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Sample records for macroenvironmental conditions physiological

  1. Macroenvironmental factors including GDP per capita and physical activity in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Adrian J; Van Stralen, Maartje M; Kunst, Anton E; Te Velde, Saskia J; Van Lenthe, Frank J; Salmon, Jo; Brug, Johannes

    2013-02-01

    Socioeconomic inequalities in physical activity at the individual level are well reported. Whether inequalities in economic development and other macroenvironmental variables between countries are also related to physical activity at the country level is comparatively unstudied. We examined the relationship between country-level data on macroenvironmental factors (gross domestic product (GDP) per capita, public sector expenditure on health, percentage living in urban areas, and cars per 1000 population) with country-level physical activity prevalence obtained from previous pan-European studies. Studies that assessed leisuretime physical activity (n = 3 studies including 27 countries in adults, n = 2 studies including 28 countries in children) and total physical activity (n = 3 studies in adults including 16 countries) were analyzed separately as were studies among adults and children. Strong and consistent positive correlations were observed between country prevalence of leisure-time physical activity and country GDP per capita in adults (average r = 0.70; all studies, P G 0.05). In multivariate analysis, country prevalence of leisure-time physical activity among adults remained associated with country GDP per capita (two of three studies) but not urbanization or educational attainment. Among school-age populations, no association was found between country GDP per capita and country prevalence of leisure-time physical activity. In those studies that assessed total physical activity (which also includes occupational and transport physical activity), no association with country GDP per capita was observed. Clear differences in national leisure-time physical activity levels throughout Europe may be a consequence of economic development. Lack of economic development of some countries in Europe may make increasing leisure-time physical activity more difficult. Further examination of the link between country GDP per capita and national physical activity levels (across

  2. Dietary protein, physiological condition and metabolic amino acid utilisation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijs, P.J.M.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis describes the investigated effects of the level of dietary protein intake and the physiological condition of the animal on the percental oxidation of leucine. This measure reflects which part of the free leucine pool was used for protein and energy metabolism. The employed technique cons

  3. Dietary protein, physiological condition and metabolic amino acid utilisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijs, P.J.M.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis describes the investigated effects of the level of dietary protein intake and the physiological condition of the animal on the percental oxidation of leucine. This measure reflects which part of the free leucine pool was used for protein and energy metabolism. The employed

  4. Physiological consequences of repeated exposures to conditioned fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Robert S; Strong, Paul V; Fleshner, Monika

    2012-06-01

    Activation of the stress response evokes a cascade of physiological reactions that may be detrimental when repeated or chronic, and when triggered after exposure to psychological/emotional stressors. Investigation of the physiological mechanisms responsible for the health damaging effects requires animal paradigms that repeatedly evoke a response to psychological/emotional stressors. To this end, adult male Sprague Dawley rats were repeatedly exposed (2X per day for 20 days) to a context that they were conditioned to fear (conditioned fear test, CFT). Repeated exposure to CFT produced body weight loss, adrenal hypertrophy, thymic involution, and basal corticosterone elevation. In vivo biotelemetry measures revealed that CFT evokes sympathetic nervous system driven increases in heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and core body temperature. Extinction of behavioral (freezing) and physiological responses to CFT was prevented using minimal reinstatement footshock. MAP responses to the CFT did not diminish across 20 days of exposure. In contrast, HR and cardiac contractility responses declined by day 15, suggesting a shift toward vascular-dominated MAP (a pre-clinical marker of CV dysfunction). Flattened diurnal rhythms, common to stress-related mood/anxiety disorders, were found for most physiological measures. Thus, repeated CFT produces adaptations indicative of the health damaging effects of psychological/emotional stress.

  5. Physiological Consequences of Repeated Exposures to Conditioned Fear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S. Thompson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the stress response evokes a cascade of physiological reactions that may be detrimental when repeated or chronic, and when triggered after exposure to psychological/emotional stressors. Investigation of the physiological mechanisms responsible for the health damaging effects requires animal paradigms that repeatedly evoke a response to psychological/emotional stressors. To this end, adult male Sprague Dawley rats were repeatedly exposed (2X per day for 20 days to a context that they were conditioned to fear (conditioned fear test, CFT. Repeated exposure to CFT produced body weight loss, adrenal hypertrophy, thymic involution, and basal corticosterone elevation. In vivo biotelemetry measures revealed that CFT evokes sympathetic nervous system driven increases in heart rate (HR, mean arterial pressure (MAP, and core body temperature. Extinction of behavioral (freezing and physiological responses to CFT was prevented using minimal reinstatement footshock. MAP responses to the CFT did not diminish across 20 days of exposure. In contrast, HR and cardiac contractility responses declined by day 15, suggesting a shift toward vascular-dominated MAP (a pre-clinical marker of CV dysfunction. Flattened diurnal rhythms, common to stress-related mood/anxiety disorders, were found for most physiological measures. Thus, repeated CFT produces adaptations indicative of the health damaging effects of psychological/emotional stress.

  6. Effects of changes in micro- and macro-environmental factors on the supply of hospitals services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassaye, W W; Tseng, K C

    1990-01-01

    The failures, marketing difficulties and financial hardships hospitals have experienced raises a question as to whether they have been responsive to the changes in the micro and macro-environmental factors. To determine how responsive hospitals have been to these changes, we investigate the impact of a number of selected factors on the supply of hospital services during 1972 through 1978. The findings indicate that despite the fact that the economy went through recessionary periods, and the demographic distribution exhibited both a shift and a change in the aging and birth rates of the nation, the changes in hospitals' responsiveness have been less than satisfactory. It appears that hospitals readily respond to the changes in the micro-environment than to the changes in macro-environment. Their response to the changes in the macro-environment. Their response to the changes in the macro-environment may be characterized as an effort to create a higher level of production whose goal is to create a still higher level of needs and wants.

  7. Functional analysis of spontaneous cell movement under different physiological conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Takagi

    Full Text Available Cells can show not only spontaneous movement but also tactic responses to environmental signals. Since the former can be regarded as the basis to realize the latter, playing essential roles in various cellular functions, it is important to investigate spontaneous movement quantitatively at different physiological conditions in relation to a cell's physiological functions. For that purpose, we observed a series of spontaneous movements by Dictyostelium cells at different developmental periods by using a single cell tracking system. Using statistical analysis of these traced data, we found that cells showed complex dynamics with anomalous diffusion and that their velocity distribution had power-law tails in all conditions. Furthermore, as development proceeded, average velocity and persistency of the movement increased and as too did the exponential behavior in the velocity distribution. Based on these results, we succeeded in applying a generalized Langevin model to the experimental data. With this model, we discuss the relation of spontaneous cell movement to cellular physiological function and its relevance to behavioral strategies for cell survival.

  8. Passive films on metallic biomaterials under simulated physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pound, B G

    2014-05-01

    The metallic materials used for implantable medical devices are predominantly stainless steels, Ti and its alloys, and Co-Cr alloys. The corrosion resistance of each of these materials is associated with a passive oxide film on its surface. Since corrosion resistance is crucial to implant performance, considerable effort has been focused on understanding the nature of the passive film present under physiological conditions. Surface analytical techniques and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy have been used in a number of studies to investigate the passive film formed on metallic biomaterials in simulated physiological solutions. This review focuses on the surface characteristics of these materials with regard to composition, thickness, and impedance of the passive films. Of particular interest are changes in the films with surface treatment and the nature of the films developed over time in the simulated solutions. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Vascular regulation of adult neurogenesis under physiological and pathological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato eSawada

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells in the mammalian adult brain continuously produce new neurons throughout life. Accumulating evidence in rodents suggests that various aspects of adult neurogenesis, including the genesis, migration, and maturation of new neurons, are regulated by factors derived from blood vessels and their microenvironment. Brain injury enhances both neurogenesis and angiogenesis, thereby promoting the cooperative regeneration of neurons and blood vessels. In this paper, we briefly review the mechanisms for the vascular regulation of adult neurogenesis in the ventricular-subventricular zone under physiological and pathological conditions, and discuss their clinical potential for brain regeneration strategies.

  10. Magnetite Nanoparticles Stabilized Under Physiological Conditions for Biomedical Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajdãº, A.; Tombácz, E.; Illés, E.; Bica, D.; Vékás, L.

    The biomedical application of water based magnetic fluids (MFs) is of great practical importance. Their colloidal stability under physiological conditions (blood pH ˜ 7.2-7.4 and salt concentration ˜0.15 M) and more in high magnetic field gradient is crucial. Magnetite or maghemite nanoparticles are used in general. In the present work, magnetite nanoparticles were stabilized with different compounds (citric acid (CA) and phosphate) and sodium oleate (NaO) as the most used surfactant in the stabilization of MFs. The adsorption and overcharging effect were quantified, and the enhancement in salt tolerance of stabilized systems was studied. Adsorption, electrophoretic mobility and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements were performed. The electrolyte tolerance was tested in coagulation kinetic measurements. Above the adsorption saturation, the nanoparticles are stabilized in a way of combined steric and electrostatic effects. The aim was to research these two important effects and demonstrate that none of them alone is enough. The phosphate was not able to stabilize the ferrofluid in spite of our expectation, but the other two additives proved to be effective stabilizing agents. The magnetite was well stabilized by the surface complexation of CA above pH ˜ 5, however, the salt tolerance of citrate stabilized MFs remained much below the concentration of physiological salt solution, and more the dissolution of magnetite nanocrystals was enhanced due to Fe-CA complexation in aqueous medium, which may cause problems in vivo. The oleate double layers were able to stabilize magnetite nanoparticles perfectly at pH ˜ 6 preventing particle aggregation effectively even in physiological salt solution.

  11. MR features of physiologic and benign conditions of the ovary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamai, Ken; Saga, Tsuneo; Kido, Aki; Kataoka, Masako; Umeoka, Shigeaki; Togashi, Kaori [Kyoto University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Koyama, Takashi [Kyoto University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kyoto (Japan); Fujii, Shingo [Kyoto University, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan)

    2006-12-15

    In reproductive women, various physiologic conditions can cause morphologic changes of the ovary, resembling pathologic conditions. Benign ovarian diseases can also simulate malignancies. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can play an important role in establishing accurate diagnosis. Functional cysts should not be confused with cystic neoplasms. Corpus luteum cysts typically have a thick wall and are occasionally hemorrhagic. Multicystic lesions that may mimic cystic neoplasms include hyperreactio luteinalis, ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, and polycystic ovary syndrome. Recognition of clinical settings can help establish diagnosis. In endometrial cysts, MRI usually provides specific diagnosis; however, decidual change during pregnancy should not be confused with secondary neoplasm. Peritoneal inclusion cysts can be distinguished from cystic neoplasms by recognition of their characteristic configurations. Ovarian torsion and massive ovarian edema may mimic solid malignant tumors. Recognition of normal follicles and anatomic structures is useful in diagnosing these conditions. In pelvic inflammatory diseases, transfascial spread of the lesion should not be confused with invasive malignant tumors. Radiologic identification of abscess formation can be a diagnostic clue. Many benign tumors, including teratoma, Brenner tumor, and sex-cord stromal tumor, frequently show characteristic MRI features. Knowledge of MRI features of these conditions is essential in establishing accurate diagnosis and determining appropriate treatment. (orig.)

  12. Physiologically structured populations with diffusion and dynamic boundary conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, József Z; Hinow, Peter

    2011-04-01

    We consider a linear size-structured population model with diffusion in the size-space. Individuals are recruited into the population at arbitrary sizes. We equip the model with generalized Wentzell-Robin (or dynamic) boundary conditions. This approach allows the modelling of populations in which individuals may have distinguished physiological states. We establish existence and positivity of solutions by showing that solutions are governed by a positive quasicontractive semigroup of linear operators on the biologically relevant state space. These results are obtained by establishing dissipativity of a suitably perturbed semigroup generator. We also show that solutions of the model exhibit balanced exponential growth, that is, our model admits a finite-dimensional global attractor. In case of strictly positive fertility we are able to establish that solutions in fact exhibit asynchronous exponential growth.

  13. Interfacial shear rheology of DPPC under physiologically relevant conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Eline; Vermant, Jan

    2014-01-07

    Lipids, and phosphatidylcholines in particular, are major components in cell membranes and in human lung surfactant. Their ability to encapsulate or form stable layers suggests a significant role of the interfacial rheological properties. In the present work we focus on the surface rheological properties of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). Literature results are confusing and even contradictory; viscosity values have been reported differ by several orders of magnitude. Moreover, even both purely viscous and gel-like behaviours have been described. Assessing the literature critically, a limited experimental window has been explored correctly, which however does not yet include conditions relevant for the physiological state of DPPC in vivo. A complete temperature and surface pressure analysis of the interfacial shear rheology of DPPC is performed, showing that the monolayer behaves as a viscoelastic liquid with a domain structure. At low frequencies and for a thermally structured monolayer, the interaction of the molecules within the domains can be probed. The low frequency limit of the complex viscosity is measured over a wide range of temperatures and surface pressures. The effects of temperature and surface pressure on the low frequency viscosity can be analysed in terms of the effects of free molecular area. However, at higher frequencies or following a preshear at high shear rates, elasticity becomes important; most probably elasticity due to defects at the edge of the domains in the layer is probed. Preshearing refines the structure and induces more defects. As a result, disagreeing interfacial rheology results in various publications might be due to different pre-treatments of the interface. The obtained dataset and scaling laws enable us to describe the surface viscosity, and its dependence under physiological conditions of DPPC. The implications on functioning of lung surfactants and lung surfactant replacements will be discussed.

  14. Factorial switching linear dynamical systems applied to physiological condition monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, John A; Williams, Christopher K I; McIntosh, Neil

    2009-09-01

    Condition monitoring often involves the analysis of systems with hidden factors that switch between different modes of operation in some way. Given a sequence of observations, the task is to infer the filtering distribution of the switch setting at each time step. In this paper, we present factorial switching linear dynamical systems as a general framework for handling such problems. We show how domain knowledge and learning can be successfully combined in this framework, and introduce a new factor (the "X-factor") for dealing with unmodeled variation. We demonstrate the flexibility of this type of model by applying it to the problem of monitoring the condition of a premature baby receiving intensive care. The state of health of a baby cannot be observed directly, but different underlying factors are associated with particular patterns of physiological measurements and artifacts. We have explicit knowledge of common factors and use the X-factor to model novel patterns which are clinically significant but have unknown cause. Experimental results are given which show the developed methods to be effective on typical intensive care unit monitoring data.

  15. Physiological and pathological clinical conditions and light scattering in brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, Tsuyoshi; Iwata, Sachiko; Tsuda, Kennosuke; Kinoshita, Masahiro; Saikusa, Mamoru; Hara, Naoko; Oda, Motoki; Ohmae, Etsuko; Araki, Yuko; Sugioka, Takashi; Takashima, Sachio; Iwata, Osuke

    2016-08-01

    MRI of preterm infants at term commonly reveals subtle brain lesions such as diffuse white matter injury, which are linked with later cognitive impairments. The timing and mechanism of such injury remains unclear. The reduced scattering coefficient of near-infrared light (μs’) has been shown to correlate linearly with gestational age in neonates. To identify clinical variables associated with brain μs’, 60 preterm and full-term infants were studied within 7 days of birth. Dependence of μs’ obtained from the frontal head on clinical variables was assessed. In the univariate analysis, smaller μs’ was associated with antenatal glucocorticoid, emergency Caesarean section, requirement for mechanical ventilation, smaller gestational age, smaller body sizes, low 1- and 5-minute Apgar scores, higher cord blood pH and PO2, and higher blood HCO3‑ at the time of study. Multivariate analysis revealed that smaller gestational age, requirement for mechanical ventilation, and higher HCO3‑ at the time of study were correlated with smaller μs’. Brain μs’ depended on variables associated with physiological maturation and pathological conditions of the brain. Further longitudinal studies may help identify pathological events and clinical conditions responsible for subtle brain injury and subsequent cognitive impairments following preterm birth.

  16. Physiological Responses to Two Hypoxic Conditioning Strategies in Healthy Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacaroun, Samarmar; Borowik, Anna; Morrison, Shawnda A.; Baillieul, Sébastien; Flore, Patrice; Doutreleau, Stéphane; Verges, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Hypoxic exposure can be used as a therapeutic tool by inducing various cardiovascular, neuromuscular, and metabolic adaptations. Hypoxic conditioning strategies have been evaluated in patients with chronic diseases using either sustained (SH) or intermittent (IH) hypoxic sessions. Whether hypoxic conditioning via SH or IH may induce different physiological responses remains to be elucidated. Methods: Fourteen healthy active subjects (7 females, age 25 ± 8 years, body mass index 21.5 ± 2.5 kg·m−2) performed two interventions in a single blind, randomized cross-over design, starting with either 3 x SH (48 h apart), or 3 x IH (48 h apart), separated by a 2 week washout period. SH sessions consisted of breathing a gas mixture with reduced inspiratory oxygen fraction (FiO2), continuously adjusted to reach arterial oxygen saturations (SpO2) of 70–80% for 1 h. IH sessions consisted of 5 min with reduced FiO2 (SpO2 = 70–80%), followed by 3-min normoxia, repeated seven times. During the first (S1) and third (S3) sessions of each hypoxic intervention, cardiorespiratory parameters, and muscle and pre-frontal cortex oxygenation (near infrared spectroscopy) were assessed continuously. Results: Minute ventilation increased significantly during IH sessions (+2 ± 2 L·min−1) while heart rate increased during both SH (+11 ± 4 bpm) and IH (+13 ± 5 bpm) sessions. Arterial blood pressure increased during all hypoxic sessions, although baseline normoxic systolic blood pressure was reduced from S1 to S3 in IH only (−8 ± 11 mmHg). Muscle oxygenation decreased significantly during S3 but not S1, for both hypoxic interventions (S3: SH −6 ± 5%, IH −3 ± 4%); pre-frontal oxygenation decreased in S1 and S3, and to a greater extent in SH vs. IH (−13 ± 3% vs. −6 ± 6%). Heart rate variability indices indicated a significantly larger increase in sympathetic activity in SH vs. IH (lower SDNN, PNN50, and RMSSD values in SH). From S1 to S3, further reduction in

  17. Nanoparticle-based capillary electroseparation of proteins in polymer capillaries under physiological conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, C.; Harwigsson, I.; Becker, K.

    2010-01-01

    Totally porous lipid-based liquid crystalline nanoparticles were used as pseudostationary phase for capillary electroseparation with LIF detection of proteins at physiological conditions using unmodified cyclic olefin copolymer capillaries (Topas (R), 6.7 cm effective length). In the absence...... at protein friendly conditions. The developed capillary-based method facilitates future electrochromatography of proteins on polymer-based microchips under physiological conditions and enables the initial optimization of separation conditions in parallel to the chip development....

  18. Dynamic force microscopy for imaging of viruses under physiological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kienberger Ferry

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic force microscopy (DFM allows imaging of the structure and the assessment of the function of biological specimens in their physiological environment. In DFM, the cantilever is oscillated at a given frequency and touches the sample only at the end of its downward movement. Accordingly, the problem of lateral forces displacing or even destroying bio-molecules is virtually inexistent as the contact time and friction forces are reduced. Here, we describe the use of DFM in studies of human rhinovirus serotype 2 (HRV2 weakly adhering to mica surfaces. The capsid of HRV2 was reproducibly imaged without any displacement of the virus. Release of the genomic RNA from the virions was initiated by exposure to low pH buffer and snapshots of the extrusion process were obtained. In the following, the technical details of previous DFM investigations of HRV2 are summarized.

  19. Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Underlying recent developments in health care and new treatments for disease are advances in basic medical sciences. This edition of "Webwatch" focuses on sites dealing with basic medical sciences, with particular attention given to physiology. There is a vast amount of information on the web related to physiology. The sites that are included here…

  20. AFM Structural Characterization of Drinking Water Biofilm under Physiological Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to the complexity of mixed culture drinking water biofilm, direct visual observation under in situ conditions has been challenging. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the three dimensional morphology and arrangement of drinking water relevant biofilm in air...

  1. AFM Structural Characterization of Drinking Water Biofilm under Physiological Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to the complexity of mixed culture drinking water biofilm, direct visual observation under in situ conditions has been challenging. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed the three dimensional morphology and arrangement of drinking water relevant biofilm in air...

  2. Physiologic Conditions Affect Toxicity of Ingested Industrial Fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Sauerheber

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of calcium ion and broad pH ranges on free fluoride ion aqueous concentrations were measured directly and computed theoretically. Solubility calculations indicate that blood fluoride concentrations that occur in lethal poisonings would decrease calcium below prevailing levels. Acute lethal poisoning and also many of the chronic effects of fluoride involve alterations in the chemical activity of calcium by the fluoride ion. Natural calcium fluoride with low solubility and toxicity from ingestion is distinct from fully soluble toxic industrial fluorides. The toxicity of fluoride is determined by environmental conditions and the positive cations present. At a pH typical of gastric juice, fluoride is largely protonated as hydrofluoric acid HF. Industrial fluoride ingested from treated water enters saliva at levels too low to affect dental caries. Blood levels during lifelong consumption can harm heart, bone, brain, and even developing teeth enamel. The widespread policy known as water fluoridation is discussed in light of these findings.

  3. Physiologic Conditions Affect Toxicity of Ingested Industrial Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerheber, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The effects of calcium ion and broad pH ranges on free fluoride ion aqueous concentrations were measured directly and computed theoretically. Solubility calculations indicate that blood fluoride concentrations that occur in lethal poisonings would decrease calcium below prevailing levels. Acute lethal poisoning and also many of the chronic effects of fluoride involve alterations in the chemical activity of calcium by the fluoride ion. Natural calcium fluoride with low solubility and toxicity from ingestion is distinct from fully soluble toxic industrial fluorides. The toxicity of fluoride is determined by environmental conditions and the positive cations present. At a pH typical of gastric juice, fluoride is largely protonated as hydrofluoric acid HF. Industrial fluoride ingested from treated water enters saliva at levels too low to affect dental caries. Blood levels during lifelong consumption can harm heart, bone, brain, and even developing teeth enamel. The widespread policy known as water fluoridation is discussed in light of these findings. PMID:23840230

  4. Chemical regeneration of human tooth enamel under near-physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yujing; Yun, Song; Fang, Jieshi; Chen, Haifeng

    2009-10-21

    Regenerating the microstructure of human tooth enamel under near-physiological conditions (pH 6.0, 37 degrees C, 1 atm) using a simple chemical approach demonstrates a potential application to repair enamel damage in dental clinics.

  5. Real-time Continuous Assessment Method for Mental and Physiological Condition using Heart Rate Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Kiyoko; Ishii, Naohiro

    It is necessary to monitor the daily health condition for preventing stress syndrome. In this study, it was proposed the method assessing the mental and physiological condition, such as the work stress or the relaxation, using heart rate variability at real time and continuously. The instantanuous heart rate (HR), and the ratio of the number of extreme points (NEP) and the number of heart beats were calculated for assessing mental and physiological condition. In this method, 20 beats heart rate were used to calculate these indexes. These were calculated in one beat interval. Three conditions, which are sitting rest, performing mental arithmetic and watching relaxation movie, were assessed using our proposed algorithm. The assessment accuracies were 71.9% and 55.8%, when performing mental arithmetic and watching relaxation movie respectively. In this method, the mental and physiological condition was assessed using only 20 regressive heart beats, so this method is considered as the real time assessment method.

  6. The use of thermovision camera to observe physiological and pathological conditions of oral cavity mucous membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowski, M.; Dulski, R.; Żmuda, S.; Zaborowski, P.; Pogorzelski, C.

    2002-06-01

    This article presents initial results of investigations of the temperature distribution changes in oral cavity mucous membrane. The investigations aimed to prepare a model of temperature changes existing within mucosal membrane in physiological conditions and to compare those changes with those under pathological conditions. Our investigations were carried out using an infrared imaging system. A representative group of patients was tested.

  7. Pilot physiology, cognition and flight performance during flight simulation exposed to a 3810-m hypoxic condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Corey A; Weber, Raymond; Sanders, Gabriel J; Seo, Yongsuk; Kean, David; Pollock, Brandon S; Burns, Keith J; Cain, Mark; LaScola, Phillip; Glickman, Ellen L

    2017-03-01

    Hypoxia is a physiological state defined as a reduction in the distribution of oxygen to the tissues of the body. It has been considered a major factor in aviation safety worldwide because of its potential for pilot disorientation. Pilots are able to operate aircrafts up to 3810 m without the use of supplemental oxygen and may exhibit symptoms associated with hypoxia. To determine the effects of 3810 m on physiology, cognition and performance in pilots during a flight simulation. Ten healthy male pilots engaged in a counterbalanced experimental protocol comparing a 0-m normoxic condition (NORM) with a 3810-m hypoxic condition (HYP) on pilot physiology, cognition and flight performance. Repeated-measures analysis of variance demonstrated a significant (p ≤ 0.05) time by condition interaction for physiological and cognitive alterations during HYP. A paired-samples t test demonstrated no differences in pilot performance (p ≥ 0.05) between conditions. Pilots exhibited physiological and cognitive impairments; however, pilot performance was not affected by HYP.

  8. Drilling force and temperature of bone under dry and physiological drilling conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Linlin; Wang, Chengyong; Jiang, Min; He, Huiyu; Song, Yuexian; Chen, Hanyuan; Shen, Jingnan; Zhang, Jiayong

    2014-11-01

    Many researches on drilling force and temperature have been done with the aim to reduce the labour intensiveness of surgery, avoid unnecessary damage and improve drilling quality. However, there has not been a systematic study of mid- and high-speed drilling under dry and physiological conditions(injection of saline). Furthermore, there is no consensus on optimal drilling parameters. To study these parameters under dry and physiological drilling conditions, pig humerus bones are drilled with medical twist drills operated using a wide range of drilling speeds and feed rates. Drilling force and temperature are measured using a YDZ-II01W dynamometer and a NEC TVS-500EX thermal infrared imager, respectively, to evaluate internal bone damage. To evaluate drilling quality, bone debris and hole morphology are observed by SEM(scanning electron microscopy). Changes in drilling force and temperature give similar results during drilling such that the value of each parameter peaks just before the drill penetrates through the osteon of the compact bone into the trabeculae of the spongy bone. Drilling temperatures under physiological conditions are much lower than those observed under dry conditions, while a larger drilling force occurs under physiological conditions than dry conditions. Drilling speed and feed rate have a significant influence on drilling force, temperature, bone debris and hole morphology. The investigation of the effect of drilling force and temperature on internal bone damage reveals that a drilling speed of 4500 r/min and a feed rate of 50 mm/min are recommended for bone drilling under physiological conditions. Drilling quality peaks under these optimal parameter conditions. This paper proposes the optimal drilling parameters under mid- and high-speed surgical drilling, considering internal bone damage and drilling quality, which can be looked as a reference for surgeons performing orthopedic operations.

  9. Drilling Force and Temperature of Bone under Dry and Physiological Drilling Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Linlin; WANG Chengyong; JIANG Min; HE Huiyu; SONG Yuexian; CHEN Hanyuan; SHEN Jingnan; ZHANG Jiayong

    2014-01-01

    Many researches on drilling force and temperature have been done with the aim to reduce the labour intensiveness of surgery, avoid unnecessary damage and improve drilling quality. However, there has not been a systematic study of mid- and high-speed drilling under dry and physiological conditions(injection of saline). Furthermore, there is no consensus on optimal drilling parameters. To study these parameters under dry and physiological drilling conditions, pig humerus bones are drilled with medical twist drills operated using a wide range of drilling speeds and feed rates. Drilling force and temperature are measured using a YDZ-II01W dynamometer and a NEC TVS-500EX thermal infrared imager, respectively, to evaluate internal bone damage. To evaluate drilling quality, bone debris and hole morphology are observed by SEM(scanning electron microscopy). Changes in drilling force and temperature give similar results during drilling such that the value of each parameter peaks just before the drill penetrates through the osteon of the compact bone into the trabeculae of the spongy bone. Drilling temperatures under physiological conditions are much lower than those observed under dry conditions, while a larger drilling force occurs under physiological conditions than dry conditions. Drilling speed and feed rate have a significant influence on drilling force, temperature, bone debris and hole morphology. The investigation of the effect of drilling force and temperature on internal bone damage reveals that a drilling speed of 4500 r/min and a feed rate of 50 mm/min are recommended for bone drilling under physiological conditions. Drilling quality peaks under these optimal parameter conditions. This paper proposes the optimal drilling parameters under mid- and high-speed surgical drilling, considering internal bone damage and drilling quality, which can be looked as a reference for surgeons performing orthopedic operations.

  10. Transcriptomes Reveal Genetic Signatures Underlying Physiological Variations Imposed by Different Fermentation Conditions in Lactobacillus plantarum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongers, Roger S.; van Bokhorst-van de Veen, Hermien; Wiersma, Anne; Overmars, Lex; Marco, Maria L.; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2012-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are utilized widely for the fermentation of foods. In the current post-genomic era, tools have been developed that explore genetic diversity among LAB strains aiming to link these variations to differential phenotypes observed in the strains investigated. However, these genotype-phenotype matching approaches fail to assess the role of conserved genes in the determination of physiological characteristics of cultures by environmental conditions. This manuscript describes a complementary approach in which Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 was fermented under a variety of conditions that differ in temperature, pH, as well as NaCl, amino acid, and O2 levels. Samples derived from these fermentations were analyzed by full-genome transcriptomics, paralleled by the assessment of physiological characteristics, e.g., maximum growth rate, yield, and organic acid profiles. A data-storage and -mining suite designated FermDB was constructed and exploited to identify correlations between fermentation conditions and industrially relevant physiological characteristics of L. plantarum, as well as the associated transcriptome signatures. Finally, integration of the specific fermentation variables with the transcriptomes enabled the reconstruction of the gene-regulatory networks involved. The fermentation-genomics platform presented here is a valuable complementary approach to earlier described genotype-phenotype matching strategies which allows the identification of transcriptome signatures underlying physiological variations imposed by different fermentation conditions. PMID:22802930

  11. Stopover decision during migration : physiological conditions predict nocturnal restlessness in wild passerines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fusani, Leonida; Cardinale, Massimiliano; Carere, Claudio; Goymann, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    During migration, a number of bird species rely on stopover sites for resting and feeding before and after crossing ecological barriers such as deserts or seas. The duration of a stopover depends on the combined effects of environmental factors, endogenous programmes and physiological conditions. Pr

  12. Differential and conditional activation of PKC-isoforms dictates cardiac adaptation during physiological to pathological hypertrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaon Naskar

    Full Text Available A cardiac hypertrophy is defined as an increase in heart mass which may either be beneficial (physiological hypertrophy or detrimental (pathological hypertrophy. This study was undertaken to establish the role of different protein kinase-C (PKC isoforms in the regulation of cardiac adaptation during two types of cardiac hypertrophy. Phosphorylation of specific PKC-isoforms and expression of their downstream proteins were studied during physiological and pathological hypertrophy in 24 week male Balb/c mice (Mus musculus models, by reverse transcriptase-PCR, western blot analysis and M-mode echocardiography for cardiac function analysis. PKC-δ was significantly induced during pathological hypertrophy while PKC-α was exclusively activated during physiological hypertrophy in our study. PKC-δ activation during pathological hypertrophy resulted in cardiomyocyte apoptosis leading to compromised cardiac function and on the other hand, activation of PKC-α during physiological hypertrophy promoted cardiomyocyte growth but down regulated cellular apoptotic load resulting in improved cardiac function. Reversal in PKC-isoform with induced activation of PKC-δ and simultaneous inhibition of phospho-PKC-α resulted in an efficient myocardium to deteriorate considerably resulting in compromised cardiac function during physiological hypertrophy via augmentation of apoptotic and fibrotic load. This is the first report where PKC-α and -δ have been shown to play crucial role in cardiac adaptation during physiological and pathological hypertrophy respectively thereby rendering compromised cardiac function to an otherwise efficient heart by conditional reversal of their activation.

  13. Differential and Conditional Activation of PKC-Isoforms Dictates Cardiac Adaptation during Physiological to Pathological Hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naskar, Shaon; Datta, Kaberi; Mitra, Arkadeep; Pathak, Kanchan; Datta, Ritwik; Bansal, Trisha; Sarkar, Sagartirtha

    2014-01-01

    A cardiac hypertrophy is defined as an increase in heart mass which may either be beneficial (physiological hypertrophy) or detrimental (pathological hypertrophy). This study was undertaken to establish the role of different protein kinase-C (PKC) isoforms in the regulation of cardiac adaptation during two types of cardiac hypertrophy. Phosphorylation of specific PKC-isoforms and expression of their downstream proteins were studied during physiological and pathological hypertrophy in 24 week male Balb/c mice (Mus musculus) models, by reverse transcriptase-PCR, western blot analysis and M-mode echocardiography for cardiac function analysis. PKC-δ was significantly induced during pathological hypertrophy while PKC-α was exclusively activated during physiological hypertrophy in our study. PKC-δ activation during pathological hypertrophy resulted in cardiomyocyte apoptosis leading to compromised cardiac function and on the other hand, activation of PKC-α during physiological hypertrophy promoted cardiomyocyte growth but down regulated cellular apoptotic load resulting in improved cardiac function. Reversal in PKC-isoform with induced activation of PKC-δ and simultaneous inhibition of phospho-PKC-α resulted in an efficient myocardium to deteriorate considerably resulting in compromised cardiac function during physiological hypertrophy via augmentation of apoptotic and fibrotic load. This is the first report where PKC-α and -δ have been shown to play crucial role in cardiac adaptation during physiological and pathological hypertrophy respectively thereby rendering compromised cardiac function to an otherwise efficient heart by conditional reversal of their activation. PMID:25116170

  14. Differential and conditional activation of PKC-isoforms dictates cardiac adaptation during physiological to pathological hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naskar, Shaon; Datta, Kaberi; Mitra, Arkadeep; Pathak, Kanchan; Datta, Ritwik; Bansal, Trisha; Sarkar, Sagartirtha

    2014-01-01

    A cardiac hypertrophy is defined as an increase in heart mass which may either be beneficial (physiological hypertrophy) or detrimental (pathological hypertrophy). This study was undertaken to establish the role of different protein kinase-C (PKC) isoforms in the regulation of cardiac adaptation during two types of cardiac hypertrophy. Phosphorylation of specific PKC-isoforms and expression of their downstream proteins were studied during physiological and pathological hypertrophy in 24 week male Balb/c mice (Mus musculus) models, by reverse transcriptase-PCR, western blot analysis and M-mode echocardiography for cardiac function analysis. PKC-δ was significantly induced during pathological hypertrophy while PKC-α was exclusively activated during physiological hypertrophy in our study. PKC-δ activation during pathological hypertrophy resulted in cardiomyocyte apoptosis leading to compromised cardiac function and on the other hand, activation of PKC-α during physiological hypertrophy promoted cardiomyocyte growth but down regulated cellular apoptotic load resulting in improved cardiac function. Reversal in PKC-isoform with induced activation of PKC-δ and simultaneous inhibition of phospho-PKC-α resulted in an efficient myocardium to deteriorate considerably resulting in compromised cardiac function during physiological hypertrophy via augmentation of apoptotic and fibrotic load. This is the first report where PKC-α and -δ have been shown to play crucial role in cardiac adaptation during physiological and pathological hypertrophy respectively thereby rendering compromised cardiac function to an otherwise efficient heart by conditional reversal of their activation.

  15. Physiological responses related to moderate mental load during car driving in field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiberg, Henrik; Nilsson, Emma; Lindén, Per; Svanberg, Bo; Poom, Leo

    2015-05-01

    We measured physiological variables on nine car drivers to capture moderate magnitudes of mental load (ML) during driving in prolonged and repeated city and highway field conditions. Ecological validity was optimized by avoiding any artificial interference to manipulate drivers ML, drivers were alone in the car, they were free to choose their paths to the target, and the repeated drives familiarized drivers to the procedure. Our aim was to investigate if driver's physiological variables can be reliably measured and used as predictors of moderate individual levels of ML in naturally occurring unpredictably changing field conditions. Variables investigated were: heart-rate, skin conductance level, breath duration, blink frequency, blink duration, and eye fixation related potentials. After the drives, with support from video uptakes, a self-rating and a score made by external raters were used to distinguish moderately high and low ML segments. Variability was high but aggregated data could distinguish city from highway drives. Multivariate models could successfully classify high and low ML within highway and city drives using physiological variables as input. In summary, physiological variables have a potential to be used as indicators of moderate ML in unpredictably changing field conditions and to advance the evaluation and development of new active safety systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Ultrastructural and physiological changes induced by different stress conditions on the human parasite Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Morales, Deyanira; Hernández, Karla Daniela Rodríguez; Martínez, Ignacio; Agredano-Moreno, Lourdes Teresa; Jiménez-García, Luis Felipe; Espinoza, Bertha

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease. The life cycle of this protozoan parasite is digenetic because it alternates its different developmental forms through two hosts, a vector insect and a vertebrate host. As a result, the parasites are exposed to sudden and drastic environmental changes causing cellular stress. The stress response to some types of stress has been studied in T. cruzi, mainly at the molecular level; however, data about ultrastructure and physiological state of the cells in stress conditions are scarce or null. In this work, we analyzed the morphological, ultrastructural, and physiological changes produced on T. cruzi epimastigotes when they were exposed to acid, nutritional, heat, and oxidative stress. Clear morphological changes were observed, but the physiological conditions varied depending on the type of stress. The maintenance of the physiological state was severely affected by heat shock, acidic, nutritional, and oxidative stress. According to the surprising observed growth recovery after damage by stress alterations, different adaptations from the parasite to these harsh conditions were suggested. Particular cellular death pathways are discussed.

  17. The use of haemoglobin concentrations to assess physiological condition in birds: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minias, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Total blood haemoglobin concentration is increasingly being used to assess physiological condition in wild birds, although it has not been explicitly recognized how reliably this parameter reflects different components of individual quality. Thus, I reviewed over 120 published studies linking variation in haemoglobin concentrations to different measures of condition and other phenotypic or ecological traits. In most of the studied avian species, haemoglobin concentrations were positively correlated with other commonly used indices of condition, such as body mass and fat loads, as well as with quality of the diet. Also, chick haemoglobin concentrations reliably reflected the intensity of nest infestation by parasitic arthropods, and haemoglobin was suggested to reflect parasitism by haematophagous ectoparasites much more precisely than haematocrit. There was also some evidence for the negative effect of helminths on haemoglobin levels in adult birds. Finally, haemoglobin concentrations were found to correlate with such fitness-related traits as timing of arrival at breeding grounds, timing of breeding, egg size, developmental stability and habitat quality, although these relationships were not always consistent between species. In consequence, I recommend the total blood haemoglobin concentration as a relatively robust indicator of physiological condition in birds, although this parameter is also strongly affected by age, season and the process of moult. Thus, researchers are advised to control fully for these confounding effects while using haemoglobin concentrations as a proxy of physiological condition in both experimental and field studies on birds.

  18. Thermo-physiological comfort of soft-shell back protectors under controlled environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotti, Francesca; Ferri, Ada; Moncalero, Matteo; Colonna, Martino

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate thermo-physiological comfort of three back protectors identifying design features affecting heat loss and moisture management. Five volunteers tested the back protectors in a climatic chamber during an intermittent physical activity. Heart rate, average skin temperature, sweat production, microclimate temperature and humidity have been monitored during the test. The sources of heat losses have been identified using infrared thermography and the participants answered a questionnaire to express their subjective sensations associated with their thermo-physiological condition. The results have shown that locally torso skin temperature and microclimate depended on the type of back protector, whose design allowed different extent of perspiration and thermal insulation. Coupling physiological measurements with the questionnaire, it was found that overall comfort was dependent more on skin wetness than skin temperature: the participants preferred the back protector with the highest level of ventilation through the shell and the lowest level of microclimate humidity.

  19. Fluorescent naphthalene-based benzene tripod for selective recognition of fluoride in physiological condition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Barun kumar Datta; Chirantan Kar; Gopal Das

    2015-02-01

    Aluminium complex of a naphthalene-based benzene tripod ligand system has been reported for the selective recognition of fluoride in aqueous medium in physiological condition. The ligand can selectively recognize Al3+ through enhancement in the fluorescence intensity and this in situ formed aluminium complex recognizes fluoride through quenching of fluorescence. The receptor system detects fluoride in nanomolar range. The sensing property was extended for practical utility to sense fluoride in tap water, pond water and river water.

  20. Express-evaluation of the psycho-physiological condition of Paralympic athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Drozdovski A; Gromova I; Korotkov K; Shelkov O; Akinnagbe F

    2012-01-01

    Alexander Drozdovski,1 Irina Gromova,2 Konstantin Korotkov,1 Oleg Shelkov,1 Femi Akinnagbe31Saint Petersburg Federal Research Institute of Physical Culture and Sport, St Petersburg, Russia; 2Paralympic Team of Russia, Moscow, Russia; 3Georgetown University, Washington, DC, USAObjective: Evaluation of elite athletes’ psycho-physiological condition at various stages of preparation and in international competition.Design: Athletes were tested during training and participation in intern...

  1. Triple Helical Recognition of RNA Using 2-Aminopyridine-Modified PNA at Physiologically Relevant Conditions**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengeya, Thomas; Gupta, Pankaj

    2013-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids containing thymidine and 2-aminopyridine (M) nucleobases formed stable and sequence selective triple helices with double stranded RNA at physiologically relevant conditions. The M-modified PNA displayed unique RNA selectivity by having two orders of magnitude higher affinity for the double stranded RNAs than for the same DNA sequences. Preliminary results suggested that nucleobase-modified PNA could bind and recognize double helical precursors of microRNAs. PMID:23125029

  2. Triple Helical Recognition of RNA Using 2-Aminopyridine-Modified PNA at Physiologically Relevant Conditions**

    OpenAIRE

    Zengeya, Thomas; Gupta, Pankaj; Rozners, Eriks

    2012-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids containing thymidine and 2-aminopyridine (M) nucleobases formed stable and sequence selective triple helices with double stranded RNA at physiologically relevant conditions. The M-modified PNA displayed unique RNA selectivity by having two orders of magnitude higher affinity for the double stranded RNAs than for the same DNA sequences. Preliminary results suggested that nucleobase-modified PNA could bind and recognize double helical precursors of microRNAs.

  3. Triple-helical recognition of RNA using 2-aminopyridine-modified PNA at physiologically relevant conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengeya, Thomas; Gupta, Pankaj; Rozners, Eriks

    2012-12-07

    Peptide nucleic acids containing thymidine and 2-aminopyridine (M) nucleobases form stable and sequence-selective triple helices with double-stranded RNA at physiologically relevant conditions. The M-modified PNA showed unique RNA selectivity by having two orders of magnitude higher affinity for the double-stranded RNAs than for the same DNA sequences. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. PHYSIOLOGICAL AND SANITARY QUALITIES OF MAIZE LANDRACE SEEDS STORED UNDER TWO CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Stefanello

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The preservation of seed quality during the storage period depends not only on the conditions during production and harvesting but also on the storage and maintenance of appropriate storage product conditions. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the physiological and sanitary qualities of maize landrace seeds stored under two conditions. The maize seed batch varieties Oito carreiras, Cabo roxo and Lombo baio were used. Tests included germination, first count, cold test, accelerated aging and sanity. Based on the results it was concluded that the physiological quality of these seed varieties decreased with the storage period. The major fungi identified in the maize seeds during storage were from the genera Aspergillus, Fusarium and Penicillium, which caused deterioration and reduction of the physiological quality. Storage using a paper bag at a temperature of 10 °C did not prevent the deterioration of maize seeds but was more effective at preserving the quality of the seed compared with a plastic bag at room temperature.

  5. Physiological assessment of drought tolerance of two ecotypes of cumin (Cuminum cyminum L. under greenhouse conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Drought has adverse effects on plant growth and production. Plants respond to drought stress through biochemical and physiological processes. In the present study, physiological responses of two cumin (Cuminum cyminum L. ecotypes including Ravar and Gonbad, which belong to dry and sub-humid regions of Iran, respectively, were evaluated in a split-plot factorial experiment with three replications in controlled greenhouse conditions. Physiological traits such as relative water content, relative leaf water loss and electrolyte leakage were measured. Analysis of variance showed that there are considerable genetic variations for drought tolerance between the ecotypes. Drought stress decreased relative water content and relative leaf water loss rate, while electrolyte leakage was significantly increased in both ecotypes. Most of the significant changes were recorded in Gonbad ecotype. The Ravar ecotype demonstrated higher tolerance to drought stress, as compared to Gonbad ecotype, which can be due to compatibility of this genotype to water-deficit conditions. Therefore, this ecotype was recommended as a tolerant ecotype to drought stress. In conclusion, the investigated traits in this experiment were found to be valuable criteria in selection of drought-tolerant ecotypes at seedling stage under greenhouse conditions.

  6. Seminal, adventitious and lateral root growth and physiological responses in rice to upland conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨玲; 郑炳松; 毛传澡; 易可可; 吴运荣; 吴平; 陶勤南

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the growth and physiological responses of rice to upland conditions would be helpful for designing treatments to improve the tolerance of rice under a rainfed system. The objective of this study was to investigate the initiation,elongation and membrane stability of seminal, lateral and adventitious roots of upland rice after 9-d upland condition treatment. Compared with control roots under waterlogged conditions, upland water deficiency conditions favor seminal and lateral root growth over adventitious root growth by accelerating seminal root elongation, promoting lateral root initiation and elongation, and reducing the elongation and number of adventitious roots. Enhanced total root number and length resulted in increase of total root dry weight and thereby increasing the root-to-shoot ratio. Organic compound leakage from seminal root tips and adventitious roots increased progressively to some extent with upland culture duration, while significant increases in seminal root tips were the consequence of loss of membrane integrity caused by the upland-condition enhanced growth.

  7. Paddy plants inoculated with PGPR show better growth physiology and nutrient content under saline condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yachana Jha

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The possible role of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR to alleviate salt stress during plant growth has been studied on paddy rice (Oryza sativa L. 'GJ-17' under greenhouse conditions; the study included growth parameters, mineral concentration, and antioxidant enzyme level. Salinity reduced plant growth, but PGPR inoculation reduced its harmful effect up to 1% salinity. Plants inoculated with PGPR under saline conditions showed 16% higher germination, 8% higher survival, 27% higher dry weight, and 31% higher plant height. Similarly, PGPR inoculated plants showed increased concentrations of N(26%, P (16%, K (31%, and reduced concentrations of Na (71% and Ca (36% as compared to non-inoculated control plants under saline conditions. Plants inoculated with PGPR under saline conditions also showed significant variations in antioxidant levels and growth physiology. Results suggested that inoculation with PGPR Bacillus pumilus and Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes in salt-stressed plants could help to alleviate salt stress in the paddy.

  8. Daily rhythms of physiological parameters in the dromedary camel under natural and laboratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Haidary, Ahmed A; Abdoun, Khalid A; Samara, Emad M; Okab, Aly B; Sani, Mamane; Refinetti, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    Camels are well adapted to hot arid environments and can contribute significantly to the economy of developing countries in arid regions of the world. Full understanding of the physiology of camels requires understanding of the internal temporal order of the body, as reflected in daily or circadian rhythms. In the current study, we investigated the daily rhythmicity of 20 physiological variables in camels exposed to natural oscillations of ambient temperature in a desert environment and compared the daily temporal courses of the variables. We also studied the rhythm of core body temperature under experimental conditions with constant ambient temperature in the presence and absence of a light-dark cycle. The obtained results indicated that different physiological variables exhibit different degrees of daily rhythmicity and reach their daily peaks at different times of the day, starting with plasma cholesterol, which peaks 24min after midnight, and ending with plasma calcium, which peaks 3h before midnight. Furthermore, the rhythm of core body temperature persisted in the absence of environmental rhythmicity, thus confirming its endogenous nature. The observed delay in the acrophase of core body temperature rhythm under constant conditions suggests that the circadian period is longer than 24h. Further studies with more refined experimental manipulation of different variables are needed to fully elucidate the causal network of circadian rhythms in dromedary camels.

  9. Animal nutrition and breeding conditions modify the physiology of isolated primary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milisav, Irina; Banič, Blaž; Šuput, Dušan

    2017-05-01

    Animal primary cell cultures are widely used in biomedical research to investigate cell metabolism, diseases and to devise novel treatments. Modern animal breeding techniques are developed to unify, control and reduce the amount of microorganisms that the animals are being exposed to. Furthermore, health monitoring and strict caging and handling protocols allow animals to be exposed only to a selected spectrum of microbes. We are starting to appreciate that nutrition can influence composition of gut microbiota that can impact hosting organism's physiology and can even result in development of pathological changes. Evidence is also emerging that acute as well as chronic stresses can profoundly influence the physiology of certain organs, especially heart and liver. Our preliminary data imply that changes in animal nutrition and stress levels initiated up to minutes before the cell isolation could alter the cell stress response of cultured primary hepatocytes after isolation, leading to differences in sensitivity of apoptosis triggering. Therefore, we propose the hypothesis that conditions of animal breeding, especially diet and stress levels, are reflected in the physiology of the isolated primary cells. Variations in animal breeding conditions may influence experimental results on isolated cells and their applicability for studying human disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of a one-semester conditioning class on physiological characteristics of college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danoff, Jerome V; Raupers, Erin G

    2014-11-01

    Long-term exercise is known to have positive effects on the health of adults. Some college "activity" courses are designed to give participants exposure to, and practice with, safe exercise techniques. Whether these 1-semester courses, usually 12-14 weeks, are sufficient to alter physiological characteristics, such as blood pressure or strength, has not been established. Therefore, the purpose of our investigation was to evaluate physiological and performance measures in college students to determine whether changes would result after 14 weeks of a general conditioning activity course. This study involved 79 students from several sections of exercise and conditioning classes at our university. Classes included a variety of fitness- and strength-oriented exercises. Physiological and performance measurements were collected in weeks 2 (pretest) and 14 (posttest), and compared pre with post using paired t-tests subject to Bonferroni correction (significant p college-based activity class can result in significant improvements in some measures of fitness and strength in college-aged participants.

  11. Interactions between sleep, stress, and metabolism: From physiological to pathological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Hirotsu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Poor sleep quality due to sleep disorders and sleep loss is highly prevalent in the modern society. Underlying mechanisms show that stress is involved in the relationship between sleep and metabolism through hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA axis activation. Sleep deprivation and sleep disorders are associated with maladaptive changes in the HPA axis, leading to neuroendocrine dysregulation. Excess of glucocorticoids increase glucose and insulin and decrease adiponectin levels. Thus, this review provides overall view of the relationship between sleep, stress, and metabolism from basic physiology to pathological conditions, highlighting effective treatments for metabolic disturbances.

  12. Proton-coupled electron transfer promotes the reduction of ferrylmyoglobin by uric acid under physiological conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Zawadzki, Andressa; Cardoso, Daniel R.; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2017-01-01

    The hypervalent muscle pigment ferrylmyoglobin, MbFe(IV)]O, is not reduced by urate monoanions at physiological conditions despite a strong driving force of around 30 kJ mol1 while for low pH, uric acid was found to reduce protonated ferrylmyoglobin, MbFe(IV)]O,H+, efficiently in a bimolecular...... for reduction of hypervalent heme iron, where initial proton transfer to oxo-iron initiates the intermolecular electron transfer from urate to ferrylmyoglobin. The concentration of the powerful prooxidant ferrylmyoglobin increases strongly during digestion of red meat in the stomach. A concomitant increase...

  13. Myocardial capillary permeability for small hydrophilic indicators during normal physiological conditions and after ischemia and reperfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup

    1991-01-01

    of the injected indicator molecules in an extracted and a transmitted fraction of molecules. In open chest dog hearts measurements performed during normal physiological conditions gave mean capillary extraction values of 43.5-47.5% and the corresponding calculated PdS values were 47.1 - 57.5 ml.(100g.min)-1. From......Myocardial capillary permeability for small hydrophilic solutes (51Cr-EDTA or 99mTc-DTPA) has been measured using intracoronary indicator bolus injection and external radioactivity registration (the single injection, residue detection method). The method is based on kinetic separation...

  14. Effect of modeled reduced gravity conditions on bacterial morphology and physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukanti Raja

    2012-01-01

    physiologically more active and a larger percentage are viable under MRG as compared to NG conditions. In addition, these results demonstrate that bacterial physiological responses to MRG conditions vary with growth medium and growth phase demonstrating that nutrient resources are a modulator of response.

  15. Effects of Acclimation on Poststocking Dispersal and Physiological Condition of Age-1 Pallid Sturgeon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenburg, Eric W.; Guy, Christopher S.; Cureton, Eli S.; Webb, Molly H.; Gardner, William M.

    2011-03-28

    A propagation program for pallid sturgeon Scaphirhynchus albus in the upper Missouri River was implemented by the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 1997. Preliminary research indicated that many hatchery-reared pallid sturgeon were experiencing significant downstream poststocking dispersal, negatively affecting their recruitment. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of acclimation to flow and site-specific physicochemical water conditions on poststocking dispersal and physiological condition of age-1 pallid sturgeon. Fish from three acclimation treatments were radio-tagged, released at two locations (Missouri River and Marias River), and monitored using passive telemetry stations. Marias treatment was acclimated to flow and site-specific physicochemical conditions, Bozeman treatment was acclimated to flow only, and traditional treatment had no acclimation (reared under traditional protocol). During both years fish released in the Missouri River dispersed less than fish released in the Marias River. In 2005, Marias treatment dispersed less and nearly twice as many fish remained in the Missouri River reach than traditional treatment. In 2006, pallid sturgeon dispersed similarly among treatments and fish remaining in the Missouri River reach were similar among all treatments. Differences in poststocking dispersal between years may be related to fin curl. Fin curl was present in all fish in 2005 and 27% of the fish in 2006. Pallid sturgeon from all treatments in both years had a greater affinity for the lower reaches of the Missouri River than the upper reaches. Thus, habitat at release site influenced poststocking dispersal more than acclimation treatment. No difference was observed in relative growth rate among treatments in 2006. However, acclimation to flow (i.e., exercise conditioning) may reduce liver fat content. Acclimation conditions used in this study may not benefit pallid sturgeon unless physiological maladies are present

  16. Physiological and hematological responses of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis Niloticus to different anesthetics during simulated transport conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Diana Navarro

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Minimization of stress during the transportation of live fish is essential in maintaining the welfare and performance of the animals. In order to test the hypothesis that stress during transport of fingerlings of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus can be reduced with the aid of the anesthetics menthol, eugenol or benzocaine, we have assessed the effects of these agents at various concentrations on the physiological parameters and survival rates of fish subjected to conditions simulating those normally used in transportation. Fingerlings (N = 1200 were fasted for 24 hours and distributed in 20 L polyethylene bags (N = 50 per bag containing 5 L of water and an anesthetic at the appropriate concentration. Fingerlings treated with menthol at 75 mg L-1, or eugenol or benzocaine at 20 mg L-1, maintained levels of plasma cortisol and glucose that were lower than those of the stressed but untreated controls and within the physiological limits of the baseline values for this species. Under these conditions, the survival rate was 100%, suggesting that stress was substantially reduced despite dense consignment. Treatments involving higher doses of the studied agents induced significant anesthetic toxicity.

  17. Life under multiple extreme conditions: diversity and physiology of the halophilic alkalithermophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesbah, Noha M; Wiegel, Juergen

    2012-06-01

    Around the world, there are numerous alkaline, hypersaline environments that are heated either geothermally or through intense solar radiation. It was once thought that such harsh environments were inhospitable and incapable of supporting a variety of life. However, numerous culture-dependent and -independent studies revealed the presence of an extensive diversity of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and archaea that survive and grow under these multiple harsh conditions. This diversity includes the halophilic alkalithermophiles, a novel group of polyextremophiles that require for growth and proliferation the multiple extremes of high salinity, alkaline pH, and elevated temperature. Life under these conditions undoubtedly involves the development of unique physiological characteristics, phenotypic properties, and adaptive mechanisms that enable control of membrane permeability, control of intracellular osmotic balance, and stability of the cell wall, intracellular proteins, and other cellular constituents. This minireview highlights the ecology and growth characteristics of the extremely halophilic alkalithermophiles that have been isolated thus far. Biochemical, metabolic, and physiological properties of the extremely halophilic alkalithermophiles are described, and their roles in resistance to the combined stressors of high salinity, alkaline pH, and high temperature are discussed. The isolation of halophilic alkalithermophiles broadens the physicochemical boundaries for life and extends the boundaries for the combinations of the maximum salinity, pH, and temperature that can support microbial growth.

  18. Custom AFM for X-ray beamlines: in situ biological investigations under physiological conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumí-Audenis, B. [ESRF, The European Synchrotron, Grenoble (France); Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), Barcelona (Spain); Physical Chemistry Department, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Networking Biomedical Research Center on Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN), Madrid (Spain); Carlà, F. [ESRF, The European Synchrotron, Grenoble (France); Vitorino, M. V. [University of Lisboa, Falculty of Science, Biosystems and Integrative Sciences Institute - BIOISI, Lisbon (Portugal); Panzarella, A. [ESRF, The European Synchrotron, Grenoble (France); Porcar, L. [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Boilot, M. [ORTEC, Marseille (France); Guerber, S. [CEA, LETI Grenoble (France); Bernard, P. [ESRF, The European Synchrotron, Grenoble (France); Rodrigues, M. S. [University of Lisboa, Falculty of Science, Biosystems and Integrative Sciences Institute - BIOISI, Lisbon (Portugal); Sanz, F.; Giannotti, M. I. [Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), Barcelona (Spain); Physical Chemistry Department, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Networking Biomedical Research Center on Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN), Madrid (Spain); Costa, L., E-mail: luca.costa@esrf.fr [ESRF, The European Synchrotron, Grenoble (France)

    2015-09-30

    The performance of a custom atomic force microscope for grazing-incidence X-ray experiments on hydrated soft and biological samples is presented. A fast atomic force microscope (AFM) has been developed that can be installed as a sample holder for grazing-incidence X-ray experiments at solid/gas or solid/liquid interfaces. It allows a wide range of possible investigations, including soft and biological samples under physiological conditions (hydrated specimens). The structural information obtained using the X-rays is combined with the data gathered with the AFM (morphology and mechanical properties), providing a unique characterization of the specimen and its dynamics in situ during an experiment. In this work, lipid monolayers and bilayers in air or liquid environment have been investigated by means of AFM, both with imaging and force spectroscopy, and X-ray reflectivity. In addition, this combination allows the radiation damage induced by the beam on the sample to be studied, as has been observed on DOPC and DPPC supported lipid bilayers under physiological conditions.

  19. Correlations between the behavior of recreational horses, the physiological parameters and summer atmospheric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janczarek, Iwona; Wilk, Izabela; Zalewska, Edyta; Bocian, Krzysztof

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this paper was to select atmospheric factors and their values, which may disrupt the correct behavior and physiological condition of recreational horses. The studies were carried out from 1 July until 1 September on 16 Anglo-Arabian geldings. Each day, from 09.00 to 10.00 hours, the horses worked under saddle. The riders and the authors gave a qualitative behavioral assessment for each horse. Mood and willingness to work were evaluated. The quantitative assessment was called 'incorrect behavior of the horse while riding' (IBHR). The percentage time of duration and the number of occurrences of the features while riding were calculated. Heart rate, body temperature and respiratory rate were taken at 08.00 hours (resting measurement) and at 10.05 hours (post-exercise measurement). Air temperature, relative air humidity, wind speed and atmospheric pressure were measured at 08.00 and 10.00 hours. The results showed that adverse changes in the behavior of recreational horses can occur if the horse is ridden when the air temperature is above 26°C and when wind speeds exceed 5.5 m/s. Such conditions may cause a reduction in the mood and willingness to work in horses. Physiological parameters like heart rate and body temperature seem to be more sensitive indicators of the horse body reaction to the weather than behavioral reactions.

  20. Algorithm-driven high-throughput screening of colloidal nanoparticles under simulated physiological and therapeutic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhirde, Ashwinkumar A; Sindiri, Sivasish; Calco, Gina N; Aronova, Maria A; Beaucage, Serge L

    2017-02-09

    Colloidal nanoparticles have shown tremendous potential as cancer drug carriers and as phototherapeutics. However, the stability of nanoparticles under physiological and phototherapeutic conditions is a daunting issue, which needs to be addressed in order to ensure a successful clinical translation. The design, development and implementation of unique algorithms are described herein for high-throughput hydrodynamic size measurements of colloidal nanoparticles. The data obtained from such measurements provide clinically-relevant particle size distribution assessments that are directly related to the stability and aggregation profiles of the nanoparticles under putative physiological and phototherapeutic conditions; those profiles are not only dependent on the size and surface coating of the nanoparticles, but also on their composition. Uncoated nanoparticles showed varying degrees of association with bovine serum albumin, whereas PEGylated nanoparticles did not exhibit significant association with the protein. The algorithm-driven, high-throughput size screening method described in this report provides highly meaningful size measurement patterns stemming from the association of colloidal particles with bovine serum albumin used as a protein model. Noteworthy is that this algorithm-based high-throughput method can accomplish sophisticated hydrodynamic size measurement protocols within days instead of years it would take conventional hydrodynamic size measurement techniques to achieve a similar task.

  1. Microfluidic device to study cell transmigration under physiological shear stress conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Kiilerich-Pedersen, Katrine; Moresco, Jacob Lange

    2011-01-01

    the membrane under flow conditions. The 3D environment of migrating cells is imitated by injecting cell adhesion proteins to coat the membrane in the device. We tested the developed device with Jurkat cells migration towards medium supplemented with serum, and with chemokine induced lymphocytes migration......The development of new drug therapies relies on studies of cell transmigration in in vitro systems. Migration has traditionally been studied using two methods, the Boyden chamber and a shear flow chamber assay. Though, commonly applied in cell transmigration studies, they are far from imitating...... a natural migration process. Here we describe a novel in vitro cell transmigration microfluidic assay, which mimicks physiological shear flow conditions in blood vessels. The device was designed to incorporate the principles of both the Boyden chamber and the shear flow chamber assay, i.e. migration through...

  2. Physiological behaviour of gliotoxigenic Aspergillus fumigatus sensu stricto isolated from maize silage under simulated environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, V; Vergara, L Díaz; Aminahuel, C; Pereyra, C; Pena, G; Torres, A; Dalcero, A; Cavaglieri, L

    2015-01-01

    Environmental conditions play a key role in fungal development. During the silage production process, humidity, oxygen availability and pH vary among lactic-fermentation phases and among different silage sections. The aim of this work was to study the physiological behaviour of gliotoxicogenic Aspergillus fumigatus strains isolated from maize silage under simulated natural physicochemical conditions - different water activities (a(W)), temperatures (Tº), pH and oxygen pressure - on the growth parameters (growth rate and lag phase) and gliotoxin production. The silage was made with the harvested whole maize plant that was chopped and used for trench-type silo fabrication. Water activity and pH of the silage samples were determined. Total fungal counts were performed on Dichloran Rose Bengal Chloramphenicol agar and Dichloran 18% Glycerol agar. The morphological identification of A. fumigatus was performed with different culture media and at different growth temperature to observe microscopic and macroscopic characteristics. Gliotoxin production by A. fumigatus was determined by HPLC. All strains isolated were morphologically identified as A. fumigatus. Two A. fumigatus strains isolated from the silage samples were selected for the ecophysiological study (A. fumigatus sensu stricto RC031 and RC032). The results of this investigation showed that the fungus grows in the simulated natural physicochemical conditions of corn silage and produces gliotoxin. The study of the physiological behaviour of gliotoxigenic A. fumigatus under simulated environmental conditions allowed its behaviour to be predicted in silage and this will in future enable appropriate control strategies to be developed to prevent the spread of this fungus and toxin production that leads to impairment and reduced quality of silage.

  3. A Novel Approach for Dynamic Testing of Total Hip Dislocation under Physiological Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Sven; Kluess, Daniel; Kaehler, Michael; Grawe, Robert; Rachholz, Roman; Souffrant, Robert; Zierath, János; Bader, Rainer; Woernle, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Constant high rates of dislocation-related complications of total hip replacements (THRs) show that contributing factors like implant position and design, soft tissue condition and dynamics of physiological motions have not yet been fully understood. As in vivo measurements of excessive motions are not possible due to ethical objections, a comprehensive approach is proposed which is capable of testing THR stability under dynamic, reproducible and physiological conditions. The approach is based on a hardware-in-the-loop (HiL) simulation where a robotic physical setup interacts with a computational musculoskeletal model based on inverse dynamics. A major objective of this work was the validation of the HiL test system against in vivo data derived from patients with instrumented THRs. Moreover, the impact of certain test conditions, such as joint lubrication, implant position, load level in terms of body mass and removal of muscle structures, was evaluated within several HiL simulations. The outcomes for a normal sitting down and standing up maneuver revealed good agreement in trend and magnitude compared with in vivo measured hip joint forces. For a deep maneuver with femoral adduction, lubrication was shown to cause less friction torques than under dry conditions. Similarly, it could be demonstrated that less cup anteversion and inclination lead to earlier impingement in flexion motion including pelvic tilt for selected combinations of cup and stem positions. Reducing body mass did not influence impingement-free range of motion and dislocation behavior; however, higher resisting torques were observed under higher loads. Muscle removal emulating a posterior surgical approach indicated alterations in THR loading and the instability process in contrast to a reference case with intact musculature. Based on the presented data, it can be concluded that the HiL test system is able to reproduce comparable joint dynamics as present in THR patients.

  4. A Novel Approach for Dynamic Testing of Total Hip Dislocation under Physiological Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Herrmann

    Full Text Available Constant high rates of dislocation-related complications of total hip replacements (THRs show that contributing factors like implant position and design, soft tissue condition and dynamics of physiological motions have not yet been fully understood. As in vivo measurements of excessive motions are not possible due to ethical objections, a comprehensive approach is proposed which is capable of testing THR stability under dynamic, reproducible and physiological conditions. The approach is based on a hardware-in-the-loop (HiL simulation where a robotic physical setup interacts with a computational musculoskeletal model based on inverse dynamics. A major objective of this work was the validation of the HiL test system against in vivo data derived from patients with instrumented THRs. Moreover, the impact of certain test conditions, such as joint lubrication, implant position, load level in terms of body mass and removal of muscle structures, was evaluated within several HiL simulations. The outcomes for a normal sitting down and standing up maneuver revealed good agreement in trend and magnitude compared with in vivo measured hip joint forces. For a deep maneuver with femoral adduction, lubrication was shown to cause less friction torques than under dry conditions. Similarly, it could be demonstrated that less cup anteversion and inclination lead to earlier impingement in flexion motion including pelvic tilt for selected combinations of cup and stem positions. Reducing body mass did not influence impingement-free range of motion and dislocation behavior; however, higher resisting torques were observed under higher loads. Muscle removal emulating a posterior surgical approach indicated alterations in THR loading and the instability process in contrast to a reference case with intact musculature. Based on the presented data, it can be concluded that the HiL test system is able to reproduce comparable joint dynamics as present in THR patients.

  5. Correlations between psychological tests and physiological responses during fear conditioning and renewal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez Karen G

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anxiety disorders are characterized by specific emotions, thoughts and physiological responses. Little is known, however, about the relationship between psychological/personality indices of anxiety responses to fear stimuli. Methods We studied this relationship in healthy subjects by comparing scores on psychological and personality questionnaires with results of an experimental fear conditioning paradigm using a visual conditioned stimulus (CS. We measured skin conductance response (SCR during habituation, conditioning, and extinction; subsequently testing for recall and renewal of fear 24 hours later. Results We found that multiple regression models explained 45% of the variance during conditioning to the CS+, and 24% of the variance during renewal of fear to the CS+. Factors that explained conditioning included lower levels of conscientiousness, increased baseline reactivity (SCL, and response to the shock (UCR. Low levels of extraversion correlated with greater renewal. No model could be found to explain extinction learning or extinction recall to the CS+. Conclusions The lack of correlation of fear extinction with personality and neuropsychological indices suggests that extinction may be less determined by trait variables and cognitive state, and may depend more on the subject’s current emotional state. The negative correlation between fear renewal and extraversion suggests that this personality characteristic may protect against post-treatment relapse of symptoms of anxiety disorders.

  6. Electrical coupling of astrocytes in rat hippocampal slices under physiological and simulated ischemic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guangjin; Wang, Wei; Kimelberg, Harold K; Zhou, Min

    2010-03-01

    Mammalian protoplasmic astrocytes are extensively coupled through gap junction channels but the biophysical properties of these channels under physiological and ischemic conditions in situ are not well defined. Using confocal morphometric analysis of biocytin-filled astrocytic syncytia in rat hippocampal CA1 stratum radiatum we found that each astrocyte directly couples, on average, to 11 other astrocytes with a mean interastrocytic distance of 45 microm. Voltage-independent and bidirectional transjunctional currents were always measured between directly coupled astrocyte pairs in dual voltage-clamp recordings, but never from astrocyte-NG2 glia or astrocyte-interneuron pairs. The electrical coupling ratio varied considerably among astrocytes in developing postnatal day 14 rats (P14, 0.5-12.4%, mean = 3.6%), but became more constant in young adult P21 rats (0.18-3.9%, mean = 1.6%), and the coupling ratio declined exponentially with increasing pair distance. Electrical coupling was not affected by short-term oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) treatment, but showed delayed inhibition in an acidic extracellular pH of 6.4. Combination of acidic pH (6.4) and OGD, a condition that better represents cerebral ischemia in vivo, accelerated the inhibition of electrical coupling. Our results show that, under physiological conditions, 20.7-24.2% of K(+) induced currents can travel from any astrocytic soma in CA1 stratum radiatum to the gap junctions of the nearest neighbor astrocytes, but this should be severely inhibited as a consequence of the OGD and acidosis seen in the ischemic brain.

  7. Mineralization of bone-related SaOS-2 cells under physiological hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Werner E G; Schröder, Heinz C; Tolba, Emad; Diehl-Seifert, Bärbel; Wang, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) is a physiological energy-rich polymer with multiple phosphoric anhydride bonds. In cells such as bone-forming osteoblasts, glycolysis is the main pathway generating metabolic energy in the form of ATP. In the present study, we show that, under hypoxic culture conditions, the growth/viability of osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cells is not impaired. The addition of polyP to those cells, administered as amorphous calcium polyP nanoparticles (aCa-polyP-NP; approximate size 100 nm), significantly increased the proliferation of the cells. In the presence of polyP, the cells produce significant levels of lactate, the end product of anaerobic glycolysis. Under those conditions, an eight-fold increase in the steady-state level of the membrane-associated carbonic anhydrase IX is found, as well as a six-fold induction of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1. Consequently, biomineral formation onto the SaOS-2 cells decreases under low oxygen tension. If the polyP nanoparticles are added to the cells, the degree of mineralization is enhanced. These changes had been measured also in human mesenchymal stem cells. The assumption that the bicarbonate, generated by the carbonic anhydrase in the presence of polyP under low oxygen, is deposited as a constituent of the bioseeds formed during initial hydroxyapatite formation is corroborated by the identification of carbon besides of calcium, oxygen and phosphorus in the initial biomineral deposit onto the cells using the sensitive technology of high-resolution energy dispersive spectrometry mapping. Based on these data, we conclude that polyP is required for the supply of metabolic energy during bone mineral formation under physiological, hypoxic conditions, acting as a 'metabolic fuel' for the cells to grow.

  8. Ccr5 deficiency regulates the proliferation and trafficking of natural killer cells under physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Ido D; Shoham, Hadas; Wald, Ori; Wald, Hanna; Beider, Katia; Abraham, Michal; Barashi, Neta; Galun, Eithan; Nagler, Arnon; Peled, Amnon

    2011-06-01

    Chemokines were shown to govern the trafficking of immune cells and may also play important roles in the survival and activation of these cells. We report here that under physiological conditions, the bone marrow (BM), spleen, blood and liver of Ccr5, but not of Ccr1-deficient mice, contain reduced numbers of NK cells. NK cells in the BM of Ccr5-deficient mice proliferate to a lesser extent compared to WT mice. Furthermore, spleen NK cells derived from Ccr5-deficient mice that were transplanted into irradiated recipients failed to proliferate in the host. Ccr5, but not Ccr1-deficient NK cells, failed to migrate in vitro in response to RANTES and MIP-1β but not MIP-1β or SDF-1 and had reduced activation, lower expression levels of NK cell markers and a slightly reduced capacity to adhere to target cells and stimulate their killing. Using the polyI:C mouse model for NK trafficking, we found that in the absence of Ccr5, but not Ccr1, NK cells failed to accumulate in the liver. In contrast, using the influenza viral infection as a model to evaluate NK cell proliferation, we found that Ccr5-deficient NK cells in the BM had a higher proliferation rate than WT NK cells. These results suggest a role for Ccr5 in NK cell proliferation and circulation under physiological conditions and a complex role for Ccr5 in determining the fate of NK cells under pathological conditions. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Physiological responses to ocean acidification and warming synergistically reduce condition of the common cockle Cerastoderma edule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, E Z; Briffa, M; Moens, T; Van Colen, C

    2017-09-01

    The combined effect of ocean acidification and warming on the common cockle Cerastoderma edule was investigated in a fully crossed laboratory experiment. Survival of the examined adult organisms remained high and was not affected by elevated temperature (+3 °C) or lowered pH (-0.3 units). However, the morphometric condition index of the cockles incubated under high pCO2 conditions (i.e. combined warming and acidification) was significantly reduced after six weeks of incubation. Respiration rates increased significantly under low pH, with highest rates measured under combined warm and low pH conditions. Calcification decreased significantly under low pH while clearance rates increased significantly under warm conditions and were generally lower in low pH treatments. The observed physiological responses suggest that the reduced food intake under hypercapnia is insufficient to support the higher energy requirements to compensate for the higher costs for basal maintenance and growth in future high pCO2 waters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Enhanced desorption of persistent organic pollutants from microplastics under simulated physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakir, Adil; Rowland, Steven J; Thompson, Richard C

    2014-02-01

    Microplastics have the potential to uptake and release persistent organic pollutants (POPs); however, subsequent transfer to marine organisms is poorly understood. Some models estimating transfer of sorbed contaminants to organisms neglect the role of gut surfactants under differing physiological conditions in the gut (varying pH and temperature), examined here. We investigated the potential for polyvinylchloride (PVC) and polyethylene (PE) to sorb and desorb (14)C-DDT, (14)C-phenanthrene (Phe), (14)C-perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and (14)C-di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP). Desorption rates of POPs were quantified in seawater and under simulated gut conditions. Influence of pH and temperature was examined in order to represent cold and warm blooded organisms. Desorption rates were faster with gut surfactant, with a further substantial increase under conditions simulating warm blooded organisms. Desorption under gut conditions could be up to 30 times greater than in seawater alone. Of the POP/plastic combinations examined Phe with PE gave the highest potential for transport to organisms.

  11. Surface modifications on InAs decrease indium and arsenic leaching under physiological conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jewett, Scott A. [Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Yoder, Jeffrey A. [Department of Molecular Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Center for Comparative Medicine and Translational Research, North Carolina State University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Ivanisevic, Albena, E-mail: ivanisevic@ncsu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering North Carolina State University/University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer InAs was assessed under physiological conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A thiol-alcohol and a PEG-based polymer layers demonstrated the highest stability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unmodified and modified InAs showed no toxicity to zebrafish up to 120 h post fertilization. - Abstract: Devices containing III-V semiconductors such as InAs are increasingly being used in the electronic industry for a variety of optoelectronic applications. Furthermore, the attractive chemical, material, electronic properties make such materials appealing for use in devices designed for biological applications, such as biosensors. However, in biological applications the leaching of toxic materials from these devices could cause harm to cells or tissue. Additionally, after disposal, toxic inorganic materials can leach from devices and buildup in the environment, causing long-term ecological harm. Therefore, the toxicity of these materials along with their stability in physiological conditions are important factors to consider. Surface modifications are one common method of stabilizing semiconductor materials in order to chemically and electronically passivate them. Such surface modifications could also prevent the leaching of toxic materials by preventing the regrowth of the unstable surface oxide layer and by creating an effective barrier between the semiconductor surface and the surrounding environment. In this study, various surface modifications on InAs are developed with the goal of decreasing the leaching of indium and arsenic. The leaching of indium and arsenic from modified substrates was assessed in physiological conditions using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Substrates modified with 11-mercapto-1-undecanol (MU) and graft polymerized with poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG) were most effective at preventing indium and arsenic leaching. These surfaces were characterized using contact angle analysis, ellipsometry

  12. Physiological outflow boundary conditions methodology for small arteries with multiple outlets: a patient-specific hepatic artery haemodynamics case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramburu, Jorge; Antón, Raúl; Bernal, Nebai; Rivas, Alejandro; Ramos, Juan Carlos; Sangro, Bruno; Bilbao, José Ignacio

    2015-04-01

    Physiological outflow boundary conditions are necessary to carry out computational fluid dynamics simulations that reliably represent the blood flow through arteries. When dealing with complex three-dimensional trees of small arteries, and therefore with multiple outlets, the robustness and speed of convergence are also important. This study derives physiological outflow boundary conditions for cases in which the physiological values at those outlets are not known (neither in vivo measurements nor literature-based values are available) and in which the tree exhibits symmetry to some extent. The inputs of the methodology are the three-dimensional domain and the flow rate waveform and the systolic and diastolic pressures at the inlet. The derived physiological outflow boundary conditions, which are a physiological pressure waveform for each outlet, are based on the results of a zero-dimensional model simulation. The methodology assumes symmetrical branching and is able to tackle the flow distribution problem when the domain outlets are at branches with a different number of upstream bifurcations. The methodology is applied to a group of patient-specific arteries in the liver. The methodology is considered to be valid because the pulsatile computational fluid dynamics simulation with the inflow flow rate waveform (input of the methodology) and the derived outflow boundary conditions lead to physiological results, that is, the resulting systolic and diastolic pressures at the inlet match the inputs of the methodology, and the flow split is also physiological.

  13. Production of DMS and DMSP in different physiological stages and salinity conditions in two marine algae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUANG Guangchao; YANG Guipeng; YU Juan; GAO Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Dimethylsulfide (DMS) and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) production by Scrippsiella trochoidea and Prorocentrum minimum was investigated to characterize the effects of physiological stage and salinity on DMS and DMSP pools of these two marine phytoplankton species. Axenic laboratory cultures of the two marine algae were tested for DMSP production and its conversion into DMS. The results demonstrated that both algal species could produce DMS, but the average concentration of DMS per cell in S. trochoidea (12.63 fmol/L) was about six times that in P. minimum (2.01 fmol/L). DMS and DMSP concentrations in algal cultures varied significantly at different growth stages, with high release during the late stationary growth phase and the senescent phase. DMS production induced by three salinities (22, 28, 34) showed that the DMS concentrations per cell in the two algal cultures increased with increasing salinity, which might result from intra-cellular DMSP up-regulation with the change of osmotic stress. Our study specifies the distinctive contributions of different physiological stages of marine phytoplankton on DMSP and DMS production, and clarifies the influence of salinity conditions on the release of DMS and DMSP.As S. trochoidea and P. minimum are harmful algal bloom species with high DMS production, they might play an additional significant role in the sulfur cycle when a red tide occurs.

  14. Anatomic and physiological modifications in seedlings of Coffea arabica cultivar Siriema under drought conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuelle Ferreira Melo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to the weather changes prognostic for the coming years, the understanding of water deficit and physiological responses of plants to drought becomes an important requirement in order to develop technologies such as mechanisms to assist plants to cope with longer drought periods, which will be essential to maintenance of Brazilian and worldwide production. This study aimed to evaluate ecophysiological and anatomical aspects as well as the nitrate reductase activity in Siriema coffee seedlings subjected to four treatments: Daily irrigated, non-irrigated, re-irrigated 24 hours and re-irrigated 48 hours after different stress periods. Non-irrigation promoted a reduction in leaf water potential being accented from the ninth day of evaluation onwards. Re-irrigation promoted a partial recovery of the plant water potential. Non-irrigated plants showed an increase in stomatal resistance and reduction of transpiration and nitrate reductase activity. In the roots, there was a decrease in nitrate reductase activity under water stress. Leaf anatomical modifications were significant only for the adaxial surface epidermis and palisade parenchyma thickness, this latter characteristic being higher in control plants. Stomatal density and polar and equatorial diameter ratios showed the highest values in plants under water stress. In the roots, differences only in the cortex thickness being bigger in the non-irrigated treatment could be observed. Therefore, Siriema coffee plants under water stress show physiological, biochemical and anatomical modifications that contribute to the tolerance of this genotype to these conditions.

  15. Effects of Ionizing Irradiation on Mushrooms as Influenced by Physiological and Environmental Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Jens-Peder; Bech, K.; Lundsten, K.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of irradiation with β (10 MeV fast electrons)- and γ-rays were studied on several characters in strains of the cultured mushroom under different physiological and environmental conditions, including uncut and cut mushrooms, tightness of packing, and relative humidity. Weight loss...... was greatest in the non-irradiated mushrooms owing to evaporation from an increased surface area resulting from expansion and ripening which were greatly retarded in the irradiated samples. Twenty-five krads of β- or γ-rays had a significant, but transitory, effect on the veil opening. The inhibition became...... opening rates. Expansion and elongation were retarded significantly by 100 krads. The effect improved further with increasing dose. Irradiation improved the skin colour when the mushrooms were stored uncovered or in boxes with perforated PVC-foil. The opposite was the case when the boxes were sealed...

  16. Physiological response in the European flounder (Platichthys flesus) to variable salinity and oxygen conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgreen, Kim; Kiilerich, Pia; Tipsmark, Christian Kølbæk

    2008-01-01

    Physiological mechanisms involved in acclimation to variable salinity and oxygen levels and their interaction were studied in European flounder. The fish were acclimated for two weeks to freshwater (1 ‰ salinity), brackish water (11 ‰) or full strength seawater (35 ‰) under normoxic conditions...... (water Po2 = 158 mmHg) and then subjected to 48 h of continued normoxia or hypoxia at a level (Po2 = 54 mmHg) close to but above the critical Po2. Plasma osmolality, [Na+] and [Cl-] increased with increasing salinity, but the rises were limited, reflecting an effective extracellular osmoregulation....... Muscle water content was the same at all three salinities, indicating complete cell volume regulation. Gill Na+/K+-ATPase activity did not change with salinity, but hypoxia caused a 25 % decrease in branchial Na+/K+-ATPase activity at all three salinities. Furthermore, hypoxia induced a significant...

  17. Visualization of single receptor molecules bound to human rhinovirus under physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienberger, Ferry; Rankl, Christian; Pastushenko, Vassili; Zhu, Rong; Blaas, Dieter; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2005-09-01

    Dynamic force microscopy (DFM) was used to image human rhinovirus HRV2 alone and complexed with single receptor molecules under near physiological conditions. Specific and site-directed immobilization of HRV2 on a model cell membrane resulted in a crystalline arrangement of virus particles with hexagonal symmetry and 35 nm spacing. High-resolution imaging of the virus capsid revealed about 20 resolvable structural features with 3 nm diameters; this finding is in agreement with protrusions seen by cryo-electron microscopy. Binding of receptor molecules to individual virus particles was observed after injection of soluble receptors into the liquid cell. Virus-receptor complexes with zero, one, two, or three attached receptor molecules were resolved. The number of receptor molecules associated to virions increased over time. Occasionally, dissociation of single receptor molecules from viral particles was also observed.

  18. Optogenetics, the intersection between physics and neuroscience: light stimulation of neurons in physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei; Goldys, Ewa M; Farnham, Melissa M J; Pilowsky, Paul M

    2014-12-01

    Neuronal stimulation by light is a novel approach in the emerging field of optogenetics, where genetic engineering is used to introduce light-activated channels. However, light is also capable of stimulating neurons even in the absence of genetic modifications through a range of physical and biological mechanisms. As a result, rigorous design of optogenetic experiments needs to take note of alternative and parallel effects of light illumination of neuronal tissues. Thus all matters relating to light penetration are critical to the development of studies using light-activated proteins. This paper discusses ways to quantify light, light penetration in tissue, as well as light stimulation of neurons in physiological conditions. We also describe the direct effect of light on neurons investigated at different sites.

  19. Surface modifications on InAs decrease indium and arsenic leaching under physiological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, Scott A.; Yoder, Jeffrey A.; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2012-11-01

    Devices containing III-V semiconductors such as InAs are increasingly being used in the electronic industry for a variety of optoelectronic applications. Furthermore, the attractive chemical, material, electronic properties make such materials appealing for use in devices designed for biological applications, such as biosensors. However, in biological applications the leaching of toxic materials from these devices could cause harm to cells or tissue. Additionally, after disposal, toxic inorganic materials can leach from devices and buildup in the environment, causing long-term ecological harm. Therefore, the toxicity of these materials along with their stability in physiological conditions are important factors to consider. Surface modifications are one common method of stabilizing semiconductor materials in order to chemically and electronically passivate them. Such surface modifications could also prevent the leaching of toxic materials by preventing the regrowth of the unstable surface oxide layer and by creating an effective barrier between the semiconductor surface and the surrounding environment. In this study, various surface modifications on InAs are developed with the goal of decreasing the leaching of indium and arsenic. The leaching of indium and arsenic from modified substrates was assessed in physiological conditions using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Substrates modified with 11-mercapto-1-undecanol (MU) and graft polymerized with poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG) were most effective at preventing indium and arsenic leaching. These surfaces were characterized using contact angle analysis, ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Substrates modified with collagen and synthetic polyelectrolytes were least effective, due to the destructive nature of acidic environments on InAs. The toxicity of modified and unmodified InAs, along with raw indium, arsenic, and PEG components was assessed

  20. Growth and Eco-Physiological Performance of Cotton Under Water Stress Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chun-yan; Isoda Akihiro; LI Mao-song; WANG Dao-long

    2007-01-01

    A cotton cultivar Xinluzao 8 was grown under four levels of water stress treatments (normal irrigation, slight, mild and severe water stress) from the initial reproductive growth stage in Shihezi, Xinjiang, China, in 2002, to evaluate the growth and eco-physiological performances. Under water stress conditions, the transpiration ability decreased while the leaf temperature increased. Although the relative leaf water content decreased as water stress increased, the differences among the treatments were small, indicating that cotton has high ability in maintaining water in leaf. The stomatal density increased as water stress increased, while the maximum stomatal aperture reduced only in the severest stressed plants.The time of the maximum stomatal aperture was delayed in the mild and severe stressed plants. When severe stress occurred, the stomata were kept open until the transpiration decreased to nearly zero, suggesting that the stomata might not be the main factor in adjusting transpiration in cotton. Cotton plant has high adaptation ability to water stress conditions because of decrease in both stomatal conductance and hydraulic conductance from soil-to-leaf pathway. The actual quantum yield of photosystem Ⅱ (PS Ⅱ) decreased under water stress conditions, while the maximum quantum yield of PS Ⅱ did not vary among treatments, suggesting that PS Ⅱ would not be damaged by water stress. The total dry weight reduced as water stress increased.

  1. Matrix Intensification Affects Body and Physiological Condition of Tropical Forest-Dependent Passerines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justus P Deikumah

    Full Text Available Matrix land-use intensification is a relatively recent and novel landscape change that can have important influences on the biota within adjacent habitat patches. While there are immediate local changes that it brings about, the influences on individual animals occupying adjacent habitats may be less evident initially. High-intensity land use could induce chronic stress in individuals in nearby remnants, leading ultimately to population declines. We investigated how physiological indicators and body condition measures of tropical forest-dependent birds differ between forest adjacent to surface mining sites and that near farmlands at two distances from remnant edge in southwest Ghana. We used mixed effects models of several condition indices including residual body mass and heterophil to lymphocyte (H/L ratios (an indicator of elevated chronic stress to explore the effect of matrix intensity on forest-dependent passerines classed as either sedentary area-sensitive habitat specialists or nomadic generalists. Individual birds occupying tropical forest remnants near surface mining sites were in poorer condition, as indicated by lower residual body mass and elevated chronic stress, compared to those in remnants near agricultural lands. The condition of the sedentary forest habitat specialists white-tailed alethe, Alethe diademata and western olive sunbird, Cyanomitra obscura was most negatively affected by high-intensity surface mining land-use adjacent to remnants, whereas generalist species were not affected. Land use intensification may set in train a new trajectory of faunal relaxation beyond that expected based on habitat loss alone. Patterns of individual condition may be useful in identifying habitats where species population declines may occur before faunal relaxation has concluded.

  2. Rational Design and Characterization of a Nanosuspension for Intraoral Administration Considering Physiological Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Ramona; Teubl, Birgit J; Tetyczka, Carolin; Roblegg, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The oral cavity displays an attractive route in drug administration that is not associated with gastric transit and hepatic first-pass metabolism. However, limiting factors for an efficient transit of drugs through the oral mucosa are poor water solubility and permeability. Hence, various strategies exist to enhance solubility. Specifically, nanotechnology has attracted much research interest in the past decade. This study aimed at developing a stable nanosuspension of the model compound phenytoin via wet media milling. The nanosuspensions were carefully characterized regarding hydrodynamic particle sizes, crystallinity, and dissolution characteristics under nonphysiological or physiological (salivary) conditions. The permeability of bulk phenytoin and nanophenytoin through a buccal in vitro and ex vivo model was investigated, and the apparent permeability coefficients were determined. Moreover, cytotoxicity studies were conducted. The addition of Tween 80 as stabilizer resulted in a stable crystalline nanosuspension (330 nm). The solubility characteristics significantly increased under salivary conditions, which further impacted the permeability, as the steady state appearance rate of nanosized phenytoin was 1.4-fold higher. Cytotoxicity studies demonstrated that bulk-/nano-phenytoin exhibited no harmful effects. It can be concluded that the salivary environment (i.e., ionic strength, pH) strongly impacts the solubility and consequently the permeability of crystalline nanosuspensions across the buccal mucosa.

  3. Simulating physiological conditions to evaluate nanoparticles for magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) therapy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shihwei; Chiang, Chen-li; Hsieh, Shuchen

    2010-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles with high self-heating capacity and low toxicity characteristics are a promising candidate for cancer hyperthermia treatment. In order to achieve minimum dosage to a patient, magnetic nanoparticles with high heating capacity are needed. In addition, the influence of physiological factors on the heat capacity of a material should be investigated in order to determine the feasibility. In this study, magnetite nanoparticles coated with lauric acid were prepared by co-precipitation of Fe 3+:Fe 2+ in a ratio of 2:1, 5:3, 3:2, and 4:3, and the pH was controlled using NaOH. Structural and magnetization characterization by means of X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) revealed that the main species was Fe 3O 4 and further showed that most of the nanoparticles exhibited superparamagnetic properties. All of the magnetic nanoparticles showed a specific absorption rate (SAR) increase that was linear with the magnetic field strength and frequency of the alternating magnetic field. Among all, the magnetic nanoparticles prepared in a 3:2 ratio showed the highest SAR. To further test the influence of physiological factors on the 3:2 ratio magnetic nanoparticles, we simulated the environment with protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA), blood sugar (dextrose), electrolytes (commercial norm-saline) and viscosity (glycerol) to examine the heating capacity under these conditions. Our results showed that the SAR value was unaffected by the protein and blood sugar environments. On the other hand, the SAR value was significantly reduced in the electrolyte environment, due to precipitation and aggregation with sodium ions. For the simulated viscous environment with glycerol, the result showed that the SAR values reduced with increasing glycerol concentration. We have further tested the heating capacity contribution from the Néel mechanism by trapping the magnetic nanoparticles in a solid form of polydimethylsiloxane

  4. Simulating physiological conditions to evaluate nanoparticles for magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) therapy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Shihwei [Department of Chemistry and Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Taiwan (China); Chiang Chenli [Department of Chemical Engineering, Southern Taiwan University of Technology, Taiwan (China); Hsieh Shuchen, E-mail: shsieh@facmail.nsysu.edu.t [Department of Chemistry and Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Taiwan (China)

    2010-01-15

    Magnetite nanoparticles with high self-heating capacity and low toxicity characteristics are a promising candidate for cancer hyperthermia treatment. In order to achieve minimum dosage to a patient, magnetic nanoparticles with high heating capacity are needed. In addition, the influence of physiological factors on the heat capacity of a material should be investigated in order to determine the feasibility. In this study, magnetite nanoparticles coated with lauric acid were prepared by co-precipitation of Fe{sup 3+}:Fe{sup 2+} in a ratio of 2:1, 5:3, 3:2, and 4:3, and the pH was controlled using NaOH. Structural and magnetization characterization by means of X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) revealed that the main species was Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and further showed that most of the nanoparticles exhibited superparamagnetic properties. All of the magnetic nanoparticles showed a specific absorption rate (SAR) increase that was linear with the magnetic field strength and frequency of the alternating magnetic field. Among all, the magnetic nanoparticles prepared in a 3:2 ratio showed the highest SAR. To further test the influence of physiological factors on the 3:2 ratio magnetic nanoparticles, we simulated the environment with protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA), blood sugar (dextrose), electrolytes (commercial norm-saline) and viscosity (glycerol) to examine the heating capacity under these conditions. Our results showed that the SAR value was unaffected by the protein and blood sugar environments. On the other hand, the SAR value was significantly reduced in the electrolyte environment, due to precipitation and aggregation with sodium ions. For the simulated viscous environment with glycerol, the result showed that the SAR values reduced with increasing glycerol concentration. We have further tested the heating capacity contribution from the Neel mechanism by trapping the magnetic nanoparticles in a solid form of

  5. GROSS AND MICROSCOPIC ANATOMY OF MAMMARY GLAND OF DROMEDARIES UNDER DIFFERENT PHYSIOLOGICAL CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kausar, A. Sarwar and C.S. Hayat

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Samples of 24 mammary glands from healthy one-humped camel (Camelus dromedarius cows were investigated under different physiological conditions for their gross and light microscopic anatomy. Different groups included equal number of immature heifers, mature heifers, lactating and non-lactating animals. Tissues fixed in 10% NBF were processed as per routine and stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E and Massons trichome. Morphometry was done with the help of stage and ocular micrometer. Gross studies revealed that the camel's udder consists of four quarters. The udder and teat showed light brown to solid black tinge in colour. The tips of teats sloped to a point both in immature and mature animals, however, the conformation of teats turned rounded at the tips in lactating camels. Each teat possessed two teat canals. The dimensions of teat and streak canal varied markedly among four different groups. Number of Furestenberg's rosettes ranged from 11.6 to 13.6. Microscopic studies revealed that streak canal was lined by stratified squamous keratinized epithelium that was partially extremely thin in some parts. Cutaneous layer of teat was devoid of hair follicles except at the base of teat. Follicles were associated with sebaceous glands. Sweat glands were less coiled and showed a wide acinous element forming the part of excretory duct. Glomus organs occurred in the stratum profundum of the corium as well as in the subcutis of the skin of mammary gland. They also revealed great variation in structure and size. Epithelial lining of the alveoli varied from flattened to columnar according to physiological state. Number and size of alveoli per lobule decreased and the parenchyma was replaced by loose connective tissue during non-lactating phase. These results suggested that age and lactation considerably influenced gross and microscopic anatomy of mammary gland in camels.

  6. Physiological response of Pinus halepensis needles under ozone and water stress conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manes, F.; Donato, E. [Univ. of Rome ' La Sapienza' , Dept. of Plant Biology, Rome (Italy); Vitale, M. [Univ. of Molise, Dept. of Environmental Sciences, Isernia (Italy)

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate how physiological processes of potted Pinus halepensis plants, grown under controlled conditions, were affected by ozone (O{sub 3}) and/or water stress, integrating the gas exchange and biochemical data with fluorescence OJIP polyphasic transient data. Plants submitted to only water stress (T{sub 1}) and with ozone (T{sub 3}) showed a strong decrease in stomatal conductance and gas exchange, coinciding with a reduction of maximum yield of photochemistry ({rho}{sub po}) and very negative values of leaf water potential. Simultaneously, a great increase of both PSII antenna size, indicated by absorption per reaction centre, and electron transport per reaction centre were found. The reduction of photosynthesis in the O{sub 3}-treated plants (T{sub 2}) by a slowing down of the Calvin cycle was supported by the increase of related fluorescence parameters such as relative variable fluorescence, heat de-excitation constant, energy de-excitation by spillover, and the decrease of {rho}{sub po}. We suggest an antagonistic effect between the two stresses to explain the delayed ozone-induced decrease of stomatal conductance values for T{sub 3} with respect to T{sub 1} plants, by an alteration of the physiological mechanisms of stomatal opening, which involve the increase of intra-cellular free-calcium induced by ABA under co-occurring water shortage. We emphasise the importance of considering the intensity of the individual stress factor in studies concerning the interaction of stresses. (au)

  7. Ability of sat-1 to transport sulfate, bicarbonate, or oxalate under physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krick, Wolfgang; Schnedler, Nina; Burckhardt, Gerhard; Burckhardt, Birgitta C

    2009-07-01

    Tubular reabsorption of sulfate is achieved by the sodium-dependent sulfate transporter, NaSi-1, located at the apical membrane, and the sulfate-anion exchanger, sat-1, located at the basolateral membrane. To delineate the physiological role of rat sat-1, [(35)S]sulfate and [(14)C]oxalate uptake into sat-1-expressing oocytes was determined under various experimental conditions. Influx of [(35)S]sulfate was inhibited by bicarbonate, thiosulfate, sulfite, and oxalate, but not by sulfamate and sulfide, in a competitive manner with K(i) values of 2.7 +/- 1.3 mM, 101.7 +/- 9.7 microM, 53.8 +/- 10.9 microM, and 63.5 +/- 38.7 microM, respectively. Vice versa, [(14)C]oxalate uptake was inhibited by sulfate with a K(i) of 85.9 +/- 9.5 microM. The competitive type of inhibition indicates that these compounds are most likely substrates of sat-1. Physiological plasma bicarbonate concentrations (25 mM) reduced sulfate and oxalate uptake by more than 75%. Simultaneous application of sulfate, bicarbonate, and oxalate abolished sulfate as well as oxalate uptake. These data and electrophysiological studies using a two-electrode voltage-clamp device provide evidence that sat-1 preferentially works as an electroneutral sulfate-bicarbonate or oxalate-bicarbonate exchanger. In kidney proximal tubule cells, sat-1 likely completes sulfate reabsorption from the ultrafiltrate across the basolateral membrane in exchange for bicarbonate. In hepatocytes, oxalate extrusion is most probably mediated either by an exchange for sulfate or bicarbonate.

  8. The normal flora may contribute to the quantitative preponderance of myeloid cells under physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shi; LiHua, Hu

    2011-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, the innate immune cells derived from myeloid lineage absolutely outnumber the lymphoid cells. At present, two theories are attributed to the maintenance of haemopoiesis: the asymmetric cell division and the bone marrow hematopoietic microenvironment or "niche". However, the former only explains the self-renewal of haemopoietic stem cell (HSC) and the start of haemopoietic differentiation but fails to address the inducers of cell fate decisions; the latter has to admit that the hematopoietic cytokines, despite their significance in the maintenance of haemopoiesis, have no specific effect on lineage commitment. Given these flaws, the advantageous mechanism of myeloid haemopoiesis has not yet been uncovered in the current theories. The discoveries that bacterial components (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) and intestinal decontamination affect the mobilization of HSC trigger the interest in normal flora, which together with their components may have an effect on haemopoiesis. In the experiments in dogs and mice, researchers documented that the generation of myeloid cells has undergone changes in the bone marrow and periphery when antibiotics are used to regulate the normal intestinal flora and the concentration of its components. However, the same changes are not involved in lymphoid cells. Therefore, we hypothesize that in human body normal flora and its components are a driving force to maintain myeloid haemopoiesis under physiological conditions. To account for the selectiveness in haemopoiesis, these facts should be taken into consideration, such as HSC and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) functionally expressed pattern recognition receptors (PRR), and both of them can self-migrate or be recruited by normal flora or its components into periphery. Dynamically monitoring the myeloid haemopoiesis may provide an important complementary program that precludes the abuse of antibiotics, which prevents diseases triggered by the imbalance of normal

  9. Exploring the Limits of Cell Adhesion under Shear Stress within Physiological Conditions and beyond on a Chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie E. M. Stamp

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion processes are of ubiquitous importance for biomedical applications such as optimization of implant materials. Here, not only physiological conditions such as temperature or pH, but also topographical structures play crucial roles, as inflammatory reactions after surgery can diminish osseointegration. In this study, we systematically investigate cell adhesion under static, dynamic and physiologically relevant conditions employing a lab-on-a-chip system. We screen adhesion of the bone osteosarcoma cell line SaOs-2 on a titanium implant material for pH and temperature values in the physiological range and beyond, to explore the limits of cell adhesion, e.g., for feverish and acidic conditions. A detailed study of different surface roughness Rq gives insight into the correlation between the cells’ abilities to adhere and withstand shear flow and the topography of the substrates, finding a local optimum at Rq = 22 nm. We use shear stress induced by acoustic streaming to determine a measure for the ability of cell adhesion under an external force for various conditions. We find an optimum of cell adhesion for T = 37 °C and pH = 7.4 with decreasing cell adhesion outside the physiological range, especially for high T and low pH. We find constant detachment rates in the physiological regime, but this behavior tends to collapse at the limits of 41 °C and pH 4.

  10. Neurogenesis within the adult hippocampus under physiological conditions and in depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martin Dokter; Oliver von Bohlen und Halbach

    2012-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis can only be observed in some specific brain regions.One of these areas is the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation.The progenitor cells located in the subgranular layer of the dentate gyrus proliferate, differentiate, and give rise to young neurons that can become integrated into existing neuronal circuits.Under physiological conditions, hippocampal neurogenesis is linked to hippocampal-dependent learning, whereas deficits in adult hippocampal neurogenesis have been shown to correlate with disturbances in spatial learning and memory.This review summarizes the phenomenon of adult hippocampal neurogenesis and the use of suitable markers for the investigation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis.In addition, we focused on the disturbances in neurogenesis that can be seen in depression.Interestingly, several antidepressants have been found to be capable of increasing the rate of hippocampal neurogenesis.Based on that, it can be speculated that factors, which directly or indirectly increase the rate of hippocampal neurogenesis, may be helpful in the treatment of depression.

  11. Physiological response of gmelina (Gmelina arborea Roxb. to hydric conditions of the colombian Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojas Andrea

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available

    Gmelina is an important forest species because of its adaptability to different tropical environments, rapid growth and high quality wood for many uses. Although the species thrives in lowlands, both wet and dry, water availability is the main limiting factor for production in the latter. The transpiration rate, stomatal resistance, water potential and chlorophyll and carotenoid pigments content were monitored for three climatic seasons (rainy, transitional and dry and three ages (seedling (2-10 months, juvenile (10-16 months and adult (48-60 months, in order to observe the physiological response of gmelina to conditions in northern Colombia. Transpiration rates decreased with the age of the trees and the critical value of leaf water potential, that generates stomatal closure, was observed below -2.6 MPa. The dry season resulted in increased carotenoid content, in contrast to the content of chlorophyll A, B and total.

  12. The non-oxidative degradation of ascorbic acid at physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, G L; Ortwerth, B J

    2000-04-15

    The degradation of L-ascorbate (AsA) and its primary oxidation products, L-dehydroascorbate (DHA) and 2,3-L-diketogulonate (2, 3-DKG) were studied under physiological conditions. Analysis determined that L-erythrulose (ERU) and oxalate were the primary degradation products of ASA regardless of which compound was used as the starting material. The identification of ERU was determined by proton decoupled (13)C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and was quantified by high performance liquid chromatography, and enzymatic analysis. The molar yield of ERU from 2,3-DKG at pH 7.0 37 degrees C and limiting O(2)97%. This novel ketose product of AsA degradation, was additionally qualitatively identified by gas-liquid chromatography, and by thin layer chromatography. ERU is an extremely reactive ketose, which rapidly glycates and crosslinks proteins, and therefore may mediate the AsA-dependent modification of protein (ascorbylation) seen in vitro, and also proposed to occur in vivo in human lens during diabetic and age-onset cataract formation.

  13. Human Serum Albumin Increases the Stability of Green Tea Catechins in Aqueous Physiological Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Zinellu

    Full Text Available Epicatechin (EC, epigallocatechin (EGC, epicatechingallate (ECG and epigallocatechingallate (EGCG are antioxidants present in the green tea, a widely used beverage whose health benefits are largely recognized. Nevertheless, major physicochemical limitations, such as the high instability of catechins, pose important questions concerning their potential pharmacological use. Recent studies indicate that binding of catechins with plasmatic proteins may modulate their plasma concentration, tissue delivery and biological activity. After 5 minutes of incubation with HSA both ECG and EGCG were fully bound to HSA, while after 48h incubation only 41% of EC and 70% of EGC resulted linked. HSA had a strong stabilizing effect on all catechins, which could be found in solution between 29 and 85% even after 48h of incubation. In the absence of HSA, EGC and EGCG disappeared in less than 24h, while ECG and EC were found after 48h at 5 and 50%, respectively. The stabilizing effect of HSA toward EGCG, obtained in aqueous physiological conditions, resulted stronger in comparison to cysteine and HCl, previously reported to stabilize this polyphenol. Because of the multitude of contradictory data concerning in vivo and in vitro antioxidant-based experimentations, we believe our work may shed some light on this debated field of research.

  14. Human Serum Albumin Increases the Stability of Green Tea Catechins in Aqueous Physiological Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinellu, Angelo; Sotgia, Salvatore; Scanu, Bastianina; Forteschi, Mauro; Giordo, Roberta; Cossu, Annalisa; Posadino, Anna Maria; Carru, Ciriaco; Pintus, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    Epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin (EGC), epicatechingallate (ECG) and epigallocatechingallate (EGCG) are antioxidants present in the green tea, a widely used beverage whose health benefits are largely recognized. Nevertheless, major physicochemical limitations, such as the high instability of catechins, pose important questions concerning their potential pharmacological use. Recent studies indicate that binding of catechins with plasmatic proteins may modulate their plasma concentration, tissue delivery and biological activity. After 5 minutes of incubation with HSA both ECG and EGCG were fully bound to HSA, while after 48h incubation only 41% of EC and 70% of EGC resulted linked. HSA had a strong stabilizing effect on all catechins, which could be found in solution between 29 and 85% even after 48h of incubation. In the absence of HSA, EGC and EGCG disappeared in less than 24h, while ECG and EC were found after 48h at 5 and 50%, respectively. The stabilizing effect of HSA toward EGCG, obtained in aqueous physiological conditions, resulted stronger in comparison to cysteine and HCl, previously reported to stabilize this polyphenol. Because of the multitude of contradictory data concerning in vivo and in vitro antioxidant-based experimentations, we believe our work may shed some light on this debated field of research.

  15. Effect of iron dusts on physiological responses of gram seedlings (Cicer arietinum L. under laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das C.R.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory experiments was conducted for the assessment of physiological and biochemical responses of iron dust under the influence of different pH levels (6.5, 5.0, 3.0 and two concentration of iron dust (0.1 mg and 0.6 mg with two particle size (100 μm and 300 μm sprayed on the Cicer arietinum L. seed surface for fifteen day exposure. Observation was made on germination percentage and germination rate, vigour index, % phytotoxicity of root and shoot, chlorophyll, sugar, protein and proline content in both treated and control plant. The present results revealed that the seed color changes to brown under iron stress. The lower germination percentage and germination rate gradually decrease with pH of the medium but both the parameters were not significantly affected by the iron dust. Moreover higher % phytotoxicity was observed under all treatments compared to control and also lower values of this parameter were recorded in shoot than root. The reduction trend in chlorophyll and protein content was recorded at low pH but reverse result was recorded for sugar. Moreover highest proline was recorded under highly acidic condition.

  16. Microstructured, functional PVA hydrogels through bioconjugation with oligopeptides under physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Siow-Feng; Smith, Anton A A; Zelikin, Alexander N

    2013-03-25

    In this work, bioconjugation techniques are developed to achieve peptide functionalization of poly(vinyl alcohol), PVA, as both a polymer in solution and within microstructured physical hydrogels, in both cases under physiological conditions. PVA is unique in that it is one of very few polymers with excellent biocompatibility and safety and has FDA approval for clinical uses in humans. However, decades of development have documented only scant opportunities in bioconjugation with PVA. As such, materials derived thereof fail to answer the call for functional biomaterials for advanced cell culture and tissue engineering applications. To address these limitations, PVA is synthesized with terminal thiol groups and conjugated with thiolated peptides using PVA in solution. Further, microstructured, surface-adhered PVA physical hydrogels are assembled, the available conjugation sites within the hydrogels are quantified, and quantitative kinetic data are collected on peptide conjugation to the hydrogels. The success of bioconjugation in the gel phase is quantified through the use of a cell-adhesive peptide and visualization of cell adhesion on PVA hydrogels as cell culture substrates. Taken together, the presented data establish a novel paradigm in bioconjugation and functionalization of PVA physical hydrogels. Coupled with an excellent safety profile of PVA, these results deliver a superior biomaterial for diverse biomedical applications.

  17. Mechanical and physiological examination of barefoot and shod conditions in female runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, S; Braun, W A

    2014-08-01

    Barefoot running and running using minimalist footwear have become increasingly popular in recent years. Footwear choice may affect running mechanics and the metabolic cost of running. To investigate these factors, 8 well-trained, female distance runners (mean age=20.1±1.4 years) were recruited to participate in the study. Following orientation to testing procedures, subjects completed 3 running economy tests on separate days. Treatment order (barefoot, minimalist footwear and running shoe) was counter-balanced. Each testing session consisted of a 5-min warm-up at 2.24 m · s(-1), followed by the 7-min RE test at 3.13 m · s(-1). Biomechanical data were collected at the 3-min mark for 10 s, and expired gases were collected from minutes 5-7. One-way repeated measures ANOVA revealed a statistically significant difference for running economy (p=0.04), expressed as relative oxygen uptake per km in the barefoot condition (running shoe: 204.51±2.84; minimalist footwear: 198.21±3.04; barefoot: 193.26±3.62 ml · kg(-1)· km(-1)) vs. running shoe. The other physiological and biomechanical variables were not statistically significant (p>0.05). However, moderate to large effect sizes suggested there were biomechanical changes that ensured between conditions. It should be further evaluated whether these mechanical adjustments and the running economy trend would translate into improved distance race performance while running barefoot or with minimalist footwear.

  18. Tidal flushing restores the physiological condition of fish residing in degraded salt marshes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibble, Kimberly L; Meyerson, Laura A

    2012-01-01

    Roads, bridges, and dikes constructed across salt marshes can restrict tidal flow, degrade habitat quality for nekton, and facilitate invasion by non-native plants including Phragmites australis. Introduced P. australis contributes to marsh accretion and eliminates marsh surface pools thereby adversely affecting fish by reducing access to intertidal habitats essential for feeding, reproduction, and refuge. Our study assessed the condition of resident fish populations (Fundulus heteroclitus) at four tidally restricted and four tidally restored marshes in New England invaded by P. australis relative to adjacent reference salt marshes. We used physiological and morphological indicators of fish condition, including proximate body composition (% lipid, % lean dry, % water), recent daily growth rate, age class distributions, parasite prevalence, female gravidity status, length-weight regressions, and a common morphological indicator (Fulton's K) to assess impacts to fish health. We detected a significant increase in the quantity of parasites infecting fish in tidally restricted marshes but not in those where tidal flow was restored to reduce P. australis cover. Using fish length as a covariate, we found that unparasitized, non-gravid F. heteroclitus in tidally restricted marshes had significantly reduced lipid reserves and increased lean dry (structural) mass relative to fish residing in reference marshes. Fish in tidally restored marshes were equivalent across all metrics relative to those in reference marshes indicating that habitat quality was restored via increased tidal flushing. Reference marshes adjacent to tidally restored sites contained the highest abundance of young fish (ages 0-1) while tidally restricted marshes contained the lowest. Results indicate that F. heteroclitus residing in physically and hydrologically altered marshes are at a disadvantage relative to fish in reference marshes but the effects can be reversed through ecological restoration.

  19. Tidal flushing restores the physiological condition of fish residing in degraded salt marshes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly L Dibble

    Full Text Available Roads, bridges, and dikes constructed across salt marshes can restrict tidal flow, degrade habitat quality for nekton, and facilitate invasion by non-native plants including Phragmites australis. Introduced P. australis contributes to marsh accretion and eliminates marsh surface pools thereby adversely affecting fish by reducing access to intertidal habitats essential for feeding, reproduction, and refuge. Our study assessed the condition of resident fish populations (Fundulus heteroclitus at four tidally restricted and four tidally restored marshes in New England invaded by P. australis relative to adjacent reference salt marshes. We used physiological and morphological indicators of fish condition, including proximate body composition (% lipid, % lean dry, % water, recent daily growth rate, age class distributions, parasite prevalence, female gravidity status, length-weight regressions, and a common morphological indicator (Fulton's K to assess impacts to fish health. We detected a significant increase in the quantity of parasites infecting fish in tidally restricted marshes but not in those where tidal flow was restored to reduce P. australis cover. Using fish length as a covariate, we found that unparasitized, non-gravid F. heteroclitus in tidally restricted marshes had significantly reduced lipid reserves and increased lean dry (structural mass relative to fish residing in reference marshes. Fish in tidally restored marshes were equivalent across all metrics relative to those in reference marshes indicating that habitat quality was restored via increased tidal flushing. Reference marshes adjacent to tidally restored sites contained the highest abundance of young fish (ages 0-1 while tidally restricted marshes contained the lowest. Results indicate that F. heteroclitus residing in physically and hydrologically altered marshes are at a disadvantage relative to fish in reference marshes but the effects can be reversed through ecological

  20. Estimation of the physiological mechanical conditioning in vascular tissue engineering by a predictive fluid-structure interaction approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresoldi, Claudia; Bianchi, Elena; Pellegata, Alessandro Filippo; Dubini, Gabriele; Mantero, Sara

    2017-08-01

    The in vitro replication of physiological mechanical conditioning through bioreactors plays a crucial role in the development of functional Small-Caliber Tissue-Engineered Blood Vessels. An in silico scaffold-specific model under pulsatile perfusion provided by a bioreactor was implemented using a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) approach for viscoelastic tubular scaffolds (e.g. decellularized swine arteries, DSA). Results of working pressures, circumferential deformations, and wall shear stress on DSA fell within the desired physiological range and indicated the ability of this model to correctly predict the mechanical conditioning acting on the cells-scaffold system. Consequently, the FSI model allowed us to a priori define the stimulation pattern, driving in vitro physiological maturation of scaffolds, especially with viscoelastic properties.

  1. Express-evaluation of the psycho-physiological condition of Paralympic athletes

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    Drozdovski A

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Alexander Drozdovski,1 Irina Gromova,2 Konstantin Korotkov,1 Oleg Shelkov,1 Femi Akinnagbe31Saint Petersburg Federal Research Institute of Physical Culture and Sport, St Petersburg, Russia; 2Paralympic Team of Russia, Moscow, Russia; 3Georgetown University, Washington, DC, USAObjective: Evaluation of elite athletes’ psycho-physiological condition at various stages of preparation and in international competition.Design: Athletes were tested during training and participation in international competition using methods of galvanic skin response (GSR and gas discharge visualization (GDV.Setting: Saint Petersburg Federal Research Institute of Physical Culture and Sport, Russia and Paralympic athletic training camp, Norway.Participants: Eighteen athletes from Russia’s Skiing and Biathlon Paralympic Team. All athletes had some level of damage to their musculoskeletal system.Main outcome measures: Stress level (SL, energy potential (EP, and psycho-emotional tension (PET.Results: It was found that the higher the level of EP achieved by the athlete in the training period, the lower the SL in the competition time. The SL of an athlete recorded in the training period significantly correlates with the SL both before and at the time of competition. The PET and SL before the World Cup was negatively correlated to the results of skiing competitions.Conclusion: Evaluation of PET, EP, and SL through GSR and GDV offers a fast, highly precise, non-invasive method to assess an athlete’s level of readiness during both training and at the time of competition.Keywords: paralympic sport, express-analysis, galvanic skin response (GSR, gas discharge visualization (GDV

  2. Bacterial Physiological Adaptations to Contrasting Edaphic Conditions Identified Using Landscape Scale Metagenomics

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    Ashish A. Malik

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Environmental factors relating to soil pH are important regulators of bacterial taxonomic biodiversity, yet it remains unclear if such drivers affect community functional potential. To address this, we applied whole-genome metagenomics to eight geographically distributed soils at opposing ends of a landscape soil pH gradient (where “low-pH” is ~pH 4.3 and “high-pH” is ~pH 8.3 and evaluated functional differences with respect to functionally annotated genes. First, differences in taxonomic and functional diversity between the two pH categories were assessed with respect to alpha diversity (mean sample richness and gamma diversity (total richness pooled for each pH category. Low-pH soils, also exhibiting higher organic matter and moisture, consistently had lower taxonomic alpha and gamma diversity, but this was not apparent in assessments of functional alpha and gamma diversity. However, coherent changes in the relative abundances of annotated genes between low- and high-pH soils were identified; with strong multivariate clustering of samples according to pH independent of geography. Assessment of indicator genes revealed that the acidic organic-rich soils possessed a greater abundance of cation efflux pumps, C and N direct fixation systems, and fermentation pathways, indicating adaptations to both acidity and anaerobiosis. Conversely, high-pH soils possessed more direct transporter-mediated mechanisms for organic C and N substrate acquisition. These findings highlight the distinctive physiological adaptations required for bacteria to survive in soils of various nutrient availability and edaphic conditions and more generally indicate that bacterial functional versatility with respect to functional gene annotations may not be constrained by taxonomy.

  3. Functional significance of the Frank-Starling mechanism under physiological and pathophysiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, R; Dierberger, B; Kissling, G

    1992-11-01

    The functional significance of the Frank-Starling mechanism under physiological and pathophysiological conditions is discussed, based mainly on animal experiment results (in the dog, pig and rat). The dependence of individual stroke volume on end-diastolic volume can be described adequately using Frank's diagram. This can be illustrated by varying filling pressure (respiratory cycle, vascular tone in the capacitance system, body position, circulating blood volume) and by alterations in the duration of the filling period (heart rate and rhythm, rate of relaxation) and in ventricular compliance (wall thickness, fibrosis; contracture, rigor). The functional importance of the Frank-Starling mechanism lies mainly in adapting left to right ventricular output. During upright physical exercise an increase in end-diastolic volume due to the action of the peripheral muscle pump and increased venous tone can assist in enhancing stroke volume. Reduced contractility leads to a shift of the operating point to the right in the pressure-volume diagram, thus tending to prevent a decrease in stroke volume. However, the consequences of increased circulating blood volume in chronic heart failure are, as a rule, mainly detrimental (congestive symptoms; myocardial component of coronary resistance; cardiac energetics). Reduced contractility results in a flattening of the relation between stroke volume (or stroke work) and end-diastolic volume. Furthermore, the Starling mechanism is prevented from becoming effective if the sarcomere-length reserve is exhausted, or in the presence of inadequate sarcomere extension due to impaired relaxation or reduced distensibility of the ventricular wall. The latter is illustrated using the example of a dilated fibrotic left ventricle from a rat with experimental supravalvular aortic stenosis.

  4. A dynamic artificial gastrointestinal system for studying the behavior of orally administered drug dosage forms under various physiological conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanquet, S.; Zeijdner, E.; Beyssac, E.; Meunier, J.-P.; Denis, S.; Havenaar, R.; Alric, M.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the potential of a dynamic, multicompartmental in vitro system simulating the human stomach and small intestine (TIM-1) for studying the behavior of oral drug dosage forms under various physiological gastrointestinal conditions. Methods. Two mode

  5. Non-invasive monitoring of osteogenic differentiation on microtissue arrays under physiological conditions using scanning electrochemical microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sridhar, Adithya; Berg, van den Albert; Le Gac, Séverine

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a non-invasive assay using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) for detecting osteogenic differentiation at physiological conditions (pH 7.5) on arrays of C2C12 microtissues. Upon exposure to bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP-2), C2C12 microtissues differentiate and exp

  6. The surface properties of nanoparticles determine the agglomeration state and the size of the particles under physiological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Bantz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to the recent widespread application of nanomaterials to biological systems, a careful consideration of their physiological impact is required. This demands an understanding of the complex processes at the bio–nano interface. Therefore, a comprehensive and accurate characterization of the material under physiological conditions is crucial to correlate the observed biological impact with defined colloidal properties. As promising candidates for biomedical applications, two SiO2-based nanomaterial systems were chosen for extensive size characterization to investigate the agglomeration behavior under physiological conditions. To combine the benefits of different characterization techniques and to compensate for their respective drawbacks, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation were applied. The investigated particle systems were (i negatively charged silica particles and (ii poly(organosiloxane particles offering variable surface modification opportunities (positively charged, polymer coated. It is shown that the surface properties primarily determine the agglomeration state of the particles and therefore their effective size, especially under physiological conditions. Thus, the biological identity of a nanomaterial is clearly influenced by differentiating surface properties.

  7. Physiological Responses and Performance Analysis Difference between Official and Simulated Karate Combat Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaabène, Helmi; Mkaouer, Bessem; Franchini, Emerson; Souissi, Nafaa; Selmi, Mohamed Amine; Nagra, Yassine; Chamari, Karim

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to compare physiological responses and time-motion analysis between official and simulated karate combat. Methods Ten high-level karatekas participated in this study, which included official and simulated karate combat. Results Karatekas used more upper-limb attack techniques during official combat compared to simulated ones (6±3 vs 3±1; P=0.05, respectively). For official and simulated karate matches, the numbers of high-intensity actions (i.e. offensive and defensive fighting activity) were 14±6 and 18±5, respectively (P>0.05), lasting from <1s to 5s each. Total fighting activity phase was lower during official compared to simulated matches (21.0±8.2s vs 30.4±9.9s, P<0.01, respectively). Effort (10.0±2.8s) to rest (11.9±2.7s) ratio (E:R) was 1:1 and high-intensity actions (1.6±0.3s) to rest (11.9±2.7s) ratio was higher than 1:7 during simulated combat. During official karate match, the activity and rest duration were 10.0±3.4s and 16.2±4.1s, respectively (E:R ratio 1:1.5), while high-intensity actions were 1.5±0.3s, resulting in an E:R ratio of 1:11. Blood lactate concentration was higher during official (11.14±1.82 mmol.l-1) compared to simulated karate combat (7.80±2.66 mmol.l-1) (P<0.05). Subjective perceived exertion differed significantly between official and simulated combat (14±2 vs. 12±2; P<0.05, respectively). The majority of karatekas’ perceived exertion was higher in the lower limb muscle groups irrespective of the karate combat condition. Conclusion Official and simulated matches differ considerably, therefore coaches should create new strategies during training sessions to achieve the same effort and pause profile of competitive matches and/or that athletes should be submitted to frequent competitions to adapt themselves to the profile of this event. PMID:24868428

  8. Physiological Responses to Firefighting in Extreme Temperatures Do Not Compare to Firefighting in Temperate Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Windisch

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine physiological responses to two different simulated firefighting exercises: a firefighting exercise with flashovers, smoke, poor visibility and extreme temperatures (300° in a burning container and a standard firefighting exercise in temperate conditions. Furthermore, a second purpose of the study was to find out if the contribution of strength and endurance capacities to firefighting performance changes when the demands of the firefighting exercise change.Methods: Sixteen professional firefighters performed a maximum treadmill test, strength testing, a standard simulated firefighting exercise (SFE without heat and flashovers and a firefighting exercise with a simulation of the flashover phenomenon in a burning container (FOT. The treadmill testing was used to determine peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak, ventilatory threshold (VT1 and respiratory compensation point (RCP. Three intensity zones were identified according to heart rate (HR values corresponding to VT1 and RCP: zone 1–HR below VT1, zone 2-HR between VT1 and RCP, zone 3–HR above RCP. Firefighting performance was determined by a simple time-strain-air depletion model (TSA taking the sum of z-transformed parameters of time to finish the exercise, strain in terms of mean heart rate, and air depletion from the breathing apparatus. Correlations were then established between TSA based firefighting performance parameters and fitness variables representing strength and endurance.Results: HR was significantly lower during SFE (79.9 ± 6.9%HRmax compared to FOT (85.4 ± 5.2%HRmax. During SFE subjects spent 24.6 ± 30.2% of time in zone 1, 65.8 ± 28.1% in zone 2 and 9.7 ± 16.6% in zone 3. During FOT subjects spent 16.3 ± 12.8% in zone 1, 50.4 ± 13.2% in zone 2 and 33.3 ± 16.6% in zone 3. Out of all correlations, relative VO2peak showed the highest relation to mean HR during SFE (−0.593 as well as FOT (−0.693.Conclusions: Endurance in terms of

  9. A surface acoustic wave-driven micropump for particle uptake investigation under physiological flow conditions in very small volumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian G. Strobl

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Static conditions represent an important shortcoming of many in vitro experiments on the cellular uptake of nanoparticles. Here, we present a versatile microfluidic device based on acoustic streaming induced by surface acoustic waves (SAWs. The device offers a convenient method for introducing fluid motion in standard cell culture chambers and for mimicking capillary blood flow. We show that shear rates over the whole physiological range in sample volumes as small as 200 μL can be achieved. A precise characterization method for the induced flow profile is presented and the influence of flow on the uptake of Pt-decorated CeO2 particles by endothelial cells (HMEC-1 is demonstrated. Under physiological flow conditions the particle uptake rates for this system are significantly lower than at low shear conditions. This underlines the vital importance of the fluidic environment for cellular uptake mechanisms.

  10. Altered physiological conditions of the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber as a measure of subchronic TiO2 effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srpčič, Anja Menard; Drobne, Damjana; Novak, Sara

    2015-03-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) show low toxic potential against a variety of environmental organisms when measured by conventional toxicity endpoints. However, the question is whether the conventional measures of toxicity can define the adverse effects of nanoparticles. The aim of this study was to asses the potential toxic and cytotoxic effects of the ingested nano-TiO2 (anatase, Porcellio scaber. In addition to conventional toxicity parameters, the physiological condition of the animals was assessed. Following 28-day feeding exposure to nano-TiO2 at concentrations up to 5,000 μg nano-TiO2/g leaf dry weight, no toxic or cytotoxic effects were demonstrated. However, the physiological condition of the animals was affected in a dose-dependent manner. The physiological state of organisms is an important parameter to assess the potential population implications due to the exposure to nanomaterials. Therefore, we suggest that only if both, the physiological state of the animals exposed to nano-TiO2 and the conventional toxicity markers show no effects, the exposure dose can be interpreted as non-hazardous.

  11. Selecting boundary conditions in physiological strain analysis of the femur: Balanced loads, inertia relief method and follower load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyland, Mark; Trepczynski, Adam; Duda, Georg N; Zehn, Manfred; Schaser, Klaus-Dieter; Märdian, Sven

    2015-12-01

    Selection of boundary constraints may influence amount and distribution of loads. The purpose of this study is to analyze the potential of inertia relief and follower load to maintain the effects of musculoskeletal loads even under large deflections in patient specific finite element models of intact or fractured bone compared to empiric boundary constraints which have been shown to lead to physiological displacements and surface strains. The goal is to elucidate the use of boundary conditions in strain analyses of bones. Finite element models of the intact femur and a model of clinically relevant fracture stabilization by locking plate fixation were analyzed with normal walking loading conditions for different boundary conditions, specifically re-balanced loading, inertia relief and follower load. Peak principal cortex surface strains for different boundary conditions are consistent (maximum deviation 13.7%) except for inertia relief without force balancing (maximum deviation 108.4%). Influence of follower load on displacements increases with higher deflection in fracture model (from 3% to 7% for force balanced model). For load balanced models, follower load had only minor influence, though the effect increases strongly with higher deflection. Conventional constraints of fixed nodes in space should be carefully reconsidered because their type and position are challenging to justify and for their potential to introduce relevant non-physiological reaction forces. Inertia relief provides an alternative method which yields physiological strain results.

  12. Lymphocytes Mitochondrial Physiology as Biomarker of Energy Metabolism during Fasted and Fed Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Cortez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are central coordinators of energy metabolism, and changes of their physiology have long been associated with metabolic disorders. Thus, observations of energy dynamics in different cell types are of utmost importance. Therefore, tools with quick and easy handling are needed for consistent evaluations of such interventions. In this paper, our main hypothesis is that during different nutritional situations lymphocytes mitochondrial physiology could be associated with the metabolism of other cell types, such as cardiomyocytes, and consequently be used as metabolic biomarker. Blood lymphocytes and heart muscle fibers were obtained from both fed and 24 h-fasted mice, and mitochondrial analysis was assessed by high-resolution respirometry and western blotting. Carbohydrate-linked oxidation and fatty acid oxidation were significantly higher after fasting. Carnitine palmitoil transferase 1 and uncouple protein 2 contents were increased in the fasted group, while the glucose transporters 1 and 4 and the ratio phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase/AMPK did not change between groups. In summary, under a nutritional status modification, mitochondria demonstrated earlier adaptive capacity than other metabolic sensors such as glucose transporters and AMPK, suggesting the accuracy of mitochondria physiology of lymphocytes as biomarker for metabolic changes.

  13. ATP-P2X7 Receptor Modulates Axon Initial Segment Composition and Function in Physiological Conditions and Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Puerto del Pino, Ana del; Fronzaroli-Molinieres, Laure; Pérez-Álvarez, María José; Giraud, Pierre; Carlier, Edmond; Wandosell, Francisco; Debanne, Dominique; Garrido, Juan José

    2015-01-01

    © 2014 The Author. All rights reserved. Axon properties, including action potential initiation and modulation, depend on both AIS integrity and the regulation of ion channel expression in the AIS. Alteration of the axon initial segment (AIS) has been implicated in neurodegenerative, psychiatric, and brain trauma diseases, thus identification of the physiological mechanisms that regulate the AIS is required to understand and circumvent AIS alterations in pathological conditions. Here, we show ...

  14. Physiology of Geobacter metallireducens under excess and limitation of electron donors. Part II. Mimicking environmental conditions during cultivation in retentostats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marozava, Sviatlana; Röling, Wilfred F M; Seifert, Jana; Küffner, Robert; von Bergen, Martin; Meckenstock, Rainer U

    2014-06-01

    The strict anaerobe Geobacter metallireducens was cultivated in retentostats under acetate and acetate plus benzoate limitation in the presence of Fe(III) citrate in order to investigate its physiology under close to natural conditions. Growth rates below 0.003h(-1) were achieved in the course of cultivation. A nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach (nano-LC-MS/MS) with subsequent label-free quantification was performed on proteins extracted from cells sampled at different time points during retentostat cultivation. Proteins detected at low (0.002h(-1)) and high (0.06h(-1)) growth rates were compared between corresponding growth conditions (acetate or acetate plus benzoate). Carbon limitation significantly increased the abundances of several catabolic proteins involved in the degradation of substrates not present in the medium (ethanol, butyrate, fatty acids, and aromatic compounds). Growth rate-specific physiology was reflected in the changed abundances of energy-, chemotaxis-, oxidative stress-, and transport-related proteins. Mimicking natural conditions by extremely slow bacterial growth allowed to show how G. metallireducens optimized its physiology in order to survive in its natural habitats, since it was prepared to consume several carbon sources simultaneously and to withstand various environmental stresses.

  15. Myocardial ischemic conditioning: Physiological aspects and clinical applications in cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousselmi, Radhouane; Lebbi, Mohamed Anis; Ferjani, Mustapha

    2014-04-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion is a major determinant of myocardial impairment in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. The main goal of research in cardioprotection is to develop effective techniques to avoid ischemia-reperfusion lesions. Myocardial ischemic conditioning is a powerful endogenous cardioprotective phenomenon. First described in animals in 1986, myocardial ischemic conditioning consists of applying increased tolerance of the myocardium to sustained ischemia by exposing it to brief episodes of ischemia-reperfusion. Several studies have sought to demonstrate its effective cardioprotective action in humans and to understand its underlying mechanisms. Myocardial ischemic conditioning has two forms: ischemic preconditioning (IPC) when the conditioning stimulus is applied before the index ischemia and ischemic postconditioning when the conditioning stimulus is applied after it. The cardioprotective action of ischemic conditioning was reproduced by applying the ischemia-reperfusion stimulus to organs remote from the heart. This non-invasive manner of applying ischemic conditioning has led to its application in clinical settings. Clinical trials for the different forms of ischemic conditioning were mainly developed in cardiac surgery. Many studies suggest that this phenomenon can represent an interesting adjuvant to classical cardioprotection during on-pump cardiac surgery. Ischemic conditioning was also tested in interventional cardiology with interesting results. Finally, advances made in the understanding of mechanisms that underlie the cardioprotective action of ischemic conditioning have paved the way to a new form of myocardial conditioning which is pharmacological conditioning.

  16. PHYSICAL FITNESS AND EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY KNOWLEDGE IN SEDENTARY MALES AFTER A CONDITIONING PROGRAM

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of a sport for all program onphysical fitness components and exercise physiology knowledge in sedentary males. For thisaim; Sixty-nine male exercisers; aged 21.37 ± 1.76 years; and 69 male controls; aged 20.89 ±1.21 volunteered to take part. The method of the study was explained to the subjects; and theyfilled up the consent form. The experimental group participated in the sport for all program 3 d;pdwk-1 for 8 weeks and received...

  17. Evaluation of Physiological and Biochemical Characteristics of Four Canola (Brassica napus L. Cultivars in drought condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Jamshidi zinab

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Rapeseed (Brassica napus L. is one of the major crops cultivated mainly for oil, human consumption and renewable fuel all over the world. Drought stress is one of the most important abiotic factors which adversely affect growth, metabolism and yield of crops in semiarid and arid area. Drought stress during any particular growth stage of crops causes yield reduction. In order to evaluate the effect of drought stress on yield, physiological, morphological and biochemical characteristics of rapeseed in flowering stage, this field experiment was carried out in Yazd agricultural research institute during 2011-2012. Materials and Methods The experiment was conducted in split-plot design based on randomized complete blocks with three replications imposed. Irrigation was considered as the main plot at two levels including control (irrigation after 80 mm evaporation from class A pan and stress in the anthesis stage (irrigation after 160 mm evaporation from class A pan and cultivars (Oise, Triangle, Karun and SLM046 were considered as sub plots. Sampling was carried out 7, 12 and 26 days after drought stress imposed. In each plot, 7, 12 and 26 days after stop irrigation from flowering stage (drought stress treatment, 4-5 expanded leaves from above of canopy were harvested. Relative water content of leaves and stomatal conductance were recorded. Soluble carbohydrate and proline content were measured. The lipid peroxidation level of the leaves was determined by measuring the content of malondealdehyde. Yield and yield components (number of grains per pod, number of pod per plant and weight of 1000 grains were recorded at maturity. Results and Discussion The results showed that drought and cultivar interaction on SPAD value was not significant after stress. The interaction of the drought on leaf relative water content was significant at 26 days after the stress. The results revealed that, drought stress led to a significant decrease in relative

  18. Classification of 2-pore domain potassium channels based on rectification under quasi-physiological ionic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haijun; Zuo, Dongchuan; Zhang, Jianing; Zhou, Min; Ma, Liqun

    2014-01-01

    It is generally expected that 2-pore domain K(+) (K2P) channels are open or outward rectifiers in asymmetric physiological K(+) gradients, following the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz (GHK) current equation. Although cloned K2P channels have been extensively studied, their current-voltage (I-V) relationships are not precisely characterized and previous definitions are contradictory. Here we study all the functional channels from 6 mammalian K2P subfamilies in transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells with patch-clamp technique, and examine whether their I-V relationships are described by the GHK current equation. K2P channels display 2 distinct types of I-V curves in asymmetric physiological K(+) gradients. Two K2P isoforms in the TWIK subfamily conduct large inward K(+) currents and have a nearly linear I-V curve. Ten isoforms from 5 other K2P subfamilies conduct small inward K(+) currents and exhibit open rectification, but fits with the GHK current equation cannot precisely reveal the differences in rectification among K2P channels. The Rectification Index, a ratio of limiting I-V slopes for outward and inward currents, is used to quantitatively describe open rectification of each K2P isoform, which is previously qualitatively defined as strong or weak open rectification. These results systematically and precisely classify K2P channels and suggest that TWIK K(+) channels have a unique feature in regulating cellular function.

  19. Thromboelastometry and Thrombelastography Analysis under Normal Physiological Conditions – Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Marcel; Ivic, Sandra; Bodmer, Nicolas S.; ten Cate, Hugo; Bachmann, Lucas M.; Wuillemin, Walter A.; Nagler, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background Studies investigating thromboelastometry or thrombelastography analyses in a physiological context are scattered and not easy to access. Objective To systematically retrieve and describe published reports studying healthy subjects and targeting at the correlation of ROTEM® and TEG® measurements with conventional parameters of hemostasis. Methods Systematic Review: Papers were searched in Medline, Scopus and the Science Citation Index database. Reference lists of included studies and of reviews were screened. To be included papers had to report ROTEM or TEG data on healthy subjects. Two reviewers screened papers for inclusion, read full texts of potentially relevant papers, and extracted data of included papers. Results Searches identified 1,721 records of which 1,713 were either excluded immediately or after reading the full text. The remaining 8 studies enrolled 632 subjects. The association of conventional parameters of hemostasis with ROTEM and with TEG was investigated in one and two studies, respectively. Overall correlation was limited and ranged from 0.0 to 0.40 (total thrombus generation vs. fibrinogen; clotting time INTEM vs. activated partial thromboplastin time). Conclusions Studies assessing the relationship between thromboelastometry or thromboelastography analyses and conventional parameters of hemostasis in healthy subjects remains scarce, and correlations are limited. Further research is needed to understand the physiology of thromboelastometry and thromboelastography parameters. PMID:28503123

  20. Novel magnesium alloy Mg–2La caused no cytotoxic effects on cells in physiological conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weizbauer, Andreas, E-mail: weizbauer.andreas@mh-hannover.de [Laboratory for Biomechanics and Biomaterials, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Anna-von-Borries-Straße 1-7, 30625 Hannover (Germany); CrossBIT, Center for Biocompatibility and Implant-Immunology, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Feodor-Lynen-Str. 31, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Seitz, Jan-Marten [Institute of Materials Science, Leibniz Universität Hannover, An der Universität 2, 30823 Garbsen (Germany); Werle, Peter [ABB AG, Trafoweg 4, 06112 Halle (Germany); Hegermann, Jan [Institute of Functional and Applied Anatomy, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg-Straße 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Willbold, Elmar [Laboratory for Biomechanics and Biomaterials, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Anna-von-Borries-Straße 1-7, 30625 Hannover (Germany); CrossBIT, Center for Biocompatibility and Implant-Immunology, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Feodor-Lynen-Str. 31, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Eifler, Rainer [Institute of Materials Science, Leibniz Universität Hannover, An der Universität 2, 30823 Garbsen (Germany); Windhagen, Henning [Laboratory for Biomechanics and Biomaterials, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Anna-von-Borries-Straße 1-7, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Reifenrath, Janin [Small Animal Clinic, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Bünteweg 9, 30559 Hannover (Germany); Waizy, Hazibullah [Laboratory for Biomechanics and Biomaterials, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Anna-von-Borries-Straße 1-7, 30625 Hannover (Germany)

    2014-08-01

    Using several different in vitro assays, a new biodegradable magnesium alloy Mg–2La, composed of 98% magnesium and 2% lanthanum, was investigated as a possible implant material for biomedical applications. An in vitro cytotoxicity test, according to EN ISO 10993-5/12, with L929 and human osteoblastic cells identified no toxic effects on cell viability at physiological concentrations (at 50% dilutions and higher). The metabolic activity of human osteoblasts in the 100% extract was decreased to < 70% and was therefore rated as cytotoxic. The degradation rates of Mg–2La were evaluated in phosphate buffered saline and four different cell culture media. The degradation rates were shown to be influenced by the composition of the solution, and the addition of fetal bovine serum slightly accelerated the corrosive process. The results of these in vitro experiments suggest that Mg–2La is a promising candidate for use as an orthopedic implant material. - Highlights: • A new magnesium alloy (Mg–2La) has been developed. • Magnesium alloy Mg–2La revealed no toxic effect in physiological concentrations. • Degradation rates were influenced by the corrosion media. • The addition of fetal bovine serum increased the corrosive process slightly.

  1. Macroenvironmental factors affecting ethical behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Önsel Ekici, Şule; Ekici, Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to take a macroethical perspective and study the relationships between various structural factors and ethical behavior of firms. Using the data obtained from the Global Competitiveness Network of the World Economic Forum-WEF, and through the Bayesian Causal Map (BCM) methodology, we study how ethical behaviors of firms in a given country group are shaped by how managers perceive the political, legislative, and protective environment of business in these countries....

  2. Using High-Resolution Hyperspectral and Thermal Airborne Imagery to Assess Physiological Condition in the Context of Wheat Phenotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Gonzalez-Dugo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing need for developing high-throughput tools for crop phenotyping that would increase the rate of genetic improvement. In most cases, the indicators used for this purpose are related with canopy structure (often acquired with RGB cameras and multispectral sensors allowing the calculation of NDVI, but using approaches related with the crop physiology are rare. High-resolution hyperspectral remote sensing imagery provides optical indices related to physiological condition through the quantification of photosynthetic pigment and chlorophyll fluorescence emission. This study demonstrates the use of narrow-band indicators of stress as a potential tool for phenotyping under rainfed conditions using two airborne datasets acquired over a wheat experiment with 150 plots comprising two species and 50 varieties (bread and durum wheat. The flights were performed at the early stem elongation stage and during the milking stage. Physiological measurements made at the time of flights demonstrated that the second flight was made during the terminal stress, known to largely determine final yield under rainfed conditions. The hyperspectral imagery enabled the extraction of thermal, radiance, and reflectance spectra from 260 spectral bands from each plot for the calculation of indices related to photosynthetic pigment absorption in the visible and red-edge regions, the quantification of chlorophyll fluorescence emission, as well as structural indices related to canopy structure. Under the conditions of this study, the structural indices (i.e., NDVI did not show a good performance at predicting yield, probably because of the large effects of terminal water stress. Thermal indices, indices related to chlorophyll fluorescence (calculated using the FLD method, and carotenoids pigment indices (PRI and CAR demonstrated to be better suited for screening complex traits such as crop yield. The study concludes that the indicators derived from high

  3. A major role for Tau in neuronal DNA and RNA protection in vivo under physiological and hyperthermic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie eViolet

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nucleic acid protection is a substantial challenge for neurons, which are continuously exposed to oxidative stress in the brain. Neurons require powerful mechanisms to protect DNA and RNA integrity and ensure their functionality and longevity. Beside its well known role in microtubule dynamics, we recently discovered that Tau is also a key nuclear player in the protection of neuronal genomic DNA integrity under reactive oxygen species (ROS-inducing heat stress (HS conditions in primary neuronal cultures. In this report, we analyzed the capacity of Tau to protect neuronal DNA integrity in vivo in adult mice under physiological and HS conditions. We designed an in vivo mouse model of hyperthermia/HS to induce a transient increase in ROS production in the brain. Comet and TUNEL assays demonstrated that Tau protected genomic DNA in adult cortical and hippocampal neurons in vivo under physiological conditions in wild-type and Tau-deficient (KO-Tau mice. HS increased DNA breaks in KO-Tau neurons. Notably, KO-Tau hippocampal neurons in the CA1 subfield restored DNA integrity after HS more weakly than the dentate gyrus neurons. The formation of phosphorylated histone H2AX foci, a double-strand break marker, was observed in KO-Tau neurons only after HS, indicating that Tau deletion did not trigger similar DNA damage under physiological or HS conditions. Moreover, genomic DNA and cytoplasmic and nuclear RNA integrity were altered under HS in hippocampal neurons exhibiting Tau deficiency, which suggests that Tau also modulates RNA metabolism. Our results suggest that Tau alterations lead to a loss of its nucleic acid safeguarding functions and participate in the accumulation of DNA and RNA oxidative damage observed in the Alzheimer’s disease brain.

  4. Intraspecific variation in physiological condition of reef-building corals associated with differential levels of chronic disturbance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Pisapia

    Full Text Available Even in the absence of major disturbances (e.g., cyclones, bleaching, corals are subject to high levels of partial or whole-colony mortality, often caused by chronic and small-scale disturbances. Depending on levels of background mortality, these chronic disturbances may undermine individual fitness and have significant consequences on the ability of colonies to withstand subsequent acute disturbances or environmental change. This study quantified intraspecific variations in physiological condition (measured based on total lipid content and zooxanthellae density through time in adult colonies of two common and widespread coral species (Acropora spathulata and Pocillopora damicornis, subject to different levels of biological and physical disturbances along the most disturbed reef habitat, the crest. Marked intraspecific variation in the physiological condition of A. spathulata was clearly linked to differences in local disturbance regimes and habitat. Specifically, zooxanthellae density decreased (r2 = 26, df = 5,42, p<0.02, B =  -121255, p = 0.03 and total lipid content increased (r2 = 14, df = 5,42, p = 0.01, B = 0.9, p = 0.01 with increasing distance from exposed crests. Moreover, zooxanthellae density was strongly and negatively correlated with the individual level of partial mortality (r2 = 26, df = 5,42, p<0.02, B =  -7386077, p = 0.01. Conversely, P. damicornis exhibited very limited intraspecific variation in physiological condition, despite marked differences in levels of partial mortality. This is the first study to relate intraspecific variation in the condition of corals to localized differences in chronic disturbance regimes. The next step is to ascertain whether these differences have further ramifications for susceptibility to periodic acute disturbances, such as climate-induced coral bleaching.

  5. Spectrophotometric analysis of flavonoid-DNA binding interactions at physiological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjua, Naveed Kausar; Siddiqa, Asima; Yaqub, Azra; Sabahat, Sana; Qureshi, Rumana; Haque, Sayed ul

    2009-12-01

    Mode of interactions of three flavonoids [morin (M), quercetin (Q), and rutin (R)] with chicken blood ds.DNA (ck.DNA) has been investigated spectrophotometrically at different temperatures including body temperature (310 K) and at two physiological pH values, i.e. 7.4 (human blood pH) and 4.7 (stomach pH). The binding constants, Kf, evaluated using Benesi-Hildebrand equation showed that the flavonoids bind effectively through intercalation at both pH values and body temperature. Quercetin, somehow, showed greater binding capabilities with DNA. The free energies of flavonoid-DNA complexes indicated the spontaneity of their binding. The order of binding constants of three flavonoids at both pH values were found to be Kf(Q) > Kf(R) > Kf(M) and at 310 K.

  6. Myeloid derived suppressor cells in physiological and pathological conditions: the good, the bad, and the ugly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Paolo

    2013-12-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a heterogeneous population of myeloid progenitors, are recognized as a key element in tumor escape and progression. The importance of MDSCs in human malignancies has been demonstrated in recent years, and new approaches targeting their suppressive/tolerogenic action are currently being tested in both preclinical model and clinical trials. However, emerging evidence suggests that MDSCs may play a prominent role as regulator of the physiologic, the chronic, and the pathologic immune responses. This review will focus on the biology of MDSC in light of these new findings and the possible role of this myeloid population not only in the progression of the tumor but also in its initiation.

  7. Molecular clocks and the human condition: approaching their characterization in human physiology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, G A; Yang, G; Paschos, G K; Liang, X; Skarke, C

    2015-09-01

    Molecular clockworks knit together diverse biological networks and compelling evidence from model systems infers their importance in metabolism, immunological and cardiovascular function. Despite this and the diurnal variation in many aspects of human physiology and the phenotypic expression of disease, our understanding of the role and importance of clock function and dysfunction in humans is modest. There are tantalizing hints of connection across the translational divide and some correlative evidence of gene variation and human disease but most of what we know derives from forced desynchrony protocols in controlled environments. We now have the ability to monitor quantitatively ex vivo or in vivo the genome, metabolome, proteome and microbiome of humans in the wild. Combining this capability, with the power of mobile telephony and the evolution of remote sensing, affords a new opportunity for deep phenotyping, including the characterization of diurnal behaviour and the assessment of the impact of the clock on approved drug function.

  8. No evidence for a bone phenotype in GPRC6A knockout mice under normal physiological conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorph, Petrine; Johansen, Lars Dan; Jensen, Anders Asbjørn;

    2009-01-01

    . Analogously to the closely related calcium-sensing receptor, GPRC6A has been proposed to function as a metabolic sensor of Ca2+ and amino acids in bone and other tissues. In the present study, we have generated the first GPRC6A knockout mice and studied their phenotype with particular focus on bone...... homeostasis. The generated GPRC6A knockout mice are viable and fertile, develop normally and exhibit no significant differences in body weight compared to wild type littermates. Assessment of bone mineral density, histomorphometry and bone metabolism demonstrated no significant differences between 13-week......-old knockout and wild type mice. In conclusion, our data do not support a role for GPRC6A in normal bone physiology....

  9. The antitumor agent 3-bromopyruvate has a short half-life at physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Matthew; Biddle, Perry; Jantzi, Josh; Weaver, Samantha; Schirch, Doug

    2014-09-12

    Clinical research is currently exploring the validity of the anti-tumor candidate 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) as a novel treatment for several types of cancer. However, recent publications have overlooked rarely-cited earlier work about the instability of 3-BP and its decay to 3-hydroxypyruvate (3-HP) which have obvious implications for its mechanism of action against tumors, how it is administered, and for precautions when preparing solutions of 3-BP. This study found the first-order decay rate of 3-BP at physiological temperature and pH has a half-life of only 77 min. Lower buffer pH decreases the decay rate, while choice of buffer and concentration do not affect it. A method for preparing more stable solutions is also reported.

  10. Indices for physiological assessment of nutritional condition in pregnant collared peccaries (Tayassu tajacu).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochmiller, R L; Hellgren, E C; Varner, L W; Grant, W E

    1988-07-01

    Hematological and serum biochemical responses to two levels of dietary energy (high energy [HE], 3300 kcal digestible energy [DE]/kg; moderate energy [ME], 2300 kcal DE/kg) and protein (high protein [HP], 16.0% crude protein; moderate protein [MP], 8.4% crude protein) during gestation in 15 collared peccaries (Tayassu tajacu) were examined. Dietary energy and protein levels influenced body weight gain during gestation. Red blood cell counts and lymphocyte concentrations were higher and neutrophil concentrations were lower among females fed an HP diet compared to those fed an MP diet. Alkaline phosphatase and alpha-2 globulin concentrations were higher among females fed an MP diet. Aspartate aminotransferase and cholesterol concentrations were higher and calcium and thyroxine concentrations were lower among females fed ME diets compared to those fed HE diets. These results suggest that physiological indices used in combination with morphological measurements can be useful in assessing collared peccary nutritional health during gestation.

  11. An Inexpensive Arterial Pressure Wave Sensor and its application in different physiological condition

    CERN Document Server

    Sur, S; Sur, Shantanu

    2005-01-01

    Arterial Blood Pressure wave monitoring is considered to be important in assessment of cardiovascular system. We developed a novel pulse wave detection system using low frequency specific piezoelectric material as pressure wave sensor. The transducer detects the periodic change in the arterial wall diameter produced by pressure wave and the amplified signal after integration represents the pressure wave. The signal before integration is proportional to the rate of change of pressure wave and it not only reproduces the pressure waveform faithfully, but also its sharper nature helps to reliably detect the heart period variability (HPV). We have studied the position-specific (e.g. over carotid or radial artery) nature of change of this pulse wave signal (shape and amplitude) and also the changes at different physiological states.

  12. Reduction of myocardial infarct size with ischemic "conditioning": physiologic and technical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przyklenk, Karin

    2013-10-01

    A wealth of evidence has revealed that the heart can be "conditioned" and rendered less vulnerable to ischemia-reperfusion injury via the upregulation of endogenous protective signaling pathways. Three distinct conditioning strategies have been identified: (1) preconditioning, the phenomenon where brief episodes of myocardial ischemia (too brief to cause cardiomyocyte death) limit necrosis caused by a subsequent sustained ischemic insult; (2) postconditioning, the concept that relief of myocardial ischemia in a staged or stuttered manner attenuates lethal ischemia-reperfusion injury; and (3) remote conditioning, or upregulation of a cardioprotective phenotype initiated by ischemia in a remote organ or tissue and "transported" to the heart. Progress has been made in defining the technical requirements and limitations of each of the 3 ischemic conditioning models (including the timing and severity of the protective stimulus), as well as elucidating the molecular mechanisms (in particular, the receptor-mediated signaling pathways) responsible for conditioning-induced myocardial protection. Moreover, phase III clinical trials are in progress, seeking to capitalize on the protection that can be achieved by postconditioning and remote conditioning, and applying these strategies in patients undergoing cardiac surgery or angioplasty for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction. There is, however, a potentially important caveat to the clinical translation of myocardial conditioning: emerging data suggest that the efficacy of ischemic conditioning is compromised in aging, diabetic, and hypertensive cohorts, the specific populations in which myocardial protection is most relevant. Successful clinical application of myocardial conditioning will therefore require an understanding of the potential confounding consequences of these comorbidities on the "conditioned" phenotype.

  13. Stress physiology and weapon integrity of intertidal mantis shrimp under future ocean conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deVries, Maya S; Webb, Summer J; Tu, Jenny; Cory, Esther; Morgan, Victoria; Sah, Robert L; Deheyn, Dimitri D; Taylor, Jennifer R A

    2016-12-15

    Calcified marine organisms typically experience increased oxidative stress and changes in mineralization in response to ocean acidification and warming conditions. These effects could hinder the potency of animal weapons, such as the mantis shrimp's raptorial appendage. The mechanical properties of this calcified weapon enable extremely powerful punches to be delivered to prey and aggressors. We examined oxidative stress and exoskeleton structure, mineral content, and mechanical properties of the raptorial appendage and the carapace under long-term ocean acidification and warming conditions. The predatory appendage had significantly higher % Mg under ocean acidification conditions, while oxidative stress levels as well as the % Ca and mechanical properties of the appendage remained unchanged. Thus, mantis shrimp tolerate expanded ranges of pH and temperature without experiencing oxidative stress or functional changes to their weapons. Our findings suggest that these powerful predators will not be hindered under future ocean conditions.

  14. The UV responses of bacterioneuston and bacterioplankton isolates depend on the physiological condition and involve a metabolic shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Ana L; Baptista, Inês; Lopes, Sílvia; Henriques, Isabel; Gomes, Newton C M; Almeida, Adelaide; Correia, António; Cunha, Angela

    2012-06-01

    Bacteria from the surface microlayer (bacterioneuston) and underlying waters (bacterioplankton) were isolated upon exposure to UV-B radiation, and their individual UV sensitivity in terms of CFU numbers, activity (leucine and thymidine incorporation), sole-carbon source use profiles, repair potential (light-dependent and independent), and photoadaptation potential, under different physiological conditions, was compared. Colony counts were 11.5-16.2% more reduced by UV-B exposure in bacterioplankton isolates (P < 0.05). Inhibition of leucine incorporation in bacterioneuston isolates was 10.9-11.5% higher than in bacterioplankton (P < 0.05). These effects were accompanied by a shift in sole-carbon source use profiles, assessed with Biolog(®) EcoPlates, with a reduction in consumption of amines and amino acids and increased use of polymers, particularly in bacterioneuston isolates. Recovery under starvation was generally enhanced compared with nourished conditions, especially in bacterioneuston isolates. Overall, only insignificant increases in the induction of antibiotic resistant mutant phenotypes (Rif(R) and Nal(R) ) were observed. In general, a potential for photoadaptation could not be detected among the tested isolates. These results indicate that UV effects on bacteria are influenced by their physiological condition and are accompanied by a shift in metabolic profiles, more significant in bacterioneuston isolates, suggesting the presence of bacterial strains adapted to high UV levels in the SML.

  15. The Role of Gap Junction Channels During Physiologic and Pathologic Conditions of the Human Central Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilio, Daniel; Sáez, Juan C.; Orellana, Juan A.; Raine, Cedric S.; Bukauskas, Feliksas; Bennett, Michael V. L.; Berman, Joan W.

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions (GJs) are expressed in most cell types of the nervous system, including neuronal stem cells, neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, cells of the blood brain barrier (endothelial cells and astrocytes) and under inflammatory conditions in microglia/macrophages. GJs connect cells by the docking of two hemichannels, one from each cell with each hemichannel being formed by 6 proteins named connexins (Cx). Unapposed hemichannels (uHC) also can be open on the surface of the cells allowing the release of different intracellular factors to the extracellular space. GJs provide a mechanism of cell-to-cell communication between adjacent cells that enables the direct exchange of intracellular messengers, such as calcium, nucleotides, IP3, and diverse metabolites, as well as electrical signals that ultimately coordinate tissue homeostasis, proliferation, differentiation, metabolism, cell survival and death. Despite their essential functions in physiological conditions, relatively little is known about the role of GJs and uHC in human diseases, especially within the nervous system. The focus of this review is to summarize recent findings related to the role of GJs and uHC in physiologic and pathologic conditions of the central nervous system. PMID:22438035

  16. The role of gap junction channels during physiologic and pathologic conditions of the human central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugenin, Eliseo A; Basilio, Daniel; Sáez, Juan C; Orellana, Juan A; Raine, Cedric S; Bukauskas, Feliksas; Bennett, Michael V L; Berman, Joan W

    2012-09-01

    Gap junctions (GJs) are expressed in most cell types of the nervous system, including neuronal stem cells, neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, cells of the blood brain barrier (endothelial cells and astrocytes) and under inflammatory conditions in microglia/macrophages. GJs connect cells by the docking of two hemichannels, one from each cell with each hemichannel being formed by 6 proteins named connexins (Cx). Unapposed hemichannels (uHC) also can be open on the surface of the cells allowing the release of different intracellular factors to the extracellular space. GJs provide a mechanism of cell-to-cell communication between adjacent cells that enables the direct exchange of intracellular messengers, such as calcium, nucleotides, IP(3), and diverse metabolites, as well as electrical signals that ultimately coordinate tissue homeostasis, proliferation, differentiation, metabolism, cell survival and death. Despite their essential functions in physiological conditions, relatively little is known about the role of GJs and uHC in human diseases, especially within the nervous system. The focus of this review is to summarize recent findings related to the role of GJs and uHC in physiologic and pathologic conditions of the central nervous system.

  17. Resolving the physiological conditions in bioavailability and bioequivalence studies: Comparison of fasted and fed state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Felix; Grimm, Michael; Koziolek, Mirko; Modeß, Christiane; Dokter, Anne; Roustom, Tarek; Siegmund, Werner; Weitschies, Werner

    2016-11-01

    In the present study temperature, pH and pressure profiles of nine healthy human volunteers were investigated after ingestion of the SmartPill® under conditions simulating the fasted state treatment in bioavailability and bioequivalence studies. In a previously published study the same subjects received the SmartPill® under fed conditions as recommended by the FDA. Since large non-digestible objects are mainly emptied during phase III of the interdigestive migrating motor complex, the gastric residence time of the SmartPill® was found to be clearly shorter under fasting conditions. Intragastric pH values during the initial 5min were similar with an identical median value of pH 4.6. Interestingly, the median lowest observed intragastric pH value in fasted state was about one pH unit higher than that under fed conditions. Highest pressure activity was observed within the stomach, in relation to gastric emptying. In fasted state, pressure values upon gastric emptying varied strongly between 30mbar and 304mbar, whereas after fed state ingestion values of at least 240mbar could always be observed. The data showed highly variable gastrointestinal parameters even under fasting conditions which must be considered when evaluating clinical studies and developing biorelevant in vitro test methods especially for large non-disintegrating dosage forms.

  18. [Defense mechanism to prevent ectopic activation of pancreatic digestive enzymes under physiological conditions and its breakdown in acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaku, Midori; Otsuko, Makoto

    2004-11-01

    Independent of the etiology, acute pancreatitis is associated with significant morbidity and the potential for mortality. In most patients, acute pancreatitis follows an uncomplicated or mild course. Recent studies in hereditary pancreatitis have clearly revealed that trypsin is the key enzyme at the onset of pancreatitis. However, there are several defense mechanisms to prevent ectopic activation of trypsin under physiological conditions. If the defense mechanisms failed or activation of trypsin occurred over defense ability, trypsin would activate other digestive enzymes and self-digestion of the pancreas would occur.

  19. Sequence selective recognition of double-stranded RNA at physiologically relevant conditions using PNA-peptide conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muse, Oluwatoyosi; Zengeya, Thomas; Mwaura, Juddy; Hnedzko, Dziyana; McGee, Dennis W; Grewer, Christof T; Rozners, Eriks

    2013-08-16

    Conjugation of short peptide nucleic acids (PNA) with tetralysine peptides strongly enhanced triple helical binding to RNA at physiologically relevant conditions. The PNA hexamers and heptamers carrying cationic nucleobase and tetralysine modifications displayed high binding affinity for complementary double-stranded RNA without compromising sequence selectivity. The PNA-peptide conjugates had unique preference for binding double-stranded RNA, while having little, if any, affinity for double-stranded DNA. The cationic PNAs were efficiently taken up by HEK293 cells, whereas little uptake was observed for unmodified PNA.

  20. Physiological and psychological fatigue in extreme conditions: overtraining and elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis, Dianna; Gonsalves, Stephen; Deuster, Patricia A

    2010-05-01

    This article will review relevant mechanisms and markers associated with overtraining syndrome (OTS), and discuss signs and symptoms, differential diagnosis, and current assessment tools for fatigue within the context of overtraining. The findings are drawn from original research and review articles referenced by PubMed and ScienceDirect databases. Sources were selected for their contributions to the current knowledge of biological, psychological, and molecular mechanisms. Data were reviewed for relevance to OTS and then evaluated against criteria that included significant OTS outcomes and findings. Information was systematically analyzed to identify patterns, dependencies, connections, and causal factors. Comparative analysis was confounded by inconsistent metrics, terminology, and variable methodology; potential biomarkers, treatment and prevention approaches, and future research directions are identified. Diagnosing OTS is difficult because underlying cause(s) are unknown; one must exclude other factors that degrade performance and mood status. Many studies are confounded by inadequate experimental designs, poor measures of performance, and different methods for characterizing OTS. OTS is complex because the demands of excessive training in combination with other biologic, psychological, and social stressors are difficult to quantify. However, changes in mood are always noted. Interrelations among dietary patterns; social, psychological and physiological profiles; and the neuroendocrine, immune, and central nervous systems are complex and not adequately elucidated. Copyright (c) 2010 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Production of hydrogen peroxide by polyphenols and polyphenol-rich beverages under quasi-physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagawa, Mitsugu; Shigemitsu, Tomoko; Suyama, Kyozo

    2003-12-01

    To investigate the ability of the production of H(2)O(2) by polyphenols, we incubated various phenolic compounds and natural polyphenols under a quasi-physiological pH and temperature (pH 7.4, 37 degrees C), and then measured the formation of H(2)O(2) by the ferrous ion oxidation-xylenol orange assay. Pyrocatechol, hydroquinone, pyrogallol, 1,2,4-benzenetriol, and polyphenols such as catechins yielded a significant amount of H(2)O(2). We also examined the effects of a metal chelator, pH, and O(2) on the H(2)O(2)-generating property, and the generation of H(2)O(2) by the polyphenol-rich beverages, green tea, black tea, and coffee, was determined. The features of the H(2)O(2)-generating property of green tea, black tea, and coffee were in good agreement with that of phenolic compounds, suggesting that polyphenols are responsible for the generation of H(2)O(2) in beverages. From the results, the possible significances of the H(2)O(2)-generating property of polyphenols for biological systems are discussed.

  2. Hydrazine selective dual signaling chemodosimetric probe in physiological conditions and its application in live cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandi, Sandip; Sahana, Animesh; Mandal, Sandip [Department of Chemistry, The University of Burdwan, Burdwan, 713104 West Bengal (India); Sengupta, Archya; Chatterjee, Ansuman [Department of Zoology, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan, West Bengal (India); Safin, Damir A., E-mail: damir.a.safin@gmail.com [Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences, Molecules, Solids and Reactivity (IMCN/MOST), Université catholique de Louvain, Place L. Pasteur 1, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Babashkina, Maria G.; Tumanov, Nikolay A.; Filinchuk, Yaroslav [Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences, Molecules, Solids and Reactivity (IMCN/MOST), Université catholique de Louvain, Place L. Pasteur 1, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Das, Debasis, E-mail: ddas100in@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, The University of Burdwan, Burdwan, 713104 West Bengal (India)

    2015-09-17

    A rhodamine–cyanobenzene conjugate, (E)-4-((2-(3′,6′-bis(diethylamino)-3-oxospiro[isoindoline-1,9′-xanthene] -2-yl)ethylimino)methyl)benzonitrile (1), which structure has been elucidated by single crystal X-ray diffraction, was synthesized for selective fluorescent “turn-on” and colorimetric recognition of hydrazine at physiological pH 7.4. It was established that 1 detects hydrazine up to 58 nM. The probe is useful for the detection of intracellular hydrazine in the human breast cancer cells MCF-7 using a fluorescence microscope. Spirolactam ring opening of 1, followed by its hydrolysis, was established as a probable mechanism for the selective sensing of hydrazine. - Highlights: • A selective rhodamine–cyanobenzene conjugate is synthesized. • The conjugate is a selective dual signaling chemodosimetric probe towards hydrazine. • Spirolactam ring opening of the probe, followed by its hydrolysis, is the sensing mechanism. • The probe detects hydrazine in the human breast cancer cells MCF-7 imaging.

  3. Effect of endophytic fungi Pirifomospora indica on some physiologic traits of strawberry under hydroponic culture conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. R. Rahmani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial endophytes, which are considered as the most important soil microorganisms, increase the yield of their host plants by creating changes in their genetic, physiological and ecological traits. Pirifomospora indica fungus is a member of Sebacinales order, which increases plant biomass and resistance to living and non-living stresses. In this study, effect of different concentrations [0 (control, 80, 160, 250 and 330 spores/ml of endophytic fungus P. indica on plant height, chlorophyll indicator and branching of strawberry, under hydroponic culture, was examined in a completely randomized design with 28 replications. P. indica was inoculated by injecting around roots of strawberry plants. Two months after fungal inoculation, plant height and chlorophyll content was measured by using coulisse and SPAD, respectively. Results showed that maximum chlorophyll content, branching and plant height belongs to 330 spores/ml treatment with 15%, 30% and 24.5% increase as compared to control, respectively. Also, there was no significant difference among 80, 160 and 250 spores/ml treatments, while 330 spores/ml treatment was significantly different from other treatments (P≤ 0.01. Therefore, it can be concluded that high concentrations of fungus P. indica can affect the abovementioned traits and thus could have a positive effect on strawberry plant's growth and yield.

  4. Short exposure of albumin to high concentrations of malondialdehyde does not mimic physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millanta, Susanna; Furfaro, Anna Lisa; Carlier, Paolo; Tasso, Bruno; Nitti, Mariapaola; Domenicotti, Cinzia; Odetti, Patrizio; Pronzato, Maria Adelaide; Traverso, Nicola

    2013-02-01

    Malondialdehyde (MDA), a major lipid peroxidation product, spontaneously binds to, and modifies proteins. In vivo, proteins are physiologically exposed to micromolar MDA concentrations for long periods. In order to mimic this process in vitro, protein modification is often performed by short exposure to millimolar MDA concentrations, also in order to generate antigenic structures for antibody production. However, in our study, spectrophotometric and fluorimetric characteristics, electrophoretic migration, susceptibility to trypsin digestion and reactivity to antibodies indicated substantial differences between albumin incubated with millimolar MDA concentrations for a short period of time and albumin incubated with micromolar MDA concentrations for a long period of time. Therefore, our study showed that short incubation of albumin with millimolar MDA concentrations does not mimic the consequences of albumin exposure to long incubation with micromolar MDA concentrations. This casts doubts on the real possibility that antibodies, elicited with proteins modified with millimolar MDA concentrations for a short period, could detect all MDA-modified proteins in vivo. Moreover, natural antibodies against albumin, modified with micromolar MDA concentrations, have been detected in the serum of healthy blood donors, which appears to justify the existence of these kinds of modified proteins in vivo.

  5. PHYSIOLOGICAL QUALITY OF Araucaria angustifolia (Bertol. Kuntze SEEDS SUBMITTED TO DIFFERENT STORAGE CONDITIONS AND ESCARIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Valente Caçola

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The seeds of Araucaria angustifolia (Bertol. Kuntze are recalcitrants and, therefore, they lose rapidly the viability after the harvest, limiting their use for nursery production of seedlings. This work was carried out to investigate the effects of cold storage duration, conservation method, and escarification on germination and vigour of seeds of Araucaria angustifolia. The seeds were cold stored (0-1oC/90-95% RH for 0, 60, 120, and 180 days, under normal air condictions (NA, modified atmosphere (MA, and controlled atmosphere (CA storage. For each cold storage duration, after removal from cold storage, the seeds were submitted or not to scarification (by cutting a small portion of the apical seed tegument, avoiding the damage of the endosperm, letting the germinate in a chamber with controlled environment, in plastic trays filled with vermiculite, for 60 days. The experiment followed the completely randomized factorial design (4x3x2, with four cold storage durations (0, 60, 120, and 180 days, three storage methods (NA, MA, and CA, with or without escarification, and four replicates. There was a good preservation of physiological quality for seeds submitted to different conservation methods in cold storage along the 180-day period. However, there was a faster germination and initial growth of seedlings for seeds left in cold storage for 60 days than in seeds assessed at harvest or left in cold storage for 120-180 days. The NA storage of seeds in perfurated plastic bags was as efficient as MA and CA storage to preserve seeds quality. Seeds scarification increased vigor and promoted seedlings initial growth of Araucaria angustifolia after being removed from cold storage.

  6. Nitrate reduction to nitrite, nitric oxide and ammonia by gut bacteria under physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiso, Mauro; Schechter, Alan N

    2015-01-01

    The biological nitrogen cycle involves step-wise reduction of nitrogen oxides to ammonium salts and oxidation of ammonia back to nitrites and nitrates by plants and bacteria. Neither process has been thought to have relevance to mammalian physiology; however in recent years the salivary bacterial reduction of nitrate to nitrite has been recognized as an important metabolic conversion in humans. Several enteric bacteria have also shown the ability of catalytic reduction of nitrate to ammonia via nitrite during dissimilatory respiration; however, the importance of this pathway in bacterial species colonizing the human intestine has been little studied. We measured nitrite, nitric oxide (NO) and ammonia formation in cultures of Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species grown at different sodium nitrate concentrations and oxygen levels. We found that the presence of 5 mM nitrate provided a growth benefit and induced both nitrite and ammonia generation in E.coli and L.plantarum bacteria grown at oxygen concentrations compatible with the content in the gastrointestinal tract. Nitrite and ammonia accumulated in the growth medium when at least 2.5 mM nitrate was present. Time-course curves suggest that nitrate is first converted to nitrite and subsequently to ammonia. Strains of L.rhamnosus, L.acidophilus and B.longum infantis grown with nitrate produced minor changes in nitrite or ammonia levels in the cultures. However, when supplied with exogenous nitrite, NO gas was readily produced independently of added nitrate. Bacterial production of lactic acid causes medium acidification that in turn generates NO by non-enzymatic nitrite reduction. In contrast, nitrite was converted to NO by E.coli cultures even at neutral pH. We suggest that the bacterial nitrate reduction to ammonia, as well as the related NO formation in the gut, could be an important aspect of the overall mammalian nitrate/nitrite/NO metabolism and is yet another way in which the microbiome

  7. Social and reproductive physiology and behavior of the Neotropical cichlid fish Cichlasoma dimerus under laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Alonso

    Full Text Available In this work we describe for the first time the social and reproductive behavior of the Neotropical fish Cichlasoma dimerus (Heckel, 1840 [Perciformes: Cichlidae], endemic to the Paraná River basin, using a comprehensive-integral approach, including morphological and physiological features. This substrate breeding fish has biparental care of the fry and presents a dominance hierarchy that determines access to breeding territories among males, and to males with territories among females. Gregarious behavior associated with a pale body color, was observed before reproductive behaviors started. Afterwards, a dominance hierarchy was established through aggressive interactions. Territorial individuals had bright body color patterns and non territorial an opaque grey one. Black ventral coloration was associated with reproductive individuals. Courtship displays, which were similar to threatening displays, had the common effect of increasing the visible area of the individual. The dominant male was always the largest one suggesting that size is probably a major factor determining the hierarchy establishment and that these intra-sexually selected traits may have been reinforced by inter-sexual selection. Reproductive males had higher pituitary levels of β-follicle stimulating hormone (β-FSH and somatolactin (SL than non reproductive ones, while no differences were found among females. No differences were found among male gonadosomatic indexes. Non reproductive individuals had higher plasma cortisol levels for both sexes. It is possible that dominant reproductive individuals may be inhibiting reproduction of subordinate fish through physical contact, increasing their cortisol levels and diminishing FSH and SL pituitary content. However, this was not reflected as an inhibition at the gonadal level in our experimental design.

  8. Influence of Bacillus spp. strains on seedling growth and physiological parameters of sorghum under moisture stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Minakshi; Madhubala, R; Ali, Sk Z; Yadav, S K; Venkateswarlu, B

    2014-09-01

    Microorganisms isolated from stressed ecosystem may prove as ideal candidates for development of bio-inoculants for stressed agricultural production systems. In the present study, moisture stress tolerant rhizobacteria were isolated from the rhizosphere of sorghum, pigeonpea, and cowpea grown under semiarid conditions in India. Four isolates KB122, KB129, KB133, and KB142 from sorghum rhizosphere exhibited plant growth promoting traits and tolerance to salinity, high temperature, and moisture stress. These isolates were identified as Bacillus spp. by 16S rDNA sequence analysis. The strains were evaluated for growth promotion of sorghum seedlings under two different moisture stress conditions (set-I, continuous 50% soil water holding capacity (WHC) throughout the experiment and set-II, 75% soil WHC for 27 days followed by no irrigation for 5 days) under greenhouse conditions. Plate count and scanning electron microscope studies indicated successful root surface colonization by inoculated bacteria. Plants inoculated with Bacillus spp. strains showed better growth in terms of shoot length and root biomass with dark greenish leaves due to high chlorophyll content while un-inoculated plants showed rolling of the leaves, stunted appearance, and wilting under both stress conditions. Inoculation also improved leaf relative water content and soil moisture content. However, variation in proline and sugar content in the different treatments under two stress conditions indicated differential effect of microbial treatments on plant physiological parameters under stress conditions.

  9. Physiological and oenological traits of different Dekkera/Brettanomyces bruxellensis strains under wine-model conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigentini, Ileana; Romano, Andrea; Compagno, Concetta; Merico, Annamaria; Molinari, Francesco; Tirelli, Antonio; Foschino, Roberto; Volonterio, Gaspare

    2008-11-01

    Contamination of wine by Dekkera/Brettanomyces bruxellensis is mostly due to the production of off-flavours identified as vinyl- and especially ethyl-phenols, but these yeasts can also produce several other spoiling metabolites, such as acetic acid and biogenic amines. Little information is available about the correlation between growth, viability and off-flavour and biogenic amine production. In the present work, five strains of Dekkera bruxellensis isolated from wine were analysed over 3 months in wine-like environment for growth, cell survival, carbon source utilization and production of volatile phenols and biogenic amines. Our data indicate that the wine spoilage potential of D. bruxellensis is strain dependent, being strictly associated with the ability to grow under oenological conditions. 4-Ethyl-phenol and 4-ethyl-guaiacol production ranged between 0 and 2.7 and 2 mg L(-1), respectively, depending on the growth conditions. Putrescine, cadaverine and spermidine were the biogenic amines found.

  10. Tidal Flushing Restores the Physiological Condition of Fish Residing in Degraded Salt Marshes

    OpenAIRE

    Dibble, Kimberly L.; Meyerson, Laura A.

    2012-01-01

    Roads, bridges, and dikes constructed across salt marshes can restrict tidal flow, degrade habitat quality for nekton, and facilitate invasion by non-native plants including Phragmites australis. Introduced P. australis contributes to marsh accretion and eliminates marsh surface pools thereby adversely affecting fish by reducing access to intertidal habitats essential for feeding, reproduction, and refuge. Our study assessed the condition of resident fish populations (Fundulus heteroclitus) a...

  11. The seed physiological potential of hybrid corn treated with insecticides and store in two environmental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Fátima Baldiga Tonin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Seed treatment is a widely disseminated practice in Brazilian cultural areas, which linked to other cultural practices, has contributed to the increase in productivity, cost reduction, final product improvement, environmental damage reduction as well as good seed protection in the field level and storage. The work had the objective to check the insecticide effect on the germination and vigor of the hybrid maize seeds, stored in two environmental conditions. The seeds were treated with three insecticides, identified as: Insecticide one (Thiametoxan; Insecticide two (Neonicotinoide and Insecticide three [Neonicotinoide + (Imidaclopride+thiodicarbe]. After being treated, the seeds were stored for a period of 270 days, in two different places, one with (10ºC temperature and relative humidity (60% and another under normal condition of storage. During this period evaluations were accomplished every 45 days, through germination and vigor tests. In addition to germination and cooling tests, sanitation analysis, seedling emergency and seed inoculation were carried out. After that the seeds were stored for a period of 30 days in environmental places with and without control of air condition. The results obtained allow to conclude that the maintenance of seed quality of hybrid maize, treated with insecticides, depends on the hybrid and chemical product used in their treatment and that the reduction in feasibility and vigor of seeds treated with thiametoxan is intensified due to the storage period extension.

  12. Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell adhesion on E- and P-selectin under physiological flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Hematogenous metastasis is still a poorly understood phenomenon. The rate-limiting step within the metastatic cascade is not yet clear although it may be estimated that the extravasation of circulating tumor cells is a step of crucial importance, as most tumor cells that are shed into circulation undergo apoptosis. The process of extravasation includes a cascade of consecutive steps, starting with adhesion of tumor cells circulating in the bloodstream to endothelial cells, mimicking leukocyte adhesion and transmigration. Endothelial cell selectin-leukocyte glycan interaction occurs when leukocytes adhere to endothelial cells under conditions of shear stress. As there are parallels between cancer cell endothelial interactions with leukocyte endothelial cell systems an experimental setup has been developed in which adhesion of small cell lung carcinoma adhesive properties can be analyzed under physiological shear stress conditions during their attachment to E- and P-selection.

  13. Interaction of baseline synaptic noise and Ia EPSPs: evidence for appreciable negative correlation under physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solodkin, M; Jiménez, I; Collins, W F; Mendell, L M; Rudomin, P

    1991-04-01

    1. In the anesthetized cat, simultaneous intracellular recordings from pairs of spinal motoneurons were undertaken to see whether the amplitude of single-fiber excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in both cells fluctuated in a coordinated manner that would indicate correlative mechanisms at either pre- or post-synaptic level. Although these recordings revealed correlated fluctuations in the baseline, the single-fiber Ia/EPSPs recorded with the spike-triggered averaging technique exhibited no correlated fluctuations and, unexpectedly, virtually no increase in baseline variance associated with the EPSP. However, the fact that these experiments were carried out under conditions of high baseline synaptic noise (i.e., with muscle stretch) may have influenced the outcome because of interaction between EPSP and synaptic noise, and this possibility was evaluated explicitly. 2. A given connection was studied under low noise by electrically stimulating a single Ia fiber in the absence of muscle stretch. The same connection was analyzed under conditions of high noise by activating the fiber and all other stretch receptor afferents with muscle stretch and by using spike-triggered averaging to extract the EPSP. The differences in mean EPSP amplitude at a given connection under conditions of low noise and high noise were minimal. 3. Fluctuations in EPSP amplitude were then determined to see whether these were influenced by presence of baseline synaptic noise and whether the interaction was nonlinear. Two methods were used to measure EPSP fluctuations: measurement of the variance associated with the EPSP, and determination by the use of deconvolution methods of the discrete amplitude components associated with the EPSP. 4. An increase in baseline variance was observed during the EPSP evoked under low noise conditions at all six connections studied in this way. This increase disappeared at two of these connections when examined under high noise. This may help to explain the

  14. Qualidade fisiológica de sementes de soja submetidas ao hidrocondicionamento = Soybean seed physiological quality after hydro-conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Izabel Krüger Giurizatto

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A técnica de hidratação controlada de sementes vem sendo utilizada como método de condicionamento fisiológico, tanto para sementes deterioradas como para sementes altamente sensíveis à embebição rápida, ou a interação entre ambas, objetivando melhorar o desempenho destas no campo. A hidratação pode ser seguida por secagem, se assementes não tiverem atingido a fase III da germinação, facilitando, assim, o subseqüente manuseio, armazenamento e semeadura no campo. O objetivo do presente trabalho foi avaliar os efeitos do hidrocondicionamento na qualidade fisiológica de sementes de soja,sendo estas sementes hidrocondicionadas por períodos de 0, 20 e 24h, secas e armazenadas por 0, 90, 180 e 270 dias em câmara seca, com umidade e temperatura controladas. O hidrocondicionamento teve efeito benéfico na qualidade fisiológica das sementes de soja,suas vantagens se tornaram mais evidentes com o envelhecimento natural das sementes durante o armazenamento.Controlled hydration of seeds has been used as a physiological conditioning method, both for deteriorated seeds as well as seeds that are highly sensitive to soaking, or an interaction among both, aiming to improving their performance after sowing in the field. Thehydration must be followed by drying, in case the seeds have not reached yet phase III of germination, thus facilitating subsequent handling, storage and sowing operations. This work aimed to evaluate the hydro-conditioning effect (0, 20 and 24 hours, followed by seeddrying on the physiological quality of soybean seeds, stored in dry chamber under controlled conditions (relative humidity and temperature during 0, 90, 180 and 270 days. Hydro-conditioning has revealed positive effects on the physiological quality of those seedsand its advantage became more evident according to natural aging of the seeds during the storage.

  15. Physiological response of Clostridium ljungdahlii DSM 13528 of ethanol production under different fermentation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Bin-Tao; Liu, Zi-Yong; Tian, Lei; Li, Fu-Li; Chen, Xiao-Hua

    2015-02-01

    In this study, cell growth, gene expression and ethanol production were monitored under different fermentation conditions. Like its heterotrophical ABE-producing relatives, a switch from acidogenesis to solventogenesis of Clostridium ljungdahlii during the autotrophic fermentation with CO/CO2 could be observed, which occurred surprisingly in the late-log phase rather than in the transition phase. The gene expression profiles indicated that aor1, one of the putative aldehyde oxidoreductases in its genome played a critical role in the formation of ethanol, and its transcription could be induced by external acids. Moreover, a low amount of CaCO3 was proved to have positive influences on the cell density and substrate utilization, followed by an increase of over 40% ethanol and 30% acetate formation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Temperate heath plant response to dry conditions depends on growth strategy and less on physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian Rost; Kongstad, J.; Schmidt, I. K.

    2012-01-01

    The evidence that is currently available demonstrates that future changes in precipitation patterns will affect plant carbon uptake. However, the outcome in terms of success, productivity and fecundity depends upon individual species and different responses of various growth forms. Examination...... of these differences in response in dry versus rewetting conditions can be used to highlight the limitations coherent in different strategies adopted by, for example, evergreen shrubs and grasses. We investigated the leaf-level photosynthetic performance, leaf C, N and d13C along with vegetation cover and biomass...... rewetting increased leaf nitrogen and photosynthesis in the grass much more than for the dwarf shrub. These different strategies may have a considerable impact on carbon uptake and on the ability of a species to compete, as future climatic changes are likely to extend the summer drought period together...

  17. Viscoelastic Properties of Hyaluronan in Physiological Conditions [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary K. Cowman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronan (HA is a high molecular weight glycosaminoglycan of the extracellular matrix (ECM, which is particularly abundant in soft connective tissues. Solutions of HA can be highly viscous with non-Newtonian flow properties. These properties affect the movement of HA-containing fluid layers within and underlying the deep fascia. Changes in the concentration, molecular weight, or even covalent modification of HA in inflammatory conditions, as well as changes in binding interactions with other macromolecules, can have dramatic effects on the sliding movement of fascia. The high molecular weight and the semi-flexible chain of HA are key factors leading to the high viscosity of dilute solutions, and real HA solutions show additional nonideality and greatly increased viscosity due to mutual macromolecular crowding. The shear rate dependence of the viscosity, and the viscoelasticity of HA solutions, depend on the relaxation time of the molecule, which in turn depends on the HA concentration and molecular weight. Temperature can also have an effect on these properties. High viscosity can additionally affect the lubricating function of HA solutions. Immobility can increase the concentration of HA, increase the viscosity, and reduce lubrication and gliding of the layers of connective tissue and muscle. Over time, these changes can alter both muscle structure and function. Inflammation can further increase the viscosity of HA-containing fluids if the HA is modified via covalent attachment of heavy chains derived from Inter-α-Inhibitor. Hyaluronidase hydrolyzes HA, thus reducing its molecular weight, lowering the viscosity of the extracellular matrix fluid and making outflow easier. It can also disrupt any aggregates or gel-like structures that result from HA being modified. Hyaluronidase is used medically primarily as a dispersion agent, but may also be useful in conditions where altered viscosity of the fascia is desired, such as in the treatment of

  18. Vascular hyperpolarization in human physiology and cardiovascular risk conditions and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinzari, F; Tesauro, M; Cardillo, C

    2017-01-01

    Hyperpolarization causing smooth muscle relaxation contributes to the maintenance of vascular homeostasis, particularly in small-calibre arteries and arterioles. It may also become a compensatory vasodilator mechanism upregulated in states with impaired nitric oxide (NO) availability. Bioassay of vascular hyperpolarization in the human circulation has been hampered by the complexity of mechanisms involved and the limited availability of investigational tools. Firm evidence, however, supports the notion that hyperpolarization participates in the regulation of resting vasodilator tone and vascular reactivity in healthy subjects. In addition, an enhanced endothelium-derived hyperpolarization contributes to both resting and agonist-stimulated vasodilation in a variety of cardiovascular risk conditions and disease. Thus, hyperpolarization mediated by epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and H2 O2 has been observed in coronary arterioles of patients with coronary artery disease. Similarly, ouabain-sensitive and EETs-mediated hyperpolarization has been observed to compensate for NO deficiency in patients with essential hypertension. Moreover, in non-hypertensive patients with multiple cardiovascular risk factors and in hypercholesterolaemia, KCa channel-mediated vasodilation appears to be activated. A novel paradigm establishes that perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) is an additional regulator of vascular tone/function and endothelium is not the only agent in vascular hyperpolarization. Indeed, some PVAT-derived relaxing substances, such as adiponectin and angiotensin 1-7, may exert anticontractile and vasodilator actions by the opening of KCa channels in smooth muscle cells. Conversely, PVAT-derived factors impair coronary vasodilation via differential inhibition of some K(+) channels. In view of adipose tissue abnormalities occurring in human obesity, changes in PVAT-dependent hyperpolarization may be relevant for vascular dysfunction also in this condition.

  19. Social and reproductive physiology and behavior of the Neotropical cichlid fish Cichlasoma dimerus under laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Alonso

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we describe for the first time the social and reproductive behavior of the Neotropical fish Cichlasoma dimerus (Heckel, 1840 [Perciformes: Cichlidae], endemic to the Paraná River basin, using a comprehensive-integral approach, including morphological and physiological features. This substrate breeding fish has biparental care of the fry and presents a dominance hierarchy that determines access to breeding territories among males, and to males with territories among females. Gregarious behavior associated with a pale body color, was observed before reproductive behaviors started. Afterwards, a dominance hierarchy was established through aggressive interactions. Territorial individuals had bright body color patterns and non territorial an opaque grey one. Black ventral coloration was associated with reproductive individuals. Courtship displays, which were similar to threatening displays, had the common effect of increasing the visible area of the individual. The dominant male was always the largest one suggesting that size is probably a major factor determining the hierarchy establishment and that these intra-sexually selected traits may have been reinforced by inter-sexual selection. Reproductive males had higher pituitary levels of β-follicle stimulating hormone (β-FSH and somatolactin (SL than non reproductive ones, while no differences were found among females. No differences were found among male gonadosomatic indexes. Non reproductive individuals had higher plasma cortisol levels for both sexes. It is possible that dominant reproductive individuals may be inhibiting reproduction of subordinate fish through physical contact, increasing their cortisol levels and diminishing FSH and SL pituitary content. However, this was not reflected as an inhibition at the gonadal level in our experimental design.En este trabajo se describen por primera vez el comportamiento social y reproductivo del pez cíclido neotropical Cichlasoma

  20. Physiological responses of juvenile rainbow trout to fasting and swimming activity: Effects on body composition and condition indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpkins, D.G.; Hubert, W.A.; Del Rio, C.M.; Rule, D.C.

    2003-01-01

    The physiological traits that allow fish to survive periods of limited food resources are poorly understood. We assessed changes in proximate body composition, relative organ mass, blood metabolites, and relative weight (Wr) of sedentary and actively swimming (15 cm/s) juvenile rainbow trout (154-182 mm total length) over 147 d of fasting. Fasting caused measurable responses that were augmented when fish were swimming. Lipids and plasma triacylglycerides declined over time. Proteins were catabolized simultaneously with lipid reserves, but ammonia concentrations in plasma did not increase. The liver somatic index (LSI) did not change substantially over 105 d, suggesting that gluconeogenesis maintained blood glucose concentrations and hepatic glycogen reserves for a substantial period of fasting. The gut somatic index (GSI) and Wr declined linearly during fasting, but the LSI did not decline until after 105 d of fasting. Consequently, the use of different body condition indices could lead to different conclusions about the condition of juvenile rainbow trout. Swimming activity caused fish to have lower lipid and protein reserves than those of sedentary fish. No mortalities were observed among sedentary fish, but mortalities occurred among actively swimming fish after 97 d of fasting when 3.2% or less lipid remained in their bodies. Body condition indices did not account for differences in proximate body composition between sedentary and actively swimming fish and were relatively poor predictors of lipid content and risk of mortality. The probability of mortality was most accurately predicted by percent lipid content. Therefore, we suggest that fisheries scientists consider using percent lipid content when evaluating the physiological status and risk of mortality due to starvation among juvenile rainbow trout.

  1. The effect of physiological conditions on the surface structure of proteins: Setting the scene for human digestion of emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Valderrama, J.; Gunning, A. P.; Ridout, M. J.; Wilde, P. J.; Morris, V. J.

    2009-10-01

    Understanding and manipulating the interfacial mechanisms that control human digestion of food emulsions is a crucial step towards improved control of dietary intake. This article reports initial studies on the effects of the physiological conditions within the stomach on the properties of the film formed by the milk protein ( β -lactoglobulin) at the air-water interface. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), surface tension and surface rheology techniques were used to visualize and examine the effect of gastric conditions on the network structure. The effects of changes in temperature, pH and ionic strength on a pre-formed interfacial structure were characterized in order to simulate the actual digestion process. Changes in ionic strength had little effect on the surface properties. In isolation, acidification reduced both the dilatational and the surface shear modulus, mainly due to strong repulsive electrostatic interactions within the surface layer and raising the temperature to body temperature accelerated the rearrangements within the surface layer, resulting in a decrease of the dilatational response and an increase of surface pressure. Together pH and temperature display an unexpected synergism, independent of the ionic strength. Thus, exposure of a pre-formed interfacial β -lactoglobulin film to simulated gastric conditions reduced the surface dilatational modulus and surface shear moduli. This is attributed to a weakening of the surface network in which the surface rearrangements of the protein prior to exposure to gastric conditions might play a crucial role.

  2. The effect of anti-rosetting agents against malaria parasites under physiological flow conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Adams

    Full Text Available Rosetting remains the dominant malaria parasite adhesion phenotype associated with severe disease and pathogenicity in Africa. The formation of rosettes, whereby a Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocyte (IE adheres to two or more non-IEs, is thought to facilitate the occlusion of microvascular blood vessels by adhering to host endothelial cells and other bound IEs. Current methods of determining the rosette-disrupting capabilities of antibodies/drugs have focused on static assays. As IEs in vivo are exposed to shear stresses within the microvasculature, the effect of flow conditions on rosetting requires further examination. This study establishes a new rosetting flow assay using a closed perfusion system together with inverted fluorescence microscopy and image analysis, and confirms previous reports that rosettes exist under shear stresses equivalent to those present in the microvasculature (0.5-1.0 dyn/cm(2. Furthermore, we tested the effectiveness of rosette-disrupting PfEMP1 antibodies, heparin and fucoidan over a range of concentrations on two P. falciparum strains, and found no statistically significant differences between the results of static and flow assays. The new flow assay is a valuable addition to the tools available to study rosetting. However, the static assay has good predictive value and remains useful as the standard screening test for rosette-disrupting interventions.

  3. Competitive endothelial adhesion between Plasmodium falciparum isolates under physiological flow conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molyneux Malcolm

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequestration of parasitized red blood cells in the microvasculature of major organs involves a sequence of events that is believed to contribute to the pathogenesis of severe falciparum malaria. Plasmodium falciparum infections are commonly composed of multiple subpopulations of parasites with varied adhesive properties. A key question is: do these subpopulations compete for adhesion to endothelium? This study investigated whether, in a laboratory model of cytoadherence, there is competition in binding to endothelium between pRBC infected with P. falciparum of variant adhesive phenotypes, particularly under flow conditions. Methods Four different P. falciparum isolates, of known adherence phenotypes, were matched in pairs, mixed in different proportions and allowed to bind to cultured human endothelium. Using in vitro competitive static and flow-based adhesion assays, that allow simultaneous testing of the adhesive properties of two different parasite lines, adherence levels of paired P. falciparum isolates were quantified and analysed using either non-parametric Wilcoxon's paired signed rank test or Student paired test. Results Study findings show that P. falciparum parasite lines show marked differences in the efficiency of adhesion to endothelium. Conclusion Plasmodium falciparum variants will compete for adhesion to endothelia and variants can be ranked by their efficiency of binding. These findings suggest that variants from a mixed infection will not show uniform cytoadherence and so may vary in their ability to cause disease.

  4. Role of ROS and RNS Sources in Physiological and Pathological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Di Meo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is significant evidence that, in living systems, free radicals and other reactive oxygen and nitrogen species play a double role, because they can cause oxidative damage and tissue dysfunction and serve as molecular signals activating stress responses that are beneficial to the organism. Mitochondria have been thought to both play a major role in tissue oxidative damage and dysfunction and provide protection against excessive tissue dysfunction through several mechanisms, including stimulation of opening of permeability transition pores. Until recently, the functional significance of ROS sources different from mitochondria has received lesser attention. However, the most recent data, besides confirming the mitochondrial role in tissue oxidative stress and protection, show interplay between mitochondria and other ROS cellular sources, so that activation of one can lead to activation of other sources. Thus, it is currently accepted that in various conditions all cellular sources of ROS provide significant contribution to processes that oxidatively damage tissues and assure their survival, through mechanisms such as autophagy and apoptosis.

  5. Water Use Efficiency and Physiological Response of Rice Cultivars under Alternate Wetting and Drying Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunbo Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the technology options that can help farmers cope with water scarcity at the field level is alternate wetting and drying (AWD. Limited information is available on the varietal responses to nitrogen, AWD, and their interactions. Field experiments were conducted at the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI farm in 2009 dry season (DS, 2009 wet season (WS, and 2010 DS to determine genotypic responses and water use efficiency of rice under two N rates and two water management treatments. Grain yield was not significantly different between AWD and continuous flooding (CF across the three seasons. Interactive effects among variety, water management, and N rate were not significant. The high yield was attributed to the significantly higher grain weight, which in turn was due to slower grain filling and high leaf N at the later stage of grain filling of CF. AWD treatments accelerated the grain filling rate, shortened grain filling period, and enhanced whole plant senescence. Under normal dry-season conditions, such as 2010 DS, AWD reduced water input by 24.5% than CF; however, it decreased grain yield by 6.9% due to accelerated leaf senescence. The study indicates that proper water management greatly contributes to grain yield in the late stage of grain filling, and it is critical for safe AWD technology.

  6. Physiological requirements for growth and competitiveness of Dekkera bruxellensis under oxygen-limited or anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomqvist, Johanna; Nogué, Violeta Sànchez; Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie; Passoth, Volkmar

    2012-07-01

    The effect of glucose and oxygen limitation on the growth and fermentation performances of Dekkera bruxellensis was investigated in order to understand which factors favour its propagation in ethanol or wine plants. Although D. bruxellensis has been described as a facultative anaerobe, no growth was observed in mineral medium under complete anaerobiosis while growth was retarded under severe oxygen limitation. In a continuous culture with no gas inflow, glucose was not completely consumed, most probably due to oxygen limitation. When an air/nitrogen mixture (O(2)-content ca. 5%) was sparged to the culture, growth became glucose-limited. In co-cultivations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ethanol yields/g consumed sugar were not affected by the co-cultures as compared to the pure cultures. However, different population responses were observed in both systems. In oxygen-limited cultivation, glucose was depleted within 24 h after challenging with S. cerevisiae and both yeast populations were maintained at a stable level. In contrast, the S. cerevisiae population constantly decreased to about 1% of its initial cell number in the sparged glucose-limited fermentation, whereas the D. bruxellensis population remained constant. To identify the requirements of D. bruxellensis for anaerobic growth, the yeast was cultivated in several nitrogen sources and with the addition of amino acids. Yeast extract and most of the supplied amino acids supported anaerobic growth, which points towards a higher nutrient demand for D. bruxellensis compared to S. cerevisiae in anaerobic conditions. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. THE INFLUENCE OF POLYMERIC GROWTH REGULATORS ON MORPHOLOGICAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL PARAMETERS OF RICE IN SALINE CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tretyakova O. I.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article studies the influence of polymeric in the form of formers and growth regulators on the growth and development of rice plants when grown in saline conditions. We controlled the effect of salinity on grows regulators and vigor, seed germination, root and shoot weight, the content of photosynthetic pigments parameters, induction curves of delayed fluorescence, the indicators of structure of harvest, grain yield. It was found, that pre-sowing seed soaking in solutions of polymer grows regulators has a stimulating effect on the growth and development of rice plants in the early stages: we significantly increased germination and emergence, dry weight of root and shoot compared to control. At different stages of ontogeny rice, the absolute content of pigments in the leaves and the relationship between the individual variants change. The absolute content of pigments in leaves and their relationship between experiences at different stages of ontogeny change. In the period of intensive vegetative growth from seedling stage the content of total chlorophyll is maximum, and by the end of the growing season it decreases. It can be assumed that the salinity of the substrate significantly reduces the productivity of photosynthesis in young plants, possibly due to imbalance of ions in the cell, the older it gets – the weaker the phenomenon is and even becomes reversed. The second maximum IR ZF increases during the growing season from germination to flowering, then decreases to the beginning of ripening in all embodiments. The same dynamics is characteristic of the magnitude of the proton gradient in the membranes of chloroplasts tylakoids. Salt protection effect of growth regulators on grain yield is significant on both backgrounds of mineral nutrition

  8. Analysis of Cap-binding Proteins in Human Cells Exposed to Physiological Oxygen Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpano, Sara; Melanson, Gaelan; Evagelou, Sonia L; Guild, Brianna D; Specker, Erin J; Uniacke, James

    2016-12-28

    Translational control is a focal point of gene regulation, especially during periods of cellular stress. Cap-dependent translation via the eIF4F complex is by far the most common pathway to initiate protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells, but stress-specific variations of this complex are now emerging. Purifying cap-binding proteins with an affinity resin composed of Agarose-linked m(7)GTP (a 5' mRNA cap analog) is a useful tool to identify factors involved in the regulation of translation initiation. Hypoxia (low oxygen) is a cellular stress encountered during fetal development and tumor progression, and is highly dependent on translation regulation. Furthermore, it was recently reported that human adult organs have a lower oxygen content (physioxia 1-9% oxygen) that is closer to hypoxia than the ambient air where cells are routinely cultured. With the ongoing characterization of a hypoxic eIF4F complex (eIF4F(H)), there is increasing interest in understanding oxygen-dependent translation initiation through the 5' mRNA cap. We have recently developed a human cell culture method to analyze cap-binding proteins that are regulated by oxygen availability. This protocol emphasizes that cell culture and lysis be performed in a hypoxia workstation to eliminate exposure to oxygen. Cells must be incubated for at least 24 hr for the liquid media to equilibrate with the atmosphere within the workstation. To avoid this limitation, pre-conditioned media (de-oxygenated) can be added to cells if shorter time points are required. Certain cap-binding proteins require interactions with a second base or can hydrolyze the m(7)GTP, therefore some cap interactors may be missed in the purification process. Agarose-linked to enzymatically resistant cap analogs may be substituted in this protocol. This method allows the user to identify novel oxygen-regulated translation factors involved in cap-dependent translation.

  9. Extracellular Membrane Vesicles as Vehicles for Brain Cell-to-Cell Interactions in Physiological as well as Pathological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Schiera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles are involved in a great variety of physiological events occurring in the nervous system, such as cross talk among neurons and glial cells in synapse development and function, integrated neuronal plasticity, neuronal-glial metabolic exchanges, and synthesis and dynamic renewal of myelin. Many of these EV-mediated processes depend on the exchange of proteins, mRNAs, and noncoding RNAs, including miRNAs, which occurs among glial and neuronal cells. In addition, production and exchange of EVs can be modified under pathological conditions, such as brain cancer and neurodegeneration. Like other cancer cells, brain tumours can use EVs to secrete factors, which allow escaping from immune surveillance, and to transfer molecules into the surrounding cells, thus transforming their phenotype. Moreover, EVs can function as a way to discard material dangerous to cancer cells, such as differentiation-inducing proteins, and even drugs. Intriguingly, EVs seem to be also involved in spreading through the brain of aggregated proteins, such as prions and aggregated tau protein. Finally, EVs can carry useful biomarkers for the early diagnosis of diseases. Herein we summarize possible roles of EVs in brain physiological functions and discuss their involvement in the horizontal spreading, from cell to cell, of both cancer and neurodegenerative pathologies.

  10. Physiological and lactation responses of Egyptian dairy Baladi goats to natural thermal stress under subtropical environmental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Tarabany, Mahmoud S.; El-Tarabany, Akram A.; Atta, Mostafa A.

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of thermal stress on milk production and physiological traits of Baladi goats under subtropical Egyptian conditions. Sixty dairy Baladi goats were exposed to three different levels of temperature-humidity index (THI), including low (less than 70), moderate (over 70 and up to 80), and high levels (over 80). The influence of THI on the milk composition and physiological, hematological, and biochemical traits was investigated. Rectal temperature and respiration rate were significantly greater at the higher THI than at low and moderate THI (p = 0.016 and 0.002, respectively). Baladi goats had decreased daily milk yield in a rate of 27.3 and 19.3 % at high THI level, compared with low and moderate THI, respectively (p = 0.031). On the contrary, no significant differences have been reported in protein, fat, and total solids percentages at different THI levels. Total leucocyte count, serum glucose, and total protein were significantly reduced at high THI in comparison with low and moderate THI levels (p = 0.043, 0.001, and 0.001, respectively). However, dairy goats maintained relatively stable estimates for erythrocytes count, hemoglobin, serum triglycerides, cholesterol, catalase, total antioxidant capacity, and triiodothyronine at different THI levels. Our results indicate that dairy Baladi goats can tolerate THI levels up to 80; however, variable reduction in milk yield and few biochemical (serum total protein and glucose) and hematological (leucocytes count) parameters have been reported at a THI level higher than 80.

  11. Physiological and lactation responses of Egyptian dairy Baladi goats to natural thermal stress under subtropical environmental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Tarabany, Mahmoud S.; El-Tarabany, Akram A.; Atta, Mostafa A.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of thermal stress on milk production and physiological traits of Baladi goats under subtropical Egyptian conditions. Sixty dairy Baladi goats were exposed to three different levels of temperature-humidity index (THI), including low (less than 70), moderate (over 70 and up to 80), and high levels (over 80). The influence of THI on the milk composition and physiological, hematological, and biochemical traits was investigated. Rectal temperature and respiration rate were significantly greater at the higher THI than at low and moderate THI ( p = 0.016 and 0.002, respectively). Baladi goats had decreased daily milk yield in a rate of 27.3 and 19.3 % at high THI level, compared with low and moderate THI, respectively ( p = 0.031). On the contrary, no significant differences have been reported in protein, fat, and total solids percentages at different THI levels. Total leucocyte count, serum glucose, and total protein were significantly reduced at high THI in comparison with low and moderate THI levels ( p = 0.043, 0.001, and 0.001, respectively). However, dairy goats maintained relatively stable estimates for erythrocytes count, hemoglobin, serum triglycerides, cholesterol, catalase, total antioxidant capacity, and triiodothyronine at different THI levels. Our results indicate that dairy Baladi goats can tolerate THI levels up to 80; however, variable reduction in milk yield and few biochemical (serum total protein and glucose) and hematological (leucocytes count) parameters have been reported at a THI level higher than 80.

  12. Interaction between Fibrinogen and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Binding Protein-1 in Human Plasma under Physiological Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gligorijević, N; Nedić, O

    2016-02-01

    Fibrinogen is a plasma glycoprotein and one of the principle participants in blood coagulation. It interacts with many proteins during formation of a blood clot, including insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and their binding proteins (IGFBP). Fibrinogen complexes were found as minor fractions in fibrinogen preparations independently of the coagulation process, and their presence influences the kinetics of polymerization. The idea of this work was to investigate whether fibrinogen in human plasma interacts with IGFBPs independently of the tissue injury or coagulation process. The results have shown that fibrinogen forms complexes with IGFBP-1 under physiological conditions. Several experimental approaches have confirmed that complexes are co-isolated with fibrinogen from plasma, they are relatively stable, and they appear as a general feature of human plasma. Several other experiments excluded the possibility that alpha-2 macroglobulin/IGFBP-1 complexes or IGFBP-1 oligomers contributed to IGFBP-1 immunoreactivity. The role of fibrinogen/IGFBP-1 complexes is still unknown. Further investigation in individuals expressing both impaired glucose control and coagulopathy could contribute to identification and understanding of their possible physiological role.

  13. Modulation of the genotoxicity of bleomycin by amines through noncovalent DNA interactions and alteration of physiological conditions in yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, George R. [Department of Biology, College of the Holy Cross, One College Street, Worcester, MA 01610-2395 (United States)], E-mail: ghoffmann@holycross.edu; Gessner, Gabrielle S.; Hughes, Jennifer F.; Ronan, Matthew V.; Sylvia, Katelyn E.; Willett, Christine J. [Department of Biology, College of the Holy Cross, One College Street, Worcester, MA 01610-2395 (United States)

    2007-10-01

    noncovalent association with DNA, altered BLM access to DNA, and modulation of physiological conditions.

  14. ASH1 mRNP-core factors form stable complexes in absence of cargo RNA at physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelmann, Franziska T; Niedner, Annika; Niessing, Dierk

    2015-01-01

    Asymmetric ASH1 mRNA transport during mitosis of budding yeast constitutes one of the best-studied examples of mRNA localization. Recently, 2 studies used in vitro motility assays to prove that motile ASH1 mRNA-transport complexes can be reconstituted entirely from recombinant factors. Both studies, however, differed in their conclusions on whether cargo RNA itself is required for particle assembly and thus activation of directional transport. Here we provide direct evidence that stable complexes do assemble in absence of RNA at physiologic conditions and even at ionic strengths above cellular levels. These results directly confirm the previous notion that the ASH1 transport machinery is not activated by the cargo RNA itself, but rather through protein-protein interactions.

  15. Evaluation Physiological Characteristics and Grain Yield Canola Cultivars under end Seasonal Drought Stress in Weather Condition of Ahvaz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Seyed Ahmadi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate canola cultivars response to physiological characteristics and grain yield end seasonal drought stress in weather condition of Ahvaz, farm experiments were done at research farm of Khuzestan agriculture and natural resources center. During 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 crop years. Farm test comprised drought stress was done as split plot form with randomize complete block design with four replication, treatments consist of drought stress (main factor including 50, 60 and 70 percent of water use content, which was applied from early heading stage until physiological maturity, and three spring canola cultivar including Shirali, Hayola 401 and R.G.S. were considered as sub plots. Measurements include biological yield, grain yield, harvesting index, number of pod per plant 1000 grain weight, number of grain in pod, plant height, and stem diameter, oil and protein percentage. Results showed that drought stress reduced significantly grain yield, biological yield, harvest index and the average of reduction of them during 2 years for per unit reduce moisture from 50% to 70% were 2, 1.35, and 0.81 percent, respectively. During two years, 1000 grain weight, number of pods per plant and number of grain per pod reduced 27, 36 and 20 percent, respectively. Terminal Drought stress reduced significantly plant height, stem diameter, stem number per plant and pod length, this reduced were 12, 46, 36 and 14 percent, respectively. Stem diameter, and stem number per plant reduced more than other characteristics. In this study oil grain decreased 12 % and protein grain increased 18.5% but oil and protein yield decreased 44.9% and 27.1% respectively..Finally, in weather condition of Khuzestan, terminal drought stress on February and March in which has simultaneous with early flowering stage and filling seed, significantly, reduced yield and compounded yield and affects on stem growth and qualities oil and protein negatively. Therefore, with irrigation

  16. Physiological condition of juvenile wading birds in relation to multiple landscape stressors in the Florida Everglades: effects of hydrology, prey availability, and mercury bioaccumulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garth Herring

    Full Text Available The physiological condition of juvenile birds can be influenced by multiple ecological stressors, and few studies have concurrently considered the effects of environmental contaminants in combination with ecological attributes that can influence foraging conditions and prey availability. Using three temporally distinct indices of physiological condition, we compared the physiological response of nestling great egrets (Ardea alba and white ibises (Eudocimus albus to changing prey availability, hydrology (water depth, recession rate, and mercury exposure in the Florida Everglades. We found that the physiological response of chicks varied between species and among environmental variables. Chick body condition (short-term index and fecal corticosterone levels (medium-term were influenced by wetland water depth, prey availability, region, and age, but not by mercury contamination. However, mercury exposure did influence heat shock protein 70 (HSP70 in egret chicks, indicating a longer-term physiological response to contamination. Our results indicate that the physiological condition of egret and ibis chicks were influenced by several environmental stressors, and the time frame of the effect may depend on the specialized foraging behavior of the adults provisioning the chicks.

  17. The link between antioxidant enzymes catalase and glutathione S-transferase and physiological condition of a control population of terrestrial isopod (Porcellio scaber).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemec, Anita; Lešer, Vladka; Drobne, Damjana

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate if the activities of catalase and glutathione S-transferase in a control population of terrestrial isopods (Porcellio scaber) are correlated with the physiological condition of the isopods. For this purpose, the activities of these enzymes were analysed in isopods from a stock population and in parallel, the physiological condition of the same specimens was assessed using a histological approach based on epithelial thickness and lipid droplets. We found a correlation between antioxidant enzymes and the physiological condition of the isopods. This implies that these enzymes could be used as predictive indicators of the physiological condition in a stock population before comprehensive toxicological studies are conducted and also in control group after the experiment. When a control group is found to be very heterogeneous in terms of physiological condition, the experiment should be repeated with a larger number of experimental animals. The findings of this study will contribute to more accurate experimental design of toxicity tests when using biomarkers. This should encourage other researchers to increase their effort to know the physiological state of their test organisms.

  18. Physiological condition of juvenile wading birds in relation to multiple landscape stressors in the Florida Everglades: effects of hydrology, prey availability, and mercury bioaccumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, Garth; Eagles-Smith, Collin A; Gawlik, Dale E; Beerens, James M; Ackerman, Joshua T

    2014-01-01

    The physiological condition of juvenile birds can be influenced by multiple ecological stressors, and few studies have concurrently considered the effects of environmental contaminants in combination with ecological attributes that can influence foraging conditions and prey availability. Using three temporally distinct indices of physiological condition, we compared the physiological response of nestling great egrets (Ardea alba) and white ibises (Eudocimus albus) to changing prey availability, hydrology (water depth, recession rate), and mercury exposure in the Florida Everglades. We found that the physiological response of chicks varied between species and among environmental variables. Chick body condition (short-term index) and fecal corticosterone levels (medium-term) were influenced by wetland water depth, prey availability, region, and age, but not by mercury contamination. However, mercury exposure did influence heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in egret chicks, indicating a longer-term physiological response to contamination. Our results indicate that the physiological condition of egret and ibis chicks were influenced by several environmental stressors, and the time frame of the effect may depend on the specialized foraging behavior of the adults provisioning the chicks.

  19. Physiological condition of juvenile wading birds in relation to multiple landscape stressors in the Florida Everglades: effects of hydrology, prey availability, and mercury bioaccumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, Garth; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Gawlik, Dale E.; Beerens, James M.; Ackerman, Joshua T.

    2014-01-01

    The physiological condition of juvenile birds can be influenced by multiple ecological stressors, and few studies have concurrently considered the effects of environmental contaminants in combination with ecological attributes that can influence foraging conditions and prey availability. Using three temporally distinct indices of physiological condition, we compared the physiological response of nestling great egrets (Ardea alba) and white ibises (Eudocimus albus) to changing prey availability, hydrology (water depth, recession rate), and mercury exposure in the Florida Everglades. We found that the physiological response of chicks varied between species and among environmental variables. Chick body condition (short-term index) and fecal corticosterone levels (medium-term) were influenced by wetland water depth, prey availability, region, and age, but not by mercury contamination. However, mercury exposure did influence heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in egret chicks, indicating a longer-term physiological response to contamination. Our results indicate that the physiological condition of egret and ibis chicks were influenced by several environmental stressors, and the time frame of the effect may depend on the specialized foraging behavior of the adults provisioning the chicks.

  20. Effect of silicon application on physiological characteristics and growth of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. under drought stress condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Karmollachaab

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effect of silicon application on some physiological characteristics and growth of Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. under late drought stress condition, an experiment was conducted at the Agriculture and Natural Resources University of Ramin, Khuzestan during year 2012. The experiment was conducted in the open environment as factorial randomized complete block design with three levels of drought stress (irrigation after 25, 50 and 75% depletion of available water content as the first factor and four levels of silicon (0, 10, 20 and 30 mg Si.kg-1 soil as the second factor with three replications. The results showed that drought stress imposed a negative significant effect on all traits. The drought stress led to increased electrolyte leakage and proline content, cuticular wax, leaf silicon concentration, superoxide dismutase activity (SOD and grain potassium were decreased. The severe drought stress has most effect on electrolyte leakage (up to 53%. The application of silicon except the shoot/root parameter, on all characters have been affected so that application of 30 mg Si.kg-1 soil led to decrease electrolyte leakage up to 22.5% and increased SOD activity, proline content, cuticular wax grain K and flag leaf Si concentration, 25, 12.8, 21, 17 and 30% compared to control, respectively. In general, the results showed a positive effect of silicon on wheat plant under stress conditions that were higher than no stress condition.

  1. Azospirillum and arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization enhance rice growth and physiological traits under well-watered and drought conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruíz-Sánchez, Michel; Armada, Elisabet; Muñoz, Yaumara; García de Salamone, Inés E; Aroca, Ricardo; Ruíz-Lozano, Juan Manuel; Azcón, Rosario

    2011-07-01

    The response of rice plants to inoculation with an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus, Azospirillum brasilense, or combination of both microorganisms, was assayed under well-watered or drought stress conditions. Water deficit treatment was imposed by reducing the amount of water added, but AM plants, with a significantly higher biomass, received the same amount of water as non-AM plants, with a poor biomass. Thus, the water stress treatment was more severe for AM plants than for non-AM plants. The results showed that AM colonization significantly enhanced rice growth under both water conditions, although the greatest rice development was reached in plants dually inoculated under well-watered conditions. Water level did not affect the efficiency of photosystem II, but both AM and A. brasilense inoculations increased this value. AM colonization increased stomatal conductance, particularly when associated with A. brasilense, which enhanced this parameter by 80% under drought conditions and by 35% under well-watered conditions as compared to single AM plants. Exposure of AM rice to drought stress decreased the high levels of glutathione that AM plants exhibited under well-watered conditions, while drought had no effect on the ascorbate content. The decrease of glutathione content in AM plants under drought stress conditions led to enhance lipid peroxidation. On the other hand, inoculation with the AM fungus itself increased ascorbate and proline as protective compounds to cope with the harmful effects of water limitation. Inoculation with A. brasilense also enhanced ascorbate accumulation, reaching a similar level as in AM plants. These results showed that, in spite of the fact that drought stress imposed by AM treatments was considerably more severe than non-AM treatments, rice plants benefited not only from the AM symbiosis but also from A. brasilense root colonization, regardless of the watering level. However, the beneficial effects of A. brasilense on most of the

  2. Characterization of biomaterials polar interactions in physiological conditions using liquid-liquid contact angle measurements: relation to fibronectin adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velzenberger, Elodie; El Kirat, Karim; Legeay, Gilbert; Nagel, Marie-Danielle; Pezron, Isabelle

    2009-02-01

    Wettability of biomaterials surfaces and protein-coated substrates is generally characterized with the sessile drop technique using polar and apolar liquids. This procedure is often performed in air, which does not reflect the physiological conditions. In this study, liquid/liquid contact angle measurements were carried out to be closer to cell culture conditions. This technique allowed us to evaluate the polar contribution to the work of adhesion between an aqueous medium and four selected biomaterials widely used in tissue culture applications: bacteriological grade polystyrene (PS), tissue culture polystyrene (tPS), poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) film (PolyHEMA), and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose-carboxymethylcellulose bi-layered Petri dish (CEL). The contributions of polar interactions were also estimated on the same biomaterials after fibronectin (Fn) adsorption. The quantity of Fn adsorbed on PS, tPS, PolyHEMA and CEL surfaces was evaluated by using the fluorescein-labeled protein. PolyHEMA and CEL were found to be hydrophilic, tPS was moderately hydrophilic and PS was highly hydrophobic. After Fn adsorption on PS and tPS, a significant increase of the surface polar interaction was observed. On PolyHEMA and CEL, no significant adsorption of Fn was detected and the polar interactions remained unchanged. Finally, an inverse correlation between the polarity of the surfaces and the quantity of adsorbed Fn was established.

  3. Markers of physiological stress during exercise under conditions of normoxia, normobaric hypoxia, hypobaric hypoxia, and genuine high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, David Richard; O'Hara, John Paul; Boos, Christopher John; Hodkinson, Peter David; Tsakirides, Costas; Hill, Neil Edward; Jose, Darren; Hawkins, Amanda; Phillipson, Kelly; Hazlerigg, Antonia; Arjomandkhah, Nicola; Gallagher, Liam; Holdsworth, David; Cooke, Mark; Green, Nicholas Donald Charles; Mellor, Adrian

    2017-05-01

    To investigate whether there is a differential response at rest and following exercise to conditions of genuine high altitude (GHA), normobaric hypoxia (NH), hypobaric hypoxia (HH), and normobaric normoxia (NN). Markers of sympathoadrenal and adrenocortical function [plasma normetanephrine (PNORMET), metanephrine (PMET), cortisol], myocardial injury [highly sensitive cardiac troponin T (hscTnT)], and function [N-terminal brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP)] were evaluated at rest and with exercise under NN, at 3375 m in the Alps (GHA) and at equivalent simulated altitude under NH and HH. Participants cycled for 2 h [15-min warm-up, 105 min at 55% Wmax (maximal workload)] with venous blood samples taken prior (T0), immediately following (T120) and 2-h post-exercise (T240). Exercise in the three hypoxic environments produced a similar pattern of response with the only difference between environments being in relation to PNORMET. Exercise in NN only induced a rise in PNORMET and PMET. Biochemical markers that reflect sympathoadrenal, adrenocortical, and myocardial responses to physiological stress demonstrate significant differences in the response to exercise under conditions of normoxia versus hypoxia, while NH and HH appear to induce broadly similar responses to GHA and may, therefore, be reasonable surrogates.

  4. Equilibrium Dynamics of β-N-Methylamino-L-Alanine (BMAA) and Its Carbamate Adducts at Physiological Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, David; Goto, Joy J.; Krishnan, Viswanathan V

    2016-01-01

    Elevated incidences of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Parkinsonism Dementia complex (ALS/PDC) is associated with β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a non-protein amino acid. In particular, the native Chamorro people living in the island of Guam were exposed to BMAA by consuming a diet based on the cycad seeds. Carbamylated forms of BMAA are glutamate analogues. The mechanism of neurotoxicity of the BMAA is not completely understood, and BMAA acting as a glutamate receptor agonist may lead to excitotoxicity that interferes with glutamate transport systems. Though the interaction of BMAA with bicarbonate is known to produce carbamate adducts, here we demonstrate that BMAA and its primary and secondary adducts coexist in solution and undergoes a chemical exchange among them. Furthermore, we determined the rates of formation/cleavage of the carbamate adducts under equilibrium conditions using two-dimensional proton exchange NMR spectroscopy (EXSY). The coexistence of the multiple forms of BMAA at physiological conditions adds to the complexity of the mechanisms by which BMAA functions as a neurotoxin. PMID:27513925

  5. Effect of Elevated CO2 in Different Fertilizer Conditions on Physiological Traits in Lemon Balm (Melissa officinalis at Greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Shoor

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations and nutrients supply are generally expected to enhance photosynthesis and growth of crops as a result considerably increase yields. The present study aims to investigate effects of elevated CO2 and different fertilizer conditions on physiological traits in Lemon balm. A factorial experiment was conducted based on completely randomized design with three replications and nine treatments at the greenhouse in 2010. The experiment factors were included three CO2 concentrations (380, 700 and 1050 ppm and three kinds of conditions fertilizer (no fertilizer, manure fertilizer and nitrogen fertilizer. The results indicated that increasing of CO2 from 380 to 1050 ppm led to improve in leaf area, plant height, relative growth ratio, total dry matter and final yield of individual plant. The highest and the lowest amount of measured traits related to with and without nitrogen fertilizer, respectively. Impact of elevated CO2 in conjunction with nitrogen and manure fertilizers increased. These effects were more on total dry matter and final yield than other growth indices. Therefore, it can be concluded that, whereas increase of temperature caused by rising CO2 is not considered or there is not any limitation for resources, CO2 enrichment will be improved lemon balm production.

  6. Engineering of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase levels and physiological conditions for enhanced carotenoid and astaxanthin synthesis in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitenbach, Jürgen; Visser, Hans; Verdoes, Jan C; van Ooyen, Albert J J; Sandmann, Gerhard

    2011-04-01

    The basidiomycetous yeast, Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous, is one of the very few organisms which can be used for biological production of the carotenoid astaxanthin. crtE cDNA has been cloned from this fungus for engineering of the terpenoid pathway. The function of its gene product as a geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase was established. X. dendrorhous was transformed with the crtE cDNA to divert metabolite flow from the sterol pathway towards carotenoid biosynthesis. Transformants were obtained with increased levels of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase leading to higher carotenoid levels including astaxanthin. Physiological conditions for maximum carotenoid synthesis for wild type and the CrtE transformant were dim light and extra air supply of the shaking culture. These conditions and the transformation with crtE had additive effects and resulted in an 8-fold higher astaxanthin formation as compared to the initial wild type culture without illumination and extra air supply yielding 451 μg/g dry wt within 4 days of growth.

  7. Equilibrium Dynamics of β-N-Methylamino-L-Alanine (BMAA) and Its Carbamate Adducts at Physiological Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, David; Goto, Joy J; Krishnan, Viswanathan V

    2016-01-01

    Elevated incidences of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Parkinsonism Dementia complex (ALS/PDC) is associated with β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a non-protein amino acid. In particular, the native Chamorro people living in the island of Guam were exposed to BMAA by consuming a diet based on the cycad seeds. Carbamylated forms of BMAA are glutamate analogues. The mechanism of neurotoxicity of the BMAA is not completely understood, and BMAA acting as a glutamate receptor agonist may lead to excitotoxicity that interferes with glutamate transport systems. Though the interaction of BMAA with bicarbonate is known to produce carbamate adducts, here we demonstrate that BMAA and its primary and secondary adducts coexist in solution and undergoes a chemical exchange among them. Furthermore, we determined the rates of formation/cleavage of the carbamate adducts under equilibrium conditions using two-dimensional proton exchange NMR spectroscopy (EXSY). The coexistence of the multiple forms of BMAA at physiological conditions adds to the complexity of the mechanisms by which BMAA functions as a neurotoxin.

  8. The Relationship between Human Operators' Psycho-physiological Condition and Human Errors in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Arryum; Jang, Inseok; Kang, Hyungook; Seong, Poonghyun [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The safe operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs) is substantially dependent on the performance of the human operators who operate the systems. In this environment, human errors caused by inappropriate performance of operator have been considered to be critical since it may lead serious problems in the safety-critical plants. In order to provide meaningful insights to prevent human errors and enhance the human performance, operators' physiological conditions such as stress and workload have been investigated. Physiological measurements were considered as reliable tools to assess the stress and workload. T. Q. Tran et al. and J. B. Brooking et al pointed out that operators' workload can be assessed using eye tracking, galvanic skin response, electroencephalograms (EEGs), heart rate, respiration and other measurements. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the human operators' tense level and knowledge level to the number of human errors. For this study, the experiments were conducted in the mimic of the main control rooms (MCR) in NPP. It utilized the compact nuclear simulator (CNS) which is modeled based on the three loop Pressurized Water Reactor, 993MWe, Kori unit 3 and 4 in Korea and the subjects were asked to follow the tasks described in the emergency operating procedures (EOP). During the simulation, three kinds of physiological measurement were utilized; Electrocardiogram (ECG), EEG and nose temperature. Also, subjects were divided into three groups based on their knowledge of the plant operation. The result shows that subjects who are tense make fewer errors. In addition, subjects who are in higher knowledge level tend to be tense and make fewer errors. For the ECG data, subjects who make fewer human errors tend to be located in higher tense level area of high SNS activity and low PSNS activity. The results of EEG data are also similar to ECG result. Beta power ratio of subjects who make fewer errors was higher. Since beta

  9. Direct electric current treatment under physiologic saline conditions kills Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms via electrolytic generation of hypochlorous acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth L Sandvik

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism by which a direct electrical current reduced the viability of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms in conjunction with ciprofloxacin at physiologic saline conditions meant to approximate those in an infected artificial joint. Biofilms grown in CDC biofilm reactors were exposed to current for 24 hours in 1/10(th strength tryptic soy broth containing 9 g/L total NaCl. Dose-dependent log reductions up to 6.7 log(10 CFU/cm(2 were observed with the application of direct current at all four levels (0.7 to 1.8 mA/cm(2 both in the presence and absence of ciprofloxacin. There were no significant differences in log reductions for wells with ciprofloxacin compared to those without at the same current levels. When current exposures were repeated without biofilm or organics in the medium, significant generation of free chlorine was measured. Free chlorine doses equivalent to the 24 hour endpoint concentration for each current level were shown to mimic killing achieved by current application. Current exposure (1.8 mA/cm(2 in medium lacking chloride and amended with sulfate, nitrate, or phosphate as alternative electrolytes produced diminished kills of 3, 2, and 0 log reduction, respectively. Direct current also killed Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms when NaCl was present. Together these results indicate that electrolysis reactions generating hypochlorous acid from chloride are likely a main contributor to the efficacy of direct current application. A physiologically relevant NaCl concentration is thus a critical parameter in experimental design if direct current is to be investigated for in vivo medical applications.

  10. Direct electric current treatment under physiologic saline conditions kills Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms via electrolytic generation of hypochlorous acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandvik, Elizabeth L; McLeod, Bruce R; Parker, Albert E; Stewart, Philip S

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism by which a direct electrical current reduced the viability of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms in conjunction with ciprofloxacin at physiologic saline conditions meant to approximate those in an infected artificial joint. Biofilms grown in CDC biofilm reactors were exposed to current for 24 hours in 1/10(th) strength tryptic soy broth containing 9 g/L total NaCl. Dose-dependent log reductions up to 6.7 log(10) CFU/cm(2) were observed with the application of direct current at all four levels (0.7 to 1.8 mA/cm(2)) both in the presence and absence of ciprofloxacin. There were no significant differences in log reductions for wells with ciprofloxacin compared to those without at the same current levels. When current exposures were repeated without biofilm or organics in the medium, significant generation of free chlorine was measured. Free chlorine doses equivalent to the 24 hour endpoint concentration for each current level were shown to mimic killing achieved by current application. Current exposure (1.8 mA/cm(2)) in medium lacking chloride and amended with sulfate, nitrate, or phosphate as alternative electrolytes produced diminished kills of 3, 2, and 0 log reduction, respectively. Direct current also killed Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms when NaCl was present. Together these results indicate that electrolysis reactions generating hypochlorous acid from chloride are likely a main contributor to the efficacy of direct current application. A physiologically relevant NaCl concentration is thus a critical parameter in experimental design if direct current is to be investigated for in vivo medical applications.

  11. The exchangeable yeast ribosomal acidic protein YP2beta shows characteristics of a partly folded state under physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurdo, J; Sanz, J M; González, C; Rico, M; Ballesta, J P

    1997-08-05

    The eukaryotic acidic ribosomal P proteins, contrary to the standard r-proteins which are rapidly degraded in the cytoplasm, are found forming a large cytoplasmic pool that exchanges with the ribosome-bound proteins during translation. The native structure of the P proteins in solution is therefore an essential determinant of the protein-protein interactions that take place in the exchange process. In this work, the structure of the ribosomal acidic protein YP2beta from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and sedimentation equilibrium techniques. We have established the fact that YP2beta bears a 22% alpha-helical secondary structure and a noncompact tertiary structure under physiological conditions (pH 7.0 and 25 degrees C); the hydrophobic core of the protein appears to be solvent-exposed, and very low cooperativity is observed for heat- or urea-induced denaturation. Moreover, the 1H-NMR spectra show a small signal dispersion, and virtually all the amide protons exchange with the solvent on a very short time scale, which is characteristic of an open structure. At low pH, YP2beta maintains its secondary structure content, but there is no evidence for tertiary structure. 2,2,2-Trifluoroethanol (TFE) induces a higher amount of alpha-helical structure but also disrupts any trace of the remaining tertiary fold. These results indicate that YP2beta may have a flexible structure in the cytoplasmic pool, with some of the characteristics of a "molten globule", and also point out the physiological relevance of such flexible protein states in processes other than protein folding.

  12. Physiological Effects of Ergot Alkaloid and Indole-Diterpene Consumption on Sheep under Hot and Thermoneutral Ambient Temperature Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Michelle L E; Kemp, Stuart; Dunshea, Frank R; Leury, Brian J

    2016-06-02

    A controlled feeding study was undertaken to determine the physiological and production effects of consuming perennial ryegrass alkaloids (fed via seed) under extreme heat in sheep. Twenty-four Merino ewe weaners (6 months; initial BW 30.8 ± 1.0 kg) were selected and the treatment period lasted 21 days following a 14 day acclimatisation period. Two levels of two factors were used. The first factor was alkaloid, fed at a nil (NilAlk) or moderate level (Alk; 80 μg/kg LW ergovaline and 20.5 μg/kg·LW lolitrem B). The second factor was ambient temperature applied at two levels; thermoneutral (TN; constant 21-22 °C) or heat (Heat; 9:00 AM-5:00 PM at 38 °C; 5:00 PM-9:00 AM at 21-22 °C), resulting in four treatments, NilAlk TN, NilAlk Heat, Alk TN and Alk Heat. Alkaloid consumption reduced dry matter intake ( p = 0.008), and tended to reduce liveweight ( p = 0.07). Rectal temperature and respiration rate were increased by both alkaloid and heat ( p < 0.05 for all). Respiration rate increased to severe levels when alkaloid and heat were combined, indicating the short term effects which may be occurring in perennial ryegrass toxicosis (PRGT) areas during severe weather conditions, a novel finding. When alkaloid ingestion and heat were administered separately, similar physiological responses occurred, indicating alkaloid ingestion causes a similar heat stress response to 38 °C heat.

  13. Physiological Effects of Ergot Alkaloid and Indole-Diterpene Consumption on Sheep under Hot and Thermoneutral Ambient Temperature Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L. E. Henry

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A controlled feeding study was undertaken to determine the physiological and production effects of consuming perennial ryegrass alkaloids (fed via seed under extreme heat in sheep. Twenty-four Merino ewe weaners (6 months; initial BW 30.8 ± 1.0 kg were selected and the treatment period lasted 21 days following a 14 day acclimatisation period. Two levels of two factors were used. The first factor was alkaloid, fed at a nil (NilAlk or moderate level (Alk; 80 μg/kg LW ergovaline and 20.5 μg/kg·LW lolitrem B. The second factor was ambient temperature applied at two levels; thermoneutral (TN; constant 21–22 °C or heat (Heat; 9:00 AM–5:00 PM at 38 °C; 5:00 PM–9:00 AM at 21–22 °C, resulting in four treatments, NilAlk TN, NilAlk Heat, Alk TN and Alk Heat. Alkaloid consumption reduced dry matter intake ( p = 0.008, and tended to reduce liveweight ( p = 0.07. Rectal temperature and respiration rate were increased by both alkaloid and heat ( p < 0.05 for all. Respiration rate increased to severe levels when alkaloid and heat were combined, indicating the short term effects which may be occurring in perennial ryegrass toxicosis (PRGT areas during severe weather conditions, a novel finding. When alkaloid ingestion and heat were administered separately, similar physiological responses occurred, indicating alkaloid ingestion causes a similar heat stress response to 38 °C heat.

  14. Integration of an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system into an examination incubator to facilitate in vivo imaging of cardiovascular development in higher vertebrate embryos under stable physiological conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Happel, Christoph M.; Thrane, Lars; Thommes, Jan

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution in vivo imaging of higher vertebrate embryos over short or long time periods under constant physiological conditions is a technically challenging task for researchers working on cardiovascular development. In chick embryos, for example, various studies have shown that without...... significance, should be documented under physiological conditions. However, previous studies were mostly carried out outside of an incubator or under suboptimal environmental conditions. Here we present, to the best of our knowledge, the first detailed description of an optical coherence tomography (OCT......) system integrated into an examination incubator to facilitate real-time in vivo imaging of cardiovascular development under physiological environmental conditions. We demonstrate the suitability of this OCT examination incubator unit for use in cardiovascular development studies by examples of proof...

  15. Overwinter survival of juvenile lake herring in relation to body size, physiological condition, energy stores, and food ration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangle, Kevin L.; Sutton, Trent M.; Kinnunen, Ronald E.; Hoff, Michael H.

    2004-01-01

    Populations of lake herring Coregonus artedi in Lake Superior have exhibited high recruitment variability over the past three decades. To improve our understanding of the mechanisms which influence year-class strength, we conducted a 225-d laboratory experiment to evaluate the effects of body size, physiological condition, energy stores, and food ration on the winter survival of age-0 lake herring. Small (total length (TL) range = 60–85 mm) and large (TL range = 86–110 mm) fish were maintained under thermal and photoperiod regimes that mimicked those in Lake Superior from October through May. Fish in each size-class were maintained at two feeding treatments: brine shrimp Artemiaspp. ad libitum and no food. The mortality of large lake herring (fed, 3.8%; starved, 20.1%) was significantly less than that of small fish (fed, 11.7%; starved, 32.0%). Body condition and crude lipid content declined for all fish over the experiment; however, these variables were significantly greater for large fed (0.68% and 9.8%) and small fed (0.65% and 7.3%) fish than large starved (0.49% and 5.7%) and small starved (0.45% and 4.8%) individuals. Final crude protein and gross energy contents were also significantly greater in large fed lake herring (17.6% and 1,966 cal/g), followed by small fed (17.1% and 1,497 cal/g), large starved (15.4% and 1,125 cal/g), and small starved (13.2% and 799 cal/g) fish. Lake herring that died during the experiment had significantly lower body condition and energy stores relative to those of the surviving fish. These results suggest that the depletion of energy stores contributes to greater winter mortality of small lake herring with limited energy uptake and may partially explain the variability in recruitment observed in Lake Superior.

  16. Semi-in situ atomic force microscopy imaging of intracellular neurofilaments under physiological conditions through the 'sandwich' method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Fumiya; Asakawa, Hitoshi; Fukuma, Takeshi; Terada, Sumio

    2016-08-01

    Neurofilaments are intermediate filament proteins specific for neurons and characterized by formation of biochemically stable, obligate heteropolymers in vivo While purified or reassembled neurofilaments have been subjected to morphological analyses by electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, there has been a need for direct imaging of cytoplasmic genuine intermediate filaments with minimal risk of artefactualization. In this study, we applied the modified 'cells on glass sandwich' method to exteriorize intracellular neurofilaments, reducing the risk of causing artefacts through sample preparation. SW13vim(-) cells were double transduced with neurofilament medium polypeptide (NF-M) and alpha-internexin (α-inx). Cultured cells were covered with a cationized coverslip after prestabilization with tannic acid to form a sandwich and then split into two. After confirming that neurofilaments could be deposited on ventral plasma membranes exposed via unroofing, we performed atomic force microscopy imaging semi-in situ in aqueous solution. The observed thin filaments, considered to retain native structures of the neurofilaments, exhibited an approximate periodicity of 50-60 nm along their length. Their structural property appeared to reflect the morphology formed by their constituents, i.e. NF-M and α-inx. The success of semi-in situ atomic force microscopy of exposed bona fide assembled neurofilaments through separating the sandwich suggests that it can be an effective and alternative method for investigating cytoplasmic intermediate filaments under physiological conditions by atomic force microscopy.

  17. The presynaptic microtubule cytoskeleton in physiological and pathological conditions: lessons from Fragile X Syndrome and Hereditary Spastic Paraplegias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Bodaleo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of the nervous system to generate neuronal networks relies on the establishment and maintenance of synaptic contacts. Synapses are composed of functionally different presynaptic and postsynaptic compartments. An appropriate synaptic architecture is required to provide the structural basis that supports synaptic transmission, a process involving changes in cytoskeletal dynamics. Actin microfilaments are the main cytoskeletal components present at both presynaptic and postsynaptic terminals in glutamatergic synapses. However, in the last few years it has been demonstrated that microtubules (MTs transiently invade dendritic spines, promoting their maturation. Nevertheless, the presence and functions of MTs at the presynaptic site are still a matter of debate. Early electron microscopy (EM studies revealed that MTs are present in the presynaptic terminals of the central nervous system (CNS where they interact with synaptic vesicles (SVs and reach the active zone. These observations have been reproduced by several EM protocols; however, there is empirical heterogeneity in detecting presynaptic MTs, since they appear to be both labile and unstable. Moreover, increasing evidence derived from studies in the fruit fly neuromuscular junction proposes different roles for MTs in regulating presynaptic function in physiological and pathological conditions. In this review, we summarize the main findings that support the presence and roles of MTs at presynaptic terminals, integrating descriptive and biochemical analyses, and studies performed in invertebrate genetic models.

  18. Investigation of corrosion behaviour of magnesium alloy AM60B-F under pseudo-physiological conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levesque, J.; Mantovani, D. [Dept. of Mining, Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Laval Univ., PQ (Canada); Lab. for Biomaterials and Bioengineering, St-Francois-d' Assise Hospital, PQ (Canada); Dube, D.; Fiset, M. [Dept. of Mining, Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Laval Univ., PQ (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Endovascular stents have proven effective in treating coronary and peripheral arterial occlusions. All metallic materials currently used to make these devices are considered to be corrosion-resistant, and are therefore implanted on a long-term basis. Complications, however, have often been reported, such as restenosis and thrombosis. To reduce the risk of thrombus formation and restenosis, it would be useful to develop a new family of degradable stents. In fact, in most clinical cases, the occluded artery requires a stent only for a period of up to one year. Interesting candidate materials for manufacture of degradable stents include magnesium alloys, magnesium being an element that is essential to the organism and has a high electronegative potential. Success in using magnesium alloys for making endovascular devices is closely related to the properties of the selected alloy. Ideally, the alloy should degrade slowly, be ductile, be non-toxic, and corrode uniformly. Given these desired properties, we investigated the potential of magnesium alloys as degradable endovascular biomaterials. A test bench was designed and evaluated to reproduce the physiological conditions encountered in coronary arteries. (orig.)

  19. Qigong as a Traditional Vegetative Biofeedback Therapy: Long-Term Conditioning of Physiological Mind-Body Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Luís Carlos; Sousa, Cláudia Maria; Gonçalves, Mário; Gabriel, Joaquim; Machado, Jorge; Greten, Henry Johannes

    2015-01-01

    A contemporary understanding of Chinese Medicine (CM) regards CM diagnosis as a functional vegetative state that may be treated by vegetative reflex therapies such as acupuncture. Within this context, traditional mind-body exercises such as Qigong can be understood as an attempt to enhance physiological proprioception, by combining a special state of "awareness" with posture, movement, and breath control. We have formerly trained young auditing flutists in "White Ball" Qigong to minimize anxiety-induced cold hands and lower anxiety-induced heart rate. Functional changes occurred 2-5 min after training and were observed over the whole training program, allowing the children to control their symptoms. In our current work, we report that warm fingers and calm hearts could be induced by the children even without Qigong exercises. Thus, these positive changes once induced and "conditioned" vegetatively were stable after weeks of training. This may show the mechanism by which Qigong acts as a therapeutic measure in disease: positive vegetative pathways may be activated instead of dysfunctional functional patterns. The positive vegetative patterns then may be available in critical stressful situations. Qigong exercise programs may therefore be understood as an ancient vegetative biofeedback exercise inducing positive vegetative functions which are added to the individual reactive repertoire.

  20. Physiological Strategies to Improve the Performance of Spring Maize (Zea mays L. Planted under Early and Optimum Sowing Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Amir Bakhtavar

    Full Text Available Low temperature at stand establishment and high temperature at reproductive stage are involved in reduction of grain yield of spring maize. A field study was therefore conducted to evaluate different physiological strategies for improving performance of spring maize under temperature extremes. Seed priming and foliar spray with 3% moringa leaf extract (MLE and 100 mg L-1 kinetin solution alone or in all possible combinations with each other at three growth stages (knee height, tasseling and grain filling stage and hydropriming was compared with control. Seed priming plus foliar spray of MLE and kinetin significantly improved stand establishment especially under early sown crop as indicated by reduced mean emergence time (MET, improved emergence index (EI and final emergence percentage (FEP. Similarly increased chlorophyll contents, crop growth rate, leaf area index, photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, relative water content and decreased membrane permeability were recorded in both early and optimum sowing conditions in MLE priming plus foliar spray treatment. All these improvements were harvested in the form of increased yield and harvest index compared with control treatment. Overall crop sown at optimum time performed best but exogenous application of MLE through seed priming and foliar spray maximally improved the performance of early sown maize crop which is attributed more likely due to improved stand establishment, chlorophyll and phenolic contents, increased leaf area duration and grain filling period. It can be concluded that seed priming with MLE along with its foliar spray could increase production of maize under temperature extremes.

  1. Physiological Strategies to Improve the Performance of Spring Maize (Zea mays L.) Planted under Early and Optimum Sowing Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtavar, Muhammad Amir; Afzal, Irfan; Basra, Shahzad Maqsood Ahmed; Ahmad, Azraf-Ul-Haq; Noor, Mehmood Ali

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature at stand establishment and high temperature at reproductive stage are involved in reduction of grain yield of spring maize. A field study was therefore conducted to evaluate different physiological strategies for improving performance of spring maize under temperature extremes. Seed priming and foliar spray with 3% moringa leaf extract (MLE) and 100 mg L-1 kinetin solution alone or in all possible combinations with each other at three growth stages (knee height, tasseling and grain filling stage) and hydropriming was compared with control. Seed priming plus foliar spray of MLE and kinetin significantly improved stand establishment especially under early sown crop as indicated by reduced mean emergence time (MET), improved emergence index (EI) and final emergence percentage (FEP). Similarly increased chlorophyll contents, crop growth rate, leaf area index, photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, relative water content and decreased membrane permeability were recorded in both early and optimum sowing conditions in MLE priming plus foliar spray treatment. All these improvements were harvested in the form of increased yield and harvest index compared with control treatment. Overall crop sown at optimum time performed best but exogenous application of MLE through seed priming and foliar spray maximally improved the performance of early sown maize crop which is attributed more likely due to improved stand establishment, chlorophyll and phenolic contents, increased leaf area duration and grain filling period. It can be concluded that seed priming with MLE along with its foliar spray could increase production of maize under temperature extremes.

  2. Role of ACTH in the interactive/paracrine regulation of adrenal steroid secretion in physiological and pathophysiological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herve Lefebvre

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the normal human adrenal gland, steroid secretion is regulated by a complex network of autocrine/paracrine interactions involving bioactive signals released by endothelial cells, nerve terminals, chromaffin cells, immunocompetent cells and adrenocortical cells themselves. ACTH can be locally produced by medullary chromaffin cells and is therefore a major mediator of the corticomedullary functional interplay. Plasma ACTH also triggers the release of angiogenic and vasoactive agents from adrenocortical cells and adrenal mast cells, and thus indirectly regulates steroid production through modulation of the adrenal blood flow. Adrenocortical neoplasms associated with steroid hypersecretion exhibit molecular and cellular defects which tend to reinforce the influence of paracrine regulatory loops on corticosteroidogenesis. Especially, ACTH has been found to be abnormally synthesized in bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia responsible for hypercortisolism. In these tissues, ACTH is detected in a subpopulation of adrenocortical cells which express gonadal markers. This observation suggests that ectopic production of ACTH may result from impaired embryogenesis leading to abnormal maturation of the adrenogonadal primordium. Globally, the current literature indicates that ACTH is a major player in the autocrine/paracrine processes occurring in the adrenal gland in both physiological and pathological conditions.

  3. Role of ACTH in the Interactive/Paracrine Regulation of Adrenal Steroid Secretion in Physiological and Pathophysiological Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Hervé; Thomas, Michaël; Duparc, Céline; Bertherat, Jérôme; Louiset, Estelle

    2016-01-01

    In the normal human adrenal gland, steroid secretion is regulated by a complex network of autocrine/paracrine interactions involving bioactive signals released by endothelial cells, nerve terminals, chromaffin cells, immunocompetent cells, and adrenocortical cells themselves. ACTH can be locally produced by medullary chromaffin cells and is, therefore, a major mediator of the corticomedullary functional interplay. Plasma ACTH also triggers the release of angiogenic and vasoactive agents from adrenocortical cells and adrenal mast cells and, thus, indirectly regulates steroid production through modulation of the adrenal blood flow. Adrenocortical neoplasms associated with steroid hypersecretion exhibit molecular and cellular defects that tend to reinforce the influence of paracrine regulatory loops on corticosteroidogenesis. Especially, ACTH has been found to be abnormally synthesized in bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia responsible for hypercortisolism. In these tissues, ACTH is detected in a subpopulation of adrenocortical cells that express gonadal markers. This observation suggests that ectopic production of ACTH may result from impaired embryogenesis leading to abnormal maturation of the adrenogonadal primordium. Globally, the current literature indicates that ACTH is a major player in the autocrine/paracrine processes occurring in the adrenal gland in both physiological and pathological conditions.

  4. EFFECT OF FATTY-ACID CONCENTRATE (FAC AND CARNITINE ON PERFORMANCE, PHYSIOLOGICAL CONDITION AND MEAT QUALITY OF BROILER CHICKENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryadchikov V. G.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to examine the effect of fatty acid concentrate (FAC, as a new source of energy and carnitine on performance, physiological condition and meat quality of broiler chickens. In experiment there were four groups of 80 chickens of cross Hubbard each (males: females=40:40 in age period 0-41 days. 1 group (control received in during the periods 0-14, 15-28 and 29-41days, sunflower oil (SO respectively 5.34%, 5.50%, and 6.10%, group 2 received the same amounts of FAC instead SO, 3 group - mixture SO:FAC (50:50, 4 group -FAC + 0,25% carnitine. Final body weight: 1 group = 2574±29 g, 2 group FAC= 2553±27 g 3 group SO + FAC = 2531±34 g., 4 group FAC+0,25 carnitine = 2520±34 g. Feed conversion, digestibility of nutrients, blood hematology and biochemistry, the condition of organs, meat quality and cutting of carcass of chickens on FAC had no any differences from the same signs in chicks on SO. Carnitine had a positive effect on chicken growth only in the period 0-14 and less 15-28 days; in the period 29-41 days daily gain was below, than that in 1-3 groups. Canitine reduced the content of liver fat. Outcome: FAC is a satisfactory source of energy, comparable with vegetable oils. The price of FAC is 30% lower in comparison with sunflower oil and soybean oils, therefore its use in broiler poultry farming instead of vegetable oils will be of great economic importance

  5. Solution study under physiological conditions and cytotoxic activity of the gold(III complexes with L-histidine-containing peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glišić Biljana Đ.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Proton NMR spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry have been applied to study the stability of three gold(III complexes with L-histidine-containing peptides, [Au(Gly-L-His-N,N’,N’’Cl]NO3.1.25H2O (Au1, [Au(L-Ala-L-His-N,N’,N’’Cl]NO3.2.5H2O (Au2 and [Au(Gly-Gly-L-His-N,N’,N’’,N’’’]Cl.H2O (Au3 under physiologically relevant conditions. It was found that tridentate coordination of Gly-L-His and L-Ala-L-His dipeptides, as well as tetradentate coordination of Gly-Gly-L-His tripeptide in Au1, Au2 and Au3 complexes, respectively, stabilized +3 oxidation state of gold and prevented its reduction to Au(I and Au(0. No release of the coordinated peptides from Au(III was observed under these experimental conditions. Considering remarkable stability of Au1, Au2 and Au3 complexes, their cytotoxic activity was evaluated by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay toward five human tumor cell lines, MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma, HT-29 (human colon adenocarcinoma, HeLa (human cervix carcinoma, HL-60 (human promyelocytic leukemia, Raji (human Burkitt’s lymphoma and one human normal cell line MRC-5 (human fetal lung fibroblasts. While the cytotoxic activity of Au1, Au2 and Au3 against investigated human malignant cell lines was strongly cell line dependent, none of these complexes was cytotoxic against normal MRC-5 cell line. This study can contribute to the future development of gold(III-peptide complexes as potential antitumor agents.

  6. The effect of environmental and physiological conditions on excystation of Acanthamoeba castellanii belonging to the T4 genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhundi, Sahreena; Khan, Naveed Ahmed; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah

    2014-08-01

    Excystation in Acanthamoeba is an important property for the onset of infection as well as infection recurrence, post-treatment. The overall aim of this study was to determine the effects of several environmental and physiological parameters on excystation in Acanthamoeba castellanii belonging to the T4 genotype. Cysts were prepared by inoculating A. castellanii trophozoites on non-nutrient agar plates for up to 2 weeks. To determine the effects of various conditions on excystation, A. castellanii cysts were inoculated in growth medium i.e. PYG and incubated at varying temperatures (4-40 °C), various pHs (4-9), artificial light/dark cycles and 5% of CO2. Optimum excystation was observed when cysts were incubated at 30 °C in growth medium at neutral pH. Extremes of temperature and pH reduced excystation, while light/dark cycles had no effect on excystation of A. castellanii. On the other hand, 5% of CO2 enhanced excystation and growth of excysting amoebae. To determine the effect of serum on A. castellanii excystation, assays were performed in the presence of varying concentrations of heat-inactivated foetal bovine serum (FBS) (5-100%). The results revealed that FBS promoted excystation. The involvement of G proteins in excystation was also determined. Using propranolol hydrochloride, a G protein inhibitor, the results revealed that G proteins play a role in A. castellanii differentiation. Furthermore, organic solvents (methanol/ethanol) completely blocked excystation. None of the aforementioned conditions had any effect on the viability of A. castellanii. A complete understanding of excystation in A. castellanii will be of value to counter infection recurrence.

  7. Observed and simulated effect of plant physiology and structure on land surface energy fluxes and soil conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yen-Sen; Rihani, Jehan; Langensiepen, Matthias; Simmer, Clemens

    2016-04-01

    The parameterization of stomatal conductance and leaf area index (LAI) in land surface models largely influence simulated terrestrial system states. While stomatal conductance mainly controls transpiration, latent heat flux, and root-water-uptake, LAI impacts additionally the radiative energy exchange. Thus both affect canopy evaporation and transpiration and land surface energy and water fluxes as a whole. Common parameterizations of stomatal conductance follow either semi-mechanistic forms based on photosynthesis (Ball-Berry Type (BB)) or forms which consider environmental factors such as impact of light, temperature, humidity and soil moisture (Jarvis-Stewart Type (JS)). Both approaches differ also in the interpretation of humidity effects and light-use efficiency. While soil moisture plays an important role for root-water-uptake there is no clear conclusion yet about how soil moisture interacts with stomata activity. Values for LAI can be obtained from field measurements, satellite estimates or modelling and are used as an essential model input. While field measurements are very time consuming and only represent single points, satellite estimates may have biases caused by variable albedo and sensor limitations. Representing LAI within land surface models requires complex schemes in order to represent all processes contributing to plant growth. We use the Terrestrial System Modelling Platform (TerrSysMP) over the Rur watershed in Germany for studying the influence of plant physiology and structure on the state of the terrestrial system. The Transregional Collaborative Research Center 32 (TR32) extensively monitors this catchment for almost a decade. The land surface (CLM3.5) and the subsurface (ParFlow) modules of TerrSysMP are conditioned based on satellite-retrieved land cover and the soil map from FAO and forced with a high-resolution reanalysis by DWD. For studying the effect of plant physiology, the Ball-Berry-Leuning, and Jarvis-Stewart stomatal

  8. Selectin, platelet plays a critical role in granulocyte access to the pregnant mouse uterus under physiological and pathological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernekorn, Uta; Butcher, Eugene C; Behrends, Jochen; Karsten, Christian M; Röbke, Astrid; Schulze, Torsten J; Kirchner, Holger; Kruse, Andrea

    2007-04-01

    Leukocyte recruitment to the pregnant mouse uterus is associated with highly regulated patterns of expression of vascular adhesion receptors. One striking observation is the localized expression of mucosal vascular addressin cell adhesion molecule (MADCAM1) and selectin, platelet (SELP, formerly P-selectin) by maternal vessels in the vascular zone (VZ) during the first half of pregnancy. From midgestation onwards, endothelial cells lining the maternal vessels of the VZ in addition express vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM1). The predominant cell population within these vessels is monocyte-like cells. Granulocytes and low numbers of lymphocytes are also present. Murine fetal trophoblast cells are almost devoid of adhesion molecules, including SELP. In contrast, spontaneous abortions of allogeneic pregnancies are characterized by dramatic upregulation of SELP on maternal VZ vessels and on fetal trophoblast cells. Upregulation of SELP is associated with a dramatic influx of highly activated granulocytes, which infiltrate the vessels and tissue of the VZ and the trophoblast. The majority of the activated granulocytes within the trophoblast undergo nuclear fragmentation, which can be detected by TUNEL staining. To demonstrate that SELP is involved in the recruitment of granulocytes to the pregnant uterus, we undertook long-term in vivo inhibition studies using a monoclonal antibody to inhibit the contribution of SELP to leukocyte trafficking to the decidua. In addition, the pregnant uteri of syngeneic Selp(-/-) x Selp(-/-) mice were investigated and compared to the controls. Our results clearly demonstrate the importance of SELP for granulocyte access to the pregnant mouse uterus under physiological and pathological conditions.

  9. Patch clamp studies of human sperm under physiological ionic conditions reveal three functionally and pharmacologically distinct cation channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansell, S A; Publicover, S J; Barratt, C L R; Wilson, S M

    2014-05-01

    Whilst fertilizing capacity depends upon a K(+) conductance (GK) that allows the spermatozoon membrane potential (Vm) to be held at a negative value, the characteristics of this conductance in human sperm are virtually unknown. We therefore studied the biophysical/pharmacological properties of the K(+) conductance in spermatozoa from normal donors held under voltage/current clamp in the whole cell recording configuration. Our standard recording conditions were designed to maintain quasi-physiological, Na(+), K(+) and Cl(-) gradients. Experiments that explored the effects of ionic substitution/ion channel blockers upon membrane current/potential showed that resting Vm was dependent upon a hyperpolarizing K(+) current that flowed via channels that displayed only weak voltage dependence and limited (∼7-fold) K(+) versus Na(+) selectivity. This conductance was blocked by quinidine (0.3 mM), bupivacaine (3 mM) and clofilium (50 µM), NNC55-0396 (2 µM) and mibefradil (30 µM), but not by 4-aminopyridine (2 mM, 4-AP). Progesterone had no effect upon the hyperpolarizing K(+) current. Repolarization after a test depolarization consistently evoked a transient inward 'tail current' (ITail) that flowed via a second population of ion channels with poor (∼3-fold) K(+) versus Na(+) selectivity. The activity of these channels was increased by quinidine, 4-AP and progesterone. Vm in human sperm is therefore dependent upon a hyperpolarizing K(+) current that flows via channels that most closely resemble those encoded by Slo3. Although 0.5 µM progesterone had no effect upon these channels, this hormone did activate the pharmacologically distinct channels that mediate ITail. In conclusion, this study reveals three functionally and pharmacologically distinct cation channels: Ik, ITail, ICatSper.

  10. CHANGES IN PHYSIOLOGICAL TREMOR RESULTING FROM SLEEP DEPRIVATION UNDER CONDITIONS OF INCREASING FATIGUE DURING PROLONGED MILITARY TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tomczak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to define the changes of the characteristics of physiological postural tremor under conditions of increasing fatigue and lack of sleep during prolonged military training (survival.The subjects of the study were 15 students of the Polish Air Force Academy in Dęblin. The average age was 19.9±1.3 years. During the 36-hour-long continuous military training (survival the subjects were deprived of sleep. Four tremor measurements were carried out for each of the subjects: Day 1 – morning, after rest (measurement 0; Day 2 – morning, after overnight physical exercise (measurement 1; afternoon, after continuous sleep deprivation (measurement 2; Day 3 – morning, after a full night sleep (measurement 3. The accelerometric method using an acceleration measuring kit was applied to analyse tremor. A significant difference between mean values of the index evaluating tremor power in low frequencies L2-4 in measurement 0 and measurement 3 was observed (p<0.01. No significant differences were found in mean values of index L10-20. Mean frequencies F2-4 differed significantly from each other (F 2,42 =4.53; p<0.01. Their values were 2.94±0.11, 2.99±0.9, 2.93±0.07 and 2.91±0.07 for successive measurements. A gradual, significant decrease of F 8-14 was observed (F 2,42 =5.143; p<0.01. Prolonged sleep deprivation combined with performing tasks demanding constant physical effort causes long-lasting (over 24 hours changes of the amplitude of low-frequency tremor changes. This phenomenon may significantly influence psychomotor performance, deteriorating the ability to perform tasks requiring movement precision.

  11. Characterization of the interaction between human lactoferrin and lomefloxacin at physiological condition: Multi-spectroscopic and modeling description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamani, J., E-mail: Chamani@ibb.ut.ac.i [Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Islamic Azad University-Mashhad Branch, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tafrishi, N. [Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Islamic Azad University-Mashhad Branch, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Momen-Heravi, M. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Islamic Azad University-Mashhad Branch, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-07-15

    The interaction between lomefloxacin (LMF) and human lactoferrin (Hlf) was studied by using fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic and molecular modeling measurements. By the fluorescence quenching results, it was found that the binding constant K{sub A}=8.69x10{sup 5} L mol{sup -1}, and number of binding sites n=1.75 at physiological condition. Experimental results observed showed that the binding of LMF to Hlf induced conformational changes of Hlf. The participation of tyrosyl and tryptophanyl residues of protein was also estimated in the drug-Hlf complex by synchronous fluorescence. The quantitative analysis data of far-UV CD spectra from that of the alpha-helix 37.4% in free Hlf to 30.2% in the LMF-Hlf complex further confirmed that secondary structure of the protein was changed by LMF. Near-UV CD showed perturbations around tryptophan and tyrosine residues which involves perturbations of tertiary structure. The thermodynamic parameters like, DELTAH{sup o} and DELTAS{sup o}, have been calculated to be 63.411 kJ mol{sup -1} and 231.104 J mol{sup -1} K{sup -1}, respectively. Thermodynamic analysis showed that hydrophobic interactions were the main force in the binding site but the hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interaction could not be excluded which in agreement with the result of molecular docking study. The distance r between donor and acceptor was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and found to be 1.78 nm. The interaction between LMF and Hlf has been verified as consistent with the static quenching procedure and the quenching mechanism is related to the energy transfer. Furthermore, the study of molecular modeling that LMF could bind to the alpha-helixes between Pro145-Asn152 and Phe167-Gln172 regions and hydrophobic interaction was the major acting force for the binding site, which was in agreement with the thermodynamic analysis.

  12. Proteomic analysis of vascular smooth muscle cells in physiological condition and in pulmonary arterial hypertension: Toward contractile versus synthetic phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Régent, Alexis; Ly, Kim Heang; Lofek, Sébastien; Clary, Guilhem; Tamby, Mathieu; Tamas, Nicolas; Federici, Christian; Broussard, Cédric; Chafey, Philippe; Liaudet-Coopman, Emmanuelle; Humbert, Marc; Perros, Frédéric; Mouthon, Luc

    2016-10-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are highly specialized cells that regulate vascular tone and participate in vessel remodeling in physiological and pathological conditions. It is unclear why certain vascular pathologies involve one type of vessel and spare others. Our objective was to compare the proteomes of normal human VSMC from aorta (human aortic smooth muscle cells, HAoSMC), umbilical artery (human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells, HUASMC), pulmonary artery (HPASMC), or pulmonary artery VSMC from patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH-SMC). Proteomes of VSMC were compared by 2D DIGE and MS. Only 19 proteins were differentially expressed between HAoSMC and HPASMC while 132 and 124 were differentially expressed between HUASMC and HAoSMC or HPASMC, respectively (fold change 1.5≤ or -1.5≥, p < 0.05). As much as 336 proteins were differentially expressed between HPASMC and PAH-SMC (fold change 1.5≤ or -1.5≥, p < 0.05). HUASMC expressed increased amount of α-smooth muscle actin compared to either HPASMC or HAoSMC (although not statistically significant). In addition, PAH-SMC expressed decreased amount of smooth muscle myosin heavy chain and proliferation rate was increased compared to HPASMC thus supporting that PAH-SMC have a more synthetic phenotype. Analysis with Ingenuity identified paxillin and (embryonic lethal, abnormal vision, drosophila) like 1 (ELAVL1) as molecules linked with a lot of proteins differentially expressed between HPASMC and PAH-SMC. There was a trend toward reduced proliferation of PAH-SMC with paxillin-si-RNA and increased proliferation with ELAVL1-siRNA. Thus, VSMCs have very diverse protein content depending on their origin and this is in link with phenotypic differentiation. Paxillin targeting may be a promising treatment of PAH. ELAVL1 also participate in the regulation of PAH-SMC proliferation.

  13. Electroformation of Giant Unilamellar Vesicles from Native Membranes and Organic Lipid Mixtures for the Study of Lipid Domains under Physiological Ionic-Strength Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montes, Ruth; Ahyayauch, Hasna; Ibarguren, Maitane

    2010-01-01

    for the preparation of GUVs work only at very low salt concentrations, thus precluding experimentation under physiological conditions. In addition, the GUVs thus obtained lack membrane compositional asymmetry. Here we show how to prepare GUVs using a new protocol based on the electroformation method either from...

  14. The Evaluation of Exogenous Application of Salicylic Acid on Physiological Characteristics, Proline and Essential Oil Content of Chamomile (Matricaria chamomila L. under Normal and Heat Stress Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Ghasemi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of exogenous application of salicylic acid concentrations on the physiological and biochemical traits and essential oil content of chamomile under normal and heat stress conditions as induced by delayed sowing. The experiments were conducted during 2011–2012 as a factorial using a randomized complete block design with three replications, in a very hot region. The factors included five salicylic acid concentrations (0 (control, 1, 10, 25 and 100 mg·L−1 and three chamomile cultivars (Bushehr, Bona, Bodegold. The seeds of chamomile were sown on two different sowing dates including an optimum planting date and a late planting date. The physiological traits (plant height, capitol diameter, 1000 grain weight, fresh and dried flower weight, total chlorophyll, proline and essential oil content were investigated. Analysis of variance showed that the effect of the environmental conditions (normal and heat stress was significant on all physiological and biochemical traits with the exception of the essential oil content. The heat stress decreased physiological traits and total chlorophyll in comparison with the normal conditions but it had no significant effect on the essential oil content. Findings indicated that the application of exogenous salicylic acid improves essential oil content in chamomile cultivars under environmental heat stress conditions.

  15. Electroformation of Giant Unilamellar Vesicles from Native Membranes and Organic Lipid Mixtures for the Study of Lipid Domains under Physiological Ionic-Strength Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montes, Ruth; Ahyayauch, Hasna; Ibarguren, Maitane

    2010-01-01

    for the preparation of GUVs work only at very low salt concentrations, thus precluding experimentation under physiological conditions. In addition, the GUVs thus obtained lack membrane compositional asymmetry. Here we show how to prepare GUVs using a new protocol based on the electroformation method either from...

  16. Physiological and behavioral basis for the successful adaptation of goats to severe water restriction under hot environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliber, M; Koluman, N; Silanikove, N

    2016-01-01

    Among domestic ruminants, goats are renowned for their ability to tolerate water deprivation, water restriction and energy restriction. However, some basic questions regarding their ability to endure water restriction under heat stress are still open. Three levels of water restriction (56%, 73% and 87% of the ad libitum) were imposed on 20 cross-bred 3-year-old female goats (75% German Fawn and 25% Hair Goat) distributed into four groups, with five animals per treatment. The experiment was conducted from the beginning of July to the end of August in a farm located in the Eastern Mediterranean region of Turkey (40 m in altitude; 36 59' N, 35 18'E), in which subtropical weather conditions prevail. The average daily temperature during the experiment was 34.2°C, whereas the highest and lowest temperatures were 42°C and 23.1°C, respectively. The average relative humidity was 68.2% and wind speed was 1.2 km/h. Weekly average thermal heat indexes during the experiment were 78.3 (week 1), 79.1 (week 2), 80.1 (weak 3), 79.8 (weak 4), 81.3 (weak 5) and on average 79.7. Feed intake, heart rate, thermoregulatory responses (rectal temperature, respiration rate), blood plasma concentrations of ions (Na, K), antidiuretic hormone (ADH), metabolites (glucose, cholesterol, creatinine and urea) and behavioral aspects (standing, walking, lying) were studied over 30 days. The responses to water restriction were proportional to the level of restriction. The reductions in feed intake (up to 13%), BW (up to 4.6%) and the increases in rectal temperature (0.5°C) and breath rate (10 respirations/min) were moderate and also were far from responses encountered under severe heat and water stresses. The increase in plasma Na (from 119 to 140 mM) and ADH concentrations (from 12.6 to 17.4 pg/ml) indicates that the physiological response to water restriction was in response to mild dehydration, which also explains the increase in blood plasma concentrations of glucose, cholesterol, creatinine

  17. Biomolecular characterization, identification, enzyme activities of molds and physiological changes in sweet potatoes (Ipomea batatas) stored under controlled atmospheric conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C O OLADOYE; I F CONNERTON; R M O KAYODE; P F OMOJASOLA; I B KAYODE

    2016-01-01

    Microbial attacks during storage are one of the primary causes of product deterioration, and can limit the process of prolonging the shelf-life of harvested food. In this study, sweet potatoes were stored at temperatures of 13, 21, and 29 °C for 4 weeks. Samples were colected during storage and plated on potato dextrose agar, from which axenic mold cultures were obtained and identified using 26S rRNA gene sequences. Physiological changes of potato tubers were assessed with respect to pathogenicity, enzyme activity, and atmospheric storage conditions. Six fungal species were identified, namelyPenicilium chrysogenum (P. rubens),P. brevicompactum,Mucor circineloides, Cladosporium cladosporiodes,P. expansum, andP. crustosum.The folowing fungal isolates, namely P. expansum,P. brevicompactum, andRhizopus oryzae, were recovered from the re-infected samples and selected according to their levels of enzyme activity. This study revealed high levels of activity for celulase and pectinase, which were most notable during the initial three days of testing, and were folowed by a steady decrease (P  目的:鉴定甘薯贮藏环境中霉菌的生物分子特征和酶活性,并比较不同试剂处理后甘薯的生理变化。方法:从不同温度下保存的甘薯得到霉菌菌株,提取其细菌基因组DNA,进行聚合酶链反应(PCR)及测序鉴定。将甘薯分成扑海因处理组、次氯酸钠处理组和对照组,在为期三个月的贮藏时间内,对霉菌致病性、酶活性和空气条件对甘薯的生理变化的影响进行评估。结论:实验结束后,扑海因处理组的变质率为5%,次氯酸钠组为55%,对照组为100%。研究发现,甘薯组织变质主要由于不同的微生物酶的活动,尤其是受感染组织的果胶酶活性。因此,建议将扑海因作为甘薯贮藏之前的保鲜剂。

  18. Physiological, Anatomical and Metabolic Implications of Salt Tolerance in the Halophyte Salvadora persica under Hydroponic Culture Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parida, Asish K; Veerabathini, Sairam K; Kumari, Asha; Agarwal, Pradeep K

    2016-01-01

    Salt tolerance mechanism of an extreme halophyte Salvadora persica was assessed by analyzing growth, nutrient uptake, anatomical modifications and alterations in levels of some organic metabolites in seedlings imposed to various levels of salinity (0, 250, 500, and 750 mM NaCl) under hydroponic culture condition. After 21 days of salt treatment, plant height, leaf area, and shoot biomass decreased with increase in salinity whereas the leaf succulence increased significantly with increasing salinity in S. persica. The RWC% of leaf increased progressively in salt-treated seedlings as compared to control. Na(+) contents of leaf, stem and root increased in dose-dependent manner whereas there was no significant changes in K(+) content. There was significant alterations in leaf, stem, and root anatomy by salinity. The thickness of epidermis and spongy parenchyma of leaf increased in salt treated seedlings as compared to control, whereas palisade parenchyma decreased dramatically in extreme salinity (750 mM NaCl). There was a significant reduction in stomatal density and stomatal pore area of leaf with increasing salinity. Anatomical observations of stem showed that the epidermal cells diameter and thickness of cortex decreased by salinity whereas thickness of hypodermal layer, diameter of hypodermal cell, pith area and pith cell diameter increased by high salinity. The root anatomy showed an increase in epidermal thickness by salinity whereas diameters of epidermal cells and xylem vessels decreased. Total soluble sugar content remained unchanged at all levels of salinity whereas reducing sugar content increased by twofold at high salinity (750 mM NaCl). The starch content of leaf decreased progressively in NaCl treated seedlings as compared to control. Total free amino acid content did not change at low salinity (250 mM), whereas it increased significantly at higher salinity (500 and 750 mM NaCl). The proline content increased in NaCl treated seedlings as compared to

  19. The influence of the passive evaporative cooling vest on a chemical industry workers and physiological strain level in hot conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karkalić Radovan M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted in order to evaluate efficiency of a personal body cooling system based on passive evaporative technologies and its effects on test subjects psycho-physiological suitability during exertional heat stress in hot environment. Performed results are based on conducted tests in climatic chamber in the Military Medical Academy Institute of Hygiene in Belgrade. Ten male test subjects were subjected to exertional heat stress test consisted of walking on motorized treadmill at a speed of 5 km/h in hot environment. Tests were performed with and without cooling system. As a physiological strain indicator the following parameters have been determined: mean skin temperature, tympanic temperature, heart rate and sweat rate. Results confirmed that cooling vest worn over the clothes was able to attenuate the physiological strain levels during exercise, when compared to identical exposure without the cooling system.

  20. Early life exposure to artificial light at night affects the physiological condition: An experimental study on the ecophysiology of free-living nestling songbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raap, Thomas; Casasole, Giulia; Pinxten, Rianne; Eens, Marcel

    2016-11-01

    Light pollution or artificial light at night (ALAN) is increasingly recognised to be an important anthropogenic environmental pressure on wildlife, affecting animal behaviour and physiology. Early life experiences are extremely important for the development, physiological status and health of organisms, and as such, early exposure to artificial light may have detrimental consequences for organism fitness. We experimentally manipulated the light environment of free-living great tit nestlings (Parus major), an important model species in evolutionary and environmental research. Haptoglobin (Hp) and nitric oxide (NOx), as important indicators of immunity, health, and physiological condition, were quantified in nestlings at baseline (13 days after hatching) and after a two night exposure to ALAN. We found that ALAN increased Hp and decreased NOx. ALAN may increase stress and oxidative stress and reduce melatonin which could subsequently lead to increased Hp and decreased NOx. Haptoglobin is part of the immune response and mounting an immune response is costly in energy and resources and, trade-offs are likely to occur with other energetically demanding tasks, such as survival or reproduction. Acute inhibition of NOx may have a cascading effect as it also affects other physiological aspects and may negatively affect immunocompetence. The consequences of the observed effects on Hp and NOx remain to be examined. Our study provides experimental field evidence that ALAN affects nestlings' physiology during development and early life exposure to ALAN could therefore have long lasting effects throughout adulthood.

  1. Effects of rearing conditions on behavioural and physiological responses of pigs to preslaughter handling and mixing at transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, I.C; Prelle, I.T.; Lambooij, E.; Korte, S.M.; Blokhuis, H.J; Koolhaas, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    The physiological and behavioural responses of slaughter pigs reared in either a barren environment or in an enriched environment (larger pens with straw bedding) to preslaughter handling and mixing at transport were studied. Enriched-reared pigs had higher salivary cortisol concentrations in the ho

  2. Effect of rearing conditions on behavioural and physiological responses of pigs to preslaughter handling and mixing at transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de I.C.; Prelle, I.T.; Burgwal, van de J.A.; Lambooij, E.; Korte, S.M.; Blokhuis, H.J.; Koolhaas, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    The physiological and behavioural responses of slaughter pigs reared in either a barren environment or in an enriched environment (larger pens with straw bedding) to preslaughter handling and mixing at transport were studied. Enriched-reared pigs had higher salivary cortisol concentrations in the ho

  3. Alternate furrow irrigation of four fresh-market tomato cultivars under semi-arid condition of Ethiopia – Part II: Physiological response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashinie Bogale

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the variation in physiological response to deficit irrigation together with better knowledge on physiological characteristics of different genotypes that contribute to drought adaptation mechanisms would be helpful in transferring different irrigation technologies to farmers. A field experiment was carried to investigate the physiological response of four tomato cultivars (Fetan, Chali, Cochoro and ARP Tomato d2 to moderate water deficit induced by alternate furrow irrigation (AFI and deficit irrigation (DI under semi-arid condition of Ethiopia during 2013 and 2014. The study also aimed at identifying physiological attributes to the fruit yield of tomato under different deficit irrigation techniques. A factorial combination of irrigation treatments and cultivar were arranged in a complete randomized design with three replicates. Results showed that stomatal conductance (g_s was significantly reduced while photosynthetic performance measured as chlorophyll fluorescence (Fv’/Fm’, relative water content (RWC and leaf ash content remained unaffected under deficit irrigations. Significant differences among cultivars were found for water use efficiency (WUE, g_s, chlorophyll content (Chl_SPAD, normal difference vegetation index (NDVI, leaf ash content and fruit growth rate. However, cultivar differences in WUE were more accounted for by the regulation of g_s, therefore, g_s could be useful for breeders for screening large numbers of genotypes with higher WUE under deficit irrigation condition. The study result also demonstrated that cultivar with traits that contribute to achieve higher yields under deficit irrigation strategies has the potential to increase WUE.

  4. The physiology of ex vitro pineapple (Ananas comosus L. Merr. var MD-2) as CAM or C3 is regulated by the environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragón, C; Carvalho, L; González, J; Escalona, M; Amancio, S

    2012-04-01

    Many plant species grown under in vitro controlled conditions can be used as models for the study of physiological processes. Adult pineapple can display CAM physiology while in vitro it functions as a C3 plant. Ex vitro Ananas comosus has plastic morphology and physiology, both easy to modify from C3 to CAM by changing the environmental conditions. The yield of survival for a rentable propagation protocol of pineapple is closely related with the C3/CAM shift and the associated physiological characteristics. In the present work, ex vitro pineapple plants were divided in two sets and subjected to C3 and CAM-inducing environmental conditions, determined by light intensity and relative humidity, respectively, 40 μmol m(-2) s(-1)/85% and 260 μmol m(-2) s(-1)/50%. The results demonstrated that the stress imposed by the environmental conditions switched pineapple plants from C3 to CAM behavior. Comparing to CAM induced, C3-induced pineapple plants showed substandard growth parameters and morphological leaf characteristics but a better rooting process and a higher ABA production, a phenotype closer to adult plants, which are expected to produce fruits in a normal production cycle. We conclude that the upholding of these characteristics is conditioned by low light intensity plus high relative humidity, especially during the first 8 weeks of ex vitro growth. It is expected that the better understanding of pineapple acclimatization will contribute to the design of a protocol to apply as a rentable tool in the pineapple agronomic industry.

  5. Effect of Salinity on Growth and Physiological Parameters of Four Olive (OleaeuropaeaL. Cultivars underGreenhouse Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Olyaei

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Salinity is a common abiotic stress that seriously affects crop production around the world, particularly in arid and semi-arid regions.The deleterious effects of salinity on plant growth are associated with low osmotic potential of soil solution (water stress, nutritional imbalance, specific ion effect (salt stress, or a combination of these factors. Olive is one of the most important fruit crops in Iran and the world. Despite olive has been classified as moderately salt tolerant plant, poor quality of irrigation water in association with salt build-up soils has reduced the yields, especially in arid and semi-arid regions of Iran. The tolerance of the olive to salt is to a great extent depends on the cultivar. Selecting salinity-resistant cultivars is one of the most important strategies used for mitigating salinity effects on olive. Therefore, this study was performed to assess the salt tolerance of four olive cultivars under greenhouse condition. Materials and Methods: For this purpose, one-year-old rooted cuttings of Iranian olive cultivars (‘Dakal’, ‘Shiraz’, ‘Zard’ and non-Iranian cultivar ‘Amigdal’ were grown in the research greenhouse of Agricultural College, Isfahan University of Technology of Iran. Plants were grown in plastic pots. The pots were 180 mm in diameter and 20 mm in depth with volume of 7 L. The minimum and maximum temperatures during the experiment period were 19 and 35˚C, respectively. After sticking the cuttings, the pots with uniform plants were subjected to the treatment with 0 (control, 100, 150 or 200 mMNaCl. The electrical conductivities of these solutions were 0.003, 10.52, 15.43 and 19.55 dS m-1, respectively. To avoid osmotic shock, the NaCl concentration was gradually increased. The layout was a 4×4 factorial experiment based oncompletely randomized design, with four replications. The experimental measurements were carried out three months after beginning the salt treatments

  6. Organic and Inorganic Nitrogen Fertilization Effects on Some Physiological and Agronomical Traits of Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. in Irrigated Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Namvar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of organic and inorganic nitrogen fertilization on some physiological and agronomical traits of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. cv. ILC 482, investigated at the Experimental Farm of the Agriculture Faculty, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili. The trial was laid out in spilt plot design based on randomized complete block with four replications. Experimental factors were mineral nitrogen fertilizer at four levels (0, 50, 75 and 100 kg urea/ha in the main plots, and two levels of inoculation with Rhizobium bacteria (with and without inoculation as sub plots. N application and Rh. inoculation showed positive effects on physiological and agronomical traits of chickpea. The highest value of leaf RWC recorded in 50 kg urea/ha that was statistically in par with 75 kg urea/ha application while, usage of 75 kg urea/ha showed the maximum stem RWC. The maximum CMS obtained form application of 75 kg urea/ha. Chlorophyll content, leaf area index and grains protein content showed their maximum values in the highest level of nitrogen usage (100 kg urea/ha. Moreover, inoculated plants had the highest magnitudes of all physiological traits. In the case of agronomical traits, the highest values of plant height, number of primary and secondary branches, number of pods per plant, number of grains per plant, grain and biological yield were obtained from the highest level of nitrogen fertilizer (100 kg urea/ha and Rh. inoculation. Application of 75 kg urea/ha was statistically in par with 100 kg urea/ha in all of these traits. The results pointed out that some N fertilization (i.e. between 50 and 75 kg urea/ha as starter can be beneficial to improve growth, development, physiological traits and total yield of inoculated chickpea.

  7. Expression of endogenic lectins and their glycoligands in the tear fluid, human corneal and conjunctival epithelium under physiological and disease conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Hrdličková, Enkela

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Lectins play an important role in many biological processes. The aim of this work was to analyse mainly the expression of endogenic lectins, such as galectins and plant lectin, e.g. Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), and their glycoligands in the tear fluid, human corneal and conjunctival epithelium in physiological and disease conditions. Further, we studied the human natural antibody against Galα1,3Gal-R, which is mainly responsible for hyperacute rejection of xenografts transplan...

  8. Physiological age at harvest regulates the variability in postharvest ripening, sensory and nutritional characteristics of mango (Mangifera indica L.) cv. Coghshall due to growing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joas, Jacques; Vulcain, Emmanuelle; Desvignes, Claire; Morales, Emeline; Léchaudel, Mathieu

    2012-04-01

    Climacteric fruits are harvested at the green-mature stage and ripen during their marketing cycle. However, growing conditions induce variability into the maturity stage of mangoes at harvest, with an impact on their final quality. Assuming that the physiological age can be correctly evaluated by a criterion based on the variable chlorophyll fluorescence of the skin (F(v)) and that differences in physiological age depend on growing conditions, controlled stress experiments were carried out on mango fruit by manipulating either the leaf/fruit ratio or the light environment. Delays from 9 to 30 days were observed, depending on stress level and harvest stage, to obtain the same F(v) value. For moderate stress, fruit composition after ripening was partially compensated for, with little or no difference in sugar, dry matter, carotenoid and aroma contents. For more pronounced stress, the major metabolites were not particularly affected, but the synthesis capacity of carotenoids and aromas was lower after maturity. The ripening ability of a fruit is acquired on the tree and defines its postharvest changes. Control of the physiological age at harvest can minimise the variability observed under natural conditions and guarantee fruit batches whose postharvest changes will be relatively homogeneous. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Re-evaluation of the action potential upstroke velocity as a measure of the Na+ current in cardiac myocytes at physiological conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Géza Berecki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The SCN5A encoded sodium current (I(Na generates the action potential (AP upstroke and is a major determinant of AP characteristics and AP propagation in cardiac myocytes. Unfortunately, in cardiac myocytes, investigation of kinetic properties of I(Na with near-physiological ion concentrations and temperature is technically challenging due to the large amplitude and rapidly activating nature of I(Na, which may seriously hamper the quality of voltage control over the membrane. We hypothesized that the alternating voltage clamp-current clamp (VC/CC technique might provide an alternative to traditional voltage clamp (VC technique for the determination of I(Na properties under physiological conditions. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied I(Na under close-to-physiological conditions by VC technique in SCN5A cDNA-transfected HEK cells or by alternating VC/CC technique in both SCN5A cDNA-transfected HEK cells and rabbit left ventricular myocytes. In these experiments, peak I(Na during a depolarizing VC step or maximal upstroke velocity, dV/dt(max, during VC/CC served as an indicator of available I(Na. In HEK cells, biophysical properties of I(Na, including current density, voltage dependent (inactivation, development of inactivation, and recovery from inactivation, were highly similar in VC and VC/CC experiments. As an application of the VC/CC technique we studied I(Na in left ventricular myocytes isolated from control or failing rabbit hearts. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that the alternating VC/CC technique is a valuable experimental tool for I(Na measurements under close-to-physiological conditions in cardiac myocytes.

  10. Effects of Storage Condition on Physiological Rind Disorder of Citrus Fruits%贮藏条件对柑桔果皮生理病害的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仇坚; 刘丽丹; 曾凯芳

    2011-01-01

    柑桔果皮生理病害是影响柑桔果实贮藏品质的重要因素,它是由于柑桔果皮代谢失调导致的.本文在概述柑桔果皮生理病害基础上,主要综述了贮藏条件对果皮生理病害发生的影响,并对贮藏条件对果皮生理病害的控制进行了展望.%Physiological rind disorder of citrus fruits in storage period is an important factor, which influence the storage qualitative of citrus fruits, which is caused by disproportion of fruit peel metabolism.This paper reviewed the describing and the effect of storage condition on the physiological rind disorder of citrus fruits, And the control method in storage period was also described.

  11. Investigation of the physiological response to oxygen limited process conditions of Pichia pastoris Mut(+) strain using a two-compartment scale-down system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorantfy, Bettina; Jazini, Mohammadhadi; Herwig, Christoph

    2013-09-01

    Inhomogeneities in production-scale bioreactors influence microbial growth and product quality due to insufficient mixing and mass transfer. For this reason, lots of efforts are being made to investigate the effects of gradients that impose stress in large-scale reactors in laboratory scale. We have implemented a scale-down model which allows separating a homogeneous part, a stirred tank reactor (STR), and a plug flow reactor (PFR) which mimics the inhomogeneous regimes of the large-scale fermenters. This scale-down model shows solutions to trigger oxygen limited conditions in the PFR part of the scale-down setup for physiological analysis. The goal of the study was to investigate the scale-up relevant physiological responses of Pichia pastoris strain to oxygen limited process conditions in the above mentioned two-compartment bioreactor setup. Experimental results with non-induced cultures show that the specific growth rate significantly decreased with increasing the exposure time to oxygen limitation. In parallel more by-products were produced. Examining physiological scalable key parameters, multivariate data analyses solely using on-line data revealed that different exposures to the oxygen limitation significantly affected the culture performance. This work with the small scale-downs setup reflects new approaches for a valuable process development tool for accelerating strain characterization or for verifying CFD simulations of large-scale bioreactors. As a novel methodological achievement, the combination of the two-compartment scale-down system with the proposed multivariate techniques of solely using on-line data is a valuable tool for recognition of stress effects on the culture performance for physiological bioprocess scale-up issues.

  12. Levels and actions of progesterone and its metabolites in the nervous system during physiological and pathological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcangi, Roberto Cosimo; Giatti, Silvia; Calabrese, Donato; Pesaresi, Marzia; Cermenati, Gaia; Mitro, Nico; Viviani, Barbara; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Caruso, Donatella

    2014-02-01

    Progesterone is synthesized and actively metabolized in the central and peripheral nervous system, into neuroactive steroid metabolites, such as dihydroprogesterone, allopregnanolone and isopregnanolone. Progesterone and/or its metabolites exert a variety of effects acting as physiological regulators of neuronal and glial development and plasticity, controlling reproduction, neuroendocrine events, mood and affection. In addition, these neuroactive steroids maintain neural homeostasis and exert neuroprotective actions. In agreement, metabolic pathways of progesterone are affected by modifications in the level of gonadal hormones and by pathology or injury with a regional specificity and in a sex-dimorphic way. Therefore, observations here summarized may provide a background to design sex-specific therapies based on progesterone metabolites. On this point of view, considering that one of the major limits of a therapy based on neuroactive steroids could be modifications in their plasma levels and their consequent peripheral effects, pharmacological treatments aimed to increase their levels in the nervous system could provide an interesting therapeutic option.

  13. An efficient strategy to assemble water soluble histidine-perylene diimide and graphene oxide for the detection of PPi in physiological conditions and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthuraj, B; Mukherjee, Sudip; Chowdhury, Sayan Roy; Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Iyer, Parameswar K

    2017-03-15

    A strategy to develop water soluble, biocompatible nanocomposite probe for the detection of pyrophosphate (PPi) in physiological conditions and in in vitro live melanoma cancer cells (B16F10) is reported. The self-assembled nanocomposite probe comprised of amino acid (histidine) functionalized perylenediimide (PDI-HIS), copper ion and graphene oxide (GO) and that could be utilized as a highly effective sensing platform in biological conditions and cellular environment via fluorescence "turn-on" for PPi detection. This controlled fabrication of metal organic self-assembled spheres along with GO proved very valuable for the detection of PPi in unprecedented sensitivity over other competing ions. The PDI-HIS-Cu-GO (PCG) nanocomposite sensor provides a unique platform for the fluorogenic detection of PPi having a very low limit of detection (LOD) of 0.60×10(-7)M based on the strong affinity (1.0×10(6)M(-1)) between the copper complex of PDI-HIS receptor and PPi. The intracellular detection of PPi using PCG also carried out in B16F10 cells where >10 times observed as compared to the PDI-HIS+Cu(2+) complex. Thus early cancer detection via PPi recognition in physiological conditions and in live cells was possible using PCG. Furthermore, the fabrication of PDI-HIS and PCG with PVA hydrogel films and on thin layer chromatography plates demonstrated the practical utility for the detection of PPi anions by "off-on" response rapidly in a label free manner.

  14. Introduction of a new model for time-continuous and non-contact investigations of in-vitro thrombolysis under physiological flow conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trillenberg Peter

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thrombolysis is a dynamic and time-dependent process influenced by the haemodynamic conditions. Currently there is no model that allows for time-continuous, non-contact measurements under physiological flow conditions. The aim of this work was to introduce such a model. Methods The model is based on a computer-controlled pump providing variable constant or pulsatile flows in a tube system filled with blood substitute. Clots can be fixed in a custom-built clot carrier within the tube system. The pressure decline at the clot carrier is measured as a novel way to measure lysis of the clot. With different experiments the hydrodynamic properties and reliability of the model were analyzed. Finally, the lysis rate of clots generated from human platelet rich plasma (PRP was measured during a one hour combined application of diagnostic ultrasound (2 MHz, 0.179 W/cm2 and a thrombolytic agent (rt-PA as it is commonly used for clinical sonothrombolysis treatments. Results All hydrodynamic parameters can be adjusted and measured with high accuracy. First experiments with sonothrombolysis demonstrated the feasibility of the model despite low lysis rates. Conclusions The model allows to adjust accurately all hydrodynamic parameters affecting thrombolysis under physiological flow conditions and for non-contact, time-continuous measurements. Low lysis rates of first sonothrombolysis experiments are primarily attributable to the high stability of the used PRP-clots.

  15. Reaction of 1,2,3,4-Diepoxybutane with 2′-Deoxyguanosine: Initial Products and Their Stabilities and Decomposition Patterns under Physiological Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xin-Yu; Elfarra, Adnan A.

    2005-01-01

    1,2,3,4-Diepoxybutane (DEB), an in vivo metabolite of 1,3-butadiene (BD), is a carcinogen and a potent mutagen. Previously, DEB was shown to react with 2′-deoxyguanosine (dG) under physiological conditions to produce seven major nucleoside adducts resulting from alkylation at the N1- (P8 and P9), N7- (P5 and P5′) and both the N1- and N2-positions of dG to form six-membered (P4-1 and P4-2) and seven-membered fused ring systems (P6), respectively (Zhang and Elfarra, Chem. Res. Toxicol. 2003, 16...

  16. Effect of Ar Ion Beam Implantation on Morphological and Physiological Characteristics of Liquorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch) Under Short-Term Artificial Drought Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiangsheng; WU Lijun; YU Lixiang; WEI Shenglin; LIU Jingnan; YU Zengliang

    2007-01-01

    Ar+ ion beam with low energy of 30 keV was implanted into liquorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch) seeds at the doses of 0,600,900 and 1200 × (2.6×1013) ions/cm2,respectively.The seeds were sowed in pots and after one month the plants were subjected to different drought conditions for two months.Then the plants'morphological and physiological characteristics,antioxidation enzymes and levels of endogenous hormones were investigated.The results showed that ion implantation at a proper dose can greatly enhance the liquorice seedlings'resistance against drought stress.

  17. Qigong as a Traditional Vegetative Biofeedback Therapy: Long-Term Conditioning of Physiological Mind-Body Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Carlos Matos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A contemporary understanding of Chinese Medicine (CM regards CM diagnosis as a functional vegetative state that may be treated by vegetative reflex therapies such as acupuncture. Within this context, traditional mind-body exercises such as Qigong can be understood as an attempt to enhance physiological proprioception, by combining a special state of “awareness” with posture, movement, and breath control. We have formerly trained young auditing flutists in “White Ball” Qigong to minimize anxiety-induced cold hands and lower anxiety-induced heart rate. Functional changes occurred 2–5 min after training and were observed over the whole training program, allowing the children to control their symptoms. In our current work, we report that warm fingers and calm hearts could be induced by the children even without Qigong exercises. Thus, these positive changes once induced and “conditioned” vegetatively were stable after weeks of training. This may show the mechanism by which Qigong acts as a therapeutic measure in disease: positive vegetative pathways may be activated instead of dysfunctional functional patterns. The positive vegetative patterns then may be available in critical stressful situations. Qigong exercise programs may therefore be understood as an ancient vegetative biofeedback exercise inducing positive vegetative functions which are added to the individual reactive repertoire.

  18. Phenology of Lithothamnion glaciale in mixed fjord conditions: mesocosm experiments provide insight to maerl physiology and distribution in southwestern Greenland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenrock, Kathryn; Baquet, Marion; Kamenos, Nicholas

    2017-04-01

    Maerl are free living coralline algae that are often bedded in the subtidal forming important marine habitats in many regions of the world. Greenland is known to have at least three species of maerl along the coast and extending into some fjord systems. In the Godthåbsfjord region, Lithothamnion glaciale is never found dominating shallow maerl beds as it is further north (Disko bay) and in other regions of the Arctic. To investigate reasons for this maerl physiology was measured in situ over two field seasons and over the year in a mesocosm experiment which manipulated temperature and salinity to represent marine and fjord systems. The results of these measurements show that calcification and photosynthesis (DO production) in L. glaciale as well as another maerl species, Clathromorphum compactum, operate at very low rates and are influenced negatively by low salinity but positively by low temperature throughout the year. Photosynthesis and calcification are not often correlated in these species which is an unusual finding as these two metabolic processes are thought to be coupled. Findings provide natural history background for ecotypes from the Godthåbsfjord region and a baseline for future research in biogeochemistry and ecology.

  19. The influence of physiological matrix conditions on permanent culture of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heras-Bautista, Carlos O; Katsen-Globa, Alisa; Schloerer, Nils E; Dieluweit, Sabine; Abd El Aziz, Osama M; Peinkofer, Gabriel; Attia, Wael A; Khalil, Markus; Brockmeier, Konrad; Hescheler, Jürgen; Pfannkuche, Kurt

    2014-08-01

    Cardiomyocytes (CMs) from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells mark an important achievement in the development of in vitro pharmacological, toxicological and developmental assays and in the establishment of protocols for cardiac cell replacement therapy. Using CMs generated from murine embryonic stem cells and iPS cells we found increased cell-matrix interaction and more matured embryoid body (EB) structures in iPS cell-derived EBs. However, neither suspension-culture in form of purified cardiac clusters nor adherence-culture on traditional cell culture plastic allowed for extended culture of CMs. CMs grown for five weeks on polystyrene exhibit signs of massive mechanical stress as indicated by α-smooth muscle actin expression and loss of sarcomere integrity. Hydrogels from polyacrylamide allow adapting of the matrix stiffness to that of cardiac tissue. We were able to eliminate the bottleneck of low cell adhesion using 2,5-Dioxopyrrolidin-1-yl-6-acrylamidohexanoate as a crosslinker to immobilize matrix proteins on the gels surface. Finally we present an easy method to generate polyacrylamide gels with a physiological Young's modulus of 55 kPa and defined surface ligand, facilitating the culture of murine and human iPS-CMs, removing excess mechanical stresses and reducing the risk of tissue culture artifacts exerted by stiff substrates.

  20. Influence of rearing conditions on performance, behavioral, and physiological responses of pigs to preslaughter handling, carcass traits, and meat quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebret, B.; Meunier-Salaün, M.C.; Foury, A.; Mormède, P.; Dransfield, E.; Dourmad, J.Y.

    2006-01-01

    A total of 120 crossbred [synthetic line x (Large White x Landrace)] pigs (castrated males and females) were used to evaluate the influence of rearing conditions for growing-finishing pigs on growth performance, carcass, stress reactions at slaughter, and meat eating quality. At approximately 35 kg

  1. Adipose-derived stem cells cultivated on electrospun l-lactide/glycolide copolymer fleece and gelatin hydrogels under flow conditions - aiming physiological reality in hypodermis tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugerell, Alfred; Neumann, Anne; Kober, Johanna; Tammaro, Loredana; Hoch, Eva; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Kamolz, Lars; Kasper, Cornelia; Keck, Maike

    2015-02-01

    Generation of adipose tissue for burn patients that suffer from an irreversible loss of the hypodermis is still one of the most complex challenges in tissue engineering. Electrospun materials with their micro- and nanostructures are already well established for their use as extracellular matrix substitutes. Gelatin is widely used in tissue engineering to gain thickness and volume. Under conventional static cultivation methods the supply of nutrients and transport of toxic metabolites is controlled by diffusion and therefore highly dependent on size and porosity of the biomaterial. A widely used method in order to overcome these limitations is the medium perfusion of 3D biomaterial-cell-constructs. In this study we combined perfusion bioreactor cultivation techniques with electrospun poly(l-lactide-co-glycolide) (P(LLG)) and gelatin hydrogels together with adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) for a new approach in soft tissue engineering. ASCs were seeded on P(LLG) scaffolds and in gelatin hydrogels and cultivated for 24 hours under static conditions. Thereafter, biomaterials were cultivated under static conditions or in a bioreactor system for three, nine or twelve days with a medium flow of 0.3ml/min. Viability, morphology and differentiation of cells was monitored. ASCs seeded on P(LLG) scaffolds had a physiological morphology and good viability and were able to migrate from one electrospun scaffold to another under flow conditions but not migrate through the mesh. Differentiated ASCs showed lipid droplet formations after 21 days. Cells in hydrogels were viable but showed rounded morphology. Under flow conditions, morphology of cells was more diffuse. ASCs could be cultivated on P(LLG) scaffolds and in gelatin hydrogels under flow conditions and showed good cell viability as well as the potential to differentiate. These results should be a next step to a physiological three-dimensional construct for soft tissue engineering and regeneration. Copyright © 2014

  2. Monitoring of growth and physiological activities of biofilm during succession on polystyrene from activated sludge under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Iffat; Batool, Syeda Ain-ul; Ali, Naeem; Khatoon, Nazia; Atiq, Niama; Hameed, Abdul; Ahmed, Safia

    2013-08-01

    The present research work monitored the successive biofilm development and its catabolic role in the degradation of polystyrene (PS). PS material was artificially colonized with biofilm by incubating it with activated sludge under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Biofilm formation was monitored by gravimetric weight analysis, spectrophotometric absorbance technique, heterotrophic plate count, and scanning electron microscopy under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The wet weight (1.59 and 1.17 g) and dry weight (0.41 and 0.08 g) of a biofilm showed a significant constant increase under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively, from first till 9 weeks of incubation. Plate count of the selected bacteria (Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Shigella dysenteriae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) considerably declined (90-99 %) in the biofilm after seventh and fifth weeks of incubation under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively, indicating a positive shift from pathogenic to beneficial microbial community. While most probable number index of fecal coliforms and E. coli in the sludge showed more reduction (98 and 99 %) under aerobic as compare to anaerobic conditions (86 and 91 %) after 9 weeks of biofilm formation on PS cubes. Correspondingly, the decreasing levels of chemical oxygen demand and biochemical oxygen demand (up to 73 %) showed signs of sludge digestion. Scanning electron microscope coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope revealed nature of PS media containing high carbon content. However, biofilm development proved to be involved in the biochemical transformation of the PS medium as indicated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  3. Gene expression and physiological changes of different populations of the long-lived bivalve Arctica islandica under low oxygen conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva E R Philipp

    , temperature, salinity. Contrary, higher physiological flexibility and stress hardening may predispose these animals to perform a pronounced stress response at the expense of life span.

  4. Thermal, physiological strain index and perceptual responses in Iranian Muslim women under Thermal Condition in order to Guide in Prevention of Heat Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peymaneh Habibi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Heat stress risk assessment, as a harmful agent at workplace, is essential for controlling heat strain. The purpose of this study was relation between physiological and perceptual heat strain responses in Iranian veiled women under laboratory thermal conditions. This experimental study was carried out on 36 healthy females (age 22.3 ± 2.0 yr, height 162.76±5. 57cm, weight 55.82 ± 9.27kg in sitting state under thermal conditions (27 - 38° C in the hot-dry climatic condition for 120 min. In order to calculate the physiological strain index (PSI, oral temperature and heart rate were measured every 5 min. Physiological factors, and Heat Strain Score Index (HSSI questionnaires are simultaneous measurements taken at any 5 min during the exposure and physiological factors, and Heat Strain Score Index (HSSI questionnaires are the initial measurements. The data were analyzed using correlation and line regression by test spss16. The results showed that the average heart rate and oral temperature at resting and sitting were between 83.06 ±9.41bpm, 87.91 ±7.87 bpm and 36.7° C, 37. 1° C respectively. Also, the results have revealed a direct and significant and direct correlation among HSSI with WBGT (R2 = 0.97, P< 0.001, PSI (R2 = 0.96, P< 0.001, oral temperature (R2 = 0.96, P< 0.001 and heart rate (R2 = 0.62, P< 0.01 indices. The results have shown that simultaneously with the increase in valid indices of heat stress evaluation such as WBGT and PSI indices, the amount of HSSI index has also increased with high power. Therefore, it can be conclude that when there is no access to a reliable heat stress method such as WBGT or PSI indices, HSSI index, an objective and subjective heat strain method, can be used as a simple, fast and inexpensive method for evaluating the heat strain in women.

  5. A multicomponent bioactive tissue-engineered blood vessel: Fabrication, mechanical evaluation and biological evaluation with physiological-relevant conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonani, Walter

    The high long-term failure rate of synthetic vascular grafts in the replacement of small vessels is known to be associated with the lack of physiological signals to vascular cells causing adverse hemodynamic, inflammatory or coagulatory events. Current studies focus on developing engineered vascular devices with ability of directing cell activity in vitro and in vivo for tissue regeneration. It is also known that controlled molecule release from scaffolds can dramatically increase the scaffold ability of directing cell activities in vitro and in vivo for tissue regeneration. To address the mechanical and biological problems associated with graft materials, we demonstrated a degradable polyester-fibroin composite tubular scaffolds which shows well-integrated nanofibrous structure, endothelial-conducive surface and anisotropic mechanical property, suitable as engineered vascular constructs. Tissue regeneration needs not only functional biomolecules providing signaling cues to cells and guide tissue remodeling, but also an adequate modality of molecule delivery. In fact, healthy tissue formation requires specific signals at well-defined place and time. To develop scaffolds with multi-modal presentation of biomolecules, we patterned electrospun nanofibers over the thickness of the 3-dimensional scaffolds by programming the deposition of interpenetrating networks of degradable polymers poly(a-caprolactone) and poly(lactide-co-glycolide) acid in tailored proportion. Fluorescent model molecules, drug and growth factors were embedded in the polymeric fibers with different techniques and release profiles were obtained and discussed. Fabrication process resulted in precise gradient patterns of materials and functional biomolecules throughout the thickness of the scaffold. These graded materials showed programmable spatio-temporal control over the release. Molecule release profiles on each side of the scaffolds were used to determine the separation efficiency of molecule

  6. Maternal undernutrition during late pregnancy in sheep. Its relationship to maternal condition, gestation length, hepatic physiology and glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, H J

    1996-04-01

    There is a paucity of information on the metabolic effects of undernutrition of the ewe carrying multiple fetuses in late pregnancy. In the present study the effects of induction of ketosis from 132 d gestation in ewes carrying twin fetuses were compared with a control group. The ewes were well fed up to 132 d. Ketotic ewes showed a loss of condition score from 3.7 (SE 0.11) at 130 d gestation to 3.0 (SE 0.15) 10 d later after clinical recovery, compared with control twin-pregnant ewes (P < 0.01). The weight loss during the same time period was from 70.6 (SE 2.7) kg at 130 d to 64.2 (SE 2.7) kg at 140.d gestation. As expected, both groups lost weight and condition score in the first 28 d of lactation. Induction of ketosis caused a significant shortening of the gestation period to 142.8 (SE 0.7) d compared with 150 (SE 0.4) d in normal twin-pregnant ewes (P < 0.001). Ewes with induced ketosis recovered clinically and showed a normal feed intake by 3.4 (SE 0.07) d; three required treatment. Induction of ketosis resulted in reduction of hepatic uptake of bromosulphthalein (P < 0.01) and its biliary excretion (P < 0.05), metabolic clearance rate (P < 0.001), fractional clearance (P < 0.001) and 15 and 30 min retention compared with control twin-pregnant ewes. Most values had returned to normal by the first week of lactation. It is thought that in human pregnancy similar changes in bromosulphthalein clearance may be related to reduced binding sites for bromosulphthalein in the liver caused by increased circulating oestrogens. Induction of ketosis resulted in a significant hypoglycaemic (P < 0.01), ketotic (P < 0.001) state compared with well-fed twin-pregnant ewes. These changes could be correlated with the severity of the clinical signs, together with a significant rise in plasma urea (P < 0.001) and NH3 (P < 0.05) concentrations. Again, the return of most of these values to normal by the first week of lactation lends support to the reversibility of hepatic lesions

  7. Comparative analysis of human γD-crystallin aggregation under physiological and low pH conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine W Wu

    Full Text Available Cataract, a major cause of visual impairment worldwide, is the opacification of the eye's crystalline lens due to aggregation of the crystallin proteins. The research reported here is aimed at investigating the aggregating behavior of γ-crystallin proteins in various incubation conditions. Thioflavin T binding assay, circular dichroism spectroscopy, 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid fluorescence spectroscopy, intrinsic (tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy, light scattering, and electron microscopy were used for structural characterization. Molecular dynamics simulations and bioinformatics prediction were performed to gain insights into the γD-crystallin mechanisms of fibrillogenesis. We first demonstrated that, except at pH 7.0 and 37°C, the aggregation of γD-crystallin was observed to be augmented upon incubation, as revealed by turbidity measurements. Next, the types of aggregates (fibrillar or non-fibrillar aggregates formed under different incubation conditions were identified. We found that, while a variety of non-fibrillar, granular species were detected in the sample incubated under pH 7.0, the fibrillogenesis of human γD-crystallin could be induced by acidic pH (pH 2.0. In addition, circular dichroism spectroscopy, 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid fluorescence spectroscopy, and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy were used to characterize the structural and conformational features in different incubation conditions. Our results suggested that incubation under acidic condition led to a considerable change in the secondary structure and an enhancement in solvent-exposure of the hydrophobic regions of human γD-crystallin. Finally, molecular dynamics simulations and bioinformatics prediction were performed to better explain the differences between the structures and/or conformations of the human γD-crystallin samples and to reveal potential key protein region involved in the varied aggregation behavior. Bioinformatics analyses

  8. MODEL-ASSISTED ESTIMATION OF THE GENETIC VARIABILITY IN PHYSIOLOGICAL PARAMETERS RELATED TO TOMATO FRUIT GROWTH UNDER CONTRASTED WATER CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Constantinescu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Drought stress is a major abiotic stres threatening plant and crop productivity. In case of fleshy fruits, understanding Drought stress is a major abiotic stress threatening plant and crop productivity. In case of fleshy fruits, understanding mechanisms governing water and carbon accumulations and identifying genes, QTLs and phenotypes, that will enable trade-offs between fruit growth and quality under Water Deficit (WD condition is a crucial challenge for breeders and growers. In the present work, 117 recombinant inbred lines of a population of Solanum lycopersicum were phenotyped under control and WD conditions. Plant water status, fruit growth and composition were measured and data were used to calibrate a process-based model describing water and carbon fluxes in a growing fruit as a function of plant and environment. Eight genotype-dependent model parameters were estimated using a multiobjective evolutionary algorithm in order to minimize the prediction errors of fruit dry and fresh mass throughout fruit development. WD increased the fruit dry matter content (up to 85 % and decreased its fresh weight (up to 60 %, big fruit size genotypes being the most sensitive. The mean normalized root mean squared errors of the predictions ranged between 16-18 % in the population. Variability in model genotypic parameters allowed us to explore diverse genetic strategies in response to WD. An interesting group of genotypes could be discriminated in which i the low loss of fresh mass under WD was associated with high active uptake of sugars and low value of the maximum cell wall extensibility, and ii the high dry matter content in control treatment (C was associated with a slow decrease of mass flow. Using 501 SNP markers genotyped across the genome, a QTL analysis of model parameters allowed to detect three main QTLs related to xylem and phloem conductivities, on chromosomes 2, 4 and 8. The model was then applied to design ideotypes with high dry matter

  9. Nasal Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregivers Contact ARS HOME ANATOMY Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure ... Patient Education About this Website Font Size + - Home > ANATOMY > Nasal Physiology Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy ...

  10. Epithelial thickness and lipid droplets in the hepatopancreas of Porcellio scaber (Crustacea: Isopoda) in different physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leser, Vladka; Drobne, Damjana; Vilhar, Barbara; Kladnik, Ales; Znidarsic, Nada; Strus, Jasna

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the morphometric characteristics of the hepatopancreatic epithelium in the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber during acclimatization to laboratory conditions, during the daily cycle, the molt cycle, and fasting. The hepatopancreatic epithelium was analyzed using computer-assisted microscopy of serial sections of the hepatopancreatic tubes. In addition, the abundance, the distribution, and the size of lipid droplets in the hepatopancreatic epithelium were recorded. The experimental animals were collected in the field and transferred to the laboratory. The hepatopancreatic epithelium was thinner and lipid droplets reduced after 2 months of acclimatization to laboratory conditions. The daily cycle and the molt cycle affected neither the epithelial thickness nor the abundance of lipid droplets. But in animals fasted for 2 weeks, these two parameters were significantly reduced. Based on both the epithelial thickness and the abundance of lipid droplets in B cells, we propose criteria for estimating the stress status of the animals. With the possibility to determine the stress status, many studies on isopods gain in relevance.

  11. Mapping QTLs associated with agronomic and physiological traits under terminal drought and heat stress conditions in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahmasebi, Sirous; Heidari, Bahram; Pakniyat, Hassan; McIntyre, C Lynne

    2017-01-01

    Wheat crops frequently experience a combination of abiotic stresses in the field, but most quantitative trait loci (QTL) studies have focused on the identification of QTLs for traits under single stress field conditions. A recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from SeriM82 × Babax was used to map QTLs under well-irrigated, heat, drought, and a combination of heat and drought stress conditions in two years. A total of 477 DNA markers were used to construct linkage groups that covered 1619.6 cM of the genome, with an average distance of 3.39 cM between adjacent markers. Moderate to relatively high heritability estimates (0.60-0.70) were observed for plant height (PHE), grain yield (YLD), and grain per square meter (GM2). The most important QTLs for days to heading (DHE), thousand grain weight (TGW), and YLD were detected on chromosomes 1B, 1D-a, and 7D-b. The prominent QTLs related to canopy temperature were on 3B. Results showed that common QTLs for DHE, YLD, and TGW on 7D-b were validated in heat and drought trials. Three QTLs for chlorophyll content in SPAD unit (on 1A/6B), leaf rolling (ROL) (on 3B/4A), and GM2 (on 1B/7D-b) showed significant epistasis × environment interaction. Six heat- or drought-specific QTLs (linked to 7D-acc/cat-10, 1B-agc/cta-9, 1A-aag/cta-8, 4A-acg/cta-3, 1B-aca/caa-3, and 1B-agc/cta-9 for day to maturity (DMA), SPAD, spikelet compactness (SCOM), TGW, GM2, and GM2, respectively) were stable and validated over two years. The major DHE QTL linked to 7D-acc/cat-10, with no QTL × environment (QE) interaction increased TGW and YLD. This QTL (5.68 ≤ LOD ≤ 10.5) explained up to 19.6% variation in YLD in drought, heat, and combined stress trials. This marker as a candidate could be used for verification in other populations and identifying superior allelic variations in wheat cultivars or its wild progenitors to increase the efficiency of selection of high yielding lines adapted to end-season heat and drought stress conditions.

  12. Urinary metabolites from mango (Mangifera indica L. cv. Keitt) galloyl derivatives and in vitro hydrolysis of gallotannins in physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Ryan C; Krenek, Kimberly A; Meibohm, Bernd; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U; Talcott, Stephen T

    2016-03-01

    The absorption, metabolism, and excretion of mango galloyl derivatives (GD) has not yet been investigated in humans, and studies investigating repeated dosages of polyphenols are limited. In this human pilot trial, healthy volunteers (age = 21-38 y, n = 11) consumed 400 g/day of mango-pulp (cv. Keitt) for 10 days, and seven metabolites of gallic acid (GA) were characterized and quantified in urine excreted over a 12 h period. Pyrogallol-O-sulfate and deoxypyrogallol-O-sulfate were found to be significantly more excreted between days 1 and 10 (p mango consumption. Mango GTs were also found to release free GA in conditions similar to the intestines. GTs may serve as a pool of pro-GA compounds that can be absorbed or undergo microbial metabolism. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Express Type 1 Fimbriae Only in Surface Adherent Populations Under Physiological Growth Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stærk, Kristian; Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Khandige, Surabhi

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:  Most uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains harbor genes encoding adhesive type 1 fimbria (T1F). T1F is a key factor for successful establishment of urinary tract infection. However, UPEC strains typically do not express T1F in the bladder urine, and little is understood about...... its induction in vivo. METHODS:  A flow chamber infection model was used to grow UPEC under conditions simulating distinct infection niches in the bladder. Type 1 fimbriation on isolated UPEC was subsequently determined by yeast cell agglutination and immunofluorescence microscopy, and the results...... were correlated with the ability to adhere to and invade cultured human bladder cells. RESULTS:  Although inactive during planktonic growth in urine, T1F expression occurs when UPEC settles on and infects bladder epithelial cells or colonizes catheters. As a result, UPEC in these sessile populations...

  14. A quantitative method to monitor reactive oxygen species production by electron paramagnetic resonance in physiological and pathological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrakic-Sposta, Simona; Gussoni, Maristella; Montorsi, Michela; Porcelli, Simone; Vezzoli, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    The growing interest in the role of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and in the assessment of oxidative stress in health and disease clashes with the lack of consensus on reliable quantitative noninvasive methods applicable. The study aimed at demonstrating that a recently developed Electron Paramagnetic Resonance microinvasive method provides direct evidence of the "instantaneous" presence of ROS returning absolute concentration levels that correlate with "a posteriori" assays of ROS-induced damage by means of biomarkers. The reliability of the choice to measure ROS production rate in human capillary blood rather than in plasma was tested (step I). A significant (P condition, were found significantly different (range 0.0001-0.05 P level). The comparison of the results with antioxidant capacity and oxidative damage biomarkers concentrations showed that all changes indicating increased oxidative stress are directly related to ROS production increase. Therefore, the adopted method may be an automated technique for a lot of routine in clinical trials.

  15. Growth traits and nitrogen assimilation-associated physiological parameters of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) under low and high N conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Fei-fei; GAO Si; ZHAO Yuan-yuan; ZHAO Xiao-lei; LIU Xiao-man; XIAO Kai

    2015-01-01

    In this study, 14 wheat cultivars with contrasting yield and N use efifciency (NUE) were used to investigate the agronomic and NUE-related traits, and the N assimilation-associated enzyme activities under low and high N conditions. Under deifcient-N, the cultivars with high N uptake efifciency (UpE) and high N utilization efifciency (UtE) exhibited higher plant biomass, yields, and N contents than those with medium and low NUEs. The high UpE cultivars accumulated more N than other NUE type cultivars. Under sufifcient-N, the tested cultivars showed similar patterns in biomass, yield, and N content to those under deifcient-N, but the varietal variations in above traits were smal er. In addition, the high UpE cultivars displayed much more of root biomass and larger of root length, surface area, and volume than other NUE type cultivars, indicating that the root morphological traits under N deprivation are closely associated with the plant biomass through its improvement of the N acquisition. The high UtE cultivars showed higher activities of nitrate reductase (NR), nitrite reductase (NIR), and gluta-mine synthetase (GS) at stages of seediling, heading and ifl ing than other NUE type cultivars under both low and high N conditions. Moreover, the high UpE and UtE cultivars also displayed higher photosynthetic rate under deifcient-N than the medium and low NUE cultivars. Together, our results indicated that the tested wheat cultivars possess dramatical y genetic variations in biomass, yield, and NUE. The root morphological traits and the N assimilation enzymatic acitivities play critical roles in regulating N accumulation and internal N translocation under the N-starvation stress, respectively. They can be used as morphological and biochemical references for evaluation of UpE and UtE in wheat.

  16. The Effect of Vermicompost and Mycorrhizal Inoculation on Grain Yield and some Physiological Characteristics of Soybean (Glycine max L. under Water Stress Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Jahangiri nia

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Moisture limitation is considered as one of the important limiting factors in soybean growth. Drought stress affects different aspects of soybean growth through making anatomical, physiological and biochemical changes (Tarumingkeng & Coto, 2003. Under dry tension condition, there will be a disturbance in transmitting nutrients, but some useful soil fungi such as mycorrhiza improve production of crops under stress through forming colonies in the root and boosting water and nutrient absorption (Al-Karaki et al., 2004. Using vermicompost in sustainable agriculture strengthens support and activities of beneficial soil microorganisms (such as mycorrhizal fungi and phosphate solubilizing microorganisms in order to provide nutrients required by plants like nitrogen, phosphorus and soluble potassium as well as improving the growth and performance of the crops (Arancon et al., 2004. Materials and methods In order to investigate the effects of vermicompost and mycorrhiza fertilizers on grain yield and some physiological characteristics of soybean under water stress condition an experiment was conducted at Agricultural Research Center of Khorramabad during 2013. The field experiment was carried out based on a randomized complete blocks design arranged in split-plot with four replications. The experiment treatments including irrigation in three levels (after 60, 120 and 180 mm evaporation from pan class A pan, nutrient management in six levels (non-use of vermicompost and mycorhiza fertilizer, inoculated with mycorrhiza fertilizer, consumption of 5 and 10 t.ha-1 vermicompost, consumption of 5 and 10 t.ha-1 vermicompost with mycorrhiza were respectively as the main plots and sub. In current study, RWC, LAI, SPAD were measured during 59 days after planting at the beginning of podding of the control treatment. The temperature of plant leaves were measured by the thermometer (model TM-958 LUTRON infrared Thermometers. To analyze the growth of

  17. Effect of Zeolite, Selenium and Silicon on Yield, Yield Components and Some Physiological Traits of Canola under Salt Stress Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Bybordi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Canola can be cultivated in large areas of the country due to its specific characteristics such as suitable composition of the fatty acids, its germination ability under low temperature, as well as its good compatibility with different climates. Canola is a high demanding crop in terms of fertilizers so that it uptakes considerable amount of nutrients from the soil during the growing season. Canola cultivation in poor soils or application of imbalanced fertilizers, especially nitrogen, can reduce qualitaty and quantity of final yield. On the other hand, salinity is known as one of the major limiting factors in canola production. Therefore, the aim of this study is the application of zeolite, selenium and silicon treatments to amend soil and increasing salinity tolerance in canola. Materials and Methods In order to study the effect of soil applied zeolite and foliar application of selenium and silicon on yield, yield components and some physiological traits of canola grown under salinity stress, a factorial experiment in randomized complete block design was conducted in Agriculture and Natural Resource Research Center in East Azerbaijan during 2011-2013 cropping seasons. Zeolite was applied at three levels (0, 5 and 10 ton ha-1 and foliar selenium and silicon were applied at three levels as well (each one zero, 2 and 4 g l-1. For this purpose, seedbed was prepared using plow and disk and then plot were designed. Canola seeds, cultivar Okapi, were sown in sandy loam soil with 4 dS.m-1 salinity at the depth of 2-3 cm. Irrigation was performed using local well based on 60% field capacity using the closed irrigation system. Potassium selentae and potassium silicate were used for selenium and silicon treatments. Treatments at rosette and stem elongation stages were sprayed on plants using a calibrated pressurized backpack sprayer. At flowering stage, photosynthesis rate was recorded. Then leaf samples were randomly collected to assay

  18. A1Ao-ATP synthase of Methanobrevibacter ruminantium couples sodium ions for ATP synthesis under physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Duncan G G; Ferguson, Scott A; Dey, Debjit; Schröder, Katja; Aung, Htin Lin; Carbone, Vincenzo; Attwood, Graeme T; Ronimus, Ron S; Meier, Thomas; Janssen, Peter H; Cook, Gregory M

    2011-11-18

    An unresolved question in the bioenergetics of methanogenic archaea is how the generation of proton-motive and sodium-motive forces during methane production is used to synthesize ATP by the membrane-bound A(1)A(o)-ATP synthase, with both proton- and sodium-coupled enzymes being reported in methanogens. To address this question, we investigated the biochemical characteristics of the A(1)A(o)-ATP synthase (MbbrA(1)A(o)) of Methanobrevibacter ruminantium M1, a predominant methanogen in the rumen. Growth of M. ruminantium M1 was inhibited by protonophores and sodium ionophores, demonstrating that both ion gradients were essential for growth. To study the role of these ions in ATP synthesis, the ahaHIKECFABD operon encoding the MbbrA(1)A(o) was expressed in Escherichia coli strain DK8 (Δatp) and purified yielding a 9-subunit protein with an SDS-stable c oligomer. Analysis of the c subunit amino acid sequence revealed that it consisted of four transmembrane helices, and each hairpin displayed a complete Na(+)-binding signature made up of identical amino acid residues. The purified MbbrA(1)A(o) was stimulated by sodium ions, and Na(+) provided pH-dependent protection against inhibition by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide but not tributyltin chloride. ATP synthesis in inverted membrane vesicles lacking sodium ions was driven by a membrane potential that was sensitive to cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone but not to monensin. ATP synthesis could not be driven by a chemical gradient of sodium ions unless a membrane potential was imposed. ATP synthesis under these conditions was sensitive to monensin but not cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. These data suggest that the M. ruminantium M1 A(1)A(o)-ATP synthase exhibits all the properties of a sodium-coupled enzyme, but it is also able to use protons to drive ATP synthesis under conditions that favor proton coupling, such as low pH and low levels of sodium ions.

  19. Physiological and biochemical characterization of the assai palm (Euterpe oleracea Mart. during seed germination and seedling growth under aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Francisco de Carvalho Gonçalves

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Physiological and biochemical aspects of assai palm during seed germination and early seedling growth were investigated. Seeds collected from plants growing in flooded and upland forests were used to determine the influence of normoxic (aerobic and anoxic (anaerobic conditions in germination and the initial and average time of development in the roots and shoots. After 75 days, seedlings germinated under normoxia were transferred to trays and submitted to flooding. Seed reserves (lipids, proteins, soluble sugars and starch were monitored for quiescent and germinated seeds maintained under normoxic and anoxic conditions, as well as after 5, 10 and 20 days of seedling growth. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH activity was quantified in roots and leaves of seedlings without or with flooding (partial and total. Seeds were not able to germinate under anoxia. Different strategies of storage mobilization of lipids, proteins, soluble sugars and starch were observed in seeds of each environment. ADH activity was induced by anoxia, with the highest level observed in the leaves. This study showed that, under normoxic conditions, the best developmental performance of assai palm seeds, from flooded or upland forest areas, during germination was associated with primary metabolites mobilization and seedling flooding tolerance with increased ADH activity. We conclude that the assai palm is well adapted to the anoxic conditions provoked by flooding.

  20. Aftereffect conditions of prolonged space flight on physiological and biochemical processes and plant resistance Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. to pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Lidiya

    2016-07-01

    Tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) - one of the most popular vegetables in Ukraine, they are a valuable product of therapeutic and dietetic foods because they contain a significant amount of nutrients and essential to the human body minerals and vitamins, but by the content of carotenoids - lycopene and β-carotene - is a powerful antioxidant. Therefore, tomato plants can be used successfully to astronauts on long space flights. We aftereffect was studied factors of space flight on the variety of tomato seeds Mir-1, which lasted (6 years) were on an orbital space station "Mir". Then, also after long-term storage in 2011, seeds were sown in the laboratory and received seedlings grown in field conditions Kiev region. The resulting seeds of the tomato crop in 2011 ("Space" and still) we used in our subsequent field studies in Kyiv and Poltava regions. We have previously shown that the "space" seeds had shown in 2011-2012 increased resistance to viruses PVY and PVM natural infectious background. Therefore, it is necessary continue the investigation and started to observe in future years, including 2015 and to analyze the results obtained. Because plants grown constantly in the field natural infectious background, there was a high probability of their defeat pathogens of different nature, including viruses. The works of many authors proved reduce the concentration of carotene and lycopene in tomatoes with the defeat of viruses (Raithak, 2012). In addition, the control plants were observed symptoms of such that is a viral infection, namely in 2011 - leaves curl in 2012 - except leaves curl and even mosaics. The research results were confirmed in 2013, namely on the plants of "space" seed no symptoms of, and in control - detection of potato virus Y (method RT-PCR) and symptoms of leaf curl and mosaic. During the bearing samples were taken leaves of the options and experiment conducted determination of photosynthetic pigments. It should be emphasized that in plant

  1. Physiology, Fe(II oxidation, and Fe mineral formation by a marine planktonic cyanobacterium grown under ferruginous conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth D. Swanner

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Evidence for Fe(II oxidation and deposition of Fe(III-bearing minerals from anoxic or redox-stratified Precambrian oceans has received support from decades of sedimentological and geochemical investigation of Banded Iron Formations (BIF. While the exact mechanisms of Fe(II oxidation remains equivocal, reaction with O2 in the marine water column, produced by cyanobacteria or early oxygenic phototrophs, was likely. In order to understand the role of cyanobacteria in the deposition of Fe(III minerals to BIF, we must first know how planktonic marine cyanobacteria respond to ferruginous (anoxic and Fe(II-rich waters in terms of growth, Fe uptake and homeostasis, and Fe mineral formation. We therefore grew the common marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7002 in closed bottles that began anoxic, and contained Fe(II concentrations that span the range of possible concentrations in Precambrian seawater. These results, along with cell suspension experiments, indicate that Fe(II is likely oxidized by this strain via chemical oxidation with oxygen produced during photosynthesis, and not via any direct enzymatic or photosynthetic pathway. Imaging of the cell-mineral aggregates with scanning electron microscopy (SEM and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM are consistent with extracellular precipitation of Fe(III (oxyhydroxide minerals, but that >10% of Fe(III sorbs to cell surfaces rather than precipitating. Proteomic experiments support the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS in Fe(II toxicity to Synechococcus PCC 7002. The proteome expressed under low Fe conditions included multiple siderophore biosynthesis and siderophore and Fe transporter proteins, but most siderophores are not expressed during growth with Fe(II. These results provide a mechanistic and quantitative framework for evaluating the geochemical consequences of perhaps life’s greatest metabolic innovation, i.e. the evolution and activity of oxygenic photosynthesis, in ferruginous

  2. Transport of particles in intestinal mucus under simulated infant and adult physiological conditions: impact of mucus structure and extracellular DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macierzanka, Adam; Mackie, Alan R; Bajka, Balazs H; Rigby, Neil M; Nau, Françoise; Dupont, Didier

    2014-01-01

    The final boundary between digested food and the cells that take up nutrients in the small intestine is a protective layer of mucus. In this work, the microstructural organization and permeability of the intestinal mucus have been determined under conditions simulating those of infant and adult human small intestines. As a model, we used the mucus from the proximal (jejunal) small intestines of piglets and adult pigs. Confocal microscopy of both unfixed and fixed mucosal tissue showed mucus lining the entire jejunal epithelium. The mucus contained DNA from shed epithelial cells at different stages of degradation, with higher amounts of DNA found in the adult pig. The pig mucus comprised a coherent network of mucin and DNA with higher viscosity than the more heterogeneous piglet mucus, which resulted in increased permeability of the latter to 500-nm and 1-µm latex beads. Multiple-particle tracking experiments revealed that diffusion of the probe particles was considerably enhanced after treating mucus with DNase. The fraction of diffusive 500-nm probe particles increased in the pig mucus from 0.6% to 64% and in the piglet mucus from ca. 30% to 77% after the treatment. This suggests that extracellular DNA can significantly contribute to the microrheology and barrier properties of the intestinal mucus layer. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the structure and permeability of the small intestinal mucus have been compared between different age groups and the contribution of extracellular DNA highlighted. The results help to define rules governing colloidal transport in the developing small intestine. These are required for engineering orally administered pharmaceutical preparations with improved delivery, as well as for fabricating novel foods with enhanced nutritional quality or for controlled calorie uptake.

  3. Transport of particles in intestinal mucus under simulated infant and adult physiological conditions: impact of mucus structure and extracellular DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Macierzanka

    Full Text Available The final boundary between digested food and the cells that take up nutrients in the small intestine is a protective layer of mucus. In this work, the microstructural organization and permeability of the intestinal mucus have been determined under conditions simulating those of infant and adult human small intestines. As a model, we used the mucus from the proximal (jejunal small intestines of piglets and adult pigs. Confocal microscopy of both unfixed and fixed mucosal tissue showed mucus lining the entire jejunal epithelium. The mucus contained DNA from shed epithelial cells at different stages of degradation, with higher amounts of DNA found in the adult pig. The pig mucus comprised a coherent network of mucin and DNA with higher viscosity than the more heterogeneous piglet mucus, which resulted in increased permeability of the latter to 500-nm and 1-µm latex beads. Multiple-particle tracking experiments revealed that diffusion of the probe particles was considerably enhanced after treating mucus with DNase. The fraction of diffusive 500-nm probe particles increased in the pig mucus from 0.6% to 64% and in the piglet mucus from ca. 30% to 77% after the treatment. This suggests that extracellular DNA can significantly contribute to the microrheology and barrier properties of the intestinal mucus layer. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the structure and permeability of the small intestinal mucus have been compared between different age groups and the contribution of extracellular DNA highlighted. The results help to define rules governing colloidal transport in the developing small intestine. These are required for engineering orally administered pharmaceutical preparations with improved delivery, as well as for fabricating novel foods with enhanced nutritional quality or for controlled calorie uptake.

  4. Growth, physiology and yield of durum wheat (Triticum durum) treated with sewage sludge under water stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjabi, Sonia; Kribaa, Mohammed; Chenchouni, Haroun

    2015-01-01

    In arid and semi-arid areas, low soil fertility and water deficit considerably limit crop production. The use of sewage sludge as an organic amendment could contribute to the improvement of soil fertility and hence the agronomic production. The study aims to highlight the behaviour of durum wheat to the application of sewage sludge associated with water stress. The assessment focused on morphophysiological parameters of the wheat plant and yield. Under greenhouse conditions, the variety Mohamed Ben Bachir was treated by four water stress levels (100 %, 80 %, 50 % and 30 %). Each stress level comprised five fertilizer treatments: 20, 50 and 100 t/ha of dry sludge, 35 kg/ha of urea, and a control with no fertilization. Results revealed a significant loss in water content and chlorophyll a in leaves. Water stress negatively affected the development of wheat plants by reducing significantly seed yield, leaf area and biomass produced. Plant's responses to water stress manifested by an accumulation of proline and a decrease in total phosphorus. However, the increasing doses of sewage sludge limited the effect of water stress. Our findings showed an increase in the amount of chlorophyll pigments, leaf area, total phosphorus, biomass and yield. In addition, excessive accumulation of proline (1.11 ± 1.03 µg/g DM) was recorded as a result of the high concentration of sludge (100 t/ha DM). The application of sewage sludge is beneficial for the wheat crop, but the high accumulation of proline in plants treated with high dose of sludge suggests to properly consider this fact. The application of sludge should be used with caution in soils where water is limited. Because the combined effect of these two factors could result in a fatal osmotic stress to crop development.

  5. Influence of two pedalling rate conditions on mechanical output and physiological responses during all-out intermittent exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorel, Sylvain; Bourdin, Muriel; Van Praagh, Emmanuel; Lacour, Jean-René; Hautier, Christophe André

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of two cycling velocities on power output and concomitant metabolic and cardiorespiratory responses to repeated all-out exercises. Mean power output (P(m)), total work ( W(tot)), total oxygen consumption (VO(2tot)) and blood lactate accumulation (delta[La](b)) were evaluated in 13 male subjects who performed two series of twelve 5-s bouts of sprint cycling. Recovery periods of 45-s were allowed between trials. One series was executed at optimal velocity (V(opt): velocity for greatest power) and the other one at 50% V(opt) (0.5 V(opt)). Velocities obtained in these conditions were V(opt=)116.6 (4.7) rpm; 0.5V(opt)=60.6 (4.9) rpm. After a phase of adaptation in oxygen uptake in the first part of the series, the data from the 6th to the 12th sprint were as follows: P(m), 924.6 (73.9) versus 689.2 (61.8) W; W(tot), 29.95 (4.14) versus 22.04 (3.17) kJ; VO(2tot), 12.80 (1.36) versus 10.58 (1.37) l; delta[La](b), 2.72 (1.22) versus 0.64 (0.79) mmol x l(-1), respectively (P<0.001). Both W(tot) and VO(2tot) were consistently higher at optimal velocity (+21 and +35.8%, respectively). The present findings demonstrate that during intermittent short-term all-out exercise requiring maximal activation, the energy turnover is not necessarily maximal. It depends on muscle contraction velocity. The increase, lower than expected, in metabolic response from 0.5 V(opt) to V(opt) suggests also that mechanical efficiency is higher at V(opt).

  6. Physiology, Fe(II) oxidation, and Fe mineral formation by a marine planktonic cyanobacterium grown under ferruginous conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanner, Elizabeth; Wu, Wenfang; Hao, Likai; Wuestner, Marina; Obst, Martin; Moran, Dawn; McIlvin, Matthew; Saito, Mak; Kappler, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Evidence for Fe(II) oxidation and deposition of Fe(III)-bearing minerals from anoxic or redox-stratified Precambrian oceans has received support from decades of sedimentological and geochemical investigation of Banded Iron Formations (BIF). While the exact mechanisms of Fe(II) oxidation remains equivocal, reaction with O2 in the marine water column, produced by cyanobacteria or early oxygenic phototrophs, was likely. In order to understand the role of cyanobacteria in the deposition of Fe(III) minerals to BIF, we must first know how planktonic marine cyanobacteria respond to ferruginous (anoxic and Fe(II)-rich) waters in terms of growth, Fe uptake and homeostasis, and Fe mineral formation. We therefore grew the common marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus PCC 7002 in closed bottles that began anoxic, and contained Fe(II) concentrations that span the range of possible concentrations in Precambrian seawater. These results, along with cell suspension experiments, indicate that Fe(II) is likely oxidized by this strain via chemical oxidation with oxygen produced during photosynthesis, and not via any direct enzymatic or photosynthetic pathway. Imaging of the cell-mineral aggregates with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) are consistent with extracellular precipitation of Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxide minerals, but that >10% of Fe(III) sorbs to cell surfaces rather than precipitating. Proteomic experiments support the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Fe(II) toxicity to Synechococcus PCC 7002. The proteome expressed under low Fe conditions included multiple siderophore biosynthesis and siderophore and Fe transporter proteins, but most siderophores are not expressed during growth with Fe(II). These results provide a mechanistic and quantitative framework for evaluating the geochemical consequences of perhaps life’s greatest metabolic innovation, i.e. the evolution and activity of oxygenic photosynthesis, in ferruginous

  7. A YAP/TAZ-miR-130/301 molecular circuit exerts systems-level control of fibrosis in a network of human diseases and physiologic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertero, Thomas; Cottrill, Katherine A.; Annis, Sofia; Bhat, Balkrishen; Gochuico, Bernadette R.; Osorio, Juan C.; Rosas, Ivan; Haley, Kathleen J.; Corey, Kathleen E.; Chung, Raymond T.; Nelson Chau, B.; Chan, Stephen Y.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular origins of fibrosis affecting multiple tissue beds remain incompletely defined. Previously, we delineated the critical role of the control of extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffening by the mechanosensitive microRNA-130/301 family, as activated by the YAP/TAZ co-transcription factors, in promoting pulmonary hypertension (PH). We hypothesized that similar mechanisms may dictate fibrosis in other tissue beds beyond the pulmonary vasculature. Employing an in silico combination of microRNA target prediction, transcriptomic analysis of 137 human diseases and physiologic states, and advanced gene network modeling, we predicted the microRNA-130/301 family as a master regulator of fibrotic pathways across a cohort of seemingly disparate diseases and conditions. In two such diseases (pulmonary fibrosis and liver fibrosis), inhibition of microRNA-130/301 prevented the induction of ECM modification, YAP/TAZ, and downstream tissue fibrosis. Thus, mechanical forces act through a central feedback circuit between microRNA-130/301 and YAP/TAZ to sustain a common fibrotic phenotype across a network of human physiologic and pathophysiologic states. Such re-conceptualization of interconnections based on shared systems of disease and non-disease gene networks may have broad implications for future convergent diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26667495

  8. Study of the interaction between fluoxetine hydrochloride and bovine serum albumin in the imitated physiological conditions by multi-spectroscopic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katrahalli, Umesha [Department of Chemistry, Karnatak University, Dharwad 580 003 (India); Jaldappagari, Seetharamappa, E-mail: j_seetharam@rediffmail.co [Department of Chemistry, Karnatak University, Dharwad 580 003 (India); Kalanur, Shankara S. [Department of Chemistry, Karnatak University, Dharwad 580 003 (India)

    2010-02-15

    The mechanism of interaction of an antidepressant, fluoxetine hydrochloride (FLX) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been studied by different spectroscopic techniques under physiological conditions. FLX was found to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of protein by static quenching mechanism. The binding constant 'K' was found to be 7.06x10{sup 3} M{sup -1} at 296 K. The value of 'n' close to unity revealed that the BSA has a single class of binding site for FLX. Based on thermodynamic parameters, hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces were proposed to operate between BSA and FLX. The change in conformation of protein was noticed upon its interaction with the drug. From displacement studies it was concluded that the FLX bound to protein at site I. The effects of various common metals ions on the binding were also investigated.

  9. Heart Rate Variability as a Method for Assessment of the Autonomic Nervous System and the Adaptations to Different Physiological and Pathological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taralov Zdravko Z.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The autonomic nervous system controls the smooth muscles of the internal organs, the cardiovascular system and the secretory function of the glands and plays a major role in the processes of adaptation. Heart rate variability is a non-invasive and easily applicable method for the assessment of its activity. The following review describes the origin, parameters and characteristics of this method and its potential for evaluation of the changes of the autonomic nervous system activity in different physiological and pathological conditions such as exogenous hypoxia, physical exercise and sleep. The application of heart rate variability in daily clinical practice would be beneficial for the diagnostics, the outcome prognosis and the assessment of the effect of treatment in various diseases.

  10. An ion-insensitive cAMP biosensor for long term quantitative ratiometric fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements under variable physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salonikidis, Petrus S; Niebert, Marcus; Ullrich, Tim; Bao, Guobin; Zeug, Andre; Richter, Diethelm W

    2011-07-01

    Ratiometric measurements with FRET-based biosensors in living cells using a single fluorescence excitation wavelength are often affected by a significant ion sensitivity and the aggregation behavior of the FRET pair. This is an important problem for quantitative approaches. Here we report on the influence of physiological ion concentration changes on quantitative ratiometric measurements by comparing different FRET pairs for a cAMP-detecting biosensor. We exchanged the enhanced CFP/enhanced YFP FRET pair of an established Epac1-based biosensor by the fluorophores mCerulean/mCitrine. In the case of enhanced CFP/enhanced YFP, we showed that changes in proton, and (to a lesser extent) chloride ion concentrations result in incorrect ratiometric FRET signals, which may exceed the dynamic range of the biosensor. Calcium ions have no direct, but an indirect pH-driven effect by mobilizing protons. These ion dependences were greatly eliminated when mCerulean/mCitrine fluorophores were used. For such advanced FRET pairs the biosensor is less sensitive to changes in ion concentration and allows consistent cAMP concentration measurements under different physiological conditions, as occur in metabolically active cells. In addition, we verified that the described FRET pair exchange increased the dynamic range of the FRET efficiency response. The time window for stable experimental conditions was also prolonged by a faster biosensor expression rate in transfected cells and a greatly reduced tendency to aggregate, which reduces cytotoxicity. These properties were verified in functional tests in single cells co-expressing the biosensor and the 5-HT(1A) receptor.

  11. Zinc Transporter 3 (ZnT3) in the Enteric Nervous System of the Porcine Ileum in Physiological Conditions and during Experimental Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonkowski, Sławomir; Rowniak, Maciej; Wojtkiewicz, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Zinc transporter 3 (ZnT3) is a member of the solute-linked carrier 30 (SLC 30) zinc transporter family. It is closely linked to the nervous system, where it takes part in the transport of zinc ions from the cytoplasm to the synaptic vesicles. ZnT3 has also been observed in the enteric nervous system (ENS), but its reactions in response to pathological factors remain unknown. This study, based on the triple immunofluorescence technique, describes changes in ZnT3-like immunoreactive (ZnT3-LI) enteric neurons in the porcine ileum, caused by chemically-induced inflammation. The inflammatory process led to a clear increase in the percentage of neurons immunoreactive to ZnT3 in all “kinds” of intramural enteric plexuses, i.e., myenteric (MP), outer submucous (OSP) and inner submucous (ISP) plexuses. Moreover, a wide range of other active substances was noted in ZnT3-LI neurons under physiological and pathological conditions, and changes in neurochemical characterisation of ZnT3+ cells in response to inflammation depended on the “kind” of enteric plexus. The obtained results show that ZnT3 is present in the ENS in a relatively numerous and diversified neuronal population, not only in physiological conditions, but also during inflammation. The reasons for the observed changes are not clear; they may be connected with the functions of zinc ions and their homeostasis disturbances in pathological processes. On the other hand, they may be due to adaptive and/or neuroprotective processes within the pathologically altered gastrointestinal tract. PMID:28178198

  12. Zinc Transporter 3 (ZnT3 in the Enteric Nervous System of the Porcine Ileum in Physiological Conditions and during Experimental Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir Gonkowski

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Zinc transporter 3 (ZnT3 is a member of the solute-linked carrier 30 (SLC 30 zinc transporter family. It is closely linked to the nervous system, where it takes part in the transport of zinc ions from the cytoplasm to the synaptic vesicles. ZnT3 has also been observed in the enteric nervous system (ENS, but its reactions in response to pathological factors remain unknown. This study, based on the triple immunofluorescence technique, describes changes in ZnT3-like immunoreactive (ZnT3-LI enteric neurons in the porcine ileum, caused by chemically-induced inflammation. The inflammatory process led to a clear increase in the percentage of neurons immunoreactive to ZnT3 in all “kinds” of intramural enteric plexuses, i.e., myenteric (MP, outer submucous (OSP and inner submucous (ISP plexuses. Moreover, a wide range of other active substances was noted in ZnT3-LI neurons under physiological and pathological conditions, and changes in neurochemical characterisation of ZnT3+ cells in response to inflammation depended on the “kind” of enteric plexus. The obtained results show that ZnT3 is present in the ENS in a relatively numerous and diversified neuronal population, not only in physiological conditions, but also during inflammation. The reasons for the observed changes are not clear; they may be connected with the functions of zinc ions and their homeostasis disturbances in pathological processes. On the other hand, they may be due to adaptive and/or neuroprotective processes within the pathologically altered gastrointestinal tract.

  13. Assessment of the effect of temperature on the carp physiology (Cyprinus carpio, L., 1758 fed with probiotics in condition of a recirculating aquaculture system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena BOCIOC

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to establish the effect of temperature on the physiology of the carp, special attention was awarded to leukograma and absolute number of leukocytes of carp blood. Body's reaction to stress factors action involves physiological changes, including changes in blood composition and immune mechanisms. The hematological analysis has been effectuated in the experiment that took place during 60 days, in four breeding units of 500 litters in volume each. Four kinds of variants were compared: V1-pellets with 30% crude protein, without probiotics; V2-pellets with 30% crude protein, with probiotics of 2.24×109 CFU/kg food; V3-pellets with 30% crude protein, with probiotics of 3.84×109 CFU/kg food; and V4-pellets with 30% crude protein, with probiotics of 7.04×109 CFU/kg food. We used BioPlus®2B probiotics (a mixture of Bacillus licheniformis (DSM 5749 and Bacillus subtilis (DSM 5750. The microscopic examination of blood smears, which were coloured with May-Grunewald Giemsa panoptic method (both at the beginning and at the end of each experimental stage, we found that lymphocytes were predominant in comparison with other types of leukocytes, the absolute number being: V1 73.3 – 85.9%; V2 65.3 – 84.7%; V3 67.0 – 87.5%; V4 71.3 – 88.3%. It was noticed that eosinophilic granulocytes and basophils from the fish blood, were presented in a low number (0.1–0.8%, (0.2 – 0.4% respectively, also at the beginning of the experiment and in the end of the two phases. The glucose concentration in blood registered higher values, across to normal values reported by literature for carp, also in control group (V1 – 101.8 mg/dl as well as variants with different concentrations of probiotic (V2 – 104.6 mg/dl, V3 – 102.2 mg/dl, V4 – 116.2 mg/dl. The mean values of protein level were in the normal limits for carp, between 3.9 g/dl and 4.9 g/dl, aspect which suggests that fish present a normal physiological condition. In conclusion, probiotics can

  14. In-Situ Determination of the Mechanical Properties of Gliding or Non-Motile Bacteria by Atomic Force Microscopy under Physiological Conditions without Immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhahri, Samia; Ramonda, Michel; Marlière, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We present a study about AFM imaging of living, moving or self-immobilized bacteria in their genuine physiological liquid medium. No external immobilization protocol, neither chemical nor mechanical, was needed. For the first time, the native gliding movements of Gram-negative Nostoc cyanobacteria upon the surface, at speeds up to 900 µm/h, were studied by AFM. This was possible thanks to an improved combination of a gentle sample preparation process and an AFM procedure based on fast and complete force-distance curves made at every pixel, drastically reducing lateral forces. No limitation in spatial resolution or imaging rate was detected. Gram-positive and non-motile Rhodococcus wratislaviensis bacteria were studied as well. From the approach curves, Young modulus and turgor pressure were measured for both strains at different gliding speeds and are ranging from 20±3 to 105±5 MPa and 40±5 to 310±30 kPa depending on the bacterium and the gliding speed. For Nostoc, spatially limited zones with higher values of stiffness were observed. The related spatial period is much higher than the mean length of Nostoc nodules. This was explained by an inhomogeneous mechanical activation of nodules in the cyanobacterium. We also observed the presence of a soft extra cellular matrix (ECM) around the Nostoc bacterium. Both strains left a track of polymeric slime with variable thicknesses. For Rhodococcus, it is equal to few hundreds of nanometers, likely to promote its adhesion to the sample. While gliding, the Nostoc secretes a slime layer the thickness of which is in the nanometer range and increases with the gliding speed. This result reinforces the hypothesis of a propulsion mechanism based, for Nostoc cyanobacteria, on ejection of slime. These results open a large window on new studies of both dynamical phenomena of practical and fundamental interests such as the formation of biofilms and dynamic properties of bacteria in real physiological conditions. PMID:23593493

  15. In-situ determination of the mechanical properties of gliding or non-motile bacteria by atomic force microscopy under physiological conditions without immobilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Dhahri

    Full Text Available We present a study about AFM imaging of living, moving or self-immobilized bacteria in their genuine physiological liquid medium. No external immobilization protocol, neither chemical nor mechanical, was needed. For the first time, the native gliding movements of Gram-negative Nostoc cyanobacteria upon the surface, at speeds up to 900 µm/h, were studied by AFM. This was possible thanks to an improved combination of a gentle sample preparation process and an AFM procedure based on fast and complete force-distance curves made at every pixel, drastically reducing lateral forces. No limitation in spatial resolution or imaging rate was detected. Gram-positive and non-motile Rhodococcus wratislaviensis bacteria were studied as well. From the approach curves, Young modulus and turgor pressure were measured for both strains at different gliding speeds and are ranging from 20±3 to 105±5 MPa and 40±5 to 310±30 kPa depending on the bacterium and the gliding speed. For Nostoc, spatially limited zones with higher values of stiffness were observed. The related spatial period is much higher than the mean length of Nostoc nodules. This was explained by an inhomogeneous mechanical activation of nodules in the cyanobacterium. We also observed the presence of a soft extra cellular matrix (ECM around the Nostoc bacterium. Both strains left a track of polymeric slime with variable thicknesses. For Rhodococcus, it is equal to few hundreds of nanometers, likely to promote its adhesion to the sample. While gliding, the Nostoc secretes a slime layer the thickness of which is in the nanometer range and increases with the gliding speed. This result reinforces the hypothesis of a propulsion mechanism based, for Nostoc cyanobacteria, on ejection of slime. These results open a large window on new studies of both dynamical phenomena of practical and fundamental interests such as the formation of biofilms and dynamic properties of bacteria in real physiological conditions.

  16. Oxyntomodulin increases the concentrations of insulin and glucose in plasma but does not affect ghrelin secretion in Holstein cattle under normal physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ThanThan, S; Zhao, H; Yannaing, S; Ishikawa, T; Kuwayama, H

    2010-10-01

    Ghrelin, the natural ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R1a), has been shown to stimulate growth hormone (GH) secretion. Regulation of ghrelin secretion in ruminants is not well studied. We investigated the effects of oxyntomodulin (OXM) and secretin on the secretions of ghrelin, insulin, glucagon, glucose, and nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) in pre-ruminants (5 wk old) and ruminants (10 wk old) under normal physiological (feeding) conditions. Eight male Holstein calves (pre-ruminants: 52 +/- 1 kg body weight [BW]; and ruminants: 85 +/- 1 kg BW) were injected intravenously with 30 microg of OXM/kg BW, 50 microg of secretin/kg BW, and vehicle (0.1% bovine serum albumin [BSA] in saline as a control) in random order. Blood samples were collected, and plasma hormones and metabolites were analyzed using a double-antibody radioimmunoassay system and commercially available kits, respectively. We found that OXM increased the concentrations of insulin and glucose but did not affect the concentrations of ghrelin in both pre-ruminants and ruminants and that there was no effect of secretin on the concentrations of ghrelin, insulin, and glucose in these calves. We also investigated the dose-response effects of OXM on the secretion of insulin and glucose in 8 Holstein steers (401 +/- 1 d old, 398 +/- 10 kg BW). We found that OXM increased the concentrations of insulin and glucose even at physiological plasma concentrations, with a minimum effective dose of 0.4 microg/kg for the promotion of glucose secretion and 2 microg/kg for the stimulation of insulin secretion. These findings suggest that OXM takes part in glucose metabolism in ruminants.

  17. Assessment of Bioequivalence of Weak Base Formulations Under Various Dosing Conditions Using Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Simulations in Virtual Populations. Case Examples: Ketoconazole and Posaconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofoletti, Rodrigo; Patel, Nikunjkumar; Dressman, Jennifer B

    2017-02-01

    Postabsorptive factors which can affect systemic drug exposure are assumed to be dependent on the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), and thus independent of formulation. In contrast, preabsorptive factors, for example, hypochlorhydria, might affect systemic exposure in both an API and a formulation-dependent way. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the oral absorption of 2 poorly soluble, weakly basic APIs, ketoconazole (KETO) and posaconazole (POSA), would be equally sensitive to changes in dissolution rate under the following dosing conditions-coadministration with water, with food, with carbonated drinks, and in drug-induced hypochlorhydria. The systems-components of validated absorption and PBPK models for KETO and POSA were modified to simulate the above-mentioned clinical scenarios. Virtual bioequivalence studies were then carried out to investigate whether formulation effects on the plasma profile vary with the dosing conditions. The slow precipitation of KETO upon reaching the upper part of the small intestine renders its absorption more sensitive to the completeness of gastric dissolution and thus to the gastric environment than POSA, which is subject to extensive precipitation in response to a pH shift. The virtual bioequivalence studies showed that hypothetical test and reference formulations containing KETO would be bioequivalent only if the microenvironment in the stomach enables complete gastric dissolution. We conclude that physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling and simulation has excellent potential to address issues close to bedside such as optimizing dosing conditions. By studying virtual populations adapted to various clinical situations, clinical strategies to reduce therapeutic failures can be identified.

  18. Creatine is a scavenger for methylglyoxal under physiological conditions via formation of N-(4-methyl-5-oxo-1-imidazolin-2-yl)sarcosine (MG-HCr).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löbner, Jürgen; Degen, Julia; Henle, Thomas

    2015-03-04

    Following incubation of methylglyoxal and creatine under physiological conditions, N-(4-methyl-5-oxo-1-imidazolin-2-yl)sarcosine (MG-HCr) was isolated and identified by NMR and mass spectrometry. Due to its rapid formation, MG-HCr represents a specific product following "scavenging" of methylglyoxal by creatine. Using hydrophilic interaction chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, MG-HCr was analyzed in urine samples of healthy volunteers. Daily MG-HCr excretion of nonvegetarians ranged from 0.35 to 3.84 μmol/24 h urine (median: 0.90 μmol/24 h urine) and of vegetarians from 0.11 to 0.31 μmol/24 h urine (median: 0.19 μmol/24 h urine), indicating that formation of MG-HCr in vivo is influenced by the dietary intake of creatine. The trapping of methylglyoxal by creatine may delay the formation of advanced glycation compounds in vivo and, therefore, could be of special importance in situations in which the body has to deal with pathophysiologically increased amounts of dicarbonyl compounds ("carbonyl stress"), for instance in diabetic patients.

  19. Bacterial Type I Glutamine Synthetase of the Rifamycin SV Producing Actinomycete, Amycolatopsis mediterranei U32, is the Only Enzyme Responsible for Glutamine Synthesis under Physiological Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Tao PENG; Jin WANG; Ting WU; Jian-Qiang HUANG; Jui-Shen CHIAO; Guo-Ping ZHAO

    2006-01-01

    The structural gene for glutamine synthetase, glnA, from Amycolatopsis mediterranei U32 was cloned via screening a genomic library using the analog gene from Streptomyces coelicolor. The clone was functionally verified by complementing for glutamine requirement of an Escherichia coli glnA null mutant under the control of a lac promoter. Sequence analysis showed an open reading frame encoding a protein of466 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence bears significant homologies to other bacterial type I glutamine synthetases, specifically, 71% and 72% identical to the enzymes of S. coelicolor and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, respectively. Disruption of this glnA gene in A. mediterranei U32 led to glutamine auxotrophy with no detectable glutamine synthetase activity in vivo. In contrast, the cloned glnA+ gene can complement for both phenotypes in trans. It thus suggested that in A. mediterranei U32, the glnA gene encoding glutamine synthetase is uniquely responsible for in vivo glutamine synthesis under our laboratory defined physiological conditions.

  20. Effect of Silicon application on Morpho-physiological Characteristics, Grain Yield and Nutrient Content of Bread Wheat under Water Stress Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Karmollachaab

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effect of silicon application on some physiological characteristics, yield and yield components, and grain mineral contents of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum under water stress condition, an experiment was conducted in Ramin Agriculture and Natural Resources University, Khuzestan, in 2012. The experiment was arranged in split-plots design in RCBD (Completely Randomized Blocks Design with three replications. Treatments consisted of drought stress (irrigation after 25, 50 and 75% depletion of Available Water Content in main plots and silicon (0, 10, 20 and 30 Kg Si ha-1 arranged in sub-plots. Results showed that the effect of drought stress was significant on most traits and led to the increase of electrolyte leakage (EL, cuticular wax, leaf and grain silicon content and grain nitrogen content. But drought led to negative impacts on grain yield and its components, and leaf potassium content, i.e. moderate and severe stresses reduced yield by 17% and 38% compared to control, respectively. Effect of silicon application was significant on all traits except for spike per square meter. Silicon had the greatest impact on EL and led to 35% decrease in this trait. Also, silicon led to increase in leaf and grain silicon contents and grain K content and grain yield and yield components, when applied at 30 kg ha-1. Generally, application of 30 kg ha-1 of silicon led to 6 and 14% increases of grain yield at the presence of moderate and severe drought stresses, respectively. Thus, given the abundance of silicon it can be used as an ameliorating element for planting bread wheat in drought-prone conditions.

  1. Selenium Supplementation Affects Physiological and Biochemical Processes to Improve Fodder Yield and Quality of Maize (Zea mays L.) under Water Deficit Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Fahim; Naeem, Muhammad; Ashraf, Muhammad Y; Tahir, Muhammad N; Zulfiqar, Bilal; Salahuddin, Muhammad; Shabbir, Rana N; Aslam, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is one of the most complex challenges that pose serious threats to livelihoods of poor people who rely heavily on agriculture and livestock particularly in climate-sensitive developing countries of the world. The negative effects of water scarcity, due to climate change, are not limited to productivity food crops but have far-reaching consequences on livestock feed production systems. Selenium (Se) is considered essential for animal health and has also been reported to counteract various abiotic stresses in plants, however, understanding of Se regulated mechanisms for improving nutritional status of fodder crops remains elusive. We report the effects of exogenous selenium supply on physiological and biochemical processes that may influence green fodder yield and quality of maize (Zea mays L.) under drought stress conditions. The plants were grown in lysimeter tanks under natural conditions and were subjected to normal (100% field capacity) and water stress (60% field capacity) conditions. Foliar spray of Se was carried out before the start of tasseling stage (65 days after sowing) and was repeated after 1 week, whereas, water spray was used as a control. Drought stress markedly reduced the water status, pigments and green fodder yield and resulted in low forage quality in water stressed maize plants. Nevertheless, exogenous Se application at 40 mg L(-1) resulted in less negative leaf water potential (41%) and enhanced relative water contents (30%), total chlorophyll (53%), carotenoid contents (60%), accumulation of total free amino acids (40%) and activities of superoxide dismutase (53%), catalase (30%), peroxidase (27%), and ascorbate peroxidase (27%) with respect to control under water deficit conditions. Consequently, Se regulated processes improved fodder yield (15%) and increased crude protein (47%), fiber (10%), nitrogen free extract (10%) and Se content (36%) but did not affect crude ash content in water stressed maize plants. We propose that

  2. Selenium Supplementation Affects Physiological and Biochemical Processes to Improve Fodder Yield and Quality of Maize (Zea mays L. under Water Deficit Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahim Nawaz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is one of the most complex challenges that pose serious threats to livelihoods of poor people who rely heavily on agriculture and livestock particularly in climate-sensitive developing countries of the world. The negative effects of water scarcity, due to climate change, are not limited to productivity food crops but have far-reaching consequences on livestock feed production systems. Selenium (Se is considered essential for animal health and has also been reported to counteract various abiotic stresses in plants however, understanding of Se regulated mechanisms for improving nutritional status of fodder crops remains elusive. We report the effects of exogenous selenium (Se supply on physiological and biochemical processes that may influence green fodder yield and quality of maize (Zea mays L. under drought stress conditions. The plants were grown in lysimeter tanks under natural conditions and were subjected to normal (100% field capacity and water stress (60% field capacity conditions. Foliar spray of Se was carried out before the start of tasseling stage (65 days after sowing and was repeated after one week, whereas water spray was used as a control. Drought stress markedly reduced the water status, pigments and green fodder yield and resulted in low forage quality in water stressed maize plants. Nevertheless, exogenous Se application at 40 mg L-1 resulted in less negative leaf water potential (41% and enhanced relative water contents (30%, total chlorophyll (53%, carotenoid contents (60%, accumulation of total free amino acids (40% and activities of superoxide dismutase (53%, catalase (30%, peroxidase (27% and ascorbate peroxidase (27% with respect to control under water deficit conditions. Consequently, Se regulated processes improved fodder yield (15% and increased crude protein (47%, fibre (10%, nitrogen free extract (10% and Se content (36% but did not affect crude ash content in water stressed maize plants. We propose

  3. Nutrient removal efficiency and physiological responses of Desmodesmus communis at different HRTs and nutrient stress condition using different sources of urban wastewater effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samorì, Giulia; Samorì, Chiara; Pistocchi, Rossella

    2014-05-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the nutrient removal efficiency and the physiological responses in terms of growth, biochemical composition and photosynthetic activity of the autochthonous freshwater algal strain Desmodesmus communis. Microalgae were grown in a primary municipal effluent under different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) and in a two-phases process using both primary and secondary wastewater effluents. Semi-continuous cultures were operated for 7 day at 5-, 3- and 1.5-day HRT and the different dilution rate showed a greater influence on the biomass composition and nutrient removal efficiency. Removal of N-NH3 and P-PO4 was over 99 % and the highest accumulation of polysaccharides (57.2 wt.%) was obtained at high HRT (5 day); the maximum content of proteins (26.9 wt.%) was achieved at 1.5-day HRT, even if, under this condition, a clear inefficiency in terms of ammonia removal was observed. Moreover the accumulation of N-NH3 occurring at 1.5-day HRT caused the decrease of the photosynthetic response in terms of efficiency of light capture (α) and relative electron transport rate (rETR), both parameters extracted from the rapid light curves (RLC) measurements. No significant differences were observed for the total fatty acids (TFAs), with a content of 2-3.5 wt.% for each HRT condition. On the other hand, in the two-phases process, when a nutrient deprivation condition was induced by diluting the culture with the secondary wastewater effluent, the algal cells accumulated TFAs, achieving a maximum content of 9.7 wt.% and a great increment in terms of biomass (1.64 ± 0.02 g L(-1)) due to the ability of this algal strain to accumulate intracellular N. The wide and accurate investigation of the different aspects related to the whole process represents a relevant point of novelty in this research field and suggests the operational conditions for the start-up of an open pond system for wastewater treatment and biomass

  4. Selenium Supplementation Affects Physiological and Biochemical Processes to Improve Fodder Yield and Quality of Maize (Zea mays L.) under Water Deficit Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Fahim; Naeem, Muhammad; Ashraf, Muhammad Y.; Tahir, Muhammad N.; Zulfiqar, Bilal; Salahuddin, Muhammad; Shabbir, Rana N.; Aslam, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is one of the most complex challenges that pose serious threats to livelihoods of poor people who rely heavily on agriculture and livestock particularly in climate-sensitive developing countries of the world. The negative effects of water scarcity, due to climate change, are not limited to productivity food crops but have far-reaching consequences on livestock feed production systems. Selenium (Se) is considered essential for animal health and has also been reported to counteract various abiotic stresses in plants, however, understanding of Se regulated mechanisms for improving nutritional status of fodder crops remains elusive. We report the effects of exogenous selenium supply on physiological and biochemical processes that may influence green fodder yield and quality of maize (Zea mays L.) under drought stress conditions. The plants were grown in lysimeter tanks under natural conditions and were subjected to normal (100% field capacity) and water stress (60% field capacity) conditions. Foliar spray of Se was carried out before the start of tasseling stage (65 days after sowing) and was repeated after 1 week, whereas, water spray was used as a control. Drought stress markedly reduced the water status, pigments and green fodder yield and resulted in low forage quality in water stressed maize plants. Nevertheless, exogenous Se application at 40 mg L-1 resulted in less negative leaf water potential (41%) and enhanced relative water contents (30%), total chlorophyll (53%), carotenoid contents (60%), accumulation of total free amino acids (40%) and activities of superoxide dismutase (53%), catalase (30%), peroxidase (27%), and ascorbate peroxidase (27%) with respect to control under water deficit conditions. Consequently, Se regulated processes improved fodder yield (15%) and increased crude protein (47%), fiber (10%), nitrogen free extract (10%) and Se content (36%) but did not affect crude ash content in water stressed maize plants. We propose that Se

  5. conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Venkatesulu

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Solutions of initial value problems associated with a pair of ordinary differential systems (L1,L2 defined on two adjacent intervals I1 and I2 and satisfying certain interface-spatial conditions at the common end (interface point are studied.

  6. Physiological basis of genetic variation in leaf photosynthesis among rice (Oryza sativa L.) introgression lines under drought and well-watered conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xinyou

    2012-01-01

    To understand the physiological basis of genetic variation and resulting quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for photosynthesis in a rice (Oryza sativa L.) introgression line population, 13 lines were studied under drought and well-watered conditions, at flowering and grain filling. Simultaneous gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements were conducted at various levels of incident irradiance and ambient CO2 to estimate parameters of a model that dissects photosynthesis into stomatal conductance (g s), mesophyll conductance (g m), electron transport capacity (J max), and Rubisco carboxylation capacity (V cmax). Significant genetic variation in these parameters was found, although drought and leaf age accounted for larger proportions of the total variation. Genetic variation in light-saturated photosynthesis and transpiration efficiency (TE) were mainly associated with variation in g s and g m. One previously mapped major QTL of photosynthesis was associated with variation in g s and g m, but also in J max and V cmax at flowering. Thus, g s and g m, which were demonstrated in the literature to be responsible for environmental variation in photosynthesis, were found also to be associated with genetic variation in photosynthesis. Furthermore, relationships between these parameters and leaf nitrogen or dry matter per unit area, which were previously found across environmental treatments, were shown to be valid for variation across genotypes. Finally, the extent to which photosynthesis rate and TE can be improved was evaluated. Virtual ideotypes were estimated to have 17.0% higher photosynthesis and 25.1% higher TE compared with the best genotype investigated. This analysis using introgression lines highlights possibilities of improving both photosynthesis and TE within the same genetic background. PMID:22888131

  7. Physiological basis of genetic variation in leaf photosynthesis among rice (Oryza sativa L.) introgression lines under drought and well-watered conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Junfei; Yin, Xinyou; Stomph, Tjeerd-Jan; Wang, Huaqi; Struik, Paul C

    2012-09-01

    To understand the physiological basis of genetic variation and resulting quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for photosynthesis in a rice (Oryza sativa L.) introgression line population, 13 lines were studied under drought and well-watered conditions, at flowering and grain filling. Simultaneous gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements were conducted at various levels of incident irradiance and ambient CO(2) to estimate parameters of a model that dissects photosynthesis into stomatal conductance (g(s)), mesophyll conductance (g(m)), electron transport capacity (J(max)), and Rubisco carboxylation capacity (V(cmax)). Significant genetic variation in these parameters was found, although drought and leaf age accounted for larger proportions of the total variation. Genetic variation in light-saturated photosynthesis and transpiration efficiency (TE) were mainly associated with variation in g(s) and g(m). One previously mapped major QTL of photosynthesis was associated with variation in g(s) and g(m), but also in J(max) and V(cmax) at flowering. Thus, g(s) and g(m), which were demonstrated in the literature to be responsible for environmental variation in photosynthesis, were found also to be associated with genetic variation in photosynthesis. Furthermore, relationships between these parameters and leaf nitrogen or dry matter per unit area, which were previously found across environmental treatments, were shown to be valid for variation across genotypes. Finally, the extent to which photosynthesis rate and TE can be improved was evaluated. Virtual ideotypes were estimated to have 17.0% higher photosynthesis and 25.1% higher TE compared with the best genotype investigated. This analysis using introgression lines highlights possibilities of improving both photosynthesis and TE within the same genetic background.

  8. Physiological Networks: towards systems physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Ronny P.; Bashan, Amir; Kantelhardt, Jan W.; Havlin, Shlomo; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2012-02-01

    The human organism is an integrated network where complex physiologic systems, each with its own regulatory mechanisms, continuously interact, and where failure of one system can trigger a breakdown of the entire network. Identifying and quantifying dynamical networks of diverse systems with different types of interactions is a challenge. Here, we develop a framework to probe interactions among diverse systems, and we identify a physiologic network. We find that each physiologic state is characterized by a specific network structure, demonstrating a robust interplay between network topology and function. Across physiologic states the network undergoes topological transitions associated with fast reorganization of physiologic interactions on time scales of a few minutes, indicating high network flexibility in response to perturbations. The proposed system-wide integrative approach may facilitate new dimensions to the field of systems physiology.

  9. Fetal cardiovascular physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychik, J

    2004-01-01

    The cardiovascular system of the fetus is physiologically different than the adult, mature system. Unique characteristics of the myocardium and specific channels of blood flow differentitate the physiology of the fetus from the newborn. Conditions of increased preload and afterload in the fetus, such as sacrococcygeal teratoma and twin-twin transfusion syndrome, result in unique and complex pathophysiological states. Echocardiography has improved our understanding of human fetal cadiovasvular physiology in the normal and diseased states, and has expanded our capability to more effectively treat these disease processes.

  10. Study the Effect of Different Phosphorus Fertilizers on Physiological Characteristic of Photosynthetic Pigments and Soluble Sugars of Safflower under Water Deficit Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Heshmati

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Drought stress is one of the most important and effective factors in agricultural practices in arid and semi-arid regions of the world. The arid and semi-arid regions comprise more than 70% of the total area of Iran. Reduction in chlorophyll concentrations has been attributed to the increase in chlorophyll degradation in water deficit conditions and impairment in the enzymes activity responsible for the synthesis of photosynthetic pigments. Under drought stress, maintenance of photosynthetic capacities and leaf chlorophyll are physiological parameters which influence drought stress tolerant of crop. Phosphorus is one the most essential elements for plant growth after nitrogen. However, the availability of this nutrient for plants is limited by different chemical reactions especially in arid and semi-arid soils. Plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB are soil and rhizosphere bacteria that can benefit plant growth by different mechanisms. Given the negative environmental impact of chemical fertilizers and their increasing costs, the use of PGPB as natural fertilizers is advantageous for the development of sustainable agriculture. Inoculation of plants with native beneficial microorganisms may increase drought tolerance of plants growing in arid or semi-arid areas. Materials and Methods In order to study the effect of biologic and chemical phosphorous fertilizer on photosynthetic pigments of safflower cultivar (IL111, under water deficit condition, an experiment was conducted in 2012 at the Research Field of the Faculty of Agriculture, Shahed University. The experimental design was split-factorial arrangement in randomized complete block design with three replicates. The main factors were the three levels of irrigation treatment: full irrigation (irrigation up to 50% soil moisture depletion relative to field capacity, water stress in the vegetative and flowering stages (irrigation up to 75% soil moisture depletion relative to field

  11. Neuropeptide-Y and Y-receptors in the autocrine-paracrine regulation of adrenal gland under physiological and pathophysiological conditions (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinazzi, Raffaella; Andreis, Paola G; Nussdorfer, Gastone G

    2005-01-01

    Neuropeptide-Y (NPY) is a 36-amino acid peptide, which belongs, along with peptide YY (PYY), to the pancreatic polypeptide (PP) family. The members of this family of peptides act via G protein-coupled receptors (Rs), six subtypes of which (from Y1- to Y6-R) have been identified. NPY and PYY preferentially bind the Y1-R, Y2-R and Y5-R, while PP mainly acts via the Y4-R. Evidence has been provided that the Y3-R is selective for NPY. NPY and Y-Rs are expressed in the adrenal gland (preferentially adrenal medulla) and pheochromocytomas, where they exert various autocrine-paracrine regulatory functions. Findings indicate that NPY is co-released with catecholamines under a variety of stimuli, including splanchnic nerve and cholinergic- and nicotinic-receptor activation. NPY, mainly acting via the Y1-R, Y2-R and Y3-R, either inhibits catecholamine secretion from bovine adrenal chromaffin cells or stimulates catecholamine secretion from adrenomedullary cells of humans and rats. NPY inhibits aldosterone secretion from dispersed zona glomerulosa (ZG) cells, but this effect has probably to be considered non-specific and toxic in nature, since it is obtained only using micromolar concentrations of the peptide. In contrast, NPY appears to modulate the secretory response of dispersed rat ZG cells to their main agonists (ACTH, angiotensin-II and potassium). However, there is indication that the main effect of NPY on the ZG in rats is indirect and involves the local release of catecholamines, which in turn, acting via beta-adrenoceptors, enhance the secretion of aldosterone. The prolonged treatment with NPY is also able to enhance the growth of the rat ZG. In contrast, the effects of NPY on glucocorticoid secretion from zona fasciculata-reticularis cells are negligible and doutbful. The physiological relevance of the effects of NPY on adrenal medulla and ZG remains to be addressed by future experimental studies employing more selective and potent Y-R antagonists. In contrast

  12. EFFECT OF PROTECTIVE FUNCTION OF VERMICULTURE PRODUCTS ON MORPHOLOGICAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF PLANTS IN THE CONDITION OF ABIOTIC FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.M. Vasilyuk

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of MgSO4 on morphometric specifics of the Salix alba L., which characterized by high rates of growth and development is investigated. Mg2+ was added in the form of MgSO4*3H2O at a concentration of 2.5 g/l considering of salt water content in the research solutions with S. alba L. and  combined with plant growth regulator (GR of natural origin Humisol. These studies have shown toxicity ofMgSO4 at a concentration of 2.5 g/l during all the period of growth and development. So, MgSO4 had toxic effect on plant growth and development within whole period of observation. We registered negative correlation (R = - 0.99 between toxic properties of salt and the age of the studied plants (for example, the growth rate of shoots and leaf blades by S. alba L. and positive correlation (R = 0.99 while studied the root growth rate, which was caused by the direct contact of rhizosphere and negative stressors. The GR Humisol accelerated the rate of physiological processes of growth and development of shoots and roots in 2-3 times, but the growth of leaf blade was not activated regards the control. The combined effect of magnesium salts and GR levelled toxic concentrations of magnesium sulphate were accelerated plant growth or stimulated growth up to control values, promoted adaptation mechanisms of plants and provided a protective role against excessive salinity. We suggested using the Humisol as a natural product, vermiculture, adaptogene, protector, and fertilizer agent of natural origin, which provides for biota to consume the environmental services without damage to the environment under conditions of excessive pressure of salt stress on plant organism.

  13. Effect of Seed Priming on Growth and Some Physiological Characteristics of Sesame (Sesamum indicum L. under salinity Stress Condition caused by Alkali Salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Bekhrad

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Sesame (Sesamun indicum L. is an important oil seed crop. Its seed has excellent nutritional value with a high and unique protein composition, making it a perfect food. Salinity is a serious problem in many regions of the world including Iran. Salinity stress is one of the widespread environmental constraints affecting crop productivity. Salinity generally induces osmotic stress and causes direct ion injury by disrupting ion homeostasis and the ion balance within plant cells (25. Seed priming is one of the ways to reduce negative effects of salt which is used for increasing germination percentage and seed resistance in salty zones. Seed priming is a pre-germination treatment that provides a moisture level sufficient to start pre-germination metabolic processes. It entails the partial germination of seeds by soaking them in water (or in a solution of salts for specified period of time, and then re-dry them just before radicle emerges (24. Priming stimulates many of the metabolic processes involved with the early phases of germination. Given that part of the germination processes have been initiated, seedlings from primed seed grow faster, grow more vigorously, and perform better in adverse conditions (24. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of salinity stress caused by alkali salts on growth and some physiologic characteristics of sesame. Materials and Methods This study was conducted in a greenhouse in Vali-e-Asr University of Rafsanjan as factorial arrangement in randomized complete block design with three replications. Experimental factors included priming (control (unprimed, hydropriming, halopriming with NaCl and NaHCO3 and level of salinity with sodium bicarbonate salt (Zero, 15, 30 and 45 mM. Seeds were planted in pots filled with perlite and cocopite (1:1. The pots were irrigated with a nutrient solution (with half strength Hoagland's solution. After the fourth true leaves appeared, salinty stress in

  14. Measuring sap flow, and other plant physiological conditions across a soil salinity gradient in the lower Colorado River at Cibola National Wildlife Refuge: Vegetation and soil physiology linkages with microwave dielectric constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, K. C.; Lasne, Y.; Schroeder, R.; Morino, K.; Hultine, K. R.; Nagler, P. L.

    2009-12-01

    We used ground measurements to examine stand structure and evapotranspiration of Tamarix in the Cibola National Wildlife Refuge (CNWR) on the Lower Colorado River. Three Tamarix study sites were established at different distances from the Colorado River on a river terrace in the CNWR. The sites were chosen from aerial photographs to represent typical dense stands of Tamarix within the CNWR. The sites were representative of differing saline environments, with each having ground water with distinct salt concentration levels. Wells were established at the site to establish depth to water and the salinity concentration within the ground water. We monitored xylem sap flow within each of the three stands. In addition we measured leaf area index to characterize canopy structure. We compared ET, foliage density, depth to water, and salinity among the Tamarix sites to examine stand-level variability driven by the variations in salinity. We supplemented these collections with measurements to characterize soil and vegetation microwave dielectric properties and their relationship to physiologic parameters. The dielectric properties of a material describe the interaction of an electric field with the material. Previous field experiments have demonstrated that varying degrees of correlation exist between vegetation dielectric properties and tree canopy water status. Temporal variation of the dielectric constant of woody plant tissue may result from changes in water status (e.g., water content) and chemical composition, albeit to varying degrees of sensitivity. The varying amount of ground water salinity at CNWR offers a unique opportunity to examine the relationship between vegetation and soil dielectric constant as related to vegetation ecophysiology. A field portable vector network analyzer is used to measure the microwave dielectric spectrum of the soil and vegetation Combined with measurements of vegetation xylem sap flux and soil chemistry, these measurements allow

  15. Non-invasive measurement of oxygen saturation in the spinal vein using SWI: quantitative evaluation under conditions of physiological and caffeine load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujima, Noriyuki; Kudo, Kohsuke; Terae, Satoshi; Ishizaka, Kinya; Yazu, Rie; Zaitsu, Yuri; Tha, Khin Khin; Yoshida, Daisuke; Tsukahara, Akiko; Haacke, Mark E; Sasaki, Makoto; Shirato, Hiroki

    2011-01-01

    Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) has been used for quantitative and non-invasive measurement of blood oxygen saturation in the brain. In this study, we used SWI for quantitative measurement of oxygen saturation in the spinal vein to look for physiological- or caffeine-induced changes in venous oxygenation. SWI measurements were obtained for 5 healthy volunteers using 1.5-T MR units, under 1) 3 kinds of physiological load (breath holding, Bh; hyperventilation, Hv; and inspiration of highly concentrated oxygen, Ox) and 2) caffeine load. Oxygen saturation in the anterior spinal vein (ASV) was calculated. We evaluated changes in oxygen saturation induced by physiological load. We also evaluated the time-course of oxygen saturation after caffeine intake. For the physiological load measurements, the average oxygen saturation for the 5 subjects was significantly lower in Hv (0.75) and significantly higher in Bh (0.84) when compared with control (0.80). There was no significant difference between Ox (0.81) and control. Oxygen saturation gradually decreased after caffeine intake. The average values of oxygen saturation were 0.79 (0 min), 0.76 (20 min), 0.74 (40 min), and 0.73 (60 min), respectively. We demonstrated a significant difference in oxygen saturation at 40 and 60 min after caffeine intake when compared with 0 min. In conclusion, we demonstrated the feasibility of using SWI for non-invasive measurement of oxygen saturation in the spinal vein. We showed changes in oxygen saturation under physiological as well as caffeine load and suggest that this method is a useful tool for the clinical evaluation of spinal cord oxygenation.

  16. Mathematical physiology

    CERN Document Server

    Sneyd, James

    2009-01-01

    There has been a long history of interaction between mathematics and physiology. This book looks in detail at a wide selection of mathematical models in physiology, showing how physiological problems can be formulated and studied mathematically, and how such models give rise to interesting and challenging mathematical questions. With its coverage of many recent models it gives an overview of the field, while many older models are also discussed, to put the modern work in context. In this second edition the coverage of basic principles has been expanded to include such topics as stochastic differential equations, Markov models and Gibbs free energy, and the selection of models has also been expanded to include some of the basic models of fluid transport, respiration/perfusion, blood diseases, molecular motors, smooth muscle, neuroendrocine cells, the baroreceptor loop, turboglomerular oscillations, blood clotting and the retina. Owing to this extensive coverage, the second edition is published in two volumes. ...

  17. Prediction of rectal temperature using non-invasive physiologic variable measurements in hair pregnant ewes subjected to natural conditions of heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Pérez, Ricardo; Avendaño-Reyes, Leonel; Mejía-Vázquez, Ángel; Álvarez-Valenzuela, F Daniel; Correa-Calderón, Abelardo; Mellado, Miguel; Meza-Herrera, Cesar A; Guerra-Liera, Juan E; Robinson, P H; Macías-Cruz, Ulises

    2016-01-01

    Rectal temperature (RT) is the foremost physiological variable indicating if an animal is suffering hyperthermia. However, this variable is traditionally measured by invasive methods, which may compromise animal welfare. Models to predict RT have been developed for growing pigs and lactating dairy cows, but not for pregnant heat-stressed ewes. Our aim was to develop a prediction equation for RT using non-invasive physiological variables in pregnant ewes under heat stress. A total of 192 records of respiratory frequency (RF) and hair coat temperature in various body regions (i.e., head, rump, flank, shoulder, and belly) obtained from 24 Katahdin × Pelibuey pregnant multiparous ewes were collected during the last third of gestation (i.e., d 100 to lambing) with a 15 d sampling interval. Hair coat temperatures were taken using infrared thermal imaging technology. Initially, a Pearson correlation analysis examined the relationship among variables, and then multiple linear regression analysis was used to develop the prediction equations. All predictor variables were positively correlated (Pheat-stressed pregnant ewes can be predicted with an adequate accuracy using non-invasive physiologic variables, and the final equation was: RT=35.57+0.004 (RF)+0.067 (heat temperature)+0.028 (belly temperature).

  18. Impact of microbial inoculation on biomass accumulation by Sulla carnosa provenances, and in regulating nutrition, physiological and antioxidant activities of this species under non-saline and saline conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidri, R; Barea, J M; Mahmoud, O Metoui-Ben; Abdelly, C; Azcón, Rosario

    2016-08-20

    Bacteria (Pseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp.) and/or the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Rhizophagus intraradices were able to improve growth, physiological and biochemical characteristics of four Sulla carnosa Desf. provenances (Sidi khlif, Thelja, Kalbia and Kerker) from Tunisia under both saline and non-saline conditions. S. carnosa is a salt-tolerant legume plant, native from North Africa. The intrinsic bacterial characteristics evidenced the fitness of these bacteria to support salt stress and to stimulate plant growth. Bacillus sp. produced more indol acetic acid (IAA) than Pseudomonas sp. and showed a great surviving capacity under salt conditions supporting its capacity to improve plant growth under stress conditions. The microorganisms applied also have a different potential to increase the nutritional and related plant growth parameters. It is noticeable that some provenances reached the highest level of growth when inoculated with Bacillus sp. in Sidi khlif or by Bacillus plus AMF in Kalbia, which increased shoot by 318% and root by 774%. In contrast, in Thelja and Kerker the impact of the test microorganisms was mainly evidenced at increasing nutritional and physiological functions. Salinity reduced some growth and physiological variables as stomatal conductance, photosynthetic pigments and photosynthetic efficiency and increased electrolyte leakage. However, the microbial inoculants compensated these detrimental effects in a degree depending on the S. carnosa provenance. These microorganisms also orchestrate antioxidant activities involved in adaptative responses in S. carnosa provenances. The intrinsic ability of inoculants allow us to select the provenance/microorganism combination which maximizes S. carnosa growth, nutrition and physiological/biochemical responses under salt and non-salt conditions. The results obtained support that the target microbial inocula are beneficial for the ecological stability if this Mediterranean legume.

  19. Reproductive physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, G.F.; Russman, S.E.; Ellis, David H.; Gee, George F.; Mirande, Claire M.

    1996-01-01

    Conclusions: Although the general pattern of avian physiology applies to cranes, we have identified many physiological mechanisms (e.g., effects of disturbance) that need further study. Studies with cranes are expensive compared to those done with domestic fowl because of the crane's larger size, low reproductive rate, and delayed sexual maturity. To summarize, the crane reproductive system is composed of physiological and anatomical elements whose function is controlled by an integrated neural-endocrine system. Males generally produce semen at a younger age than when females lay eggs. Eggs are laid in clutches of two (1 to 3), and females will lay additional clutches if the preceding clutches are removed. Both sexes build nests and incubate the eggs. Molt begins during incubation and body molt may be completed annually in breeding pairs. However, remiges are replaced sequentially over 2 to 3 years, or abruptly every 2 to 3 years in other species. Most immature birds replace their juvenal remiges over a 2 to 3 year period. Stress interferes with reproduction in cranes by reducing egg production or terminating the reproductive effort. In other birds, stress elevates corticosterone levels and decreases LHRH release. We know little about the physiological response of cranes to stress.

  20. Exercise physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiens, Bente; Richter, Erik; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    The passing of Professor Bengt Saltin on September 12, 2014 truly marks the end of an era. As editor of the Journal of Applied Physiology and one of Bengt’s many collaborators and colleagues, I wanted the Journal to celebrate his many seminal contributions by means of an Editorial. Professor Bent...

  1. Physiological Control of Germline Development

    OpenAIRE

    Hubbard, E. Jane Albert; Korta, Dorota Z.; Dalfó, Diana

    2013-01-01

    The intersection between developmental programs and environmental conditions that alter physiology is a growing area of research interest. The C. elegans germ line is emerging as a particularly sensitive and powerful model for these studies. The germ line is subject to environmentally regulated diapause points that allow worms to withstand harsh conditions both prior to and after reproduction commences. It also responds to more subtle changes in physiological conditions. Recent studies demons...

  2. Agro-morphological, Physiological and Yield related Performances of Finger Millet [Eleusine coracana (l. Gaertn.] Accessions Evaluated for Drought Resistance under Field Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awol Assefa

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted at Dhera Sub-center of Kulumsa Agricultural Research Center, Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia from July - December 2011; to screen drought tolerance of 96 finger millet accessions (Eleusine coracana L. Gaertn. collected from different agro-ecological zones of the country. Data were collected for plant height (PH, green leaf number (GLN, green leaf area (GLA, ear number (EN, ear length (EL and relative water content (RWC. Significant difference (P<0.05 were obtained between accessions for most selected physiological, morphological and yield related traits such as Chlorophyll Content Index (CCI, RWC, and yield related parameters, such as tiller number (TN, productive tillers (PT, seed weight per head and per plant. Based on high RWC, CCI, GLN, PT, EL, and EN, Grain Yield per head and per plant, a total of 23 accessions were categorized as drought stress tolerance and promoted to the next intensive physiological and yield related evaluation. Moreover, AAUFM-7, AAUFM-2, AAUFM-44 were the first top three accessions with the highest grain yield of 77.5, 72g/plant and 65.4g/plant, respectively. Overall, the higher genetic variability observed among accession in this study should be further utilized for finger millet improvement targeting semi-arid areas of Ethiopia.

  3. Effects of myxoma virus and rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus on the physiological condition of wild European rabbits: Is blood biochemistry a useful monitoring tool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacios-Palma, Isabel; Santoro, Simone; Bertó-Moran, Alejandro; Moreno, Sacramento; Rouco, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    Myxomatosis and rabbit hemorrhagic disease (RHD) are the major viral diseases that affect the wild European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). These diseases arrived in Europe within the last decades and have caused wild rabbit populations to decline dramatically. Both viruses are currently considered to be endemic in the Iberian Peninsula; periodic outbreaks that strongly impact wild populations regularly occur. Myxoma virus (MV) and rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) alter the physiology of infected rabbits, resulting in physical deterioration. Consequently, the persistence and viability of natural populations are affected. The main goal of our study was to determine if blood biochemistry is correlated with serostatus in wild European rabbits. We carried out seven live-trapping sessions in three wild rabbit populations over a two-year period. Blood samples were collected to measure anti-MV and anti-RHDV antibody concentrations and to measure biochemical parameters related to organ function, protein metabolism, and nutritional status. Overall, we found no significant relationships between rabbit serostatus and biochemistry. Our main result was that rabbits that were seropositive for both MV and RHDV had low gamma glutamyltransferase concentrations. Given the robustness of our analyses, the lack of significant relationships may indicate that the biochemical parameters measured are poor proxies for serostatus. Another explanation is that wild rabbits might be producing attenuated physiological responses to these viruses because the latter are now enzootic in the study area. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Autochthonous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and Bacillus thuringiensis from a degraded Mediterranean area can be used to improve physiological traits and performance of a plant of agronomic interest under drought conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armada, Elisabeth; Azcón, Rosario; López-Castillo, Olga M; Calvo-Polanco, Mónica; Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel

    2015-05-01

    Studies have shown that some microorganisms autochthonous from stressful environments are beneficial when used with autochthonous plants, but these microorganisms rarely have been tested with allochthonous plants of agronomic interest. This study investigates the effectiveness of drought-adapted autochthonous microorganisms [Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) and a consortium of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi] from a degraded Mediterranean area to improve plant growth and physiology in Zea mays under drought stress. Maize plants were inoculated or not with B. thuringiensis, a consortium of AM fungi or a combination of both microorganisms. Plants were cultivated under well-watered conditions or subjected to drought stress. Several physiological parameters were measured, including among others, plant growth, photosynthetic efficiency, nutrients content, oxidative damage to lipids, accumulation of proline and antioxidant compounds, root hydraulic conductivity and the expression of plant aquaporin genes. Under drought conditions, the inoculation of Bt increased significantly the accumulation of nutrients. The combined inoculation of both microorganisms decreased the oxidative damage to lipids and accumulation of proline induced by drought. Several maize aquaporins able to transport water, CO2 and other compounds were regulated by the microbial inoculants. The impact of these microorganisms on plant drought tolerance was complementary, since Bt increased mainly plant nutrition and AM fungi were more active improving stress tolerance/homeostatic mechanisms, including regulation of plant aquaporins with several putative physiological functions. Thus, the use of autochthonous beneficial microorganisms from a degraded Mediterranean area is useful to protect not only native plants against drought, but also an agronomically important plant such as maize.

  5. [The study of the relation between the working conditions and the prevalences of obesity, liver disorder and hyperlipidemia: evaluation of physiological examination data during the terms of car manufacturing work and car sales work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, M; Oda, N; Wada, N; Okazaki, I

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the relation between the working conditions and the workers' health, particularly the prevalences of obesity, liver disorder and hyperlipidemia, we analyzed physiological examination data and the questionnaire survey about life behaviors and working conditions during the terms of car manufacturing work and car sales work among 61 male subjects. In the physiological examination data, compared with the term of car manufacturing work, the values of body weight, body mass index (BMI), GOT, GPT, gamma-GTP, TG and T-CHO elevated and the prevalences of obesity and liver disorder increased during the term of car sales work. During the term of car sales work, the prevalences of alcohol drinkers and cigarette smokers increased and the changes of food intake behaviors were noted. It was estimated that the changes of food intake behaviors associated with the differences of working conditions contributed increasing number of obesity and liver disorder that was based on fatty liver caused by hyperlipidemia. These results of this study suggested that working conditions associated with the prevalences of obesity, liver disorder and hyperlipidemia were important to conduct the effective health education in the present occupational health administration.

  6. MORPHOLOGICAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS IN PROBOSCIA ALATA (BACILLARIOPHYCEAE) GROWN UNDER DIFFERENT LIGHT AND CO2 CONDITIONS OF THE MODERN SOUTHERN OCEAN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogstraten, Astrid; Timmermans, Klaas R.; de Baar, Hein J. W.

    2012-01-01

    The combined effects of different light and aqueous CO2 conditions were assessed for the Southern Ocean diatom Proboscia alata (Brightwell) Sundstrom in laboratory experiments. Selected culture conditions (light and CO2(aq)) were representative for the natural ranges in the modern Southern Ocean. Li

  7. Occupational physiology

    CERN Document Server

    Toomingas, Allan; Tornqvist, Ewa Wigaeus

    2011-01-01

    In a clear and accessible presentation, Occupational Physiology focuses on important issues in the modern working world. Exploring major public health problems-such as musculoskeletal disorders and stress-this book explains connections between work, well-being, and health based on up-to-date research in the field. It provides useful methods for risk assessment and guidelines on arranging a good working life from the perspective of the working individual, the company, and society as a whole.The book focuses on common, stressful situations in different professions. Reviewing bodily demands and r

  8. Nitrogen-detected TROSY yields comparable sensitivity to proton-detected TROSY for non-deuterated, large proteins under physiological salt conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Koh [National Institute for Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Molecular Profiling Research Center for Drug Discovery (Japan); Arthanari, Haribabu [Harvard Medical School, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology (United States); Imai, Misaki [Japan Biological Informatics Consortium, Research and Development Department (Japan); Wagner, Gerhard, E-mail: gerhard-wagner@hms.harvard.edu [Harvard Medical School, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology (United States); Shimada, Ichio, E-mail: shimada@iw-nmr.f.u-tokyo.ac.jp [National Institute for Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Molecular Profiling Research Center for Drug Discovery (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    Direct detection of the TROSY component of proton-attached {sup 15}N nuclei ({sup 15}N-detected TROSY) yields high quality spectra with high field magnets, by taking advantage of the slow {sup 15}N transverse relaxation. The slow transverse relaxation and narrow line width of the {sup 15}N-detected TROSY resonances are expected to compensate for the inherently low {sup 15}N sensitivity. However, the sensitivity of {sup 15}N-detected TROSY in a previous report was one-order of magnitude lower than in the conventional {sup 1}H-detected version. This could be due to the fact that the previous experiments were performed at low salt (0–50 mM), which is advantageous for {sup 1}H-detected experiments. Here, we show that the sensitivity gap between {sup 15}N and {sup 1}H becomes marginal for a non-deuterated, large protein (τ{sub c} = 35 ns) at a physiological salt concentration (200 mM). This effect is due to the high salt tolerance of the {sup 15}N-detected TROSY. Together with the previously reported benefits of the {sup 15}N-detected TROSY, our results provide further support for the significance of this experiment for structural studies of macromolecules when using high field magnets near and above 1 GHz.

  9. Residual Effect of Chemical and Animal Fertilizers and Compost on Yield, YieldComponents, Physiological Characteristics and Essential Oil Content of Matricaria chamomilla L. under Drought Stress conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    a Ahmadian

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The residual effect of inorganic and organic fertilizers on growth and yield of plants is one of the important problems in nutrition. This study was conducted to determine the residual effect of different fertilizers on yield, yield components, physiological parameters and essential oil percentage of Matricaria chamomilla under drought stress. A split plot arrangement based on randomized completely block design (RCBD with three replication was conducted in 2009, at the University of Zabol. Treatments included W1 (non stress, W2 (75% FC and W3 (50% FC as main plot and three types of residual’s fertilizers: F1 (non fertilizer, F2 (chemical fertilizer, F3 (manure fertilizer and F4 (compost as sub plot. Results showed that water stress at W3 treatment reduced dry flower yield. Low water stress increased essential oil percentage and the highest oil was obtained in W2. In this experiment, free proline and total soluble carbohydrate concentration were increased under water stress. The residual’s manure and compost enhanced flower yield, percentage and yield of essential oil of chamomile at the second year. At a glance, animal manure application and light water stress (75% FC was recommended to obtain best quantitative and qualitative yield. Keywords: Water Stress, Fertilizer, Carbohydrate, Proline, Chamomile

  10. Interaction Effect of CO2 Enrichment and Nutritional Conditions on Physiological Characteristics, Essential Oil and Yield of Lemon Balm (Melissa officinalis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud SHOOR

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide enrichment and nutritional improvement can increase photosynthesis and growth of different crops. The aim of the present study was to assess interaction effects of CO2 enrichment and fertilizer on physiological characteristics and lemon balm essential oil. Experimental units were composed of CO2 at 380, 700, and 1050 ppm with and without manure and N fertilizer application. A continuous increasing trend of individual plant leaf area, total dry weight accumulation and relative growth ratio were recorded with CO2 enrichment. When CO2 was elevated from 380 to 1050 ppm, the values of height (24.3%, SPAD reading (2.7%, essential oil yield (26.3% and final yield (65.3% were increased, unlike, stomatal conductance (35.2% and essential oil percentage (53% were decreased. The highest and the lowest values (except for oil percentage were obtained under N and no fertilizer application, respectively. Except for SPAD, interaction between CO2 enrichment and each fertilizer on all measured characteristics had a significant effect, so that CO2 effect was intensified by applying each fertilizer. Therefore, it can be concluded that when temperature increase caused by rising CO2 is not considered or there is not a limitation for resources, CO2 enrichment will improve lemon balm biomass and essential oil yield.

  11. In-situ determination of the mechanical properties of crawling or non-motile bacteria by Atomic Force Microscopy under physiological conditions without immobilization

    CERN Document Server

    Dhahri, Samia; Marlière, Christian

    2012-01-01

    We present a new, non-perturbative, easy-to-apply method for AFM imaging of living bacteria in their genuine physiological liquid environment. No immobilization protocol, neither chemical nor mechanical, was needed. For the first time, the native gliding (crawling) movements of gram-negative filamentous Nostoc cyanobacteria, along the surface and at speeds up to 200 nm/s, were studied by AFM. With the AFM working in a fast approach/retract mode, no limitation in neither spatial resolution nor imaging rate was detected. Gram positive and non-motile Rhodococcus wratislaviensis bacteria were studied as well. From the approach curves, Young modulus and turgor pressure were measured for both strains and for different gliding speeds. Young modulus is ranging from 20 to 105MPa and turgor pressure from 40 to 310kPa depending on the bacterium and the gliding speed. For Nostoc, spatially limited zones with higher values of stiffness were observed. The related spatial period is much higher than the mean length of nodule...

  12. Using ImageJ for the quantitative analysis of flow-based adhesion assays in real-time under physiologic flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer dos Santos, Sascha; Klinkhardt, Ute; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Harder, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    This article intends to close the gap between the abundance of regular articles focusing on adhesive mechanisms of cells in a flow field and purely technical reports confined to the description of newly developed algorithms, not yet ready to be used by users without programming skills. A simple and robust method is presented for analysing raw videomicroscopic data of flow-based adhesion assays using the freely available public domain software ImageJ. We describe in detail the image processing routines used to rapidly and reliably evaluate the number of adherent and translocating platelets in videomicroscopic recordings. The depicted procedures were exemplified by analysing platelet interaction with immobilized von Willebrand factor and fibrinogen in flowing blood under physiological wall shear rates. Neutralizing GPIbalpha function reduced shear-dependent platelet translocation on von Willebrand factor and abolished firm platelet adhesion. Abciximab, Tirofiban and Eptifibatide completely inhibited GPIIb/IIIa-dependent stable platelet deposition on fibrinogen. The presented method to analyse videomicroscopic recordings from flow-based adhesion assays offers the advantage of providing a simple and reliable way to quantify flow-based adhesion assays, which is completely based on ImageJ and can easily be applied to study adhesion mechanisms of cells in non-fluorescent modes without the need to deviate from the presented protocol.

  13. Physiological Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Eric D.

    The analysis of physiological sound in the peripheral auditory system solves three important problems. First, sound energy impinging on the head must be captured and presented to the transduction apparatus in the ear as a suitable mechanical signal; second, this mechanical signal needs to be transduced into a neural representation that can be used by the brain; third, the resulting neural representation needs to be analyzed by central neurons to extract information useful to the animal. This chapter provides an overview of some aspects of the first two of these processes. The description is entirely focused on the mammalian auditory system, primarily on human hearing and on the hearing of a few commonly used laboratory animals (mainly rodents and carnivores). Useful summaries of non-mammalian hearing are available [1]. Because of the large size of the literature, review papers are referenced wherever possible.

  14. Selection of reference genes for quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis of rat tissues under physiological and toxicological conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svingen, Terje; Letting, Heidi; Hadrup, Niels

    2015-01-01

    , Rps18, Rps29, Sdha, Tbp and Ubc) across several juvenile and adult rat tissues (liver, adrenal, prostate, fat pad, testis and ovaries), both under normal conditions and following exposure to various chemicals during development. Employing NormFinder and BestKeeper softwares, we found Hprt and Sdha...

  15. The role of equilibrium and kinetic properties in the dissociation of Gd[DTPA-bis(methylamide)] (Omniscan) at near to physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranyai, Zsolt; Brücher, Ernő; Uggeri, Fulvio; Maiocchi, Alessandro; Tóth, Imre; Andrási, Melinda; Gáspár, Attila; Zékány, László; Aime, Silvio

    2015-03-16

    [Gd(DTPA-BMA)] is the principal constituent of Omniscan, a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. In body fluids, endogenous ions (Zn(2+), Cu(2+), and Ca(2+)) may displace the Gd(3+). To assess the extent of displacement at equilibrium, the stability constants of DTPA-BMA(3-) complexes of Gd(3+), Ca(2+), Zn(2+), and Cu(2+) have been determined at 37 °C in 0.15 M NaCl. The order of these stability constants is as follows: GdL≈CuL>ZnL≫CaL. Applying a simplified blood plasma model, the extent of dissociation of Omniscan (0.35 mM [Gd(DTPA-BMA)]) was found to be 17% by the formation of Gd(PO4), [Zn(DTPA-BMA)](-) (2.4%), [Cu(DTPA-BMA)](-) (0.2%), and [Ca(DTPA-BMA)](-) (17.7%). By capillary electrophoresis, the formation of [Ca(DTPA-BMA)](-) has been detected in human serum spiked with [Gd(DTPA-BMA)] (2.0 mM) at pH 7.4. Transmetallation reactions between [Gd(DTPA-BMA)] and Cu(2+) at 37 °C in the presence of citrate, phosphate, and bicarbonate ions occur by dissociation of the complex assisted by the endogenous ligands. At physiological concentrations of citrate, phosphate, and bicarbonate ions, the half-life of dissociation of [Gd(DTPA-BMA)] was calculated to be 9.3 h at pH 7.4. Considering the rates of distribution and dissociation of [Gd(DTPA-BMA)] in the extracellular space of the body, an open two-compartment model has been developed, which allows prediction of the extent of dissociation of the Gd(III) complex in body fluids depending on the rate of elimination of the contrast agent. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. An Investigation on Physiological Characteristics of Tow Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. Cultivars and Soil Moisture Content as Affected by Straw Management and Nitrogen Rates under Dryland Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Sadeghi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In most southern parts of Iran, crop residues have been traditionally burned or removed; that is often criticized for soil organic and nutrient losses, reducing soil microbial activity and increasing CO2 emission. A 2-years field study was conducted at the College of Agricultural, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran to evaluate the effects of different barley residue and N rates on some physiological indices and soil moisture contents of two dryland barley cultivars. The experiment was conducted as strip split plot with four replications. Vertical plots included two dryland common barley cultivars (Afzal and Reyhan, horizontal plots were three crop residue rates (0, 750 and 1500 kg ha-1 and sub plots were three N rates (0, 40, and 80 kg N ha-1. The results showed that when the crop residues were applied, N rates should be increased accordingly. Increasing N rates (from 0 to 80 kg N ha-1 accompanied by residue application increased leaf area index in both cultivars. When the crop residues were completely applied, but N rates were not appropriated with crop residue application, LAI decreased in both cultivars. The lowest LAI (1.14 was obtained from 1500 kg ha-1crop residue and 0 kg N ha-1 in both cultivars. The highest (1196g/m2 and the lowest (595g/m2 dry matter yield was obtained from 80 kg N ha-1 and % 100 crop residue and from 0 kg N ha-1 and 1500 kg ha-1 crop residue in both cultivars, respectively. Application of 1500 kg ha-1 crop residues and 80 kg N ha-1 significantly increased soil moisture contents and LAI.

  17. Physiologically stressed cells of fluorescent pseudomonas EKi as better option for bioformulation development for management of charcoal rot caused by Macrophomina phaseolina in field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Ekta; Arora, Naveen K

    2011-06-01

    Bioformulation that supports the inoculant under storage condition and on application to field is of prime importance for agroindustry. Pseudomonas strain EKi having biocontrol activity against Macrophomina phaseolina was used in the study. EKi cells were pretreated by carbon starvation, osmotic stress (NaCl), and freeze drying conditions, and talc-based bioformulation was developed. Combined pretreatment with carbon starvation and osmotic stress was given to Pseudomonas cells. Bioformulation of untreated, freeze dried (FD), carbon starved, osmotic stressed, and combined pre-treated cells showed 50.36, 44.76, 45.95, 34.82, and 27.27% reduction in CFU counts after 6 months of storage. The osmotic stressed cells showed one over-expressed protein (11.5 kDa) in common with carbon starved cells responsible for its better shelf life. The plant growth promotory activity of bioformulations was determined taking Cicer arietinum as a test crop in M. phaseolina infested field. Carbon starved + osmotic stressed cells showed maximum enhancement of dry weight (272.56%) followed by osmotic stressed (230.74%), untreated (155.70%), FD (88.93%), and carbon starved (59.34%) cells over uninoculated control. Carbon starved + osmotic stressed, osmotic stressed, untreated, FD, and carbon starved cells showed 156.60, 100, 75, 40, and 16.67% reduction of charcoal rot disease over uninoculated control. The results clearly showed that combined pretreatment by carbon starvation and osmotic stress provides the bacteria potential of rapid adaptation to different environment conditions.

  18. Pancreatic lipase and pancreatic lipase-related protein 2, but not pancreatic lipase-related protein 1, hydrolyze retinyl palmitate in physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboul, Emmanuelle; Berton, Amélie; Moussa, Myriam; Kreuzer, Corinne; Crenon, Isabelle; Borel, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    The major sources of vitamin A in the human diet are retinyl esters (mainly retinyl palmitate) and provitamin A carotenoids. It has been shown that classical pancreatic lipase (PL) is involved in the luminal hydrolysis of retinyl palmitate (RP), but it is not known whether pancreatic lipase-related proteins 1 (PLRP1) and 2 (PLRP2), two other lipases recovered in the human pancreatic juice, are also involved. The aim of this study was to assess whether RP acts a substrate for these lipase-related proteins. Pure horse PL, horse PLRP2 and dog PLRP1 were incubated with RP solubilized in its physiological vehicles, i.e., triglyceride-rich lipid droplets, mixed micelles and vesicles. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to assess RP hydrolysis by the free retinol released in the incubation medium. Incubation of RP-containing emulsions with horse PL and colipase resulted in RP hydrolysis (0.051+/-0.01 micromol/min/mg). This hydrolysis was abolished when colipase was not added to the medium. PLRP2 and PLRP1 were unable to hydrolyze RP solubilized in emulsions, regardless of whether colipase was added to the medium. PL hydrolyzed RP solubilized in mixed micelles as well (0.074+/-0.014 micromol/min/mg). Again, this hydrolysis was abolished in the absence of colipase. PLRP2 hydrolyzed RP solubilized in micelles but less efficiently than PL (0.023+/-0.005 micromol/min/mg). Colipase had no effect on this hydrolysis. PLRP1 was unable to hydrolyze RP solubilized in micelles, regardless of whether colipase was present or absent. Both PL and PLRP2 hydrolyzed RP solubilized in a vesicle rich-solution, and a synergic phenomenon between the two lipases was enlighten. Taken together, these results show that (1) PL hydrolyzes RP whether RP is solubilized in emulsions or in mixed micelles, (2) PLRP2 hydrolyzes RP only when RP is solubilized in mixed micelles, and (3) PLRP1 is unable to hydrolyze RP regardless of whether RP is solubilized in emulsions or in mixed

  19. Space Physiology within an Exercise Physiology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jason R.; West, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Compare and contrast strategies remain common pedagogical practices within physiological education. With the support of an American Physiological Society Teaching Career Enhancement Award, we have developed a junior- or senior-level undergraduate curriculum for exercise physiology that compares and contrasts the physiological adaptations of…

  20. Potassium physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thier, S O

    1986-04-25

    Potassium is the most abundant exchangeable cation in the body. It exists predominantly in the intracellular fluid at concentrations of 140 to 150 meq/liter and in the extracellular fluid at concentrations of 3.5 to 5 meq/liter. The maintenance of the serum potassium concentration is a complex bodily function and results from the balance between intake, excretion, and distribution between intracellular and extracellular space. Ingested potassium is virtually completely absorbed from and minimally excreted through the intestine under nonpathologic circumstances. Renal excretion of potassium, which is the major chronic protective mechanism against abnormalities in potassium balance, depends on filtration, reabsorption, and a highly regulated distal nephron secretory process. Factors regulating potassium secretion include prior potassium intake, intracellular potassium, delivery of sodium chloride and poorly reabsorbable anions to the distal nephron, the urine flow rate, hormones such as aldosterone and beta-catecholamines, and the integrity of the renal tubular cell. The maintenance of distribution between the inside and outside of cells depends on the integrity of the cell membrane and its pumps, osmolality, pH, and the hormones insulin, aldosterone, beta 2-catecholamines, alpha-catecholamines, and prostaglandins. Both distribution across cell membranes and/or renal excretion of potassium may be altered by pharmacologic agents such as diuretics, alpha- and beta-catechol antagonists and agonists, depolarizing agents, and digitalis. Problems with hypokalemia and hyperkalemia can be analyzed on the basis of potassium physiology and pharmacology; proper treatment depends on an accurate analysis.

  1. Growth and physiological responses of a tropical toxic marine microgalga Heterosigma akashiwo (Heterokontophyta: Raphidophyceae) from Singapore waters to varying nitrogen sources and light conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Jerome Wai Kit; Yeo, Darren Chong Jinn; Leong, Sandric Chee Yew

    2015-09-01

    Strains of Heterosigma akashiwo have been identified in Singapore waters, but there have been few studies detailing the biology of such tropical strains. Management of such species is important for the integrity of aquaculture industries, as well as for food safety and public health. Coastal modifications may, however, be altering the productivity of such species. This study investigated the effects of two anthropogenic factors—nitrogen (N)-pollution and light-shading—upon a single strain of H. akashiwo which was isolated from Singapore waters. The study observed that H. akashiwo strains grew well under the pulsed supply of three N-sources—ammonium, nitrate, and urea. Growth rate values suggest its ability to out-grow diatom species, which typically dominate coastal environments. The light absorption capacity highlighted potential response dissimilarity under the different N-regime conditions. Light experiments also demonstrated the ability of H. akashiwo to tolerate decreased light conditions, which allow it to thrive at depth. The ability to accumulate intracellular stores of N-nutrients was also demonstrated and can be important for sustaining cell productivity. This study therefore indicated how poor management of coastal environments may enhance the bloom potential of such toxic bloomforming species.

  2. Qualidade de sementes de algodão submetidas ao condicionamento hídrico. = Physiological quality of cottonseeds submitted to hydric conditioning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Antonio Nóbrega Queiroga

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available No presente trabalho se determinou os efeitos dos tratamentos pré-germinativos de hidratação sobre a germinação e vigor de sementes de algodão. Um ensaio foi conduzido no Laboratório de Fitotecnia da Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Espanha, no período de março a setembro de 2006. Utilizou-se sementes deslintadas quimicamente da cultivar Panton e aplicou-se dois tipos de condicionamento hídrico: sem e com renovação de água, em função dos tempos de imersão de 0, 1, 2, 4, 8 e 24 horas. As sementes de algodão da cultivar Panton foram provenientes dos campos irrigados de produção de sementescertifi cadas da empresa Monsanto de Sevilla, Espanha.Os resultados indicam que o condicionamento hídrico foi mais efetivo para incrementar o vigor das sementes de algodão, mas não foi eficiente para elevar seu potencial germinativo. = The present study determined the effects of daily pre-germinative hydration treatments on the germination and vigor of cottonseeds. The assay was realized in the Laboratory of Phytotech of the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain, the period from March to September 2006. Delinted seeds of the cultivar Panton were used and were submitted to two types of chemical hydric conditions: with and without water renewal, in function of the periods of immersion 0, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 24 hours.The seeds of cotton cultivar Panton were from the irrigated fields of production of certifi ed seeds from Monsanto, Seville, Spain. The results indicated that hydric conditioning was more effective for the development the vigor of cottonseeds, but were not efficient to elevate its germinative potential.

  3. Selection of reference genes for quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis of rat tissues under physiological and toxicological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svingen, Terje; Letting, Heidi; Hadrup, Niels; Hass, Ulla; Vinggaard, Anne Marie

    2015-01-01

    In biological research the analysis of gene expression levels in cells and tissues can be a powerful tool to gain insights into biological processes. For this, quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) is a popular method that often involve the use of constitutively expressed endogenous reference (or 'housekeeping') gene for normalization of data. Thus, it is essential to use reference genes that have been verified to be stably expressed within the specific experimental setting. Here, we have analysed the expression stability of 12 commonly used reference genes (Actb, B2m, Gapdh, Hprt, Pgk1, Rn18s, Rpl13a, Rps18, Rps29, Sdha, Tbp and Ubc) across several juvenile and adult rat tissues (liver, adrenal, prostate, fat pad, testis and ovaries), both under normal conditions and following exposure to various chemicals during development. Employing NormFinder and BestKeeper softwares, we found Hprt and Sdha to be amongst the most stable genes across normal and manipulated tissues, with several others also being suitable for most tissues. Tbp and B2m displayed highest variability in transcript levels between tissues and developmental stages. It was also observed that the reference genes were most unstable in liver and testis following toxicological exposure. For future studies, we propose the use of more than one verified reference gene and the continuous monitoring of their suitability under various experimental conditions, including toxicological studies, based on changes in threshold (Ct) values from cDNA samples having been reverse-transcribed from a constant input concentration of RNA.

  4. Relationships between body temperatures and inflammation indicators under physiological and pathophysiological conditions in pigs exposed to systemic lipopolysaccharide and dietary deoxynivalenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesch, T; Bannert, E; Kluess, J; Frahm, J; Hüther, L; Kersten, S; Breves, G; Renner, L; Kahlert, S; Rothkötter, H-J; Dänicke, S

    2017-03-06

    We studied the constancy of the relationship between rectal and intraabdominal temperature as well as their linkage to inflammatory markers (leucocyte counts, kynurenine-to-tryptophan ratio (Kyn-Trp ratio), tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in healthy and in pigs exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and/or deoxynivalenol (DON). Barrows (n = 44) were fed 4 weeks either a DON-contaminated (4.59 mg DON/kg feed) or a control (CON) diet and equipped with an intraabdominal temperature logger and a multicatheter system (V.portae hepatis, V.lienalis, Vv.jugulares) facilitating infusion of 0.9% NaCl (CON) or LPS (7.5 μg/kg BW) and simultaneous blood sampling. Body temperatures were measured and blood samples taken every 15 min for leucocyte counts, TNF-α and Kyn-Trp ratio. Combination of diet and infusion created six groups: CON_CONjug .-CONpor. , CON_CONjug. -LPSpor. , CON_LPSjug. -CONpor. , DON_CONjug. -CONpor. , DON_CONjug. -LPSpor. , DON_LPSjug. -CONpor. . The relationship between both temperatures was not uniform for all conditions. Linear regression revealed that an intraabdominal increase per 1°C increase in rectal temperature was ~25% higher in all LPS-infused pigs compared to NaCl-infusion, albeit diet and site of LPS infusion modified the magnitude of this difference. Inflammatory markers were only strongly present under LPS influence and showed a significant relationship with body temperatures. For example, leucocyte counts in clinically inconspicuous animals were only significantly correlated to core temperature in DON-fed pigs, but in all LPS-infused groups, irrespective of diet and temperature method. In conclusion, the gradient between body core and rectal temperature is constant in clinically inconspicuous pigs, but not under various pathophysiological conditions. In the latter, measurement of inflammatory markers seems to be a useful completion.

  5. Stability of long term facilitation and expression of zif268 and Arc in the spinal cord dorsal horn is modulated by conditioning stimulation within the physiological frequency range of primary afferent fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugan, F; Wibrand, K; Fiskå, A; Bramham, C R; Tjølsen, A

    2008-07-17

    Long term facilitation (LTF) of C-fiber-evoked firing of wide dynamic range neurons in the spinal dorsal horn in response to conditioning stimulation (CS) of afferent fibers is a widely studied cellular model of spinal nociceptive sensitization. Although 100 Hz CS of primary afferent fibers is commonly used to induce spinal cord LTF, this frequency exceeds the physiological firing range. Here, we examined the effects of electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve within the physiological frequency range on the magnitude and stability of the C-fiber-evoked responses of wide dynamic range neurons and the expression of immediate early genes (c-fos, zif268, and Arc) in anesthetized rats. Stimulation frequencies of 3, 30 and 100 Hz all induced facilitation of similar magnitude as recorded at 1 h post-CS. Strikingly, however, 3 Hz-induced potentiation of the C-fiber responses was decremental, whereas both 30 and 100 Hz stimulation resulted in stable, non-decremental facilitation over 3 h of recording. The number of dorsal horn neurons expressing c-fos, but not zif268 or Arc, was significantly elevated after 3 Hz CS and increased proportionally with stimulation rate. In contrast, a stable LTF of C-fiber responses was obtained at 30 and 100 Hz CS, and at these frequencies there was a sharp increase in zif268 expression and appearance of Arc-positive neurons. The results show that response facilitation can be induced by stimulation frequencies in the physiological range (3 and 30 Hz). Three hertz stimulation induced the early phase of LTF, but the responses were decremental. Arc and zif268, two genes previously coupled to LTP of synaptic transmission in the adult brain, are upregulated at the same frequencies that give stable LTF (30 and 100 Hz). This frequency-dependence is important for understanding how the afferent firing pattern affects neuronal plasticity and nociception in the spinal dorsal horn.

  6. Isotopologue profiling of triterpene formation under physiological conditions. Biosynthesis of lupeol-3-(3'-R-hydroxy)-stearate in Pentalinon andrieuxii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Rodríguez, Luis M; Yam-Puc, Alejandro; Knispel, Nihat; Schramek, Nicholas; Huber, Claudia; Graßberger, Christoph; Ramírez-Torres, Fabiola G; Escalante-Erosa, Fabiola; García-Sosa, Karlina; Hiebert-Giesbrecht, Mickel R; Chan-Bacab, Manuel J; Godoy-Hernández, Gregorio; Bacher, Adelbert; Eisenreich, Wolfgang

    2014-04-04

    The biosynthesis of lupeol-3-(3'R-hydroxy)-stearate (procrim b, 1) was investigated in the Mexican medicinal plant Pentalinon andrieuxii by (13)CO2 pulse-chase experiments. NMR analyses revealed positional enrichments of (13)C2-isotopologues in both the triterpenoid and the hydroxystearate moieties of 1. Five of the six isoprene units reflected a pattern with [1,2-(13)C2]- and [3,5-(13)C2]-isotopologues from the respective C5-precursors, IPP and DMAPP, whereas one isoprene unit in the ring E of 1 showed only the [3,5-(13)C2]-connectivity of the original C5-precursor, due to rearrangement of the dammarenyl cation intermediate during the cyclization process. The presence of (13)C2-isotopologues was indicative of [(13)C2]acetyl-CoA being the precursor units in the formation of the fatty acid moiety and of the triterpene via the mevalonate route. The observed labeling pattern was in agreement with a chair-chair-chair-boat conformation of the (S)-2,3-oxidosqualene precursor during the cyclization process, suggesting that the lupeol synthase from P. andrieuxii is of the same type as that from Olea europea and Taraxacum officinale, but different from that of Arabidopsis thaliana. The study shows that (13)CO2 pulse-chase experiments are powerful in elucidating, under in vivo conditions and in a single experiment, the biosynthesis of complex plant products including higher terpenes.

  7. The physiological characteristics of the yeast Dekkera bruxellensis in fully fermentative conditions with cell recycling and in mixed cultures with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Luciana Filgueira; Bassi, Ana Paula Guarnieri; Avansini, Simoni Helena; Neto, Adauto Gomes Barbosa; Brasileiro, Bereneuza Tavares Ramos Valente; Ceccato-Antonini, Sandra Regina; de Morais, Marcos Antonio

    2012-03-01

    The yeast Dekkera bruxellensis plays an important role in industrial fermentation processes, either as a contaminant or as a fermenting yeast. In this study, an analysis has been conducted of the fermentation characteristics of several industrial D. bruxellensis strains collected from distilleries from the Southeast and Northeast of Brazil, compared with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It was found that all the strains of D. bruxellensis showed a lower fermentative capacity as a result of inefficient sugar assimilation, especially sucrose, under anaerobiosis, which is called the Custer effect. In addition, most of the sugar consumed by D. bruxellensis seemed to be used for biomass production, as was observed by the increase of its cell population during the fermentation recycles. In mixed populations, the surplus of D. bruxellensis over S. cerevisiae population could not be attributed to organic acid production by the first yeast, as previously suggested. Moreover, both yeast species showed similar sensitivity to lactic and acetic acids and were equally resistant to ethanol, when added exogenously to the fermentation medium. Thus, the effects that lead to the employment of D. bruxellensis in an industrial process and its effects on the production of ethanol are multivariate. The difficulty of using this yeast for ethanol production is that it requires the elimination of the Custer effect to allow an increase in the assimilation of sugar under anaerobic conditions.

  8. An Interplay among FIS, H-NS, and Guanosine Tetraphosphate Modulates Transcription of the Escherichia coli cspA Gene under Physiological Growth Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandi, Anna; Giangrossi, Mara; Giuliodori, Anna M.; Falconi, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    CspA, the most characterized member of the csp gene family of Escherichia coli, is highly expressed not only in response to cold stress, but also during the early phase of growth at 37°C. Here, we investigate at molecular level the antagonistic role played by the nucleoid proteins FIS and H-NS in the regulation of cspA expression under non-stress conditions. By means of both probing experiments and immunological detection, we demonstrate in vitro the existence of binding sites for these proteins on the cspA regulatory region, in which FIS and H-NS bind simultaneously to form composite DNA-protein complexes. While the in vitro promoter activity of cspA is stimulated by FIS and repressed by H-NS, a compensatory effect is observed when both proteins are added in the transcription assay. Consistently with these findings, inactivation of fis and hns genes reversely affect the in vivo amount of cspA mRNA. In addition, by means of strains expressing a high level of the alarmone guanosine tetraphosphate ((p)ppGpp) and in vitro transcription assays, we show that the cspA promoter is sensitive to (p)ppGpp inhibition. The (p)ppGpp-mediated expression of fis and hns genes is also analyzed, thus clarifying some aspects of the regulatory loop governing cspA transcription. PMID:27252944

  9. An interplay among FIS, H-NS and guanosine tetraphosphate modulates transcription of the Escherichia coli cspA gene under physiological growth conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eBrandi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available CspA, the most characterized member of the csp gene family of Escherichia coli, is highly expressed not only in response to cold stress, but also during the early phase of growth at 37°C. Here, we investigate at molecular level the antagonistic role played by the nucleoid proteins FIS and H-NS in the regulation of cspA expression under non-stress conditions. By means of both probing experiments and immunological detection, we demonstrate in vitro the existence of binding sites for these proteins on the cspA regulatory region, in which FIS and H-NS bind simultaneously to form composite DNA-protein complexes. While the in vitro promoter activity of cspA is stimulated by FIS and repressed by H-NS, a compensatory effect is observed when both proteins are added in the transcription assay. Consistently with these findings, inactivation of fis and hns genes reversely affect the in vivo amount of cspA mRNA. In addition, by means of strains expressing a high level of the alarmone guanosine tetraphosphate ((pppGpp and in vitro transcription assays, we show that the cspA promoter is sensitive to (pppGpp inhibition. The (pppGpp-mediated expression of fis and hns genes is also analyzed, thus clarifying some aspects of the regulatory loop governing cspA transcription.

  10. Avian reproductive physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, G.F.; Gibbons, Edward F.; Durrant, Barbara S.; Demarest, Jack

    1995-01-01

    Knowledge of the many physiological factors associated with egg production , fertility, incubation, and brooding in nondomestic birds is limited. Science knows even less about reproduction in most of the 238 endangered or threatened birds. This discussion uses studies of nondomestic and, when necessary, domestic birds to describe physiological control of reproduction. Studies of the few nondomestic avian species show large variation in physiological control of reproduction. Aviculturists, in order to successfully propagate an endangered bird, must understand the bird's reproductive peculiarities. First, investigators can do studies with carefully chosen surrogate species, but eventually they need to confirm the results in the target endangered bird. Studies of reproduction in nondomestic birds increased in the last decade. Still, scientists need to do more comparative studies to understand the mechanisms that control reproduction in birds. New technologies are making it possible to study reproductive physiology of nondomestic species in less limiting ways. These technologies include telemetry to collect information without inducing stress on captives (Howey et al., 1987; Klugman, 1987), new tests for most of the humoral factors associated with reproduction, and the skill to collect small samples and manipulate birds without disrupting the physiological mechanisms (Bercovitz et al., 1985). Managers are using knowledge from these studies to improve propagation in zoological parks, private and public propagation facilities, and research institutions. Researchers need to study the control of ovulation, egg formation, and oviposition in the species of nondomestic birds that lay very few eggs in a season, hold eggs in the oviduct for longer intervals, or differ in other ways from the more thoroughly studied domestic birds. Other techniques that would enhance propagation for nondomestlc birds include tissue culture of cloned embryonic cells, cryopreservation of embryos

  11. Early Life Conditions and Physiological Stress following the Transition to Farming in Central/Southeast Europe: Skeletal Growth Impairment and 6000 Years of Gradual Recovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison A Macintosh

    Full Text Available Early life conditions play an important role in determining adult body size. In particular, childhood malnutrition and disease can elicit growth delays and affect adult body size if severe or prolonged enough. In the earliest stages of farming, skeletal growth impairment and small adult body size are often documented relative to hunter-gatherer groups, though this pattern is regionally variable. In Central/Southeast Europe, it is unclear how early life stress, growth history, and adult body size were impacted by the introduction of agriculture and ensuing long-term demographic, social, and behavioral change. The current study assesses this impact through the reconstruction and analysis of mean stature, body mass, limb proportion indices, and sexual dimorphism among 407 skeletally mature men and women from foraging and farming populations spanning the Late Mesolithic through Early Medieval periods in Central/Southeast Europe (~7100 calBC to 850 AD. Results document significantly reduced mean stature, body mass, and crural index in Neolithic agriculturalists relative both to Late Mesolithic hunter-gatherer-fishers and to later farming populations. This indication of relative growth impairment in the Neolithic, particularly among women, is supported by existing evidence of high developmental stress, intensive physical activity, and variable access to animal protein in these early agricultural populations. Among subsequent agriculturalists, temporal increases in mean stature, body mass, and crural index were more pronounced among Central European women, driving declines in the magnitude of sexual dimorphism through time. Overall, results suggest that the transition to agriculture in Central/Southeast Europe was challenging for early farming populations, but was followed by gradual amelioration across thousands of years, particularly among Central European women. This sex difference may be indicative, in part, of greater temporal variation in the

  12. Early Life Conditions and Physiological Stress following the Transition to Farming in Central/Southeast Europe: Skeletal Growth Impairment and 6000 Years of Gradual Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macintosh, Alison A; Pinhasi, Ron; Stock, Jay T

    2016-01-01

    Early life conditions play an important role in determining adult body size. In particular, childhood malnutrition and disease can elicit growth delays and affect adult body size if severe or prolonged enough. In the earliest stages of farming, skeletal growth impairment and small adult body size are often documented relative to hunter-gatherer groups, though this pattern is regionally variable. In Central/Southeast Europe, it is unclear how early life stress, growth history, and adult body size were impacted by the introduction of agriculture and ensuing long-term demographic, social, and behavioral change. The current study assesses this impact through the reconstruction and analysis of mean stature, body mass, limb proportion indices, and sexual dimorphism among 407 skeletally mature men and women from foraging and farming populations spanning the Late Mesolithic through Early Medieval periods in Central/Southeast Europe (~7100 calBC to 850 AD). Results document significantly reduced mean stature, body mass, and crural index in Neolithic agriculturalists relative both to Late Mesolithic hunter-gatherer-fishers and to later farming populations. This indication of relative growth impairment in the Neolithic, particularly among women, is supported by existing evidence of high developmental stress, intensive physical activity, and variable access to animal protein in these early agricultural populations. Among subsequent agriculturalists, temporal increases in mean stature, body mass, and crural index were more pronounced among Central European women, driving declines in the magnitude of sexual dimorphism through time. Overall, results suggest that the transition to agriculture in Central/Southeast Europe was challenging for early farming populations, but was followed by gradual amelioration across thousands of years, particularly among Central European women. This sex difference may be indicative, in part, of greater temporal variation in the social status afforded

  13. Physiological conditions conducive to high cell density and high cyanophycin content in Ralstonia eutropha strain H16 possessing a KDPG aldolase gene-dependent addiction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kaichien; Elbahloul, Yasser; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2012-03-01

    The recombinant strain of Ralstonia eutropha H16-PHB(-)4-∆eda (pBBR1MCS-2::cphA (6308)/eda (H16)) presenting a 2-keto-3-desoxy-phosphogluconate (KDPG) aldolase (eda) gene-dependent catabolic addiction system for plasmid maintenance when using gluconate or fructose as sole carbon source was used in this study. The effects of the initial pH, the nitrogen-to-carbon ratio, the inorganic components of medium, the oxygen supply, and the different carbon and nitrogen sources on the cell dry matter (CDM) and the cyanophycin granule polypeptide (CGP) content of the cells were studied in a mineral salts medium (MSM) without any additional amino acids or CGP precursor substrates. The experiments were designed to systematically find out the optimal conditions for growth of cells to high densities and for high CGP contents of the cells. Maximum contents of water-insoluble CGP and water-soluble CGP, contributing to 47.5% and 5.8% (w/w) of CDM, respectively, were obtained at the 30-L scale cultivation when cells were cultivated in MSM medium containing sufficient supplements of fructose, NH(3), K(2)SO(4), MgSO(4)[Symbol: see text]7H(2)O, Fe(Ш)NH(4)-citrate, CaCl(2)[Symbol: see text]2H(2)O, and trace elements (SL6). The molecular masses of water-insoluble and water-soluble CGP ranged from 25 to 31 kDa and from 15 to 21 kDa, respectively. High cell densities of up to 82.8 g CDM/L containing up to 37.8% (w/w) water-insoluble CGP at the 30-L scale cultivation were also obtained. This is by far the best combination of high cell density and high cellular CGP contents ever reported, and it showed that efficient production of CGP at the industrial scale in white biotechnology could be achieved.

  14. Understanding the physiology of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Brian

    2013-03-01

    The physiology of schizophrenia includes complex genetic and environmental interactions. Current treatment largely focuses on positive symptoms, but many patients with schizophrenia present with additional symptoms and conditions that hinder their social and occupational functioning. The study of the physiology of this disorder has expanded beyond dopamine dysfunction to include the glutamate, serotonin, and nicotinic/acetylcholine systems, as well as physiologic abnormalities such as diabetes and inflammation. Clinicians who understand these additional problem areas can incorporate them into their assessment and treatment plans for patients with schizophrenia. © Copyright 2013 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  15. Influence of the slope altitude-associated microclimate and light conditions on the physiological and biochemical processes in leaves of coastal forest trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Khromykh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The problem of natural forests conservation is relevant in the Ukrainian steppe zone where the forest ecosystems develop in the unfavorable conditions of geographic mismatch; therefore, they suffer as a result of any environmental changes. The hypothesis of susceptibility of tree leaves’ metabolism even to slight changes of climatic parameters was tested. The study was conducted in more than 75 years-old natural mixed forest located on the right bank of the Samara river. The chlorophyll (Chl content, and catalase (CAT, benzidine-peroxidase (BPOD and guaiacol-peroxidase (GPOD activities in leaves of autochthonous maple species (Acer platanoides L. and adventive acacia species (Robinia pseudoacacia L. were investigated on the lower (52 m above see level, a.s.l., middle (74 m a.s.l. and upper (96 m a.s.l. coastal slope altitude. In maple leaves decreasing chlorophyll amount on the middle and upper plots (8.8% and 19.5% compared with the lower plot together with Chla/Chlb ratio decrease (from 4.7 on the lower to 4.4 on the middle and 4.0 on the upper plots was found. Chlorophyll content in acacia leaves decreased only on the upper plot (by 8.5% compared to the lower one, and Chla/Chlb ratio on the lower and upper plots reached 5.1. In maple leaves the increase in altitude was accompanied by the decrease in BPOD activity (by 26% and 63% on the middle and upper plots, accordingly, and GPOD and CAT (accordingly, by 31% and 37% on the upper plots compared to the lower plots. High correlation coefficients of light, temperature and humidity with activity of CAT (respectively, r = –0.98; r = –0.85; r = 0.83, BPOD (r = –0.96; r = –0.93; r = 0.90 and GPOD (r = –0.98; r = –0.82; r = 0.82 were estimated in A. platanoides leaves. Sharp decline in GPOD activity in R. pseudoacacia leaves was revealed on the upper plot (by 95% compared to the lower one, whereas BPOD activity increased by 47% on the middle plot but decreased by 74% on the upper one

  16. [Human physiology: kidney].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natochin, Iu V

    2010-01-01

    The content of human physiology as an independent part of current physiology is discussed. Substantiated is the point that subjects of human physiology are not only special sections of physiology where functions are inherent only in human (physiology of intellectual activity, speech, labor, sport), but also in peculiarities of functions, specificity of regulation of each of physiological systems. By the example of physiology of kidney and water-salt balance there are shown borders of norm, peculiarities of regulation in human, new chapters of renal physiology which have appeared in connection with achievements of molecular physiology.

  17. Neonatal cardiovascular physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Michael H

    2013-11-01

    The pediatric surgeon deals with a large number and variety of congenital defects in neonates that frequently involve early surgical intervention and care. Because the neonatal cardiac physiology is unique, starting with the transition from fetal circulation and including differences in calcium metabolism and myocardial microscopic structure and function, it serves the pediatric surgeon well to have a sound understanding of these principles and how they directly and indirectly affect their plans and treatments. In addition, many patients will have associated congenital heart disease that can also dramatically influence not only the surgical and anesthetic care but also the timing and planning of procedures. Finally, the pediatric surgeon is often called upon to treat conditions and complications associated with complex congenital heart disease such as feeding difficulties, bowel perforations, and malrotation in heterotaxy syndromes. In this article, we will review several unique aspects of neonatal cardiac physiology along with the basic physiology of the major groups of congenital heart disease to better prepare the training and practicing pediatric surgeon for care of these complex and often fragile patients.

  18. Physiological responses and physical performance during football in the heat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohr, Magni; Nybo, Lars; Grantham, Justin;

    2012-01-01

    To examine the impact of hot ambient conditions on physical performance and physiological responses during football match-play.......To examine the impact of hot ambient conditions on physical performance and physiological responses during football match-play....

  19. Biochemical Thermodynamics under near Physiological Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    The recommendations for nomenclature and tables in Biochemical Thermodynamics approved by IUBMB and IUPAC in 1994 can be easily introduced after the chemical thermodynamic formalism. Substitution of the usual standard thermodynamic properties by the transformed ones in the thermodynamic equations, and the use of appropriate thermodynamic tables…

  20. Sialosyl-fucosyl Poly-LacNAc without the sialosyl-Lex epitope as the physiological myeloid cell ligand in E-selectin-dependent adhesion: studies under static and dynamic flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, K; Stroud, M R; Hakomori, S

    1997-10-14

    The majority of E- and P-selectin ligands in leukocytes and myelocytic or monocytic leukemia cells are carried by transmembrane glycoproteins having a tandem repeat mucin-like domain through which O-linked carbohydrate ligands are carried. However, determination of structure and adhesive function of carbohydrates in glycoproteins is extremely difficult because of the extensive structural heterogeneity and the scarcity of material for functional analysis. We have overcome this difficulty through use of poly-LacNAc gangliosides isolated from a large quantity of ( approximately 1.2 L packed) HL60 cells [Stroud, M. R., Handa, K., Salyan, M. E. K., Ito, K., Levery, S. B., Hakomori, S., Reinhold, B. B., & Reinhold, V. N. (1996) Biochemistry 35, 758-769, 770-778]. We identified two major types of poly-LacNAc gangliosides without the sialosyl-Lex epitope as being capable of binding to E-selectin: (i) those having a single alpha1-->3 fucosylation at internal GlcNAcs but not at the penultimate GlcNAc and (ii) those having double alpha1-->3 fucosylation at internal GlcNAcs, excluding the penultimate GlcNAc. Gangliosides from group i above did not show any adhesion under static conditions, but showed strong adhesion under dynamic flow conditions. Gangliosides from group ii above showed adhesion under both static and dynamic conditions, as did sialosyl-Lex (SLex)-containing structures in previous studies. However, SLex-containing poly-LacNAc gangliosides are virtually absent or present in only trace quantities in leukocytes and HL60 cells. Poly-LacNAc gangliosides from groups i and ii above, lacking SLex structure, are the major membrane components of leukocytes and HL60 cells. These carbohydrates, bound to lipid or to protein, may therefore be the physiological epitope for E-selectin-dependent binding of these cells, particularly under dynamic flow conditions.

  1. 不同储藏条件对油葵籽生理品质的影响研究%INFLUENCES OF STORAGE CONDITIONS ON PHYSIOLOGICAL QUALITY OF OIL SUNFLOWER SEEDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李岩; 张来林; 顾祥明; 付刚

    2013-01-01

    We determined the physiological quality indicators of oil sunflower seeds under different storage conditions.The results showed that the color and smell of oil sunflower seeds changed abnormally,and the viability,germination rate and catalase activity deteriorated gradually as the storage time prolonged; and the deterioration degree was obvious when the temperature and moisture content increased.Therefore,low temperature and low moisture content are the key conditions for safe storage of oil sunflower seeds.%测定不同储藏条件下油葵籽生理指标的变化情况.结果表明:随着储藏时间的延长,油葵籽色泽、气味逐渐出现异常,生活力、发芽率和过氧化氢酶活度均呈逐渐下降的趋势,且温度和水分越高,下降趋势越明显.因此,低温、低水分是油葵籽安全储藏的主要条件.

  2. Impacto estratégico dos fatores macroambientais no desempenho de concessões de serviços públicos: a CEG e a CEG RIO na ótica relacional Strategic impact of macro-environmental factors on the performance of public utility concessions: CEG and CEG RIO from a relational perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio A. P. Bastos

    2007-08-01

    of macro-environmental factors on the performance of CEG and CEG RIO - gas distribution companies in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, privatized in July, 1997. In accordance with Yin's case study method (1994, a triangulation of methods was adopted. Thus, data was collected by way of documental/telematic investigations, a survey of management perceptions with the help of a predominantly structured questionnaire and complementary interviews. Data interpretation and analysis were carried out with the help of a relational framework and Macedo-Soares's model (2002 for relational strategic analysis. The results suggested that the firms' strategies were indeed adequate, confirming that the relational perspective added value to the traditional perspective, contributing with new insights to the companies' strategic decision-making processes and to the management of public utility concessions in general.

  3. Respuesta fisiológica de semillas de Cratylia argentea (Desvaux O. Kuntze a condiciones de almacenamiento y crioconservación Physiological response of Cratylia argentea (Desvaux O. Kuntze seeds to storage and cryoconservation conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana María Montoya Bárcenas

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available En la Universidad Nacional de Colombia y en los cuartos de crioconservación del Instituto Humboldt del Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT (Palmira, Colombia en un diseño completamente al azar, con cuatro repeticiones, se evaluaron los efectos de tres contenidos de humedad (10%, 8% y 6 %, el congelamiento ultrarrápido a través de inmersión en nitrógeno líquido (NL y dos condiciones de almacenamiento en la germinación de las semillas de Cratylia argentea (Desvaux O. Kuntze cultivar Veranera. Los resultados mostraron la alta calidad fisiológica inicial de las semillas de esta leguminosa forrajera y la ausencia de latencia física o fisiológica, aunque la germinación se reduce drásticamente en condiciones no controladas de almacenamiento. La germinación disminuyó significativamente cuando el contenido de humedad se redujo a 6%, indicando el posible comportamiento recalcitrante, o sea semillas que pierden su viabilidad por deshidratación producida por el medio donde se encuentren, sea éste de almacenamiento o natural (Vieira et al., 1994. Para la crioconservación por inmersión en nitrógeno líquido durante un mes, el contenido adecuado de humedad fue de 8%, aunque no se detectaron diferencias en la germinación cuando las semillas en los tres niveles de humedad se crioconservaron durante una hora en nitrógeno líquido.On the cryoconservation cool rooms of the Nacional University of Colombia, Palmira, and the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT, the effects on germination of Cratylia argentea seeds (cv. Veranera of three moisture levels (10, 8 and 6%, the liquid N (LN cryoperservation and two storage conditions were evaluated. The results showed high initial physiological quality of seeds and lack of any type of physical or physiological dormancy which drastically reduce germination on non controlled storage conditions. Germination decreased drastically when moisture content was reduced to 6% which

  4. Efeitos de tempos e temperaturas de condicionamento sobre a qualidade fisiológica de sementes de cafeeiro (Coffea arabica, L. sob condições ideais e de estresse térmico Effects of the times and temperatures of conditioning on the physiological quality of coffee seeds (Coffea arabica L. under ideal conditions and under thermal stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Mara Pacheco Lima

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se com a presente pesquisa estudar tempos e temperaturas mais adequadas para o condicionamento fisiológico e avaliar os efeitos desses tratamentos na germinação sob condições de estresse térmico, de sementes de cafeeiro armazenadas. O estudo foi conduzido nos Laboratórios de Análise de Sementes e Técnicas Moleculares do Departamento de Agricultura da Universidade Federal de Lavras, utilizando-se sementes de café da cultivar Acaiá do cerrado. As sementes foram colhidas nos campos de produção da UFLA e armazenadas em condições de ambiente de agosto/2000 a janeiro/2001, quando foram submetidas ao condicionamento em água nas temperaturas de 15, 25 e 35ºC por 4, 8 12 dias de embebição. O condicionamento foi realizado em câmara tipo BOD, na presença de luz, e a aeração foi feita com compressores e bombas de aquário. Após cada tratamento, as sementes foram imediatamente submetidas à determinação do teor de água e avaliadas pelos testes de germinação e índice de velocidade de germinação sob estresse térmico (20 e 35ºC e eletroforese de enzimas. Para comparação, foram utilizadas sementes sem tratamento de embebição. Pelos resultados, conclui-se que as sementes condicionadas em água a 15 e 25ºC apresentaram melhor desempenho da germinação em condições de estresse térmico; o condicionamento a 35ºC não foi apropriado; o condicionamento por 4 dias foi o menos eficiente em melhorar a qualidade fisiológica das sementes, e o condicionamento fisiológico em água mostrou-se eficaz ao revigoramento, principalmente a 25ºC por 12 dias.The goal of this work was the evaluation of the adequate times and temperatures for the physiological contitioning and effects of this techinique in the germination on stress conditions, of stored coffee seeds. The experiment was performed in the Seed and Molecular Techniques Laboratories of the UFLA's Agriculture Departament. The seeds used were from the cultivar Acai

  5. Physiological effects in aromatherapy

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The effects of aromas on humans are divided into physiological and psychological effects. The physiological effect acts directly on the physical organism, the psychological effect acts via the sense of smell or olfactory system, which in turn may cause a physiological effect. This paper reviews on the physiological effects which are used for the evaluation of the effects of aromas. Physiological parameters, i.e. heart rate blood pressure, electrodermal activity, electroencephalogram, slow pot...

  6. Physiology of bile secretion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alejandro Esteller

    2008-01-01

    The formation of bile depends on the structural and functional integrity of the bile-secretory apparatus and its impairment,in different situations,results in the syndrome of cholestasis.The structural bases that permit bile secretion as well as various aspects related with its composition and flow rate in physiological conditions will first be reviewed.Canalicular bile is produced by polarized hepatocytes that hold transporters in their basolateral (sinusoidal) and apical (canalicular) plasma membrane.This review summarizes recent data on the molecular determinants of this primary bile formation.The major function of the biliary tree is modification of canalicular bile by secretory and reabsorptive processes in bileduct epithelial cells (cholangiocytes) as bile passes through bile ducts.The mechanisms of fluid and solute transport in cholangiocytes will also be discussed.In contrast to hepatocytes where secretion is constant and poorly controlled,cholangiocyte secretion is regulated by hormones and nerves.A short section dedicated to these regulatory mechanisms of bile secretion has been included.The aim of this revision was to set the bases for other reviews in this series that will be devoted to specific issues related with biliary physiology and pathology.

  7. 奖惩对行为抑制及程序阶段中自主生理反应的影响%Impact of Reward/punishment Conditions on Behavioral Inhibition and Automatic Physiological Responses in the Stages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谷莉; 白学军; 王芹

    2015-01-01

    Though the revised reinforcement sensitivity theory (RST) provides a biological interpretation for the relationship between emotions and behavioral inhibition aroused by reward/punishment, it is still somewhat limited when attempting to explain specific phenomena. This may be attributed to factors such as the type, degree, and duration of reward/punishment stimuli, which have differed across studies. For instance, in many studies reward/punishment is a within-subjects factor, however, in clinical situations a cumulative and constant reward/punishment model is more commonly encountered, such as persistent praise or criticism of a certain individual. Furthermore, the emotion triggered by cumulative reward/punishment could manifest at any stage of the task completing process. Accordingly, this research investigated the impact of cumulative reward/punishment conditions on inhibition and automatic physiological responses during different time stages. Forty-five college students were allocated to a reward group, punishment group, or control group at random. The experiment used the Super Lab system to present stimuli and record the response time and rate of error inhibition shown by the subjects during the stop-signal task. Automatic physiological responses were collected continuously throughout the whole procedure (preparatory stage, working stage, feedback stage and reward/punishment stage) by a 16-channel physiological recording system. The results showed that: (1) in the absence of the stop-signal task, the response time of the reward group and punishment group was significantly longer than that of control group, and during the stop-signal task, the error inhibition rate of the reward group and punishment group was significantly lower than that of control group. However, there were no difference between the reward group and punishment group; (2) Heart rates within the reward group were much higher than those in the punishment group and control group, and finger

  8. Condicionamento fisiológico na germinação e no vigor de sementes armazenadas de café Stored coffee seeds germination and vigour as affected by physiological conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madelon Rodrigues Sá Braz

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar o efeito do condicionamento fisiológico na germinação e no vigor de sementes armazenadas de café. Para tanto, as sementes de café da cultivar "Catuaí Vermelho IAC 144" foram secas até atingir 30% de água e expostas a quatro condições de conservação: combinação de dois materiais de embalagens (polietileno e algodão e de dois ambientes de armazenamento (câmara seca e ambiente sem controle de temperatura e umidade relativa do ar. Após zero, três, seis e nove meses de armazenamento, as sementes foram submetidas ao condicionamento fisiológico, empregando-se a técnica de exposição em câmara com atmosfera saturada e a de condicionamento osmótico com PEG 6000 a 0,0 e a -0,4MPa. Sementes não-condicionadas foram usadas como controle. As sementes foram submetidas à determinação do teor de água e aos testes de germinação, de vigor e de sanidade. O condicionamento fisiológico favoreceu a germinação e o vigor das sementes de café armazenadas em embalagem de polietileno e em câmara seca, durante nove meses.The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of priming on stored coffee seeds germination and vigour. The coffee seeds, cv. ‘Catuaí Vermelho IAC 144’ were dried at 30% of moisture content and exposed to four storage conditions combined with two packing materials (polyethylene and cotton and two storage environments (dry chamber and uncontrolled environment. After each storage period (zero, three, six and nine months, the seeds were submitted to priming treatments by saturated atmosphere or osmotic conditioning with PEG 6000 at 0.0 and -0.4MPa. Unprimed seeds were used as control. The seeds were evaluated by tests of moisture content, germination, vigour and health test. The physiological conditioning favored the seeds germination and vigour that were stored in the polyethylene packs and maintained in the dry chamber, during nine months.

  9. Physiological Information Database (PID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has developed a physiological information database (created using Microsoft ACCESS) intended to be used in PBPK modeling. The database contains physiological parameter values for humans from early childhood through senescence as well as similar data for laboratory animal spec...

  10. Produção e fisiologia de plantas de cajueiro anão precoce sob condições de sequeiro e irrigado Production and physiology of dwarf cashew plants under rainfed and irrigated conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiala V Amorim

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A exploração do cajueiro sob condições de irrigação tem-se mostrado bastante promissora, especialmente no estado do Ceará, porém a resposta dessa cultura ao regime hídrico depende do genótipo. Objetivouse, com este trabalho, comparar respostas fisiológicas e bioquímicas (teores de solutos orgânicos e inorgânicos e trocas gasosas, tal como a produtividade de plantas de cajueiro anão precoce (Anacardium occidentale L. sob dois regimes hídricos (sequeiro e irrigado. O experimento foi conduzido no Campo Experimental da Embrapa Agroindústria Tropical, em Pacajus CE, no período de agosto de 2006 a janeiro de 2007. As plantas foram submetidas a dois tratamentos: um sem irrigação e outro com água de poço com condutividade elétrica (CEa de 0,5 dS m-1. As respostas fisiológicas foram avaliadas mensalmente e os dados de produção foram obtidos no período de novembro a janeiro. Os teores foliares de N-aminossolúveis e prolina foram mais elevados nas plantas cultivadas em condições de sequeiro do que naquelas irrigadas, porém não houve diferença significativa entre os tratamentos para as trocas gasosas, teores de carboidratos solúveis, K+, Na+ e Cl-. Entretanto, com exceção da fotossíntese, todas as variáveis estudadas apresentaram alterações com as épocas de coleta. Apesar das alterações em algumas variáveis ao longo do experimento, a produtividade das plantas não foi afetada pelo estresse hídrico.The exploitation of cashew under irrigated conditions has been very promising, especially in the state of Ceará, however, the response of this crop to the water regime depends on the genotype. This work attempts to compare the physiological and biochemical responses (content of organic and inorganic solutes and gas exchange and yield of precocious dwarf cashew (Anacardium occidentale L plants under two water regimes (irrigated and rainfed. The experiment was conducted at the experimental field of Embrapa Agroind

  11. Chewing Over Physiology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkader, Fernando; Azevedo-Martins, Anna Karenina; de Arcisio Miranda, Manoel; Brunaldi, Kellen

    2005-01-01

    An important challenge for both students and teachers of physiology is to integrate the differentareas in which physiological knowledge is didactically divided. In developing countries, such an issue is even more demanding, because budget restrictions often affect the physiology program with laboratory classes being the first on the list when it…

  12. Chewing Over Physiology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkader, Fernando; Azevedo-Martins, Anna Karenina; de Arcisio Miranda, Manoel; Brunaldi, Kellen

    2005-01-01

    An important challenge for both students and teachers of physiology is to integrate the differentareas in which physiological knowledge is didactically divided. In developing countries, such an issue is even more demanding, because budget restrictions often affect the physiology program with laboratory classes being the first on the list when it…

  13. Monitoring the Physiology of Animals in the Wild.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arehart-Treichel, Joan

    1979-01-01

    The use of radio telemetry as a research tool for studying the physiology of animals under natural conditions is described. Unexpected insights into animals' physiology, particularly the interaction of heart rates and breathing rates, are detailed. (BT)

  14. Microarrays for global expression constructed with a low redundancy set of 27,500 sequenced cDNAs representing an array of developmental stages and physiological conditions of the soybean plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retzel Ernest

    2004-09-01

    stages and physiological conditions of the soybean plant. We also demonstrate that the quality of the data from the soybean cDNA microarrays is sufficiently reliable to examine isogenic lines that differ with respect to a mutant phenotype and thereby to define a small list of candidate genes potentially encoding or modulated by the mutant phenotype.

  15. Physiological effects in aromatherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapanee Hongratanaworakit

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of aromas on humans are divided into physiological and psychological effects. The physiological effect acts directly on the physical organism, the psychological effect acts via the sense of smell or olfactory system, which in turn may cause a physiological effect. This paper reviews on the physiological effects which are used for the evaluation of the effects of aromas. Physiological parameters, i.e. heart rate blood pressure, electrodermal activity, electroencephalogram, slow potential brain waves (contingent negativevariation, and eye blink rate or pupil functions, are used as indices for the measurement of the aroma effects

  16. Doppler radar physiological sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Lubecke, Victor M; Droitcour, Amy D; Park, Byung-Kwon; Singh, Aditya

    2016-01-01

    Presents a comprehensive description of the theory and practical implementation of Doppler radar-based physiological monitoring. This book includes an overview of current physiological monitoring techniques and explains the fundamental technology used in remote non-contact monitoring methods. Basic radio wave propagation and radar principles are introduced along with the fundamentals of physiological motion and measurement. Specific design and implementation considerations for physiological monitoring radar systems are then discussed in detail. The authors address current research and commercial development of Doppler radar based physiological monitoring for healthcare and other applications.

  17. Effects of different soil condition on physiology and fruit quality of wine grapes%不同土壤条件对酿酒葡萄生理及果实品质的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李文超; 孙盼; 王振平

    2012-01-01

    [Objective]The study was to elucidate the effect of different soil condition on physiology and fruit quality of wine grapes. [Method] 'Cabernet Shelongzhu' wine grape was used as experiment material to study the effect of soil conditions including the Yellow River silt, sandy loam with stone and aeolian sandy soil on grape sugar unloading , berry weight, soluble solids, titratable acidity, total soluble sugar, pigment, tannin and grape leaf photosynthetic rate. [Result]The results showed that during period from grape berry color change to full ripening ~ sugar content of grapes increased in sandy loam with stone by 7%, 9% than that in the Yellow River silt and aeolian sandy soil. Grape pigment content and grape leaf photosynthetic rate were also the highest under the condition of sandy loam with stone . Total titratable acidity (8.28 g. L^(-1)) and berry weight (2.32 g) in the Yellow River silt were higher than in other soil, and the tannin content (1.15 mg·g^(-1) in seed and 0.30 mg·g^(-1) in skin ) in aeolian sandy soil was the highest. [Conclusion] The studies suggested that effects of different soil condition on fruit quality of wine grapes is sig- nificant, fruit quality grown in the sandy loam with stone is the best.%【目的】为了探索不同土壤条件对酿酒葡萄生理及果实品质的影响,【方法】以‘蛇龙珠’酿酒葡萄为试材,研究了宁夏贺兰山东麓地区,黄河淤土、含石的沙壤土和风沙土3种土壤对葡萄糖分卸载的影响,测定了不同土壤栽培条件下葡萄果实的单果质量、可溶性固形物、可滴定酸、可溶性总糖、色素、单宁及葡萄叶片的光合速率。【结果】结果表明,在葡萄开始着色至葡萄完全成熟期间,在含石的沙壤土栽培条件下葡萄可溶性总糖含量(22.4%)比黄河淤土栽培条件下和风沙土栽培条件下分别高7%、9%;葡萄色素(5.14mg·g。)和叶片光合速

  18. Neuroticism, Extraversion, Conscientiousness and Stress: Physiological Correlates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Anne-Marie; van Schaik, Martin G.; Korteling, J.E. (Hans); van Erp, Johannes Bernardus Fransiscus; Toet, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    High extraversion and conscientiousness and low neuroticism predict successful performance during and after stressful conditions. We investigated whether these personality factors are linked to stress sensitivity and to baseline physiology. Stress was induced through negative feedback on gaming perf

  19. Neuroticism, extraversion, conscientiousness and stress : Physiological correlates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, A.M.; Schaik, M.G. van; Korteling, J.E.; Erp, J.B.F. van; Toet, A.

    2015-01-01

    High extraversion and conscientiousness and low neuroticism predict successful performance during and after stressful conditions. We investigated whether these personality factors are linked to stress sensitivity and to baseline physiology. Stress was induced through negative feedback on gaming perf

  20. Neuroticism, extraversion, conscientiousness and stress : Physiological correlates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, A.M.; Schaik, M.G. van; Korteling, J.E.; Erp, J.B.F. van; Toet, A.

    2015-01-01

    High extraversion and conscientiousness and low neuroticism predict successful performance during and after stressful conditions. We investigated whether these personality factors are linked to stress sensitivity and to baseline physiology. Stress was induced through negative feedback on gaming perf

  1. Neuroticism, Extraversion, Conscientiousness and Stress: Physiological Correlates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Anne-Marie; Schaik, van Martin G.; Korteling, J.E. (Hans); Erp, van Jan B.F.; Toet, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    High extraversion and conscientiousness and low neuroticism predict successful performance during and after stressful conditions. We investigated whether these personality factors are linked to stress sensitivity and to baseline physiology. Stress was induced through negative feedback on gaming perf

  2. Neuroticism, Extraversion, Conscientiousness and Stress: Physiological Correlates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Anne-Marie; van Schaik, Martin G.; Korteling, J.E. (Hans); van Erp, Johannes Bernardus Fransiscus; Toet, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    High extraversion and conscientiousness and low neuroticism predict successful performance during and after stressful conditions. We investigated whether these personality factors are linked to stress sensitivity and to baseline physiology. Stress was induced through negative feedback on gaming

  3. Intragroup Emotions: Physiological Linkage and Social Presence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvelä, Simo; Kätsyri, Jari; Ravaja, Niklas; Chanel, Guillaume; Henttonen, Pentti

    2016-01-01

    We investigated how technologically mediating two different components of emotion—communicative expression and physiological state—to group members affects physiological linkage and self-reported feelings in a small group during video viewing. In different conditions the availability of second screen text chat (communicative expression) and visualization of group level physiological heart rates and their dyadic linkage (physiology) was varied. Within this four person group two participants formed a physically co-located dyad and the other two were individually situated in two separate rooms. We found that text chat always increased heart rate synchrony but HR visualization only with non-co-located dyads. We also found that physiological linkage was strongly connected to self-reported social presence. The results encourage further exploration of the possibilities of sharing group member's physiological components of emotion by technological means to enhance mediated communication and strengthen social presence. PMID:26903913

  4. Intragroup emotions: physiological linkage and social presence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simo eJärvelä

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We investigated how technologically mediating two different components of emotion – communicative expression and physiological state – to group members affects physiological linkage and self-reported feelings in a small group during video viewing. In different conditions the availability of second screen text chat (communicative expression and visualization of group level physiological heart rates and their dyadic linkage (physiology was varied. Within this four person group two participants formed a physically co-located dyad and the other two were individually situated in two separate rooms. We found that text chat always increased heart rate synchrony but HR visualization only with non-co-located dyads. We also found that physiological linkage was strongly connected to self-reported social presence. The results encourage further exploration of the possibilities of sharing group member’s physiological components of emotion by technological means to enhance mediated communication and strengthen social presence.

  5. Quantifying the effect of nighttime interactions between roots and canopy physiology and their control of water and carbon cycling on feedbacks between soil moisture and terrestrial climatology under variable environmental conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domec, Jean-Christophe [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Palmroth, Sari [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Oren, Ram [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Swenson, Jennifer [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); King, John S. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Noormets, Asko [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The primary objective of this project is to characterize and quantify how the temporal variability of hydraulic redistribution (HR) and its physiological regulation in unmanaged and complex forests is affecting current water and carbon exchange and predict how future climate scenarios will affect these relationships and potentially feed back to the climate. Specifically, a detailed study of ecosystem water uptake and carbon exchange in relation to root functioning was proposed in order to quantify the mechanisms controlling temporal variability of soil moisture dynamic and HR in three active AmeriFlux sites, and to use published data of two other inactive AmeriFlux sites. Furthermore, data collected by our research group at the Duke Free Air CO2 enrichment (FACE) site was also being utilized to further improve our ability to forecast future environmental impacts of elevated CO2 concentration on soil moisture dynamic and its effect on carbon sequestration and terrestrial climatology. The overarching objective being to forecast, using a soil:plant:atmosphere model coupled with a biosphere:atmosphere model, the impact of root functioning on land surface climatology. By comparing unmanaged sites to plantations, we also proposed to determine the effect of land use change on terrestrial carbon sequestration and climatology through its effect on soil moisture dynamic and HR. Our simulations of HR by roots indicated that in some systems HR is an important mechanism that buffers soil water deficit, affects energy and carbon cycling; thus having significant implications for seasonal climate. HR maintained roots alive and below 70% loss of conductivity and our simulations also showed that the increased vapor pressure deficit at night under future conditions was sufficient to drive significant nighttime transpiration at all sites, which reduced HR. This predicted reduction in HR under future climate conditions played an important regulatory role in land atmosphere interactions

  6. PHYSIOLOGY OF ACID BASE BALANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awati

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Acid-base, electrolyte, and metabolic disturbances are common in the intensive care unit. Almost all critically ill patients often suffer from compound acid-base and electrolyte disorders. Successful evaluation and management of such patients requires recognition of common patterns (e.g., metabolic acidosis and the ability to dissect one disorder from another. The intensivists needs to identify and correct these condition with the easiest available tools as they are the associated with multiorgan failure. Understanding the elements of normal physiology in these areas is very important so as to diagnose the pathological condition and take adequate measures as early as possible. Arterial blood gas analysis is one such tool for early detection of acid base disorder. Physiology of acid base is complex and here is the attempt to simplify it in our day to day application for the benefit of critically ill patients.

  7. Anatomy and physiology of cisternostomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Iype Cherian; Giovanni Grasso; Antonio Bernardo; Sunil Munakomi

    2016-01-01

    Cisternostomy is defined as opening the basal cisterns to atmospheric pressure.This technique helps to reduce the intracranial pressure in severe head trauma as well as other conditions when the so-called sudden "brain swelling" troubles the surgeon.We elaborated the surgical anatomy of this procedure as well as the proposed physiology of how cisternostomy works.This novel technique may change the current trends in neurosurgery.

  8. Formation of Fused-Ring 2′-Deoxycytidine Adducts from 1-Chloro-3-buten-2-one, an in Vitro 1,3-Butadiene Metabolite, under in Vitro Physiological Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liang; Pelah, Avishay; Zhang, Dong-Ping; Zhong, Yu-Fang; An, Jing; Yu, Ying-Xin; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Elfarra, Adnan A.

    2013-01-01

    1-Chloro-3-buten-2-one (CBO) is a potential metabolite of 1,3-butadiene (BD), a carcinogenic air pollutant. CBO is a bifunctional alkylating agent that readily reacts with glutathione (GSH) to form mono-GSH and di-GSH adducts. Recently, CBO and its precursor 1-chloro-2-hydroxy-3-butene (CHB) were found to be cytotoxic and genotoxic in human liver cells in culture with CBO being approximately 100-fold more potent than CHB. In the present study, CBO was shown to react readily with 2′-deoxycytidine (dC) under in vitro physiological conditions (pH 7.4, 37 °C) to form four dC adducts with the CBO moieties forming fused rings with the N3 and N4 atoms of dC. The four products were structurally characterized as 2-hydroxy-2-hydroxymethyl-7-(2-deoxy-β-D-erythro-pentofuranosyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahy dro-6-oxo-6H,7H-pyrimido[1,6-a]pyrimidin-5-ium (dC-1 and dC-2, a pair of diastereomers), 4-chloromethyl-4-hydroxy-7-(2-deoxy-β-D-erythro-pentofuranosyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydr o-6-oxo-6H,7H-pyrimido[1,6-a]pyrimidin-5-ium (dC-3), and 2-chloromethyl-2-hydroxy-7-(2-deoxy-β-D-erythro-pentofuranosyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydr o-6-oxo-6H,7H-pyrimido[1,6-a]pyrimidin-5-ium (dC-4). Interestingly, dC-1 and dC-2 were stable under our experimental conditions (pH 7.4, 37 °C, 6 h) and existed in equilibrium as indicated by HPLC analysis, whereas dC-3 and dC-4 were labile with the half-lives being 3.0 ± 0.36 and 1.7 ± 0.06 h, respectively. Decomposition of dC-4 produced both dC-1 and dC-2, whereas acid hydrolysis of dC-1/dC-2 and dC-4 in 1 M HCl at 100 °C for 30 min yielded the deribosylated adducts dC-1H/dC-2H and dC-4H, respectively. Because fused-ring dC adducts of other chemicals are mutagenic, the characterized CBO-dC adducts could be mutagenic and play a role in the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of CBO and its precursors, CHB and BD. The CBO-dC adducts may also be used as standards to characterize CBO-DNA adducts and to develop potential biomarkers for CBO formation in vivo. PMID:24020501

  9. Polyamines in plant physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galston, A. W.; Sawhney, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    The diamine putrescine, the triamine spermidine, and the tetramine spermine are ubiquitous in plant cells, while other polyamines are of more limited occurrence. Their chemistry and pathways of biosynthesis and metabolism are well characterized. They occur in the free form as cations, but are often conjugated to small molecules like phenolic acids and also to various macromolecules. Their titer varies from approximately micromolar to more than millimolar, and depends greatly on environmental conditions, especially stress. In cereals, the activity of one of the major polyamine biosynthetic enzymes, arginine decarboxylase, is rapidly and dramatically increased by almost every studied external stress, leading to 50-fold or greater increases in putrescine titer within a few hours. The physiological significance of this increase is not yet clear, although most recent work suggests an adaptive, protective role. Polyamines produced through the action of ornithine decarboxylase, by contrast, seem essential for DNA replication and cell division. The application of exogenous polyamines produces effects on patterns of senescence and morphogenesis, suggesting but not proving a regulatory role for polyamines in these processes. The evidence for such a regulatory role is growing.

  10. Physiology of Visceral Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhart, G F; Bielefeldt, Klaus

    2016-09-15

    Pain involving thoracic, abdominal, or pelvic organs is a common cause for physician consultations, including one-third of chronic pain patients who report that visceral organs contribute to their suffering. Chronic visceral pain conditions are typically difficult to manage effectively, largely because visceral sensory mechanisms and factors that contribute to the pathogenesis of visceral pain are poorly understood. Mechanistic understanding is particularly problematic in "functional" visceral diseases where there is no apparent pathology and pain typically is the principal complaint. We review here the anatomical organization of the visceral sensory innervation that distinguishes the viscera from innervation of all other tissues in the body. The viscera are innervated by two nerves that share overlapping functions, but also possess notably distinct functions. Additionally, the visceral innervation is sparse relative to the sensory innervation of other tissues. Accordingly, visceral sensations tend to be diffuse in character, are typically referred to nonvisceral somatic structures and thus are difficult to localize. Early arguments about whether the viscera were innervated ("sensate") and later, whether innervated by nociceptors, were resolved by advances reviewed here in the anatomical and functional attributes of receptive endings in viscera that contribute to visceral pain (i.e., visceral nociceptors). Importantly, the contribution of plasticity (i.e., sensitization) of peripheral and central visceral nociceptive mechanisms is considered in the context of persistent, chronic visceral pain conditions. The review concludes with an overview of the functional anatomy of visceral pain processing. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1609-1633, 2016. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  11. Advances in physiological computing

    CERN Document Server

    Fairclough, Stephen H

    2014-01-01

    This edited collection will provide an overview of the field of physiological computing, i.e. the use of physiological signals as input for computer control. It will cover a breadth of current research, from brain-computer interfaces to telemedicine.

  12. Phun Week: Understanding Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limson, Mel; Matyas, Marsha Lakes

    2009-01-01

    Topics such as sports, exercise, health, and nutrition can make the science of physiology relevant and engaging for students. In addition, many lessons on these topics, such as those on the cardiovascular, respiratory, and digestive systems, align with national and state life science education standards. Physiology Understanding Week (PhUn…

  13. Physiology of sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Ron

    2007-07-01

    The elite athlete represents the extreme of the human gene pool, where genetic endowment is developed by an intensive training programme. Sport encompasses many different activities, calling for different physical and mental attributes. Understanding the physiology of exercise provides insights into normal physiological function.

  14. Physiological changes in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    SOMA-PILLAY, Priya; Catherine, Nelson-Piercy; Tolppanen, Heli; Mebazaa, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Physiological changes occur in pregnancy to nurture the developing foetus and prepare the mother for labour and delivery. Some of these changes influence normal biochemical values while others may mimic symptoms of medical disease. It is important to differentiate between normal physiological changes and disease pathology. This review highlights the important changes that take place during normal pregnancy.

  15. Neuronal responses to physiological stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos eKagias

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Physiological stress can be defined as any external or internal condition that challenges the homeostasis of a cell or an organism. Physiological stress can be divided into three different aspects: environmental stress, intrinsic developmental stress and aging. Throughout life all living organisms are challenged by changes in the environment. Fluctuations in oxygen levels, temperature and redox state for example, trigger molecular events that enable an organism to adapt, survive and reproduce. In addition to external stressors, organisms experience stress associated with morphogenesis and changes in inner chemistry during normal development. For example, conditions such as intrinsic hypoxia and oxidative stress, which result from an increase in tissue mass, have to be confronted by developing embryos in order to complete their development. Finally, organisms face the challenge of stochastic accumulation of molecular damage during aging that results in decline and eventual death. Studies have shown that the nervous system plays a pivotal role in responding to stress. Neurons not only receive and process information from the environment but also actively respond to various stresses to promote survival. These responses include changes in the expression of molecules such as transcription factors and microRNAs that regulate stress resistance and adaptation. Moreover, both intrinsic and extrinsic stresses have a tremendous impact on neuronal development and maintenance with implications in many diseases. Here, we review the responses of neurons to various physiological stressors at the molecular and cellular level.

  16. Physiology of in vitro culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Jesús Cañal

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The culture procedures described up to the eighties, did not made any mention to the environmental control of in vitro plant development. However, growth rate, development and many of the physiologic-morphologic features of the in vitro grown plants are influenced by the culture vessel. The increasing knowledge about the environmental control of culture vessels under sterile conditions, is helping to change micorpropagation procedures. The in vitro environment with lower rate ventilation, brings about low flow rates of matter and energy, with minimum variations of temperature, high relative humidity and large daily changes of the concentration of CO2 inside the culture vessel. The type of culture vessel (size, shape, fabric and closing system can influence the evolution of the atmosphere along the time of culture. Although submitted to different stresses factors plant can be grown in vitro, but plants can be faulty in their anatomy, morphology and physiology. As a consequence, these plants shown a phenotype unable to survive to ex vitro conditions. Different strategies can be used to control the atmosphere along the different phases of micropropagation, in heterotrophic, mixotrophic or autotrophic cultures. The election of the best strategy will be based on different factors as species, number of transplantes required, or quality-price relationship. enviromental control, tissue culture, micropropagation Keywords: in vitro enviromental, characteristic physiology,

  17. 不同水分条件对人参榕生长和生理的影响%Effects of soil water condition on Ficus microcarpa growth and physiological characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆銮眉; 陈鹭真; 林金水; 杜晓娜

    2011-01-01

    以3年生人参榕(Ficus microcarpa)为试材,采用盆栽调控水分的方法,研究5种不同的水分处理(基质最大含水量的90%~100%,70%~80%,50%~60%,30% ~ 40%和10%~20%)对人参榕生长和生理的影响,为栽培生产提供理论依据.结果表明:随着浇水量的减少,人参榕的株高、冠幅、块根增量均显著下降(P<0.05);人参榕叶片的超氧化物歧化酶(SOD)、过氧化物酶(POD)活性显著增高(P<0.05),细胞膜相对透性显著增强,脯氨酸和丙二醛(MDA)含量也显著增加;叶片净光合速率(Pn)和蒸腾速率(Tr)呈随浇水量的减少而显著降低;但叶片水分利用效率(WUE)呈显著增加趋势;各处理的叶片初始荧光(F0)和最大光量子效率(Fv/Fm)差异不显著.在各处理中,70%~80%的最大基质含水量的处理,其人参榕叶片的细胞膜相对透性最低,保护酶活性最弱,脯氨酸和丙二醛含量最低,净光合速率高,从而导致了人参榕具有生长最快、株高、冠幅和最大块根直径增量最大的特点.可见,70%~80%的最大基质含水量为是人参榕种植效果最好的水分管理模式.%A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of different soil water conditions on the growth and physiological characteristics of three years old Ficus microcarpa seedlings, aimed to provide an optimum water management mode for the cultivation of this horticultural species. Five treatments were installed, I. E. , 90%-100% , 70%-80% , 50%-60% , 30% -40% , and 10% -20% of maximum soil water content. With the decrease of the water content, the seedling height, crown diameter, and root tuber biomass decreased significantly, leaf superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) activities, membrane permeability, and proline and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents had significant increase, leaf photosynthetic rate (Pn) and transpiration rate (TT) decreased significantly, and leaf water use efficiency (WUE) had a significant

  18. 不同贮藏条件对麻疯树种子生理生化和萌发的影响%Effect of Different Storage Condition on Seed Physiology and Chemistry Character and Germination of Jatropha curcas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦小丽; 周晓东

    2011-01-01

    采用室温,4、-5℃的贮藏温度和8.7%,4.7%的种子含水量设置6种组合,对麻疯树种子进行贮藏试验,分别于贮藏前、贮藏1个月和贮藏3个月测定不同贮藏条件下种子生理生化指标和萌发特性的变化.结果表明,随着贮藏时间的延长,麻疯树种子出现明显的劣变现象,一方面是贮藏物质的水解,表现为蛋白质含童降低、可溶性糖含童增加;另一方面是保护酶系统的破坏,呈现明显的膜脂过氧化,SOD活性降低,MDA含量和超氧阴离子自由基产生速率增加.最终结果是种子活力下降,发芽率降低.6种贮藏组合中,贮藏效果最好的是4号处理(温度4℃,含水量4.7%),其次是3号处理(温度4℃,含水量8.7%),最差的是1号处理(常温,含水量8.7%).初步认为,采用 4.7%的种子含水量和4℃贮藏条件贮藏麻疯树种子效果比较好.%The seed storage experiment of Jatropha curcas was carried out by designing six kinds of different combinations of temperature and seed moisture ( temperature: room temperature,4 ℃, - 5 ℃. seed moisture: 8.7% ,4.7% ). The physiology and chemistry indexes, germination rate of seed were tested before storage,storaged one month ,storaged three months. The results indicated that the seed germination capacity decreased siginficantly with storage time extending. On the one hand, the storage substance of seed hydrolyzed, the protein content decreased and the soluble sugar content increased. On the other hand, the protection enzyme system of seed was destoryed with membrance lipid peroxidation, the SOD activity decreaseded, the MDA content and the generated rate of Superoxide anion free radical increased. Finally, the seed vigor and germination rate of seed declined. Among the six kinds of combinations, the best combination for seed longevity was No. 4 (temperature 4 ℃ and seed moisture 4.7% ),the second was No. 3( temperature 4 ℃ and seed moisture 8.7% ),and the worst combination was No

  19. 不同立地条件下南方红豆杉幼苗的生长和生理特性%Growth and physiological characteristics of Taxus wallichiana var.mairei seedlings under different site conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘建福; 王明元; 杨晨; 范燕萍; 刘春冬; 傅建卿

    2012-01-01

    为阐明不同立地条件下南方红豆杉的生长发育、光合特性、活性氧代谢及其与环境的关系,本试验以2年生南方红豆杉幼苗为材料,在福建省泉州地区开展桉树林、樟树林和空地3种生境下南方红豆杉幼苗的生长和生理特性研究,探索适宜南方红豆杉幼苗生长的环境特点.结果表明:桉树林和樟树林下南方红豆杉幼苗的株高和新梢长度显著高于空地,桉树林和樟树林有利于南方红豆杉幼苗的生长;桉树林和樟树林下南方红豆杉幼苗叶绿素b含量和类胡萝卜素含量显著高于空地,气孔导度和蒸腾速率显著提高,净光合速率也高于空地;桉树林和樟树林下南方红豆杉幼苗可溶性糖和氨基酸含量高于空地,蛋白质含量低于空地.桉树林和樟树林下南方红豆杉幼苗超氧化物歧化酶和过氧化氢酶活性显著低于空地,而过氧化物酶活性高于空地;这可能是空地生境对南方红豆杉幼苗产生一定的光胁迫效应,桉树林和樟树林可为南方红豆杉幼苗生长提供必要的遮荫环境,有利于南方红豆杉幼苗的生长.%To clarify the relationships between the growth, photosynthesis, and active oxygen me-tabolism of Taxus wallichiana var. mairei and the environment under different stand conditions, and to approach the habitats suitable for the growth of T. wallichiana var. mairei seedlings, an investigation was made on the growth and physiological characteristics of two-year-old T. wallichi-ana var. mairei seedlings in three different habitats (Camphor stand, Eucalyptus stand, and open space) in Quanzhou of Fujian Province, East China. As compared with those in open space, the plant height and new shoot length of the seedlings in Eucalyptus and Camphor planta-tions were significantly improved, suggesting that woodland habitats benefited the growth of the seedlings. The seedlings chlorophyll b and carotenoid contents, stomatal conductance, transpira

  20. Effects of the invasive annual grass Lolium multiflorum Lam. on the growth and physiology of a Southern African Mediterranean-climate geophyte Tritonia crocata (L.) Ker. Gawl. under different resource conditions / J.L. Arnolds

    OpenAIRE

    Arnolds, Judith Lize

    2007-01-01

    Little is known of the physiological and biochemical mechanisms underlying competitive interactions between alien invasive grasses and native taxa, and how these are affected by resource supply. Consequently, this study compared photosystem II (PS II) function, photosynthetic gas and water exchange, enzyme and pigment concentrations, flowering and biomass accumulation in an indigenous geophyte, Tritonia crocata (L.) Ker. Gawl., grown in monoculture and admixed with the alien grass, Lolium mul...

  1. Wireless Sensor Network for Wearable Physiological Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Pandian

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Wearable physiological monitoring system consists of an array of sensors embedded into the fabric of the wearer to continuously monitor the physiological parameters and transmit wireless to a remote monitoring station. At the remote monitoring station the data is correlated to study the overall health status of the wearer. In the conventional wearable physiological monitoring system, the sensors are integrated at specific locations on the vest and are interconnected to the wearable data acquisition hardware by wires woven into the fabric. The drawbacks associated with these systems are the cables woven in the fabric pickup noise such as power line interference and signals from nearby radiating sources and thereby corrupting the physiological signals. Also repositioning the sensors in the fabric is difficult once integrated. The problems can be overcome by the use of physiological sensors with miniaturized electronics to condition, process, digitize and wireless transmission integrated into the single module. These sensors are strategically placed at various locations on the vest. Number of sensors integrated into the fabric form a network (Personal Area Network and interacts with the human system to acquire and transmit the physiological data to a wearable data acquisition system. The wearable data acquisition hardware collects the data from various sensors and transmits the processed data to the remote monitoring station. The paper discusses wireless sensor network and its application to wearable physiological monitoring and its applications. Also the problems associated with conventional wearable physiological monitoring are discussed.

  2. Anatomy and physiology of the stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybel, David I

    2005-10-01

    In this article, key concepts in gastric anatomy and physiology are reviewed. Attention is given to historical development of concepts of acid secretion, to the role of stomach in digestion, and to the mechanisms that protect gastric mucosa from acid and hostile luminal conditions. Evolving ideas that may influence understand-ing of the physiologic consequences of emerging therapeutics, and procedures that target anatomy or function of the stomach are also reviewed.

  3. Applied physiology of cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, I E

    1984-01-01

    Historically, the bicycle has evolved through the stages of a machine for efficient human transportation, a toy for children, a finely-tuned racing machine, and a tool for physical fitness development, maintenance and testing. Recently, major strides have been made in the aerodynamic design of the bicycle. These innovations have resulted in new land speed records for human powered machines. Performance in cycling is affected by a variety of factors, including aerobic and anaerobic capacity, muscular strength and endurance, and body composition. Bicycle races range from a 200m sprint to approximately 5000km. This vast range of competitive racing requires special attention to the principle of specificity of training. The physiological demands of cycling have been examined through the use of bicycle ergometers, rollers, cycling trainers, treadmill cycling, high speed photography, computer graphics, strain gauges, electromyography, wind tunnels, muscle biopsy, and body composition analysis. These techniques have been useful in providing definitive data for the development of a work/performance profile of the cyclist. Research evidence strongly suggests that when measuring the cyclist's aerobic or anaerobic capacity, a cycling protocol employing a high pedalling rpm should be used. The research bicycle should be modified to resemble a racing bicycle and the cyclist should wear cycling shoes. Prolonged cycling requires special nutritional considerations. Ingestion of carbohydrates, in solid form and carefully timed, influences performance. Caffeine appears to enhance lipid metabolism. Injuries, particularly knee problems which are prevalent among cyclists, may be avoided through the use of proper gearing and orthotics. Air pollution has been shown to impair physical performance. When pollution levels are high, training should be altered or curtailed. Effective training programmes simulate competitive conditions. Short and long interval training, blended with long

  4. Reproduction, physiology and biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter summarizes fundamental knowledge and recent discoveries about the reproduction, physiology and biochemistry of plant-parasitic nematodes. Various types of reproduction are reviewed, including sexual reproduction and mitotic and meiotic parthenogenesis. Although much is known about the p...

  5. Applied physiology of swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, J M; Montpetit, R R

    1986-01-01

    Scientific research in swimming over the past 10 to 15 years has been oriented toward multiple aspects that relate to applied and basic physiology, metabolism, biochemistry, and endocrinology. This review considers recent findings on: 1) specific physical characteristics of swimmers; 2) the energetics of swimming; 3) the evaluation of aerobic fitness in swimming; and 4) some metabolic and hormonal aspects related to swimmers. Firstly, the age of finalists in Olympic swimming is not much different from that of the participants from other sports. They are taller and heavier than a reference population of the same age. The height bias in swimming may be the reason for lack of success from some Asian and African countries. Experimental data point toward greater leanness, particularly in female swimmers, than was seen 10 years ago. Overall, female swimmers present a range of 14 to 19% body fat whereas males are much lower (5 to 10%). Secondly, the relationship between O2 uptake and crawl swimming velocity (at training and competitive speeds) is thought to be linear. The energy cost varies between strokes with a dichotomy between the 2 symmetrical and the 2 asymmetrical strokes. Energy expenditure in swimming is represented by the sum of the cost of translational motion (drag) and maintenance of horizontal motion (gravity). The cost of the latter decreases as speed increases. Examination of the question of size-associated effects on the cost of swimming using Huxley's allometric equation (Y = axb) shows an almost direct relationship with passive drag. Expressing energy cost in litres of O2/m/kg is proposed as a better index of technical swimming ability than the traditional expression of VO2/distance in L/km. Thirdly, maximal direct conventional techniques used to evaluate maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max) in swimming include free swimming, tethered swimming, and flume swimming. Despite the individual peculiarities of each method, with similar experimental conditions

  6. Cassava biology and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sharkawy, Mabrouk A

    2004-11-01

    Cassava or manioc (Manihot esculenta Crantz), a perennial shrub of the New World, currently is the sixth world food crop for more than 500 million people in tropical and sub-tropical Africa, Asia and Latin America. It is cultivated mainly by resource-limited small farmers for its starchy roots, which are used as human food either fresh when low in cyanogens or in many processed forms and products, mostly starch, flour, and for animal feed. Because of its inherent tolerance to stressful environments, where other food crops would fail, it is often considered a food-security source against famine, requiring minimal care. Under optimal environmental conditions, it compares favorably in production of energy with most other major staple food crops due to its high yield potential. Recent research at the Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT) in Colombia has demonstrated the ability of cassava to assimilate carbon at very high rates under high levels of humidity, temperature and solar radiation,which correlates with productivity across all environments whether dry or humid. When grown on very poor soils under prolonged drought for more than 6 months, the crop reduce both its leaf canopy and transpiration water loss, but its attached leaves remain photosynthetically active, though at greatly reduced rates. The main physiological mechanism underlying such a remarkable tolerance to drought was rapid stomatal closure under both atmospheric and edaphic water stress, protecting the leaf against dehydration while the plant depletes available soil water slowly during long dry periods. This drought tolerance mechanism leads to high crop water use efficiency values. Although the cassava fine root system is sparse, compared to other crops, it can penetrate below 2 m soil,thus enabling the crop to exploit deep water if available. Leaves of cassava and wild Manihot possess elevated activities of the C4 enzyme PEP carboxylase but lack the leaf Kranz anatomy typical of C4

  7. Physiological mechanisms of prosociality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jonas G

    2017-08-12

    Psychophysiological perspectives can provide unique insights into the nature and motivations of children's prosociality and inform our understanding of individual differences. Here, I review current research on prosociality involving some of the most common physiological measures in developmental psychology, including cortisol, various sympathetic nervous system measures, and high-frequency heart rate variability. The literature has been quite mixed, in part because the link between physiology and prosociality is context-dependent and person-dependent. However, recent advances are refining our understanding of the basic physiological mechanisms of prosociality. Resting physiology that contributes to a balance of regulation and vigilance prepares children to effectively cope with future social challenges, like noticing and attending to the needs of others. Experiencing some arousal is an important aspect of empathy-related responding, but physiological patterns of both heightened and hypoarousal can undermine prosociality. Physiological flexibility in response to others' needs may support emotional and behavioral flexibility important for prosociality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fish cardiovascular physiology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrill, Johanna; Weber, E Scott; Marty, Gary D; Hernandez-Divers, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Fish patients with cardiovascular disorders present a challenge in terms of diagnostic evaluation and therapeutic options. Veterinarians can approach these cases in fish using methods similar to those employed for other companion animals. Clinicians who evaluate and treat fish in private, aquarium, zoologic, or aquaculture settings need to rely on sound clinical judgment after thorough historical and physical evaluation. Pharmacokinetic data and treatments specific to cardiovascular disease in fish are limited; thus, drug types and dosages used in fish are largely empiric. Fish cardiovascular anatomy, physiology, diagnostic evaluation, monitoring, common diseases, cardiac pathologic conditions, formulary options, and comprehensive references are presented with the goal of providing fish veterinarians with clinically relevant tools.

  9. From growth physiology to systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaechter, Moselio

    2006-09-01

    As it focuses on the integrated behavior of the entire cell, systems biology is a powerful extension of growth physiology. Here, I briefly trace some of the origins of modern-day bacterial growth physiology and its relevance to systems biology. I describe how growth physiology emerged from the foggy picture of the growth curve as a self-contained entity. For this insight, we can thank Henrici, Hershey, Monod, Maaløe, and others. As a result of their work, growth rate is understood to be the unitary manifestation of the response to nutritional conditions and to the control condition for studies on the effect of environmental stresses. For this response to be usefully reproducible, cultures must be in the steady state known as balanced growth. I point out that present-day experimenters are not always aware of this imperative and thus do not always use conditions that ensure the balanced growth of their control cultures.

  10. Neuropeptide physiology in helminths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousley, Angela; Novozhilova, Ekaterina; Kimber, Michael J; Day, Tim A

    2010-01-01

    Parasitic worms come from two distinct, distant phyla, Nematoda (roundworms) and Platyhelminthes (flatworms). The nervous systems of worms from both phyla are replete with neuropeptides and there is ample physiological evidence that these neuropeptides control vital aspects of worm biology. In each phyla, the physiological evidence for critical roles for helminth neuropeptides is derived from both parasitic and free-living members. In the nematodes, the intestinal parasite Ascaris suum and the free-living Caenorhabditis elegans have yielded most of the data; in the platyhelminths, the most physiological data has come from the blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni. FMRFamide-like peptides (FLPs) have many varied effects (excitation, relaxation, or a combination) on somatic musculature, reproductive musculature, the pharynx and motor neurons in nematodes. Insulin-like peptides (INSs) play an essential role in nematode dauer formation and other developmental processes. There is also some evidence for a role in somatic muscle control for the somewhat heterogeneous grouping ofpeptides known as neuropeptide-like proteins (NLPs). In platyhelminths, as in nematodes, FLPs have a central role in somatic muscle function. Reports of FLP physiological action in platyhelminths are limited to a potent excitation of the somatic musculature. Platyhelminths are also abundantly endowed with neuropeptide Fs (NPFs), which appear absent from nematodes. There is not yet any data linking platyhelminth NPF to any particular physiological outcome, but this neuropeptide does potently and specifically inhibit cAMP accumulation in schistosomes. In nematodes and platyhelminths, there is an abundance of physiological evidence demonstrating that neuropeptides play critical roles in the biology of both free-living and parasitic helminths. While it is certainly true that there remains a great deal to learn about the biology of neuropeptides in both phyla, physiological evidence presently available points

  11. Crop physiology in (semi-)closed greenhouses - Final report of the TransForum scientific project “SynErgy: Monitoring and control system for conditioning of plants and greenhouse” (WP-066)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieleman, J.A.; Qian, T.; Elings, A.; Marcelis, L.F.M.

    2010-01-01

    In The Netherlands, since 2002, a number of (semi-)closed greenhouses was constructed. Climate conditions in these greenhouses were found to differ considerably from those in conventional greenhouses. Knowledge of the effects of these climate conditions on the crop was scarce. Therefore, in the rese

  12. Human physiology in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernikos, J.

    1996-01-01

    The universality of gravity (1 g) in our daily lives makes it difficult to appreciate its importance in morphology and physiology. Bone and muscle support systems were created, cellular pumps developed, neurons organised and receptors and transducers of gravitational force to biologically relevant signals evolved under 1g gravity. Spaceflight provides the only microgravity environment where systematic experimentation can expand our basic understanding of gravitational physiology and perhaps provide new insights into normal physiology and disease processes. These include the surprising extent of our body's dependence on perceptual information, and understanding the effect and importance of forces generated within the body's weightbearing structures such as muscle and bones. Beyond this exciting prospect is the importance of this work towards opening the solar system for human exploration. Although both appear promising, we are only just beginning to taste what lies ahead.

  13. Circadian physiology of metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Satchidananda

    2016-11-25

    A majority of mammalian genes exhibit daily fluctuations in expression levels, making circadian expression rhythms the largest known regulatory network in normal physiology. Cell-autonomous circadian clocks interact with daily light-dark and feeding-fasting cycles to generate approximately 24-hour oscillations in the function of thousands of genes. Circadian expression of secreted molecules and signaling components transmits timing information between cells and tissues. Such intra- and intercellular daily rhythms optimize physiology both by managing energy use and by temporally segregating incompatible processes. Experimental animal models and epidemiological data indicate that chronic circadian rhythm disruption increases the risk of metabolic diseases. Conversely, time-restricted feeding, which imposes daily cycles of feeding and fasting without caloric reduction, sustains robust diurnal rhythms and can alleviate metabolic diseases. These findings highlight an integrative role of circadian rhythms in physiology and offer a new perspective for treating chronic diseases in which metabolic disruption is a hallmark.

  14. Plant Physiology and Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taiz, Lincoln; Zeiger, Eduardo; Møller, Ian Max

    Physiology and Development. As before, Unit III begins with updated chapters on Cell Walls and Signals and Signal Transduction. The latter chapter has been expanded to include a discussion of major signaling molecules, such as calcium ions and plant hormones. A new, unified chapter entitled Signals from......Throughout its twenty-two year history, the authors of Plant Physiology have continually updated the book to incorporate the latest advances in plant biology and implement pedagogical improvements requested by adopters. This has made Plant Physiology the most authoritative, comprehensive......, and widely used upper-division plant biology textbook. In the Sixth Edition, the Growth and Development section (Unit III) has been reorganized and expanded to present the complete life cycle of seed plants from germination to senescence. In recognition of this enhancement, the text has been renamed Plant...

  15. The Face of Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul White

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the relationship between the physiology of the emotions and the display of character in Victorian Britain. Charles Bell and others had begun to link certain physiological functions, such as respiration, with the expression of feelings such as fear, regarding the heart and other internal organs as instruments by which the emotions were made visible. But a purely functional account of the emotions, which emerged through the development of reflex physiology during the second half of the century, would dramatically alter the nature of feelings and the means of observing them. At the same time, instinctual or acquired sympathy, which had long underpinned the accurate reading of expressions, became a problem to be surmounted by new 'objectively'. Graphic recording instruments measuring a variety of physiological functions and used with increasing frequency in clinical diagnostics became of fundamental importance for tracing the movement of feelings during the period prior to the development of cinematography. They remained, in the form of devices such as the polygraph, a crucial and controversial means of measuring affective states, beneath the potentially deceptive surface of the body.

  16. Starting Physiology: Bioelectrogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Vander

    2015-01-01

    From a Cartesian perspective of rational analysis, the electric potential difference across the cell membrane is one of the fundamental concepts for the study of physiology. Unfortunately, undergraduate students often struggle to understand the genesis of this energy gradient, which makes the teaching activity a hard task for the instructor. The…

  17. Physiology of Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carley, David W; Farabi, Sarah S

    2016-02-01

    IN BRIEF Far from a simple absence of wakefulness, sleep is an active, regulated, and metabolically distinct state, essential for health and well-being. In this article, the authors review the fundamental anatomy and physiology of sleep and its regulation, with an eye toward interactions between sleep and metabolism.

  18. Integrative Physiology of Fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secor, Stephen M; Carey, Hannah V

    2016-03-15

    Extended bouts of fasting are ingrained in the ecology of many organisms, characterizing aspects of reproduction, development, hibernation, estivation, migration, and infrequent feeding habits. The challenge of long fasting episodes is the need to maintain physiological homeostasis while relying solely on endogenous resources. To meet that challenge, animals utilize an integrated repertoire of behavioral, physiological, and biochemical responses that reduce metabolic rates, maintain tissue structure and function, and thus enhance survival. We have synthesized in this review the integrative physiological, morphological, and biochemical responses, and their stages, that characterize natural fasting bouts. Underlying the capacity to survive extended fasts are behaviors and mechanisms that reduce metabolic expenditure and shift the dependency to lipid utilization. Hormonal regulation and immune capacity are altered by fasting; hormones that trigger digestion, elevate metabolism, and support immune performance become depressed, whereas hormones that enhance the utilization of endogenous substrates are elevated. The negative energy budget that accompanies fasting leads to the loss of body mass as fat stores are depleted and tissues undergo atrophy (i.e., loss of mass). Absolute rates of body mass loss scale allometrically among vertebrates. Tissues and organs vary in the degree of atrophy and downregulation of function, depending on the degree to which they are used during the fast. Fasting affects the population dynamics and activities of the gut microbiota, an interplay that impacts the host's fasting biology. Fasting-induced gene expression programs underlie the broad spectrum of integrated physiological mechanisms responsible for an animal's ability to survive long episodes of natural fasting.

  19. Condições climáticas, caracteristicas do fruto e sistema de colheita na qualidade fisiológica de sementes de jacarandá Climatic conditions, fruit characteristics and harvest system on physiological quality of jacaranda seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele Chalita Martins

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available As características dos frutos coletados e o sistema de colheita utilizado dependem da espécie que se está estudando. Esses parâmetros devem ser bem estabelecidos para permitir a obtenção de sementes com máxima germinação e vigor. Com o objetivo de determinar as características dos frutos e o sistema de colheita mais favorável à qualidade fisiológica de sementes de Jacaranda cuspidifolia Mart., por dois anos consecutivos foram colhidos frutos na árvore (verdes fechados, marrons fechados e marrons abertos e frutos marrons no chão. As sementes foram extraídas, limpas e avaliadas quanto ao teor de água, germinação e vigor (primeira contagem do teste de germinação, comprimento da parte aérea e da radícula das plântulas e porcentagem de emergência. Para a obtenção de sementes de jacarandá com melhor qualidade fisiológica, os frutos devem ser colhidos na árvore marrons, abertos ou fechados e com teor de água inferior a 24,4%.The characteristics of the collected fruits and its harvest system depend on the studied specie. These parameters must be well established to obtaining seeds with maximum germination and vigor. The objective of this study was to determinate the fruit characteristics and harvest system more favorable to physiological quality of Jacaranda cuspidifolia Mart. seeds, collecting during two years fruits from trees (green closed, brown closed and brown opened, and brown fruits on floor. Seeds were extracted, cleaned, and had evaluated the moisture content, germination and vigor (first counting of the germination test, seedling shoot and root growth and percentage of seedling emergence. Best physiological quality of jacarandá seeds was obtained with the harvest of brown fruits, opened or closed, on the trees with moisture content lower than 24.4%.

  20. The differentiation of cortical ciliature microtubules of Oxytricha platystoma under different physiological conditions%阔口尖毛虫皮层纤毛器微管在不同生理条件下的分化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟楠; 郭键; 林钦; 倪兵

    2012-01-01

    应用激光扫描共聚焦显微术,显示腹毛类纤毛虫阔口尖毛虫(Oxytricha platystoma)无性生殖过程中,新的口围带、波动膜、额腹横棘毛、左右缘棘毛微管先后分化,老纤毛器微管去分化,细胞分裂产生各含一套纤毛器微管的前、后两仔虫;生理改组过程中,口围带、波动膜、额腹横棘毛、左右缘棘毛微管发生去分化和再分化,细胞皮层微管胞器更新形成含一套纤毛器微管的新细胞.结果表明阔口尖毛虫在无性生殖和生理改组这两种不同的生理条件下,其纤毛器微管结构的形成或更新可能具有相同的细胞调控机制,形态发生中老纤毛器结构可能对新结构的发生和发育具有诱导定位和物质贡献的作用.%The cortical ciliature microtubules of one hypotrichous ciliate Oxytricha platystoma were visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy. During the process of asexual reproduction, when old ciliature microtubules disintegrated, new adoral zone of mem-branelles (AZM) , undulating membranes ( UM ) , frontal-ventral-transverse cirri ( FVTC) and left and right marginal cirri ( L-and RMC) were differentiated in order. And one cell divided into one proter and one opisthe, both had one set of ciliature microtubules. During the process of physiological reorganization, adoral zone of membranelles ( AZM ) , undulating membranes ( UM ) , frontal-ventral-transverse cirri (FVTC) and left and right marginal cirri (L-and RMC) were dedifferentiated first and then redifferentiated. And the cortical microtubular organelles of the cell were renewed to be a new cell with one set of ciliature microtubules. The results showed that during the different processes of asexual reproduction and physiological reorganization, the regulation mechanism for forming and renewing ciliature microtubules of Oxytricha platystoma was same and the old ciliature might play a role of inducing location and physical contribution to the new ones

  1. Cell volume regulation: physiology and pathophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambert, I H; Hoffmann, E K; Pedersen, Stine Helene Falsig

    2008-01-01

    not only under physiological conditions, e.g. following accumulation of nutrients, during epithelial absorption/secretion processes, following hormonal/autocrine stimulation, and during induction of apoptosis, but also under pathophysiological conditions, e.g. hypoxia, ischaemia and hyponatremia....../hypernatremia. On the other hand, it has recently become clear that an increase or reduction in cell volume can also serve as a specific signal in the regulation of physiological processes such as transepithelial transport, cell migration, proliferation and death. Although the mechanisms by which cell volume perturbations...... are sensed are still far from clear, significant progress has been made with respect to the nature of the sensors, transducers and effectors that convert a change in cell volume into a physiological response. In the present review, we summarize recent major developments in the field, and emphasize...

  2. Physiological attributes of triathletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriano, R; Bishop, D

    2010-05-01

    Triathlons of all distances can be considered endurance events and consist of the individual disciplines of swimming, cycling and running which are generally completed in this sequential order. While it is expected that elite triathletes would possess high values for submaximal and maximal measures of aerobic fitness, little is known about how these values compare with those of single-sport endurance athletes. Earlier reviews, conducted in the 1980s, concluded that triathletes possessed lower V(O2(max)) values than other endurance athletes. An update of comparisons is of interest to determine if the physiological capacities of elite triathletes now reflect those of single-sport athletes or whether these physiological capacities are compromised by the requirement to cross-train for three different disciplines. It was found that although differences in the physiological attributes during swimming, cycling and running are evident among triathletes, those who compete at an international level possess V(O2(max)) values that are indicative of success in endurance-based individual sports. Furthermore, various physiological parameters at submaximal workloads have been used to describe the capacities of these athletes. Only a few studies have reported the lactate threshold among triathletes with the majority of studies reporting the ventilatory threshold. Although observed differences among triathletes for both these submaximal measures are complicated by the various methods used to determine them, the reported values for triathletes are similar to those for trained cyclists and runners. Thus, from the limited data available, it appears that triathletes are able to obtain similar physiological values as single-sport athletes despite dividing their training time among three disciplines.

  3. Mechanisms of physiological and epileptic HFO generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jefferys, J.G.; Menendez de la Prida, L.; Wendling, F.; Bragin, A.; Avoli, M.; Timofeev, I.; Lopes da Silva, F.H.

    2012-01-01

    High frequency oscillations (HFO) have a variety of characteristics: band-limited or broad-band, transient burst-like phenomenon or steady-state. HFOs may be encountered under physiological or under pathological conditions (pHFO). Here we review the underlying mechanisms of oscillations, at the leve

  4. Alterações das características fisiológicas da bananeira sob condições de fertirrigação Alteration of the physiologic characteristics in banana under fertirrigation conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Soares de Melo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A aplicação de fertilizantes via sistema de irrigação tem se tornado uma prática importante para o suprimento de nutrientes na fruticultura. No entanto, é necessário estudar o efeito dessa aplicação sobre a fisiologia da bananeira a fim de aumentar a eficiência do uso desses insumos. O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar os efeitos de doses de nitrogênio e potássio, via água de irrigação, sobre as características fisiológicas da bananeira, cultivar 'Prata-Anã', nos tabuleiros costeiros do Estado de Sergipe. O experimento foi conduzido no campo, utilizando um fatorial 4x4 com quatro blocos casualizados, na Estação Experimental da Universidade Federal de Sergipe. Foram testados dois fatores: nitrogênio (0; 250; 500 e 750, em kg ha-1 de N, na forma de uréia e potássio (0; 290; 580 e 870, em kg ha-1 de K2O, na forma de cloreto de potássio. Foram determinadas: a taxa de assimilação de CO², a transpiração, a condutância estomática, a concentração interna de CO² e as eficiências no uso da água e da carboxilação. A condutância estomática foi reduzida, principalmente, na fertilização com 700kg ha-1 de N e na ausência de K, afetando as trocas gasosas e, conseqüentemente, o processo fotossintético. Em situações de maior disponibilidade de potássio, as bananeiras necessitam de menores quantidades de nitrogênio para manutenção da eficiência no uso da água, como conseqüência da melhoria no ajuste estomático.Fertilizer application through the irrigation system, has become an important way to supply nutrients to fruit trees. However, it is necessary to study its effects on the banana tree physiology, in order to improve fertilizer use efficiency. The objective of this study was to evaluate doses of nitrogen and potassium through irrigation water, on the physiological characteristics of the banana tree, cv. 'Prata-Anã', in the coastal tablelands of Sergipe State. The experiment was established in the field

  5. Tuna comparative physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jeffrey B; Dickson, Kathryn A

    2004-11-01

    Thunniform swimming, the capacity to conserve metabolic heat in red muscle and other body regions (regional endothermy), an elevated metabolic rate and other physiological rate functions, and a frequency-modulated cardiac output distinguish tunas from most other fishes. These specializations support continuous, relatively fast swimming by tunas and minimize thermal barriers to habitat exploitation, permitting niche expansion into high latitudes and to ocean depths heretofore regarded as beyond their range.

  6. Pollen performance, cell number, and physiological state in the early-divergent angiosperm Annona cherimola Mill. (Annonaceae) are related to environmental conditions during the final stages of pollen development

    OpenAIRE

    Lora, Jorge; Herrero Romero, María; Hormaza Urroz, José Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Pollen performance is an important determinant for fertilization success, but high variability in pollen behavior both between and within species occurs in different years and under varying environmental conditions. Annona cherimola, an early-divergent angiosperm, is a species that releases a variable ratio of bicellular and tricellular hydrated pollen at anther dehiscence depending on temperature. The presence of both bi- and tricellular types of pollen is an uncommon characteristic in angio...

  7. Neuronal responses to physiological stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kagias, Konstantinos; Nehammer, Camilla; Pocock, Roger David John

    2012-01-01

    by changes in the environment. Fluctuations in oxygen levels, temperature, and redox state for example, trigger molecular events that enable an organism to adapt, survive, and reproduce. In addition to external stressors, organisms experience stress associated with morphogenesis and changes in inner...... include changes in the expression of molecules such as transcription factors and microRNAs that regulate stress resistance and adaptation. Moreover, both intrinsic and extrinsic stresses have a tremendous impact on neuronal development and maintenance with implications in many diseases. Here, we review......Physiological stress can be defined as any external or internal condition that challenges the homeostasis of a cell or an organism. It can be divided into three different aspects: environmental stress, intrinsic developmental stress, and aging. Throughout life all living organisms are challenged...

  8. CH2 - Lighting and Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Altomonte

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper explains the designed performances of the new CH2 building in Melbourne, Australia. CH2 is an environmentally significant project that involves biomimicry of natural systems to produce indoor conditions that are conducive to user comfort, health and productivity. This paper focuses on lighting and physiology and examines the solutions chosen for artificial and natural lighting and the likely effects these will have on building occupants. The purpose of the paper is to critically comment on the adopted strategy and, cognisance of contemporary thinking in lighting design, to judge the effectiveness of this aspect of the project with a view to later verification and post-occupancy review. The paper concludes that CH2 is an exemplar of lighting innovation that provides valuable lessons to designers of office buildings, particularly in the Melbourne CSD.

  9. CH2 - Lighting and Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Altomonte

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper explains the designed performances of the new CH2 building in Melbourne, Australia. CH2 is an environmentally significant project that involves biomimicry of natural systems to produce indoor conditions that are conducive to user comfort, health and productivity. This paper focuses on lighting and physiology and examines the solutions chosen for artificial and natural lighting and the likely effects these will have on building occupants. The purpose of the paper is to critically comment on the adopted strategy and, cognisance of contemporary thinking in lighting design, to judge the effectiveness of this aspect of the project with a view to later verification and post-occupancy review. The paper concludes that CH2 is an exemplar of lighting innovation that provides valuable lessons to designers of office buildings, particularly in the Melbourne CSD.

  10. Calidad fisiológica de semillas de Physalis ixocarpa en función de madurez a cosecha y condiciones de almacenamiento Physalis ixocarpa physiological seed quality in terms of maturity at harvest and storage conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Pérez Camacho

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available El deterioro de la semilla durante el almacenamiento reduce su capacidad germinativa y el establecimiento de plántulas en campo. En semillas de Physalis ixocarpa Brot., se desconocen los niveles de los factores ambientales que afectan su longevidad germinativa y su desempeño fisiológico durante el almacenamiento, en función del estado de desarrollo a la cosecha. En esta investigación se evaluó semilla de la variedad Chapingo cosechada en tres estados de desarrollo (45, 55 y 65 días después de la polinización, en tres periodos de almacenamiento (0, 4 y 8 meses combinados con cinco ambientes que incluyeron dos temperaturas (23.8 y 5.3 °C y dos niveles de humedad relativa (24 y 81%. Se encontró que la semilla puede mantener su capacidad germinativa inicial (70%, por al menos durante 8 meses cuando se almacena en baja humedad relativa (24% o en frío (5 °C, ya que la combinación de alta humedad relativa (81% y temperatura de 23 °C causan el deterioro de la semilla. El deterioro se manifiesta en reducciones de germinación de 70 a 29%, viabilidad de 81 a 46%, velocidad de emergencia de radícula de 20.4 a 9.9 radículas por día, velocidad de emergencia de la parte aérea de 6.3 a 2.3 plántulas por día, respiración de 16.1 a6.6nmol CO2 g-1 s-¹ y en un aumento en conductividad eléctrica de 32 a 97 µS cm-¹ g-¹. Las semillas de 55 días de edad ya han alcanzado la madurez fisiológica, pues germinan igual y con el mismo vigor que las semillas de 65 días. Las semillas inmaduras de 45 días ya poseen capacidad de germinar, aunque 10% menos que la semilla madura y con menor vigor.Seed deterioration during storage reduces germination and seedling establishment in the field. For Physalis ixocarpa Brot. seeds the levels of environmental factors that affect its germination longevity and physiological performance during storage, depending on the state of development at harvest are unknown. For this research, variety Chapingo seeds

  11. Pollen performance, cell number, and physiological state in the early-divergent angiosperm Annona cherimola Mill. (Annonaceae) are related to environmental conditions during the final stages of pollen development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lora, J; Herrero, M; Hormaza, J I

    2012-09-01

    Pollen performance is an important determinant for fertilization success, but high variability in pollen behavior both between and within species occurs in different years and under varying environmental conditions. Annona cherimola, an early-divergent angiosperm, is a species that releases a variable ratio of bicellular and tricellular hydrated pollen at anther dehiscence depending on temperature. The presence of both bi- and tricellular types of pollen is an uncommon characteristic in angiosperms and makes Annona cherimola an interesting model to study the effect of varying environmental conditions on subsequent pollen performance during the final stages of pollen development. In this work, we study the influence of changes in temperature and humidity during the final stages of pollen development on subsequent pollen performance, evaluating pollen germination, presence of carbohydrates, number of nuclei, and water content. At 25 °C, which is the average field temperature during the flowering period of this species, pollen had a viability of 60-70 %, starch hydrolyzed just prior to shedding, and pollen mitosis II was taking place, resulting in a mixture of bi- and tricellular pollen. This activity may be related to the pollen retaining 70 % water content at shedding. Temperatures above 30 °C resulted in a decrease in pollen germination, whereas lower temperatures did not have a clear influence on pollen germination, although they did have a clear effect on starch hydrolysis. On the other hand, slightly higher dehydration accelerated mitosis II, whereas strong dehydration arrested starch hydrolysis and reduced pollen germination. These results show a significant influence of environmental conditions on myriad pollen characteristics during the final stages of pollen development modifying subsequent pollen behavior and contributing to our understanding of the variability observed in pollen tube performance.

  12. Physiological response of vicia faba to prohexadione-calcium under saline conditions Resposta fisiológica de vicia faba a prohexadiona-cálcio sob condições salinas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Bekheta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the activities of oxidative enzymes (indole acetic acid oxidase, peroxidase and catalase, endogenous hormones (gibberellic acid (GA3, indole acetic acid (IAA, abscisic acid (ABA and cytokinins (AsZeatin, photosynthetic pigments (chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and carotenoids, total carbohydrates, total soluble sugars, amino acid proline and vegetative growth parameters were used as indicators to explain the physiological role of the growth retardant prohexadione-calcium on Vicia faba seedlings 40 days after sowing under salinity stress for 30 days. The obtained results show that soaking faba bean seeds prior to sowing at different concentrations of prohexadione-calcium (0, 10, 20 and 30 ppm significantly increased the activities of indole acetic acid oxidase (IAA-oxidase and peroxidase enzymes, but decreased the catalase enzyme activity as compared with their respective control. Application of prohexadione-Ca caused markedly decreases in the endogenous contents of gibberellins and indole acetic acid (IAA but increased the levels of natural growth inhibitor abscisic acid (ABA and cytokinins in the shoots of faba bean seedlings. All the prohexadione-Ca concentrations increased the contents of amino acid proline, photosynthetic pigments (chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and carotenoids, total carbohydrates and total soluble sugars in faba bean seedlings grown under salt stress. Application of prohexadione-Ca decreased significantly seedling height and shoot fresh weight but significantly increased shoot dry weight.Mudanças nas atividades de enzimas oxidativas (oxidase, peroxidase e catalase do ácido indol-acético, hormônios endógenos (ácido giberélico (GA3, ácido indol-acético (AIA, ácido abscísico (ABA e citocininas (AsZeatin, pigmentos fotossintéticos (clorofila a, clorofila b e carotenóides, carboidratos totais, açúcares solúveis totais, aminoácido prolina e parâmetros de crescimento vegetativo foram usados como

  13. Vasogenic shock physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotiria Gkisioti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sotiria Gkisioti, Spyros D MentzelopoulosDepartment of Intensive Care Medicine, University of Athens Medical School, Evaggelismos General Hospital, Athens, GreeceAbstract: Shock means inadequate tissue perfusion by oxygen-carrying blood. In vasogenic shock, this circulatory failure results from vasodilation and/or vasoplegia. There is vascular hyporeactivity with reduced vascular smooth muscle contraction in response to α1 adrenergic agonists. Considering vasogenic shock, one can understand its utmost importance, not only because of its association with sepsis but also because it can be the common final pathway for long-lasting, severe shock of any cause, even postresuscitation states. The effective management of any patient in shock requires the understanding of its underlying physiology and pathophysiology. Recent studies have provided new insights into vascular physiology by revealing the interaction of rather complicated and multifactorial mechanisms, which have not been fully elucidated yet. Some of these mechanisms, such as the induction of nitric oxide synthases, the activation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels, and vasopressin deficiency, have gained general acceptance and are considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of vasodilatory shock. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the pathogenesis of vasogenic shock.Keywords: nitric oxide synthases, KATP channels, vasopressin, H2S, vasoplegic syndrome

  14. Influência do sistema de criação sobre o desempenho, a condição fisiológica e o comportamento de linhagens de frangos para corte Influence of the rearing system on performance, physiological condition and behaviour of broilers lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurélio Neves da Silva

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Realizou-se o presente trabalho com o intuito de avaliar a influência do sistema de criação (intensivo e semi-intensivo no desempenho (peso corporal e conversão alimentar, na condição fisiológica sob estresse térmico (temperatura retal, freqüência respiratória e hematócrito e comportamento (freqüência ao pasto de frangos de corte. Foram utilizadas quatro linhagens de frangos de corte, duas tipo caipira e duas comerciais. Para avaliação do desempenho e condição fisiológica das aves nas idades de 45, 55, 65 e 75 dias, instalou-se um experimento no qual as aves foram alojadas em boxes constituídos de 4,5 m² de área interna (abrigo e 35 m² de área de pastejo com lotação de 35 aves/box. Outro experimento foi instalado para avaliação da freqüência das aves ao pasto entre o 35º e 75º dia de idade. Uma das linhagens avaliadas não demonstrou ser adaptada ao sistema semi-intensivo de criação. Verificaram-se diferenças significativas nos parâmetros de desempenho e de condição fisiológica das aves nos dois sistemas. Na criação semi-intensiva obtiveram-se menores valores para temperatura retal, taxa respiratória e hematócrito e melhores valores de peso corporal e conversão alimentar. Concluiu-se que a criação semi-intensiva proporcionou condições que aumentaram o bem-estar das aves, tendo influenciado positivamente o desempenho e a condição fisiológica das linhagens avaliadas, mesmo sob condições de estresse térmico.The objectives of this research were to evaluate the influence of rearing systems (intensive or semi-intensive on the performance (body weight and feed efficiency, chicken physiological condition under heat stress (rectal temperature, respiratory frequency and hematocrit and behavioural parameters (frequency in the pasture areas of broilers lines. To evaluate broiler's performance and physiological condition on the ages of 45, 55, 65 and 75 days one experiment was carried out in boxes with 4

  15. Growth and physiological responses to water and nutrient stress in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth and physiological responses to water and nutrient stress in oil palm. ... conditions) and to two nutrient regimes (with or without fertilization) of oil ... Moreover, deficiency of both water and nutrients in combination had the greatest impact ...

  16. Physiological benefits of nectar-feeding by a predatory beetle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extrafloral nectar is an important food source for many animals, including predatory lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), although the physiological benefits of nectar consumption are poorly understood for most consumers. Under laboratory conditions, we confined new females of Coleomegilla macu...

  17. Network Physiology: Mapping Interactions Between Networks of Physiologic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Bartsch, Ronny P.

    The human organism is an integrated network of interconnected and interacting organ systems, each representing a separate regulatory network. The behavior of one physiological system (network) may affect the dynamics of all other systems in the network of physiologic networks. Due to these interactions, failure of one system can trigger a cascade of failures throughout the entire network. We introduce a systematic method to identify a network of interactions between diverse physiologic organ systems, to quantify the hierarchical structure and dynamics of this network, and to track its evolution under different physiologic states. We find a robust relation between network structure and physiologic states: every state is characterized by specific network topology, node connectivity and links strength. Further, we find that transitions from one physiologic state to another trigger a markedly fast reorganization in the network of physiologic interactions on time scales of just a few minutes, indicating high network flexibility in response to perturbations. This reorganization in network topology occurs simultaneously and globally in the entire network as well as at the level of individual physiological systems, while preserving a hierarchical order in the strength of network links. Our findings highlight the need of an integrated network approach to understand physiologic function, since the framework we develop provides new information which can not be obtained by studying individual systems. The proposed system-wide integrative approach may facilitate the development of a new field, Network Physiology.

  18. Effects of Vinyl House with Sunlight Conditioning Film on the Growth and Physiology of Tobacco Seedling with Floating System%调光膜对烤烟漂浮育苗烟苗生长及生理的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李鹏志; 马敏伦; 罗贞宝; 胡玮; 翟欣; 陈雪; 马本宁; 陈万奎; 熊晶; 杨显志

    2011-01-01

    In Guizhou province, most of the tobacco production areas suffer from continuous low temperature in early stage of tobacco seedling, which delays seedling growth, decrease quality of seedlings and postpone the transplanting stage. To overcome these problems, Field experiments were conducted to compare the effects between sunlight conditioning film vinyl house and norm vinyl house. The results showed that optical nature of the film, by which the quality of tobacco seedling in the greenhouse improved significantly, especially its fresh and dry weights of root and photosynthesis, could increase effectively the light intensity of the plastic greenhouse both in sunny and overcast days, and shorten the time of seedling development by 5 days. Furthermore, the results showed that optical nature of the film was helpful for seedling to grow up quickly and for transplantation in advance. Consequently, optical nature of the film has large potential in the utilization of tobacco seedling.%针对贵州多数产烟区在育苗前期遭受持续低温,导致成苗时间晚、育苗时间延长、烟苗素质不高、移栽期延后等现象,开展了调光膜和常规膜大棚育苗对比试验.结果表明,调光膜在晴天和阴天能有效增加大棚光强,缩短成苗时间5d;烟苗素质尤其是根系干鲜质量较常规有较大提高,光合作用明显增强.调光膜还有助于烤烟漂浮育苗提早成苗、移栽,在烤烟育苗中具有一定推广价值.

  19. Formation of three N-acetyl-L-cysteine monoadducts and one diadduct by the reaction of S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine sulfoxide with N-acetyl-L-cysteine at physiological conditions: chemical mechanisms and toxicological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barshteyn, Nella; Elfarra, Adnan A

    2007-10-01

    Previously, our laboratory has shown that S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine sulfoxide (DCVCS), a Michael acceptor produced by a flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3)-mediated oxidation of S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC), is a more potent nephrotoxicant than DCVC. In the present study, we characterized reactions of DCVCS with nucleophilic amino acids. DCVCS incubations with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) at pH 7.4 and 37 degrees C for 1 h resulted in the formation of three monoadducts and one diadduct characterized by LC/MS, 1H NMR, and 1H-detected heteronuclear single quantum correlation. The formation of all adducts (with relative ratios of 29, 31, 24, and 12%, respectively) was rapid and time-dependent; the half-lives of the two DCVCS diastereomers in the presence of NAC were 13.8 (diastereomer I) and 9.4 min (diastereomer II). Adducts 1 and 2 were determined to be diastereomers of S-[1-chloro-2-(N-acetyl-L-cystein- S-yl)vinyl]-L-cysteine sulfoxide formed by Michael addition of NAC to the terminal vinylic carbon of DCVCS followed by loss of HCl. Adduct 4 was determined to be S-[2-chloro-2-(N-acetyl-L-cystein- S-yl)vinyl]-L-cysteine sulfoxide formed from the initial Michael addition product followed by a less favorable loss of HCl and/or by a rearrangement of adduct 2 through the formation of a cyclic chloronium ion. The addition of another molecule of NAC to monoadducts 1, 2, or 4 resulted in the formation of the novel diadduct, S-[2,2-( N-acetyl-L-cystein-S-yl)vinyl]-L-cysteine sulfoxide (adduct 3), whose detection in relatively large amount suggests that DCVCS could act as a cross-linking agent. DCVCS was not reactive with N-acetyl-L-lysine or L-valinamide at similar incubation conditions. Collectively, the results suggest selective reactivity of DCVCS toward protein sulfhydryl groups. Furthermore, the cross-linking properties of DCVCS may in part explain its high nephrotoxic potency.

  20. Morphological and Physiological Responses of Strawberry Plants to Water Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Krzysztof Klamkowski; Waldemar Treder

    2006-01-01

    The most of previous studies have been focused on the effect of water stress on plant yielding. However, the conditions in which plants grow from the moment of planting might affect their morphology and physiological response. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of water deficiency on growth and plant physiological response of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch. cv. ‘Salut’) under greenhouse conditions. The plants were grown in plastic containers filled with peat substratum. Wat...

  1. Single Cell Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveu, Pierre; Sinha, Deepak Kumar; Kettunen, Petronella; Vriz, Sophie; Jullien, Ludovic; Bensimon, David

    The possibility to control at specific times and specific places the activity of biomolecules (enzymes, transcription factors, RNA, hormones, etc.) is opening up new opportunities in the study of physiological processes at the single cell level in a live organism. Most existing gene expression systems allow for tissue specific induction upon feeding the organism with exogenous inducers (e.g., tetracycline). Local genetic control has earlier been achieved by micro-injection of the relevant inducer/repressor molecule, but this is an invasive and possibly traumatic technique. In this chapter, we present the requirements for a noninvasive optical control of the activity of biomolecules and review the recent advances in this new field of research.

  2. [Physiology of the neuropeptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-López, M J; Martínez-Martos, J M; Mayas, M D; Carrera, M P; Ramírez- Expósito, M J

    In the present review, the characteristics of mammalian neuropeptides have been studied. Neuropeptides are widely distributed not only in the nervous system but also in the periphery. They are synthesised by neurons as large precursor molecules (pre propeptides) which have to be cleaved and modified in order to form the mature neuropeptides. Neuropeptides may exert actions as neurotransmitters, neuromodulators and/or neurohormones. In the neurons, they coexist with classic transmitters and often with other peptides. After their releasing, they bind to especific receptors to exert their action in the target cell. Most of these receptors belongs to a family of G protein coupled receptors. Finally, peptidases are the enzymes involved in the degradation of neuropeptides. Conclusions. In the last years, the number of known neuropeptides and the understanding of their functions have been increased. With these data, present investigations are looking for the treatment of different pathologies associated with alterations in the physiology of neuropeptides.

  3. Physiology for engineers applying engineering methods to physiological systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chappell, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to qualitative and quantitative aspects of human physiology. It looks at biological and physiological processes and phenomena, including a selection of mathematical models, showing how physiological problems can be mathematically formulated and studied. It also illustrates how a wide range of engineering and physics topics, including electronics, fluid dynamics, solid mechanics and control theory can be used to describe and understand physiological processes and systems. Throughout the text there are introductions to measuring and quantifying physiological processes using both signal and imaging technologies. Physiology for Engineers describes the basic structure and models of cellular systems, the structure and function of the cardiovascular system, the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart and provides an overview of the structure and function of the respiratory and nervous systems. It also includes an introduction to the basic concepts and applications of reacti...

  4. Network Physiology reveals relations between network topology and physiological function

    CERN Document Server

    Bashan, Amir; Kantelhardt, Jan W; Havlin, Shlomo; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; 10.1038/ncomms1705

    2012-01-01

    The human organism is an integrated network where complex physiologic systems, each with its own regulatory mechanisms, continuously interact, and where failure of one system can trigger a breakdown of the entire network. Identifying and quantifying dynamical networks of diverse systems with different types of interactions is a challenge. Here, we develop a framework to probe interactions among diverse systems, and we identify a physiologic network. We find that each physiologic state is characterized by a specific network structure, demonstrating a robust interplay between network topology and function. Across physiologic states the network undergoes topological transitions associated with fast reorganization of physiologic interactions on time scales of a few minutes, indicating high network flexibility in response to perturbations. The proposed system-wide integrative approach may facilitate the development of a new field, Network Physiology.

  5. Network physiology reveals relations between network topology and physiological function

    OpenAIRE

    Bashan, Amir; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Kantelhardt, Jan W.; Havlin, Shlomo; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2012-01-01

    The human organism is an integrated network where complex physiological systems, each with its own regulatory mechanisms, continuously interact, and where failure of one system can trigger a breakdown of the entire network. Identifying and quantifying dynamical networks of diverse systems with different types of interactions is a challenge. Here we develop a framework to probe interactions among diverse systems, and we identify a physiological network. We find that each physiological state is...

  6. Anatomy and physiology of the upper airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin-Yilmaz, Asli; Naclerio, Robert M

    2011-03-01

    The nose is the major portal of air exchange between the internal and external environment. The nose participates in the vital functions of conditioning inspired air toward a temperature of 37°C and 100% relative humidity, providing local defense and filtering inhaled particulate matter and gases. It also functions in olfaction, which provides both a defense and pleasure for the individual. Understanding normal physiology provides the basis for recognizing abnormalities.

  7. Chromatin remodeling in cardiovascular development and physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Pei; Hang, Calvin T.; Yang, Jin; Chang, Ching-Pin

    2011-01-01

    Chromatin regulation provides an important means of controlling cardiac gene expression under different physiological and pathological conditions. Processes that direct the development of normal embryonic hearts and pathology of stressed adult hearts may share general mechanisms that govern cardiac gene expression by chromatin-regulating factors. These common mechanisms may provide a framework for us to investigate the interactions among diverse chromatin remodelers/modifiers and various tran...

  8. Physiological Acceptance Criteria for Cold Weather Clothing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-01

    been shown to decrease (3, 8, 11, 17, 23, 29, 33). Fanger describes this relationship mathematically as: ts M 35.7 - 0.032(H/AD), where ts - mean...1982. 6. Fanger , P. 0. Conditions for thermal comfort. Introducticn of a general comfort equation. In: Physiological and Behavioral Temperature...Regulation, edited by J. D. Hardy, A. P. Gagge, and J. A. J. Stolwijk. Springfield, Il.- Charles C. Thomas, 1970, p. 152-176. 7. Fanger , P. 0. Ansessment of

  9. Cardiovascular physiology and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, Narayana S; Svatikova, Anna; Somers, Virend K

    2003-05-01

    Sleep is a natural periodic suspension of consciousness during which processes of rest and restoration occur. The cognitive, reparative and regenerative accompaniments of sleep appear to be essential for maintenance of health and homeostasis. This brief overview will examine the cardiovascular responses to normal and disordered sleep, and their physiologic and pathologic implications. In the past, sleep was believed to be a passive state. The tableau of sleep as it unfolds is anything but a passive process. The brain's activity is as complex as wakefulness, never "resting" during sleep. Following the demise of the 'passive theory of sleep' (the reticular activating system is fatigued during the waking day and hence becomes inactive), there arose the 'active theory of sleep' (sleep is due to an active general inhibition of the brain) (1). Hess demonstrated the active nature of sleep in cats, inducing "physiological sleep" with electrical stimulation of the diencephalon (2). Classical experiments of transection of the cat brainstem (3) at midpontine level inhibited sleep completely, implying that centers below this level were involved in the induction of sleep (1, 4). For the first time, measurement of sleep depth without awakening the sleeper using the electroencephalogram (EEG) was demonstrated in animals by Caton and in humans, by Berger (1). This was soon followed by discovery of the rapid eye movement sleep periods (REM) by Aserinski and Kleitman (5), demonstration of periodical sleep cycles and their association with REM sleep (6, 7). Multiple studies and steady discoveries (4) made polysomnography, with its ability to perform simultaneous whole night recordings of EEG, electromyogram (EMG), and electrooculogram (EOC), a major diagnostic tool in study of sleep disorders. This facility has been of further critical importance in allowing evaluation of the interaction between sleep and changes in hemodynamics and autonomic cardiovascular control. Consequently the

  10. Physiology of vitreous surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefánsson, Einar

    2009-02-01

    Vitreous surgery has various physiological and clinical consequences, both beneficial and harmful. Vitrectomy reduces the risk of retinal neovascularization, while increasing the risk of iris neovascularization, reduces macular edema and stimulates cataract formation. These clinical consequences may be understood with the help of classical laws of physics and physiology. The laws of Fick, Stokes-Einstein and Hagen-Poiseuille state that molecular transport by diffusion or convection is inversely related to the viscosity of the medium. When the vitreous gel is replaced with less viscous saline, the transport of all molecules, including oxygen and cytokines, is facilitated. Oxygen transport to ischemic retinal areas is improved, as is clearance of VEGF and other cytokines from these areas, thus reducing edema and neovascularization. At the same time, oxygen is transported faster down a concentration gradient from the anterior to the posterior segment, while VEGF moves in the opposite direction, making the anterior segment less oxygenated and with more VEGF, stimulating iris neovascularization. Silicone oil is the exception that proves the rule: it is more viscous than vitreous humour, re-establishes the transport barrier to oxygen and VEGF, and reduces the risk for iris neovascularization in the vitrectomized-lentectomized eye. Modern vitreous surgery involves a variety of treatment options in addition to vitrectomy itself, such as photocoagulation, anti-VEGF drugs, intravitreal steroids and release of vitreoretinal traction. A full understanding of these treatment modalities allows sensible combination of treatment options. Retinal photocoagulation has repeatedly been shown to improve retinal oxygenation, as does vitrectomy. Oxygen naturally reduces VEGF production and improves retinal hemodynamics. The VEGF-lowering effect of photocoagulation and vitrectomy can be augmented with anti-VEGF drugs and the permeability effect of VEGF reduced with corticosteroids

  11. Procedures of Exercise Physiology Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Phillip A.; Fortney, Suzanne; Greenisen, Michael; Siconolfi, Steven F.; Bamman, Marcas M.; Moore, Alan D., Jr.; Squires, William

    1998-01-01

    This manual describes the laboratory methods used to collect flight crew physiological performance data at the Johnson Space Center. The Exercise Countermeasures Project Laboratory is a standard physiology laboratory; only the application to the study of human physiological adaptations to spaceflight is unique. In the absence of any other recently published laboratory manual, this manual should be a useful document staffs and students of other laboratories.

  12. Conservation physiology of marine fishes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian; Peck, Myron A.; Antognarelli, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    At the end of May, 17 scientists involved in an EU COST Action on Conservation Physiology of Marine Fishes met in Oristano, Sardinia, to discuss how physiology can be better used in modelling tools to aid in management of marine ecosystems. Current modelling approaches incorporate physiology...... to different extents, ranging from no explicit consideration to detailed physiological mechanisms, and across scales from a single fish to global fishery resources. Biologists from different sub-disciplines are collaborating to rise to the challenge of projecting future changes in distribution and productivity...

  13. Starting physiology: bioelectrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Vander

    2015-12-01

    From a Cartesian perspective of rational analysis, the electric potential difference across the cell membrane is one of the fundamental concepts for the study of physiology. Unfortunately, undergraduate students often struggle to understand the genesis of this energy gradient, which makes the teaching activity a hard task for the instructor. The topic of bioelectrogenesis encompasses multidisciplinary concepts, involves several mechanisms, and is a dynamic process, i.e., it never turns off during the lifetime of the cell. Therefore, to improve the transmission and acquisition of knowledge in this field, I present an alternative didactic model. The design of the model assumes that it is possible to build, in a series of sequential steps, an assembly of proteins within the membrane of an isolated cell in a simulated electrophysiology experiment. Initially, no proteins are inserted in the membrane and the cell is at a baseline energy state; the extracellular and intracellular fluids are at thermodynamic equilibrium. Students are guided through a sequence of four steps that add key membrane transport proteins to the model cell. The model is simple at the start and becomes progressively more complex, finally producing transmembrane chemical and electrical gradients. I believe that this didactic approach helps instructors with a more efficient tool for the teaching of the mechanisms of resting membrane potential while helping students avoid common difficulties that may be encountered when learning this topic.

  14. Hypertension: physiology and pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, John E; Granger, Joey P; do Carmo, Jussara M; da Silva, Alexandre A; Dubinion, John; George, Eric; Hamza, Shereen; Speed, Joshua; Hall, Michael E

    2012-10-01

    Despite major advances in understanding the pathophysiology of hypertension and availability of effective and safe antihypertensive drugs, suboptimal blood pressure (BP) control is still the most important risk factor for cardiovascular mortality and is globally responsible for more than 7 million deaths annually. Short-term and long-term BP regulation involve the integrated actions of multiple cardiovascular, renal, neural, endocrine, and local tissue control systems. Clinical and experimental observations strongly support a central role for the kidneys in the long-term regulation of BP, and abnormal renal-pressure natriuresis is present in all forms of chronic hypertension. Impaired renal-pressure natriuresis and chronic hypertension can be caused by intrarenal or extrarenal factors that reduce glomerular filtration rate or increase renal tubular reabsorption of salt and water; these factors include excessive activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and sympathetic nervous systems, increased formation of reactive oxygen species, endothelin, and inflammatory cytokines, or decreased synthesis of nitric oxide and various natriuretic factors. In human primary (essential) hypertension, the precise causes of impaired renal function are not completely understood, although excessive weight gain and dietary factors appear to play a major role since hypertension is rare in nonobese hunter-gathers living in nonindustrialized societies. Recent advances in genetics offer opportunities to discover gene-environment interactions that may also contribute to hypertension, although success thus far has been limited mainly to identification of rare monogenic forms of hypertension. © 2012 American Physiological Society

  15. Physiology in Modelica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Mateják

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Modelica is an object-oriented language, in which models can be created and graphically represented by connecting instances of classes from libraries. These connections are not only assignments of values; they can also represent acausal equality. Even more, they can model Kirchhoff’s laws of circuits. In Modelica it is possible to develop library classes which are an analogy of electrical circuit components. The result of our work in this field is Physiolibrary (www.physiolibrary.org – a free, open-source Modelica library for human physiology. By graphical joining instances of Physiolibrary classes, user can create models of cardiovascular circulation, thermoregulation, metabolic processes, nutrient distribution, gas transport, electrolyte regulation, water distribution, hormonal regulation and pharmacological regulation. After simple setting of the parameters, the models are ready to simulate. After simulation, the user can examine variables as their values change over time. Representing the model as a diagram has also great educational advantages, because students are able to better understand physical principles when they see them modeled graphically.

  16. Smolt physiology and endocrinology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Stephen D.; McCormick, Stephen D.; Farrell, Anthony Peter; Brauner, Colin J.

    2013-01-01

    Hormones play a critical role in maintaining body fluid balance in euryhaline fishes during changes in environmental salinity. The neuroendocrine axis senses osmotic and ionic changes, then signals and coordinates tissue-specific responses to regulate water and ion fluxes. Rapid-acting hormones, e.g. angiotensins, cope with immediate challenges by controlling drinking rate and the activity of ion transporters in the gill, gut, and kidney. Slow-acting hormones, e.g. prolactin and growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1, reorganize the body for long-term acclimation by altering the abundance of ion transporters and through cell proliferation and differentiation of ionocytes and other osmoregulatory cells. Euryhaline species exist in all groups of fish, including cyclostomes, and cartilaginous and teleost fishes. The diverse strategies for responding to changes in salinity have led to differential regulation and tissue-specific effects of hormones. Combining traditional physiological approaches with genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic analyses will elucidate the patterns and diversity of the endocrine control of euryhalinity.

  17. DOSHIC PHYSIOLOGY OF SKIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivprasad Chiplunkar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The balance of dosha  represents the healthy state and imbalance will cause various diseases. In normalcy doshas will be performing their own functions and individual doshas will be having their own specific sites. By telling the various sthana of each dosha, different function that is taken up by individual dosha in different sites has been highlighted.By mentioning ‘sparshanendriyam’ as one of the sthana of vata dosha the sensory functions of skin to vata dosha has been emphasised. By mentioning ‘sparshanam’ as one of the sthana of pittadosha, the function of colouring/pigmentation of skin, which is majorly carried out  by melanocytes by secreting melanin pigment has been highlighted. Meda is one among the sthanas of kapha dosha; this can be considered as the adipose tissue of skin/below skin. Since sweda is mala of meda it can be also considered as the secretions from the eccrine glands.With respect to skin, sensory functions, both tactile and thermal is carried out by vata dosha more specifically vyana vata, pigmentation to the skin carried out by meloncytes by secreting melanin, it is nothing but function of pitta dosha more specifically brajaka pitta with the help of udana vata and finally production of sweat in sweat glands is the function of kapha. So there is the need for further study and research regarding the sthanas of all three doshas in different structures/organs in the body and its physiology.

  18. Physiology of Volition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, Mark

    The idea of free will is a conscious awareness of the brain concerning the nature of the movement that it produces. There is no evidence for it to be a driving force in movement generation. This review considers the physiology of movement generation and how the concepts of willing and agency might arise. Both the anatomical substrates and the timing of events are considered. Movement initiation and volition are not necessarily linked, and one line of evidence comes from consideration of patients with disorders of volition. Movement is generated subconsciously, and the conscious sense of willing the movement comes later, but the exact time of this event is difficult to assess because of the potentially illusory nature of introspection. The evidence suggests that movement is initiated in frontal lobe, particularly the mesial areas, and the sense of volition arises as the result of a corollary discharge from premotor and motor areas likely involving the parietal lobe. Agency probably involves a similar region in the parietal lobe and requires both the sense of volition and movement feedback.

  19. Anatomy and physiology of genital organs - women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziottin, Alessandra; Gambini, Dania

    2015-01-01

    "Anatomy is destiny": Sigmund Freud viewed human anatomy as a necessary, although not a sufficient, condition for understanding the complexity of human sexual function with a solid biologic basis. The aim of the chapter is to describe women's genital anatomy and physiology, focusing on women's sexual function with a clinically oriented vision. Key points include: embryology, stressing that the "female" is the anatomic "default" program, differentiated into "male" only in the presence of androgens at physiologic levels for the gestational age; sex determination and sex differentiation, describing the interplay between anatomic and endocrine factors; the "clitoral-urethral-vaginal" complex, the most recent anatomy reading of the corpora cavernosa pattern in women; the controversial G spot; the role of the pelvic floor muscles in modulating vaginal receptivity and intercourse feelings, with hyperactivity leading to introital dyspareunia and contributing to provoked vestibulodynia and recurrent postcoital cystitis, whilst lesions during delivery reduce vaginal sensations, genital arousability, and orgasm; innervation, vessels, bones, ligaments; and the physiology of women's sexual response. Attention to physiologic aging focuses on "low-grade inflammation," genital and systemic, with its impact on women sexual function, especially after the menopause, if the woman does not or cannot use hormone replacement therapy.

  20. Physiological functions of MTA family of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Nirmalya; Gui, Bin; Kumar, Rakesh

    2014-12-01

    Although the functional significance of the metastasic tumor antigen (MTA) family of chromatin remodeling proteins in the pathobiology of cancer is fairly well recognized, the physiological role of MTA proteins continues to be an understudied research area and is just beginning to be recognized. Similar to cancer cells, MTA1 also modulates the expression of target genes in normal cells either by acting as a corepressor or coactivator. In addition, physiological functions of MTA proteins are likely to be influenced by its differential expression, subcellular localization, and regulation by upstream modulators and extracellular signals. This review summarizes our current understanding of the physiological functions of the MTA proteins in model systems. In particular, we highlight recent advances of the role MTA proteins play in the brain, eye, circadian rhythm, mammary gland biology, spermatogenesis, liver, immunomodulation and inflammation, cellular radio-sensitivity, and hematopoiesis and differentiation. Based on the growth of knowledge regarding the exciting new facets of the MTA family of proteins in biology and medicine, we speculate that the next burst of findings in this field may reveal further molecular regulatory insights of non-redundant functions of MTA coregulators in the normal physiology as well as in pathological conditions outside cancer.

  1. BELLIS PERENNIS - VARIATIONS OF PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES IN URBAN CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Alina CIOBANU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, Bellis perennis were sampled from park and a nearby street in the urban area of Timisoara and in different time periods, i.e. April and July. The objectives were to examine the potential impacts of traffic pollution on the B. perennis and the repartition of water, dry matter and organic matter into different plant parts (leaves, scapes, inflorescences and roots. Our results would be helpful in understanding the resource distribution within the plant in urban environment.

  2. DNA electrochemical biosensor for metallic drugs at physiological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Lopez, Angel J.; Vera, José L.; Meléndez, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Entrapment of dsSS-DNA into the polypyrrole-polyvinyl sulphonate (dsSS-DNA-PPy-PVS) film over indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated glass has been designed to detect titanium and platinum drugs, titanocene dichloride and cisplatin. The disposable dsSS-DNA-PPy-PVS/ITO biosensor was characterized by cyclic voltammetry, attenuated total reflectance Infrared spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Amperometric studies by cyclic voltammetry using, dsSS-DNA-PPy PVS/ITO biosensor, demonstrated the ability of this biosensor to detect these metallic drugs in millimolar concentration by monitoring the decrease of the guanine oxidation signal as a result of the DNA damage. The concentration range detected for titanocene dichloride is 0.25 to 1.5 mM and for cisplatin is 0.06 to 1.0 mM. PMID:25705144

  3. Physiological Plausibility and Boundary Conditions of Theories of Risk Sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchiori, Davide; Elqayam, Shira

    2012-01-01

    dilatation, which in turn positively correlates with a risk aversion behavior. They hypothesize that participants’ attention is increased in decision problems involving losses, which trigger an innate prudent behavior in situations entailing danger and/or hazard. Interestingly, Y&T find that the nature...

  4. Physiological demands of competitive basketball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narazaki, K; Berg, K; Stergiou, N; Chen, B

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess physiological demands of competitive basketball by measuring oxygen consumption (VO2) and other variables during practice games. Each of 12 players (20.4 +/- 1.1 years) was monitored in a 20-min practice game, which was conducted in the same way as actual games with the presence of referees and coaches. VO2 was measured by a portable system during the game and blood lactate concentration (LA) was measured in brief breaks. Subjects were also videotaped for time-motion analysis. Female and male players demonstrated respective VO2 of 33.4 +/- 4.0 and 36.9 +/- 2.6 mL/kg/min and LA of 3.2 +/- 0.9 and 4.2 +/- 1.3 mmol/L in the practice games (P>0.05). They spent 34.1% of play time running and jumping, 56.8% walking, and 9.0% standing. Pre-obtained VO(2max) was correlated to VO(2) during play (r=0.673) and to percent of duration for running and jumping (r=0.935 and 0.962 for females and males, respectively). This study demonstrated a greater oxygen uptake for competitive basketball than that estimated based on a previous compendium. The correlation between aerobic capacity and activity level suggests the potential benefit of aerobic conditioning in basketball.

  5. Causality in physiological signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Andreas; Kraemer, Jan F; Penzel, Thomas; Bonnemeier, Hendrik; Kurths, Jürgen; Wessel, Niels

    2016-05-01

    Health is one of the most important non-material assets and thus also has an enormous influence on material values, since treating and preventing diseases is expensive. The number one cause of death worldwide today originates in cardiovascular diseases. For these reasons the aim of understanding the functions and the interactions of the cardiovascular system is and has been a major research topic throughout various disciplines for more than a hundred years. The purpose of most of today's research is to get as much information as possible with the lowest possible effort and the least discomfort for the subject or patient, e.g. via non-invasive measurements. A family of tools whose importance has been growing during the last years is known under the headline of coupling measures. The rationale for this kind of analysis is to identify the structure of interactions in a system of multiple components. Important information lies for example in the coupling direction, the coupling strength, and occurring time lags. In this work, we will, after a brief general introduction covering the development of cardiovascular time series analysis, introduce, explain and review some of the most important coupling measures and classify them according to their origin and capabilities in the light of physiological analyses. We will begin with classical correlation measures, go via Granger-causality-based tools, entropy-based techniques (e.g. momentary information transfer), nonlinear prediction measures (e.g. mutual prediction) to symbolic dynamics (e.g. symbolic coupling traces). All these methods have contributed important insights into physiological interactions like cardiorespiratory coupling, neuro-cardio-coupling and many more. Furthermore, we will cover tools to detect and analyze synchronization and coordination (e.g. synchrogram and coordigram). As a last point we will address time dependent couplings as identified using a recent approach employing ensembles of time series. The

  6. Assessing prebaccalaureate human physiology courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleary, V L

    1998-12-01

    Two surveys were conducted between 1994 and 1996. The purpose of the initial survey was to obtain demographic information about prebaccaulareate human physiology courses. Of the 117 responding physiology departments, 50% offered human physiology at the prebaccalaureate level to 14,185 students during the 1994-1995 academic year. The mean was 245 students per year (+/- 30 SE). Class size was limited by 44% of the respondents. Prebaccaluareate human physiology was offered as a separate course from anatomy by 93% of the departments. Sixty-one percent scheduled the course once a year. The purpose of the second survey was to determine how physiology departments evaluated prebaccalaureate physiology courses and faculty. All responding departments utilized student feedback; 38% of the departments included physiology chair review, 38% peer review, and 9% allied health faculty review. Twenty-eight percent of allied health programs evaluated the course. Results indicated that, whereas a significant number of undergraduate students are enrolled in prebaccaluareate physiology courses annually, those courses appear to lack formal, consistent formative evaluation.

  7. Regulation and function of AMPK in physiology and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Sang-Min

    2016-07-15

    5'-adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine kinase that was originally identified as the key player in maintaining cellular energy homeostasis. Intensive research over the last decade has identified diverse molecular mechanisms and physiological conditions that regulate the AMPK activity. AMPK regulates diverse metabolic and physiological processes and is dysregulated in major chronic diseases, such as obesity, inflammation, diabetes and cancer. On the basis of its critical roles in physiology and pathology, AMPK is emerging as one of the most promising targets for both the prevention and treatment of these diseases. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the molecular and physiological regulation of AMPK and its metabolic and physiological functions. In addition, we discuss the mechanisms underlying the versatile roles of AMPK in diabetes and cancer.

  8. Satellite-detected fluorescence reveals global physiology of ocean phytoplankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Behrenfeld

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton photosynthesis links global ocean biology and climate-driven fluctuations in the physical environment. These interactions are largely expressed through changes in phytoplankton physiology, but physiological status has proven extremely challenging to characterize globally. Phytoplankton fluorescence does provide a rich source of physiological information long exploited in laboratory and field studies, and is now observed from space. Here we use satellite-based fluorescence measurements to evaluate light-absorption and energy-dissipation processes influencing phytoplankton light use efficiency and demonstrate its utility as a global physiological indicator of iron-limited growth conditions. This new tool provides a path for monitoring climate-phytoplankton physiology interactions, improving descriptions of light use efficiency in ocean productivity models, evaluating nutrient-stress predictions in ocean ecosystem models, and appraising phytoplankton responses to natural iron enrichments or purposeful iron fertilizations activities.

  9. Physiological roles of small RNA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaux, Charlotte; Verneuil, Nicolas; Hartke, Axel; Giard, Jean-Christophe

    2014-06-01

    Unlike proteins, RNA molecules have emerged lately as key players in regulation in bacteria. Most reviews hitherto focused on the experimental and/or in silico methods used to identify genes encoding small RNAs (sRNAs) or on the diverse mechanisms of these RNA regulators to modulate expression of their targets. However, less is known about their biological functions and their implications in various physiological responses. This review aims to compile what is known presently about the diverse roles of sRNA transcripts in the regulation of metabolic processes, in different growth conditions, in adaptation to stress and in microbial pathogenesis. Several recent studies revealed that sRNA molecules are implicated in carbon metabolism and transport, amino acid metabolism or metal sensing. Moreover, regulatory RNAs participate in cellular adaptation to environmental changes, e.g. through quorum sensing systems or development of biofilms, and analyses of several sRNAs under various physiological stresses and culture conditions have already been performed. In addition, recent experiments performed with Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens showed that regulatory RNAs play important roles in microbial virulence and during infection. The combined results show the diversity of regulation mechanisms and physiological processes in which sRNA molecules are key actors.

  10. Distinguishing hyperhidrosis and normal physiological sweat production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlacius, Linnea; Gyldenløve, Mette; Zachariae, Claus

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hyperhidrosis is a condition in which the production of sweat is abnormally increased. No objective criteria for the diagnosis of hyperhidrosis exist, mainly because reference intervals for normal physiological sweat production at rest are unknown. OBJECTIVE: The main objective...... of this study was to establish reference intervals for normal physiological axillary and palmar sweat production. METHODS: Gravimetric testing was performed in 75 healthy control subjects. Subsequently, these results were compared with findings in a cohort of patients with hyperhidrosis and with the results...... derived from a review of data on hyperhidrosis published between 1980 and 2013. RESULTS: Approximately 90% of the controls had axillary and palmar sweat production rates of below 100 mg/5 min. In all except one of the axillary and palmar hyperhidrosis studies reviewed, average sweat production exceeded...

  11. Obesity: physiologic changes and challenges during laparoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamvu, Georgine; Zolnoun, Denniz; Boggess, John; Steege, John F

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this report was to describe the evidence for the benefits of laparoscopic surgery in obese patients, to review the physiologic abnormalities that are associated with obesity, and to explore surgical techniques that will enable surgeons to perform laparoscopy successfully in obese patients. This article is a review of the available literature on obesity, the physiologic changes that occur in obese patients, and the impact of these changes on laparoscopy outcomes. Obesity is associated with sudden death and a wide range of morbid conditions such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, angina, chronic obstructive disease, and diabetes mellitus. Recent studies have demonstrated that obese patients who undergo laparoscopy have shorter hospital stays, less postoperative pain, and fewer wound infections when compared with obese patients who undergo laparotomy. Laparoscopy patients also have fewer postoperative ileus and fevers. With thorough preparation and careful preoperative evaluation, laparoscopy can be performed safely and is the preferred surgical method in obese patients.

  12. Bioactive lipids in kidney physiology and pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Sałata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipids not only have structural functions, but also play an important role as signaling and regulatory molecules and participate in many cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, migration, and apoptosis. Bioactive lipids act both as extracellular mediators, which are associated with receptors on the surface of cells, and intracellular mediators triggering different signal pathways. They are present and active in physiological conditions, and are also involved in the pathogenesis of inflammation, asthma, cancer, diabetes, and hypertension. Bioactive lipids such as derivatives of arachidonic acid and sphingolipids have an important role in renal development, physiology and in many renal diseases. Some of them are potential indicators of kidney damage degree and/or function of the transplanted kidneys.

  13. The physiological roles of primary phospholipase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong Ryoul; Follo, Matilde Y; Cocco, Lucio; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2013-09-01

    The roles of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) have been extensively investigated in diverse cell lines and pathological conditions. Among the PLC isozmes, primary PLCs, PLC-β and PLC-γ, are directly activated by receptor activation, unlike other secondary PLCs (PLC-ɛ, PLC-δ1, and PLC-η1). PLC-β isozymes are activated by G protein couple receptor and PLC-γ isozymes are activated by receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK). Primary PLCs are differentially expressed in different tissues, suggesting their specific roles in diverse tissues and regulate a variety of physiological and pathophysiological functions. Thus, dysregulation of phospholipases contributes to a number of human diseases and primary PLCs have been identified as therapeutic targets for prevention and treatment of diseases. Here we review the roles of primary PLCs in physiology and their impact in pathology. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Review: the physiological and computational approaches for atherosclerosis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wuchen; Lee, Yugyung; Lee, Chi H

    2013-09-01

    The cardiovascular disease has long been an issue that causes severe loss in population, especially those conditions associated with arterial malfunction, being attributable to atherosclerosis and subsequent thrombotic formation. This article reviews the physiological mechanisms that underline the transition from plaque formation in atherosclerotic process to platelet aggregation and eventually thrombosis. The physiological and computational approaches, such as percutaneous coronary intervention and stent design modeling, to detect, evaluate and mitigate this malicious progression were also discussed.

  15. Cancer Pain Physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Sarah; Bannister, Kirsty; Dickenson, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    reorganization within segments of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord receiving nociceptive input from the bone are discussed. Changes in certain neurotransmitters implicated in brain modulation of spinal function are also altered with implications for the affective components of cancer pain. Treatments......Mechanisms of inflammatory and neuropathic pains have been elucidated and translated to patient care by the use of animal models of these pain states. Cancer pain has lagged behind since early animal models of cancer-induced bone pain were based on the systemic injection of carcinoma cells....... This precluded systematic investigation of specific neuronal and pharmacological alterations that occur in cancer-induced bone pain. In 1999, Schwei et al. described a murine model of cancer-induced bone pain that paralleled the clinical condition in terms of pain development and bone destruction, confined...

  16. STUDY OF PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES OF EQUINES WITHOUT DEFINED BREED AND QUARTER HORSE TO THE CLIMATIC CONDITIONS OF TERESINA, PIAUÍ ESTUDO DE RESPOSTAS FISIOLÓGICAS DE EQÜINOS SEM RAÇA DEFINIDA E DA RAÇA QUARTO DE MILHA ÀS CONDIÇÕES CLIMÁTICAS DE TERESINA, PIAUÍ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Helena Nogueira Turco

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was developed to evaluate the adaptability of without defined breed and Quarter Horses to the thermal conditions of Teresina, using physiological parameters using tolerance tests and heat dissipation. The measures of rectal temperature and heart and respiratory rates were collected in March and October. These months represents, respectively, the rainy period and the hot and dry period in the area studied. The response of each genetic group was evaluated using physiological parameters and adaptations indexes (Ibéria, Benezra and Rainysby tests. In each herd the experimental design was completely randomized and the statistical model included the effect of period of the year and/or schedule of measurement of the parameter. The thermal environment in the area during the dry period of the year hinders the homoeothermic maintenance in the animals, limiting the physical activities with horses. The physiological parameters suffered with an increase of the environmental temperature. The Quarter Horses were shown to be adapted to the environmental conditions, with small alterations in the rectal temperature caused by increment of the temperature. The hot thermal environment during the dry period of the year interfered in the homoeothermic behavior of the Without Defined Breed animals.

    KEY WORDS: Adaptation, indexes, rectal temperature, respiratory rate, thermal environment. Estudou-se, com eqüinos Sem Raça Definida e com animais da raça Quarto de Milha, o comportamento de parâmetros fisiológicos com objetivo de avaliar, por meio de testes de tolerância e de dissipação de calor, a adaptabilidade desses animais ao ambiente térmico de Teresina, PI. Coletaram-se as medidas de temperatura retal e as freqüências cardíaca e respiratória em março e outubro, período esse que representa, respectivamente, o período chuvoso e o quente e seco na região. A resposta de cada grupo genético foi avaliada utilizando-se os par

  17. Medical electronics and physiological measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, T.

    1989-07-01

    This article describes some recent developments in physiological measurement since the last `special issue' in 1978. Nine examples are given covering mature applications, new techniques and some `ideas for the future'. The need for good scientists in this interesting and challenging area is stressed. Physiological measurement is challenging because human physiology is complex. The examples described in this article illustrate some areas where cooperation between basic scientists, engineers, clinicians and, not least, patients has led to remarkable advances in our understanding of man and his physiology. Many challenges still lie ahead. There is no doubt that good quality graduates, with fresh minds and fresh enthusiasm, are needed to build on the foundation that has already been laid.

  18. Survey of Departments of Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, William F.

    1977-01-01

    Presents data of the 1976 survey of departments of physiology. Includes comparison to 1974 and 1975 data for number of academic positions available, department budgets, graduate students and post doctoral fellows, and salaries. (SL)

  19. Physiology of the fetal circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiserud, Torvid

    2005-12-01

    Our understanding of fetal circulatory physiology is based on experimental animal data, and this continues to be an important source of new insight into developmental mechanisms. A growing number of human studies have investigated the human physiology, with results that are similar but not identical to those from animal studies. It is time to appreciate these differences and base more of our clinical approach on human physiology. Accordingly, the present review focuses on distributional patterns and adaptational mechanisms that were mainly discovered by human studies. These include cardiac output, pulmonary and placental circulation, fetal brain and liver, venous return to the heart, and the fetal shunts (ductus venosus, foramen ovale and ductus arteriosus). Placental compromise induces a set of adaptational and compensational mechanisms reflecting the plasticity of the developing circulation, with both short- and long-term implications. Some of these aspects have become part of the clinical physiology of today with consequences for surveillance and treatment.

  20. Olfaction: anatomy, physiology and behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Benignus, Vernon A.; Prah, James D.

    1982-01-01

    The anatomy, physiology and function of the olfactory system are reviewed, as are the normal effects of olfactory stimulation. It is speculated that olfaction may have important but unobtrusive effects on human behavior.

  1. Survey of Departments of Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, William F.

    1977-01-01

    Presents data of the 1976 survey of departments of physiology. Includes comparison to 1974 and 1975 data for number of academic positions available, department budgets, graduate students and post doctoral fellows, and salaries. (SL)

  2. Seasonal changes in reindeer physiology

    OpenAIRE

    A. Reeta Pösö

    2005-01-01

    The seasonal changes in the photoperiod, temperature and availability of food need to be converted to hormonal signals in order to induce adaptations in the physiology of the reindeer. The most reliable of the seasonal changes in the environment is the photoperiod, which affects the reindeer physiology through pineal gland and its hormone, melatonin. Usually there are large diurnal changes in the concentration of melatonin, but in the reindeer the daily rhythm disappears during the arctic sum...

  3. Physiologically relevant organs on chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yum, Kyungsuk; Hong, Soon Gweon; Healy, Kevin E; Lee, Luke P

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in integrating microengineering and tissue engineering have generated promising microengineered physiological models for experimental medicine and pharmaceutical research. Here we review the recent development of microengineered physiological systems, or also known as "ogans-on-chips", that reconstitute the physiologically critical features of specific human tissues and organs and their interactions. This technology uses microengineering approaches to construct organ-specific microenvironments, reconstituting tissue structures, tissue-tissue interactions and interfaces, and dynamic mechanical and biochemical stimuli found in specific organs, to direct cells to assemble into functional tissues. We first discuss microengineering approaches to reproduce the key elements of physiologically important, dynamic mechanical microenvironments, biochemical microenvironments, and microarchitectures of specific tissues and organs in microfluidic cell culture systems. This is followed by examples of microengineered individual organ models that incorporate the key elements of physiological microenvironments into single microfluidic cell culture systems to reproduce organ-level functions. Finally, microengineered multiple organ systems that simulate multiple organ interactions to better represent human physiology, including human responses to drugs, is covered in this review. This emerging organs-on-chips technology has the potential to become an alternative to 2D and 3D cell culture and animal models for experimental medicine, human disease modeling, drug development, and toxicology.

  4. Physiological and psychological assessment of sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagihashi, R.; Ohira, Masayoshi; Kimura, Teiji; Fujiwara, Takayuki

    The psycho-physiological effects of several sound stimulations were investigated to evaluate the relationship between a psychological parameter, such as subjective perception, and a physiological parameter, such as the heart rate variability (HRV). Eight female students aged 21-22 years old were tested. Electrocardiogram (ECG) and the movement of the chest-wall for estimating respiratory rate were recorded during three different sound stimulations; (1) music provided by a synthesizer (condition A); (2) birds twitters (condition B); and (3) mechanical sounds (condition C). The percentage power of the low-frequency (LF; 0.05<=0.15 Hz) and high-frequency (HF; 0.15<=0.40 Hz) components in the HRV (LF%, HF%) were assessed by a frequency analysis of time-series data for 5 min obtained from R-R intervals in the ECG. Quantitative assessment of subjective perception was also described by a visual analog scale (VAS). The HF% and VAS value for comfort in C were significantly lower than in either A and/or B. The respiratory rate and VAS value for awakening in C were significantly higher than in A and/or B. There was a significant correlation between the HF% and the value of the VAS, and between the respiratory rate and the value of the VAS. These results indicate that mechanical sounds similar to C inhibit the para-sympathetic nervous system and promote a feeling that is unpleasant but alert, also suggesting that the HRV reflects subjective perception.

  5. Physical and physiological profiles of taekwondo athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Craig A; Ferreira da Silva Santos, Jonatas; Chaabène, Helmi; Pieter, Willy; Franchini, Emerson

    2014-06-01

    Taekwondo has evolved into a modern-day Olympic combat sport. The physical and physiological demands of modern-day taekwondo competition require athletes to be competent in several aspects of fitness. This review critically explores the physical and physiological characteristics of taekwondo athletes and presents implications for training and research. International taekwondo athletes possess low levels of body fat and a somatotype that characterises a blend of moderate musculoskeletal tissue and relative body linearity. While there is some variation in the maximum oxygen uptake of taekwondo athletes, moderate to high levels of cardio-respiratory fitness are necessary to support the metabolic demands of fighting and to facilitate recovery between consecutive matches. Taekwondo athletes demonstrate high peak anaerobic power characteristics of the lower limbs and this attribute appears to be conducive to achieving success in international competition. The ability to generate and sustain power output using both concentric and 'stretch-shortening cycle' muscle actions of the lower limbs may be important to support the technical and tactical actions in combat. Taekwondo competitors also display moderate to high maximum dynamic strength characteristics of the lower and upper extremities, and moderate endurance properties of the trunk and hip flexor musculature. The dynamic nature of the technical and tactical actions in the sport demand high flexibility of the lower limbs. More extensive research is required into the physical and physiological characteristics of taekwondo athletes to extend existing knowledge and to permit specialised conditioning for different populations within the sport.

  6. Conservation physiology of animal migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Robert J; Chapman, Jacqueline M; Souliere, Christopher M; Tudorache, Christian; Wikelski, Martin; Metcalfe, Julian D; Cooke, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Migration is a widespread phenomenon among many taxa. This complex behaviour enables animals to exploit many temporally productive and spatially discrete habitats to accrue various fitness benefits (e.g. growth, reproduction, predator avoidance). Human activities and global environmental change represent potential threats to migrating animals (from individuals to species), and research is underway to understand mechanisms that control migration and how migration responds to modern challenges. Focusing on behavioural and physiological aspects of migration can help to provide better understanding, management and conservation of migratory populations. Here, we highlight different physiological, behavioural and biomechanical aspects of animal migration that will help us to understand how migratory animals interact with current and future anthropogenic threats. We are in the early stages of a changing planet, and our understanding of how physiology is linked to the persistence of migratory animals is still developing; therefore, we regard the following questions as being central to the conservation physiology of animal migrations. Will climate change influence the energetic costs of migration? Will shifting temperatures change the annual clocks of migrating animals? Will anthropogenic influences have an effect on orientation during migration? Will increased anthropogenic alteration of migration stopover sites/migration corridors affect the stress physiology of migrating animals? Can physiological knowledge be used to identify strategies for facilitating the movement of animals? Our synthesis reveals that given the inherent challenges of migration, additional stressors derived from altered environments (e.g. climate change, physical habitat alteration, light pollution) or interaction with human infrastructure (e.g. wind or hydrokinetic turbines, dams) or activities (e.g. fisheries) could lead to long-term changes to migratory phenotypes. However, uncertainty remains

  7. The Impact of National Macro-Environmental Variables on Tourism Services Consumption in Romania

    OpenAIRE

    Untaru E.

    2009-01-01

    The studies of consumers’ demand represent the main objective of market research, the importance of these studies being emphasized in all marketing literature. In order to better understand the complex mechanisms of changing the needs for goods or services into demand, the marketing theory includes studying the consumer behaviour as regards tourism goods and services.

  8. The Impact of National Macro-Environmental Variables on Tourism Services Consumption in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Untaru E.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The studies of consumers’ demand represent the main objective of market research, the importance of these studies being emphasized in all marketing literature. In order to better understand the complex mechanisms of changing the needs for goods or services into demand, the marketing theory includes studying the consumer behaviour as regards tourism goods and services.

  9. Physiological Studies of Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gunda

    industrial production by employing flow cytometry for viability assessment, cell size comparison, intracellular pH (pHi) determination and cell sorting. The physiological studies of L. lactis were complemented by examining the growth behavior, glucose consumption, lactate production, culturability on solid...... was found to facilitate the differentiation and accurate quantification of L. lactis cells in different physiological states, which agreed with the reproductive viability of reference samples and of exponential cells. The high viability of one particular L. lactis strain demonstrated its robustness during......, cell size comparison and pHi determination reflected the increasing physiological impairment during this accelerated stability test, while a preincubation in buffer led to inconsistent flow cytometric results. The comparison of reproductive and growth-independent viability suggested the presence...

  10. Stimulating Student Interest in Physiology: The Intermedical School Physiology Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hwee-Ming

    2010-01-01

    The Intermedical School Physiology Quiz (IMSPQ) was initiated in 2003 during the author's last sabbatical from the University of Malaya. At this inaugural event, there were just seven competing teams from Malaysian medical schools. The challenge trophy for the IMSPQ is named in honor of Prof. A. Raman, who was the first Malaysian Professor of…

  11. Misophonia: physiological investigations and case descriptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miren eEdelstein

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Misophonia is a relatively unexplored chronic condition in which a person experiences autonomic arousal (analogous to an involuntary fight-or-flight response to certain innocuous or repetitive sounds such as chewing, pen clicking and lip smacking. Misophonics report anxiety, panic and rage when exposed to trigger sounds, compromising their ability to complete everyday tasks and engage in healthy and normal social interactions. Across two experiments, we measured behavioral and physiological characteristics of the condition. Interviews (Experiment 1 with misophonics showed that the most problematic sounds are generally related to other people's behavior (pen clicking, chewing sounds. Misophonics are however not bothered when they produce these trigger sounds themselves, and some report mimicry as a coping strategy. Next, (Experiment 2 we tested the hypothesis that misophonics’ subjective experiences evoke an anomalous physiological response to certain auditory stimuli. Misophonic individuals showed heightened ratings and skin conductance responses to auditory, but not visual stimuli, relative to a group of typically developed controls, supporting this general viewpoint and indicating that misophonia is a disorder that produces distinct autonomic effects not seen in typically developed individuals.

  12. Physiological conjunction of allelochemicals and desert plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yosef Friedjung, Avital; Choudhary, Sikander Pal; Dudai, Nativ; Rachmilevitch, Shimon

    2013-01-01

    Plants exchange signals with other physical and biological entities in their habitat, a form of communication termed allelopathy. The underlying principles of allelopathy and secondary-metabolite production are still poorly understood, especially in desert plants. The coordination and role of secondary metabolites were examined as a cause of allelopathy in plants thriving under arid and semiarid soil conditions. Desert plant species, Origanum dayi, Artemisia sieberi and Artemisia judaica from two different sources (cultivar cuttings and wild seeds) were studied in their natural habitats. Growth rate, relative water content, osmotic potential, photochemical efficiency, volatile composition and vital factors of allelopathy were analyzed at regular intervals along four seasons with winter showing optimum soil water content and summer showing water deficit conditions. A comprehensive analysis of the volatile composition of the leaves, ambient air and soil in the biological niche of the plants under study was carried out to determine the effects of soil water conditions and sample plants on the surrounding flora. Significant morpho-physiological changes were observed across the seasons and along different soil water content. Metabolic analysis showed that water deficit was the key for driving selective metabolomic shifts. A. judaica showed the least metabolic shifts, while A. sieberi showed the highest shifts. All the species exhibited high allelopathic effects; A. judaica displayed relatively higher growth-inhibition effects, while O. dayi showed comparatively higher germination-inhibition effects in germination assays. The current study may help in understanding plant behavior, mechanisms underlying secondary-metabolite production in water deficit conditions and metabolite-physiological interrelationship with allelopathy in desert plants, and can help cull economic benefits from the produced volatiles.

  13. Physiological conjunction of allelochemicals and desert plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avital Yosef Friedjung

    Full Text Available Plants exchange signals with other physical and biological entities in their habitat, a form of communication termed allelopathy. The underlying principles of allelopathy and secondary-metabolite production are still poorly understood, especially in desert plants. The coordination and role of secondary metabolites were examined as a cause of allelopathy in plants thriving under arid and semiarid soil conditions. Desert plant species, Origanum dayi, Artemisia sieberi and Artemisia judaica from two different sources (cultivar cuttings and wild seeds were studied in their natural habitats. Growth rate, relative water content, osmotic potential, photochemical efficiency, volatile composition and vital factors of allelopathy were analyzed at regular intervals along four seasons with winter showing optimum soil water content and summer showing water deficit conditions. A comprehensive analysis of the volatile composition of the leaves, ambient air and soil in the biological niche of the plants under study was carried out to determine the effects of soil water conditions and sample plants on the surrounding flora. Significant morpho-physiological changes were observed across the seasons and along different soil water content. Metabolic analysis showed that water deficit was the key for driving selective metabolomic shifts. A. judaica showed the least metabolic shifts, while A. sieberi showed the highest shifts. All the species exhibited high allelopathic effects; A. judaica displayed relatively higher growth-inhibition effects, while O. dayi showed comparatively higher germination-inhibition effects in germination assays. The current study may help in understanding plant behavior, mechanisms underlying secondary-metabolite production in water deficit conditions and metabolite-physiological interrelationship with allelopathy in desert plants, and can help cull economic benefits from the produced volatiles.

  14. Electronic Textbook in Human Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broering, Naomi C.; Lilienfield, Lawrence S.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the development of an electronic textbook in human physiology at the Georgetown University Medical Center Library that was designed to enhance learning and visualization through a prototype knowledge base of core instructional materials stored in digital format on Macintosh computers. The use of computers in the medical curriculum is…

  15. Exercise Effects on Sleep Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunao eUchida

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This mini-review focuses on the effects of exercise on sleep. In its early days, sleep research largely focused on central nervous system (CNS physiology using standardized tabulations of several sleep-specific landmark electroencephalogram (EEG waveforms. Though coarse, this method has enabled the observation and inspection of numerous uninterrupted sleep phenomena. Thus, research on the effects of exercise on sleep began, in the 1960’s, with a focus primarily on sleep EEG (CNS sleep changes. Those early studies found only small effects of exercise on sleep. More recent sleep research has explored not only CNS functioning, but somatic physiology as well. As physical exercise mostly affects somatic functions, endocrine and autonomic nervous system (ANS changes that occur during sleep should be affected by daytime exercise. Since endocrinological, metabolic and autonomic changes can be measured during sleep, it should be possible to assess exercise effects on somatic physiology in addition to CNS sleep quality, building from standard polysomnographic (PSG techniques. Incorporating measures of somatic physiology in the quantitative assessment of sleep could further our understanding of sleep's function as an auto-regulatory, global phenomenon.

  16. Physiological aspects of paired stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijler, F.L.; Durrer, D.

    1966-01-01

    Starling's law of the heart states that "the energy of contraction, however measured, is a function of the length of the muscle fibre" (Starling, 1915). This physiological property of myocardial and skeletal muscle enables the heart, within certain limits, to eject during each systole the amount

  17. The Limits of Exercise Physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabriel, Brendan M; Zierath, Juleen R

    2017-01-01

    Many of the established positive health benefits of exercise have been documented by historical discoveries in the field of exercise physiology. These investigations often assess limits: the limits of performance, or the limits of exercise-induced health benefits. Indeed, several key findings have...

  18. Physiological specialization of Stagonospora nodorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septoriosis is a harmful disease of wheat, widespread all over the world, including Russia. Stagonospora nodorum (Berk.) C