resistance to clonal distribution.

  12. Impact of mutations in DNA gyrase genes on quinolone resistance in Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changkwanyeun, Ruchirada; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Kongsoi, Siriporn; Changkaew, Kanjana; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Kim, Hyun; Suthienkul, Orasa; Usui, Masaru; Tamura, Yutaka; Nakajima, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2016-10-01

    Amino acid substitutions providing quinolone resistance to Campyloabcter jejuni have been found in the quinolone resistance-determining region of protein DNA gyrase subunit A (GyrA), with the highest frequency at position 86 followed by position 90. In this study, wild-type and mutant recombinant DNA gyrase subunits were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using Ni-NTA agarose column chromatography. Soluble 97 kDa GyrA and 87 kDa DNA gyrase subunit B were shown to reconstitute ATP-dependent DNA supercoiling activity. A quinolone-inhibited supercoiling assay demonstrated the roles of Thr86Ile, Thr86Ala, Thr86Lys, Asp90Asn, and Asp90Tyr amino acid substitutions in reducing sensitivity to quinolones. The marked effect of Thr86Ile on all examined quinolones suggested the advantage of this substitution in concordance with recurring isolation of quinolone-resistant C. jejuni. An analysis of the structure-activity relationship showed the importance of the substituent at position 8 in quinolones to overcome the effect of Thr86Ile. Sitafloxacin (SIT), which has a fluorinate cyclopropyl ring at R-1 and a chloride substituent at R-8, a characteristic not found in other quinolones, showed the highest inhibitory activity against all mutant C. jejuni gyrases including ciprofloxacin-resistant mutants. The results suggest SIT as a promising drug for the treatment of campylobacteriosis caused by CIP-resistant C. jejuni. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Multiplex PCR To Identify Macrolide Resistance Determinants in Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Simon; Desmolaize, Benoit; Jaju, Puneet

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida are major etiological agents in respiratory tract infections of cattle. Although these infections can generally be successfully treated with veterinary macrolide antibiotics, a few recent isolates have shown resistance...

  14. Mechanism of resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin antibiotics in Streptococcus thermophilus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) group antibiotics in the dairy bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus (ST) is documented but the mechanism of resistance has not been elucidated. MIC values for erythromycin (Erm), azithromycin (Azm), tylosin (Tyl), spiramycin (Spm), pristinamyci...

  15. Macrolide antibiotics and the airway: antibiotic or non-antibiotic effects?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, D M

    2010-03-01

    The macrolides are a class of antibiotics widely prescribed in infectious disease. More recently, there has been considerable interest in potential indications for these agents, in addition to their simple antibacterial indications, in a number of lung pathophysiologies.

  16. Prevalence of quinolone resistance mechanisms and associations to minimum inhibitory concentrations in quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from humans and swine in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaco, Lina; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Hasman, Henrik;

    2008-01-01

    Prevalence of quinolone resistance mechanisms and associations to minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of nalidixic acid (NAL) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) were investigated in 124 Escherichia coli isolated from humans (n = 85) and swine (n = 39) in Denmark. The collection included 59 high-level CIP......-resistant isolates (MIC >= 4) from human (n = 51) and pig origin (n = 8) and 65 low-level CIP-resistant isolates (MIC >= 0.125) from human (n = 34) and pig origin (n = 31). Resistance by target modification was screened by PCR amplification and sequencing, of the quinolone resistance determining regions (QRDRs......A and qnrS genes conferring quinolone resistance by target protection were detected in two human low-level CIP-resistant isolates that did not display NAL resistance. As expected, target mutation in QRDRs was the most prevalent mechanism of quinolone resistance. This mechanism was complemented by efflux...

  17. Inhibition of Protein Synthesis on the Ribosome by Tildipirosin Compared with Other Veterinary Macrolides

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Niels Møller; Poehlsgaard, Jacob; Warrass, Ralf; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Tildipirosin is a 16-membered-ring macrolide developed to treat bacterial pathogens, including Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida, that cause respiratory tract infections in cattle and swine. Here we evaluated the efficacy of tildipirosin at inhibiting protein synthesis on the ribosome (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50], 0.23 ± 0.01 μM) and compared it with the established veterinary macrolides tylosin, tilmicosin, and tulathromycin. Mutation and methylation at key rRNA nucleo...

  18. Multiplex PCR To Identify Macrolide Resistance Determinants in Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida

    OpenAIRE

    Rose, Simon; Desmolaize, Benoit; Jaju, Puneet; Wilhelm, Cornelia; Warrass, Ralf; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida are major etiological agents in respiratory tract infections of cattle. Although these infections can generally be successfully treated with veterinary macrolide antibiotics, a few recent isolates have shown resistance to these drugs. Macrolide resistance in members of the family Pasteurellaceae is conferred by combinations of at least three genes: erm(42), which encodes a monomethyltransferase and confers a type I MLSB ...

  19. Molecular characterization of macrolide resistant Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from pharyngitis patients in Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opavski, Natasa; Gajic, Ina; Borek, Anna L; Obszańska, Katarzyna; Stanojevic, Maja; Lazarevic, Ivana; Ranin, Lazar; Sitkiewicz, Izabela; Mijac, Vera

    2015-07-01

    A steady increase in macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes, group A streptococci (GAS) was reported in Serbia during 2004-2009 (9.9%). However, there are no data on the molecular epidemiology of pharyngeal macrolide resistance GAS (MRGAS) isolates. Therefore, the aims of this first nationwide study were to examine the prevalence of macrolide resistance in Serbian GAS and to determine their resistance phenotypes, genotypes and clonal relationships. Overall 3893 non-duplicate pharyngeal S. pyogenes isolates from outpatients with GAS infection were collected throughout country during 2008 and 2009. Among 486 macrolide resistant pharyngeal isolates collected, 103 were further characterized. Macrolide resistance phenotypes and genotypes were determined by double-disk diffusion test and PCR, respectively. Strain relatedness was determined by emm typing, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), multilocus variable tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), phage profiling (PP) and virulence factor profiling (VFP). Overall, macrolide resistance among GAS isolates in Serbia was 12.5%. M phenotype was the most common (71.8%), followed by iMLS (18.4%) and cMLS (9.7%). Three clonal complexes--emm75/mefA/ST49, emm12/mefA/ST36 and emm77/ermA/tetO/ST63 comprised over 90% of the tested strains. Although MLVA, PP and VFP distinguished 10, 20 and 12 different patterns, respectively, cluster analysis disclosed only small differences between strains which belonged to the same emm/ST type. Our data indicate dominance of three major internationally widely disseminated macrolide resistant clones and a high genetic homogeneity among the Serbian MRGAS population. Continued surveillance of macrolide resistance and clonal composition in MRGAS in Serbia in future is necessary to determine stability of MRGAS clones and to guide therapy strategies.

  20. Suppressive activity of macrolide antibiotics on nitric oxide production by lipopolysaccharide stimulation in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajime Terao

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Low-dose and long-term administration of macrolide antibiotics into patients with chronic airway inflammatory diseases could favorably modify their clinical conditions. However, the therapeutic mode of action of macrolides is not well understood. Free oxygen radicals, including nitric oxide (NO, are well recognized as the important final effector molecules in the development and the maintenance of inflammatory diseases.

  1. Analysis of macrolide antibiotics, using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, in food, biological and environmental matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian

    2009-01-01

    Macrolides are a group of antibiotics that have been widely used in human medical and veterinary practices. Analysis of macrolides and related compounds in food, biological, and environmental matrices continue to be the focus of scientists for the reasons of food safety, pharmacokinetic studies, and environmental concerns. This article presents an overview on the primary biological properties of macrolides and their associated analytical issues, including extraction, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), method validation, and measurement uncertainty. The main techniques that have been used to extract macrolides from various matrices are solid-phase extraction and liquid-liquid extraction. Conventional liquid chromatography (LC) with C18 columns plays a dominant role for the determination of macrolides, whereas ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) along with sub-2 microm particle C18 columns reduces run time and improves sensitivity. Mass spectrometry (MS), serving as a universal detection technique, has replaced ultraviolet (UV), fluorometric, and electrochemical detection for multi-macrolide analysis. The triple-quadrupole (QqQ), quadrupole ion trap (QIT), triple-quadrupole linear ion trap, time-of-flight (TOF), and quadrupole time-of-flight (QqTOF) mass spectrometers are current choices for the determination of macrolides, including quantification, confirmation, identification of their degradation products or metabolites, and structural elucidation. LC or UPLC coupled to a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer operated in the multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mode (LC/MS/MS) is the first choice for quantification. UPLC-TOF or UPLC-QqTOF has been recognized as an emerging technique for accurate mass measurement and unequivocal identification of macrolides and their related compounds.

  2. THEORETICAL STUDY OF PODOPHYLLOTOXIN AND QUINOLONE ANALOGUES AS ANTITUMOR DRUGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何峰; 戴颖仪; 朱孝峰; 黄爱东; 张翎; 颜少平; 刘宗潮

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the active sites of podophyllotoxin derivatives. Methods: Some podophyllotoxin derivatives were analyzed by quantum and mechanics method. Results: Some information was given according to the calculation results about HOMO and LUMO electron density. The C-4 position is the position for effective modification. The B ring and E ring are important active centers. Conclusion: The hole of positive charge in B ring easily combines with an acceptor within the molecular. Some quinolones with similar electronic construction to podophyllotoxin may have antitumor activity.

  3. Thermodynamic study by infrared spectroscopy of the association of 2-quinolone, some carboxylic acids, and the corresponding 2-quinolone--acid mixed dimers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, J.C.

    1971-01-01

    Self-association of 2-quinolone in carbon tetrachloride was studied by infrared spectroscopy, using the absorption bands in the amide NH and carbonyl stretching regions. 2-Quinolone forms a cyclic dimer from which the enthalpy (..delta..H/sup 0/, kcal/mol), free energy (..delta..G/sup 0//sub 22/, kcal/mol), and entropy (..delta..S/sup 0/, eu) of association are -8.69, -6.11, and -8.76, respectively. Dimer formation is via a carbonyl-hydrogen bond, although evidence exists for the formation of a small amount of dimer via a ..pi..-hydrogen bond. 2-Quinolone was also found to form cyclic mixed dimers with carboxylic acids. Mixed dimers of 2-quinolone with benzoic, cyclohexanecarboxylic, and 4-cyclohexylbutanoic acids gave ..delta..H/sup 0/ values of -12.2, -10.3, and -10.4; ..delta..G/sup 0//sub 22/ values of -6.36, -5.94, and -5.78; and ..delta..S/sup 0/ values of -19.9, -14.8, and -15.6, respectively. Thermodynamic data on the acid dimers and spectral data on the different systems studied are also reported. The 2-quinolone-carboxylic acid interaction is of importance because of the simultaneous occurrence of quinolones and carboxylic acids in many biologically derived materials.

  4. Impaired Fitness and Transmission of Macrolide-Resistant Campylobacter jejuni in Its Natural Host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luangtongkum, Taradon; Shen, Zhangqi; Seng, Virginia W.; Sahin, Orhan; Jeon, Byeonghwa; Liu, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a major zoonotic pathogen transmitted to humans via the food chain and is prevalent in chickens, a natural reservoir for this pathogenic organism. Due to the importance of macrolide antibiotics in clinical therapy of human campylobacteriosis, development of macrolide resistance in Campylobacter has become a concern for public health. To facilitate the control of macrolide-resistant Campylobacter, it is necessary to understand if macrolide resistance affects the fitness and transmission of Campylobacter in its natural host. In this study we conducted pairwise competitions and comingling experiments in chickens using clonally related and isogenic C. jejuni strains, which are either susceptible or resistant to erythromycin (Ery). In every competition pair, Ery-resistant (Eryr) Campylobacter was consistently outcompeted by the Ery-susceptible (Erys) strain. In the comingling experiments, Eryr Campylobacter failed to transmit to chickens precolonized by Erys Campylobacter, while isogenic Erys Campylobacter was able to transmit to and establish dominance in chickens precolonized by Eryr Campylobacter. The fitness disadvantage was linked to the resistance-conferring mutations in the 23S rRNA. These findings clearly indicate that acquisition of macrolide resistance impairs the fitness and transmission of Campylobacter in chickens, suggesting that the prevalence of macrolide-resistant C. jejuni will likely decrease in the absence of antibiotic selection pressure. PMID:22183170

  5. Macrolide treatment failure in streptococcal pharyngitis resulting in acute rheumatic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Latania K; McAuley, James B; Shulman, Stanford T

    2012-03-01

    Macrolide resistance (MR) in group A Streptococcus (GAS) has been well documented in several countries and has become clinically significant since the large increases in macrolide usage during the 1970s. Macrolides are recommended as an alternative therapy for GAS pharyngitis, the most common cause of bacterial pharyngitis. Macrolide resistance has been associated with certain emm types, a sequence-based typing system of the hypervariable region of the GAS M-protein gene. Clinical failure of macrolide treatment of GAS infections can be associated with complications including acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease, the leading cause of acquired heart disease in children worldwide. Here we report 2 pediatric cases of MR and/or treatment failure in the treatment of GAS pharyngitis with the subsequent development of acute rheumatic fever. We also review the literature on worldwide MR rates, molecular classifications, and emm types, primarily associated with GAS pharyngeal isolates between the years of 2000 and 2010. The use of macrolides in the management of GAS pharyngitis should be limited to patients with significant penicillin allergy.

  6. The analysis of tetracyclines, quinolones, macrolides, lincosamides, pleuromutilins, and sulfonamides in chicken feathers using UHPLC-MS/MS in order to monitor antibiotic use in the poultry sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Larissa J M; Bolck, Yvette J C; Rademaker, Janneau; Zuidema, Tina; Berendsen, Bjorn J A

    2017-08-01

    In The Netherlands, all antibiotic treatments should be registered at the farm and in a central database. To enforce correct antibiotic use and registration, and to enforce prudent use of antibiotics, there is a need for methods that are able to detect antibiotic treatments. Ideally, such a method is able to detect antibiotic applications during the entire lifespan of an animal, including treatments administered during the first days of the animals' lives. Monitoring tissue, as is common practice, only provides a limited window of opportunity, as residue levels in tissue soon drop below measurable quantities. The analysis of feathers proves to be a promising tool in this respect. Furthermore, a qualitative confirmatory method was developed for the analyses of six major groups of antibiotics in ground chicken feathers, aiming for a detection limit as low as reasonably possible. The method was validated according to Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. All compounds comply with the criteria and, as a matter of fact, 58% of the compounds could also be quantified according to regulations. Additionally, we demonstrated that a less laborious method, in which whole feathers were analyzed, proved successful in the detection of applied antibiotics. Most compounds could be detected at levels of 2 μg kg(-1) or below with the exception of sulfachloropyridazine, tylosin, and tylvalosin. This demonstrates the effectiveness of feather analysis to detect antibiotic use to allow effective enforcement of antibiotic use and prevent the illegal, off-label, and nonregistered use of antibiotics.

  7. The analysis of tetracyclines, quinolones, macrolides, lincosamides, pleuromutilins, and sulfonamides in chicken feathers using UHPLC-MS/MS in order to monitor antibiotic use in the poultry sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Larissa J.M.; Bolck, Yvette J.C.; Rademaker, Janneau; Zuidema, Tina; Berendsen, Bjorn J.A.

    2017-01-01

    In The Netherlands, all antibiotic treatments should be registered at the farm and in a central database. To enforce correct antibiotic use and registration, and to enforce prudent use of antibiotics, there is a need for methods that are able to detect antibiotic treatments. Ideally, such a method

  8. Impairment of membrane phosphoinositide metabolism by aminoglycoside antibiotics: streptomycin, amikacin, kanamycin, dibekacin, gentamicin and neomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marche, P; Koutouzov, S; Girard, A

    1983-11-01

    Like many amphiphilic cationic drugs, aminoglycosides are able to produce phospholipidosis, mainly by inhibiting enzymes involved in phospholipid metabolism. Phosphoinositides have been suggested to function as receptors for aminoglycosides. Therefore, we investigated the influence of these drugs upon phosphoinositide metabolism by measuring the 32P-incorporation into the polyphosphoinositides, using the rat erythrocyte membrane as a model. Depending upon the experimental conditions, neomycin induced a decrease and/or an increase in the 32P-labeling of triphosphoinositides (TPI) and of diphosphoinositides (DPI), respectively. These variations were rapid and depended upon the drug concentration. At 0.3 mM, neomycin reversed the distribution of radioactivities associated with DPI and TPI without modifying the total radioactivity incorporated. This drug concentration altered neither the Mg++-activated TPI-specific phosphomonoesterase activity nor the Ca++-activated polyphosphoinositide phosphodiesterase activity. It appears likely that the drug inhibits the DPI-kinase activity, by interacting with DPI and thereby lowering the substrate availability. Over the range of concentrations studied (up to 1-2 mM), gentamicin, kanamycin and dibekacin behave as neomycin. However, their effects could be observed only at drug concentrations higher than those of neomycin. By contrast, streptomycin and amikacin did not alter the 32P-labeling of TPI and of DPI. The order of potency of aminoglycosides for the impairment of the phosphoinositide interconversion was neomycin, gentamicin, dibekacin, kanamycin. A possible relationship between the toxicity of aminoglycosides and their capacity to impair the phosphoinositide metabolism is discussed.

  9. Tobramycin and Amikacin Delay Adhesion and Microcolony Formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cystic Fibrosis Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, Elodie; Badel-Berchoux, Stéphanie; Provot, Christian; Jaulhac, Benoît; Prévost, Gilles; Bernardi, Thierry; Jehl, François

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are predisposed to chronic colonization of the major airways by Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Pulmonary infections, involving sessile bacteria, are the main cause of morbidity and mortality. As the eradication of antibiotic-resistant biofilms remains impossible, one key objective for the treatment of lung infections is to delay the switch of P. aeruginosa to a sessile phenotype. Few tools are currently available in hospital laboratories to evaluate the susceptibility of adherent microorganisms to antimicrobials. In this study, we used the Biofilm Ring Test(®), for the achievement of Antibiofilmograms(®) on CF clinical isolates. In comparison to standard antibiograms, these procedures allow the investigation of antibiotic effects on the biofilm formation by bacteria. To confirm the inter-assay reproducibility, conventional Crystal Violet assays were performed. To mimic the pathologic reality of CF, we also used a model allowing the biofilm growth on CF-derived cells. Results obtained from these three different assays showed that amikacin and tobramycin, the two favored aminoglycosides in CF therapies, were able to prevent the early adhesion of P. aeruginosa isolates. This promising inhibitory effect of antimicrobials confirm that biofilm setting up is governed by adaptive responses and depends on environmental conditions, as opposite processes of biofilm induction by aminoglycosides were previously described in literature. Finally, Antibiofilmograms(®), whose given results are in concordance with other in vitro antibiotic susceptibility testing, appear to be useful for the optimisation of CF therapies by the selection of antimicrobials able to delay chronic infection establishment.

  10. The impact of alpha-lipoic acid on amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asci, Halil; Saygin, Mustafa; Cankara, Fatma Nihan; Bayram, Dilek; Yesilot, Sukriye; Candan, Ibrahim Aydin; Ilhan, Ilter

    2015-02-01

    Amikacin (AK) is an antibacterial drug, but it has remarkable nephrotoxic and ototoxic side effects due to increase in reactive oxygen radicals. This study was established to determine the possible protective effects of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA), a powerful antioxidant, on AK-induced nephrotoxicity. Three different groups of rats (n = 6) were administered saline (control), AK (1.2 g/kg, intraperitoneally), ALA (100 mg/kg, p.o.) and AK combination (ALA one day before the AK for five days). Renal function, oxidative stress markers and histological changes were evaluated at the end of the experiment. Malondialdehyde was increased as an indicator of free radical formation in AK-induced group and decreased with ALA treatment. While catalase activity was increased significantly, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities were not statistically significant increased with ALA treatment. The result showed that AK enhanced levels of urea, creatinine and blood urea nitrogen in serum significantly. Administration of ALA reduced these levels of biochemical markers. Histopathological observations were confirmed by biochemical findings. In conclusion, ALA is suggested to be a potential candidate to ameliorate AK-induced nephrotoxicity.

  11. Once-daily dosing of amikacin for treatment of Mycobacterium abscessus lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H; Sohn, Y M; Ko, J Y; Lee, S-Y; Jhun, B W; Park, H Y; Jeon, K; Kim, D H; Kim, S-Y; Choi, J E; Moon, I J; Shin, S J; Park, H J; Koh, W-J

    2017-07-01

    Tertiary referral centre, Samsung Medical Center, South Korea. To evaluate the pharmacokinetic parameters and toxicities of once-daily amikacin (AMK) dosing for lung disease due to Mycobacterium abscessus. A retrospective review of 48 patients with M. abscessus lung disease who received once-daily AMK for 4 weeks between January 2012 and June 2015. With a starting dose of 15 mg/kg/day and adjustment of AMK dose according to the peak serum level (Cmax), the Cmax target of 55-65 μg/ml was achieved in 31.3% (15/48) of patients in the first week, 68.8% (33/48) in week 2, 91.7% (44/48) in week 3 and 95.8% (46/48) in week 4. Transient nephrotoxicity developed in 6.3% (3/48) of patients and ototoxicity in 25.0% (6/24), which was determined by audiogram as hearing loss, asymptomatic in five patients and tinnitus in one. Multivariate analysis revealed that the highest drug concentration 12 h after administration was significantly associated with the development of toxicities (adjusted odds ratio 1.862, P = 0.047). Our results suggest that once-daily AMK for 4 weeks with a target Cmax of 55-65 μg/ml can be used in patients with M. abscessus lung disease, with careful monitoring of toxicity.

  12. Comparative in vitro activities of nemonoxacin (TG-873870), a novel nonfluorinated quinolone, and other quinolones against clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauderdale, Tsai-Ling; Shiau, Yih-Ru; Lai, Jui-Fen; Chen, Hua-Chien; King, Chi-Hsin R

    2010-03-01

    The in vitro antibacterial activities of nemonoxacin (TG-873870), a novel nonfluorinated quinolone, against 770 clinical isolates were investigated. Nemonoxacin (tested as its malate salt, TG-875649) showed better in vitro activity than ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin against different species of staphylococci, streptococci, and enterococci, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Haemophilus influenzae. The in vitro activity of TG-875649 was also comparable to or better than that of moxifloxacin against these pathogens, which included ciprofloxacin-resistant, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and levofloxacin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae.

  13. [Investigation of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli strains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktepe, Orhan Cem; Aşık, Gülşah; Cetinkol, Yeliz; Biçmen, Meral; Gülay, Zeynep

    2012-01-01

    Quinolones are widely used antimicrobial agents, particularly for the treatment of infections caused by gram-negative bacilli such as E.coli. As a consequence, quinolone resistance has been increasing among this species in recent years. Bacterial resistance to quinolones usually results from mutations in the chromosomal genes which encode topoisomerases and also the expression of efflux pumps and loss of porines contributed to development of quinolone resistance. However, recent studies have shown that the spread and increase of quinolone resistance may be due to the transfer of plasmid-mediated genes. To date, three groups of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes, namely qnr, aac(6')-Ib-cr, and qepA, have been described. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in E.coli clinical isolates. A total of 112 quinolone-resistant E.coli strains isolated from different clinical specimens (84 urine, 16 blood, 10 wound, 2 bronchoalveolar lavage) of which 78 (69.6%) were extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) positive, in Afyon Kocatepe University Hospital, Microbiology Laboratory were included in the study. In the isolates, qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, qnrC, qepA, and aac(6')-1b-cr plasmid genes were analysed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). After aac(6')- 1b determinant was amplified by PCR, all aac(6')-1b positive amplicons were analyzed by digestion with BseGI restriction enzyme to identify aac(6')-1b-cr variant. It was found that, none of the strains horboured qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, qnrC and qepA genes, however, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance gene aac(6')-1b-cr was found positive in 59.8% (67/112) of the strains. It was notable that 86.6% (58/67) of those isolates were ESBL producers. The rates of quinolone resistance among E.coli isolates infections were high in our region and an increasing trend has been observed in recent years. Our data indicated that the presence of plasmid- mediated resistance genes

  14. Combined ciprofloxacin and amikacin prophylaxis in the prevention of septicemia after transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehinde, Elijah O; Al-Maghrebi, May; Sheikh, Mehraj; Anim, Jehoram T

    2013-03-01

    A steady increase in the incidence of septicemia after prostate biopsy in our unit between 2001 and 2005 prompted us to review our prophylactic antibiotic regimen. We compared the incidence of septicemia in patients undergoing prostate biopsy between 2001 and 2005 when only oral ciprofloxacin was used prophylactically (group 1) to the incidence among patients undergoing biopsy between 2006 and 2010 when a single dose of intravenous amikacin was added to ciprofloxacin (group 2). In group 1 the 300 patients were given 500 mg oral ciprofloxacin twice daily 1 day before and for 2 days after the biopsy while in group 2 the 897 patients, in addition to the ciprofloxacin previously mentioned, received 500 mg intravenous amikacin 30 minutes before the biopsy. Patients admitted to the hospital with septicemia after prostate biopsy had urine and blood culture and sensitivity tests. The number of patients in whom septicemia developed in each group after prostate biopsy and the microorganisms isolated from the urine and blood of such patients were compared using the chi-square test. Septicemia was seen in 24 of 300 (8%) and 15 of 897 (1.7%) patients in groups 1 and 2, respectively (p responsible for 33 of 39 (84.6%) septicemic cases. The addition of amikacin to ciprofloxacin prophylaxis significantly reduces the incidence of septicemia after prostate biopsy. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Design and synthesis of modified quinolones as antitumoral acridones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabarrini, O; Cecchetti, V; Fravolini, A; Nocentini, G; Barzi, A; Sabatini, S; Miao, H; Sissi, C

    1999-06-17

    The bacterial topoisomerase II (DNA gyrase) and the mammalian topoisomerase II represent the cellular targets for quinolone antibacterials and a wide variety of anticancer drugs, respectively. In view of the mechanistic similarities and sequence homologies exhibited by the two enzymes, tentative efforts to selectively shift from an antibacterial to an antitumoral activity was made by synthesizing a series of modified tricyclic quinolones, in which the essential 3-carboxylic function is surrogated by phenolic OH and the classic C-6 fluorine atom is replaced by a NH2 group. The resulting 7-amino-9-acridone derivatives were assayed for their antibacterial as well as cytotoxic activities. No antibacterial activity was found. On the other hand, many derivatives showed significant cytotoxic activity against both HL-60 and P388 leukemias and a wide panel of human and rodent solid tumor cells, derivatives 25 and 26 displaying the best overall antiproliferative activity. Against the LoVo cell line, derivative 25 exhibited higher cytotoxic effects than etoposide.

  16. Quantifying Pseudomonas aeruginosa quinolones and examining their interactions with lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Gregory C; Schertzer, Jeffrey W; Mashburn-Warren, Lauren; Whiteley, Marvin

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces a quorum sensing molecule termed the Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal (2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone; PQS) that regulates an array of genes involved in virulence. This chapter addresses four related techniques useful for detecting and quantifying PQS. First, extraction of PQS from complex mixtures (e.g. cell cultures) is described. Separation of PQS from extracts by Thin-Layer Chromatography (TLC) is used in combination with the natural fluorescence of the molecule for quantification. A second separation technique for the PQS precursor HHQ using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) is also described, and this assay exploits the molecule's characteristic absorbance for quantification. A third method for quantification of PQS from simple mixtures (e.g. enzyme assays) using fluorescence is outlined. Finally, a protocol for determining PQS interactions with membrane lipids through Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) is presented. These techniques allow for quantification and characterization of PQS from diverse environments, a prerequisite to understanding the biological functions of QS molecules.

  17. Quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli in Poultry Farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hricová, Kristýna; Röderová, Magdaléna; Pudová, Vendula; Hanulík, Vojtěch; Halová, Dana; Julínková, Pavla; Dolejská, Monika; Papoušek, Ivo; Bardoň, Jan

    2017-06-01

    Increasing bacterial resistance to quinolone antibiotics is apparent in both humans and animals. For humans, a potential source of resistant bacteria may be animals or their products entering the human food chain, for example poultry. Between July 2013 and September 2014, samples were collected and analyzed in the Moravian regions of the Czech Republic to isolate the bacterium Escherichia coli. As a result, 212 E. coli isolates were obtained comprising 126 environmental isolates from poultry houses and 86 isolates from cloacal swabs from market-weight turkeys. Subsequently, the E. coli isolates were tested for susceptibility to selected antibiotics. Resistance of the poultry isolates to quinolones ranged from 53% to 73%. Additionally, the presence of plasmid-mediated resistance genes was studied. The genes were confirmed in 58% of the tested strains. The data on resistance of isolates from poultry were compared with results of resistance tests in human isolates obtained in the same regions. The high levels of resistance determined by both phenotyping and genotyping methods and reported in the present study confirm the fact that the use of fluoroquinolones in poultry should be closely monitored. Copyright© by the National Institute of Public Health, Prague 2017.

  18. N-Substituted piperazinyl quinolones as potential cytotoxic agents: structure-activity relationships study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroumadi, Alireza; Emami, Saeed; Rajabalian, Saeed; Badinloo, Marziyeh; Mohammadhosseini, Negar; Shafiee, Abbas

    2009-03-01

    As part of a continuing search for new potential anticancer candidates in the piperazinyl quinolone series, the cytotoxicity evaluation of new N-substituted piperazinyl quinolones was of our interest. The growth inhibitory activities of 12 new compounds, namely N-[2-(5-chlorothiophen-2-yl)-2-oxoethyl] and N-[2-(5-chlorothiophen-2-yl)-2-oxyiminoethyl] piperazinyl quinolones 1-12 were determined against six cancer cell lines using MTT colorimetric assay. Preliminary screening showed that most of the new N-[2-(5-chlorothiophen-2-yl)ethyl]piperazinyl quinolones 4-12 containing (un)substituted oxime moiety showed significant cytotoxic activity and the modification of functionality on ethyl spacer produced a relatively minor change of activity. Thus, in the piperazinyl quinolone series, cytotoxic activity can be positively modulated through the introduction of 2-(5-chlorothiophen-2-yl)ethyl residue on the piperazine ring. The results revealed that the introduction of 2-(5-chlorothiophen-2-yl)ethyl moiety on the piperazine ring of quinolone antibacterials (ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin and enoxacin) changes the biological profile of piperazinyl quinolones from antibacterials to cytotoxic agents.

  19. Clofazimine Prevents the Regrowth of Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium avium Type Strains Exposed to Amikacin and Clarithromycin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Beatriz E.; Meletiadis, Joseph; Wattenberg, Melanie; de Jong, Arjan; van Soolingen, Dick; Mouton, Johan W.

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug therapy is a standard practice when treating infections by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), but few treatment options exist. We conducted this study to define the drug-drug interaction between clofazimine and both amikacin and clarithromycin and its contribution to NTM treatment. Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium avium type strains were used. Time-kill assays for clofazimine alone and combined with amikacin or clarithromycin were performed at concentrations of 0.25× to 2× MIC. Pharmacodynamic interactions were assessed by response surface model of Bliss independence (RSBI) and isobolographic analysis of Loewe additivity (ISLA), calculating the percentage of statistically significant Bliss interactions and interaction indices (I), respectively. Monte Carlo simulations with predicted human lung concentrations were used to calculate target attainment rates for combination and monotherapy regimens. Clofazimine alone was bacteriostatic for both NTM. Clofazimine-amikacin was synergistic against M. abscessus (I = 0.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.29 to 0.55) and M. avium (I = 0.027; 95% CI, 0.007 to 0.048). Based on RSBI analysis, synergistic interactions of 28.4 to 29.0% and 23.2 to 56.7% were observed at 1× to 2× MIC and 0.25× to 2× MIC for M. abscessus and M. avium, respectively. Clofazimine-clarithromycin was also synergistic against M. abscessus (I = 0.53; 95% CI, 0.35 to 0.72) and M. avium (I = 0.16; 95% CI, 0.04 to 0.35), RSBI analysis showed 23.5% and 23.3 to 53.3% at 2× MIC and 0.25× to 0.5× MIC for M. abscessus and M. avium, respectively. Clofazimine prevented the regrowth observed with amikacin or clarithromycin alone. Target attainment rates of combination regimens were >60% higher than those of monotherapy regimens for M. abscessus and M. avium. The combination of clofazimine with amikacin or clarithromycin was synergistic in vitro. This suggests a potential role for clofazimine in treatment regimens that warrants further

  20. Influence of Renal Replacement Modalities on Amikacin Population Pharmacokinetics in Critically Ill Patients on Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Claire; Wallis, Steven C; Muller, Laurent; Saissi, Gilbert; Lipman, Jeffrey; Lefrant, Jean-Yves; Roberts, Jason A

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to describe amikacin pharmacokinetics (PK) in critically ill patients receiving equal doses (30 ml/kg of body weight/h) of continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) and continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF). Patients receiving amikacin and undergoing CVVH or CVVHDF were eligible. Population pharmacokinetic analysis and Monte Carlo simulation were undertaken using the Pmetrics software package for R. Sixteen patients (9 undergoing CVVH, 11 undergoing CVVHDF) and 20 sampling intervals were analyzed. A two-compartment linear model best described the data. Patient weight was the only covariate that was associated with drug clearance. The mean ± standard deviation parameter estimates were 25.2 ± 17.3 liters for the central volume, 0.89 ± 1.17 h(-1) for the rate constant for the drug distribution from the central to the peripheral compartment, 2.38 ± 6.60 h(-1) for the rate constant for the drug distribution from the peripheral to the central compartment, 4.45 ± 2.35 liters/h for hemodiafiltration clearance, and 4.69 ± 2.42 liters/h for hemofiltration clearance. Dosing simulations for amikacin supported the use of high dosing regimens (≥25 mg/kg) and extended intervals (36 to 48 h) for most patients when considering PK/pharmacodynamic (PD) targets of a maximum concentration in plasma (Cmax)/MIC ratio of ≥8 and a minimal concentration of ≤2.5 mg/liter at the end of the dosing interval. The mean clearance of amikacin was 1.8 ± 1.3 liters/h by CVVHDF and 1.3 ± 1 liters/h by CVVH. On the basis of simulations, a strategy of an extended-interval high loading dose of amikacin (25 mg/kg every 48 h) associated with therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) should be the preferred approach for aminoglycoside treatment in critically ill patients receiving continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). (This study is a substudy of a trial registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under number NCT01403220.). Copyright © 2016, American Society

  1. Responses of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes and bacterial taxa to (fluoro)quinolones-containing manure in arable soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wenguang; Sun, Yongxue; Ding, Xueyao; Zhang, Yiming; Zhong, Xiaoxia; Liang, Wenfei; Zeng, Zhenling

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the fate of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes and the disturbance of soil bacterial communities posed by (fluoro)quinolones (FQNs)-containing manure in arable soil. Representative FQNs (enrofloxacin (ENR), ciprofloxacin (CIP) and norfloxacin (NOR)), PMQR genes (qepA, oqxA, oqxB, aac(6')-Ib-cr and qnrS) and bacterial communities in untreated soil, +manure and +manure+FQNs groups were analyzed using culture independent methods. The significantly higher abundance of oqxA, oqxB and aac(6')-Ib-cr, and significantly higher abundance of qnrS in +manure group than those in untreated soil disappeared at day 30 and day 60, respectively. All PMQR genes (oqxA, oqxB, aac(6')-Ib-cr and qnrS) dissipated 1.5-1.7 times faster in +manure group than those in +manure+FQNs group. The disturbance of soil bacterial communities posed by FQNs-containing manure was also found. The results indicated that significant effects of PMQR genes (oqxA, oqxB, aac(6')-Ib and qnrS) on arable soils introduced by manure disappeared 2 month after manure application. FQNs introduced by manure slowed down the dissipation of PMQR genes. The presence of high FQNs provided a selective advantage for species affiliated to the phylum including Acidobacteria, Verrucomicrobia and Planctomycetes while suppressing Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria.

  2. Inhibitory effects of the macrolide antimicrobial tylosin on anaerobic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Toshio; Zilles, Julie L; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2008-09-01

    A laboratory-scale anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) was operated using a glucose-based synthetic wastewater to study the effects of tylosin, a macrolide antimicrobial commonly used in swine production, on treatment performance. The experimental period was divided into three consecutive phases with different influent tylosin concentrations (0, 1.67, and 167 mg/L). The addition of 1.67 mg/L tylosin to the reactor had negligible effects on the overall treatment performance, that is, total methane production and effluent chemical oxygen demand did not change significantly (P tylosin was added. The addition of 167 mg/L tylosin to the reactor resulted in a gradual decrease in methane production and the accumulation of propionate and acetate. Subsequent inhibition of methanogenesis was attributed to a decrease in the pH of the reactor. After the addition of 167 mg/L tylosin to the reactor, an initial decrease in the rate of glucose uptake during the ASBR cycle followed by a gradual recovery was observed. In batch tests, the specific biogas production with the substrate butyrate was completely inhibited in the presence of tylosin. This study indicated that tylosin inhibited propionate- and butyrate-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria and fermenting bacteria resulting in unfavorable effects on methanogenesis.

  3. Antipneumococcal activity of DW-224a, a new quinolone, compared to those of eight other agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosowska-Shick, Klaudia; Credito, Kim; Pankuch, Glenn A; Lin, Gengrong; Bozdogan, Bülent; McGhee, Pamela; Dewasse, Bonifacio; Choi, Dong-Rack; Ryu, Jei Man; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2006-06-01

    DW-224a is a new broad-spectrum quinolone with excellent antipneumococcal activity. Agar dilution MIC was used to test the activity of DW-224a compared to those of penicillin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin, gemifloxacin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefuroxime, and azithromycin against 353 quinolone-susceptible pneumococci. The MICs of 29 quinolone-resistant pneumococci with defined quinolone resistance mechanisms against seven quinolones and an efflux mechanism were also tested. DW-224a was the most potent quinolone against quinolone-susceptible pneumococci (MIC(50), 0.016 microg/ml; MIC(90), 0.03 microg/ml), followed by gemifloxacin, moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin. beta-Lactam MICs rose with those of penicillin G, and azithromycin resistance was seen mainly in strains with raised penicillin G MICs. Against the 29 quinolone-resistant strains, DW-224a had the lowest MICs (0.06 to 1 microg/ml) compared to those of gemifloxacin, clinafloxacin, moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin. DW-224a at 2x MIC was bactericidal after 24 h against eight of nine strains tested. Other quinolones gave similar kill kinetics relative to higher MICs. Serial passages of nine strains in the presence of sub-MIC concentrations of DW-224a, moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, gatifloxacin, gemifloxacin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefuroxime, and azithromycin were performed. DW-224a yielded resistant clones similar to moxifloxacin and gemifloxacin but also yielded lower MICs. Azithromycin selected resistant clones in three of the five parents tested. Amoxicillin-clavulanate and cefuroxime did not yield resistant clones after 50 days.

  4. A novel synthesis of carbon-labelled quinolone-3-carboxylic acid antibacterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, R.M.; Sutherland, D.R. (Glaxo Research and Development Ltd., Greenford (United Kingdom). Isotope Chemistry Group)

    1994-10-01

    3-Iodoquinolones were prepared from the corresponding quinolone-3-carboxylic acids by Hunsdiecker-type iododecarboxylation reactions with lead tetraacetate and iodine. Cyanation of the iodo compounds with mixtures of potassium [[sup 13]C]cyanide and copper (1) iodide, gave [3-[sup 13]C]cyanoquinolones which on acidic hydrolysis afforded quinolone-[3-[sup 13]C]carboxylic acids. In this way, nalidixic acid, an immediate precursor of norfloxacin, and quinolone WIN57273 were labelled with carbon-13 in the metabolically stable carboxylic acid fragment. (author).

  5. The effects of D-Tyrosine combined with amikacin on the biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Pengfei; Chen, Lihua; Liu, Hongbo; Zou, Yaru; Luo, Zhen; Koronfel, Asmaa; Wu, Yong

    2015-09-01

    The biofilm formation of microorganisms causes persistent tissue infections resistant to treatment with antimicrobial agents. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is commonly isolated from the airways of patients with chronic fibrosis (CF) and often forms biofilms, which are extremely hard to eradicate and a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Recent studies have shown that D-amino acids (D-AAs) inhibited and disrupted biofilm formation by causing the release of the protein component of the polymeric matrix. However, the effects of D-AAs combined with common antibiotics on biofilms have rarely been studied. The current study first determined whether D-AAs disrupted the biofilms of PAO1 and the clinical airway isolates of P. aeruginosa. It was then determined whether combinations of D-Tyr (the most effective one) and the antibiotic amikacin (AMK) enhanced the activity against these biofilms. The results of the current study showed that D-Tyr is the most effective among those that disassemble the D-amino acids (D-leucine, D-methionine, D-Tyrptophan, and D-tryptophan), and D-Tyr at concentrations higher than 5 mM significantly reduced the biofilm biomass of P. aeruginosa (p biofilms, as indicated by a reduction in the minimal biofilm-inhibiting concentration (MBIC50 and MBIC90) without a change in the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of planktonic bacteria. Thus, the findings indicated that D-Tyr supplementation overcame the resistance of P. aeruginosa biofilms to AMK, which might be helpful for preventing AMK overuse when this specific D-Tyr is recommended for combatting these biofilms. Also, toxicity of the liver and kidney from AMK could be potentially mitigated by co-delivery with D-Tyr.

  6. Macrolide resistance determinants among Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from carriers in Central Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grivea Ioanna N

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We sought to characterize the temporal trends in nasopharyngeal carriage of macrolide-resistant pneumococci during a period with increased heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7 coverage in Central Greece. Methods Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates were recovered from 2649 nasopharyngeal samples obtained from day-care center attendees in Central Greece during 2005–2009. A phenotypic and genotypic analysis of the isolates was performed, including the identification of macrolide resistance genes mef(A, subclasses mef(A and mef(E, as well as erm(B. Results Of the 1105 typeable S. pneumoniae isolates, 265 (24% were macrolide-resistant; 22% in 2005, 33.3% in 2006, 23.7% in 2007, and 20.5% in 2009 (P=0.398. Among these macrolide-resistant pneumococci, 28.5% possessed erm(B, 24.3% erm(B+mef(E, 41.8% mef(E, and 5.3% mef(A. A mef gene as the sole resistance determinant was carried by 31% of macrolide-resistant isolates belonging to PCV7 serotypes and 75.8% of the non-PCV7 serotypes. Across the 4 annual surveillances, pneumococci carrying mef(A gradually disappeared, whereas serotype 19F isolates carrying both erm(B and mef(E persisted without significant yearly fluctuations. Among isolates belonging to non-PCV7 serotypes, macrolide-resistance was observed in those of serotypes 6A, 19A, 10A, 15A, 15B/C, 35F, 35A, and 24F. In 2009, ie 5 years after the introduction of PCV7 in our country, 59% of macrolide-resistant pneumococci belonged to non-PCV7 serotypes. Conclusions Across the study period, the annual frequency of macrolide-resistant isolates did not change significantly, but in 2009 a marked shift to non-PCV7 serotypes occurred. Overall, more than half of the macrolide-resistant isolates possessed erm(B either alone or in combination with mef(E. erm(B dominated among isolates belonging to PCV7 serotypes, but not among those of non-PCV7 serotypes.

  7. Macrolides and lincosamides in cattle and pigs: use and development of antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyörälä, Satu; Baptiste, Keith Edward; Catry, Boudewijn; van Duijkeren, Engeline; Greko, Christina; Moreno, Miguel A; Pomba, M Constança Matias Ferreira; Rantala, Merja; Ružauskas, Modestas; Sanders, Pascal; Threlfall, E John; Torren-Edo, Jordi; Törneke, Karolina

    2014-05-01

    Macrolides and lincosamides are important antibacterials for the treatment of many common infections in cattle and pigs. Products for in-feed medication with these compounds in combination with other antimicrobials are commonly used in Europe. Most recently approved injectable macrolides have very long elimination half-lives in both pigs and cattle, which allows once-only dosing regimens. Both in-feed medication and use of long-acting injections result in low concentrations of the active substance for prolonged periods, which causes concerns related to development of antimicrobial resistance. Acquired resistance to macrolides and lincosamides among food animal pathogens, including some zoonotic bacteria, has now emerged. A comparison of studies on the prevalence of resistance is difficult, since for many micro-organisms no agreed standards for susceptibility testing are available. With animal pathogens, the most dramatic increase in resistance has been seen in the genus Brachyspira. Resistance towards macrolides and lincosamides has also been detected in staphylococci isolated from pigs and streptococci from cattle. This article reviews the use of macrolides and lincosamides in cattle and pigs, as well as the development of resistance in target and some zoonotic pathogens. The focus of the review is on European conditions.

  8. Macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from throat infections in the region of Aachen, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, C M; Honscha, M; Truong, N D; Holland, R; Hövener, B; Bryskier, A; Lütticken, R; Reinert, R R

    2001-01-01

    Macrolide-resistance was assessed in 216 consecutive Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from throat infections in the region of Aachen, Germany. Seventeen isolates were resistant to erythromycin: 12 isolates revealed a macrolide (M) phenotype and harbored mefA, and five strains expressed an inducible macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) phenotype of which four strains harbored ermA(TR) and one strain contained ermB(AM). Telithromycin (HMR 3647) and quinupristin/dalfopristin remained active particularly against the ermA(TR)-containing S. pyogenes isolates studied. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis identified multiple clones among erythromycin-resistant strains, but did not discriminate beyond the emm-type. mefA was present in three isolates either with emm2, emm12, or emm75, and in nine isolates with emm4. All four strains with ermA(TR) contained emm77, and the single strain with ermB(AM) harbored emm1. Despite the relative low rate of macrolide-resistance, these data suggest that at least three different macrolide-resistance determinants are prevalent in Germany and that mefA has spread rapidly into multiple clones of S. pyogenes.

  9. August 2014 Phoenix pulmonary journal club: the use of macrolide antibiotics in chronic respiratory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. This month's journal club reviewed the role of macrolide antibiotics in chronic respiratory disease. Macrolide usage was suggested from observational studies in Japan in diffuse panbroncholitis, a disorder associated with chronic respiratory infection, usually Pseudomonas aeruginosa (1. Clinical improvement was noted despite doses of antibiotics well below the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of the antibiotic. This suggested the antibiotic was likely working by an anti-inflammatory effect. These observations were extended to cystic fibrosis (CF where prophylactic macrolide therapy in CF patients infected with Pseudomonas has become standard therapy (2. More recently, low dose macrolide therapy has been applied to non-CF lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, bronchiectasis and asthma. Time did not permit a review of all studies so a representative sample was discussed. In patients with COPD, the four randomized, placebo-controlled trials reviewed all suggested that chronic therapy with macrolide antibiotics reduced COPD exacerbations (3-5. This ...

  10. New luminophor-activators based on (fluoro)quinolone antibacterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polishchuk, A.V. [Joint Biotechnology Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Turku, BioCity 6A, FIN-20520 Turku (Finland); Institute of Chemistry, Far-Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, pr.100-let Vladivostoku, 159, Vladivostok 690022 (Russian Federation); Karaseva, E.T. [Institute of Chemistry, Far-Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, pr.100-let Vladivostoku, 159, Vladivostok 690022 (Russian Federation); Korpela, T. [Joint Biotechnology Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Turku, BioCity 6A, FIN-20520 Turku (Finland); Karasev, V.E. [Institute of Chemistry, Far-Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, pr.100-let Vladivostoku, 159, Vladivostok 690022 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: karasev@ich.dvo.ru

    2008-11-15

    It was shown that (fluoro)quinolone antibiotics form strongly fluorescent solid-state complexes with Eu(III) and Tb(III) lanthanide ions, with a wavelength red-shift beneficial for applications to greenhouse-cover polymers. Complexes with optimal properties were prepared by the mechanical activation of fine-dispersed composite mixtures with the lanthanide salts. The spectral properties, photo-stability to UV-light, and compatibility with the polyethylene matrix were investigated. The formulation additives of the tablet forms of the antibiotic medicines did not quench the fluorescence from the lanthanide ions. Therefore, the outdated drug forms of the antibiotics can serve as cheap recyclable sources for the covering material of greenhouses. In addition, diphenylguanidine (DPG) was investigated as a coligand. DPG enhanced fluorescence of the fluoroquinolone complexes by decreasing the non-radiative energy loss through O-H vibration of H{sub 2}O.

  11. Quinolones for the Treatment of Neisseria Gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia Trachomatis

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    Sebastian Faro

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The most commonly sexually transmitted bacteria are Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis. The quinolones ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin have been shown to have activity against both of these bacteria in vitro and in vivo. Ofloxacin is particularly well suited for the treatment of N. gonorrhoeae and C. trachomatis cervical infection, which can be considered the earliest manifestation of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID. Not only can ofloxacin be effectively used as a single agent, it is also useful in treating urinary tract infections caused by Enterobacteriaceae. Although it has moderate activity against anaerobes in general, ofloxacin does have activity against the anaerobes commonly isolated from female patients with soft tissue pelvic infections. Thus, ofloxacin has the potential for being utilized to treat early salpingitis.

  12. Pharmacodynamics of Aerosolized Fosfomycin and Amikacin against Resistant Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Hollow-Fiber Infection Model: Experimental Basis for Combination Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sime, Fekade Bruck; Johnson, Adam; Whalley, Sarah; Santoyo-Castelazo, Anahi; Montgomery, A. Bruce; Walters, Kathie Ann; Lipman, Jeffrey; Hope, William W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT There has been a resurgence of interest in aerosolization of antibiotics for treatment of patients with severe pneumonia caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens. A combination formulation of amikacin-fosfomycin is currently undergoing clinical testing although the exposure-response relationships of these drugs have not been fully characterized. The aim of this study was to describe the individual and combined antibacterial effects of simulated epithelial lining fluid exposures of aerosolized amikacin and fosfomycin against resistant clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MICs of 16 mg/liter and 64 mg/liter) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (MICs of 2 mg/liter and 64 mg/liter) using a dynamic hollow-fiber infection model over 7 days. Targeted peak concentrations of 300 mg/liter amikacin and/or 1,200 mg/liter fosfomycin as a 12-hourly dosing regimens were used. Quantitative cultures were performed to describe changes in concentrations of the total and resistant bacterial populations. The targeted starting inoculum was 108 CFU/ml for both strains. We observed that neither amikacin nor fosfomycin monotherapy was bactericidal against P. aeruginosa while both were associated with rapid amplification of resistant P. aeruginosa strains (about 108 to 109 CFU/ml within 24 to 48 h). For K. pneumoniae, amikacin but not fosfomycin was bactericidal. When both drugs were combined, a rapid killing was observed for P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae (6-log kill within 24 h). Furthermore, the combination of amikacin and fosfomycin effectively suppressed growth of resistant strains of P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae. In conclusion, the combination of amikacin and fosfomycin was effective at maximizing bacterial killing and suppressing emergence of resistance against these clinical isolates. PMID:27795380

  13. Comparison of susceptibility of Enterobacteriaceae causing community-onset urinary tract infection to isepamicin and amikacin by the disc diffusion method

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    Yung-Chih Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Enterobacteriaceae, common pathogens responsible for urinary tract infections are known to be susceptible to aminoglycosides. The emergence of resistant pathogens complicates antimicrobial regimen and becomes a challenge for clinicians. The aim of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility of clinically isolated Enterobacteriaceae to isepamicin and amikacin using disc diffusion method. Materials and Methods: A total of 234 Enterobacteriaceae isolates was collected and examined. Antimicrobial susceptibilities to gentamicin, amikacin, and isepamicin were assessed using disc diffusion method. The production of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL or AmpC β-lactamase was also tested. The susceptibilities of the pathogens to isepamicin and amikacin were evaluated. Results: Two hundred and thirty-four Enterobacteriaceae isolates were found to be more susceptible to amikacin and isepamicin than to gentamicin. Of the isolates, 39 (16.7% produced ESBL and 41 (17.5% harbored AmpC β-lactamase. The results revealed that amikacin and isepamicin exerted excellent antibacterial activity (94% vs. 93.6% against all tested isolates. Isepamicin was effective against 89.7% ESBL-producing isolates and 92.7% of AmpC-producing isolates. The susceptibility to amikacin and isepamicin established by the disc diffusion method was mostly consistent with the overall agreement estimated 99.6%. Conclusions: Isepamicin showed excellent activities against infections caused by Enterobacteriaceae, including strains harboring ESBL or AmpC beta-lactamase. The susceptibility of tested isolated to isepamicin measured by disc diffusion method is comparable to that of amikacin.

  14. Overcoming target-mediated quinolone resistance in topoisomerase IV by introducing metal-ion-independent drug-enzyme interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldred, Katie J; Schwanz, Heidi A; Li, Gangqin; McPherson, Sylvia A; Turnbough, Charles L; Kerns, Robert J; Osheroff, Neil

    2013-12-20

    Quinolones, which target gyrase and topoisomerase IV, are the most widely prescribed antibacterials worldwide. Unfortunately, their use is threatened by the increasing prevalence of target-mediated drug resistance. Greater than 90% of mutations that confer quinolone resistance act by disrupting enzyme-drug interactions coordinated by a critical water-metal ion bridge. Quinazolinediones are quinolone-like drugs but lack the skeletal features necessary to support the bridge interaction. These compounds are of clinical interest, however, because they retain activity against the most common quinolone resistance mutations. We utilized a chemical biology approach to determine how quinazolinediones overcome quinolone resistance in Bacillus anthracis topoisomerase IV. Quinazolinediones that retain activity against quinolone-resistant topoisomerase IV do so primarily by establishing novel interactions through the C7 substituent, rather than the drug skeleton. Because some quinolones are highly active against human topoisomerase IIα, we also determined how clinically relevant quinolones discriminate between the bacterial and human enzymes. Clinically relevant quinolones display poor activity against topoisomerase IIα because the human enzyme cannot support drug interactions mediated by the water-metal ion bridge. However, the inclusion of substituents that allow quinazolinediones to overcome topoisomerase IV-mediated quinolone resistance can cause cross-reactivity against topoisomerase IIα. Therefore, a major challenge in designing drugs that overcome quinolone resistance lies in the ability to identify substituents that mediate strong interactions with the bacterial, but not the human, enzymes. On the basis of our understanding of quinolone-enzyme interactions, we have identified three compounds that display high activity against quinolone-resistant B. anthracis topoisomerase IV but low activity against human topoisomerase IIα.

  15. The Impact of Antibiotic Stewardship Programs in Combating Quinolone Resistance: A Systematic Review and Recommendations for More Efficient Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitiriga, Vasiliki; Vrioni, Georgia; Saroglou, George; Tsakris, Athanasios

    2017-04-01

    Quinolones are among the most commonly prescribed antibiotics worldwide. A clear relationship has been demonstrated between excessive quinolone use and the steady increase in the incidence of quinolone-resistant bacterial pathogens, both in hospital and community sites. In addition, exposure to quinolones has been associated with colonization and infection with healthcare-associated pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile in hospitalized patients. Therefore, the management of quinolone prescribing in hospitals through antibiotic stewardship programs is considered crucial. Although suggestions have been made by previous studies on the positive impact of stewardship programs concerning the emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria at hospital level, the association of quinolone-targeted interventions with reduction of quinolone resistance is vague. The purpose of this article was to evaluate the impact of stewardship interventions on quinolone resistance rates and healthcare-associated infections, through a literature review using systematic methods to identify and select the appropriate studies. Recommendations for improvements in quinolone-targeted stewardship programs are also proposed. Efforts in battling quinolone resistance should combine various interventions such as restriction formulary policies, prospective audits with feedback to prescribers, infection prevention and control measures, prompt detection of low-level resistance, educational programs, and guidelines for optimal quinolone usage. However, the effectiveness of such strategies should be assessed by properly designed and conducted clinical trials. Finally, novel approaches in diagnostic stewardship for rapidly detecting bacterial resistance, including PCR-based techniques, mass spectrometry, microarrays, and whole-genome sequencing as well as the prompt investigation on the clonality of quinolone-resistant strains, will strengthen our

  16. Differentiation in quinolone resistance by virulence genotype in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

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    Melissa Agnello

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading pathogen that has become increasingly resistant to the fluoroquinolone antibiotics due to widespread prescribing. Adverse outcomes have been shown for patients infected with fluoroquinolone-resistant strains. The type III secretion system (TTSS is a major virulence determinant during acute infections through the injection of effector toxins into host cells. Most strains exhibit a unique TTSS virulence genotype defined by the presence of either exoS or exoU gene encoding two of the effector toxins, ExoS and ExoU, respectively. Specific TTSS effector genotype has been shown previously to differentially impact virulence in pneumonia. In this study, we examined the relationship between TTSS effector genotype and fluoroquinolone resistance mechanisms in a collection of 270 respiratory isolates. We found that a higher proportion of exoU+ strains were fluoroquinolone-resistant compared to exoS+ strains (63% vs 49%, p = 0.03 despite its lower overall prevalence (38% exoU+ vs 56% exoS+. Results from sequencing the quinolone resistance determining regions (QRDRs of the 4 target genes (gyrA, gyrB, parC, parE indicated that strains containing the exoU gene were more likely to acquire ≥ 2 mutations than exoS+ strains at MICs ≤ 8 µg/ml (13% vs none and twice as likely to have mutations in both gyrA and parC than exoS+ strains (48% vs 24% p = 0.0439. Our findings indicate that P. aeruginosa strains differentially develop resistance-conferring mutations that correlate with TTSS effector genotype and the more virulent exoU+ subpopulation. Differences in mutational processes by virulence genotype that were observed suggest co-evolution of resistance and virulence traits favoring a more virulent genotype in the quinolone-rich clinical environment.

  17. [The molecular physiological and genetic mechanisms underlying the superb efficacy of quinolones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Quan-xin; He, Ying; Xie, Jian-ping

    2012-08-01

    The fluoroquinolones are the most widely used broad-spectrum antibiotics, accounting for 18% of global antibacterial market share. They can kill bacteria rapidly with variety of derivatives available. Different quinolones vary significantly in rate and spectrum of killing, oxygen requirement for metabolism and reliance upon protein synthesis. Further understanding the sophisticated mechanisms of action of this important antibiotic family based on the molecular genetic response of bacteria can facilitate the discovery of better quinolone derivatives. Factors such as SOS response, bacterial toxin-antitoxin system, programmed death, chromosome fragmentation and reactive oxygen have been implicated in the action to some extent. "Two steps characteristic" of quinolones killing is also emphasized, which might inspire future better quinolones modification.

  18. Chemical structure and pharmacokinetics of novel quinolone agents represented by avarofloxacin, delafloxacin, finafloxacin, zabofloxacin and nemonoxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocsis, Bela; Domokos, J; Szabo, D

    2016-05-23

    Quinolones are potent antimicrobial agents with a basic chemical structure of bicyclic ring. Fluorine atom at position C-6 and various substitutions on the basic quinolone structure yielded fluoroquinolones, namely norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin and numerous other agents. The target molecules of quinolones and fluoroquinolones are bacterial gyrase and topoisomerase IV enzymes. Broad-spectrum and excellent tissue penetration make fluoroquinolones potent agents but their toxic side effects and increasing number of resistant pathogens set limits on their use. This review focuses on recent advances concerning quinolones and fluoroquinolones, we will be summarising chemical structure, mode of action, pharmacokinetic properties and toxicity. We will be describing fluoroquinolones introduced in clinical trials, namely avarofloxacin, delafloxacin, finafloxacin, zabofloxacin and non-fluorinated nemonoxacin. These agents have been proved to have enhanced antibacterial effect even against ciprofloxacin resistant pathogens, and found to be well tolerated in both oral and parenteral administrations. These features are going to make them potential antimicrobial agents in the future.

  19. Aquatic toxicity of the macrolide antibiotic clarithromycin and its metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Michaela; Weiss, Klaus; Maletzki, Dirk; Schüssler, Walter; Schudoma, Dieter; Kopf, Willi; Kühnen, Ute

    2015-02-01

    The human macrolide antibiotic clarithromycin is widespread in surface waters. Our study shows that its major metabolite 14-hydroxy(R)-clarithromycin is found in surface waters in comparable amounts. This metabolite is known to be pharmacologically active. Additionally, clarithromycin is partly metabolised to N-desmethyl-clarithromycin, which has no antimicrobial activity. For clarithromycin, some ecotoxicological studies on aquatic organisms have been published. However, many of them are not conform with the scientific principles as given in the "Technical guidance for deriving environmental quality standards" (TGD-EQS), because numerous studies were poorly documented and the methods did not contain analytical measurements confirming that the exposure concentrations were in the range of ± 20% of the nominal concentrations. Ecotoxicological effects of clarithromycin and its two metabolites on the zebrafish Danio rerio (embryo test), the microcrustacean Daphnia magna, the aquatic monocotyledonous macrophyte Lemna minor, the freshwater green alga Desmodesmus subspicatus (Chlorophyta) and the cyanobacterium Anabaena flosaquae were investigated in compliance with the TGD-EQS. Environmental risk assessment was performed using ErC10 values of Anabaena, the species most sensitive to clarithromycin and 14-hydroxy(R)-clarithromycin in our testing. Based oncomparable toxicity and similar concentrations of clarithromycin and its active metabolite 14-hydroxy(R)-clarithromycin in surface waters, an additional multiplication factor of 2 to the assessment factor of 10 on the ErC10 of clarithromycin should be used. Consequently, a freshwater quality standard of 0.130 μg L(-1) is proposed for clarithromycin as the "lead substance". Taking this additional multiplication factor of 2 into account, single monitoring of clarithromycin may be sufficient, in order to reduce the number of substances listed for routine monitoring programs.

  20. Evaluating the impact of a novel restricted reimbursement policy for quinolone antibiotics: A time series analysis

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    Manns Braden

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Publicly-funded drug plans often use prior authorization policies to limit drug prescribing. To guide physician prescribing of a class of antibiotics with broad antimicrobial activity (quinolone antibiotics in accordance with new prescribing guidelines, Alberta’s provincial health ministry implemented a new mechanism for formulary restriction entitled the optional special authorization (OSA program. We conducted an observational study to determine the impact of this new formulary restriction policy on antimicrobial prescription rates as well as any clinical consequences. Methods Quinolone antibiotic use, and adherence with quinolone prescribing guidelines, was assessed before and after implementation of the OSA program in patients with common outpatient infections using an administrative data cohort and a chart review cohort, respectively. At the same time this policy was implemented to limit quinolone prescribing, two new quinolone antibiotics were added to the formulary. Using administrative data, we analysed a total of 397,534 unique index visits with regard to overall antibiotic utilization, and through chart review, we analysed 1681 charts of patients with infections of interest to determine the indications for quinolone usage. Results Using segmented regression models adjusting for age, sex and physician enrollment in the OSA program, there was no statistically significant change in the monthly rate of all quinolone use (−3.5 (95% CI −5.5, 1.4 prescriptions per 1000 index visits following implementation of the OSA program (p = 0.74. There was a significant level change in the rate of quinolone antibiotic use for urinary tract infection (−33.6 (95% CI: -23.8, -43.4 prescriptions and upper respiratory tract infection (−16.1 (95%CI: -11.6, -20.6 prescriptions per 1000 index visits. Among quinolone prescriptions identified on chart review, 42.5% and 58.5% were consistent with formulary guidelines before and

  1. Dynamics of Quinolone Resistance in Fecal Escherichia coli of Finishing Pigs after Ciprofloxacin Administration

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Kang; Xu, Chang-Wen; Zeng, Bo; XIA, Qing-Qing; Zhang, An-Yun; LEI, Chang-Wei; Guan, Zhong-Bin; Cheng, Han; Wang, Hong-ning

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Escherichia coli resistance to quinolones has now become a serious issue in large-scale pig farms of China. It is necessary to study the dynamics of quinolone resistance in fecal Escherichia coli of pigs after antimicrobial administration. Here, we present the hypothesis that the emergence of resistance in pigs requires drug accumulation for 7 days or more. To test this hypothesis, 26 pigs (90 days old, about 30 kg) not fed any antimicrobial after weaning were selected and divided in...

  2. The non-antibacterial effects and possible clinical applications of macrolide antibiotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Shi-liang; WANG Yuan-liang; GAO Wen-juan

    2006-01-01

    As one group of the most widely used oral antibacterial drugs, macrolides have been clinically applied for more than 50 years because of their safety and efficacy. Recently, the non-antibacterial applications of macrolides are frequently reported, such as the therapy of malignant tumor, exudative pleurisy, pulmonary fibrosis, rheumatoid arthritis, bronchiectasis, asthma, gastrointestinal peristalsis disorders, and so on with new pharmacological effects, including reverse of tumor resistance, anti-chemical adherence, anti-fibrosis, and modulations of gastrointestinal motility as well as immune activity. The in-depth research of marcolides' non-antibiotic actions can not only extend the application fields of macrolides, but provide a new way to treat some refractory diseases.

  3. Diagnosis of Drug Resistance to Fluoroquinolones, Amikacin, Capreomycin, Kanamycin and Ethambutol with Genotype MTBDRsl Assay: a Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiaolu; Ke, Zunqiong; Shi, Xiaoyan; Liu, Shuiyi; Tang, Beibei; Wang, Jin; Huang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    The Genotype MTBDRsl is a new-generation PCR-based line-probe assay for rapid identification of the resistance to the second-line antituberculosis drugs with a single strip. The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the performance of Genotype MTBDRsl in detecting drug resistance to fluoroquinolones, amikacin, capreomycin, kanamycin and ethambutol in comparison with the phenotypic drug susceptibility test. We searched Pubmed, Embase and the Cochrane Library and calculated the sensitivity, the specificity, the positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR), diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI), and the area under the summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curves (AUC), and tested heterogeneity in accuracy estimates with the Spearman correlation coefficient and Chi-square. The summarized sensitivity (95% CI), specificity (95% CI), and AUC (standard error) were 0.869 (0.847-0.890), 0.973 (0.965-0.979) and 0.9690 (0.0188) for fluoroquinolones, 0.868 (0.829-0.900), 0.998 (0.994-0.999) and 0.9944 (0.0050) for amikacin, 0.879 (0.838-0.914), 0.970 (0.958-0.978) and 0.9791 (0.0120) for capreomycin, 0.501 (0.461-0.541), 0.991 (0.983-0.996) and 0.9814 (0.0114) for kanamycin and 0.686 (0.663-0.709), 0.871 (0.852-0.888) and 0.7349 (0.0639) for ethambutol, respectively. The genotype MTBDRsl demonstrate excellent accuracy for detecting drug resistance to fluoroquinolones, amikacin, and capreomycin, but it may not be an appropriate choice for detection of kanamycin and ethambutol. © 2015 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  4. Enrofloxacin and macrolides alone or in combination with rifampicin as antimicrobial treatment in a bovine model of acute Chlamydia psittaci infection.

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    Annette Prohl

    Full Text Available Chlamydia psittaci is a zoonotic bacterium with a wide host range that can cause respiratory disease in humans and cattle. In the present study, effects of treatment with macrolides and quinolones applied alone or in combination with rifampicin were tested in a previously established bovine model of respiratory C. psittaci infection. Fifty animals were inoculated intrabronchially at the age of 6-8 weeks. Seven served as untreated controls, the others were assigned to seven treatment groups: (i rifampicin, (ii enrofloxacin, (iii enrofloxacin + rifampicin, (iv azithromycin, (v azithromycin + rifampicin, (vi erythromycin, and (vii erythromycin + rifampicin. Treatment started 30 hours after inoculation and continued until 14 days after inoculation (dpi, when all animals were necropsied. The infection was successful in all animals and sufficient antibiotic levels were detected in blood plasma and tissue of the treated animals. Reisolation of the pathogen was achieved more often from untreated animals than from other groups. Nevertheless, pathogen detection by PCR was possible to the same extent in all animals and there were no significant differences between treated and untreated animals in terms of local (i.e., cell count and differentiation of BALF-cells and systemic inflammation (i.e. white blood cells and concentration of acute phase protein LBP, clinical signs, and pathological findings at necropsy. Regardless of the reduced reisolation rate in treated animals, the treatment of experimentally induced respiratory C. psittaci infection with enrofloxacin, azithromycin or erythromycin alone or in combination with rifampicin was without obvious benefit for the host, since no significant differences in clinical and pathological findings or inflammatory parameters were detected and all animals recovered clinically within two weeks.

  5. Antimalarial therapy selection for quinolone resistance among Escherichia coli in the absence of quinolone exposure, in tropical South America.

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    Ross J Davidson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is thought to develop only in the presence of antibiotic pressure. Here we show evidence to suggest that fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli has developed in the absence of fluoroquinolone use. METHODS: Over 4 years, outreach clinic attendees in one moderately remote and five very remote villages in rural Guyana were surveyed for the presence of rectal carriage of ciprofloxacin-resistant gram-negative bacilli (GNB. Drinking water was tested for the presence of resistant GNB by culture, and the presence of antibacterial agents and chloroquine by HPLC. The development of ciprofloxacin resistance in E. coli was examined after serial exposure to chloroquine. Patient and laboratory isolates of E. coli resistant to ciprofloxacin were assessed by PCR-sequencing for quinolone-resistance-determining-region (QRDR mutations. RESULTS: In the very remote villages, 4.8% of patients carried ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli with QRDR mutations despite no local availability of quinolones. However, there had been extensive local use of chloroquine, with higher prevalence of resistance seen in the villages shortly after a Plasmodium vivax epidemic (p<0.01. Antibacterial agents were not found in the drinking water, but chloroquine was demonstrated to be present. Chloroquine was found to inhibit the growth of E. coli in vitro. Replica plating demonstrated that 2-step QRDR mutations could be induced in E. coli in response to chloroquine. CONCLUSIONS: In these remote communities, the heavy use of chloroquine to treat malaria likely selected for ciprofloxacin resistance in E. coli. This may be an important public health problem in malarious areas.

  6. Occurrence of (fluoro)quinolones and (fluoro)quinolone resistance in soil receiving swine manure for 11 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yonggang; Yu, Wantai; Ma, Qiang; Zhou, Hua

    2015-10-15

    Because of the widespread use of antibiotics in animal breeding, the agricultural application of animal manure can lead to the introduction of antibiotics, antibiotic-resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes to the soil and surrounding environment, which may pose a threat to public health. In this study, we investigated the status of (fluoro)quinolone (FQ) residues and FQ resistance levels in soil with and without receiving long-term swine manure. Six FQs (pipemidic acid, lomefloxacin, enrofloxacin, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and ofloxacin) were only detected in manured soil, with individual concentrations ranging from below the detection limit to 27.2 μg kg(-1) and increasing with the increase in swine manure application rates. Higher load rates of swine manure yielded a higher number of ciprofloxacin-resistant (CIPr) bacteria after spreading. A total of 24 CIPr bacterial isolates were obtained from the tested soil, which belonged to four phyla (Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes) or were related to nine different genera. Only 18 isolates from manured soil were positive for five plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes (aac(6')-Ib-cr, qnrD, qepA, oqxA, and oqxB). To our knowledge, this study is the first to examine the occurrence of PMQR genes in FQ-resistant bacteria from the soil environment. A similar result was observed for the total DNA from soil, with the exception of aac(6')-Ib being detected in the control sample. The absolute and relative abundances of total PMQR genes also increased with fertilization quantity. Significant correlations were observed between FQ resistance levels and FQ concentrations. These results indicated that the agricultural application of swine manure led to FQ residues and enhanced FQ resistance. This investigation provides baseline data on FQ resistance profiles in soils receiving long-term swine manure. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Rational Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation of Heterocyclic Quinolones Targeting the Respiratory Chain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, W David; Gibbons, Peter D; Leung, Suet C; Amewu, Richard; Stocks, Paul A; Stachulski, Andrew; Horta, Pedro; Cristiano, Maria L S; Shone, Alison E; Moss, Darren; Ardrey, Alison; Sharma, Raman; Warman, Ashley J; Bedingfield, Paul T P; Fisher, Nicholas E; Aljayyoussi, Ghaith; Mead, Sally; Caws, Maxine; Berry, Neil G; Ward, Stephen A; Biagini, Giancarlo A; O'Neill, Paul M; Nixon, Gemma L

    2017-05-11

    A high-throughput screen (HTS) was undertaken against the respiratory chain dehydrogenase component, NADH:menaquinone oxidoreductase (Ndh) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). The 11000 compounds were selected for the HTS based on the known phenothiazine Ndh inhibitors, trifluoperazine and thioridazine. Combined HTS (11000 compounds) and in-house screening of a limited number of quinolones (50 compounds) identified ∼100 hits and four distinct chemotypes, the most promising of which contained the quinolone core. Subsequent Mtb screening of the complete in-house quinolone library (350 compounds) identified a further ∼90 hits across three quinolone subtemplates. Quinolones containing the amine-based side chain were selected as the pharmacophore for further modification, resulting in metabolically stable quinolones effective against multi drug resistant (MDR) Mtb. The lead compound, 42a (MTC420), displays acceptable antituberculosis activity (Mtb IC50 = 525 nM, Mtb Wayne IC50 = 76 nM, and MDR Mtb patient isolates IC50 = 140 nM) and favorable pharmacokinetic and toxicological profiles.

  8. [Multiresidue determination of quinolones in animal and fishery products by HPLC].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonan, Takao; Fujimoto, Toru; Inoue, Maki; Tazawa, Teijiro; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2008-06-01

    A simple and rapid multiresidue method was developed for the determination of twelve quinolones (ciprofloxacin, danofloxacin, difloxacin, enrofloxacin, flumequine, marbofloxacin, nalidixic acid, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, orbifloxacin, oxolinic acid and sarafloxacin) in muscle, liver, chicken eggs, milk, prawn and rainbow trout. The quinolones were extracted from a sample with acetonitrile-water (95 : 5). A fifth part of the filtered extract was diluted with water to keep the acetonitrile ratio at ca. 60%, and passed through a C18 mini-column. The eluate was evaporated to dryness, and the residues were dissolved in methanol-water (30 : 70) for HPLC analysis. The quinolones were separated on a Inertsil ODS-3V column (4.6 mm i.d.x250 mm) with a gradient system of 0.1% phosphoric acid-acetonitrile as the mobile phase, with fluorescence detection.No interfering peak was found on the chromatograms of animal and fishery products, except for milk. The recoveries of the quinolones were over 60% from the animal and fishery products fortified at 0.1 microg/g, and the quantification limits of the quinolones were 0.005 microg/g. This proposed method was found to be effective and suitable for the screening of the quinolones in animal and fishery products.

  9. Genotoxicity of quinolone antibiotics in chlorination disinfection treatment: formation and QSAR simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Wei, Dongbin; Du, Yuguo

    2016-10-01

    Lots of unexpected disinfection by-products were formed during the chlorination disinfection of contaminated water bodies, leading to a potential threat to human health and ecological safety. In this study, SOS/umu assay was used to trace the genotoxicity variation of 20 quinolone compounds during the chlorination disinfection. Furthermore, two- and three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship models were developed based on the electronic and hydrophobic properties of the quinolones, which were used to quantify the impact of the different structural features of the compounds on their genotoxicity variation. The results revealed that quinolones bearing hydrophilic substituents with less H-bond donors and negative charge at the 1-position of the quinolone ring exhibited a positive correlation with genotoxicity elevation. More notably, the chlorination of quinolones in both ultrapure water and secondary effluent matrices provided comparable levels of genotoxicity, indicating that our research could potentially be used to evaluate the environmental risk of quinolone antibiotics in chlorination disinfection treatment.

  10. 4-Quinolone-3-carboxylic acids as cell-permeable inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Ying; Gao, Li-Xin; Jin, Yi; Tang, Chun-Lan; Li, Jing-Ya; Li, Jia; Long, Ya-Qiu

    2014-07-15

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B is a negative regulator in the insulin and leptin signaling pathways, and has emerged as an attractive target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity. However, the essential pharmacophore of charged phosphotyrosine or its mimetic confer low selectivity and poor cell permeability. Starting from our previously reported aryl diketoacid-based PTP1B inhibitors, a drug-like scaffold of 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acid was introduced for the first time as a novel surrogate of phosphotyrosine. An optimal combination of hydrophobic groups installed at C-6, N-1 and C-3 positions of the quinolone motif afforded potent PTP1B inhibitors with low micromolar IC50 values. These 4-quinolone-3-carboxylate based PTP1B inhibitors displayed a 2-10 fold selectivity over a panel of PTP's. Furthermore, the bidentate inhibitors of 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acids conjugated with aryl diketoacid or salicylic acid were cell permeable and enhanced insulin signaling in CHO/hIR cells. The kinetic studies and molecular modeling suggest that the 4-quinolone-3-carboxylates act as competitive inhibitors by binding to the PTP1B active site in the WPD loop closed conformation. Taken together, our study shows that the 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acid derivatives exhibit improved pharmacological properties over previously described PTB1B inhibitors and warrant further preclinical studies.

  11. Structural insights into the quinolone resistance mechanism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase.

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    Jérémie Piton

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase, an indispensable nanomachine involved in the regulation of DNA topology, is the only type II topoisomerase present in this organism and is hence the sole target for quinolone action, a crucial drug active against multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. To understand at an atomic level the quinolone resistance mechanism, which emerges in extensively drug resistant tuberculosis, we performed combined functional, biophysical and structural studies of the two individual domains constituting the catalytic DNA gyrase reaction core, namely the Toprim and the breakage-reunion domains. This allowed us to produce a model of the catalytic reaction core in complex with DNA and a quinolone molecule, identifying original mechanistic properties of quinolone binding and clarifying the relationships between amino acid mutations and resistance phenotype of M. tuberculosis DNA gyrase. These results are compatible with our previous studies on quinolone resistance. Interestingly, the structure of the entire breakage-reunion domain revealed a new interaction, in which the Quinolone-Binding Pocket (QBP is blocked by the N-terminal helix of a symmetry-related molecule. This interaction provides useful starting points for designing peptide based inhibitors that target DNA gyrase to prevent its binding to DNA.

  12. Interplay between intrinsic and acquired resistance to quinolones in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-León, Guillermo; Salgado, Fabiola; Oliveros, Juan Carlos; Sánchez, María Blanca; Martínez, José Luis

    2014-05-01

    To analyse whether the mutation-driven resistance-acquisition potential of a given bacterium might be a function of its intrinsic resistome, quinolones were used as selective agents and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia was chosen as a bacterial model. S. maltophilia has two elements - SmQnr and SmeDEF - that are important in intrinsic resistance to quinolones. Using a battery of mutants in which either or both of these elements had been removed, the apparent mutation frequency for quinolone resistance and the phenotype of the selected mutants were found to be related to the intrinsic resistome and also depended on the concentration of the selector. Most mutants had phenotypes compatible with the overexpression of multidrug efflux pump(s); SmeDEF overexpression was the most common cause of quinolone resistance. Whole genome sequencing showed that mutations of the SmeRv regulator, which result in the overexpression of the efflux pump SmeVWX, are the cause of quinolone resistance in mutants not overexpressing SmeDEF. These results indicate that the development of mutation-driven antibiotic resistance is highly dependent on the intrinsic resistome, which, at least for synthetic antibiotics such as quinolones, did not develop as a response to the presence of antibiotics in the natural ecosystems in which S. maltophilia evolved.

  13. Predominant role of msr(D) over mef(A) in macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Okada, Ryo; Hata, Nanako; Matsumoto, Masakado; Isaka, Masanori; Isobe, Ken-ichi; Hasegawa, Tadao

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, the number of patients with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is reported to be increasing. mef(A) gene-positive macrolide-resistant emm1 strains are thought to possibly contribute to the rise in the frequency of STSS. Although analyses of macrolide-resistant mechanisms, including mef(A) resistance, have been performed mainly in Streptococcus pneumoniae, the role of this gene in Streptococcus pyogenes has not been completely investigated. Therefore, to the best of our knowledge, we established the first mef(A)-knockout strain using an emm1-type S. pyogenes strain, and tested its susceptibility to erythromycin, clarithromycin and azithromycin. We found that the antimicrobial susceptibilities were almost identical to those of the parental strain. Hence, we established a knockout strain for another gene, msr(D), that is located immediately downstream of mef(A). The macrolide resistances of the resulting strain significantly decreased, and were further altered when both mef(A) and msr(D) were knocked out. The introduction of the msr(D) gene into a macrolide-sensitive strain conferred more resistance than the introduction of the mef(A) gene. The erythromycin susceptibilities of knockout strains were further dissected using two additional emm4- and emm75-type S. pyogenes strains. We found almost identical results for both strains except for the mef(A) knockout emm4 type, whose susceptibility was altered, although the change was less than that for the msr(D) knockout. These results suggest that both mef(A) and msr(D) are involved in macrolide resistance in S. pyogenes, and that the msr(D) gene plays a more predominant role in macrolide resistance than mef(A).

  14. Macrolide and fluoroquinolone mediated cardiac arrhythmias: clinical considerations and comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornett, Elyse; Novitch, Matthew B; Kaye, Alan D; Pann, Chris A; Bangalore, Harish Siddaiah; Allred, Gregory; Bral, Matthew; Jhita, Preya K; Kaye, Adam M

    2017-09-01

    While there is evidence for cardiac arrhythmias associated with macrolide and fluoroquinolone antibiotics, there is still debate among health care providers as to whether this risk of arrhythmia is overstated. A joint panel of the US Food and Drug Administration suggested that macrolide and fluoroquinolone labels need much stronger warnings regarding the possible serious adverse cardiac effects associated with these antibiotics, especially since they are so widely prescribed. And while health care providers may differ on the pertinence of the cardiac risks associated with antibiotic use, they can undoubtedly minimize the cardiac effects that are associated with these antibiotics by paying attention to the cardiac risk factors and drug history associated with the patient. Relevant studies for our review were identified from a PubMed search using keywords and combined word searches involving macrolides, fluoroquinolones, and cardiac arrhythmias. We attempted to include as many recent (>2015) articles as possible. We included case reports, randomized, controlled trials, observational studies, case-control studies, systematic reviews, and retrospective studies. Underlying cardiac issues can predispose patients to harmful cardiac side effects that can be exacerbated in the presence of antibiotics. The health care provider should rule out any risk factor associated with antibiotic-induced cardiac arrhythmia in the event that a patient does need a macrolide or fluoroquinolone antibiotic. Rigorous patient evaluation and a detailed patient history, including short and long term medication use, is the likely key to reducing any risk of cardiac arrhythmias associated with macrolides and fluoroquinolones. Clinicians should be cautious when prescribing macrolide and fluoroquinolone medications to patients with risk factors that may lead to antibiotic-induced cardiac arrhythmias, including a slow heart rate and those that are taking medications to treat arrhythmias.

  15. Extended spectrum β-lactamase and plasmid mediated quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli fecal isolates from healthy companion animals in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousfi, Massilia; Mairi, Assia; Touati, Abdelaziz; Hassissene, Lila; Brasme, Lucien; Guillard, Thomas; De Champs, Christophe

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the rate of fecal carriage of Escherichia coli strains producing Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) isolated from healthy pets (dogs and cats) in Algeria. Fecal samples from 171 healthy pets (102 dogs and 69 cats) in one veterinary practice and private owners were included. After isolates identification, antibiotic susceptibility was determined by disk diffusion procedure. ESBL were detected by combination disk tests. PCR and sequencing were used to characterize genes encoding ESBLs and PMQR. Transfer of ESBL and PMQR genes was assessed by conjugation experiments. Phylogenetic groups of E. coli were determined by PCR. Of the 171 animals, 20 carried an ESBL producing E. coli giving a prevalence of ESBL fecal carriage of 11.7%. All isolates were susceptible to carbapenems, cefoxitin, piperacillin-tazobactam, amikacin and fosfomycine. For the rest of the tested β-lactams, susceptibility rates ranged from 35% to 70% for cefepime and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid respectively. Concerning the non-beta-lactams antibiotics, the rates of susceptibility ranged between 5% to trimethoprim and 95% for chloramphenicol. The beta-lactamase genes identified in E. coli isolates were blaCTX-M-15, blaCTX-M-1, blaSHV-12 and blaTEM-1. The PMQR determinants aac(6')-Ib-cr, qnrS1 and qnrB5 genes were identified in 15 isolates. Transconjugants were obtained for two isolates. Phylogenetic analysis showed that E. coli isolates belong to commensal phylogroups of A and B1. We reported here for the first time in Algeria ESBL and PMQR-producing E. coli in healthy cats and dogs.

  16. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF NEWER MACROLIDES WITH ETORICOXIB

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    Gajendra Naidu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to investigate the anti-inflammatory activity of macrolides and to compare with standard non- steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID etoricoxib. This study was conducted in male wistar albino rats by inducing edema with 1% carrageenan. Animals were divided into 5 groups with 6 in each and paw edema volume was measured by digital plethysmograph before and 3hrs after 1% carrageenan administration. Percentage of inhibition of paw edema was calculated. Results showed macrolides having significant anti-inflammatory activity & the anti-inflammatory activity of roxithromycin was almost equally comparable with etoricoxib

  17. Discovery of the butenyl-spinosyn insecticides: novel macrolides from the new bacterial strain Saccharopolyspora pogona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewer, Paul; Hahn, Donald R; Karr, Laura L; Duebelbeis, Dennis O; Gilbert, Jeffrey R; Crouse, Gary D; Worden, Thomas; Sparks, Thomas C; Edwards, Pat McKamey Rex; Graupner, Paul R

    2009-06-15

    A new bacterium, Saccharopolyspora pogona (NRRL30141) was discovered which produced a series of very potent insecticidal compounds structurally related to the 'classical' (i.e., C-21-ethyl) spinosyns. A series of fermentations gave sufficient extract to allow the isolation and characterization of a total of 31 new metabolites. The majority of these compounds contained a but-1-enyl group at C-21 of the macrolide in place of the ethyl group in the 'classical' spinosyn series, corresponding to an additional acetate group incorporated during their biosynthesis. Additionally a variety of other new functionality was seen including hydroxylations, several novel forosamine sugar replacements, and a novel 14-membered macrolide ring analog.

  18. Screening of quinolone antibiotic residues in chicken meat and beef sold in the markets of Ankara, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Er, Buket; Onurdag, Fatma Kaynak; Demirhan, Burak; Ozgacar, Selda Özgen; Oktem, Aysel Bayhan; Abbasoglu, Ufuk

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed to find the effects of quinolone antibiotics in chicken and beef used in Ankara, Turkey. Total number of 127 chicken and 104 beef meat samples were collected randomly from local markets for analysis. Extraction and determination of quinolones were made by ELISA procedure. One hundred eighteen of 231 (51.1%) examined chicken meat and beef samples were found to contain quinolone antibiotic residue. Among the chicken meat and beef samples, 58 (45.7%) of chicken meat samples and 60 (57.7%) of beef meat samples were positive for quinolones, respectively. The mean levels (±SE) of quinolones were found to be 30.81 ± 0.45 µg/kg and 6.64 ± 1.11 µg/kg in chicken and beef samples, respectively. This study indicated that some chicken and beef meat sold in Ankara contains residues of quinolone antibiotics.

  19. Investigations on the 4-Quinolone-3-carboxylic Acid Motif. 7. Synthesis and Pharmacological Evaluation of 4-Quinolone-3-carboxamides and 4-Hydroxy-2-quinolone-3-carboxamides as High Affinity Cannabinoid Receptor 2 (CB2R) Ligands with Improved Aqueous Solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugnaini, Claudia; Brizzi, Antonella; Ligresti, Alessia; Allarà, Marco; Lamponi, Stefania; Vacondio, Federica; Silva, Claudia; Mor, Marco; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Corelli, Federico

    2016-02-11

    4-Quinolone-3-carboxamide derivatives have long been recognized as potent and selective cannabinoid type-2 receptor (CB2R) ligands. With the aim to improve their physicochemical properties, basically aqueous solubility, two different approaches were followed, entailing the substitution of the alkyl chain with a basic replacement or scaffold modification to 4-hydroxy-2-quinolone structure. According to the first approach, compound 6d was obtained, showing slightly reduced receptor affinity (K(i) = 60 nM) compared to the lead compound 4 (0.8 nM) but greatly enhanced solubility (400-3400 times depending on the pH of the medium). On the other hand, shifting from 4-quinolone to 4-hydroxy-2-quinolone structure enabled the discovery of a novel class of CB2R ligands, such as 7b and 7c, characterized by K(i) 1300. At pH 7.4, compound 7c resulted by 100-fold more soluble than 4.

  20. Rapid determination of quinolones in cosmetic products by ultra high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shao-Ying; Huang, Xi-Hui; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Jin, Quan; Zhu, Guo-Nian

    2014-05-01

    This study developed an improved analytical method for the simultaneous quantification of 13 quinolones in cosmetics by ultra high performance liquid chromatography combined with ESI triple quadrupole MS/MS under the multiple reaction monitoring mode. The analytes were extracted and purified by using an SPE cartridge. The limits of quantification ranged from 0.03 to 3.02 μg/kg. The precision for determining the quinolones was quinolones in real cosmetic samples.

  1. Quinolone resistance in absence of selective pressure: the experience of a very remote community in the Amazon forest.

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    Lucia Pallecchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Quinolones are potent broad-spectrum bactericidal agents increasingly employed also in resource-limited countries. Resistance to quinolones is an increasing problem, known to be strongly associated with quinolone exposure. We report on the emergence of quinolone resistance in a very remote community in the Amazon forest, where quinolones have never been used and quinolone resistance was absent in 2002. METHODS: The community exhibited a considerable level of geographical isolation, limited contact with the exterior and minimal antibiotic use (not including quinolones. In December 2009, fecal carriage of antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli was investigated in 120 of the 140 inhabitants, and in 48 animals reared in the community. All fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates were genotyped and characterized for the mechanisms of plasmid- and chromosomal-mediated quinolone resistance. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Despite the characteristics of the community remained substantially unchanged during the period 2002-2009, carriage of quinolone-resistant E. coli was found to be common in 2009 both in humans (45% nalidixic acid, 14% ciprofloxacin and animals (54% nalidixic acid, 23% ciprofloxacin. Ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates of human and animal origin showed multidrug resistance phenotypes, a high level of genetic heterogeneity, and a combination of GyrA (Ser83Leu and Asp87Asn and ParC (Ser80Ile substitutions commonly observed in fluoroquinolone-resistant clinical isolates of E. coli. CONCLUSIONS: Remoteness and absence of antibiotic selective pressure did not protect the community from the remarkable emergence of quinolone resistance in E. coli. Introduction of the resistant strains from antibiotic-exposed settings is the most likely source, while persistence and dissemination in the absence of quinolone exposure is likely mostly related with poor sanitation. Interventions aimed at reducing the spreading of resistant isolates (by improving sanitation

  2. Rh(III) and Ru(II)-catalyzed site-selective C-H alkynylation of quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dahye; Hong, Sungwoo

    2015-04-17

    C2- and C5-alkynylated quinolone scaffolds are core structures of numerous biologically active molecules. Utilizing TIPS-EBX as an alkynylating agent, we have developed an efficient and site-selective C5 alkynylation of 4-quinolones that is directed by the weakly coordinating carbonyl group. In addition, Ru(II) catalyzed C2-selective alkynylation was successfully realized via N-pyrimidyl group-directed cross-couplings to access valuable C2-alkynylated 4-quinolones. This strategy provides direct access to the C2 or C5 alkynylated 4-quinolones. Furthermore, the reaction was applied to isoquinolones for C3-selective alkynylation.

  3. Actualidad de las quinolonas Present situation of quinolones

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    Manuel Cué Brugueras

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Las quinolonas son los antimicrobianos que han tenido un mayor desarrollo en los últimos años. Después de obtenerse el ácido nalidíxico, en 1962, se desarrollaron varios compuestos con características muy similares, que solo se establecieron como antisépticos urinarios, y que constituyeron la primera generación de quinolonas, hasta que en 1978, mediante la adición de un grupo piperacinil en posición 7 y un átomo de flúor en posición 6 comenzó a desarrollarse un conjunto de agentes antibacterianos llamados piperacinil fluoroquinolonas o simplemente fluoroquinolonas. El primero de ellos fue el norfloxacino, con el cual se logró una mayor actividad antimicrobiana del grupo y su uso sistémico. Durante años las fluroquinolonas fueron consideradas como un grupo homogéneo de antibióticos, con propiedades semejantes y, por tanto, como la segunda y última posibilidad de generación de quinolonas, pero las posibilidades de transformación de su estructura química ha producido un desarrollo vertiginoso de este grupo, que lo ha convertido en el más acelerado dentro de los antibióticos, con compuestos de mayor espectro antibacteriano, penetración tisular y seguridad, y con menor manifestación de resistencia antimicrobiana, demostrada hasta el presente, lo cual ha hecho que actualmente existan 4 generaciones de quinolonas, que se haya ampliado su uso y que continúe su desarrollo. Por tal motivo, se presenta una revisión que incluye espectro y mecanismo de acción, resistencia bacteriana, farmacodinamia y farmacocinética, interacciones medicamentosas, efectos adversos, indicaciones y dosificación de las más usadas.The quinolones are antimicrobial agents that have attained their highest development in the last years. After obtaining nalidixic acid, in 1962, several compounds were developed with similar characteristics that were only established as urinary antiseptics and that were the first generation of quinolones until 1978, when

  4. [Comparison of the in vitro post-antibiotic effect of C14 macrolides (erythromycin and roxithromycin) and C16 macrolides (josamycin and spiramycin) against Staphylococcus aureus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolin, O; Bouanchaud, D H

    1989-05-01

    In vitro post-antibiotic effect (PAE) induced by erythromycin, roxithromycin, josamycin and spiramycin has been compared on Staphylococcus aureus. Three MLSB sensitive and three MLSB inducible resistant S. aureus strains have been used. delta t was the time required for culture to increase by 1 log10 after drug removal in comparison with controls. For erythromycin and roxithromycin delta t ranged from 6 minutes at 1 x MIC to 48 minutes at 4 x MIC (average of the six strains at 4 x MIC: 33 minutes). For josamycin and spiramycin, delta t ranged from 36 at 1/2 x MIC to 138 minutes at 4 x MIC (average at 4 x MIC: 101 minutes). No difference was observed between MLSB sensitive and MLSB inducible resistant S. aureus strains. In our experimental conditions, PAEs observed with josamycin and spiramycin (16-membered-ring macrolides) were 2.5 to 3 times longer than those observed with erythromycin and roxithromycin (14-membered-ring macrolides). These results added to biological differences previously observed between 14-membered-ring and 16-membered-ring macrolides.

  5. MANAGEMENT OF OSTEOMYELITIS CAUSED BY SALMONELLA ENTERICA SUBSP. HOUTENAE IN A TAYLOR'S CANTIL (AGKISTRODON BILINEATUS TAYLORI) USING AMIKACIN DELIVERED VIA OSMOTIC PUMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Meredith M; Newton, Alisa L; Sykes, John M

    2016-06-01

    An adult female Taylor's cantil (Agkistrodon bilineatus taylori) presented with marked spinal and mandibular osteomyelitis that cultured positive for Salmonella enterica subsp. houtenae, serovar IV 43:z4,z32:-. Progression of osteomyelitis was arrested by treatment using amikacin (0.026 mg/kg per hour) delivered via subcutaneous osmotic pump for 10 mo, replacing the pump every 4 wk. No adverse effects on renal function were appreciated throughout the course of therapy. Amikacin therapy was discontinued after improvement with treatment, but 5 mo later, bony lesions worsened, and an additional abscess formed at the previous pump site. The animal's condition declined and euthanasia was elected. Postmortem examination confirmed marked osteomyelitis with Salmonella infection of same serovar as the initial biopsy. This report highlights the pathogenicity of the S. enterica subsp. houtenae serovar and the ability to deliver effective amikacin dosage via osmotic pump to arrest osteomyelitis due to salmonellosis in a venomous snake.

  6. INTERACTIVE EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT DURATION OF LITHIUM PRETREATMENT WITH AMIKACIN AND GENTAMICIN ONAPOMORPHINE-INDUCED LICKING IN RATS

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    MOHAMMAD SHARIFZADEH

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study the hypothesis that aminoglycoside antibiotics and lithium may influence apomorphine-induced licking via their effects on phosphoinositide pathways and calcium stores were investigated in male rats. Subcutaneous administration of apomorphine (0.1,0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg to rats induced licking in a dose-dependent manner and the maximum response was obtained by the dose of 0.5 mg/kg of the drug. Intracerebroventricular injections of amikacin (5, 25 and 50 ug/rat and gentamicin (10, 20 and 40 ug/rat decreased the apomorphine-induced licking significantly. Pretreatment of animals with lithium (600 mg/1 for 7,14 and 21 days increased licking induced by apomorphine. The inhibitory effects of amikacin and high dose of gentamicin were not affected by lithium pretreatment for 14 and 28 days. These findings indicate the possible involvement of phosphoinositide cascade in alterations of apomorphine-induced licking by aminoglycoside antibiotics and lithium in the brain. Also it is suggested that type and dose of aminoglycoside antibiotics and duration of lithium administration probably have different effects on responses mediated by phosphoinositide hydrolysis.

  7. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and drug resistance mechanisms to macrolides%肺炎支原体对抗菌药物敏感性及对大环内酯类的耐药机制研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵茂茂; 宋波; 蒲增惠; 于红霞

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the prevalence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection in the adults and teenagers with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) ,observe the drug susceptibility to the commonly used antibiotics ,and define the drug resistance mechanisms to the macrolides .METHODS From Oct 2010 to Mar 2012 , the throat swab specimens were collected during the acute stage to isolate and culture the M .pneumoniae .The molecular identification of the clinical isolates was performed by using polymerase-chain-reaction , the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of macrolides ,quinolones ,and tetracyclines were determined with the use of microdilution method .The 23S rRNA gene sequencing was performed for the macrolides-resistant strains and was compared with the gene sequencing of the standard strain MPFH (ATCC 15531) .RESULTS A total of 20 strains of M .pneumoniae have been isolated from the throat swab specimens obtained from the 129 CAP patients ,with the isolation rate of 15 .50% ;the strains were highly susceptible to tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones and were resistant to all the macrolides ,and both of the resistance mechanisms were the mutation of locus 2063 of 23 rRNA from A to G .CONCLUSIONS The situation of the drug resistance of M .pneumoniae to macrolides is harsh ,and the mutation of locus of the 23S rRNA is the major drug resistance mechanism .%目的:了解成人及青少年社区获得性肺炎(CAP)中肺炎支原体(MP)感染状况及其对常用抗菌药物的敏感性,明确M P对大环内酯类的耐药机制。方法2010年10月-2012年3月129例C A P患者取急性期咽拭子标本进行肺炎支原体分离培养,应用聚合酶链反应(PC R )对临床分离株进行分子鉴定;采用微量稀释法测定肺炎支原体对大环内酯类、喹诺酮类及四环素类抗菌药物的最低抑菌浓度(M IC );对大环内酯类耐药株进行23S rRNA 基因测序,并与标准菌株MPFH (ATCC 15531)基

  8. Mechanisms of quinolone resistance and implications for human and animal health

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    Velhner Maja

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Quinolone antibiotics have been widely used in human and veterinary medicine. This has caused the development of resistance and difficulties in the treatment of complicated bacterial infections in humans. The resistance to quinolones develops due to chromosome mutations and it can also be transferred by plasmids. The target enzyme for quinolones in Gram-negative bacteria is Gyrasa A, while the target enzyme in Grampositive bacteria is mostly topoisomerase IV. Gyrase A consists of two subunits encoded by genes gyrA and gyrB. The function of the enzyme is to introduce negative super coiling in DNA and therefore is essential for the replication of bacteria. Quinolone resistance develops if point mutations at 83 and/or 87 codon are introduced on gyrA. Establishing a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC to this group of antimicrobials will reveal possible mutations. Recently it was discovered that quinolone resistance is transmittable by plasmid termed PMQR (plasmid mediated quinolone resistance. The target gene marked qnr encodes a pentapeptide repeat family protein. Pentapeptide repeats form sheets, involved in protein-protein interactions. Qnr protein binds to GyrA protecting the enzyme from the inhibitory effect of ciprofloxacin. The distribution of qnr related resistance is higher in humans than in animals. In poultry, however, this type of resistance is present more than in other animals. Plasmid mediated resistance contributes to the faster spread of quinolone resistance. Proper food handling will significantly contribute to decreasing the risk from infection to which people are exposed. In medical and veterinary laboratories antimicrobial resistance monitoring in clinical and environmental isolates is advised. Since correlation between antibiotics application and antimicrobial resistance is often suggested, antimicrobial use must be under strict control of the authorities both in human and in veterinary medicine. .

  9. [Role of reactive oxygen species in the bactericidal action of quinolones--inhibitors of DNA gyrase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotova, V Iu; Mironov, A S; Zavigel'skiĭ, G B

    2014-01-01

    Quinolone antibiotics inhibit DNA gyrase, but the induced degradation of chromosomal DNA is determined by a complex process of joint action quinolones and hydroxyl radical OH'. To quantify the level of stress responses and their time dependence in bacterial cells the induced specific lux-biosensors--the bacterium Escherichia coli, containing hybrid plasmids pColD'::lux; pSoxS'::lux; pKatG'::lux were used in this study. It is shown that quinolones (nalidixic acid, norfloxacin) induce SOS-response and oxidative stress with the formation of superoxide anion O2(-) in E. coli cells. The main parameters of SOS-response and oxidative stress, which depend on the quinolone concentration, are determined. Formation of superoxide anion O2(-) occurs almost simultaneously with the SOS-response. The mutant strain of E. coli sodA sodB, which do not contain active forms of superoxide dismutases SodA and SodB, is characterized by an increased resistance to quinolones as compared to the wild type cells. At high concentrations of quinolones (nalidixic acid-->20 μg/mL; norfloxacin-->500 ng/mL) their bactericidal effect is partially caused by conversion of the superoxide anion to hydrogen peroxide H2O2, conducted by superoxide dismutases SodA and SodB, which is followed by the Fenton reaction and the formation of toxic hydroxyl radical OH'. At low concentrations of quinolones (nalidixic acid--<20 μg/mL; norfloxacin--<500 ng/mL), the role of active oxygen species in the antimicrobial effect is practically nonexistent.

  10. Characterization of quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana from chickens in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan; Zhao, Hongyu; Liu, Yuqi; Zhou, Xuping; Wang, Jinyuan; Liu, Tiantian; Beier, Ross C; Hou, Xiaolin

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the quinolone resistance of Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana isolated from chickens in China. A total of 293 Salmonella strains were isolated from chicken farms and slaughterhouses in Shandong province of China, and 130 (44.4%) were characterized as Salmonella enterica Indiana (chicken farms, n=52 strains; slaughter houses, n=78 strains). All isolate serotypes were tested with the Kauffmann-White classification system and examined for susceptibility to the quinolones: nalidixic acid, enrofloxacin, norfloxacin, and ciprofloxacin. The resistance of the Salmonella Indiana strains to nalidixic acid, enrofloxacin, norfloxacin, and ciprofloxacin were 100, 73.1, 71.2, and 82.7%, and 100, 59.0, 79.5, and 80.2%, respectively. Selected quinolone resistant strains were evaluated for mutations in genes (gyrA, gyrB, parC, and marA) by DNA sequencing. The gyrA mutation was found in all isolates, the parC mutation was only found in some isolates, and the gyrB and marA mutations were not observed. Quinolone resistance was evaluated in the representative isolates by screening for the quinolone resistance determinants, qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, qepA, and aac (6 ')-Ib-cr using PCR technology. The quinolone resistance determinants in Salmonella, qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, and qepA were negative by PCR, but aac(6 ')-Ib-cr had high detection rates of 90.4 and 96.2% in chicken farms and slaughterhouses, respectively. Salmonella Indiana containing the gyrA mutation was prevalent in farms and slaughterhouses and possessed a high frequency of the quinolone resistance determinant aac(6 ')-Ib-cr. These bacteria may have originated from the same source.

  11. A new macrolide and glycosides from the stem of Sargentodoxa cuneata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Xian Chen; Dai Lin Liu; Wen Yuan Gao; Tie Jun Zhang

    2009-01-01

    A new macrolide glycoside, cuneataside F was isolated from the n-butanol extract of the stem of Sargentodoxa cuneata. The structure was elucidated on the basis of extensive ID and 2D NMR as well as HRESI-MS spectroscopic analysis.

  12. Dominance of multidrug resistant CC271 clones in macrolide-resistant streptococcus pneumoniae in Arizona

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    Bowers Jolene R

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rates of resistance to macrolide antibiotics in Streptococcus pneumoniae are rising around the world due to the spread of mobile genetic elements harboring mef(E and erm(B genes and post-vaccine clonal expansion of strains that carry them. Results Characterization of 592 clinical isolates collected in Arizona over a 10 year period shows 23.6% are macrolide resistant. The largest portion of the macrolide-resistant population, 52%, is dual mef(E/erm(B-positive. All dual-positive isolates are multidrug-resistant clonal lineages of Taiwan19F-14, mostly multilocus sequence type 320, carrying the recently described transposon Tn2010. The remainder of the macrolide resistant S. pneumoniae collection includes 31% mef(E-positive, and 9% erm(B-positive strains. Conclusions The dual-positive, multidrug-resistant S. pneumoniae clones have likely expanded by switching to non-vaccine serotypes after the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine release, and their success limits therapy options. This upsurge could have a considerable clinical impact in Arizona.

  13. Macrolide-resistant phenotypes of invasive streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in Serbia

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    Gajić Ina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae has emerged as an important worldwide problem over the past decade. The aim of this study was to investigate macrolide-resistant phenotypes and the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of invasive pneumococci in Serbia. A total of 68 invasive pneumococcal strains, collected from 2009 to 2011, were sent from regional laboratories to the National Reference Laboratory. Susceptibility testing was performed using the VITEK2 system and phenotypes were determined by triple-test. Overall penicillin and erythromycin nonsusceptibility rates were 26% and 43%, respectively. Resistance rates were higher in children than in adults. Co-resistance to penicillin and erythromycin was detected in 18% strains. Resistance rates to the third generation of cephalosporins, TMP-SXT and tetracycline were 16%, 37% and 29%, respectively. All isolates were fully susceptible to vancomycin, linezolid, fluoroquinolones, telithromycin and rifampicin. Twenty-two isolates (79% an expressed macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB resistance phenotype and M phenotype was found in 21% of macrolide resistant strains. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175039

  14. Enantioselective synthesis in carbohydrate-based drug discovery: imino sugars, alkaloids and macrolide antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Nuno M; Rauter, Amélia P

    2014-01-01

    This review is dedicated to enantioselective methods for the generation of carbohydrate-based lead compounds for drug research. Selected examples encompassing imino sugars, bicyclic imino sugar-type alkaloids such as castanospermine, swainsonine, or alexine, as well as macrolide glycosides are covered and discussed.

  15. Amphidinolides B4 and B5, Potent Cytotoxic 26-Membered Macrolides from Dinoflagellate Amphidinium Species

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    Jun’ichi Kobayashi

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Two new cytotoxic 26-membered macrolides, amphidinolides B4 (1 and B5 (2, have been isolated from a marine dinoflagellate Amphidinium sp. (strain Y-100, and the structures were elucidated on the basis of detailed analyses of 2D NMR data including 13C−13C correlations.

  16. The clinical characteristics,treatment and outcome of macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲍芳

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the drug resistance of My-coplasma pneumoniae among children with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) ,and to explore the clinical and radiological characteristics of and the role of azithromycin in the treatment of of macrolide-resistant (MR) Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia.Methods Cases of CAP in children (n=179) were prospectively enrolled in

  17. Evaluation of macrolides for possible use against multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Paardt, Anne-Fleur; Wilffert, Bob; Akkerman, Onno W.; de Lange, Wiel C. M.; van Soolingen, Dick; Sinha, Bhanu; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C.

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is a major global health problem. The loss of susceptibility to an increasing number of drugs behoves us to consider the evaluation of non-traditional anti-tuberculosis drugs. Clarithromycin, a macrolide antibiotic, is defined as a group 5 anti-tuberculosis

  18. Failure of moxifloxacin treatment in Mycoplasma genitalium infections due to macrolide and fluoroquinolone resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couldwell, Deborah L; Tagg, Kaitlin A; Jeoffreys, Neisha J; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L

    2013-10-01

    Increasing azithromycin treatment failure in sexually transmitted Mycoplasma genitalium infection, is linked to macrolide resistance and second-line treatment relies on the fluoroquinolone, moxifloxacin. We recently detected fluoroquinolone and macrolide resistance-associated mutations in 15% and 43%, respectively, of 143 initial M. genitalium PCR-positive specimens. For a subset of 33 Western Sydney Sexual Health Centre patients, clinical information and results of sequence analysis of M. genitalium macrolide and fluoroquinolone target genes - the 23S rRNA gene, and parC and gyrA, respectively - were used to examine whether mutations were associated with treatment failure. Macrolide resistance-associated mutations correlated with microbiological (p = 0.013) and clinical (p = 0.024) treatment failure, and fluoroquinolone resistance-associated mutations with microbiological moxifloxacin treatment failure (p = 0.005). We describe the first reported cases of clinical and microbiological moxifloxacin treatment failure. Failure of first- and second-line antibiotic treatment of M. genitalium infection is occurring and likely to increase with current treatment strategies.

  19. Fate and Ecotoxicology of Veterinary Macrolide and Sulfonamide Antibiotics in Surface Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotics are carried from manured lands and production sites in runoff to surface waters. Our objectives were to assess the environmental fate and ecotoxicology of two macrolide antibiotics (tylosin and erythromycin) and sulfamethazine. Experiments were designed to simulate Midwestern farm pond c...

  20. Macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLS) resistance in cutaneous propionibacteria: definition of phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eady, E A; Ross, J I; Cove, J H; Holland, K T; Cunliffe, W J

    1989-04-01

    Erythromycin-resistant propionibacteria isolated from the skin of antibiotic-treated acne patients were found to express four different patterns of resistance to a set of eight MLS antibiotics. The majority of isolates (48/89 strains) were constitutively resistant to 14- and 16-membered ring macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B-type antibiotics. MICs of josamycin (0.5-16 mg/l) and spiramycin (0.5-128 mg/l) were lower than those of erythromycin, oleandomycin and tylosin (64 to less than 512 mg/l). Two strains of Propionibacterium granulosum exhibited inducible MLS resistance. Both 14- and 16-membered ring macrolides and virginiamycin S induced clindamycin resistance in these strains. Fifteen isolates demonstrated a similar phenotype to the inducible strains but were non-inducible by erythromycin. A fourth group of strains demonstrated high level resistance to all five macrolides tested (MIC greater than or equal to 128 mg/l) but were sensitive to virginiamycin S. The phenotype displayed by these strains is not compatible with the expression of methylase genes as currently known, nor with the action of an erythromycin esterase which hydrolyses only 14-membered ring macrolides. The resistance patterns of 12 isolates could not be classified into any of the above phenotypic classes. Therefore, the majority of erythromycin resistant propionibacteria express MLS resistance which is phenotypically similar to that coded for by several well characterized RNA methylase (erm) genes.

  1. [In vitro antibacterial activity of a new macrolide: miokamycin. Comparison with erythromycin and josamycin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soussy, C J; Leclercq, R; Duval, J

    1988-05-01

    Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of miokamycin (M) were evaluated by agar dilution, comparatively with erythromycin (E) and josamycin (J) for 81 bacterial strains chosen as a function of susceptibility and resistance to Macrolides-Lincosamides-Streptogramins group (MLS). On Gram positive cocci, mode MIC of E, J, and M for strains sensitive to MLS were respectively (micrograms/ml): Staphylococci: 0.25; 1; 2-Streptococci and Pneumococci: 0.016; 0.03-0.12; 0.06-0.25-Enterococci: 0.5; 0.5-1; 1-2. Activity of the three antibiotics was similar against Staphylococci resistant to lincomycin and streptogramin A, those resistant to streptogramins A and B, on Staphylococci and Streptococci only resistant to lincosamides by inactivation. M, as J, was active on coagulase negative (Staphylococci resistant to E by inactivation and on MLBB inducible Staphylococci; on these strains, M is a resistance non-inducible macrolide. Activity of E, J and M was reduced on MLSB inducible Streptococci. The three antibiotics were inactive on Staphylococci Streptococci and Enterococci MLSB resistant constitutive. On Haemophilus, E (2-8 micrograms/ml) was more active than J (2-16) and M (8-32). Thus, M, as J, was shown to be among macrolide antibiotics of resistance non-inducing type on MLSB inducible resistant Staphylococci; its activity was slightly inferior to that of J, but very similar to that of spiramycin, other macrolide of this group.

  2. [In vitro activity of roxithromycin, new semisynthetic macrolide against obligate anaerobes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubreuil, L; Devos, J; Romond, C; Bryskier, A

    1986-05-01

    The "in vitro" susceptibility to roxithromycin and three other macrolides of 236 anaerobes isolated from clinical samples in 1984/1985 was determined by an agar-dilution method on Wilkins Chalgren medium. 90% of Gram positive cocci were susceptible to both roxithromycin and josamycin (MIC less than 1 mg/l, whereas 1 mg/l erythromycin and 2 mg/l spiramycin were able to inhibit respectively 46 and 86% of the same tested strains. No resistance to the four macrolides was observed among Eubacterium, propionibacterium and Bifidobacterium. Two C. perfringens strains and one C. difficile strain were resistant to all four macrolides, while 97% of Clostridium sp. strains were inhibited by 4 mg/l erythromycin, josamycin or roxithromycin. Against Gram positive anaerobes, roxithromycin was equal or superior to erythromycin and spiramycin. At a concentration of 4 mg/l, roxithromycin inhibited 82% of B. fragilis strains. Roxithromycin and josamycin were more active against Gram negative bacilli that erythromycin and spiramycin. Macrolides had no effect on Fusobacterium strains. In this study, 4 mg/l roxithromycin inhibited 217 of the 236 anaerobic strains investigated (92%).

  3. Nitroimidazoles, Quinolones and Oxazolidinones as Fluorine Bearing Antitubercular Clinical Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rahul V; Keum, Young-Soo; Park, Se Won

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a leading killer of lives worldwide and the global curse of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis is attaining really dangerous levels. Synergistic interaction of HIV and TB is the twin epidemics in resource-limited countries as each potentiate progression of the other. The increasing emergence of MDR-TB and XDR-TB place an immense burden for the treatment of TB with currently available drugs. The situation urgently demands for the discovery of new drugs with novel mode of action and differs in structural features in order to overcome resistance appears in conventional TB therapeutics. The present report covers the discovery of three classes of antituberculosis drugs, Nitroimidazoles, Quinolones and Oxazolidinones, undergoing clinical development with fluorine atom in their structures. Highly electronegative fluorine atom plays a signature role in advancing medicinal innovations as it existence in the drug compounds critically influences metabolic stability and lipophilicity thereby delaying its elimination by the body which results into a long term in vivo efficiency of the drug. Presence of fluorine atom(s) in the drug structures described in this report, has been associated with the several fold increase in the overall potency of the compound as demonstrated since the early discoveries. 6 Fluorinated derivatives from these three classes as pretomanid, delamanid, moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, linezolid and sutezolid have been discussed with their antituberculosis effects, mode of action, chemical synthetic routes and results of clinical studies.

  4. Effect of subtherapeutic vs therapeutic administration of macrolides on antimicrobial resistance in Mannheimia haemolytica and enterococci isolated from beef cattle

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    Rahat eZaheer

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Macrolides are the first-line treatment against bovine respiratory disease, and are also used to treat infections in humans. The macrolide, tylosin phosphate, is often included in the diet of cattle as a preventative for liver abscesses in many regions of the world outside of Europe. This study investigated the effects of administering macrolides to beef cattle either systemically through a single subcutaneous injection (therapeutic or continuously in-feed (subtherapeutic, on the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Mannheimia haemolytica and Enterococcus spp. isolated from the nasopharynx and faeces, respectively. Nasopharyngeal and faecal samples were collected weekly over 28 days from untreated beef steers and from steers injected once with tilmicosin or tulathromycin or continuously fed tylosin phosphate at dosages recommended by manufacturers. Tilmicosin and tulathromycin were effective in lowering (P < 0.05 the prevalence of M. haemolytica, whereas subtherpeutic tylosin had no effect. M. haemolytica isolated from control- and macrolide-treated animals were susceptible to macrolides as well as to other antibiotics. Major bacteria co-isolated with M. haemolytica included Pasteurella multocida, Staphylococcus spp., Acinetobacter spp., E. coli and Bacillus spp. With the exception of M. haemolytica and P. multocida, erythromycin resistance was frequently found in other isolated species. Both methods of macrolide administration increased (P < 0.05 the levels erythromycin-resistance enterococci in faeces. Development of resistance to injectable macrolides in bacteria isolated from the nasopharynx was species dependent. Therapeutic administration of tilmicosin and tularthromycin selected for macrolide resistant bacteria within both the respiratory and intestinal tract, whereas suptherapeutic administration of tylosin only selected for macrolide resistance in enteric bacteria.

  5. Combinations of macrolide resistance determinants in field isolates of Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmolaize, Benoit; Rose, Simon; Wilhelm, Cornelia; Warrass, Ralf; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2011-09-01

    Respiratory tract infections in cattle are commonly associated with the bacterial pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida. These infections can generally be successfully treated in the field with one of several groups of antibiotics, including macrolides. A few recent isolates of these species exhibit resistance to veterinary macrolides with phenotypes that fall into three distinct classes. The first class has type I macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B antibiotic resistance and, consistent with this, the 23S rRNA nucleotide A2058 is monomethylated by the enzyme product of the erm(42) gene. The second class shows no lincosamide resistance and lacks erm(42) and concomitant 23S rRNA methylation. Sequencing of the genome of a representative strain from this class, P. multocida 3361, revealed macrolide efflux and phosphotransferase genes [respectively termed msr(E) and mph(E)] that are arranged in tandem and presumably expressed from the same promoter. The third class exhibits the most marked drug phenotype, with high resistance to all of the macrolides tested, and possesses all three resistance determinants. The combinations of erm(42), msr(E), and mph(E) are chromosomally encoded and intermingled with other exogenous genes, many of which appear to have been transferred from other members of the Pasteurellaceae. The presence of some of the exogenous genes explains recent reports of resistance to additional drug classes. We have expressed recombinant versions of the erm(42), msr(E), and mph(E) genes within an isogenic Escherichia coli background to assess their individually contributions to resistance. Our findings indicate what types of compounds might have driven the selection for these resistance determinants.

  6. Characterization of in vivo-acquired resistance to macrolides of Mycoplasma gallisepticum strains isolated from poultry

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    Gerchman Irena

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The macrolide class of antibiotics, including tylosin and tilmicosin, is widely used in the veterinary field for prophylaxis and treatment of mycoplasmosis. In vitro susceptibility testing of 50 strains of M. gallisepticum isolated in Israel during the period 1997-2010 revealed that acquired resistance to tylosin as well as to tilmicosin was present in 50% of them. Moreover, 72% (13/18 of the strains isolated from clinical samples since 2006 showed acquired resistance to enrofloxacin, tylosin and tilmicosin. Molecular typing of the field isolates, performed by gene-target sequencing (GTS, detected 13 molecular types (I-XIII. Type II was the predominant type prior to 2006 whereas type X, first detected in 2008, is currently prevalent. All ten type X strains were resistant to both fluoroquinolones and macrolides, suggesting selective pressure leading to clonal dissemination of resistance. However, this was not a unique event since resistant strains with other GTS molecular types were also found. Concurrently, the molecular basis for macrolide resistance in M. gallisepticum was identified. Our results revealed a clear-cut correlation between single point mutations A2058G or A2059G in domain V of the gene encoding 23S rRNA (rrnA, MGA_01 and acquired macrolide resistance in M. gallisepticum. Indeed, all isolates with MIC ≥ 0.63 μg/mL to tylosin and with MIC ≥ 1.25 μg/mL to tilmicosin possess one of these mutations, suggesting an essential role in decreased susceptibility of M. gallisepticum to 16-membered macrolides.

  7. Macrolide-lincosamide-resistant phenotypes and genotypes of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine clinical mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Wu, Cong-Ming; Lu, Li-Ming; Ren, Gao-Wa Na; Cao, Xing-Yuan; Shen, Jian-Zhong

    2008-07-27

    The present study aimed to determine the prevalence and mechanisms of macrolide-lincosamide (ML) resistance in 72 Staphylococcus aureus isolates from cows with clinical mastitis. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of ML antibiotics were determined by the broth microdilution technique, inducible ML resistance phenotype by the D test, and ML resistance genes by PCR assay. The isolates showed a high level of resistance to erythromycin (93.1%), azithromycin (93.1%), spiramycin (41.7%), tylosin (40.3%), tilmicosin (27.8%), and clindamycin (36.1%). Macrolide-lincosamide MIC(90) values were > or = 128 mg/L. Inducible ML resistance (iML) phenotype was detected in 52.8% (38/72) of isolates. In erythromycin-resistant (ER-R) strains, methylase genes ermB and ermC, efflux gene msrA/msrB, and inactivating enzyme genes lnuA and mphC were present alone or in various combinations, with ermB and ermC genes predominating. This is the first report of ML resistance genes ermB, mrsA/mrsB and mphC in S. aureus isolated from bovine mastitis. The occurrence of high levels of resistance to ML antibiotics among the S. aureus isolates, and the high rate of iML phenotype, indicate that appropriate alternative antibiotics should be prescribed for treating bovine mastitis caused by S. aureus. Furthermore, significant differences in the conformations of lactone rings of 16- and 14-membered macrolides could explain why some isolates with a constitutive ML resistance (cML) phenotype were sensitive to 16-membered macrolides alone. The different interaction of the 16-membered macrolides with the 50S ribosomal subunit is also presumably the reason why the susceptibility results of tilmcosin differed from those of tylosin and spiramycin.

  8. Correlation between macrolide lung pharmacokinetics and therapeutic efficacy in a mouse model of pneumococcal pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veber, B; Vallée, E; Desmonts, J M; Pocidalo, J J; Azoulay-Dupuis, E

    1993-09-01

    The correlation between the pharmacokinetics of erythromycin, roxithromycin, clarithromycin, spiramycin and azithromycin and their efficacy was investigated in two pneumococcal pneumonia models. Female Swiss and C57B1/6 mice were infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae strain P4241 by the intratracheal per oral route. This virulent strain produces acute pneumonia with death within 3-4 days (Swiss mice), or subacute pneumonia with death within 10 days (C57B1/6 mice) in untreated mice and the outcome of the disease is closely related to progressive weight loss. Swiss mice received three doses of each macrolide 50 mg/kg bd beginning 18 h post-infection. C57B1/6 mice received three doses of each macrolide 25 mg/kg, bd (except azithromycin was 12.5 mg/kg bd) beginning 48 h post-infection. Cure rates were evaluated on the basis of body weight variations recorded daily after the end of treatment. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined in infected and non-infected mice after a single dose of each macrolide 50 mg/kg sc. The pharmacokinetics of azithromycin was also determined in leucopenic Swiss mice. We observed a hierarchy of in-vivo efficacy as follows: azithromycin > spiramycin = clarithromycin > roxithromycin = erythromycin which did not correlate with in-vitro MIC or MBC. The same hierarchy was found in terms of the lung T1/2. Lung T1/2s of macrolides could thus be predictive of their efficacy in respiratory tract infections. A reduced tissue AUC of azithromycin was seen in leucopenic mice suggesting leucocytes may help transport macrolides to sites of infection.

  9. Effect of various storage conditions on the stability of quinolones in raw milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meixia; Wen, Fang; Wang, Hui; Zheng, Nan; Wang, Jiaqi

    2016-07-01

    Research on the storage stability of antibiotic residues in milk is important for method development or validation, milk quality control and risk assessment during screening, confirmation, qualitative or quantitative analysis. This study was conducted using UPLC-MS/MS to determine the stability of six quinolones - ciprofloxacin (CIP), danofloxacin (DAN), enrofloxacin (ENR), sarafloxacin (SAR), difloxacin (DIF) and flumequine (FLU) - in raw milk stored under various conditions to investigate if quinolones degrade during storage of milk, and finally to determine optimal storage conditions for analysis and scientific risk assessment of quinolone residues in raw milk. The storage conditions included different temperatures and durations (4°C for 4, 8, 24 and 48 h; -20°C for 1, 7 and 30 days; -80°C for 1, 7 and 30 days), thawing temperatures (25, 40 and 60°C), freeze-thaw cycles (1-5), and the addition of different preservatives (sodium thiocyanate, sodium azide, potassium dichromate, bronopol and methanal). Most quinolones exhibited high stability at 4°C for up to 24 h, but began to degrade after 48 h. In addition, no degradation of quinolones was seen when milk samples were stored at -20°C for up to 7 days; however, 30 days of storage at -20°C resulted in a small amount of degradation (about 30%). Similar results were seen when samples were stored at -80°C. Moreover, no losses were observed when frozen milk samples were thawed at 25, 40 or 60°C. All the quinolones of interest, except sarafloxacin, were stable when milk samples were thawed at 40°C once and three times, but unstable after five freeze-thaw cycles. Preservatives affected the stability of quinolones, but the effects differed depending on the preservative and quinolone. The results of this study indicate optimum storage protocols for milk samples, so that residue levels reflect those at the time of initial sample analysis, and should improve surveillance programmes for quinolones in raw milk.

  10. In vitro anti-Mycobacterium avium activities of quinolones: predicted active structures and mechanistic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopman, G; Li, J Y; Wang, S; Pearson, A J; Chang, K; Jacobs, M R; Bajaksouzian, S; Ellner, J J

    1994-08-01

    The relationship between the structures of quinolones and their anti-Mycobacterium avium activities has been previously derived by using the Multiple Computer-Automated Structure Evaluation program. A number of substructural constraints required to overcome the resistance of most of the strains have been identified. Nineteen new quinolones which qualify under these substructural requirements were identified by the program and subsequently tested. The results show that the substructural attributes identified by the program produced a successful a priori prediction of the anti-M. avium activities of the new quinolones. All 19 quinolones were found to be active, and 4 of them are as active or better than ciprofloxacin. With these new quinolones, the updated multiple computer-automated structure evaluation program structure-activity relationship analysis has helped to uncover additional information about the nature of the substituents at the C5 and C7 positions needed for optimal inhibitory activity. A possible explanation of drug resistance based on the observation of suicide inactivation of bacterial cytochrome P-450 by the cyclopropylamine moiety has also been proposed and is discussed in this report. Furthermore, we confirm the view that the amount of the uncharged form present in a neutral pH solution plays a crucial role in the drug's penetration ability.

  11. Fluorescence quenching as a tool to investigate quinolone antibiotic interactions with bacterial protein OmpF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Patrícia; Sousa, Isabel; Winterhalter, Mathias; Gameiro, Paula

    2009-02-01

    The outer membrane porin OmpF is an important protein for the uptake of antibiotics through the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria; however, the possible binding sites involved in this uptake are still not recognized. Determination, at the molecular level, of the possible sites of antibiotic interaction is very important, not only to understand their mechanism of action but also to unravel bacterial resistance. Due to the intrinsic OmpF fluorescence, attributed mainly to its tryptophans (Trp(214), Trp(61)), quenching experiments were used to assess the site(s) of interaction of some quinolone antibiotics. OmpF was reconstituted in different organized structures, and the fluorescence quenching results, in the presence of two quenching agents, acrylamide and iodide, certified that acrylamide quenches Trp(61) and iodide Trp(214). Similar data, obtained in presence of the quinolones, revealed distinct behaviors for these antibiotics, with nalidixic acid interacting near Trp(214) and moxifloxacin near Trp(61). These studies, based on straightforward and quick procedures, show the existence of conformational changes in the protein in order to adapt to the different organized structures and to interact with the quinolones. The extent of reorganization of the protein in the presence of the different quinolones allowed an estimate on the sites of protein/quinolone interaction.

  12. Introduction of quinolone resistant Escherichia coli to Swedish broiler population by imported breeding animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börjesson, Stefan; Guillard, Thomas; Landén, Annica; Bengtsson, Björn; Nilsson, Oskar

    2016-10-15

    During recent years a rapid increase of quinolone resistant Escherichia coli have been noted in the Swedish broiler population, despite the lack of a known selective pressure. The current study wanted to investigate if imported breeding birds could be a source for the quinolone resistant E. coli. The occurrence of quinolone resistant E. coli was investigated, using selective cultivation with nalidixic acid, in grand-parent birds on arrival to Sweden and their progeny. In addition, sampling in hatcheries and empty cleaned poultry houses was performed. Clonality of isolates was investigated using a 10-loci multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). To identify the genetic basis for the resistance isolates were also analysed for occurrence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) determinants and characterization of chromosomal mutations. E. coli resistant to nalidixic acid occurred in grandparent birds imported to Sweden for breeding purposes. Four predominant MLVA types were identified in isolates from grandparent birds, parent birds and broilers. However, resistant E. coli with identical MLVA patterns were also present in hatcheries and poultry houses suggesting that the environment plays a role in the occurrence. Nalidixic acid resistance was due to a mutation in the gyrA gene and no PMQR could be identified. The occurrence of identical clones in all levels of the production pyramid points to that quinolone resistant E. coli can be introduced through imported breeding birds and spread by vertical transmission to all levels of the broiler production pyramid.

  13. Semiempirical MNDO and UV Absorption Studies on Tautomerism of 2-Quinolones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirek, Julian; Syguła, Andrzej

    1982-11-01

    Semiempirical MNDO calculations with geometry optimization were carried out for seven 4-X-2-quinolone tautomers (X = H, CH3, Cl, OCH3, N(CH3)2, COOH, COOCH3). The results show that 2-hydroxyquinolines are less stabilized compared to 2-quinoIones than 2-hydroxypyridines vs. 2-pyridones. The earlier estimated correction applied to these MNDO results suggests that 4-X-2-quinolones have lower chemical binding energies than the corresponding 4-X-2- hydroxyquinolines by ca. 2.1-3.3 kcal/mol. It is additionally shown that the substituent in position 4 does not influence significantly the relative stabilities of the tautomers. The results of the calculations are verified by UV absorption studies of diluted decane solutions of 2-quinolones at ca. 120°. CNDO/S-Cl-1 calculations based on the optimal MNDO geometries were carried out for 4-X-2- quinolone tautomers. The results generally agree well with the experimental data. A disagreement of the data for 4-COOR-2-quinolones is rationalized.

  14. Study of the luminescence behavior of seven quinolones on a paper substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Junfen [Institute of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China)]. E-mail: fenjunli@sina.com; Li Jianqing [Institute of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Shuang Shaomin [Institute of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Dong Chuan [Institute of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China)]. E-mail: dc@sxu.edu.cn

    2005-08-29

    Studies on the luminescence spectra behaviors of seven quinines on solid substrate (SS-RTP) were performed. Experimental conditions, such as heavy atom type, pH and drying time of the sample, etc. on solid substrate room temperature phosphorescence (SS-RTP) or solid substrate delayed fluorescence (SS-DF), were studied in detail. CdCl{sub 2} could induce strongest RTP or DF emission of these quinolones. In addition, a comparative study on the spectral behavior of seven quinolones was given, including low temperature phosphorescence (LTP), low temperature fluorescence (LTF) and spectra methioned above. New determination methods for the analysis of seven quinolones by solid substrate room temperature fluorescence (SS-RTF), SS-RTP or SS-DF with filter paper as solid substrate were presented. Analytical characteristics of these methods of seven quinolones were studied. The linear dynamic ranges (LDR), the limit of detection (LOD) and the relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) were valued. Recoveries of seven quinolones in human urine samples were from 98.1% to 104.3%.

  15. Protective effect of Qnr on agents other than quinolones that target DNA gyrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, George A; Corcoran, Marian A; Hooper, David C

    2015-11-01

    Qnr is a plasmid-encoded and chromosomally determined protein that protects DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV from inhibition by quinolones. Despite its prevalence worldwide and existence prior to the discovery of quinolones, its native function is not known. Other synthetic compounds and natural products also target bacterial topoisomerases. A number were studied as molecular probes to gain insight into how Qnr acts. Qnr blocked inhibition by synthetic compounds with somewhat quinolone-like structure that target the GyrA subunit, such as the 2-pyridone ABT-719, the quinazoline-2,4-dione PD 0305970, and the spiropyrimidinetrione pyrazinyl-alkynyl-tetrahydroquinoline (PAT), indicating that Qnr is not strictly quinolone specific, but Qnr did not protect against GyrA-targeting simocyclinone D8 despite evidence that both simocyclinone D8 and Qnr affect DNA binding to gyrase. Qnr did not affect the activity of tricyclic pyrimidoindole or pyrazolopyridones, synthetic inhibitors of the GyrB subunit, or nonsynthetic GyrB inhibitors, such as coumermycin A1, novobiocin, gyramide A, or microcin B17.Thus, in this set of compounds the protective activity of Qnr was confined to those that, like quinolones, trap gyrase on DNA in cleaved complexes.

  16. Metal-free transannulation reaction of indoles with nitrostyrenes: a simple practical synthesis of 3-substituted 2-quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, Alexander V; Smirnov, Alexander N; Aksenov, Nicolai A; Aksenova, Inna V; Frolova, Liliya V; Kornienko, Alexander; Magedov, Igor V; Rubin, Michael

    2013-10-18

    3-Substituted 2-quinolones are obtained via a novel, metal-free transannulation reaction of 2-substituted indoles with 2-nitroalkenes in polyphosphoric acid. The reaction can be used in conjunction with the Fisher indole synthesis offering a practical three-component heteroannulation methodology to produce 2-quinolones from arylhydrazines, 2-nitroalkenes and acetophenone.

  17. [Investigation of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates from bloodstream infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buruk, Celal Kurtuluş; Öztel Ocak, Hikmet; Bayramoğlu, Gülçin; Aydın, Faruk

    2016-04-01

    One of the treatment options of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. infections which are the most common opportunistic pathogens of gram-negative sepsis is quinolones. Resistance to quinolones which act by disrupting DNA synthesis has been increasing. Horizontal transfer of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes play an important role in the spread of resistance. The data about the prevalence of PMQR genes in our country is quite limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of known PMQR genes namely qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrS, qnrD, aac(6')-Ib-cr, qepA and oqxAB amongst quinolone-resistant E. coli and Klebsiella spp. strains isolated from blood cultures. One hundred twenty seven E.coli and 66 Klebsiella isolates detected as nalidixic acid- and/or ciprofloxacin-resistant by phenotypical methods, from 193 blood samples of 187 patients admitted to Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Microbiology, Bacteriology Unit of Patient Service Laboratory between January 2012 to August 2013 were included in the study. The presence of PMQR genes were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and for the detection of aac(6')-Ib-cr variants PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method was used. The positive bands were sequenced using the same primers, and aligned with formerly defined resistance gene sequences, and confirmed. In the study, 56.7% (72/127) of E.coli and 19.7% (13/66) of Klebsiella spp. isolates, with a total of 44% (85/193) of all the isolates were found to be phenotypically resistant to quinolones. Of the 13 resistant Klebsiella isolates, 11 were K.pneumoniae, and two were K.oxytoca. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing isolates showed higher resistance (50/80, 62.5%) to quinolones than the negative ones (35/113, 30.9%). The prevalence of quinolone resistance genes among resistant E. coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates was determined as qnrA, 1.4% and 15.4%; qnrB, 4

  18. Distribution of quinolones, sulfonamides, tetracyclines in aquatic environment and antibiotic resistance in Indochina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru eSuzuki

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Southeast Asia has become the center of rapid industrial development and economic growth. However, this growth has far outpaced investment in public infrastructure, leading to the unregulated release of many pollutants, including wastewater-related contaminants such as antibiotics. Antibiotics are of major concern because they can easily be released into the environment from numerous sources, and can subsequently induce development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Recent studies have shown that for some categories of drugs this source-to-environment antibiotic resistance relationship is more complex. This review summarizes current understanding regarding the presence of quinolones, sulfonamides, and tetracyclines in aquatic environments of Indochina and the prevalence of bacteria resistant to them. Several noteworthy findings are discussed: 1 quinolone contamination and the occurrence of quinolone resistance are not correlated; 2 occurrence of the sul sulfonamide resistance gene varies geographically; and 3 microbial diversity might be related to the rate of oxytetracycline resistance.

  19. Stability of ampicillin, piperacillin, cefotaxime, netilmicin and amikacin in an L-amino acid solution prepared for total parenteral nutrition of newborn infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldstein, K; Colding, H; Andersen, G E

    1988-01-01

    The stability of ampicillin, piperacillin and cefotaxime, alone or in combination with either netilmicin or amikacin, was tested by microbiological methods at 29 degrees C (ampicillin, also at 22 degrees C) in an L-amino acid solution specially prepared for newborn infants. In the case of ampicil...

  20. Comparing amikacin and kanamycin-induced hearing loss in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment under programmatic conditions in a Namibian retrospective cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagwa, Evans L; Ruswa, Nunurai; Mavhunga, Farai; Rennie, Timothy; Leufkens, Hubert G M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075255049; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/266775098

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Amikacin and kanamycin are mainly used for treating multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), especially in developing countries where the burden of MDR-TB is highest. Their protracted use in MDR-TB treatment is known to cause dose-dependent irreversible hearing loss, requiring hearing

  1. Comparing amikacin and kanamycin-induced hearing loss in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment under programmatic conditions in a Namibian retrospective cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagwa, Evans L; Ruswa, Nunurai; Mavhunga, Farai; Rennie, Timothy; Leufkens, Hubert G M; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Amikacin and kanamycin are mainly used for treating multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), especially in developing countries where the burden of MDR-TB is highest. Their protracted use in MDR-TB treatment is known to cause dose-dependent irreversible hearing loss, requiring hearing

  2. KPC-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Strains That Harbor AAC(6′)-Ib Exhibit Intermediate Resistance to Amikacin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremmer, Derek N.; Clancy, Cornelius J.; Press, Ellen G.; Almaghrabi, Reem; Chen, Liang; Doi, Yohei; Nguyen, M. Hong

    2014-01-01

    The aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme AAC(6′)-Ib is common among carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CR-Kp) strains. We investigated amikacin (AMK) activity against 20 AAC(6′)-Ib-producing CR-Kp strains. MICs clustered at 16 to 32 μg/ml. By the time-kill study, AMK (1× and 4× the MIC) was bactericidal against 30% and 85% of the strains, respectively. At achievable human serum concentrations, however, the majority of strains showed regrowth, suggesting that AAC(6′)-Ib confers intermediate AMK resistance. AMK and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) were synergistic against 90% of the strains, indicating that the combination may overcome resistance. PMID:25288089

  3. Prediction of Quinolone Activity against Mycobacterium avium by Molecular Topology and Virtual Computational Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozalbes, Rafael; Brun-Pascaud, Monique; García-Domenech, Ramon; Gálvez, Jorge; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Doucet, Jean-Pierre; Derouin, Francis

    2000-01-01

    We conducted a quantitative structure-activity relationship study using a database of 158 quinolones previously tested against Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare complex in order to develop a model capable of predicting the activity of new quinolones against the M. avium-M. intracellulare complex in vitro. Topological indices were used as structural descriptors and were related to anti-M. avium-M. intracellulare complex activity by using the linear discriminant analysis (LDA) statistical technique. The discriminant equation thus obtained correctly classified 137 of the 158 quinolones, including 37 of a test group of 44 randomly chosen compounds. This model was then applied to 24 quinolones, including recently developed fluoroquinolones, whose MICs were subsequently determined in vitro by using the Alamar blue microplate assay; the biological results confirmed the model's predictions. The MICs of these 24 quinolones were then treated by multilinear regression (MLR) to establish a model capable of classifying them according to their in vitro activities. Using this model, a good correlation between measured and predicted MICs was found (r2 = 0.88; r2cv [cross-validation correlation] = 0.82). Moxifloxacin, sparfloxacin, and gatifloxacin were the most potent against the M. avium- M. intracellulare complex, with MICs of 0.2, 0.4, and 0.9 μg/ml, respectively. Finally, virtual modifications of these three drugs were evaluated in LDA and MLR models in order to determine the importance of different substituents in their activity. We conclude that the combination of molecular-topology methods, LDA, and MLR provides an excellent tool for the design of new quinolone structures with enhanced activity. PMID:10991858

  4. A "Double-Edged" Scaffold: Antitumor Power within the Antibacterial Quinolone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisacchi, Gregory S; Hale, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    In the late 1980s, reports emerged describing experimental antibacterial quinolones having significant potency against eukaryotic Type II topoisomerases (topo II) and showing cytotoxic activity against tumor cell lines. As a result, several pharmaceutical companies initiated quinolone anticancer programs to explore the potential of this class in comparison to conventional human topo II inhibiting antitumor drugs such as doxorubicin and etoposide. In this review, we present a modern re-evaluation of the anticancer potential of the quinolone class in the context of today's predominantly pathway-based (rather than cytotoxicity-based) oncology drug R&D environment. The quinolone eukaryotic SAR is comprehensively discussed, contrasted with the corresponding prokaryotic data, and merged with recent structural biology information which is now beginning to help explain the basis for that SAR. Quinolone topo II inhibitors appear to be much less susceptible to efflux-mediated resistance, a current limitation of therapy with conventional agents. Recent advances in the biological understanding of human topo II isoforms suggest that significant progress might now be made in overcoming two other treatment-limiting disadvantages of conventional topo II inhibitors, namely cardiotoxicity and drug-induced secondary leukemias. We propose that quinolone class topo II inhibitors could have a useful future therapeutic role due to the continued need for effective topo II drugs in many cancer treatment settings, and due to the recent biological and structural advances which can now provide, for the first time, specific guidance for the design of a new class of inhibitors potentially superior to existing agents.

  5. Characterization of Salmonella Typhimurium DNA gyrase as a target of quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongsoi, Siriporn; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Suprasert, Apinun; Utrarachkij, Fuangfa; Nakajima, Chie; Suthienkul, Orasa; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2015-08-01

    Quinolones exhibit good antibacterial activity against Salmonella spp. isolates and are often the choice of treatment for life-threatening salmonellosis due to multi-drug resistant strains. To assess the properties of quinolones, we performed an in vitro assay to study the antibacterial activities of quinolones against recombinant DNA gyrase. We expressed the S. Typhimurium DNA gyrase A (GyrA) and B (GyrB) subunits in Escherichia coli. GyrA and GyrB were obtained at high purity (>95%) by nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid agarose resin column chromatography as His-tagged 97-kDa and 89-kDa proteins, respectively. Both subunits were shown to reconstitute an ATP-dependent DNA supercoiling activity. Drug concentrations that suppressed DNA supercoiling by 50% (IC50 s) or generated DNA cleavage by 25% (CC25 s) demonstrated that quinolones highly active against S. Typhimurium DNA gyrase share a fluorine atom at C-6. The relationships between the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs), IC50 s and CC25 s were assessed by estimating a linear regression between two components. MICs measured against S. Typhimurium NBRC 13245 correlated better with IC50 s (R = 0.9988) than CC25 s (R = 0.9685). These findings suggest that the DNA supercoiling inhibition assay may be a useful screening test to identify quinolones with promising activity against S. Typhimurium. The quinolone structure-activity relationship demonstrated here shows that C-8, the C-7 ring, the C-6 fluorine, and N-1 cyclopropyl substituents are desirable structural features in targeting S. Typhimurium gyrase.

  6. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance; interactions between human, animal and environmental ecologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent ePOIREL

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to quinolones and fluoroquinolones is being increasingly reported among human but also veterinary isolates during the last two to three decades, very likely as a consequence of the large clinical usage of those antibiotics. Even if the principle mechanisms of resistance to quinolones are chromosome-encoded, due to modifications of molecular targets (DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, decreased outer-membrane permeability (porin defect and overexpression of naturally-occurring efflux, the emergence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR has been reported since 1998. Although these PMQR determinants confer low-level resistance to quinolones and/or fluoroquinolones, they are a favorable background for selection of additional chromosome-encoded quinolone resistance mechanisms. Different transferable mechanisms have been identified, corresponding to the production of Qnr proteins, of the aminoglycoside acetyltransferase AAC(6’-Ib-cr, or of the QepA-type or OqxAB-type efflux pumps. Qnr proteins protect target enzymes (DNA gyrase and type IV topoisomerase from quinolone inhibition (mostly nalidixic acid. The AAC(6’-Ib-cr determinant acetylates several fluoroquinolones, such as norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin. Finally, the QepA and OqxAB efflux pumps extrude fluoroquinolones from the bacterial cell. A series of studies have identified the environment to be a reservoir of PMQR genes, with farm animals and aquatic habitats being significantly involved. In addition, the origin of the qnr genes has been identified, corresponding to the waterborne species Shewanella sp. Altogether, the recent observations suggest that the aquatic environment might constitute the original source of PMQR genes, that would secondly spread among animal or human isolates.

  7. Improving quinolone use in hospitals by using a bundle of interventions in an interrupted time series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemsen, Ina; Cooper, Ben; van Buitenen, Carin; Winters, Marjolein; Andriesse, Gunnar; Kluytmans, Jan

    2010-09-01

    The objectives of the present study were to determine the effects of multiple targeted interventions on the level of use of quinolones and the observed rates of resistance to quinolones in Escherichia coli isolates from hospitalized patients. A bundle consisting of four interventions to improve the use of quinolones was implemented. The outcome was measured from the monthly levels of use of intravenous (i.v.) and oral quinolones and the susceptibility patterns for E. coli isolates from hospitalized patients. Statistical analyses were performed using segmented regression analysis and segmented Poisson regression models. Before the bundle was implemented, the annual use of quinolones was 2.7 defined daily doses (DDDs)/100 patient days. After the interventions, in 2007, this was reduced to 1.7 DDDs/100 patient days. The first intervention, a switch from i.v. to oral medication, was associated with a stepwise reduction in i.v. quinolone use of 71 prescribed daily doses (PDDs) per month (95% confidence interval [CI] = 47 to 95 PDDs/month, P quinolones (reduction, 107 PDDs/month [95% CI = 58 to 156 PDDs/month). Before the interventions the quinolone resistance rate was increasing, on average, by 4.6% (95% CI = 2.6 to 6.1%) per year. This increase leveled off, which was associated with intervention 2 and intervention 4, active monitoring of prescriptions and feedback. Trends in resistance to other antimicrobial agents did not change. This study showed that the hospital-wide use of quinolones can be significantly reduced by an active policy consisting of multiple interventions. There was also a stepwise reduction in the rate of quinolone resistance associated with the bundle of interventions.

  8. Novel application of Wiener vis-à-vis Szeged indices: Antitubercular activities of quinolones

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vijay K Agarwal; Shahnaz Bano; Keshav C Mathur; Padmakar V Khadikar

    2000-04-01

    The paper gives a brief account of the recently introduced Szeged index (Sz). Using this index antitubercular activities of N-2,4-difluorophenyl quinolones are subjected to quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis. The potential of Sz related to the Wiener index (W) is critically discussed. In addition, Huckel molecular orbital energies: HOMO, LUMO and total were also used for comparing and modelling antitubercular activities of the quinolones. The results, based on univariate as well as multivariate regressions, have shown that W, Sz and total give better results and that the correlations improve in multivariate regression analyses.

  9. The DNA gyrase-quinolone complex. ATP hydrolysis and the mechanism of DNA cleavage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampranis, S C; Maxwell, A

    1998-01-01

    Quinolone binding to the gyrase-DNA complex induces a conformational change that results in the blocking of supercoiling. Under these conditions gyrase is still capable of ATP hydrolysis which now proceeds through an alternative pathway involving two different conformations of the enzyme (Kampranis......, S. C., and Maxwell, A. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 22606-22614). The kinetics of ATP hydrolysis via this pathway have been studied and found to differ from those of the reaction of the drug-free enzyme. The quinolone-characteristic ATPase rate is DNA-dependent and can be induced in the presence...

  10. Prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants among oxyiminocephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Rincon Cruz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available High quinolone resistance rates were observed among oxyiminocephalosporin-resistant enterobacteria. In the present study, we searched for the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR genes within the 55 oxyiminocephalosporin-resistant enterobacteria collected in a previous survey. The main PMQR determinants were aac(6'-Ib-cr and qnrB, which had prevalence rates of 42.4% and 33.3%, respectively. The aac(6'-Ib-cr gene was more frequently found in CTX-M-15-producing isolates, while qnrB was homogeneously distributed among all CTX-M producers.

  11. Insights into resistance mechanism of the macrolide biosensor protein MphR(A) binding to macrolide antibiotic erythromycin by molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tingting; Zhang, Yanjun; Ding, Jing-Na; Fan, Song; Han, Ju-Guang

    2015-12-01

    Macrolide biosensor protein MphR(A) has been known as a key regulatory protein in metabolite sensing and genetic expression regulating. MphR(A) protein binds to macrolide antibiotic erythromycin (Ery) and releases the gene operon, thus activates expression of the mphA gene and initiates Ery resistance. The two mutant amino acid residues (V66L and V126L) might potentially disrupt Ery binding to MphR(A). In these studies, the binding of macrolide antibiotic Ery to wild type (Wt) MphR(A) and double mutant (V66L/V126L) MphR(A) are explored by molecular dynamics simulations. Compared to the Apo-MphR(A) protein and Wt-MphR(A)-Ery complex, many interesting effects owing to the double mutant (V66L/V126L) are discovered. In the case of Ery, Helix I which plays an important role in transcription shows itself a right-hand α helix in Wt-MphR(A)-Ery, whereas the activated helix is broken down in double mutant-V66L/V126L-MphR(A)-Ery. The calculated results exhibit that the double mutant V66L/V126L reduces the binding affinity of the V66L/V126L-MphR(A) to Ery, resulting in the block of Ery resistance. The binding free energy decomposition analysis reveals that the decrease of the binding affinity for the variant V66L/V126L-MphR(A)-Ery is mainly attributed to the gas phase electrostatic energies. The residue Leu66, Thr154, and Arg122 enhance the binding affinity of V66L/V126L-MphR(A) to Ery. The residues Tyr103 and His147 contributes mainly to binding energies in the Wt-MphR(A)-Ery complex, whereas the two residues have no contribution to the binding free energy inV66L/V126L-MphR(A)-Ery complex. Our study gives useful insights into the nature of amino acids mutation effect, the mechanism of blocking drug resistance at the atomic level and the characteristics in binding affinity for Ery to double mutant (V66L/V126L) MphR(A), which will contribute to the design of more effective macrolide antibiotics.

  12. Insights into resistance mechanism of the macrolide biosensor protein MphR(A) binding to macrolide antibiotic erythromycin by molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tingting; Zhang, Yanjun; Ding, Jing-Na; Fan, Song; Han, Ju-Guang

    2015-12-01

    Macrolide biosensor protein MphR(A) has been known as a key regulatory protein in metabolite sensing and genetic expression regulating. MphR(A) protein binds to macrolide antibiotic erythromycin (Ery) and releases the gene operon, thus activates expression of the mphA gene and initiates Ery resistance. The two mutant amino acid residues (V66L and V126L) might potentially disrupt Ery binding to MphR(A). In these studies, the binding of macrolide antibiotic Ery to wild type (Wt) MphR(A) and double mutant (V66L/V126L) MphR(A) are explored by molecular dynamics simulations. Compared to the Apo-MphR(A) protein and Wt-MphR(A)-Ery complex, many interesting effects owing to the double mutant (V66L/V126L) are discovered. In the case of Ery, Helix I which plays an important role in transcription shows itself a right-hand α helix in Wt-MphR(A)-Ery, whereas the activated helix is broken down in double mutant-V66L/V126L-MphR(A)-Ery. The calculated results exhibit that the double mutant V66L/V126L reduces the binding affinity of the V66L/V126L-MphR(A) to Ery, resulting in the block of Ery resistance. The binding free energy decomposition analysis reveals that the decrease of the binding affinity for the variant V66L/V126L-MphR(A)-Ery is mainly attributed to the gas phase electrostatic energies. The residue Leu66, Thr154, and Arg122 enhance the binding affinity of V66L/V126L-MphR(A) to Ery. The residues Tyr103 and His147 contributes mainly to binding energies in the Wt-MphR(A)-Ery complex, whereas the two residues have no contribution to the binding free energy inV66L/V126L-MphR(A)-Ery complex. Our study gives useful insights into the nature of amino acids mutation effect, the mechanism of blocking drug resistance at the atomic level and the characteristics in binding affinity for Ery to double mutant (V66L/V126L) MphR(A), which will contribute to the design of more effective macrolide antibiotics.

  13. In-vitro release pharmacokinetics of amikacin, teicoplanin and polyhexanide in a platelet rich fibrin-layer (PRF)-a laboratory evaluation of a modern, autologous wound treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knafl, Daniela; Thalhammer, Florian; Vossen, Matthias G

    2017-01-01

    Platelet rich fibrin (PRF) is an autologous fibrin glue, produced from patients' blood, which, besides intraoperative use, has applications in the treatment of infected wounds. The combination with antimicrobial agents results in a prolonged antibacterial effect allowing for wound dressing change intervals of seven days even in infected wounds. The aim of this study was to evaluate release kinetics of amikacin, teicoplanin or polyhexanide from a PRF-layer. PRF mixed with teicoplanin, amikacin or polyhexanide was sprayed on a silicon gauze patch and put on a colombia agar with bacteria with known minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and incubated for 24 hours and afterwards transferred to another agar with the same bacterial strain. Inhibition zones were measured every 24 hours. This was repeated on 7 consecutive days. Antibiotic concentrations were calculated by interpolation. More than 1000 mg/L teicoplanin were released within the first 24 hours and 28.22 mg/L after 168 hours. Amikacin release was above 10,000 mg/L within the first 24 hours and still 120.8 mg/L after 120 hours. A release of polyhexanide could be verified for the first 24 hours only. Consequently teicoplanin and amikacin released from PRF showed antimicrobial in-vitro effects for almost a week, whereas an antimicrobial effect of polyhexanide could only be verified for the first 24 hours. Our Results show that a weekly dressing regimen may be justified in wounds treated with PRF plus amikacin or teicoplanin, since bacteria will be eradicated over a considerable period of time after a single application of PRF.

  14. In vitro activities of ceftobiprole combined with amikacin or levofloxacin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa: evidence of a synergistic effect using time-kill methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresken, Michael; Körber-Irrgang, Barbara; Läuffer, Jörg; Decker-Burgard, Sabine; Davies, Todd

    2011-07-01

    Ceftobiprole is an investigational intravenous broad-spectrum cephalosporin with in vitro activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens, including meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent nosocomial pathogen, increasingly associated with complicated skin and skin-structure infections. Combination antimicrobial therapy is recommended as empirical therapy for serious infections where P. aeruginosa is suspected. Therefore, in this study the interaction of ceftobiprole with two other antipseudomonal agents (amikacin and levofloxacin) was investigated. Time-kill studies were performed for each single agent and for the combination of ceftobiprole 4 mg/L with either amikacin or levofloxacin at 0.5×, 1× and 2× the minimum inhibitory concentration. Five clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa as well as the P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853 reference strain were tested at initial inocula of 5×10(5) colony-forming units (CFU)/mL (low inoculum) or 5×10(7) CFU/mL (high inoculum). Synergy was defined as a decrease of ≥2log(10) CFU/mL with the combination compared with the most active single drug at 6 h and 24 h. At low inoculum with ceftobiprole as a single agent, viable counts were decreased by 1.5-2log(10) at 6 h. Addition of either amikacin or levofloxacin resulted in synergistic bactericidal activity at 24 h. At high inoculum the combination of ceftobiprole with amikacin or levofloxacin demonstrated synergism in one of three and three of five strains, respectively. This study demonstrated that the combination of ceftobiprole at a clinically achievable concentration of 4 mg/L with amikacin or levofloxacin exhibited synergistic activity against P. aeruginosa. There was no evidence of antagonism for either combination.

  15. Feasibility of the GenoType MTBDRsl assay for fluoroquinolone, amikacin-capreomycin, and ethambutol resistance testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and clinical specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillemann, Doris; Rüsch-Gerdes, Sabine; Richter, Elvira

    2009-06-01

    The new GenoType Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance second line (MTBDRsl) assay (Hain Lifescience, Nehren, Germany) was tested on 106 clinical isolates and directly on 64 sputum specimens for the ability to detect resistance to fluoroquinolones, injectable drugs (amikacin or capreomycin), and ethambutol in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. A total of 63 strains harboring fluoroquinolone, amikacin/capreomycin, or ethambutol resistance and 43 fully susceptible strains were comparatively analyzed with the new MTBDRsl assay, by DNA sequencing, and by conventional drug susceptibility testing in liquid and solid media. No discrepancies were obtained in comparison with the DNA sequencing results. Fluoroquinolone resistance was detected in 29 (90.6%) of 32, amikacin/capreomycin resistance was detected in 39/39 (84.8%/86.7%) of 46/45, and ethambutol resistance was detected in 36 (69.2%) of 52 resistant strains. A total of 64 sputum specimens (42 smear positive, 12 scanty, and 10 smear negative) were tested with the new MTBDRsl assay, and the results were compared with those of conventional drug susceptibility testing. Fluoroquinolone resistance was detected in 8 (88.9%) of 9, amikacin/capreomycin resistance was detected in 6/7 (75.0%/87.5%) of 8, and ethambutol resistance was detected in 10 (38.5%) of 26 resistant strains. No mutation was detected in susceptible strains. The new GenoType MTBDRsl assay represents a reliable tool for the detection of fluoroquinolone and amikacin/capreomycin resistance and to a lesser extent also ethambutol resistance. In combination with a molecular test for detection of rifampin and isoniazid resistance, the potential for the detection of extensively resistant tuberculosis within 1 to 2 days can be postulated.

  16. Macrolide susceptibility in Streptococcus pyogenes: monitoring of isolates collected from throat swabs for the period november 2003 to september 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Gabriella Mazzarello

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Streptococcus pyogenes can cause acute suppurative infections (tonsillitis and pharyngitis and serious complications like rheumatic fever or acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. Antibiotic treatment of streptococcal infections is recommended and penicillin is the therapy of choice, moreover, macrolides represent an important alternative particularly for patients with ß-lactam-associated allergies. However, increasing resistance of S. pyogenes to macrolides has been observed in some European countries (especially in Spain and Italy in the last decade.This study was conducted to update our knowledge on this evolution. Materials and methods: A total of 128 clinical strains of S. pyogenes isolated from 933 throat swabs collected in the Clinical Microbiological Laboratory of Ovada (ASL 22 between November 2003 and September 2006 were tested for their susceptibility to erythromycin, clindamycin and rokitamycin. The phenotype of macrolide resistance was determined by the triple-disc diffusion test method (Giovanetti et al, 1999. Results: S. pyogenes strains isolated between November 2003 and December 2005 showed a percentage of macrolide-resistance of 15%; more precisely 9% with phenotype M and 6% with phenotype iMLS. Only 3 of the 28 isolates (10.7% collected between January-September 2006 were macrolide-resistant (phenotype M.All 128 isolates were fully susceptible to rokitamycin. Conclusion: Macrolide resistance rates determined in the present study were relatively low in comparison to the values registered in our country in the last decade. Efflux of the drug (phenotype M is the predominating mechanism. This type of resistance does not affect the activity of macrolides 16-membered (e.g. rokitamicin.However, changes of resistance rates and their prevailing mechanisms can occur rapidly. For safe empirical prescription of macrolides, further surveillance studies that include the identification of resistance mechanisms are required

  17. Airborne allergic contact dermatitis from tylosin in pharmacy compounders and cross-sensitization to macrolide antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaiyandi, Viba; Houle, Marie Claude; Skotnicki-Grant, Sandy

    2012-01-01

    Tylosin is a broad-spectrum macrolide antibiotic that is restricted to veterinary use. Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) caused by tylosin has been reported in the literature from the farming industry and veterinary medicine. It is also reported as the most common antibiotic to cause ACD in the previously mentioned occupational settings. We present 2 cases of airborne ACD from tylosin among veterinary pharmaceutical compounding technicians. To our knowledge, only one other case of patch test-confirmed tylosin ACD has been reported in the manufacturing setting. Based on our results, cross-sensitization to other clinically relevant macrolides does not appear to be a concern. Our cases highlight the importance of patch testing among pharmaceutical compounders where the incidence of an airborne contact may be greater, given that the exposure is to the powdered form of potential allergens.

  18. Antimicrobial susceptibility and macrolide resistance genes in Streptococcus pyogenes collected in Austria and Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattringer, Rainer; Sauermann, Robert; Lagler, Heimo; Stich, Karin; Buxbaum, Astrid; Graninger, Wolfgang; Georgopoulos, Apostolos

    2004-09-01

    A total of 341 clinical isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes from Vienna, Austria and three Hungarian cities were tested for susceptibility to four macrolides and 12 other antibiotics. All isolates were fully susceptible to penicillin and the other beta-lactams tested. A high level of tetracycline resistance was found in Austria (26.7%) and in Hungary (30.5%). The rate of resistance to erythromycin, clarithromycin and azithromycin was 4.7% in Vienna and 3.7% in the Hungarian communities. In both countries, the MIC(90) values of erythromycin and clarithromycin were 0.12 mg/L and the MIC(90) of josamycin was 0.5mg/L. The M phenotype of resistance conferred by the mefA genes was predominant (n = 9) among the macrolide-resistant isolates (n = 14).

  19. Determination of macrolide antibiotics in chicken tissues by liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salikin, Jamilah; Abdullah, Aminah

    2013-11-01

    A methodusingliquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry (LC-(ESI)MS) for the simultaneous determination of three macrolides (tylosin, spiramycin and tilmicosin) in poultry muscle has been developed. The drugs were extracted with EDTA McIlvaine buffer, filter through celite 545 and the extracts were cleaned up by SPE Oasis HLB cartridge. Separation was carried out in end-capped silica-based C18 column and mobile phases containing trifluoroacetic acid-acetonitrile with a binary gradient system at a flow rate 0.5 ml/min. Detection was performed by single mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization in the positive mode. Several parameters affecting the mass spectra were studied. Chicken samples from the market were analyzed to check the residue of macrolide antibiotics.

  20. In vitro susceptibility of Ureaplasma urealyticum clinical isolates to new macrolides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamoto, Y; Miyake, Y; Suginaka, H; Usui, T

    1991-01-01

    Nine antimicrobial agents, the new macrolides, rokitamycin and midecamycin acetate, and seven other antibiotics, tetracycline, minocycline, doxycycline, josamycin, erythromycin, spiramycin, and norfloxacin, were studied for their antimicrobial activity against 100 strains of Ureaplasma urealyticum, using a microtiter broth dilution technique. The new macrolides, rokitamycin and midecamycin acetate, had the highest activity, with the MIC against 90% of isolates tested (MIC90) being less than or equal to 0.05 microgram/ml. MICs90 of erythromycin, josamycin, doxycycline, minocycline and tetracycline ranged from 0.1 to 0.78 micrograms/ml. Norfloxacin was least active, with a MIC90 of 12.5 micrograms/ml. Five of 100 strains tested were resistant (MIC greater than or equal to 12.5 micrograms/ml) to tetracycline, and two were resistant to minocycline and doxycycline; all of these were susceptible to rokitamycin and midecamycin acetate.

  1. [In vitro comparative activity of five macrolides against 190 Branhamella catarrhalis strains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chardon, H; Bellon, O; Bourgeois, F; Lagier, E

    1989-05-01

    We compared the in vitro activity of 5 macrolides against 190 strains of Branhamella catarrhalis; 48 strains were isolated at Centre Hospitalier, Aix-en-Provence, the 142 others were isolated during 1987, in 15 different Centres-Hospitaliers-Généraux in France. 153 strains were betalactamase producing strains; no difference in susceptibility to erythromycin was observed on betalactamase producing and non producing strains. Three active macrolides against 100% of strains were: erythromycin (MIC 50 = 0.25 mg/l - MIC 90 = 0.50 mg/l), roxithromycin (MIC 50 = 0.50 mg/l - MIC 90 = 0.50 mg/l) and josamycin (MIC 50 = 0.50 mg/l - MIC 90 = 1 mg/l); A lower activity was noted on midecamycin (mic 50 = 2 mg/l - MIC 90 = 2 mg/l) and spiramycin (MIC 50 = 4 mg/l - MIC 90 = 8 mg/l).

  2. Prevalence of quinolone resistance mechanisms and associations to minimum inhibitory concentrations in quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from humans and swine in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaco, Lina Maria; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Hasman, Henrik; Guardabassi, Luca; Nielsen, Lene; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2008-06-01

    Prevalence of quinolone resistance mechanisms and associations to minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of nalidixic acid (NAL) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) were investigated in 124 Escherichia coli isolated from humans (n=85) and swine (n=39) in Denmark. The collection included 59 high-level CIP-resistant isolates (MIC >or= 4) from human (n=51) and pig origin (n=8) and 65 low-level CIP-resistant isolates (MIC >or= 0.125) from human (n=34) and pig origin (n=31). Resistance by target modification was screened by PCR amplification and sequencing of the quinolone resistance determining regions (QRDRs) of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE. QRDR mutations occurred in all except two isolates (98%). All high-level CIP-resistant E. coli had one or two mutations in gyrA in combination with mutations in parC or parE. Mutations in parC and parE were only found in combination with gyrA mutations, and no mutations were observed in gyrB. Efflux pump mechanisms were detected in 10 human (11.8%) and 29 porcine (74.4%) isolates by an efflux pump inhibitor (EPI) agar dilution assay. The aac(6')-Ib-cr gene mediating resistance by enzymatic modification was found in 12 high-level CIP-resistant human isolates. The qnrA and qnrS genes conferring quinolone resistance by target protection were detected in two human low-level CIP-resistant isolates that did not display NAL resistance. As expected, target mutation in QRDRs was the most prevalent mechanism of quinolone resistance. This mechanism was complemented by efflux mechanisms in most porcine isolates. Transferable resistance by target protection or enzymatic modification was less common (10%) and restricted to human isolates.

  3. Nickel-quinolones interaction. Part 5-Biological evaluation of nickel(II) complexes with first-, second- and third-generation quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyrianou, Kalliopi C; Perdih, Franc; Papadopoulos, Athanasios N; Turel, Iztok; Kessissoglou, Dimitris P; Psomas, George

    2011-10-01

    The nickel(II) complexes with the quinolone antibacterial agents oxolinic acid, flumequine, enrofloxacin and sparfloxacin in the presence of the N,N'-donor heterocyclic ligand 2,2'-bipyridylamine have been synthesized and characterized. The quinolones act as bidentate ligands coordinated to Ni(II) ion through the pyridone oxygen and a carboxylato oxygen. The crystal structure of [(2,2'-bipyridylamine)bis(sparfloxacinato)nickel(II)] has been determined by X-ray crystallography. UV study of the interaction of the complexes with calf-thymus DNA (CT DNA) has shown that they bind to CT DNA with [(2,2'-bipyridylamine)bis(flumequinato)nickel(II)] exhibiting the highest binding constant to CT DNA. The cyclic voltammograms of the complexes have shown that in the presence of CT DNA the complexes can bind to CT DNA by the intercalative binding mode which has also been verified by DNA solution viscosity measurements. Competitive study with ethidium bromide (EB) has shown that the complexes can displace the DNA-bound EB indicating that they bind to DNA in strong competition with EB. The complexes exhibit good binding propensity to human or bovine serum albumin protein having relatively high binding constant values. The biological properties of the [Ni(quinolonato)(2)(2,2'-bipyridylamine)] complexes have been evaluated in comparison to the previously reported Ni(II) quinolone complexes [Ni(quinolonato)(2)(H(2)O)(2)], [Ni(quinolonato)(2)(2,2'-bipyridine)] and [Ni(quinolonato)(2)(1,10-phenanthroline)]. The quinolones and their Ni(II) complexes have been tested for their antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity. They have been also tested in vitro for their inhibitory activity against soybean lipoxygenase.

  4. Antimicrobial growth promoter ban and resistance to macrolides and vancomycin in enterococci from pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boerlin, P.; Wissing, A.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller;

    2001-01-01

    Ninety-six enterococcus isolates from fecal samples of pigs receiving tylosin as an antimicrobial growth promoter and 59 isolates obtained in the same farms 5 to 6 months after the ban of antimicrobial growth promoters in Switzerland were tested for susceptibility to nine antimicrobial agents. A ....... A clear decrease in resistance to macrolides, lincosamides, and tetracycline was visible after the ban. Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium belonged to the same clonal lineage as vancomycin-resistant isolates previously isolated from Danish pigs....

  5. Spectrophotometric determination of acidity constants of some macrolides in acetonitrile-water binary mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanli, Senem; Sanli, Nurullah; Alsancak, Güleren

    2010-12-01

    The acidity constants of eight macrolides (erythromycin, roxithromycin, oleandomycin, azithromycin, josamycin, tylosin tartrate, tilmicosin and spiramycin) have been determined in acetonitrile-water binary mixtures (30%, 40% and 50% (v/v)) by spectrophotometric method. The pKa's available in literature determined by various methods are compiled in comparison with the value of this work. These results are expected to essentially facilitate the research on occurrence, fate and effects, analysis method development, and control of antibiotics in various treatment occurrences.

  6. Genotypic and phenotypic detection of macrolide and lincosamide resistance in Streptococcus uberis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt-Van de Leemput, E; Zadoks, R N

    2007-11-01

    Streptococcus uberis isolates (n = 55) were obtained from milk samples of cases of mild clinical mastitis in 55 dairy cows from 35 herds serviced by one veterinary practice in Mayenne, France. Isolates were tested for macrolide and lincosamide resistance by using phenotypic and genotypic methods. Erythromycin resistance was detected in 12 of the 55 (22%) isolates based on agar disc diffusion testing and MIC measurements, and was encoded by ermB. This gene also conferred phenotypic resistance to pirlimycin based on MIC measurements, but the D-test was needed for detection of the resistance phenotype in the agar disc diffusion test. Isolates with ermB were also highly resistant to the macrolide antibiotic spiramycin. Seventeen of the 55 isolates (31%) were classified as resistant to spiramcyin only and as having intermediate susceptibility to spiramycin based on agar disc diffusion testing and MIC measurements, respectively. The genetic mechanism behind this phenotype and its clinical relevance are unknown. The efflux pump gene mefA was not detected in any of the 55 isolates in this study. Pirlimycin resistance without macrolide resistance was encoded by the lincosamide resistance gene linB in 4 isolates. Based on current guidelines, some linB-positive isolates would be classified as susceptible by using phenotypic tests, and alternative values for the interpretation of the agar disc diffusion test are suggested. We conclude that the agar disc diffusion test is a useful indicator for macrolide and lincosamide resistance of Strep. uberis in veterinary practice, provided that the D-test is used for detection of pirlimycin resistance.

  7. Fluoroquinolone and Macrolide Exposure Predict Clostridium difficile Infection with the Highly Fluoroquinolone- and Macrolide-Resistant Epidemic C. difficile Strain BI/NAP1/027.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorkiewicz, Jeffrey T; Lopansri, Bert K; Cheknis, Adam; Osmolski, James R; Hecht, David W; Gerding, Dale N; Johnson, Stuart

    2015-11-02

    Antibiotics have been shown to influence the risk of infection with specific Clostridium difficile strains as well as the risk of C. difficile infection (CDI). We performed a retrospective case-control study of patients infected with the epidemic BI/NAP1/027 strain in a U.S. hospital following recognition of increased CDI severity and culture of stools positive by C. difficile toxin immunoassay. Between 2005 and 2007, 72% (103/143) of patients with first-episode CDIs were infected with the BI strain by restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) typing. Most patients received multiple antibiotics within 6 weeks of CDI onset (median of 3 antibiotic classes). By multivariate analysis, fluoroquinolone and macrolide exposure was more frequent among BI cases than among non-BI-infected controls (odds ratio [OR] for fluoroquinolones, 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3 to 7.5; (P Fluoroquinolone use, macrolide use, and C. difficile resistance to these antibiotic classes were associated with infection by the epidemic BI strain of C. difficile in a U.S. hospital during a time when CDI rates were increasing nationally due to the highly fluoroquinolone-resistant BI/NAP1/027 strain. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. 尿路分离大肠埃希菌耐药性及喹诺酮类药物耐药株危险因素病例对照研究%The drug resistance of Escherichia coli isolated from urinary tract infection and risk factors of quinolone resistance strains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张昭勇; 张吉才; 杜毅

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the drug resistance of Escherichia coli isolated from urinary tract infection and risk factors of quinolone resistance strains.Methods A total of 705 cases (strains) with Escherichia coli drug resistance isolated from urine specimens were divided into quinolone sensitive group [474 cases(strains)] and quinolone resistance group [231 cases(strains)].The risk factors of the quinolone resistance strains were analyzed.Results The sensitivity rate of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid,cefalotin,ceftazidime,aztreonam,piperacillin,amikacin,compound sulfamethoxazole,ciprofloxacin,gentamicin,levofloxacin,cefepime in quinolone resistance group was higher than that in quinolone sensitive group [50.2%(238/474) vs.78.8%(182/231),11.6%(55/474) vs.48.5%(112/231),17.9%(85/474) vs.63.2%(146/231),15.0%(71/474) vs.57.6%(133/231),3.2%(15/474) vs.27.7%(64/231),80.8%(383/474)vs.93.1%(215/231),16.0%(76/474) vs.49.8%(115/231),0 vs.100.0%(231/231),32.5% (154/474)vs.70.6% (163/231),3.8% (18/474) vs.98.7% (228/231),18.6% (88/474) vs.63.2% (146/231),P <0.05].Logistic regression analysis showed history of using the third generation cephalosporins and quinolones,urinary drainage and bacterium producing extra-broad spectrum beta-lactamase was independent risk factor for quinolone resistance Escherichia coli (P < 0.05).Conclusions The epidemic of quinolone resistance Escherichia coli isolated from urine specimens is extremely serious.The quinolone resistance is strong,and infection patients have a high medical cost and average length of stay.The quinolone resistance Escherichia coli infection has multiple independent risk factors.To strengthen the control of the independent risk factors can effectively prevent quinolone resistance strains infection spread.%目的 分析尿路感染大肠埃希菌耐药性及喹诺酮类药物耐药株感染危险因素.方法 监测705例(株)尿路感染大肠埃希菌的耐

  9. The enhancement of cardiac toxicity by concomitant administration of Berberine and macrolides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Duo; Feng, Pan-Feng; Sun, Jia-Liang; Guo, Fengfeng; Zhang, Rui; Zhao, Xin; Li, Bao-Xin

    2015-08-30

    As is well-known, hERG plays an essential role in phase III repolarization of cardiac action potentials. Blocking of hERG channels can lead to LQTS. Inhibition of the metabolism of CYPs activities may elevate plasma levels, to further increase accumulation of drug on cardiac. The elevated serum levels may however elicit unexpected toxicities. Therefore, the inhibition tests of hERG and CYP are central to the preclinical studies because they may lead to severe cardiac toxicity. Berberine is widely used as an antibacterial agent and often combined with macrolides to treat gastropathy. Our objective was to assess cardiac toxicity during the combined use of Berberine with macrolides. (1) Azithromycin reduced hERG currents by accelerated channel inactivation. (2) The combination of Berberine with Azithromycin reduced hERG currents, producing an inhibitive effect stronger than use of a single drug alone, due to the high binding affinity for the onset of inactivation. (3) When cells were perfused concomitantly with Berberine and Clarithromycin, they showed a stronger inhibitive effect on hERG currents by decreasing the time constant for the onset of inactivation. (4) The combined administration of Berberine with Clarithromycin had a powerful inhibitive effect on CYP3A activities than use of a single drug alone. Collectively, these results demonstrated that concomitant use of Berberine with macrolides may require close monitoring because of potential drug toxicities, especially cardiac toxicity.

  10. Antibiotic susceptibility and molecular mechanisms of macrolide resistance in streptococci isolated from adult cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Christina S; Grinwis, Margot E; Sibley, Christopher D; Parkins, Michael D; Rabin, Harvey R; Surette, Michael G

    2015-11-01

    The cystic fibrosis (CF) airways are colonized by polymicrobial communities with high bacterial load and are influenced by frequent antibiotic exposures. This community includes diverse streptococci, some of which have been directly or indirectly associated with pulmonary exacerbations. As many streptococci are naturally competent, horizontal transfer of antibiotic-resistant determinants coupled with frequent and/or chronic antibiotic exposure may contribute to high resistance rates. In this study, we assessed antibiotic resistance in 413 streptococcal isolates from adult CF patients against nine antibiotics relevant in CF treatment. We observed very low rates of cephalosporin resistance [cefepime and ceftriaxone ( resistance to tetracycline (∼34%) and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (∼45%). The highest rate of antibiotic resistance was to the macrolides [azithromycin (56.4%) and erythromycin (51.6%)]. We also investigated the molecular mechanisms of macrolide resistance and found that only half of our macrolide-resistant streptococci isolates contained the mef (efflux pump) or erm (methylation of 23S ribosomal target site) genes. The majority of isolates were, however, found to have point mutations at position 2058 or 2059 of the 23S ribosomal subunit - a molecular mechanism of resistance not commonly reported in the non-pyogenic and non-pneumococcal streptococci, and unique in comparison with previous studies. The high rates of resistance observed here may result in poor outcomes where specific streptococci are contributing to CF airway disease and serve as a reservoir of resistance genes within the CF airway microbiome.

  11. Microbiological assay for the analysis of certain macrolides in pharmaceutical dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, A; Fourar, R E-A; Boukhechem, M S; Zarkout, S

    2015-08-01

    Clarithromycin (CLA) and roxithromycin (ROX) are macrolide antibiotics with an expanded spectrum of activity that are commercially available as tablets. A microbiological assay, applying the cylinder-plate method and using a strain of Micrococcus luteus ATCC 9341 as test organism, has been used and validated for the quantification of two macrolide drugs; CLA and ROX in pure and pharmaceutical formulations. The validation of the proposed method was carried out for linearity, precision, accuracy and specificity. The linear dynamic ranges were from 0.1 to 0.5μg/mL for both compounds. Logarithmic calibration curve was obtained for each macrolide (r>0.989) with statistically equal slopes varying from 3.275 to 4.038, and a percentage relative standard deviation in the range of 0.24-0.92%. Moreover, the method was applied successfully for the assay of the studied drugs in pharmaceutical tablet dosage forms. Recovery from standard addition experiments in commercial products was 94.71-96.91% regarding clarithromycin and 93.94-98.12% regarding roxithromycin, with a precision (%RSD) 1.32-2.11%. Accordingly, this microbiological assay can be used for routine quality control analysis of titled drugs in tablet formulations.

  12. Mycoplasma genitalium in Spain: prevalence of genital infection and frequency of resistance to macrolides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asenjo, Alejandra; Kusters, Johannes G; Severs, Tim T; Alós, Juan-Ignacio

    2017-03-11

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Mycoplasma genitalium infection and the resistance to macrolides within a general population in Madrid in 2015. We collected 359 urine samples from a general population with symptoms of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). All samples underwent a real-time PCR. For the detection of macrolide resistance, a 283bp fragment of region V of the 23S rRNA gene of M. genitalium was amplified and sequenced. We found a prevalence of 3.34% of M. genitalium and a macrolide resistance rate of 20%. In males, the prevalence was 6.62% and in women 0.96%, being significantly higher in males. The prevalence obtained shows that it is a pathogen to consider in our environment. These findings stress the need for routine testing of M. genitalium infections and would seem to suggest the advisability of resistance testing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  13. The inactivation of RNase G reduces the Stenotrophomonas maltophilia susceptibility to quinolones by triggering the heat shock response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra eBernardini

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Quinolone resistance is usually due to mutations in the genes encoding bacterial topoisomerases. However different reports have shown that neither clinical quinolone resistant isolates nor in vitro obtained S. maltophilia mutants present mutations in such genes. The mechanisms so far described consist on efflux pumps' overexpression. Our objective is to get information on novel mechanisms of S. maltophilia quinolone resistance. For this purpose, a transposon-insertion mutant library was obtained in S. maltophilia D457.. One mutant presenting reduced susceptibility to nalidixic acid was selected. Inverse PCR showed that the inactivated gene encodes RNase G. Complementation of the mutant with wild-type RNase G allele restored the susceptibility to quinolones. Transcriptomic and real-time RT-PCR analyses showed that several genes encoding heat-shock response proteins were expressed at higher levels in the RNase defective mutant than in the wild-type strain. In agreement with this situation, heat-shock reduces the S. maltophilia susceptibility to quinolone. We can then conclude that the inactivation of the RNase G reduces the susceptibility of S. maltophilia to quinolones, most likely by regulating the expression of heat-shock response genes. Heat-shock induces a transient phenotype of quinolone resistance in S. maltophilia.

  14. Quinolone resistant campylobacter infections in Denmark: risk factors and clinical consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, J.; Neimann, J.; Nielsen, E. M.

    2004-01-01

    origin) was associated with a decreased risk. Typing data showed an association between strains from retail food products and broiler chickens and quinolone-sensitive domestically acquired C. jejuni infections. An association between treatment with a fluoroquinolone before stool-specimen collection...

  15. In vitro selection of resistance in haemophilus influenzae by 4 quinolones and 5 beta-lactams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Catherine; Kosowska, Klaudia; Bozdogan, Bülent; Credito, Kim; Dewasse, Bonifacio; McGhee, Pamela; Jacobs, Michael R; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2004-05-01

    We tested abilities of ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin, amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, cefixime, cefpodoxime, and cefdinir to select resistant mutants in 5 beta-lactamase positive and 5 beta-lactamase negative Haemophilus influenzae strains by single and multistep methodology. In multistep tests, amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanate and cefpodoxime exposure did not cause >4-fold minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) increase after 50 days. One mutant selected by cefdinir had one amino acid substitution (Gly490Glu) in PBP3 and became resistant to cefdinir. Cefixime exposure caused 8-fold MIC-increase in 1 strain with TEM but the mutant remained cefixime susceptible and had no alteration in PBP3 or TEM. Among 10 strains tested, ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin caused >4-fold MIC increase in 6, 6, 5, and 2 strain, respectively. Despite the increases in quinolone MICs, none of the mutants became resistant to quinolones by established criteria. Quinolone selected mutants had quindone resistance-determining region (QRDR) alterations in GyrA, GyrB, ParC, ParE. Four quinolone mutants had no QRDR alterations. Among beta-lactams cefdinir and cefixime selected one mutant each with higher MICs however amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, and cefpodoxime exposure did not select resistant mutants.

  16. Distinguishing importation from diversification of quinolone-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae by molecular evolutionary analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Michael

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Distinguishing the recent introduction of quinolone resistant gonococci into a population from diversification of resistant strains already in the population is important for planning effective infection control strategies. We applied molecular evolutionary analyses to DNA sequences from 9 housekeeping genes and gyrA, parC and porB of 24 quinolone resistant N. gonorrhoeae (QRNG and 24 quinolone sensitive isolates collected in Israel during 2000–2001. Results Phylogenetic and eBURST analyses and estimates of divergence time indicated QRNG were introduced on 3 separate occasions and underwent limited diversification by mutation, deletion and horizontal gene transfer. Reconstruction of N. gonorrhoeae demography showed a slowly declining effective strain population size from 1976 to 1993, rapid decline between 1994 and 1999, and an increase from 1999 to 2001. This is partially attributable to declining gonorrhea case rates from 1973 to 1994. Additional contributing factors are selective sweeps of antibiotic resistant gonococci and increased transmission from sex workers. The abrupt decline in the mid-1990s heralded an increased incidence of gonorrhea from 1997 to the present. The subsequent increase in effective strain population size since 1999 reflects the increased gonococcal census population and introduction of quinolone resistance strains. Conclusion Our study demonstrates the effective use of population genetic approaches to assess recent and historical population dynamics of N. gonorrhoeae.

  17. Quinolone therapy of Klebsiella pneumoniae sepsis following irradiation: Comparison of pefloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and ofloxacin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brook, I.; Elliott, T.B.; Ledney, G.D. (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Exposure to whole-body irradiation is associated with fatal gram-negative sepsis. The effect of oral therapy with three quinolones, pefloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and ofloxacin, for orally acquired Klebsiella pneumoniae infection was tested in B6D2F1 mice exposed to 8.0 Gy whole-body irradiation from bilaterally positioned 60Co sources. A dose of 10(8) organisms was given orally 2 days after irradiation, and therapy was started 1 day later. Quinolones reduced colonization of the ileum with K. pneumoniae: 16 of 28 (57%) untreated mice harbored the organisms, compared to only 12 of 90 (13%) mice treated with quinolones (P less than 0.005). K. pneumoniae was isolated from the livers of 6 of 28 untreated mice, compared to only 1 of 90 treated mice (P less than 0.001). Only 5 of 20 (25%) untreated mice survived for at least 30 days compared with 17 of 20 (85%) mice treated with ofloxacin, 15 of 20 (75%) mice treated with pefloxacin, and 14 of 20 (70%) treated with ciprofloxacin (P less than 0.05). These data illustrate the efficacy of quinolones for oral therapy of orally acquired K. pneumoniae infection in irradiated hosts.

  18. Quinolone Resistance among Salmonella enterica from Cattle, Broilers and Swine in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiuff, C.; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Madsen, M.

    2000-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the susceptibility to nalidixic acid and fluoroquinolones of Salmonella Dublin, S. Enteritidis, and S. Typhimurium isolates from cattle, broilers, and pigs over time in Denmark and to characterise the gyrA, gyrB, and parC genes in quinolone-resistant isolates...

  19. Chemistry of Nitroquinolones and Synthetic Application to Unnatural 1-Methyl-2-quinolone Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagatoshi Nishiwaki

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The 1-methyl-2-quinolone (MeQone framework is often found in alkaloids and recently attention was drawn to unnatural MeQone derivatives with the aim of finding new biologically active compounds, however, low reactivity of the MeQone framework prevents the syntheses of versatile derivatives. A nitro group is one of the useful activating groups for this framework that enables a concise chemical transformation. Among nitroquinolones, 1-methyl-3,6,8-trinitro-2-quinolone (TNQ exhibits unusual reactivity favoring region-selective cine-substitutions that afford 4-substituted 1-methyl-6,8-dinitro-2-quinolones upon treatment with nucleophilic reagents. Contrary to this, 1-methyl-3,6-dinitro-2-quinolone (3,6-DNQ does not undergo any reaction under the same conditions. The unusual reactivity of TNQ is caused by steric repulsion between the methyl group at the 1-position and the nitro group at the 8-position, which distorts the MeQone framework. As a result, the pyridone ring of TNQ loses aromaticity and acts rather as an activated nitroalkene. Indeed, the pyridone moiety of TNQ undergoes cycloaddition with electron-rich alkenes or dienes under mild conditions, whereby a new fused ring is constructed on the [c]-face of the MeQone. Consequently, TNQ can be used as a new scaffold leading to versatile unnatural MeQone derivatives.

  20. Improved microbial screning assay for the detection of quinolone residues in poultry and eggs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pikkemaat, M.G.; Mulder, P.P.J.; Elferink, J.W.A.; Cocq, A.; Nielen, M.W.F.; Egmond, van H.J.

    2007-01-01

    An improved microbiological screening assay is reported for the detection of quinolone residues in poultry muscle and eggs. The method was validated using fortified tissue samples and is the first microbial assay to effectively detect enrofloxacin, difloxacin, danofloxacin, as well as flumequine and

  1. Prevalence and characteristics of quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli in veal calves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hordijk, J.; Veldman, K.T.; Dierikx, C.M.; Essen-Zandbergen, van A.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Mevius, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    Quinolone resistance is studied and reported increasingly in isolates from humans, food-producing animals and companion animals. Resistance can be caused by chromosomal mutations in topoisomerase genes, plasmid-mediated resistance genes, and active transport through efflux pumps. Cross sectional dat

  2. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance among non-typhi Salmonella enterica isolates, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    We determined the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance mechanisms among non-Typhi Salmonella (NTS) spp. isolates from humans, food animals, and retail meat in the United States in 2007. Fifty-one (2.4%) of human isolates (n=2165), 5 (1.6%) of isolates from animal isolates (n=1915) an...

  3. Generation and characterization of quinolone-specific DNA aptamers suitable for water monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinemann, C; Freiin von Fritsch, U; Rudolph, S; Strehlitz, B

    2016-03-15

    Quinolones are antibiotics that are accredited in human and veterinary medicine but are regularly used in high quantities also in industrial livestock farming. Since these compounds are often only incompletely metabolized, significant amounts contaminate the aquatic environment and negatively impact on a variety of different ecosystems. Although there is increasing awareness of problems caused by pharmaceutical pollution, available methods for the detection and elimination of numerous pharmaceutical residues are currently inefficient or expensive. While this also applies to antibiotics that may lead to multi-drug resistance in pathogenic bacteria, aptamer-based technologies potentially offer alternative approaches for sensitive and efficient monitoring of pharmaceutical micropollutants. Using the Capture-SELEX procedure, we here describe the selection of an aptamer pool with enhanced binding qualities for fluoroquinolones, a widely used group of antibiotics in both human and veterinary medicine. The selected aptamers were shown to detect various quinolones with high specificity, while specific binding activities to structurally unrelated drugs were not detectable. The quinolone-specific aptamers bound to ofloxacin, one of the most frequently prescribed fluoroquinolone, with high affinity (KD=0.1-56.9 nM). The functionality of quinolone-specific aptamers in real water samples was demonstrated in local tap water and in effluents of sewage plants. Together, our data suggest that these aptamers may be applicable as molecular receptors in biosensors or as catcher molecules in filter systems for improved monitoring and treatment of polluted water.

  4. Synthesis of quinolones by nickel-catalyzed cycloaddition via elimination of nitrile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Kenichiro; Kurahashi, Takuya; Matsubara, Seijiro

    2013-02-15

    Substituted quinolones were efficiently synthesized via the nickel-catalyzed cycloaddition of o-cyanophenylbenzamide derivatives with alkynes. The reaction involves elimination of a nitrile group by cleavage of the two independent aryl-cyano and aryl-carbonyl C-C bonds of the amides.

  5. [Determination of 25 quinolones in cosmetics by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li; Zhang, Yi; Tu, Xiaoke; Xie, Liqi; Yue, Zhenfeng; Kang, Haining; Wu, Weidong; Luo, Yao

    2015-03-01

    An analytical method was developed for the simultaneous determination of 25 quinolones, including danofloxacin mesylate, enrofloxacin, flumequine, oxloinic acid, ciprofloxacin, sarafloxacin, nalidixic acid, norfloxacin, and ofloxacin etc in cosmetics using direct extraction and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). Cosmetic sample was extracted by acidified acetonitrile, defatted by n-hexane and separated on Poroshell EC-C18 column with gradient elution program using acetonitrile and water (both containing 0. 1% formic acid) as the mobile phases and analyzed by LC-ESI-MS/MS under the positive mode using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The interference of matrix was reduced by the matrix-matched calibration standard curve. The method showed good linearities over the range of 1-200 mg/kg for the 25 quinolones with good linear correlation coefficients (r ≥ 0.999). The method detection limit of the 25 quinolones was 1.0 mg/kg, and the recoveries of all analytes in lotion, milky and cream cosmetics matrices ranged from 87.4% to 105% at the spiked levels of 1, 5 and 10 mg/kg with the relative standard deviations (RSD) of 4.54%-19.7% (n = 6). The results indicated that this method is simple, fast and credible, and suitable for the simultaneous determination of the quinolones in the above three types of cosmetics.

  6. Bartonella bacilliformis, endemic pathogen of the Andean region, is intrinsically resistant to quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Valle, Luis J; Flores, Lidia; Vargas, Martha; García-de-la-Guarda, Ruth; Quispe, Ruth L; Ibañez, Zoila B; Alvarado, Débora; Ramírez, Pablo; Ruiz, Joaquim

    2010-06-01

    To analyze the sequence of the region involved in the development of quinolone resistance of the gyrA and parC genes in a series of Bartonella bacilliformis isolates recovered prior to the introduction of quinolones, as well as one clinical isolate recovered in the 1970s, establishing the susceptibility levels to nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin. Five B. bacilliformis were studied: four isolated before 1957, prior to the introduction of quinolones in clinical practice. The remaining strain was isolated in 1977. A fragment of the gyrA and parC genes was amplified and sequenced. Susceptibility to nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin was established by the E-test method. All the strains were resistant to nalidixic acid (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) >256 mg/l). Three isolates presented decreased susceptibility to ciprofloxacin and two were highly resistant (MIC >32 mg/l). All the strains presented an Ala at position 91 of GyrA and position 85 of ParC. B. bacilliformis presents a constitutive resistance to quinolones, which may be related to the presence of Ala at position 91 of GyrA and 85 of ParC. These results advise against the current clinical guidelines recommending the use of ciprofloxacin to treat bartonellosis in some countries of the Andean area. Copyright 2009 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevalence and characteristics of quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli in veal calves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hordijk, J.; Veldman, K.T.; Dierikx, C.M.; Essen-Zandbergen, van A.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Mevius, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    Quinolone resistance is studied and reported increasingly in isolates from humans, food-producing animals and companion animals. Resistance can be caused by chromosomal mutations in topoisomerase genes, plasmid-mediated resistance genes, and active transport through efflux pumps. Cross sectional dat

  8. [Preliminary study on occurrence and health risk assessment of quinolone antibiotics in vegetables from Guangzhou, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Wen; Zhang, Yan; Mo, Ce-Hui; Tai, Yi-Ping; Wu, Xiao-Lian; Wang, Ji-Yang; Su, Qing-Yun

    2010-10-01

    Quinolone antibiotics (QNs) including norfloxacin (NOR), enrofolxacin (ENR), ciprofloxacin (CIP) and lomefloxacin (LOM) in vegetable samples collected from Guangzhou were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with fluorescent detector (FLD). The detected frequency of QNs was 96% in vegetables. The total concentration of quinolones (sigma QNs) detected in vegetable ranged from 1.0 microg/kg to 1 683.1 microg/kg (F.W.). Leafy vegetable topped the content of quinolones among the three types of vegetables, followed by the melon-fruit vegetable and rhizome vegetable. The detected frequency of the four quinolone antibiotics ranked as NOR > CIP > LOM > ENR. Except ENR, concentrations of CIP, NOR, LOM and sigma QNs in pollution-free vegetable, green vegetable and organic vegetable were higher than those in routine cultivated vegetables. The maximum contribution to ADI value (caculated by the sum of CIP and ENR) is estimated up to 41.5% and 83% for adults and children respectively via consumption of vegetables.

  9. CE determination of quinolones in the presence of bovine serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Weidong; Liu, Qingchun; Fan, Yongxia

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the influence of bovine serum albumin (BSA) as an additive on the capillary electrophoresis-potential gradient determination of five quinolones, enoxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, fleroxacin, and pazufloxacin. With 10 mg/L of BSA present in the buffer of 30 mM Tris and 3 mM phosphoric acid at pH 9, the detection limits of the five quinolones were in the range of 0.24-0.68 mg/L, i. e. 5.8-16.5-fold lower than those obtained with the buffer devoid of BSA, and the analysis time was shortened. We suggest that the inner wall-adsorbed BSA suppresses the adsorption of quinolones and simultaneously enhances the electroosmotic flow rate. Our experiments indicated that adopting the potential gradient detection technique could eliminate the interference of the UV-active proteins on the detection of quinolones that would occur with conventional optical detection, and therefore offer high detection sensitivity. As a demonstration, the method was applied to the determination of QNs in fortified chicken muscle sample with satisfactory results.

  10. A series of 2D metal-quinolone complexes: Syntheses, structures, and physical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Jiang-Hong [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Xiao, Dong-Rong, E-mail: xiaodr98@yahoo.com.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Chen, Hai-Yan; Sun, Dian-Zhen; Yan, Shi-Wei; Wang, Xin; Ye, Zhong-Li [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Luo, Qun-Li, E-mail: qlluo@swu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Wang, En-Bo, E-mail: wangeb889@nenu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Polyoxometalate Science of Ministry of Education, Department of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China)

    2013-02-15

    Six novel 2D metal-quinolone complexes, namely [Cd(cfH)(bpdc)]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (1), [M(norfH)(bpdc)]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (M=Cd (2) and Mn (3)), [Mn{sub 2}(cfH)(odpa)(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}]{center_dot}0.5H{sub 2}O (4), [Co{sub 2}(norfH)(bpta)({mu}{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (5) and [Co{sub 3}(saraH){sub 2}(Hbpta){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]{center_dot}9H{sub 2}O (6) (cfH=ciprofloxacin, norfH=norfloxacin, saraH=sarafloxacin, bpdc=4,4 Prime -biphenyldicarboxylate, odpa=4,4 Prime -oxydiphthalate, bpta=3,3 Prime ,4,4 Prime -biphenyltetracarboxylate) have been synthesized and characterized. Compounds 1-3 consist of 2D arm-shaped layers based on the 1D {l_brace}M(COO){r_brace}{sub n}{sup n+} chains. Compounds 4 and 5 display 2D structures based on tetranuclear manganese or cobalt clusters with (3,6)-connected kgd topology. Compound 6 exhibits a 2D bilayer structure, which represents the first example of metal-quinolone complexes with 2D bilayer structure. By inspection of the structures of 1-6, it is believed that the long aromatic polycarboxylate ligands are important for the formation of 2D metal-quinolone complexes. The magnetic properties of compounds 3-6 was studied, indicating the existence of antiferromagnetic interactions. Furthermore, the luminescent properties of compounds 1-2 are discussed. - Graphical abstract: Six novel 2D metal-quinolone complexes have been prepared by self-assemblies of the quinolones and metal salts in the presence of long aromatic polycarboxylates. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compounds 1-3 consist of novel 2D arm-shaped layers based on the 1D {l_brace}M(COO){r_brace}{sub n}{sup n+} chains. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compounds 4 and 5 are two novel 2D layers based on tetranuclear Mn or Co clusters with kgd topology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compound 6 is the first example of metal-quinolone complexes with 2D bilayer structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compounds 1-6 represent six unusual

  11. Microbial screening for quinolones residues in cow milk by bio-optical method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appicciafuoco, Brunella; Dragone, Roberto; Frazzoli, Chiara; Bolzoni, Giuseppe; Mantovani, Alberto; Ferrini, Anna Maria

    2015-03-15

    The use of antibiotics on lactating cows should be monitored for the possible risk of milk contamination with residues. Accordingly, Maximum Residue Levels (MRLs) are established by the European Commission to guarantee consumers safety. As pointed out by Dec 2002/657/EC, screening is the first step in the strategy for antibiotic residue control, thus playing a key role in the whole control procedure. However, current routine screening methods applied in milk chain still fail to detect residues of quinolones at concentrations of interest. This paper reports the findings of a new bio-optical method for the screening of quinolones residues in bovine milk, based on E. coli ATCC 11303 growth inhibition. The effect of blank and spiked cow milk samples (aliquots equivalents to 0.8%, v/v) is evaluated in Mueller Hinton Broth (MHb) and MHb enriched with MgSO4 2% (MHb-Mg) inoculated with the test strain at the concentration of 10(4)CFU/mL. The presence of quinolones inhibits the cellular growth in MHb, while this effect is neutralized in MHb-Mg allowing both detection and presumptive identification of quinolones. Growth of the test strain is monitored at 37 °C in a Bioscreen C automated system, and Optical Density (OD) at 600 nm is recorded every 10 min after shaking for 10s. Growth curves (OD vs. time) of E. coli ATCC 11303 are assessed in milk samples, with and without quinolones, and their differences in terms of ΔOD (ΔOD600nm=ODMHb-Mg-ODMHb) are calculated. The presence of quinolones is detected by the cellular growth inhibition (OD vs time, none increase in the value OD) and presumptively identified through the increase of the slope of ΔOD600nm curve (ΔOD vs. time), after about 3h of incubation. The detection limit for ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin is at the level of MRL, for marbofloxacin is at 2-fold the MRL whereas for danofloxacin is at 4-fold the MRL. Although the sensitivity of the method could be further improved and the procedure automated, it is a

  12. Otoproteção das células ciliadas auditivas contra a ototoxicidade da amicacina Otoprotection of auditory hair cells against amikacin ototoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio A. de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Este estudo teve por objetivo verificar a ocorrência de otoproteção contra a ototoxicidade da amicacina em cobaias. Forma de estudo: experimental. Material e método: Foram estudadas as células ciliadas externas do órgão de Corti de 31 animais por meio de microscopia eletrônica de varredura (JEOL-JMS 5200. Foram estudados 4 grupos: A, controle; B, amicacina 20 mg/kg/dia por 30 dias; C, amicacina 400 mg/Kg/ dia 12 dias; grupo D, amicacina 20 mg/kg/dia por 30 dias seguido de 400 mg/kg/dia por 12 dias. Resultados: Nos grupos A e B, as células estavam normais em todas as cócleas; no grupo C houve lesões extensas nas duas espiras mais basais; no grupo D houve redução significante das lesões nas duas mais basais em comparação com o grupo C que recebeu a dose ototóxica de amicacina isoladamente. Conclusão: Conclui-se que a dose não ototóxica de amicacina administrada previamente à dose ototóxica do mesmo antibiótico tem efeito protetor, estatisticamente significante, nas duas espiras mais basais das cócleas de cobaias.Aim: The objective of the present study was to determine the occurrence of self-protection of hair cells against the ototoxicity of amikacin in guinea pigs. Study design: experimental. Material and method: The outer hair cells of the organ of Corti of 31 animals were studied by scanning electron microscopy. The animals were divided into four groups: A, control; B, amikacin, 20 mg/kg/day for 30 days; C, amikacin, 400 mg/kg/day for 12 days; group D, amikacin, 20 mg/kg/day for 30 days followed by 400 mg/kg/day for 12 days. Results: In groups A and B, the cells were normal in all cochleae, in group C there were extensive lesions of the two more basal turns, in group D there was a significant reduction of lesions in the two more basal turns compared to group C, which had received the ototoxic dose of amikacin alone. Conclusion: We conclude that the non-ototoxic dose of amikacin administered before the ototoxic

  13. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of vancomycin prevent quinolone-resistance in a penicillin-resistant isolate of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreillon Philippe

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The continuous spread of penicillin-resistant pneumococci represents a permanent threat in the treatment of pneumococcal infections, especially when strains show additional resistance to quinolones. The main objective of this study was to determine a treatment modality impeding the emergence of quinolone resistance. Results Exposure of a penicillin-resistant pneumococcus to increasing concentrations of trovafloxacin or ciprofloxacin selected for mutants resistant to these drugs. In the presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of vancomycin, development of trovafloxacin-resistance and high-level ciprofloxacin-resistance were prevented. Conclusions Considering the risk of quinolone-resistance in pneumococci, the observation might be of clinical importance.

  14. Decay mechanisms of protonated 4-quinolone antibiotics after electrospray ionization and ion activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovačević, Borislav; Schorr, Pascal; Qi, Yulin; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2014-11-01

    This study presents a detailed experimental investigation of charge isomers of protonated 4-quinolone antibiotics molecules formed during electrospray ionization (ESI) with proposed dissociation mechanisms after collisional activation. Piperazinyl quinolones have been previously shown to exhibit erratic behavior during tandem MS analyses of biological samples, which originated from varying ratios of two isomeric variants formed during ESI. Here, a combination of ESI-collision-induced dissociation (CID), differential ion mobility spectrometry (DMS), high resolution MS, and density functional theory (DFT) was used to investigate the underlying mechanisms of isomer formation and their individual dissociation behaviors. The study focused on ciprofloxacin; major findings were confirmed using structurally related 4-quinolones. DFT calculations showed a reversal of basicity for piperazinyl quinolones between liquid and gas phase. We provide an experimental comparison and theoretical treatment of factors influencing the formation ratio of the charge isomers during ESI, including solvent pH, protic/aprotic nature of solvent, and structural effects such as pK a and proton affinity. The actual dissociation mechanisms of the isomers of the protonated molecules were studied by separating the individual isomers via DMS-MS, which allowed type-specific CID spectra to be recorded. Both primary CID reactions of the two charge isomers originated from the same carboxyl group by charge-remote (CO(2) loss) and charge-mediated (H(2)O loss) fragmentation of the piperazinyl quinolones, depending on whether the proton resides on the more basic keto or the piperazinyl group, followed by a number of secondary dissociation reactions. The proposed mechanisms were supported by calculated energies of precursors, transition states, and products for competing pathways.

  15. Detection of quinolones in poultry meat obtained from retail centers in Santiago Province, the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silfrany, R O; Caba, R E; Solís de Los Santos, F; Hanning, I

    2013-02-01

    In the Dominican Republic, poultry consumption per capita is greater than 34 kg of poultry meat per year. However, antibiotics, specifically the quinolone group, may be overused and can result in residues in the poultry meat. These residues are of concern because consumers may have allergies to antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant bacteria can develop from overuse of antibiotics in production. Little is known concerning this issue specifically for Santiago Province in the Dominican Republic. Thus, the main purpose of this research was to evaluate the incidence of residual quinolones in poultry meat and determine whether any residues detected were higher than the residue maximum limits (100 μg/kg) established by food industry authorities, including the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and European Food Safety Authority. A total of 135 samples of chicken breast were taken from different retail meat centers in the nine municipalities of Santiago Province (Santiago, Tamboril, Sabana Iglesia, Villa Bisonó, Puñal, Villa González, Licey, Jánico, and San José De Las Matas) and were analyzed using the Equinox test (Immunotec, Swanton, VT). Of the 135 samples analyzed, 50% from Sabana Iglesia, 20% from Licey, 20% from San Jose De Las Matas, and 6.25% from Santiago contained residues of quinolones higher than the residue maximum limits. No quinolone residues were detected in samples obtained from Janico, Punal, Tamboril, Villa Bisono, or Villa Gonzalez. The results of this investigation suggest that some poultry meat sold for human consumption in Santiago Province of the Dominican Republic contains quinolone residues and may represent a health risk to some consumers.

  16. Nasopharyngeal carriage and macrolide resistance in Indigenous children with bronchiectasis randomized to long-term azithromycin or placebo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, K M; Grimwood, K; Chang, A B; Chatfield, M D; Valery, P C; Leach, A J; Smith-Vaughan, H C; Morris, P S; Byrnes, C A; Torzillo, P J; Cheng, A C

    2015-11-01

    Although long-term azithromycin decreases exacerbation frequency in bronchiectasis, increased macrolide resistance is concerning. We investigated macrolide resistance determinants in a secondary analysis of a multicenter randomized controlled trial. Indigenous Australian children living in remote regions and urban New Zealand Māori and Pacific Islander children with bronchiectasis were randomized to weekly azithromycin (30 mg/kg) or placebo for up to 24 months and followed post-intervention for up to 12 months. Nurses administered and recorded medications given and collected nasopharyngeal swabs 3-6 monthly for culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Nasopharyngeal carriage of Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis was significantly lower in azithromycin compared to placebo groups, while macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus carriage was significantly higher. Australian children, compared to New Zealand children, had higher carriage overall, significantly higher carriage of macrolide-resistant bacteria at baseline (16/38 versus 2/40 children) and during the intervention (69/152 versus 22/239 swabs), and lower mean adherence to study medication (63 % versus 92 %). Adherence ≥70 % (versus resistant pathogens (OR 0.34, 95 % CI 0.14-0.81). Post-intervention (median 6 months), macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae declined significantly in the azithromycin group, from 79 % (11/14) to 7 % (1/14) of positive swabs, but S. aureus strains remained 100 % macrolide resistant. Azithromycin treatment, the Australian remote setting, and adherence resistance in children with bronchiectasis. Adherence to treatment may limit macrolide resistance by suppressing carriage.

  17. Therapeutic efficacy of azithromycin, clarithromycin, minocycline and tosufloxacin against macrolide-resistant and macrolide-sensitive Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia in pediatric patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koseki, Naoko; Kaiho, Miki; Ariga, Tadashi; Kikuta, Hideaki; Togashi, Takehiro; Oba, Koji; Morita, Keisuke; Nagano, Naoko; Nakanishi, Masanori; Hara, Kazuya; Hazama, Kyosuke; Watanabe, Toru; Yamanaka, Tatsuru; Sasaki, Satoshi; Furuyama, Hideto; Shibata, Mutsuo; Shida, Satoru; Ishizaka, Akihito; Tabata, Yuichi; Aoyagi, Hayato; Naito, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Mikio; Horino, Atsuko; Kenri, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    Objective To clarify therapeutic effects of azithromycin, clarithromycin, minocycline and tosufloxacin against macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MRMP) pneumonia and against macrolide-sensitive Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MSMP) pneumonia in pediatric patients. Methods A prospective, multicenter observational study was conducted from July 2013 to August 2015. The therapeutic effects of azithromycin, clarithromycin, minocycline and tosufloxacin were evaluated in 59 patients with pneumonia caused by MRMP and in 50 patients with pneumonia caused by MSMP. In vitro activities of antimicrobial agents against isolates of Mycoplasma pneumoniae were also measured. Results Mean durations of fever following commencement of treatment in patients infected with MRMP and MSMP were 5.2 and 1.9 days, respectively (log-rank test, P < 0.0001). Among patients infected with MRMP, mean durations of fever were 4.6, 5.5, 1.0 and 7.5 days for patients treated with azithromycin, clarithromycin, minocycline and tosufloxacin, respectively (log-rank test, P < 0.0001). Among patients infected with MSMP, mean durations of fever were 2.5, 1.7, 0.9 and 4.3 days for patients treated with azithromycin, clarithromycin, minocycline and tosufloxacin, respectively (log-rank test, P = 0.0162). The MIC90s of azithromycin and clarithromycin among the 27 isolates of MRMP were 64 and 256 μg/ml, respectively, and those among the 23 isolates of MSMP were <0.000125 and 0.001 μg/ml, respectively. The MIC90s of minocycline and tosufloxacin among the 27 isolates of MRMP were 1.0 and 0.25 μg/ml, respectively, and those among the 23 isolates of MSMP were 1.0 and 0.5 μg/ml, respectively. Conclusion Both minocycline and tosufloxacin showed good in vitro activities against MRMP. Minocycline, but not tosufloxacin, shortened the duration of fever in pediatric patients infected with MRMP compared to the duration of fever in patients treated with macrolides. PMID:28288170

  18. In-vitro release pharmacokinetics of amikacin, teicoplanin and polyhexanide in a platelet rich fibrin?layer (PRF)?a laboratory evaluation of a modern, autologous wound treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Knafl, Daniela; Thalhammer, Florian; Vossen, Matthias G.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Platelet rich fibrin (PRF) is an autologous fibrin glue, produced from patients' blood, which, besides intraoperative use, has applications in the treatment of infected wounds. The combination with antimicrobial agents results in a prolonged antibacterial effect allowing for wound dressing change intervals of seven days even in infected wounds. The aim of this study was to evaluate release kinetics of amikacin, teicoplanin or polyhexanide from a PRF-layer. Methods PRF mixed with te...

  19. Alteration of some cellular function in amikacin resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa transfected macrophages:a time dependent approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Subhankari Prasad Chakraborty; Santanu KarMahapatra; Sabyasachi Das; Somenath Roy

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the free radical generation and antioxidant enzymes status in murine peritoneal macrophage during in vitro amikacin resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ARPA) treatment with different time interval. Methods: Peritoneal macrophages were treated with 1×108 CFU/mL ARPA cell suspension in vitro for different time interval (1, 2, 3, 6, 12, and 24 h) and super oxide anion generation, NO generation, reduced glutathione level and antioxidant enzymes status were analyzed. Results: Super oxide anion generation and NO generation got peak at 12 h, indicating maximal free radical generation through activation of NADPH oxidase in murine peritoneal macrophages during ARPA transfection. Reduced glutathione level and antioxidant enzymes status were decreased significantly (P<0.05) with increasing time of ARPA transfection. All the changes in peritoneal macrophages after 12 h in vitro ARPA transfection had significant difference (P<0.05). Conclusions: From this study, it may be summarized that in vitro ARPA infection not only generates excess free radical but also affects the antioxidant system and glutathione cycle in murine peritoneal macrophage.

  20. Clinical Application of Development of Nonantibiotic Macrolides That Correct Inflammation-Driven Immune Dysfunction in Inflammatory Skin Diseases

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    Carmen Rodriguez-Cerdeira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Inflammation-driven immune dysfunction supports the development of several chronic human disorders including skin diseases. Nonantibiotic macrolides have anti-inflammatory and/or immunomodulatory activity that suggests the exploitation of these in the treatment of skin diseases characterized by inflammatory disorders. Materials and Methods. We performed an extensive review of the nonantibiotic macrolide literature published between 2005 and 2012, including cross-references of any retrieved articles. We also included some data from our own experience. Results. Calcineurin antagonists such as tacrolimus and ascomycins (e.g., pimecrolimus act by inhibiting the activation of the nuclear factor for activated T cells (NFAT. There are new applications for these macrolides that have been available for several years and have been applied to skin and hair disorders such as atopic dermatitis, oral lichen planus, vitiligo, chronic autoimmune urticaria, rosacea, alopecia areata, pyoderma gangrenosum, Behcet’s disease, neutrophilic dermatosis, and lupus erythematosus. We also reviewed new macrolides, like rapamycin, everolimus, and temsirolimus. In addition to the literature review, we report a novel class of nonantibiotic 14-member macrocycle with anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. Conclusions. This paper summarizes the most important clinical studies and case reports dealing with the potential benefits of nonantibiotic macrolides which have opened new avenues in the development of anti-inflammatory strategies in the treatment of cutaneous disorders.

  1. 喹诺酮类药物的研究进展%Progress on the Research of Pharmaceuticals of Quinolones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾焕君; 王怀生

    2014-01-01

    Quinolones are synthetic antibacterial agents. many quinolones have one or two chiral centers and some of enantiomers show dif erent feature in pharmacology, toxicology and pharmacodynamics. In this paper, chiral separation and determination of quinolones about recent years were reviewed for providing some reference in the research of quinolones.%喹诺酮类药物是人工合成的抗菌药,很多药物都具有1~2个手性中心,且有些对映体呈现不同的药理学的、毒理学的、药效学的特性。本文对近几年喹诺酮类的药物手性的拆分与定量进行了研究,为临床上研究喹诺酮类的药物提供了一系列参考依据。

  2. Prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants in Enterobacteriaceae strains isolated in North-East Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocsis, B; Mazzariol, A; Kocsis, E; Koncan, R; Fontana, R; Cornaglia, G

    2013-02-01

    We investigated the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in 756 clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae originating from Microbiology Diagnostic Laboratories of North-East Italy. Five point zero two percent of isolates carried a qnr determinant while the aac(6')-Ib-cr determinant was detected in 9·25% of isolates. We also investigated the association between the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance and the beta-lactamase genes, and characterized the plasmids carrying these determinants of resistance.

  3. Impact of the E540V amino acid substitution in GyrB of Mycobacterium tuberculosis on quinolone resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun; Nakajima, Chie; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Rahim, Zeaur; Kim, Youn Uck; Oguri, Hiroki; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2011-08-01

    Amino acid substitutions conferring resistance to quinolones in Mycobacterium tuberculosis have generally been found within the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) in the A subunit of DNA gyrase (GyrA) rather than the B subunit of DNA gyrase (GyrB). To clarify the contribution of an amino acid substitution, E540V, in GyrB to quinolone resistance in M. tuberculosis, we expressed recombinant DNA gyrases in Escherichia coli and characterized them in vitro. Wild-type and GyrB-E540V DNA gyrases were reconstituted in vitro by mixing recombinant GyrA and GyrB. Correlation between the amino acid substitution and quinolone resistance was assessed by the ATP-dependent DNA supercoiling assay, quinolone-inhibited supercoiling assay, and DNA cleavage assay. The 50% inhibitory concentrations of eight quinolones against DNA gyrases bearing the E540V amino acid substitution in GyrB were 2.5- to 36-fold higher than those against the wild-type enzyme. Similarly, the 25% maximum DNA cleavage concentrations were 1.5- to 14-fold higher for the E540V gyrase than for the wild-type enzyme. We further demonstrated that the E540V amino acid substitution influenced the interaction between DNA gyrase and the substituent(s) at R-7, R-8, or both in quinolone structures. This is the first detailed study of the contribution of the E540V amino acid substitution in GyrB to quinolone resistance in M. tuberculosis.

  4. Prevalence of quinolone resistance determinants in non-typhoidal Salmonella isolates from human origin in Extremadura, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Maria Jorge; Palomo, Gonzalo; Hormeño, Lorena; Herrera-León, Silvia; Domínguez, Lucas; Vadillo, Santiago; Píriz, Segundo; Quesada, Alberto

    2014-05-01

    Resistance to the quinolones nalidixic acid (NAL) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) and the occurrence of quinolone resistance determinants have been investigated in 300 non-typhoidal Salmonella from human origin, isolated in the years between 2004 and 2008, in 6 hospitals within Extremadura (Spain). Salmonella Enteritidis was the major serotype found among quinolone-resistant isolates, most of which were clustered by clonal analysis to a single clone, which presented D87 or S83 substitutions in GyrA. Eleven isolates presented the non-classical quinolone resistance phenotype (resistance to CIP and susceptibility to NAL), lacking mutations in the quinolone resistance determinant region of topoisomerase genes. Among them, one Salmonella Typhimurium isolate carried a qnrS1 gene in a low-molecular-weight plasmid, pQnrS1-HLR25, identical to plasmids previously found in the UK, Taiwan, and USA. The occurrence of this genetic element could represent a risk for the horizontal transmission of quinolone resistance among Enterobacteriaceae in the Iberian Peninsula.

  5. Comparative Analysis of Quinolone Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli from Chinese Children and Adults

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    Ying Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to compare quinolone resistance and gyrA mutations in clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli from Chinese adults who used quinolone in the preceding month and children without any known history of quinolone administration. The antimicrobial susceptibilities of 61 isolates from children and 79 isolates from adults were determined. The mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions in gyrA gene were detected by PCR and DNA sequencing. Fluoroquinolone resistance and types of gyrA mutations in isolates from children and adults were compared and statistically analyzed. No significant differences were detected in the resistance rates of ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin between children and adults among isolates of the two species (all P>0.05. The double mutation Ser83→Leu + Asp87→Asn in the ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates occurred in 73.7% isolates from the children and 67.9% from the adults, respectively (P=0.5444. Children with no known history of quinolone administration were found to carry fluoroquinolone-resistant Enterobacteriaceae isolates. The occurrence of ciprofloxacin resistance and the major types of gyrA mutations in the isolates from the children were similar to those from adults. The results indicate that precautions should be taken on environmental issues resulting from widespread transmission of quinolone resistance.

  6. Genotoxicity of quinolones: substituents contribution and transformation products QSAR evaluation using 2D and 3D models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Wei, Dongbin; Zhao, Huimin; Du, Yuguo

    2014-01-01

    The genotoxicity of 21 quinolones antibiotics was determined using SOS/umu assay. Some quinolones exhibited high genotoxicity, and the chemical substituent on quinolone ring significantly affected genotoxicity. To establish the relationship between genotoxicity and substituent, a 2D-QSAR model based on quantum chemical parameters was developed. Calculation suggested that both steric and electrostatic properties were correlated well with genotoxicity. Furthermore, the specific effect on three key active sites (1-, 7- and 8-positions) of quinolone ring was investigated using a 3D-QSAR (comparative molecular field analysis, CoMFA) method. From our modeling, the genotoxicity increased when substituents had: (1) big volume and/or positive charge at 1-position; (2) negative charge at 7-position; and (3) small volume and/or negative charge at 8-position. The developed QSAR models were applicable to estimate genotoxicity of quinolones antibiotics and their transformation products. It is noted that some of the transformation products exhibited higher genotoxicity comparing to their precursor (e.g., ciprofloxacin). This study provided an alternative way to understand the molecule genotoxicity of quinolones derivatives, as well as to evaluate their potential environmental risks.

  7. Comparative analysis of quinolone resistance in clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli from Chinese children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Ogutu, James O; Gu, Jiarui; Ding, Fengshu; You, Yuhong; Huo, Yan; Zhao, Hong; Li, Wenjing; Zhang, Zhiwei; Zhang, Wenli; Chen, Xiaobei; Fu, Yingmei; Zhang, Fengmin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare quinolone resistance and gyrA mutations in clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli from Chinese adults who used quinolone in the preceding month and children without any known history of quinolone administration. The antimicrobial susceptibilities of 61 isolates from children and 79 isolates from adults were determined. The mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions in gyrA gene were detected by PCR and DNA sequencing. Fluoroquinolone resistance and types of gyrA mutations in isolates from children and adults were compared and statistically analyzed. No significant differences were detected in the resistance rates of ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin between children and adults among isolates of the two species (all P > 0.05). The double mutation Ser83→Leu + Asp87→Asn in the ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates occurred in 73.7% isolates from the children and 67.9% from the adults, respectively (P = 0.5444). Children with no known history of quinolone administration were found to carry fluoroquinolone-resistant Enterobacteriaceae isolates. The occurrence of ciprofloxacin resistance and the major types of gyrA mutations in the isolates from the children were similar to those from adults. The results indicate that precautions should be taken on environmental issues resulting from widespread transmission of quinolone resistance.

  8. Molecular resistance mechanisms of macrolide-resistant invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from Alaska, 1986 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Karen; Bulkow, Lisa; Bruce, Michael; Zulz, Tammy; Reasonover, Alisa; Harker-Jones, Marcella; Hurlburt, Debby; Hennessy, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    The rapid emergence of antibiotic-resistant pneumococcal strains has reduced treatment options. The aim of this study was to determine antimicrobial susceptibilities, serotype distributions, and molecular resistance mechanisms among macrolide-resistant invasive pneumococcal isolates in Alaska from 1986 to 2010. We identified cases of invasive pneumococcal disease in Alaska from 1986 to 2010 through statewide population-based laboratory surveillance. All invasive pneumococcal isolates submitted to the Arctic Investigations Program laboratory were confirmed by standard microbiological methods and serotyped by slide agglutination and the Quellung reaction. MICs were determined by the broth microdilution method, and macrolide-resistant genotypes were determined by multiplex PCR. Among 2,923 invasive pneumococcal isolates recovered from 1986 to 2010, 270 (9.2%) were nonsusceptible to erythromycin; 177 (66%) erythromycin-nonsusceptible isolates demonstrated coresistance to penicillin, and 167 (62%) were multidrug resistant. The most frequent serotypes among the macrolide-resistant isolates were serotypes 6B (23.3%), 14 (20.7%), 19A (16.7%), 9V (8.9%), 19F (6.3%), 6A (5.6%), and 23F (4.8%). mef and erm(B) genes were detected in 207 (77%) and 32 (12%) of the isolates, respectively. Nineteen (7%) of the erythromycin-nonsusceptible isolates contained both mef and erm(B) genotypes; 15 were of serotype 19A. There was significant year-to-year variation in the proportion of isolates that were nonsusceptible to erythromycin (P resistance among pneumococcal isolates from Alaska is mediated predominantly by mef genes, and this has not changed significantly over time. However, there was a statistically significant increase in the proportion of isolates that possess both erm(B) and mef, primarily due to serotype 19A isolates.

  9. Acquired resistance to the 16-membered macrolides tylosin and tilmicosin by Mycoplasma bovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Uri; Amram, Eytan; Ayling, Roger D; Mikula, Inna; Gerchman, Irena; Harrus, Shimon; Teff, Dina; Yogev, David; Lysnyansky, Inna

    2014-01-31

    The molecular mechanism of acquired resistance to the 16-membered macrolides tylosin (Ty) and tilmicosin (Tm) was investigated in Mycoplasma bovis field isolates. Sequence analysis of domains II and V of the two 23S rRNA alleles and ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 was performed on 54 M. bovis isolates showing different minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC). The presence of any one of the point mutations G748A, C752T, A2058G, A2059G or A2059C (Escherichia coli numbering) in one or both alleles of the 23S rRNAs was correlated with decreased susceptibility to Ty (8-1024 μg/ml) and to Tm (32 to >256 μg/ml) in 27/27 and 27/31 M. bovis isolates, respectively. Although a single mutation in domain II or V could be sufficient to cause decreased susceptibility to Ty, our data imply that a combination of mutations in two domains is necessary to achieve higher MICs (≥ 128 μg/ml). The influence of a combination of mutations in two domains II and V on enhancement of resistance to Tm was less clear. In addition, the amino acid (aa) substitution L22-Q90H was found in 24/32 representative M. bovis isolates with different MICs, but no correlation with decreased susceptibility to Ty or Tm was identified. Multiple aa substitutions were also identified in the L4 protein, including at positions 185-186 (positions 64 and 65 in E. coli) which are adjacent to the macrolide-binding site. This is the first description of the molecular mechanism of acquired resistance to the 16-membered macrolides in M. bovis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Gallium maltolate as an alternative to macrolides for treatment of presumed Rhodococcus equi pneumonia in foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Noah D; Slovis, Nathan M; Giguère, Steeve; Baker, Samantha; Chaffin, M Keith; Bernstein, Lawrence R

    2015-01-01

    Macrolide-resistant isolates of Rhodococcus equi are emerging, prompting the search for clinically effective alternative antimicrobials. The proportion of foals with ultrasonographic evidence of pneumonia presumed to be caused by R. equi that had a successful outcome when administered gallium maltolate (GaM) PO would not be more than 10% inferior (ie, lower) than that of foals receiving standard treatment. Fifty-four foals with subclinical pulmonary abscesses among 509 foals at 6 breeding farms in Kentucky. Controlled, randomized, prospective noninferiority study. Foals with ultrasonographic lesions >1 cm in diameter (n = 54) were randomly allocated to receive per os either clarithromycin combined with rifampin (CLR+R) or GaM, and followed up for 28 days by daily physical inspections and weekly (n = 1 farm) or biweekly (n = 4 farms) thoracic ultrasound examinations by individuals unaware of treatment-group assignments. Treatment success was defined as resolution of ultrasonographically identified pulmonary abscesses within 28 days of initiating treatment. Noninferiority was defined as a 90% confidence interval for the observed difference in CLR+R minus GaM that was ≤10%. The proportion of GaM-treated foals that resolved (70%; 14/20) was similar to that of foals treated with CLR+R (74%; 25/34), but we failed to demonstrate noninferiority for GaM relative to CLR+R; however, GaM was noninferior to CLR+R treatment when results from a noncompliant farm were excluded. Gallium maltolate is not inferior to macrolides for treating foals with subclinical pneumonia. Use of GaM might reduce pressure for macrolide-resistance in R. equi. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  11. [In vitro antibacterial activity of rokitamycin, a new macrolide antibiotic. Results of a multicenter study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soussy, C J; Le Van Thoi, J; Meyran, M; Joly, B; Derlot, E; Morel, C

    1990-05-01

    Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of rokitamycin (R) were evaluated by agar dilution for 914 bacterial strain isolated in 4 hospitals and classed as a function of susceptibility and resistance to Macrolides-Lincosamides-Streptogramines group (MLS). MICs of R ranged from 0.06 to 1 microgram/ml (mode MIC 0.25-0.5) on Staphylococci susceptible to MLS and on MLSB inducible strains; R was inactive on MLSB constitutive strains. MICs of R ranged from 0.008 to 0.5 microgram/ml (mode MIC 0.06 to 0.25) for Streptococci and Pneumococci susceptible to erythromycin (E) and from 0.06 to greater than 128 for strains resistant to E. Enterococci susceptible to E were inhibited by 0.06 to 0.5 microgram/ml (mode MIC 0.5) and strains resistant to E by 0.25 to greater than 128. Haemophilus were inhibited by 0.5 to 0.65 microgram/ml (mode MICs of R ranged generally from 0.016 to 0.5 microgram/ml (mode MIC 0.12) for C. perfringens and from 0.016 to 1 (mode MIC 0.06) for B. fragilis. Thus, R was shown to be among macrolide antibiotics of resistance strains. Its activity was superior to that of other products of this group spiramycin, josamycin, miokamycin, particularly on Gram positive cocci. R had a good activity on Neisseria, Branhamella, anaerobes and, as others macrolides, was poorly active on Haemophilus.

  12. [In vitro antibacterial activity of a new macrolide, miokamycin. Results of a multicenter study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soussy, C J; Thabaut, A; Bismuth, R; Morel, C; Berthelot, G; Chanal, M; Derlot, E

    1989-05-01

    Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of miokamycin (M) were evaluated by agar dilution for 1,024 bacterial strains isolated in 6 hospitals and classed as a function of susceptibility and resistance to macrolides, lincosamides, streptogramins group (MLS). MIC of M ranged from 0.25 to 4 micrograms/ml (mode MIC 1-2) on Staphylococcus susceptible to MLS and on MLSB inducible strains; M was inactive on MLSB constitutive strains. MIC of M ranged from 0.016 to 4 micrograms/ml (mode MIC 0.12 to 0.5) for Streptococci and Pneumococci susceptible to erythromycin (E) and from 0.12 to greater than 128 for strains resistant to E. Enterococci susceptible to E were inhibited by 0.5 to 2 micrograms/ml (mode MIC 1) and strains resistant to E by 4 to greater than 128. Haemophilus were inhibited by 2 to 64 micrograms/ml (mode MIC 32), Neisseria by 0.12 to 4 (mode MIC 0.5-1) and B. catarrhalis by 0.12 to 8 (mode MIC 1). L. pneumophila was very susceptible to M: MIC 0.016 to 0.12 (mode MIC 0.06). MIC of M ranged generally from 0.5 to 2 micrograms/ml (mode MIC 1) for C. perfringens and from 0.03 to 2 (mode MIC 1) for B. fragilis. Thus, M was shown to be among macrolide antibiotics of resistance non-inducing type on MLSB inducible resistance strains. Its activity was similar to that of spiramycin slightly superior on Staphylococci, slightly inferior on Streptococci and Enterococci, similar on Pneumococci, very superior on Neisseria, Legionella and anaerobes. M had a good activity on Branhamella and, as others macrolides, was poorly active on Haemophilus.

  13. In-vitro activities of 14-, 15- and 16-membered macrolides against gram-positive cocci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton-Miller, J M

    1992-02-01

    The in-vitro activities of the 14-membered macrolides erythromycin, dirithromycin, roxithromycin, clarithromycin, the 15-membered compound azithromycin and the 16-membered macrolides (16 MM) josamycin, spiramycin and midecamycin acetate (MOM) have been compared against staphylococci, enterococci and streptococci. Results have been analysed separately according to the sensitivity status of the tested strains to erythromycin, namely sensitive (S), inducibly resistant (IR) or constitutively resistant (CR). 14- and 15-membered macrolides were active only against S strains; the order of potency in vitro was clarithromycin = erythromycin greater than azithromycin = roxithromycin greater than dirithromycin. The 16 MM were slightly less active against S strains than were the 14- and 15-membered compounds, and inhibited most IR strains; MOM and josamycin were about twice as potent as spiramycin. IR and S Staphylococcus aureus strains were equally sensitive to 16 MM, while IR strains of coagulase-negative staphylococci were less sensitive than were S strains. All CR strains of S. aureus were resistant to 16 MM, as were most of the other CR strains. However, 5/21 CR coagulase-negative staphylococci and 2/20 CR enterococci tested were sensitive to 16 MM. The seven CR strains showing anomalous sensitivity to the 16 MM (five Staphylococcus haemolyticus and two enterococci) were only 'moderately resistant' to erythromycin (MIC 8-64 mg/L), while all the other CR strains were 'highly resistant' (MIC greater than 128 mg/L). These results indicate that it may be difficult to predict the sensitivity of Gram-positive cocci to 16 MM, and therefore individual sensitivity testing to specific compounds is essential.

  14. Detection of genetic mutations associated with macrolide resistance of Mycoplasma pneumoniae

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    Chi Eun Oh

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : The aim of this study was to identify mutations associated with macrolide resistance in Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP and to establish a cultural method to determine antimicrobial susceptibility. Methods : Nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs were collected from 62 children diagnosed with MP pneumonia by a serologic method or polymerase chain reaction. The 23S rRNA and L4 ribosomal protein genes of MP were amplified and sequenced. To identify mutations in these 2 genes, their nucleotide sequences were compared to those of the reference strain M129. MP cultivation was carried out for 32 (28 frozen and 5 refrigerated NPAs and M129 strain using Chanock’s glucose broth and agar plate in a 5% CO2 incubator at 37?#608;and examined at 2-3 day intervals for 6 weeks. Results : Among the 62 specimens, 17 had M144V mutations in ribosomal protein L4. The A2064G mutation was observed in 1 specimen; its 23S rRNA gene was successfully sequenced. Culture for MP was successful from the M129 strain and 2 of the 5 NPAs that were refrigerated for no longer than 3 days. However, MP did not grow from the 28 NPAs that were kept frozen at -80?#608;since 2003. Conclusion : We found the M144V mutation of L4 protein to be common and that of domain V of 23S rRNA gene was relatively rare among MP. Studies on the prevalence of macrolide-resistant MP and the relationship between the mutations of 23S rRNA gene and ribosomal protein L4 will aid in understanding the mechanism of macrolide resistance in MP.

  15. 13-Deoxytedanolide, a marine sponge-derived antitumor macrolide, binds to the 60S large ribosomal subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Shinichi; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Yoshida, Minoru; Hirota, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Fusetani, Nobuhiro

    2005-01-17

    13-Deoxytedanolide is a potent antitumor macrolide isolated from the marine sponge Mycale adhaerens. In spite of its remarkable activity, the mode of action of 13-deoxytedanolide has not been elucidated. [11-3H]-(11S)-13-Deoxydihydrotedanolide derived from the macrolide was used for identifying the target molecule from the yeast cell lysate. Fractionation of the binding protein revealed that the labeled 13-deoxytedanolide derivative strongly bound to the 80S ribosome as well as to the 60S large subunit, but not to the 40S small subunit. In agreement with this observation, 13-deoxytedanolide efficiently inhibited the polypeptide elongation. Interestingly, competition studies demonstrated that 13-deoxytedanolide shared the binding site on the 60S large subunit with pederin and its marine-derived analogues. These results indicate that 13-deoxytedanolide is a potent protein synthesis inhibitor and is the first macrolide to inhibit the eukaryotic ribosome.

  16. Evolution of macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes over 14 years in an area of central Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, Raffaela; Morandi, Matteo; Zanchi, Alessandra; Tordini, Giacinta; Pozzi, Gianni; De Luca, Andrea; Montagnani, Francesca

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated temporal fluctuations in macrolide resistance rates, analysing genetic determinants of resistance and clonal evolution in a population of 2744 S. pyogenes isolates collected in the period 2000-2013. The total resistance rate to erythromycin of the isolates was 17.9 %. A maximum of erythromycin resistance emerged in 2000 (38.6 %), followed by a significant decrease to 5.2 % in 2012 (P pyogenes. Continuous monitoring of microbiological epidemiology seems to be crucial for correct and effective management of streptococcal infections.

  17. CONFLEX/MM3 search/minimization study of the conformations of the macrolide antibiotic tylosin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Petko M.

    2002-03-01

    The conformations of the 16-membered macrolide antibiotic tylosin were studied with the MM3 force field. The CONFLEX conformational search procedure was used for finding low-energy conformations. The computed data are indicative for the existence of several conformations in equilibrium. The intramolecular hydrogen bonds play an important role for the preferred geometry of the macroring and the conformations of the side chains. The present results provide further insight into the most probable conformations of tylosin and compliment an earlier analysis based on NMR techniques.

  18. Synthesis of Key Fragments of Amphidinolide Q — A Cytotoxic 12-membered Macrolide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Kawa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available b-Hydroxy aldehyde and alkyl ketone moieties were effectively synthesized as key intermediates of amphidinolide Q, a cytotoxic macrolide from the cultured dinoflagellate Amphidinium sp.. The asymmetric center of the former derivative was produced by Sharpless asymmetric epoxidation, followed by E-selective 1,4-addition to give the sp2 methyl group. Derivatization of the L-ascorbic acid derivative by Evans asymmetric alkylation and Peterson olefination provided the latter intermediate. The coupling reaction of the segments was examined.

  19. Balticolid: A New 12-Membered Macrolide with Antiviral Activity from an Ascomycetous Fungus of Marine Origin

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    Ulrike Lindequist

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A new 12-membered macrolide, balticolid (1 was isolated from the EtOAc extract of the culture broth of fungal strain 222 belonging to the Ascomycota, which was found on driftwood collected from the coast of the Greifswalder Bodden, Baltic Sea, Germany. The structure of balticolid was determined to be (3R,11R, (4E,8E-3-hydroxy-11-methyloxacyclododeca-4,8-diene-1,7-dione using extensive spectral data as well as the modified Mosher ester method. Balticolid (1 displayed anti-HSV-1 activity with an IC50 value of 0.45 µM.

  20. Simple methods for the qualitative identification and quantitative determination of macrolide antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, N D; Holeman, J A; Bristol, D C; Kirzner, D H

    1993-02-01

    Pyrolysis-gas chromatography is shown to be a rapid straightforward method for the qualitative differentiation of the macrolide antibiotics erythromycin, oleandomycin, troleandomycin, spiramycin and tylosin. Organic salts do not interfere and identification of erythromycin and troleandomycin in commercial products is viable. Spectrophotometric quantitation of these same five antibiotics after reaction with concentrated sulphuric acid is studied at about 470 nm. Reaction conditions such as acid concentration, time and temperature are provided. The sugar moieties of the antibiotics are proposed as the reactive sites. Detection limits are about 0.2-1.0 microg ml-1 [corrected] and analysis of pharmaceutical products should be possible.

  1. Plasmid-related quinolone resistance determinants in epidemic Vibrio parahaemolyticus, uropathogenic Escherichia coli, and marine bacteria from an aquaculture area in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aedo, Sandra; Ivanova, Larisa; Tomova, Alexandra; Cabello, Felipe C

    2014-08-01

    Marine bacteria from aquaculture areas with industrial use of quinolones have the potential to pass quinolone resistance genes to animal and human pathogens. The VPA0095 gene, related to the quinolone resistance determinant qnrA, from clinical isolates of epidemic Vibrio parahaemolyticus conferred reduced susceptibility to quinolone after cloning into Escherichia coli K-12 either when acting alone or synergistically with DNA gyrase mutations. In addition, a plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance gene from marine bacteria, aac(6')-Ib-cr, was identical to aac(6')-Ib-cr from urinary tract isolates of E. coli, suggesting a recent flow of this gene between these bacteria isolated from different environments. aac(6')-Ib-cr from E. coli also conferred reduced susceptibility to quinolone and kanamycin when cloned into E. coli K-12.

  2. Survey of Tetracyclines, Sulfonamides, Sulfamethazine, and Quinolones in UHT Milk in China Market

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Rong-wei; ZHENG Nan; WANG Jia-qi; ZHEN Yun-peng; LI Song-li; YU Qun-li

    2013-01-01

    This study surveyed 180 samples of ultra high temperature (UHT) milk of four top Chinese dairy brands collected in the 25 cities in China in June 2011, and assessed their contamination with antibiotics, using the ELISA method. The percentages of tetracyclines, sulfonamides, sulfamethazine, and quinolones detected in the samples were 0, 16.7, 40.6, and 100%, respectively. The maximum concentrations of the tetracyclines, sulfonamides, sulfamethazine and quinolones in UHT milk samples were<1.5, 26.2, 22.6, and 58.8μg kg-1, respectively. None of the samples exceeded the maximum residue levels (MRLs) for these four veterinary drugs, according to the regulations set by China, the European Union (EU) and the Codex Alimentarius Commission (CAC).

  3. An outbreak of multidrug-resistant, quinolone-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype typhimurium DT104

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molbak, K.; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    1999-01-01

    , and tetracycline. An increasing proportion of DT104 isolates also have reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones. Methods The Danish salmonella surveillance program determines the phage types of all typhimurium strains from the food chain, and in the case of suspected outbreaks, five-drug-resistant strains...... findings here. Results Until 1997, DT104 infections made up less than 1 percent of all human salmonella infections. The strain isolated from patients in the first community outbreak of DT104 in Denmark, in 1998, was resistant to nalidixic acid and had reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones...... with fluoroquinolones. Conclusions Our investigation of an outbreak of DT104 documented the spread of quinolone-resistant bacteria from food animals to humans; this spread was associated with infections that were difficult to treat. Because of the increase in quinolone resistance in salmonella, the use...

  4. Resistance to quinolones in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli from Danish broilers at farm level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl; Wedderkopp, A.

    2003-01-01

    Aims : To investigate the prevalence of quinolone resistance among Campylobacter jejuni and Camp. coli isolates from Danish poultry at the farm level, as well as for the whole country. Methods and Results : Data and isolates were collected from a national surveillance of Campylobacter in poultry......-resistant variant. Conclusions : Overall, quinolone resistance among Campylobacter isolates from Danish broilers was 7.5% in 1998 and 1999; it was higher among Camp. coli than Camp. jejuni . Genetic diversity among resistant isolates was lower than among susceptible isolates, and certain clones existed in both...... a resistant and a susceptible variant. Some resistant clones appeared to persist on the farms and were repeatedly isolated from poultry flocks. Significance and Impact of the Study : The study is important for the understanding of persistence and dynamics of Campylobacter in broiler houses. It also highlights...

  5. Design, synthesis and biological characterization of a new class of osteogenic (1H)-quinolone derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manetti, Fabrizio; Petricci, Elena; Gabrielli, Annalisa; Mann, Andrè; Faure, Hélène; Gorojankina, Tatiana; Brasseur, Laurent; Hoch, Lucile; Ruat, Martial; Taddei, Maurizio

    2016-10-04

    Smoothened (Smo) is the signal transducer of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway and its stimulation is considered a potential powerful tool in regenerative medicine to treat severe tissue injuries. Starting from GSA-10, a recently reported Hh activator acting on Smo, we have designed and synthesized a new class of quinolone-based compounds. Modification and decoration of three different portions of the original scaffold led to compounds able to induce differentiation of multipotent mesenchymal cells into osteoblasts. The submicromolar activity of several of these new quinolones (0.4-0.9 μM) is comparable to or better than that of SAG and purmorphamine, two reference Smo agonists. Structure-activity relationships allow identification of several molecular determinants important for the activity of these compounds.

  6. Determination of fluorinated quinolone antibacterials by ion chromatography with fluorescence detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yan-zhen; ZHANG Zheng-yi; ZHOU Yan-chun; LIU Li; ZHU Yan

    2007-01-01

    For preparing fluorinated quinolone antibiotic medicine locally used in stomatology, simultaneous determination of norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and enoxacin was carried out by multiphase ion chromatography with fluorescence detection. Quinolone antibiotics were separated by Dionex OmniPac PAX-500 column with an eluent of 15 mmol/L H2SO4 and 35% methanol (v/v) at a flow-rate of 1.0 ml/min and detected with fluorescence with excitation and emission wave lengths of 347 nm and 420 nm respectively. The detection limits (S/N=3) ofnorfloxacin, ciprofloxacin and enoxacin were 50, 105 and 80 ng/ml respectively. The relative standard deviations of retention time, peak area and peak height were less than 1.1% and good linear relationship resulted.The developed method was applied to pharmaceutical formulations and biological fluids.

  7. Origins of the Quinolone Class of Antibacterials: An Expanded "Discovery Story".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisacchi, Gregory S

    2015-06-25

    Published descriptions of the specific lines of research leading to the discovery of therapeutically important medicines, especially major new class medicines, have long provided value to the biopharmaceutical community as models of success, often influencing the strategies and methods of subsequent drug research. Quinolone antibacterials represent one of medicine's most important classes of anti-infective agents; yet in contrast to many other classes of anti-infectives, astonishingly few details concerning the origin of the class or the rationale leading to the selection of the first clinical agent, nalidixic acid, were ever published by the discoverers. Moreover, earlier disclosures of an independent discovery of the quinolone class of antibacterials have been almost entirely overlooked by the scientific literature. This review brings together all the available information from primary literature sources relating to both discoveries and provides for the first time a much fuller, if still partially speculative, story of the earliest years of this important class of drugs.

  8. 4(1H)-Quinolones with liver stage activity against Plasmodium berghei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacrue, Alexis N; Sáenz, Fabián E; Cross, R Matthew; Udenze, Kenneth O; Monastyrskyi, Andrii; Stein, Steven; Mutka, Tina S; Manetsch, Roman; Kyle, Dennis E

    2013-01-01

    With the exception of primaquine, tafenoquine, and atovaquone, there are very few antimalarials that target liver stage parasites. In this study, a transgenic Plasmodium berghei parasite (1052Cl1; PbGFP-Luc(con)) that expresses luciferase was used to assess the anti-liver stage parasite activity of ICI 56,780, a 7-(2-phenoxyethoxy)-4(1H)-quinolone (PEQ), as well as two 3-phenyl-4(1H)-quinolones (P4Q), P4Q-146 and P4Q-158, by using bioluminescent imaging (BLI). Results showed that all of the compounds were active against liver stage parasites; however, ICI 56,780 and P4Q-158 were the most active, with low nanomolar activity in vitro and causal prophylactic activity in vivo. This potent activity makes these compounds ideal candidates for advancement as novel antimalarials.

  9. Occurrence of quinolone- and beta-lactam-resistant Escherichia coli in danish broiler flocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortolaia, Valeria; Guardabassi, Luca; Bisgaard, Magne

    ). In Denmark, antimicrobial resistance is annually monitored in both clinical and indicator E. coli isolated from poultry (DANMAP, 2006). However, very little is known on the prevalence of resistance at the flock level. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of flocks positive for E. coli...... resistant to quinolones or ß-lactams. Sock samples were collected from 10 broiler parent flocks and 10 broiler offspring flocks. Five pairs of socks were collected from each house. Samples were enriched in McConkey broth and streaked on McConkey agar added with nalidixic acid (32 µg/ml), ciprofloxacin (2 µg...... and nalidixic acid resistances were detected in all flocks. The numbers of E. coli resistant to these drugs were higher in plates from parent flocks than in those from offspring flocks. A broiler parent flock without any history of quinolone usage tested positive for ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli, although...

  10. Dynamics of quinolone resistance in fecal Escherichia coli of finishing pigs after ciprofloxacin administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kang; Xu, Chang-Wen; Zeng, Bo; Xia, Qing-Qing; Zhang, An-Yun; Lei, Chang-Wei; Guan, Zhong-Bin; Cheng, Han; Wang, Hong-Ning

    2014-09-01

    Escherichia coli resistance to quinolones has now become a serious issue in large-scale pig farms of China. It is necessary to study the dynamics of quinolone resistance in fecal Escherichia coli of pigs after antimicrobial administration. Here, we present the hypothesis that the emergence of resistance in pigs requires drug accumulation for 7 days or more. To test this hypothesis, 26 pigs (90 days old, about 30 kg) not fed any antimicrobial after weaning were selected and divided into 2 equal groups: the experimental (EP) group and control (CP) group. Pigs in the EP group were orally treated daily with 5 mg ciprofloxacin/kg of body weight for 30 days, and pigs in the CP group were fed a normal diet. Fresh feces were collected at 16 time points from day 0 to day 61. At each time point, ten E. coli clones were tested for susceptibility to quinolones and mutations of gyrA and parC. The results showed that the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) for ciprofloxacin increased 16-fold compared with the initial MIC (0.5 µg/ml) after ciprofloxacin administration for 3 days and decreased 256-fold compared with the initial MIC (0.5 µg/ml) after ciprofloxacin withdrawal for 26 days. GyrA (S83L, D87N/ D87Y) and parC (S80I) substitutions were observed in all quinolone-resistant E. coli (QREC) clones with an MIC ≥8 µg/ml. This study provides scientific theoretical guidance for the rational use of antimicrobials and the control of bacterial resistance.

  11. Design, synthesis and antitumor activity of 3-substituted quinolone derivatives (Ⅰ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A series of quinolone derivatives containing benzimidazole, benzoxazole or benzothiazole ring were synthesized. The cytotoxicity of 12 new compounds was evaluated in KB, Be17402, A2780 and HT-29 cell lines. Most of synthesized compounds showed moderate inhibitory activity against cancer cells. The inhibitory activities of 6k, against KB and A2780 tumor cells are comparable to that of topotecan, one of topoisomerase I inhibitors.

  12. "Changes in cartilage of rats after treatment with Quinolone and in Magnesium-deficient diet "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakibaei M

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Ultrastructural changes in immature articular carilage were studied after treatment of 5-weeks-old rats with ofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone, and in magnesium deficiency.We concluded that quinolone-induced arthropathy is probably due to chelation of functionally available magnesium in joint cartilage as magnesium deficiency in joint cartilage could impair chondrocyte-matrix- interaction which is mediated by cation-dependent integrin-receptors of the β1-subfamily. With immuno-histochemical methods using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies we showed that B1 integrins were expressed in rat joint cartilage. Joint cartilage lesions were detected in ofloxacin-treated and magnesium-deficient rats. Lesions were more pronounced in the quinolone-treated group. Expression of several integrins was reduced in the vicinity of lesions after oral treatment with 2×600 mg ofloxacin/kg body wt for one day. Gross-structural lesions (e.g. cleft formation, unmasked collagen fibres in magnesium deficient rats were very similar but changes in intergrin expression were less pronounced. Alterations observed on the ultrastructural level showed striking similarities in magnesium-deficient rats and in rats treated with single doses of 600 mg ofloxacin per kg body wt.Typical observation were: bundle shaped, electron-dense aggregates on the surface and in the cytoplasm of chondrocytes, detachement of the cell membrance from the matrix and necrotic chondrocytes, reduced synthesis and/or reduced of extracellular matrix and swelling of cell organelles such as mitochondria.The results of this study confirm our previously reported finding that quinolone-induced arthropathy probably is caued by a reduction of functionally available magnesium (ionized Mg2+ in cartilage. Furthermore, they provide a basis for aimed studies with human cartilage samples from quinolone-treated patients which might be available postmortal or after hip replacement surgery

  13. Characterization of quinolone resistance in Salmonella spp. isolates from food products and human samples in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribul, Bruno Rocha; Festivo, Marcia Lima; de Souza, Miliane Moreira Soares; dos Prazeres Rodrigues, Dalia

    2016-01-01

    Non-typhoidal salmonellosis is an important zoonotic disease caused by Salmonella enterica. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in Salmonella spp. and its association with fluoroquinolone susceptibility in Brazil. A total of 129 NTS isolates (samples from human origin, food from animal origin, environmental, and animal) grouped as from animal (n = 62) and human (n = 67) food were evaluated between 2009 and 2013. These isolates were investigated through serotyping, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and the presence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes (qnr, aac(6′)-Ib) and associated integron genes (integrase, and conserved integron region). Resistance to quinolones and/or fluoroquinolones, from first to third generations, was observed. Fifteen isolates were positive for the presence of qnr genes (8 qnrS, 6 qnrB, and 1 qnrD) and twenty three of aac(6′)-Ib. The conserved integron region was detected in 67 isolates as variable regions, from ±600 to >1000 pb. The spread of NTS involving PMQR carriers is of serious concern and should be carefully monitored. PMID:26887245

  14. Cellular Response to Ciprofloxacin in Low-Level Quinolone-Resistant Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Machuca

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bactericidal activity of quinolones has been related to a combination of DNA fragmentation, reactive oxygen species (ROS production and programmed cell death (PCD systems. The underlying molecular systems responsible for reducing bactericidal effect during antimicrobial therapy in low-level quinolone resistance (LLQR phenotypes need to be clarified. To do this and also define possible new antimicrobial targets, the transcriptome profile of isogenic Escherichia coli harboring quinolone resistance mechanisms in the presence of a clinical relevant concentration of ciprofloxacin was evaluated. A marked differential response to ciprofloxacin of either up- or downregulation was observed in LLQR strains. Multiple genes implicated in ROS modulation (related to the TCA cycle, aerobic respiration and detoxification systems were upregulated (sdhC up to 63.5-fold in mutants with LLQR. SOS system components were downregulated (recA up to 30.7-fold. yihE, a protective kinase coding for PCD, was also upregulated (up to 5.2-fold. SdhC inhibition sensitized LLQR phenotypes (up to ΔLog = 2.3 after 24 h. At clinically relevant concentrations of ciprofloxacin, gene expression patterns in critical systems to bacterial survival and mutant development were significantly modified in LLQR phenotypes. Chemical inhibition of SdhC (succinate dehydrogenase validated modulation of ROS as an interesting target for bacterial sensitization.

  15. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in Enterobacteriaceae: a systematic review with a focus on Mediterranean countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanat, B; Rodríguez-Martínez, J-M; Touati, A

    2017-03-01

    Quinolones are a family of synthetic broad-spectrum antimicrobial drugs. These molecules have been widely prescribed to treat various infectious diseases and have been classified into several generations based on their spectrum of activity. Quinolones inhibit bacterial DNA synthesis by interfering with the action of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. Mutations in the genes encoding these targets are the most common mechanisms of high-level fluoroquinolone resistance. Moreover, three mechanisms for plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) have been discovered since 1998 and include Qnr proteins, the aminoglycoside acetyltransferase AAC(6')-Ib-cr, and plasmid-mediated efflux pumps QepA and OqxAB. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistance (extended spectrum beta-lactamases [ESBLs] and plasmidic AmpC [pAmpC] ß-lactamases) and can transfer multidrug resistance. The PMQR determinants are disseminated in Mediterranean countries with prevalence relatively high depending on the sources and the regions, highlighting the necessity of long-term surveillance for the future monitoring of trends in the occurrence of PMQR genes.

  16. Characterization of quinolone resistance in Salmonella spp. isolates from food products and human samples in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribul, Bruno Rocha; Festivo, Marcia Lima; de Souza, Miliane Moreira Soares; Rodrigues, Dalia dos Prazeres

    2016-01-01

    Non-typhoidal salmonellosis is an important zoonotic disease caused by Salmonella enterica. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in Salmonella spp. and its association with fluoroquinolone susceptibility in Brazil. A total of 129 NTS isolates (samples from human origin, food from animal origin, environmental, and animal) grouped as from animal (n=62) and human (n=67) food were evaluated between 2009 and 2013. These isolates were investigated through serotyping, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and the presence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes (qnr, aac(6')-Ib) and associated integron genes (integrase, and conserved integron region). Resistance to quinolones and/or fluoroquinolones, from first to third generations, was observed. Fifteen isolates were positive for the presence of qnr genes (8 qnrS, 6 qnrB, and 1 qnrD) and twenty three of aac(6')-Ib. The conserved integron region was detected in 67 isolates as variable regions, from ±600 to >1000pb. The spread of NTS involving PMQR carriers is of serious concern and should be carefully monitored.

  17. A series of 2D metal-quinolone complexes: Syntheses, structures, and physical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiang-Hong; Xiao, Dong-Rong; Chen, Hai-Yan; Sun, Dian-Zhen; Yan, Shi-Wei; Wang, Xin; Ye, Zhong-Li; Luo, Qun-Li; Wang, En-Bo

    2013-02-01

    Six novel 2D metal-quinolone complexes, namely [Cd(cfH)(bpdc)]rad H2O (1), [M(norfH)(bpdc)]rad H2O (M=Cd (2) and Mn (3)), [Mn2(cfH)(odpa)(H2O)3]rad 0.5H2O (4), [Co2(norfH)(bpta)(μ2-H2O)(H2O)2]rad H2O (5) and [Co3(saraH)2(Hbpta)2(H2O)4]rad 9H2O (6) (cfH=ciprofloxacin, norfH=norfloxacin, saraH=sarafloxacin, bpdc=4,4'-biphenyldicarboxylate, odpa=4,4'-oxydiphthalate, bpta=3,3',4,4'-biphenyltetracarboxylate) have been synthesized and characterized. Compounds 1-3 consist of 2D arm-shaped layers based on the 1D {M(COO)}nn+ chains. Compounds 4 and 5 display 2D structures based on tetranuclear manganese or cobalt clusters with (3,6)-connected kgd topology. Compound 6 exhibits a 2D bilayer structure, which represents the first example of metal-quinolone complexes with 2D bilayer structure. By inspection of the structures of 1-6, it is believed that the long aromatic polycarboxylate ligands are important for the formation of 2D metal-quinolone complexes. The magnetic properties of compounds 3-6 was studied, indicating the existence of antiferromagnetic interactions. Furthermore, the luminescent properties of compounds 1-2 are discussed.

  18. 喹诺酮类药物的研究进展%Research Progress of Quinolones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田秋月

    2014-01-01

    喹诺酮类药物是一类人工合成的抗菌药物,目前广泛应用于临床抗感染治疗中,具有较强的抗菌活性。本文主要从喹诺酮类药物的作用机制、临床应用、不良反应及耐药机制等方面进行分析和整理,综述其研究进展并对其未来的研究方向提出了建议,希望为今后喹诺酮药物的研究提供一定的参考依据。%Quinolones are a group of synthetic antibacteril drugs with strong antibacterial activity which have a broad range of clinic applications in recent years. In this article, research progress of quinolones was analyzed and summarized from the aspects of action mechanism, clinical application, adverse reactions and drug resistance mechanism, and the future research direction of quinolones was proposed.

  19. Liquid chromatographic determination of quinolones in water and human urine samples after microextraction by packed sorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Susheela; Kumar, Ashwini; Malik, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Baldev

    2012-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of quinolones in water and urine samples by microextraction in a sorbent-packed syringe (MEPS) with LC is described. MEPS is a new miniaturized SPE technique that can be used with chromatographic instruments without any modifications. In MEPS, approximately 1 mg of the solid packing material is inserted into a syringe (100-250 microL) as a plug. Sample preparation takes place on the packed bed. The new method is promising, easy to use, economical, and rapid. The determination of quinolones in groundwater and urine was performed using MEPS as a sample preparation method with LC-UV determination. Four quinolone antibiotics--enrofloxacin, enoxacin, danofloxacin, and nalidixic acid--in groundwater and urine samples were used as analytes. The extraction recovery was found to be between 64.9 and 98.9%. The results showed high correlation coefficients (R2 > 0.992) for all of the analytes within the calibration range. The LOQ was between 0.091 and 0.315 ng/mL.

  20. Renaissance of antibiotics against difficult infections: Focus on oritavancin and new ketolides and quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2014-11-01

    Lipoglycopeptide, ketolide, and quinolone antibiotics are currently in clinical development, with specific advantages over available molecules within their respective classes. The lipoglycopeptide oritavancin is bactericidal against MRSA, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and multiresistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, and proved effective and safe for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection (ABSSSI) upon administration of a single 1200 mg dose (two completed phase III trials). The ketolide solithromycin (two phase III studies recruiting for community-acquired pneumonia) shows a profile of activity similar to that of telithromycin, but in vitro data suggest a lower risk of hepatotoxicity, visual disturbance, and aggravation of myasthenia gravis due to reduced affinity for nicotinic receptors. Among quinolones, finafloxacin and delafloxacin share the unique property of an improved activity in acidic environments (found in many infection sites). Finafloxacin (phase II completed; activity profile similar to that of ciprofloxacin) is evaluated for complicated urinary tract and Helicobacter pylori infections. The other quinolones (directed towards Gram-positive pathogens) show improved activity on MRSA and multiresistant S. pneumoniae compared to current molecules. They are in clinical evaluation for ABSSSI (avarofloxacin (phase II completed), nemonoxacin and delafloxacin (ongoing phase III)), respiratory tract infections (zabofloxacin and nemonoxacin (ongoing phase III)), or gonorrhea (delafloxacin).

  1. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bovine digital dermatitis treponemes identifies macrolides for in vivo efficacy testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, N J; Brown, J M; Hartley, C; Smith, R F; Carter, S D

    2012-12-07

    Digital dermatitis (DD) is a major infectious lameness of dairy cattle and sheep considered to be caused by treponemes. The aim of this study was to identify antibiotics effective against DD treponemes that might be useful in the treatment of ruminant DD in the future or to identify antibiotics useful in isolation studies. Here, a microdilution method was used to identify in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of treponemes cultured from DD lesions to eight relevant antibiotics. DD treponemes exhibited highest susceptibility to amoxicillin, azithromycin and gamithromycin. Unfortunately, amoxicillin whilst having potential for DD treatment in other animals (e.g. sheep) would require milk withhold periods in dairy cattle. DD treponemes were not particularly susceptible to two cephalosporins: cefalexin and ceftiofur, which do not require milk withhold. The bacteria demonstrated low susceptibility to trimethoprim and especially colistin suggesting these antimicrobials may be particularly useful in isolation of DD treponemes. The most promising high susceptibility results for macrolides indicate a rationale to consider veterinary licensed macrolides as DD treatments. Furthermore, given the DD treponeme antibiotic susceptibility similarities to established treatments for human treponematoses, identification of treponemacidal, long acting β-lactam analogues not requiring milk withhold may allow for development of a successful treatment for dairy cattle DD.

  2. Reaction of some macrolide antibiotics with the ribosome. Labeling of the binding site components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejedor, F.; Ballesta, J.P.

    1986-11-18

    Radioactive carbomycin A, niddamycin, tylosin, and spiramycin, but not erythromycin, can be covalently bound to Escherichia coli ribosomes by incubation at 37 degrees C. The incorporation of radioactivity into the particles is inhibited by SH- and activated double bond containing compounds but not by amino groups, suggesting that the reactions may take place by addition to the double bond present in the reactive antibiotics. This thermic reaction must be different from the photoreaction described for some of these macrolides (Tejedor, F., and Ballesta, J. P. G. (1985) Biochemistry 24, 467-472) since tylosin, which is not photoincorporated, is thermically bound to ribosomes. Most of the radioactivity is incorporated into the ribosomal proteins. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of proteins labeled by carbomycin A, niddamycin, and tylosin indicates that about 40% of the radioactivity is bound to protein L27; the rest is distributed among several other proteins such as L8, L2, and S12, to differing extents depending on the drug used. These results indicate, in accordance with previous data, that protein L27 plays an important role in the macrolide binding site, confirming that these drugs bind near the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome.

  3. Synergistic anti-Campylobacter jejuni activity of fluoroquinolone and macrolide antibiotics with phenolic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euna eOh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The increasing resistance of Campylobacter to clinically-important antibiotics, such as fluoroquinolones and macrolides, is a serious public health problem. The objective of this study is to investigate synergistic anti-Campylobacter jejuni activity of fluoroquinolones and macrolides in combination with phenolic compounds. Synergistic antimicrobial activity was measured by performing a checkerboard assay with ciprofloxacin and erythromycin in the presence of 21 phenolic compounds. Membrane permeability changes in C. jejuni by phenolic compounds were determined by measuring the level of intracellular uptake of 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine (NPN. Antibiotic accumulation assays were performed to evaluate the level of ciprofloxacin accumulation in C. jejuni. Six phenolic compounds, including p-coumaric acid, sinapic acid, caffeic acid, vanillic acid, gallic acid, and taxifolin, significantly increased the susceptibility to ciprofloxacin and erythromycin in several human and poultry isolates. The synergistic antimicrobial effect was also observed in ciprofloxacin- and erythromycin-resistant C. jejuni strains. The phenolic compounds also substantially increased membrane permeability and antibiotic accumulation in C. jejuni. Interestingly, some phenolic compounds, such as gallic acid and taxifolin, significantly reduced the expression of the CmeABC multidrug efflux pump. Phenolic compounds increased the NPN accumulation in the cmeB mutant, indicating phenolic compounds may affect the membrane permeability. In this study, we successfully demonstrated that combinational treatment of C. jejuni with antibiotics and phenolic compounds synergistically inhibits C. jejuni by impacting both antimicrobial influx and efflux.

  4. Synergy of four macrolide antibiotics with chloroquine against chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, P; Howells, R E

    1986-01-01

    The antimalarial activity of four macrolide antibiotics was investigated against the multidrug resistant K1 strain of Plasmodium falciparum in vitro. ID50 (50% inhibitory concentration) values for erythromycin, spiramycin, tylosin tartrate and oleandomycin phosphate in 48-hour assays were 1.6 X 10(-4)M, 2.5 X 10(-5)M, 1.2 X 10(-5)M and 9 X 10(-6)M respectively, and in 96 hour assays were 10(-5)M, 2.6 X 10(-6)M, 2.6 X 10(-6) and 3 X 10(-6)M, respectively. Comparable values were obtained in assays in which drug effect was quantified from either parasite counts or 14C isoleucine incorporation. Each of the four macrolides displayed synergy with chloroquine at the IC90 (90% inhibitory concentration) level, but at the IC50 level synergy was either less pronounced or absent. For each combination this difference in the degree of synergy was significant at the 95% level of confidence. In replicate assays in which 3H hypoxanthine was the marker of drug effect, synergy between chloroquine and either erythromycin or spiramycin could not be detected.

  5. Nationwide monitoring of selected antibiotics: Distribution and sources of sulfonamides, trimethoprim, and macrolides in Japanese rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Ayako; Takada, Hideshige; Mutoh, Kunihiro; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Harada, Arata; Nakada, Norihide

    2011-11-15

    We report the results of a nationwide survey of commonly used human and veterinary antibiotics (7 sulfonamides, trimethoprim, and 4 macrolides) in 37 Japanese rivers. Concentrations of the sum of the 12 target antibiotics ranged from undetectable to 626 ng/L, with a median of 7.3 ng/L for the 37 rivers. Antibiotics concentrations were higher in urban rivers than in rural rivers and were correlated with those of molecular markers of sewage (crotamiton and carbamazepine). Macrolides were dominant over sulfonamides in urban rivers. Sulfonamides, especially sulfamethazine (used in animals), were dominant in a few rivers in whose catchment animal husbandry is active. However, these signals of veterinary antibiotics were overwhelmed by those of human antibiotics in lower reaches of most rivers. The analysis of the antibiotics in all 88 samples showed that the target antibiotics in Japanese rivers are derived mainly from urban sewage, even though larger amounts of antibiotics are used in livestock. Most of the livestock waste-derived antibiotics are unlikely to be readily discharged to surface waters. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Synergistic anti-Campylobacter jejuni activity of fluoroquinolone and macrolide antibiotics with phenolic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Euna; Jeon, Byeonghwa

    2015-01-01

    The increasing resistance of Campylobacter to clinically important antibiotics, such as fluoroquinolones and macrolides, is a serious public health problem. The objective of this study is to investigate synergistic anti-Campylobacter jejuni activity of fluoroquinolones and macrolides in combination with phenolic compounds. Synergistic antimicrobial activity was measured by performing a checkerboard assay with ciprofloxacin and erythromycin in the presence of 21 phenolic compounds. Membrane permeability changes in C. jejuni by phenolic compounds were determined by measuring the level of intracellular uptake of 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine (NPN). Antibiotic accumulation assays were performed to evaluate the level of ciprofloxacin accumulation in C. jejuni. Six phenolic compounds, including p-coumaric acid, sinapic acid, caffeic acid, vanillic acid, gallic acid, and taxifolin, significantly increased the susceptibility to ciprofloxacin and erythromycin in several human and poultry isolates. The synergistic antimicrobial effect was also observed in ciprofloxacin- and erythromycin-resistant C. jejuni strains. The phenolic compounds also substantially increased membrane permeability and antibiotic accumulation in C. jejuni. Interestingly, some phenolic compounds, such as gallic acid and taxifolin, significantly reduced the expression of the CmeABC multidrug efflux pump. Phenolic compounds increased the NPN accumulation in the cmeB mutant, indicating phenolic compounds may affect the membrane permeability. In this study, we successfully demonstrated that combinational treatment of C. jejuni with antibiotics and phenolic compounds synergistically inhibits C. jejuni by impacting both antimicrobial influx and efflux.

  7. Hydrolysis of amphenicol and macrolide antibiotics: Chloramphenicol, florfenicol, spiramycin, and tylosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Shannon M; Ullman, Jeffrey L; Teel, Amy L; Watts, Richard J

    2015-09-01

    Antibiotics that enter the environment can present human and ecological health risks. An understanding of antibiotic hydrolysis rates is important for predicting their environmental persistence as biologically active contaminants. In this study, hydrolysis rates and Arrhenius constants were determined as a function of pH and temperature for two amphenicol (chloramphenicol and florfenicol) and two macrolide (spiramycin and tylosin) antibiotics. Antibiotic hydrolysis rates in pH 4-9 buffer solutions at 25°C, 50°C, and 60°C were quantified, and degradation products were characterized. All of the antibiotics tested remained stable and exhibited no observable hydrolysis under ambient conditions typical of aquatic ecosystems. Acid- and base-catalyzed hydrolysis occurred at elevated temperatures (50-60°C), and hydrolysis rates increased considerably below pH 5 and above pH 8. Hydrolysis rates also increased approximately 1.5- to 2.9-fold for each 10°C increase in temperature. Based on the degradation product masses found, the functional groups that underwent hydrolysis were alkyl fluoride, amide, and cyclic ester (lactone) moieties; some of the resultant degradation products may remain bioactive, but to a lesser extent than the parent compounds. The results of this research demonstrate that amphenicol and macrolide antibiotics persist in aquatic systems under ambient temperature and pH conditions typical of natural waters. Thus, these antibiotics may present a risk in aquatic ecosystems depending on the concentration present.

  8. Characteristics of Quinolone Resistance in Salmonella spp. Isolates from the Food Chain in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribul, Bruno R; Festivo, Marcia L; Rodrigues, Marcelle S; Costa, Renata G; Rodrigues, Elizabeth C Dos P; de Souza, Miliane M S; Rodrigues, Dalia Dos P

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella spp. is an important zoonotic pathogen related to foodborne diseases. Despite that quinolones/fluoroquinolones are considered a relevant therapeutic strategy against resistant isolates, the increase in antimicrobial resistance is an additional difficulty in controlling bacterial infections caused by Salmonella spp. Thus, the acquisition of resistance to quinolones in Salmonella spp. is worrisome to the scientific community along with the possibility of transmission of resistance through plasmids. This study investigated the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) in Salmonella spp. and its association with fluoroquinolone susceptibility in Brazil. We evaluated 129 isolates, 39 originated from food of animal sources, and 14 from environmental samples and including 9 from animals and 67 from humans, which were referred to the National Reference Laboratory of Enteric Diseases (NRLEB/IOC/RJ) between 2009 and 2013. These samples showed a profile of resistance for the tested quinolones/fluoroquinolones. A total of 33 serotypes were identified; S. Typhimurium (63) was the most prevalent followed by S. Enteritidis (25). The disk diffusion test showed 48.8% resistance to enrofloxacin, 42.6% to ciprofloxacin, 39.53% to ofloxacin, and 30.2% to levofloxacin. According to the broth microdilution test, the resistance percentages were: 96.1% to nalidixic acid, 64.3% to enrofloxacin, 56.6% to ciprofloxacin, 34.1% to ofloxacin, and 30.2% to levofloxacin. Qnr genes were found in 15 isolates (8 qnrS, 6 qnrB, and 1 qnrD), and the aac(6')-Ib gene in 23. The integron gene was detected in 67 isolates with the variable region between ±600 and 1000 bp. The increased detection of PMQR in Salmonella spp. is a serious problem in Public Health and must constantly be monitored. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was performed to evaluated clonal profile among the most prevalent serovars resistant to different classes of quinolones. A total of 33 pulsotypes of S

  9. Detection of quinolones in commercial eggs obtained from farms in the Espaíllat Province in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscoso, S; de los Santos, F Solís; Andino, A G; Diaz-Sanchez, Sandra; Hanning, I

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we reported the use of quinolones in broiler chickens resulted in residues in retail poultry meat obtained from nine districts in the Santiago Province of the Dominican Republic. Residues in poultry products are a concern due to consumer allergies and the potential to develop antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Given the use of quinolones in poultry production and our previous findings in poultry meat, the objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of quinolone residues in eggs. Samples were collected from 48 different farms located in three of the four municipalities (Moca, Cayetano Germosén, and Jamao) of the Espaíllat Province. Each farm was sampled three times between July and September for a total of 144 samples. Samples were evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively for quinolone residues using the Equinox test. Operation systems (cage or floor), seasonality, and location were considered along with egg-producer sizes that were defined as small scale, 60,000 eggs per day. From small-, medium-, and large-scale producers, 69, 50, and 40% of samples were positive for quinolone residues, respectively. A greater number of samples were positive (61%) in floor-laying hen producers compared with those using cages (40%). In the Jamao municipality, 67% of the samples were positive compared with Moca and Cayetano Germosén, where 56 and 25% of samples were positive, respectively. Sampling time had an effect on percent positives: samples collected in July, August, and September were 71, 19, and 63% positive, respectively. Overall, 51% of the samples obtained from eggs produced in the province of Espaíllat were positive for quinolone residues at levels higher than the maximum limits for edible tissue established by the regulatory agencies, including the European Union and U.S. Department of Agriculture. The results obtained from this research confirmed the presence of quinolone residue in eggs, which may present a health risk to some consumers.

  10. Comparing amikacin and kanamycin-induced hearing loss in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment under programmatic conditions in a Namibian retrospective cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagwa, Evans L; Ruswa, Nunurai; Mavhunga, Farai; Rennie, Timothy; Leufkens, Hubert G M; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K

    2015-12-10

    Amikacin and kanamycin are mainly used for treating multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), especially in developing countries where the burden of MDR-TB is highest. Their protracted use in MDR-TB treatment is known to cause dose-dependent irreversible hearing loss, requiring hearing aids, cochlear implants or rehabilitation. Therapeutic drug monitoring and regular audiological assessments may help to prevent or detect the onset of hearing loss, but these services are not always available or affordable in many developing countries. We aimed to compare the cumulative incidence of hearing loss among patients treated for MDR-TB with amikacin or kanamycin-based regimens, and to identify the most-at-risk patients, based on the real-life clinical practice experiences in Namibia. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients treated with amikacin or kanamycin-based regimens in four public sector MDR-TB treatment sites in Namibia between June 2004 and March 2014. Patients were audiologically assessed as part of clinical care. The study outcome was the occurrence of any hearing loss. Data were manually extracted from patients' treatment records. We compared proportions using the Chi-square test; applied stratified analysis and logistic regression to study the risk of hearing loss and to identify the most-at-risk patients through effect-modification analysis. A P-value < 0.05 was statistically significant. All 353 patients had normal baseline hearing, 46 % were HIV co-infected. Cumulative incidence of any hearing loss was 58 %, which was mostly bilateral (83 %), and mild (32 %), moderate (23 %), moderate-severe (16 %), severe (10 %), or profound (15 %). Patients using amikacin had a greater risk of developing the more severe forms of hearing loss than those using kanamycin (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 4.0, 95 % CI: 1.5-10.8). Patients co-infected with HIV (OR = 3.4, 95 % CI: 1.1-10.6), males (OR = 4.5, 95 %1.5-13.4) and those with lower

  11. Macrolide resistance conferred by rRNA mutations in field isolates of Mannheimia haemolytica and Pasteurella multocida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anders S; Warrass, Ralf; Douthwaite, Stephen Roger

    2014-01-01

    . haemolytica identified as being highly resistant (MICs >64 mg/L) to the macrolides erythromycin, gamithromycin, tilmicosin, tildipirosin and tulathromycin were screened by multiplex PCR for the previously identified resistance genes erm(42), msr(E) and mph(E). Strains lacking these determinants were analysed...

  12. Relationship between copper, glycopeptide, and macrolide resistance among Enterococcus faecium strains isolated from pigs in Denmark between 1997 and 2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasman, Henrik; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2005-01-01

    A significant relationship between copper resistance (tcrB), glycopeptide resistance (Tn1546), and macrolide resistance [erm(B)] in Enterococcus faecium isolated from pigs was found. The tcrB gene was located closely upstream of the Tn1546 element. However, the continued use of copper sulfate has...

  13. Macrolide-peptide conjugates as probes of the path of travel of the nascent peptides through the ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Arren Z; Benicewicz, Derek B; Canzoneri, Joshua C; Fagan, Crystal E; Mwakwari, Sandra C; Maehigashi, Tatsuya; Dunham, Christine M; Oyelere, Adegboyega K

    2014-11-21

    Despite decades of research on the bacterial ribosome, the ribosomal exit tunnel is still poorly understood. Although it has been suggested that the exit tunnel is simply a convenient route of egress for the nascent chain, specific protein sequences serve to slow the rate of translation, suggesting some degree of interaction between the nascent peptide chain and the exit tunnel. To understand how the ribosome interacts with nascent peptide sequences, we synthesized and characterized a novel class of probe molecules. These peptide-macrolide (or "peptolide") conjugates were designed to present unique peptide sequences to the exit tunnel. Biochemical and X-ray structural analyses of the interactions between these probes and the ribosome reveal interesting insights about the exit tunnel. Using translation inhibition and RNA structure probing assays, we find the exit tunnel has a relaxed preference for the directionality (N → C or C → N orientation) of the nascent peptides. Moreover, the X-ray crystal structure of one peptolide derived from a positively charged, reverse Nuclear Localization Sequence peptide, bound to the 70S bacterial ribosome, reveals that the macrolide ring of the peptolide binds in the same position as other macrolides. However, the peptide tail folds over the macrolide ring, oriented toward the peptidyl transferase center and interacting in a novel manner with 23S rRNA residue C2442 and His69 of ribosomal protein L4. These data suggest that these peptolides are viable probes for interrogating nascent peptide-exit tunnel interaction.

  14. Mycoplasma genitalium Prevalence, Coinfection, and Macrolide Antibiotic Resistance Frequency in a Multicenter Clinical Study Cohort in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Alice; O'Donnell, Meghan; Cohen, Seth

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence rates of Mycoplasma genitalium infections and coinfections with other sexually transmitted organisms and the frequency of a macrolide antibiotic resistance phenotype were determined in urogenital specimens collected from female and male subjects enrolled in a multicenter clinical study in the United States. Specimens from 946 subjects seeking care from seven geographically diverse clinical sites were tested for M. genitalium and for Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Trichomonas vaginalis. Sequencing was used to assess macrolide antibiotic resistance among M. genitalium-positive subjects. M. genitalium prevalence rates were 16.1% for females and 17.2% for males. Significant risk factors for M. genitalium infections were black race, younger age, non-Hispanic ethnicity, and female symptomatic status. Female M. genitalium infections were significantly more prevalent than C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae infections, while the M. genitalium infection rate in males was significantly higher than the N. gonorrhoeae and T. vaginalis infection rates. The macrolide-resistant phenotype was found in 50.8% of females and 42% of males. These results show a high prevalence of M. genitalium single infections, a lower prevalence of coinfections with other sexually transmitted organisms, and high rates of macrolide antibiotic resistance in a diverse sample of subjects seeking care across a wide geographic area of the United States. PMID:27307460

  15. Macrolide use and the risk of vascular disease in HIV-infected men in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woolley, Ian J; Li, Xiuhong; Jacobson, Lisa P

    2007-01-01

    event in the HAART era was also significant (0.10 [0.01-0.75]). CONCLUSIONS: Traditional risk factors are important in the pathogenesis of vascular events in HIV-infected individuals. Macrolide antibiotics may have a protective effect in the HIV-infected individuals in the HAART era. Udgivelsesdato...

  16. Macrolides decrease the minimal inhibitory concentration of anti-pseudomonal agents against Pseudomonas aeruginosa from cystic fibrosis patients in biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Larissa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biofilm production is an important mechanism for bacterial survival and its association with antimicrobial resistance represents a challenge for the patient treatment. In this study we evaluated the in vitro action of macrolides in combination with anti-pseudomonal agents on biofilm-grown Pseudomonas aeruginosa recovered from cystic fibrosis (CF patients. Results A total of 64 isolates were analysed. The biofilm inhibitory concentration (BIC results were consistently higher than those obtained by the conventional method, minimal inhibitory concentration, (MIC for most anti-pseudomonal agents tested (ceftazidime: P = 0.001, tobramycin: P = 0.001, imipenem: P P = 0.005. When macrolides were associated with the anti-pseudomonal agents, the BIC values were reduced significantly for ceftazidime (P  0.001 and tobramycin (P  0.001, regardless the concentration of macrolides. Strong inhibitory quotient was observed when azithromycin at 8 mg/L was associated with all anti-pseudomonal agents tested in biofilm conditions. Conclusions P. aeruginosa from CF patients within biofilms are highly resistant to antibiotics but macrolides proved to augment the in vitro activity of anti-pseudomonal agents.

  17. Macrolide resistance determination and molecular typing of mycoplasma pneumoniae in respiratory specimens collected between 1997 and 2008 in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spuesens, E.B.M.; Meijer, A.; Bierschenk, D.; Hoogenboezem, T.; Donker, G.A.; Hartwig, N.G.; Koopmans, M.P.G.; Vink, C.; Rossum, A.M.C. van

    2012-01-01

    An important role in the treatment regimens for Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections is played by macrolide (ML) antibiotics. In the past few years, however, a steady increase has been detected in the worldwide prevalence of ML-resistant (MLr) M. pneumoniae strains. It is obvious that this increase nece

  18. 23S rRNA gene mutations contributing to macrolide resistance in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Operon specific 23S rRNA mutations affecting minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of macrolides (erythromycin [ERY], azithromycin [AZM], tylosin [TYL]) and a lincosamide (clindamycin [CLI]) were examined in a collection of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli isolates. The three copies of the Campy...

  19. Macrolide antibiotics promote the LPS-induced upregulation of prostaglandin E receptor EP2 and thus attenuate macrolide suppression of IL-6 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yoshinori; Kaneko, Kenichi; Inoue, Matsuhisa

    2007-03-01

    We studied the influence of the inhibitory effect of clarithromycin (CAM) and erythromycin (EM) on the production of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), as well as PGE(2) receptor (EP(2)) expression, by LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. Production of IL-6 was significantly decreased by treatment with CAM or EM in a dose-dependent manner, but the inhibitory effect of CAM was significantly weaker than that of EM. In contrast, the production of MIP-2 and PGE(2) was inhibited to the same extent by CAM and EM. LPS induced the expression of EP(2) mRNA and its expression was promoted further by treatment with CAM or EM. In particular, CAM significantly upregulated EP(2) mRNA expression compared with that after stimulation by LPS alone. After treatment with a nonselective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor (indomethacin), a selective COX-2 inhibitor (NS398), or an EP(2)/EP(4) receptor antagonist (AH6809), the inhibitory effect of CAM and EM on LPS-induced IL-6 production was equalized. These results indicate that macrolide antibiotics upregulate the expression of EP(2), which then attenuates the suppressive effect on IL-6 production of these antibiotics, suggesting that these drugs have a variable anti-inflammatory effect that could influence host defenses.

  20. Looking for the new preparations for antibacterial therapy III. New antimicrobial agents from the quinolones group in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpiuk, Izabela; Tyski, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    There is an essential need for searching for the new compounds effective in the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria. This paper is the third part of a series associated with the exploration of new antibacterial agents and it discusses the compounds belonging to the group of quinolones and substances possessing a hybrid structure composed of the quinolone molecule and other compounds. Eleven new substances at the stage of clinical trials are presented. Three of them belong to the group of non-fluorinated quinolone (nemonoxacin, ozenoxacin and KRP-AM 1977X), while six are the quinolones containing fluorine atom at 6 position of the carbon atom in the quinoline ring (zabofloxacin, finafloxacin, delafloxacin, JNJ-Q2, WCK771 and KPI-10). The remaining two compounds possess a hybrid construction composed of the quinolone structure and other molecules (cadazolid and CBR-2092). There is a chance in the near future, that the presented compounds can extend the range of existing antibacterial drugs and provide an alternative to currently available medicinal products.

  1. High-level quinolone resistance is associated with the overexpression of smeVWX in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-León, G; Ruiz de Alegría Puig, C; García de la Fuente, C; Martínez-Martínez, L; Martínez, J L; Sánchez, M B

    2015-05-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is the only known bacterium in which quinolone-resistant isolates do not present mutations in the genes encoding bacterial topoisomerases. The expression of the intrinsic quinolone resistance elements smeDEF, smeVWX and Smqnr was analysed in 31 clinical S. maltophilia isolates presenting a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) range to ciprofloxacin between 0.5 and > 32 μg/mL; 11 (35.5%) overexpressed smeDEF, 2 (6.5%) presenting the highest quinolone MICs overexpressed smeVWX and 1 (3.2%) overexpressed Smqnr. Both strains overexpressing smeVWX presented changes at the Gly266 position of SmeRv, the repressor of smeVWX. Changes at the same position were previously observed in in vitro selected S. maltophilia quinolone-resistant mutants, indicating this amino acid is highly relevant for the activity of SmeRv in repressing smeVWX expression. For the first time SmeVWX overexpression is associated with quinolone resistance of S. maltophilia clinical isolates.

  2. Using SAR and QSAR analysis to model the activity and structure of the quinolone-DNA complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorente, B; Leclerc, F; Cedergren, R

    1996-01-01

    A set of 78 quinolone derivatives were used in a structure-activity study to identify structural features correlating with antibacterial activity. Distinct combinations of functional properties were identified for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. 3-D Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies identified specific hydrophobic, topologic and electronic properties of the molecules for both in vitro and in vivo activities. From these results, a three-dimensional model of a DNA-quinolone complex was built using molecular modeling techniques. It was based on the intercalation of quinolone into the double helix of DNA. We conclude that the intercalation model is consistent with most available data on the structure of the quinolone complex. This predicted structure is stabilized by the binding of magnesium ion with the sp2 oxygens present in quinolone, a phosphate and a purine base of the DNA. Substituents R1 and R7 are predicted to make hydrophobic interactions in the major and minor groove of DNA, respectively. R7 could also form hydrogen bonds with amino groups of guanines and the aspartic acid residue at position 87 in DNA gyrase subunit A.

  3. In vitro impact of macrolide antibiotics on the viability of selected mammalian cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Tvrdá

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro cytotoxicity of different concentrations of macrolide  antibiotics (tilmicosin-TILM, tylosin-TYL and spiramycin-SPI on selected animal cell cultures. VERO cells (kidney cells from Macacus rhesus, FE cells (feline embryonal cells and BHK 21 cells (cell line from young hamster kidneys were used in the study and subjected to concentrations of macrolides ranging 50-1000 µg/mL, depending on the specific antibiotic and cell line. The cell viability expressed as the mitochondrial activity of living cells was assessed using the metabolic mitochondrial MTT test. The effect of tilmicosin: FE cells were the most sensitive with a significant decrease of mitochondrial activity at 100-150 µg/mL (P<0.001 TILM. VERO cells were the most resistant, as no significant decrease of viability was observed at any TILM dose. The effect of tylosin: FE cells showed the highest sensitivity to TYL, as 1000 µg/mL reduced the cell viability to a half (P<0.001 when compared to the untreated control. Similarly, a decreased viability of BHK 21 cells was observed following the supplementation of 1500 (P<0.001 and 900 (P<0.05 µg/mL TYL. VERO cells exhibited the highest resilience to the TYL treatment, with no significant differences of viability in comparison to the control. The effect of spiramycin: BHK 21 cells exhibited the highest sensitivity to the antibiotic, as all concentrations (150, 200, 300 µg/mL SPI led to a significant decrease (P<0.001 of the mitochondrial activity.  Similarly, the viability of FE cells significantly (P<0.05 decreased after the administration of 350 and 540 µg/mL SPI. On the other hand, VERO cells revealed the highest resistance to the antibiotic, with no significant effects in comparison to the control. Our data reveal that macrolides have a significant adverse negative effect on the cell viability, and may provide more information to our knowledge on the specific effects medication has on

  4. In vitro effects of four macrolides (roxithromycin, spiramycin, azithromycin (CP-62,993), and A-56268) on Toxoplasma gondii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, H.R.; Pechere, J.C.

    1988-04-01

    The effect of four macrolides against intracellular Toxoplasma gondii was determined in three different in vitro systems. Unactivated murine peritoneal macrophages were infected with the virulent RH strain of T. gondii. The activity of the macrolides was first measured with (/sup 3/H)uracil, which is incorporated by the parasite but not the host cell. The 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) and 95% confidence limits were calculated at 54 (38 to 73), 140 (98 to 201), 147 (101 to 214), and 246 (187 to 325) micron for roxithromycin, azithromycin (CP-62,993), A-56268, and spiramycin, respectively. Inhibition of Toxoplasma growth was confirmed by microscopic examination of the infected macrophages after treatment with roxithromycin. Compared with untreated controls, roxithromycin concentrations near the IC50s decreased the number of infected cells, the number of tachyzoites per vacuole, and the number of cells containing rosettes (i.e., clusters of more than eight tachyzoites). After treatment with the four macrolides, tachyzoites were released from the macrophages and subcultured in HeLa cells, which are nonprofessional phagocytes, to assess the viability of the remaining parasites. This showed that the macrolides at concentrations corresponding to four times their 90% inhibitory concentrations (IC90s) had no significant killing effect. At 8 times the IC90, roxithromycin showed an incomplete killing effect, similar to that of the combination of pyrimethamine (0.41 microM)-sulfadiazine (99.42 microM). All macrolides tested showed inhibitory effects against intracellular T. gondii, but amounts of azithromycin and A-56268 corresponding to the IC90 appeared to be toxic against the host macrophages, which might have had nonspecific activity against Toxoplasma metabolism.

  5. Mild and efficient Winterfeldt oxidation of 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-γ-carbolines for the synthesis of dihydropyrrolo[3,2-b]-quinolones and pyrrolo[3,2-b]quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Rong; Zhu, Jiangwei; Hu, Yongzhou

    2012-01-30

    The Winterfeldt oxidation (NaOH, DMF, air, rt) of substituted 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-γ-carbolines has been developed, which provides a convenient and efficient method for the synthesis of the corresponding dihydropyrrolo[3,2-b]quinolones in moderate to excellent yields (38-94%). The generality and substrate scope of this reaction are explored and a possible mechanism is proposed. The results imply that electron-withdrawing groups on N2 of tetrahydro-γ-carbolines and N5-H are necessary. The synthesis of 5 or 7-substituted pyrrolo[3,2-b]quinolones in near quantitative yields was also achieved through deprotection and aromatization of N1-Boc-dihydropyrrolo[3,2-b]quinolones.

  6. Visualizing the 16-membered ring macrolides tildipirosin and tilmicosin bound to their ribosomal site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poehlsgaard, Jacob; Andersen, Niels M; Warrass, Ralf; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2012-08-17

    The veterinary antibiotic tildipirosin (20,23-dipiperidinyl-mycaminosyl-tylonolide, Zuprevo) was developed recently to treat bovine and swine respiratory tract infections caused by bacterial pathogens such as Pasteurella multocida. Tildipirosin is a derivative of the naturally occurring compound tylosin. Here, we define drug-target interactions by combining chemical footprinting with structure modeling and show that tildipirosin, tylosin, and an earlier tylosin derivative, tilmicosin (20-dimethylpiperidinyl-mycaminosyl-tylonolide, Micotil), bind to the same macrolide site within the large subunit of P. multocida and Escherichia coli ribosomes. The drugs nevertheless differ in how they occupy this site. Interactions of the two piperidine components, which are unique to tildipirosin, distinguish this drug from tylosin and tilmicosin. The 23-piperidine of tildipirosin contacts ribosomal residues on the tunnel wall while its 20-piperidine is oriented into the tunnel lumen and is positioned to interfere with the growing nascent peptide.

  7. Borrelidins C–E: New Antibacterial Macrolides from a Saltern-Derived Halophilic Nocardiopsis sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungwoo Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemical investigation of a halophilic actinomycete strain belonging to the genus Nocardiopsis inhabiting a hypersaline saltern led to the discovery of new 18-membered macrolides with nitrile functionality, borrelidins C–E (1–3, along with a previously reported borrelidin (4. The planar structures of borrelidins C–E, which are new members of the rare borrelidin class of antibiotics, were elucidated by NMR, mass, IR, and UV spectroscopic analyses. The configurations of borrelidines C–E were determined by the interpretation of ROESY NMR spectra, J-based configuration analysis, a modified Mosher’s method, and CD spectroscopic analysis. Borrelidins C and D displayed inhibitory activity, particularly against the Gram-negative pathogen Salmonella enterica, and moderate cytotoxicity against the SNU638 and K562 carcinoma cell lines.

  8. Sacrolide A, a new antimicrobial and cytotoxic oxylipin macrolide from the edible cyanobacterium Aphanothece sacrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Oku

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Macroscopic gelatinous colonies of freshwater cyanobacterium Aphanothece sacrum, a luxury ingredient for Japanese cuisine, were found to contain a new oxylipin-derived macrolide, sacrolide A (1, as an antimicrobial component. The configuration of two chiral centers in 1 was determined by a combination of chiral anisotropy analysis and conformational analysis of different ring-opened derivatives. Compound 1 inhibited the growth of some species of Gram-positive bacteria, yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and fungus Penicillium chrysogenum, and was also cytotoxic to 3Y1 rat fibroblasts. Concern about potential food intoxication caused by accidental massive ingestion of A. sacrum was dispelled by the absence of 1 in commercial products. A manual procedure for degrading 1 in raw colonies was also developed, enabling a convenient on-site detoxification at restaurants or for personal consumption.

  9. Sacrolide A, a new antimicrobial and cytotoxic oxylipin macrolide from the edible cyanobacterium Aphanothece sacrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oku, Naoya; Matsumoto, Miyako; Yonejima, Kohsuke; Tansei, Keijiroh; Igarashi, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Macroscopic gelatinous colonies of freshwater cyanobacterium Aphanothece sacrum, a luxury ingredient for Japanese cuisine, were found to contain a new oxylipin-derived macrolide, sacrolide A (1), as an antimicrobial component. The configuration of two chiral centers in 1 was determined by a combination of chiral anisotropy analysis and conformational analysis of different ring-opened derivatives. Compound 1 inhibited the growth of some species of Gram-positive bacteria, yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and fungus Penicillium chrysogenum, and was also cytotoxic to 3Y1 rat fibroblasts. Concern about potential food intoxication caused by accidental massive ingestion of A. sacrum was dispelled by the absence of 1 in commercial products. A manual procedure for degrading 1 in raw colonies was also developed, enabling a convenient on-site detoxification at restaurants or for personal consumption.

  10. Ecological approach of macrolide-lincosamides-streptogramin producing actinomyces from Cuban soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, I; Niebla, A; Lemus, M; González, L; Iznaga, I O; Pérez, M E; Vallin, C

    1999-09-01

    We report in this study the frequency of Streptomyces strains to produce macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) antibiotics isolated from Cuban soils. The screening assay is based on the induction of MLS-resistance phenotype in a clinical isolated strain of Staphylococcus aureus S-18. Our results suggest that of 800 Streptomyces strains isolated from different soil samples, 6% were positives in the screening test used. The ferralitic red soil from Pinar del Río (north) provided the major percentage (3.6%) of MLS producing strains. The other soil samples tested belonging to Guira de Melena and Bauta in Havana, Matanzas City, Topes De Collantes (Villa Clara), and Soroa Mountains (Pinar del Rio) hill reached very low percentages.

  11. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase dependent angiogenesis revealed by a bioengineered macrolide inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirando, Adam C; Fang, Pengfei; Williams, Tamara F; Baldor, Linda C; Howe, Alan K; Ebert, Alicia M; Wilkinson, Barrie; Lounsbury, Karen M; Guo, Min; Francklyn, Christopher S

    2015-08-14

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) catalyze an early step in protein synthesis, but also regulate diverse physiological processes in animal cells. These include angiogenesis, and human threonyl-tRNA synthetase (TARS) represents a potent pro-angiogenic AARS. Angiogenesis stimulation can be blocked by the macrolide antibiotic borrelidin (BN), which exhibits a broad spectrum toxicity that has discouraged deeper investigation. Recently, a less toxic variant (BC194) was identified that potently inhibits angiogenesis. Employing biochemical, cell biological, and biophysical approaches, we demonstrate that the toxicity of BN and its derivatives is linked to its competition with the threonine substrate at the molecular level, which stimulates amino acid starvation and apoptosis. By separating toxicity from the inhibition of angiogenesis, a direct role for TARS in vascular development in the zebrafish could be demonstrated. Bioengineered natural products are thus useful tools in unmasking the cryptic functions of conventional enzymes in the regulation of complex processes in higher metazoans.

  12. The effect of milk on plasmatic and tissue levels of macrolides: in vivo study in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. C. Groppo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available

    The ingestion of milk with drugs, particularly some antibiotics, is frequently recommended in order to decrease possible gastrointestinal discomfort. The objective of this study was to assess the interference of milk in the absorption and tissue levels of macrolide antibiotics (erythromycin, clarithromycin, roxithromycin and azithromycin. Forty female rats received surgicallyimplanted PVC sponges on their backs. One week later, granulomatous tissue was observed and the animals were divided into eight groups, which received erythromycin, clarithromycin, roxithromycin and azithromycin with and without milk. One hour after administration of antibiotic, the animals were sacrificed. The serum and tissue samples were submitted to microbiological assay with Micrococcus luteus ATCC 9341, in order to determine drug concentration. Milk did not cause any reduction in the serum and tissue levels of azithromycin and clarithromycin (p>0.05,t-test. However, ingestion of milk reduced by approximately 28.7% the roxithromycin (p<0.0001, t-test and by 34.1% the erythromycin (p<0.0001, t test serum concentrations. Similar effects were observed on tissue levels. Milk ingestion caused a reduction of approximately 20.8% in the roxithromycin (p<0.0001, t-test and 40% in the erythromycin (p<0.0001, t-test tissue levels. We concluded that erythromycin and roxithromycin should be not administered with milk. Keywords: Pharmacokinetics, macrolides, milk, serum concentration

  13. Macrolide and clindamycin resistance in Streptococcus milleri group isolates from the airways of cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinwis, Margot E; Sibley, Christopher D; Parkins, Michael D; Eshaghurshan, Christina S; Rabin, Harvey R; Surette, Michael G

    2010-07-01

    Organisms belonging to the Streptococcus milleri group (SMG) are known for their role in pyogenic infections but have recently been implicated as etiological agents of pulmonary exacerbation in adult patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The prolonged exposure of CF patients to antibiotics prompted us to investigate the susceptibility profiles of 118 SMG isolates from the airways of CF patients to 12 antibiotics compared to 43 SMG isolates from patients with invasive infections. We found that approximately 60% of all isolates failed to grow using the standard medium for disc diffusion, Mueller-Hinton blood agar (MHBA), so we explored the usefulness of brain heart infusion (BHI) agar for susceptibility testing. Zone-of-inhibition comparisons between BHI and MHBA showed strong correlations for six antibiotics, and interpretations were similar for both medium types. For ceftriaxone and cefepime, both groups of isolates were highly susceptible. Tetracycline resistance levels were comparable between the two groups (22% in CF isolates and 17.4% in invasive isolates). However, more than half of the CF isolates were not susceptible to azithromycin, erythromycin, and clindamycin, compared to 11%, 13%, and 6.5% of invasive isolates, respectively. There were 5-fold and 8-fold increased risks of azithromycin and clindamycin resistance, respectively, for the isolates from the airways of CF patients relative to the invasive isolates. Macrolide resistance was strongly linked to chronic azithromycin therapy in CF patients. This study shows that BHI agar is a suitable alternative for antimicrobial susceptibility testing for the SMG and that SMG isolates from the airways of CF patients are more resistant to macrolides and clindamycin than strains isolated from patients with invasive infections.

  14. Development of macrolide-resistant Campylobacter in broilers administered subtherapeutic or therapeutic concentrations of tylosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladely, Scott R; Harrison, Mark A; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J; Berrang, Mark E; Englen, Mark D; Meinersmann, Richard J

    2007-08-01

    The use of antimicrobials in food animal production, particularly those commonly used to treat infections in humans, has become a source of debate in recent years. However, limited data are available regarding the development of resistance following the subtherapeutic or therapeutic administration of antimicrobials in animal production. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the administration of therapeutic and subtherapeutic concentrations of tylosin on the erythromycin susceptibility of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli isolated from the ceca of treated broilers. In three replicated studies, day-of-hatch chicks were exposed to macrolide-susceptible C. jejuni or C. coli. At 2 weeks of age, tylosin was administered at subtherapeutic (22 ppm, continuously in the diet) or therapeutic concentrations (529 ppm, in the drinking water for 5 days). Broilers were sacrificed weekly. Total and erythromycin-resistant Campylobacter spp. were enumerated from individual ceca plus cecal contents. Overall erythromycin resistance was observed at a higher frequency (P tylosin administration. Across Campylobacter species, erythromycin resistance was observed at a higher frequency (P tylosin was administered at subtherapeutic (62.7%) than at therapeutic (11.4%) concentrations. Subtherapeutic administration resulted in the recovery of 83.3 and 56.1% erythromycin-resistant isolates compared with only 33.3 and 7.9% of the isolates expressing erythromycin resistance following the administration of therapeutic concentrations for C. coli and C. jejuni, respectively. Further studies are needed to determine the factors involved in the apparent difference in the acquisition of macrolide resistance in C. coli compared with C. jejuni.

  15. Macrolide resistance determination and molecular typing of Mycoplasma pneumoniae by pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spuesens, Emiel B M; Hoogenboezem, Theo; Sluijter, Marcel; Hartwig, Nico G; van Rossum, Annemarie M C; Vink, Cornelis

    2010-09-01

    The first choice antibiotics for treatment of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections are macrolides. Several recent studies, however, have indicated that the prevalence of macrolide (ML)-resistance, which is determined by mutations in the bacterial 23S rRNA, is increasing among M. pneumoniae isolates. Consequently, it is imperative that ML-resistance in M. pneumoniae is rapidly detected to allow appropriate and timely treatment of patients. We therefore set out to determine the utility of pyrosequencing as a convenient technique to assess ML-resistance. In addition, we studied whether pyrosequencing could be useful for molecular typing of M. pneumoniae isolates. To this end, a total of four separate pyrosequencing assays were developed. These assays were designed such as to determine a short genomic sequence from four different sites, i.e. two locations within the 23S rRNA gene, one within the MPN141 (or P1) gene and one within the MPN528a gene. While the 23S rRNA regions were employed to determine ML-resistance, the latter two were used for molecular typing. The pyrosequencing assays were performed on a collection of 108 M. pneumoniae isolates. The ML-resistant isolates within the collection (n=4) were readily identified by pyrosequencing. Moreover, each strain was correctly typed as either a subtype 1 or subtype 2 strain by both the MPN141 and MPN528a pyrosequencing test. Interestingly, two recent isolates from our collection, which were identified as subtype 2 strains by the pyrosequencing assays, were found to carry novel variants of the MPN141 gene, having rearrangements in each of the two repetitive elements (RepMP4 and RepMP2/3) within the gene. In conclusion, pyrosequencing is a convenient technique for ML-resistance determination as well as molecular typing of M. pneumoniae isolates.

  16. In vitro activity of telithromycin against Spanish Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates with characterized macrolide resistance mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morosini, M I; Cantón, R; Loza, E; Negri, M C; Galán, J C; Almaraz, F; Baquero, F

    2001-09-01

    The susceptibilities to telithromycin of 203 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates prospectively collected during 1999 and 2000 from 14 different geographical areas in Spain were tested and compared with those to erythromycin A, clindamycin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, penicillin G, cefotaxime, and levofloxacin. Telithromycin was active against 98.9% of isolates (MICs, MICs at which 90% of isolates are inhibited being 0.06 microg/ml, irrespective of the resistance genotype. The corresponding values for erythromycin were 61.0% (MICs, 64 microg/ml. The erm(B) gene (macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance phenotype) was detected in 36.4% (n = 74) of the isolates, which corresponded to 93.6% of erythromycin-intermediate and -resistant isolates, whereas the mef(A) gene (M phenotype [resistance to erythromycin and susceptibility to clindamycin and spiramycin without blunting]) was present in only 2.4% (n = 5) of the isolates. One of the latter isolates also carried erm(B). Interestingly, in one isolate for which the erythromycin MIC was 2 microg/ml, none of these resistance genes could be detected. Erythromycin MICs for S. pneumoniae erm(B)-positive isolates were higher (range, 0.5 to >64 microg/ml) than those for erm(B)- and mef(A)-negative isolates (range, 0.008 to 2 microg/ml). The corresponding values for telithromycin were lower for both groups, with ranges of 0.004 to 1 and 0.002 to 0.06 microg/ml, respectively. The erythromycin MIC was high for a large number of erm(B)-positive isolates, but the telithromycin MIC was low for these isolates. These results indicate the potential usefulness of telithromycin for the treatment of infections caused by erythromycin-susceptible and -resistant S. pneumoniae isolates when macrolides are indicated.

  17. Why are ototopical aminoglycosides still first-line therapy for chronic suppurative otitis media? A systematic review and discussion of aminoglycosides versus quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, A S; Elhassan, H A; Flook, E P

    2016-01-01

    This systematic review aimed to establish that quinolones are as effective as aminoglycosides when used to treat chronic suppurative otitis media. The review included good quality, randomised, controlled trials on human subjects, published in English, that compared topical aminoglycosides with topical quinolones for the treatment of chronic suppurative otitis media. Nine trials met the criteria. Two studies showed a higher clinical cure rate in the quinolone group (93 per cent vs 71 per cent, p = 0.04, and 76 per cent vs 52 per cent, p = 0.009). Four studies showed no statistically significant difference in clinical outcome. A significant difference in microbiological clearance in favour of quinolones was shown in two studies (88 per cent vs 30 per cent, p otitis media and when used as prophylaxis post-myringotomy. Topical quinolones should be considered a first-line treatment for these patients.

  18. USE OF QUINOLONES IN BULL SEMEN EXTENDERS TO REDUCE SPERM DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACID DAMAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Gonzalez-Marin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryopreserved sperm samples from Holstein bulls (n = 20 were examined for bacterial presence and Sperm DNA Fragmentation (SDF dynamics. SDF was assessed after thawing (T0 and at 4, 24 and 48 h of incubation (37°C and the rate of SDF (r-SDF, as an estimator of the DNA degradation over time, was calculated. Two groups of bulls were identified based on the presence or absence of bacteria: One group (n = 10 had a readily detectable bacterial presence, while the other group (n = 10 had an undetectable bacterial presence. Differences in the SDF at T0 were not observed between these two groups. However, statistically different results were found after 24 h of incubation at 37°C (Kaplan-Meier estimator; Log-Rank Matel-Cox, p-1 of ciprofloxacin at T0. Differences in the r-SDF (p>0.05 were not detected between the control and the quinolone treated sample for those samples without bacteria. However, differences (p<0.000 in SDF were observed for quinolone treated samples that previously presented bacteria. Incubation of sealed straws showed that bacterial contamination occurred prior to cryopreservation. These results call attention to three points: (1 sperm samples were in contact with bacteria before cryopreservation; (2 the r-SDF can be directly correlated with bacterial presence but this effect remains cryptic after thawing and (3 the r-SDF can be reduced by treating the semen samples with an adequate antibiotic such as quinolones, a finding not previously reported in the scientific literature, but important in terms of reproduction.

  19. Characterization of quinolone resistance mechanisms in Enterobacteriaceae recovered from diseased companion animals in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillard, T; de Jong, A; Limelette, A; Lebreil, A L; Madoux, J; de Champs, C

    2016-10-15

    ComPath is a European monitoring programme dedicated to the collection of bacterial pathogens from diseased dogs and cats to determine their antibiotic susceptibility. The objective was to characterize genetic determinants associated with quinolone resistance among 69 enrofloxacin non-wild type strains selected among 604 non-duplicate Enterobacteriaceae isolates collected in 10EU countries from 2008 to 2010: quinolone resistance determining region (QRDR) and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR). Among them, 17% (12/69) carried at least one PMQR (9/12 qnrB, qnrS or qnrD and 4/12 aac(6')-Ib-cr) and 83% (57/69) no PMQR. All the Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates chromosomally carried oqxAB . No qepA genes were detected. Eight strains did not carry any mutations in QRDR (4 PMQR-positive and 4 PMQR-negative strains). From the 12 PMQR-positive strains, 4 showed enrofloxacin MICs≤2μg/mL, and 8 MICs≥8μg/mL (resistant). These latter strains carried 1-5 mutations in QRDR, including a ParE I529L mutation. qnrD was found in 2 Proteus mirabilis and the plasmids were similar to pDIJ09-518a previously described. For the 57 non-PMQR strains, 29 strains showed MICs≤2μg/mL (4 with no QRDR mutations, 21 with 1 mutation in GyrA, 4 with 2 mutations in GyrA) and 28 showed enrofloxacin MICs≥8μg/mL carrying at least 2 mutations in QRDR, including a ParE I529L mutation for 2 Escherichia coli strains with a total of 5 QRDR mutations. No GyrB mutations were found. qnr was the major PMQR and qnrD was only detected in Proteus spp. Twelve strains carried at least 4 mutations.

  20. Molecular epidemiological survey on quinolone resistance genotype and phenotype of Escherichia coli in septicemic broilers in Hebei, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Rong; Huo, Shuying; Li, Yurong; Chen, Ligong; Zhang, Feiyan; Wu, Xianjun

    2014-02-01

    In this study, the quinolone-resistant determining region (QRDR) of gyrA of Escherichia coli and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes, qnr(qnrA, qnrB, and qnrS), and aac(6 ')-Ib-cr were detected, sequenced, and analyzed. In addition, antimicrobial susceptibility tests (using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method) were performed for all 111 E. coli isolates from septicemic broilers in Hebei, China. The results show that the resistance rates were as follows: ofloxacin 99.10%, ciprofloxacin 93.69%, levofloxacin 91.89%, norfloxacin 90.09%, and gatifloxacin 76.58%. Of the PMQR genes examined, aac(6 ')-Ib-cr (36.04%) was the most frequently identified gene in all isolates, followed by qnrS (8.11%), qnrB (0.90%), and qnrA (0%). Of the QRDR examined in the 40 phenotypic quinolone-resistant isolates, compared with the gyrA(+) gene of E. coli K-12, 4 amino acid exchanges were found, namely Ser-83→Asp, Asp-87→Asn, Asp-87→Tyr, and Asp-87→Ala, and all 40 isolates had 1 or 2 exchanges in QRDR. It was concluded that quinolone-resistance in E. coli remains a serious problem in Hebei, China. Therefore, there is considerable local surveillance of quinolone resistance. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance of the qnr type remains rare in Hebei, China, and mutation in QRDR may be the main problem.

  1. Quinolone Resistance among Salmonella enterica from Cattle, Broilers and Swine in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiuff, C.; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Madsen, M.

    2000-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the susceptibility to nalidixic acid and fluoroquinolones of Salmonella Dublin, S. Enteritidis, and S. Typhimurium isolates from cattle, broilers, and pigs over time in Denmark and to characterise the gyrA, gyrB, and parC genes in quinolone-resistant isolates......, and one from 1999 were resistant to nalidixic acid. All the nalidixic acid-resistant isolates had reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones. Sequence analysis of the gyrA gene in 37 nalidixic-resistant isolates identified two different base substitutions at codon serine-83 and two at aspartate-87...

  2. Comparison of Antimicrobial Properties of Nano Quinolone with its Microscale Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behbahani, G. Rezaie; Sadr, M. Hossaini; Nabipour, H.; Behbahani, H. Rezaei; Vahedpour, M.; Barzegar, L.

    2013-06-01

    Nano nalidixic acid was prepared by ultrasonic method in carbon tetrachloride. Nano nalidixic acid (quinolone antibiotic) was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The antibacterial activities of nano nalidixic acid were tested against microorganisms and compared with the microscale drug. The results show that nano nalidixic acid has good inhibitory properties against two Gram-positive species, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis. Nano nalidixic acid also showed good antifungal activity against Candida albicans. Nano nalidixic acid can be injected into the human body as a decontaminating agent to prevent the growth of harmful microorganisms more effectively than the micro-sized drug.

  3. QSAR study and VolSurf characterization of anti-HIV quinolone library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipponi, Enrica; Cruciani, Gabriele; Tabarrini, Oriana; Cecchetti, Violetta; Fravolini, Arnaldo

    2001-03-01

    Antiviral quinolones are promising compounds in the search for new therapeutically effective agents for the treatment of AIDS. To rationalize the SAR for this new interesting class of anti-HIV derivatives, we performed a 3D-QSAR study on a library of 101 6-fluoro and 6-desfluoroquinolones, taken either from the literature or synthesized by us. The chemometric procedure involved a fully semiempirical minimization of the molecular structures by the AMSOL program, which takes into account the solvatation effect, and their 3D characterization by the VolSurf/GRID program. The QSAR analysis, based on PCA and PLS methods, shows the key structural features responsible for the antiviral activity.

  4. Lanthanum triflate triggered synthesis of tetrahydroquinazolinone derivatives of N-allyl quinolone and their biological assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jardosh Hardik H.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of 24 derivatives of tetrahydroquinazolinone has been synthesized by one-pot cyclocondensation reaction of N-allyl quinolones, cyclic β-diketones and (thiourea/N-phenylthiourea in presence of lanthanum triflate catalyst. This methodology allowed us to achieve the products in excellent yield by stirring at room temperature. All the synthesized compounds were investigated against a representative panel of pathogenic strains using broth microdilution MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration method for their in vitro antimicrobial activity. Amongst these sets of heterocyclic compounds 5h, 6b, 6h, 5f, 5l, 5n and 6g found to have admirable activity.

  5. Synthesis of Some 4-Quinolones and Related Structures for Evaluation as Potential Antimalarial Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-11-30

    evaluation new com- pounds related to either endochin (2-methyl-3-heptyl-7-.nethoxy-4(lH)- quino - lone) or the 3-carbomethoxy-4(lH)-quinolones that had shown...of aliphatic aldehydes with 2-methyl-4(lH)- quino - lones to give the 3(1-alkenyl) derivatives proved its generality, since it pro- ceeds when both...yields. Tnis facile reaction indicates, once more, the activated nature of the 3 position in the ’(lDOi- quino - lone ring system. 0 0 + CH20 ) CCHYN(CH3

  6. [Residues of tetracycline and quinolones in wild fish living around a salmon aquaculture center in Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortt Z, Antonia; Cabello C, Felipe; Buschmann R, Alejandro

    2007-02-01

    The presence of residues of tetracycline, quinolones and antiparasitic drugs was investigated in wild fish captured around salmon aquaculture pens in Cochamó, Region X, Chile. Residues of both antibiotics were found in the meta [corrected] of two species of wild fish that are consumed by humans, robalo (Elginops maclovinus) and cabrilla (Sebastes capensis) [corrected] These findings suggest that the antibiotic usage in salmon aquaculture in Chile has nvironmental implications that may affect human and animal health. More studies are needed in Chile to determine the relevance of these findings for human and animal health and the environment to regulate this use of antibiotics.

  7. Affinity of 3-acyl substituted 4-quinolones at the benzodiazepine site of GABAA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lager, Erik; Nilsson, Jakob; Nielsen, Elsebet Østergaard

    2008-01-01

    The finding that alkyl 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline-3-carboxylate and N-alkyl-1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline-3-carboxamide derivatives may be high-affinity ligands at the benzodiazepine binding site of the GABA(A) receptor, prompted a study of 3-acyl-1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline (3-acyl-4-quinolones......). In general, the affinity of the 3-acyl derivatives was found to be comparable with the 3-carboxylate and the 3-carboxamide derivatives, and certain substituents (e.g., benzyl) in position 6 were again shown to be important. As it is believed that the benzodiazepine binding site is situated between an alpha...

  8. Functions of a GyrBA fusion protein and its interaction with QnrB and quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunhui; Villet, Regis; Jacoby, George A; Hooper, David C

    2015-11-01

    In order to study the interactions between Escherichia coli DNA gyrase and the gyrase interacting protein QnrB in vivo, we constructed a gyrB-gyrA fusion and validated its ability to correct the temperature-sensitive growth of gyrA and gyrB mutants. Like wild-type gyrA, the gyrB-gyrA fusion complemented a quinolone-resistant gyrA mutant to increase susceptibility. It functioned as an active type II topoisomerase, catalyzed negative supercoiling of DNA, was inhibited by quinolone, and was protected by QnrB.

  9. Therapeutic efficacy of amikacin combined with fosfomycin against bacteria producing KPC enzymes%阿米卡星与磷霉素治疗产KPC酶细菌的疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑海岚; 华俊彦; 朱雅艳; 叶伟红

    2014-01-01

    目的:了解阿米卡星、磷霉素联合使用和单独使用对产K PC酶细菌的疗效,为临床治疗产K PC酶细菌感染提供依据。方法收集2011年1月-2012年12月检测出产K PC酶20例住院患者资料,采用阿米卡星和磷霉素单用或联用治疗,并对其临床疗效和细菌学清除率进行回顾性统计分析。结果阿米卡星联用磷霉素的临床有效率和细菌学清除率均为71.4%,单用阿米卡星的临床有效率和细菌学清除率分别为57.1和28.6%,单用磷霉素的临床有效率和细菌学清除率分别为33.3%和16.7%。结论阿米卡星、磷霉素单用治疗产K PC酶细菌疗效不佳,但联用后可获得较好的疗效。%OBJECTIVE To analyze clinical therapeutic efficacy of amikacin combined with fosfomycin or amikacin/fosfomycin only against KPC-producing bacteria ,in order to provide evidence for the clinical therapy of KPC-producing bacteria infections .METHODS Totally 20 patients with KPC-producing bacteria infections were collecte d and treated with amikacin combined with fosfomycin or amikacin/fosfomycin only ,and the therapeutic effect and bacteria clearance rate were analyzed retrospectively .RESULTS The effective rate and the bacteria clearance rate of amikacin combination with fosfomycin were both 71 .43% ,while those of the method of amikacin only were 57 .1% and 28 .6% respectively . And those of the method of fosfomycin only were 33 .3% and 16 .7%respectively .CONCLUSION Amikacin combined with fosfomycin against KPC-producing bacteria could obtain well therapeutic effect ,which was much better than using amikacin or fosfomycin only .

  10. Real-life treatment of acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis with moxifloxacin or macrolides: a comparative post-marketing surveillance study in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaberg, T; Möller, M; File, T; Stauch, K; Landen, H

    2006-01-01

    To compare the real-life treatment of acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (AECBs) using moxifloxacin tablets or one of the oral macrolides azithromycin, clarithromycin or roxithromycin in terms of symptom relief, time until improvement and cure, overall efficacy and tolerability. This prospective, non-interventional, multicentre study included out-patients with AECB whose last exacerbation was treated with a macrolide. The current AECB was treated either with moxifloxacin or with one of the macrolides azithromycin, clarithromycin or roxithromycin. Data were obtained on the patient's characteristics, disease and treatment history, the course of the current AECB including time to improvement and cure, and the final assessments of efficacy and tolerability. All adverse events were recorded in patients treated with moxifloxacin; for patients receiving macrolides, only drug-related adverse events were reported. 464 physicians treated 904 patients with moxifloxacin and 846 patients with one of the macrolides. Age, sex and body mass index were well matched between the two treatment groups. However, more moxifloxacin than macrolide patients presented with a generally bad condition (62.8% vs 48.6%). About 42% of patients in both groups had had chronic bronchitis for 1-5 years, and about 27% for 5-10 years. The mean number of AECBs in the previous 12 months was 2.7 and 2.6, respectively. Moxifloxacin was administered to most patients for 5 (43.8%) or 7 days (42.4%). Patients in the macrolide group were treated in most cases with clarithromycin 500 mg for 4-7 days, roxithromycin 300 mg for 6-7 days or azithromycin 500 mg for 3 days. Physicians assessed overall efficacy and tolerability as 'very good' or 'good' in 96.1% and 98.1%, respectively, of moxifloxacin-treated patients and in 67.5% and 91.7%, respectively, of macrolide-treated patients. The mean duration until improvement and cure of AECB was 3.2 days (+/- SD 1.5) and 6.2 days (+/- 2.6) in moxifloxacin

  11. Macrolides from a Marine-Derived Fungus, Penicillium meleagrinum var. viridiflavum, Showing Synergistic Effects with Fluconazole against Azole-Resistant Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Miki; Sugita, Takashi; Kinoshita, Kaoru; Koyama, Kiyotaka

    2016-04-22

    Two new 13-membered macrolides (1, 7), along with known 13-membered macrolides PF1163A, B, D, H, and F (2-6), were isolated from a strain of a marine-derived fungus, Penicillium meleagrinum var. viridiflavum. The structures of 1 and 7 were elucidated from spectroscopic data (NMR, MS, IR). Compounds 1-7 showed synergistic effects with fluconazole against azole-resistant Candida albicans by a checkerboard assay.

  12. Phenotypic and genotypic study of macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B (MLSB) resistance in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus in Tehran, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Saderi, Horieh; Emadi, Behzad; Owlia, Parviz

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Resistance to antimicrobial agents among Staphylococcus aureus is an increasing problem. Two common genes responsible for resistance to macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B (MLSB) antibiotics are the ermA and ermC genes. Three resistance phenotypes have been detected to these antibiotics: strains containing cMLSB (constitutive MLSB) and iMLSB (inducible MLSB), which are resistant to macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B antibiotics, and MS, which is only resistan...

  13. Reduced persistence of the macrolide antibiotics erythromycin, clarithromycin and azithromycin in agricultural soil following several years of exposure in the field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topp, Edward, E-mail: ed.topp@agr.gc.ca; Renaud, Justin; Sumarah, Mark; Sabourin, Lyne

    2016-08-15

    The macrolide antibiotics erythromycin, clarithromycin and azithromycin are very important in human and animal medicine, and can be entrained onto agricultural ground through application of sewage sludge or manures. In the present study, a series of replicated field plots were left untreated or received up to five annual spring applications of a mixture of three drugs to achieve a nominal concentration for each of 10 or 0.1 mg kg{sup −1} soil; the latter an environmentally relevant concentration. Soil samples were incubated in the laboratory, and supplemented with antibiotics to establish the dissipation kinetics of erythromycin and clarithromycin using radioisotope methods, and azithromycin using HPLC-MS/MS. All three drugs were dissipated significantly more rapidly in soils with a history of field exposure to 10 mg kg{sup −1} macrolides, and erythromycin and clarithromycin were also degraded more rapidly in field soil exposed to 0.1 mg kg{sup −1} macrolides. Rapid mineralization of {sup 14}C-labelled erythromycin and clarithromycin are consistent with biodegradation. Analysis of field soils revealed no carryover of parent compound from year to year. Azithromycin transformation products were detected consistent with removal of the desosamine and cladinose moieties. Overall, these results have revealed that following several years of exposure to macrolide antibiotics these are amenable to accelerated degradation. The potential accelerated degradation of these drugs in soils amended with manure and sewage sludge should be investigated as this phenomenon would attenuate environmental exposure and selection pressure for clinically relevant resistance. - Highlights: • The impact of field exposure on persistence of macrolide antibiotics was evaluated. • Soil samples were incubated in the laboratory with macrolides. • Field exposure resulted in more rapid dissipation of all macrolides. • Radiolabelled erythromycin and clarithromycin were rapidly mineralized

  14. Quantitative determination of quinolones residues in milk by HPLC-FLD

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    Marilena Gili

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Veterinary drugs have become an integral part of the livestock production and play an important role in maintenance of animal welfare. The use of veterinary medicines may be cause of the presence of drug residues in animal food products if appropriate withdrawal periods are not respected or if contaminated feeds are used. This work presents the development of an HPLC-FLD method for the quantitative de-tection of eight quinolones – norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, danofloxacin, enrofloxacin, difloxacin, oxolinic acid, nalidixic acid, flumequine– in bovine milk. After deproteination and extraction with a metaphos-phoric acid 1% w/v / methanol / acetonitrile (60/20/20 v/v/v solution, the sample is partially evaporated and cleaned up on a reversed phase SPE cartridge.The extract is analyzed using an high performance liquid chromatograph with fluorescence detector. Mean recovery ranged between 65% - 88%. All the an-alytes can be identified and quantified in the concentration range 15 - 60 μg/Kg for danofloxacin and 25 - 150 μg/Kg for the other quinolones.

  15. Structure based in silico analysis of quinolone resistance in clinical isolates of Salmonella Typhi from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Dahiya, Sushila; Sharma, Priyanka; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P; Kapil, Arti; Kaur, Punit

    2015-01-01

    Enteric fever is a major cause of morbidity in several parts of the Indian subcontinent. The treatment for typhoid fever majorly includes the fluoroquinolone group of antibiotics. Excessive and indiscriminate use of these antibiotics has led to development of acquired resistance in the causative organism Salmonella Typhi. The resistance towards fluoroquinolones is associated with mutations in the target gene of DNA Gyrase. We have estimated the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of commonly used fluoroquinolone representatives from three generations, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin, for 100 clinical isolates of Salmonella Typhi from patients in the Indian subcontinent. The MICs have been found to be in the range of 0.032 to 8 μg/ml. The gene encoding DNA Gyrase was subsequently sequenced and point mutations were observed in DNA Gyrase in the quinolone resistance determining region comprising Ser83Phe/Tyr and Asp87Tyr/Gly. The binding ability of these four fluoroquinolones in the quinolone binding pocket of wild type as well as mutant DNA Gyrase was computationally analyzed by molecular docking to assess their differential binding behaviour. This study has revealed that mutations in DNA Gyrase alter the characteristics of the binding pocket resulting in the loss of crucial molecular interactions and consequently decrease the binding affinity of fluoroquinolones with the target protein. The present study assists in understanding the underlying molecular and structural mechanism for decreased fluoroquinolone susceptibility in clinical isolates as a consequence of mutations in DNA Gyrase.

  16. Adsorption of quinolone, tetracycline, and penicillin antibiotics from aqueous solution using activated carbons: Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Muthanna J

    2017-03-01

    Antibiotics, an important type of pharmaceutical pollutant, have attracted many researchers to the study of their removal from aqueous solutions. Activated carbon (AC) has been widely used as highly effective adsorbent for antibiotics because of its large specific surface area, high porosity, and favorable pore size distribution. In this article, the adsorption performance of AC towards three major types of antibiotics such as tetracyclines, quinolones, and penicillins were reviewed. According to collected data, maximum adsorption capacities of 1340.8, 638.6, and 570.4mg/g were reported for tetracyclines, quinolones, and penicillins, respectively. The values of 1/n for Freundlich isotherm were less than unity, suggesting that the adsorption was nonlinear and favorable. Adsorption kinetics followed closely the pseudo-second-order model and analysis using the Weber-Morris model revealed that the intra-particle diffusion was not the only rate controlling step. AC adsorption demonstrated superior performance for all selected drugs, thus being efficient technology for treatment of these pollutants.

  17. [Effect of pazufloxacin mesilate, a new quinolone antibacterial agent, for intravenous use on QT interval].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Hitoshi; Morita, Yukie; Shiotani, Norio; Mizuo, Midori; Komae, Norihisa

    2004-08-01

    The potential for QT interval prolongation of pazufloxacin mesilate (PZFX mesilate), a new quinolone antibacterial agent for intravenous use, was investigated by in vitro and in vivo electrophysiology studies. Following results were obtained. In vitro electrophysiology study using guinea pig papillary muscles: PZFX mesilate (30-300 microM) had no effects on resting membrane potential (RMP), action potential amplitude (APA) and action potential duration (APD). Reference quinolones, sparfloxacin (3-30 microM) and moxifloxacin (10-100 microM), had no effects on RMP and APA, but significantly prolonged APD at more than 3 and 10 microM, respectively, while ciprofloxacin (10-100 microM) had no effect on each parameter. In vivo electrophysiology study using anesthetized dogs: PZFX mesilate had no effects on electrocardiograph parameter (PR interval, QRS interval, QT interval and QTc) after intravenous administration of 3-30 mg/kg. These results suggest that PZFX mesilate has low potential for QT interval prolongation.

  18. Increasing resistance to quinolones: A four-year prospective study of urinary tract infection pathogens

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    Orhiosefe Omigie

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Orhiosefe Omigie, Lawrence Okoror, Patience Umolu, Gladys IkuuhDepartment of Microbiology, Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, NigeriaAbstract: A four-year prospective study was carried out to determine the incidence and rate of development of resistance by common urinary tract infection (UTI pathogens to quinolone antimicrobial agents. Results show that there is high intrinsic resistance to the quinolones among strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (43.4%, Escherichia coli (26.3%, and Proteus spp. (17.1%. Over four years, rising rates of resistance were observed in P. aeruginosa (14.6% increase, Staphylococcus aureus (9.8%, and E. coli (9.7%. The highest potency was exhibited by ciprofloxacin (91.2%, levofloxacin (89.2%, and moxifloxacin (85.1%, while there were high rates of resistance to nalidixic acid (51.7% and pefloxacin (29.0%. Coliforms, particularly E. coli (>45%, remain the most prevalent causative agents of UTI while females within the age range of 20–50 years were most vulnerable to UTI.Keywords: UTI, microorganisms, antibiotics, resistance

  19. Bacterial plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in aquatic environments in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lei; Liu, Dan; Wang, Xin-Hua; Wang, Yunkun; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Mingyu; Xu, Hai

    2017-01-01

    Emerging antimicrobial resistance is a major threat to human’s health in the 21st century. Understanding and combating this issue requires a full and unbiased assessment of the current status on the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance genes and their correlation with each other and bacterial groups. In aquatic environments that are known reservoirs for antimicrobial resistance genes, we were able to reach this goal on plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes that lead to resistance to quinolones and possibly also to the co-emergence of resistance to β-lactams. Novel findings were made that qepA and aac-(6′)-Ib genes that were previously regarded as similarly abundant with qnr genes are now dominant among PMQR genes in aquatic environments. Further statistical analysis suggested that the correlation between PMQR and β-lactam resistance genes in the environment is still weak, that the correlations between antimicrobial resistance genes could be weakened by sufficient wastewater treatment, and that the prevalence of PMQR has been implicated in environmental, pathogenic, predatory, anaerobic, and more importantly, human symbiotic bacteria. This work provides a comprehensive analysis of PMQR genes in aquatic environments in Jinan, China, and provides information with which combat with the antimicrobial resistance problem may be fought. PMID:28094345

  20. Analysis of quinolones by voltage-assisted liquid-phase microextraction combined with LC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mi-Hung; Wang, Shu-Ping

    2012-03-01

    The method of liquid-phase microextraction assisted with voltage was developed and applied on determination of quinolones in water sample in this study. Both of the reproducibility and extraction time were improved with the aid of applying voltage. Four analytes in neutral state such as cinoxacin, oxolinic acid, nalidixic acid, and flumequine were extracted from a sample solution at pH 2.0, through a polypropylene hollow fiber which was immobilized with 2-octanone, and then into a 25 μL of the acceptor phase of 40 mM borate buffer at pH 10.0 by applying voltage of 100 V. Subsequently, the acceptor solution was directly subjected to analysis by LC-MS. The performance of the method for four quinolones was also evaluated. Linearity was obtained in the range of 1.0-25.0 ng/mL with R(2) > 0.996. Limits of detection were below 0.6 ng/mL, and recoveries of water sample were ranged from 90.8 to 109.6%.

  1. Synthesis, alkaline phosphatase inhibition studies and molecular docking of novel derivatives of 4-quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miliutina, Mariia; Ejaz, Syeda Abida; Khan, Shafi Ullah; Iaroshenko, Viktor O; Villinger, Alexander; Iqbal, Jamshed; Langer, Peter

    2017-01-27

    New and convenient methods for the functionalization of the 4-quinolone scaffold at positions C-1, C-3 and C-6 were developed. The 4-quinolone derivatives were evaluated for their inhibitory potential on alkaline phosphatase isozymes. Most of the compounds exhibit excellent inhibitory activity and moderate selectivity. The IC50 values on tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) were in the range of 1.34 ± 0.11 to 44.80 ± 2.34 μM, while the values on intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) were in the range of 1.06 ± 0.32 to 192.10 ± 3.78 μM. The most active derivative exhibits a potent inhibition on IAP with a ≈14 fold higher selectivity as compared to TNAP. Furthermore, molecular docking calculations were performed for the most potent inhibitors to show their binding interactions within the active site of the respective enzymes.

  2. Lack of efflux mediated quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie eBaucheron

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A isolates from human patients in France displaying different levels of resistance to quinolones or fluoroquinolones were studied for resistance mechanisms to these antimicrobial agents. All resistant isolates carried either single or multiple target gene mutations (i.e. in gyrA, gyrB, or parC correlating with the resistance levels observed. Active efflux, through upregulation of multipartite efflux systems, has also been previously reported as contributing mechanism for other serovars. Therefore, we investigated also the occurrence of non-target gene mutations in regulatory regions affecting efflux pump expression. However, no mutation was detected in these regions in both Typhi and Paratyphi isolates of this study. Besides, no overexpression of the major efflux systems was observed for these isolates. Nevertheless, a large deletion of 2334 bp was identified in the acrS-acrE region of all S. Typhi strains but which did not affect the resistance phenotype. As being specific to S. Typhi, this deletion could be used for specific molecular detection purposes. In conclusion, the different levels of quinolone or FQ resistance in both S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi A seem to rely only on target modifications.

  3. Structure Based In Silico Analysis of Quinolone Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Salmonella Typhi from India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Priyanka; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P.; Kapil, Arti; Kaur, Punit

    2015-01-01

    Enteric fever is a major cause of morbidity in several parts of the Indian subcontinent. The treatment for typhoid fever majorly includes the fluoroquinolone group of antibiotics. Excessive and indiscriminate use of these antibiotics has led to development of acquired resistance in the causative organism Salmonella Typhi. The resistance towards fluoroquinolones is associated with mutations in the target gene of DNA Gyrase. We have estimated the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of commonly used fluoroquinolone representatives from three generations, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin, for 100 clinical isolates of Salmonella Typhi from patients in the Indian subcontinent. The MICs have been found to be in the range of 0.032 to 8 μg/ml. The gene encoding DNA Gyrase was subsequently sequenced and point mutations were observed in DNA Gyrase in the quinolone resistance determining region comprising Ser83Phe/Tyr and Asp87Tyr/Gly. The binding ability of these four fluoroquinolones in the quinolone binding pocket of wild type as well as mutant DNA Gyrase was computationally analyzed by molecular docking to assess their differential binding behaviour. This study has revealed that mutations in DNA Gyrase alter the characteristics of the binding pocket resulting in the loss of crucial molecular interactions and consequently decrease the binding affinity of fluoroquinolones with the target protein. The present study assists in understanding the underlying molecular and structural mechanism for decreased fluoroquinolone susceptibility in clinical isolates as a consequence of mutations in DNA Gyrase. PMID:25962113

  4. Multiresidue determination of quinolone antibacterials in eggs of laying hens by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassouan, M K; Ballesteros, O; Taoufiki, J; Vílchez, J L; Cabrera-Aguilera, M; Navalón, A

    2007-06-01

    An analytical method for the simultaneous determination of seven quinolones (ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, danofloxacin, difloxacin, flumequine, oxolinic acid and sarafloxacin) in egg samples of laying hens was developed. Their use is totally prohibited in animals from which eggs are produced for human consumption. Protein precipitation was achieved by addition of acetonitrile and ammonia, removal of acetonitrile with dichloromethane, the quinolones remaining in the basic aqueous extract. The aqueous extract was analysed by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (LC-FD). The mobile phase was composed of acetonitrile and 10 mM citrate buffer solution of pH 4.5, with an initial composition of acetonitrile-water (12:88, v/v) and using linear gradient elution. Norfloxacin was used as an internal standard. The limits of detection found were 4-12 ng g(-1). These values were lower than the maximum residue limits (MRLs) established by the European Union for these compounds in different tissues of eggs-producing animals.

  5. Structure based in silico analysis of quinolone resistance in clinical isolates of Salmonella Typhi from India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Kumar

    Full Text Available Enteric fever is a major cause of morbidity in several parts of the Indian subcontinent. The treatment for typhoid fever majorly includes the fluoroquinolone group of antibiotics. Excessive and indiscriminate use of these antibiotics has led to development of acquired resistance in the causative organism Salmonella Typhi. The resistance towards fluoroquinolones is associated with mutations in the target gene of DNA Gyrase. We have estimated the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC of commonly used fluoroquinolone representatives from three generations, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin, for 100 clinical isolates of Salmonella Typhi from patients in the Indian subcontinent. The MICs have been found to be in the range of 0.032 to 8 μg/ml. The gene encoding DNA Gyrase was subsequently sequenced and point mutations were observed in DNA Gyrase in the quinolone resistance determining region comprising Ser83Phe/Tyr and Asp87Tyr/Gly. The binding ability of these four fluoroquinolones in the quinolone binding pocket of wild type as well as mutant DNA Gyrase was computationally analyzed by molecular docking to assess their differential binding behaviour. This study has revealed that mutations in DNA Gyrase alter the characteristics of the binding pocket resulting in the loss of crucial molecular interactions and consequently decrease the binding affinity of fluoroquinolones with the target protein. The present study assists in understanding the underlying molecular and structural mechanism for decreased fluoroquinolone susceptibility in clinical isolates as a consequence of mutations in DNA Gyrase.

  6. Genotypic characterization of quinolone resistant-Escherichia coli isolates from retail food in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayme, Kaotar; Barguigua, Abouddihaj; Bouchrif, Brahim; Karraouan, Bouchra; El Otmani, Fatima; Elmdaghri, Naima; Zerouali, Khalid; Timinouni, Mohammed

    2017-02-01

    This study was conducted to assess the retail food as a possible vehicle for antimicrobial resistant, particularly quinolones resistant and pathogenic Escherichia coli. We determined the prevalence and characteristics of nalidixic acid (Nal) resistant E. coli isolates from diverse retail food samples. In all, 70 (28%) of 250 E. coli isolates studied were Nal-resistant E. coli and 91% of these were multi-drug resistant. Plasmid mediated quinolone resistance genes were identified in 32 isolates, including aac(6')-Ib-cr (n = 16), qnrS1 (n = 11) and qnrB19 (n = 7). Mutations in gyr A and par C genes were detected among 80% of the isolates, and the isolates showed substitution Ser83-Leu and Asp87-Asn in gyrA and Ser80-Ile in parC. In addition, three different gene cassettes were identified (aadA1, aadA7, aac(3)-Id) in 18%. Virulence-associated genes stx1, eae, sfa, hlyA and stx2 were found in six (8%), three (4%), two (3%), three (4%) and three (4%) isolates, respectively. E. coli isolates of phylogenetic group A were dominant (64%, 45/70). Pulsed field gel electrophoresis revealed none epidemiological relationship between these isolates. The results of this work report the higher frequency of Nal-resistant E. coli isolates from Moroccan retail food samples including MDR and pathogenic isolates.

  7. The in-vitro activity of clarithromycin and other macrolides against the type strain of Chlamydia pneumoniae (TWAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, G L; Mumtaz, G; Fenelon, L

    1991-02-01

    The activity of oxytetracycline and seven macrolide antibiotics was investigated against a prototype strain of Chlamydia pneumoniae in cell culture. Following incubation, inoculated cell monolayers were fixed in methanol and stained with a genus specific immunofluorescent monoclonal antibody before examination for inhibition of inclusion formation. The most active agent was clarithromycin (MIC 0.007 mg/l), followed by erythromycin (0.06 mg/l). Other macrolides were less active; josamycin and roxithromycin (0.25 mg/l), midecamycin acetate and azithromycin (0.5 mg/l) and spiramycin (4.0 mg/l). The MIC of oxytetracycline was 0.25 mg/l. Clinical evaluation of clarithromycin for C. pneumoniae lower respiratory infection is indicated.

  8. The Comparison Of The Efficacy Of Cefriaxon Monotherapy With Ceftazidim Plus Amikacin As Initial Empiric Antibiotic Therapy In Febrile Neutropenic Patients Emam Hospital (2000-2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi S M

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Neutropenic state with fever is exactly regarded as a medical emergency, with high mortality and morbidity rate, unless treated urgently and correctly. Every attempt should be made to find and establish the offending organism, but postponing treatment until obtaining culture results is not advised. Controversy exist on which antibiotic regimen to be used while waiting for culture results. Many antibiotic regiments both monotherapy or combination treatments have been used with varying result. The objective of this study is to compare the efficacy of cefriaxon monothenapy with ceftazidim. Plus Amikacin as initial empiric antibiotic therapy in febrile neutropenic patients."nMaterials and Methods: We performed a randomized, single blind clinical trial in 57 adult (age>12 years, neutropenic (PMN<1000 patients with fever (Temperature, oral >38.5c in Hematology ward, Imam khomeini hospital. After careful physical exam and obtaining blood & urine samples for culture, the patients were randomized to each of the two arms: Cefriaxon 2 grams daily, intravenously (arm A and; Ceftazidim 2g thrice daily plus amikacin 500 mg twice daily (arm B. Patients with shock, organ failure or previous antibiotic intake (during 48 hour before fever were excluded. If needed, dose adjustment of drugs were allowed. Effervescence in 3 days following initiation of treatment, lasting 48 hours or more, were regarded as effective (positive result."nResults: During a twelve months period of study, a total of 57 patients (17female, 40male were included. They were randomly selected to each arm of empirical treatment. Of 28 pts in arm A, 19 (67 percent, the treatment was effective, compared to 15 of 29 (51.7 percent in groups B. The duration of fever after initiation of treatment was 37.9 ± 17 hours in arm A and 40. 1 ± 20 h in arm B. Blood and / or urine culture was equally positive in two arms (25 percent in arm A and 27.6 percent in arm B."nConclusion: Cefriaxon monotherapy is at

  9. [Amino acid and peptide derivatives of the tylosin family of macrolide antibiotics modified at the aldehyde group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumbatian, N V; Kuznetsova, I V; Karpenko, V V; Fedorova, N V; Chertkov, V A; Korshunova, G A; Bogdanov, A A

    2010-01-01

    Fourteen new functionally active amino acid and peptide derivatives of the antibiotics tylosin, desmycosin, and 5-O-mycaminosyltylonolide were synthesized in order to study the interaction of the growing polypeptide chain with the ribosomal tunnel. The conjugation of various amino acids and peptides with a macrolide aldehyde group was carried out by two methods: direct reductive amination with the isolation of the intermediate Schiff bases or through binding via oxime using the preliminarily obtained derivatives of 2-aminooxyacetic acid.

  10. Surface-coated wooden-tip electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for determination of trace fluoroquinolone and macrolide antibiotics in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jiewei; Yu, Tiantian; Yao, Yao; Peng, Qi; Luo, Lijuan; Chen, Baowei; Wang, Xiaowei; Yang, Yunyun; Luan, Tiangang

    2017-02-15

    In this study, a surface-coated wooden-tip electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (SCWT-ESI-MS) method was developed for rapid and sensitive analysis of trace fluoroquinolone and macrolide antibiotics in water. First, a SCWT solid-phase microextration (SPME) probe was prepared, via silanization and sulfonation for modification of a layer of adsorbent containing both C8-chain and sulfo group on the surface of wooden tips. Then, the SCWT-SPME probe was applied for extraction of trace fluoroquinolone and macrolide antibiotics in water. The specially designed adsorbent gave the probe desirable enrichment capacity towards fluoroquinolone and macrolide antibiotics, with enrichment factors of approximately 100-500 folds for six target analytes. After extraction, the loaded SCWT-SPME probe was directly applied for ambient MS analysis. With the application of a high voltage and some spray solvent on the SCWT-SPME probe, analytes enriched on the probe was desorbed and ionized for mass spectrometric analysis under ambient and open-air conditions. The method was sensitive, with limits of detection and quantification of 1.8-4.5 ng/L and 5.9-15.1 ng/L, respectively. The method also showed good linearity, with correlation coefficient values (r(2)) of no less than 0.9940 for six target analytes. The developed method was successfully applied for the analysis of six fluoroquinolone and macrolide antibiotics in tap and river water samples, and no antibiotic was found in tap water but some antibiotics were detected in river water with concentrations at dozens to hundreds nanogram-per-liter level. Standard addition experiments were also performed, and the obtained recoveries were 89-102% for tap waters and 82-92% for river waters, respectively. All the experimental results demonstrated that our proposed SCWT-ESI-MS method was rapid, sensitive, and reliable for analyzing trace antibiotics in water.

  11. Molecular characterization of macrolide resistance of a Mycoplasma pneumoniae strain that developed during therapy of a patient with pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Dumke

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of macrolide resistance that occurred during 3 days of therapy with azithromycin to treat Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia in a paediatric patient is reported. After extended molecular characterization of strains, the parallel occurrence of clones showing the non-mutated wild-type 23S rRNA sequence as well as mutations A2063G and A2064G, which are both responsible for phenotypic resistance, was confirmed for the first time.

  12. Shifts in the Antibiotic Susceptibility, Serogroups, and Clonal Complexes of Neisseria meningitidis in Shanghai, China: A Time Trend Analysis of the Pre-Quinolone and Quinolone Eras.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingliang Chen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fluoroquinolones have been used broadly since the end of the 1980s and have been recommended for Neisseria meningitidis prophylaxis since 2005 in China. The aim of this study was to determine whether and how N. meningitidis antimicrobial susceptibility, serogroup prevalence, and clonal complex (CC prevalence shifted in association with the introduction and expanding use of quinolones in Shanghai, a region with a traditionally high incidence of invasive disease due to N. meningitidis.A total of 374 N. meningitidis isolates collected by the Shanghai Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention between 1965 and 2013 were studied. Shifts in the serogroups and CCs were observed, from predominantly serogroup A CC5 (84% in 1965-1973 to serogroup A CC1 (58% in 1974-1985, then to serogroup C or B CC4821 (62% in 2005-2013. The rates of ciprofloxacin nonsusceptibility in N. meningitidis disease isolates increased from 0% in 1965-1985 to 84% (31/37 in 2005-2013 (p < 0.001. Among the ciprofloxacin-nonsusceptible isolates, 87% (27/31 were assigned to either CC4821 (n = 20 or CC5 (n = 7. The two predominant ciprofloxacin-resistant clones were designated ChinaCC4821-R1-C/B and ChinaCC5-R14-A. The ChinaCC4821-R1-C/B clone acquired ciprofloxacin resistance by a point mutation, and was present in 52% (16/31 of the ciprofloxacin-nonsusceptible disease isolates. The ChinaCC5-R14-A clone acquired ciprofloxacin resistance by horizontal gene transfer, and was found in 23% (7/31 of the ciprofloxacin-nonsusceptible disease isolates. The ciprofloxacin nonsusceptibility rate was 47% (7/15 among isolates from asymptomatic carriers, and nonsusceptibility was associated with diverse multi-locus sequence typing profiles and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns. As detected after 2005, ciprofloxacin-nonsusceptible strains were shared between some of the patients and their close contacts. A limitation of this study is that isolates from 1986-2004 were not available

  13. Quinolone- and ß-lactam-resistance in Escherichia coli from Danish and Italian broiler flocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortolaia, Valeria; Guardabassi, Luca; Bisgaard, Magne

    Frederiksberg C, Denmark 2Dipartimento di Sanità Pubblica Veterinaria e Patologia Animale, Facoltà di Medicina Veterinaria, Università di Bologna, 40064 Ozzano Emilia (BO), Italy   The prevalence of quinolone- and ß-lactam-resistant E. coli was investigated among broiler flocks in Denmark and Italy. In Denmark...

  14. Studies on the antagonistic action between chloramphenicol and quinolones with presence of bovine serum albumin by fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Baosheng, E-mail: lbs@hbu.edu.c [Key Laboratory of Medical Chemistry and Molecular Diagnosis, Ministry of Education, Center of Physics and Chemistry, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Zhao Fengli; Xue Chunli; Wang Jing; Lu Yunkai [Key Laboratory of Medical Chemistry and Molecular Diagnosis, Ministry of Education, Center of Physics and Chemistry, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China)

    2010-05-15

    Chloramphenicol (CHL) and quinolone drugs like ofloxacin (OFLX), lomefloxacin (LMX) and ciprofloxacin (CPFX) can all quench the fluorescence of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in the aqueous solution of pH=7.40. This quenching effect becomes more significant when CHL and quinolone drugs coexist. Based on this, further studies on the interactions between CHL and quinolone drugs using fluorescence spectrum are established. The results showed that the interaction between the drugs would increase the binding constant and binding stability of the drug and protein, thus reducing the amount of drugs transported to their targets. Therefore, free drug concentration at targets would decrease, reducing the efficacy of the drugs. It indicated that there exists antagonistic action between drugs. The results also showed that the quenching mechanism of BSA by the drugs is a static procedure. The number of binding sites is 1 in various systems. Due to the existence of the antagonistic action between drugs, the binding distance r is reduced. Studies utilizing synchronous spectra showed that the antagonistic action between the drugs would affect the conformation of BSA, making protein molecules extend and hydrophobic decrease. The order of antagonistic action between CHL and quinolone drugs is: CPFX>OFLX>LMX with presence of BSA.

  15. Analysis of the gyrA gene of clinical Yersinia ruckeri isolates with reduced susceptibility to quinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibello, Alicia; Porrero, M Concepción; Blanco, M Mar; Vela, Ana I; Liébana, Pilar; Moreno, Miguel A; Fernández-Garayzábal, José F; Domínguez, Lucas

    2004-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility of seven clinical strains of Yersinia ruckeri representative of those isolated between 1994 and 2002 from a fish farm with endemic enteric redmouth disease was studied. All isolates displayed indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis restriction patterns, indicating that they represented a single strain. However, considering both inhibition zone diameters (IZD) and MICs, the isolates recovered in 2001-2002 formed a separate cluster with lower levels of susceptibility to all the quinolones tested, especially nalidixic acid (NA) and oxolinic acid (OA), compared with the isolates recovered between 1994 and 1998. Analysis of the PCR product of the quinolone resistance-determining region of the gyrA gene from clinical isolates of Y. ruckeri with reduced susceptibility to OA and NA revealed a single amino acid substitution, Ser-83 to Arg-83 (Escherichia coli numbering). Identical substitution was observed in induced OA-resistant mutant strains, which displayed IZD and MICs of quinolones similar to those of the clinical isolates of Y. ruckeri with reduced susceptibility to these antimicrobial agents. These data indicate in that for Y. ruckeri, the substitution of Ser by Arg at position 83 of the gyrA gene is associated with reduced susceptibility to quinolones.

  16. Synthesis and in vitro antibacterial activities of 7-(4-alkoxyimino-3-hydroxypiperidin-1-y1)quinolone derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A series of novel 7-(4-alkoxyimino-3-hydroxypiperidin-1-yl)quinolone derivatives were designed,synthesized and evaluated for in vitro antibacterial activities.Compounds 8f,8g,8i and 8j with the potencies similar to or better than those of levofloxacin and IMB against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis,worth further investigation.

  17. Risk factors for quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli in feces from preweaned dairy calves and postpartum dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duse, Anna; Waller, Karin Persson; Emanuelson, Ulf; Unnerstad, Helle Ericsson; Persson, Ylva; Bengtsson, Björn

    2015-09-01

    Quinolone resistance may emerge in gut bacteria (e.g., in Escherichia coli) of animals. Such bacteria could cause infections in the animal itself or be transmitted to humans via the food chain. Quinolone resistance is also observed in fecal E. coli of healthy dairy cattle, but the prevalence varies between farms, not solely as a result of varying degree of fluoroquinolone exposure. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors for the fecal shedding of quinolone-resistant E. coli (QREC) from dairy calves and postpartum cows. Rectal swabs from 15 preweaned calves and 5 postpartum cows per farm were collected on 23 Swedish dairy farms to determine the prevalence of QREC. Risk factors for the shedding of QREC were investigated using multivariable statistical models. Quinolone-resistant E. coli were found on all but one farm. Factors associated with QREC shedding by calves were being younger than 18 d, being fed milk from cows treated with antimicrobials, recent use of fluoroquinolones in the herd, carriage of QREC by postpartum cows, and using the calving area never or rarely as a sick pen compared with often. Factors associated with QREC shedding by cows were calving in group pens or freestalls compared with single pens or tiestalls, purchasing cattle, sharing animal transports with other farmers, and poor farm hygiene. Proper biosecurity and improved hygiene, as well as minimizing fluoroquinolone exposure and waste milk feeding, may be important factors to reduce the burden of QREC on dairy farms.

  18. Progress in research on quinolone antibacterials%喹诺酮类抗菌药物研究新进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋晓磊; 崔玉彬; 曹胜华

    2011-01-01

    This article has reviewed progress in research on quinolone antibacterials in recent years,which consisted of newly launched products, agents in clinical trials and future development of this kind of drugs. It focused on some clinical promising candidates. Among these drugs, delafloxacin would be the most potential candidate.Moreover it introduced new fields of the future development, including modifying side chain, quinolone-like compounds, antibacterial quinolone hybrids and anti-TB quinolone-drug conjugates.%本文简述了喹诺酮类药物近几年的研究进展,分为上市药物、临床试验药物和未来发展趋势三部分,对目前处于临床研究阶段的药物做了重点讲述,其中delafloxacin是最有希望的喹诺酮类候选药物,同时介绍了喹诺酮类抗菌药物的未来发展方向,即侧链修饰、喹诺酮类似物、喹诺酮杂合物和TB药物与喹诺酮扼合物.

  19. Rational use of quinolones antibiotics%合理应用喹诺酮类抗菌药物

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋惠珠

    2011-01-01

    目的 了解喹诺酮类抗菌药物的作用机制,不良反应及使用时的注意事项. 方法 对喹诺酮类抗菌药物在临床使用中的注意事项及所涉及的不良反应进行汇总. 结果 随着临床使用喹诺酮类抗菌药物的增加,药物的不良反应也随着上升,其不良反应发生率<2.0%,肾损害的发生率为0.9%~4.3%. 结论 在广泛应用喹诺酮类抗菌药物的同时,要更多地关注其安全性.%OBJECTIVE To understand the mechanism of quinolones, adverse reactions and precautions when using.METHODS The precautions of quinolones in clinical use and the adverse reactions involved were aggregated.RESULTS With the increased clinical use of quinolones, the incidence of adverse drug reactions was increased more than <2.0%. CONCLUSION In the widely use of quinolones antibiotics, their safety should be more concerned about.

  20. Distribution and risk assessment of quinolone antibiotics in the soils from organic vegetable farms of a subtropical city, Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao-Lian; Xiang, Lei; Yan, Qing-Yun; Jiang, Yuan-Neng; Li, Yan-Wen; Huang, Xian-Pei; Li, Hui; Cai, Quan-Ying; Mo, Ce-Hui

    2014-07-15

    Organic fertilizer or manure containing antibiotics has been widely used in organic farms, but the distribution and potential impacts of antibiotics to the local environment are not well understood. In this study, four quinolone antibiotics in soil samples (n=69) from five organic vegetable farms in a subtropical city, Southern China, were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Our results indicated that quinolone compounds were ubiquitous in soil samples (detection frequency>97% for all compounds), and their concentrations ranged from not detectable to 42.0 μg/kg. Among the targets, enrofloxacin (ENR) was the dominant compound, followed by ciprofloxacin (CIP) and norfloxacin (NOR). The average total concentrations of four compounds in the soils were affected by vegetable types and species cultivated, decreasing in the order of fruit>rhizome>leaf vegetables. Moreover, the average concentrations of quinolone compounds (except ENR) in open-field soils were higher than those in greenhouse soils. The concentrations of quinolone antibiotics in this study were lower than the ecotoxic effect trigger value (100 μg/kg) proposed by the Veterinary Medicine International Coordination commission. Risk assessment based on the calculated risk quotients indicated that NOR, CIP, and ENR posed mainly medium to low risks to bacteria.

  1. A Facile Solid Phase Synthesis of 2—Alkylthio—4(1H)—quinolones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG,Jing; WU,Ming-Guang; HUANG,Xian

    2003-01-01

    The resin-bound cyclic malonic acid ester 2 reacted with aryl isothiocyanate and alkyl halides to afford the key intermediate arylthioaminomethylene cyclic malonic ester resin 3.Subsequently,resin 3 proceeded thermal cyclizaiton giving the 2-alkylthio-4(1H)-quinolones in good yields and excellent purties.

  2. Quinolones control in milk and eggs samples by liquid chromatography using a surfactant-mediated mobile phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambla-Alegre, M; Collado-Sánchez, M A; Esteve-Romero, J; Carda-Broch, S

    2011-05-01

    Four quinolones (danofloxacin, difloxacin, flumequine and marbofloxacin) were determined in milk and egg samples by a simplified high-performance liquid chromatographic procedure using a micellar mobile phase. No extraction was needed to precipitate the proteins from the matrices since they were solubilised in micelles. The only pretreatment steps required were homogenisation, dilution and filtration before injecting the sample into the chromatographic system. An adequate resolution of the quinolones was achieved by a chemometrics approach where retention was modelled as a first step using the retention factors in only five mobile phases. Afterwards, an optimisation criterion was applied to consider the position and shape of the chromatographic peaks. Analytical separation involved a C18 reversed-phase column, a hybrid micellar mobile phase of 0.05 M sodium dodecyl sulphate, 10% (v/v) butanol and 0.5% (v/v) triethylamine buffered at pH 3 and fluorimetric detection. Quinolones were eluted in less than 15 min without the protein band or other endogenous compounds from the food matrices interfering. The calculated relevant validation parameters, e.g., decision limit (CC(α)), detection capability (CC(β)), repeatability, within-laboratory reproducibility, recoveries and robustness, were acceptable and complied with European Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. Finally, the proposed method was successfully employed in quantifying the four quinolones in spiked egg and milk samples.

  3. Fluorimetric study of the interaction between human serum albumin and quinolones-terbium complex and its application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yusheng; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Chongqiu

    2005-10-01

    A highly sensitive spectrofluorimetric method is proposed for determination of human serum albumin (HSA) and some quinolone drugs. Using quinolones-terbium (Tb 3+) complex as a fluorescent probe, in the buffer solution of pH 7.8, HSA can remarkably enhance the fluorescence intensity of the quinolones-Tb 3+ complex at 545 nm and the enhanced fluorescence intensity of Tb 3+ ion is in proportion to the concentration of HSA and quinolone drugs. Optimum conditions for the determination of HSA were also investigated. The linear ranges and limits of detection are 8.0 × 10 -9 to 8.0 × 10 -8 mol L -1, 4.20 × 10 -9 mol L -1 (for HSA); 1.0 × 10 -6 to 4.0 × 10 -6 mol L -1, 1.87 × 10 -8 mol L -1 (for norfloxacin) and 1.0 × 10 -7 to 1.0 × 10 -6 mol L -1, 4.82 × 10 -8 mol L -1 (for enoxacine), respectively. This method is simple, practical and relatively free interference from coexisting substances, as well as much more sensitive than most of the existing assays.

  4. Development of an optical surface plasmon resonance biosensor assay for (fluoro) quinolones in egg, fish, and poultry meat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huet, A.C.; Charlier, C.; Singh, G.; Benrejeb Godefroy, S.; Leivo, J.; Vehniainen, M.; Nielen, M.W.F.; Weigel, S.; Delahaut, P.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an optical biosensor inhibition immunoassay, based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) principle, for use as a screening test for 13 (fluoro)quinolones, including flumequine, used as veterinary drugs in food-producing animals. For this, we immobilised various

  5. Validation of an optical surface plasmon resonance biosensor assay for screening (fluoro)quinolones in egg, fish and poultry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huet, A.C.; Charlier, C.; Weigel, S.; Benrejeb Godefroy, S.; Delahaut, P.

    2009-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance biosensor immunoassay has been developed for multi-residue determination of 13 (fluoro)quinolone antibiotics in poultry meat, eggs and fish. The following performance characteristics were determined according to the guidelines laid down for screening assay validation in E

  6. Orally bioavailable 6-chloro-7-methoxy-4(1H)-quinolones efficacious against multiple stages of Plasmodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, R Matthew; Flanigan, David L; Monastyrskyi, Andrii; LaCrue, Alexis N; Sáenz, Fabián E; Maignan, Jordany R; Mutka, Tina S; White, Karen L; Shackleford, David M; Bathurst, Ian; Fronczek, Frank R; Wojtas, Lukasz; Guida, Wayne C; Charman, Susan A; Burrows, Jeremy N; Kyle, Dennis E; Manetsch, Roman

    2014-11-13

    The continued proliferation of malaria throughout temperate and tropical regions of the world has promoted a push for more efficacious treatments to combat the disease. Unfortunately, more recent remedies such as artemisinin combination therapies have been rendered less effective due to developing parasite resistance, and new drugs are required that target the parasite in the liver to support the disease elimination efforts. Research was initiated to revisit antimalarials developed in the 1940s and 1960s that were deemed unsuitable for use as therapeutic agents as a result of poor understanding of both physicochemical properties and parasitology. Structure-activity and structure-property relationship studies were conducted to generate a set of compounds with the general 6-chloro-7-methoxy-2-methyl-4(1H)-quinolone scaffold which were substituted at the 3-position with a variety of phenyl moieties possessing various properties. Extensive physicochemical evaluation of the quinolone series was carried out to downselect the most promising 4(1H)-quinolones, 7, 62, 66, and 67, which possessed low-nanomolar EC50 values against W2 and TM90-C2B as well as improved microsomal stability. Additionally, in vivo Thompson test results using Plasmodium berghei in mice showed that these 4(1H)-quinolones were efficacious for the reduction of parasitemia at >99% after 6 days.

  7. Quinolone resistance and ESBL/AmpC’s in commensal Escherichia coli in veal calves : prevalence and molecular characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hordijk, J.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis the prevalence and molecular characteristics of resistance to (fluoro)quinolones and Extended Spectrum Cephalosporins (ESC) in veal calves were described using Escherichia coli as an indicator organism. Ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid were used as indicator antimicrobials for quinolo

  8. Quinolone resistance and ESBL/AmpC’s in commensal Escherichia coli in veal calves : prevalence and molecular characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hordijk, J.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis the prevalence and molecular characteristics of resistance to (fluoro)quinolones and Extended Spectrum Cephalosporins (ESC) in veal calves were described using Escherichia coli as an indicator organism. Ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid were used as indicator antimicrobials for quinolo

  9. Validation of an optical surface plasmon resonance biosensor assay for screening (fluoro)quinolones in egg, fish and poultry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huet, A.C.; Charlier, C.; Weigel, S.; Benrejeb Godefroy, S.; Delahaut, P.

    2009-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance biosensor immunoassay has been developed for multi-residue determination of 13 (fluoro)quinolone antibiotics in poultry meat, eggs and fish. The following performance characteristics were determined according to the guidelines laid down for screening assay validation in E

  10. Validation of an optical surface plasmon resonance biosensor assay for screening (fluoro)quinolones in egg, fish and poultry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huet, A.C.; Charlier, C.; Weigel, S.; Benrejeb Godefroy, S.; Delahaut, P.

    2009-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance biosensor immunoassay has been developed for multi-residue determination of 13 (fluoro)quinolone antibiotics in poultry meat, eggs and fish. The following performance characteristics were determined according to the guidelines laid down for screening assay validation in

  11. Development of an optical surface plasmon resonance biosensor assay for (fluoro) quinolones in egg, fish, and poultry meat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huet, A.C.; Charlier, C.; Singh, G.; Benrejeb Godefroy, S.; Leivo, J.; Vehniainen, M.; Nielen, M.W.F.; Weigel, S.; Delahaut, P.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an optical biosensor inhibition immunoassay, based on the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) principle, for use as a screening test for 13 (fluoro)quinolones, including flumequine, used as veterinary drugs in food-producing animals. For this, we immobilised various

  12. Detection of mutations in mtrR gene in quinolone resistant strains of N.gonorrhoeae isolated from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S V Kulkarni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Emergence of multi-drug resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae resulting from new genetic mutation is a serious threat in controlling gonorrhea. This study was undertaken to identify and characterise mutations in the mtrR genes in N.gonorrhoeae isolates resistant to six different antibiotics in the quinolone group. Materials and Methods: The Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC of five quinolones for 64 N.gonorrhoeae isolates isolated during Jan 2007-Jun 2009 were determined by E-test method. Mutations in MtrR loci were examined by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA sequencing. Results: The proportion of N.gonorrhoeae strains resistant to anti-microbials was 98.4% for norfloxacin and ofloxacin, 96.8% for enoxacin and ciprofloxacin, 95.3% for lomefloxacin. Thirty-one (48.4% strains showed mutation (single/multiple in mtrR gene. Ten different mutations were observed and Gly-45 → Asp, Tyr-105 → His being the most common observed mutation. Conclusion: This is the first report from India on quinolone resistance mutations in MtrRCDE efflux system in N.gonorrhoeae. In conclusion, the high level of resistance to quinolone and single or multiple mutations in mtrR gene could limit the drug choices for gonorrhoea.

  13. Use of next generation sequence to investigate potential novel macrolide resistance mechanisms in a population of Moraxella catarrhalis isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya-Li; Li, Dong-Fang; Xu, He-Ping; Xiao, Meng; Cheng, Jing-Wei; Zhang, Li; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Chen, Xin-Xin; Zhang, Ge; Kudinha, Timothy; Kong, Fanrong; Gong, Yan-Ping; Wang, Xin-Ying; Zhang, Yin-Xin; Wu, Hong-Long; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Although previous studies have confirmed that 23S rRNA gene mutation could be responsible for most of macrolide resistance in M. catarrhalis, a recent study suggested otherwise. Next generation sequence based comparative genomics has revolutionized the mining of potential novel drug resistant mechanisms. In this study, two pairs of resistant and susceptible M. catarrhalis isolates with different multilocus sequence types, were investigated for potential differential genes or informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The identified genes and SNPs were evaluated in 188 clinical isolates. From initially 12 selected differential genes and 12 informative SNPs, 10 differential genes (mboIA, mcbC, mcbI, mboIB, MCR_1794, MCR_1795, lgt2B/C, dpnI, mcbB, and mcbA) and 6 SNPs (C619T of rumA, T140C of rplF, G643A of MCR_0020, T270G of MCR_1465, C1348A of copB, and G238A of rrmA) were identified as possibly linked to macrolide resistance in M. catarrhalis. Most of the identified differential genes and SNPs are related to methylation of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) or DNA, especially MCR_0020 and rrmA. Further studies are needed to determine the function and/or evolution process, of the identified genes or SNPs, to establish whether some novel or combined mechanisms are truly involved in M. catarrhalis macrolide resistance mechanism. PMID:27774989

  14. Anti-Toxoplasma Activities of 24 Quinolones and Fluoroquinolones In Vitro: Prediction of Activity by Molecular Topology and Virtual Computational Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozalbes, Rafael; Brun-Pascaud, Monique; Garcia-Domenech, Ramon; Galvez, Jorge; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Doucet, Jean-Pierre; Derouin, Francis

    2000-01-01

    The apicoplast, a plastid-like organelle of Toxoplasma gondii, is thought to be a unique drug target for quinolones. In this study, we assessed the in vitro activity of quinolones against T. gondii and developed new quantitative structure-activity relationship models able to predict this activity. The anti-Toxoplasma activities of 24 quinolones were examined by means of linear discriminant analysis (LDA) using topological indices as structural descriptors. In parallel, in vitro 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) were determined in tissue culture. A multilinear regression (MLR) analysis was then performed to establish a model capable of classifying quinolones by in vitro activity. LDA and MLR analysis were applied to virtual structures to identify the influence of each atom or substituent of the quinolone ring on anti-Toxoplasma activity. LDA predicted that 20 of the 24 quinolones would be active against T. gondii. This was confirmed in vitro for most of the quinolones. Trovafloxacin, grepafloxacin, gatifloxacin, and moxifloxacin were the quinolones most potent against T. gondii, with IC50s of 0.4, 2.4, 4.1, and 5.1 mg/liter, respectively. Using MLR analysis, a good correlation was found between measured and predicted IC50s (r2 = 0.87, cross-validation r2 = 0.74). MLR analysis showed that the carboxylic group at position C-3 of the quinolone ring was not essential for anti-Toxoplasma activity. In contrast, activity was totally dependent on the presence of a fluorine at position C-6 and was enhanced by the presence of a methyl group at C-5 or an azabicyclohexane at C-7. A nucleophilic substituent at C-8 was essential for the activity of gatifloxacin and moxifloxacin. PMID:10991859

  15. Emergence of quinolone resistance among extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in the Central African Republic: genetic characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Thierry

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cross-resistance to quinolones and beta-lactams is frequent in Enterobacteriaceae, due to the wide use of these antibiotics clinically and in the food industry. Prescription of one of these categories of antibiotic may consequently select for bacteria resistant to both categories. Genetic mechanisms of resistance may be secondary to a chromosomal mutation located in quinolone resistance determining region of DNA gyrase or topoisomerase IV or to a plasmid acquisition. The insertion sequence ISCR1 is often associated with qnr and may favour its dissemination in Gram-negative bacteria. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic mechanism of quinolone resistance among extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae strains in the Central African Republic. Findings Among seventeen ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolated from urine, pus or stool between January 2003 and October 2005 in the Central African Republic, nine were resistant to ciprofloxacin (seven from community patients and two from hospitalized patients. The ESBL were previously characterized as CTX-M-15 and SHV-12. Susceptibility to nalidixic acid, norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin, and the minimal inhibitory concentrations of these drugs were determined by disc diffusion and agar dilution methods, respectively. The presence of plasmid-borne ISCR1-qnrA region was determined by PCR and amplicons, if any, were sent for sequencing. Quinolone resistance determining region of DNA gyrase gyrA gene was amplified by PCR and then sequenced for mutation characterization. We found that all CTX-M-producing strains were resistant to the tested quinolones. All the isolates had the same nucleotide mutation at codon 83 of gyrA. Two Escherichia coli strains with the highest MICs were shown to harbour an ISCR1-qnrA1 sequence. This genetic association might favour dissemination of resistance to quinolone and perhaps other antibiotics among Enterobacteriaceae

  16. Antibiotic selection pressure and macrolide resistance in nasopharyngeal Streptococcus pneumoniae: a cluster-randomized clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison H Skalet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is widely thought that widespread antibiotic use selects for community antibiotic resistance, though this has been difficult to prove in the setting of a community-randomized clinical trial. In this study, we used a randomized clinical trial design to assess whether macrolide resistance was higher in communities treated with mass azithromycin for trachoma, compared to untreated control communities. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In a cluster-randomized trial for trachoma control in Ethiopia, 12 communities were randomized to receive mass azithromycin treatment of children aged 1-10 years at months 0, 3, 6, and 9. Twelve control communities were randomized to receive no antibiotic treatments until the conclusion of the study. Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from randomly selected children in the treated group at baseline and month 12, and in the control group at month 12. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed on Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from the swabs using Etest strips. In the treated group, the mean prevalence of azithromycin resistance among all monitored children increased from 3.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.8%-8.9% at baseline, to 46.9% (37.5%-57.5% at month 12 (p = 0.003. In control communities, azithromycin resistance was 9.2% (95% CI 6.7%-13.3% at month 12, significantly lower than the treated group (p < 0.0001. Penicillin resistance was identified in 0.8% (95% CI 0%-4.2% of isolates in the control group at 1 year, and in no isolates in the children-treated group at baseline or 1 year. CONCLUSIONS: This cluster-randomized clinical trial demonstrated that compared to untreated control communities, nasopharyngeal pneumococcal resistance to macrolides was significantly higher in communities randomized to intensive azithromycin treatment. Mass azithromycin distributions were given more frequently than currently recommended by the World Health Organization's trachoma program. Azithromycin use in this setting

  17. Monte Carlo simulation for evaluation of the efficacy of carbapenems and new quinolones against ESBL-producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tatsuya; Shimizu, Chihiro; Kasahara, Mayumi; Okuda, Kazuyuki; Nakata, Chiyo; Fujimoto, Hiroko; Okura, Hiroe; Komatsu, Masaru; Shimakawa, Kouichi; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Ura, Toshiro; Satoh, Kaori; Toyokawa, Masahiro; Wada, Yasunao; Orita, Tamaki; Kofuku, Tomomi; Yamasaki, Katsutoshi; Sakamoto, Masako; Nishio, Hisaaki; Kinoshita, Shohiro; Takahashi, Hakuo

    2009-02-01

    Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria are known to be resistant to penicillins, cephalosporins, and monobactams because of their substrate specificity, and these bacteria are sensitive only to a narrow range of antimicrobial agents. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of carbapenems and the new quinolones against ESBL-producing Escherichia coli, using a Monte Carlo simulation based on the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) theory. The time above MIC (TAM, %) served as the PK/PD parameter for carbapenems, with the target level set at 40%. The AUC/MIC served as the PK/PD parameter for the new quinolones, with the target level set at more than 125. In the analysis of drug sensitivity, the MIC50 of all carbapenems other than imipenem was low (0.03 microg/ml), while the MIC50 of the new quinolones was higher (1-2 microg/ml). The probability of achieving the PK/PD target with carba penems after two doses at the usual dose level, as determined by the Monte Carlo simulation, was high for each of the carbapenems tested (99.0% for biapenem, 99.60% for meropenem, and 95.03% for doripenem), except for imipenem. Among the new quinolones, the highest probability of achieving the PK/PD target was obtained with pazufloxacin (42.90%). Thus, the results of the present study have revealed that carbapenems are effective at the regular dose and can be used as the first-choice antibiotics for ESBL-producing E. coli because the resistance ratios for carbapenems are low compared to those of the new quinolones.

  18. Antistaphylococcal activity of DX-619, a new des-F(6)-quinolone, compared to those of other agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanovich, Tatiana; Esel, Duygu; Kelly, Linda M; Bozdogan, Bülent; Credito, Kim; Lin, Gengrong; Smith, Kathy; Ednie, Lois M; Hoellman, Dianne B; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2005-08-01

    The in vitro activity of DX-619, a new des-F(6)-quinolone, was tested against staphylococci and compared to those of other antimicrobials. DX-619 had the lowest MIC ranges/MIC(50)s/MIC(90)s (microg/ml) against 131 Staphylococcus aureus strains (32), and ciprofloxacin (>32/>32). Raised quinolone MICs were associated with mutations in GyrA (S84L) and single or double mutations in GrlA (S80F or Y; E84K, G, or V) in all S. aureus strains tested. A recent vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA) strain (Hershey) was resistant to available quinolones and was inhibited by DX-619 at 0.25 microg/ml and sitafloxacin at 1.0 microg/ml. Vancomycin (except VRSA), linezolid, ranbezolid, tigecycline, and quinupristin-dalfopristin were active against all strains, and teicoplanin was active against S. aureus but less active against coagulase-negative staphylococci. DX-619 produced resistant mutants with MICs of 1 to >32 microg/ml after 32 microg/ml for ciprofloxacin, sitafloxacin, moxifloxacin, and gatifloxacin. DX-619 and sitafloxacin were also more active than other tested drugs against selected mutants and had the lowest mutation frequencies in single-step resistance selection. DX-619 and sitafloxacin were bactericidal against six quinolone-resistant (including the VRSA) and seven quinolone-susceptible strains tested, whereas gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin were bactericidal against 11, 10, 7, and 5 strains at 4x MIC after 24 h, respectively. DX-619 was also bactericidal against one other VRSA strain, five vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus strains, and four vancomycin-intermediate coagulase-negative staphylococci. Linezolid, ranbezolid, and tigecycline were bacteriostatic and quinupristin-dalfopristin, teicoplanin, and vancomycin were bactericidal against two, eight, and nine strains, and daptomycin and oritavancin were rapidly bactericidal against all strains, including the VRSA. DX-619 has potent in vitro activity against staphylococci, including

  19. A function of SmeDEF, the major quinolone resistance determinant of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, is the colonization of plant roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-León, Guillermo; Hernández, Alvaro; Hernando-Amado, Sara; Alavi, Peyman; Berg, Gabriele; Martínez, José Luis

    2014-08-01

    Quinolones are synthetic antibiotics, and the main cause of resistance to these antimicrobials is mutation of the genes encoding their targets. However, in contrast to the case for other organisms, such mutations have not been found in quinolone-resistant Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolates, in which overproduction of the SmeDEF efflux pump is a major cause of quinolone resistance. SmeDEF is chromosomally encoded and highly conserved in all studied S. maltophilia strains; it is an ancient element that evolved over millions of years in this species. It thus seems unlikely that its main function would be resistance to quinolones, a family of synthetic antibiotics not present in natural environments until the last few decades. Expression of SmeDEF is tightly controlled by the transcriptional repressor SmeT. Our work shows that plant-produced flavonoids can bind to SmeT, releasing it from smeDEF and smeT operators. Antibiotics extruded by SmeDEF do not impede the binding of SmeT to DNA. The fact that plant-produced flavonoids specifically induce smeDEF expression indicates that they are bona fide effectors regulating expression of this resistance determinant. Expression of efflux pumps is usually downregulated unless their activity is needed. Since smeDEF expression is triggered by plant-produced flavonoids, we reasoned that this efflux pump may have a role in the colonization of plants by S. maltophilia. Our results showed that, indeed, deletion of smeE impairs S. maltophilia colonization of plant roots. Altogether, our results indicate that quinolone resistance is a recent function of SmeDEF and that colonization of plant roots is likely one original function of this efflux pump.

  20. Evaluation of ticarcillin/clavulanic acid versus ceftriaxone plus amikacin for fever and neutropenia in pediatric patients with leukemia and lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrilli Antonio Sérgio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The empirical use of antibiotic treatments is widely accepted as a means to treat cancer patients in chemotherapy who have fever and neutropenia. Intravenous monotherapy, with broad spectrum antibiotics, of patients with a high risk of complications is a possible alternative. METHODS: We conducted a prospective open-label, randomized study of patients with lymphoma or leukemia who had fever and neutropenia during chemotherapy. Patients received either monotherapy with ticarcillin/clavulanic acid (T or ceftriaxone plus amikacin (C+A. RESULTS: Seventy patients who presented 136 episodes were evaluated, 68 in each arm of the study. The mean neutrophil counts at admission were 217cells/mm³ (T and 201cells/mm³ (C+A. The mean duration of neutropenia was 8.7 days (T and 7.6 days (C+A. Treatment was successful without the need for modifications in 71% of the episodes in the T group and 81% in the C+A group (p=0.23. Treatment was considered to have failed because of death in two episodes (3% in the T group and three episodes (4% in the C+A group, and because of a change in the drug applied in one episode in the T group and two episodes in the C+A group. Overall success was 96% (T and 93% (C+A. Adverse events that occurred in group T were not related to the drugs used in this study. CONCLUSION: In pediatric and adolescent patients with leukemia or lymphoma, who presented with fever and neutropenia, during chemotherapy, ticarcillin/clavulanic acid was as successful as the combination of ceftriaxone plus amikacin. It should be considered an appropriate option for this group of patients at high risk for infections.

  1. Identification and synthesis of macrolide pheromones of the grain beetle Oryzaephilus surinamensis and the frog Spinomantis aglavei.

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    Hötling, Susann; Haberlag, Birte; Tamm, Matthias; Collatz, Jana; Mack, Patrick; Steidle, Johannes L M; Vences, Miguel; Schulz, Stefan

    2014-03-10

    Macrolide lactones, the so called cucujolides derived from unsaturated fatty acids, are aggregation pheromones of cucujid grain beetles. Thirty years ago, Oehlschlarger et al. showed that (3Z,6Z)-dodeca-3,6-dien-11-olide (4) and the respective 12-olide (7) attract the sawtoothed grain beetle Oryzaephilus surinamensis, whereas (5Z,8Z,13R)-tetradeca-5,8-dien-13-olide (5) increases the response synergistically. The frass of this beetle is attractive for its parasitoid Cephalonomia tarsalis, which potentially can be used for pest control. A GC/MS analysis of attractive frass showed the presence of 5, together with an unknown isomer. Cucujolide V was tentatively identified also in the femoral glands, pheromone-releasing structures, of the Madagascan mantelline frog Spinomantis aglavei. Therefore, a new route to synthesize doubly unsaturated macrolides allowing the flexible attachment of the side chain was developed. A straightforward method to obtain Z configured macrolides involves ring-closing alkyne metathesis (RCAM) followed by Lindlar-catalyzed hydrogenation. This methodology was extended to homoconjugated diene macrolides by using RCAM after introduction of one Z configured double bond in the precursor by Wittig reaction. A tungsten benzylidyne complex was used as the catalyst in the RCAM reaction, which afforded the products in high yield at room temperature. With the synthetic material at hand, the unknown isomer was identified as the new natural product (5Z,8Z,12R)-tetradeca-5,8-dien-12-olide, cucujolide X (8). Furthermore, the route also allowed the synthesis of cucujolide V in good yield. The natural products were identified by the synthesis of enantiomerically pure or enriched material and gas chromatography on chiral phases. The new macrolide (R)-8 proved to be biologically active, attracting female O. surinamensis, but no males. The synthetic material allowed the identification of (R)-5 in both the beetle and the frog. © 2014 WILEY

  2. Prevalence of macrolide and fluoroquinolone resistance-mediating mutations in Mycoplasma genitalium in five cities in Russia and Estonia.

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    Shipitsyna, Elena; Rumyantseva, Tatiana; Golparian, Daniel; Khayrullina, Guzel; Lagos, Amaya C; Edelstein, Inna; Joers, Kai; Jensen, Jörgen S; Savicheva, Alevtina; Rudneva, Natalia; Sukhanova, Larisa; Kozlov, Roman; Guschin, Alexander; Unemo, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    Resistance in the sexually transmitted bacterium Mycoplasma genitalium to all recommended therapeutic antimicrobials have rapidly emerged. However, to date, internationally reported resistance surveillance data for M. genitalium strains circulating in Eastern Europe are entirely lacking. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of macrolide and fluoroquinolone resistance-associated mutations in M. genitalium in four cities in Russia and one in Estonia, 2013-2016. Consecutive urogenital samples found positive for M. genitalium during diagnostic testing were retrospectively analyzed for resistance-associated mutations in the 23S rRNA and parC genes using pyrosequencing and conventional Sanger sequencing, respectively. In total, 867 M. genitalium positive samples from 2013-2016 were analyzed. Macrolide resistance-associated mutations were detected in 4.6% of the samples from Russia (0.7-6.8% in different cities) and in 10% of the samples from Estonia. The mutations A2059G and A2058G were highly predominating in both Russia and Estonia, accounting together for 90.9% of the cases positive for nucleotide substitutions in the 23S rRNA gene. The rates of possible fluoroquinolone resistance-associated mutations were 6.2% in Russia (2.5-7.6% in different cities) and 5% in Estonia. The mutations S83I and S83N were the most frequent ones in Russia (24.4% each), whereas D87N highly predominated in Estonia (83.3% of all fluoroquinolone resistance-associated mutations). Approximately 1% of the samples in both countries harbored both macrolide and possible fluoroquinolone resistance-associated mutations, with A2058G and S83I being the most frequent combination (37.5%). The prevalence of macrolide and fluoroquinolone resistance-associated mutations in M. genitalium was 4.6% and 6.2%, respectively, in Russia, and 10% and 5%, respectively, in Estonia. Despite the relatively low rates of macrolide and fluoroquinolone resistance in these countries, antimicrobial resistance

  3. Voreloxin is an anticancer quinolone derivative that intercalates DNA and poisons topoisomerase II.

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    Rachael E Hawtin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Topoisomerase II is critical for DNA replication, transcription and chromosome segregation and is a well validated target of anti-neoplastic drugs including the anthracyclines and epipodophyllotoxins. However, these drugs are limited by common tumor resistance mechanisms and side-effect profiles. Novel topoisomerase II-targeting agents may benefit patients who prove resistant to currently available topoisomerase II-targeting drugs or encounter unacceptable toxicities. Voreloxin is an anticancer quinolone derivative, a chemical scaffold not used previously for cancer treatment. Voreloxin is completing Phase 2 clinical trials in acute myeloid leukemia and platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. This study defined voreloxin's anticancer mechanism of action as a critical component of rational clinical development informed by translational research. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Biochemical and cell-based studies established that voreloxin intercalates DNA and poisons topoisomerase II, causing DNA double-strand breaks, G2 arrest, and apoptosis. Voreloxin is differentiated both structurally and mechanistically from other topoisomerase II poisons currently in use as chemotherapeutics. In cell-based studies, voreloxin poisoned topoisomerase II and caused dose-dependent, site-selective DNA fragmentation analogous to that of quinolone antibacterials in prokaryotes; in contrast etoposide, the nonintercalating epipodophyllotoxin topoisomerase II poison, caused extensive DNA fragmentation. Etoposide's activity was highly dependent on topoisomerase II while voreloxin and the intercalating anthracycline topoisomerase II poison, doxorubicin, had comparable dependence on this enzyme for inducing G2 arrest. Mechanistic interrogation with voreloxin analogs revealed that intercalation is required for voreloxin's activity; a nonintercalating analog did not inhibit proliferation or induce G2 arrest, while an analog with enhanced intercalation was 9.5-fold more

  4. Functional characterization of CYP107W1 from Streptomyces avermitilis and biosynthesis of macrolide oligomycin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Songhee; Pham, Tan-Viet; Kim, Joo-Hwan; Lim, Young-Ran; Park, Hyoung-Goo; Cha, Gun-Su; Yun, Chul-Ho; Chun, Young-Jin; Kang, Lin-Woo; Kim, Donghak

    2015-06-01

    Streptomyces avermitilis contains 33 cytochrome P450 genes in its genome, many of which play important roles in the biosynthesis process of antimicrobial agents. Here, we characterized the biochemical function and structure of CYP107W1 from S. avermitilis, which is responsible for the 12-hydroxylation reaction of oligomycin C. CYP107W1 was expressed and purified from Escherichia coli. Purified proteins exhibited the typical CO-binding spectrum of P450. Interaction of oligomycin C and oligomycin A (12-hydroxylated oligomycin C) with purified CYP107W1 resulted in a type I binding with Kd values of 14.4 ± 0.7 μM and 2.0 ± 0.1 μM, respectively. LC-mass spectrometry analysis showed that CYP107W1 produced oligomycin A by regioselectively hydroxylating C12 of oligomycin C. Steady-state kinetic analysis yielded a kcat value of 0.2 min(-1) and a Km value of 18 μM. The crystal structure of CYP107W1 was determined at 2.1 Å resolution. The overall P450 folding conformations are well conserved, and the open access binding pocket for the large macrolide oligomycin C was observed above the distal side of heme. This study of CYP107W1 can help a better understanding of clinically important P450 enzymes as well as their optimization and engineering for synthesizing novel antibacterial agents and other pharmaceutically important compounds.

  5. Structural Disorder in the Complex of Human Pregnane X Receptor and the Macrolide Antibiotic Rifampicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrencik, Jill E.; Orans, Jillian; Moore, Linda B.; Xue, Yu; Peng, Li; Collins, Jon L.; Wisely, G. Bruce; Lambert, Millard H.; Kliewer, Steven A.; Redinbo, Matthew R. (U. of Texas-SMED); (UNC)

    2010-07-13

    The human nuclear xenobiotic receptor, pregnane X receptor (PXR), detects a variety of structurally distinct endogenous and xenobiotic compounds and controls expression of genes central to drug and cholesterol metabolism. The macrolide antibiotic rifampicin, a front-line treatment for tuberculosis, is an established PXR agonist and, at 823 Da, is one of the largest known ligands for the receptor. We present the 2.8 {angstrom} crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain of human PXR in complex with rifampicin. We also use structural and mutagenesis data to examine the origins of the directed promiscuity exhibited by the PXRs across species. Three structurally flexible loops adjacent to the ligand-binding pocket of PXR are disordered in this crystal structure, including the 200-210 region that is part of a sequence insert novel to the promiscuous PXRs relative to other members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. The 4-methyl-1-piperazinyl ring of rifampicin, which would lie adjacent to the disordered protein regions, is also disordered and not observed in the structure. Taken together, our results indicate that one wall of the PXR ligand-binding cavity can remain flexible even when the receptor is in complex with an activating ligand. These observations highlight the key role that structural flexibility plays in PXR's promiscuous response to xenobiotics.

  6. Susceptibility of streptococcus pneumoniae to fluoroquinolones and macrolides in upper respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mykhalko, Yaroslav O; Duhovych, Tetyana V; Kish, Pavlo P

    Streptococcal species are known as the most common cause of bacterial upper respiratory tract infections (URTI). Once bacterial infection is diagnosed it demands empirical antibiotic prescription. On the other hand antimicrobial resistance is a global burden in today's medicine. For that reason, knowing of antimicrobial susceptibility patterns in population is an important background for successful treatment of bacterial caused URTI. The aim of this study was to analyze S. pneumoniae resistance and susceptibility patterns to fluoroquinolones and macrolides in URTI. The results of microbiological examination of 2,055 pharyngeal swabs taken from patients with bacterial caused tonsillitis, pharyngitis and laryngitis were analyzed. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for levofloxacin, ofloxacin, gatifloxacin, erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin was performed with the disk-diffusion method. The incidence of S. pneumoniae in the etiological structure of bacterial caused URTI was increasing from 22.47% of cases in 2011 to 36.48% in 2015. The susceptibility of this microorganism to ofloxacin, gatifloxacin and levofloxacin decreased from 96.25%, 100% and 95.00% in 2011 to 44.22%, 65.99% and 62.59% in 2015 respectively. The susceptibility of S. pneumoniae to erythromycin, azithromycin and clarithromycin also decreased from 30.00%, 63.75% and 41.25% in 2011 to 6.80%, 26.53%, 27.21 in 2015. Among investigated antibiotics levofloxacin can be recommended for empiric therapy of URTI because of high pneumococci susceptibility to this drug.

  7. EFFECT OF MACROLIDE ANTIBIOTICS ON VARIOUS CELL CULTURES IN VITRO: 1. CELL MORPHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renáta Kováčová

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of macrolide antibiotics (tilmicosin, tylosin and spiramycin of various concentrations on different cell cultures in vitro. Cellular lines from animal tissues (VERO cells - kidney cells of Macacus rhesus, FE cells - feline embryonal cells, BHK 21 cellular line from young hamster kidneys were used. Tilmicosin effect: BHK cells are most sensitive, significant decrease in vital cells occurs already at the concentration of 50 μg.ml-1. VERO cells were most resistant, significant decrease of vital cells was observed only at the concentration of 300 μg.ml-1. Tylosin effect: BHK cells can be considered most sensitive, since at concentrations higher than 500 μg.ml-1, no vital cells were observed. At the concentration of 1000 μg.ml-1 were 3.13% of vital and 70.52% of subvital FE cells. In Vero cells, we observed a significant decrease at the concentration of 750 μg.ml-1. Spiramycin effect: Significant decrease of vital BHK cells was observed at the concentration of 150 μg.ml-1, at the concentration of 300 μg.ml-1, no vital cells and only 7.53% of subvital cells were observed. At the concentration of 500 μg.ml-1 reported 10.34% of vital FE cells. At the concentration of 500 μg.ml-1 22.48% of vital and 71.16% of subvital VERO cells were recorded.

  8. Fluoroquinolone and macrolide resistance in Campylobacter jejuni isolated from broiler slaughterhouses in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Arguello, Yuli M; Perdoncini, G; Morgan, R B; Salle, C T P; Moraes, H L S; Gomes, Marcos J P; do Nascimento, Vladimir Pinheiro

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is recognized as a leading cause of acute bacterial gastroenteritis in humans. The over-use of antimicrobials in the human population and in animal husbandry has led to an increase in antimicrobial-resistant infections, particularly with fluoroquinolones and macrolides. The aim of the present study was to provide information of the current status of antimicrobial resistance patterns in Campylobacter jejuni from poultry sources. Fifty strains were recovered from broiler slaughterhouses in Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil, 2012. The strains were investigated for antimicrobial susceptibility against three agents (ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid and erythromycin) by minimal inhibitory concentrations. The strains were analysed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism for detection of the Thr-86 mutation that confers resistance to ciprofloxacin. In addition, all the strains were tested for the presence of efflux systems (cmeB gene) conferring antimicrobial resistance. The minimum inhibitory concentrations results showed that 98% of isolates were sensitive to erythromycin and most isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin (94%) and nalidixic acid (90%). A complete correlation was observed between the minimum inhibitory concentrations and PCR-RFLP assay. Finally, the cmeB gene that is responsible for multidrug resistance was detected in 16 isolates out the 50 strains (32%).

  9. The suppression of enhanced bitterness intensity of macrolide dry syrup mixed with an acidic powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaka, Toshihiko; Okada, Sachie; Takemoto, Eri; Tokuyama, Emi; Tsuji, Eriko; Mukai, Junji; Uchida, Takahiro

    2007-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify a medicine which strongly enhanced the bitterness of clarithromycin dry syrup (CAMD) when administered concomitantly and to develop a method to suppress this enhanced bitterness. The bitterness enhancement was evaluated not only by gustatory sensation tests but also using pH and taste sensor measurements of the mixed sample. A remarkable bitterness enhancement was found when CAMD was mixed with the acidic powder L-carbocysteine. The acidic pH (pH 3.40) of the suspension made from these two preparations, seemed to be due to enhanced release of clarithromycin caused by the dissolution of the alkaline polymer film-coating. Several methods for preventing this bitterness enhancement were investigated. Neither increasing the volume of water taken with the mixture, nor changing the ratio of CAMD:L-carbocysteine in the mixture, were effective in reducing the bitterness intensity of the CAMD/L-carbocysteine mixture. The best way to achieve taste masking was to first administer CAMD mixed with chocolate jelly, which has a neutral pH, followed by the L-carbocysteine suspension. Similar results were obtained for the bitterness suppression of azithromycin fine granules with L-carbocysteine. The chocolate jelly will be useful for taste masking of bitter macrolide drug formulations, when they need to be administered together with acidic drug formulations.

  10. [Bacteriostatic and bactericidal activities of cyclines, macrolides and fluoroquinolones against Chlamydia trachomatis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailloux, M; Villemain, P

    1992-05-01

    The in vitro activity of minocycline, doxycycline, erythromycin, roxithromycin, spiramycin, pefloxacin, and ofloxacin against ten C. trachomatis strains recovered from human genital tract specimens was evaluated. Mac Coy cell monolayers in 24-microwell plates were used. The C. trachomatis inoculum was 10(4) IFU/well. Appropriate dilutions of antibiotic were added and inclusions were detected by immunofluorescence using monoclonal antibodies. MICs were determined after 48 hours of exposure to each antimicrobial. The MIC90 for cyclines was 0.2 mg/l. Among tested macrolides, roxithromycin had a lower MIC than erythromycin (0.2 versus 0.4 mg/l) whereas spiramycin inhibited growth only in a concentration of 2 mg/l. Ofloxacin showed better activity than pefloxacin. Bactericidal activity was evaluated by determining two parameters: MBC1 (without transfer to new cells) measured the ability of a C. trachomatis particle to persist in a latent form within cells exposed to an antibiotic and to grow again following removal of the antibiotic, whereas MBC2 (with transfer to new cells) reflected infectivity of the bacteria after 48 hours exposure to the antimicrobial. None of the tested antibiotics was bactericidal according to both parameters. The ability of C. trachomatis to remain within antibiotic-exposed cells in a latent form was clearly demonstrated by the high MBC1 values. This feature may explain why recurrences are common in clinical practice.

  11. Effects of Combined Treatment with Sansanmycin and Macrolides on Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Formation of Biofilm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE LI; YUN-YING XIE; RU-XIAN CHEN; HONG-ZHANG XU; GUO-JI ZHANG; JIN-ZHE LI; XIAO-MIAN LI

    2009-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of combined treatment with sansanmycin and macrolides on Pseudomonas aeruginosa and formation of biofilm. Methods Micro-dilution method was used to determine the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of sansanmycin, gentamycin, carbenicillin, polymyxin B, roxithromycin, piperacillin, and tazobactam. PA1 and PA27853 biofilms were observed under optical microscope after staining and under SEM after treatment with sansanmycin at different dosages and combined treatment with sansanmycin and roxithromycin. Viable bacteria in PA1 and PA27853 biofilms were counted after treatment with sansanmycin at different dosages or combined treatment with sansanmycin and roxithromycin. Results The MIC of sansanmycin was lower than that of gentamycin and polymyxin B, but was higher than that of carbenicillin. Roxithromycin enhanced the penetration of sansanmycin to PA1 and PA27853 strains through biofilms. PA1 and PA27853 biofilms were gradually cleared with the increased dosages of sansanmycin or with the combined sansanmycin and roxithromycin. Conclusion Sub-MIC levels of roxithromycin and sansanmycin substantially inhibit the generation of biofilms and proliferation of bacteria. Therefore, combined antibiotics can be used in treatment of intractable bacterial infection.

  12. Macrolide analog F806 suppresses esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) by blocking β1 integrin activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li-Yan; Jiang, Hong; Xie, Yang-Min; Liao, Lian-Di; Cao, Hui-Hui; Xu, Xiu-E; Chen, Bo; Zeng, Fa-Min; Zhang, Ying-Li; Du, Ze-Peng; Chen, Hong; Huang, Wei; Jia, Wei; Zheng, Wei; Xie, Jian-Jun; Li, En-Min; Xu, Li-Yan

    2015-06-30

    The paucity of new drugs for the treatment of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) limits the treatment options. This study characterized the therapeutic efficacy and action mechanism of a novel natural macrolide compound F806 in human ESCC xenograft models and cell lines. F806 inhibited growth of ESCC, most importantly, it displayed fewer undesirable side effects on normal tissues in two human ESCC xenograft models. F806 inhibited proliferation of six ESCC cells lines, with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) ranging from 9.31 to 16.43 μM. Furthermore, F806 induced apoptosis of ESCC cells, contributing to its growth-inhibitory effect. Also, F806 inhibited cell adhesion resulting in anoikis. Mechanistic studies revealed that F806 inhibited the activation of β1 integrin in part by binding to a novel site Arg610 of β1 integrin, suppressed focal adhesion formation, decreased cell adhesion to extracellular matrix and eventually triggered apoptosis. We concluded that F806 would potentially be a well-tolerated anticancer drug by targeting β1 integrin, resulting in anoikis in ESCC cells.

  13. In-vitro release pharmacokinetics of amikacin, teicoplanin and polyhexanide in a platelet rich fibrin—layer (PRF)—a laboratory evaluation of a modern, autologous wound treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalhammer, Florian

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Platelet rich fibrin (PRF) is an autologous fibrin glue, produced from patients' blood, which, besides intraoperative use, has applications in the treatment of infected wounds. The combination with antimicrobial agents results in a prolonged antibacterial effect allowing for wound dressing change intervals of seven days even in infected wounds. The aim of this study was to evaluate release kinetics of amikacin, teicoplanin or polyhexanide from a PRF-layer. Methods PRF mixed with teicoplanin, amikacin or polyhexanide was sprayed on a silicon gauze patch and put on a colombia agar with bacteria with known minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and incubated for 24 hours and afterwards transferred to another agar with the same bacterial strain. Inhibition zones were measured every 24 hours. This was repeated on 7 consecutive days. Antibiotic concentrations were calculated by interpolation. Results More than 1000 mg/L teicoplanin were released within the first 24 hours and 28.22 mg/L after 168 hours. Amikacin release was above 10,000 mg/L within the first 24 hours and still 120.8 mg/L after 120 hours. A release of polyhexanide could be verified for the first 24 hours only. Consequently teicoplanin and amikacin released from PRF showed antimicrobial in-vitro effects for almost a week, whereas an antimicrobial effect of polyhexanide could only be verified for the first 24 hours. Conclusions Our Results show that a weekly dressing regimen may be justified in wounds treated with PRF plus amikacin or teicoplanin, since bacteria will be eradicated over a considerable period of time after a single application of PRF. PMID:28686663

  14. Characterization of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase, carbapenemase, and plasmid quinolone determinants in Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates carrying distinct types of 16S rRNA methylase genes, and their association with mobile genetic elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Dan-Dan; Wan, La-Gen; Yu, Yang; Xu, Qun-Fei; Deng, Qiong; Cao, Xian-Wei; Liu, Yang

    2015-04-01

    Eighty-four multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (MDR-KP) isolates from a Chinese hospital from January to October 2012 were evaluated to characterize the coexistence of 16S rRNA methylase, extended-spectrum β-lactamase, carbapenemase, and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants and their association with mobile genetic elements. Among the 84 MDR-KP isolates studied, 19 isolates exhibited high-level resistance to amikacin mediated by the production of the 16S rRNA methylase. They carried 19 armA genes (22.9%) and three rmtB genes (3.6%). CTX-M genes were found in all of the isolates. Among these armA- or rmtB/CTX-M-producing K. pneumoniae isolates, 31.6% carried the carbapenemase genes (blaKPC-2 [26.3%], blaIMP-4 [10.5%], and blaNDM-1 [5.3%]), which made them resistant to imipenem (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] ≥16 mg/L). All positive strains possessed qnr-like genes (16 qnrA1, 10 qnrS1, and 7 qnrB4 genes) and 18 harbored an aac(6')-Ib-cr gene. Mobile elements ISEcp1, IS26, ISCR1, ISAba125, and sul-1 integrons were detected in 19/19 (100%), 16/19 (84.2%), 18/19 (94.7%), 9/19 (47.4%), and 18/19 (94.7%) isolates, respectively. The mobilizing elements occurred in different combinations in the study isolates. Majority of armA and qnr genes were in MDR-KP strains carrying integrons containing the ISCR1. Close to 80% of blaTEM-1 and blaSHV-12 were linked to IS26 while ≥90% of blaCTX-Ms and blaCMYs were linked to ISEcp1. ISAba125 was located upstream of blaNDM-1 and some blaCMY-2 genes. In addition, seven transconjugants were available for further analysis, and armA, qnrS1, acc(6')-Ib-cr, blaCTX-M-15, blaTEM-1, and blaNDM-1 were cotransferred. This study points to the dissemination of 16S rRNA methylase genes and the prevalence of selected elements implicated in evolution of resistance determinants in collection of clinical K. pneumoniae in China.

  15. Resistance patterns to beta-lactams and quinolones in clinical isolates of bacteria from Cuban hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzáles, I; Niebla, A; Vallin, C

    1995-01-01

    The resistance patterns to 26 beta-lactams and 8 quinolones of clinical isolates from Cuban hospitals were evaluated using the disk susceptibility test, according to the NCCLS guidelines (1992). The genera studied were Escherichia sp (320), Enterobacter sp (10), Klebsiella sp (90), Proteus sp (10), Pseudomonas sp (90), Serratia sp (20), and Staphylococcus sp (80). Higher resistance to beta-lactams was observed in the genera Pseudomonas, Escherichia and Klebsiella. For fluoroquinolones we found no significant resistance, with the exception of the genus Klebsiella. The most effective antibiotics were cephalosporins of the second and third generations, fluoroquinolones, and non-classical beta-lactams (cephamycins, moxalactam and monobactams). On the contrary, a pronounced resistance was found to penicillin, oxacillin, ticarcillin, ampicillin, methicillin, nalidixic acid and cinoxacin. These resistance patterns correspond to the high consumption of these antibiotics throughout the country.

  16. C-6 aryl substituted 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acids as inhibitors of hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yue-Lei; Zacharias, Jeana; Vince, Robert; Geraghty, Robert J; Wang, Zhengqiang

    2012-08-01

    Quinolone-3-carboxylic acid represents a highly privileged chemotype in medicinal chemistry and has been extensively explored as antibiotics and antivirals targeting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integrase (IN). Herein we describe the synthesis and anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) profile of a series of C-6 aryl substituted 4-quinlone-3-carboxylic acid analogues. Significant inhibition was observed with a few analogues at low micromolar range against HCV replicon in cell culture and a reduction in replicon RNA was confirmed through an RT-qPCR assay. Interestingly, evaluation of analogues as inhibitors of NS5B in a biochemical assay yielded only modest inhibitory activities, suggesting that a different mechanism of action could operate in cell culture.

  17. Capillary electrophoresis with electrochemiluminescence detection for the analysis of quinolone drugs and pharmacokinetics study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Ming Liu; Jun Tao Cao; Hui Wang

    2008-01-01

    A novel method for the determination of two quinolone drugs norfloxacin (NOR) and levofloxacin (LVX) was described by capillary electrophoresis with electrochemiluminescence detection. The good relationship (r ≥ 0.9991) between peak area and concentration of analytes was established over two orders of magnitude. The limits of detection (LOD, S/N = 3) in standard solution are 4.8 × 10-7 mol/L for NOR and 6.4 × 10-7 mol/L for LVX, respectively. The limits of quantitation (LOQ, S/N = 10) in real human urine samples are 1.2 × 10-6 mol/L for NOR and 1.4 × 10-6 mol/L for LVX, respectively. The present method was successfully applied to the determination of NOR and LVX in human urine and the study of pharmacokinetics of NOR.

  18. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance among extended spectrum beta lactase producing Enterobacteriaceae from bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domokos, Judit; Kristóf, Katalin; Szabó, Dóra

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine prevalence and molecular characterization of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes [qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrD, qnrS, aac(6')-Ib-cr, qepA, and oqxAB] among extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates from bloodcultures in Hungary. A total of 103 isolates were tested for quinolone susceptibility by microdilution method and PMQR genes were detected by polymerase chain reaction. About 40 ESBL-producing E. coli (39%) and 50 ESBL-producing Klebsiella spp. strains (48%) were resistant to ciprofloxacin; 40 ESBL-producing E. coli (39%) and 47 ESBL-producing Klebsiella spp. strains (45%) were resistant to levofloxacin; and 88 strains including 40 ESBL-producing E. coli (39%) and 48 (47%) ESBL-producing Klebsiella spp. were resistant to moxifloxacin. Among the 103 ESBL-producing isolates, 77 (75%) isolates (30 E. coli and 47 Klebsiella spp.) harbored PMQR genes. The most commonly detected gene was aac(6')-Ib-cr (65%). The occurrence of qnrS gene was 6%. Interestingly, qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrD, and qepA were not found in any isolates. Among 77 PMQR-positive isolates, 27 (35.1%) and 1 (1.3%) carried two and three different PMQR genes, respectively. Only Klebsiella spp. harbored more than one PMQR genes. Observing prevalence of PMQR genes in the last 8 years, the increasing incidence of aac(6')-Ib-cr and oqxAB can be seen. Our results highlight high frequency of PMQR genes among ESBL-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and E. coli isolates with an increasing dynamics in Hungary.

  19. QUINOLONE- AND ETA-LACTAM- RESISTANCE IN Escherichia coli FROM DANISH AND ITALIAN BROILER FLOCKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Trevisani

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of quinolone- and -lactam-resistant E. coli was investigated among healthy broiler flocks in Denmark and Italy. In Denmark, sock samples were collected from 10 parent flocks and 10 offspring flocks, according to the procedure currently used for the surveillance of Salmonella in the EU. Samples were enriched in McConkey broth and streaked on McConkey agar plates added with nalidixic acid (32 g/ml, ciprofloxacin (2 g/ml, ampicillin (32 g/ml, cefotaxime (2 g/ml or ceftiofur (8 g/ml. The -glucuronidase test was performed for verification of presumptive E. coli. The same methods were used to analyse sock samples collected from 6 Italian broiler flocks. PCR with primers for the CTX-M-type extended-spectrum -lactamases (ESBLs was performed on cephalosporin-resistant isolates. While resistance to ampicillin and nalidixic acid was widespread in both countries, resistance to ciprofloxacin and cephalosporins was more common among Italian flocks. In Denmark, ciprofloxacin resistance was only detected in 1 parent flock without any history of quinolone usage and none of the flocks was positive for cephalosporin-resistant E. coli. In Italy, resistance to ciprofloxacin was detected in all flocks and resistance to ceftiofur and cefotaxime were detected in 5 flocks. Primers specific for the CTX-M-type ESBLs generated PCR amplicons from isolates from 3 of these flocks. In industrialized countries, the poultry production system is highly standardized, and therefore comparable. However, the use of broad-spectrum antimicrobials is particularly limited in Danish poultry production. Accordingly, the results of this study could reflect the different policies in antimicrobial usage between the two countries.

  20. Coexistence of blaOXA-23 with armA in quinolone-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii from a Chinese university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Min; Luan, Guangxin; Wang, Yanhong; Chang, Yaowen; Zhang, Chi; Yang, Jingni; Deng, Shanshan; Ling, Baodong; Jia, Xu

    2016-03-01

    A total of 101 Acinetobacter baumannii isolates were collected to determine the mechanisms of quinolone resistance and investigate the occurrence of carbapenem and high-level aminoglycoside resistance genes among quinolone-resistant strains. Among 77 quinolone-resistant A. baumannii harbored mutations of gyrA and parC, 41 isolates, which belonged to European clone II, had resistance to aminoglycosides and carbapenems due to the expression of armA and acquisition of blaOXA-23. Most of sequence type belonged to clonal complex 92. These results suggested hospital dissemination of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii carrying blaOXA-23, armA, and mutations of quinolone resistance-determining regions in western China.

  1. Prevalence of Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Genes among Ciprofloxacin-Nonsusceptible Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolated from Blood Cultures in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Young Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES:To analyze the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR determinants in ciprofloxacin-nonsusceptible Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated from patients at a tertiary care hospital in Korea.

  2. Influence of macrolide maintenance therapy and bacterial colonisation on exacerbation frequency and progression of COPD (COLUMBUS: Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzun Sevim

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is characterised by progressive development of airflow limitation that is poorly reversible. Because of a poor understanding of COPD pathogenesis, treatment is mostly symptomatic and new therapeutic strategies are limited. There is a direct relationship between the severity of the disease and the intensity of the inflammatory response. Besides smoking, one of the hypotheses for the persistent airway inflammation is the presence of recurrent infections. Macrolide antibiotics have bacteriostatic as well as anti-inflammatory properties in patients with cystic fibrosis and other inflammatory pulmonary diseases. There is consistent evidence that macrolide therapy reduces infectious exacerbations, decreases the requirement for additional antibiotics and improves nutritional measures. Because of these positive effects we hypothesised that maintenance macrolide therapy may also have beneficial effects in patients with COPD who have recurrent exacerbations. The effects on development of bacterial resistance to macrolides due to this long-term treatment are unknown. Until now, studies investigating macrolide therapy in COPD are limited. The objective of this study is to assess whether maintenance treatment with macrolide antibiotics in COPD patients with three or more exacerbations in the previous year decreases the exacerbation rate in the year of treatment and to establish microbial resistance due to the long-term treatment. Methods/design The study is set up as a prospective randomised double-blind placebo-controlled single-centre trial. A total of 92 patients with COPD who have had at least three exacerbations of COPD in the previous year will be included. Subjects will be randomised to receive either azithromycin 500 mg three times a week or placebo. Our primary endpoint is the reduction in the number of exacerbations of COPD in the year of treatment. Discussion We investigate whether

  3. Characterization of HmqF, a protein involved in the biosynthesis of unsaturated quinolones produced by Burkholderia thailandensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Aparna; Kahyaoglu, Caroline; Hansen, Darren B

    2012-02-28

    The opportunistic pathogen Burkholderia thailandensis produces a number of structurally similar unsaturated quinolones involved in quorum sensing. However, little is known about the biosynthesis of these unsaturated quinolones. In this study, we have characterized the starting point of the biosynthesis of unsaturated quinolone molecules produced in B. thailandensis. We have shown by using in vitro enzymology, liquid chromatography, and mass spectrometry that protein HmqF is involved in the biosynthesis of unsaturated quinolones produced by B. thailandensis. HmqF consists of three domains: an adenylation domain (A domain), a dehydrogenase domain (DH domain), and an acyl carrier domain (ACP). The three domains (A, DH, and ACP) were cloned and expressed individually in Escherichia coli, and their reactivity was studied using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry (MS) based assays. Our in vitro studies show that the A domain catalyzes ATP-dependent activation of medium chain (C6-C14) fatty acids without activation by coenzyme A (CoA). Results from competition assays are consistent with decanoic acid being the preferred substrate. Incubation of the ACP domain with 4'-phosphopantetheine transferase and CoA led to the formation of phosphopantetheinylated ACP (Ppant-ACP). In a Ppant ejection assay using tandem MS (MS/MS), a mass consistent with the mass of a cyclic variant of dephosphorylated Ppant was detected. We further demonstrated that Ppant-ACP could be loaded with medium chain fatty acids in the presence of ATP and the A domain. MS analysis was consistent with the formation of Ppant-ACP thiol esters of the fatty acids. MS/MS Ppant ejection experiments confirmed the loss of 2H in samples of fatty acid-loaded Ppant-ACP in the presence of the DH domain. HPLC analysis of benzyl amide ligation products allowed us to conclude that dehydrogenation produced trans-β,γ-unsaturation in the fatty acid chains. Our results are in good agreement

  4. Characterization of antimicrobial resistance in Salmonella enterica food and animal isolates from Colombia: identification of a qnrB19-mediated quinolone resistance marker in two novel serovars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karczmarczyk, M.; Martins, M.; McCusker, M.

    2010-01-01

    Ninety-three Salmonella isolates recovered from commercial foods and exotic animals in Colombia were studied. The serotypes, resistance profiles and where applicable the quinolone resistance genes were determined. Salmonella Anatum (n=14), Uganda (19), Braenderup (10) and Newport (10) were the most...... hitherto unrecognized in various Salmonella serovars in Colombia. We also report unusual high-level quinolone resistance in the absence of any DNA gyrase mutations in serovars S. Carrau, Muenchen and Uganda....

  5. 金属离子对喹诺酮活性影响的研究进展%Research Progress of Metal Ions Influence The Activity of Quinolone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范卓文; 朱丽华; 杨爽爽; 闫丽莉; 孙建华

    2014-01-01

    喹诺酮类药物以抗菌活性强、抗菌谱广、疗效确切等优点被广泛应用于临床,一些研究结果表明金属离子对喹诺酮类药物的活性有一定的影响。本文概述了喹诺酮类药物的发展及作用机制,总结了金属离子对喹诺酮类的作用及喹诺酮类药物金属配合物的活性,最后展望了喹诺酮类药物今后的发展。%Quinolone are widely used clinically because of its antibacterial activity, widely spectrum antimicrobial, curative ef-fect, etc.Some studies show that the metal ions affect the activity of quinolone.This paper outlines the development and action mecha-nism of quinolone. Summarizes the role of metal ions on metal quinolone and the biological activity of quinolone complexes. Finally, prospects of the development of quinolone.

  6. Alarmingly High Segregation Frequencies of Quinolone Resistance Alleles within Human and Animal Microbiomes Are Not Explained by Direct Clinical Antibiotic Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Wesley; Hershberg, Ruth

    2015-05-26

    Antibiotic resistance poses a major threat to human health. It is therefore important to characterize the frequency of resistance within natural bacterial environments. Many studies have focused on characterizing the frequencies with which horizontally acquired resistance genes segregate within natural bacterial populations. Yet, very little is currently understood regarding the frequency of segregation of resistance alleles occurring within the housekeeping targets of antibiotics. We surveyed a large number of metagenomic datasets extracted from a large variety of host-associated and non host-associated environments for such alleles conferring resistance to three groups of broad spectrum antibiotics: streptomycin, rifamycins, and quinolones. We find notable segregation frequencies of resistance alleles occurring within the target genes of each of the three antibiotics, with quinolone resistance alleles being the most frequent and rifamycin resistance alleles being the least frequent. Resistance allele frequencies varied greatly between different phyla and as a function of environment. The frequency of quinolone resistance alleles was especially high within host-associated environments, where it averaged an alarming ∼ 40%. Within host-associated environments, resistance to quinolones was most often conferred by a specific resistance allele. High frequencies of quinolone resistance alleles were also found within hosts that were not directly treated with antibiotics. Therefore, the high segregation frequency of quinolone resistance alleles occurring within the housekeeping targets of antibiotics in host-associated environments does not seem to be the sole result of clinical antibiotic usage.

  7. Endochin optimization: structure-activity and structure-property relationship studies of 3-substituted 2-methyl-4(1H)-quinolones with antimalarial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, R Matthew; Monastyrskyi, Andrii; Mutka, Tina S; Burrows, Jeremy N; Kyle, Dennis E; Manetsch, Roman

    2010-10-14

    Since the 1940s endochin and analogues thereof were known to be causal prophylactic and potent erythrocytic stage agents in avian models. Preliminary screening in a current in vitro assay identified several 4(1H)-quinolones with nanomolar EC(50) against erythrocytic stages of multidrug resistant W2 and TM90-C2B isolates of Plasmodium falciparum. Follow-up structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies on 4(1H)-quinolone analogues identified several key features for biological activity. Nevertheless, structure-property relationship (SPR) studies conducted in parallel revealed that 4(1H)-quinolone analogues are limited by poor solubilities and rapid microsomal degradations. To improve the overall efficacy, multiple 4(1H)-quinolone series with varying substituents on the benzenoid quinolone ring and/or the 3-position were synthesized and tested for in vitro antimalarial activity. Several structurally diverse 6-chloro-2-methyl-7-methoxy-4(1H)-quinolones with EC(50) in the low nanomolar range against the clinically relevant isolates W2 and TM90-C2B were identified with improved physicochemical properties while maintaining little to no cross-resistance with atovaquone.

  8. Prevalence of Genotypes That Determine Resistance of Staphylococci to Macrolides and Lincosamides in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Mišić

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Macrolides, lincosamides, and streptogramins (MLS resistance genes are responsible for resistance to these antibiotics in Staphylococcus infections. The purpose of the study was to analyze the distribution of the MLS resistance genes in community- and hospital-acquired Staphylococcus isolates. The MLS resistance phenotypes [constitutive resistance to macrolide–lincosamide–streptogramin B (cMLSb, inducible resistance to macrolide–lincosamide–streptogramin B (iMLSb, resistance to macrolide/macrolide–streptogramin B (M/MSb, and resistance to lincosamide–streptogramin A/streptogramin B (LSa/b] were determined by double-disc diffusion method. The presence of the MLS resistance genes (ermA, ermB, ermC, msrA/B, lnuA, lnuB, and lsaA were determined by end-point polymerase chain reaction in 179 isolates of staphylococci collected during 1-year period at the Center for Microbiology of Public Health Institute in Vranje. The most frequent MLS phenotype among staphylococcal isolates, both community-acquired and hospital-acquired, was iMLSb (33.4%. The second most frequent was M/MSb (17.6% with statistically significantly higher number of hospital-acquired staphylococcal isolates (p < 0.05. MLS resistance was mostly determined by the presence of msrA/B (35.0% and ermC (20.8% genes. Examined phenotypes were mostly determined by the presence of one gene, especially by msrA/B (26.3% and ermC (14.5%, but 15.6% was determined by a combination of two or more genes. M/MSb phenotype was the most frequently encoded by msrA/B (95.6% gene, LSa/b phenotype by lnuA (56.3% gene, and iMLSb phenotype by ermC (29.4% and ermA (25.5% genes. Although cMLSb phenotype was mostly determined by the presence of ermC (28.9%, combinations of two or more genes have been present too. This pattern was particularly recorded in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA (58.3% and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MRCNS (90.9% isolates with c

  9. Macrolide, glycopeptide resistance and virulence genes in Enterococcus species isolates from dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iweriebor, Benson C; Obi, Larry C; Okoh, Anthony I

    2016-07-01

    The genus Enterococcus is known to possess the capacity to acquire and disseminate antimicrobial resistant determinants alongside the ability to produce various virulence genes that enables it to establish infections. We assessed the prevalence and antibiogram profiles of Enterococcus spp. in faecal samples of dairy cattle. Faecal swab samples were collected from 400 dairy cattle from two commercial cattle farms in two rural communities in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. Confirmation of enterococci isolates was carried out by PCR targeting of the tuf gene. Species delineation was by species-specific primers targeting the superoxide dismutase (sod A) gene in a multiplex PCR assay. Isolates were screened for the presence of the following virulence genes (ace, gel E, esp, efa A, cyl A and hyl E) and antimicrobial resistance determinants to erythromycin, vancomycin and streptomycin were evaluated molecularly. A total of 340 isolates were confirmed as belonging to the genus Enterococcus . Species distribution among the isolates consisted of Enterococcus faecium (52.94 %) and Enterococcus durans (23.53 %) in preponderance compared to the three other species, namely Enterococcus faecalis (8.8 %), Enterococcus hirae (8.6 %) and Enterococcus casseliflavus (5.9 %). All were resistant to vancomycin, while 99 % showed resistance to aminoglycoside and 94 % to macrolide. Three virulence genes (ace, gel E and esp) were detected in almost all the confirmed isolates. The resistance determinants van B (19.7 %), van C1 (25 %), van C2/3 (26.3 %) erm B (40.29 %) and str A (50.88 %) were detected among the isolates. A high prevalence of multidrug-resistant enterococci isolates was detected in this study and the genetic repertoire to survive in the presence of antimicrobial agents was present in these organisms.

  10. EFFECT OF MACROLIDE ANTIBIOTICS ON VARIOUS CELL CULTURES IN VITRO: 2. CELL BIOCHEMISTRY

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    Anton Kováčik

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available he aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of macrolide antibiotics (tilmicosin, tylosin and spiramycin on the cellular biochemistry using different cell cultures in vitro. Cellular lines from animal tissues (VERO cells - kidney cells of Macacus Rhesus, FE cells - feline embryonal cells and BHK21 - cellular line from young hamster kidneys were used. The effect was assessed after 24 hours of culture. We studied the concentration of calcium (Ca, magnesium (Mg, sodium (Na, potassium (K, chlorides (Cl, total proteins (TP and cholesterol (Chol. Biochemical analysis of BHK21 cells cultivated with tilmicosin showed a significant decrease in the concentration of Ca, Cl and TP in almost all experimental groups. No significant differences were found in the FE cells. The highest concentrations of tilmicosin led to a significant increase of all analyzed elements and TP in medium in the VERO cells. The effect of tylosin on the BHK21 cell metabolism showed a significant decrease in the concentration of Na and Cl in the all experimental groups and a significant decrease in the concentration of TP in the groups to which more than 700 µg.ml-1 was added. No significant differences were found in the FE and VERO cells. Biochemical analysis of BHK21 cells with spyramicin showed a significant decrease in the concentration of Na in the all experimental groups and a significant decrease in the concentration of Cl and TP in the cell cultures with 100 µg.ml-1, 150 µg.ml-1, 200 µg.ml-1, 300 µg.ml-1 concentrations of spyramycin. The highest concentrations of spyramycin caused a significant increase of Na and a significant decrease of Chol in the FE cells. No significant differences were found in the VERO cells except increased total proteins at the highest concentration of spyramycin.

  11. The Performance of Several Docking Programs at Reproducing Protein-Macrolide-Like Crystal Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Alvarez, Alejandro; Costa, Anna M; Vilarrasa, Jaume

    2017-01-17

    The accuracy of five docking programs at reproducing crystallographic structures of complexes of 8 macrolides and 12 related macrocyclic structures, all with their corresponding receptors, was evaluated. Self-docking calculations indicated excellent performance in all cases (mean RMSD values ≤ 1.0) and confirmed the speed of AutoDock Vina. Afterwards, the lowest-energy conformer of each molecule and all the conformers lying 0-10 kcal/mol above it (as given by Macrocycle, from MacroModel 10.0) were subjected to standard docking calculations. While each docking method has its own merits, the observed speed of the programs was as follows: Glide 6.6 > AutoDock Vina 1.1.2 > DOCK 6.5 > AutoDock 4.2.6 > AutoDock 3.0.5. For most of the complexes, the five methods predicted quite correct poses of ligands at the binding sites, but the lower RMSD values for the poses of highest affinity were in the order: Glide 6.6 ≈ AutoDock Vina ≈ DOCK 6.5 > AutoDock 4.2.6 > AutoDock 3.0.5. By choosing the poses closest to the crystal structure the order was: AutoDock Vina > Glide 6.6 ≈ DOCK 6.5 ≥ AutoDock 4.2.6 > AutoDock 3.0.5. Re-scoring (AutoDock 4.2.6//AutoDock Vina, Amber Score and MM-GBSA) improved the agreement between the calculated and experimental data. For all intents and purposes, these three methods are equally reliable.

  12. Polyene macrolide biosynthesis in streptomycetes and related bacteria: recent advances from genome sequencing and experimental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Patrick; De Poire, Eimear; Sheehan, James; Sweeney, Paul

    2016-05-01

    The polyene macrolide group includes important antifungal drugs, to which resistance does not arise readily. Chemical and biological methods have been used in attempts to make polyene antibiotics with fewer toxic side effects. Genome sequencing of producer organisms is contributing to this endeavour, by providing access to new compounds and by enabling yield improvement for polyene analogues obtained by engineered biosynthesis. This recent work is also enhancing bioinformatic methods for deducing the structures of cryptic natural products from their biosynthetic enzymes. The stereostructure of candicidin D has recently been determined by NMR spectroscopy. Genes for the corresponding polyketide synthase have been uncovered in several different genomes. Analysis of this new information strengthens the view that protein sequence motifs can be used to predict double bond geometry in many polyketides.Chemical studies have shown that improved polyenes can be obtained by modifying the mycosamine sugar that is common to most of these compounds. Glycoengineered analogues might be produced by biosynthetic methods, but polyene glycosyltransferases show little tolerance for donors other than GDP-α-D-mycosamine. Genome sequencing has revealed extending glycosyltransferases that add a second sugar to the mycosamine of some polyenes. NppY of Pseudonocardia autotrophica uses UDP-N-acetyl-α-D-glucosamine as donor whereas PegA from Actinoplanes caeruleus uses GDP-α-D-mannose. These two enzymes show 51 % sequence identity and are also closely related to mycosaminyltransferases. These findings will assist attempts to construct glycosyltransferases that transfer alternative UDP- or (d)TDP-linked sugars to polyene macrolactones.

  13. Molecular basis of resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins in Staphylococcus saprophyticus clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bouter, Anne; Leclercq, Roland; Cattoir, Vincent

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) antibiotics as well as to assess the molecular basis of this resistance amongst 72 Staphylococcus saprophyticus urinary isolates collected from 2005 to 2009 in University Hospital of Caen (France). Of the 72 strains studied, 33 (45.8%) were resistant to at least one MLS antibiotic, including 24 (72.7%) with an M phenotype, 5 (15.2%) with an inducible MLS(B) phenotype, 3 (9.1%) with a combined M+L phenotype and 1 (3.0%) with an L phenotype. All isolates were susceptible to the combination of streptogramins A and B. The resistance genes erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), msr(A) and lnu(A) were detected alone in 0, 0, 5 (15.2%), 24 (72.7%) and 1 (3.0%) of the 33 MLS-resistant isolates, respectively, whereas 2 strains (6.1%) were positive for both msr(A) and lnu(A). All msr(A)-positive isolates exhibited an M phenotype, whereas all five erm(C)-positive and all three lnu(A)-positive strains displayed, respectively, an inducible MLS(B) phenotype and an L phenotype with a positive Hodge test. Plasmid analysis indicated that erm(C) and lnu(A) genes were borne by small-size plasmids (ca. 2.5 kb), whereas larger plasmids (30-90 kb) harboured msr(A). In conclusion, these findings show a high prevalence of MLS resistance in S. saprophyticus, which was mainly associated with the presence of the msr(A) gene. Since S. saprophyticus colonises the gastrointestinal tract, it may constitute an unexpected reservoir for MLS resistance genes, in particular msr(A), amongst coagulase-negative staphylococci.

  14. The Performance of Several Docking Programs at Reproducing Protein–Macrolide-Like Crystal Structures

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    Alejandro Castro-Alvarez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The accuracy of five docking programs at reproducing crystallographic structures of complexes of 8 macrolides and 12 related macrocyclic structures, all with their corresponding receptors, was evaluated. Self-docking calculations indicated excellent performance in all cases (mean RMSD values ≤ 1.0 and confirmed the speed of AutoDock Vina. Afterwards, the lowest-energy conformer of each molecule and all the conformers lying 0–10 kcal/mol above it