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Sample records for macon cove campus

  1. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Macon County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Macon County, IL. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona GIS...

  2. 36 CFR 13.1122 - Bartlett Cove Public Use Dock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bartlett Cove Public Use Dock... Bartlett Cove § 13.1122 Bartlett Cove Public Use Dock. (a) Docking, tying down, or securing aircraft is prohibited except at the designated aircraft float at the Bartlett Cove Public Use Dock. Docking, tying down...

  3. Magnetoplasmadynamcis - Portrait of Macon C. 'Mike' Ellis, Jr

    Science.gov (United States)

    1962-01-01

    Portrait of Macon C. 'Mike' Ellis, Jr. James Hansen described Mike Ellis as 'the first and only person to be in charge of Langley's Magnetoplasmadynamcis (MPD) Branch.' He was 'an NACA veteran who was 42 years old when the branch was organized. Ellis had come to work at Langley in 1939, and over the course of his career at the laboratory, he had been involved in pioneering work on the aerodynamics of jet engines, ramjets, and supersonic inlets and nozzles. Fittingly, Ellis had worked for Eastman Jacobs and with Arthur Kantrowitz in the early 1940s, and he had heard firsthand accounts of his former colleagues' attempts to design a fusion reactor in the spring of 1938. By the late 1950s, Ellis was one of Langley's most outspoken believers in MPD's promise of technological benefits. Ellis encouraged Floyd Thompson's enthusiasm for MPD and persuaded Langley's senior staff of mostly engineers that MPD was a field of research vital to the future of NASA. When the time came to pick someone to head the new branch, Ellis was unquestionably the person for the job. 'Ellis was no extraordinary 'scientific brain.' As an aeronautical engineer, his talents were quite respectable, but he possessed no special competency in the physics of fluids beyond his experience in aerodynamics or gas dynamics. He was always the first to admit that the complexities of plasma physics and MPD were such that 'there was no way' that he personally could conduct basic MPD research. That challenge he would leave to minds more suited for it. But Ellis could bring the MPD researchers together as a unit, serve as their strong external advocate, shield them from front-office pressures, and make sure that they received the support they needed to carry out their work. 'I just tried to keep my head above water,' Ellis explains, 'and keep these *mad scientists' from going off on too many tangents, or going mad myself.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From

  4. 33 CFR 110.50c - Mumford Cove, Groton, Conn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... Beginning at a point on the easterly shore of Mumford Cove at latitude 41°19′36″, longitude 72°01′06... a point on the easterly shore of Mumford Cove at latitude 41°19′15″, longitude 72°00′54″; thence...

  5. Half Moon Cove Tidal Project. Feasibility report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-11-01

    The proposed Half Moon Cove Tidal Power Project would be located in a small cove in the northern part of Cobscook Bay in the vicinity of Eastport, Maine. The project would be the first tidal electric power generating plant in the United States of America. The basin impounded by the barrier when full will approximate 1.2 square miles. The average tidal range at Eastport is 18.2 feet. The maximum spring tidal range will be 26.2 feet and the neap tidal range 12.8 feet. The project will be of the single pool-type single effect in which generation takes place on the ebb tide only. Utilizing an average mean tidal range of 18.2 feet the mode of operation enables generation for approximately ten and one-half (10-1/2) hours per day or slightly in excess of five (5) hours per tide. The installed capacity will be 12 MW utilizing 2 to 6 MW units. An axial flow, or Bulb type of turbine was selected for this study.

  6. Elfin Cove, Alaska Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Elfin Cove, Alaska Forecast Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST is a...

  7. King Cove, Alaska Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The King Cove, Alaska Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST...

  8. Measurements and Status at the CERES Ocean Validation Experiment (COVE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, B. E.; Denn, F. M.; Schuster, G. L.; Arduini, R. F.; Madigan, J. J.; Rutan, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) is a suite of instruments flying on several earth-observing satellites that provides data products of radiant energy from the top of the atmosphere to the Earth's surface. The CERES Ocean Validation Experiment (COVE) was established in 1999 as an ocean surface validation site for CERES and other satellite instruments. COVE is located at Chesapeake Light Station, approximately 25 kilometers east of Virginia (coordinates: 36.90N, 75.71W). COVE measurements include downwelling and upwelling radiant flux at visible and infrared wavelengths, basic meteorological parameters, aerosol optical depth, black carbon, total column water vapor, cloud heights, and more. COVE is part of several networks including the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN), Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), Micro-Pulse Lidar Network (MPLNET) and Global Positioning System Meteorology (GPS-MET). A table will be displayed that outlines the current instrumentation and measurements being collected at COVE. Select data results will be presented, including CERES satellite derived data versus COVE surface observed measurements. Also, climatologies such as black carbon from an Aethalometer will be disclosed. In October 2012, the Department of Energy (D.O.E.) purchased Chesapeake Light with the goal of producing a base station for vertically defined wind profiles. While this project is still in the planning phase, the D.O.E. has allowed our research to continue in its current state.

  9. 76 FR 40723 - Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP; Notice of Technical Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP; Notice of Technical Conference On May 27, 2011, pursuant to section 4 of the Natural Gas Act (NGA), Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP (Cove Point) filed...

  10. CEOS Visualization Environment (COVE) Tool for Intercalibration of Satellite Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Paul D.; Killough, Brian D.; Gowda, Sanjay; Williams, Brian R.; Chander, Gyanesh; Qu, Min

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly, data from multiple instruments are used to gain a more complete understanding of land surface processes at a variety of scales. Intercalibration, comparison, and coordination of satellite instrument coverage areas is a critical effort of space agencies and of international and domestic organizations. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites Visualization Environment (COVE) is a suite of browser-based applications that leverage Google Earth to display past, present, and future satellite instrument coverage areas and coincident calibration opportunities. This forecasting and ground coverage analysis and visualization capability greatly benefits the remote sensing calibration community in preparation for multisatellite ground calibration campaigns or individual satellite calibration studies. COVE has been developed for use by a broad international community to improve the efficiency and efficacy of such calibration efforts. This paper provides a brief overview of the COVE tool, its validation, accuracies and limitations with emphasis on the applicability of this visualization tool for supporting ground field campaigns and intercalibration of satellite instruments.

  11. Polarized Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Susan Resneck

    1991-01-01

    On college campuses, the climate is polarized because of intolerance and discrimination, censorship, factionalism, and anger among students and faculty. As a result, the campus is in danger of becoming dominated by political issues and discouraging the exchange of ideas characteristic of a true liberal arts education. (MSE)

  12. Our Little Houses: From Folly Cove to Lake Elsinore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poldberg, Monique

    2011-01-01

    Virginia Lee Burton was one of the first author-artists to fully integrate text with images on the printed page, captivating generations of children. She was the founder of the Folly Cove Designers, which is an artist collective known for block printed textiles and design, an artist and a writer, entwining the visual image and written word into a…

  13. Campus Politics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays,many college students show great enthusiasm in participating intocampus political activities,such as running for heads of the Students Union or the as sociations.Campus politics is an important part of college life.

  14. Modern sedimentation patterns in Potter Cove, King George Island, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, H. Christian; Kuhn, Gerhard; Wölfl, Anne-Cathrin; Wittenberg, Nina; Betzler, Christian

    2013-04-01

    IMCOAST among a number of other initiatives investigates the modern and the late Holocene environmental development of south King George Island with a strong emphasis on Maxwell Bay and its tributary fjord Potter Cove (maximum water depth: about 200 m). In this part of the project we aim at reconstructing the modern sediment distribution in the inner part of Potter Cove using an acoustic ground discrimination system (RoxAnn) and more than136 ground-truth samples. Over the past 20 years the air temperatures in the immediate working area increased by more than 0.6 K (Schloss et al. 2012) which is less than in other parts of the West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) but it is still in the range of the recovery of temperatures from the Little Ice Age maximum to the beginning of the 20th century. Potter Cove is a small fjord characterized by a series of moraine ridges produced by a tidewater glacier (Fourcade Glacier). Presumably, the farthest moraine is not much older than about 500 years (LIA maximum), hence the sediment cover is rather thin as evidenced by high resolution seismic data. Since a few years at least the better part of the tidewater glacier retreated onto the island's mainland. It is suggested that such a fundamental change in the fjord's physiography has also changed sedimentation patterns in the area. Potter Cove is characterized by silty-clayey sediments in the deeper inner parts of the cove. Sediments are coarser (fine to coarse sands and boulders) in the shallower areas; they also coarsen from the innermost basin to the mouth of the fjord. Textural structures follow the seabed morphology, i.e. small v-shaped passages through the moraine ridges. The glacier still produces large amounts of turbid melt waters that enter the cove at various places. We presume that very fine-grained sediments fall out from the meltwater plumes and are distributed by mid-depth or even bottom currents, thus suggesting an anti-estuarine circulation pattern. Older sediments that are

  15. Chickamauga Reservoir 1992 fisheries monitoring cove rotenone results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerley, B.L.

    1993-06-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is required by the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit for Sequoyah Nuclear Plant (SQN) to conduct and report annually a nonradiological operational monitoring program to evaluate potential effects of SQN on Chickamauga Reservoir. This monitoring program was initially designed to identify potential changes in water quality and biological communities in Chickamauga Reservoir resulting from operation of SQU. Chickamauga Reservoir cove rotenone sampling has also been conducted as part of the preoperational monitoring program for Watts Bar Nuclear Plant (WBN) to evaluate the combined effects of operating two nuclear facilities on one reservoir once WBU becomes operational. The purpose of this report is to present results of cove rotenone sampling conducted on Chickamauga Reservoir in 1992.

  16. CEOS visualization environment (COVE) tool for intercalibration of satellite instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, P.D.; Killough, B.D.; Gowda, S.; Williams, B.R.; Chander, G.; Qu, Min

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly, data from multiple instruments are used to gain a more complete understanding of land surface processes at a variety of scales. Intercalibration, comparison, and coordination of satellite instrument coverage areas is a critical effort of international and domestic space agencies and organizations. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites Visualization Environment (COVE) is a suite of browser-based applications that leverage Google Earth to display past, present, and future satellite instrument coverage areas and coincident calibration opportunities. This forecasting and ground coverage analysis and visualization capability greatly benefits the remote sensing calibration community in preparation for multisatellite ground calibration campaigns or individual satellite calibration studies. COVE has been developed for use by a broad international community to improve the efficiency and efficacy of such calibration planning efforts, whether those efforts require past, present, or future predictions. This paper provides a brief overview of the COVE tool, its validation, accuracies, and limitations with emphasis on the applicability of this visualization tool for supporting ground field campaigns and intercalibration of satellite instruments.

  17. 76 FR 58488 - Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP; Application for Blanket Authorization to Export Previously Imported...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP; Application for Blanket Authorization to Export Previously Imported Liquefied... (Application), filed on August 8, 2011, by Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP (DCP), requesting blanket authorization to export liquefied natural gas (LNG) that previously had been imported into the United States...

  18. Numerical study on wave dynamics and wave-induced bed erosion characteristics in Potter Cove, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chai Heng; Lettmann, Karsten; Wolff, Jörg-Olaf

    2013-12-01

    Wave generation, propagation, and transformation from deep ocean over complex bathymetric terrains to coastal waters around Potter Cove (King George Island, South Shetland Islands, Antarctica) have been simulated for an austral summer month using the Simulating Waves Nearshore (SWAN) wave model. This study aims to examine and understand the wave patterns, energy fluxes, and dissipations in Potter Cove. Bed shear stress due to waves is also calculated to provide a general insight on the bed sediment erosion characteristics in Potter Cove.A nesting approach has been implemented from an oceanic scale to a high-resolution coastal scale around Potter Cove. The results of the simulations were compared with buoy observations obtained from the National Data Buoy Center, the WAVEWATCH III model results, and GlobWave altimeter data. The quality of the modelling results has been assessed using two statistical parameters, namely the Willmott's index of agreement D and the bias index. Under various wave conditions, the significant wave heights at the inner cove were found to be about 40-50 % smaller than the ones near the mouth of Potter Cove. The wave power in Potter Cove is generally low. The spatial distributions of the wave-induced bed shear stress and active energy dissipation were found to be following the pattern of the bathymetry, and waves were identified as a potential major driving force for bed sediment erosion in Potter Cove, especially in shallow water regions. This study also gives some results on global ocean applications of SWAN.

  19. 75 FR 53283 - Yankee Cove Development, LLC; Notice of Declaration of Intention and Soliciting Comments...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-31

    ... United States; (3) would utilize surplus water or water power from a government dam; or (4) if applicable.... d. Applicant: Yankee Cove Development, LLC. e. Name of Project: Yankee Cove Hydro Project. f...://www.ferc.gov using the ``eLibrary'' link. Enter the docket number excluding the last three digits in...

  20. COVE: a visual environment for ocean observatory design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grochow, K.; Stoermer, M.; Kelley, D.; Delaney, J.; Lazowska, E.

    2008-07-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological ocean processes play a crucial role in determining Earth's environment. Unfortunately, our knowledge of these processes is limited because oceanography is carried out today largely the way it was a century ago: as expeditionary science, going to sea in ships and measuring a relatively small number of parameters (e.g., temperature, salinity, and pressure) as time and budget allow. The NSF Ocean Observatories Initiative is a US330 million project that will help transform oceanography from a data-poor to a data-rich science. A cornerstone of this project is the deep water Regional Scale Nodes (RSN) that will be installed off the coasts of Washington and Oregon. The RSN will include 1500 km of fiber optic cable providing power and bandwidth to the seafloor and throughout the water column. Thousands of sensors will be deployed to stream data and imagery to shore, where they will be available in real time for ocean scientists and the public at large. The design of the RSN is a complex undertaking, requiring a combination of many different interactive tools and areas of visualization: geographic visualization to see the available seafloor bathymetry, scientific visualization to examine existing geospatially located datasets, layout tools to place the sensors, and collaborative tools to communicate across the team during the design. COVE, the Common Observatory Visualization Environment, is a visualization environment designed to meet all these needs. COVE has been built by computer scientists working closely with the engineering and scientific teams who will build and use the RSN. This paper discusses the data and activities of cabled observatory design, the design of COVE, and results from its use across the team.

  1. Hydroacoustic habitat mapping in Potter Cove (King George Island, Antarctica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, H. Christian; Wölfl, Anne-Cathrin; Kuhn, Gerhard; Jerosch, Kerstin; Scharf, Frauke; Abele, Doris

    2016-04-01

    Climate change increasingly affects the coastal areas off Antarctica. Strongest environmental response occurs in the transition zones that mediate between the polar and subpolar latitudes. Potter Cove, a minor fjord at the northern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula is significantly affected by rising temperatures and retreating ice sheets. Large amounts of turbid meltwaters affect both, the seafloor and the water column and cause stress for many biota. There is an increasing demand to monitor the ongoing change and to work out means for comparison with similar coastal ecosystems under pressure. Marine habitat maps provide information on the seafloor characteristics that allow to describe and evaluate the status of the recent coastal ecosystem and to predict its future development. We used a RoxAnn acoustic ground discrimination system, a sidescan sonar, grab samples (grain size and TOC) and underwater video footage to gain habitat information. Supervised and unsupervised classification routines (including fuzzy k-means clustering and LDA) were employed to calculate models ranging from two classes (soft bottom habitat, stone habitat) to 7 classes (including classes of rocks with and without macroalgae as well as classes of gravels, sands and silts). Including organic carbon in the database allowed to identify a carbon-depleted class proximal to the glacier front. Potter Cove reveals features that are related to the climate-controlled environmental change: very rough seafloor topography in a small basin close to the fjord head which was cleared by the retreating tidewater glacier through the past two decades. The increasing distance to the glacier down-fjord causes existing habitats to smooth and mature and new habitats to form. This process will change the terrestrial and marine face of Potter Cove until the ongoing climatic change stops or even reverses. It becomes apparent that the final interpretation of the results benefits significantly from the different

  2. Geology of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, J.N.; Samberg, S.M.

    1979-05-01

    The Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) is located on the northwestern margin of the Marysvale volcanic field in southwestern Utah. The geology of the KGRA is dominated by lava flows and ash-flow tuffs of late Oligocene to mid-Miocene age that were deposited on faulted sedimentary rocks of Paleozoic to Mesozoic age. The geothermal system of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA is structurally controlled by normal faults. High-angle faults control fluid flow within the geothermal reservoir, while the gravitational glide blocks provide an impermeable cap for the geothermal system in the central part of the field. Surficial activity occurring to the north and south of the glide blocks is characterized by the evolution of hydrogen sulfide and deposition of native sulphur. Intense acid alteration of the aluvium, resulting from downward migration of sulphuric acid, has left porous siliceous residues that retain many of the original sedimentary structures. Detailed logs of Union Oil Company drill holes Forminco No. 1, Utah State 42-7, and Utah State 31-33 are included.

  3. Relationship Between Participation in a Clothing Construction Workshop and Selected Characteristics and Sewing Skills of Low-Income Homemakers in Macon County, Tennessee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Madeline L.; And Others

    A study was conducted to determine the influence of selected characteristics, family patterns, economic standards and clothing problems of the low-income homemakers in Macon County on their participation in a clothing construction workshop. Changes in homemakers' sewing skills brought about by attendance at the workshop were also determined. Data…

  4. A pilot project: Antioch Delta Cove, Antioch, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minder, M. [Antioch Diversified Development Associates, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The project involves the restoration of the Hickmott cannery site, comprising approximately 15 acres (three five acre parcels) located on the Delta in inter-city Antioch. Hickmott Foods, Inc., operated a fruit and vegetable cannery between 1905 and the early 1970`s, during which time tomato skins, peach and apricot pits, and asparagus butts were discharged on the site. The decaying fruit pits have caused cyanide contamination. Additionally, the site contains some petroleum hydrocarbon contamination as well as gypsum board contamination, apparently from nearby manufacturing operations. The Antioch Delta Cove Pilot shows how interested parties can work together to clean up contaminated sites and use the clean up process to stimulate technology transfer. The Antioch project is a blueprint that can be replicated at other sites across California.

  5. Whittier small boat harbor, Shotgun Cove, Whittier, Alaska, feasibility stage: Planning aid report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Site A {Mouth of the Cove) is the most environmentally acceptable alternative and should be studied further. The impacts expected to occur at the less...

  6. County and Parish Boundaries, MFRDC has city limit boundaries for all municipalities in Dooly, Crisp, Macon, Taylor, Schley, Marion and Webster counties., Published in 2008, 1:63360 (1in=1mile) scale, Middle Flint Regional Development Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Regional | GIS Inventory — County and Parish Boundaries dataset current as of 2008. MFRDC has city limit boundaries for all municipalities in Dooly, Crisp, Macon, Taylor, Schley, Marion and...

  7. Zip Codes, MFRDC has zip code boundaries for Dooly, Crisp, Macon, Taylor, Schley, Marion and Webster counties., Published in 2008, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Middle Flint RDC.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Zip Codes dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale as of 2008. It is described as 'MFRDC has zip code boundaries for Dooly, Crisp, Macon, Taylor, Schley,...

  8. Railroad Lines, MFRDC has railroad data for Dooly, Crisp, Macon, Taylor, Schley, Marion and Webster counties., Published in 2008, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Middle Flint RDC.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Railroad Lines dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale as of 2008. It is described as 'MFRDC has railroad data for Dooly, Crisp, Macon, Taylor, Schley,...

  9. Road and Street Centerlines, MFRDC has road data for Dooly, Crisp, Macon, Taylor, Schley, Marion and Webster counties., Published in 2008, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Middle Flint RDC.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — , published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale as of 2008. It is described as 'MFRDC has road data for Dooly, Crisp, Macon, Taylor, Schley, Marion and Webster counties.'....

  10. Peninsula Effects on Birds in a Coastal Landscape: Are Coves More Species Rich than Lobes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Riffell

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Peninsula effects - decreasing richness with increasing distance along peninsula lobes - have been identified for many taxa on large peninsulas. Peninsula effects are caused by differences in colonization and extinction predicted by island biogeography or by environmental gradients along the peninsula. We compared species-area regressions for cove patches (i.e., mainland to regressions for lobe patches (i.e., on peninsula tips for wet meadow birds along a highly interdigitated shoreline (northern Lake Huron, USA. We conducted analysis both with and without accounting for variation in habitat and landscape characteristics (i.e., environmental gradients of wet meadows. Species-area regressions for coves did not differ from lobes, nor did these results differ when we accounted for gradients. Similarly, few species were more abundant in coves. Peninsula effects may have been lacking because lobe patches were located ≈ 800 m on average from the mainland, and birds are highly mobile and can easily sample patches over these distances. One important caveat was that wet meadow patches > 5 ha were located in coves, so coves would still be important considerations in conservation plans because of the contribution of large patches to reproductive success, dispersal and population dynamics.

  11. 76 FR 76698 - Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP; Application To Export Domestic Liquefied Natural Gas to Non-Free...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-08

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2011-31518] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY [FE Docket No. 11-128-LNG] Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP..., by Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP (DCP), requesting long- term, multi-contract authorization to export up to 7.82 million metric tons per year of domestically produced liquefied natural gas...

  12. 77 FR 59601 - Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental... and operation of facilities by Dominion Cove Point LNG, LP (Dominion) in Maryland and Virginia. This... 717b, DOE would authorize the export of natural gas, including liquefied natural gas (LNG),...

  13. 33 CFR 165.502 - Safety and Security Zone; Cove Point Liquefied Natural Gas Terminal, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety and Security Zone; Cove Point Liquefied Natural Gas Terminal, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland. 165.502 Section 165.502 Navigation and... Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.502 Safety and Security Zone; Cove Point Liquefied Natural...

  14. 33 CFR 334.960 - Pacific Ocean, San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval danger zone off West Cove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Island, Calif.; naval danger zone off West Cove. 334.960 Section 334.960 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.960 Pacific Ocean, San Clemente Island, Calif.; naval danger zone off West Cove. (a)...

  15. 33 CFR 110.48 - Thompson Cove on east side of Pawcatuck River below Westerly, R.I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Thompson Cove on east side of..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.48 Thompson... channelward end of Thompson Dock at the northern end of Thompson Cove 184° to the shore at the southern end...

  16. SmartCampusAAU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rene; Thomsen, Bent; Thomsen, Lone Leth

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes SmartCampusAAU - an open, extendable platform that supports the easy creation of indoor location based systems. SmartCampusAAU offers an app and backend that can be used to enable indoor positioning and navigation in any building. The SmartCampusAAU app is available on all ma...... major mobile platforms (Android, iPhone and Windows Phone) and supports both device- and infrastructure-based positioning. SmartCampusAAU also offers a publicly available OData backend that allows researchers to share radio map and location tracking data.......This paper describes SmartCampusAAU - an open, extendable platform that supports the easy creation of indoor location based systems. SmartCampusAAU offers an app and backend that can be used to enable indoor positioning and navigation in any building. The SmartCampusAAU app is available on all...

  17. Sedimentary regimes at Potter Cove, King George Island, maritime Antarctica - from source to sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monien, Donata; Monien, Patrick; Brünjes, Robert M.; Widmer, Tatjana; Schnetger, Bernhard; Brumsack, Hans-Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    Increased particle run-off due to recently retreated ice masses along the Antarctic margins may play an important role in fertilizing the high-nutrient-low-chlorophyll regions of the Southern Ocean. At Potter Cove, King George Island, maritime Antarctica, small melt water streams at the south-eastern shoreline (Potter Peninsula) discharge up to 1,500 mg L-1 (av. 110 mg L-1) of suspended particle matter (SPM) per day into the coastal water body during the summer seasons. Apart from potential light limitation of plankton growth by the suspension load, the particle run-off affects benthic feeders, possibly changes the depositional regime and the preservation of chemical proxies in the outlet zones, and exports trace elements offshore. In Potter Cove's water column, the average particle size is low, and extreme turbidity events are restricted to the upper five to seven meters. High particle loads are often associated with low salinities, most probably induced by increased onshore precipitation. Sediment traps installed in the inner and outer cove at 5 and 20 m water depth suggest mass accumulation rates of 0.83 and 0.58 g cm-2 yr-1, and 0.13 and 0.11 g cm-2 yr-1 (considering 183 days of sedimentation), respectively. 210Pb measurements of short sediment cores reveal recent sediment accumulation rates of approximately 0.1 to 0.6 g cm-2 yr-1. The SPM sampled in the melt water streams and plumes is chemically different to surface sediments deposited in Potter Cove. Chemical characteristics suggest a significant impact of particle sorting: SPM and outer cove sediments are more clayey, whereas inner cove sediments contain more heavy minerals. Generally, sediment deposits in Potter Cove exhibit coarser grain sizes and are mainly derived from Barton Peninsula (northern shoreline), whereas the SPM consists of more fine-grained material originating from Potter Peninsula eluviations. Sequential leaching of the SPM by ascorbic acid showed that approximately 0.5 to 2% of the total

  18. Advancing the discussion about systematic classroom behavioral observation, a product review of Tenny, J. (2010). eCOVE observation software. Pacific City, OR: eCOVE Software, LLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froiland, John Mark; Smith, Liana

    2014-05-01

    Applied child psychologists and behavioral consultants often use systematic behavioral observations to inform the psychological assessment and intervention development process for children referred for attention and hyperactivity problems. This article provides a review of the 2010 version of the eCOVE classroom observation software in terms of its utility in tracking the progress of children with attention and hyperactive behaviors and its use in evaluating teacher behaviors that may impede or promote children's attention and positive behavior. The eCOVE shows promise as an efficient tool for psychologists and behavioral consultants who want to evaluate the effects of interventions for children with symptoms of ADHD, ODD, mood disorders and learning disorders; however, some research-based improvements for future models are suggested. The reviewers also share their firsthand experience in using eCOVE to evaluate teacher and student behavior exhibited on a television show about teaching urban high school students and during a movie about an eccentric new kindergarten teacher. Rich examples are provided of using strategic behavioral observations to reveal how to improve the classroom environment so as to facilitate attention, motivation and positive behavior among youth. Broader implications for enhancing the use of systematic behavioral observations in the assessment of children and adolescents with attention disorders and related behavioral problems are discussed. Key issues are examined such as the use of behavioral observations during psychological consultation to prevent the previously found gender bias in referrals for ADHD. Using behavioral observations to enhance differential diagnosis is also discussed.

  19. 79 FR 36094 - Notice of Proposed Supplementary Rules for the Cove Recreation Site, Owyhee County, ID

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management Notice of Proposed Supplementary Rules for the Cove Recreation Site, Owyhee... Conservation Area (NCA) in Owyhee County, Idaho. These supplementary rules are compatible and consistent...

  20. 81 FR 43631 - Final Supplementary Rules for the Cove Recreation Site, Owyhee County, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-05

    ....HT0000 LXSS020D0000 241A 4500076900] Final Supplementary Rules for the Cove Recreation Site, Owyhee... Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area (NCA) in Owyhee County, Idaho. These final...). Originally, public comments were due August 25, 2014. The BLM accepted comments from the Owyhee...

  1. Incorporating Relevance and Rigor in a Game Environment: Barracuda Cove Investment Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    Achieving student learning outcomes in a "gamelike" environment allows students to connect real-world activities to marketing and business concepts presented in a relevant and authentic manner. The innovative game, Barracuda Cove Investment Game, can be incorporated into any marketing-related course that would require a marketing or…

  2. Virtual Campus Hub technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vercoulen, Frank; Badger, Merete; Monaco, Lucio;

    This deliverable briefly describes which technological components have been delivered for the Virtual Campus Hub and how they can be used. A detailed discussion of the technical details of the components, how they were realized and how they fit the VCH concept can be found in deliverables D5.......4. Virtual Campus Hub Technology Evaluation Report and D6.7 The Virtual Campus Hub Concept....

  3. SmartCampusAAU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rene; Thomsen, Bent; Thomsen, Lone Leth

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes SmartCampusAAU - an open, extendable platform that supports the easy creation of indoor location based systems. SmartCampusAAU offers an app and backend that can be used to enable indoor positioning and navigation in any building. The SmartCampusAAU app is available on all ma...... major mobile platforms (Android, iPhone and Windows Phone) and supports both device- and infrastructure-based positioning. SmartCampusAAU also offers a publicly available OData backend that allows researchers to share radio map and location tracking data....

  4. 2010 Campus Sustainability Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    With this review of campus sustainability efforts in 2010, the editors aim to give readers--those who are often immersed in the day-to-day particulars of sustainability efforts--the same chance to take a step back and take a broader look at where they stand with sustainability in higher education. This inaugural 2010 Campus Sustainability Review…

  5. 2010 Campus Sustainability Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    With this review of campus sustainability efforts in 2010, the editors aim to give readers--those who are often immersed in the day-to-day particulars of sustainability efforts--the same chance to take a step back and take a broader look at where they stand with sustainability in higher education. This inaugural 2010 Campus Sustainability Review…

  6. Modern sedimentation in a rapidly warming fjord: Potter Cove, King George Island, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, H. C.; Kuhn, G.; Wittenberg, N.; Wölfl, A.

    2012-04-01

    The northern Antarctic Peninsula belongs to the fastest warming regions on earth. The winter-warming trend was strong and stable over the past 70 years. As a result, Potter Cove, a small fjord that opens into Maxwell Bay (King George Island, South Shetland Islands), shows significant environmental change. A former tidewater glacier (Fourcade Glacier) has retreated onto land exposing bedrock such as a small island close to the glacier front. It is suggested that the warming trend triggered excessive discharge of sediment-laden meltwaters in the form of turbid surface waters. The hypothesis for this study is that very fine-grained materials are present in Potter Cove and that meltwater plumes that exit Potter Cove can be traced downstream in the form of fans of fine-grained materials. In this study we investigate the modern sedimentation patterns in Potter Cove using hydroacoustics and seafloor samples to compare that with conditions from the past as recorded in sediment cores. Surface grain-size distributions reveal a distinct textural pattern in Potter Cove. Cluster analysis suggests 7 classes of sediment types. Four of them are unimodal, three classes show fine-skewed distributions with tendencies to bimodality. The finer sediment classes are found in the central inner part of the cove. The finest class (mode at 16 µm) forms only a small patch in the shelter of a small island. Sediments from close to the glacier front appear to be slightly depleted in fine-grained materials. From the glacier front to the outer fjord the sediments show influence of current sorting, i.e. the coarser mode becomes more significant and sorting increases. A sediment core from the deeper outer basin of Potter Cove reveals only one of the better-sorted, coarser classes that appears to form on the way from the glacier into the basin. There are 5 long sediment cores located less than 10 km off the mouth of Potter Cove in Maxwell Bay. All of which reveal sediments that belong either to the

  7. Physical and chemical limnology of Ides Cove near Rochester, New York, 1970-1982

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubeck, R.C.; Staubitz, W.W.; Weidemann, A.D.; Spittal, L.P.

    1995-01-01

    Ides Cove is a small embayment on the western shore of Irondequoit Bay near Rochester, N.Y. In 1982, alum was applied to the cove to seal the bottom sediments and thereby decrease nutrient fluxes in an effort to assess the applicability of this technique to Irondequoit Bay. Published data were used to develop a baseline analysis of the chemical and physical limnology of Ides Cove prior to the alum treatment and to provide a basis for comparison and evaluation of post-treatment data. The baseline analysis also enables evaluation of trends in the nutrient status and mixing patterns in Ides Cove since the decrease of sewage inflows and use of road salt in the Irondequoit Bay and Ides Cove drainage basins during 1970-82. Data from 1970-72 and 1979-82 were used to construct partial and full-year depth profiles of several physical properties and chemical constituents of water in the cove; comparison of these profiles indicates a significant improvement in water quality between 1970 and 1982. The diversion of sewage out of the Irondequoit Creek drainage basin in the late 1970's resulted in an 80-percent decrease in total phosphate concentration and a 50- to 60-percent decrease in nitrogen (nitrate and ammonia) concentration in the cove. Indications of decreased primary productivity are associated with these lowered nutrient concentrations. Summer Secchi-disk transparency increased from 0.6 m (meters) in 1970-72 to 1.2 m in 1980-82; peak epilimnetic dissolved oxygen levels decreased from a range of 22 to 28 mg/L (milligrams per liter) to a range of 16 to 20 mg/L; and peak epilimnetic pH decreased from greater than 9.4 to between 8.8 and 9.0. The decrease in the use of road salt in the Irondequoit basin beginning in 1974 resulted in a decrease in chloride concentration and gradient (difference between the surface and bottom con- centration). The maximum annual chloride concentration in the epilimnion decreased from the 210-to-225-mg/L range in the spring of 1971-72 to the

  8. 2011 Oregon Parks and Recreation Department Lidar: Northeast (Clyde Holliday, Cove Palisades, Lake Owyhee, and White River Falls State Parks)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set provides the lidar elevations for four Oregon State Parks. The four state parks are Clyde Holliday (766 square acres) in Grant County, Cove Palisades...

  9. Web Interactive Campus Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marylene S. Eder

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interactive campus map is a web based application that can be accessed through a web browser. With the Google Map Application Programming Interface availability of the overlay function has been taken advantage to create custom map functionalities. Collection of building points were gathered for routing and to create polygons which serves as a representation of each building. The previous campus map provides a static visual representation of the campus. It uses legends building name and its corresponding building number in providing information. Due to its limited capabilities it became a realization to the researchers to create an interactive campus map.Storing data about the building room and staff information and university events and campus guide are among the primary features that this study has to offer. Interactive Web-based Campus Information System is intended in providing a Campus Information System.It is open to constant updates user-friendly for both trained and untrained users and capable of responding to all needs of users and carrying out analyses. Based on the data gathered through questionnaires researchers analyzed the results of the test survey and proved that the system is user friendly deliver information to users and the important features that the students expect.

  10. Hydrography of Potter Cove, a Small Fjord-like Inlet on King George Island (South Shetlands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klöser, Heinz; Ferreyra, Gustavo; Schloss, Irene; Mercuri, Guillermo; Laturnus, Frank; Curtosi, Antonio

    1994-05-01

    The hydrography of Potter Cove (King George Island, South Shetlands) is described in detail for one summer season. Recorded data are wind, air temperature, water temperature, salinity and water colour. From these, information on surface circulation patterns and dynamics of suspended sediments are derived. Possible sources of sediment input are discussed. As a result, a complex interaction between wind forcing, circulation and seasonal melt of high glacier surfaces emerges.

  11. Tributyltin in environmental samples from the Former Derecktor Shipyard, Coddington Cove, Newport RI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, Terry L.; Sweet, Stephen T.; Quinn, James G.; Cairns, Robert W.; King, John W

    2004-05-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) was detected in all 24 surface sediment (top 2 cm) samples collected from Coddington Cove, Newport, RI. TBT surface sediment concentrations ranged from 32 to 372 ng Sn/g with a mean concentration of 146 ng Sn/g. Analyses of selected core sections detected TBT in at least the top 18 cm at all 7 stations where cores were collected. No consistent TBT concentration trends with depth for these cores suggest mixing is an important process in the sediment column. In one core (station 28), TBT was found in the 76-86 cm section at a concentration of 141 ng Sn/g; thus sediments are a significant sink for TBT. However, sediment mixing processes can enhance releases of bioavailable TBT. Mussels, clams and fish from Coddington Cove contain TBT at concentrations ranging from 9.2 to 977 ng Sn/g. TBT concentrations in lobsters were below the detection limit (<6 ng Sn/g). Based on available screening criteria, TBT concentrations in Coddington Cove sediment is likely to be having an adverse effect on the biota at some locations. - TBT is likely to continue to be bioavailable for many years.

  12. Molecular characterisation of anthropogenic sources of sedimentary organic matter from Potter Cove, King George Island, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauner, Ana Lúcia L; Hernández, Edgardo A; MacCormack, Walter P; Martins, César C

    2015-01-01

    Although relatively recent, human activities in Antarctica, such as growing tourism, fishery activities, and scientific operations, have affected some areas of this continent. These activities eventually release pollutants, such as petroleum and its derivatives and sewage, into this environment. Located on King George Island (25 de Mayo Island), Potter Cove (62°14'S, 58°39'W) is home to the Argentine Carlini research station. To evaluate the anthropogenic impacts surrounding Potter Cove, sediment samples were collected and analysed for sewage and fuel introduction via the determination of organic markers. The highest concentrations were found in the central portion of the fjords, where fine sediments are deposited and the accumulation of organic molecules is favoured. Aliphatic hydrocarbons were mainly derived from biogenic sources, evidenced by the predominance of odd short-chain n-alkanes. Anthropogenic impacts were evidenced primarily by the presence of PAHs, which were predominantly related to petrogenic sources, such as vessel and boat traffic. Sewage marker concentrations were much lower than those found in other Antarctic regions. These results indicate that oil hydrocarbons and sewage inputs to Potter Cove may be considered low or only slightly influential.

  13. Campus Card Tricks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickes, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Examines the development of an innovative student identification card system that includes off-campus banking and credit card functions. Finding solutions to bank objections, credit card company rule problems, and software difficulties are discussed. (GR)

  14. OnCampus: a mobile platform towards a smart campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xin; Kong, Xiangjie; Zhang, Fulin; Chen, Zhen; Kang, Jialiang

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of researchers and practitioners are working to develop smart cities. Considerable attention has been paid to the college campus as it is an important component of smart cities. Consequently, the question of how to construct a smart campus has become a topical one. Here, we propose a scheme that can facilitate the construction of a smart and friendly campus. We primarily focus on three aspects of smart campuses. These are: the formation of social circles based on interests mining, the provision of educational guidance based on emotion analysis of information posted on a platform, and development of a secondary trading platform aimed at optimizing the allocation of campus resources. Based on these objectives, we designed and implemented a mobile platform called OnCampus as the first step towards the development of a smart campus that has been introduced in some colleges. We found that OnCampus could successfully accomplish the three above mentioned functions of a smart campus.

  15. Address Points, MFRDC has address points for all municipalities in Dooly, Crisp, Macon, Taylor, Schley, Marion and Webster counties and for the counties as well., Published in 2008, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Middle Flint Regional Development Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Regional | GIS Inventory — Address Points dataset current as of 2008. MFRDC has address points for all municipalities in Dooly, Crisp, Macon, Taylor, Schley, Marion and Webster counties and...

  16. Dual Campus High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen P. Mombourquette

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available September 2010 witnessed the opening of the first complete dual campus high school in Alberta. Catholic Central High School, which had been in existence since 1967 in one building, now offered courses to students on two campuses. The “dual campus” philosophy was adopted so as to ensure maximum program flexibility for students. The philosophy, however, was destined to affect student engagement and staff efficacy as the change in organizational structure, campus locations, and course availability was dramatic. Changing school organizational structure also had the potential of affecting student achievement. A mixed-methods study utilizing engagement surveys, efficacy scales, and interviews with students and teachers was used to ascertain the degree of impact. The results of the study showed that minimal impact occurred to levels of student engagement, minor negative impact to staff efficacy, and a slight increase to student achievement results.

  17. Response of phytoplankton dynamics to 19-year (1991-2009) climate trends in Potter Cove (Antarctica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloss, Irene R.; Abele, Doris; Moreau, Sébastien; Demers, Serge; Bers, A. Valeria; González, Oscar; Ferreyra, Gustavo A.

    2012-04-01

    King George Island (KGI, Isla 25 de Mayo) is located within one of the most rapidly warming regions on Earth at the north-western tip of the Antarctic Peninsula. Since 1991 hydrographical characteristics and phytoplankton dynamics were monitored at two stations in Potter Cove, a fjord-like environment on the south-eastern KGI coastline. Seawater temperature and salinity, total suspended particulate matter (TSPM) and chlorophyll- a (Chl- a, a proxy for phytoplankton biomass) concentrations were measured in summer and winter over a 19-year period, together with local air temperature. Mean air temperatures rose by 0.39 and 0.48 °C per decade in summer and winter, respectively. Positive anomalies characterized wind speeds during the decade between the mid '90 and the mid 2000 years, whereas negative anomalies were observed from 2004 onwards. Day of sea ice formation and retreat, based on satellite data, did not change, although total sea ice cover diminished during the studied period. Surface water temperature increased during summer (0.36 °C per decade), whereas no trend was observed in salinity. Summer Chl- a concentrations were around 1 mg m - 3 Chl- a with no clear trend throughout the study period. TSPM increased in surface waters of the inner cove during the spring-summer months. The Southern Annular Mode (SAM) climate signal was apparent in the fluctuating interannual pattern of the hydrographic variables in the outer Potter Cove and bottom waters whereas surface hydrography was strongly governed by the local forcing of glacier melt. The results show that global trends have significant effects on local hydrographical and biological conditions in the coastal marine environments of Western Antarctica.

  18. From Campus to Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloyd, Marion G.

    1980-01-01

    College students of the 1980s are working within the democratic system rather than against it. Congressmen, impressed by the seriousness and skill of today's college students, have invited them to testify on issues. College students are merging their campus organizations to provide broader support and influence. (Author)

  19. Recycling the Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Milton

    1978-01-01

    Renovation and conversion of many old buildings at Davidson (North Carolina) College over the past fifteen years have saved millions of dollars and preserved the neoclassical architecture of the campus. The Davidson shop crews' repair and remodeling projects are described and illustrated by several photographs. (MF)

  20. PNNL Campus Master Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosey, Whitney LC

    2012-09-07

    The Plan is used as a guide for PNNL in making facility and infrastructure decisions essential to supporting the PNNL vision: to establish a modern, collaborative, flexible, and sustainable campus while optimizing the efficiency of operations in support of courageous discovery and innovation.

  1. Sustainable Campus Housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimm, Jon

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how incorporating energy-efficient features into residence halls can save money and make students' campus experience more enjoyable. Use of heat-recovery systems, low-impact lighting, and natural daylighting are explored as are ideas to consider for future residence hall construction projects or renovations. (GR)

  2. Open Campus: Strategic Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    pathways for highly trained graduates of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) academic programs, and help academic institutions...international relationships. An example is the ARL West campus in Playa Vista , CA, where staff members are recruited from Southern California to work on...engineering and mathematics (STEM) disciplines relevant to ARL science and technology programs. Under EPAs, visiting students and professors

  3. Virtual Campus Tours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrell, Andrea

    1999-01-01

    College campus "tours" offered online have evolved to include 360-degree views, live video, animation, talking tour guides, interactive maps with photographic links, and detailed information about buildings, departments, and programs. Proponents feel they should enhance, not replace, real tours. The synergy between the virtual tour and…

  4. Revisiting Campuses with Newman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Edward Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    This article builds on an essay the author published twenty years ago in "Current Issues in Catholic Higher Education" that examined the viability of John Henry Newman's "Idea of a University" against Catholic campus life and the just-released "Ex corde Ecclesiae". The current essay briefly notes those earlier key…

  5. Culturable heterotrophic bacteria from Potter Cove, Antarctica, and their hydrolytic enzymes production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Tropeano

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Affiliations of the dominant culturable bacteria isolated from Potter Cove, South Shetland Islands, Antarctica, were investigated together with their production of cold-active hydrolytic enzymes. A total of 189 aerobic heterotrophic bacterial isolates were obtained at 4°C and sorted into 63 phylotypes based on their amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis profiles. The sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes of representatives from each phylotype showed that the isolates belong to the phyla Proteobacteria (classes Alpha- and Gamma-proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes (class Flavobacteria, Actinobacteria (class Actinobacteria and Firmicutes (class Bacilli. The predominant culturable group in the site studied belongs to the class Gammaproteobacteria, with 65 isolates affiliated to the genus Pseudoalteromonas and 58 to Psychrobacter. Among the 189 isolates screened, producers of amylases (9.5%, pectinases (22.8%, cellulases (14.8%, CM-cellulases (25.4%, xylanases (20.1% and proteases (44.4% were detected. More than 25% of the isolates produced at least one extracellular enzyme, with some of them producing up to six of the tested extracellular enzymatic activities. These results suggest that a high culturable bacterial diversity is present in Potter Cove and that this place represents a promising source of biomolecules.

  6. Camas Creek (Meyers Cove) Anadromous Species Habitat Improvement: Annual Report 1989.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, Terry

    1989-12-01

    Historical agricultural practices and natural events contributed to severe degradation of riparian zones and instream fish habitat in the Meyers Cove area of Camas Creek. In 1984, Salmon National Forest personnel began implementing specific management activities in riparian areas and the stream channel to accelerate habitat recovery. In 1987--88, 4.3 miles of fence was constructed establishing a riparian livestock exclosure in the Meyers Cove area of Camas Creek. One end-gap and two water-crossing corridors were constructed in 1989 to complete the fence system. The riparian exclosure has been fertilized with phosphorous-rich fertilizer to promote root growth. A stream crossing ford was stabilized with angular cobble. Streambank stabilization/habitat cover work was completed at three sites and three additional habitat structures were placed. Extensive habitat inventories were completed to identify quality/quantity of habitat available to anadromous fish. The work accomplished was designed to promote natural revegetation of the riparian area to improve rearing habitat cover and streambank stability. Streambank work was limited to extremely unstable sites. Enhancement activities will improve spawning, incubation, and rearing habitat for wild populations of steelhead trout and chinook salmon. Anadromous species population increases resulting from these enhancement activities will provide partial compensation for downstream losses resulting from hydroelectric developments on the Columbia River system. 9 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. 77 FR 33446 - Jordan Cove Energy Project, L.P.; Application for Long-Term Authorization to Export Liquefied...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ... Cove Energy Project, L.P.; Application for Long-Term Authorization to Export Liquefied Natural Gas Produced From Domestic and Canadian Natural Gas Resources to Non-Free Trade Agreement Countries for a 25..., multi-contract authorization to export as liquefied natural gas (LNG) both natural gas...

  8. Seasonal variation of algal growth conditions in sheltered Antarctic bays: the example of Potter Cove (King George Island, South Shetlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klöser, H.; Ferreyra, G.; Schloss, I.; Mercuri, G.; Laturnus, F.; Curtosi, A.

    1993-01-01

    Wind, air temperature, surface irradiance, light penetration into the water, salinity and water temperature have been recorded from mid November to mid February in Potter Cove, King George Island. Results are compared with published data on requirements for growth of Antarctic microalgae. The invest

  9. Seasonal variation of algal growth conditions in sheltered Antarctic bays: the example of Potter Cove (King George Island, South Shetlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klöser, H.; Ferreyra, G.; Schloss, I.; Mercuri, G.; Laturnus, F.; Curtosi, A.

    1993-01-01

    Wind, air temperature, surface irradiance, light penetration into the water, salinity and water temperature have been recorded from mid November to mid February in Potter Cove, King George Island. Results are compared with published data on requirements for growth of Antarctic microalgae. The

  10. Power quality on campus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copper Development Association

    2011-05-15

    The Maria Stata Center on the campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is home to the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), the Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems (LIDS) and the Department of Linguistics and Philosophy. Computers and networks are everywhere on campus and the electrical infrastructure, mainly made of copper, ensures the highest level of power quality. The copper-based grounding system helps stabilize the wiring system and several K-rated transformers help accommodate harmonic currents and improve energy efficiency. Separation from sensitive and non-sensitive branch circuits helps to shield sensitive equipment from electrical noise, and the installation of transient voltage surge suppression equipment assures maximum protection from voltage surges. .

  11. Mobile Phone on Campus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周成

    2005-01-01

    Communication revolution has brought a great convenience to modem society and people. Especially, the occurrence of mobile phone, in away, has changed the world where we live. Maybe the mobile phone was a luxury for only a decade ago. Now, it is no exaggeration4 to say that the difference between the parts and the present is as vast as that between earth and heaven. With no exception6, campus students also fall into the category called “cell-phone school”.

  12. Proposed Auxiliary Boundary Stratigraphic Section and Point (ASSP) for the base of the Ordovician System at Lawson Cove, Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James F.; Evans, Kevin R.; Ethington, Raymond L.; Freeman, Rebecca; Loch, James D.; Repetski, John E.; Ripperdan, Robert; Taylor, John F.

    2016-01-01

    The Global boundary Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) for the base of the Ordovician System is at the First Appearance Datum (FAD) of the conodont Iapetognathus fluctivagus at Green Point in Newfoundland, Canada. Strata there are typical graptolitic facies that were deposited near the base of the continental slope.We propose establishing an Auxiliary boundary Stratotype Section and Point (ASSP) at the FAD of I. fluctivagus at the Lawson Cove section in the Ibex area of Millard County, Utah, USA. There, strata consist of typical shelly facies limestones that were deposited on a tropical carbonate platform and contain abundant conodonts, trilobites, brachiopods, and other fossil groups. Cambrian and Ordovician strata in this area are ~5300m thick, with the Lawson Cove section spanning 243m in three overlapping segments. Six other measured and studied sections in the area show stratigraphic relationships similar to those at Lawson Cove. Faunas have been used to divide these strata into 14 conodont and 7 trilobite zonal units. The widespread olenid trilobite Jujuyaspis occurs ~90cm above the proposed boundary at Lawson Cove; this genus is generally regarded as earliest Ordovician. Rhynchonelliform and linguliform brachiopods are common to abundant and are useful for correlation. The FAD of Iapetognathus fluctivagus and occurrences of Jujuyaspis and the Lower Ordovician planktonic graptolite Anisograptus matanensis all occur within a 2.4m interval of strata at a nearby section. Non-biological correlation tools include a detailed sequence stratigraphic classification and a detailed carbon-isotope profile. Especially useful for correlation is a positive 13C excursion peak ~15cm below the proposed boundary horizon. All of these correlation tools form an integrated framework that makes the Lawson Cove section especially useful as an ASSP for global correlation of strata with faunas typical of shallow, warm-water, shelly facies.

  13. Geologic controls on cave development in Burnsville Cove, Bath and Highland Counties, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swezey, Christopher; Haynes, John T.; Lucas, Philip C.; Lambert, Richard A.

    2017-01-01

    Burnsville Cove in Bath and Highland Counties (Virginia, USA) is a karst region in the Valley and Ridge Province of the Appalachian Mountains. The region contains many caves in Silurian to Devonian limestone, and is well suited for examining geologic controls on cave location and cave passage morphology. In Burnsville Cove, many caves are located preferentially near the axes of synclines and anticlines. For example, Butler Cave is an elongate cave where the trunk channel follows the axis of Sinking Creek syncline and most of the side passages follow joints at right angles to the syncline axis. In contrast, the Water Sinks Subway Cave, Owl Cave, and Helictite Cave have abundant maze patterns, and are located near the axis of Chestnut Ridge anticline. The maze patterns may be related to fact that the anticline axis is the site of the greatest amount of flexure, leading to more joints and (or) greater enlargement of joints. Many of the larger caves of Burnsville Cove (e.g., Breathing Cave, Butler Cave–Sinking Creek Cave System, lower parts of the Water Sinks Cave System) are developed in the Silurian Tonoloway Limestone, the stratigraphic unit with the greatest surface exposure in the area. Other caves are developed in the Silurian to Devonian Keyser Limestone of the Helderberg Group (e.g., Owl Cave, upper parts of the Water Sinks Cave System) and in the Devonian Shriver Chert and (or) Licking Creek Limestone of the Helderberg Group (e.g., Helictite Cave). Within the Tonoloway Limestone, the larger caves are developed in the lower member of the Tonoloway Limestone immediately below a bed of silica-cemented sandstone. In contrast, the larger caves in the Keyser Limestone are located preferentially in limestone beds containing stromatoporoid reefs, and some of the larger caves in the Licking Creek Limestone are located in beds of cherty limestone below the Devonian Oriskany Sandstone. Geologic controls on cave passage morphology include joints, bedding planes, and

  14. Persistence, biodegradation and biological impact of Bunker C residues in Black Duck Cove, Nova Scotia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K.; Wohlgeschaffen, G. D.; Tremblay, G. H. [Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans of Canada, Inst. Maurice-Lamontagne, Mont Joli, PQ (Canada); Vandermeulen, D. C.; Mossman, K. G. [Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans of Canada, Bedford Inst. of Oceanography, Dartmouth, NS (Canada); Doe, K. G.; Jackman, P. M. [Environment Canada, Environmental Science Center, Moncton, NB (Canada); Prince, R. C.; Garrett, R. M.; Haith, C. E. [Exxon Research and Engineering Company, Annandale, NJ (United States)

    1998-12-31

    In 1970, approximately 2,045 cubic metres of Bunker C oil impacted on 300 km of Nova Scotia`s coastline following the grounding of the tanker `Arrow`. Only 10 per cent of the coastline was subjected to cleanup, the remainder was left to degrade naturally. Samples of sediments were collected in 1993 and 1997 in order to assess the attenuation processes on the reduction of toxicity within sediments and interstitial waters at Black Duck Cove, one of the untreated sites where residual oil was clearly evident. Detailed chemical analyses showed that the Bunker C oil at this site has undergone substantial biodegradation. Over the 20 plus years since the oil spill the toxicity of the residual oil has been significantly reduced and there is substantial evidence of habitat recovery.

  15. Persistence, biodegradation and biological impact of Bunker C residues in Black Duck Cove, Nova Scotia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K.; Wohlgeschaffen, G. D.; Tremblay, G. H. [Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans of Canada, Inst. Maurice-Lamontagne, Mont Joli, PQ (Canada); Vandermeulen, D. C.; Mossman, K. G. [Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans of Canada, Bedford Inst. of Oceanography, Dartmouth, NS (Canada); Doe, K. G.; Jackman, P. M. [Environment Canada, Environmental Science Center, Moncton, NB (Canada); Prince, R. C.; Garrett, R. M.; Haith, C. E. [Exxon Research and Engineering Company, Annandale, NJ (United States)

    1998-07-01

    In 1970, approximately 2,045 cubic metres of Bunker C oil impacted on 300 km of Nova Scotia's coastline following the grounding of the tanker 'Arrow'. Only 10 per cent of the coastline was subjected to cleanup, the remainder was left to degrade naturally. Samples of sediments were collected in 1993 and 1997 in order to assess the attenuation processes on the reduction of toxicity within sediments and interstitial waters at Black Duck Cove, one of the untreated sites where residual oil was clearly evident. Detailed chemical analyses showed that the Bunker C oil at this site has undergone substantial biodegradation. Over the 20 plus years since the oil spill the toxicity of the residual oil has been significantly reduced and there is substantial evidence of habitat recovery.

  16. Profiling Campus Administration: A Demographic Survey of Campus Police Chiefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linebach, Jared A.; Kovacsiss, Lea M.; Tesch, Brian P.

    2011-01-01

    Campus law enforcement faces unique challenges, as there are different societal expectations compared to municipal law enforcement. Municipal law enforcement models typically focus on traditionally reactive law and order, while campus law enforcement models typically focus on proactive responses to crime and its deterrence. Stressors experienced…

  17. Blended Learning on Campus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heilesen, Simon; Nielsen, Jørgen Lerche

    2004-01-01

    On the basis of a large-scale project implementing information and communication technology at Roskilde University, Denmark, this paper discusses ways of introducing technology-based blended learning in academic life. We examine some examples of use of systems for computer-mediated collabora......-tive learning and work in Danish Open University education as well as in courses on campus. We further suggest some possi-bilities for using technology in innovative ways, arguing that innovation is to be found, not in isolated instantiations of sys-tems, but in the form of a deliberate integration of all...... relevant ICT-features as a whole into the learning environment....

  18. Campus Security under the Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    A university president's worst nightmare can take any number of forms. The lone shooter run amok on campus. The freight-train sound of a tornado bearing down on a dormitory. A river cresting its banks, about to flood a college town. From robberies and assaults to fires and chemical spills, the list goes on and on. Campus security and safety…

  19. Building Your Image on Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keever, Sue

    1998-01-01

    Offers advice to recruiters working on college campuses on how they can create a positive image with students and career services personnel. States that a good recruiting organization knows its customers, creates programs with the customer in mind, chooses its recruiting team well, and fosters strong relationships with campus partners. (MKA)

  20. Campus network security model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-ku; Song, Li-ren

    2011-12-01

    Campus network security is growing importance, Design a very effective defense hacker attacks, viruses, data theft, and internal defense system, is the focus of the study in this paper. This paper compared the firewall; IDS based on the integrated, then design of a campus network security model, and detail the specific implementation principle.

  1. THE SYRACUSE CAMPUS SCHOOL PLAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BARRY, FRANKLYN S.

    THE CAMPUS SCHOOL PLAN FOR AN EDUCATIONAL PARK IN SYRACUSE, NEW YORK, WAS CONCEIVED WHEN THE BOARD OF EDUCATION WAS FACED WITH THE NEED TO REPLACE EIGHT OUTMODED ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. THE PARK WOULD BE BUILT ON A SITE ON THE PERIPHERY OF THE CITY, TO WHICH STUDENTS WOULD BE TRANSPORTED BY BUS. THE FIRST CAMPUS WOULD ESTABLISH FOUR PAIRS OF…

  2. PLANNING THE CAMPUS BY COMPUTER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MATTOX, ROBERT F.

    PROBLEMS OF CAMPUS PLANNING ARE DISCUSSED IN TERMS OF COMPUTER ANALYSIS OF SCHEDULED AND NONSCHEDULED ACTIVITIES. ESTIMATION OF SPACE NEEDS FOR SCHEDULED CAMPUS ACTIVITIES INCLUDES--(1) TOTAL ENROLLMENT, (2) DISTRIBUTION OF MAJORS, (3) DISTRIBUTION OF CLASS TIME TO DEPARTMENTS, (4) DEPARTMENT LOADS, (5) DISTRIBUTION TO LECTURE LAB, (6)…

  3. Campus Technology Innovators Awards 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Meg; Raths, David

    2010-01-01

    Each year in judging the Campus Technology Innovators awards, the authors have the privilege of reading through hundreds of fascinating examples of technology innovation on campus. Nominated projects cover the gamut of technology areas, from assessment and advising to wireless and web 2.0. This article presents 11 innovator award winners of this…

  4. Campus Capability Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Arsenlis, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bailey, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bergman, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brase, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brenner, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Camara, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Carlton, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cheng, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chrzanowski, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Colson, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); East, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Farrell, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ferranti, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gursahani, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hansen, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Helms, L. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hernandez, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jeffries, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Larson, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lu, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNabb, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mercer, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Skeate, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sueksdorf, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zucca, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Le, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ancria, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Scott, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Leininger, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gagliardi, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gash, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bronson, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chung, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hobson, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meeker, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sanchez, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zagar, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Quivey, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sommer, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Atherton, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-06-06

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Campus Capability Plan for 2018-2028. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is one of three national laboratories that are part of the National Nuclear Security Administration. LLNL provides critical expertise to strengthen U.S. security through development and application of world-class science and technology that: Ensures the safety, reliability, and performance of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile; Promotes international nuclear safety and nonproliferation; Reduces global danger from weapons of mass destruction; Supports U.S. leadership in science and technology. Essential to the execution and continued advancement of these mission areas are responsive infrastructure capabilities. This report showcases each LLNL capability area and describes the mission, science, and technology efforts enabled by LLNL infrastructure, as well as future infrastructure plans.

  5. The Virtual Campus Hub Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badger, Merete; Prag, Sidsel-Marie Winther; Monaco, Lucio

    of Technology in Sweden, Politecnico di Torino in Italy, and Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands. The project is partially funded by the European Commission under the 7th Framework Programme (project no. RI-283746). This report describes the final concept of Virtual Campus Hub. It gives...... an overview of the project achievements and recommends best practices for the use of the Virtual Campus Hub elements: a series of applications for online teaching and collaboration which are connected to a technical platform, the Virtual Campus Hub portal, using the European research infrastructure Géant/eduGAIN....

  6. IN UNIVERSITY OF BENIN CAMPUS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MCA patients were grouped under rider, passenger and pedestrian. Results: MCA ... Conclusion: Passengers and pedestrians who are the ultimate users of the motorcycle transport system in the campus showed lesser ... Information from.

  7. Using Campus Data for Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, John A., Jr.; Glover, Robert H.

    1988-01-01

    Many operational and some tactical information needs can be well supported with current information technology and campus-based data, but information support for many tactical and most strategic decisions may be aided by interinstitutional collaboration. (Author/MSE)

  8. REMOTELY-SENSED GLACIER CHANGE ESTIMATION: A CASE STUDY AT LINDBLAD COVE, ANTARCTIC PENINSULA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. D. Fieber

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study builds on existing literature of glacier change estimation in polar regions and is a continuation of efforts aimed at unlocking the information encapsulated in archival aerial photography of Antarctic Peninsula glaciers. Historical aerial imagery acquired in 1957 over three marine-terminating glaciers at Lindblad Cove on the West Coast of Trinity Peninsula is processed to extract digital elevation models (DEMs which are subsequently compared to DEMs generated from present day (2014 WorldView-2 satellite stereo-imagery. The new WorldView-2 images offer unprecedented sub-metre resolution of the Antarctic Peninsula and are explored here to facilitate improved registration and higher accuracy analysis of glacier changes. Unlike many studies, which focus on glacier fronts or only restricted regions of glaciers, this paper presents a complete coverage of elevation changes across the glacier surfaces for two of the studied glaciers. The study utilises a robust least squares matching technique to ensure precise registration of the archival and modern DEMs, which is applied due to lack of existing ground control in this remote region. This case study reveals that, while many glaciers in polar regions are reported as experiencing significant mass loss, some glaciers are stable or even demonstrate mass gain. All three glaciers reported here demonstrated overall mean increases in surface elevation, indicative of positive mass balance ranging from 0.6 to 5.8 metre water equivalent between 1957 and 2014.

  9. Remotely-Sensed Glacier Change Estimation: a Case Study at Lindblad Cove, Antarctic Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieber, K. D.; Mills, J. P.; Miller, P. E.; Fox, A. J.

    2016-06-01

    This study builds on existing literature of glacier change estimation in polar regions and is a continuation of efforts aimed at unlocking the information encapsulated in archival aerial photography of Antarctic Peninsula glaciers. Historical aerial imagery acquired in 1957 over three marine-terminating glaciers at Lindblad Cove on the West Coast of Trinity Peninsula is processed to extract digital elevation models (DEMs) which are subsequently compared to DEMs generated from present day (2014) WorldView-2 satellite stereo-imagery. The new WorldView-2 images offer unprecedented sub-metre resolution of the Antarctic Peninsula and are explored here to facilitate improved registration and higher accuracy analysis of glacier changes. Unlike many studies, which focus on glacier fronts or only restricted regions of glaciers, this paper presents a complete coverage of elevation changes across the glacier surfaces for two of the studied glaciers. The study utilises a robust least squares matching technique to ensure precise registration of the archival and modern DEMs, which is applied due to lack of existing ground control in this remote region. This case study reveals that, while many glaciers in polar regions are reported as experiencing significant mass loss, some glaciers are stable or even demonstrate mass gain. All three glaciers reported here demonstrated overall mean increases in surface elevation, indicative of positive mass balance ranging from 0.6 to 5.8 metre water equivalent between 1957 and 2014.

  10. Distribution and characteristics of marine habitats in a subpolar bay based on hydroacoustics and bed shear stress estimates—Potter Cove, King George Island, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölfl, Anne-Cathrin; Lim, Chai Heng; Hass, H. Christian; Lindhorst, Sebastian; Tosonotto, Gabriela; Lettmann, Karsten Alexander; Kuhn, Gerhard; Wolff, Jörg-Olaf; Abele, Doris

    2014-10-01

    Marine habitats worldwide are increasingly pressurized by climate change, especially along the Antarctic Peninsula. Well-studied areas in front of rapidly retreating tidewater glaciers like Potter Cove are representative for similar coastal environments and, therefore, shed light on habitat formation and development on not only a local but also regional scale. The objective of this study was to provide insights into habitat distribution in Potter Cove, King George Island, Antarctica, and to evaluate the associated environmental processes. Furthermore, an assessment concerning the future development of the habitats is provided. To describe the seafloor habitats in Potter Cove, an acoustic seabed discrimination system (RoxAnn) was used in combination with underwater video images and sediment samples. Due to the absence of wave and current measurements in the study area, bed shear stress estimates served to delineate zones prone to sediment erosion. On the basis of the investigations, two habitat classes were identified in Potter Cove, namely soft-sediment and stone habitats that, besides influences from sediment supply and coastal morphology, are controlled by sediment erosion. A future expansion of the stone habitat is predicted if recent environmental change trends continue. Possible implications for the Potter Cove environment, and other coastal ecosystems under similar pressure, include changes in biomass and species composition.

  11. Electronic Cigarettes on Hospital Campuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Meernik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Smoke and tobacco-free policies on hospital campuses have become more prevalent across the U.S. and Europe, de-normalizing smoking and reducing secondhand smoke exposure on hospital grounds. Concerns about the increasing use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes and the impact of such use on smoke and tobacco-free policies have arisen, but to date, no systematic data describes e-cigarette policies on hospital campuses. The study surveyed all hospitals in North Carolina (n = 121 to assess what proportion of hospitals have developed e-cigarette policies, how policies have been implemented and communicated, and what motivators and barriers have influenced the development of e-cigarette regulations. Seventy-five hospitals (62% completed the survey. Over 80% of hospitals reported the existence of a policy regulating the use of e-cigarettes on campus and roughly half of the hospitals without a current e-cigarette policy are likely to develop one within the next year. Most e-cigarette policies have been incorporated into existing tobacco-free policies with few reported barriers, though effective communication of e-cigarette policies is lacking. The majority of hospitals strongly agree that e-cigarette use on campus should be prohibited for staff, patients, and visitors. Widespread incorporation of e-cigarette policies into existing hospital smoke and tobacco-free campus policies is feasible but needs communication to staff, patients, and visitors.

  12. Electronic Cigarettes on Hospital Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meernik, Clare; Baker, Hannah M; Paci, Karina; Fischer-Brown, Isaiah; Dunlap, Daniel; Goldstein, Adam O

    2015-12-29

    Smoke and tobacco-free policies on hospital campuses have become more prevalent across the U.S. and Europe, de-normalizing smoking and reducing secondhand smoke exposure on hospital grounds. Concerns about the increasing use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and the impact of such use on smoke and tobacco-free policies have arisen, but to date, no systematic data describes e-cigarette policies on hospital campuses. The study surveyed all hospitals in North Carolina (n = 121) to assess what proportion of hospitals have developed e-cigarette policies, how policies have been implemented and communicated, and what motivators and barriers have influenced the development of e-cigarette regulations. Seventy-five hospitals (62%) completed the survey. Over 80% of hospitals reported the existence of a policy regulating the use of e-cigarettes on campus and roughly half of the hospitals without a current e-cigarette policy are likely to develop one within the next year. Most e-cigarette policies have been incorporated into existing tobacco-free policies with few reported barriers, though effective communication of e-cigarette policies is lacking. The majority of hospitals strongly agree that e-cigarette use on campus should be prohibited for staff, patients, and visitors. Widespread incorporation of e-cigarette policies into existing hospital smoke and tobacco-free campus policies is feasible but needs communication to staff, patients, and visitors.

  13. On University Campus Landscape Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李锋; 祁素萍

    2014-01-01

    In a few years, with the progress of China's society, material needs and spiritual needs are in the corresponding en-hancement. All needs and requirements of society for talents are in the unceasing increase and improvement, and certainly will need to increase the country's national education. Our country put forward the strategy of developing the country through sci-ence and education, and the university education is the center of it. So our country on the one hand, through expanding enroll-ment rate, let more people to accept higher education;On the other hand, through increasing the investment of the infrastructure construction in colleges and universities, the campus can satisfy the need of more features. Along with the progress of market economy and urban modernization, the campus development level has become an important symbol in measuring the progress of a city, a regional economic and cultural development. It is also the origin to transport all kinds of advanced talents for urban. The construction of university campus is gradually developed in such an environment, striving to reflect new period, new era universi-ty campus's new look and new attitude. Trying to develop the campus to which has its own characteristic humanities landscape and put the characteristic of open and humanistic, functional and artistic quality, ecological and sustainable in organic combina-tion of unity, advancing with The Times.

  14. 'We Are at This Campus, There Is Nothing in This Campus …': Socio-Spatial Analysis of a University Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglargöz, Ozan

    2017-01-01

    This article provides a socio-spatial analysis of a higher education institution operating within a multi-campus system at a location other than the flagship campus. Based on this case study of a technical school, the meanings attached to the university campus are analyzed through semi-structured interviews and official documents. The study…

  15. COVE, MARINA, and the Future of On-Board Processing (OBP) Platforms for CubeSat Science Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingree, P.; Bekker, D. L.; Bryk, M.; DeLucca, J.; Franklin, B.; Hancock, B.; Klesh, A. T.; Meehan, C.; Meshkaty, N.; Nichols, J.; Peay, C.; Rider, D. M.; Werne, T.; Wu, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The CubeSat On-board processing Validation Experiment (COVE), JPL's first CubeSat payload launched on October 28, 2011, features the Xilinx Virtex-5QV Single event Immune Reconfigurable FPGA (SIRF). The technology demonstration mission was to validate the SIRF device running an on-board processing (OBP) algorithm developed to reduce the data set by 2-orders of magnitude for the Multi-angle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (MSPI), an instrument under development at JPL (PI: D. Diner). COVE has a single data interface to the CubeSat flight computer that is used to transfer a static image taken from the CubeSat camera and store it to local memory where the FPGA then reads it to run the algorithm on it. In the next generation COVE design, called MARINA, developed for the GRIFEX CubeSat project, the OBP board is extended, using rigid-flex PCB technology, to provide an interface to a JPL-developed Read-Out Integrated Circuit (ROIC) hybridized to a detector developed by Raytheon. In this configuration the focal plane array (FPA) data can be streamed directly to the FPGA for data processing or for storage to local memory. The MARINA rigid-flex PCB design is integrated with a commercial camera lens to create a 1U instrument payload for integration with a CubeSat under development by the University of Michigan and planned for launch in 2014. In the GRIFEX technology demonstration, the limited on-board storage capacity is filled by high-rate FPA data in less than a second. The system is also limited by the CubeSat downlink data rate and several ground station passes are required to transmit this limited amount of data. While this system is sufficient to validate the ROIC technology on-orbit, the system cannot be operated in a way to perform continuous science observations due to the on-board storage and data downlink constraints. In order to advance the current platform to support sustained science observations, more on-board storage is needed. Radiation tolerant memory

  16. Sustainable Campus Dining: How Campuses Are Targeting Sustainability and Engagement through Dining Services Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Celeste

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable food and dining is a popular topic on college and university campuses. Popular areas of focus include equipment upgrades in the kitchen, installation of campus or community gardens, and streamlining existing campus recycling operations, such as by converting campus vehicles to run on used vegetable oil from the dining hall. Research…

  17. Campus fiber optic enterprise networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Richard A.

    1991-02-01

    The proliferation of departmental LANs in campus environments has driven network technology to the point where construction of token ring fiber-optic backbone systems is now a cost-effective alternative. This article will discuss several successful real life case history applications of token ring fiber in a campus setting each with unique distance and load factor requirements. It is hoped that these examples will aid in the understanding planning and implementation of similar installations. It will also attempt to provide important information on the emerging Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) standard.

  18. Will Your Campus Diversity Initiative Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingle, Grant

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author gives suggestions on how to make campus diversity initiative work. The author suggests making sure that the following conditions apply to a campus initiative before getting involved: (1) The communications about the initiative, on and off campus, are comparable to those for a capital campaign; (2) The initiative has an…

  19. Sustainable Retrofitting of Nordic University Campuses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Robert; Nenonen, Suvi; Nielsen, Susanne Balslev

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to identify the state-of-art of Nordic campus development and identify how campus areas can be retrofitted by addition of new technologies, features, functions and services. The leading research question is: how to develop Nordic resilient campus management...

  20. Academic Culture and Campus Culture of Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xi; Tian, Xianghong

    2012-01-01

    Academic culture of universities mainly consists of academic outlooks, academic spirits, academic ethics and academic environments. Campus culture in a university is characterized by individuality, academic feature, opening, leading, variety and creativity. The academic culture enhances the construction of campus culture. The campus culture…

  1. Energy Sustainability and the Green Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Walter

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the importance of campus energy sustainability, explaining that both demand- and supply-side strategies are required. Suggests that on the demand side, an aggressive campus energy conservation program can reduce campus energy consumption by 30 percent or more. Asserts that addressing the supply side of the energy equation means shifting…

  2. Coming Soon: The Cashless Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peskin, Carole Ann; McDemmond, Marie

    1994-01-01

    Increasing use of credit on college campuses raises important policy questions and planning needs. Credit and debit card use varies, and most institutions are studying, experimenting, and inventing uses. Although use of credit improves cash flow, streamlines payments and services, and increases income, there are also costs to the institution. (MSE)

  3. The Stewardship of Campus Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audrain, Calvert W.

    2011-01-01

    Even as technology and globalization are changing the way one lives and views the world, colleges and universities have become increasingly interested in preserving historic campus buildings and sites. Heritage has become more important to students, faculty, and staff, as well as to alumni, who have often been its prime supporters. This article…

  4. Problem Gambling on College Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComb, Jennifer L.; Hanson, William E.

    2009-01-01

    The vast majority of college students gamble, with some doing so problematically. This article discusses gambling and problem gambling among college students, framing it as an emerging health issue on college campuses nationwide. Given that 4 out of 5 college students admit to gambling, and that approximately 8% gamble problematically, it is…

  5. Coming Soon: The Cashless Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peskin, Carole Ann; McDemmond, Marie

    1994-01-01

    Increasing use of credit on college campuses raises important policy questions and planning needs. Credit and debit card use varies, and most institutions are studying, experimenting, and inventing uses. Although use of credit improves cash flow, streamlines payments and services, and increases income, there are also costs to the institution. (MSE)

  6. About Women on Campus, 1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Bernice Resnick, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This quarterly newsletter provides information about the programs, issues, and concerns of women students, faculty, and administrators in higher education. Each of these four issues (comprising 1 year's worth) presents brief summaries of news items or reports in regularly appearing sections covering campus news, the workplace, sexual harassment,…

  7. University Satellite Campus Management Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Doug; Stott, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Among the 60 or so university satellite campuses in Australia are many that are probably failing to meet the high expectations of their universities and the communities they were designed to serve. While in some cases this may be due to the demand driven system, it may also be attributable in part to the ways in which they are managed. The…

  8. Analysis-Driven Design Optimization of a SMA-Based Slat-Cove Filler for Aeroacoustic Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholten, William; Hartl, Darren; Turner, Travis

    2013-01-01

    Airframe noise is a significant component of environmental noise in the vicinity of airports. The noise associated with the leading-edge slat of typical transport aircraft is a prominent source of airframe noise. Previous work suggests that a slat-cove filler (SCF) may be an effective noise treatment. Hence, development and optimization of a practical slat-cove-filler structure is a priority. The objectives of this work are to optimize the design of a functioning SCF which incorporates superelastic shape memory alloy (SMA) materials as flexures that permit the deformations involved in the configuration change. The goal of the optimization is to minimize the actuation force needed to retract the slat-SCF assembly while satisfying constraints on the maximum SMA stress and on the SCF deflection under static aerodynamic pressure loads, while also satisfying the condition that the SCF self-deploy during slat extension. A finite element analysis model based on a physical bench-top model is created in Abaqus such that automated iterative analysis of the design could be performed. In order to achieve an optimized design, several design variables associated with the current SCF configuration are considered, such as the thicknesses of SMA flexures and the dimensions of various components, SMA and conventional. Designs of experiment (DOE) are performed to investigate structural response to an aerodynamic pressure load and to slat retraction and deployment. DOE results are then used to inform the optimization process, which determines a design minimizing actuator forces while satisfying the required constraints.

  9. Evidence of macroalgal colonization on newly ice-free areas following glacial retreat in Potter Cove (South Shetland Islands), Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartino, María Liliana; Deregibus, Dolores; Campana, Gabriela Laura; Latorre, Gustavo Edgar Juan; Momo, Fernando Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Climate warming has been related to glacial retreat along the Western Antarctic Peninsula. Over the last years, a visible melting of Fourcade Glacier (Potter Cove, South Shetland Islands) has exposed newly ice-free hard bottom areas available for benthic colonization. However, ice melting produces a reduction of light penetration due to an increase of sediment input and higher ice impact. Seventeen years ago, the coastal sites close to the glacier cliffs were devoid of macroalgae. Are the newly ice-free areas suitable for macroalgal colonization? To tackle this question, underwater video transects were performed at six newly ice-free areas with different degree of glacial influence. Macroalgae were found in all sites, even in close proximity to the retreating glacier. We can show that: 1. The complexity of the macroalgal community is positively correlated to the elapsed time from the ice retreat, 2. Algae development depends on the optical conditions and the sediment input in the water column; some species are limited by light availability, 3. Macroalgal colonization is negatively affected by the ice disturbance, 4. The colonization is determined by the size and type of substrate and by the slope of the bottom. As macroalgae are probably one of the main energy sources for the benthos, an expansion of the macroalgal distribution can be expected to affect the matter and energy fluxes in Potter Cove ecosystem.

  10. Evidence of macroalgal colonization on newly ice-free areas following glacial retreat in Potter Cove (South Shetland Islands, Antarctica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Liliana Quartino

    Full Text Available Climate warming has been related to glacial retreat along the Western Antarctic Peninsula. Over the last years, a visible melting of Fourcade Glacier (Potter Cove, South Shetland Islands has exposed newly ice-free hard bottom areas available for benthic colonization. However, ice melting produces a reduction of light penetration due to an increase of sediment input and higher ice impact. Seventeen years ago, the coastal sites close to the glacier cliffs were devoid of macroalgae. Are the newly ice-free areas suitable for macroalgal colonization? To tackle this question, underwater video transects were performed at six newly ice-free areas with different degree of glacial influence. Macroalgae were found in all sites, even in close proximity to the retreating glacier. We can show that: 1. The complexity of the macroalgal community is positively correlated to the elapsed time from the ice retreat, 2. Algae development depends on the optical conditions and the sediment input in the water column; some species are limited by light availability, 3. Macroalgal colonization is negatively affected by the ice disturbance, 4. The colonization is determined by the size and type of substrate and by the slope of the bottom. As macroalgae are probably one of the main energy sources for the benthos, an expansion of the macroalgal distribution can be expected to affect the matter and energy fluxes in Potter Cove ecosystem.

  11. Geologic, geomorphic, and meteorological aspects of debris flows triggered by Hurricanes Frances and Ivan during September 2004 in the Southern Appalachian Mountains of Macon County, North Carolina (southeastern USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, R.M.; Gillon, K.A.; Witt, A.C.; Latham, R.S.; Douglas, T.J.; Bauer, J.B.; Fuemmeler, S.J.; Lee, L.G.

    2008-01-01

    In September 2004, rain from the remnants of Hurricanes Frances and Ivan triggered at least 155 landslides in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina. At least 33 debris flows occurred in Macon County, causing 5 deaths, destroying 16 homes, and damaging infrastructure. We mapped debris flows and debris deposits using a light-detecting and ranging digital elevation model, remote imagery and field studies integrated in a geographic information system. Evidence of past debris flows was found at all recent debris flow sites. Orographic rainfall enhancement along topographic escarpments influenced debris flow frequency at higher elevations. A possible trigger for the Wayah and fatal Peeks Creek debris flows was a spiral rain band within Ivan that moved across the area with short duration rainfall rates of 150-230 mm/h. Intersecting bedrock structures in polydeformed metamorphic rock influence the formation of catchments within structural-geomorphic domains where debris flows originate. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  12. The first CERN Spring Campus

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2014-01-01

    From 14 to 16 April, the first edition of the CERN Spring Campus took place in Spain. Taking place over three intensive days, this event brought experts from CERN together at the University of Oviedo, where they met the engineers and scientists of the future in a programme of scientific and technological dissemination and cultural exchange.   The young participants of the first CERN Spring Campus and their instructors show their enthusiasm after the intensive three-day course. “This three-day school focuses on preparing young engineers for the job market, with a particular emphasis on computing,” explains Derek Mathieson, Advanced Information Systems Group Leader in the GS Department and Head of the CERN Spring Campus organising committee. “We organised talks on entrepreneurship and IT, as well as on job interviews and CV writing. It was also an important opportunity for the participants to meet CERN computing engineers to find out what it is like to work in I...

  13. ORTHOIMAGERY, MACON COUNTY, GA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Digital orthographic imagery datasets contain georeferenced images of the Earth?s surface, collected by a sensor in which object displacement has been removed for...

  14. Two cubic phases in kimzeyite garnet from the type locality Magnet Cove, Arkansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antao, Sytle M.; Cruickshank, Laura A.

    2016-11-08

    The crystal structure of an optically anisotropic kimzeyite garnet from Magnet Cove, Arkansas, USA, where it was first discovered, was refined with the Rietveld method, cubic space group, Ia\\overline 3 d, and monochromatic [λ = 0.41422 (2) Å] synchrotron high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction (HRPXRD) data. The Rietveld refinement reduced χ2and overallR(F2) values are 1.840 and 0.0647, respectively. The sample, with the general garnet formula[8]X3[6]Y2[4]Z3[4]O12, contains an intergrowth of two cubic phases that occur initially as oscillatory growth zoning, and patchy intergrowths arise later from fluid-enhanced dissolution and re-precipitation. The two compositions obtained with electron-probe microanalyses (EPMA) are Ca3.00(Zr1.31Ti4+0.46Fe3+0.22Mn3+0.01)Σ2[Al0.76Fe3+1.01Si1.23]Σ3O12for phase 1aand Ca2.99(Zr1.48Ti4+0.37Fe3+0.15)Σ2[Al0.87Fe3+0.98Si1.15]Σ3O12for phase 1b. The weight percentage, unit-cell parameter (Å), distances (Å), and site occupancy factors (s.o.f.s) for phase 1aare as follows: 42.6 (2)%,a= 12.46553 (3) Å, average <X—O> = 2.482,Y—O = 2.059 (2),Z—O = 1.761 (2) Å, Ca (Xs.o.f.) = 0.960 (4), Zr (Ys.o.f.) = 0.809 (3), and Fe (Zs.o.f.) = 0.623 (2). The corresponding values for phase 1bare 57.4 (2)%,a= 12.47691 (2) Å, average <

  15. Perceptions of campus climate by sexual minorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetreault, Patricia A; Fette, Ryan; Meidlinger, Peter C; Hope, Debra

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that students who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) often have negative experiences on university campuses due to their sexual orientation or gender identity. Direct and indirect experiences contribute to an overall perception of the campus climate. This study used an online survey to assess students' perceptions of campus climate, their experiences confronting bias, support of family members and friends, and whether they had considered leaving campus. Multiple regression analysis indicated that perceptions of poorer campus climate were predicted by greater unfair treatment by instructors, more impact from anti-lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer (LGBTQ) bias on friends' and families' emotional support, and having hidden one's LGBT identity from other students. Cluster analyses revealed four groups of participants distinguished by openness about their sexual orientation and negative experiences, with one group appearing to be at risk for poor retention. Results are discussed in terms of the needs of LGBTQ students on campus.

  16. Evaluation of microplastics in Jurujuba Cove, Niterói, RJ, Brazil, an area of mussels farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Rebeca Oliveira; Silva, Melanie L; Marques, Mônica Regina C; de Araújo, Fábio V

    2016-09-15

    Once non-biodegradable, microplastics remain on the environment absorbing toxic hydrophobic compounds making them a risk to biodiversity when ingested or filtered by organisms and entering in the food chain. To evaluate the potential of the contamination by microplastics in mussels cultivated in Jurujuba Cove, Niterói, RJ, waters of three stations were collected during a rain and dry seasons using a plankton net and later filtered. Microplastics were quantified and characterized morphologically and chemically. The results showed a high concentration of microplastics in both seasons with diversity of colors, types and sizes. Synthetic polymers were present in all samples. The presence of microplastics was probably due to a high and constant load of effluent that this area receives and to the mussel farming activity that use many plastic materials. Areas with high concentrations of microplastics could not be used for mussel cultivation due to the risk of contamination to consumers.

  17. Seasonal variation of algal growth conditions in sheltered Antarctic bays: the example of Potter Cove (King George Island, South Shetlands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klöser, Heinz; Ferreyra, Gustavo; Schloss, Irene; Mercuri, Guillermo; Laturnus, Frank; Curtosi, Antonio

    1993-10-01

    Wind, air temperature, surface irradiance, light penetration into the water, salinity and water temperature have been recorded from mid November to mid February in Potter Cove, King George Island. Results are compared with published data on requirements for growth of Antarctic microalgae. The investigated season showed two distinct periods: Early summer lasted until end of December with comparatively cold temperatures, unstable water column and deep penetration of light; late summer started in early January and was characterized by reduced salinity due to meltwater discharge and high turbidity due to suspended sediments. Meltwater influence did not sufficiently change salinity to be responsible for the frequently noted paucity of macroalgal communities in sheltered bays. Shading by suspended sediments was equally considered to be of minor importance, as macroalgae have their optimal growth phase from September to December. During this period, light penetration and depth distribution of macroalgae coincide perfectly. From these results, a general review on depth limitation of macroalgae by light conditions is derived.

  18. Using ANN to predict E. coli accumulation in coves based on interaction amongst various physical, chemical and biological factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, D.; Mohanty, B. P.; Lesikar, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    The accumulation of Escherichia Coli (E. coli) in canals, coves and streams is the result of a number of interacting processes operating at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Fate and transport of E. coli in surface water systems is governed by different physical, chemical, and biological processes. Various models developed to quantify each of these processes occurring at different scales are not so far pooled into a single predictive model. At present, very little is known about the fate and transport of E. coli in the environment. We hypothesize that E. coli population heterogeneity in canals and coves is affected by physical factors (average stream width and/ depth, secchi depth, flow and flow severity, day since precipitation, aquatic vegetation, solar radiation, dissolved and total suspended solids etc.); chemical factors (basic water quality, nutrients, organic compounds, pH, and toxicity etc.); and biological factors (type of bacterial strain, predation, and antagonism etc.). The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) examine the interactions between E. coli and various coupled physical, chemical and biological factors; (2) examine the interactions between E. coli and toxic organic pollutants and other pathogens (viruses); and (3) evaluate qualitatively the removal efficiency of E. coli. We suggest that artificial neural networks (ANN) may be used to provide a possible solution to this problem. To demonstrate the application of the approach, we develop an ANN representing E. coli accumulation in two polluted sites at Lake Granbury in the upper part of the Brazos River in North Central Texas. The graphical structure of ANN explicitly represents cause- and-effect relationship between system variables. Each of these relationships can then be quantified independently using an approach suitable for the type and scale of information available. Preliminary results revealed that E. coli concentrations in canals show seasonal variations regardless of change

  19. Conversations about Sexuality on a Public University Campus: Perspectives from Campus Ministry Students and Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Charis R.; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle M.; Messias, DeAnne K. Hilfinger; Friedman, Daniela B.; Robillard, Alyssa G.

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about university campus religious organisations' influence on students' sexuality-related attitudes and behaviours. This study sought to better understand sexuality-related communication within the context of campus ministries by exploring students' and campus ministry leaders' conversational experiences at a public university in…

  20. Conversations about Sexuality on a Public University Campus: Perspectives from Campus Ministry Students and Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Charis R.; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle M.; Messias, DeAnne K. Hilfinger; Friedman, Daniela B.; Robillard, Alyssa G.

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about university campus religious organisations' influence on students' sexuality-related attitudes and behaviours. This study sought to better understand sexuality-related communication within the context of campus ministries by exploring students' and campus ministry leaders' conversational experiences at a public university in…

  1. Virtual Campus Hub technical evaluation report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vercoulen, Frank; Badger, Merete; Monaco, Lucio;

    This report describes and discusses the technical achievements of the Virtual Campus Hub project and formulates a brief agenda for the future.......This report describes and discusses the technical achievements of the Virtual Campus Hub project and formulates a brief agenda for the future....

  2. Campus Stalking: Theoretical Implications and Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Joel H.; Cooper, Dianne L.

    2011-01-01

    The problem of campus stalking requires uniting several departments to develop a response plan reflective of the comprehensive nature of campus stalking. This article highlights how research on stalking, stalking theories, and related environmental theories support the formation of a cross-functional team to develop a multifaceted response to this…

  3. Campuses See Rising Demand for Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Eric

    2008-01-01

    The numbers looked strange. In early March, the University of Missouri had received many more campus-housing contracts than it expected. Each year many upperclassmen cancel their agreements after finding an off-campus rental, leaving enough spaces for incoming students. But on March 17, the first day freshmen could select their rooms online, there…

  4. Report on Extended Campus Library Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickler, Sally Ann; And Others

    This report presents the results of a study of the Extended Campus Library Services program at Western Kentucky University (WKU), which was conducted by a committee appointed by the Director of University Libraries. A description of the program's goals and objectives is followed by a review of the extended campus programs in relation to similar…

  5. Empowering Entrepreneurship through Improving Campus Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Woge

    2014-01-01

    Inventors an Innovators Alliance) konferencen i San Jose CA, den 21. – 23. Marts 2014 med posterpræsentationen“Empowering Entrepreneurship through Improving Campus Life......Inventors an Innovators Alliance) konferencen i San Jose CA, den 21. – 23. Marts 2014 med posterpræsentationen“Empowering Entrepreneurship through Improving Campus Life...

  6. A Rubric for Campus Heritage Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Charles A.; Fixler, David N.; Kelly, Sarah D.

    2011-01-01

    This article is inspired by recent observations, events, and publications, as well as by a general and rising concern for and appreciation of the culture of American historical heritage as manifested on college and university campuses. Among the influences and inspirations for this article are Richard P. Dober's (2005) "Campus Heritage"…

  7. Should Tourists Be Banned From Campuses?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Xiamen University,one of the leading universities in China,began to ban tour groups from entering its campus on June 1.The notice of the university said that except for certain dining halls,most of the school's cafeterias will not receive tourists or accept cash.However,individual tourists are still allowed to enter the campus after registration.

  8. Suicide and Its Prevention on College Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Lee

    2012-01-01

    Suicide is a significant issue facing higher education institutions. Many campuses are involved in a variety of procedures, programs, and initiatives that seek to reduce or prevent suicide and the impact of suicide-related behavior. This article offers examples of campus prevention efforts, important resources on suicide prevention for college…

  9. Campus Stalking: Theoretical Implications and Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Joel H.; Cooper, Dianne L.

    2011-01-01

    The problem of campus stalking requires uniting several departments to develop a response plan reflective of the comprehensive nature of campus stalking. This article highlights how research on stalking, stalking theories, and related environmental theories support the formation of a cross-functional team to develop a multifaceted response to this…

  10. The CIC Historic Campus Architecture Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Richard H.

    2011-01-01

    America's private colleges and universities include most of the oldest institutions of higher education in the country, and their evolving physical campuses say much about American education. In recent years, the study of campus history, preservation, and adaptive reuse has received increasing attention by many sectors of the educational…

  11. Making Technology Work for Campus Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floreno, Jeff; Keil, Brad

    2010-01-01

    The challenges associated with securing schools from both on- and off-campus threats create constant pressure for law enforcement, campus security professionals, and administrators. And while security technology choices are plentiful, many colleges and universities are operating with limited dollars and information needed to select and integrate…

  12. Green connector design for conservation campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prihanto, Teguh

    2017-03-01

    Universitas Negeri Semarang (UNNES) as a green campus of conservation must be comfortable, safe and fit for the users. As the growth of several new campus buildings, the need for integration means building green connectors adjacent buildings. The design is in line with their internal transportation policies that encourage the academic community to walk in the campus area. This effort is also to make the walk as a cultural activity, not merely implement policies campus only. So that the future is expected to create a built environment conservation campus humane, environmentally friendly and an inspiration for the region around the campus environment in an effort to better environmental management. The connector provided is considered still can not fully meet the eligibility aspect and comfort. Based on the extent of the problem can be formulated green connector design of the building to meet the comfort of pedestrians on campus. This study has the objective to: (1) assess the development potential point green connectors; (2) develop alternative design green connectors. Alternative green connector design that is more convenient to replace the connector campus that are currently lacking to provide comfort for pedestrians.

  13. Solicitation on Campus: Free Speech or Commercialization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Annette

    1986-01-01

    The issue of whether the First Amendments right to freedom of speech applies to commercial vendors on campuses as it does to nonprofit solicitation is addressed and guidelines provided. Banning commercial solicitation from residence halls, but allowing it on a limited basis in campus centers is recommended. (Author/ABB)

  14. The Mixed Political Blessing of Campus Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Sheryl D.

    2010-01-01

    The rise of sustainability rhetoric, curriculum, infrastructure, and marketing on college campuses is a mixed blessing. On the one hand, college presidents are pledging to eliminate their campuses' global warming emissions; colleges and universities are building wind turbines, composters, and green buildings; and sustainability coordinators are…

  15. Collaborative procurement for developing a sustainable campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nifa, Faizatul Akmar Abdul; Rahim, Syukran Abdul; Rani, Wan Nurul Mardiah Wan Mohd; Ismail, Mohd. Noorizhar

    2016-08-01

    It is particularly challenging to achieve sustainability in campus universities, where a high volume of users and activities has made it more imperative to promote green buildings that reduce energy and water consumption while having a minimal carbon footprint. At present, the frameworks for sustainable campus have seldom focused on the project procurement method which would improve construction team integration in developing the physical aspect of campus development. Therefore, in response to that challenge, this paper investigates how the delivery team, responsible for the design and construction of a project, can be integrated to work together more efficiently and more using the collaborative procurement method known as partnering. This paper reports part of a previous research and sets the base for ongoing research on the critical factors in partnering for sustainable campus development. The outcome or result of this study will meet and support the requirement for construction, maintenance, and operation process for universities towards sustainable building/campus in the future.

  16. Development of a SMA-Based Slat-Cove Filler for Reduction of Aeroacoustic Noise Associated With Transport-Class Aircraft Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Travis L.; Kidd, Reggie T.; Hartl, Darren J.; Scholten, William D.

    2013-01-01

    Airframe noise is a significant part of the overall noise produced by typical, transport-class aircraft during the approach and landing phases of flight. Leading-edge slat noise is a prominent source of airframe noise. The concept of a slat-cove filler was proposed in previous work as an effective means of mitigating slat noise. Bench-top models were deployed at 75% scale to study the feasibility of producing a functioning slat-cove filler. Initial results from several concepts led to a more-focused effort investigating a deformable structure based upon pseudoelastic SMA materials. The structure stows in the cavity between the slat and main wing during cruise and deploys simultaneously with the slat to guide the aerodynamic flow suitably for low noise. A qualitative parametric study of SMA-enabled, slat-cove filler designs was performed on the bench-top. Computational models were developed and analyses were performed to assess the displacement response under representative aerodynamic load. The bench-top and computational results provide significant insight into design trades and an optimal design.

  17. Geochemical and geophysical examination of submarine groundwater discharge and associated nutrient loading estimates into Lynch Cove, Hood Canal, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarzenski, P.W.; Simonds, F.W.; Paulson, A.J.; Kruse, S.; Reich, C.

    2007-01-01

    Geochemical tracer data (i.e., 222Rn and four naturally occurring Ra isotopes), electromagnetic (EM) seepage meter results, and high-resolution, stationary electrical resistivity images were used to examine the bi-directional (i.e., submarine groundwater discharge and recharge) exchange of a coastal aquifer with seawater. Our study site for these experiments was Lynch Cove, the terminus of Hood Canal, WA, where fjord-like conditions dramatically limit water column circulation that can lead to recurring summer-time hypoxic events. In such a system a precise nutrient budget may be particularly sensitive to groundwater-derived nutrient loading. Shore-perpendicular time-series subsurface resistivity profiles show clear, decimeter-scale tidal modulation of the coastal aquifer in response to large, regional hydraulic gradients, hydrologically transmissive glacial terrain, and large (4-5 m) tidal amplitudes. A 5-day 222Rn time-series shows a strong inverse covariance between 222Rn activities (0.5−29 dpm L-1) and water level fluctuations, and provides compelling evidence for tidally modulated exchange of groundwater across the sediment/water interface. Mean Rn-derived submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) rates of 85 ± 84 cm d-1 agree closely in the timing and magnitude with EM seepage meter results that showed discharge during low tide and recharge during high tide events. To evaluate the importance of fresh versus saline SGD, Rn-derived SGD rates (as a proxy of total SGD) were compared to excess 226Ra-derived SGD rates (as a proxy for the saline contribution of SGD). The calculated SGD rates, which include a significant (>80%) component of recycled seawater, are used to estimate associated nutrient (NH4+, Si, PO43-, NO3 + NO2, TDN) loads to Lynch Cove. The dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN = NH4 + NO2 + NO3) SGD loading estimate of 5.9 × 104 mol d-1 is 1−2 orders of magnitude larger than similar estimates derived from atmospheric deposition and surface water runoff

  18. Geochemical and geophysical examination of submarine groundwater discharge and associated nutrient loading estimates into Lynch Cove, Hood Canal, WA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarzenski, Peter W; Simonds, F William; Paulson, Anthony J; Kruse, Sarah; Reich, Chris

    2007-10-15

    Geochemical tracer data (i.e., 222Rn and four naturally occurring Ra isotopes), electromagnetic (EM) seepage meter results, and high-resolution, stationary electrical resistivity images were used to examine the bi-directional (i.e., submarine groundwater discharge and recharge) exchange of a coastal aquifer with seawater. Our study site for these experiments was Lynch Cove, the terminus of Hood Canal, WA, where fjord-like conditions dramatically limit water column circulation that can lead to recurring summer-time hypoxic events. In such a system a precise nutrient budget may be particularly sensitive to groundwater-derived nutrient loading. Shore-perpendicular time-series subsurface resistivity profiles show clear, decimeter-scale tidal modulation of the coastal aquifer in response to large, regional hydraulic gradients, hydrologically transmissive glacial terrain, and large (4-5 m) tidal amplitudes. A 5-day 222Rn time-series shows a strong inverse covariance between 222Rn activities (0.5-29 dpm L(-1)) and water level fluctuations, and provides compelling evidence for tidally modulated exchange of groundwater across the sediment/water interface. Mean Rn-derived submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) rates of 85 +/- 84 cm d(-1) agree closely in the timing and magnitude with EM seepage meter results that showed discharge during low tide and recharge during high tide events. To evaluate the importance of fresh versus saline SGD, Rn-derived SGD rates (as a proxy of total SGD) were compared to excess 226Ra-derived SGD rates (as a proxy for the saline contribution of SGD). The calculated SGD rates, which include a significant (>80%) component of recycled seawater, are used to estimate associated nutrient (NH4+, Si, PO4(3-), NO3 + NO2, TDN) loads to Lynch Cove. The dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN = NH4 + NO2 + NO3) SGD loading estimate of 5.9 x 10(4) mol d(-1) is 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than similar estimates derived from atmospheric deposition and surface water

  19. Academic citizenship beyond the campus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Rikke Toft; Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    2016-01-01

    -imagine the possibilities of the university to integrate with people and society through dialogue and placeful-ness. Accordingly, supporting academic citizenship entails designing for the placeful university – a university that invites and promotes openness, dialogue, democracy, mutual integration, care and joint......hrough combining theories of space and place with works on institutional being, virtues and modes of becoming, this article develops and promotes academic citizenship as the formation of dwelling, being and becoming on the placeful university beyond the campus. We argue that this is a prerequisite...... for the integration of the university in society and society in the university. We discuss the need for a concept of the placeful university to capture academic belonging in the nexus between university and society. As such, the conceptualisation of the placeful university provides an opportunity to re...

  20. Geothermal investment analysis with site-specific applications to Roosevelt Hot Springs and Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassel, T.A.V.; Edelstein, R.H.; Blair, P.D.

    1978-12-01

    The analysis and modeling of investment behavior in the development of hydrothermal electric power facilities are reported. This investment behavior reflects a degree of sensitivity to public policy alternatives concerning taxation and regulation of the resource and its related energy conversion facilities. The objective of the current research is to provide a realistic and theoretically sound means for estimating the impacts of such public policy alternatives. A stochastic simulation model was developed which offers an efficient means for site-specific investment analysis of private sector firms and investors. The results of the first year of work are discussed including the identification, analysis, quantification and modeling of: a decision tree reflecting the sequence of procedures, timing and stochastic elements of hydrothermal resource development projects; investment requirements, expenses and revenues incurred in the exploration, development and utilization of hydrothermal resources for electric power generation; and multiattribute investment decision criteria of the several types of firms in the geothermal industry. An application of the investment model to specific resource sites in the state of Utah is also described. Site specific data for the Known Geothermal Resource Areas of Roosevelt Hot Springs and Cove Fort-Sulphurdale are given together with hypothesized generation capacity growth rates.

  1. Giraut de Borneil, “Ben cove, pus ja bayssa·l ram” (BdT 242.25

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro G. Beltrami

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper will offer a revision, with a translation and commentary, of the text of “Ben cove, pus ja baissa·l ram” by Giraut de Borneil, with a new examination of the manuscript tradition after the monographic editions by Adolf Kolsen and Ruth Verity Sharman. In particular the paper will offer a new reading of l. 20, transmitted only by Chansonnier a, while the other manuscripts have a lacuna that seems to have been crudely corrected by Sg. The interpretation of “e leis s’embla, que a miralh” as ‘and she, who holds a mirror, is elusive’ restores an image of the lady filled with pride on seeing her own beauty reflected in a mirror that is also in Raimbaut d’Aurenga and Pons de Capduoill. In the Introduction the text is interpreted as an example of two different aspects of Giraut’s poetry, expressed through two different voices in the text, the author’s ‘self’ and the lover’s ‘self’. The former, who speaks in the first stanza, gives importance to his aiming for excellence; the latter, who speaks in the following stanzas, presents contents and forms belonging to a discourse on love. Finally, the point is made that where the two parts meet, at l. 9 “E per ma guerreira cui am” ‘and for my enemy whom I love’, the text is of great poetic intensity.

  2. Sessile macro-epibiotic community of solitary ascidians, ecosystem engineers in soft substrates of Potter Cove, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Rimondino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The muddy bottoms of inner Potter Cove, King George Island (Isla 25 de Mayo, South Shetlands, Antarctica, show a high density and richness of macrobenthic species, particularly ascidians. In other areas, ascidians have been reported to play the role of ecosystem engineers, as they support a significant number of epibionts, increasing benthic diversity. In this study, a total of 21 sessile macro-epibiotic taxa present on the ascidian species Corella antarctica Sluiter, 1905, Cnemidocarpa verrucosa (Lesson, 1830 and Molgula pedunculata Herdman, 1881 were identified, with Bryozoa being the most diverse. There were differences between the three ascidian species in terms of richness, percent cover and diversity of sessile macro-epibionts. The morphological characteristics of the tunic surface, the available area for colonization (and its relation with the age of the basibiont individuals and the pH of the ascidian tunic seem to explain the observed differences. Recent environmental changes in the study area (increase of suspended particulate matter caused by glaciers retreat have been related to observed shifts in the benthic community structure, negatively affecting the abundance and distribution of the studied ascidian species. Considering the diversity of sessile macro-epibionts found on these species, the impact of environmental shifts may be greater than that estimated so far.

  3. Declining metal levels at Foundry Cove (Hudson River, New York): Response to localized dredging of contaminated sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackie, Joshua A. [Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, Invertebrate Zoology, 8272 Moss Landing Road, CA 95039-9647 (United States)], E-mail: jmackie@mlml.calstate.edu; Natali, Susan M.; Levinton, Jeffrey S. [Stony Brook University, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5245 (United States); Sanudo-Wilhelmy, Sergio A. [Stony Brook University, Department of Ecology and Evolution, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5245 (United States); University of Southern California, Marine and Environmental Biology, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0371 (United States)

    2007-09-15

    This study examines the effectiveness of remediating a well-recognized case of heavy metal pollution at Foundry Cove (FC), Hudson River, New York. This tidal freshwater marsh was polluted with battery-factory wastes (1953-1979) and dredged in 1994-1995. Eight years after remediation, dissolved and particulate metals (Cd, Co, Cu, Pb, Ni, and Ag) were found to be lower than levels in the lower Hudson near New York City. Levels of metals (Co, Ni, Cd) on suspended particles were comparatively high. Concentrations of surface sediment Cd throughout the marsh system remain high, but have decreased both in the dredged and undredged areas: Cd was 2.4-230 mg/kg dw of sediment in 2005 vs. 109-1500 mg/kg in the same area in 1983. The rate of tidal export of Cd from FC has decreased by >300-fold, suggesting that dredging successfully stemmed a major source of Cd to the Hudson River. - Dredging of a hotspot of metal-contaminated sediment is associated with a recognizable local and river-wide decline in cadmium in the Hudson River, New York.

  4. CDC STATE System Tobacco Legislation - Smokefree Campus

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1995-2016. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System. Legislation – Smokefree Campuses....

  5. CDC STATE System Tobacco Legislation - Smokefree Campus

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1995-2017. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System. Legislation – Smokefree Campuses. The...

  6. CDC STATE System Tobacco Legislation - Smokefree Campus

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1995-2016. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System. Legislation – Smokefree Campuses. The...

  7. Dairy Campus in Leeuwarden krijgt vorm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, de C.J.A.M.; Rotgers, G.

    2011-01-01

    Dairy Campus begint vorm te krijgen. Nog niet in gemetselde bouwstenen, maar in projecten en op papier. Sinds maart 2011 heeft dit nieuwe melkvee-innovatiecentrum van Wageningen Universiteit en Research Center een manager: Kees de Koning.

  8. VetSuccess on Campus (VSOC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VSOC program provides a VA Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor (VRC) to each VSOC school. These VRCs are called VetSuccess on Campus (VSOC) Counselors. A VA Vet...

  9. Regional medical campuses: a new classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheifetz, Craig E; McOwen, Katherine S; Gagne, Pierre; Wong, Jennifer L

    2014-08-01

    There is burgeoning belief that regional medical campuses (RMCs) are a significant part of the narrative about medical education and the health care workforce in the United States and Canada. Although RMCs are not new, in the recent years of medical education enrollment expansion, they have seen their numbers increase. Class expansion explains the rapid growth of RMCs in the past 10 years, but it does not adequately describe their function. Often, RMCs have missions that differ from their main campus, especially in the areas of rural and community medicine. The absence of an easy-to-use classification system has led to a lack of current research about RMCs as evidenced by the small number of articles in the current literature. The authors describe the process of the Group on Regional Medical Campuses used to develop attributes of a campus separate from the main campus that constitute a "classification" of a campus as an RMC. The system is broken into four models-basic science, clinical, longitudinal, and combined-and is linked to Liaison Committee on Medical Education standards. It is applicable to all schools and can be applied by any medical school dean or medical education researcher. The classification system paves the way for stakeholders to agree on a denominator of RMCs and conduct future research about their impact on medical education.

  10. Wireless Campus LBS - Building campus-wide Location Based Services bases on WiFi technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Köbben, Barend; Bunningen, van Arthur H.; Muthukrishnan, Kavitha; Stefanakis, Emmanuel

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a project that has just started at the University of Twente (UT) in cooperation with the International Institute for Geo-Information Science and Earth Observation (ITC) to provide Location Based Services (LBS) for the UT campus. This LBS will run on the existing Wireless Campus

  11. The Impact of the Structure, Function, and Resources of the Campus Security Office on Campus Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Patricia Anne

    2012-01-01

    The topic of this dissertation is college and university safety. This national quantitative study utilized resource dependency theory to examine relationships between the incidence of reported campus crimes and the structure, function, and resources of campus security offices. This study uncovered a difference in reported total crime rates,…

  12. Comparative analysis of the food webs of two intertidal mudflats during two seasons using inverse modelling: Aiguillon Cove and Brouage Mudflat, France

    OpenAIRE

    Degre, Delphine; Leguerrier, D; Du Chatelet, E; Rzeznik, J; Auguet, Jean-christophe; Dupuy, Christine; Marquis, E.; Fichet, Denis; Struski, Caroline; Joyeux, E; Sauriau, Pierre-Guy; NIQUIL Nathalie

    2006-01-01

    Inverse analysis was used to model the food webs of two intertidal mudflat ecosystems: Aiguillon Cove (AC) and Brouage Mudflat (BM) (south-western Atlantic coast, France). The aim of the present study is to describe and compare the functioning of these two ecosystems. The method of inverse analysis has been adapted in order to take into account, in a single calculation, two seasons: spring/summer (mid-March to mid-October) and autumn/winter (the rest of the year). Gathering all available data...

  13. The Future of the Campus: Architecture and Master Planning Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, Jonathan; Roberts, Paul; Taylor, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The article discusses current and likely future trends within the architecture and master planning of university campuses. It argues that higher education administrators must maximise the value of the campus to create physical environments that enhance the student experience.

  14. The Future of the Campus: Architecture and Master Planning Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, Jonathan; Roberts, Paul; Taylor, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The article discusses current and likely future trends within the architecture and master planning of university campuses. It argues that higher education administrators must maximise the value of the campus to create physical environments that enhance the student experience.

  15. Professional Organizations for Pharmacy Students on Satellite Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Mollie Ashe; McLaughlin, Jacqueline; Shepherd, Greene; Williams, Charlene; Zeeman, Jackie; Joyner, Pamela

    2016-06-25

    Objective. To evaluate the structure and impact of student organizations on pharmacy school satellite campuses. Methods. Primary administrators from satellite campuses received a 20-question electronic survey. Quantitative data analysis was conducted on survey responses. Results. The most common student organizations on satellite campuses were the American Pharmacists Association (APhA) (93.1%), American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) (89.7%), Christian Pharmacists Fellowship International (CPFI) (60.0%), state organizations (51.7%), and local organizations (58.6%). Perceived benefits of satellite campus organizations included opportunities for professional development, student engagement, and service. Barriers to success included small enrollment, communication between campuses, finances, and travel. Conclusion. Student organizations were an important component of the educational experience on pharmacy satellite campuses and allowed students to develop professionally and engage with communities. Challenges included campus size, distance between campuses, and communication.

  16. Does the Degree of Campus "Wiredness" Matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouping Hu

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Responses to the College Student Experience Questionnaire 4th Edition from 18,844 students at 71 colleges and universities were analyzed to determine if the presence of computing and information technology influenced the frequency of use of various forms of technology and other educational resources and the exposure to good educational practices. Undergraduates attending "more wired" campuses as determined by the 1998 and 1999 Yahoo! Most Wired Campus survey more frequently used computing and information technology and reported higher levels of engagement in good educational practices than their counterparts at less wired institutions. Non-traditional students benefited less than traditional students, but both women and men students benefited comparably from campus "wiredness."

  17. Campus sustainable food projects: critique and engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlett, Peggy F

    2011-01-01

    Campus sustainable food projects recently have expanded rapidly. A review of four components - purchasing goals, academic programs, direct marketing, and experiential learning - shows both intent and capacity to contribute to transformational change toward an alternative food system. The published rationales for campus projects and specific purchasing guidelines join curricular and cocurricular activities to evaluate, disseminate, and legitimize environmental, economic, social justice, and health concerns about conventional food. Emerging new metrics of food service practices mark a potential shift from rhetoric to market clout, and experiential learning builds new coalitions and can reshape relations with food and place. Campus projects are relatively new and their resilience is not assured, but leading projects have had regional, state, and national impact. The emergence of sustainability rankings in higher education and contract-based compliance around purchasing goals suggests that if support continues, higher education's leadership can extend to the broader agrifood system.

  18. Design Process of a Campus Plan: A Case Study of Duzce University Konuralp Campus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Yerli

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Humanity have always felt the need to alter the environment they inhabit. In our modern era, this desire continues to exhibit itself in more urban landscapes. As a microcosm of the cityscape, university campuses contribute many cultural and economic advantages to the urban population. Moreover they bring under control to the urban growth and generally provides open and green spaces to the city. In this paper, Düzce University Konuralp Campus, located north of the Düzce City, was considered as our study area. Here we describe the Konuralp campus design which was developed in "Duzce University Konuralp Campus Development Plan Urban Design Competition". The method of the study consist of three steps. Some analyses like location, topography (ecological wind corridors and the meeting point of the valleys, spatial zoning, design axes and circulation were performed at the first step. In the second step it has been tried to specify how to apply the steps for designing kind of these campus projects. The concept of the design was created and constructed for the project. In the last step the design was visualized with 3D aplications and presented here. The aim of the study is how to design a campus which is sustainable and accessible. Consequently, the campus design was realized which had some design principles based on pedestrian priority. Educational buildings were separated from social buildings, sports center and cultural centers by using a-pedestrian walkways. In the middle of the working area campus square was designed which contains some land uses such as ceremony area, student center, amphitheatre and library. Finally a sustainable and accessible campus design was developed for Duzce University.

  19. Integrated Renewable Energy and Campus Sustainability Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uthoff, Jay [Luther College, Decorah, IA (United States); Jensen, Jon [Luther College, Decorah, IA (United States); Bailey, Andrew [Luther College, Decorah, IA (United States)

    2013-09-25

    Renewable energy, energy conservation, and other sustainability initiatives have long been a central focus of Luther College. The DOE funded Integrated Renewable Energy and Campus Sustainability Initiative project has helped accelerate the College’s progress toward carbon neutrality. DOE funds, in conjunction with institutional matching funds, were used to fund energy conservation projects, a renewable energy project, and an energy and waste education program aimed at all campus constituents. The energy and waste education program provides Luther students with ideas about sustainability and conservation guidelines that they carry with them into their future communities.

  20. Computational and Experimental Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis of a High-Lift Wing with a Slat-Cove Filler for Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholten, William D.; Patterson, Ryan D.; Hartl, Darren J.; Strganac, Thomas W.; Chapelon, Quentin H. C.; Turner, Travis

    2017-01-01

    Airframe noise is a significant component of overall noise produced by transport aircraft during landing and approach (low speed maneuvers). A significant source for this noise is the cove of the leading-edge slat. The slat-cove filler (SCF) has been shown to be effective at mitigating slat noise. The objective of this work is to understand the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) behavior of a superelastic shape memory alloy (SMA) SCF in flow using both computational and physical models of a high-lift wing. Initial understanding of flow around the SCF and wing is obtained using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis at various angles of attack. A framework compatible with an SMA constitutive model (implemented as a user material subroutine) is used to perform FSI analysis for multiple flow and configuration cases. A scaled physical model of the high-lift wing is constructed and tested in the Texas A&M 3 ft-by-4-foot wind tunnel. Initial validation of both CFD and FSI analysis is conducted by comparing lift, drag and pressure distributions with experimental results.

  1. Proposed stratotype for the base of the highest Cambrian stage at the first appearance datum of Cordylodus andresi, Lawson Cove section, Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J.F.; Ethington, Raymond L.; Evans, K.R.; Holmer, L.E.; Loch, James D.; Popov, L.E.; Repetski, J.E.; Ripperdan, R.L.; Taylor, John F.

    2006-01-01

    We propose a candidate for the Global Standard Stratotype-section and Point (GSSP) for the base of the highest stage of the Furongian Series of the Cambrian System. The section is at Lawson Cove in the Ibex area of Millard County, Utah, USA. The marker horizon is the first appearance datum (FAD) of the conodont Cordylodus andresi Viira et Sergeyeva in Kaljo et al. [Kaljo, D., Borovko, N., Heinsalu, H., Khazanovich, K., Mens, K., Popov, L., Sergeyeva, S., Sobolevskaya, R., Viira, V., 1986. The Cambrian-Ordovician boundary in the Baltic-Ladoga clint area (North Estonia and Leningrad Region, USSR). Eesti NSV Teaduste Akadeemia Toimetised. Geologia 35, 97-108]. At this section and elsewhere this horizon also is the FAD of the trilobite Eurekia apopsis (Winston et Nicholls, 1967). This conodont characterizes the base of the Cordylodus proavus Zone, which has been recognized in many parts of the world. This trilobite characterizes the base of the Eurekia apopsis Zone, which has been recognized in many parts of North America. The proposed boundary is 46.7 m above the base of the Lava Dam Member of the Notch Peak Formation at the Lawson Cove section. Brachiopods, sequence stratigraphy, and carbon-isotope geochemistry are other tools that characterize this horizon and allow it to be recognized in other areas. ?? 2006 Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, CAS.

  2. Measuring Sexual Violence on Campus: Climate Surveys and Vulnerable Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heer, Brooke; Jones, Lynn

    2017-01-01

    Since the 2014 "Not Alone" report on campus sexual assault, the use of climate surveys to measure sexual violence on campuses across the United States has increased considerably. The current study utilizes a quasi meta-analysis approach to examine the utility of general campus climate surveys, which include a measure of sexual violence,…

  3. Software Engineering Infrastructure in a Large Virtual Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristobal, Jesus; Merino, Jorge; Navarro, Antonio; Peralta, Miguel; Roldan, Yolanda; Silveira, Rosa Maria

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The design, construction and deployment of a large virtual campus are a complex issue. Present virtual campuses are made of several software applications that complement e-learning platforms. In order to develop and maintain such virtual campuses, a complex software engineering infrastructure is needed. This paper aims to analyse the…

  4. Implementation and application of ACL in campus network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shiyong; Li, Zhao; Li, Biqing

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, it firstly introduces the related knowledge of access control list (ACL) technology, hardware requirements and software configuration. Then it discusses the topological structure of campus network from the perspective of campus network planning as well as demonstrates the application of ACL technology in campus network combined with examples.

  5. Gang Activity on Campus: A Crisis Response Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Mahauganee; Meaney, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    This case study challenges readers to consider a contemporary issue for campus threat assessment and emergency preparedness: gang presence on college campuses. A body of research examining the presence of gangs and gang activity on college campuses has developed, revealing that gangs pose a viable threat for institutions of higher education. The…

  6. Software Engineering Infrastructure in a Large Virtual Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristobal, Jesus; Merino, Jorge; Navarro, Antonio; Peralta, Miguel; Roldan, Yolanda; Silveira, Rosa Maria

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The design, construction and deployment of a large virtual campus are a complex issue. Present virtual campuses are made of several software applications that complement e-learning platforms. In order to develop and maintain such virtual campuses, a complex software engineering infrastructure is needed. This paper aims to analyse the…

  7. A Virtual Campus Based on Human Factor Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuting; Kang, Houliang

    2014-01-01

    Three Dimensional or 3D virtual reality has become increasingly popular in many areas, especially in building a digital campus. This paper introduces a virtual campus, which is based on a 3D model of The Tourism and Culture College of Yunnan University (TCYU). Production of the virtual campus was aided by Human Factor and Ergonomics (HF&E), an…

  8. A New Campus Police Agency: A Florida Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfitt, Rick

    2012-01-01

    Campus policing is a geographically focused police practice and the epitome of community oriented policing. Campus law enforcement agencies deal not only with a racially, ethnically, and culturally diverse population, they also deal with populations that change dramatically every year. While some campuses are enclaves unto themselves, many are…

  9. A Virtual Campus Based on Human Factor Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuting; Kang, Houliang

    2014-01-01

    Three Dimensional or 3D virtual reality has become increasingly popular in many areas, especially in building a digital campus. This paper introduces a virtual campus, which is based on a 3D model of The Tourism and Culture College of Yunnan University (TCYU). Production of the virtual campus was aided by Human Factor and Ergonomics (HF&E), an…

  10. A Geospatial Mixed Methods Approach to Assessing Campus Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hites, Lisle S.; Fifolt, Matthew; Beck, Heidi; Su, Wei; Kerbawy, Shatomi; Wakelee, Jessica; Nassel, Ariann

    2013-01-01

    Background: While there is no panacea for alleviating campus safety concerns, safety experts agree that one of the key components to an effective campus security plan is monitoring the environment. Despite previous attempts to measure campus safety, quantifying perceptions of fear, safety, and risk remains a challenging issue. Since perceptions of…

  11. Understanding the Law Enforcement Officer's Role in the Campus Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhyne, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    Campus police forces operate under a difficult mandate of competing and conflicting goals. Officers are charged with protecting institutions whose basic mission is to provide a peaceful, open campus setting that encourages freedom of movement and expression. Campuses are generally unguarded and open to the general public and their buildings,…

  12. Assessing Fault Slip Behavior and the History of Fluid-Rock Interaction of The Rodeo Cove Thrust, Franciscan Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartram, H.; Goodwin, L. B.; Tobin, H. J.

    2016-12-01

    Internal mechanical properties and stress conditions in subduction megathrusts remain poorly understood. We present a study of fault rocks and veins to elucidate controls on fault slip behavior in the Rodeo Cove thrust zone, a fossil plate boundary exposed in two coastal outcrops of the Mesozoic Franciscan accretionary complex: Rodeo Beach (RB) and Black Sand Beach (BSB). Thrusts imbricate mechanically distinct lithologic units including pillow basalt, radiolarian chert, black shale, and greywacke. Locally large vein-to-rock ratios record significant fluid flux and mineral precipitation during deformation. Cross-cutting relations at outcrop- and micro-scale reveal a complex history of fluid-rock interaction followed by brittle shearing. At RB, fault-related deformation is commonly concentrated in altered basalts in which original, isotropic igneous microstructures are preserved but rocks are more commonly foliated. These structures are locally disrupted by foliation-parallel and cross-cutting calcite veins as well as calcite-cemented breccia. Veins are less common at BSB, where they are found in altered basalt and greywacke near black shales. Stable isotope chemistry of calcite records differing fluid sources at these two locations. At RB, δ18O values range from 17.5—22.4‰ SMOW compared to 16.9—21.4‰ SMOW at BSB. These relatively high δ18O values may reflect upward movement of metamorphic fluids along the fault. The RB δ13C values (-2.0—+2.9‰ VPDB) are similar to those of marine carbonates precipitated from seawater and are considerably higher than the BSB values (-16.8—+3.0‰ VPDB), which suggest a possible biogenic source of carbon consistent with fluid interaction with black shale. Optical cathodoluminescence of calcite reveals complex internal structures that will be correlated with quantitative chemical analysis using an electron microprobe. Anastomosing localized brittle shear zones of foliated cataclasite or gouge cut veins at RB and

  13. Campus Information Network Hardware System Design%Campus Information Network Hardware System Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘正勇

    2011-01-01

    The emphasis of constructing and developing the campus information network is how to design and optimize the network hardware system. This paper mainly studies the network system structure design, the server system structure design and the network export

  14. Needed: A Fresh Perspective on Campus Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Anthony; Males, Mike

    2017-01-01

    That campuses suffer unacceptable levels of violence is undisputable; they are part of a larger American society in which family, community, and institutional violence far exceed levels found in comparable Western nations. And yet, amid the finger-pointing and scapegoating of students as violent, we note a critical lack of evidence-based analysis,…

  15. Uus ja uhke campus valmib aastaks 2010

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Tallinna Tehnikaülikooli haldusdirektor Henn Karits tutvustab ülikooli lähimate aastate ehitusplaane - peamaja rekonstrueerimist, majandus- ja humanitaarteaduskondade hoone ning raamatukogu uue hoone ehitamist. Uus campus sisaldab endas ka maa-aluse parkla, spordikompleksi, üliõpilasühiselamud

  16. A Comprehensive Model for Campus Death Postvention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, David X.; Ginsberg, Marc H.

    1996-01-01

    Describes an ecomap and time-event flowchart for monitoring postvention following a death on a college campus. Argues that poor coordination of postvention efforts can result in delays, duplication of efforts, errors, risk of liability, and public relations problems. Provides diagrams of an ecomap and of a time-event schedule. (RJM)

  17. For Members Only: Feminism on Campus Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agness, Karin L.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of contemporary feminism in the classroom and on campus is widespread, and student clubs, women's centers, and women's studies departments often exclude women who hold traditional views. In this article, the author takes a look at how this influence evolved and describes the very successful actions she took as a student to challenge…

  18. For Members Only: Feminism on Campus Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agness, Karin L.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of contemporary feminism in the classroom and on campus is widespread, and student clubs, women's centers, and women's studies departments often exclude women who hold traditional views. In this article, the author takes a look at how this influence evolved and describes the very successful actions she took as a student to challenge…

  19. New Campus Crime Prevention Resources Available

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campus Law Enforcement Journal, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Campus Crime Prevention Committee has compiled a list of university and college crime prevention agencies and resources, which includes contact information, links to agency crime prevention web pages, and a list of resources they offer (i.e., brochures, guides, PowerPoint programs, videos, etc.) as well as a spreadsheet showing organizations…

  20. Campus Response to a Student Gunman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmussen, Kelly J.; Creswell, John W.

    1995-01-01

    A qualitative case analysis describes campus reaction to an incident in which a student attempted to fire a gun at his classmates. Data were collected through interviews with informants, observations, documents, and audiovisual materials. From the case emerged themes of denial, fear, concern for safety, long-term psychological effects, and need…

  1. Campus Environmental Audits: The UCLA Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, April A.; Gottlieb, Robert

    1992-01-01

    The nation's first comprehensive analysis of a university's environmental impact, at the University of California at Los Angeles, has become a blueprint for prompting environmental change on campuses nationwide. The study documented conditions in the workplace, wastes and hazards, air quality, water and energy use, and procurement practices.…

  2. Policing Alcohol and Related Crimes on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Andrea N.

    2013-01-01

    Research shows that college students drink alcohol frequently and heavily. This can compromise their health and well-being. Student drinking is also tied to crime. While prior work explores the nature and extent of crimes involving alcohol on campus, to date no study has examined how police handle these incidents or crime generally. This study…

  3. Guns on Campus: A Chilling Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mash, Kenneth M.

    2013-01-01

    The author of this article observes that, while much has been written on the overall topic of safety with regard to allowing guns on college campuses, little has been said about how allowing the possession of deadly weapons can create a "chilling effect" on academic discussions. This article considers how some universities have…

  4. A Reaction to Mazoue's Deconstructed Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrock, Sharon A.

    2012-01-01

    Mazoue's ("J Comput High Educ," 2012) article, "The Deconstructed Campus," is examined from the perspective of instructional design practice. Concerns center on: the knowledge base of precision instruction; the differential effectiveness of teaching procedural as opposed to declarative knowledge; the reliance on assessment of online learning; and…

  5. Eco-Friendly Campuses as Teaching Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Stephen J.; Kearns, Thomas D.

    2008-01-01

    Sustainable design projects offer academic communities the opportunity to make the design and operations of their campuses part of the larger lessons of social and environmental responsibility that are integral parts of higher education. In no place is that demonstrated more clearly than in New England, with its long commitment to environmental…

  6. Historical Analysis of College Campus Interracial Dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmin, Michael W.; Firebaugh, Stephanie

    2008-01-01

    Interracial dating on American campuses has had a relatively stormy past. Until the past three decades or so, it was outlawed in some states. Southern institutions, in particular, such as the infamous Bob Jones University have made this issue divisive even among their own constituencies. Age and generation seem to be cogent factors with younger…

  7. Infusing JUST Design in Campus Recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staeger-Wilson, Katheryne; Sampson, Douglas H.

    2012-01-01

    This practice brief highlights the collaborative work among a disability resource professional, a university architect, and students with disabilities to create a campus recreation center with universal design features. This partnership serves to illustrate that building to minimum compliance standards does not necessarily remove barriers to…

  8. Adaptively Ubiquitous Learning in Campus Math Path

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Shu-Chuan; Kuo, Bor-Chen; Liu, Yu-Lung

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this study are to develop and evaluate the instructional model and learning system which integrate ubiquitous learning, computerized adaptive diagnostic testing system and campus math path learning. The researcher first creates a ubiquitous learning environment which is called "adaptive U-learning math path system". This…

  9. Leadership Development on a Diverse Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riutta, Satu; Teodorescu, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    While leadership development is considered an important goal of education on many campuses, very little is known about how leadership skills develop in a diverse environment, which most colleges will be in the future. We compare causes for Socially Responsible Leadership (SRL) at the end of college students' first year in one diverse liberal…

  10. Gay Rights on Campus, circa 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Elizabeth P.; Ford, Charles H.

    2011-01-01

    The environment for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students, staff, and faculty on college campuses has certainly improved over the last generation, but recent dramatic episodes confirm the continuing need for vigilance and reform. Students remain the constituency most vulnerable to the effects of entrenched bigotry: the harassment…

  11. Operations Course Icebreaker: Campus Club Cupcakes Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Brent; Southin, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Campus Club Cupcakes is an in-class "introduction to operations management" experiential learning exercise which can be used within minutes of starting the course. After reading the one-page mini case, students are encouraged to meet each other and collaborate to determine if making and selling cupcakes to fellow business students would…

  12. Uus ja uhke campus valmib aastaks 2010

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Tallinna Tehnikaülikooli haldusdirektor Henn Karits tutvustab ülikooli lähimate aastate ehitusplaane - peamaja rekonstrueerimist, majandus- ja humanitaarteaduskondade hoone ning raamatukogu uue hoone ehitamist. Uus campus sisaldab endas ka maa-aluse parkla, spordikompleksi, üliõpilasühiselamud

  13. Guns on Campus: A Chilling Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mash, Kenneth M.

    2013-01-01

    The author of this article observes that, while much has been written on the overall topic of safety with regard to allowing guns on college campuses, little has been said about how allowing the possession of deadly weapons can create a "chilling effect" on academic discussions. This article considers how some universities have…

  14. Nerf Guns Strike a Nerve on Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    Killing zombies on campus just isn't as much fun as it used to be. Students at Bowling Green State University once carried Nerf guns for a week each semester, shooting the zombies before the creatures could tag them. Participants were seen by most bystanders as nerdy but harmless kids who liked role-playing. These days, bright plastic Nerf guns…

  15. Transportation Sustainability on a University Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to show the present level of sustainable transportation, mainly walking and bicycling, on a large campus in the US Midwest and then analyzes some of the opportunities and impediments in increasing the modal share. Design/methodology/approach: Three types of analysis are used. First, current level of walking and bicycling…

  16. Hate Speech on Campus: A Practical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Patrick

    1997-01-01

    Looks at arguments concerning hate speech and speech codes on college campuses, arguing that speech codes are likely to be of limited value in achieving civil rights objectives, and that there are alternatives less harmful to civil liberties and more successful in promoting civil rights. Identifies specific goals, and considers how restriction of…

  17. Operations Course Icebreaker: Campus Club Cupcakes Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Brent; Southin, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Campus Club Cupcakes is an in-class "introduction to operations management" experiential learning exercise which can be used within minutes of starting the course. After reading the one-page mini case, students are encouraged to meet each other and collaborate to determine if making and selling cupcakes to fellow business students would…

  18. Campus Police Benefit by Automating Training Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Bob

    2008-01-01

    Making sure law enforcement officers are current with their professional training has always been a top priority of police departments whether they must protect a city or a college campus. However, as training has expanded with many new certification categories, tracking all of these for each officer has grown more complex. This has prompted many…

  19. Improving Service Management in Campus IT Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Stewart H. C.; Chan, Yuk-Hee

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims at presenting the benefits from implementing IT service management (ITSM) in an organization for managing campus-wide IT operations. In order to improve the fault correlation from business perspectives, we proposed a framework to automate network and system alerts with respect to its business service impact for proactive…

  20. Sustainable Campus: Engaging the Community in Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Too, Linda; Bajracharya, Bhishna

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify the major factors necessary for engaging university campus community in sustainability. While general awareness in sustainability issues has improved in recent years through mass media coverage, this knowledge is not always translated into actual sustainable practice. Studies have indicated that…

  1. Mapping Academic Library Contributions to Campus Internationalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Steven W.; Kutner, Laurie; Cooper, Liz

    2015-01-01

    This study surveyed academic libraries across the United States to establish baseline data on their contributions to campus internationalization. Supplementing data from the American Council on Education (ACE) on internationalization of higher education, this research measured the level of international activities taking place in academic…

  2. Sustainable Campus: Engaging the Community in Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Too, Linda; Bajracharya, Bhishna

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify the major factors necessary for engaging university campus community in sustainability. While general awareness in sustainability issues has improved in recent years through mass media coverage, this knowledge is not always translated into actual sustainable practice. Studies have indicated that…

  3. Rethinking Partnerships on a Decentralized Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufault, Katie H.

    2017-01-01

    Decentralization is an effective approach for structuring campus learning and success centers. McShane & Von Glinow (2007) describe decentralization as "an organizational model where decision authority and power are dispersed among units rather than held by a single small group of administrators" (p. 237). A decentralized structure…

  4. Savoy/TMA Public Education Campus Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    21st Century School Fund, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The Savoy/TMA Public Education Campus encompasses the 3.5 acres that includes the Savoy Elementary School and the former Nichols Avenue School, now the fully modernized Thurgood Marshall Academy Public Charter High School (TMA) and a recreation center sponsored by the Department of Parks and Recreation. As a part of public initiatives to better…

  5. Building Partnerships with College Campuses: Community Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiderman, Sally; Furco, Andrew; Zapf, Jennifer; Goss, Megan

    The information that forms the basis of this brochure was drawn from a summit of community organization representatives who have worked in partnerships with institutions of higher education. The brochure highlights three issues community partners believe must be fully addressed if community/campus partnerships are to be successful and mutually…

  6. Facilitating College Readiness through Campus Life Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Mary Beth

    2014-01-01

    In a program called "College Immersion," middle grades students spend up to one week on a local college campus, attending specially designed college classes and experiencing collegiate activities. This research study reports on findings related to two different college-middle school partnerships involved in a College Immersion program.…

  7. Design and Implementation of Campus Application APP Based on Android

    Science.gov (United States)

    dongxu, Zhu; yabin, liu; xian lei, PI; weixiang, Zhou; meng, Huang

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, "Internet + campus" as the entrance of the Android technology based on the application of campus design and implementation of Application program. Based on GIS(Geographic Information System) spatial database, GIS spatial analysis technology, Java development technology and Android development technology, this system server adopts the Model View Controller architectue to realize the efficient use of campus information and provide real-time information of all kinds of learning and life for campus student at the same time. "Fingertips on the Institute of Disaster Prevention Science and Technology" release for the campus students of all grades of life, learning, entertainment provides a convenient.

  8. Evaluation of TRIGRS (transient rainfall infiltration and grid-based regional slope-stability analysis)'s predictive skill for hurricane-triggered landslides: A case study in Macon County, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Z.; Hong, Y.; Kirschbaum, D.; Adler, R.F.; Gourley, J.J.; Wooten, R.

    2011-01-01

    The key to advancing the predictability of rainfall-triggered landslides is to use physically based slope-stability models that simulate the transient dynamical response of the subsurface moisture to spatiotemporal variability of rainfall in complex terrains. TRIGRS (transient rainfall infiltration and grid-based regional slope-stability analysis) is a USGS landslide prediction model, coded in Fortran, that accounts for the influences of hydrology, topography, and soil physics on slope stability. In this study, we quantitatively evaluate the spatiotemporal predictability of a Matlab version of TRIGRS (MaTRIGRS) in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Macon County, North Carolina where Hurricanes Ivan triggered widespread landslides in the 2004 hurricane season. High resolution digital elevation model (DEM) data (6-m LiDAR), USGS STATSGO soil database, and NOAA/NWS combined radar and gauge precipitation are used as inputs to the model. A local landslide inventory database from North Carolina Geological Survey is used to evaluate the MaTRIGRS' predictive skill for the landslide locations and timing, identifying predictions within a 120-m radius of observed landslides over the 30-h period of Hurricane Ivan's passage in September 2004. Results show that within a radius of 24 m from the landslide location about 67% of the landslide, observations could be successfully predicted but with a high false alarm ratio (90%). If the radius of observation is extended to 120 m, 98% of the landslides are detected with an 18% false alarm ratio. This study shows that MaTRIGRS demonstrates acceptable spatiotemporal predictive skill for landslide occurrences within a 120-m radius in space and a hurricane-event-duration (h) in time, offering the potential to serve as a landslide warning system in areas where accurate rainfall forecasts and detailed field data are available. The validation can be further improved with additional landslide information including the exact time of failure for each

  9. Detection and quality of previously undetermined Floridan aquifer system discharge to the St. Johns River, Jacksonville, to Green Cove Springs, northeastern Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spechler, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    Potentiometric surface maps of the Upper Floridan aquifer show two depressions around the St. Johns River frm the city of Jacksonville south toward Green Cove Springs. These depressions, depending on their locations, are the result of withdrawals from agricultural, industrial, domestic and public-supply wells, diffuse upward leakage, and discharge from springs. Submerged springs that discharge into the St. Johns River between Jacksonville and Green Cove Springs have been thought to exist, but locating and evaluating these springs had not been attempted before this investigation. Thermal infrared imagery, seismic reflection, and numerous interviews with local residents were used to locate springs. An airborne thermal infrared survey was conducted along a section of the St. Johns River in northeastern Florida during February 1992 to detect possible sources of ground-water discharge to the river. An infrared image displayed one thermal anomaly in the St. Johns River which is associated with a previously unknown spring discharge from the Floridan aquifer system. Thermal anomalies also were observed at six locations where municipal facilities discharge treated wastewater to the river. Results of seismic reflection surveys indicate the presence of collapse and other karst features underlying the St. Johns River. These features indicate that the surficial deposits and the Hawthorn Formation that underlie the river probably do not consist of continuous beds. The collapse or deformation of the Hawthorn Formation or the presence of permeable sediment of localized extent could create zones of relatively high vertical leakance. This could provide a more direct hydraulic connection between the Upper Floridan aquifer and the river. Water samples collected from the only submerged spring in the St. Johns River within the Jacksonville-Green Cove Springs reach indicate that the source of the water is the Floridan aquifer system. Chloride and sulfate concentrations were 12 and 340

  10. arena_cove.grd

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NGDC builds and distributes high-resolution, coastal digital elevation models (DEMs) that integrate ocean bathymetry and land topography to support NOAA's mission to...

  11. Alcohol Regulation and Violence on College Campuses

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Grossman; Sara Markowitz

    1999-01-01

    This study focuses on the effects of variations in alcoholic beverage prices among states of the United States on violence on college campuses. The principal hypothesis tested is that the incidence of violence is negatively related to the price of alcohol. This hypothesis is derived from two well established relationships: the positive relationship between alcohol and violence and the negative relationship between the use of alcohol and its price. The data employed in the study are the 1989, ...

  12. Substance abuse on the college campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimsza, Mary Ellen; Moses, Karen S

    2005-02-01

    Substance abuse is a major health and behavioral concern in college students. Alcohol and marijuana are the most commonly abused drugs on college campuses. Others include tobacco, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, gamma-hydroxybutyrate, flunitrazepam (Rohypnol), lysergic acid, ketamine, methamphetamine, phencyclidine, cocaine, and psilocybin mushrooms. This article reviews the use of these drugs by college students. Substance use is a major contributing factor in poor academic performance and failure to successfully complete a college education.

  13. Keeping our Campuses and Communities Safe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Goodman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the events of September 11, 2001, the U.S. population has a heightened awareness that tragedies can and do strike ordinary people without warning. The same can be said for the unfortunate abundance of campus shootings, where the next "9/11" occurred in 2007 on the campus of Virginia Tech. And yet, subsequent investigations into these horrific events often reveal that clues existed that might have pointed to the eventual violent outcome. It is unquestionable that to dramatically improve the safety and security of our cities we must rely upon the millions of eyes of our fellow citizens to unearth these clues as they pursue their daily activities. But ordinary citizens on the street are often reluctant to get involved and lackthe tools to overcome their reticence to report suspicious activity. In this article, we examine several indicators of campus and community violence, as well as a novel technology to facilitate communication of potential threats to safety before they become a reality.

  14. A New Campus Built on Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, Ari [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mercado, Andrea [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Regnier, Cindy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The University of California (UC), Merced partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to reduce energy consumption by as part of DOE’s Commercial Buildings Partnerships (CBP) Program. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) provided technical expertise in support of this DOE program. This case study reports on the process and outcome of this project including the achieved savings from design improvements for the campus. The intent of the project was to retrofit the Science & Engineering (S&E) building and the central plant at UC Merced to achieve up to 30% energy reduction. The anticipated savings from these retrofits represented about 17% of whole-campus energy use. If achieved, the savings contribution from the CBP project would have brought overall campus performance to 56% of the 1999 UC/CSU benchmark performance for their portfolio of buildings. However, the final design that moved forward as part of the CBP program only included the retrofit measures for the S&E building.

  15. Federal Campuses Handbook for Net Zero Energy, Water, and Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2017-08-14

    In 2015, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) defined a zero energy campus as "an energy-efficient campus where, on a source energy basis, the actual annual delivered energy is less than or equal to the on-site renewable exported energy." This handbook is focused on applying the EERE definition of zero energy campuses to federal sector campuses. However, it is not intended to replace, substitute, or modify any statutory or regulatory requirements and mandates.

  16. What Should Stay Put? Campus Landscape Planning for the Long Term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahres, Mike Van

    2000-01-01

    Discusses campus landscape long-term planning and design decision making during campus alterations and upgrades. Those campus landscape elements that tend to remain in place and planning for their continued existence are discussed. (GR)

  17. FIRE's Guide to Free Speech on Campus. Second Edition. FIRE's Guides to Student Rights on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverglate, Harvey A.; French, David; Lukianoff, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Since its first publication in 2005, the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) has distributed more than 138,000 print and online copies of its "Guide to Free Speech on Campus." In that time, FIRE's commitment to advocating on behalf of the essential rights discussed in the pages that follow has remained unwavering;…

  18. The campus in the twentieth century: The urban campus in Chicago from 1890 to 1965

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Giliberti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available After the Civil War, when socio political reorganisation was urgently needed, American universities contributed to the process of re establishing the internal equilibrium of power within the nation. Thus an attempt was made to reinforce the political parties and develop regions as politically discrete territorial entities that were relatively manageable. In the twentieth century the effect of this policy of local centralisation at the regional level, in conjunction with the opportunity offered by the need to develop more effective city governance, was translated into the awareness that a major contribution of academia to politics is to help re establish the parameters of governability for the entire country. With the goal of documenting and exploring some key relations between campus plans and city planning in Chicago, this paper illustrates a number of campus plans and planning strategies in which “the city” can be thought of as a metonym for the entire society. Nexuses between campus and city planning can be revealed from the creation of the campus of the University of Chicago in 1890 to the first half of the 1960s.

  19. Seeding Entrepreneurship across Campus: Early Implementation Experiences of the Kauffman Campuses Initiative. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulsey, Lara; Rosenberg, Linda; Kim, Benita

    2006-01-01

    Although entrepreneurship has long been considered a fundamental aspect of American society, its development as an academic field in U.S. colleges and universities is relatively recent and on-campus entrepreneurship programs have been most commonly found in business schools. Because entrepreneurs and innovative ideas can arise from within any…

  20. THERMAL ADAPTATION, CAMPUS GREENING AND OUTDOOR USE IN LAUTECH CAMPUS, OGBOMOSO, NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Adeniran ADEDEJI

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The interwoven relationship between the use of indoors and outdoors in the tropics as means of thermal adaptation has long been recognized. In the case of outdoors, this is achieved by green intervention of shading trees as adaptive mechanisms through behavioural thermoregulation. Unfortunately, the indoor academic spaces of LAUTECH campus was not provided with necessary outdoor academic learning environment in the general site planning of the campus for use at peak indoor thermal dissatisfaction period considering the tropical climatic setting of the university. The students’ departmental and faculty associations tried to provide parks for themselves as alternatives which on casual observation are of substandard quality and poorly maintained because of lack of institutional coordination and low funding. This study examined the quality and use of these parks for thermal comfort through behavioral adjustment from subjective field evidence with the goal of improvement. To achieve this, twelve parks were selected within the campus. Questionnaires containing use and quality variables were administered randomly upon 160 users of these parks. The data obtained was subjected to descriptive statistical analysis. Results show that the quality of the parks, weather condition, period of the day, and personal psychological reasons of users has great influence on the use of the parks. The study concludes with policy recommendations on improvement of the quality of the parks and the campus outdoors and greenery in general.

  1. Transactive Campus Energy Systems: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katipamula, Srinivas; Corbin, Charles D.; Haack, Jereme N.; Hao, He; Kim, Woohyun; Hostick, Donna J.; Akyol, Bora A.; Allwardt, Craig H.; Carpenter, Brandon J.; Huang, Sen; Liu, Guopeng; Lutes, Robert G.; Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Ngo, Hung; Somasundaram, Sriram; Underhill, Ronald M.; Zhao, Mingjie

    2017-09-26

    Transactive energy refers to the combination of economic and control techniques to improve grid reliability and efficiency. The fundamental purpose of transactive energy management is to seamlessly coordinate the operation of large numbers of new intelligent assets—such as distributed solar, energy storage and responsive building loads—to provide the flexibility needed to operate the power grid reliably and at minimum cost, particularly one filled with intermittent renewable generation such as the Pacific Northwest. It addresses the key challenge of providing smooth, stable, and predictable “control” of these assets, despite the fact that most are neither owned nor directly controlled by the power grid. The Clean Energy and Transactive Campus (CETC) work described in this report was done as part of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the Washington State Department of Commerce (Commerce) through the Clean Energy Fund (CEF). The project team consisted of PNNL, the University of Washington (UW) and Washington State University (WSU), to connect the PNNL, UW, and WSU campuses to form a multi-campus testbed for transaction-based energy management—transactive—solutions. Building on the foundational transactive system established by the Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration (PNWSGD), the purpose of the project was to construct the testbed as both a regional flexibility resource and as a platform for research and development (R&D) on buildings/grid integration and information-based energy efficiency. This report provides a summary of the various tasks performed under the CRADA.

  2. Black Hills State University Underground Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, Brianna J; Thomas, Keenan J; Oliver-Mallory, Kelsey C; Lesko, Kevin T; Schnee, Richard W; Henning, Reyco; MacLellan, Ryan F; Guerra, Marcelo B B; Busch, Matthew; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann D; Wilkerson, J F; Xu, Wenqin; Mei, Dongming

    2017-08-01

    The Black Hills State University Underground Campus (BHUC) houses a low background counting facility on the 4850' level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility. There are currently four ultra-low background, high-purity germanium detectors installed in the BHUC and it is anticipated four more detectors will be installed within a year. In total, the BHUC will be able to accommodate up to twelve detectors with space inside a class 1000 cleanroom, an automated liquid nitrogen fill system, on-site personnel assistance and other required utilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Eco-movilidad en el Campus universitario

    OpenAIRE

    Jané Ribera, Eduard

    2013-01-01

    El objetivo del proyecto es concebir y analizar la creación de un toldo, localizado en el aparcamiento universitario del Campus Sud de la UPC, compuesto por lonas fotovoltaicas tensadas y estructuras relativamente no complejas. El toldo alimenta energéticamente a una red interna de motocicletas eléctricas que circulan en la zona universitaria disponible para los usuarios de las facultades de la zona. Este proyecto se clasifica en cuatro partes: un análisis de la gestión de la construcción ...

  4. Assessing LGBTQ campus climate and creating change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, Megan R; Gilmore, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    We report the findings of a climate study of a liberal arts college in Pennsylvania. This climate assessment was comprehensive in content (heterosexual and cisgender individuals' attitudes, and LGBTQ individuals' experiences), participants (faculty, staff, and students), and methodology (qualitative and quantitative). We found low levels of sexual prejudice and generally positive perceptions of the campus, but positive attitudes were more strongly endorsed by heterosexual and cisgender than LGBTQ participants. We consider the impact of these perceptions on LGBTQ students' co-curricular involvement and discuss the institutional changes that are underway as a result of our study.

  5. Eastern hemlock found in Macon County, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    David B. South; Brian Via; Henri D. Grissino-Mayer; Richard Martin; Richard Shelby; Sandie McCall

    2016-01-01

    Alabama is currently the southern limit of the range of eastern hemlock [Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carriere]. In 2012, several well preserved stumps were excavated from a farm located in Notasulga, Alabama (32 º 33” 6’ N; 85º 40” 22’ W). Even though they were buried in a saturated soil for approximately 1,500 years, the stumps were remarkably well preserved. The low-...

  6. FLOODPLAIN, MACON COUNTY, TENNESSEE and INCORPORATED AREAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  7. FLOODPLAIN, MACON COUNTY, GEORGIA and INCORPORATED AREAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  8. Censorship of Off-Campus Publications Violates First Amendment Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Julian

    1989-01-01

    Reviews Burch v. Barker, in which the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that school administrators' prior review of an alternative or off-campus publication, destined for distribution on the school campus, is in violation of the First Amendment. (MS)

  9. Miami-Dade Community College: Applications at the Wolfson Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padron, Eduardo J.; Levitt, Ted

    1995-01-01

    Reviews the Miami-Dade Community College (MDCC) general education program, focusing on the program's specific applications at MDCC's Wolfson Campus. Indicates that general education at the Campus involves education in environmental issues, social studies, humanities, multicultural awareness, the cultivation of individual responsibility, and…

  10. The Public Health Approach to Campus Suicide Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodoin, Elizabeth C.; Robertson, Jason

    2013-01-01

    The perception that college students are coming to campus with more severe psychological concerns than in the past has been empirically supported on college campuses (Benton and others, 2003). Approximately 20 percent of all adolescents have a diagnosable mental health disorder (Kessler and others, 2005), many of which then continue on to college…

  11. Defining Campus Violence: A Phenomenological Analysis of Community Stakeholder Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Matthew J.; Caldwell, Rebecca J.; Goldman, Emily Grey

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to derive an empirically based understanding of campus violence. Grounded in a communication paradigm offered by sociolinguistic scholars, we adopted a phenomenological approach for conducting and analyzing 23 interviews from campus community stakeholders, including students, staff, faculty, administrators, and…

  12. The Role of Institutional Culture in Campus Master Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Raymond Chip, III

    2012-01-01

    Campuses of higher education are physical artifacts of the institutions' culture. No matter the institutional type, geographic location, or population it serves, "the campus is a visible, physical manifestation and indicator of organizational life" (D. Martin, 2006, p. iii). Artifacts serving as symbols of the institution's…

  13. Breaking the Silence Surrounding Mental Health on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, Larry D.

    2013-01-01

    Mentally ill students are able to participate in higher education at unprecedented rates. While colleges and universities have been responsive to the therapeutic needs, we have failed to successfully create supportive campus climates. Campus leaders are challenged to demonstrate ethical leadership that breaks the silence and confronts the stigma…

  14. Application of Campus Instructional Support: Two Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauss-Ehlers, Caroline S.; Pasquerella, Lynn

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how instructional support is a critical tool to promote the use of technology in research and teaching. A Campus-Wide Collaborative Model of Technological Instructional Support (CCMTIS) is presented that incorporates: integration of technology across campus; technical assistance; allocation of…

  15. Assessing the Campus's Ethical Climate: A Multidimensional Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banning, James H.

    1997-01-01

    Develops a general framework and matrix for assessing ethical behavior from a campus perspective and illustrates how visual anthropology can be used to implement the matrix. Claims that indices, such as photographs on bulletin boards, architecture, graffiti, and other environmental elements, can portray a campus's ethical climate. (RJM)

  16. The Impact of Honors on the Campus Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Larry

    2015-01-01

    The development of an honors program at Rogers State University a decade ago brought about significant positive changes to the campus, where more than three-quarters of the students are the first in their families to attend college. Throughout the years, these young scholars have elevated academic discourse across campus and delivered an impact…

  17. Should College Campuses become Tobacco Free without an Enforcement Plan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, Reginald

    2012-01-01

    Tobacco-free campuses are a great public health initiative. "Healthy People 2020" and "Healthy Campus 2020" address tobacco use and young adults including college students. Sources indicate that of the more than 6,000 colleges and universities in the United States, less than 800 are either smoke free or tobacco free. An increasing number of…

  18. Invoking the Spiritual in Campus Life and Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Judy L.; Dantley, Michael E.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the implications of the spirituality in the workplace movement for leadership and campus life in colleges and universities. Describes how student affairs leadership, informed by spiritual intelligence, can create campus environments that support and enhance the sense of wholeness, connection, and community for students, faculty, and…

  19. College Student Perceptions on Campus Alcohol Policies and Consumption Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Brenda L.; Roberts, Katherine J.; Donnelly, Joseph W.; Rutledge, Imani N.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental strategies for colleges and universities to reduce alcohol consumption among their students include the development and enforcement of campus alcohol policies. This study examines students' knowledge and attitudes toward campus alcohol policies and how they relate to alcohol consumption and alcohol social norms. A sample of 422…

  20. Why Students Choose the Branch Campus of a Large University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Jeff; Howell, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Fonseca and Bird (2007) ask an intriguing question that relates to university branch campuses: "What happened to all the people who thought online learning would drive traditional education out of the market? Just when "click" is supposed to be replacing "brick," branch campuses are proliferating around the country."…

  1. Recreational Use of Ritalin on College Campuses. Infofacts/Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapner, Daniel Ari

    2008-01-01

    Although alcohol is the most abused drug on college campuses, Ritalin has also attracted much concern in recent years. This "Infofacts/Resources" describes Ritalin use on college campuses, outlines possible effects of its abuse, and recommends policies for institutions of higher education. (Contains 7 online resources.)

  2. Motivational Signage Increases Physical Activity on a College Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, M. Allison; Torok, Donald

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors evaluated whether motivational signage influenced rates of stair use relative to elevator use on a college campus. Participants: In March and April 2004, the authors observed students, faculty, staff, and any visitors accessing a college campus building. Methods: During Phase I, the authors monitored ascending stair and…

  3. The Relationship between Social Capital and Weapon Possession on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messer, Rachel H.; Bradley, Kristopher I.; Calvi, Jessica L.; Kennison, Shelia M.

    2012-01-01

    The present research focused on the problem of how college officials might be able to predict weapon possession on college campuses. We hypothesized that measures of social capital (i.e., trust and participation in society) may be useful in identifying individuals who are likely to possess weapons on campuses. Prior research has shown that those…

  4. Modern Architecture and the U.S. Campus Heritage Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buono, Jon

    2011-01-01

    The history of an educational institution is maintained both in its traditions--the customs and practices of the school--and in its physical dimension--the buildings, landscapes, and other cultural resources that define its "campus." In the past 15 years, the memorialization of the American college and university campus--whether in…

  5. Essential Ingredients to Working with Campus Protests and Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Dustin

    2012-01-01

    Recent months have provided many campus law enforcement and security administrators with an added challenge in providing for the safety and welfare of their campus communities. The "Occupy Wall Street" (OWS) movement, which began on September 17, 2011 in New York City, was numerous protests against economic inequality, record rates of…

  6. The Full and True Value of Campus Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elefante, Carl

    2011-01-01

    To gain a full and true understanding of the value of campus heritage requires shifting perspective. On many campuses, heritage resources are perceived to have no relevance whatsoever to the challenges of sustainability. This results largely from a profound misconception about what may constitute a sustainable future and what steps may be needed…

  7. Campus Architecture: Building in the Groves of Academe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dober, Richard P.

    This book describes, defines, and documents campus architectural designs, covering all aspects of campus building and landscape planning in light of today's new challenges--from the updating and revitalization of the existing architectural heritage to the kinds of innovative new buildings required to meet today's and tomorrow's academic needs. The…

  8. Chinese-English Code-switching in Campus Advertisements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨真真

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to analyze Chinese-English code-switching in campus advertisements by the linguistic adaptation theory. Through the interpretation of the specific examples, the communicative goals are achieved by adaptation of linguistic reality, social convention and psychological motivations. Code-switching has significant pragmatic value in campus advertisements and makes the communication efficient.

  9. Essential Ingredients to Working with Campus Protests and Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Dustin

    2012-01-01

    Recent months have provided many campus law enforcement and security administrators with an added challenge in providing for the safety and welfare of their campus communities. The "Occupy Wall Street" (OWS) movement, which began on September 17, 2011 in New York City, was numerous protests against economic inequality, record rates of…

  10. Defining Campus Violence: A Phenomenological Analysis of Community Stakeholder Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Matthew J.; Caldwell, Rebecca J.; Goldman, Emily Grey

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to derive an empirically based understanding of campus violence. Grounded in a communication paradigm offered by sociolinguistic scholars, we adopted a phenomenological approach for conducting and analyzing 23 interviews from campus community stakeholders, including students, staff, faculty, administrators, and…

  11. The Police Response to Mental Illness on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Gary J.; Shtull, Penny R.

    2012-01-01

    Campus police officers are often among the initial contacts for behavioral incidents involving people with mental illness. Their training and access to resources influence decisions to direct the individual to support services and/or through campus disciplinary processes and/or the criminal justice system. Over the past decade, there has been an…

  12. Anti-Stigma Programs: Stigma in Campus Police Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafacz, Jennifer D.

    2012-01-01

    It has been proposed that the most effective way to combat mental illness stigma is to focus on power groups who have a direct impact on the lives of persons with serious mental illness. With the increase of violence and need for mental health services on college campuses, campus police officers are seen as an important power group for persons…

  13. Teaching Undergraduate Business Management Courses on Campus and in Prisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudin, Joel P.

    1998-01-01

    In a comparison of performance in a business management course by on-campus and incarcerated students (the latter taught via interactive television), prisoners outperformed both U.S. and international on-campus students. Results may support the argument that elimination of Pell Grants for prisoners was shortsighted. (SK)

  14. Reference Services for Off-Campus Students and Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pease, Barbara; Power, Colleen

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of off-campus library services focuses on a literature review of surveys on reference services to off-campus users that investigated the philosophy of service, student demographics, the reference environment, materials provision, theory versus practice, reference assessment and guidelines, local library partnerships, and future trends.…

  15. Assessing the Campus's Ethical Climate: A Multidimensional Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banning, James H.

    1997-01-01

    Develops a general framework and matrix for assessing ethical behavior from a campus perspective and illustrates how visual anthropology can be used to implement the matrix. Claims that indices, such as photographs on bulletin boards, architecture, graffiti, and other environmental elements, can portray a campus's ethical climate. (RJM)

  16. Understanding and Advancing Campus Sustainability Using a Systems Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Stephen M.; Stuart, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: University campuses behave as complex systems, and sustainability in higher education is best seen as an emergent quality that arises from interactions both within an institution and between the institution and the environmental and social contexts in which it operates. A framework for strategically prioritizing campus sustainability work…

  17. Campus Sustainability Initiatives and Performance: Do They Correlate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to test the hypothesis that there are correlations between campus sustainability initiatives and environmental performance, as measured by resource consumption and waste generation performance metrics. Institutions of higher education would like to imply that their campus sustainability initiatives are good…

  18. Development, Validity, and Reliability of the Campus Residential Experience Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, Rishi; Scales, Laine; Shushok, Frank, Jr.

    2017-01-01

    The importance of living on campus is well established, but extant research that examines administrator perceptions of what comprises the best educational experience for students living on campus is generally unavailable. This study reports the development of a psychometric instrument designed to uncover underlying paradigms and attitudes of…

  19. A New Campus of Vienna University of Economics and Business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsyredar Dagdanova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issues of building of modern university campuses through the example of a new campus of Vienna University of Economics and Business – a successful project that facilitates the improvement of education quality and provides conditions for harmonious development of the individual.

  20. Virtual Campus in the Context of an Educational Virtual City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fominykh, Mikhail; Prasolova-Forland, Ekaterina; Morozov, Mikhail; Gerasimov, Alexey

    2011-01-01

    This paper is focused on virtual campuses, i.e. virtual worlds representing real educational institutions that are based on the metaphor of a university and provide users with different learning tools. More specifically, the idea of integrating a virtual campus into the context of a virtual city is suggested. Such a virtual city, where students…

  1. AASHE Digest 2009. A Review of Campus Sustainability News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Andrea, Comp.; Sweeney, Seann, Comp.

    2010-01-01

    This paper includes over 1,250 stories that catalog a broadening and deepening commitment to campus sustainability by colleges and universities in the U.S. and Canada. The 380-page report categorizes stories from nearly 600 higher education institutions into 24 chapters, spanning education and research, campus operations, and administration and…

  2. AASHE Digest 2008. A Review of Campus Sustainability News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Andrea, Comp.; Dautremont-Smith, Julian, Comp.

    2009-01-01

    This publication includes over 1,350 stories that illustrate the continued expansion of sustainability practices into every sector of campus. Initiatives from nearly 700 institutions are organized into 28 chapters, spanning education and research, campus operations, and administration and finance. In addition, the publication contains over 90 new…

  3. Embedding Marketing in International Campus Development: Lessons from UK Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Vicky

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides recommendations for embedding a market- and marketing-informed approach within the development process for a new international campus. It includes a brief outline of the current global profile of international campuses (as one form of transnational education) before highlighting the role of marketing at key stages of campus…

  4. Anti-Stigma Programs: Stigma in Campus Police Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafacz, Jennifer D.

    2012-01-01

    It has been proposed that the most effective way to combat mental illness stigma is to focus on power groups who have a direct impact on the lives of persons with serious mental illness. With the increase of violence and need for mental health services on college campuses, campus police officers are seen as an important power group for persons…

  5. Institutional Identity and Organizational Structure in Multi-Campus Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengerink, Harold A.

    2001-01-01

    Explores the structure of universities with multiple campuses but no independent central administrative system. Discusses the hybrid missions of branch campuses, which are asked to serve both the overall university and local constituent communities. Explains that these multiple missions may conflict and thus require intentional organizational…

  6. College Student Perceptions on Campus Alcohol Policies and Consumption Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Brenda L.; Roberts, Katherine J.; Donnelly, Joseph W.; Rutledge, Imani N.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental strategies for colleges and universities to reduce alcohol consumption among their students include the development and enforcement of campus alcohol policies. This study examines students' knowledge and attitudes toward campus alcohol policies and how they relate to alcohol consumption and alcohol social norms. A sample of 422…

  7. Campus Architecture: Building in the Groves of Academe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dober, Richard P.

    This book describes, defines, and documents campus architectural designs, covering all aspects of campus building and landscape planning in light of today's new challenges--from the updating and revitalization of the existing architectural heritage to the kinds of innovative new buildings required to meet today's and tomorrow's academic needs. The…

  8. Modern Architecture and the U.S. Campus Heritage Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buono, Jon

    2011-01-01

    The history of an educational institution is maintained both in its traditions--the customs and practices of the school--and in its physical dimension--the buildings, landscapes, and other cultural resources that define its "campus." In the past 15 years, the memorialization of the American college and university campus--whether in…

  9. Study of Smart Campus Development Using Internet of Things Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widya Sari, Marti; Wahyu Ciptadi, Prahenusa; Hafid Hardyanto, R.

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes the development of smart campus using Internet of Things (IoT) technology. Through smart campus, it is possible that a campus is connected via online by the outside entity, so that the teaching approach based on technology can be conducted in real time. This research was conducted in smart education, smart parking and smart room. Observation and literature studies were applied as the research method with the related theme for the sake of system design of smart campus. The result of this research is the design of smart campus system that includes smart education development, smart parking and smart room with the sake of Universitas PGRI Yogyakarta as the case study.

  10. Campus Recreation Worldwide: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashem Kozechian

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The percentage of adults who engage in regular leisure time physical activity is decreasing, causing an increase in risk for several health issues. Research indicates that the more physically active individuals are in their leisure time as adolescents and young adults, the more likely they are to remain active throughout the lifespan. The number of individuals entering the college or university setting has continued to increase over the past decade. Institutions of higher education are supporting the construction and management of large recreational facilities on-campuses for college students to use for leisure time physical activity behaviors. Many administrators are aware of the benefits of participation in leisure time physical activity among college students including: higher grades, less stress, better adjustment and higher persistence to graduation. Given the increase in popularity of comprehensive campus recreation programs and facilities, there is a need for theory based research to bridge the gap in assessing participation and developing intervention and educational materials to increase participation.

  11. Project campus and maternal and child clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Aldemar Gómez Sierra

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to illustrate the activities of the process of cooperation between the University of Pavia , Italy and the Juan de Castellanos de Tunja University Foundation . The first involved the signing of an agreement in April 2012, related to the formulation of hypotheses to project the new University Campus and some preliminary ideas for the construction of a Mother and Child University Hospital , level IV , hinged to the campus ; projects then emerged from anthropological reflections on creating spaces provided to address structural elements in a culture in this case to: create, teach , learn and apply science with other knowledge and related health and disease. This experience , still ongoing , is part of the main aims of cooperation , which is an opportunity for scientific research and methodological experimentation and innovation , both in terms of architectural solutions and technical control of the project. In fact , it appears that any architectural project in territorial contexts (climate, soil, subsoil and culture , environmental, social and diverse climate , requires a study and knowledge of the resources and potential of the place where you go to work, to enrich and value the traditions and local identities and transformations stays mixed . Through this activity , it was possible to gather and exchange processes experiment applied between experts from different disciplines and thesis students , thus consolidating an interesting interplay of scientific competition between two universities , which enriches professional , academic and social heritage.

  12. Focus on the Part-Timer; Arbitration on a Non-Unionized Campus; Campus Negotiators--A Critical Comment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenstein, Aaron, Ed.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Job concerns and characteristics of part-time faculty and interests concerning union representation, arbitration on a nonunionized campus and a view of campus negotiators are addressed in this newsletter issue. The issue of protection of part-timers by their union is examined, and adjunct faculty are categorized as follows: the semi-retired, those…

  13. Conveying Campus Sexual Misconduct Policy Information to College and University Students: Results from a 7-Campus Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, S. J.; Edwards, K. M.; Banyard, V. L.; Stapleton, J. G.; Demers, J. M.; Moynihan, M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine the efficacy of different methods (ie, in-class policy reading; in-class policy reading and discussion; no reading or discussion) to deliver campus sexual misconduct policy information to students on 7 campuses. Participants: A total of 1,195 participants at 7 colleges and universities participated in the study from August to…

  14. MONITORING OF RADIOACTIVITY AT DNURT CAMPUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. F. Dolina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The research paper aims to determine radioactive contamination on the territory of campus of Dnipropetrovsk National University of Railway Transport named after Academician V. Lazaryan (DNURT. Methodology. The dosimeters measured the radioactive contamination in different places (points of DNURT campus, focusing on public places. The centres of measurements became dormitories, monuments, stops, main entrances of the new and the old buildings, classrooms, basements, a swimming pool, boiler room and others. Findings. The conducted radiation monitoring for the first time in the history of the University discovered the source of radioactive contamination on DNURT territory and campus. The highest radiation background is observed on three points, namely: the pedestal of the monument, the monument to students-soldiers, the main entrance of the new building (columns. This can be explained by granite materials, which the pedestals and the stairs are made of. Originality. The largest contribution to the total value of annual effective dose of human exposure is made by ionizing radiation sources (IRS of building materials (65 - 70%. The radioactivity level of building materials is determined by the content of natural radionuclides that are included in uranium-radium and thorium decay series (18 and 12 radionuclides as well as potassium-40. Radioactivity of building materials is evaluated by the content of dominant radionuclides radium-226, thorium-232 and potassium-40. Their dominant role is explained by the fact that these long-lived high-energy - emitters are the products of decay of radium-226 in uranium series of and radium-224 in thorium series, exposing radioactive gases (radon-222 and radon-220. Radioactive gases are accumulated in the basements of educational buildings; their decay is accompanied by 100% alpha radiation, which is the most dangerous. Practical value. It is necessary to set radioactivity signs near the objects with high

  15. Campus e città. Il progetto Mastercampus / Campus and City. The Mastercampus Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Quintelli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available La componente universitaria, strategicamente indispensabile nello sviluppo di un’economia della conoscenza, rappresenta una risorsa determinante per la struttura e il paesaggio della città dove la ricerca è alla base di ogni laboratorio produttivo caratterizzato dall’innovazione, in cui la tipologia del campus universitario diventa strumento poleogenetico necessariamente complementare al contesto della città e alla realtà territoriale preesistente. / The university component is strategically indispensable in the development of a knowledge economy, one where research is the basis of every production lab characterized by innovation, where the university campus type becomes a poleogenetic tool, of necessity complementary to the city context and pre-existing local circumstances

  16. Natural attenuation of heavy oil on a coarse sediment beach : results from Black Duck Cove, Nova Scotia, Canada over 35 years following the Arrow oil spill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owens, E.H. [Polaris Applied Sciences Inc., Bainbridge Island, WA (United States); Prince, R.C. [ExxonMobil Biomedical Sciences Inc., Annandale, NJ (United States); Taylor, R.B. [Natural Resources Canada, Dartmouth, NS (Canada). Geological Survey of Canada

    2008-07-01

    In 1970, the tanker Arrow spilled bunker C oil into Black Duck Cove on the Atlantic coast of Nova Scotia. The coarse sediment beaches provided an accessible natural laboratory for the study of the long-term fate and persistence of stranded oil in a coastal marine environment. Although the site is well known to the oil spill scientific community, it has not been studied systematically and much remains to be learned regarding the physical and chemical processes that have been ongoing. More information is needed pertaining to the character of the oil residues and the reasons for their persistence. This paper summarized the knowledge that has been acquired collectively over the last 35 years. The focus was primarily on coarse sediments, including cobbles and boulders. All tidal zones at the site have both surface and subsurface oil deposits. The sediments whose pore spaces remain filled with oil are examples of stable oil-sediment deposits. Wave action is slowly eroding these asphalt pavements. Intertidal pore-filled sediments are resistant to physical processes, and sequestered subsurface residues coat the cobble-boulder sediments below the zone of sediment redistribution. The subsurface oils will probably remain until the sediment is disturbed by major storms or by landward barrier migration. Although the surface oil is highly biodegraded, the subsurface oil remains similar to that of the spilled material. It was concluded that subsurface residues will likely remain sequestered and unaltered for the foreseeable future. 26 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  17. Atmospheric bioaerosols originating from Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae): Ecological observations of airborne bacteria at Hukuro Cove, Langhovde, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Fumihisa; Maki, Teruya; Kakikawa, Makiko; Noda, Takuji; Mitamura, Hiromichi; Takahashi, Akinori; Imura, Satoshi; Iwasaka, Yasunobu

    2016-03-01

    The relationship between atmospheric bioaerosols and ecosystems is currently of global importance. Antarctica has an extreme climate, meaning that ecosystem behavior in this region is relatively simple. Direct sampling of atmospheric bioaerosols was performed at an Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) colony at Hukuro Cove, Langhovde, Antarctica on 22 January 2013. The aim of the sampling was to reveal the effect of the penguins on the Antarctic ecosystem within the atmospheric bioaerosols. Samples were bio-analyzed using a next-generation sequencing method. Biomass concentrations of Bacilli-class bacteria were 19.4 times higher when sampled leeward of the penguin colony compared with windward sampling. The source of these bacteria was the feces of the penguins. Predicted atmospheric trajectories indicate that the bacteria disperse towards the Southern Ocean. The largest biomass concentration in the windward bacteria was of the Gammaproteobacteria class, which decreased markedly with distance through the penguin colony, being deposited on soil, surface water, and ocean. It is concluded that bioaerosols and ecosystems near the penguin colony strongly influence each other.

  18. Seeding Entrepreneurship Across Campus Early Implementation Experiences of the Kauffman Campuses Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Lara Hulsey; Linda Rosenberg; Benita Kim

    2006-01-01

    Entrepreneurship has long been a fundamental aspect of American society, serving as an important contributor to economic growth. However, only recently has entrepreneurship begun to develop as an academic field in U.S. colleges and universities. The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation launched the Kauffman Campuses Initiative in eight U.S. universities to encourage campuswide expansion of entrepreneurship programs and activities. This report provides a cross-site analysis of implementation exper...

  19. Assessing the Feasibility of International Branch Campuses: Factors Universities Consider when Establishing Campuses Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    locations in urban areas close to air and rail transportation. Three administrators with IBCs located over an hour from international airports noted that...countries. Research by Lane (2011), specifically in Malaysia and Dubai, suggests that IBCs typically serve at least one of the three purposes...described by Levy. The University of Nottingham’s campus in Malaysia , for instance, arguably offers a new pedagogical approach and opportunities that are

  20. Creating an Energy Intelligent Campus: Data Integration Challenges and Solutions at a Large Research Campus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutler, Dylan; Frank, Stephen; Slovensky, Michelle; Sheppy, Michael; Petersen, Anya

    2016-08-26

    Rich, well-organized building performance and energy consumption data enable a host of analytic capabilities for building owners and operators, from basic energy benchmarking to detailed fault detection and system optimization. Unfortunately, data integration for building control systems is challenging and costly in any setting. Large portfolios of buildings--campuses, cities, and corporate portfolios--experience these integration challenges most acutely. These large portfolios often have a wide array of control systems, including multiple vendors and nonstandard communication protocols. They typically have complex information technology (IT) networks and cybersecurity requirements and may integrate distributed energy resources into their infrastructure. Although the challenges are significant, the integration of control system data has the potential to provide proportionally greater value for these organizations through portfolio-scale analytics, comprehensive demand management, and asset performance visibility. As a large research campus, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) experiences significant data integration challenges. To meet them, NREL has developed an architecture for effective data collection, integration, and analysis, providing a comprehensive view of data integration based on functional layers. The architecture is being evaluated on the NREL campus through deployment of three pilot implementations.

  1. State University of New York Controls Over Telephone Systems at Selected Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Office of the Comptroller, Albany.

    The State University of New York (SUNY) consists of 29 State-operated campuses. Campuses of the SUNY system each operate and manage their own telephone systems. Campuses may own or lease their own telephone system called a private branch exchange (PBX). A PBX makes a campus a miniature telephone company with the ability to add and delete telephone…

  2. A Multi-Component Model for HIV/AIDS Prevention Education on the College Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Gopal; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes an approach to building a multidimensional HIV/AIDS prevention education model for college campuses based on surveys of students' and faculty members' knowledge and attitudes about HIV/AIDS. The model emphasizes education, campus health services, campus environment, counseling and support services, and campus community coalitions. (SM)

  3. Campus Access Control System RFID Based

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. SANTHOSH S

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Radio frequency identification (RFID technology has helped many organizations to reduce cost. Nevertheless, there are challenges and issues associated with RFID adoption. The most common internal challenge for many organizations is justifying the investment and modification of processes. The focus of this project is to show the business value of RFID technology and its applications. The important issue is the security level of the whole campus because it needs to be carefully differentiated. Dormitories and special research laboratories should benefit from higher levels of security than any other campuses. The key to the problem is represented by the new Radio Frequency Identification (RFID which can support contactless cards with memory. The most important feature of the proposed system is the updating of access permission level at any time for the user based on the availability of that user. The data transfer from the reader to the database was done using wireless communication (RF communication. To achieve this here RF transmitter and the RF receiver is used. The data which is read by the reader is sent to the microcontroller. Then from the controller we can transfer the data to the database by using the UART module (serial communication which is inbuilt in the microcontroller through RF transmitter. RF receiver of the same frequency at the receiver end receives and then stores the data in the database. RF transmitter and Receiver – frequency for transmitting and receiving the data depends on the user as per the requirement for the application and it is based on the range of distance. For the data encoding and decoding process HCS-101 protocol is used.

  4. Comparative Study on Sino-US Campus Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏二梅

    2015-01-01

    Cultural communication is playing an increasingly important role in the communication between between China and the United States,which not only promotes the communication and cooperation between the two countries,but provides experience and reference for the development of campus culture and education.We should find the root causes,draw lessons from the essences of American campus culture based on our excellent traditional culture,create campus culture with our own national characteristics to train comprehensive high-quality talents and develop the education system of our country.

  5. From the Digital Campus to Smart Campus%从数字化校园到智慧校园

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任斌

    2012-01-01

      At present, the construction of smart campus and exploration in many nationwide famous universities were all carried on, the smart campus is a traditional concept of wisdom campus on development, this paper introduces the digital campus to smart campus from the developed progress, and emphatically introduces the characteristics of smart campus, and points out some problems existed in the construction process of smart campus.%  目前,全国很多知名高校都在进行智慧校园的建设和探索,智慧校园是对传统智慧校园概念的发展,本文介绍了从数字化校园到智慧校园的发展历程,着重介绍了智慧校园的特点,指出了在智慧校园建设过程中存在的一些问题。

  6. Academic and social integration on campus among sexual minority students: the impacts of psychological and experiential campus climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodford, Michael R; Kulick, Alex

    2015-03-01

    A heterosexist campus climate can increase risk for mental health problems for sexual minority students; however, the relationship between campus climate for sexual minorities and academic outcomes remains understudied. Using a sample of sexual minority respondents extracted from a campus climate survey conducted at a large university in the Midwest, we examine relationships between multiple dimensions of psychological and experiential campus climate for sexual minorities with academic integration (academic disengagement, grade-point average [GPA]) and social integration (institutional satisfaction, acceptance on campus). We also investigate the protective role of engagement with informal academic and peer-group systems. Findings suggest campus climate affects sexual minority students' integration. In multivariate analyses, perceptions of whether lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) people could be open about their sexual identity was positively associated with acceptance on campus; personal heterosexist harassment was positively associated with academic disengagement and negatively with GPA. Students' informal academic integration (instructor relations) and informal social integration (LGB friends) demonstrated influential main effects but did not moderate any of the climate-outcome relationships. Researchers should further explore the relationships between climate and academic outcomes among sexual minority students, both collectively and among specific sub-groups, and address the role of other protective factors.

  7. Green Campus initiative and its impacts on quality of life of stakeholders in Green and Non-Green Campus universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiyarattanachai, Ronnachai; Hollmann, Nicholas M

    2016-01-01

    In 2010, Universitas Indonesia (UI) developed the UI GreenMetric World University Ranking for universities to share information about their sustainability practices. This ranking system was well aligned with the basis of Sustainability for Higher Education. The scoring system can also be used as a guideline for universities to achieve sustainability in their campuses. Since its first launch, more universities around the world have increasingly participated in the ranking system including many universities in Thailand. This study compared perception of stakeholders in Green Campus and Non-Green Campus universities in Thailand regarding stakeholders' satisfaction on sustainability practices and perceived quality of life at their campuses. The results showed that stakeholders at the studied Green Campus University were more satisfied and had significantly better perceived quality of life compared to stakeholders from the studied Non-Green Campus university. The results suggested that universities should adopt the criteria set in the UI GreenMetric World University Ranking to achieve better sustainability in their campuses and improve quality of life of their stakeholders.

  8. A Comparative Analysis of the Academic Performance of Distance and On-campus Learners

    OpenAIRE

    MAGAGULA, C. M.; NGWENYA, A. P.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined (i) the profile of the distance and on-campus learners, (ii) the academic performance of distance and on-campus learners, (iii) the advantages and disadvantages of learning through distance education and on-campus education, and (iv) how the disadvantages of learning through distance education could be reduced. The study found that the majority of distance and on-campus learners were female, single, and unemployed. Most off-campus learners were more than 20 years old, whil...

  9. Campus Activism in the 21st Century: A Historical Framing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadhurst, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter frames campus activism by introducing the historical movements that have been important for higher education since the 18th century to the present and exploring the connections and shared characteristics among these various movements.

  10. A Mathematical Sciences Program at an Upper-Division Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swetz, Frank J.

    1978-01-01

    The conception, objectives, contents, and limitations of a degree program in the mathematical sciences at Pennsylvania State University, Capitol Campus, are discussed. Career goals that may be pursued include: managerial, science, education, actuarial, and computer. (MP)

  11. AnimaCampuse lipukiri soovitab: "Kehtesta oma reeglid" / Liina Luhats

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Luhats, Liina

    2011-01-01

    15.-19. nov.-ni Tallinnas paralleelselt animafilmide festivaliga toimuvat AnimaCampust tutvustab programmijuht Heilika Pikkov. AnimaCampuse avalike loengute kava. 19. nov.-l toimuvast koomiksipäevast

  12. Are You Ready To Discuss IT Outsourcing on Your Campus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Explores why the idea of outsourcing campus information technology (IT) services rouses opinions and passions best handled by informed dialogue. Discusses how to conduct this dialog, including common myths about outsourcing and useful lessons. (EV)

  13. A MODEL FOR HIGHER EDUCATION CAMPUS HEALTH SERVICES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-17

    Mar 17, 2010 ... nurses who are employed at a higher education campus' health service to render a healthcare ..... effectively perform roles and tasks expected of him or her in .... all times by those with whom the individual comes into contact.

  14. A Mathematical Sciences Program at an Upper-Division Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swetz, Frank J.

    1978-01-01

    The conception, objectives, contents, and limitations of a degree program in the mathematical sciences at Pennsylvania State University, Capitol Campus, are discussed. Career goals that may be pursued include: managerial, science, education, actuarial, and computer. (MP)

  15. Spiders of Kerala Agricultural University Campus, Thrissur, Kerala, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. K. Adarsh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A total of 86 species of spiders belonging to 56 genera of 20 families have been recorded from the Kerala Agricultural University (KAU campus, Thrissur, Kerala, southern India.  This represents 5.1% of the total spiders’ species and 33.33% of the total families of spiders recorded in India.  The dominant spider family at KAU campus is Araneidae with 18 species of nine genera. Salticidae is represented by 14 species of 13 genera.  Out of 252 endemic spiders of India, 16 have been reported from KAU campus.  Guild structure analysis shows spiders belonging to seven types of feeding guilds present in KAU campus.  Orb-web builders are the dominant feeding guild accounting for 34%, followed by stalkers (22%, ground runners (20%, ambushers (8%, scattered line weavers (8%, foliage runners (7% and sheet-web builders (1%. 

  16. A MODEL FOR HIGHER EDUCATION CAMPUS HEALTH SERVICES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-17

    Mar 17, 2010 ... nurses who are employed at a higher education campus' health service to render a healthcare ..... extremely diverse in terms of gender, age, religion, culture, .... the environment, with relative freedom from pain, disability,.

  17. Development of an integrated campus security alerting system ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development of an integrated campus security alerting system. ... Nigerian Journal of Technology ... (IP) cameras and micro-switches for monitoring security situations thereby providing an immediate alerting signal to the security personnel.

  18. Creating a Campus Identity in an Urban Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Janet

    2002-01-01

    Describes the design of Coe College in Iowa, the University of Chicago, and the University of California's Washington, DC campus to illustrate the successful development of a physical identity by urban institutions. (EV)

  19. Design And Development Of Three Wheeled Campus Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad Patel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In todays world infrastructure of College and Industries are becoming large so if one has to travel or visit from one place to another he has to walk long distance and sometimes it becomes very hasty and inconvenient. Sometimes after too many traveling in campus it causes strain and pain in body. So to travel these distances two-wheeled or three wheeled electric scooter like Segway PT Irrway were introduced. But these scooters are very costly such as they starts from amp8377 50000. Another problem with those vehicle is that they are difficult to handle when we drive first time. So in alternate to this product we developed whole newly designed product and this is Reliable Ecofriendly Compact vehicle for campus. Its utilities are college campus Airports Industries Recreational Parks Sanctuaries Museums Palaces Villas etc. So Our research is on design and development of three-wheel campus vehicle and also its multipurpose utility among the society.

  20. Mike O’Callaghan Federal Medical Center Campus Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Center Campus Final EA Departments to the basement, outpatient clinics and medical center diagnostics to the first floor, surgical services to the...Center Campus Final EA 3.8.1 Vegetation The Integrated Natural Resource Management Plan (INRMP) describes the desert scrub creosote bush/white bursage...domestic geese and ducks. The areas with the most diverse wildlife are those containing native desert scrub vegetation, mostly located in clear

  1. Assessment of a University Campus Food Environment, California, 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Tseng, Marilyn; DeGreef, Kelsey; Fishler, Madison; Gipson, Rachel; Koyano, Kelly; Neill, Dawn B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction University campuses offer an opportunity to study the extent to which modifying the food environment influences eating, but in-depth characterizations of campus food environments are needed to identify potential targets for intervention. The objective of this project was to describe the availability, accessibility, and quality of healthful food choices in dining venues and food stores at or near a public, 4-year university in California. Methods Trained assessors used the Nutriti...

  2. Employer Branding; influencing student perception by campus management activities

    OpenAIRE

    Strnad, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The target of this thesis was to define the concept of employer branding and its relation to campus management, the activities companies do in order to attract students and promote themselves as quality employers. The theoretical research captures the marketing essence of branding and further develops it into the employer branding framework. Further research focussed on possible campus management activities. In the practical part the popularity and effectiveness of the activities were tested ...

  3. Decentralised energy solutions: The CSIR energy autonomous campus

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Carter-Brown, Clinton

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Reduce Consumption : 20% reduction through energy efficiency (30 GWh) 24GWh) per year Load Management : Through Demand Response (DR) measures including Electric Vehicles Supply PV: All CSIR rooftops, 1-2 ground-mounted plants Total of 8 MWp 13 GWh... analysis, Site selection, Environmental Impact Assessment, etc Demand side management: Campus energy audit & street light energy audit Storage: Technology selection process, procurement of electric vehicles for the campus 27 Over 1 MW of Solar PV...

  4. Development of Networked Virtual Experiment System Based on Virtual Campus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-tai Guo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available China’s higher education has been going through a period of rapid expansion in undergraduate population,and this means a much heavier demand on teaching resources such as laboratories, experiments, teaching staff,etc., which cannot possibly be made available all of a sudden.To deal with this situation, we found virtual reality (VR technology very helpful. Virtual reality (VR has found many applications in education; and the resources of virtual education such as virtual campus, virtual laboratory etc. are used more and more widely, especially in the field of higher education. But so far virtual campus was mainly regarded as a means of image exhibition, and virtual laboratories were no more than 2D display of experimental processes and equipments. To make better use of these resources, this paper puts forward the concept of networked virtual experiment systems based on virtual campus by combining the virtual laboratory and virtual campus with the technique of LAN (Local area network, and establishes its theoretical model. Finally, a networked virtual experiment system based on virtual campus is developed using VRML and 3DSMAX. Networked virtual experiment system based on virtual campus has a promising future for various applications in higher education.

  5. A MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF CAMPUS INFORMATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. STALIN KUMAR

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An H-magic labeling in a H-decomposable graph G is a bijection f : V (G ∪ E(G → {1, 2, ..., p + q} such that for every copy H in the decomposition, \\sum\\limits_{v∈V (H}{f(v}+\\sum\\limits_{e∈E(H}{ f(e} is constant. f is said to be H-V -super magic if f(V (G = {1, 2, ..., p}. Suppose that V (G = U(G ∪ W(G with |U(G| = m and |W(G| = n. Then f is said to be H-V -super-strong magic labeling if f(U(G = {1, 2, ..., m} and f(W(G = {m + 1, m + 2, ...,(m + n = p}. A graph that admits a H-V -super-strong magic labeling is called a H-V -super-strong magic decomposable graph. In this paper, we pay our attention to provide a mathematical modeling of campus information system.

  6. Automatic Campus Network Management using GPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayakumar.S

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Organization Network is the place where large number of attacks is happening. The attackers are using different methodologies to capture the information from the end user without the knowledge of the end-user. This paper introduces the concepts of Campus Management and Emergency log by using Medium Access Control (MAC and Global Positioning System (GPS. By using the IP address of an attacker, the MAC address can be found and the attackers machine can be blocked access with the help of firewall. Using the GPS we can be able to navigate the attackers position with the help of the position log. The log keeps updating for each and every 10 seconds. The attacker can be identified as if he used his own system or victim (3rd party system. An emergency response log has been created to record each emergency incident response process. The role of the log is more important with an increasing accumulation of information with the log; Network Engineer/Administrator can determine the type of inevitable emergency incidents grouped into evitable events, in order to improve the system reliability of emergency response.

  7. 3D Visualization Development of SIUE Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellutla, Shravya

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has progressed from the traditional map-making to the modern technology where the information can be created, edited, managed and analyzed. Like any other models, maps are simplified representations of real world. Hence visualization plays an essential role in the applications of GIS. The use of sophisticated visualization tools and methods, especially three dimensional (3D) modeling, has been rising considerably due to the advancement of technology. There are currently many off-the-shelf technologies available in the market to build 3D GIS models. One of the objectives of this research was to examine the available ArcGIS and its extensions for 3D modeling and visualization and use them to depict a real world scenario. Furthermore, with the advent of the web, a platform for accessing and sharing spatial information on the Internet, it is possible to generate interactive online maps. Integrating Internet capacity with GIS functionality redefines the process of sharing and processing the spatial information. Enabling a 3D map online requires off-the-shelf GIS software, 3D model builders, web server, web applications and client server technologies. Such environments are either complicated or expensive because of the amount of hardware and software involved. Therefore, the second objective of this research was to investigate and develop simpler yet cost-effective 3D modeling approach that uses available ArcGIS suite products and the free 3D computer graphics software for designing 3D world scenes. Both ArcGIS Explorer and ArcGIS Online will be used to demonstrate the way of sharing and distributing 3D geographic information on the Internet. A case study of the development of 3D campus for the Southern Illinois University Edwardsville is demonstrated.

  8. Web Content Analysis On Sustainable Campus Operation (SCO Initiatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razman Ruzaimah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyse the current practices implemented in global universities for achieving sustainability throughout campus operations. This study adopted a web content analysis method where 30 international green universities’ websites have been thoroughly examined to identify common initiatives implemented to achieve sustainability through campus operations. The findings are ranked based on the implementation of these initiatives by participating universities. From the websites reviewed, as much as 31 initiatives have been identified as common initiatives frequently implemented by green universities to achieve sustainability in campus operations. It was found that the common initiatives frequently implemented by most of the universities include ‘Provide bin with clearly marked signs to increase the number of recycling items’, and ‘Generate electricity on campus by establishing power generation plants’ with 87% and 83% respectively. This paper fills the gap by presenting the investigation of sustainability initiatives from some of the major green universities internationally. It is suggested that higher education institutions, particularly Malaysian universities, initiate or manage their implementation of sustainable campus operation (SCO initiatives based on the findings of this research.

  9. Starry Campus: Reducing Light Pollution at Smith College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenon, Alexandria

    2017-01-01

    This is the start of a program to teach Smith College students about the dangers posed by light pollution and inspire them to help make Smith a better dark sky area. This will focus both on general astronomy education to catch their interest and speciic light pollution information as well. My advisor is creating an initiative for dark skies education and preservation on college campuses, with this as the pilot program. College students can help both on campus and off when they will be able to take what they learn to inform their decisions about lighting when they move out on their own. The ultimate goal is to convince Smith College to make the changes it needs to reduce its light pollution as well as to motivate its students to learn more about astronomy and light pollution. I am developing an education and outreach program using venues such as house teas, lectures, and meetings to teach other students, the staff, and faculty about the issue. I am also working with existing clubs and organizations on campus such as the Green Team, the landscape studies department, and the Center for the Environment, Ecological Design, and Sustainability. This will help to develop campus lighting standards. These lighting standards will be proposed to the college, as there are no current standards in place for lighting around campus.

  10. True Green and Sustainable University Campuses? Toward a Clusters Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Sonetti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Campus greening is often the first step universities take towards sustainability. However, the diffusion of sustainability reporting methodologies and rankings is still at an early stage, and is biased in mainly measuring energy efficiency indicators while omitting basic features enabling meaningful comparisons among centers or addressing social (users aspects related to long term sustainability transitions. This paper aims to introduce a critical perspective on sustainability university frameworks through: (i a review of current Campus Sustainability Assessments (CSAs; (ii performing and comparing the results obtained from the application of two internationally recognized CSAs (namely, Green Metric and ISCN to two case studies (the Politecnico di Torino, in Italy, and the Hokkaido University, In Japan and, finally, (iii proposing a new CSA approach that encompasses clusters of homogeneous campus typologies for meaningful comparisons and university rankings. The proposed clusters regard universities’ morphological structures (campuses nested within city centers versus outside of a city compact ones, climatic zones and functions. At the micro scale, the paper introduces the need for indicators beyond measuring pure energy efficiency, but which are attentive to local and societal constraints and provide long-term tracking of outcomes. This, better than a sheer record of sustainability priority actions, can help in building homogenous university case studies to find similar and scalable success strategies and practices, and also in self-monitoring progress toward achieving truly sustainable university campuses.

  11. Student Engineers and Engineer Identity: Campus Engineer Identities as Figured World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonso, Karen L.

    2006-09-01

    The research reported here contributes to understanding how student engineers on an engineering campus in the US mid-continent not only talked about the kinds of people recognized as engineers on campus, but also juxtaposes their talk about "campus engineer identities" with two students' ways of presenting themselves as engineers through engineering project teamwork to argue that campus engineer identities framed on-campus interpretations of actions, and ultimately that identity production was a complicated process through which campus engineer identities (cultural knowledge learned on campus) provided a lens of meaning through which to "recognize" (or not) performances of engineer selves as engineers. This research adds to conversations about identity in practice, especially identity production in science education, by suggesting the importance of cultural forms for belonging, especially at an obdurate site of science practice like the campus studied.

  12. Towards the development of a new model for best practice and knowledge construction in virtual campuses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cartelli, Antonio; Connolly, Thomas; Magalhaes, Hugo; Stansfield, Mark; Jimoyiannis, Athanassios; Maillet, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    .... The paper outlines a tentative model of issues underpinning best practice in virtual campuses derived from an initial literature-based investigation of existing virtual campus initiatives within the European Union...

  13. Enhancing college students’ global awareness through campus Toastmasters clubs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu, Tsu-Chia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to investigate the effects of the 20 college campus Toastmasters clubs all over Taiwan, towards the enhancement of its student members’ global awareness. Within the concept of cooperative learning, promotion of global views by means of sharing various cultural concepts within the conducted Toastmasters meeting program, group works such as structured interaction and communication activities, and individual speaking activities, while not worrying about their grammatical errors are used as strategies. Using the qualitative research paradigm in terms of focus group and individual interviews, the current study gathers college student members’ global viewpoints along with their insightful observations in order to understand the implications of such cooperative strategies. Results indicates that co-curricular programs in existing campus activities, such as Campus Toastmasters clubs, is capable of developing the students’ global viewpoints and/or was able to help diminish their culture shock within a competitive diversely membered higher education milieu.

  14. The use of local data in ESRI Virtual Campus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunstrup, Jan Kloster; Hedegaard, Torben

    1998-01-01

    alternated by hands-on sessions. However, with the ESRI Virtual Campus new possibilities have emerged. A ‘localized extension’ to the Virtual Campus is now being developed in our department in cooperation with the ESRI team. The idea is to make exercises available, based on local data, as a part...... make the training more rewarding for the individuals involved. We would like to present our results so far, to the European ESRI user community, together with some work still in progress. We believe, that our experience, and our work together with the very kind and cooperative Virtual Campus...... development team, may be beneficial to many others users in Europe. A further perspective could even be the development of an ‘EU Virtual Campus’ based on common European data sets. Such data would be much more relevant and comprehensible for the users in Europe than American data....

  15. Business Planning for a Campus-Wide Biobank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarling, Tamsin E; Lasser, Frances; Carter, Candace; Matzke, Lise A M; Dhugga, Gurm; Arora, Nidhi; Dee, Simon; LeBlanc, Jodi; Babinsky, Sindy; O'Donoghue, Sheila; Cheah, Stefanie; Watson, Peter; Vercauteren, Suzanne M

    2017-02-01

    Biobanks are resources that facilitate research. Many biobanks exist around the world, but most tend to focus on a specific disease or research area. BC Children's Hospital and BC Women's Hospital are located on the same campus (Oak Street Campus) in Vancouver, BC, Canada. A campus-wide biobank has been established on the site of these two hospitals to collect specimens and annotated data from children or women seeking medical care at either of the hospitals. Such an initiative requires careful planning and consideration of many factors such as buy in and support of key stakeholders, governance, financial planning, and optimizing specimen collection. We developed a business plan to account for the many aspects associated with integrating the "BC Children's Hospital BioBank." This document describes the approach our business plan took for the implementation of our biobank and the progress, including deviations from the business plan. We also provide a perspective on the current status with a focus on sustainability.

  16. Trends in Student Radicalization across University Campuses in Afghanistan

    OpenAIRE

    Zaman, Robert; Mohammadi, Abdul Ahad

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to examine the trends in student radicalization across eight university campuses\\ud in Afghanistan. We conclude from our survey of student and staff views and an analysis of the\\ud character of protests across campuses that the extent of student radicalization varies. In\\ud particular, we come to three noteworthy findings. First, most university students are more\\ud concerned over prospects of post-graduation follow-on careers than ideological ambition.\\ud Second, while we fin...

  17. Comparing Perceptions of Campus Crime Severity among Community College and Public Four-Year University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Loren M.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years violent crimes on several university campuses have been highlighted by mass media, drawing national attention to the issue of campus crime. Not all college campuses, however, experience the same level of crime. While community colleges serve roughly half of all undergraduates in the U.S., statistically these public institutions…

  18. Design and Implementation of Multi-Campus, Modular Master Classes in Biochemical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuyts, Niek; Bruneel, Dorine; Meyers, Myriam; Van Hoof, Etienne; De Vos, Leander; Langie, Greet; Rediers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    The Master of Science in engineering technology: biochemical engineering is organised in KU Leuven at four geographically dispersed campuses. To sustain the Master's programmes at all campuses, it is clear that a unique education profile at each campus is crucial. In addition, a rationalisation is required by increased cooperation, increased…

  19. Design and Implementation of Multi-Campus, Modular Master Classes in Biochemical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuyts, Niek; Bruneel, Dorine; Meyers, Myriam; Van Hoof, Etienne; De Vos, Leander; Langie, Greet; Rediers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    The Master of Science in engineering technology: biochemical engineering is organised in KU Leuven at four geographically dispersed campuses. To sustain the Master's programmes at all campuses, it is clear that a unique education profile at each campus is crucial. In addition, a rationalisation is required by increased cooperation, increased…

  20. Demographic and Academic Trends in Drinking Patterns and Alcohol-Related Problems on Dry College Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Dexter M.; Johnson, Mark B.; Voas, Robert B.; Turrisi, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Restricting alcohol consumption on campus is a measure often used by college administrators to prevent alcohol abuse and-alcohol-related problems. The effect of dry campus policies on alcohol consumption and alcohol-related problems, however, remains poorly understood. This report will compare characteristics of two dry campuses with descriptions…

  1. A New Technique for Mitigating Risk on US College Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephanie; White, Rebecca J.; Hertz, Giles

    2008-01-01

    High-profile criminal acts continue to plague United States (US) college campuses despite recent efforts to implement more aggressive risk mitigation practices, such as criminal background checks. Despite these efforts, incidents such as the most recent shootings at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University continue to demonstrate that,…

  2. Innovation & Collaboration Are Keys to Campus Water Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler-Carter, Ruth E.

    2013-01-01

    Water, water everywhere--managing and conserving water resources is a major factor at campuses worldwide. Doing so is a challenge, since water is one of the most-used and ubiquitous resources in any environment. Water is often taken for granted and not measured by the people who use it the most, yet it might have the greatest potential for helping…

  3. Colleges Wade into Survival Training for Campus Shootings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Eric

    2008-01-01

    This month a company in Spokane, Washington, plans to release "Shots Fired on Campus," an instructional DVD with strategies for preventing and surviving a gun rampage. About 50 colleges have ordered the video, and its creators expect to sell several hundred more this fall. Since the massacre at Virginia Tech last year, colleges everywhere have…

  4. Coaching Students to Academic Success and Engagement on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Claire; Gahagan, Jimmie

    2010-01-01

    Academic coaching can be a crucial step in helping students transition to college. Coaches work with students to be strategic in establishing and achieving their academic goals as well as becoming engaged on campus. At the University of South Carolina, academic coaching is defined as a one-on-one interaction with a student focusing on strengths,…

  5. Operational Considerations for Opening a Branch Campus Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Lawrence M.; Lammey, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    Universities have been attracted to the creation of international branch campuses (IBCs) for many reasons, including cultural immersion of students and faculty and global brand recognition for a university seeking to enhance its reputation and strengthen its academic standards. This chapter provides specific advice for how IBCs can negotiate entry…

  6. Colleges Wade into Survival Training for Campus Shootings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Eric

    2008-01-01

    This month a company in Spokane, Washington, plans to release "Shots Fired on Campus," an instructional DVD with strategies for preventing and surviving a gun rampage. About 50 colleges have ordered the video, and its creators expect to sell several hundred more this fall. Since the massacre at Virginia Tech last year, colleges everywhere have…

  7. STARS[R] Spring 2012 Quarterly Review: Framing Campus Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanski, Monika

    2012-01-01

    The Spring 2012 SQR: "Framing Campus Sustainability," features stories that frame the evolving concept of sustainability in higher education. Included in this issue are a snapshot of ratings-to-date, a focus on credits within the Operations (OP) category, and insights into how institutions are defining and interpreting the evolving concepts of…

  8. The Troubled Student and Campus Violence: Connecting Academic "Silos"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Six months after the carnage at Virginia Tech last year, the author relates that she studied the steps colleges have since taken to try to prevent suicide and homicide on campus. Here, she discusses some of the observations she gathered from her study. She describes that some faculty members are indifferent, oblivious, or even nasty to their…

  9. Frequency and Correlates of Campus Crime: Missouri Public Postsecondary Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seunghee

    2012-01-01

    Data from 34 public postsecondary institutions in Missouri showed liquor- and drug-related offenses and burglary as the most frequent campus crimes. Four-year institutions, institutions with a greater number of students, full-time students, younger students, out-of-state students, and a larger percentage of program completion were positively…

  10. Campus-Based Policy Institute Poised to Reinvent New England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodbury, Robert L.

    1996-01-01

    Campus-based public policy institutes with local, state, and regional orientations may play a profound role in shaping New England's future by addressing a variety of issues, including achieving quality in public schools, access to health care and other social services, job creation, environmental protection and creation of livable communities,…

  11. The Practice of Campus-Based Threat Assessment: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Jeffrey W.; Nolan, Jeffrey J.; Deisinger, Eugene R. D.

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an overview of threat assessment and management as implemented on campuses of higher education. Standards of practice and state calls for implementation are cited. An overview of some of the basic principles for threat assessment and management implementation is accompanied by examples of how they are utilized. Pitfalls…

  12. Digital Devices Invade Campus, and Networks Feel the Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    New, Jake

    2013-01-01

    Inside campus libraries and dormitory rooms, thousands of students connect to the Internet not only to study with online systems like Blackboard but also to watch movies and TV shows on Netflix. Computers, smartphones, wireless printers, tablets, iPods, Xboxes, handheld gaming systems, e-readers, smart TVs, Blu-ray players--students now bring an…

  13. Sustainable Education Campus in Spain: Nature and Architecture for Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Sotelo, Pablo Campos

    2008-01-01

    The quality of education is intimately linked to its architecture. Any urbanistic/architectural project must stem from an in-depth study of the area's characteristics, taken in the broad geographical, climatic, cultural, functional and ideological sense. The site should provide the conceptual energy from which a campus draws life. This requirement…

  14. Faculty Activity Analysis in the Universidad Tecnica Del Estado Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadima, Oscar

    An analysis of academic activities of college faculty at the eight campuses of Chile's Universidad Tecnica del Estado was conducted. Activities were grouped into seven categories: direct teaching, indirect teaching, research, community services, faculty development, academic administration, and other activities. Following the narrative…

  15. Library Outreach: Introducing Campus Childcare Providers to the Academic Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Melissa Maxwell; Thornton, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    This case study describes a library outreach effort to university staff members employed by the campus child care center. Authors planned an instructional session to introduce child care staff members to library resources, focusing on the curriculum collection as a source of supplemental materials for classrooms. Surveys were administered before…

  16. Enhancing NTIS Database Access at a Multi-Campus University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conkling, Thomas W.; Jordan, Kelly

    1997-01-01

    The Pennsylvania State University Libraries and the National Technical Information Service (NTIS) collaborated to bring the entire NTIS bibliographic database online on the University-wide information system and make it available for searching at all 21 Pennsylvania State campuses. This article also reviews the level of database and technical…

  17. Strategies for Implementing a Tobacco-Free Campus Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Tavis J.; Reindl, Diana M.; Whewell, Aubrey T.

    2011-01-01

    This report examines the rationale for creating a tobacco-free campus to utilize in passing antitobacco policies, and recommendations for overcoming barriers. As with any type of advocacy effort, a variety of impediments exist, including lack of administrative and staff support, absence of student involvement, and sparse resources. A variety of…

  18. Campus Partner Collections: Expanding the Boundaries of the Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elguindi, Anne C.; Kelshian, Robert; Sandler, Alayne Mundt

    2011-01-01

    At most colleges and universities, there are a number of small, nonlibrary collections across campus, such as those found in student centers or academic departments. Historically, at American University, partnership with these collections was done through absorbing them into the main library collection. Recently, however, the Library has seen…

  19. Campus Community Policing: It All Started with Us...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Gary J.; March, Noel C.

    2008-01-01

    The first police in the United States to embrace the kind of community-focused policing that "modern" law enforcement embraces, and which was extolled by Sir Robert Peel in 1826, were the New Haven, Connecticut police officers hired by Yale University in 1894 to patrol and keep order on campus. Why did Yale not simply rely on the New…

  20. Digital Devices Invade Campus, and Networks Feel the Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    New, Jake

    2013-01-01

    Inside campus libraries and dormitory rooms, thousands of students connect to the Internet not only to study with online systems like Blackboard but also to watch movies and TV shows on Netflix. Computers, smartphones, wireless printers, tablets, iPods, Xboxes, handheld gaming systems, e-readers, smart TVs, Blu-ray players--students now bring an…

  1. A Harassing Climate? Sexual Harassment and Campus Racial Climate Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundy-Wagner, Valerie; Winkle-Wagner, Rachelle

    2013-01-01

    In this conceptual paper, the authors discuss how research about sexual harassment and campus racial climates for undergraduate students is relegated to separate silos. Drawing on intersectionality and critical race feminist frameworks, the authors juxtapose these strands of research with attention to ethnicity/race and gender, highlighting how…

  2. Innovation & Collaboration Are Keys to Campus Water Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler-Carter, Ruth E.

    2013-01-01

    Water, water everywhere--managing and conserving water resources is a major factor at campuses worldwide. Doing so is a challenge, since water is one of the most-used and ubiquitous resources in any environment. Water is often taken for granted and not measured by the people who use it the most, yet it might have the greatest potential for helping…

  3. Campus Computing Looks Ahead: Tracking the Digital Puck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Kenneth C.

    2002-01-01

    Examines data from the 2002 Campus Computing Survey to determine trends in information technology in higher education and future possibilities. Discusses Web portals; electronic commerce capabilities, including use of credit cards; budget challenges, including budget cuts; and mobile technology and wireless networks. (LRW)

  4. Virtual Mobility in Higher Education. The UNED Campus Net Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguado, Teresa; Monge, Fernando; Del Olmo, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    We present the UNED Virtual Mobility Campus Net Program, implemented since 2012 in collaboration with European and Latin American universities. Program's objectives, participating institutions, procedures, and evaluation are exposed. Virtual mobility is understood as a meaningful strategy for intercultural learning by studying an undergraduate or…

  5. Internationalizing a Campus: From Colonial to Modern Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Pamela L.; Barber, James P.; Holly, Neal; Brush, Kim; Bohon, Leslie; Green, Madeleine F.

    2013-01-01

    In the March-April 2013 issue of "Change," Patti McGill Peterson and Robin Matross Helms described the disheartening status of internationalization on American college campuses. Despite internationalization being touted as a strategic goal in higher education, over the past 15 years little has changed at most colleges. Student learning…

  6. The Campus Laboratory School: Phoenix or Dodo Bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeoch, Dorothy M.

    The development of the campus laboratory school is traced from its origins in Europe in the seventeenth century and in the United States normal school schools of the 1820's. These schools served for practice, as models of the desired teaching methods and provided opportunities for student teaching. Even before 1900 the function of the schools was…

  7. A Model of Ethnoviolence and Public Policy on College Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryman, Mfanya D.

    1992-01-01

    Examines a model and provides possible causal explanations for the increasing number of acts of racial violence, the rise of racism on college campuses, and the attendant implications for public policy. Causes for increased racial violence are complex and can be outlined in the Holistic Model of Ethnoviolence. (JB)

  8. International Students' Enhanced Academic Performance: Effects of Campus Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banjong, Delphine N.

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates international students' challenges, such as financial, English proficiency, loneliness/homesickness in the United States. In addition, it assesses how these students coped with such difficulties by making use of resources on campus, such as an international center, writing center, counseling center, and the student…

  9. Ready, Fire, Aim: The College Campus Gun Fight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The question of whether guns should be permitted on college and university campuses in the United States reflects the tension between two competing perspectives. America has both a robust gun culture and an equally robust (if less well known) gun-control culture. The gun culture is as American as apple pie: There may be as many as 300 million…

  10. Guns on Campus: A Current Debate. E-Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Almost all U.S. college campuses ban concealed weapons. But in the aftermath of the tragic shooting deaths at Virginia Tech in 2007, the debate on whether guns should be permitted at colleges and universities has intensified. Dozens of states have considered proposals to lift bans on concealed weapons at colleges and universities, but so far none…

  11. Rural Teacher's Perceptions of Safety on Texas High School Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Ronald J., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological research study used narrative inquiry to explore the perceptions of safety of rural Texas high school teachers as it related to a campus intruder or active shooter. The investigator utilized Creswell's (2012) six steps in analyzing and interpreting the qualitative data. The results of the study showed that…

  12. A Sustainability Initiative to Quantify Carbon Sequestration by Campus Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Helen M.

    2012-01-01

    Over 3,900 trees on a university campus were inventoried by an instructor-led team of geography undergraduates in order to quantify the carbon sequestration associated with biomass growth. The setting of the project is described, together with its logistics, methodology, outcomes, and benefits. This hands-on project provided a team of students…

  13. Understanding How Institutional Leadership Affects Civic Engagement on University Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Prairie Leigh

    2011-01-01

    Higher education in America has a long tradition of civic engagement education. Although there is theoretical and rhetorical support, many institutions still struggle with implementing effective civic engagement on their campuses. The aim of this study was to provide an understanding of factors that contribute to successful civic engagement,…

  14. Campus Partnerships Improve Impact Documentation of Nutrition Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Partnerships with other campus college units can provide ways of improving Extension's impact documentation. Nutrition programs have relied upon knowledge gained and people's self report of behavior change. Partnering with the College of Nursing, student nurses provided blood screenings during the pre and 6 month follow-up of a pilot heart risk…

  15. Emotional Support Animals, Service Animals, and Pets on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Bergen, C. W.

    2015-01-01

    For decades, universities have been accommodating physically disabled students who require guide dogs and other types of service animals. Within the past several years, however, mentally disabled students have increasingly petitioned colleges with no-pet policies to permit them to bring their animals on campus because they need a companion or…

  16. A Perspective on the Future of Branch Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Branch campuses can thrive in the extremely competitive environment of higher education, because of their commitment to access and their relatively low cost of operation. Success, however, depends on understanding the preferences of adult learners and other place bound students. With targeted programs, focused services, careful financial…

  17. Campus Sustainability: Climate Change, Transport and Paper Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Alison; Giurco, Damien

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to detail the design of a campus climate change strategy, transport strategy and paper reduction strategy at the University of Technology, Sydney (Australia). Design/methodology/approach: The approach to strategy development used desktop research and staff/student consultation to inform the development of objectives,…

  18. The Causal Effect of Campus Residency on College Student Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schudde, Lauren T.

    2011-01-01

    Despite theoretical evidence positing a positive relationship between campus residency and collegiate outcomes, prior research has not established a causal link. Utilizing propensity score matching and national longitudinal data, this study investigates whether living in university-owned housing impacts retention. The results suggest that the…

  19. Organizing a Campus Seminar on Careers in Entertainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walt Disney Productions, Anaheim, CA.

    Developed by Walt Disney Productions as part of a project granted by the Career Education Program of the Office of Education, this handbook is designed to help college and university fine arts departments in planning and carrying out an on-campus seminar on careers in entertainment. Sections include Why Hold a Seminar on Careers in Entertainment?,…

  20. Measles: Current Status and Outbreak Control on Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amler, Robert W.; Orenstein, Walter A.

    1984-01-01

    The current effort to eliminate measles in the United States has caused record low levels of the disease. This strategy must continue to be applied in order to break the transmission of measles on college campuses through high immunization levels, promotion of rapid reporting of cases, and quick responses to outbreaks. (Author/DF)

  1. Marketing Your Campus Events to the Community at Large.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreider, Jim

    1997-01-01

    Provides advice on marketing campus events to the local community at large, using the experiences of the programming board at Eastern Oregon State University. Focuses on the development of a marketing team, interviews with community organizations and the media, a market survey snapshot, marketing strategies for various local media, and examples of…

  2. STARS Quarterly Review. Summer 2012: Innovations in Campus Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanski, Monika

    2012-01-01

    The Summer 2012 SQR: "Innovations in Campus Sustainability," explores the critical linkages between education, innovation, and sustainability. This issue highlights new and ground-breaking practices within the Innovation (IN) category of STARS, focusing on the unique solutions within higher education that positively impact current and future…

  3. STARS: A Campus-Wide Integrated Continuous Planning Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about Sustainability Tracking, Assessment and Rating System or "STARS," a tool currently available that aims to help a campus answer the "how" and "how hard" questions. Created by AASHE (the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education), STARS presents guidelines and suggestions (based on…

  4. Campus Social Climate Correlates of Environmental Type Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Daniel W.; Junco, Reynol; Irvin, Summer D.

    2004-01-01

    To address the ability of the Salter Environment Type Assessment (SETA) to measure different kinds of campus environments, data from three studies of the SETA with the Work Environment Scale, Group Environment Scale, and University Residence Environment Scale were reexamined (n = 534). Relationship dimension scales were very consistent with…

  5. ATM Technology Adoption in U.S. Campus Networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Engui; Perry, John F.; Anderson, Larry S.; Brook, R. Dan; Hare, R. Dwight; Moore, Arnold J.; Xu, Xiaohe

    This study examined the relationships between ATM (asynchronous transfer mode) adoption in universities and four organizational variables: university size, type, finances, and information processing maturity. Another purpose of the study was to identify the current status of ATM adoption in campus networking. Subjects were university domain LAN…

  6. Campus Information Systems for Students: Classification in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobarsi, Josep; Bernardo, Merce; Coenders, Germa

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: First, this article seeks to establish a conceptual model for campus information systems for students, in order to make their comparison possible for strategic management purposes. Second, it seeks to test this conceptual model in a fieldwork on Spanish higher education institutions, in order to relate information systems characteristics…

  7. Money Worries Keep Students Going to Campus Food Banks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Hunger on campus is part of a lingering national problem that grew after the financial crisis that began in late 2007. In an unforgiving economy, many students across the country struggle not only to pay tuition but also to buy food. Colleges and nonprofit groups have noticed, and more are reacting. Food pantries are cropping up on two-year and…

  8. A Diversity Doctor’s Best Lessons from the Campus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy-Anne Jordan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Review of the book: “Taking on Diversity: How We Can Move from Anxiety to Respect—A Diversity Doctor’s Best Lessons from the Campus.” By Rupert W. Nacoste. Amherst, NY: Prometheus Books, 2015. ISBN: 978-1-63388026-9

  9. Ready, Fire, Aim: The College Campus Gun Fight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The question of whether guns should be permitted on college and university campuses in the United States reflects the tension between two competing perspectives. America has both a robust gun culture and an equally robust (if less well known) gun-control culture. The gun culture is as American as apple pie: There may be as many as 300 million…

  10. Community College Faculty: Attitudes toward Guns on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Patricia P.; Bonham, Gene, Jr.; Reddington, Frances P.

    2016-01-01

    This exploratory research surveyed faculty who instruct in community colleges from 18 states about their attitudes toward the concealed carry gun policies that allow appropriately licensed citizens to carry a handgun in public places such as college campuses. Building upon previous research involving 4-year institutions, we surveyed 1,889…

  11. The Campus-Based Formula. NASFAA Task Force Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA) Campus-Based Aid Allocation Task Force was to examine the formula by which congressional appropriations for the Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG), Federal Work-Study (FWS), and Perkins Loan programs are distributed to schools,…

  12. Current Practice and Infrastructures for Campus Centers of Community Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Marshall; Saltmarsh, John

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an overview of current practice and essential infrastructure of campus community engagement centers in their efforts to establish and advance community engagement as part of the college experience. The authors identified key characteristics and the prevalence of activities of community engagement centers at engaged campuses…

  13. Foreign Language Departments as Leaders in Globalization of the Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Roberta

    1997-01-01

    Rather than try and shield themselves from organizational change, language departments should turn current administrative attempts to streamline the campus to their advantage, particularly in the trend toward internationalization of the curriculum. Areas for expansion include languages across the curriculum, area studies, study abroad, comparative…

  14. Faculty Attitudes Toward Regulating Speech on College Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Eric L.; Hurtado, Sylvia

    1996-01-01

    This study used data from a 1992-93 national survey of college teaching faculty (n=29,771) to examine attitudes toward institutional attempts to regulate racist and sexist on-campus speech. Most faculty supported prohibition of hate speech but were less likely to support administrators' right to ban extreme speakers. Unanticipated patterns were…

  15. Hate Crimes and Violence on College and University Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stage, Frances K.; Downey, John P.

    1999-01-01

    The growing problem of hate crime on college campuses is addressed. Characteristics of hate speech and hate crime are distinguished; types of offenders, scope of the problem, and related legal issues are discussed. A model for development of campuswide multiculturalism is presented among several recommendations for administrators. (Author/EMK)

  16. Marketing Your Campus Events to the Community at Large.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreider, Jim

    1997-01-01

    Provides advice on marketing campus events to the local community at large, using the experiences of the programming board at Eastern Oregon State University. Focuses on the development of a marketing team, interviews with community organizations and the media, a market survey snapshot, marketing strategies for various local media, and examples of…

  17. STARS[R] Spring 2012 Quarterly Review: Framing Campus Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanski, Monika

    2012-01-01

    The Spring 2012 SQR: "Framing Campus Sustainability," features stories that frame the evolving concept of sustainability in higher education. Included in this issue are a snapshot of ratings-to-date, a focus on credits within the Operations (OP) category, and insights into how institutions are defining and interpreting the evolving…

  18. Suggested Steps to Make Campuses More Trans-Inclusive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beemyn, Brett Genny; Domingue, Andrea; Pettitt, Jessica; Smith, Todd

    2005-01-01

    To assist colleges and universities in becoming more supportive of transgender people, the authors, who work in campus LGBT student services, offer practical recommendations in areas where gender-variant students, staff, and faculty are likely to encounter discrimination. These areas include health care, residence halls, bathrooms, locker rooms,…

  19. Campus Heritage Planning: Understanding the Economics "and" Managing the Financing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGirr, Dale; Kull, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    For many it's a dollars and cents issue; for others, it's a heritage or spiritual issue. In reality campus heritage is both a spiritual and a monetary/economic issue. Some say that heritage should reflect institutional values, tradition, academic stature, and the role graduates have played in society, and others cast aside tradition and pay…

  20. An Examination of Campus Climate for LGBTQ Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Jason C.; Taylor, Jason L.; Rankin, Susan

    2015-01-01

    This study examines campus climate for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) undergraduate students at community colleges. Data for the study originates from Rankin, Blumenfeld, Weber, and Frazer's (2010) "State of Higher Education for LGBT People." We analyzed both quantitative data generated from closed-ended…

  1. Campus, Inc.: Corporate Power in the Ivory Tower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Geoffry D., Ed.

    This collection of essays from some of the most active progressive thinkers and organizers in the U.S. offers a broad perspective on the problems of the growing corporatization of the university. The following 30 chapters are: (1) "The Tricks of Academe" (Lawrence Soley); (2) "The Goods at Their Worst: Campus Procurement in the…

  2. Measuring Campus Climate for Personal and Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Andrew J.; Mitchell, Joshua J.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding institutional climate enhances decision-making capacity when planning new programs and improving learning environments on college campuses. This chapter defines climate, discusses the purpose and advantages of climate assessment, and identifies important factors to consider in planning and conducting a personal and social…

  3. Safety on a Rural Community College Campus via Integrated Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnage, Marie Foster; Dziagwa, Connie; White, Dave

    2009-01-01

    West Virginia University at Parkersburg uses a two-way emergency system as a baseline for emergency communications. The college has found that such a system, a key component of its safety and crisis management plan, can be integrated with other communication initiatives to provide focused security on the campus.

  4. Healthy campus by open space design: Approaches and guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Siu Yu Lau

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the architectural and landscape design strategies and intentions for green, open spaces facilities targeting stress alleviation for learning environments such as those of university campuses in a compact urban setting. Literature reviews provide three prevailing perspectives for physical design pedagogical operatives: healing gardens where greenery and plants produce restorative effects; flexible spaces that accommodate functional needs of different activities; and green buildings that incorporate open space as a catalyst for integrated eco-system. Corresponding design approaches (landscape design, spatial design and green design are scrutinized by case study. A comparison of two university campuses with different urban contexts is conducted to identify challenges and opportunities for applying these design approaches. For a compact campus, high-dense surroundings may limit the size of an open space and may handicap circulation and accessibility; on the other side, a small open space may provide its users more intimate contact with natural restorative elements and also a more controllable microclimate for physical comfort. A healthy campus should encompass diverse open spaces to satisfy different purposes. Finally, a framework that integrates the three approaches is combined to produce a sustainable design rubric.

  5. University Students' Perception of Discrimination on Campus in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokce, Asiye Toker

    2013-01-01

    This study explores discrimination on campus in Turkey. The participants were 164 university students from the first, third, and fourth classes of two departments in a university in Turkey. The data was gathered through a questionnaire developed by the author. The results revealed that students were discriminated against because of their clothing…

  6. Collective Action Competence: An Asset to Campus Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Charlotte R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to operationalize theories of social learning and collective action for campus sustainability practitioners at higher education institutions (IHEs) to enhance their work, and to introduce the concept of collective action competence as a practical tool. Design/methodology/approach: This paper presents a…

  7. Facilitating the Design of a Campus Leadership Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Renee A.; Johnson, John R.

    2008-01-01

    This essay describes how we facilitated the design of a campus leadership team. What is particularly interesting about this consultative project is that both authors participated--one as facilitator and the other as participant. The facilitation included a needs assessment prior to the event, the use of structured controversy techniques,…

  8. Measuring Campus Climate for Personal and Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Andrew J.; Mitchell, Joshua J.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding institutional climate enhances decision-making capacity when planning new programs and improving learning environments on college campuses. This chapter defines climate, discusses the purpose and advantages of climate assessment, and identifies important factors to consider in planning and conducting a personal and social…

  9. Sustainable Education Campus in Spain: Nature and Architecture for Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Sotelo, Pablo Campos

    2008-01-01

    The quality of education is intimately linked to its architecture. Any urbanistic/architectural project must stem from an in-depth study of the area's characteristics, taken in the broad geographical, climatic, cultural, functional and ideological sense. The site should provide the conceptual energy from which a campus draws life. This requirement…

  10. Criteria for Effective Planning in Multi-Campus Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womack, Farris W.; Podemski, Richard S.

    1985-01-01

    The process of system-level planning must account for and facilitate the interaction of administrators and faculty from different campuses and create a context in which all can be involved. Eleven criteria are identified,including goal-setting, coordinated decision making, and accountability. (MLW)

  11. Campus Partnerships Improve Impact Documentation of Nutrition Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Partnerships with other campus college units can provide ways of improving Extension's impact documentation. Nutrition programs have relied upon knowledge gained and people's self report of behavior change. Partnering with the College of Nursing, student nurses provided blood screenings during the pre and 6 month follow-up of a pilot heart risk…

  12. Drug Abuse on College Campuses: Emerging Issues. Issues in Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This "Issues in Prevention" focuses on emerging issues concerning drug abuse on college campuses. This issue contains the following articles: (1) Drug Abuse Trends; (2) Q&A With Jim Lange; (3) Bath Salts; (4) Refuse to Abuse; (5) Related Federal Resource; and (6) Higher Education Center Resources.

  13. Operational Considerations for Opening a Branch Campus Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Lawrence M.; Lammey, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    Universities have been attracted to the creation of international branch campuses (IBCs) for many reasons, including cultural immersion of students and faculty and global brand recognition for a university seeking to enhance its reputation and strengthen its academic standards. This chapter provides specific advice for how IBCs can negotiate entry…

  14. STARS[R] Spring 2012 Quarterly Review: Framing Campus Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanski, Monika

    2012-01-01

    The Spring 2012 SQR: "Framing Campus Sustainability," features stories that frame the evolving concept of sustainability in higher education. Included in this issue are a snapshot of ratings-to-date, a focus on credits within the Operations (OP) category, and insights into how institutions are defining and interpreting the evolving…

  15. Therapy Dogs on Campus: Recommendations for Counseling Center Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daltry, Rachel M.; Mehr, Kristin E.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the design and implementation of a dog therapy outreach program through the counseling center at West Chester University in Pennsylvania. Two main goals were identified for this program: (a) provide stress relief and comfort to students across campus, and (b) increase potential access to counseling services and improve…

  16. STARS Quarterly Review. Summer 2012: Innovations in Campus Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanski, Monika

    2012-01-01

    The Summer 2012 SQR: "Innovations in Campus Sustainability," explores the critical linkages between education, innovation, and sustainability. This issue highlights new and ground-breaking practices within the Innovation (IN) category of STARS, focusing on the unique solutions within higher education that positively impact current and…

  17. LGBTQ People on Community College Campuses: A 20-Year Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leider, Steven J.

    2012-01-01

    In March 2000, an "ERIC Digest" was published on the status of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender students on community college campuses. It was immediately apparent that there was a dearth of literature on the subject, nor was research being conducted about these student populations. The "Digest" examined some possible reasons why. This…

  18. Rural Teacher's Perceptions of Safety on Texas High School Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Ronald J., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological research study used narrative inquiry to explore the perceptions of safety of rural Texas high school teachers as it related to a campus intruder or active shooter. The investigator utilized Creswell's (2012) six steps in analyzing and interpreting the qualitative data. The results of the study showed that…

  19. Gender Variance on Campus: A Critical Analysis of Transgender Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz, Lee M.

    2011-01-01

    Transgender college students face discrimination, harassment, and oppression on college and university campuses; consequently leading to limited academic and social success. Current literature is focused on describing the experiences of transgender students and the practical implications associated with attempting to meet their needs (Beemyn,…

  20. Evaluating Student Satisfaction of Quality at International Branch Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Syed Zamberi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to present the determinants of students' perceptions of quality and experience of study at international branch campuses in Malaysia, a country that is set to become an academic hub in Asia. This study used a multi-method approach for data collection. The respondents comprised 245 students (both undergraduate and…

  1. Campus Technology Innovators Awards 2011: Technology All-Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Meg; Raths, David

    2011-01-01

    Out of a total of 393 entries for the 2011 Campus Technology Innovators award, 10 winners rose to the top in six categories: (1) Leadership, Governance, and Policy; (2) Teaching and Learning; (3) Student Systems and Services; (4) Administrative Systems; (5) IT Infrastructure and Systems; and (6) Education Futurists. These innovative IT leaders…

  2. STARS Quarterly Review. Summer 2012: Innovations in Campus Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanski, Monika

    2012-01-01

    The Summer 2012 SQR: "Innovations in Campus Sustainability," explores the critical linkages between education, innovation, and sustainability. This issue highlights new and ground-breaking practices within the Innovation (IN) category of STARS, focusing on the unique solutions within higher education that positively impact current and…

  3. Video Tutorials: A Sustainable Method for Campus Technology Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, John; Dent, Julie; Barnes, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Technology training is a resource-intensive endeavor with inherent potential for waste. Such training is commonly offered in live, face-to-face workshops on campus, without charge, by colleges and universities who value technology skills in their faculty, staff, and students. The true cost to the institution begins with the space used for…

  4. The Engaged Campus: Toward a Comprehensive Approach to Public Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furco, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Although civic purposes are implicit in the mission statements of higher education institutions, American colleges and universities have not always embraced public engagement initiatives. This paper explores how the recent emergence of the engaged campus movement has helped move public engagement initiatives from the margins to the mainstream by…

  5. Reenvisioning Teaching and Learning: Opportunities for Campus IT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    The pressure on higher education to become more innovative and effective with respect to its teaching and learning (T&L) mission is unceasing. Institutions are challenged to rethink how they perform this core mission. The campus IT organization, always of strategic importance, can become a key partner and facilitator in that process. Its…

  6. The Anatomy of a Plagiarism Initiative: One Library's Campus Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madray, Amrita

    2008-01-01

    Plagiarism in media and print continues to be a major issue for professors, librarians, and students. Through initiatives and outreach from the B. Davis Memorial Library at the C. W. Post Campus of Long Island University, plagiarism Web sites have been created and workshops and programs continually provided for faculty and students to detect,…

  7. Finding "safe" campuses: predicting the presence of LGBT student groups at North Carolina colleges and universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Melinda D

    2013-01-01

    A key indicator of a supportive campus climate for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) college students is the existence of an LGBT student organization. This article integrates the research on high school LGBT policies and programs with social movement studies of campus activism to examine the characteristics associated with the existence of university-approved LGBT groups on North Carolina campuses. Drawing on data from the National Center for Education Statistics, campus Web sites, and other sources, logistic regression is used to examine the importance of public opinion, campus and community resources, and the institutional context in predicting the location of these student groups.

  8. Sustainability at DTU from Campus Service point of view -an invitation to use campus as learning lab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelsen, Lisbet

    2014-01-01

    Campus Service (CAS) at DTU has the mission of servicing our University with a high quality within all areas of Facility Management: planning, building, operation and maintenance. At the same time CAS supports the vision of DTU to be a sustainable university so we try to think sustainable in all...

  9. Campus Microclimates for LGBT Faculty, Staff, and Students: An Exploration of the Intersections of Social Identity and Campus Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, Annemarie

    2012-01-01

    This ethnographic study of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) faculty, staff, graduate students, and undergraduates expands the higher education conversation about campus climate beyond the traditional organizational-level paradigm. Findings suggest that LGBT individuals with similar organizational roles shared common experiences and…

  10. Campus Microclimates for LGBT Faculty, Staff, and Students: An Exploration of the Intersections of Social Identity and Campus Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, Annemarie

    2012-01-01

    This ethnographic study of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) faculty, staff, graduate students, and undergraduates expands the higher education conversation about campus climate beyond the traditional organizational-level paradigm. Findings suggest that LGBT individuals with similar organizational roles shared common experiences and…

  11. Ground water contamination with (238)U, (234)U, (235)U, (226)Ra and (210)Pb from past uranium mining: cove wash, Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias da Cunha, Kenya Moore; Henderson, Helenes; Thomson, Bruce M; Hecht, Adam A

    2014-06-01

    in the majority of the water samples, indicating more than one source of contamination could contribute to the sampled sources. The effective doses due to ingestion of the minimum uranium concentrations in water samples exceed the average dose considering inhalation and ingestion of regular diet for other populations around the world (1 μSv/year). The maximum doses due to ingestion of (238)U or (234)U were above the international limit for effective dose for members of the public (1 mSv/year), except for inhabitants of two chapters. The highest effective dose was estimated for inhabitants of Cove, and it was almost 20 times the international limit for members of the public. These results indicate that ingestion of water from some of the sampled sources poses health risks.

  12. Student Conduct Administrator Knowledge of the Statistical Reporting Obligations of the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBowes, Michael Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The "Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act" (the "Clery Act") is a consumer right-to-know law originally passed by Congress in 1900. The law requires colleges and universities receiving federal student aid to publish annually their security-related policies and crime statistics. The…

  13. 多校区大学校园文化认同性的思考%Thought on Identity of Campus Culture in Multi-Campus University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李海榕; 陈伟斌

    2011-01-01

    阐述随着高等教育向大众化方向发展,多校区大学已成为高校办学的基本态势,而相应的多校区大学校园文化承继与认同,成为我国高等教育的一项重大课题。从多校区大学的办学模式角度,分析多校区大学校园文化认同存在的问题,并提出加强多校区大学校园文化建设与核心校区校园文化认同的对策。%With higher education stepping into a popularization stage, building up multi-campus university is becoming the basic university-running direction; correspondingly, the inheritance and identity of campus culture in multi-campus university has become a significant research subject. Based on the running mode of multi-campus university, this paper analyzes the problems of identity of campus culture in multi-campus university, and put forward countermeasures on constructing campus culture in multi-campus university.

  14. Campus suicide prevention: bridging paradigms and forging partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drum, David J; Denmark, Adryon Burton

    2012-01-01

    Colleges and universities are increasingly recognizing the need to expand suicide-prevention efforts beyond the standard, clinical-intervention paradigm of suicide prevention, which relies on referral to, and treatment by, mental health services. These services frequently struggle, however, to provide effective, comprehensive care. After reviewing findings that support the need to adopt a broader, problem-focused paradigm, the article provides a framework for bridging this paradigm with the clinical-intervention approach and for conceptualizing a full continuum of preventive interventions. For each level of intervention (ranging from the individual to the ecological), we describe the goals and methods used, and provide examples to illustrate the role of psychiatrists and other campus mental health providers in the collaborative partnerships that must form to support a comprehensive, campus-wide suicide-prevention strategy.

  15. Evaluation of Fiji National University Campus Information Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Bimal Aklesh

    2011-01-01

    Fiji National University (FNU) has been encountering many difficulties with its current campus administrative systems. These difficulties include accessibility, scalability, performance, flexibility and integration. In order to address these difficulties, we developed a thin client web based campus information system. The newly designed system allows the students, academic and administration staff of the university to handle their day to day affairs with the university online. In this paper we describe three types of evaluation carried out to determine the suitability of newly developed system for FNU environment. User interface evaluation was carried out to assess user interface on a set of usability principles, usability evaluation to see the ease at which users can use the system and finally performance evaluation to verify and validate user response time required to complete various tasks. The result of each of these evaluations were analysed and the system was rectified as part of iterative design proces...

  16. A Distributed Cooperative Power Allocation Method for Campus Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, He; Sun, Yannan; Carroll, Thomas E.; Somani, Abhishek

    2015-09-01

    We propose a coordination algorithm for cooperative power allocation among a collection of commercial buildings within a campus. We introduced thermal and power models of a typical commercial building Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system, and utilize model predictive control to characterize their power flexibility. The power allocation problem is formulated as a cooperative game using the Nash Bargaining Solution (NBS) concept, in which buildings collectively maximize the product of their utilities subject to their local flexibility constraints and a total power limit set by the campus coordinator. To solve the optimal allocation problem, a distributed protocol is designed using dual decomposition of the Nash bargaining problem. Numerical simulations are performed to demonstrate the efficacy of our proposed allocation method

  17. Birds of Sabaragamuwa University campus, Buttala, Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.D. Surasinghe

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a bird survey in the Sabaragamuwa University premises in southeastern Sri Lanka between 2001 and 2004. We recorded 145 bird species, representing 17 orders and 51 families from the campus. The birdlife included Red-faced Malkoha, a globally Vulnerable species and four Near Threatened taxa. The university premises suffer from severe habitat alteration largely owing to fire, filling-up of aquatic habitats, resource over-extraction, improper waste management, invasion by exotic species and livestock grazing. Several conservation measures, including habitat management strategies such as restoration of riparian vegetation, and wetlands, increasing plant diversity in home gardens and prevention of secondary successions in grasslands are recommended to protect the campus environment and to conserve its avifaunal diversity.

  18. Construction of the NIFS campus information network, NIFS-LAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuda, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Takashi; Kato, Takeo; Nakamura, Osamu; Watanabe, Kunihiko; Watanabe, Reiko; Tsugawa, Kazuko; Kamimura, Tetsuo

    2000-10-01

    The advanced NIFS campus information network, NIFS-LAN, was designed and constructed as an informational infrastructure in 1996, 1997 and 1998 fiscal year. NIFS-LAN was composed of three autonomous clusters classified from research purpose; Research Information cluster, Large Helical Device Experiment cluster and Large-Scale Computer Simulation Research cluster. Many ATM(Asychronous Transfer Mode) switching systems and switching equipments were used for NIFS-LAN. Here, the outline of NIFS-LAN is described. (author)

  19. (Mixed) Race Matters: Racial Theory, Classification, and Campus Climate

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    As the expanding post-civil rights multiracial population is likely to transform the demographics of American colleges and universities, its perceived growth is also misused to advance neo-conservative agendas and post-racial views about the declining significance of race. Politicized issues around multiraciality frame and impact the campus climate for diversity, but research is scant on the climate for multiracial students. This thesis uses a three-article format to develop an Integrative ...

  20. Development of Networked Virtual Experiment System Based on Virtual Campus

    OpenAIRE

    Tian-tai Guo; Guo, Lin; Li, Dong-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    China’s higher education has been going through a period of rapid expansion in undergraduate population,and this means a much heavier demand on teaching resources such as laboratories, experiments, teaching staff,etc., which cannot possibly be made available all of a sudden.To deal with this situation, we found virtual reality (VR) technology very helpful. Virtual reality (VR) has found many applications in education; and the resources of virtual education such as virtual campus, virtual labo...

  1. Gender variance on campus : a critical analysis of transgender voices

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Transgender college students face discrimination, harassment, and oppression on college and university campuses; consequently leading to limited academic and social success. Current literature is focused on describing the experiences of transgender students and the practical implications associated with attempting to meet their needs (Beemyn, 2005; Beemyn, Curtis, Davis, & Tubbs, 2005). This study examined the perceptions of transgender inclusion, ways in which leadership structures or entiti...

  2. Pedagogical and technological challenges in on/off campus education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Ole; Knudsen, Morten Haack; Rokkjær, Ole

    2004-01-01

    preparation for the preceding attendance teaching, an understandable fact since the classroom teaching is a quality of service alternative. Changing the on-campus learning process to be more reflective and using the new format for courses may improve the learning behavior and merge material maintenance...... and development. This requires new competences in the learning organization, and the problem is if the willingness for changes exists among staff and in the organization as long as competition from the educational market is small...

  3. Pedagogical and Technological Challenges in on/off Campus Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Ole; Knudsen, Morten; Rokkjær, Ole

    2004-01-01

    preparation for the preceding attendance teaching, an understandable fact since the classroom teaching is a quality of service alternative. Changing the on-campus learning process to be more reflective and using the new format for courses may improve the learning behavior and merge material maintenance...... and development. This requires new competences in the learning organization, and the problem is if the willingess for changes exists among staff and in the organization as long as competition from the educational market is small...

  4. Camp Campus: College Preparation for Adolescents and Young Adults with High-Functioning Autism, Asperger Syndrome, and Other Social Communication Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retherford, Kristine S.; Schreiber, Linda R.

    2015-01-01

    Camp Campus is a 1-week campus experience for juniors or seniors in high school or high school graduates who are diagnosed with high-functioning autism, Asperger syndrome, or a related social communication disorder and who plan to attend college. Participants experience campus life by partaking of campus services, living and dining on campus,…

  5. Camp Campus: College Preparation for Adolescents and Young Adults with High-Functioning Autism, Asperger Syndrome, and Other Social Communication Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retherford, Kristine S.; Schreiber, Linda R.

    2015-01-01

    Camp Campus is a 1-week campus experience for juniors or seniors in high school or high school graduates who are diagnosed with high-functioning autism, Asperger syndrome, or a related social communication disorder and who plan to attend college. Participants experience campus life by partaking of campus services, living and dining on campus,…

  6. A Study of WLAN Campus in an Educational Establishment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taghareed Abdul-Hameed

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available the main aim of campus network is to efficiently separate, share and access knowledge among its users. The big demand of such systems of distributed knowledge networks is to be able to handle advanced applications which are the end-user requirements. The main goal of this study is to assess the ability of WLAN campus to dealing with applications request of end users in education establishments and network achievement under different conditions of operation. The study has been conducted in two stages: the first stage was accomplished by conducting a survey, using the Student Village network at Anglia Ruskin University as a case study; the main aim was to determine end-use requirements, gather information about the nature applications running by users and get a view about the likely future applications. The second stage was achieved by conducting experiments to evaluate the WLAN campus network performance under various different scenarios: impact of handover from Access Point (AP to another AP on end-user link performance, network performance in different usage time and network performance in different weather conditions.

  7. Avifaunal diversity in Assam University Campus, Silchar, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswajit Chakdar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a bird survey in the Assam University campus, Silchar from February 2011 to June 2011.  A total of 73 species of birds belonging to 56 genera, 32 families and 13 orders was recorded. Significantly, the highest number of bird species restricted to only one particular habitat (17 species was recorded in the forest area called ‘eco-forest’ (χ2=18, df=3, P<0.01.  The highest similarity of bird species was found between degraded area and secondary growth area, and the lowest was found between eco-forest and degraded area.  Species richness and dominance of species were more in the eco-forest area.  The diversity of species was more in the secondary growth area. Red-vented Bulbul, Spotted Dove and Red-whiskered Bulbul were the most abundant and frequent bird species found in campus.  The avifaunal diversity in the study area shows the importance of the University campus as an ideal bird habitat. 

  8. Who Enters Campus Recreation Facilities: A Demographic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Rohe Milton

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine student entry into a campus recreation center based on seven demographics (gender, ethnicity, age, class standing, intercollegiate athlete vs. non-athlete, students with self-reported disability vs. non-disability, and campus residence in order to determine who would be most likely to enter the recreation center. Subjects were from a mid-western, four year state-assisted institution with combined enrollment of 23,932 undergraduate and graduate students. Of the 23,932 enrolled, 14,032 students were examined in this study. Information on student entry to the recreation center was collected through the university’s student information system. Data was analyzed and interpreted using chi-square analysis. Results of the study show statistically significant differences in the demographics except the student disability demographic. More males than females, more African Americans than other ethnicities, more traditionally aged (18-25 students than non-traditional students, more underclassmen than seniors, more athletes and non-athletes, more residents than commuters were likely to enter the campus recreation center. The findings in this study could be used by collegiate recreational sport directors and administrators, in the United States and internationally, for future ideas about programming in similar recreation settings.

  9. Based on the Network Technology of Digital Campus Design and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Hongbin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, in order to meet the trend of popularization of higher education, expanding the scale of Chinese colleges and universities, and lead to university campuses scattered teaching resources, and information to be slow, poor accuracy and efficiency of the office problems have emerged. The construction of digital campus is not only working for the university scientific research, management provides a fast and convenient information service, and realize the education space and time, teaching contents, means and forms of further opening, largely improves the ability of teaching and scientific research ability and management level. This article through to the digital campus in the process of planning and design requirements, puts forward the conception and design of the construction of the digital campus network, then the digital campus network topology, design of core network, IP address assignment has carried on the discussion a rough. For the design of the digital campus construction provides a draft plan.

  10. MOBILE CAMPUS: A REFLECTIVE AND COLLECTIVE DIMENSION OF EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITIES MEDIATED BY MOBILE TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Yu. Travkin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The author considers a definition and general characteristics of the mobile campus allowing to ensure a combination of informal and social types of the educational activities with formal learning in a traditional educational institution (institutes of higher education. A fundamental element of the mobile campus is intelligent algorithms providing learning analyst for personalized learning experience. Also the article examines connections between the mobile campus and a learning community, a personal learning network and electronic student profile.

  11. Feasibility and Guidelines for the Development of Microgrids on Campus-Type Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    FINAL REPORT Feasibility and Guidelines for the Development of Microgrids in Campus-Type Facilities SERDP Project EW-1710 APRIL 2012...Feasibility and Guidelines for the Development of Microgrids on Campus-Type Facilities 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 09-C-0058 5b. GRANT NUMBER...Development of Microgrids in Campus-Type Facilities”, sponsored by the Department of Defense (DoD)’s Strategic Environmental Research and Development

  12. Smoking restrictions on campus: changes and challenges at three Canadian universities, 1970-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procter-Scherdtel, Amy; Collins, Damian

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the restriction of smoking on university campuses in the Canadian context. Indoor smoking on campus is now completely prohibited by law, and universities are increasingly moving to restrict, or prohibit, outdoor smoking on their grounds. The research focuses on three case studies to identify changes in spatial restrictions on campus smoking over the last four decades (1970-2010), and to determine the challenges involved in establishing bans in outdoor areas of campus. The three universities were selected for their different approaches to the issue of outdoor smoking. Data collection involved semi-structured interviews with 36 key informants, conducted from September 2010 to January 2011, supplemented by documentary information. Interview data were analysed thematically. Protection against environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) on campus proceeded incrementally, via policy-making at the provincial, municipal and institutional levels. Historically, institutional bans on indoor smoking were particularly significant, but their health benefits could be limited by the presence of private property on campus. Universities continue to initiate smoking restrictions today, with respect to outdoor bans. However, respondents reported myriad challenges in developing, implementing and maintaining such bans. Five principal concerns were articulated: the need for ongoing policy communication; management of community relations as smokers are displaced from campus; enforcement to ensure that the policy has practical effect; safety concerns; and difficulties relating to campus layout. Because challenges are diverse and contextual, effective protection against outdoor ETS on campus is likely to require an ongoing commitment on the part of administrators.

  13. Establishing and maintaining a satellite campus connected by synchronous video conferencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Brent I; McDonough, Sharon L; McConatha, Barry J; Marlowe, Karen F

    2011-06-10

    Pharmacy education has experienced substantial growth in the number of new schools and existing schools establishing satellite campuses. Several models have previously been used to connect primary and satellite campuses. We describe the Auburn University Harrison School of Pharmacy's (AUHSOP's) experiences using synchronous video conferencing between the Auburn University campus in Auburn and a satellite campus in Mobile, Alabama. We focus on the technology considerations related to planning, construction, implementation, and continued use of the various resources that support our program. Students' perceptions of their experiences related to technology also are described.

  14. Workshops in creativity and self-esteem in the Teaching Degree at Campus Quito

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    María Verónica Di Caudo; Gladys Montero Pastrana

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental implementation of creativity and self-esteem workshops within the teaching degree at Salesian Polytechnic University, Campus Quito, with the goal of strenghthening...

  15. "Social jetlag" in morning-type college students living on campus: implications for physical and psychological well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Esther Yuet Ying; Wong, Mark Lawrence; Ng, Eddie Chi Wai; Hui, Chi-chiu Harry; Cheung, Shu Fai; Mok, Doris Shui Ying

    2013-08-01

    Although on-campus residence allows easier access to campus facilities, existing studies showed mixed results regarding the relationship between college residence and students' well-being indicators, such as sleep behaviors and mood. There was also a lack of studies investigating the role of chronotype in the relationship between on-campus residence and well-being. In particular, the temporal relationships among these factors were unclear. Hence, this longitudinal study aims to fill in these gaps by first reporting the well-being (measured in terms of mood, sleep, and quality of life) among students living on and off campus across two academic semesters. We explored factors predicting students' dropout in university residences. Although students living on campus differ in their chronotypes, activities in campus residence (if any) are mostly scheduled in the nighttime. We therefore tested if individual differences in chronotype interact with campus residence in affecting well-being. Our final sample consisted of 215 campus residents and 924 off-campus-living students from 10 different universities or colleges in Hong Kong or Macau. Their mean age was 20.2 years (SD=2.3); 6.5% of the participants are female. Participants completed self-reported questionnaires online on their sleep duration, sleep quality, chronotype, mood, and physical and psychological quality of life. Across two academic semesters, we assessed if students living on and off campus differed in our well-being measures after we partialed out the effects of demographic information (including age, sex, family income, and parents' education) and the well-being measures at baseline (T1). The results showed that, campus residents exhibited longer sleep duration, greater sleep efficiency, better sleep quality, and less feeling of stress than off-campus-living students. From one semester to the next, around 10% of campus residents did not continue to live on campus. Logistic regression showed that a morning

  16. 利用数字校园建设培养人文校园精神%Using Digital Campus Construction to Cultivate Campus Humanity Spirit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邸灿

    2014-01-01

    数字校园近年来已经被许多高校所运用,成为了衡量高校发展的重要指标之一。本文将数字校园建设作为打造人文校园的重要手段,论证了数字校园对于人文校园建设的重要意义,阐明了“以人为本”的理念是数字化校园建设中实现人文校园的关键。%Digital campus has been employed in recent years by a large number of colleges and universities, became one of the important indicators of the development of universities. In this paper, the digital campus construction as an important means to create a humanities campus, demonstrates the importance of of digital campus to campus humanities construction, to clarify the"people-oriented"concept is the key to achieve digital campus humanities campus.

  17. A Comparative Analysis of the Academic Performance of Distance and On-campus Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. NGWENYA

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available This study examined (i the profile of the distance and on-campus learners, (ii the academic performance of distance and on-campus learners, (iii the advantages and disadvantages of learning through distance education and on-campus education, and (iv how the disadvantages of learning through distance education could be reduced. The study found that the majority of distance and on-campus learners were female, single, and unemployed. Most off-campus learners were more than 20 years old, whilst on-campus learners were less than 20 years old. Off-campus learners tended to perform better than on-campus learners. Advantages of distance learning included application of acquired knowledge and skills if working; earning income if working; and studying at own pace, time and place. Disadvantages of studying off-campus included use of all Saturdays for face-to-face tutorials; inability to use library facilities on Saturdays due to tight schedule; some modules were not available on time for learners to use resulting in issue of photocopied handouts and notes by tutors and lecturers; and photocopied handouts were not serving a useful purpose since they were not appropriate for distance learning. Subsequently, off-campus learners suggested that the library should close late on Saturdays; lecturers and tutors should be available in their offices for consultations on Saturdays and during the week; lecturers should pin consultation schedules on their office doors; and lecturers and tutors who absent themselves should be reprimanded and/or requested to repay off-campus learners for the costs incurred travelling to regional learning centres.

  18. E-Cigarette Policies on College Campuses: Student Use Behaviors, Awareness, and Policy Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Elizabeth M; Henes, Amy L; Olson, Lindsay T

    2016-12-01

    This study examined e-cigarette use and attitudes toward e-cigarette policies among students at colleges and universities with and without policies prohibiting e-cigarette use on campus. In April 2015, we fielded an online survey with a convenience sample of 930 students at 14 North Dakota colleges and universities. The survey included questions about e-cigarette use, observed e-cigarette use on campus, awareness of school e-cigarette policy, and support for policies prohibiting e-cigarette use on campus. Over 40 % of respondents had used e-cigarettes at least once, and most current users reported using them rarely (36 %). Nearly 29 % of respondents reported observing e-cigarette use on campus, and more than half of these reported seeing e-cigarette use indoors. More than 42 % did not know whether their school's policy prohibited e-cigarette use on campus, and students at schools with a policy were more likely to identify their campus policy correctly. Sixty-six percent of respondents were in favor of policies prohibiting e-cigarette use on campus, and those at schools with policies prohibiting e-cigarette use were more likely to support a campus e-cigarette policy. Policies prohibiting e-cigarette use on campus intend to restrict use, reduce prevalence, and shape social norms. This study indicates that support for campus e-cigarette policies is high, although awareness of whether e-cigarettes are included in college and university policies is low. These findings demonstrate the need for coordinated policy education efforts and may guide college administrators and student health services personnel as they consider how to implement and evaluate campus e-cigarette policies.

  19. Chlorfenapyr (A Pyrrole Insecticide) Applied Alone or as a Mixture with Alpha-Cypermethrin for Indoor Residual Spraying against Pyrethroid Resistant Anopheles gambiae sl: An Experimental Hut Study in Cove, Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngufor, Corine; Critchley, Jessica; Fagbohoun, Josias; N'Guessan, Raphael; Todjinou, Damien; Rowland, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Indoor spraying of walls and ceilings with residual insecticide remains a primary method of malaria control. Insecticide resistance in malaria vectors is a growing problem. Novel insecticides for indoor residual spraying (IRS) which can improve the control of pyrethroid resistant malaria vectors are urgently needed. Insecticide mixtures have the potential to improve efficacy or even to manage resistance in some situations but this possibility remains underexplored experimentally. Chlorfenapyr is a novel pyrrole insecticide which has shown potential to improve the control of mosquitoes which are resistant to current WHO-approved insecticides. The efficacy of IRS with chlorfenapyr applied alone or as a mixture with alpha-cypermeththrin (a pyrethroid) was evaluated in experimental huts in Cove, Southern Benin against wild free flying pyrethroid resistant Anopheles gambiae sl. Comparison was made with IRS with alpha-cypermethrin alone. Fortnightly 30-minute in situ cone bioassays were performed to assess the residual efficacy of the insecticides on the treated hut walls. Survival rates of wild An gambiae from the Cove hut site in WHO resistance bioassays performed during the trial were >90% with permethrin and deltamethrin treated papers. Mortality of free-flying mosquitoes entering the experimental huts was 4% in the control hut. Mortality with alpha-cypermethrin IRS did not differ from the control (5%, P>0.656). The highest mortality was achieved with chlorfenapyr alone (63%). The alpha-cypermethrin + chlorfenapyr mixture killed fewer mosquitoes than chlorfenapyr alone (43% vs. 63%, P<0.001). While the cone bioassays showed a more rapid decline in residual mortality with chlorfenapyr IRS to <30% after only 2 weeks, fortnightly mortality rates of wild free-flying An gambiae entering the chlorfenapyr IRS huts were consistently high (50-70%) and prolonged, lasting over 4 months. IRS with chlorfenapyr shows potential to significantly improve the control of malaria

  20. Introducing and Promoting the New Porvoo Campus in Educational Fairs

    OpenAIRE

    Leal Tennberg, Joni

    2011-01-01

    The thesis was carried out as a project. The objective was to attend and organize three different educational fairs for HAAGA-HELIA in Bulgaria, Germany and the Ukraine. The purpose of attending these events was to attract new students to the Porvoo Campus, the brand new building and concept of HAAGA-HELIA in Porvoo. The project consisted of arranging and representing HAAGA-HELIA in the different events. The thesis presents the planning before and after the fair and also evaluates the work of...

  1. Herramientas para favorecer las interrelaciones en campus virtual

    OpenAIRE

    Olivares, Alberto; Pizarro, Celeste; Simón, Clara; Alonso-Ayuso, Antonio; Moguerza, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Unos de los retos más importantes para el buen desarrollo de la asignatura Optimización de Recursos en la Nueva Economía dentro del Campus Virtual de ADA-Madrid es la de favorecer una interacción fluida entre profesor, alumno, entorno virtual y contenido académico. En este trabajo se presentan los aspectos más importantes de nuestra experiencia en la formación virtual, así como algunas conclusiones.

  2. URBAN TREE SURVEY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRASILIA CAMPUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Luis Kurihara

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A census of all the trees on 111 ha was conducted at the University of Brasilia campus. A total of 5,011 trees with DBHover 5 cm were identified and their DBH, diameter at 30 cm on ground level, diameter under the bifurcation point, height up to the firstbifurcation and the total height of the tree were measured. Phenological observation was also carried out. A great diversity of treeswas found composed of 49 botanical families and 154 species. The main species are Acrocomia aculeata, Syagrus oleracea, Ingamarginata, Pterogyne nitens, Caesalpinia ferrea, Caesalpinia pluviosa, Peltophorum dubium, Pachira aquatica, Syzygium cuminiand Tabebuia impetiginosa.

  3. Integrated systems: from library to campus and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C L; Marcum, D B

    1983-07-01

    Integrated library systems have not yet been created, although they have been emphasized for nearly two decades. Now and in the future, the task is even more complex because the principal issue is access to information itself, wherever it is located and in whatever form it may exist. The goal becomes more feasible because of changes in library practices achieved with technological innovation. Although individual elements of a campus-wide information system may already exist, the details for implementation are yet to be articulated.

  4. New Phone System Coming to NCI Campus at Frederick | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Travis Fouche and Trent McKee, Guest Writers Beginning in September, phones at the NCI Campus at Frederick will begin to be replaced, as the project to upgrade the current phone system ramps up. Over the next 16 months, the Information Systems Program (ISP) will be working with Facilities Maintenance and Engineering and Computer & Statistical Services to replace the current Avaya phone system with a Cisco Unified Communications phone system. The Cisco system is already in use at the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF).

  5. Context-free pragmatism in Danish campus architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lars Emmerik Damgaard

    to the philosophies of James Williams, John Dewey, and Richard Rorty. Danish architects such as Bjarke Ingels and Henning Larsen Architects are playing key roles in the Danish wave and are enjoying a status as superheroes by making architecture relevant to the media and politicians again. On the other hand critics...... an educational ideal that also seem to lack a sense of context, and hence both the architecture and the educational structuring in Campus Roskilde can be understood as a context free pragmatism. I analyze this tendency with references to Dewey’s own work on the meaning of the educational environment....

  6. Analysis of Energy Saving Reconstruction of Existing Campus Dormitories in Chongqing---Taking Dormitory Six on Campus B of Chongqing University as An Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WenJing Dong; TieJun Zhou; RunZhao Qi

    2014-01-01

    At present, a large number of historic buildings on campus are lack of energy-saving measures from the design time, especially the dormitories. And the reconstruction mostly focuses on functional reorganization or furniture replacement. However, energy efficiency design has not been paid enough attention, which leads to the high building energy consumption and the harsh physical environment. Based on the analysis of climatic characteristics of Chongqing area, taking Dormitory Six on campus B of Chongqing University as an example, the reconstruction of rooms on the top floor and West end are focused to guarantee the equal benefits of the dormitory environment. Through the simulation analysis of the software, on the basis of energy saving reconstruction of common maintenance structure, this thesis discusses the energy saving reconstruction methods and strategies of the existing campus dormitories, which are more suitable for the existing campus dormitories in Chongqing area.

  7. Resources on Campus Governance and Employment Relations, 1967-1977. With Essay, Annotations, and Indexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Terrence N.

    An annotated bibliography containing 1,110 items from 1967 through early 1977 and other relevant resources covers virtually all the significant material on campus collective bargaining and closely related issues regarding campus governance and employment relations. It complements five publications from 1972-76 and indexes both authors and…

  8. APPA Participates in Innovative Effort to Enhance Campus Safety and Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler-Carter, Ruth E.

    2009-01-01

    College and university campuses may be safer environments than the "real world" around them, but recent years have made it clear that they are not immune to frightening and dangerous events, either natural or manmade. Today's campuses and their facilities professionals have to be prepared to respond to crises caused by both nature (think of…

  9. The Practical Application of Promoting Positive Body Image on a College Campus: Insights from Freshmen Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Jackson, TeriSue; Reel, Justine J.; Thackeray, Rosemary

    2014-01-01

    Background: Body image disturbances and disordered eating behaviors are prevalent across college campuses and can lead to psychological and physical health consequences. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to gain formative research on the promotion of positive body image on a university campus with the goal of developing educational programs.…

  10. Case Western Reserve U. Builds Virtual Campus to Woo Prospective Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a virtual world program that Case Western University administrators built using Second Life. It is designed for use by prospective students, who can tour the campus online. The program shows campus buildings, athletic facilities, a diner, and a virtual dormitory with window views of the athletics fields, a feature of the…

  11. A Comparative Case Study Analysis of Campus Violence Prevention Plans at Three Illinois Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Wade R.

    2013-01-01

    The postsecondary acts of violence at Virginia Technical University (VT) and Northern Illinois University (NIU) forced Illinois legislators to approve the "Campus Security Enhancement Act" in 2008 (110 ILCS 12/20). The "Act" requires all private and public postsecondary education institutions to develop a Campus Violence…

  12. Creating a Campus Sustainability Revolving Loan Fund: A Guide for Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diebolt, Asa; Den Herder-Thomas, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    This publication describes innovative and powerful mechanisms for financing sustainability projects on campus including energy efficiency upgrades and renewable energy installations. The guide provides step-by-step guidance for establishing revolving loan funds for campus sustainability, based on the experiences of the authors in setting up such a…

  13. Needs of Sexual Assault Advocates in Campus-Based Sexual Assault Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, Dianne; Ekhomu, Jessica; Payne, Brian K.

    2009-01-01

    Most campuses have sexual assault crisis centers that are designed to assist victims and educate the college community about this crime. While much is known about sexual assault victimization patterns on college campuses, there is still a lack of understanding about the needs of those working to prevent sexual assault. In the current study, campus…

  14. How Many More Guns?: Estimating the Effect of Allowing Licensed Concealed Handguns on a College Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouffard, Jeffrey A.; Nobles, Matt R.; Wells, William; Cavanaugh, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Among other arguments, advocates for lifting bans on carrying concealed handguns on campus propose that this would increase the prevalence of legitimately carried handguns, which might then deter crimes or be used to intervene in campus shooting incidents like the one that took place at Virginia Tech in 2007. Opponents suggest that increased…

  15. Perceptions of Campus Climates for Civic Learning as Predictors of College Students' Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Joshua J.; Reason, Robert D.; Hemer, Kevin M.; Finley, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    This study explored whether three broad areas promoted students' mental health: perceptions of the climate related to civic learning, experiences on campus, and civic engagement. Campus climates for civic learning including the development of ethical and moral reasoning and the importance of contributing to community were the strongest predictors…

  16. Five Recession-Driven Strategies for Planning and Managing Campus Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudden, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Colleges and universities continue to face significant fiscal challenges in the current recession. A review of ongoing campus facilities planning projects, coupled with a review of more than 30 recent campus master planning requests for proposals and the relevant literature, indicates that colleges and universities are finding innovative ways to…

  17. Report of the Task Force on Providing Library Services to Extended Campus Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickler, Sally Ann Koenig; And Others

    This task force report proposes a plan for providing campus-quality library services to students at three sites of Western Kentucky University's extended campus program which would offer access to main library services and collections rather than the traditional assembling of additional library collections in off-site locations. Elements of the…

  18. Community and Campus Crime: A Geospatial Examination of the Clery Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobles, Matt R.; Fox, Kathleen A.; Khey, David N.; Lizotte, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the provisions of the Clery Act, which requires institutional reporting of crime on college campuses, patterns of campus crime have received surprisingly little research attention to date. Furthermore, few studies have described the extent to which college students engage in criminal behaviors. This study examines the criminality of…

  19. Achieving Campus Sustainability: Top-Down, Bottom-Up, or Neither?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkhurst, Marena; Rose, Peter; Maurice, Gillian; Ackerman, Josef Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The dynamics of organizational change related to environmental sustainability on university campuses are examined in this article. Whereas case studies of campus sustainability efforts tend to classify leadership as either "top-down" or "bottom-up", this classification neglects consideration of the leadership roles of…

  20. Racial Arrested Development: A Critical Whiteness Analysis of the Campus Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Nolan L.; Watson, Jesse S.; Franklin, Jeremy D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzes the campus ecology (Renn, 2003, 2004) literature from the perspective of Critical Whiteness specifically problematizing perceptions of safety and inclusion on the college campus. Relying upon Sullivan's (2006) ontological expansiveness, Mills's (1997) epistemology of ignorance, and Leonardo and Porter's (2010) Fanonian…

  1. Community Alert: Using Text Messaging and Social Media to Improve Campus Emergency Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    This article describes emergency management and the part that social media technologies and mobile messaging have made when they are included as part of the campus emergency plan. Administrators have found that ample notification and preparedness must be built into campus communication systems. Social media platforms such as Twitter and Facebook…

  2. The Concept of "Educational Campus" and Its Application in Spanish Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Sotelo, Pablo Campos

    2010-01-01

    A university campus should reflect a commitment to quality and be dedicated to the intellectual, psychological and social development of its students. The "Educational Campus" is an innovative concept which espouses this concept and is designed to stimulate a process of modernisation in universities and contribute to their excellence.…

  3. Passive WiFi monitoring of the rhythm of the campus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalogianni, E.; Sileryte, R.; Lam, M.; Zhou, K.; Van der Ham, M.; Van der Spek, S.C.; Verbree, E.

    2015-01-01

    Within this research-driven project, passive WiFi monitoring of WiFi enabled devices was used to detect users (students, employees, visitors) of buildings at the campus of Delft University of Technology to gain insight into the Rhythm of the Campus: the occupation, duration of stay and moving

  4. Examining the Impact of Federal Grants to Reduce Violent Crimes against Women on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Jane E.; Alda, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Sexual assault on college campuses is persistently underreported; therefore, Clery Act sexual assault statistics are not strong indicators of incidence. Instead, they may indicate whether students feel comfortable reporting on a particular campus. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of the Office on Violence Against Women Campus…

  5. The Practical Application of Promoting Positive Body Image on a College Campus: Insights from Freshmen Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Jackson, TeriSue; Reel, Justine J.; Thackeray, Rosemary

    2014-01-01

    Background: Body image disturbances and disordered eating behaviors are prevalent across college campuses and can lead to psychological and physical health consequences. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to gain formative research on the promotion of positive body image on a university campus with the goal of developing educational programs.…

  6. Using a Structural Equation Model to Describe the Infusion of Civic Engagement in the Campus Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Meredith S.; Terkla, Dawn Geronimo

    2011-01-01

    This study assesses whether Tufts University's campus culture was successful at infusing civic-mindedness in all undergraduates. A structural equation model was developed, and findings revealed that the campus environment had a significant positive impact on civic values and beliefs and a positive indirect effect on civic engagement activities.…

  7. The Influence of Campus Racial Climate on Graduate Student Attitudes about the Benefits of Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Kelly Marie; Zarate, Maria Estela

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between campus racial climate and graduate student attitudes about the benefits of diversity. Grounded in the campus racial climate frameworks proposed by Hurtado, Carter, and Kardia (1998) and Milem, Chang, and Antonio (2005), the authors build a case for documenting how student attitudes about diversity may…

  8. Campus Free Speech Presents Both Legal and PR Challenges for Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, AiVi; Dragga, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Free speech is fast becoming a hot-button issue at colleges across the country, with campus protests often mirroring those of the public-at-large on issues such as racism or tackling institution-specific matters such as college governance. On the surface, the issue of campus free speech may seem like a purely legal concern, yet in reality,…

  9. Race Consciousness and Collective Commitment among Black Students on White Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Walter R.

    1984-01-01

    Black students on White campuses seem to retain high levels of race consciousness and collective commitment. However, compared to a 1970 sample of Black students attending historically Black colleges, Black students on White campuses in 1981 are decidedly more moderate. These differences are partly attributable to institutional context effects.…

  10. LGBT Discrimination on Campus and Heterosexual Bystanders: Understanding Intentions to Intervene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessel, Adrienne B.; Goodman, Kevin D.; Woodford, Michael R.

    2017-01-01

    Discrimination targeting lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students on college campuses occurs. Bystander intervention is important in supporting targeted students and improving campus climate for LGBT students. Peer-familiarity context (i.e., who the bystander knows in the situation) can play a role in bystander intervention, but…

  11. A Hidden Crisis: Including the LGBT Community When Addressing Sexual Violence on College Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Zenen Jaimes; Hussey, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    Recently, sexual assault on college campuses has received increased national attention. In its first report, the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault highlighted steps colleges and universities can take to curb the number of sexual assaults on campuses. For the first time, the U.S. Department of Education has released the…

  12. Gender and Race Are Significant Determinants of Students' Food Choices on a College Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boek, Stacey; Bianco-Simeral, Stephanie; Chan, Kenny; Goto, Keiko

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine the roles of gender and race in students' determinants of food choices on a college campus. Methods: A total of 405 college students participated in a survey entitled "Campus Food: You Tell Us!" Chi-square and logistic regression were used to examine associations between demographics and food choice determinants. Results:…

  13. Five Recession-Driven Strategies for Planning and Managing Campus Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudden, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Colleges and universities continue to face significant fiscal challenges in the current recession. A review of ongoing campus facilities planning projects, coupled with a review of more than 30 recent campus master planning requests for proposals and the relevant literature, indicates that colleges and universities are finding innovative ways to…

  14. Residence Hall Room Type and Alcohol Use among College Students Living on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Jennifer E.; Zimmerman, Don; O'Grady, Megan A.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives were to explore the relation between the built environment of residence halls and the alcohol use of college students living on campus from the perspective of the theory of routine activity. This exploratory study examined data from two samples on one college campus. Online surveys assessed alcohol use, attitudes toward alcohol use,…

  15. Case Western Reserve U. Builds Virtual Campus to Woo Prospective Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a virtual world program that Case Western University administrators built using Second Life. It is designed for use by prospective students, who can tour the campus online. The program shows campus buildings, athletic facilities, a diner, and a virtual dormitory with window views of the athletics fields, a feature of the…

  16. An Investigation of the Impact of International Branch Campuses on Organizational Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, William G.; Lanford, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The authors first survey the factors related to globalization that have stimulated the creation of international branch campuses. They then contend that the viability of an international branch campus should not be solely evaluated from a rational choice perspective oriented toward economic self-interest. Rather, the organizational culture of the…

  17. Implementing a Cost Effectiveness Analyzer for Web-Supported Academic Instruction: A Campus Wide Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Anat; Nachmias, Rafi

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a quantitative cost effectiveness analyzer for Web-supported academic instruction that was developed in Tel Aviv University during a long term study. The paper presents the cost effectiveness analysis of Tel Aviv University campus. Cost and benefit of 3,453 courses were analyzed, exemplifying campus-wide…

  18. Organizational Structure in Multi-Campus Community Junior Colleges/Districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Nai-Kwang

    The administrative structures and functions of multi-campus colleges/districts of the same size as the Community College of Denver (CCD) were investigated to determine the positive and negative aspects of multi-campus colleges vs. separate independent colleges and of centralization vs. decentralization of 38 administrative functions. A survey of…

  19. Links between Leader Cognition, Power, and Change on Community College Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Pamela L.

    2004-01-01

    As organizational change at community colleges becomes the norm, presidents leading these campuses play a heightened role in guiding successful initiatives. The research reported here investigated the relationship between leader cognition and power levers of two presidents as they framed change for campus members. These leaders' underlying…

  20. Gender and Race Are Significant Determinants of Students' Food Choices on a College Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boek, Stacey; Bianco-Simeral, Stephanie; Chan, Kenny; Goto, Keiko

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine the roles of gender and race in students' determinants of food choices on a college campus. Methods: A total of 405 college students participated in a survey entitled "Campus Food: You Tell Us!" Chi-square and logistic regression were used to examine associations between demographics and food choice determinants. Results:…

  1. Other Drug Use and Abuse on Campus: The Scope of the Problem. Infofacts/Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Virginia; DeJong, William

    2009-01-01

    Of all drugs abused on college and university campuses, alcohol causes the greatest harm. Other drugs (the prevention field uses the term "other drugs" to distinguish them from alcohol, which also is a drug) also take a significant toll--diminishing the quality of campus life, undermining academic performance, compromising students' health and…

  2. Campus Counseling Centers React to Recession-Related Stress among Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushong, Steven

    2009-01-01

    The recession has complicated the path in life that many students had envisioned. As a result, campus mental-health counselors say more students are expressing anxiety about the economy's effect on their future. Visits to campus counseling centers have been climbing for several years, according to the Association for University and College…

  3. A Comparison of Urban, Suburban, and Rural Principal Leadership Skills by Campus Student Achievement Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Susan; Winn, Pam; Erwin, John

    2011-01-01

    Because of the importance of developing highly skilled school leaders, statewide assessments of 784 Texas public school administrators were compared in a causal-comparison study to determine how leadership skills varied by type of campus (urban, suburban and rural) and by campus student achievement ratings. Data were collected from a 2006-2008…

  4. The Availability, Prospects, and Fiscal Potential of On-Campus Housing at Rural Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeck, Pat G.; Katsinas, Stephen G.; Hardy, David E.; Bush, V. Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Many rural community colleges have long provided on-campus housing. This article profiles the availability of housing at rural community colleges in 2001-2002 and 2005-2006, examines the factors that will continue to make on-campus housing an important service at rural institutions, and draws on 2005-2006 data from the Institutional…

  5. Categorizing and Assessing Multi-Campus Universities in Contemporary Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Rómulo; Nordstrand Berg, Laila

    2017-01-01

    Multi-campus universities are not a new phenomenon per se, but they have become an increasing feature of contemporary higher education systems all over the world. In the case of Northern Europe, multi-campus universities are the consequence of contraction patterns resulting from overcapacity, fragmentation and rising competition. This paper has…

  6. Geographical Information Systems (GIS) Mapping of Environmental Samples across College Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis-Roberts, Kathleen L.; Moeur, Harriet P.; Zanella, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students take environmental samples at various locations around the college campuses, take geospatial coordinates with a global position systems (GPS) unit, and map their results on a geo-referenced campus map with geographical information systems (GIS) software. Nitrogen dioxide air pollution sampling is used as an…

  7. Guns on Campus: The Architecture and Momentum of State Policy Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Andrew; Sisneros, Lauren; Perez, Zeke; Sponsler, Brian A.

    2016-01-01

    "Guns on Campus: The Architecture and Momentum of State Policy Action" offers a detailed summary of state legislative action and higher education system policy decisions that have occurred in two specific categories: (1) States that have permitted or are seeking to permit guns on campus; and (2) States that have prohibited or are seeking…

  8. Campus Free Speech Presents Both Legal and PR Challenges for Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, AiVi; Dragga, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Free speech is fast becoming a hot-button issue at colleges across the country, with campus protests often mirroring those of the public-at-large on issues such as racism or tackling institution-specific matters such as college governance. On the surface, the issue of campus free speech may seem like a purely legal concern, yet in reality,…

  9. Creating a Campus Culture of Integrity: Comparing the Perspectives of Full- and Part-Time Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudd, Suzanne S.; Apgar, Caroline; Bronson, Eric Franklyn; Lee, Renee Gravois

    2009-01-01

    Part-time faculty play an important role in creating a culture of integrity on campus, yet they face a number of structural constraints. This paper seeks to improve our understanding of the potentially unique experiences of part-time faculty with academic misconduct and suggests ways to more effectively involve them in campus-wide academic…

  10. Sticks and Stones: Why First Amendment Absolutism Fails When Applied to Campus Harassment Codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumsden, Linda

    This paper analyzes how absolutist arguments against campus harassment codes violate the spirit of the first amendment, examining in particular the United States Supreme Court ruling in "RAV v. St. Paul." The paper begins by tracing the current development of first amendment doctrine, analyzing its inadequacy in the campus hate speech…

  11. Community Responses to the Removal of Bottled Water on a University Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailovich, Katja; Fitzgerald, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aimed to examine the impact of the removal of bottled water on the campus community. This paper presents the findings of a survey conducted at the first Australian university to remove single-use bottled water from sale on a small regional university campus. The removal of bottled water from sale at the university formed part…

  12. The Diversity Myth: Multiculturalism and Political Intolerance on Campus. [Second Edition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, David O.; Thiel, Peter A.

    The "diversity myth" is the myth that universities are doing a good job promoting diversity on campus. Universities in America have promoted this "diversity myth" which belies the actual state of affairs in the nation's schools. Instead, universities have fostered conformity on campus, and stifled true diversity. This document, sponsored by the…

  13. Students’ Assessment of Campus Sustainability at the University of Dammam, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismaila R. Abubakar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Higher education institutions are major drivers of change in achieving environmental sustainability both within college campuses and beyond campuses in communities at large. However, achieving campus sustainability is not possible without the involvement of students as one of the major stakeholders of a university. Based on survey of 152 students of the College of Architecture and Planning, University of Dammam, Saudi Arabia, this study explores students’ assessment of campus sustainability components: curriculum and research; campus operations; and community involvement. The results show that even though the students indicate a great deal of awareness and concern about campus environmental sustainability, they lack interest and willingness to participate in initiatives towards achieving sustainability. Apart from some sustainable landscaping and waste recycling practices, there are few sustainability initiatives in transportation and energy and water conservation on the campus. Offered courses and student projects have also been reported to have modest focus on sustainability. The article concludes by highlighting the roles of incorporating sustainability into campus operations, and training university students in promoting environmental sustainability in Saudi Arabia and the Middle East.

  14. Passive WiFi monitoring of the rhythm of the campus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalogianni, E.; Sileryte, R.; Lam, M.; Zhou, K.; Van der Ham, M.; Van der Spek, S.C.; Verbree, E.

    2015-01-01

    Within this research-driven project, passive WiFi monitoring of WiFi enabled devices was used to detect users (students, employees, visitors) of buildings at the campus of Delft University of Technology to gain insight into the Rhythm of the Campus: the occupation, duration of stay and moving patter

  15. Managing Disaster Recovery Centers on Campus: The Experience of Southeastern Louisiana University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Heather; Shafer, Duane

    2007-01-01

    When Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast in August 2005, Southeastern Louisiana University was spared the brunt of the storm and was fortunate that most structures on campus remained intact. However, the storm still affected the campus for weeks. This article reflects on the experiences of university leaders and facility managers as they provided…

  16. State Legislative Developments on Campus Sexual Violence: Issues in the Context of Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Andrew; Sponsler, Brian A.; Fulton, Mary

    2015-01-01

    NASPA--Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education and Education Commission of the States (ECS) have partnered to address legislative developments and offer considerations for leaders in higher education and policy on two top-level safety issues facing the higher education community: campus sexual violence and guns on campus. The first in a…

  17. An Assessment of Campus Police Departments across Mississippi's Public Community and Junior Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggs, Brad D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to provide an assessment of campus police departments throughout the 15 public community and junior colleges in Mississippi. This research could provide Mississippi community and junior college administrators the opportunity to observe and appraise the overall safety of their respective campuses in comparison to safety…

  18. The Campus Spiritual Climate: Predictors of Satisfaction among Students with Diverse Worldviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockenbach, Alyssa Bryant; Mayhew, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Using data collected via the Campus Religious and Spiritual Climate Survey (CRSCS), we examined how dimensions of the campus spiritual climate shape student satisfaction. The findings reveal that structural worldview diversity, space for support and spiritual expression, and provocative experiences with worldview diversity positively relate to…

  19. Plans and Living Practices for the Green Campus of Portland State University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Jung Choi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to comprehend Portland State University (PSU’s green campus strategies, and students’ level of knowledge and living practices relating to green campus. PSU’s sustainable campus plan has been nationally and internationally recognized. A literature review, field investigation, and interviews were conducted to ascertain the PSU green campus strategies. This study also used a survey to understand students’ level of knowledge and practices. The survey results were analyzed by SPSS. Green campus projects at PSU were operated by official organizations and funded according to PSU’s long term plans in 12 multilateral categories: administration, energy, water, climate action, green buildings, green purchasing, waste reduction and recycling, food and dining services, transportation, land use, action, and education and student activity. The survey results show that the level of students’ understanding about PSU’s green campus strategies was somewhat low, but the amount of practice of a sustainable lifestyle was higher. Students who had taken courses related with sustainability or were engaged in sustainable activities had more knowledge about green campus strategies than students who had not. Therefore, it would be important to focus more on educating students and developing related programs in order to have more positive effects of green campus projects.

  20. Navigating Conflicts Related to Religious and Non-Religious Identity on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Eboo; Montero, Janina; Love, Cindi; Giess, Mary Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Matters of interreligious engagement and worldview orientation are becoming more salient on campuses across the country. All-comers policies, conflicts about the Middle East, and intersections of spirituality with other aspects of identity present challenges for professionals working with students on college campuses. This article will discuss…