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Sample records for macdonnell calipso a-train

  1. NASA 3D Models: CALIPSO

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite provides new insight into the role that clouds and atmospheric aerosols...

  2. CALIPSO at Four: Results and Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winker, Dave; Hu, Yong; Pitts, Mike; Tackett, Jason; Kittaka, Chieko; Liu, Zhaoyan; Vaughan, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Aerosols and clouds play important roles in Earth?s climate system, but limitations in our ability to observe them globally limit our understanding of the climate system and our ability to model it. The CALIPSO satellite was developed to provide new capabilities to observe aerosol and cloud from space. CALIPSO carries the first polarization-sensitive lidar to fly in space, which has now provided a four-year record of global aerosol and cloud profiles. This paper briefly summarizes the status of the CALIPSO mission, describes some of the results from CALIPSO, and presents highlights of recent improvements in data products.

  3. The Calipso Thermal Control Subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasbarre, Joseph F.; Ousley, Wes; Valentini, Marc; Thomas, Jason; Dejoie, Joel

    2007-01-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) is a joint NASA-CNES mission to study the Earth s cloud and aerosol layers. The satellite is composed of a primary payload (built by Ball Aerospace) and a spacecraft platform bus (PROTEUS, built by Alcatel Alenia Space). The thermal control subsystem (TCS) for the CALIPSO satellite is a passive design utilizing radiators, multi-layer insulation (MLI) blankets, and both operational and survival surface heaters. The most temperature sensitive component within the satellite is the laser system. During thermal vacuum testing of the integrated satellite, the laser system s operational heaters were found to be inadequate in maintaining the lasers required set point. In response, a solution utilizing the laser system s survival heaters to augment the operational heaters was developed with collaboration between NASA, CNES, Ball Aerospace, and Alcatel-Alenia. The CALIPSO satellite launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on April 26th, 2006. Evaluation of both the platform and payload thermal control systems show they are performing as expected and maintaining the critical elements of the satellite within acceptable limits.

  4. Patterns of Saharan dust transport over the Atlantic: winter vs. summer, based on CALIPSO first year data

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Ben-Ami; I. Koren; O. Altaratz

    2009-01-01

    One of the most important factors that determines the transported dust effect is its vertical distribution in the atmosphere. Until the launch of the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO), the vertical distribution was studied mostly by in-situ measurements and models. CALIPSO, as a part of the A-Train constellation has opened an opportunity to study the transported dust vertical structure in a large number of events (sufficient statistics).
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  5. Assessment of Aerosol Distributions from GEOS-5 Using the CALIPSO Feature Mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, Ellsworth

    2010-01-01

    A-train sensors such as MODIS, MISR, and CALIPSO are used to determine aerosol properties, and in the process a means of estimating aerosol type (e.g. smoke vs. dust). Correct classification of aerosol type is important for climate assessment, air quality applications, and for comparisons and analysis with aerosol transport models. The Aerosols-Clouds-Ecosystems (ACE) satellite mission proposed in the NRC Decadal Survey describes a next generation aerosol and cloud suite similar to the current A-train, including a lidar. The future ACE lidar must be able to determine aerosol type effectively in conjunction with modeling activities to achieve ACE objectives. Here we examine the current capabilities of CALIPSO and the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System general circulation model and data assimilation system (GEOS-5), to place future ACE needs in context. The CALIPSO level 2 feature mask includes vertical profiles of aerosol layers classified by type. GEOS-5 provides global 3D aerosol mass for sulfate, sea salt, dust, and black and organic carbon. A GEOS aerosol scene classification algorithm has been developed to provide estimates of aerosol mixtures and extinction profiles along the CALIPSO orbit track. In previous work, initial comparisons between GEOS-5 derived aerosol mixtures and CALIPSO derived aerosol types were presented for July 2007. In general, the results showed that model and lidar derived aerosol types did not agree well in the boundary layer. Agreement was poor over Europe, where CALIPSO indicated the presence of dust and pollution mixtures yet GEOS-5 was dominated by pollution with little dust. Over the ocean in the tropics, the model appeared to contain less sea salt than detected by CALIPSO, yet at high latitudes the situation was reserved. Agreement between CALIPSO and GEOS-5, aerosol types improved above the boundary layer, primarily in dust and smoke dominated regions. At higher altitudes (> 5 km), the model contained aerosol layers not detected

  6. An Integrated Cloud-Aerosol-Radiation Product Using CERES, MODIS, CALIPSO and CloudSat Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun-Mack, S.; Gibson, S.; Chen, Y.; Wielicki, B.; Minnis, P.

    2006-12-01

    The goal of this paper is to provide the first integrated data set of global vertical profiles of aerosols, clouds, and radiation using the combined NASA A-Train data from Aqua CERES and MODIS, CALIPSO, and CloudSat. All of these instruments are flying in formation as part of the Aqua Train, or A-Train. This paper will present the preliminary results of merging aerosol and cloud data from the CALIPSO active lidar, cloud data from CloudSat, integrated column aerosol and cloud data from the MODIS CERES analyses, and surface and top-of-atmosphere broadband radiation fluxes from CERES. These new data will provide unprecedented ability to test and improve global cloud and aerosol models, to investigate aerosol direct and indirect radiative forcing, and to validate the accuracy of global aerosol, cloud, and radiation data sets especially in polar regions and for multi-layered cloud conditions.

  7. The CALIPSO Integrated Thermal Control Subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasbarre, Joseph F.; Ousley, Wes; Valentini, Marc; Thomas, Jason; Dejoie, Joel

    2007-01-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) is a joint NASA-CNES mission to study the Earth's cloud and aerosol layers. The satellite is composed of a primary payload (built by Ball Aerospace) and a spacecraft platform bus (PROTEUS, built by Alcatel Alenia Space). The thermal control subsystem (TCS) for the CALIPSO satellite is a passive design utilizing radiators, multi-layer insulation (MLI) blankets, and both operational and survival surface heaters. The most temperature sensitive component within the satellite is the laser system. During thermal vacuum testing of the integrated satellite, the laser system's operational heaters were found to be inadequate in maintaining the lasers required set point. In response, a solution utilizing the laser system's survival heaters to augment the operational heaters was developed with collaboration between NASA, CNES, Ball Aerospace, and Alcatel-Alenia. The CALIPSO satellite launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on April 26th, 2006. Evaluation of both the platform and payload thermal control systems show they are performing as expected and maintaining the critical elements of the satellite within acceptable limits.

  8. Integrated cloud-aerosol-radiation product using CERES, MODIS, CALIPSO, and CloudSat data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun-Mack, Sunny; Minnis, Patrick; Chen, Yan; Gibson, Sharon; Yi, Yuhong; Trepte, Qing; Wielicki, Bruce; Kato, Seiji; Winker, Dave; Stephens, Graeme; Partain, Philip

    2007-10-01

    This paper documents the development of the first integrated data set of global vertical profiles of clouds, aerosols, and radiation using the combined NASA A-Train data from the Aqua Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO), and CloudSat. As part of this effort, cloud data from the CALIPSO lidar and the CloudSat radar are merged with the integrated column cloud properties from the CERES-MODIS analyses. The active and passive datasets are compared to determine commonalities and differences in order to facilitate the development of a 3-dimensional cloud and aerosol dataset that will then be integrated into the CERES broadband radiance footprint. Preliminary results from the comparisons for April 2007 reveal that the CERES-MODIS global cloud amounts are, on average, 0.14 less and 0.15 greater than those from CALIPSO and CloudSat, respectively. These new data will provide unprecedented ability to test and improve global cloud and aerosol models, to investigate aerosol direct and indirect radiative forcing, and to validate the accuracy of global aerosol, cloud, and radiation data sets especially in polar regions and for multi-layered cloud conditions.

  9. Cloud vertical profiles derived from CALIPSO and CloudSat and a comparison with MODIS derived clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, S.; Sun-Mack, S.; Miller, W. F.; Rose, F. G.; Minnis, P.; Wielicki, B. A.; Winker, D. M.; Stephens, G. L.; Charlock, T. P.; Collins, W. D.; Loeb, N. G.; Stackhouse, P. W.; Xu, K.

    2008-05-01

    CALIPSO and CloudSat from the a-train provide detailed information of vertical distribution of clouds and aerosols. The vertical distribution of cloud occurrence is derived from one month of CALIPSO and CloudSat data as a part of the effort of merging CALIPSO, CloudSat and MODIS with CERES data. This newly derived cloud profile is compared with the distribution of cloud top height derived from MODIS on Aqua from cloud algorithms used in the CERES project. The cloud base from MODIS is also estimated using an empirical formula based on the cloud top height and optical thickness, which is used in CERES processes. While MODIS detects mid and low level clouds over the Arctic in April fairly well when they are the topmost cloud layer, it underestimates high- level clouds. In addition, because the CERES-MODIS cloud algorithm is not able to detect multi-layer clouds and the empirical formula significantly underestimates the depth of high clouds, the occurrence of mid and low-level clouds is underestimated. This comparison does not consider sensitivity difference to thin clouds but we will impose an optical thickness threshold to CALIPSO derived clouds for a further comparison. The effect of such differences in the cloud profile to flux computations will also be discussed. In addition, the effect of cloud cover to the top-of-atmosphere flux over the Arctic using CERES SSF and FLASHFLUX products will be discussed.

  10. Looking Into CALIPSO Climatological Products: Evaluation and Suggestions from EARLINET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papagiannopoulos Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Pathfinder Satellite Observations Level 3 (CL3 data were compared against EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network monthly averages obtained by profiles during satellite overpasses. Data from EARLINET stations of Évora, Granada, Leipzig, Naples and Potenza, equipped with advanced multi-wavelength Raman lidars were used for this study. Owing to spatial and temporal differences, we reproduced the CL3 filtering rubric onto the CALIPSO Level 2 data. The CALIPSO monthly mean profiles following this approach are called CALIPSO Level 3*, CL3*. This offers the possibility to achieve direct comparable datasets. In respect to CL3 data, the agreement typically improved, in particular above the areas directly affected by the anthropogenic activities within the planetary boundary layer. However in most of the cases a subtle CALIPSO underestimation was observed with an average bias of 0.03 km-1. We investigated the backscatter coefficient applying the same screening criteria, where the mean relative difference in respect to the extinction comparison improved from 15.2% to 11.4%. Lastly, the typing capabilities of CALIPSO were assessed outlining the importance of the correct aerosol type (and associated lidar ratio value assessment to the CALIPSO aerosol properties retrieval.

  11. CALIPSO climatological products: evaluation and suggestions from EARLINET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Papagiannopoulos

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The CALIPSO Level 3 (CL3 product is the most recent data set produced by the observations of the Cloud–Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP instrument onboard the Cloud–Aerosol Lidar and Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO space platform. The European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET, based mainly on multi-wavelength Raman lidar systems, is the most appropriate ground-based reference for CALIPSO calibration/validation studies on a continental scale. In this work, CALIPSO data are compared against EARLINET monthly averaged profiles obtained by measurements performed during CALIPSO overpasses. In order to mitigate uncertainties due to spatial and temporal differences, we reproduce a modified version of CL3 data starting from CALIPSO Level 2 (CL2 data. The spatial resolution is finer and nearly 2°  ×  2° (latitude  ×  longitude and only simultaneous measurements are used for ease of comparison. The CALIPSO monthly mean profiles following this approach are called CALIPSO Level 3*, CL3*. We find good agreement on the aerosol extinction coefficient, yet in most of the cases a small CALIPSO underestimation is observed with an average bias of 0.02 km−1 up to 4 km and 0.003 km−1 higher above. In contrast to CL3 standard product, the CL3* data set offers the possibility to assess the CALIPSO performance also in terms of the particle backscatter coefficient keeping the same quality assurance criteria applied to extinction profiles. The mean relative difference in the comparison improved from 25 % for extinction to 18 % for backscatter, showing better performances of CALIPSO backscatter retrievals. Additionally, the aerosol typing comparison yielded a robust identification of dust and polluted dust. Moreover, the CALIPSO aerosol-type-dependent lidar ratio selection is assessed by means of EARLINET observations, so as to investigate the performance of the extinction retrievals. The aerosol types of

  12. Data assimilation of CALIPSO aerosol observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. T. Sekiyama

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed an advanced data assimilation system for a global aerosol model with a four-dimensional ensemble Kalman filter in which the Level 1B data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO were successfully assimilated for the first time, to the best of the authors' knowledge. A one-month data assimilation cycle experiment for dust, sulfate, and sea-salt aerosols was performed in May 2007. The results were validated via two independent observations: 1 the ground-based lidar network in East Asia, managed by the National Institute for Environmental Studies of Japan, and 2 weather reports of aeolian dust events in Japan. Detailed four-dimensional structures of aerosol outflows from source regions over oceans and continents for various particle types and sizes were well reproduced. The intensity of dust emission at each grid point was also corrected by this data assimilation system. These results are valuable for the comprehensive analysis of aerosol behavior as well as aerosol forecasting.

  13. Comparison of Cloud and Aerosol Detection between CERES Edition 3 Cloud Mask and CALIPSO Version 2 Data Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepte, Qing; Minnis, Patrick; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Trepte, Charles

    Clouds and aerosol play important roles in the global climate system. Accurately detecting their presence, altitude, and properties using satellite radiance measurements is a crucial first step in determining their influence on surface and top-of-atmosphere radiative fluxes. This paper presents a comparison analysis of a new version of the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Edition 3 cloud detection algorithms using Aqua MODIS data with the recently released Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) Version 2 Vertical Feature Mask (VFM). Improvements in CERES Edition 3 cloud mask include dust detection, thin cirrus tests, enhanced low cloud detection at night, and a smoother transition from mid-latitude to polar regions. For the CALIPSO Version 2 data set, changes to the lidar calibration can result in significant improvements to its identification of optically thick aerosol layers. The Aqua and CALIPSO satellites, part of the A-train satellite constellation, provide a unique opportunity for validating passive sensor cloud and aerosol detection using an active sensor. In this paper, individual comparison cases will be discussed for different types of clouds and aerosols over various surfaces, for daytime and nighttime conditions, and for regions ranging from the tropics to the poles. Examples will include an assessment of the CERES detection algorithm for optically thin cirrus, marine stratus, and polar night clouds as well as its ability to characterize Saharan dust plumes off the African coast. With the CALIPSO lidar's unique ability to probe the vertical structure of clouds and aerosol layers, it provides an excellent validation data set for cloud detection algorithms, especially for polar nighttime clouds.

  14. Global Distribution of Planetary Boundary Layer Height Derived from CALIPSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J.

    2015-12-01

    The global distribution of planetary boundary layer (PBL) height, which was estimated from the attenuated back-scatter observations of Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO), is presented. In general, the PBL is capped by a temperature inversion that tends to trap moisture and aerosols. The gradient of back-scatter observed by lidar is almost always associated with this temperature inversion and the simultaneous decrease of moisture content. Thus, the PBL top is defined as the location of the maximum aerosol scattering gradient, which is analogous to the more conventional thermodynamic definition. The maximum standard deviation method, developed by Jordan et al. (2010), is modified and used to derive the global PBL heights. The derived PBL heights are not only consistent with the results of McGrath-Spangler and Denning (2012) but also agree well with the ground-based lidar measurements. It is found that the correlation between CALIPSO and the ground-based lidar was 0.73. The seasonal mean patterns from 4-year mid-day PBL heights over global are demonstrated. Also it is found that the largest PBL heights occur over the Tibetan Plateau and the coastal areas. The smallest PBL heights appear in the Tarim Basin and the northeast of China during the local winter. The comparison of PBL heights from CALIPSO and ECMWF under different land-cover conditions showed that, over ocean and forest surface, the PBL height estimated from the CALIPSO back-scatter climatology is larger than the ones estimated from ECMWF data. However, the PBL heights from ECMWF, over grass land and bare land surface in spring and summer are larger than the ones from CALIPSO.

  15. Comparison of Cloud Properties from CALIPSO-CloudSat and Geostationary Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, L.; Minnis, P.; Chang, F.; Winker, D.; Sun-Mack, S.; Spangenberg, D.; Austin, R.

    2007-01-01

    Cloud properties are being derived in near-real time from geostationary satellite imager data for a variety of weather and climate applications and research. Assessment of the uncertainties in each of the derived cloud parameters is essential for confident use of the products. Determination of cloud amount, cloud top height, and cloud layering is especially important for using these real -time products for applications such as aircraft icing condition diagnosis and numerical weather prediction model assimilation. Furthermore, the distribution of clouds as a function of altitude has become a central component of efforts to evaluate climate model cloud simulations. Validation of those parameters has been difficult except over limited areas where ground-based active sensors, such as cloud radars or lidars, have been available on a regular basis. Retrievals of cloud properties are sensitive to the surface background, time of day, and the clouds themselves. Thus, it is essential to assess the geostationary satellite retrievals over a variety of locations. The availability of cloud radar data from CloudSat and lidar data from CALIPSO make it possible to perform those assessments over each geostationary domain at 0130 and 1330 LT. In this paper, CloudSat and CALIPSO data are matched with contemporaneous Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), Multi-functional Transport Satellite (MTSAT), and Meteosat-8 data. Unlike comparisons with cloud products derived from A-Train imagers, this study considers comparisons of nadir active sensor data with off-nadir retrievals. These matched data are used to determine the uncertainties in cloud-top heights and cloud amounts derived from the geostationary satellite data using the Clouds and the Earth s Radiant Energy System (CERES) cloud retrieval algorithms. The CERES multi-layer cloud detection method is also evaluated to determine its accuracy and limitations in the off-nadir mode. The results will be useful for

  16. Evaluation of Passive Multilayer Cloud Detection Using Preliminary CloudSat and CALIPSO Cloud Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnis, P.; Sun-Mack, S.; Chang, F.; Huang, J.; Nguyen, L.; Ayers, J. K.; Spangenberg, D. A.; Yi, Y.; Trepte, C. R.

    2006-12-01

    During the last few years, several algorithms have been developed to detect and retrieve multilayered clouds using passive satellite data. Assessing these techniques has been difficult due to the need for active sensors such as cloud radars and lidars that can "see" through different layers of clouds. Such sensors have been available only at a few surface sites and on aircraft during field programs. With the launch of the CALIPSO and CloudSat satellites on April 28, 2006, it is now possible to observe multilayered systems all over the globe using collocated cloud radar and lidar data. As part of the A- Train, these new active sensors are also matched in time ad space with passive measurements from the Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - EOS (AMSR-E). The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) has been developing and testing algorithms to detect ice-over-water overlapping cloud systems and to retrieve the cloud liquid path (LWP) and ice water path (IWP) for those systems. One technique uses a combination of the CERES cloud retrieval algorithm applied to MODIS data and a microwave retrieval method applied to AMSR-E data. The combination of a CO2-slicing cloud retireval technique with the CERES algorithms applied to MODIS data (Chang et al., 2005) is used to detect and analyze such overlapped systems that contain thin ice clouds. A third technique uses brightness temperature differences and the CERES algorithms to detect similar overlapped methods. This paper uses preliminary CloudSat and CALIPSO data to begin a global scale assessment of these different methods. The long-term goals are to assess and refine the algorithms to aid the development of an optimal combination of the techniques to better monitor ice 9and liquid water clouds in overlapped conditions.

  17. Global Distribution and Vertical Structure of Clouds Revealed by CALIPSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Y.; Minnis, P.; Winker, D.; Huang, J.; Sun-Mack, S.; Ayers, K.

    2007-12-01

    Understanding the effects of clouds on Earth's radiation balance, especially on longwave fluxes within the atmosphere, depends on having accurate knowledge of cloud vertical location within the atmosphere. The Cloud- Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite mission provides the opportunity to measure the vertical distribution of clouds at a greater detail than ever before possible. The CALIPSO cloud layer products from June 2006 to June 2007 are analyzed to determine the occurrence frequency and thickness of clouds as functions of time, latitude, and altitude. In particular, the latitude-longitude and vertical distributions of single- and multi-layer clouds and the latitudinal movement of cloud cover with the changing seasons are examined. The seasonal variablities of cloud frequency and geometric thickness are also analyzed and compared with similar quantities derived from the Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) using the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) cloud retrieval algorithms. The comparisons provide an estimate of the errors in cloud fraction, top height, and thickness incurred by passive algorithms.

  18. A New Approach for Checking and Complementing CALIPSO Lidar Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josset, Damien B.; Vaughan, Mark A.; Hu, Yongxiang; Avery, Melody A.; Powell, Kathleen A.; Hunt, William H.; Winker, David M.; Pelon, Jacques; Trepte, Charles R.; Lucker, Patricia L.; hide

    2010-01-01

    We have been studying the backscatter ratio of the two CALIPSO wavelengths for 3 different targets. We are showing the ratio of integrate attenuated backscatter coefficient for cirrus clouds, ocean surface and liquid. Water clouds for one month of nightime data (left:July,right:December), Only opaque cirrus classified as randomly oriented ice[1] are used. For ocean and water clouds, only the clearest shots, determined by a threshold on integrated attenuated backscatter are used. Two things can be immediately observed: 1. A similar trend (black dotted line) is visible using all targets, the color ratio shows a tendency to be higher north and lower south for those two months. 2. The water clouds average value is around 15% lower than ocean surface and cirrus clouds. This is due to the different multiple scattering at 532 nm and 1064 nm [2] which strongly impact the water cloud retrieval. Conclusion: Different targets can be used to improve CALIPSO 1064 nm calibration accuracy. All of them show the signature of an instrumental calibration shift. Multiple scattering introduce a bias in liquid water cloud signal but it still compares very well with all other methods and should not be overlooked. The effect of multiple scattering in liquid and ice clouds will be the subject of future research. If there really is a sampling issue. Combining all methods to increase the sampling, mapping the calibration coefficient or trying to reach an orbit per orbit calibration seems an appropriate way.

  19. CALIPSO-Inferred Aerosol Direct Radiative Effects: Bias Estimates Using Ground-Based Raman Lidars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsen, Tyler; Fu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Observational constraints on the change in the radiative energy budget caused by the presence of aerosols, i.e. the aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE), have recently been made using observations from the Cloud- Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite (CALIPSO). CALIPSO observations have the potential to provide improved global estimates of aerosol DRE compared to passive sensor-derived estimates due to CALIPSO's ability to perform vertically-resolved aerosol retrievals over all surface types and over cloud. In this study we estimate the uncertainties in CALIPSO-inferred aerosol DRE using multiple years of observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Raman lidars (RL) at midlatitude and tropical sites. Examined are assumptions about the ratio of extinction-to-backscatter (i.e. the lidar ratio) made by the CALIPSO retrievals, which are needed to retrieve the aerosol extinction profile. The lidar ratio is shown to introduce minimal error in the mean aerosol DRE at the top-of-atmosphere and surface. It is also shown that CALIPSO is unable to detect all radiatively-significant aerosol, resulting in an underestimate in the magnitude of the aerosol DRE by 30-50%. Therefore, global estimates of the aerosol DRE inferred from CALIPSO observations are likely too weak.

  20. Atmospheric aerosol layers over Bangkok Metropolitan Region from CALIPSO observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridhikitti, Arika

    2013-06-01

    Previous studies suggested that aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Earth Observing System satellite retrievals could be used for inference of ground-level air quality in various locations. This application may be appropriate if pollution in elevated atmospheric layers is insignificant. This study investigated the significance of elevated air pollution layers over the Bangkok Metropolitan Region (BMR) from all available aerosol layer scenes taken from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) for years 2007 to 2011. The results show that biomass burning smoke layers alone were the most frequently observed. The smoke layers accounted for high AOD variations and increased AOD levels. In the dry seasons, the smoke layers alone with high AOD levels were likely brought to the BMR via northeasterly to easterly prevailing winds and found at altitudes above the typical BMR mixing heights of approximately 0.7 to 1.5 km. The smoke should be attributed to biomass burning emissions outside the BMR.

  1. Ocean subsurface particulate backscatter estimation from CALIPSO spaceborne lidar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; Pan, Delu; Wang, Tianyu; Mao, Zhihua

    2017-10-01

    A method for ocean subsurface particulate backscatter estimation from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite was demonstrated. The effects of the CALIOP receiver's transient response on the attenuated backscatter profile were first removed. The two-way transmittance of the overlying atmosphere was then estimated as the ratio of the measured ocean surface attenuated backscatter to the theoretical value computed from wind driven wave slope variance. Finally, particulate backscatter was estimated from the depolarization ratio as the ratio of the column-integrated cross-polarized and co-polarized channels. Statistical results show that the derived particulate backscatter by the method based on CALIOP data agree reasonably well with chlorophyll-a concentration using MODIS data. It indicates a potential use of space-borne lidar to estimate global primary productivity and particulate carbon stock.

  2. CALIPSO Imaging Infrared Radiometer L2 Data Track V3-02

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  3. 9+ Years of CALIPSO PSC Observations: An Evolving Climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Michael C.; Poole, Lamont R.

    2015-01-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) play a crucial role in the springtime chemical depletion of ozone at high latitudes. PSC particles (primarily supercooled ternary solution, or STS droplets) provide sites for heterogeneous chemical reactions that transform stable chlorine and bromine reservoir species into highly reactive ozone-destructive forms. Furthermore, large nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) PSC particles can irreversibly redistribute odd nitrogen through gravitational sedimentation (a process commonly known as denitrification), which prolongs the ozone depletion process by slowing the reformation of the stable chlorine reservoirs. Spaceborne observations from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) lidar on the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) satellite are providing a rich new dataset for studying PSCs. CALIPSO is an excellent platform for studying polar processes with CALIOP acquiring, on average, over 300,000 backscatter profiles daily at latitudes between 55o and 82o in both hemispheres. PSCs are detected in the CALIOP backscatter profiles using a successive horizontal averaging scheme that enables detection of strongly scattering PSCs (e.g., ice) at the finest possible spatial resolution (5 km), while enhancing the detection of very tenuous PSCs (e.g., low number density NAT) at larger spatial scales (up to 135 km). CALIOP PSCs are separated into composition classes (STS; liquid/NAT mixtures; and ice) based on the ensemble 532-nm scattering ratio (the ratio of total-to-molecular backscatter) and 532-nm particulate depolarization ratio (which is sensitive to the presence of non-spherical, i.e. NAT and ice particles). In this paper, we will provide an overview of the CALIOP PSC detection and composition classification algorithm and then examine the vertical and spatial distribution of PSCs in the Arctic and Antarctic on vortex-wide scales for entire PSC seasons over the more than nine-year data

  4. Comparisons of Satellite-Deduced Overlapping Cloud Properties and CALIPSO CloudSat Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Fu-Lung; Minnis, Patrick; Lin, Bing; Sun-Mack, Sunny

    2010-01-01

    Introduction to the overlapped cloud properties derived from polar-orbiting (MODIS) and geostationary (GOES-12, -13, Meteosat-8, -9, etc.) meteorological satellites, which are produced at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) cloud research & development team (NASA lead scientist: Dr. Patrick Minnis). Comparison of the LaRC CERES MODIS Edition-3 overlapped cloud properties to the CALIPSO and the CloudSat active sensing data. High clouds and overlapped clouds occur frequently as deduced by CALIPSO (44 & 25%), CloudSat (25 & 4%), and MODIS (37 & 6%). Large fractions of optically-thin cirrus and overlapped clouds are deduced from CALIPSO, but much smaller fractions are from CloudSat and MODIS. For overlapped clouds, the averaged upper-layer CTHs are about 12.8 (CALIPSO), 10.9 (CloudSat) and 10 km (MODIS), and the averaged lower-layer CTHs are about 3.6 (CALIPSO), 3.2 (CloudSat) and 3.9 km (MODIS). Based on comparisons of upper and lower-layer cloud properties as deduced from the MODIS, CALIPSO and CloudSat data, more enhanced passive satellite methods for retrieving thin cirrus and overlapped cloud properties are needed and are under development.

  5. An A-Train Climatology of Extratropical Cyclone Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posselt, Derek J.; van den Heever, Susan C.; Booth, James F.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Kahn, Brian; Bauer, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Extratropical cyclones (ETCs) are the main purveyors of precipitation in the mid-latitudes, especially in winter, and have a significant radiative impact through the clouds they generate. However, general circulation models (GCMs) have trouble representing precipitation and clouds in ETCs, and this might partly explain why current GCMs disagree on to the evolution of these systems in a warming climate. Collectively, the A-train observations of MODIS, CloudSat, CALIPSO, AIRS and AMSR-E have given us a unique perspective on ETCs: over the past 10 years these observations have allowed us to construct a climatology of clouds and precipitation associated with these storms. This has proved very useful for model evaluation as well in studies aimed at improving understanding of moist processes in these dynamically active conditions. Using the A-train observational suite and an objective cyclone and front identification algorithm we have constructed cyclone centric datasets that consist of an observation-based characterization of clouds and precipitation in ETCs and their sensitivity to large scale environments. In this presentation, we will summarize the advances in our knowledge of the climatological properties of cloud and precipitation in ETCs acquired with this unique dataset. In particular, we will present what we have learned about southern ocean ETCs, for which the A-train observations have filled a gap in this data sparse region. In addition, CloudSat and CALIPSO have for the first time provided information on the vertical distribution of clouds in ETCs and across warm and cold fronts. We will also discuss how these observations have helped identify key areas for improvement in moist processes in recent GCMs. Recently, we have begun to explore the interaction between aerosol and cloud cover in ETCs using MODIS, CloudSat and CALIPSO. We will show how aerosols are climatologically distributed within northern hemisphere ETCs, and how this relates to cloud cover.

  6. Utilizing The Synergy of Airborne Backscatter Lidar and In-Situ Measurements for Evaluating CALIPSO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsekeri Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Airborne campaigns dedicated to satellite validation are crucial for the effective global aerosol monitoring. CALIPSO is currently the only active remote sensing satellite mission, acquiring the vertical profiles of the aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficients. Here we present a method for CALIPSO evaluation from combining lidar and in-situ airborne measurements. The limitations of the method have to do mainly with the in-situ instrumentation capabilities and the hydration modelling. We also discuss the future implementation of our method in the ICE-D campaign (Cape Verde, August 2015.

  7. Identification of Dust and Ice Cloud Formation from A-Train Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, D. S.; Liou, K. N.

    2014-12-01

    Dust aerosols are effective ice nuclei for clouds and instances of nucleation have been well studied in laboratory experiments. We used CALIOP/CALIPSO, MODIS/Aqua, and CloudSat on the A-Train to find collocated instances of clouds characterized as water by MODIS, but contain ice water as indicated by CloudSat. The vertical profiles of CALIPSO detect the presence of dust and polluted dust near clouds. This study concentrates on high dust aerosol areas including the regions surrounding the Sahara Desert as well as South Asia including the Tibetan Plateau. These cases display the effects of dust acting as ice nuclei in the time frame between MODIS overpass and CloudSat overpass (~45 seconds). Utilizing available datasets, we then carried out radiative transfer calculations to understand spectral radiative forcing differences between water and ice clouds, particularly over snow surfaces at the Tibetan Plateau.

  8. CALIPSO lidar calibration at 532 nm: version 4 nighttime algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Jayanta; Vaughan, Mark A.; Lee, Kam-Pui; Tackett, Jason L.; Avery, Melody A.; Garnier, Anne; Getzewich, Brian J.; Hunt, William H.; Josset, Damien; Liu, Zhaoyan; Lucker, Patricia L.; Magill, Brian; Omar, Ali H.; Pelon, Jacques; Rogers, Raymond R.; Toth, Travis D.; Trepte, Charles R.; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Winker, David M.; Young, Stuart A.

    2018-03-01

    Data products from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) were recently updated following the implementation of new (version 4) calibration algorithms for all of the Level 1 attenuated backscatter measurements. In this work we present the motivation for and the implementation of the version 4 nighttime 532 nm parallel channel calibration. The nighttime 532 nm calibration is the most fundamental calibration of CALIOP data, since all of CALIOP's other radiometric calibration procedures - i.e., the 532 nm daytime calibration and the 1064 nm calibrations during both nighttime and daytime - depend either directly or indirectly on the 532 nm nighttime calibration. The accuracy of the 532 nm nighttime calibration has been significantly improved by raising the molecular normalization altitude from 30-34 km to the upper possible signal acquisition range of 36-39 km to substantially reduce stratospheric aerosol contamination. Due to the greatly reduced molecular number density and consequently reduced signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at these higher altitudes, the signal is now averaged over a larger number of samples using data from multiple adjacent granules. Additionally, an enhanced strategy for filtering the radiation-induced noise from high-energy particles was adopted. Further, the meteorological model used in the earlier versions has been replaced by the improved Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications, Version 2 (MERRA-2), model. An aerosol scattering ratio of 1.01 ± 0.01 is now explicitly used for the calibration altitude. These modifications lead to globally revised calibration coefficients which are, on average, 2-3 % lower than in previous data releases. Further, the new calibration procedure is shown to eliminate biases at high altitudes that were present in earlier versions and consequently leads to an improved representation of

  9. Selection Algorithm for the CALIPSO Lidar Aerosol Extinction-to-Backscatter Ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Ali H.; Winker, David M.; Vaughan, Mark A.

    2006-01-01

    The extinction-to-backscatter ratio (S(sub a)) is an important parameter used in the determination of the aerosol extinction and subsequently the optical depth from lidar backscatter measurements. We outline the algorithm used to determine Sa for the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Spaceborne Observations (CALIPSO) lidar. S(sub a) for the CALIPSO lidar will either be selected from a look-up table or calculated using the lidar measurements depending on the characteristics of aerosol layer. Whenever suitable lofted layers are encountered, S(sub a) is computed directly from the integrated backscatter and transmittance. In all other cases, the CALIPSO observables: the depolarization ratio, delta, the layer integrated attenuated backscatter, beta, and the mean layer total attenuated color ratio, gamma, together with the surface type, are used to aid in aerosol typing. Once the type is identified, a look-up-table developed primarily from worldwide observations, is used to determine the S(sub a) value. The CALIPSO aerosol models include desert dust, biomass burning, background, polluted continental, polluted dust, and marine aerosols.

  10. Biomass burning aerosol over Romania using dispersion model and Calipso data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolae, Victor; Dandocsi, Alexandru; Marmureanu, Luminita; Talianu, Camelia

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of the study is to analyze the seasonal variability, for the hot and cold seasons, of biomass burning aerosol observed over Romania using forward dispersion calculations based on FLEXPART model. The model was set up to use as input the MODIS fire data with a degree of confidence over 25% after transforming the emitted power in emission rate. The modelled aerosols in this setup was black carbon coated by organics. Distribution in the upper layers were compared to Calipso retrieval.

  11. Airborne dust distributions over the Tibetan Plateau and surrounding areas derived from the first year of CALIPSO lidar observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Liu

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Using an analysis of the first full year of CALIPSO lidar measurements, this paper derives unprecedented, altitude-resolved seasonal distributions of desert dust transported over the Tibetan Plateau (TP and the surrounding areas. The CALIPSO lidar observations include numerous large dust plumes over the northern slope and eastern part of the TP, with the largest number of dust events occurring in the spring of 2007, and some layers being lofted to altitudes of 11–12 km. Generation of the Tibetan airborne dusts appears to be largely associated with source regions to the north and on the eastern part of the plateau. Examination of the CALIPSO time history reveals an "airborne dust corridor" due to the eastward transport of dusts originating primarily in these source areas. This corridor extends from west to east and shows a seasonality largely modulated by the TP through its dynamical and thermal forcing on the atmospheric flows. On the southern side, desert dust particles originate predominately in Northwest India and Pakistan. The dust transport occurs primarily in dry seasons around the TP western and southern slopes and dust particles become mixed with local polluted aerosols. No significant amount of dust appears to be transported over the Himalayas. Extensive forward trajectory simulations are also conducted to confirm the dust transport pattern from the nearby sources observed by the CALIPSO lidar. Comparisons with the OMI and MODIS measurements show the unique capability of the CALIPSO lidar to provide unambiguous, altitude-resolved dust measurements.

  12. Cloud type comparisons of AIRS, CloudSat, and CALIPSO cloud height and amount

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. H. Kahn

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The precision of the two-layer cloud height fields derived from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS is explored and quantified for a five-day set of observations. Coincident profiles of vertical cloud structure by CloudSat, a 94 GHz profiling radar, and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO, are compared to AIRS for a wide range of cloud types. Bias and variability in cloud height differences are shown to have dependence on cloud type, height, and amount, as well as whether CloudSat or CALIPSO is used as the comparison standard. The CloudSat-AIRS biases and variability range from −4.3 to 0.5±1.2–3.6 km for all cloud types. Likewise, the CALIPSO-AIRS biases range from 0.6–3.0±1.2–3.6 km (−5.8 to −0.2±0.5–2.7 km for clouds ≥7 km (<7 km. The upper layer of AIRS has the greatest sensitivity to Altocumulus, Altostratus, Cirrus, Cumulonimbus, and Nimbostratus, whereas the lower layer has the greatest sensitivity to Cumulus and Stratocumulus. Although the bias and variability generally decrease with increasing cloud amount, the ability of AIRS to constrain cloud occurrence, height, and amount is demonstrated across all cloud types for many geophysical conditions. In particular, skill is demonstrated for thin Cirrus, as well as some Cumulus and Stratocumulus, cloud types infrared sounders typically struggle to quantify. Furthermore, some improvements in the AIRS Version 5 operational retrieval algorithm are demonstrated. However, limitations in AIRS cloud retrievals are also revealed, including the existence of spurious Cirrus near the tropopause and low cloud layers within Cumulonimbus and Nimbostratus clouds. Likely causes of spurious clouds are identified and the potential for further improvement is discussed.

  13. Chaos, Consternation and CALIPSO Calibration: New Strategies for Calibrating the CALIOP 1064 nm Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Mark; Garnier, Anne; Liu, Zhaoyan; Josset, Damien; Hu, Yongxiang; Lee, Kam-Pui; Hunt, William; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Rodier, Sharon; Pelon, Jaques; hide

    2012-01-01

    The very low signal-to-noise ratios of the 1064 nm CALIOP molecular backscatter signal make it effectively impossible to employ the "clear air" normalization technique typically used to calibrate elastic back-scatter lidars. The CALIPSO mission has thus chosen to cross-calibrate their 1064 nm measurements with respect to the 532 nm data using the two-wavelength backscatter from cirrus clouds. In this paper we discuss several known issues in the version 3 CALIOP 1064 nm calibration procedure, and describe the strategies that will be employed in the version 4 data release to surmount these problems.

  14. Global statistics of liquid water content and effective number concentration of water clouds over ocean derived from combined CALIPSO and MODIS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Y.; Vaughan, M.; McClain, C.; Behrenfeld, M.; Maring, H.; Anderson, D.; Sun-Mack, S.; Flittner, D.; Huang, J.; Wielicki, B.; Minnis, P.; Weimer, C.; Trepte, C.; Kuehn, R.

    2007-06-01

    This study presents an empirical relation that links the volume extinction coefficients of water clouds, the layer integrated depolarization ratios measured by lidar, and the effective radii of water clouds derived from collocated passive sensor observations. Based on Monte Carlo simulations of CALIPSO lidar observations, this method combines the cloud effective radius reported by MODIS with the lidar depolarization ratios measured by CALIPSO to estimate both the liquid water content and the effective number concentration of water clouds. The method is applied to collocated CALIPSO and MODIS measurements obtained during July and October of 2006, and January 2007. Global statistics of the cloud liquid water content and effective number concentration are presented.

  15. Validation of CALIPSO space-borne-derived attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles using a ground-based lidar in Athens, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Mamouri

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We present initial aerosol validation results of the space-borne lidar CALIOP -onboard the CALIPSO satellite- Level 1 attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles, using coincident observations performed with a ground-based lidar in Athens, Greece (37.9° N, 23.6° E. A multi-wavelength ground-based backscatter/Raman lidar system is operating since 2000 at the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA in the framework of the European Aerosol Research LIdar NETwork (EARLINET, the first lidar network for tropospheric aerosol studies on a continental scale. Since July 2006, a total of 40 coincidental aerosol ground-based lidar measurements were performed over Athens during CALIPSO overpasses. The ground-based measurements were performed each time CALIPSO overpasses the station location within a maximum distance of 100 km. The duration of the ground–based lidar measurements was approximately two hours, centred on the satellite overpass time. From the analysis of the ground-based/satellite correlative lidar measurements, a mean bias of the order of 22% for daytime measurements and of 8% for nighttime measurements with respect to the CALIPSO profiles was found for altitudes between 3 and 10 km. The mean bias becomes much larger for altitudes lower that 3 km (of the order of 60% which is attributed to the increase of aerosol horizontal inhomogeneity within the Planetary Boundary Layer, resulting to the observation of possibly different air masses by the two instruments. In cases of aerosol layers underlying Cirrus clouds, comparison results for aerosol tropospheric profiles become worse. This is attributed to the significant multiple scattering effects in Cirrus clouds experienced by CALIPSO which result in an attenuation which is less than that measured by the ground-based lidar.

  16. 3D Online Visualization and Synergy of NASA A-Train Data Using Google Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Aijun; Kempler, Steven; Leptoukh, Gregory; Smith, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This poster presentation reviews the use of Google Earth to assist in three dimensional online visualization of NASA Earth science and geospatial data. The NASA A-Train satellite constellation is a succession of seven sun-synchronous orbit satellites: (1) OCO-2 (Orbiting Carbon Observatory) (will launch in Feb. 2013), (2) GCOM-W1 (Global Change Observation Mission), (3) Aqua, (4) CloudSat, (5) CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar & Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations), (6) Glory, (7) Aura. The A-Train makes possible synergy of information from multiple resources, so more information about earth condition is obtained from the combined observations than would be possible from the sum of the observations taken independently

  17. CALIPSO satellite validation using an elastic backscattering Lidar system and the AERONET sun photometer data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Fabio Juliano da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Aerosol and clouds play an important role in the Earth's climate process through their direct and indirect contributions to the radiation budget. The largest difficulty in predicting the climate change processes is associated with uncertainties in the distribution and properties of aerosols and clouds, as well as their interactions on a global scale. The CALIPSO mission was developed as part of the NASA program, in collaboration with the French space agency CNES, with the main goal to develop studies that will help to quantify the uncertainties about aerosols and clouds. The CALIPSO satellite carried a Lidar system on board, named CALIOP, as a primary instrument, able to provide the aerosol and cloud vertical profiles and distribution, as well as their interactions. Once the optical properties measured by CALIOP are retrieved, using a complex set of algorithms, it is necessary to study and develop methodologies in order to assess the accuracy of the CALIOP products. In this context, a validation methodology was developed in order to verify the assumed values of the Lidar Ratio selected by the CALIOP algorithms, using two ground-based remote sensing instruments, an elastic backscatter Lidar system (MSP) installed at IPEN in Sao Paulo and the AERONET sun photometers operating at five different locations in Brazil, Rio Branco - Acre (RB), Alta Floresta - Mato Grosso (AF), Cuiaba - Mato Grosso (CB), Campo Grande - Mato Grosso do Sul (CG) e Sao Paulo - Sao Paulo (SP). Those days when the CALIOP system and ground-based instruments spatially coincided, were selected and analyzed under cloud-free conditions, as well as days when the trajectories of air masses indicated the transport of air parcels from the CALIOP track towards the ground-based sensors. The Lidar Ratio values from the Aeronet/Caliop proposed model was determined and showed good consistency with those initially assumed by the CALIOP Algorithm. Based on the quantitative comparison, a mean difference of -2

  18. A-Train Observations of Deep Convective Storm Tops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setvak, Martin; Bedka, Kristopher; Lindsey, Daniel T.; Sokol, Alois; Charvat, Zdenek; Stastka, Jindrich; Wang, Pao K.

    2013-01-01

    The paper highlights simultaneous observations of tops of deep convective clouds from several space-borne instruments including the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) of the Aqua satellite, Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) of the CloudSat satellite, and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) flown on the CALIPSO satellite. These satellites share very close orbits, thus together with several other satellites they are referred to as the "A-Train" constellation. Though the primary responsibility of these satellites and their instrumentation is much broader than observations of fine-scale processes atop convective storms, in this study we document how data from the A-Train can contribute to a better understanding and interpretation of various storm-top features, such as overshooting tops, cold-U/V and cold ring features with their coupled embedded warm areas, above anvil ice plumes and jumping cirrus. The relationships between MODIS multi-spectral brightness temperature difference (BTD) fields and cloud top signatures observed by the CPR and CALIOP are also examined in detail to highlight the variability in BTD signals across convective storm events.

  19. Effect of CALIPSO Cloud Aerosol Discrimination (CAD) Confidence Levels on Observations of Aerosol Properties near Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weidong; Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas; Liu, Zhaoyan

    2012-01-01

    CALIPSO aerosol backscatter enhancement in the transition zone between clouds and clear sky areas is revisited with particular attention to effects of data selection based on the confidence level of cloud-aerosol discrimination (CAD). The results show that backscatter behavior in the transition zone strongly depends on the CAD confidence level. Higher confidence level data has a flatter backscatter far away from clouds and a much sharper increase near clouds (within 4 km), thus a smaller transition zone. For high confidence level data it is shown that the overall backscatter enhancement is more pronounced for small clear-air segments and horizontally larger clouds. The results suggest that data selection based on CAD reduces the possible effects of cloud contamination when studying aerosol properties in the vicinity of clouds.

  20. 3D Structure of Saharan Dust Transport Towards Europe as Seen by CALIPSO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinou Eleni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a 3D multi-year monthly mean climatology of Saharan dust advection over Europe using an area-optimized pure dust CALIPSO product. The product has been developed by applying EARLINET-measured dust lidar ratios and depolarization-based dust discrimination methods and it is shown to have a very good agreement in terms of AOD when compared to AERONET over Europe/North Africa and MODIS over Mediterranean. The processing of such purely observational data reveals the certain seasonal patterns of dust transportation towards Europe and the Atlantic Ocean. The physical and optical properties of the dust layer are identified for several areas near the Saharan sources, over the Mediterranean and over continental Europe.

  1. CaLIPSO: An novel detector concept for positron annihilation detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yvon, D.; Tauzin, G.; Verrecchia, P.; Flouzat, C.; Sharyy, S.; Ramos, E.; Renault, J-Ph.

    2013-06-01

    The CaLIPSO project focuses on the development of an innovative energetic-photon detector. The detector uses a 'heavy' organometallic liquid: the Trimethyl Bismuth (TMBi), 82% by weight of Bismuth. TMBi efficiently converts through the photo-electric effect photons of energies below 1 MeV. The ionisation signal and light produced in the liquid are both detected. Beyond the measurement of gamma photon energies, this detector will allow locating photon interactions in the detector in three dimensions down to 1 mm 3 and a sub nanosecond timing accuracy. All these desirable properties can be obtained simultaneously with liquid TMBi detector. The optical properties relevant for particle detection are measured. Preliminary results on TMBi ionization properties are shown. (authors)

  2. Analysis of co-located MODIS and CALIPSO observations near clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Várnai

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at helping synergistic studies in combining data from different satellites for gaining new insights into two critical yet poorly understood aspects of anthropogenic climate change, aerosol-cloud interactions and aerosol radiative effects. In particular, the paper examines the way cloud information from the MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer imager can refine our perceptions based on CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization lidar measurements about the systematic aerosol changes that occur near clouds.

    The statistical analysis of a yearlong dataset of co-located global maritime observations from the Aqua and CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation satellites reveals that MODIS's multispectral imaging ability can greatly help the interpretation of CALIOP observations. The results show that imagers on Aqua and CALIPSO yield very similar pictures, and that the discrepancies – due mainly to wind drift and differences in view angle – do not significantly hinder aerosol measurements near clouds. By detecting clouds outside the CALIOP track, MODIS reveals that clouds are usually closer to clear areas than CALIOP data alone would suggest. The paper finds statistical relationships between the distances to clouds in MODIS and CALIOP data, and proposes a rescaling approach to statistically account for the impact of clouds outside the CALIOP track even when MODIS cannot reliably detect low clouds, for example at night or over sea ice. Finally, the results show that the typical distance to clouds depends on both cloud coverage and cloud type, and accordingly varies with location and season. In maritime areas perceived cloud free, the global median distance to clouds below 3 km altitude is in the 4–5 km range.

  3. Clouds vertical properties over the Northern Hemisphere monsoon regions from CloudSat-CALIPSO measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Subrata Kumar; Golhait, R. B.; Uma, K. N.

    2017-01-01

    The CloudSat spaceborne radar and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) space-borne lidar measurements, provide opportunities to understand the intriguing behavior of the vertical structure of monsoon clouds. The combined CloudSat-CALIPSO data products have been used for the summer season (June-August) of 2006-2010 to present the statistics of cloud macrophysical (such as cloud occurrence frequency, distribution of cloud top and base heights, geometrical thickness and cloud types base on occurrence height), and microphysical (such as ice water content, ice water path, and ice effective radius) properties of the Northern Hemisphere (NH) monsoon region. The monsoon regions considered in this work are the North American (NAM), North African (NAF), Indian (IND), East Asian (EAS), and Western North Pacific (WNP). The total cloud fraction over the IND (mostly multiple-layered cloud) appeared to be more frequent as compared to the other monsoon regions. Three distinctive modes of cloud top height distribution are observed over all the monsoon regions. The high-level cloud fraction is comparatively high over the WNP and IND. The ice water content and ice water path over the IND are maximum compared to the other monsoon regions. We found that the ice water content has little variations over the NAM, NAF, IND, and WNP as compared to their macrophysical properties and thus give an impression that the regional differences in dynamics and thermodynamics properties primarily cause changes in the cloud frequency or coverage and only secondary in the cloud ice properties. The background atmospheric dynamics using wind and relative humidity from the ERA-Interim reanalysis data have also been investigated which helps in understanding the variability of the cloud properties over the different monsoon regions.

  4. Constraining the models' response of tropical low clouds to SST forcings using CALIPSO observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesana, G.; Del Genio, A. D.; Ackerman, A. S.; Brient, F.; Fridlind, A. M.; Kelley, M.; Elsaesser, G.

    2017-12-01

    Low-cloud response to a warmer climate is still pointed out as being the largest source of uncertainty in the last generation of climate models. To date there is no consensus among the models on whether the tropical low cloudiness would increase or decrease in a warmer climate. In addition, it has been shown that - depending on their climate sensitivity - the models either predict deeper or shallower low clouds. Recently, several relationships between inter-model characteristics of the present-day climate and future climate changes have been highlighted. These so-called emergent constraints aim to target relevant model improvements and to constrain models' projections based on current climate observations. Here we propose to use - for the first time - 10 years of CALIPSO cloud statistics to assess the ability of the models to represent the vertical structure of tropical low clouds for abnormally warm SST. We use a simulator approach to compare observations and simulations and focus on the low-layered clouds (i.e. z fraction. Vertically, the clouds deepen namely by decreasing the cloud fraction in the lowest levels and increasing it around the top of the boundary-layer. This feature is coincident with an increase of the high-level cloud fraction (z > 6.5km). Although the models' spread is large, the multi-model mean captures the observed variations but with a smaller amplitude. We then employ the GISS model to investigate how changes in cloud parameterizations affect the response of low clouds to warmer SSTs on the one hand; and how they affect the variations of the model's cloud profiles with respect to environmental parameters on the other hand. Finally, we use CALIPSO observations to constrain the model by determining i) what set of parameters allows reproducing the observed relationships and ii) what are the consequences on the cloud feedbacks. These results point toward process-oriented constraints of low-cloud responses to surface warming and environmental

  5. Global statistics of liquid water content and effective number density of water clouds over ocean derived from combined CALIPSO and MODIS measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Hu; M. Vaughan; C. McClain; M. Behrenfeld; H. Maring; D. Anderson; S. Sun-Mack; D. Flittner; J. Huang; B. Wielicki; P. Minnis; C. Weimer; C. Trepte; R. Kuehn

    2007-01-01

    International audience; This study presents an empirical relation that links layer integrated depolarization ratios, the extinction coefficients, and effective radii of water clouds, based on Monte Carlo simulations of CALIPSO lidar observations. Combined with cloud effective radius retrieved from MODIS, cloud liquid water content and effective number density of water clouds are estimated from CALIPSO lidar depolarization measurements in this study. Global statistics of the cloud liquid water...

  6. Global statistics of liquid water content and effective number concentration of water clouds over ocean derived from combined CALIPSO and MODIS measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Y.; Vaughan, M.; McClain, C.; Behrenfeld, M.; Maring, H.; Anderson, D.; Sun-Mack, S.; Flittner, D.; Huang, J.; Wielicki, B.; Minnis, P.; Weimer, C.; Trepte, C.; Kuehn, R.

    2007-01-01

    International audience; This study presents an empirical relation that links the volume extinction coefficients of water clouds, the layer integrated depolarization ratios measured by lidar, and the effective radii of water clouds derived from collocated passive sensor observations. Based on Monte Carlo simulations of CALIPSO lidar observations, this method combines the cloud effective radius reported by MODIS with the lidar depolarization ratios measured by CALIPSO to estimate both the liqui...

  7. Global statistics of liquid water content and effective number density of water clouds over ocean derived from combined CALIPSO and MODIS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Y.; Vaughan, M.; McClain, C.; Behrenfeld, M.; Maring, H.; Anderson, D.; Sun-Mack, S.; Flittner, D.; Huang, J.; Wielicki, B.; Minnis, P.; Weimer, C.; Trepte, C.; Kuehn, R.

    2007-03-01

    This study presents an empirical relation that links layer integrated depolarization ratios, the extinction coefficients, and effective radii of water clouds, based on Monte Carlo simulations of CALIPSO lidar observations. Combined with cloud effective radius retrieved from MODIS, cloud liquid water content and effective number density of water clouds are estimated from CALIPSO lidar depolarization measurements in this study. Global statistics of the cloud liquid water content and effective number density are presented.

  8. Patterns of North African dust transport over the Atlantic: winter vs. summer, based on CALIPSO first year data

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Ben-Ami; I. Koren; O. Altaratz

    2009-01-01

    One of the most important factors that determine the transported dust effect on the atmosphere is its vertical distribution. In this study the vertical structure of North African dust and stratiform low clouds is analyzed over the Atlantic Ocean for the 2006–2007 boreal winter (December–February) and boreal summer of 2006 (June–August). By using the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) backscatter measurements over the dust routes, we describe the differ...

  9. Extinction-to-Backscatter Ratios of Saharan Dust Layers Derived from In-Situ Measurements and CALIPSO Overflights During NAMMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Ali H.; Liu, Zhaoyan; Vaughan, Mark A.; Hu, Yongxiang; Ismail, Syed; Powell, Kathleen A.; Winker, David M.; Trepte, Charles R.; Anderson, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    We determine the aerosol extinction-to-backscatter (Sa) ratios of dust using airborne in-situ measurements of microphysical properties, and CALIPSO observations during the NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (NAMMA). The NAMMA field experiment was conducted from Sal, Cape Verde during Aug-Sept 2006. Using CALIPSO measurements of the attenuated backscatter of lofted Saharan dust layers, we apply the transmittance technique to estimate dust Sa ratios at 532 nm and a 2-color method to determine the corresponding 1064 nm Sa. Using this method, we found dust Sa ratios of 39.8 plus or minus 1.4 sr and 51.8 plus or minus 3.6 sr at 532 nm and 1064 nm, respectively. Secondly, Sa ratios at both wavelengths is independently calculated using size distributions measured aboard the NASA DC-8 and estimates of Saharan dust complex refractive indices applied in a T-Matrix scheme. We found Sa ratios of 39.1 plus or minus 3.5 sr and 50.0 plus or minus 4 sr at 532 nm and 1064 nm, respectively, using the T-Matrix calculations applied to measured size spectra. Finally, in situ measurements of the total scattering (550 nm) and absorption coefficients (532 nm) are used to generate an extinction profile that is used to constrain the CALIPSO 532 nm extinction profile.

  10. Blowing snow sublimation and transport over Antarctica from 11 years of CALIPSO observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Palm

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Blowing snow processes commonly occur over the earth's ice sheets when the 10 m wind speed exceeds a threshold value. These processes play a key role in the sublimation and redistribution of snow thereby influencing the surface mass balance. Prior field studies and modeling results have shown the importance of blowing snow sublimation and transport on the surface mass budget and hydrological cycle of high-latitude regions. For the first time, we present continent-wide estimates of blowing snow sublimation and transport over Antarctica for the period 2006–2016 based on direct observation of blowing snow events. We use an improved version of the blowing snow detection algorithm developed for previous work that uses atmospheric backscatter measurements obtained from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization lidar aboard the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation satellite. The blowing snow events identified by CALIPSO and meteorological fields from MERRA-2 are used to compute the blowing snow sublimation and transport rates. Our results show that maximum sublimation occurs along and slightly inland of the coastline. This is contrary to the observed maximum blowing snow frequency which occurs over the interior. The associated temperature and moisture reanalysis fields likely contribute to the spatial distribution of the maximum sublimation values. However, the spatial pattern of the sublimation rate over Antarctica is consistent with modeling studies and precipitation estimates. Overall, our results show that the 2006–2016 Antarctica average integrated blowing snow sublimation is about 393 ± 196 Gt yr−1, which is considerably larger than previous model-derived estimates. We find maximum blowing snow transport amount of 5 Mt km−1 yr−1 over parts of East Antarctica and estimate that the average snow transport from continent to ocean is about 3.7 Gt yr−1. These

  11. Probability Density Functions for the CALIPSO Lidar Version 4 Cloud-Aerosol Discrimination (CAD) Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Kar, J.; Zeng, S.; Tackett, J. L.; Vaughan, M.; Trepte, C. R.; Omar, A. H.; Hu, Y.; Winker, D. M.

    2017-12-01

    In the CALIPSO retrieval algorithm, detection layers in the lidar measurements is followed by their classification as a "cloud" or "aerosol" using 5-dimensional probability density functions (PDFs). The five dimensions are the mean attenuated backscatter at 532 nm, the layer integrated total attenuated color ratio, the mid-layer altitude, integrated volume depolarization ratio and latitude. The new version 4 (V4) level 2 (L2) data products, released in November 2016, are the first major revision to the L2 product suite since May 2010. Significant calibration changes in the V4 level 1 data necessitated substantial revisions to the V4 L2 CAD algorithm. Accordingly, a new set of PDFs was generated to derive the V4 L2 data products. The V4 CAD algorithm is now applied to layers detected in the stratosphere, where volcanic layers and occasional cloud and smoke layers are observed. Previously, these layers were designated as `stratospheric', and not further classified. The V4 CAD algorithm is also applied to all layers detected at single shot (333 m) resolution. In prior data releases, single shot detections were uniformly classified as clouds. The CAD PDFs used in the earlier releases were generated using a full year (2008) of CALIPSO measurements. Because the CAD algorithm was not applied to stratospheric features, the properties of these layers were not incorporated into the PDFs. When building the V4 PDFs, the 2008 data were augmented with additional data from June 2011, and all stratospheric features were included. The Nabro and Puyehue-Cordon volcanos erupted in June 2011, and volcanic aerosol layers were observed in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere in both the northern and southern hemispheres. The June 2011 data thus provides the stratospheric aerosol properties needed for comprehensive PDF generation. In contrast to earlier versions of the PDFs, which were generated based solely on observed distributions, construction of the V4 PDFs considered the

  12. CALIPSO: an interactive image analysis software package for desktop PACS workstations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratib, Osman M.; Huang, H. K.

    1990-07-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop a low cost workstation for quantitative analysis of multimodality images using a Macintosh II personal computer. In the current configuration the Macintosh operates as a stand alone workstation where images are imported either from a central PACS server through a standard Ethernet network or recorded through video digitizer board. The CALIPSO software developed contains a large variety ofbasic image display and manipulation tools. We focused our effort however on the design and implementation ofquantitative analysis methods that can be applied to images from different imaging modalities. Analysis modules currently implemented include geometric and densitometric volumes and ejection fraction calculation from radionuclide and cine-angiograms Fourier analysis ofcardiac wall motion vascular stenosis measurement color coded parametric display of regional flow distribution from dynamic coronary angiograms automatic analysis ofmyocardial distribution ofradiolabelled tracers from tomoscintigraphic images. Several of these analysis tools were selected because they use similar color coded andparametric display methods to communicate quantitative data extracted from the images. 1. Rationale and objectives of the project Developments of Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) in clinical environment allow physicians and radiologists to assess radiographic images directly through imaging workstations (''). This convenient access to the images is often limited by the number of workstations available due in part to their high cost. There is also an increasing need for quantitative analysis ofthe images. During thepast decade

  13. Global statistics of liquid water content and effective number concentration of water clouds over ocean derived from combined CALIPSO and MODIS measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Hu

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an empirical relation that links the volume extinction coefficients of water clouds, the layer integrated depolarization ratios measured by lidar, and the effective radii of water clouds derived from collocated passive sensor observations. Based on Monte Carlo simulations of CALIPSO lidar observations, this method combines the cloud effective radius reported by MODIS with the lidar depolarization ratios measured by CALIPSO to estimate both the liquid water content and the effective number concentration of water clouds. The method is applied to collocated CALIPSO and MODIS measurements obtained during July and October of 2006, and January 2007. Global statistics of the cloud liquid water content and effective number concentration are presented.

  14. Subtropical and Polar Cirrus Clouds Characterized by Ground-Based Lidars and CALIPSO/CALIOP Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Córdoba-Jabonero Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cirrus clouds are product of weather processes, and then their occurrence and macrophysical/optical properties can vary significantly over different regions of the world. Lidars can provide height-resolved measurements with a relatively good both vertical and temporal resolutions, making them the most suitable instrumentation for high-cloud observations. The aim of this work is to show the potential of lidar observations on Cirrus clouds detection in combination with a recently proposed methodology to retrieve the Cirrus clouds macrophysical and optical features. In this sense, a few case studies of cirrus clouds observed at both subtropical and polar latitudes are examined and compared to CALIPSO/CALIOP observations. Lidar measurements are carried out in two stations: the Metropolitan city of Sao Paulo (MSP, Brazil, 23.3°S 46.4°W, located at subtropical latitudes, and the Belgrano II base (BEL, Argentina, 78ºS 35ºW in the Antarctic continent. Optical (COD-cloud optical depth and LR-Lidar Ratio and macrophysical (top/base heights and thickness properties of both the subtropical and polar cirrus clouds are reported. In general, subtropical Cirrus clouds present lower LR values and are found at higher altitudes than those detected at polar latitudes. In general, Cirrus clouds are detected at similar altitudes by CALIOP. However, a poor agreement is achieved in the LR retrieved between ground-based lidars and space-borne CALIOP measurements, likely due to the use of a fixed (or low-variable LR value in CALIOP inversion procedures.

  15. Polar stratospheric cloud evolution and chlorine activation measured by CALIPSO and MLS, and modeled by ATLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nakajima

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We examined observations of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs by CALIPSO, and of HCl and ClO by MLS along air mass trajectories, to investigate the dependence of the inferred PSC composition on the temperature history of the air parcels and the dependence of the level of chlorine activation on PSC composition. Several case studies based on individual trajectories from the Arctic winter 2009/2010 were conducted, with the trajectories chosen such that the first processing of the air mass by PSCs in this winter occurred on the trajectory. Transitions of PSC composition classes were observed to be highly dependent on the temperature history. In cases of a gradual temperature decrease, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT and super-cooled ternary solution (STS mixture clouds were observed. In cases of rapid temperature decrease, STS clouds were first observed, followed by NAT/STS mixture clouds. When temperatures dropped below the frost point, ice clouds formed and then transformed into NAT/STS mixture clouds when temperature increased above the frost point. The threshold temperature for rapid chlorine activation on PSCs is approximately 4 K below the NAT existence temperature, TNAT. Furthermore, simulations of the ATLAS chemistry and transport box model along the trajectories were used to corroborate the measurements and show good agreement with the observations. Rapid chlorine activation was observed when an air mass encountered PSCs. Usually, chlorine activation was limited by the amount of available ClONO2. Where ClONO2 was not the limiting factor, a large dependence on temperature was evident.

  16. Climate Impacts of CALIPSO-Guided Corrections to Black Carbon Aerosol Vertical Distributions in a Global Climate Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovilakam, Mahesh; Mahajan, Salil; Saravanan, R.; Chang, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Here, we alleviate the bias in the tropospheric vertical distribution of black carbon aerosols (BC) in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4) using the Cloud-Aerosol and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO)-derived vertical profiles. A suite of sensitivity experiments are conducted with 1x, 5x, and 10x the present-day model estimated BC concentration climatology, with (corrected, CC) and without (uncorrected, UC) CALIPSO-corrected BC vertical distribution. The globally averaged top of the atmosphere radiative flux perturbation of CC experiments is ~8–50% smaller compared to uncorrected (UC) BC experiments largely due to an increase in low-level clouds. The global average surface temperature increases, the global average precipitation decreases, and the ITCZ moves northward with the increase in BC radiative forcing, irrespective of the vertical distribution of BC. Further, tropical expansion metrics for the poleward extent of the Northern Hemisphere Hadley cell (HC) indicate that simulated HC expansion is not sensitive to existing model biases in BC vertical distribution.

  17. Estimating the top altitude of optically thick ice clouds from thermal infrared satellite observations using CALIPSO data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnis, Patrick; Yost, Chris R.; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Chen, Yan

    2008-06-01

    The difference between cloud-top altitude Z top and infrared effective radiating height Z eff for optically thick ice clouds is examined using April 2007 data taken by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) and the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). For even days, the difference ΔZ between CALIPSO Z top and MODIS Z eff is 1.58 +/- 1.26 km. The linear fit between Z top and Z eff , applied to odd-day data, yields a difference of 0.03 +/- 1.21 km and can be used to estimate Z top from any infrared-based Z eff for thick ice clouds. Random errors appear to be due primarily to variations in cloud ice-water content (IWC). Radiative transfer calculations show that ΔZ corresponds to an optical depth of ~1, which based on observed ice-particle sizes yields an average cloud-top IWC of ~0.015 gm-3, a value consistent with in situ measurements. The analysis indicates potential for deriving cloud-top IWC using dual-satellite data.

  18. Analysis of Co-Located MODIS and CALIPSO Observations Near Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnai, Tamas; Marshak, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to help researchers combine data from different satellites and thus gain new insights into two critical yet poorly understood aspects of anthropogenic climate change, aerosol-cloud interactions and aerosol radiative effects, For this, the paper explores whether cloud information from the Aqua satellite's MODIS instrument can help characterize systematic aerosol changes near clouds by refining earlier perceptions of these changes that were based on the CALIPSO satellite's CALIOP instrument. Similar to a radar but using visible and ncar-infrared light, CALIOP sends out laser pulses and provides aerosol and cloud information along a single line that tracks the satellite orbit by measuring the reflection of its pulses. In contrast, MODIS takes images of reflected sunlight and emitted infrared radiation at several wavelengths, and covers wide areas around the satellite track. This paper analyzes a year-long global dataset covering all ice-free oceans, and finds that MODIS can greatly help the interpretation of CALIOP observations, especially by detecting clouds that lie outside the line observed by CALlPSO. The paper also finds that complications such as differences in view direction or clouds drifting in the 72 seconds that elapse between MODIS and CALIOP observations have only a minor impact. The study also finds that MODIS data helps refine but does not qualitatively alter perceptions of the systematic aerosol changes that were detected in earlier studies using only CALIOP data. It then proposes a statistical approach to account for clouds lying outside the CALIOP track even when MODIS cannot as reliably detect low clouds, for example at night or over ice. Finally, the paper finds that, because of variations in cloud amount and type, the typical distance to clouds in maritime clear areas varies with season and location. The overall median distance to clouds in maritime clear areas around 4-5 km. The fact that half of all clear areas is

  19. CALIPSO lidar calibration at 532 nm: version 4 nighttime algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Data products from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP on board Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO were recently updated following the implementation of new (version 4 calibration algorithms for all of the Level 1 attenuated backscatter measurements. In this work we present the motivation for and the implementation of the version 4 nighttime 532 nm parallel channel calibration. The nighttime 532 nm calibration is the most fundamental calibration of CALIOP data, since all of CALIOP's other radiometric calibration procedures – i.e., the 532 nm daytime calibration and the 1064 nm calibrations during both nighttime and daytime – depend either directly or indirectly on the 532 nm nighttime calibration. The accuracy of the 532 nm nighttime calibration has been significantly improved by raising the molecular normalization altitude from 30–34 km to the upper possible signal acquisition range of 36–39 km to substantially reduce stratospheric aerosol contamination. Due to the greatly reduced molecular number density and consequently reduced signal-to-noise ratio (SNR at these higher altitudes, the signal is now averaged over a larger number of samples using data from multiple adjacent granules. Additionally, an enhanced strategy for filtering the radiation-induced noise from high-energy particles was adopted. Further, the meteorological model used in the earlier versions has been replaced by the improved Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications, Version 2 (MERRA-2, model. An aerosol scattering ratio of 1.01 ± 0.01 is now explicitly used for the calibration altitude. These modifications lead to globally revised calibration coefficients which are, on average, 2–3 % lower than in previous data releases. Further, the new calibration procedure is shown to eliminate biases at high altitudes that were present in earlier versions and

  20. CALIPSO - a computer code for the calculation of fluiddynamics, thermohydraulics and changes of geometry in failing fuel elements of a fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kedziur, F.

    1982-07-01

    The computer code CALIPSO was developed for the calculation of a hypothetical accident in an LMFBR (Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor), where the failure of fuel pins is assumed. It calculates two-dimensionally the thermodynamics, fluiddynamics and changes in geometry of a single fuel pin and its coolant channel in a time period between failure of the pin and a state, at which the geometry is nearly destroyed. The determination of temperature profiles in the fuel pin cladding and the channel wall make it possible to take melting and freezing processes into account. Further features of CALIPSO are the variable channel cross section in order to model disturbances of the channel geometry as well as the calculation of two velocity fields including the consideration of virtual mass effects. The documented version of CALIPSO is especially suited for the calculation of the SIMBATH experiments carried out at the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, which simulate the above-mentioned accident. The report contains the complete documentation of the CALIPSO code: the modeling of the geometry, the equations used, the structure of the code and the solution procedure as well as the instructions for use with an application example. (orig.) [de

  1. Improvements of top-of-atmosphere and surface irradiance computations with CALIPSO-, CloudSat-, and MODIS-derived cloud and aerosol properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Seiji; Rose, Fred G.; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Miller, Walter F.; Chen, Yan; Rutan, David A.; Stephens, Graeme L.; Loeb, Norman G.; Minnis, Patrick; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Winker, David M.; Charlock, Thomas P.; Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.; Xu, Kuan-Man; Collins, William D.

    2011-10-01

    One year of instantaneous top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and surface shortwave and longwave irradiances are computed using cloud and aerosol properties derived from instruments on the A-Train Constellation: the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite, the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR), and the Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS). When modeled irradiances are compared with those computed with cloud properties derived from MODIS radiances by a Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) cloud algorithm, the global and annual mean of modeled instantaneous TOA irradiances decreases by 12.5 W m-2 (5.0%) for reflected shortwave and 2.5 W m-2 (1.1%) for longwave irradiances. As a result, the global annual mean of instantaneous TOA irradiances agrees better with CERES-derived irradiances to within 0.5W m-2 (out of 237.8 W m-2) for reflected shortwave and 2.6W m-2 (out of 240.1 W m-2) for longwave irradiances. In addition, the global annual mean of instantaneous surface downward longwave irradiances increases by 3.6 W m-2 (1.0%) when CALIOP- and CPR-derived cloud properties are used. The global annual mean of instantaneous surface downward shortwave irradiances also increases by 8.6 W m-2 (1.6%), indicating that the net surface irradiance increases when CALIOP- and CPR-derived cloud properties are used. Increasing the surface downward longwave irradiance is caused by larger cloud fractions (the global annual mean by 0.11, 0.04 excluding clouds with optical thickness less than 0.3) and lower cloud base heights (the global annual mean by 1.6 km). The increase of the surface downward longwave irradiance in the Arctic exceeds 10 W m-2 (˜4%) in winter because CALIOP and CPR detect more clouds in comparison with the cloud detection by the CERES cloud algorithm during polar night. The global annual mean surface downward longwave irradiance of

  2. A Training Technology Evaluation Tool

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Livingston, Stephen C; Dyer, Jean L; Swinson, Diadra

    2005-01-01

    A Training Technology Evaluation Tool was developed to help procurers and developers of training technologies to make informed decisions and to improve the overall effectiveness of training technologies...

  3. Characterization of the Temporal-Spatial Variability of Trans-Atlantic Dust Transport Based on CALIPSO Lidar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    The trans-Atlantic dust transport has important implications for human and ecosystem health, the terrestrial and oceanic biogeochemical cycle, weather systems, and climate. A reliable assessment of these influences requires the characterization of dust distributions in three dimensions and over long time periods. We provide an observation-based multiyear estimate of trans-Atlantic dust transport by using a 7-year (2007 - 2013) lidar record from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) in both cloud-free and above-cloud conditions. We estimate that on a basis of the 7-year average and integration over 10S - 30N, 182 Tg a-1 dust leaves the coast of North Africa at 15W, of which 132 Tg a-1 and 43 Tg a-1 reaches 35W and 75W, respectively. These flux estimates have an overall known uncertainty of (45 - 70). The 7-year average of dust deposition into the Amazon Basin is estimated to be 28 (8 - 48) Tg a-1 or 29 (8 - 50) kg ha-1 a-1. This imported dust could provide about 0.022 (0.006 - 0.037) Tg P of phosphorus per year, equivalent to 23 (7 - 39) g P ha-1 a-1 to fertilize the Amazon rainforest, which is comparable to the loss of phosphorus to rainfall. Significant seasonal variations are observed in both the magnitude of total dust transport and its meridional and vertical distributions. The observed large interannual variability of annual dust transport is highly anti-correlated with the prior-year Sahel Precipitation Index. Comparisons of CALIPSO measurements with surface-based observations and model simulations will also be discussed.

  4. Reducing the uncertainty in background marine aerosol radiative properties using CAM5 model results and CALIPSO-retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskhidze, N.; Gantt, B.; Dawson, K.; Johnson, M. S.; Gasso, S.

    2012-12-01

    Abundance of natural aerosols in the atmosphere strongly affects global aerosol optical depth (AOD) and influences clouds and the hydrological cycle through its ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Because the anthropogenic contribution to climate forcing represents the difference between the total forcing and that from natural aerosols, understanding background aerosols is necessary to evaluate the influences of anthropogenic aerosols on cloud reflectivity and persistence (so-called indirect radiative forcing). The effects of marine aerosols are explored using remotely sensed data obtained by Cloud-aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) and the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5.0), coupled with the PNNL Modal Aerosol Model. CALIPSO-provided high resolution vertical profile information about different aerosol subtypes (defined as clean continental, marine, desert dust, polluted continental, polluted dust, and biomass burning), particulate depolarization ratio (or particle non-sphericity), reported aerosol color ratio (the ratio of aerosol backscatter at the two wavelengths) and lidar ratios over different parts of the oceans are compared to model-simulations to help evaluate the contribution of biogenic aerosol to CCN budget in the marine boundary layer. Model-simulations show that over biologically productive ocean waters primary organic aerosols of marine origin can contribute up to a 20% increase in CCN (at a supersaturation of 0.2%) number concentrations. Corresponding changes associated with cloud properties (liquid water path and droplet number) can decrease global annual mean indirect radiative forcing of anthropogenic aerosol (less cooling) by ~0.1 Wm-2 (7%). This study suggests ignoring the complex chemical composition and size distribution of sea spray particles could result in considerable uncertainties in predicted anthropogenic aerosol indirect effect.

  5. A 3-D evaluation of the MACC reanalysis dust product over the greater European region using CALIOP/CALIPSO satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgoulias, Aristeidis K.; Tsikerdekis, Athanasios; Amiridis, Vassilis; Marinou, Eleni; Benedetti, Angela; Zanis, Prodromos; Kourtidis, Konstantinos

    2016-04-01

    Significant amounts of dust are being transferred on an annual basis over the Mediterranean Basin and continental Europe from Northern Africa (Sahara Desert) and Middle East (Arabian Peninsula) as well as from other local sources. Dust affects a number of processes in the atmosphere modulating weather and climate also having an impact on human health and the economy. Therefore, the ability of simulating adequately the amount and optical properties of dust is essential. This work focuses on the evaluation of the MACC reanalysis dust product over the regions mentioned above. The evaluation procedure is based on pure dust satellite retrievals from CALIOP/CALIPSO that cover the period 2007-2012. The CALIOP/CALIPSO data utilized here come from an optimized retrieval scheme that was originally developed within the framework of the LIVAS (Lidar Climatology of Vertical Aerosol Structure for Space-Based LIDAR Simulation Studies) project. CALIOP/CALIPSO dust extinction coefficients and dust optical depth patterns at 532 nm are used for the validation of MACC natural aerosol extinction coefficients and dust optical depth patterns at 550 nm. Overall, it is shown in this work that space-based lidars may play a major role in the improvement of the MACC aerosol product. This research has been financed under the FP7 Programme MarcoPolo (Grand Number 606953, Theme SPA.2013.3.2-01).

  6. Cloud occurrences and cloud radiative effects (CREs) from CERES-CALIPSO-CloudSat-MODIS (CCCM) and CloudSat radar-lidar (RL) products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Seung-Hee; Kato, Seiji; Rose, Fred G.; Winker, David; L'Ecuyer, Tristan; Mace, Gerald G.; Painemal, David; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Chen, Yan; Miller, Walter F.

    2017-08-01

    Two kinds of cloud products obtained from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO), CloudSat, and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are compared and analyzed in this study: Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES)-CALIPSO-CloudSat-MODIS (CCCM) product and CloudSat radar-lidar products such as GEOPROF-LIDAR and FLXHR-LIDAR. Compared to GEOPROF-LIDAR, low-level (40°). The difference occurs when hydrometeors are detected by CALIPSO lidar but are undetected by CloudSat radar. In the comparison of cloud radiative effects (CREs), global mean differences between CCCM and FLXHR-LIDAR are mostly smaller than 5 W m-2, while noticeable regional differences are found. For example, CCCM shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) CREs are larger than FXLHR-LIDAR along the west coasts of Africa and America because the GEOPROF-LIDAR algorithm misses shallow marine boundary layer clouds. In addition, FLXHR-LIDAR SW CREs are larger than the CCCM counterpart over tropical oceans away from the west coasts of America. Over midlatitude storm-track regions, CCCM SW and LW CREs are larger than the FLXHR-LIDAR counterpart.

  7. CALIPSO Borehole Instrumentation Project at Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat, BWI: Data Acquisition, Telemetry, Integration, and Archival Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, G. S.; Linde, A. T.; Sacks, I. S.; Malin, P. E.; Shalev, E.; Elsworth, D.; Hidayat, D.; Voight, B.; Young, S. R.; Dunkley, P. N.; Herd, R.; Norton, G.

    2003-12-01

    The CALIPSO Project (Caribbean Andesite Lava Island-volcano Precision Seismo-geodetic Observatory) has greatly enhanced the monitoring and scientific infrastructure at the Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat with the recent installation of an integrated array of borehole and surface geophysical instrumentation at four sites. Each site was designed to be sufficiently hardened to withstand extreme meteorological events (e.g. hurricanes) and only require minimum routine maintenance over an expected observatory lifespan of >30 y. The sensor package at each site includes: a single-component, very broad band, Sacks-Evertson strainmeter, a three-component seismometer ( ˜Hz to 1 kHz), a Pinnacle Technologies series 5000 tiltmeter, and a surface Ashtech u-Z CGPS station with choke ring antenna, SCIGN mount and radome. This instrument package is similar to that envisioned by the Plate Boundary Observatory for deployment on EarthScope target volcanoes in western North America and thus the CALIPSO Project may be considered a prototype PBO installation with real field testing on a very active and dangerous volcano. Borehole sites were installed in series and data acquisition began immediately after the sensors were grouted into position at 200 m depth, with the first completed at Trants (5.8 km from dome) in 12-02, then Air Studios (5.2 km), Geralds (9.4 km), and Olveston (7.0 km) in 3-03. Analog data from the strainmeter (50 Hz sync) and seismometer (200 Hz) were initially digitized and locally archived using RefTek 72A-07 data acquisition systems (DAS) on loan from the PASSCAL instrument pool. Data were downloaded manually to a laptop approximately every month from initial installation until August 2003, when new systems were installed. Approximately 0.2 Tb of raw data in SEGY format have already been acquired and are currently archived at UARK for analysis by the CALIPSO science team. The July 12th dome collapse and vulcanian explosion events were recorded at 3 of the 4

  8. A CloudSat-CALIPSO View of Cloud and Precipitation Properties Across Cold Fronts over the Global Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naud, Catherine M.; Posselt, Derek J.; van den Heever, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of cloud and precipitation properties across oceanic extratropical cyclone cold fronts is examined using four years of combined CloudSat radar and CALIPSO lidar retrievals. The global annual mean cloud and precipitation distributions show that low-level clouds are ubiquitous in the post frontal zone while higher-level cloud frequency and precipitation peak in the warm sector along the surface front. Increases in temperature and moisture within the cold front region are associated with larger high-level but lower mid-/low level cloud frequencies and precipitation decreases in the cold sector. This behavior seems to be related to a shift from stratiform to convective clouds and precipitation. Stronger ascent in the warm conveyor belt tends to enhance cloudiness and precipitation across the cold front. A strong temperature contrast between the warm and cold sectors also encourages greater post-cold-frontal cloud occurrence. While the seasonal contrasts in environmental temperature, moisture, and ascent strength are enough to explain most of the variations in cloud and precipitation across cold fronts in both hemispheres, they do not fully explain the differences between Northern and Southern Hemisphere cold fronts. These differences are better explained when the impact of the contrast in temperature across the cold front is also considered. In addition, these large-scale parameters do not explain the relatively large frequency in springtime post frontal precipitation.

  9. Patterns of North African dust transport over the Atlantic: winter vs. summer, based on CALIPSO first year data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ben-Ami

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important factors that determine the transported dust effect on the atmosphere is its vertical distribution. In this study the vertical structure of North African dust and stratiform low clouds is analyzed over the Atlantic Ocean for the 2006–2007 boreal winter (December–February and boreal summer of 2006 (June–August. By using the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO backscatter measurements over the dust routes, we describe the differences in dust transport between the seasons. We show a bi-modal distribution of the average dust plumes height in both seasons (it is less clear in the winter. The higher plume top height is 5.1±0.4 km, near the African coast line in the summer and 3.7±0.4 km in the winter. The lower plume merges with the marine boundary layer, in both seasons. Our study suggests that a significant part of the dust is transported near and within the marine boundary layer and interacts with low stratiform clouds.

  10. Relationships among cloud occurrence frequency, overlap, and effective thickness derived from CALIPSO and CloudSat merged cloud vertical profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Seiji; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Miller, Walter F.; Rose, Fred G.; Chen, Yan; Minnis, Patrick; Wielicki, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    A cloud frequency of occurrence matrix is generated using merged cloud vertical profiles derived from the satellite-borne Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and cloud profiling radar. The matrix contains vertical profiles of cloud occurrence frequency as a function of the uppermost cloud top. It is shown that the cloud fraction and uppermost cloud top vertical profiles can be related by a cloud overlap matrix when the correlation length of cloud occurrence, which is interpreted as an effective cloud thickness, is introduced. The underlying assumption in establishing the above relation is that cloud overlap approaches random overlap with increasing distance separating cloud layers and that the probability of deviating from random overlap decreases exponentially with distance. One month of Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) and CloudSat data (July 2006) support these assumptions, although the correlation length sometimes increases with separation distance when the cloud top height is large. The data also show that the correlation length depends on cloud top hight and the maximum occurs when the cloud top height is 8 to 10 km. The cloud correlation length is equivalent to the decorrelation distance introduced by Hogan and Illingworth (2000) when cloud fractions of both layers in a two-cloud layer system are the same. The simple relationships derived in this study can be used to estimate the top-of-atmosphere irradiance difference caused by cloud fraction, uppermost cloud top, and cloud thickness vertical profile differences.

  11. Relation of Cloud Occurrence Frequency, Overlap, and Effective Thickness Derived from CALIPSO and CloudSat Merged Cloud Vertical Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Seiji; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Miller, Walter F.; Rose, Fred G.; Chen, Yan; Minnis, Patrick; Wielicki, Bruce A.

    2009-01-01

    A cloud frequency of occurrence matrix is generated using merged cloud vertical profile derived from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR). The matrix contains vertical profiles of cloud occurrence frequency as a function of the uppermost cloud top. It is shown that the cloud fraction and uppermost cloud top vertical pro les can be related by a set of equations when the correlation distance of cloud occurrence, which is interpreted as an effective cloud thickness, is introduced. The underlying assumption in establishing the above relation is that cloud overlap approaches the random overlap with increasing distance separating cloud layers and that the probability of deviating from the random overlap decreases exponentially with distance. One month of CALIPSO and CloudSat data support these assumptions. However, the correlation distance sometimes becomes large, which might be an indication of precipitation. The cloud correlation distance is equivalent to the de-correlation distance introduced by Hogan and Illingworth [2000] when cloud fractions of both layers in a two-cloud layer system are the same.

  12. Statistical Comparison of Cloud and Aerosol Vertical Properties between Two Eastern China Regions Based on CloudSat/CALIPSO Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujun Qiu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between cloud and aerosol properties was investigated over two 4° × 4° adjacent regions in the south (R1 and in the north (R2 in eastern China. The CloudSat/CALIPSO data were used to extract the cloud and aerosol profiles properties. The mean value of cloud occurrence probability (COP was the highest in the mixed cloud layer (−40°C~0°C and the lowest in the warm cloud layer (>0°C. The atmospheric humidity was more statistically relevant to COP in the warm cloud layer than aerosol condition. The differences in COP between the two regions in the mixed cloud layer and ice cloud layer (<−40°C had good correlations with those in the aerosol extinction coefficient. A radar reflectivity factor greater than −10 dBZ occurred mainly in warm cloud layers and mixed cloud layers. A high-COP zone appeared in the above-0°C layer with cloud thicknesses of 2-3 km in both regions and in all the four seasons, but the distribution of the zonal layer in R2 was more continuous than that in R1, which was consistent with the higher aerosol optical thickness in R2 than in R1 in the above-0°C layer, indicating a positive correlation between aerosol and cloud probability.

  13. Three-Dimensional Physical and Optical Characteristics of Aerosols over Central China from Long-Term CALIPSO and HYSPLIT Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Lu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Aerosols greatly influence global and regional atmospheric systems, and human life. However, a comprehensive understanding of the source regions and three-dimensional (3D characteristics of aerosol transport over central China is yet to be achieved. Thus, we investigate the 3D macroscopic, optical, physical, and transport properties of the aerosols over central China based on the March 2007 to February 2016 data obtained from the Cloud–Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO mission and the hybrid single-particle Lagrangian integrated trajectory (HYSPLIT model. Our results showed that approximately 60% of the aerosols distributed over central China originated from local areas, whereas non-locally produced aerosols constituted approximately 40%. Anthropogenic aerosols constituted the majority of the aerosol pollutants (69% that mainly distributed less than 2.0 km above mean sea level. Natural aerosols, which are mainly composed of dust, accounted for 31% of the total aerosols, and usually existed at an altitude higher than that of anthropogenic aerosols. Aerosol particles distributed in the near surface were smaller and more spherical than those distributed above 2.0 km. Aerosol optical depth (AOD and the particulate depolarization ratio displayed decreasing trends, with a total decrease of 0.11 and 0.016 from March 2007 to February 2016, respectively. These phenomena indicate that during the study period, the extinction properties of aerosols decreased, and the degree of sphericity in aerosol particles increased. Moreover, the annual anthropogenic and natural AOD demonstrated decreasing trends, with a total decrease of 0.07 and 0.04, respectively. This study may benefit the evaluation of the effects of the 3D properties of aerosols on regional climates.

  14. Can CFMIP2 models reproduce the leading modes of cloud vertical structure in the CALIPSO-GOCCP observations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Yang, Song

    2018-02-01

    Using principal component (PC) analysis, three leading modes of cloud vertical structure (CVS) are revealed by the GCM-Oriented CALIPSO Cloud Product (GOCCP), i.e. tropical high, subtropical anticyclonic and extratropical cyclonic cloud modes (THCM, SACM and ECCM, respectively). THCM mainly reflect the contrast between tropical high clouds and clouds in middle/high latitudes. SACM is closely associated with middle-high clouds in tropical convective cores, few-cloud regimes in subtropical anticyclonic clouds and stratocumulus over subtropical eastern oceans. ECCM mainly corresponds to clouds along extratropical cyclonic regions. Models of phase 2 of Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project (CFMIP2) well reproduce the THCM, but SACM and ECCM are generally poorly simulated compared to GOCCP. Standardized PCs corresponding to CVS modes are generally captured, whereas original PCs (OPCs) are consistently underestimated (overestimated) for THCM (SACM and ECCM) by CFMIP2 models. The effects of CVS modes on relative cloud radiative forcing (RSCRF/RLCRF) (RSCRF being calculated at the surface while RLCRF at the top of atmosphere) are studied in terms of principal component regression method. Results show that CFMIP2 models tend to overestimate (underestimated or simulate the opposite sign) RSCRF/RLCRF radiative effects (REs) of ECCM (THCM and SACM) in unit global mean OPC compared to observations. These RE biases may be attributed to two factors, one of which is underestimation (overestimation) of low/middle clouds (high clouds) (also known as stronger (weaker) REs in unit low/middle (high) clouds) in simulated global mean cloud profiles, the other is eigenvector biases in CVS modes (especially for SACM and ECCM). It is suggested that much more attention should be paid on improvement of CVS, especially cloud parameterization associated with particular physical processes (e.g. downwelling regimes with the Hadley circulation, extratropical storm tracks and others), which

  15. Evaluating the Performance of the Goddard Multi-Scale Modeling Framework against GPM, TRMM and CloudSat/CALIPSO Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chern, J. D.; Tao, W. K.; Lang, S. E.; Matsui, T.; Mohr, K. I.

    2014-12-01

    Four six-month (March-August 2014) experiments with the Goddard Multi-scale Modeling Framework (MMF) were performed to study the impacts of different Goddard one-moment bulk microphysical schemes and large-scale forcings on the performance of the MMF. Recently a new Goddard one-moment bulk microphysics with four-ice classes (cloud ice, snow, graupel, and frozen drops/hail) has been developed based on cloud-resolving model simulations with large-scale forcings from field campaign observations. The new scheme has been successfully implemented to the MMF and two MMF experiments were carried out with this new scheme and the old three-ice classes (cloud ice, snow graupel) scheme. The MMF has global coverage and can rigorously evaluate microphysics performance for different cloud regimes. The results show MMF with the new scheme outperformed the old one. The MMF simulations are also strongly affected by the interaction between large-scale and cloud-scale processes. Two MMF sensitivity experiments with and without nudging large-scale forcings to those of ERA-Interim reanalysis were carried out to study the impacts of large-scale forcings. The model simulated mean and variability of surface precipitation, cloud types, cloud properties such as cloud amount, hydrometeors vertical profiles, and cloud water contents, etc. in different geographic locations and climate regimes are evaluated against GPM, TRMM, CloudSat/CALIPSO satellite observations. The Goddard MMF has also been coupled with the Goddard Satellite Data Simulation Unit (G-SDSU), a system with multi-satellite, multi-sensor, and multi-spectrum satellite simulators. The statistics of MMF simulated radiances and backscattering can be directly compared with satellite observations to assess the strengths and/or deficiencies of MMF simulations and provide guidance on how to improve the MMF and microphysics.

  16. The MJO Transition from Shallow to Deep Convection in CloudSat/CALIPSO Data and GISS GCM Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelGenio, Anthony G.; Chen, Yonghua; Kim, Daehyun; Yao, Mao-Sung

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between convective penetration depth and tropospheric humidity is central to recent theories of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO). It has been suggested that general circulation models (GCMs) poorly simulate the MJO because they fail to gradually moisten the troposphere by shallow convection and simulate a slow transition to deep convection. CloudSat and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) data are analyzed to document the variability of convection depth and its relation to water vapor during the MJO transition from shallow to deep convection and to constrain GCM cumulus parameterizations. Composites of cloud occurrence for 10MJO events show the following anticipatedMJO cloud structure: shallow and congestus clouds in advance of the peak, deep clouds near the peak, and upper-level anvils after the peak. Cirrus clouds are also frequent in advance of the peak. The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EarthObserving System (EOS) (AMSR-E) columnwater vapor (CWV) increases by;5 mmduring the shallow- deep transition phase, consistent with the idea of moisture preconditioning. Echo-top height of clouds rooted in the boundary layer increases sharply with CWV, with large variability in depth when CWV is between;46 and 68 mm. International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project cloud classifications reproduce these climatological relationships but correctly identify congestus-dominated scenes only about half the time. A version of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies Model E2 (GISS-E2) GCM with strengthened entrainment and rain evaporation that produces MJO-like variability also reproduces the shallow-deep convection transition, including the large variability of cloud-top height at intermediate CWV values. The variability is due to small grid-scale relative humidity and lapse rate anomalies for similar values of CWV. 1.

  17. Comparison of Cloud Detection Using the CERES-MODIS Ed4 and LaRC AVHRR Cloud Masks and CALIPSO Vertical Feature Mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepte, Q. Z.; Minnis, P.; Palikonda, R.; Bedka, K. M.; Sun-Mack, S.

    2011-12-01

    Accurate detection of cloud amount and distribution using satellite observations is crucial in determining cloud radiative forcing and earth energy budget. The CERES-MODIS (CM) Edition 4 cloud mask is a global cloud detection algorithm for application to Terra and Aqua MODIS data with the aid of other ancillary data sets. It is used operationally for the NASA's Cloud and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) project. The LaRC AVHRR cloud mask, which uses only five spectral channels, is based on a subset of the CM cloud mask which employs twelve MODIS channels. The LaRC mask is applied to AVHRR data for the NOAA Climate Data Record Program. Comparisons among the CM Ed4, and LaRC AVHRR cloud masks and the CALIPSO Vertical Feature Mask (VFM) constitute a powerful means for validating and improving cloud detection globally. They also help us understand the strengths and limitations of the various cloud retrievals which use either active and passive satellite sensors. In this paper, individual comparisons will be presented for different types of clouds over various surfaces, including daytime and nighttime, and polar and non-polar regions. Additionally, the statistics of the global, regional, and zonal cloud occurrence and amount from the CERES Ed4, AVHRR cloud masks and CALIPSO VFM will be discussed.

  18. CALIPSO IIR Version 2 Level 1b calibrated radiances: analysis and reduction of residual biases in the Northern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, Anne; Trémas, Thierry; Pelon, Jacques; Lee, Kam-Pui; Nobileau, Delphine; Gross-Colzy, Lydwine; Pascal, Nicolas; Ferrage, Pascale; Scott, Noëlle A.

    2018-04-01

    Version 2 of the Level 1b calibrated radiances of the Imaging Infrared Radiometer (IIR) on board the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite has been released recently. This new version incorporates corrections of small but systematic seasonal calibration biases previously revealed in Version 1 data products mostly north of 30° N. These biases - of different amplitudes in the three IIR channels 8.65 µm (IIR1), 10.6 µm (IIR2), and 12.05 µm (IIR3) - were made apparent by a striping effect in images of IIR inter-channel brightness temperature differences (BTDs) and through seasonal warm biases of nighttime IIR brightness temperatures in the 30-60° N latitude range. The latter were highlighted through observed and simulated comparisons with similar channels of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board the Aqua spacecraft. To characterize the calibration biases affecting Version 1 data, a semi-empirical approach is developed, which is based on the in-depth analysis of the IIR internal calibration procedure in conjunction with observations such as statistical comparisons with similar MODIS/Aqua channels. Two types of calibration biases are revealed: an equalization bias affecting part of the individual IIR images and a global bias affecting the radiometric level of each image. These biases are observed only when the temperature of the instrument increases, and they are found to be functions of elapsed time since night-to-day transition, regardless of the season. Correction coefficients of Version 1 radiances could thus be defined and implemented in the Version 2 code. As a result, the striping effect seen in Version 1 is significantly attenuated in Version 2. Systematic discrepancies between nighttime and daytime IIR-MODIS BTDs in the 30-60° N latitude range in summer are reduced from 0.2 K in Version 1 to 0.1 K in Version 2 for IIR1-MODIS29. For IIR2-MODIS31 and IIR3-MODIS32, they are reduced from 0.4 K

  19. Ice particle production in mid-level stratiform mixed-phase clouds observed with collocated A-Train measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Zhang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Collocated A-Train CloudSat radar and CALIPSO lidar measurements between 2006 and 2010 are analyzed to study primary ice particle production characteristics in mid-level stratiform mixed-phase clouds on a global scale. For similar clouds in terms of cloud top temperature and liquid water path, Northern Hemisphere latitude bands have layer-maximum radar reflectivity (ZL that is  ∼  1 to 8 dBZ larger than their counterparts in the Southern Hemisphere. The systematically larger ZL under similar cloud conditions suggests larger ice number concentrations in mid-level stratiform mixed-phase clouds over the Northern Hemisphere, which is possibly related to higher background aerosol loadings. Furthermore, we show that springtime northern mid- and high latitudes have ZL that is larger by up to 6 dBZ (a factor of 4 higher ice number concentration than other seasons, which might be related to more dust events that provide effective ice nucleating particles. Our study suggests that aerosol-dependent ice number concentration parameterizations are required in climate models to improve mixed-phase cloud simulations, especially over the Northern Hemisphere.

  20. Tropical cloud and precipitation regimes as seen from near-simultaneous TRMM, CloudSat, and CALIPSO observations and comparison with ISCCP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhengzhao Johnny; Anderson, Ricardo C.; Rossow, William B.; Takahashi, Hanii

    2017-06-01

    Although Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and CloudSat/CALIPSO fly in different orbits, they frequently cross each other so that for the period between 2006 and 2010, a total of 15,986 intersect lines occurred within 20 min of each other from 30°S to 30°N, providing a rare opportunity to study tropical cloud and precipitation regimes and their internal vertical structure from near-simultaneous measurements by these active sensors. A k-means cluster analysis of TRMM and CloudSat matchups identifies three tropical cloud and precipitation regimes: the first two regimes correspond to, respectively, organized deep convection with heavy rain and cirrus anvils with moderate rain; the third regime is a convectively suppressed regime that can be further divided into three subregimes, which correspond to, respectively, stratocumulus clouds with drizzle, cirrus overlying low clouds, and nonprecipitating cumulus. Inclusion of CALIPSO data adds to the dynamic range of cloud properties and identifies one more cluster; subcluster analysis further identifies a thin, midlevel cloud regime associated with tropical mountain ranges. The radar-lidar cloud regimes are compared with the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) weather states (WSs) for the extended tropics. Focus is placed on the four convectively active WSs, namely, WS1-WS4. ISCCP WS1 and WS2 are found to be counterparts of Regime 1 and Regime 2 in radar-lidar observations, respectively. ISCCP WS3 and WS4, which are mainly isolated convection and broken, detached cirrus, do not have a strong association with any individual radar and lidar regimes, a likely effect of the different sampling strategies between ISCCP and active sensors and patchy cloudiness of these WSs.

  1. Assessment of the CALIPSO Lidar 532 nm attenuated backscatter calibration using the NASA LaRC airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Rogers

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP instrument on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO spacecraft has provided global, high-resolution vertical profiles of aerosols and clouds since it became operational on 13 June 2006. On 14 June 2006, the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL was deployed aboard the NASA Langley B-200 aircraft for the first of a series of 86 underflights of the CALIPSO satellite to provide validation measurements for the CALIOP data products. To better assess the range of conditions under which CALIOP data products are produced, these validation flights were conducted under both daytime and nighttime lighting conditions, in multiple seasons, and over a large range of latitudes and aerosol and cloud conditions. This paper presents a quantitative assessment of the CALIOP 532 nm calibration (through the 532 nm total attenuated backscatter using internally calibrated airborne HSRL underflight data and is the most extensive study of CALIOP 532 nm calibration. Results show that HSRL and CALIOP 532 nm total attenuated backscatter agree on average within 2.7% ± 2.1% (CALIOP lower at night and within 2.9% ± 3.9% (CALIOP lower during the day, demonstrating the accuracy of the CALIOP 532 nm calibration algorithms. Additionally, comparisons with HSRL show consistency of the CALIOP calibration before and after the laser switch in 2009 as well as improvements in the daytime version 3.01 calibration scheme compared with the version 2 calibration scheme. Potential biases and uncertainties in the methodology relevant to validating satellite lidar measurements with an airborne lidar system are discussed and found to be less than 4.5% ± 3.2% for this validation effort with HSRL. Results from this study are also compared with prior assessments of the CALIOP 532 nm attenuated backscatter calibration.

  2. "Analysis of the multi-layered cloud radiative effects at the surface using A-train data"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viudez-Mora, A.; Smith, W. L., Jr.; Kato, S.

    2017-12-01

    Clouds cover about 74% of the planet and they are an important part of the climate system and strongly influence the surface energy budget. The cloud vertical distribution has important implications in the atmospheric heating and cooling rates. Based on observations by active sensors in the A-train satellite constellation, CALIPSO [Winker et. al, 2010] and CloudSat [Stephens et. al, 2002], more than 1/3 of all clouds are multi-layered. Detection and retrieval of multi-layer cloud physical properties are needed in understanding their effects on the surface radiation budget. This study examines the sensitivity of surface irradiances to cloud properties derived from satellite sensors. Surface irradiances were computed in two different ways, one using cloud properties solely from MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and the other using MODIS data supplemented with CALIPSO and CloudSat (hereafter CLCS) cloud vertical structure information [Kato et. al, 2010]. Results reveal that incorporating more precise and realistic cloud properties from CLCS into radiative transfer calculations yields improved estimates of cloud radiative effects (CRE) at the surface (CREsfc). The calculations using only MODIS cloud properties, comparisons of the computed CREsfc for 2-layer (2L) overcast CERES footprints, CLCS reduces the SW CRE by 1.5±26.7 Wm-2, increases the LW CRE by 4.1±12.7 Wm-2, and increases the net CREsfc by 0.9±46.7 Wm-2. In a subsequent analysis, we classified up to 6 different combinations of multi-layered clouds depending on the cloud top height as: High-high (HH), high-middle (HM), high-low (HL), middle-middle (MM), middle-low (ML) and low-low (LL). The 3 most frequent 2L cloud systems were: HL (56.1%), HM (22.3%) and HH (12.1%). For these cases, the computed CREsfc estimated using CLCS data presented the most significant differences when compared using only MODIS data. For example, the differences for the SW and Net CRE in the case HH was 12.3±47

  3. An accuracy assessment of the CALIOP/CALIPSO version 2/version 3 daytime aerosol extinction product based on a detailed multi-sensor, multi-platform case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kacenelenbogen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The Cloud Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP, on board the CALIPSO platform, has measured profiles of total attenuated backscatter coefficient (level 1 products since June 2006. CALIOP's level 2 products, such as the aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficient profiles, are retrieved using a complex succession of automated algorithms. The goal of this study is to help identify potential shortcomings in the CALIOP version 2 level 2 aerosol extinction product and to illustrate some of the motivation for the changes that have been introduced in the next version of CALIOP data (version 3, released in June 2010. To help illustrate the potential factors contributing to the uncertainty of the CALIOP aerosol extinction retrieval, we focus on a one-day, multi-instrument, multiplatform comparison study during the CALIPSO and Twilight Zone (CATZ validation campaign on 4 August 2007. On that day, we observe a consistency in the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD values recorded by four different instruments (i.e. space-borne MODerate Imaging Spectroradiometer, MODIS: 0.67 and POLarization and Directionality of Earth's Reflectances, POLDER: 0.58, airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar, HSRL: 0.52 and ground-based AErosol RObotic NETwork, AERONET: 0.48 to 0.73 while CALIOP AOD is a factor of two lower (0.32 at 532 nm. This case study illustrates the following potential sources of uncertainty in the CALIOP AOD: (i CALIOP's low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR leading to the misclassification and/or lack of aerosol layer identification, especially close to the Earth's surface; (ii the cloud contamination of CALIOP version 2 aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles; (iii potentially erroneous assumptions of the aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio (Sa used in CALIOP's extinction retrievals; and (iv calibration coefficient biases in the CALIOP daytime attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles. The use of version 3 CALIOP extinction

  4. Ticosonde CFH at Costa Rica: A Seasonal Climatology of Tropical UT-LS Water Vapor and Inter-Comparisons with MLS and CALIPSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkirk, Henry B.; Voemel, Holger; Avery, Melody; Rosenlof, Karen; Davis, Sean; Hurst, Dale; Schoeberl, Mark; Diaz, Jorge Andres; Morris, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Balloon sonde measurements of tropical water vapor using the Cryogenic Frostpoint Hygrometer were initiated in Costa Rica in July 2005 and have continued to the present day. Over the nine years through July 2014, the Ticosonde program has launched 174 CFH payloads, representing the longest-running and most extensive single-site balloon dataset for tropical water vapor. In this presentation we present a seasonal climatology for water vapor and ozone at Costa Rica and examine the frequency of upper tropospheric supersaturation with comparisons to cloud fraction and cloud ice water content observations from the Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on the CALIPSO mission. We then make a critical comparison of these data to water vapor measurements from the MLS instrument on board Aura in light of recently published work for other sites. Finally, we examine time series of 2-km altitude averages in the upper troposphere-lower stratosphere at Costa Rica in light of anomalies and trends seen in various large-scale indices of tropical water vapor.

  5. The impact of aerosol vertical distribution on aerosol optical depth retrieval using CALIPSO and MODIS data: Case study over dust and smoke regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yerong; de Graaf, Martin; Menenti, Massimo

    2017-08-01

    Global quantitative aerosol information has been derived from MODerate Resolution Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MODIS) observations for decades since early 2000 and widely used for air quality and climate change research. However, the operational MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) products Collection 6 (C6) can still be biased, because of uncertainty in assumed aerosol optical properties and aerosol vertical distribution. This study investigates the impact of aerosol vertical distribution on the AOD retrieval. We developed a new algorithm by considering dynamic vertical profiles, which is an adaptation of MODIS C6 Dark Target (C6_DT) algorithm over land. The new algorithm makes use of the aerosol vertical profile extracted from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) measurements to generate an accurate top of the atmosphere (TOA) reflectance for the AOD retrieval, where the profile is assumed to be a single layer and represented as a Gaussian function with the mean height as single variable. To test the impact, a comparison was made between MODIS DT and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) AOD, over dust and smoke regions. The results show that the aerosol vertical distribution has a strong impact on the AOD retrieval. The assumed aerosol layers close to the ground can negatively bias the retrievals in C6_DT. Regarding the evaluated smoke and dust layers, the new algorithm can improve the retrieval by reducing the negative biases by 3-5%.

  6. Radiative effect differences between multi-layered and single-layer clouds derived from CERES, CALIPSO, and CloudSat data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiming; Yi Yuhong; Minnis, Patrick; Huang Jianping; Yan Hongru; Ma Yuejie; Wang Wencai; Kirk Ayers, J.

    2011-01-01

    Clouds alter general circulation through modification of the radiative heating profile within the atmosphere. Their effects are complex and depend on height, vertical structure, and phase. The instantaneous cloud radiative effect (CRE) induced by multi-layered (ML) and single-layer (SL) clouds is estimated by analyzing data collected by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO), CloudSat, and Clouds and Earth's Radiation Energy Budget System (CERES) missions from March 2007 through February 2008. The CRE differences between ML and SL clouds at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and at the surface were also examined. The zonal mean shortwave (SW) CRE differences between the ML and SL clouds at the TOA and surface were positive at most latitudes, peaking at 120 W m -2 in the tropics and dropping to -30 W m -2 at higher latitudes. This indicated that the ML clouds usually reflected less sunlight at the TOA and transmitted more to the surface than the SL clouds, due to their higher cloud top heights. The zonal mean longwave (LW) CRE differences between ML and SL clouds at the TOA and surface were relatively small, ranging from -30 to 30 W m -2 . This showed that the ML clouds only increased the amount of thermal radiation at the TOA relative to the SL clouds in the tropics, decreasing it elsewhere. In other words, ML clouds tended to cool the atmosphere in the tropics and warm it elsewhere when compared to SL clouds. The zonal mean net CRE differences were positive at most latitudes and dominated by the SW CRE differences.

  7. Survivors’ experiences from a train crash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Forsberg

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Rarely described are people's lived experiences from severe injury events such as train crashes. The number of train crashes named disasters with ≥10 killed and/or ≥100 nonfatally injured grows globally and the trend shows that more people survive these disasters today than did so in the past. This results in an increased number of survivors needing care. The aim of the study was to explore survivors’ experiences from a train crash. Narrative interviews were performed with 14 passengers 4 years after a train crash event. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the interviews. Experiences were captured in three main themes: (1 Living in the mode of existential threat describes how the survivors first lost control, then were thrown into a state of unimaginable chaos as they faced death. (2 Dealing with the unthinkable described how survivors restored control, the central role of others, and the importance of reconstructing the event to move forward in their processing. (3 Having cheated death shows how some became shackled by their history, whereas others overcame the haunting of unforgettable memories. Furthermore, the result shows how all experienced a second chance in life. Experiencing a train crash meant that the passengers experienced severe vulnerability and a threat to life and interdependence turned out to play a crucial role. Focusing on helping other passengers on site was one way to regain the loss of control and kept the chaos at bay. Family, friends, and fellow passengers turned out to be extremely important during the recovery process why such closeness should be promoted and facilitated.

  8. Development of a training assurance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palchinsky, J.; Waylett, W.J. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The nuclear industry has made a significant commitment to improve training through the implementation of accredited performance-based training programs. Senior management expects that human performance will improve as a result of significant resource allocations. How do they know if training is effective in achieving improved human performance? Florida Power and Light Company is developing a Training Assurance Program to track indicators of training performance and future trends. Integrating the company's Quality Improvement Program processes with systematic training processes is resulting in personnel functioning in a proactive mode and increased customer satisfaction with training performance

  9. CALIPSO IIR Version 2 Level 1b calibrated radiances: analysis and reduction of residual biases in the Northern Hemisphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Garnier

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Version 2 of the Level 1b calibrated radiances of the Imaging Infrared Radiometer (IIR on board the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Satellite Observation (CALIPSO satellite has been released recently. This new version incorporates corrections of small but systematic seasonal calibration biases previously revealed in Version 1 data products mostly north of 30° N. These biases – of different amplitudes in the three IIR channels 8.65 µm (IIR1, 10.6 µm (IIR2, and 12.05 µm (IIR3 – were made apparent by a striping effect in images of IIR inter-channel brightness temperature differences (BTDs and through seasonal warm biases of nighttime IIR brightness temperatures in the 30–60° N latitude range. The latter were highlighted through observed and simulated comparisons with similar channels of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS on board the Aqua spacecraft. To characterize the calibration biases affecting Version 1 data, a semi-empirical approach is developed, which is based on the in-depth analysis of the IIR internal calibration procedure in conjunction with observations such as statistical comparisons with similar MODIS/Aqua channels. Two types of calibration biases are revealed: an equalization bias affecting part of the individual IIR images and a global bias affecting the radiometric level of each image. These biases are observed only when the temperature of the instrument increases, and they are found to be functions of elapsed time since night-to-day transition, regardless of the season. Correction coefficients of Version 1 radiances could thus be defined and implemented in the Version 2 code. As a result, the striping effect seen in Version 1 is significantly attenuated in Version 2. Systematic discrepancies between nighttime and daytime IIR–MODIS BTDs in the 30–60° N latitude range in summer are reduced from 0.2 K in Version 1 to 0.1 K in Version 2 for IIR1–MODIS29. For IIR2

  10. Water Entry by a Train of Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Huang, Xin; Chan, Chon U.; Frommhold, Philipp Erhard; Lippert, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    The impact of single droplets on a deep pool is a well-studied phenomenon which reveals reach fluid mechanics. Lesser studied is the impact of a train of droplet and the accompanied formation of largely elongated cavities, in particular for well controlled droplets. The droplets with diameters of 20-40 μm and velocities of approx. 20 m/s are generated with a piezo-actuated nozzle at rates of 200-300 kHz. Individual droplets are selected by electric charging and deflection and the impact is visualized with stroboscopic photography and high-speed videos. We study in particular the formation and shape of the cavity as by varying the number of droplets from one to 64. The cavities reach centimetres in length with lateral diameters of the order of 100 of micrometres.

  11. Consistency of aerosols above clouds characterization from A-Train active and passive measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaconu, Lucia T.; Waquet, Fabien; Josset, Damien; Ferlay, Nicolas; Peers, Fanny; Thieuleux, François; Ducos, Fabrice; Pascal, Nicolas; Tanré, Didier; Pelon, Jacques; Goloub, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    This study presents a comparison between the retrieval of optical properties of aerosol above clouds (AAC) from different techniques developed for the A-Train sensors CALIOP/CALIPSO and POLDER/PARASOL. The main objective is to analyse the consistency between the results derived from the active and the passive measurements. We compare the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) above optically thick clouds (cloud optical thickness (COT) larger than 3) and their Ångström exponent (AE). These parameters are retrieved with the CALIOP operational method, the POLDER operational polarization method and the CALIOP-based depolarization ratio method (DRM) - for which we also propose a calibrated version (denominated DRMSODA, where SODA is the Synergized Optical Depth of Aerosols). We analyse 6 months of data over three distinctive regions characterized by different types of aerosols and clouds. Additionally, for these regions, we select three case studies: a biomass-burning event over the South Atlantic Ocean, a Saharan dust case over the North Atlantic Ocean and a Siberian biomass-burning event over the North Pacific Ocean. Four and a half years of data are studied over the entire globe for distinct situations where aerosol and cloud layers are in contact or vertically separated. Overall, the regional analysis shows a good correlation between the POLDER and the DRMSODA AOTs when the microphysics of aerosols is dominated by fine-mode particles of biomass-burning aerosols from southern Africa (correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.83) or coarse-mode aerosols of Saharan dust (R2 of 0.82). A good correlation between these methods (R2 of 0.68) is also observed in the global treatment, when the aerosol and cloud layers are separated well. The analysis of detached layers also shows a mean difference in AOT of 0.07 at 532 nm between POLDER and DRMSODA at a global scale. The correlation between the retrievals decreases when a complex mixture of aerosols is expected (R2 of 0.37) - as in the

  12. Influence of the Arctic Oscillation on the vertical distribution of clouds as observed by the A-Train constellation of satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Devasthale

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of the Arctic Oscillation (AO, the dominant mode of natural variability over the northerly high latitudes, on the spatial (horizontal and vertical distribution of clouds in the Arctic. To that end, we use a suite of sensors onboard NASA's A-Train satellites that provide accurate observations of the distribution of clouds along with information on atmospheric thermodynamics. Data from three independent sensors are used (AQUA-AIRS, CALIOP-CALIPSO and CPR-CloudSat covering two time periods (winter half years, November through March, of 2002–2011 and 2006–2011, respectively along with data from the ERA-Interim reanalysis.

    We show that the zonal vertical distribution of cloud fraction anomalies averaged over 67–82° N to a first approximation follows a dipole structure (referred to as "Greenland cloud dipole anomaly", GCDA, such that during the positive phase of the AO, positive and negative cloud anomalies are observed eastwards and westward of Greenland respectively, while the opposite is true for the negative phase of AO. By investigating the concurrent meteorological conditions (temperature, humidity and winds, we show that differences in the meridional energy and moisture transport during the positive and negative phases of the AO and the associated thermodynamics are responsible for the conditions that are conducive for the formation of this dipole structure. All three satellite sensors broadly observe this large-scale GCDA despite differences in their sensitivities, spatio-temporal and vertical resolutions, and the available lengths of data records, indicating the robustness of the results. The present study also provides a compelling case to carry out process-based evaluation of global and regional climate models.

  13. Taking Control of Alzheimer's Disease: A Training Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Nina M.; Sherman, Robin

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate a training program for persons with early-stage Alzheimer's disease and their care partners. Care partners were mailed two surveys, one for themselves and one for the person with dementia. Domains covered in the training included an overview of cognitive disorders, treatment of symptoms including…

  14. ANALYSIS RESULTS FOR BUILDING 241 702-AZ A TRAIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DUNCAN JB; FRYE JM; COOKE CA; LI SW; BROCKMAN FJ

    2006-12-13

    This report presents the analyses results for three samples obtained under RPP-PLAN-28509, Sampling and Analysis Plan for Building 241 702-AZ A Train. The sampling and analysis was done in response to problem evaluation request number PER-2004-6139, 702-AZ Filter Rooms Need Radiological Cleanup Efforts.

  15. Astronaut Tamara Jernigan in the CCT during a training session

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Astronaut Tamara E. Jernigan, STS-67 payload commander, is shown here in the Shuttle Training Facility at JSC participating in a training session. Jernigan is training with the RMS controls in the Crew Compartment Trainer (CCT) of JSC's Shuttle mockup and integration laboratory.

  16. ANALYSIS RESULTS FOR BUILDING 241 702-AZ A TRAIN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DUNCAN JB; FRYE JM; COOKE CA; LI SW; BROCKMAN FJ

    2006-01-01

    This report presents the analyses results for three samples obtained under RPP-PLAN-28509, Sampling and Analysis Plan for Building 241 702-AZ A Train. The sampling and analysis was done in response to problem evaluation request number PER-2004-6139, 702-AZ Filter Rooms Need Radiological Cleanup Efforts

  17. 3D Cloud Field Prediction using A-Train Data and Machine Learning Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. L.

    2017-12-01

    Validation of cloud process parameterizations used in global climate models (GCMs) would greatly benefit from observed 3D cloud fields at the size comparable to that of a GCM grid cell. For the highest resolution simulations, surface grid cells are on the order of 100 km by 100 km. CloudSat/CALIPSO data provides 1 km width of detailed vertical cloud fraction profile (CFP) and liquid and ice water content (LWC/IWC). This work utilizes four machine learning algorithms to create nonlinear regressions of CFP, LWC, and IWC data using radiances, surface type and location of measurement as predictors and applies the regression equations to off-track locations generating 3D cloud fields for 100 km by 100 km domains. The CERES-CloudSat-CALIPSO-MODIS (C3M) merged data set for February 2007 is used. Support Vector Machines, Artificial Neural Networks, Gaussian Processes and Decision Trees are trained on 1000 km of continuous C3M data. Accuracy is computed using existing vertical profiles that are excluded from the training data and occur within 100 km of the training data. Accuracy of the four algorithms is compared. Average accuracy for one day of predicted data is 86% for the most successful algorithm. The methodology for training the algorithms, determining valid prediction regions and applying the equations off-track is discussed. Predicted 3D cloud fields are provided as inputs to the Ed4 NASA LaRC Fu-Liou radiative transfer code and resulting TOA radiances compared to observed CERES/MODIS radiances. Differences in computed radiances using predicted profiles and observed radiances are compared.

  18. Measurement of natural background radiation intensity on a train

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y. F.; Lin, J. W.; Sheu, R. J.; Lin, U. T.; Jiang, S. H.

    2011-01-01

    This work aims to measure different components of natural background radiation on a train. A radiation measurement system consisting of four types of radiation detectors, namely, a Berkeley Lab cosmic-ray detector, moderated 3He detector, high pressure ionisation chamber and NaI(Tl) spectrometer, associated with a global positioning system unit was established for this purpose. For the commissioning of the system, a test measurement on a train along the railway around the northern Taiwan coast from Hsinchu to Hualien with a distance of ∼275 km was carried out. No significant variation of the intensities of the different components of natural background radiation was observed, except when the train went underground or in the tunnels. The average external dose rate received by the crew of the train was estimated to be 62 nSv h -1 . (authors)

  19. Feedback control for a train-like vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micaelli, A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a feedback nonlinear control law for a train-like vehicle (TLV) used in nuclear power-station maintenance. The front cart is either manual or automated guided. The rear carts are feedback controlled. The control objective is to ensure that the rear carts track the path produced (on-line) by the front cart. This controller was experimentally tested on the TLV-prototype. (authors). 4 figs., 4 refs

  20. Characterization of AVHRR global cloud detection sensitivity based on CALIPSO-CALIOP cloud optical thickness information: demonstration of results based on the CM SAF CLARA-A2 climate data record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Karl-Göran; Håkansson, Nina

    2018-02-01

    The sensitivity in detecting thin clouds of the cloud screening method being used in the CM SAF cloud, albedo and surface radiation data set from AVHRR data (CLARA-A2) cloud climate data record (CDR) has been evaluated using cloud information from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) onboard the CALIPSO satellite. The sensitivity, including its global variation, has been studied based on collocations of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and CALIOP measurements over a 10-year period (2006-2015). The cloud detection sensitivity has been defined as the minimum cloud optical thickness for which 50 % of clouds could be detected, with the global average sensitivity estimated to be 0.225. After using this value to reduce the CALIOP cloud mask (i.e. clouds with optical thickness below this threshold were interpreted as cloud-free cases), cloudiness results were found to be basically unbiased over most of the globe except over the polar regions where a considerable underestimation of cloudiness could be seen during the polar winter. The overall probability of detecting clouds in the polar winter could be as low as 50 % over the highest and coldest parts of Greenland and Antarctica, showing that a large fraction of optically thick clouds also remains undetected here. The study included an in-depth analysis of the probability of detecting a cloud as a function of the vertically integrated cloud optical thickness as well as of the cloud's geographical position. Best results were achieved over oceanic surfaces at mid- to high latitudes where at least 50 % of all clouds with an optical thickness down to a value of 0.075 were detected. Corresponding cloud detection sensitivities over land surfaces outside of the polar regions were generally larger than 0.2 with maximum values of approximately 0.5 over the Sahara and the Arabian Peninsula. For polar land surfaces the values were close to 1 or higher with maximum values of 4.5 for the parts

  1. Trip optimization system and method for a train

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Ajith Kuttannair; Shaffer, Glenn Robert; Houpt, Paul Kenneth; Movsichoff, Bernardo Adrian; Chan, David So Keung

    2017-08-15

    A system for operating a train having one or more locomotive consists with each locomotive consist comprising one or more locomotives, the system including a locator element to determine a location of the train, a track characterization element to provide information about a track, a sensor for measuring an operating condition of the locomotive consist, a processor operable to receive information from the locator element, the track characterizing element, and the sensor, and an algorithm embodied within the processor having access to the information to create a trip plan that optimizes performance of the locomotive consist in accordance with one or more operational criteria for the train.

  2. A systematic approach to training: A training needs assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Margaret H.

    1989-01-01

    In an effort to determine the gap between the actual performance and the necessary performance of employees for the effective and efficient accomplishment of an organization's mission and goals, an organization-wide Training Needs Assessment must be conducted. The purpose of this work was to conduct a training needs analysis and prepare a NASA Langley Catalog of On-Site Training programs. The work included developing a Training Needs Assessment Survey, implementing the survey, analyzing and researching the training needs, identifying the courses to meet the needs, and preparing and designing an On-Site Training Catalog. This needs analysis attempted to identify performance weaknesses and deficits; seek out and provide opportunities for improved performance; anticipate and avoid future problems; enhance and create new strengths. The end product is a user-friendly catalog of on-site training available. The results include: top-down approach to needs assessment; improved communication with training coordinators; 98 percent return rate of the Training Needs Assessment survey; complete, newly designed, user-friendly catalog; 167 catalog descriptions advertised; 82 new courses advertised; training logo; and request for the training application form.

  3. SIDH: A Game-Based Architecture for a Training Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Backlund

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Game-based simulators, sometimes referred to as “lightweight” simulators, have benefits such as flexible technology and economic feasibility. In this article, we extend the notion of a game-based simulator by introducing multiple screen view and physical interaction. These features are expected to enhance immersion and fidelity. By utilizing these concepts we have constructed a training simulator for breathing apparatus entry. Game hardware and software have been used to produce the application. More important, the application itself is deliberately designed to be a game. Indeed, one important design goal is to create an entertaining and motivating experience combined with learning goals in order to create a serious game. The system has been evaluated in cooperation with the Swedish Rescue Services Agency to see which architectural features contribute to perceived fidelity. The modes of visualization and interaction as well as level design contribute to the usefulness of the system.

  4. Method for integrating a train of fast, nanosecond wide pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a method used to integrate a train of fast, nanosecond wide pulses. The pulses come from current transformers in a RF LINAC beamline. Because they are ac signals and have no dc component, true mathematical integration would yield zero over the pulse train period or an equally erroneous value because of a dc baseline shift. The circuit used to integrate the pulse train first stretches the pulses to 35 ns FWHM. The signals are then fed into a high-speed, precision rectifier which restores a true dc baseline for the following stage - a fast, gated integrator. The rectifier is linear over 55dB in excess of 25 MHz, and the gated integrator is linear over a 60 dB range with input pulse widths as short as 16 ns. The assembled system is linear over 30 dB with a 6 MHz input signal

  5. Optimization of a train of bunches for plasma wakefield acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martorelli, Roberto

    2016-05-10

    Particle accelerators are a fundamental instrument for the understanding of fundamental mechanism in nature. The need of always higher energies for the particle beams requires a huge increase of the sizes of the accelerators using the actual technology. Moreover the highest energies are achieved nowadays by circular colliders, not perfectly suitable for acceleration of electrons and positrons due to the radiation losses. In order to overcome this problem a new branch of physics studying alternative technique for particle acceleration has been developed. Among the various alternatives a promising one is the plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA), in which a driver bunch interacts with a cold background plasma, exciting a plasma wave. The electric field of the plasma wave is then used for the acceleration of a second bunch. Such a mechanism allows to reach fields strength far beyond currently available, limited by the dielectric strength of the material. Among the different driver configurations, a promising one is the use of a modulated beam, namely a train of bunches, that provides a coherent interference among the electric fields generated by the single bunches. Such mechanism is subjected to a renewed interest in view of the forthcoming AWAKE experiment at CERN in which the long proton beam produced at the SPS facility is used as a driver. This possibility is achieved thanks to the onset of the self-modulation instability that modulates the long beam in a train of approximately 100 bunches. In order to accelerate the witness bunch to high energies is necessary on the other hand an efficient exchange of energy from the driver to the accelerated bunch, as well as a long duration of the driver so that can propagates for kilometers. This thesis deals with this two last aspects. The aim of this work is to provide an optimization for the modulated driver in order to improve specific features of the PWFA. This work shows the possibility to achieve an improved efficiency

  6. The OMI Aerosol Absorption Product: An A-train application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, O.; Jethva, H. T.; Ahn, C.

    2017-12-01

    Because of the uniquely large sensitivity of satellite-measured near-UV radiances to absorption by desert dust, carbonaceous and volcanic ash aerosols, observations by a variety of UV-capable sensors have been routinely used over the last forty years in both qualitative and quantitative applications for estimating the absorption properties of these aerosol types. In this presentation we will discuss a multi-sensor application involving observations from A-train sensors OMI, AIRS and CALIOP for the creation of a 13-year record of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA). Determination of aerosol type, in terms of particle size distribution and refractive index, is an important algorithmic step that requires using external information. AIRS CO measurements are used as carbonaceous aerosols tracer to differentiate this aerosol type from desert dust. On the other hand, the height of the absorbing aerosol layer, an important parameter in UV aerosol retrievals, is prescribed using a CALIOP-based climatology. The combined use of these observations in the developments of the OMI long-term AOD/SSA record will be discussed along with an evaluation of retrieval results using independent observations.

  7. Lateral dynamic interaction analysis of a train girder pier system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, H.; Guo, W. W.; Wu, X.; Pi, Y. L.; Bradford, M. A.

    2008-12-01

    A dynamic model of a coupled train-girder-pier system is developed in this paper. Each vehicle in a train is modeled with 27 degrees-of-freedom for a 4-axle passenger coach or freight car, and 31 for a 6-axle locomotive. The bridge model is applicable to straight and curved bridges. The centrifugal forces of moving vehicles on curved bridges are considered in both the vehicle model and the bridge model. The dynamic interaction between the bridge and train is realized through an assumed wheel-hunting movement. A case study is performed for a test train traversing two straight and two curved multi-span bridges with high piers. The histories of the train traversing the bridges are simulated and the dynamic responses of the piers and the train vehicles are calculated. A field experiment is carried out to verify the results of the analysis, by which the lateral resonant train speed inducing the peak pier-top amplitudes and some other observations are validated.

  8. Development of a Training Program for Commercial Building Technicians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinholm, Rod

    2013-05-31

    This project focused on developing and deploying a comprehensive program of 22 training modules, including certification requirements, and accreditation standards for commercial building technicians, to help achieve the full savings potential of energy efficient buildings, equipment, and systems. This curriculum extended the currently available commercial building technician programs -- training a labor force in a growing market area focused on energy efficiency. The program helps to remove a major market impediment to low energy/zero energy commercial building system acceptance, namely a lack of operating personnel capable of handling more complex high efficiency systems. The project developed a training curriculum for commercial building technicians, with particular focus on high-efficiency building technology, and systems. In Phase 1, the project team worked collaboratively in developing a draft training syllabus to address project objectives. The team identified energy efficiency knowledge gaps in existing programs and plans and plans to address the gaps with either modified or new curricula. In Phase 2, appropriate training materials were developed to meet project objectives. This material was developed for alternative modes of delivery, including classroom lecture materials, e-learning elements, video segments, exercises, and hands-on training elements. A Certification and Accreditation Plan and a Commercialization and Sustainability Plan were also investigated and developed. The Project Management Plan was updated quarterly and provided direction on the management approaches used to accomplish the expected project objectives. GTI project management practices tightly coordinate project activities using management controls to deliver optimal customer value. The project management practices include clear scope definition, schedule/budget tracking, risk/issue resolution and team coordination.

  9. MONITORING SWIMMING SPRINT PERFORMANCE DURING A TRAINING CYCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Marinho

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The preparation for a major competition is an important concern of coaches and athletes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the evolution in sprint performance during a training macro cycle in age-group swimmers of both genders. The sample comprised twenty four age-group swimmers (12.0 ± 0.72 years old, 41.43 ± 6.88 kg, 1.51 ± 0.09 m. The evaluations occurred during nine weeks of swimming training in the first macro cycle. During this period the subjects performed 54 training units (6 units per week. In all weeks, the performance in two trials of a 25 m front crawl all out test, with 15 min of rest, was recorded. Only the bestperformance was used to assess the effects of training. Comparisons between the first week and the following weeks were conducted using pair-sample t-test. The significance level was set at 5%. The sprint performance did not change during the first 6 weeks of preparation. In the last three weeks the performance in the 25 m front crawl test was improved when compared with the first week, although the major changes occurred at the last week of preparation.It seems that in age-group swimmers seven weeks of specific swimming training enables improving swimmer’s sprint performance, although some differences exists between male and female swimmers. Thesedata could be used by coaches to program the training season and the evolution of the load components.

  10. Deriving the effect of wind speed on clean marine aerosol optical properties using the A-Train satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Kiliyanpilakkil

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between "clean marine" aerosol optical properties and ocean surface wind speed is explored using remotely sensed data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP on board the CALIPSO satellite and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E on board the AQUA satellite. Detailed data analyses are carried out over 15 regions selected to be representative of different areas of the global ocean for the time period from June 2006 to April 2011. Based on remotely sensed optical properties the CALIPSO algorithm is capable of discriminating "clean marine" aerosols from other types often present over the ocean (such as urban/industrial pollution, desert dust and biomass burning. The global mean optical depth of "clean marine" aerosol at 532 nm (AOD532 is found to be 0.052 ± 0.038 (mean plus or minus standard deviation. The mean layer integrated particulate depolarization ratio of marine aerosols is 0.02 ± 0.016. Integrated attenuated backscatter and color ratio of marine aerosols at 532 nm were found to be 0.003 ± 0.002 sr−1 and 0.530 ± 0.149, respectively. A logistic regression between AOD532 and 10-m surface wind speed (U10 revealed three distinct regimes. For U10 ≤ 4 m s−1 the mean CALIPSO-derived AOD532 is found to be 0.02 ± 0.003 with little dependency on the surface wind speed. For 4 < U10 ≤ 12 m s−1, representing the dominant fraction of all available data, marine aerosol optical depth is linearly correlated with the surface wind speed values, with a slope of 0.006 s m−1. In this intermediate wind speed region, the AOD532 vs. U10 regression slope derived here is comparable to previously reported values. At very high wind speed values (U10 > 18 m s−1, the AOD532-wind speed relationship

  11. Evaluating the Implementation of a Training Program for Improving Quality Service: An Action Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Ketly Dieudonne

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to implement a comprehensive training program to build employees' knowledge, skills, and attitudes in order to improve quality service at ABC Restaurant because of a surge in customer complaints. The purpose of this study was to develop a training program that included an employee handbook as a training tool, a handbook designed…

  12. Ocean, Land and Meteorology Studies Using Space-Based Lidar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu,Yongxiang

    2009-01-01

    CALIPSO's main mission objective is studying the climate impact of clouds and aerosols in the atmosphere. CALIPSO also collects information about other components of the Earth's ecosystem, such as oceans and land. This paper introduces the physics concepts and presents preliminary results for the valueadded CALIPSO Earth system science products. These include ocean surface wind speeds, column atmospheric optical depths, ocean subsurface backscatter, land surface elevations, atmospheric temperature profiles, and A-train data fusion products.

  13. A training approach for the transition of repeatable collaboration processes to practitioners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolfschoten, G.L.; De Vreede, G.J.; Pietron, L.R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a training approach to support the deployment of collaboration process support according to the Collaboration Engineering approach. In Collaboration Engineering, practitioners in an organization are trained to facilitate a specific collaborative work practice on a recurring

  14. CloudSat Safety Operations at Vandenberg AFB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Steve

    2006-01-01

    CloudSat safety operations at Vendenberg AFB is given. The topics include: 1) CloudSat Project Overview; 2) Vandenberg Ground Operations; 3) Delta II Launch Vehicle; 4) The A-Train; 5) System Safety Management; 6) CALIPSO Hazards Assessment; 7) CALIPSO Supplemental Safeguards; 8) Joint System Safety Operations; 9) Extended Stand-down; 10) Launch Delay Safety Concerns; and 11) Lessons Learned.

  15. Wind Systems for Pumping Water: A Training Manual. No. T-25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschenbach, Willis

    This document was prepared as a training manual for people interested in developing appropriate technological approaches to using wind power to pump water. The training program is divided into two basic formats, one in which a session focuses on the design process and participants are expected to do some design work in groups, and another which…

  16. A study of unstable slopes in permafrost areas : Alaskan case studies used as a training tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    This report is the companion to the PowerPoint presentation for the project A Study of Unstable Slopes in Permafrost: Alaskan Case Studies Used as a Training Tool. The objectives of this study are 1) to provide a comprehensive review of literat...

  17. The most effective way of delivering a Train-the-Trainers program: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pearce, Jennifer; Mann, Mala K.; Jones, Caryl; van Buschbach, Susanne; Olff, Miranda; Bisson, Jonathan I.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Previous literature has shown that multifaceted, interactive interventions may be the most effective way to train health and social care professionals. A Train-the-Trainer (TTT) model could incorporate all these components. We conducted a systematic review to determine the overall

  18. The Effectiveness of a Training Program Based on Practice of Careers in Vocational Interests Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahasneh, Omar. M.; Farajat, Amani. M.

    2015-01-01

    The present research was conducted to identify the effectiveness of a training program based on practice of careers in vocational interests development, to answer questions about the study and test its hypothesis the training program had been prepared and the adoption of a measure of vocational interests, as validity and reliability of each of…

  19. Evaluation of a training programme designed to improve the entrepreneurial competencies of Dutch dairy farmers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergevoet, R.H.M.; Giesen, G.W.J.; Saatkamp, H.W.; Woerkum, van C.M.J.; Huirne, R.B.M.

    2005-01-01

    Due to external and internal changes in dairy farming, entrepreneurial competencies are becoming increasingly important for dairy farmers. Investigating the possibility to improve these competencies by means of a training program is the main topic of the reported research. First the relations

  20. A training paradigm to enhance performance and safe use of an innovative neuroendovascular device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricci, D.R.; Marotta, T.R.; Riina, H.A.; Wan, M.; Vries, J. de

    2016-01-01

    Training has been important to facilitate the safe use of new devices designed to repair vascular structures. This paper outlines the generic elements of a training program for vascular devices and uses as an example the actual training requirements for a novel device developed for the treatment of

  1. Improving Social Understanding of Preschool Children: Evaluation of a Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Moises; Sidera, Francesc; Serrano, Jessica; Amado, Anna; Rostan, Carles

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: This study tested the effects of a training program intending to foster social understanding or the capacity which enables them to understand themselves and others in terms of intentions, beliefs, desires, and emotions in children at preschool age. A number of studies have shown that in the context of shared narratives, children are…

  2. MACBETH: Development of a Training Game for the Mitigation of Cognitive Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Norah E.; Wilson, Scott N.; Adame, Bradley J.; Elizondo, Javier; Jensen, Matthew L.; Miller, Claude H.; Kauffman, Abigail Allums; Seltsam, Toby; Bessarabova, Elena; Vincent, Cindy; Straub, Sara K.; Ralston, Ryan; Dulawan, Christopher L.; Ramirez, Dennis; Squire, Kurt; Valacich, Joseph S.; Burgoon, Judee K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the process of rapid iterative prototyping used by a research team developing a training video game for the Sirius program funded by the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA). Described are three stages of development, including a paper prototype, and builds for alpha and beta testing. Game development is…

  3. Sensory analysis of characterizing flavors in tobacco products using a trained expert panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erna Krüsemann

    2018-03-01

    Using a trained expert panel is a successful example of assessing characterizing flavors in tobacco products. Regulatory decisions should be made on significance level and products representing the reference space, as these directly influence strictness of the method and thus the number of products that imparts a characterizing flavor compared to the reference space.

  4. Evaluation of farmed cod products by a trained sensory panel and consumers in different test settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sveinsdottir, K.; Martinsdottir, E.; Thorsdottir, F.; Schelvis-Smit, A.A.M.; Kole, A.; Thorsdottir, I.

    2010-01-01

    Sensory characteristics of farmed cod exposed to low or conventional stress levels prior to slaughter were evaluated by a trained sensory panel. Consumers in two different settings, central location test (CLT) and home-use test (HUT), also tasted the products and rated them according to overall

  5. Views of STS-4 crew during a training session in the SMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Views of STS-4 crew during a training session in the Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS) in bldg 5. Astronauts Thomas K. Mattingly, II. (left) and Henry W. Hartsfield, Jr., commander and pilot respectively for STS-4 get in some training time in the SMS.

  6. Views of STS-5 crew during a training session in the SMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Views of STS-5 crew during a training session in the Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS). Astronaut Robert F. Overmyer, STS-5 pilot, participates in training session wearing a communications kit assembly (ASSY). He is dressed in regular flight suit and is studying flight documentation.

  7. Using a Training Video to Improve Agricultural Workers' Knowledge of On-Farm Food Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiasen, Lisa; Morley, Katija; Chapman, Benjamin; Powell, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    A training video was produced and evaluated to assess its impact on the food safety knowledge of agricultural workers. Increasing food safety knowledge on the farm may help to improve the safety of fresh produce. Surveys were used to measure workers' food safety knowledge before and after viewing the video. Focus groups were used to determine…

  8. 38 CFR 21.296 - Selecting a training establishment for on-job training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... establishment for on-job training. 21.296 Section 21.296 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF... establishment for on-job training. (a) Additional criteria for selecting a training establishment. In addition... to provide on-job training to disabled veterans; (2) Provide continuous training for each veteran...

  9. The Temporal Effect of Training Utility Perceptions on Adopting a Trained Method: The Role of Perceived Organizational Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madera, Juan M.; Steele, Stacey T.; Beier, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined the temporal effect of perceived training utility on adoption of a trained method and how perceived organizational support influences the relationship between perceived training utility perceptions and adoption of a trained method. With the use of a correlational-survey-based design, this longitudinal study required…

  10. Radiographer-led plan selection for bladder cancer radiotherapy: initiating a training programme and maintaining competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNair, H A; Hafeez, S; Taylor, H; Lalondrelle, S; McDonald, F; Hansen, V N; Huddart, R

    2015-04-01

    The implementation of plan of the day selection for patients receiving radiotherapy (RT) for bladder cancer requires efficient and confident decision-making. This article describes the development of a training programme and maintenance of competency. Cone beam CT (CBCT) images acquired on patients receiving RT for bladder cancer were assessed to establish baseline competency and training needs. A training programme was implemented, and observers were asked to select planning target volumes (PTVs) on two groups of 20 patients' images. After clinical implementation, the PTVs chosen were reviewed offline, and an audit performed after 3 years. A mean of 73% (range, 53-93%) concordance rate was achieved prior to training. Subsequent to training, the mean score decreased to 66% (Round 1), then increased to 76% (Round 2). Six radiographers and two clinicians successfully completed the training programme. An independent observer reviewed the images offline after clinical implementation, and a 91% (126/139) concordance rate was achieved. During the audit, 125 CBCT images from 13 patients were reviewed by a single observer and concordance was 92%. Radiographer-led selection of plan of the day was implemented successfully with the use of a training programme and continual assessment. Quality has been maintained over a period of 3 years. The training programme was successful in achieving and maintaining competency for a plan of the day technique.

  11. Installation Of A Training Center With Nuclear Instruments In The I.N.E.A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo B, Ana C.; Periaza C, A.

    1993-01-01

    In the framework of the regional technical cooperation of the countries in development, at present, the IAEA executes some investigation projects such as the program of Regional Arrangements of Technical Cooperation for Latin America and Caribbean (ARCAL), from which the program of nuclear instrumentation ARCAL II is derived and by agreement the INEA should install a reference center in Electronic and Nuclear Instrumentation. To complete this objective it has assigned the development of different sub projects, among which is the installation of a training center for operation, cares and quality control of nuclear instruments of medical applications

  12. Wearing a training version of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) space suit, astronaut Mario

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    STS-77 TRAINING VIEW --- Wearing a training version of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) space suit, astronaut Mario Runco, mission specialist, prepares to participate in an underwater rehearsal of a contingency Extravehicular Activity (EVA). This type of training routinely takes place in the 25-feet deep pool of the Johnson Space Centers (JSC) Weightless Environment Training Center (WET-F). The training prepares at least two crew members on each flight for procedures to follow outside the spacecraft in event of failure of remote methods to perform various chores.

  13. How large a training set is needed to develop a classifier for microarray data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbin, Kevin K; Zhao, Yingdong; Simon, Richard M

    2008-01-01

    A common goal of gene expression microarray studies is the development of a classifier that can be used to divide patients into groups with different prognoses, or with different expected responses to a therapy. These types of classifiers are developed on a training set, which is the set of samples used to train a classifier. The question of how many samples are needed in the training set to produce a good classifier from high-dimensional microarray data is challenging. We present a model-based approach to determining the sample size required to adequately train a classifier. It is shown that sample size can be determined from three quantities: standardized fold change, class prevalence, and number of genes or features on the arrays. Numerous examples and important experimental design issues are discussed. The method is adapted to address ex post facto determination of whether the size of a training set used to develop a classifier was adequate. An interactive web site for performing the sample size calculations is provided. We showed that sample size calculations for classifier development from high-dimensional microarray data are feasible, discussed numerous important considerations, and presented examples.

  14. Evaluation of patient wristbands and patient identification process in a training hospital in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Canan; Celik, Yusuf; Hikmet, Neset

    2016-10-10

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the utilisation of patient wristbands (PWs) and patient identification (PI) process in a training hospital in Ankara, Turkey. Design/methodology/approach This descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted in a training hospital with 640 beds, accreditied by Joint Commission International. The views of 348 patients and 419 hospital personnel on the implementation of patient wristbands and identification process were evaluated. Findings The results indicated that lack of information among patients about the importance of PWs and the misknowledge among staff participants on when, where, and by whom PWs should be put on and verified were the weakest points in this hospital. Research limitations/implications PI process must be strictly implemented according to the standard procedures of patient safety. Both patients and hospital personnel should be trained continuously, and training sessions must be held to increase their awareness about the importance of PWs and identification process. Practical implications Finding new ways and using new methods for increasing knowledge about PI and PWs are necessary. Hospital management should prepare a written PI and PW policy and procedure documents by taking the views of patients and hospital personnel and share these with them. Originality/value This study incorporates the views and attitudes of patients and health care personnel in improving health care quality by increasing awareness about PI and wristbands.

  15. Cost and Information Effectiveness Analysis (CIEA): A Methodology for Evaluating a Training Device Operational Readiness Assessment Capability (DORAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    Report 528 COST AIND I*FO•?JidTH ?i EFFECT•• ES1BS ANALYSIS (CDEA): A METiBLOBU Y FOR EVALUATIN1G A TRAINING DEMCE OPERATMDN1AL MAEA3 ],SE 3SSESS$ iElT ...8217, N. Within a military setting, the uses of training devices in performance evaluation have generally mirrored civilian uses and primarily...Technical Report 528 COST AND INFORMATION EFFECTIVENESS ANALYSIS (CIEA): A METHODOLOGY FOR EVALUATING A TRAINING DEVICE OPERATIONAL READINESS

  16. Extending the features of RBMK refuelling machine simulator with a training tool based on virtual reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoudiakov, M.; Slonimsky, V.; Mitrofanov, S.

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes a continuation of efforts of an international Russian - Norwegian joint team to improve operational safety during the refuelling process of an RBMK-type reactor by implementing a training simulator based on an innovative Virtual Reality (VR) approach. During the preceding 1st stage of the project a display-based simulator was extended with VR models of the real Refuelling Machine (RM) and its environment in order to improve both the learning process and operation's effectiveness. The simulator's challenge is to support the performance (operational activity) of RM operational staff firstly by helping them to develop basic knowledge and skills as well as to keep skilled staff in close touch with the complex machinery of the Refuelling Machine. During the 2nd stage of the joint project the functional scope of the VR-simulator was greatly enhanced - firstly, by connecting to the RBMK-unit full-scope simulator, and, secondly, by including a training program and simulator model upgrade. The present 3rd stage of the Project is primarily oriented towards the improvement of the training process for maintenance and operational personnel by means of a development of the Training Support Methodology and Courses (TSMC) to be based on Virtual Reality and enlarged functionality of 3D and process modelling. The TMSC development is based on Russian and International Regulatory Bodies requirements and recommendations. Design, development and creation of a specialised VR-based Training System for RM Maintenance Personnel are very important for the Russian RBMK plants. The main goal is to create a powerful, autonomous VR-based simulator for training technical maintenance personnel on the Refuelling Machine. VR based training is expected to improve the effect of training compared to the current training based on traditional methods using printed documentation. The LNPP management and the Regulatory Bodies supported this goal. The VR-based Training System should

  17. Effects of a training model on active listening skills of post-RN students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, J K; Iwasiw, C L

    1987-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of a training module on the active listening skills of non-degree registered nurses. Active listening skills were defined as understanding what another person is saying and feeling and then communicating this understanding of his thoughts and feelings back to him. The sample consisted of 26 post-diploma RNs registered in the first year of a baccalaureate degree nursing program. Pretraining and posttraining data were collected when subjects verbally responded to two portions of the Behavioral Test of Interpersonal Skills for Health Professionals (BTIS). Subjects were audiotaped while responding and tapes were scored using BTIS guidelines. Paired t-tests were used to determine differences between pretraining and posttraining scores. Active listening scores increased significantly (p less than .0005) while attempts to suppress or discount speakers' feelings decreased significantly (p less than .005). A six-hour training session significantly increased active listening skills.

  18. Methodology to develop a training program as a tool for energy management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Rosario Berenguer-Ungaro

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paperaims to present the methodology to develop a training program improve labor skills that enhance the efficient use of energy resources, which aims to make training a timely and meet the training needs as they arise and that the protagonist of it is he who receives training. It is based on the training-action and action research method and model for evaluating training Krikpatrick, it evaluates four levels, reaction, learning, behavior and results. The methodology is structured in three stages: 1 diagnosis of knowledge, 2 intervention based on the results and 3 evaluation and feedback for continuous improvement. Each stage has identified the objectives and implementation tools. Evaluation is transverse to the entire program and it is through it that decisions for feedback loops are taken.

  19. Dynamic Measurement for the Diameter of A Train Wheel Based on Structured-Light Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Gong

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Wheels are very important for the safety of a train. The diameter of the wheel is a significant parameter that needs regular inspection. Traditional methods only use the contact points of the wheel tread to fit the rolling round. However, the wheel tread is easily influenced by peeling or scraping. Meanwhile, the circle fitting algorithm is sensitive to noise when only three points are used. This paper proposes a dynamic measurement method based on structured-light vision. The axle of the wheelset and the tread are both employed. The center of the rolling round is determined by the axle rather than the tread only. Then, the diameter is calculated using the center and the contact points together. Simulations are performed to help design the layout of the sensors, and the influences of different noise sources are also analyzed. Static and field experiments are both performed, and the results show it to be quite stable and accurate.

  20. Dynamic Measurement for the Diameter of A Train Wheel Based on Structured-Light Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zheng; Sun, Junhua; Zhang, Guangjun

    2016-04-20

    Wheels are very important for the safety of a train. The diameter of the wheel is a significant parameter that needs regular inspection. Traditional methods only use the contact points of the wheel tread to fit the rolling round. However, the wheel tread is easily influenced by peeling or scraping. Meanwhile, the circle fitting algorithm is sensitive to noise when only three points are used. This paper proposes a dynamic measurement method based on structured-light vision. The axle of the wheelset and the tread are both employed. The center of the rolling round is determined by the axle rather than the tread only. Then, the diameter is calculated using the center and the contact points together. Simulations are performed to help design the layout of the sensors, and the influences of different noise sources are also analyzed. Static and field experiments are both performed, and the results show it to be quite stable and accurate.

  1. Experimental Investigation of Aerodynamic Noise Generated by a Train-Car Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizushima, Fumio; Takakura, Hiroyuki; Kurita, Takeshi; Kato, Chisachi; Iida, Akiyoshi

    To investigate the mechanism of noise generation by a train-car gap, which is one of a major source of noise in Shinkansen trains, experiments were carried out in a wind tunnel using a 1/5-scale model train. We measured velocity profiles of the boundary layer that approaches the gap and confirmed that the boundary layer is turbulent. We also measured the power spectrum of noise and surface pressure fluctuations around the train-car gap. Peak noise and broadband noise were observed. It is found that strong peak noise is generated when the vortex shedding frequency corresponds to the acoustic resonance frequency determined by the geometrical shape of the gap, and that broadband noise is generated at the downstream edge of the gap where vortexes collide. It is estimated that the convection velocity of the vortices in the gap is approximately 45% of the uniform flow velocity.

  2. A training study of theory of mind and executive function in children with autistic spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Naomi; Happé, Francesca

    2005-12-01

    This study investigated the relationship between theory of mind and executive functioning in children with autistic spectrum disorders through a training study. Ten children were trained on theory of mind, whilst ten were trained in executive function. Seven children were assigned to a control group, receiving no intervention. Training programmes were administered individually, lasting for 25 minutes per day for 5-10 days. Children were tested before training, after training and at a two-month follow-up. Significant improvements were seen in performance on theory of mind tasks in both trained groups, whilst the control group showed no improvement. No improvement on the executive function tasks was seen in any of the groups. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  3. [Problem based learning by distance education and analysis of a training system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dury, Cécile

    2004-12-01

    This article presents and analyses a training system aiming at acquiring skills in nursing cares. The aims followed are the development: --of an active pedagogic method: learning through problems (LTP); --of the interdisciplinary and intercultural approach, the same problems being solves by students from different disciplines and cultures; --of the use of the new technologies of information and communication (NTIC) so as to enable a maximal "distance" cooperation between the various partners of the project. The analysis of the system shows that the pedagogic aims followed by LTP are reached. The pluridisciplinary and pluricultural approach, to be optimal, requires great coordination between the partners, balance between the groups of students from different countries and disciplines, training and support from the tutors in the use of the distance teaching platform.

  4. MPC&A training needs of the NIS/Baltics States.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, David Franklin; Stoy-McLeod, Carol L.

    2006-07-01

    This report serves to document contract deliverables considered to be of continuing interest associated with two workshops conducted as part of an initial assessment of Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC&A) training needs of the Newly Independent and Baltic States (NIS/Baltics). These workshops were held in Kiev, Ukraine, ca. 2003-2004, with the assistance of personnel from the George Kuzmycz Training Center (GKTC) of the Kiev Institute of Nuclear Research (KINR). Because of the dominant role Ukraine plays in the region in terms of the nuclear industry, one workshop focused exclusively on Ukrainian training needs, with participants attending from twelve Ukrainian organizations (plus U.S. DOE/NNSA representatives). The second workshop included participation by a further ten countries from the NIS/Baltics region. In addition, the training needs data developed during the workshop were supplemented by the outcomes of surveys and studies conducted by the GKTC.

  5. A training manual for event history data management using Health and Demographic Surveillance System data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocquier, Philippe; Ginsburg, Carren; Herbst, Kobus; Sankoh, Osman; Collinson, Mark A

    2017-06-26

    The objective of this research note is to introduce a training manual for event history data management. The manual provides a first comprehensive guide to longitudinal Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) data management that allows for a step-by-step description of the process of structuring and preparing a dataset for the calculation of demographic rates and event history analysis. The research note provides some background information on the INDEPTH Network, and the iShare data repository and describes the need for a manual to guide users as to how to correctly handle HDSS datasets. The approach outlined in the manual is flexible and can be applied to other longitudinal data sources. It facilitates the development of standardised longitudinal data management and harmonization of datasets to produce a comparative set of results.

  6. Improving Peripheral and Central Vascular Adjustments during Exercise through a Training Program in Adolescents with Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, Valérie; Thivel, David; Pereira, Bruno; Costes, Frédéric; Richard, Ruddy; Duclos, Martine

    2016-01-01

    The effects of a training program (TP) on muscle microvascularization during exercise remained to be explored in adolescents with obesity. We hypothesized that a TP would lead to better microvascular adaptations to exercise in skeletal muscle. 15 inactive adolescents followed a 12-week TP where both peripheral (muscular microvascularization) and central (cardiac) adaptations to exercise (40 min exercise set at 70% V̇O2peak) were assessed before and after intervention. Microvascular adaptations were evaluated in the Musculus vastus lateralis with near-infrared spectroscopy, by measurement of muscular blood volume (IR-BV) and tissue oxygen saturation (IR-SO2). Central adaptations were evaluated using thoracic impedance. The TP favored lower BMI (p exercise in adolescents with obesity. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  7. Virtual vitreoretinal surgery: construction of a training programme on the Eyesi Surgical Simulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vergmann, Anna Stage; Vestergaard, Anders Højslet; Grauslund, Jakob

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test the construct validity of a full virtual reality vitreoretinal training program at the Eyesi Surgical simulator. Design and methods: A virtual vitreoretinal training program was composed on the Eyesi Surgical simulator, software version 2.9.2 (VRmagic...... GmbH, Manheim, Germany). It was completed twice by three groups: Group 1: Twenty medical students Group 2: Ten ophthalmology residents Group 3: Five vitreoretinal surgeons The program consisted of six training modules (Figure 1): Navigation level 2 (Nav2) Forceps Training level 5 (ForT5) Bimanual...... developed a training program in virtual vitreoretinal surgery with construct validity for four out of six modules and for overall score. This makes the program a useful tool in the training of future vitreoretinal surgeons....

  8. Effect of a training programme on blood culture contamination rate in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sánchez, M M; Arias-Rivera, S; Fraile-Gamo, P; Jareño-Collado, R; López-Román, S; Vadillo-Obesso, P; García-González, S; Pulido-Martos, M T; Sánchez-Muñoz, E I; Cacho-Calvo, J; Martín-Pellicer, A; Panadero-Del Olmo, L; Frutos-Vivar, F

    2018-03-30

    Blood culture contamination can occur from extraction to processing; its rate should not exceed 3%. To evaluate the impact of a training programme on the rate of contaminated blood cultures after the implementation of sample extraction recommendations based on the best evidence. Prospective before-after study in a polyvalent intensive care unit with 18 beds. Two phases were established (January-June 2012, October 2012-October 2015) with a training period between them. Main recommendations: sterile technique, surgical mask, double skin disinfection (70° alcohol and 2% alcoholic chlorhexidine), 70° alcohol disinfection of culture flasks and injection of samples without changing needles. Including all blood cultures of patients with extraction request. demographic, severity, pathology, reason for admission, stay and results of blood cultures (negative, positive and contaminated). Basic descriptive statistics: mean (standard deviation), median (interquartile range) and percentage (95% confidence interval). Calculated contamination rates per 100 blood cultures extracted. Bivariate analysis between periods. Four hundred and eight patients were included. Eight hundred and forty-one blood cultures were taken, 33 of which were contaminated. In the demographic variables, severity, diagnosis and stay of patients with contaminated samples, no differences were observed from those with uncontaminated samples. Pre-training vs post-training contamination rates: 14 vs 5.6 per 100 blood cultures extracted (P=.00003). An evidence-based training programme reduced the contamination of samples. It is necessary to continue working on the planning of activities and care to improve the detection of pollutants and prevent contamination of samples. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Enfermería Intensiva y Unidades Coronarias (SEEIUC). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Catch the A-Train from the NASA GIBS/Worldview Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmaltz, J. E.; Alarcon, C.; Baynes, K.; Boller, R. A.; Cechini, M. F.; De Cesare, C.; De Luca, A. P.; Gunnoe, T.; King, B. A.; King, J.; Pressley, N. N.; Roberts, J. T.; Rodriguez, J.; Thompson, C. K.; Wong, M. M.

    2016-12-01

    The satellites and instruments of the Afternoon Train are providing an unprecedented combination of nearly simultaneous measurements. One of the challenges for researchers and applications users is to sift through these combinations to find particular sets of data that correspond to their interests. Using visualization of the data is one way to explore these combinations. NASA's Worldview tool is designed to do just that - to interactively browse full-resolution satellite imagery. Worldview (https://worldview.earthdata.nasa.gov/) is web-based and developed using open libraries and standards (OpenLayers, JavaScript, CSS, HTML) for cross-platform compatibility. It addresses growing user demands for access to full-resolution imagery by providing a responsive, interactive interface with global coverage and no artificial boundaries. In addition to science data imagery, Worldview provides ancillary datasets such as coastlines and borders, socio-economic layers, and satellite orbit tracks. Worldview interacts with the Earthdata Search Client to provide download of the data files associated with the imagery being viewed. The imagery used by Worldview is provided NASA's Global Imagery Browse Services (GIBS - https://earthdata.nasa.gov/gibs) which provide highly responsive, highly scalable imagery services. Requests are made via the OGC Web Map Tile Service (WMTS) standard. In addition to Worldview, other clients can be developed using a variety of web-based libraries, desktop and mobile app libraries, and GDAL script-based access. GIBS currently includes more than 106 science data sets from seven instruments aboard three of the A-Train satellites and new data sets are being added as part of the President's Big Earth Data Initiative (BEDI). Efforts are underway to include new imagery types, such as vectors and curtains, into Worldview/GIBS which will be used to visualize additional A-Train science parameters.

  10. [Impact of a training model for the Child Development Evaluation Test in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzoli-Córdoba, Antonio; Delgado-Ginebra, Ismael; Cruz-Ortiz, Leopoldo Alfonso; Baqueiro-Hernández, César Iván; Martain-Pérez, Itzamara Jacqueline; Palma-Tavera, Josuha Alexander; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel; Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; O'Shea-Cuevas, Gabriel; Aceves-Villagrán, Daniel; Carrasco-Mendoza, Joaquín; Antillón-Ocampo, Fátima Adriana; Villagrán-Muñoz, Víctor Manuel; Halley-Castillo, Elizabeth; Vargas-López, Guillermo; Muñoz-Hernández, Onofre

    The Child Development Evaluation (CDE) Test is a screening tool designed and validated in Mexico for the early detection of child developmental problems. For professionals who will be administering the test in primary care facilities, previous acquisition of knowledge about the test is required in order to generate reliable results. The aim of this work was to evaluate the impact of a training model for primary care workers from different professions through the comparison of knowledge acquired during the training course. The study design was a before/after type considering the participation in a training course for the CDE test as the intervention. The course took place in six different Mexican states from October to December 2013. The same questions were used before and after. There were 394 participants included. Distribution according to professional profile was as follows: general physicians 73.4%, nursing 7.7%, psychology 7.1%, nutrition 6.1% and other professions 5.6%. The questions with the lowest correct answer rates were associated with the scoring of the CDE test. In the initial evaluation, 64.9% obtained a grade lower than 20 compared with 1.8% in the final evaluation. In the initial evaluation only 1.8% passed compared with 75.15% in the final evaluation. The proposed model allows the participants to acquire general knowledge about the CDE Test. To improve the general results in future training courses, it is required to reinforce during training the scoring and interpretation of the test together with the previous lecture of the material by the participants. Copyright © 2015 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  11. Monitoring Physical and Cognitive Overload During a Training Camp in Professional Female Cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decroix, Lieselot; Piacentini, Maria Francesca; Rietjens, Gerard; Meeusen, Romain

    2016-10-01

    High training loads combined with other stressors can lead to performance decrements. The time needed to recover determines the diagnosis of (non)-functional overreaching or the overtraining syndrome. The aim of this study was to describe the effects of an 8-day (intensified) training camp of professional female cyclists on physical and cognitive performance. Nine subjects performed a 30-min time trial (TT), cognitive test, and Profile of Mood States questionnaire before, during, and after a training camp (49% increased training volume). On data collection, cyclists were classified as "overreached" (OR) or "adapted" (A) based on TT performance. Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to detect changes in physical and cognitive parameters. Five cyclists were described as OR based on decreased mean power output (MPO) (-7.03%) on day 8. Four cyclists were classified as A (increased MPO: +1.72%). MPO and maximal heart rate were significantly different between A and OR groups. A significant slower reaction time (RT) (+3.35%) was found in OR subjects, whereas RT decreased (-4.59%) in A subjects. The change in MPO was negatively correlated with change in RT in the cognitive test (R 2 = .52). This study showed that the use of objective, inexpensive, and easy-to-interpret physical and cognitive tests can facilitate the monitoring of training adaptations in professional female athletes.

  12. [Design and validation of a training model on paediatric and neonatal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Duarte, F J; Díaz-Güemes, I; Sánchez-Hurtado, M A; Cano Novillo, I; Berchi García, F J; García Vázquez, A; Sánchez-Margallo, F M

    2012-07-01

    We present our experience in the design and development of a training program in paediatric and neonatal laparoscopic surgery, and the determination of face validity by the attendants. Data included in the present study was obtained from five consecutive editions of our Neonatal and Paediatric Laparoscopic Surgery Course. Our training model, with a total duration of 21 hours, begins with acquisition of knowledge in ergonomics and instrument concepts, after which the attendants develop basic laparoscopic dexterity through the performance of hands-on physical simulator tasks. During the second and third days of the course, surgeons undertook various surgical techniques hands-on animal model. At the end of the training program, a subjective evaluation questionnaire was handed out to the attendants, in which different didactic and organizational aspects were considered. We obtained a highly positive score on all questions concerning the different topics and techniques included in the training program (> or = 9 points over 10). 78,5% of the 54 attendants was in accordance with the course total duration, whilst 21,5% considered that it should be of longer duration. Regarding abilities' self assessment, 79,1% considered themselves capacitated to perform trained procedures on live patients. The presented training model has obtained a very positive valuation score, leading to an increase in the attendants' self confidence in the application of learned techniques to their clinical practice.

  13. Cloud remote sensing from space in the era of the A-Train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Graeme L.; Vane, Deborah G.

    2006-09-01

    The clouds of Earth are fundamental to most aspects of human life. Through production of precipitation, they are essential for delivering and sustaining the supplies of fresh water upon which human life depends. Clouds further exert a principal influence on the planet's energy balance. It is in clouds that latent heat is released through the process of condensation and the formation of precipitation affecting the development and evolution of the planet's storm systems. Clouds further exert a profound influence on the solar and infrared radiation that enters and leaves the atmosphere, further exerting profound effects on climate and on forces that affect climate change (Stephens, 2005). It is for these reasons, among others, that the need to observe the distribution and variability of the properties of clouds and precipitation has emerged as a priority in Earth observations. Most past and current observational programs are contructed in such a way that clouds and precipitation are treated as separate entities. Nature does not work this way and there is much to be gained scientifically in moving away from these artificial practices toward observing clouds and precipitation properties jointly. We are now embarking on a new age of remote sensing of clouds and precipitation using active sensors, starting with the tropical rainfall measurement mission (TRMM) and continuing on with the A-Train (described below). This new age provides us with the opportunity to move away from past and present artificial observing practices offering a more unified approach to observing clouds and precipitation properties jointly.

  14. A Training Method to Improve Police Use of Force Decision Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith P. Andersen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Police safety and use of force decisions during critical incidents are an ongoing source of concern for both police practitioners and the public. Prior research in the area of police performance reveals that psychological and physiological stress responses during critical incidents can shape the outcome of the incident, either positively or negatively. The goal of this study was to test a training method to improve use of force decision making among police. This randomized controlled pilot study consisted of training officers to apply techniques to enhance psychological and physiological control during stressful critical incidents. Of a pool of 80 police officers, potential participants were invited based on equivalent age, years of experience, physiological characteristics (i.e., body mass index [BMI] and cardiovascular reactivity, and expertise. Results revealed that the intervention group displayed significantly better physiological control, situational awareness, and overall performance, and made a greater number of correct use of force decisions than officers in the control group (all ps < .01. The relevant improvements in use of force decision-making found in this pilot study indicate that this training method warrants further investigation. Improved use of force decision making directly translates into potential lifesaving decisions for police and the civilians they are working with.

  15. Modeling of Aerodynamic Force Acting in Tunnel for Analysis of Riding Comfort in a Train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikko, Satoshi; Tanifuji, Katsuya; Sakanoue, Kei; Nanba, Kouichiro

    In this paper, we aimed to model the aerodynamic force that acts on a train running at high speed in a tunnel. An analytical model of the aerodynamic force is developed from pressure data measured on car-body sides of a test train running at the maximum revenue operation speed. The simulation of an 8-car train running while being subjected to the modeled aerodynamic force gives the following results. The simulated car-body vibration corresponds to the actual vibration both qualitatively and quantitatively for the cars at the rear of the train. The separation of the airflow at the tail-end of the train increases the yawing vibration of the tail-end car while it has little effect on the car-body vibration of the adjoining car. Also, the effect of the moving velocity of the aerodynamic force on the car-body vibration is clarified that the simulation under the assumption of a stationary aerodynamic force can markedly increase the car-body vibration.

  16. Water balance and ad libitum water intake in football players during a training session

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Diego Hernández-Camacho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is known that hydration plays a crucial performance in sports performance. But a great number of studies assessing hydration during football practice have shown that many players have a dehydration state prior to this sport and that most players are not able to replace water loss by sweating with ad libitum water intake. Objectives: To analyze ad libitum water consumption, water balance, thirst sensation and rate of perceived exertion on a sample of young football players during a training session. Material and Methods: A total of 57 players from three teams in the youth category voluntary participated in this study. Weight was collected at the beginning and at the end of training; thirst sensation, rate of perceived exertion and quantification of ingested water were assessed. We used descriptive statistics, correlational and ratio analysis. Results: Mean global intake of players studied was 844.74±351.95mL and an average loss of body water 1274.56±385.82mL. Average rate of dehydration of the initial weight was 0.63%. Average score of 2.81±1.32 on the scale of thirst sensation was obtained. Discussion and conclusions: Rate of loss of body water similar to previous studies is obtained. The players were not able to replace water loss by drinking liquid ad libitum, so the intake of an amount previously scheduled could become helpful.

  17. Vibration analysis of concrete bridges during a train pass-by using various models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Qi; Wang, Ke; Cheng, Shili; Li, Wuqian; Song, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    The vibration of a bridge must be determined in order to predict the bridge noise during a train pass-by. It can be generally solved with different models either in the time domain or the frequency domain. The computation cost and accuracy of these models vary a lot in a wide frequency band. This study aims to compare the results obtained from various models for recommending the most suitable model in further noise prediction. First, train-track-bridge models in the time domain are developed by using the finite element method and mode superposition method. The rails are modeled by Timoshenko beam elements and the bridge is respectively modeled by shell elements and volume elements. Second, power flow models for the coupled system are established in the frequency domain. The rails are modelled by infinite Timoshenko beams and the bridge is respectively represented by three finite element models, an infinite Kirchhoff plate, and an infinite Mindlin plate model. The vibration at given locations of the bridge and the power input to the bridges through the rail fasteners are calculated using these models. The results show that the shear deformation of the bridge deck has significant influences on the bridge vibration at medium-to-high frequencies. The Mindlin plate model can be used to represent the U-shaped girder to obtain the power input to the bridge with high accuracy and efficiency. (paper)

  18. Professional development as seen by children’s education teachers in a training-research context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Regina Brostolin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents part of a broader research developed between July 2010 and October 2013 and proposes an analysis of the professional development of four children’s education teachers participating in a training-research group. The resource used to give support to the reflections was the production of (auto biographical narratives stimulated by mnemonic resources such as photos, films, objects, etc. The analysis reflects their formative journeys and professional development. The fragments analyzed showed the progress of the teachers, from getting to know the school as a space for learning and professional development, remembering moments of initial training, teaching initiation and, later, investing in their career by means of new courses, lato and strictu sensu. The narratives also show that the teachers are aware of their obligation and of the complexity involved in educating a child universally, and of their vulnerability, as well as of the need for constructing their specific professional life that integrates knowledge on childhood in the 21st century.

  19. Implementation and assessment of a training course for residents in neonatology and pediatric emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossier, D; Bellot, A; Villedieu, F; Fazilleau, L; Brouard, J; Guillois, B

    2017-05-01

    Residents must balance patient care and the ongoing acquisition of medical knowledge. With increasing clinical responsibilities and patient overload, medical training is often left aside. In 2010, we designed and implemented a training course in neonatology and pediatric emergency medicine for residents in pediatrics, in order to improve their medical education. The course was made of didactic sessions and several simulation-based seminars for each year of residency. We conducted this study to assess the impact of our program on residents' satisfaction and self-assessed clinical skills. A survey was conducted at the end of each seminar. The students were asked to complete a form on a five-point rating scale to evaluate the courses and their impact on their satisfaction and self-assessed clinical skills, following the French National Health Institute's adapted Kirkpatrick model. Sixty-four (84%) of the 76 residents who attended the courses completed the form. The mean satisfaction score for the entire course was 4.78±0.42. Over 80% of the students felt that their clinical skills had improved. Medical education is an important part of residency training. Our training course responded to the perceived needs of the students with consistently satisfactory evaluations. Before the evaluation of the impact of the course on patient care, further studies are needed to assess the acquisition of knowledge and skills through objective evaluations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Retrospective evaluation of urological admissions to emergency service of a training and research hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topaktaş, Ramazan; Altın, Selçuk; Aydın, Cemil; Akkoç, Ali; Yılmaz, Yakup

    2014-12-01

    Many patients consult emergency services with urological complaints. The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiology, clinical presentation and treatments of urological emergency cases in a training and research hospital. We retrospectively evaluated urological emergency patients referred to the emergency unit between July 2012 and July 2013 according to age, gender, affected organ, radiological imaging techniques and treatment. Among 141.844 emergency cases, 3.113 (2.19%) were urological emergencies and 53.2% of the patients were male (mean age: 49.1), and 46.8% of them were female (median age: 42.8). The most frequent illness was genitourinary infection constituting 41.2% of the cases followed by renal colic (36.9%). Among the urological emergencies 483 (15.5%) patients were hospitalized and 152 surgical operations were performed. The mostly performed procedure was the placement of a suprapubic catheter in 34 patients constituting (22.3%) of the cases. Totally eight patients were referred to another experienced health center due to different reasons. Most of the urological emergency patients do not require emergency surgical interventions however, timely identification and management of urological emergencies with in-depth clinical evaluation are important to prevent late complications. Therefore the doctors working in emergency services must be heedful of urological emergencies.

  1. Construct Validity of Fresh Frozen Human Cadaver as a Training Model in Minimal Access Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macafee, David; Pranesh, Nagarajan; Horgan, Alan F.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The construct validity of fresh human cadaver as a training tool has not been established previously. The aims of this study were to investigate the construct validity of fresh frozen human cadaver as a method of training in minimal access surgery and determine if novices can be rapidly trained using this model to a safe level of performance. Methods: Junior surgical trainees, novices (cadavers. Expert laparoscopists (>100 laparoscopic procedures) performed 3 repetitions of identical tasks. Performances were scored using a validated, objective Global Operative Assessment of Laparoscopic Skills scale. Scores for 3 consecutive repetitions were compared between experts and novices to determine construct validity. Furthermore, to determine if the novices reached a safe level, a trimmed mean of the experts score was used to define a benchmark. Mann-Whitney U test was used for construct validity analysis and 1-sample t test to compare performances of the novice group with the benchmark safe score. Results: Ten novices and 2 experts were recruited. Four out of 5 tasks (nondominant to dominant hand transfer; simulated appendicectomy; intracorporeal and extracorporeal knot tying) showed construct validity. Novices’ scores became comparable to benchmark scores between the eighth and tenth repetition. Conclusion: Minimal access surgical training using fresh frozen human cadavers appears to have construct validity. The laparoscopic skills of novices can be accelerated through to a safe level within 8 to 10 repetitions. PMID:23318058

  2. A multi-method evaluation of a training course on dual diagnosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rani, S

    2012-08-01

    A training course on dual diagnosis was developed within the Irish forensic mental health service, to bridge the gap in the lack of training on dual diagnosis in Ireland. The course was designed for service providers within mental health and addiction services. Twenty participants involving nursing, social work, police and social welfare disciplines attended the first training course. A mixed methodology research design was adapted to describe participants\\' evaluation of the training course. Data were collected using multiple methods: pre- and post-test, daily evaluation and focus group interviews. Quantitative data were analysed using the spss Version 16.0 and qualitative data were analysed thematically. Findings from the pre- and post-test suggest an increase in participants\\' knowledge of dual diagnosis and an increase in confidence in conducting groups. Daily evaluation indicates that the course content largely met participants\\' needs. Finally, three themes emerged from the focus group interview: increased confidence, the training course\\/teaching methods and personal\\/organizational challenges. This study implies that service providers within mental health and addiction services benefit from inter-professional, needs and skills based courses incorporating a variety of teaching methods. The way forward for future dual diagnosis training course developments would be working in partnership with service users and carers.

  3. Food poisoning outbreak in a training establishment: A retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maramraj Kiran Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: An outbreak of food poisoning occurred among recruits in a training establishment. Investigation of outbreak was undertaken with active preventive interventions concurrently to arrest the current outbreak as well as to avoid such incidents in future. Materials and Methods: A retrospective cohort study was undertaken among all recruits, regardless of presence or absence of symptoms. The risk ratios (relative risks and attributable risks were calculated for each food item of the suspected meal to assess the association between consumption of individual food items and subsequent illness. An environmental survey was undertaken to investigate into the course of food processing and storage facilities at trainees' galley (cookhouse and other relevant eating establishments. Results: A total of 494 recruits reported with symptoms of gastroenteritis in a span of 3 days. Of those affected, only 9 were admitted and rest recovered with treatment on OPD basis. The overall attack rate was 22.9%. No deaths were reported. It was a classical point source, single exposure gastroenteritis outbreak. When food histories and sickness histories were analyzed, the attributable risk (24.17 and relative risk (5.11 were highest for the “Flavoured milk,” which was an outsourced item. The statistical findings were substantiated with environmental and epidemiological evidence. Conclusion: Epidemiological investigation incriminated dinner of the previous day as the meal responsible for the outbreak with flavored milk as the most attributable food item.

  4. EFFECT OF A TRAINING PROGRAM ON THE IMPROVEMENT OF BASKETBALL PLAYERS' DECISION MAKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Alarc\\u00F3n

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyse whether a tactical training program based on a constructivist model can improve decision making related to keeping control of the ball for a men's senior basketball team composed of ten players. The dependent variables were: player distribution around the ball, and achieving support on both sides of the ball at an effective passing distance. Data collection was made through observational analysis utilizing a previously validated tool. A pretest-posttest design without a control group was used. Results demonstrated an improvement in decision making after the posttest for both the number of support players near the player with the ball, as it increased from 85% in the pretest to 100% in the posttest, and the number of collective or team actions around the player with the ball (from 5% to 76.5% with highly significant differences. The primary conclusion is that a training program for teaching team tactics based on a constructivist model has a positive influence on players' capability to facilitate the pass to their teammates.

  5. Developing a training programme for radiation protection officers at industrial irradiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davor, P.

    2013-04-01

    A training programme for staff of irradiation facilities especially radiation safety officers at industrial irradiation facilities has been developed. The programme focused on technical and administrative basis for ensuring radiation safety at the practices. It consists of thirteen modules ranging from fundamentals of radiation, biological effects of ionizing radiation as well as the technical and administrative issues pertinent to radiation safety of the sources. The overall objective of this programme was to build competence in the area of radiation protection and raise the confidence level of staff of industrial irradiation facilities. The modules are structured in a manner that attempts to give a good understanding to participants on safety features of irradiators and use of radiation monitoring equipment. Each module has specific objectives and expected outcome and the course content is also stated under each module. The duration of the whole programme is sixteen weeks and the participants are expected to have some working knowledge in radiation protection and safe use of radiation sources. (au)

  6. A train dispatching model based on fuzzy passenger demand forecasting during holidays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Dou Dou

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Purpose: The train dispatching is a crucial issue in the train operation adjustment when passenger flow outbursts. During holidays, the train dispatching is to meet passenger demand to the greatest extent, and ensure safety, speediness and punctuality of the train operation. In this paper, a fuzzy passenger demand forecasting model is put up, then a train dispatching optimization model is established based on passenger demand so as to evacuate stranded passengers effectively during holidays. Design/methodology/approach: First, the complex features and regularity of passenger flow during holidays are analyzed, and then a fuzzy passenger demand forecasting model is put forward based on the fuzzy set theory and time series theory. Next, the bi-objective of the train dispatching optimization model is to minimize the total operation cost of the train dispatching and unserved passenger volume during holidays. Finally, the validity of this model is illustrated with a case concerned with the Beijing-Shanghai high-speed railway in China. Findings: The case study shows that the fuzzy passenger demand forecasting model can predict outcomes more precisely than ARIMA model. Thus train dispatching optimization plan proves that a small number of trains are able to serve unserved passengers reasonably and effectively. Originality/value: On the basis of the passenger demand predictive values, the train dispatching optimization model is established, which enables train dispatching to meet passenger demand in condition that passenger flow outbursts, so as to maximize passenger demand by offering the optimal operation plan.

  7. The Text of the Instrument Concerning the Agency's Assistance to Argentina for the Establishment of a Training Reactor Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1971-01-01

    The text of the Agreement between the Agency and the Governments of Argentina and the Federal Republic of Germany concerning the Agency's assistance for the establishment of a training reactor project in Argentina is reproduced herein for the information of all Members. The Agreement entered into force on 13 March 1970.

  8. Information Technology Infusion Case Study: Integrating Google Earth(Trademark) into the A-Train Data Depot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter; Kempler, Steven; Leptoukh, Gregory; Chen, Aijun

    2010-01-01

    This poster paper represents the NASA funded project that was to employ the latest three dimensional visualization technology to explore and provide direct data access to heterogeneous A-Train datasets. Google Earth (tm) provides foundation for organizing, visualizing, publishing and synergizing Earth science data .

  9. A Train-the-Trainer Design for Green Ambassadors in an Environmental Education Programme on Plastic Waste Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Yannes Tsz-Yan; Chow, Cheuk-Fai; So, Winnie Wing-Mui

    2018-01-01

    To educate a sustainable future, a train-the-trainer (TTT) approach was adopted to train student teachers (STs) from a teacher education institute to be green ambassadors (GAs) in an environmental education (EE) programme with the aim of promoting plastic waste recycling among primary school pupils. The design of the TTT course for the GAs not…

  10. Moral Dilemmas in a Military Context. a Case Study of a Train the Trainer Course on Military Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Baarle, Eva; Bosch, Jolanda; Widdershoven, Guy; Verweij, Desiree; Molewijk, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Moral competence is important for soldiers who have to deal with complex moral dilemmas in practice. However, openly dealing with moral dilemmas and showing moral competence is not always easy within the culture of a military organization. In this article, based on analysis of experiences during a train the trainer course on military ethics, we…

  11. The Text of the Instrument Concerning the Agency's Assistance to Argentina for the Establishment of a Training Reactor Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1971-02-23

    The text of the Agreement between the Agency and the Governments of Argentina and the Federal Republic of Germany concerning the Agency's assistance for the establishment of a training reactor project in Argentina is reproduced herein for the information of all Members. The Agreement entered into force on 13 March 1970.

  12. Marriage as a training ground: Examining change in self-control and forgiveness over the first four years of marriage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, T.M.; Buyukcan-Tetik, A.; Iliás, M.; Finkenauer, C.

    2018-01-01

    Do partners’ levels of self-control and forgiveness change over the course of marriage? Based on the idea that marriage may function as a training ground for these vital relationship abilities, we hypothesized that people increase their levels of self-control and forgiveness over time and that these

  13. The Effect of a Training Programme in Creativity on Developing the Creative Abilities among Children with Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dababneh, Kholoud A.; al-Masa'deh, Mu'tasem M.; Oliemat, Enass M.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of a training programme in creativity on developing creative abilities among 9-10-year-old children with visual impairment in Jordan. The study sample consisted of 41 students from fourth and fifth grades, who were randomly selected and divided into two experimental groups and two control groups. To…

  14. Conversations about mental states and theory of mind development during middle childhood: A training study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Federica; Lecce, Serena; Banerjee, Robin

    2016-09-01

    Despite 30years of productive research on theory of mind (ToM), we still know relatively little about variables that influence ToM development during middle childhood. Recent experimental studies have shown that conversations about the mind affect ToM abilities, but they have not explored the mechanisms underlying this developmental effect. In the current study, we examined two potential mechanisms through which conversations about mental states are likely to influence ToM: an increased frequency of references to mental states when explaining behavior and an increased accuracy of mental-state attributions. To this aim, we conducted a training study in which 101 children were assigned to either an intervention condition or a control condition. The conversation-based intervention was made up of four sessions scheduled over 2weeks. Children completed a battery of assessments before and after the intervention as well as 2months later. The groups were equivalent at Time 1 (T1) for age, family affluence, vocabulary, and executive functions. The ToM group showed an improvement in ToM skills (as evaluated on both the practiced tasks and a transfer task). Mediation analyses demonstrated that the accuracy of mental-state attributions, but not the mere frequency of mental-state references, mediated the positive effect of conversations about the mind on ToM development. Our results indicate that conversational experience can enhance mental-state reasoning not by simply drawing children's attention to mental states but rather by scaffolding a mature understanding of social situations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. How did General Surgery Department of a Training Hospital Change in Ten Years?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafer Ergül

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available  Aim: To investigate the changes in a training hospital’s surgical patient profile in ten years. To delineate the effects of the transfer of Social Security Institution Hospitals to the Ministry of Health on this process. Material and Method: Ten-year apart, two-year periods were selected and all elective and emergency cases were retrospectively searched. In between periods, the hospital was transferred from Social Security Institution Hospital to the Ministry of Health and then became a trauma center. The indications, techniques, the number of performed surgeries, and the patient related factors were compared. The ratio of the number emergency cases and the number of cases performed by residents in training to the total number of cases were investigated. Results: The number of elective and emergent operations during the former and the latter periods were 2668 and 2041, respectively. The percentage of the decrease was 23.5%. After ten years, the patients were younger, more commonly male, emergency cases were more common, and operations performed primarily by the residents in training were less frequent than the former period (p<0,05. Oncological surgery of stomach, colon-rectum, breast, thyroid and primary-metastatic-malign carcinoma were more frequent during former period whereas urgent operations except peptic ulcer perforation and upper gastrointestinal bleeding and benign anorectal diseases were more common during later period (p<0,05. Discussion: The comparison revealed a significant decrease in the number of operations in ten years. The number of oncological patients increased whereas the number of emergency cases declined. The changes were thought to be related more to the transition in health and becoming a trauma center than to major developments in the country and the world.

  16. Analysis of hazardous work environment factors at a train conductor workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.F. Vil'k

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper dwells on generalized analysis of morbidity which is characteristic for conductors working in passenger carriages of locomotive-driven trains. Working conditions train conductors had to work in were examined as per results of sanitary-hygienic research on intra-carriage environment, specific working conditions assessment, and questioning. Hazards caused by working environment factors for train conductors to a certain extent depend on a carriage type, its technical and hygienic state, as well as on a route a train goes by. Our research revealed that impacts exerted by various working environment factors, namely physical, chemical, biological, and psychophysical ones, caused respiratory diseases, increased allergic reactivity, changes in hearing sensitivity, and overall morbidity growth among people from this occupational group. Unordered regime resulting from constant trips and unfavorable living conditions in a carriage lead to the following diseases: varix dilatation in legs, ischemic heart disease together with primary hypertension, and chronic rheumatic heart diseases. More precise classification of conductors' working conditions can be obtained via a mathematical model creation as it enables precise estimation of occupational diseases probability. Such models should be based on a relationship between diseases frequency (or probability and working conditions as per specific hygienic factors. We worked out methodical guidelines on providing safe working conditions at conductors' working places which include efficient activities aimed at prevention of hazardous impacts exerted by working environment factors. It will help to improve working conditions substantially, to preserve workers' health, and to ensure safe passengers traffic. Safe working conditions for conductors can be secured due to a set of activities aimed at equipping new carriages and those after capital repair with air-conditioning, disinfection systems, heating

  17. Evaluation of knowledge change of internal medicine residents following a training program in smoking cessation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labib, N.A.; Radwan, G.N.; Salma, R.A.A.; Horeesh, N.A.

    2012-01-01

    One of the major barriers to smoking cessation practice is that many health professionals do not have the knowledge and skills on how to intervene. Objectives: To assess the effect of a training program on physicians' knowledge about tobacco dependence and cessation interventions. Subjects and Methods: A comprehensive training program was given to internal medicine residents in Cairo University Hospitals, Egypt during 2008-2009. An anonymous, 11- item questionnaire was administered before and after the training program. The training process was evaluated by participants' satisfaction using a 13- item checklist. The objective of the study was adequately explained to participants and their consensus was obtained with assured confidentiality. Results: A total of 163 internists entered the training program. Improvement in overall knowledge was evidenced by higher mean score in the post-test than pre-test (6.2 vs. 4.7; p<0.001). Significant improvement were seen in the participants' knowledge related to assessment of tobacco dependence (61% vs. 27%;p<0.001), interventions for smokers willing to quit (51.6 vs. 28.2%; p<0.001), interventions for smokers unwilling to quit (40.8 vs. 19.6%; p<0.001) and coping skills to handle withdrawal symptoms (52.9 vs. 30.7;p<0.001). Almost all participants reported that the training was very useful (96%) and applicable (85.6%) in their medical practices. Conclusions: Targeted training of health professionals has a potential to translate into improved smoking cessation counseling and to increase their inclination to intervene. Policy message: Continued medical education and regular/targeted training of health providers should be done. (author)

  18. Evaluation of a training program of hypertension for accredited social health activists (ASHA) in rural India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-All, Marwa; Thrift, Amanda Gay; Riddell, Michaela; Thankappan, Kavumpurathu Raman Thankappan; Mini, Gomathyamma Krishnakurup; Chow, Clara K; Maulik, Pallab Kumar; Mahal, Ajay; Guggilla, Rama; Kalyanram, Kartik; Kartik, Kamakshi; Suresh, Oduru; Evans, Roger George; Oldenburg, Brian; Thomas, Nihal; Joshi, Rohina

    2018-05-02

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, a leading cause of premature death and disability in India. Since access to health services is poor in rural India and Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHAs) are available throughout India for maternal and child health, a potential solution for improving hypertension control is by utilising this available workforce. We aimed to develop and implement a training package for ASHAs to identify and control hypertension in the community, and evaluate the effectiveness of the training program using the Kirkpatrick Evaluation Model. The training program was part of a cluster randomised feasibility trial of a 3-month intervention to improve hypertension outcomes in South India. Training materials incorporated details on managing hypertension, goal setting, facilitating group meetings, and how to measure blood pressure and weight. The 15 ASHAs attended a five-day training workshop that was delivered using interactive instructional strategies. ASHAs then led community-based education support groups for 3 months. Training was evaluated using Kirkpatrick's evaluation model for measuring reactions, learning, behaviour and results using tests on knowledge at baseline, post-training and post-intervention, observation of performance during meetings and post-intervention interviews. The ASHAs' knowledge of hypertension improved from a mean score of 64% at baseline to 76% post-training and 84% after the 3-month intervention. Research officers, who observed the community meetings, reported that ASHAs delivered the self-management content effectively without additional assistance. The ASHAs reported that the training materials were easy to understand and useful in educating community members. ASHAs can be trained to lead community-based group educational discussions and support individuals for the management of high blood pressure. The feasibility trial is registered with the Clinical Trials Registry - India (CTRI

  19. Evaluation of cloud resolving model simulations of midlatitude cirrus with ARM and A-Train observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlbauer, A. D.; Ackerman, T. P.; Lawson, P.; Xie, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    This paper evaluates cloud resolving model (CRM) and cloud system-resolving model (CSRM) simulations of a midlatitude cirrus case with comprehensive observations collected under the auspices of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program and with spaceborne observations from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) A-train satellites. Vertical profiles of temperature, relative humidity and wind speeds are reasonably well simulated by the CSRM and CRM but there are remaining biases in the temperature, wind speeds and relative humidity, which can be mitigated through nudging the model simulations toward the observed radiosonde profiles. Simulated vertical velocities are underestimated in all simulations except in the CRM simulations with grid spacings of 500m or finer, which suggests that turbulent vertical air motions in cirrus clouds need to be parameterized in GCMs and in CSRM simulations with horizontal grid spacings on the order of 1km. The simulated ice water content and ice number concentrations agree with the observations in the CSRM but are underestimated in the CRM simulations. The underestimation of ice number concentrations is consistent with the overestimation of radar reflectivity in the CRM simulations and suggests that the model produces too many large ice particles especially toward cloud base. Simulated cloud profiles are rather insensitive to perturbations in the initial conditions or the dimensionality of the model domain but the treatment of the forcing data has a considerable effect on the outcome of the model simulations. Despite considerable progress in observations and microphysical parameterizations, simulating the microphysical, macrophysical and radiative properties of cirrus remains challenging. Comparing model simulations with observations from multiple instruments and observational platforms is important for revealing model deficiencies and for providing rigorous benchmarks. However, there still is considerable

  20. Incorporating a gender perspective into the development of clinical guidelines: a training course for guideline developers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgers Jako S

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dutch guideline-developing organizations do not focus systematically on differences between men and women when developing guidelines, even though there is increasing evidence that being male or female may have an effect on health and health outcomes. In collaboration with two prominent Dutch guideline-developing organizations, we designed a training course to encourage systematic attention to sex differences in guideline development procedures. Methods The course is targeted towards guideline developers. Its aims are to improve awareness concerning the relevance of considering sex differences in the guideline development process, as well as the competence and skills necessary for putting this into practice. The design and teaching methods of the course are based on adult learning styles and principles of changing provider behaviour. It was adjusted to the working methods of guideline organizations. The course was taught to, and evaluated by, a group of staff members from two guideline organizations in the Netherlands. Results The course consists of five modules, each of which corresponds to a key step in the guideline development process. The participants rated the training course positively on content, programme, and trainers. Their written comments suggest that the course met its objectives. Conclusion The training course is the first to address sex differences in guideline development. Results from the pilot test suggest that the course achieved its objectives. Because its modules and teaching methods of the course are widely transferable, the course could be useful for many organizations that are involved in developing guidelines. Follow-up studies are needed to assess the long-term effect of the course on the actions of guideline developers and its utility in other settings.

  1. Assessment of laparoscopic skills of Gynecology and Obstetrics residents after a training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Carla Ferreira Kikuchi; Ruano, José Maria Cordeiro; Kati, Lea Mina; Noguti, Alberto Sinhiti; Girão, Manoel João Batista Castello; Sartori, Marair Gracio Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate laparoscopic skills of third-year Gynecology and Obstetrics residents after training at a training and surgical experimentation center. Use of a prospective questionnaire analyzing demographic data, medical residency, skills, competences, and training in a box trainer and in pigs. After the training, there was significant improvement in laparoscopic skills according to the residents (before 1.3/after 2.7; p=0.000) and preceptors (before 2.1/after 4.8; p=0.000). There was also significant improvement in the feeling of competence in surgeries with level 1 and 2 of difficulty. All residents approved the training. The training was distributed into 12 hours in the box trainer and 20 hours in animals, and led to better laparoscopic skills and a feeling of more surgical competence in laparoscopic surgery levels 1 and 2. Avaliar a habilidade laparoscópica dos residentes do terceiro ano de residência médica em Ginecologia e Obstetrícia após treinamento em um centro de treinamento e experimentação cirúrgica. Aplicação de questionário de forma prospectiva analisando dados demográficos, da residência médica, da habilidade, da competência e do treinamento em caixa preta e em porcas. Após o treinamento, houve melhora da habilidade em laparoscopia de forma significativa na avaliação dos residentes (antes 1,3/depois 2,7; p=0,000) e preceptores (antes 2,1/depois 4,8; p=0,000). Houve melhora significativa na sensação de competência em cirurgias de níveis 1 e 2 de dificuldade. Todos os residentes aprovaram o treinamento. O treinamento dividido em 12 horas de caixa preta e 20 horas em animais trouxe melhora na habilidade em laparoscopia e na sensação de melhora na competência cirúrgica em cirurgias laparoscópicas de níveis 1 e 2.

  2. Effects of a training program after surgically treated ankle fracture: a prospective randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekdahl Charlotte S

    2009-09-01

    out of nine outcome measures showed a difference, the beneficial effect from an additional standardised individually suited training program can be expected to be limited. There is need for further studies to elucidate how a training program should be designed to increase and optimise function in patients middle-aged or older. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ACTRN12609000327280

  3. PACS: Do clinical users benefit from it as a training adjunct?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J van Heerden

    2011-05-01

    as a training adjunct included the frustrations associated with PACS downtime (especially during the period in 2009 when many electrical power cuts were experienced nationwide, resulting in network interruptions and slow image retrieval during peak work-flow times. The advantages of PACS as a positive training adjunct were highlighted in the areas of multi-site viewing and consultation, the possibility of image manipulation and measurement tools, and better overall image quality. Clinicians felt that their training experience was also enhanced because of better patient follow-up made possible by access to all previous radiological imaging of a particular patient. Of the clinicians who completed the questionnaires, 63.5% felt that the PACS at Steve Biko Academic Hospital contributed positively to their training by creating more overall learning opportunities than other training environments without a PACS.

  4. Workplace health promotion: analysis of actions proposed by graduates of a training course (2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francielle Bertusso

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The incorporation of the workers knowledge in the actions of health promotion and prevention can strengthen the search for better working conditions and the protection of workers' health. This bibliographic study aimed to analyze, from the theoretical framework of occupational health, the actions proposed by graduates of a training course for health promotion for healthcare workers in 2012. Of the 221 projects analyzed, 1Enfermeira, aluna especial do Programa de Mestrado em Biociências e Saúde da Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Paraná, campus de Cascavel. E-mail: franbertusso@hotmail.com 2 Doutora em Saúde Coletiva, Professora adjunta do Curso de Enfermagem do Centro de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde da Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Paraná, campus de Cascavel, Pr. 3 Enfermeiro da Secretaria de Estado da Saúde do Paraná - SESA. Aluno especial do Programa de Mestrado em Biociências e Saúde da Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Paraná, Campus de Cascavel, Pr. 4 Doutora em Enfermargem pela Universidade de São Paulo. Professora do Programa de Mestrado em Biociências e Saúde do Centro de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde da Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Paraná, campus de Cascavel health workers were the priority target audience (84%, as well as managers (12%, from various regions of the country with a predominance of proposals from the southeast region (107 projects and northeast region (55 projects, and in several workplace activities. Program proposals attempted to solve or minimize three sets of problems: a related to the work environment, b labor management and c the workers' health. Examination of the proposals pointed to a working reality permeated by incidents of accidents by exposure to biological material, ionizing radiation, needlestick and sharps injuries, and injuries related to musculoskeletal overload, mental health and mental and behavioral disorder such as depression, alcoholism, stress, burnout and moral

  5. Detection of Multi-Layer and Vertically-Extended Clouds Using A-Train Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, J.; Vasilkov, A. P.; Bhartia, P. K.; Wind, G.; Platnick, S.; Menzel, W. P.

    2010-01-01

    The detection of mUltiple cloud layers using satellite observations is important for retrieval algorithms as well as climate applications. In this paper, we describe a relatively simple algorithm to detect multiple cloud layers and distinguish them from vertically-extended clouds. The algorithm can be applied to coincident passive sensors that derive both cloud-top pressure from the thermal infrared observations and an estimate of solar photon pathlength from UV, visible, or near-IR measurements. Here, we use data from the A-train afternoon constellation of satellites: cloud-top pressure, cloud optical thickness, the multi-layer flag from the Aqua MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the optical centroid cloud pressure from the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). For the first time, we use data from the CloudSat radar to evaluate the results of a multi-layer cloud detection scheme. The cloud classification algorithms applied with different passive sensor configurations compare well with each other as well as with data from CloudSat. We compute monthly mean fractions of pixels containing multi-layer and vertically-extended clouds for January and July 2007 at the OMI spatial resolution (l2kmx24km at nadir) and at the 5kmx5km MODIS resolution used for infrared cloud retrievals. There are seasonal variations in the spatial distribution of the different cloud types. The fraction of cloudy pixels containing distinct multi-layer cloud is a strong function of the pixel size. Globally averaged, these fractions are approximately 20% and 10% for OMI and MODIS, respectively. These fractions may be significantly higher or lower depending upon location. There is a much smaller resolution dependence for fractions of pixels containing vertically-extended clouds (approx.20% for OMI and slightly less for MODIS globally), suggesting larger spatial scales for these clouds. We also find higher fractions of vertically-extended clouds over land as compared with

  6. The Text of the Instrument concerning the Agency's Assistance to Mexico for the Establishment of a Training Reactor Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1972-06-05

    The texts of the Agreement between the Agency the the Governments of the Federal Republic of Germany and Mexico concerning the Agency's assistance for the establishment of a training reactor project in Mexico, and of a letter relating thereto which the Resident Representative of the Federal Republic of Germany addressed to the Director General, are reproduced herein for the information of all Members. The Agreement entered into force on 21 December 1971.

  7. A Training Program to Enhance Postgraduate Students' Research Skills in Preparing a Research Proposal in the Field of Curriculum and Instruction Methods of Arabic Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfakih, Ahmed Hassan

    2017-01-01

    The study examined the impact of a training program on enhancing postgraduate students' research skills in preparing a research proposal. The nature of the skills required to prepare a research proposal were first determined using a questionnaire. A training program for improving such skills was then constructed and seven postgraduate students in…

  8. The text of the instrument concerning the Agency's assistance to Argentina for the establishment of a training reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the Protocol of 30 August 1996 suspending the application of safeguards under the Agreement between the Agency and the Government of Argentina and the Federal Republic of Germany concerning the Agency's assistance for the establishment of a training reactor project in Argentina, which entered into force on 13 March 1970, in light of the provisions for the application of safeguards pursuant to the quadripartite safeguards agreement between Argentina, Brazil, the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for the Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials and the IAEA

  9. A study on the effectiveness of task manager board game as a training tool in managing project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Shahrul Azmi Mohd; Radzi, Shanizan Herman Md; Din, Sharifah Nadera Syed; Khalid, Nurhafizah

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays, games have become one of the useful tools in training. Many instructors choose to use games to enhance the way of delivering the subject. Failure to apply the suitable tool in training will lead to discouragement in learning and causing waste to the resources. An effective game will help the student understand the concept quickly. It can also help students to get involve in experiential learning where the student can manage and solve the problem as in the actual situation. This study will focus on the effectiveness of board game as a training tool for managing projects. This game has 4 tasks to be completed by students. They will be divided into a group of 4 or 5. Two methods are used in this study, pilot test, and post-test. These methods are chosen to analyze the effectiveness of using Task Manager Board Game as a teaching tool and the improvement of student's knowledge in project management. Three sub-components assessed were motivation, user experience and learning using case studies on Kirkpatrick's level one base on the perception of the students. The result indicated that the use of Task Manager board game as a training tool for managing project has a positive impact on students. It helps students to experience the situation of managing projects. It is one of the easiest ways for improving time management, human resources and communication skill.

  10. A case for the use of Q-methodology in disability research: lessons learned from a training workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Judith; Braswell, Bob; Jelsma, Jennifer; Naidoo, Nirmala

    2011-01-01

    Q-methodology was developed to analyse subjective responses to a range of items dealing with specific topics. This article describes the use of Q-methodology and presents the results of a Q-study on perspectives on disability carried out in a training workshop as evidence for its usefulness in disability research. A Q-sort was administered in the context of a training workshop on Q-method. The Q-sort consisted of statements related to the topic of disability. The responses were analysed using specifically developed software to identify factors that represent patterns of responses. Twenty-two of the 23 respondents loaded on four factors. These factors appeared to represent different paradigms relating to the social, medical and disability rights models of disability. The fourth factor appeared to be that of a family perspective. These are all models evident in the disability research literature and provide evidence for the validity of Q-method in disability research. Based on this opportunistic study, it would appear that Q-methodology is a useful tool for identifying different view points related to disability.

  11. Development of a training program to support health care professionals to deliver the SPACE for COPD self-management program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blackmore C

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Claire Blackmore,1 Vicki L Johnson-Warrington,2 Johanna EA Williams,2 Lindsay D Apps,2 Hannah ML Young,2 Claire LA Bourne,2 Sally J Singh2 1Kettering General Hospital National Health Service (NHS Trust, Kettering, Northamptonshire, 2Centre for Exercise and Rehabilitation Science, Leicester Respiratory Biomedical Research Unit, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester, UK Background: With the growing burden of COPD and associated morbidity and mortality, a need for self-management has been identified. The Self-management Programme of ­Activity, Coping and Education for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (SPACE for COPD manual was developed to support self-management in COPD patients. Currently, there is no literature available regarding health care professionals’ training needs when supporting patients with COPD on self-management.Aim: This study sought to identify these needs to inform, design and develop a training program for health care professionals being trained to deliver a self-management program in COPD.Methods: Fourteen health care professionals from both primary and secondary care COPD services participated in face-to-face semistructured interviews. Thematic analysis was used to produce a framework and identify training needs and views on delivery of the SPACE for COPD self-management program. Components of training were web-based knowledge training, with pre- and posttraining knowledge questionnaires, and a 1-day program to introduce the self-management manual. Feedback was given after training to guide the development of the training program.Results: Health care professionals were able to identify areas where they required increased knowledge to support patients. This was overwhelming in aspects of COPD seen to be outside of their current clinical role. Skills in goal setting and behavioral change were not elicited as a training need, suggesting a lack of understanding of components of supporting self

  12. An A-train and MERRA view of cloud, thermodynamic, and dynamic variability within the subtropical marine boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. H. Kahn

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The global-scale patterns and covariances of subtropical marine boundary layer (MBL cloud fraction and spatial variability with atmospheric thermodynamic and dynamic fields remain poorly understood. We describe an approach that leverages coincident NASA A-train and the Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA data to quantify the relationships in the subtropical MBL derived at the native pixel and grid resolution. A new method for observing four subtropical oceanic regions that capture transitions from stratocumulus to trade cumulus is demonstrated, where stratocumulus and cumulus regimes are determined from infrared-based thermodynamic phase. Visible radiances are normally distributed within stratocumulus and are increasingly skewed away from the coast, where trade cumulus dominates. Increases in MBL depth, wind speed, and effective radius (re, and reductions in 700–1000 hPa moist static energy differences and 700 and 850 hPa vertical velocity correspond with increases in visible radiance skewness. We posit that a more robust representation of the cloudy MBL is obtained using visible radiance rather than retrievals of optical thickness that are limited to a smaller subset of cumulus. The method using the combined A-train and MERRA data set has demonstrated that an increase in re within shallow cumulus is strongly related to higher MBL wind speeds that further correspond to increased precipitation occurrence according to CloudSat, previously demonstrated with surface observations. Hence, the combined data sets have the potential of adding global context to process-level understanding of the MBL.

  13. Evaluation of a Training Program to Reduce Stressful Trunk Postures in the Nursing Professions: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Agnessa; Freitag, Sonja; Nienhaus, Albert

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate metrologically the effectiveness of a training program on the reduction of stressful trunk postures in geriatric nursing professions. A training program, consisting of instruction on body postures in nursing, practical ergonomic work methods at the bedside or in the bathroom, reorganization of work equipment, and physical exercises, was conducted in 12 wards of 6 nursing homes in Germany. The Computer-Assisted Recording and Long-Term Analysis of Musculoskeletal Loads (CUELA) measurement system was used to evaluate all movements and trunk postures adopted during work before and 6 months after the training program. In total, 23 shifts were measured. All measurements were supported by video recordings. A specific software program (WIDAAN 2.75) was used to synchronize the measurement data and video footage. The median proportion of time spent in sagittal inclinations at an angle of >20° was significantly reduced (by 29%) 6 months after the intervention [from 35.4% interquartile range (27.6-43.1) to 25.3% (20.7-34.1); P 4 s [4.4% (3.0-6.7) to 3.6% (2.5-4.5); P ergonomic measures were implemented properly, either at the bedside or in the bathroom. Stressful trunk postures could be significantly reduced by raising awareness of the physical strains that frequently occur during a shift, by changes in work practices and by redesigning the work environment. Workplace interventions aimed at preventing or reducing low back pain in nursing personnel would probably benefit from sensitizing employees to their postures during work. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  14. Knowledge, attitudes, and practice behaviors (KAPb) of nurses and the effectiveness of a training program in psychosocial cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahendran, Rathi; Chua, Joanne; Peh, Chao Xu; Lim, Haikel A; Ang, Emily N K; Lim, Siew Eng; Kua, Ee Heok

    2014-08-01

    Psychosocial distress in oncology patients may significantly interfere with their health outcomes and quality of life. Nurses work closely with their patients and are in the best position to screen for distress and provide timely intervention. It is thus important for nurses working in oncology settings to be equipped and prepared to address distressing psychosocial issues. The present study aims to investigate the impact of a training program in psychosocial care on nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and clinical practice behaviors. A total of 180 nurses working in medical oncology and radiation oncology departments at the National University Cancer Institute Singapore underwent a training program in psychosocial care as part of their continuing nursing education curriculum. One hundred fifty four of these nurses completed a self-designed questionnaire on nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and practice behaviors (KAPb) at all four time points: baseline, post-training, and at 6 and 12 weeks post-training, respectively. The self-designed KAPb questionnaire proved adequate for this study. Positive gains on applied knowledge and practice behaviors were sustained over a 12-week period. There were no changes in theoretical knowledge. A decreasing trend in attitudes was noted, although this was specific to the participants' attitudes toward the importance of emotional concerns as compared to physical concerns in cancer treatment. Enrolled nurses seemed to have higher starting levels of theoretical knowledge than their registered counterparts were. There were no other differences on demographic variables in relation to the efficacy of the training program. The training program was successful in improving the applied knowledge and practice behaviors of nurses in providing psychosocial care for cancer patients. However, further refinement to the program, with particular attention to nurses' existing training and years of clinical nursing experience, would enhance staff empowerment

  15. Quality control in the optical industry: From a work analysis of lens inspection to a training programme, an experimental case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebsamen, Maryline; Boucheix, Jean-Michel; Fayol, Michel

    2010-01-01

    A cognitive work analysis of quality inspection in the optical industry has been carried out in order to devise a training programme. The task concerned the inspection of high quality human eyeglass lenses. We conducted an experimental investigation of defect detection and acceptability decision-making tasks in 18 experts and novice inspectors. Detection and decision-making were investigated together and separately in two experimental sessions. We showed the effect of expertise on reaction times and errors, and we described the cognitive processes of novice inspectors. On the basis of the processing differences between the two groups, a training programme for new inspectors was devised and described. Finally, training effects were tested.

  16. How to enhance route learning and visuo-spatial working memory in aging: a training for residential care home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitolo, Micaela; Borella, Erika; Meneghetti, Chiara; Carbone, Elena; Pazzaglia, Francesca

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a route-learning training in a group of older adults living in a residential care home. We verified the presence of training-specific effects in tasks similar to those trained - route-learning tasks - as well as transfer effects on related cognitive processes - visuo-spatial short-term memory (VSSTM; Corsi Blocks Test (CBT), forward version), visuo-spatial working memory (VSWM; CBT, backward version; Pathway Span Tasks; Jigsaw Puzzle Test) - and in self-report measures. The maintenance of training benefits was examined after 3 months. Thirty 70-90-year-old residential care home residents were randomly assigned to the route-learning training group or to an active control group (involved in non-visuo-spatial activities). The trained group performed better than the control group in the route-learning tasks, retaining this benefit 3 months later. Immediate transfer effects were also seen in visuo-spatial span tasks (i.e., CBT forward and backward version and Pathway Span Task); these benefits had been substantially maintained at the 3-month follow-up. These findings suggest that a training on route learning is a promising approach to sustain older adults' environmental learning and some related abilities (e.g., VSSTM and VSWM), even in residential care home residents.

  17. Using a train drawn by a locomotive engine or a taking a railway-motor train?; Lokbespannung oder Triebzuege?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, V. [Siemens Verkehrstechnik Erlangen (Germany). ICE-Marketing

    2000-10-01

    In the field of passenger rail traffic extending from urban transport to long-distance railroad different requirements lead in the past to different developments with regard to forming a train. Using trains hauled by a locomotive. Using a push and pull train or a adistributed power train, and had to be decided with operational and economical considerations in mind. Nevertheless, besides factual and objective arguments there are also arguments to be attributed to the level of training and to emotions. Therefore, the author finally tries to arrive at an assessable conclusion by means of a comparison of the life cycle costs of two real trains running under comparable operational conditions. (orig.) [German] Zur Lokomotive eroeffnet die elektrische Traktion in Form eines Triebzuges oder Triebwagens eine Alternative mit verteilter Antriebstechnik. Fuer beide Varianten gibt es typische Anwendungsfaelle. Im Personenfernverkehr koennen beide Zugarten fallweise Vorteile fuer Betreiber und Fahrgaeste haben. Eine LCC-Betrachtung fuer beide Zugarten soll neben betrieblichen Argumenten eine Entscheidungshilfe geben. (orig.)

  18. Implementation and evaluation of a training program as part of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program in Azerbaijan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April eJohnson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A training program for animal and human health professionals has been implemented in Azerbaijan through a joint agreement between the United States Defense Threat Reduction Agency and the Government of Azerbaijan. The training program is administered as part of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program, and targets key employees in Azerbaijan’s disease surveillance system including physicians, veterinarians, epidemiologists, and laboratory personnel. Training is aimed at improving detection, diagnosis, and response to especially dangerous pathogens, although the techniques and methodologies can be applied to other pathogens and diseases of concern. Biosafety and biosecurity training is provided to all trainees within the program. Prior to 2014, a variety of international agencies and organizations provided training, which resulted in gaps related to lack of coordination of training materials and content. In 2014 a new training program was implemented in order to address those gaps. This paper provides an overview of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program training program in Azerbaijan, a description of how the program fits into existing national training infrastructure, and an evaluation of the new program’s effectiveness to date. Long-term sustainability of the program is also discussed.

  19. Therapeutical Intervention, Relaxation, Mental Images, and Spirituality (RIME for Spiritual Pain in Terminal Patients. A Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Catarina de Araújo Elias

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic intervention involving the technique of Relaxation, Mental Images, and Spirituality (RIME can foster the redefinition of spiritual pain in terminal patients. A training course was developed to instruct health care professionals in its use, and the results were followed up by evaluating reactions of professionals to its use in intervention with patients. Six subjects (a nurse, a doctor, three psychologists, and an alternative therapist, all skilled in palliative care, were invited to take part in the experience. They worked with 11 terminal patients in public hospitals of the cities of Campinas, Piracicaba, and São Paulo, located in Brazil. The theoretical basis for the study involves action research and phenomenology, and the results were analyzed using both qualitative and quantitative methods. The analysis of the experience of the professionals revealed 5 categories and 15 subcategories. The analysis of the nature of spiritual pain revealed 6 categories and 11 subcategories. The administration of RIME revealed statistically significant differences (p < 0.0001, i.e., patients reported a greater level of well-being at the end than at the beginning of sessions, which suggests that RIME led to the redefinition of spiritual pain for these terminal patients. The training program proposed has shown itself to be effective in preparing health care professionals for the use of RIME intervention.

  20. Can Trainees Effectively Deliver Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Individuals With Borderline Personality Disorder? Outcomes From a Training Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Shireen L; Hughes, Christopher D; Hittman, Alexandra D; Vieira Oliveira, Pedro

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a 6-month course of comprehensive dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) provided in a training clinic with doctoral students as therapists and assessors. Clinical outcomes for 50 individuals with borderline personality disorder (80% female, M age = 29.52 [SD = 9.64]) are reported. Reliable change indices and clinical significance were calculated for measures. Finally, our results were benchmarked against a "gold standard" randomized clinical trial (RCT; McMain et al., 2009). Analyses with both the full sample and the treatment completers indicate significant reductions in mental health symptomatology that were reliable, clinically and statistically significant, and comparable in effect size to the benchmarked RCT. This DBT training clinic produced good outcomes, comparable to that of a large RCT. Results have implications for who can provide DBT treatment, as well as improving access to DBT in community settings where training clinics may be located. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Effectiveness of a Training Program based in PRECEDE Model on Fruit and Vegetable Consumption among Female Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Khani Jeihooni

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Fruit and vegetable consumption increases students' health and growth and strengthens their mental activities. The present study aimed to investigates a training program based on PRECEDE model on fruit and vegetable consumption by female students in high schools of Fasa, Iran. Materials and Methods This is a quasi –experimental study. The research sample includes 100 female high school students in Fasa city, Fars Province, Iran, who were randomly assigned to two groups of control (n=50 and experimental (n=50 groups. Data collection instrument was a questionnaire that included items on demographic characteristics and the PERCEDE model components (knowledge, attitude, enabling and reinforcing factors and performance. Educational intervention for the experimental group was carried out in four sessions which each lasting 55 to 60 minutes, and subjects were followed for 2 months. The questionnaires were administered to both groups before and 3 months after the intervention. The collected data was analyzed by SPSS version 18.0 statistical software. Results The average performance score of experimental and control groups regarding fruits and vegetables consumption was 15.15±2.44 and 14.96±2.12 (before the intervention and 28.22±2.22 and 16.1±11.32 (after the intervention. Mean scores of predisposing (knowledge and attitude, reinforcing, and enabling factors showed a significant difference in the experimental group in comparison the control group (P

  2. [Effects of a training of power and balance on the use of mechanical restraint among in-patients with dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinert, Tilman; Bohnet, Ulrich; Flammer, Erich; Lüchtenberg, Dietmar; Eisele, Frank

    2009-09-01

    Patients with dementia are most frequently affected by mechanical restraint in psychiatric hospitals, most frequently due to falls. There is evidence for beneficial effects of a training of power and balance on the frequency of falls in residential homes. An adapted training of power and balance was developed by specialists of training in sports. In 2007, 159 patients with dementia were trained. The frequency and duration of mechanical restraint was compared with a control group of a different hospital (n = 217) and the patients treated in the year before (n = 164). The percentage of patients with mechanical restraint and the mean duration of restraint per admission were significantly lower than in the control group. However, only a non-significant reduction could be achieved in comparison with the patients treated in the year before without an increase of falls. A considerable reduction of the use of mechanical restraint in patients with dementia is feasible. An unequivocal association with the training could not be confirmed due to other influencing factors.

  3. Evaluation of a train-the-trainer program for stable coronary artery disease management in community settings: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhiyun; Jiang, Changying; Chen, Liqun

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of conducting a train-the-trainer (TTT) program for stable coronary artery disease (SCAD) management in community settings. The study involved two steps: (1) tutors trained community nurses as trainers and (2) the community nurses trained patients. 51 community nurses attended a 2-day TTT program and completed questionnaires assessing knowledge, self-efficacy, and satisfaction. By a feasibility and non-randomized control study, 120 SCAD patients were assigned either to intervention group (which received interventions from trained nurses) or control group (which received routine management). Pre- and post-intervention, patients' self-management behaviors and satisfaction were assessed to determine the program's overall impact. Community nurses' knowledge and self-efficacy improved (Pmanagement behaviors (Pmanagement in community settings in China was generally feasible and effective, but many obstacles remain including patients' noncompliance, nurses' busy work schedules, and lack of policy supports. Finding ways to enhance the motivation of community nurses and patients with SCAD are important in implementing community-based TTT programs for SCAD management; further multicenter and randomized control trials are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Inter-active and dynamic approaches on forest and land-use planning - proceedings from a training workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandewall, Mats [ed.

    1999-07-01

    This document summarises the outcome of a training workshop, 'Inter-active and dynamic approaches on forest and land-use planning', that was organised in Vietnam and Lao PDR during April 1999. The workshop was arranged by researchers from SLU, Umeaa in cooperation with SIDA and it's CCB programme, The National Board of Forestry and concerned government institutions in Lao PDR - The national Programme for Shifting Cultivation Stabilisation, Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry , and in Vietnam - the Forest Inventory and Planning Institute, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development. The main purpose of this paper are: (1) to review and conclude the outcome of the workshop to all those who have participated or been concerned with it; (2) to summarise an evaluation of the somewhat unique arrangement, with participants from different sectors, administrative levels, gender and countries; and (3) to present 'the APM approach' on land use planning, which was put forward, tested and discussed during the workshop.

  5. Validation, verification and evaluation of a Train to Train Distance Measurement System by means of Colored Petri Nets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Haifeng; Liu, Jieyu; Schnieder, Eckehard

    2017-01-01

    Validation, verification and evaluation are necessary processes to assure the safety and functionality of a system before its application in practice. This paper presents a Train to Train Distance Measurement System (TTDMS), which can provide distance information independently from existing onboard equipment. Afterwards, we proposed a new process using Colored Petri Nets to verify the TTDMS system functional safety, as well as to evaluate the system performance. Three main contributions are carried out in the paper: Firstly, this paper proposes a formalized TTDMS model, and the model correctness is validated using state space analysis and simulation-based verification. Secondly, corresponding checking queries are proposed for the purpose of functional safety verification. Further, the TTDMS performance is evaluated by applying parameters in the formal model. Thirdly, the reliability of a functional prototype TTDMS is estimated. It is found that the procedure can cooperate with the system development, and both formal and simulation-based verifications are performed. Using our process to evaluate and verify a system is easier to read and more reliable compared to executable code and mathematical methods. - Highlights: • A new Train to Train Distance Measurement System. • New approach verifying system functional safety and evaluating system performance by means of CPN. • System formalization using the system property concept. • Verification of system functional safety using state space analysis. • Evaluation of system performance applying simulation-based analysis.

  6. Examining the utility of a train-the-trainer model for dissemination of sexual violence prevention in schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarten, Christine; Rabago, Jina; Reynolds, Jasmine; Gates, Kalani; Yanagida, Evie; Baker, Charlene

    2018-06-01

    Rates of childhood sexual abuse are unacceptably high, with potentially long-lasting consequences for those who have been victimized. Currently, there are a number of sexual violence prevention programs that have been developed to lower rates of victimization, increase awareness, and connect victims with resources. Within this area of research, there has been less focus on effective methods of program dissemination. For example, school-based sexual violence prevention programs have had positive outcomes; however, little is known about how these programs are disseminated. The train-the-trainer model of dissemination utilizes master trainers to equip others to implement programs, thereby allowing more adults to teach and subsequently more children to receive the program. This study used survey data from teachers and other school personnel (n = 127) to analyze the utility of a train-the-trainer model of dissemination for a sexual violence prevention program in the state of Hawai'i. Through responses of people who were trained to implement the program (59.8% of whom did implement), aspects of the training, the program itself, and factors affecting whether a person implemented the program were explored. Results suggest that time spent in training, job position, and time in that position predicted whether a person trained to implement the sexual violence prevention program followed through with teaching the program to students. Additionally, 54.7% of people who did implement the program had at least one student disclose sexual violence to them, indicating the importance of sexual violence prevention programming and dissemination of these programs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Improving problem solving in primary school students: The effect of a training programme focusing on metacognition and working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornoldi, Cesare; Carretti, Barbara; Drusi, Silvia; Tencati, Chiara

    2015-09-01

    Despite doubts voiced on their efficacy, a series of studies has been carried out on the capacity of training programmes to improve academic and reasoning skills by focusing on underlying cognitive abilities and working memory in particular. No systematic efforts have been made, however, to test training programmes that involve both general and specific underlying abilities. If effective, these programmes could help to increase students' motivation and competence. This study examined the feasibility of improving problem-solving skills in school children by means of a training programme that addresses general and specific abilities involved in problem solving, focusing on metacognition and working memory. The project involved a sample of 135 primary school children attending eight classes in the third, fourth, and fifth grades (age range 8-10 years). The classes were assigned to two groups, one attending the training programme in the first 3 months of the study (Training Group 1) and the other serving as a waiting-list control group (Training Group 2). In the second phase of the study, the role of the two groups was reversed, with Training Group 2 attending the training instead of Training Group 1. The training programme led to improvements in both metacognitive and working memory tasks, with positive-related effects on the ability to solve problems. The gains seen in Training Group 1 were also maintained at the second post-test (after 3 months). Specific activities focusing on metacognition and working memory may contribute to modifying arithmetical problem-solving performance in primary school children. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  8. Preparing palliative home care nurses to act as facilitators for physicians' learning: Evaluation of a training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pype, Peter; Mertens, Fien; Wens, Johan; Stes, Ann; Van den Eynden, Bart; Deveugele, Myriam

    2015-05-01

    Palliative care requires a multidisciplinary care team. General practitioners often ask specialised palliative home care teams for support. Working with specialised nurses offers learning opportunities, also called workplace learning. This can be enhanced by the presence of a learning facilitator. To describe the development and evaluation of a training programme for nurses in primary care. The programme aimed to prepare palliative home care team nurses to act as facilitators for general practitioners' workplace learning. A one-group post-test only design (quantitative) and semi-structured interviews (qualitative) were used. A multifaceted train-the-trainer programme was designed. Evaluation was done through assignments with individual feedback, summative assessment through videotaped encounters with simulation-physicians and individual interviews after a period of practice implementation. A total of 35 nurses followed the programme. The overall satisfaction was high. Homework assignments interfered with the practice workload but showed to be fundamental in translating theory into practice. Median score on the summative assessment was 7 out of 14 with range 1-13. Interviews revealed some aspects of the training (e.g. incident analysis) to be too difficult for implementation or to be in conflict with personal preferences (focus on patient care instead of facilitating general practitioners' learning). Training palliative home care team nurses as facilitator of general practitioners' workplace learning is a feasible but complex intervention. Personal characteristics, interpersonal relationships and contextual variables have to be taken into account. Training expert palliative care nurses to facilitate general practitioners' workplace learning requires careful and individualised mentoring. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Ukrainian National System of MC&A Training on Regular Basis at the George Kuzmych Training Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyryshchuk, V.; Gavrilyuk, V.; Drapey, S.; Romanova, O.; Levina, E.; Proskurin, D.; Gavrilyuk-Burakova, A.; Parkhomenko, V.; Van Dassen, L.; Delalic, Z.

    2015-01-01

    The George Kuzmych Training Center (GKTC) was created at the Kyiv Institute for Nuclear Research as a result of collaborative efforts between the United States and Ukraine in 1998. Later the European Commission (EC) and Sweden joined the USA supporting MC&A aspects of the GKTC activity. The GKTC was designated by the Ukrainian Government to provide the MPC&A training and methodological assistance to nuclear facilities and nuclear specialists. In order to increase the efficiency of State MC&A system an essential number of new regulations, norms and rules was developed demanding regular and more intensive MC&A experts training from the Regulatory Body of Ukraine and all nuclear facilities. For this purpose ten training courses were developed by the GKTC under the EC contract taking into account both specifics of Ukrainian nuclear facilities and expertise level of their personnel. Along with the NDA training laboratory created with the US DOE financial support and methodological assistance in 2003, a new surveillance and containment laboratory was created under the EC contract and with US DOE financial support as well. Moreover, under the EC contract the laboratory was equipped with the state-of-the-art and most advanced means of surveillance and containment strengthening even more the GKTC training opportunities. As a result, the MC&A experts from all nuclear facilities and Regulatory Body of Ukraine can regularly be trained practically on all MC&A issues. This paper briefly describes the practical efforts applied to improve Ukrainian MC&A systems both at the State and facility levels and real results on the way to develop the National System for MC&A regular training at the GKTC, problems encountered and their solution, comments, suggestions and recommendations for the future activity to promote and improve the nuclear security culture in Ukraine. (author)

  10. Cognitive intervention through a training program for picture book reading in community-dwelling older adults: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Kuraoka, Masataka; Yasunaga, Masashi; Nonaka, Kumiko; Sakurai, Ryota; Takeuchi, Rumi; Murayama, Yoh; Ohba, Hiromi; Fujiwara, Yoshinori

    2014-11-21

    Non-pharmacological interventions are expected to be important strategies for reducing the age-adjusted prevalence of senile dementia, considering that complete medical treatment for cognitive decline has not yet been developed. From the viewpoint of long-term continuity of activity, it is necessary to develop various cognitive stimulating programs. The aim of this study is to examine the effectiveness of a cognitive intervention through a training program for picture book reading for community-dwelling older adults. Fifty-eight Japanese older participants were divided into the intervention and control groups using simple randomization (n =29 vs 29). In the intervention group, participants took part in a program aimed at learning and mastering methods of picture book reading as a form of cognitive training intervention. The control group listened to lectures about elderly health maintenance. Cognitive tests were conducted individually before and after the programs. The rate of memory retention, computed by dividing Logical Memory delayed recall by immediate recall, showed a significant interaction (p < .05) in analysis of covariance. Simple main effects showed that the rate of memory retention of the intervention group improved after the program completion (p < .05). In the participants with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) examined by Japanese version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA-J) (n =14 vs 15), significant interactions were seen in Trail Making Test-A (p < .01), Trail Making Test-B (p < .05), Kana pick-out test (p < .05) and the Mini-Mental State Examination (p < .05). The intervention effect was found in delayed verbal memory. This program is also effective for improving attention and executive function in those with MCI. The short-term interventional findings suggest that this program might contribute to preventing a decline in memory and executive function. UMIN000014712 (Date of ICMJE and WHO compliant trial information

  11. A training programme to build cancer research capacity in low- and middle-income countries: findings from Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Lauren D; Barnoya, Joaquin; Gharzouzi, Eduardo N; Benson, Peter; Colditz, Graham A

    2014-04-01

    Guatemala is experiencing an increasing burden of cancer but lacks capacity for cancer prevention, control and research. In partnership with a medical school in the United States of America, a multidisciplinary Cancer Control Research Training Institute was developed at the Instituto de Cancerología (INCAN) in Guatemala City. This institute provided a year-long training programme for clinicians that focused on research methods in population health and sociocultural anthropology. The programme included didactic experiences in Guatemala and the United States as well as applied training in which participants developed research protocols responsive to Guatemala's cancer needs. Although INCAN is the point of referral and service for Guatemala's cancer patients, the institute's administration is also interested in increasing cancer research - with a focus on population health. INCAN is thus a resource for capacity building within the context of cancer prevention and control. Trainees increased their self-efficacy for the design and conduct of research. Value-added benefits included establishment of an annual cancer seminar and workshops in cancer pathology and qualitative analysis. INCAN has recently incorporated some of the programme's components into its residency training and established a research department. A training programme for clinicians can build cancer research capacity in low- and middle-income countries. Training in population-based research methods will enable countries such as Guatemala to gather country-specific data. Once collected, such data can be used to assess the burden of cancer-related disease, guide policy for reducing it and identify priority areas for cancer prevention and treatment.

  12. Who Is Responsible? A Man With Dementia Wanders From Home, Is Hit by a Train, and Dies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Yuchi; Papenkov, Maksim; Nakashima, Taeko

    2018-07-01

    The impact of dementia and Alzheimer's disease extends far beyond the healthcare needs of the person with dementia. As the disease progresses, individuals with dementia often require ongoing formal or informal care for their basic daily routine because of behavior changes and continuing loss of cognitive function. Most of the care for people with dementia takes place at home, and the unpaid, informal caregivers are often spouses or other relatives. Providing long-term informal care at home for someone with dementia is psychologically, physically, and financially draining. The tragedy described in this case elucidates the far-reaching societal impact of dementia care and the implicit health policy considerations. In 2007, a 91-year-old Japanese man with dementia was in the care of his wife when he wandered from home, was hit by a train, and died, immediately affecting the Central Japan Railway Company operations and, subsequently, legal practice as well as Japanese elder care policy. The railway sued the man's wife and son for negligence and lost revenue, winning both trials at the local and district courts. This ruling shocked families and caregivers in Japan, where care for elderly parents traditionally falls on the oldest son, and brought attention to the complex issues related to dementia care. A decade later, we revisit this case to provoke a renewed dialogue about the matrix of responsibilities and liabilities associated with caregiving; to illuminate the unmet needs of the person with dementia, as well as his or her informal caregivers; and the financial implications related to long-term care policy. We close with 2 practical suggestions which preserve the dignity of the individual and provide reassurance for caregivers. Copyright © 2018 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The feasibility of a train-the-trainer approach to end of life care training in care homes: an evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayrhofer, Andrea; Goodman, Claire; Smeeton, Nigel; Handley, Melanie; Amador, Sarah; Davies, Sue

    2016-01-22

    The ABC End of Life Education Programme trained approximately 3000 care home staff in End of Life (EoL) care. An evaluation that compared this programme with the Gold Standards Framework found that it achieved equivalent outcomes at a lower cost with higher levels of staff satisfaction. To consolidate this learning, a facilitated peer education model that used the ABC materials was piloted. The goal was to create a critical mass of trained staff, mitigate the impact of staff turnover and embed EoL care training within the organisations. The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of using a train the trainer (TTT) model to support EoL care in care homes. A mixed method design involved 18 care homes with and without on-site nursing across the East of England. Data collection included a review of care home residents' characteristics and service use (n = 274), decedents' notes n = 150), staff interviews (n = 49), focus groups (n = 3), audio diaries (n = 28) and observations of workshops (n = 3). Seventeen care homes participated. At the end of the TTT programme 28 trainers and 114 learners (56% of the targeted number of learners) had been trained (median per home 6, range 0-13). Three care homes achieved or exceeded the set target of training 12 learners. Trainers ranged from senior care staff to support workers and administrative staff. Results showed a positive association between care home stability, in terms of leadership and staff turnover, and uptake of the programme. Care home ownership, type of care home, size of care home, previous training in EoL care and resident characteristics were not associated with programme completion. Working with facilitators was important to trainers, but insufficient to compensate for organisational turbulence. Variability of uptake was also linked to management support, programme fit with the trainers' roles and responsibilities and their opportunities to work with staff on a daily basis. When

  14. Development of a train-to-proficiency curriculum for the technical skills component of the fundamentals of endoscopic surgery exam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gearhart, Susan; Marohn, Michael; Ngamruengphong, Saowanee; Adrales, Gina; Owodunni, Oluwafemi; Duncan, Kim; Petrusa, Emil; Lipsett, Pamela

    2018-01-08

    The demonstration of competency in endoscopy is required prior to obtaining American Board of Surgery Certification. To demonstrate competency, the resident must pass a national high-stakes cognitive test and a technical skills exam on a virtual reality simulator. The purpose of this preliminary study was to design a proficiency-based endoscopy simulation curriculum to meet this competency requirement. This is a mixed methods prospective cohort study at a single academic medical institution. Prior to taking the national exam, surgery residents were required to participate in a skills lab and demonstrate proficiency on 10 simulation tasks. Proficiency was based on time and percent of objects targeted/mucosa seen. Simulation practice time, number of task repetitions to proficiency, and prior endoscopic experience were recorded. Resident's self-reported confidence scores in endoscopic skills prior to and following simulation lab training were obtained. From January 1, 2016 through August 1, 2017, 20 surgical residents (8 PGY2, 8 PGY3, 4 PGY4) completed both a faculty-supervised endoscopy skills lab and independent learning with train-to-proficiency simulation tasks. Median overall simulator time per resident was 306 min (IQR: 247-405 min). Median overall time to proficiency in all tasks was 235 min (IQR: 208-283 min). The median time to proficiency decreased with increasing PGY status (r = 0.4, P = 0.05). There was no correlation between prior real-time endoscopic experience and time to proficiency. Reported confidence in endoscopic skills increased significantly from mean of 5.75 prior to 7.30 following the faculty-supervised endoscopy skills lab (P = 0.0002). All 20 residents passed the national exam. In this preliminary study, a train-to-proficiency curriculum in endoscopy improved surgical resident's confidence in their endoscopic skills and 100% of residents passed the FES technical skills test on their first attempt. Our findings also indicate

  15. Evaluation of cloud-resolving model simulations of midlatitude cirrus with ARM and A-train observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhlbauer, A.; Ackerman, T. P.; Lawson, R. P.; Xie, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-07-01

    Cirrus clouds are ubiquitous in the upper troposphere and still constitute one of the largest uncertainties in climate predictions. This paper evaluates cloud-resolving model (CRM) and cloud system-resolving model (CSRM) simulations of a midlatitude cirrus case with comprehensive observations collected under the auspices of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program and with spaceborne observations from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration A-train satellites. The CRM simulations are driven with periodic boundary conditions and ARM forcing data, whereas the CSRM simulations are driven by the ERA-Interim product. Vertical profiles of temperature, relative humidity, and wind speeds are reasonably well simulated by the CSRM and CRM, but there are remaining biases in the temperature, wind speeds, and relative humidity, which can be mitigated through nudging the model simulations toward the observed radiosonde profiles. Simulated vertical velocities are underestimated in all simulations except in the CRM simulations with grid spacings of 500 m or finer, which suggests that turbulent vertical air motions in cirrus clouds need to be parameterized in general circulation models and in CSRM simulations with horizontal grid spacings on the order of 1 km. The simulated ice water content and ice number concentrations agree with the observations in the CSRM but are underestimated in the CRM simulations. The underestimation of ice number concentrations is consistent with the overestimation of radar reflectivity in the CRM simulations and suggests that the model produces too many large ice particles especially toward the cloud base. Simulated cloud profiles are rather insensitive to perturbations in the initial conditions or the dimensionality of the model domain, but the treatment of the forcing data has a considerable effect on the outcome of the model simulations. Despite considerable progress in observations and microphysical parameterizations, simulating

  16. A training rule which guarantees finite-region stability for a class of closed-loop neural-network control systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntanapreeda, S; Fullmer, R R

    1996-01-01

    A training method for a class of neural network controllers is presented which guarantees closed-loop system stability. The controllers are assumed to be nonlinear, feedforward, sampled-data, full-state regulators implemented as single hidden-layer neural networks. The controlled systems must be locally hermitian and observable. Stability of the closed-loop system is demonstrated by determining a Lyapunov function, which can be used to identify a finite stability region about the regulator point.

  17. A-train CALIOP and MLS observations of early winter Antarctic polar stratospheric clouds and nitric acid in 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lambert

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A-train Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS observations are used to investigate the development of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs and the gas-phase nitric acid distribution in the early 2008 Antarctic winter. Observational evidence of gravity-wave activity is provided by Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS radiances and infrared spectroscopic detection of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT in PSCs is obtained from the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS. Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS-5 DAS analyses are used to derive Lagrangian trajectories and to determine temperature-time histories of air parcels. We use CALIOP backscatter and depolarization measurements to classify PSCs and the MLS measurements to determine the corresponding gas-phase HNO3 as a function of temperature. For liquid PSCs the uptake of HNO3 follows the theoretical equilibrium curve for supercooled ternary solutions (STS, but at temperatures about 1 K lower as determined from GEOS-5. In the presence of solid phase PSCs, above the ice frost-point, the HNO3 depletion occurs over a wider range of temperatures (+2 to −7 K distributed about the NAT equilibrium curve. Rapid gas-phase HNO3 depletion is first seen by MLS from from 23–25 May 2008, consisting of a decrease in the volume mixing ratio from 14 ppbv (parts per billion by volume to 7 ppbv on the 46–32 hPa (hectopascal pressure levels and accompanied by a 2–3 ppbv increase by renitrification at the 68 hPa pressure level. The observed region of depleted HNO3 is substantially smaller than the region bounded by the NAT existence temperature threshold. Temperature-time histories of air parcels demonstrate that the depletion is more clearly correlated with prior exposure to temperatures a few kelvin above the frost-point. From the combined data we infer the presence

  18. Comparison of Aerosol Classification From Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar and the CALIPSO Vertical Feature Mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Sharon P.; Ferrare, Rich A.; Omar, Ali H.; Vaughan, Mark A.; Rogers, Raymond R.; Hostetler, Chris a.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Obland, Michael D.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Cook, Anthony L.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of aerosol composition and vertical distribution is crucial for assessing the impact of aerosols on climate. In addition, aerosol classification is a key input to CALIOP aerosol retrievals, since CALIOP requires an inference of the lidar ratio in order to estimate the effects of aerosol extinction and backscattering. In contrast, the NASA airborne HSRL-1 directly measures both aerosol extinction and backscatter, and therefore the lidar ratio (extinction-to-backscatter ratio). Four aerosol intensive properties from HSRL-1 are combined to infer aerosol type. Aerosol classification results from HSRL-1 are used here to validate the CALIOP aerosol type inferences.

  19. Evaluation of Retrieval Algorithms for Ice Microphysics Using CALIPSO/CloudSat and Earthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okamoto Hajime

    2016-01-01

    We performed several sensitivity studies to evaluate uncertainties in the retrieved ice microphysics due to ice particle orientation and shape. It was found that the implementation of orientation of horizontally oriented ice plate model in the algorithm drastically improved the retrieval results in both for nadir- and off-nadir lidar pointing periods. Differences in the retrieved microphysics between only randomly oriented ice model (3D-ice and mixture of 3D-ice and Q2Dplate model were large especially in off-nadir period, e.g., 100% in effective radius and one order in ice water content, respectively. And differences in the retrieved ice microphysics among different mixture models were smaller than about 50% for effective radius in nadir period.

  20. Do Lessons Learned in a Training Intervention on Web-Based Health Care Resources Diffuse to Nonexposed Members in the Primary Care Setting? A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homa, Karen; Schifferdecker, Karen E.; Reed, Virginia A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The Internet offers a significant information resource for health professionals. A strategy to improve the use of these resources is for health care providers and staff to receive specific training. The aim of this study was to determine whether those who attended an Internet health care resource training intervention transferred knowledge and skills to others in the practice. Methods Twenty-four primary care practices participated in the study in which 64 providers and staff attended a training intervention and 288 did not. A preintervention questionnaire that assessed knowledge, skill, and Internet usage was compared with a postintervention questionnaire. The main effect of interest in the linear model was the group by time interaction term, to determine whether knowledge and skill improved for both groups. Results There were 41 attendees and 222 nonattendees that completed both pre- and postintervention questionnaires. There were 9 variables that showed a possible diffusion pattern, in which both attendees and nonattendees improved between pre- and postintervention. Overall, the training intervention seemed to have impacted knowledge and skills of the respondents and also reported improvements in the clinical area of patient education, but frequency of use for most Web resources for medical decision making did not improve. Conclusion An improvement strategy that depends on a training intervention for a few members in a practice may not necessarily transfer relative to all aspects of patient care. PMID:19020403

  1. Tailoring a training based on the Mental Health Gap Action Programme (mhGAP) Intervention Guide (IG) to Tunisia: process and relevant adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnolo, Jessica; Champagne, François; Leduc, Nicole; Melki, Wahid; Guesmi, Imen; Bram, Nesrine; Guisset, Ann-Lise; Piat, Myra; Laporta, Marc; Charfi, Fatma

    2018-01-01

    In order to make mental health services more accessible, the Tunisian Ministry of Health, in collaboration with the School of Public Health at the University of Montreal, the World Health Organization office in Tunisia and the Montreal World Health Organization-Pan American Health Organization Collaborating Center for Research and Training in Mental Health, implemented a training programme based on the Mental Health Gap Action Programme (mhGAP) Intervention Guide (IG) (version 1.0) , developed by the World Health Organization. This article describes the phase prior to the implementation of the training, which was offered to general practitioners working in primary care settings in the Greater Tunis area of Tunisia. The phase prior to implementation consisted of adapting the standard mhGAP-IG (version 1.0) to the local primary healthcare context. This adaptation process, an essential step before piloting the training, involved discussions with stakeholder groups, as well as field observations. Through the adaptation process, we were able to make changes to the standard training format and material. In addition, the process helped uncover systemic barriers to effective mental health care. Targeting these barriers in addition to implementing a training programme may help reduce the mental health treatment gap, and promote implementation that is successful and sustainable.

  2. Evaluation of a training program to assist care staff to better recognize and manage depression among palliative care patients and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Marita R P; Goldhammer, Denisa; Mellor, David; Hallford, David; Davison, Tanya

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of a training program to improve the knowledge, attitudes, and self-efficacy of palliative care staff and thus enable them to better detect and manage depression among palliative care patients and their families. Participants were 90 professional carers who completed a four-session training program. Knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy, and barriers to working with depressed patients were assessed preintervention, post-intervention, and at a three-month follow-up. The results demonstrated that compared to the control group, the intervention group had improved in all of these areas. Improvements were maintained at the three-month follow-up in all areas except attitudes. The results of this study indicate the importance of training in managing depression among palliative care staff. Booster sessions will likely be needed to ensure that training program gains are maintained.

  3. Comparison of Corporate Image a nd Patient Loyalty Perceptions of Outpatients and Inpatients: Example of a Training and Research Hospital in Ankara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Rıfkı Önder

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the level of corporate image and patient loyalty of outpatients and inpatients who get services from a hospital and to evaluate the relationship between corporate images’ factors and patient loyalty. Totally 600 patients from a training and research hospitals in Ankara, formed the study sample. As a result, outpatients’ loyalty and image perceptions found medium level; while inpatients’ level found high. In addition, the effect of corporate image factors on patient loyalty was determined that there is a statistically significant , strong and positive correlation and 83% of patient loyalty is explained by corporate image factors. Based on the research findings, making improvements especially in quality and also physical, communication, social responsibility factors can obtain loyal patients. It is suggested to adopt different strategies to outpatients and inpatients while implementing these improvements.

  4. Effectiveness of a training package for implementing a community-based occupational therapy program in dementia: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döpp, Carola M E; Graff, Maud J L; Teerenstra, Steven; Olde Rikkert, Marcel G M; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra J F J

    2015-10-01

    Evaluate the effectiveness of a training package to implement a community occupational therapy program for people with dementia and their caregiver (COTiD). Cluster randomized controlled trial. A total of 45 service units including 94 occupational therapists, 48 managers, 80 physicians, treating 71 client-caregiver couples. Control intervention: A postgraduate course for occupational therapists only. A training package including the usual postgraduate course, additional training days, outreach visits, regional meetings, and access to a reporting system for occupational therapists. Physicians and managers received newsletters, had access to a website, and were approached by telephone. The intended adherence of therapists to the COTiD program. This was assessed using vignettes. clients' daily functioning, caregivers' sense of competence, quality of life, and self-perceived performance of daily activities of both clients and caregivers. Between-group differences were assessed using multilevel analyses with therapist and intervention factors as covariates. No significant between-group differences between baseline and 12 months were found for adherence (1.58, 95% CI -0.10 to 3.25), nor for any client or caregiver outcome. A higher number of coaching sessions and higher self-perceived knowledge of dementia at baseline positively correlated with adherence scores. In contrast, experiencing more support from occupational therapy colleagues or having conducted more COTiD treatments at baseline negatively affected adherence scores. The training package was not effective in increasing therapist adherence and client-caregiver outcomes. This study suggests that coaching sessions and increasing therapist knowledge on dementia positively affect adherence. NCT01117285. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. A training program for anthropometric measurements by a dedicated nutrition support team improves nutritional status assessment of the critically ill child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valla, Frederic V; Ford-Chessel, Carole; Meyer, Rosan; Berthiller, Julien; Dupenloup, Christine; Follin-Arbelet, Nathalie; Hubert, Anna; Javouhey, Etienne; Peretti, Noel

    2015-03-01

    The cornerstone of an optimal nutrition approach in PICUs is to evaluate the nutritional status of any patient. Anthropometric measurements and nutritional indices calculation allow for nutritional status assessment, which is not often part of routine management, as it is considered difficult to perform in this setting. We designed a study to evaluate the impact of a training program by the PICU nutritional support team on the implementation of routine anthropometric measurements on our PICU. A prospective study was performed over a 2-year period, which included: a baseline evaluation of nutritional assessment, knowledge, anthropometric measurements (weight, height, and head and mid upper arm circumferences), and nutritional indices calculation in patient files. This was followed by a training program to implement the newly developed nutrition assessment guidelines, which included anthropometrical measurements and also the interpretation of these. The impact of this nutritional assessment program was reviewed annually for 2 years after the implementation. PICU--Lyon, France. PICU nursing and medical staff, and patients admitted in February 2011, 2012, and 2013. Training program. Ninety-nine percent of staff (n = 145) attended the individual teaching. We found significant progress in nutritional awareness and confidence about nutritional assessment following the teaching program. In addition, an improvement in staff knowledge about undernutrition and its consequences were found. We enrolled 41, 55, and 91 patients in 2011, 2012, and 2013, respectively. There was a significant increase in anthropometric measurements during this time: 32%, 65% (p = 0.002), and 96% in 2013 (p Nutritional indices were calculated in 20%, 74% (p nutritional assessment teaching program that highlights both the importance and techniques of anthropometrical measurements has successfully been implemented in a PICU. It managed to improve staff knowledge and nutritional practice.

  6. Inductive Reasoning: A Training Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauer, Karl Josef; Phye, Gary D.

    2008-01-01

    Researchers have examined inductive reasoning to identify different cognitive processes when participants deal with inductive problems. This article presents a prescriptive theory of inductive reasoning that identifies cognitive processing using a procedural strategy for making comparisons. It is hypothesized that training in the use of the…

  7. EQUIP training the trainers: an evaluation of a training programme for service users and carers involved in training mental health professionals in user-involved care planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, C; Grundy, A; Meade, O; Callaghan, P; Lovell, K

    2017-08-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: UK NHS policy highlights the importance of user and carer involvement in health professional training. We know little about service user and carer motivations and experiences of accessing training courses for delivering training to health professionals and how well such courses prepare them for delivering training to healthcare professionals. 'Involvement' in training has often been tokenistic and too narrowly focused on preregistration courses. There is limited data on how best to prepare and support potential service user and carer trainers. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This study adds to the international literature by highlighting service user and carer motivations for accessing a training course for delivering training to health professionals. Service users and carers wanted to gain new skills and confidence in presentation/facilitation as well as to make a difference to healthcare practice. We also learned that service users desired different levels of involvement in training facilitation - some wanted to take a more active role than others. A one-size-fits-all approach is not always appropriate. Encountering resistance from staff in training was a previously unidentified challenge to service user and carers' experience of delivering training in practice and is a key challenge for trainers to address in future. Professional training involvement can be enhanced via specialist training such as the EQUIP training the trainers programme evaluated here. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: When training service users and carers to deliver training to mental health professionals, it is important that service users are equipped to deal with resistance from staff. It is important that service user and carer roles are negotiated and agreed prior to delivering training to healthcare professionals to accommodate individual preferences and allay anxieties. Training for service users and carers must be offered

  8. Effectiveness of a training course for general practice nurses in motivation support in type 2 diabetes care: a cluster-randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juul, Lise; Maindal, Helle T; Zoffmann, Vibeke; Frydenberg, Morten; Sandbaek, Annelli

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a common metabolic disease with the potential for prevention of complications. The prevention requires a high level of lasting actions from the patients, which may be burdensome. The aim of this trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of a training course for general practice nurses in motivation support at 18 months follow-up in the affiliated type 2 diabetes population. Forty general practices with nurse-led diabetes consultations from the area of Aarhus, Denmark were randomised 1∶1 to either intervention or usual practice. Intervention practices were offered a 16-hour Self-determination theory-based course including communication training for general practice nurses delivered over 10 months. The affiliated diabetes populations (aged 40-74 years) were identified from registers (intervention n = 2,005; usual n = 2,029). Primary outcomes were register-based glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) -, total cholesterol levels, and well-being measured by the Problem Areas In Diabetes scale (PAID) and the mental component summary score, SF12 (SF12, mcs). Intention-to-treat analyses were performed. Predefined subgroups analyses were performed. The differences between the intervention- and the control practices' mean HbA1c and total cholesterol at follow-up adjusted for baseline values and clustering were respectively: -0.02%-points (95% CI: -0.11 to 0.07; p: 0.67); 0.08 mmol/l (95% CI: 0.01 to 0.15; p: 0.02). Differences in median scores adjusted for clustering were for PAID: 1.25; p = 0.31 and SF12, mcs: 0.99; p = 0.15. Women in intervention practices differed from women in usual practices on mean HbA1c: -0.12%-points (-0.23 to -0.02; p = 0.02) and SF12, mcs: 2.6; p = 0.01. Offering a training course for general practice nurses in applying the Self-determination theory in current type 2 diabetes care had no effect compared with usual practice measured by HbA1c and total cholesterol levels and the well-being at 18 months of follow-up in

  9. Dust aerosol impact on North Africa climate: a GCM investigation of aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions using A-Train satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Gu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The climatic effects of dust aerosols in North Africa have been investigated using the atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM developed at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA. The model includes an efficient and physically based radiation parameterization scheme developed specifically for application to clouds and aerosols. Parameterization of the effective ice particle size in association with the aerosol first indirect effect based on ice cloud and aerosol data retrieved from A-Train satellite observations have been employed in climate model simulations. Offline simulations reveal that the direct solar, IR, and net forcings by dust aerosols at the top of the atmosphere (TOA generally increase with increasing aerosol optical depth. When the dust semi-direct effect is included with the presence of ice clouds, positive IR radiative forcing is enhanced since ice clouds trap substantial IR radiation, while the positive solar forcing with dust aerosols alone has been changed to negative values due to the strong reflection of solar radiation by clouds, indicating that cloud forcing associated with aerosol semi-direct effect could exceed direct aerosol forcing. With the aerosol first indirect effect, the net cloud forcing is generally reduced in the case for an ice water path (IWP larger than 20 g m−2. The magnitude of the reduction increases with IWP.

    AGCM simulations show that the reduced ice crystal mean effective size due to the aerosol first indirect effect results in less OLR and net solar flux at TOA over the cloudy area of the North Africa region because ice clouds with smaller size trap more IR radiation and reflect more solar radiation. The precipitation in the same area, however, increases due to the aerosol indirect effect on ice clouds, corresponding to the enhanced convection as indicated by reduced OLR. Adding the aerosol direct effect into the model simulation reduces the precipitation in the

  10. A-Train Aerosol Observations Preliminary Comparisons with AeroCom Models and Pathways to Observationally Based All-Sky Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redemann, J.; Livingston, J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; Russell, P.; LeBlanc, S.; Vaughan, M.; Ferrare, R.; Hostetler, C.; Rogers, R.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a technique for combining CALIOP aerosol backscatter, MODIS spectral AOD (aerosol optical depth), and OMI AAOD (absorption aerosol optical depth) retrievals for the purpose of estimating full spectral sets of aerosol radiative properties, and ultimately for calculating the 3-D distribution of direct aerosol radiative forcing. We present results using one year of data collected in 2007 and show comparisons of the aerosol radiative property estimates to collocated AERONET retrievals. Use of the recently released MODIS Collection 6 data for aerosol optical depths derived with the dark target and deep blue algorithms has extended the coverage of the multi-sensor estimates towards higher latitudes. We compare the spatio-temporal distribution of our multi-sensor aerosol retrievals and calculations of seasonal clear-sky aerosol radiative forcing based on the aerosol retrievals to values derived from four models that participated in the latest AeroCom model intercomparison initiative. We find significant inter-model differences, in particular for the aerosol single scattering albedo, which can be evaluated using the multi-sensor A-Train retrievals. We discuss the major challenges that exist in extending our clear-sky results to all-sky conditions. On the basis of comparisons to suborbital measurements, we present some of the limitations of the MODIS and CALIOP retrievals in the presence of adjacent or underlying clouds. Strategies for meeting these challenges are discussed.

  11. The Establishment of an Organic Farmers’ Market as a Training Case Study and Research for Graduate Students of Organic Agriculture at the University of Palermo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Schifani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available  Despite the modest regional consumption of organic products, Sicily is one of the most important European regions in surface area per number of companies active in organic farming. The University of Palermo, as early as 2000, to promote the development and success in this industry, the Faculty of Agriculture, introduced two major degree programs in "Organic Farming". The objective of these courses is to train graduates who are technically capable of supporting the organic farmers market, to promote and facilitate the expansion of the consumption of organic products, and to create employment opportunities for young graduates. At the end of 2009, in the area of these activities, a training and research program involved numerous students in the creation of an "joint consumption" association whose purpose is the expansion of the consumption of organic products through the enhancement of a direct relationship with small organic farms who would be unlikely to penetrate large markets, or have relationships with large distribution networks.The project aims to assess the ability of the students of the Faculty to transmit the knowledge acquired in the program, and to investigate the relative issues regarding the new phenomenon emerging in recent years in Italy, represented by the spread of various forms of ethically-conscious consumption groups called "Gruppi di Acquisto Solidale (GAS" or Solidarity Purchase Groups.

  12. Effects of 3-D clouds on atmospheric transmission of solar radiation: Cloud type dependencies inferred from A-train satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Seung-Hee; Kato, Seiji; Barker, Howard W.; Rose, Fred G.; Sun-Mack, Sunny

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) effects on broadband shortwave top of atmosphere (TOA) nadir radiance, atmospheric absorption, and surface irradiance are examined using 3-D cloud fields obtained from one hour's worth of A-train satellite observations and one-dimensional (1-D) independent column approximation (ICA) and full 3-D radiative transfer simulations. The 3-D minus ICA differences in TOA nadir radiance multiplied by π, atmospheric absorption, and surface downwelling irradiance, denoted as πΔI, ΔA, and ΔT, respectively, are analyzed by cloud type. At the 1 km pixel scale, πΔI, ΔA, and ΔT exhibit poor spatial correlation. Once averaged with a moving window, however, better linear relationships among πΔI, ΔA, and ΔT emerge, especially for moving windows larger than 5 km and large θ0. While cloud properties and solar geometry are shown to influence the relationships amongst πΔI, ΔA, and ΔT, once they are separated by cloud type, their linear relationships become much stronger. This suggests that ICA biases in surface irradiance and atmospheric absorption can be approximated based on ICA biases in nadir radiance as a function of cloud type.

  13. Emotional and behavioural barriers to learning and development in the inclusive education classrooms in South Africa: Developing a training programme for teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potgieter-Groot, Lucia; Visser, Maretha; Lubbe-de Beer, Carien

    2012-07-01

    The interaction between teachers, classroom strategies and learners experiencing emotional and behavioural barriers to learning and development in a system of inclusive education results in multiple dynamics on different levels. Many teachers in mainstream education lack training to deal with learners experiencing emotional and behavioural barriers. Resistance towards inclusive education is therefore evident. This paper describes the process of developing an in-service training programme for teachers who deal with learners with emotional and behavioural barriers in their classrooms. A process of action research was used to allow the researcher, in collaboration with 47 teachers from 2 primary schools, to develop a training programme to address the specific needs of teachers in dealing with learners experiencing emotional and behavioural barriers in their classes. Qualitative feedback from teachers and observations by the researcher and external observers were used to evaluate the appropriateness of the training. Teachers experienced that appropriate classroom management strategies made a significant difference in the behaviour of learners experiencing emotional and behavioural barriers. The training affected teachers' attitudes, teacher-learner interaction, learner behaviour and school organisation. In-service training for teachers can affect the effective implementation of inclusive education. This programme can be adapted to address the needs of teachers in other areas.

  14. A pilot study of the relationship between diet and mental health in female university students enrolled in a training course for registered dietitians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochimasu, Kazumi Dokai; Miyatake, Nobuyuki; Hase, Ayako

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of the present pilot study was to investigate the link between diet and mental health in female university students enrolled in a training course for registered dietitians. A total of 62 female university students, with a mean age of 18.79 ± 0.45 years, participated in this cross-sectional study. Diet surveys were performed using the brief-type self-administered diet history questionnaire (BDHQ). Mental health was also evaluated using the general health questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12), which was the shortest form and clinically available. Lifestyles such as physical activity levels were also evaluated. The mean energy intake was 1379 ± 575 kcal and the mean GHQ score was 3.11 ± 2.41. Among nutrients, vegetable fat and sucrose showed a weak positive correlation with the GHQ scores. Among food groups, potatoes, fats and oils, and confectioneries also showed a weak positive correlation with the GHQ scores. A multiple regression analysis showed that the confectioneries were the determining factor for the GHQ scores. Proper education concerning their diets and reducing confectioneries in their daily lives might be beneficial for the mental health of female university students.

  15. Managing deliberate self-harm in young people: An evaluation of a training program developed for school welfare staff using a longitudinal research design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGorry Patrick D

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although deliberate self-harm is prevalent among young people, many who engage in deliberate self-harm receive sub-optimal care. Although schools are a well placed setting to support young people who engage in self-harm there are no specific training packages designed to assist school welfare staff to support these young people. The current study aimed to design, deliver and evaluate a training course specifically for school staff. Methods The study employed a longitudinal design. Two hundred and thirteen people participated in the training and evaluation. A questionnaire was administered at baseline, immediately after the training and at 6-month follow-up in order to determine if the training led to improvements in confidence when working with young people who self-harm, perceived skill, knowledge of, and attitudes towards people who self harm. Results Prior to the course, the majority of participants demonstrated relatively high levels of confidence, perceived skill and knowledge of self-harm and endorsed relatively positive attitudes towards people who engage in self-harm. Despite this, significant improvements were observed in terms of increased confidence, increased perceptions of skill along with increased knowledge of deliberate self-harm. These improvements were sustained over the follow-up period. Conclusion The results demonstrated that the provision of specifically designed training can help school welfare staff to feel better equipped to support young people who are engaging in deliberate self-harm.

  16. The Bath metrology index as assessed by a trained and an untrained rater in patients with spondylarthropathy: a study of intra- and inter-rater agreements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, O R; Hansen, L B; Rytter, A

    2008-01-01

    -rater and inter-rater reproducibility of BASMI scoring in 30 Danish patients with SpA (median age 40 years, range 22-56 years) fulfilling the European Spondylarthropathy Study Group criteria, 25 of them satisfying the modified New York Criteria for AS. Measurements were performed twice on two different days......The Bath ankylosing spondylitis metrology index (BASMI; range 0-10) has gained widespread use in daily clinical practice as an objective measure of spinal stiffness not only in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) but also in patients with other spondylarthropathies (SpA). We examined intra...... (median interval 7 days, range 4-11) by a trained physiotherapist (PT) and by an untrained nurse who had undergone a single 1-h training session with the PT. The median BASMI score obtained by the PT on the two test days was 3.5 (range 1-8) and 3.0 (range 1-8), respectively (NS). Test-retest BASMI scores...

  17. The Inflatable Mini Anne® Manikin May be Used as an Inexpensive Alternative to a Standard Life-size Resuscitation Manikin During Instructor-led BLS/AED Training - A Randomized Controlled Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Camilla; Cordsen, Anna-Sophie N; Hoe, Masja B

    2017-01-01

    -led BLS/AED training. All participants underwent an end-of-course test on an AMBU® Man-manikin (AMBU). The primary endpoint: performing all steps of the European Resuscitation Council BLS/AED algorithm correctly (passing the test). Secondary endpoints: CPR quality parameters and manikin preference...

  18. Pautas para Organizar Una Actividad de Capacitacion: Un Seminario-Taller para el Desarrollo de Personal de Direccion de Sistemas Educativos (Guidelines to Organize a Training Activity: A Workshop for Management Development of Educational Systems).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Victor M.

    Often personnel performing managerial functions within educational systems are educators with almost no training in management. This paper presents ideas on how to organize a training activity intended to develop management knowledge and skills among educational systems officials and to implement an organizational self-study on management…

  19. How do A-train Sensors Inter-Compare in the Retrieval of Above-Cloud Aerosol Optical Depth? A Case Study based Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jethva, H. T.; Torres, O.; Waquet, F.; Chand, D.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are known to produce a net cooling effect in the cloud-free conditions. However, when present over the reflective cloud decks, absorbing aerosols such as biomass burning generated smoke and wind-blown dust can potentially exert a large positive forcing through enhanced atmospheric heating resulting from cloud-aerosol radiative interactions. The interest on this aspect of aerosol science has grown significantly in the recent years. Particularly, development of the satellite-based retrieval techniques and unprecedented knowledge on the above-cloud aerosol optical depth (ACAOD) is of great relevance. A direct validation of satellite ACAOD is a difficult task primarily due to lack of ample in situ and/or remote sensing measurements of aerosols above cloud. In these circumstances, a comparative analysis on the inter-satellite ACAOD retrievals can be performed for the sack of consistency check. Here, we inter-compare the ACAOD of biomass burning plumes observed from different A-train sensors, i.e., MODIS [Jethva et al., 2013], CALIOP [Chand et al., 2008], POLDER [Waquet et al., 2009], and OMI [Torres et al., 2012]. These sensors have been shown to acquire sensitivity and independent capabilities to detect and retrieve aerosol loading above marine stratocumulus clouds--a kind of situation often found over the southeastern Atlantic Ocean during dry burning season. A systematic one-to-one comparison reveals that, in general, all passive sensors and CALIOP-based research methods retrieve comparable ACAOD over homogeneous cloud fields. The high-resolution sensors (MODIS and CALIOP) are able to retrieve aerosols over thin clouds but with larger discrepancies. Given the different types of sensor measurements processed with different algorithms, a reasonable agreement between them is encouraging. A direct validation of satellite-based ACAOD remains an open challenge for which dedicated field measurements over the region of frequent aerosol/cloud overlap are

  20. Development of a training programme for home health care workers to promote preventive activities focused on a healthy lifestyle: an intervention mapping approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Maaike E; Dijkstra, Arie; de Winter, Andrea F; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    2015-07-09

    Lifestyle is an important aspect in maintaining good health in older adults, and home health care (HHC) workers can play an important role in promoting a healthy lifestyle. However, there is limited evidence in the literature regarding how to develop an effective training programme to improve the physical activity level and fruit and vegetable consumption of older adults within a HHC setting. The aim of this paper is to describe how Intervention Mapping (IM) was used to develop a training programme to promote preventive activities of HHC workers relating to the physical activity and fruit and vegetable intake of older adults living at home. IM, a systematic theory and evidence-based approach was used to develop, implement and evaluate the training programme. This entailed a literature search, a survey, semi-structured interviews and consultation with HHC workers and various field experts, and a pilot training session. The determinants associated with the provision of preventive activities were identified, and an overview was created of those objectives, matching methods and practical applications that could influence these determinants. The performance objectives for the HHC workers were early detection and monitoring, promoting a healthy lifestyle, informing colleagues, continuing allocated preventive activities and referring to other experts and facilities. Findings were translated into a comprehensive training programme for HHC workers focused on motivating older adults to adopt and maintain a healthier lifestyle. IM was a useful tool in the development of a theory-based training programme to promote preventive activities by HHC workers relating to fruit and vegetable intake and physical activity of older adults.

  1. Effects of Short-Interval and Long-Interval Swimming Protocols on Performance, Aerobic Adaptations, and Technical Parameters: A Training Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalamitros, Athanasios A; Zafeiridis, Andreas S; Toubekis, Argyris G; Tsalis, George A; Pelarigo, Jailton G; Manou, Vasiliki; Kellis, Spiridon

    2016-10-01

    Dalamitros, AA, Zafeiridis, AS, Toubekis, AG, Tsalis, GA, Pelarigo, JG, Manou, V, and Kellis, S. Effects of short-interval and long-interval swimming protocols on performance, aerobic adaptations, and technical parameters: A training study. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2871-2879, 2016-This study compared 2-interval swimming training programs of different work interval durations, matched for total distance and exercise intensity, on swimming performance, aerobic adaptations, and technical parameters. Twenty-four former swimmers were equally divided to short-interval training group (INT50, 12-16 × 50 m with 15 seconds rest), long-interval training group (INT100, 6-8 × 100 m with 30 seconds rest), and a control group (CON). The 2 experimental groups followed the specified swimming training program for 8 weeks. Before and after training, swimming performance, technical parameters, and indices of aerobic adaptations were assessed. ΙΝΤ50 and ΙΝΤ100 improved swimming performance in 100 and 400-m tests and the maximal aerobic speed (p ≤ 0.05); the performance in the 50-m swim did not change. Posttraining V[Combining Dot Above]O2max values were higher compared with pretraining values in both training groups (p ≤ 0.05), whereas peak aerobic power output increased only in INT100 (p ≤ 0.05). The 1-minute heart rate and blood lactate recovery values decreased after training in both groups (p training in both groups (p ≤ 0.05); no changes were observed in stroke rate after training. Comparisons between groups on posttraining mean values, after adjusting for pretraining values, revealed no significant differences between ΙΝΤ50 and ΙΝΤ100 for all variables; however, all measures were improved vs. the respective values in the CON (p training.

  2. Intervention for depression among palliative care patients and their families: A study protocol for evaluation of a training program for professional care staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallford, David J; McCabe, Marita P; Mellor, David; Davison, Tanya E; Goldhammer, Denisa L; George, Kuruvilla; Storer, Shane

    2011-06-13

    Clinical depression is highly prevalent yet under-detected and under-treated in palliative care settings and is associated with a number of adverse medical and psychological outcomes for patients and their family members. This article presents a study protocol to evaluate a training intervention for non-physician palliative care staff to improve the recognition of depression and provide support for depressed patients and their family members. Details of the hypotheses and expected outcomes, study design, training program development and evaluation measures are described. A randomised controlled trial will be implemented across two palliative care services to evaluate the "Training program for professional carers to recognise and manage depression in palliative care settings". Pre-, post- and three-month follow-up data will be collected to assess: the impact of the training on the knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy and perceived barriers of palliative care staff when working with depression; referral rates for depression; and changes to staff practices. Quantitative and qualitative methods, in the form of self-report questionnaires and interviews with staff and family members, will be used to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention. This study will determine the effectiveness of an intervention that aims to respond to the urgent need for innovative programs to target depression in the palliative care setting. The expected outcome of this study is the validation of an evidence-based training program to improve staff recognition and appropriate referrals for depression, as well as improve psychosocial support for depressed patients and their family members. Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR): ACTRN12610000183088.

  3. Sugammadex and neostigmine dose-finding study for reversal of residual neuromuscular block at a train-of-four ratio of 0.2 (SUNDRO20)†,.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufhold, N; Schaller, S J; Stäuble, C G; Baumüller, E; Ulm, K; Blobner, M; Fink, H

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this dose-finding study was to evaluate the dose-response relationship of sugammadex and neostigmine to reverse a commonly observed level of incomplete recovery from rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block, that is, a train-of-four ratio (TOFR) ≥0.2. Ninety-nine anaesthetized patients received rocuronium 0.6 mg kg(-1) i.v. for tracheal intubation and, if necessary, incremental doses of 0.1-0.2 mg kg(-1). Neuromuscular monitoring was performed by calibrated electromyography. Once the TOFR recovered to 0.2, patients were randomized to receive sugammadex (0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, or 1.25 mg kg(-1) i.v.), neostigmine (10, 25, 40, 55, or 70 µg kg(-1) i.v.), or saline (n=9 per group). Primary and secondary end points were the doses necessary to restore neuromuscular function to a TOFR≥0.9 with an upper limit of 5 and 10 min for 95% of patients, respectively. Neostigmine was not able to fulfil the end points. Based on the best-fitting model, the sugammadex dose estimation for recovery to a TOFR≥0.9 for 95% of patients within 5 and 10 min was 0.49 and 0.26 mg kg(-1), respectively. A residual neuromuscular block of a TOFR of 0.2 cannot be reversed reliably with neostigmine within 10 min. In the conditions studied, substantially lower doses of sugammadex than the approved dose of 2.0 mg kg(-1) may be sufficient to reverse residual rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block at a recovery of TOFR≥0.2. NCT01006720. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. The Vertical Structure of Relative Humidity and Ozone in the Tropical Upper Troposphere: Intercomparisons Among In Situ Observations, A-Train Measurements and Large-Scale Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkirk, Henry B.; Manyin, Michael; Douglass, Anne R.; Oman, Luke; Pawson, Steven; Ott, Lesley; Benson, Craig; Stolarski, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In situ measurements in the tropics have shown that in regions of active convection, relative humidity with respect to ice in the upper troposphere is typically close to saturation on average, and supersaturations greater than 20% are not uncommon. Balloon soundings with the cryogenic frost point hygrometer (CFH) at Costa Rica during northern summer, for example, show this tendency to be strongest between 11 and 15.5 km (345-360 K potential temperature, or approximately 250-120 hPa). this is the altitude range of deep convective detrainment. Additionally, simultaneous ozonesonde measurements show that stratospheric air (O3 greater than 150 ppbv) can be found as low as approximately 14 km (350 K/150 hPa). In contrast, results from northern winter show a much drier upper troposphere and little penetration of stratospheric air below the tropopause at 17.5 km (approximately 383 K). We show that these results are consistent with in situ measurements from the Measurement of Ozone and water vapor by Airbus In-service airCraft (MOZAIC) program which samples a wider, though still limited, range of tropical locations. To generalize to the tropics as a whole, we compare our insitu results to data from two A-Train satellite instruments, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Aqua and Aura satellites respectively. Finally, we examine the vertical structure of water vapor, relative humidity and ozone in the NASA Goddard MERRA analysis, an assimilation dataset, and a new version of the GEOS CCM, a free-running chemistry-climate model. We demonstrate that conditional probability distributions of relative humidity and ozone are a sensitive diagnostic for assessing the representation of deep convection and upper troposphere/lower stratosphere mixing processes in large-scale analyses and climate models.

  5. Using High Frequency Passive Microwave, A-train, and TRMM Data to Evaluate Hydrometer Structure in the NASA GEOS-5 Data Assimilation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Franklin; Bacmeister, Julio; Bosilovich, Michael; Pittman, Jasna

    2007-01-01

    Validating water vapor and prognostic condensate in global models remains a challenging research task. Model parameterizations are still subject to a large number of tunable parameters; furthermore, accurate and representative in situ observations are very sparse, and satellite observations historically have significant quantitative uncertainties. Progress on improving cloud / hydrometeor fields in models stands to benefit greatly from the growing inventory ofA-Train data sets. ill the present study we are using a variety of complementary satellite retrievals of hydrometeors to examine condensate produced by the emerging NASA Modem Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications, MERRA, and its associated atmospheric general circulation model GEOS5. Cloud and precipitation are generated by both grid-scale prognostic equations and by the Relaxed Arakawa-Schubert (RAS) diagnostic convective parameterization. The high frequency channels (89 to 183.3 GHz) from AMSU-B and MRS on NOAA polar orbiting satellites are being used to evaluate the climatology and variability of precipitating ice from tropical convective anvils. Vertical hydrometeor structure from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and CloudSat radars are used to develop statistics on vertical hydrometeor structure in order to better interpret the extensive high frequency passive microwave climatology. Cloud liquid and ice water path data retrieved from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, MODIS, are used to investigate relationships between upper level cloudiness and tropical deep convective anvils. Together these data are used to evaluate cloud / ice water path, gross aspects of vertical hydrometeor structure, and the relationship between cloud extent and surface precipitation that the MERRA reanalysis must capture.

  6. Joint project to implement a training course/seminar for high-level decision making officals on nuclear policy between Korea and IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E. J.; Suh, S. H.; Kim, S. H. and others

    2001-09-01

    Through this project, the KAERI has published a english text book titled 'Nuclear Power project: Policy and Korean Experience' with the cooperation with the Agency. Korean experts, who have more than 30 years experiences in nuclear policy and nuclear power project management, involved to prepare the contents. Experts, who are working for Department of Nuclear Energy and Department of Technical Cooperation in the Agency, reviewed the contents. The KAERI has provided a training course/seminar for a high-level delegation of nuclear policy decision makers, which is consisted of 3 deputy ministers and 3 general directors in Viet Nam Communist Party, Assembly, Government Departments, upon the agreement between Vietnam Atomic Energy Commission (VAEC) and MOST at Hanoi in November 2000. The KAERI decided to provide the IAEA regional training course for middle level managers of nuclear policy and project management in RCA member states in November 2001 and 2002 under the cooperation with the Agency and the Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA). The training course curricula, a english text book will be utilized as basic technical materials to promote the national nuclear cooperation program with the developing countries, that are considering to introduce the first or a new nuclear power plant, such as China, Indonesia, Bangladesh, Morocco, Egypt, Ukraine, etc. Through the project, the bilateral nuclear cooperation between Viet Nam and Korea in the field of nuclear manpower development has improved practically. The KAERI has decided to provide on-the job-training program for Vietnamese experts in the field of nuclear policy, safety analysis, thermal-hydraulic analysis, etc under the 2000 KISTEP Scientist Exchange Program

  7. Hemodynamic responses of unfit healthy women at a training session with nintendo wii: a possible impact on the general well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro-Junior, Renato S; Figueiredo, Luiz F; Conceição, Isabel; Carvalho, Carolina; Lattari, Eduardo; Mura, Gioia; Machado, Sérgio; da Silva, Elirez B

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was assess the effect of a training session with Nintendo Wii® on the hemodynamic responses of healthy women not involved in regular physical exercise. Twenty-five healthy unfit women aged 28 ± 6 years played for 10 minutes the game Free Run (Wii Fit Plus). The resting heart rate (RHR), systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP and DBP), and double (rate-pressure) product (DP) were measured before and after activity. The HR during the activity (exercise heart rate, EHR) was measured every minute. A statistically significant difference was observed between the RHR (75 ± 9 bpm) and the mean EHR (176 ± 15 bpm) (P < 0.001). The EHR remained in the target zone for aerobic exercise until the fifth minute of activity, which coincided with the upper limit of the aerobic zone (80% heart rate reserve (HRR) + RHR) from the sixth to tenth minute. The initial (110 ± 8 mmHg) and final (145 ± 17 mmHg) SBP (P < 0.01) were significantly different, as were the initial (71 ± 8 mmHg) and final (79 ± 9 mmHg) DBP (P < 0.01). A statistically significant difference was observed between the pre- (8.233 ± 1.141 bpm-mmHg) and post-activity (25.590 ± 4.117 bpm-mmHg) DP (P < 0.01). Physical exercise while playing Free Run sufficed to trigger acute hemodynamic changes in healthy women who were not engaged in regular physical exercise.

  8. Joint project to implement a training course/seminar for high-level decision making officals on nuclear policy between Korea and IAEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, E. J.; Suh, S. H.; Kim, S. H. and others

    2001-09-01

    Through this project, the KAERI has published a english text book titled 'Nuclear Power project: Policy and Korean Experience' with the cooperation with the Agency. Korean experts, who have more than 30 years experiences in nuclear policy and nuclear power project management, involved to prepare the contents. Experts, who are working for Department of Nuclear Energy and Department of Technical Cooperation in the Agency, reviewed the contents. The KAERI has provided a training course/seminar for a high-level delegation of nuclear policy decision makers, which is consisted of 3 deputy ministers and 3 general directors in Viet Nam Communist Party, Assembly, Government Departments, upon the agreement between Vietnam Atomic Energy Commission (VAEC) and MOST at Hanoi in November 2000. The KAERI decided to provide the IAEA regional training course for middle level managers of nuclear policy and project management in RCA member states in November 2001 and 2002 under the cooperation with the Agency and the Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA). The training course curricula, a english text book will be utilized as basic technical materials to promote the national nuclear cooperation program with the developing countries, that are considering to introduce the first or a new nuclear power plant, such as China, Indonesia, Bangladesh, Morocco, Egypt, Ukraine, etc. Through the project, the bilateral nuclear cooperation between Viet Nam and Korea in the field of nuclear manpower development has improved practically. The KAERI has decided to provide on-the job-training program for Vietnamese experts in the field of nuclear policy, safety analysis, thermal-hydraulic analysis, etc under the 2000 KISTEP Scientist Exchange Program.

  9. Can a community health worker and a trained traditional birth attendant work as a team to deliver child health interventions in rural Zambia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeboah-Antwi, Kojo; Hamer, Davidson H; Semrau, Katherine; Waltensperger, Karen Z; Snetro-Plewman, Gail; Kambikambi, Chilobe; Sakala, Amon; Filumba, Stephen; Sichamba, Bias; Marsh, David R

    2014-10-27

    Teaming is an accepted approach in health care settings but rarely practiced at the community level in developing countries. Save the Children trained and deployed teams of volunteer community health workers (CHWs) and trained traditional birth attendants (TBAs) to provide essential newborn and curative care for children aged 0-59 months in rural Zambia. This paper assessed whether CHWs and trained TBAs can work as teams to deliver interventions and ensure a continuum of care for all children under-five, including newborns. We trained CHW-TBA teams in teaming concepts and assessed their level of teaming prospectively every six months for two years. The overall score was a function of both teamwork and taskwork. We also assessed personal, community and service factors likely to influence the level of teaming. We created forty-seven teams of predominantly younger, male CHWs and older, female trained TBAs. After two years of deployment, twenty-one teams scored "high", twelve scored "low," and fourteen were inactive. Teamwork was high for mutual trust, team cohesion, comprehension of team goals and objectives, and communication, but not for decision making/planning. Taskwork was high for joint behavior change communication and outreach services with local health workers, but not for intra-team referral. Teams with members residing within one hour's walking distance were more likely to score high. It is feasible for a CHW and a trained TBA to work as a team. This may be an approach to provide a continuum of care for children under-five including newborns.

  10. Evaluation of the Cloud Fields in the UK Met Office HadGEM3-UKCA Model Using the CCCM Satellite Data Product to Advance Our Understanding of the Influence of Clouds on Tropospheric Composition and Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Sunil; Voulgarakis, Apostolos; Liu, Hongyu; Crawford, James H.; White, James

    2016-01-01

    To determine the role of clouds in driving inter-annual and inter-seasonal variability of trace gases in the troposphere and lower stratosphere with a particular focus on the importance of cloud modification of photolysis. To evaluate the cloud fields and their vertical distribution in the HadGEM3 model utilizing CCCM, a unique 3-D cloud data product merged from multiple A-Train satellites (CERES, CloudSat, CALIPSO, and MODIS) developed at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  11. Evaluation of the channelized Hotelling observer with an internal-noise model in a train-test paradigm for cardiac SPECT defect detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brankov, Jovan G

    2013-01-01

    The channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) has become a widely used approach for evaluating medical image quality, acting as a surrogate for human observers in early-stage research on assessment and optimization of imaging devices and algorithms. The CHO is typically used to measure lesion detectability. Its popularity stems from experiments showing that the CHO's detection performance can correlate well with that of human observers. In some cases, CHO performance overestimates human performance; to counteract this effect, an internal-noise model is introduced, which allows the CHO to be tuned to match human-observer performance. Typically, this tuning is achieved using example data obtained from human observers. We argue that this internal-noise tuning step is essentially a model training exercise; therefore, just as in supervised learning, it is essential to test the CHO with an internal-noise model on a set of data that is distinct from that used to tune (train) the model. Furthermore, we argue that, if the CHO is to provide useful insights about new imaging algorithms or devices, the test data should reflect such potential differences from the training data; it is not sufficient simply to use new noise realizations of the same imaging method. Motivated by these considerations, the novelty of this paper is the use of new model selection criteria to evaluate ten established internal-noise models, utilizing four different channel models, in a train-test approach. Though not the focus of the paper, a new internal-noise model is also proposed that outperformed the ten established models in the cases tested. The results, using cardiac perfusion SPECT data, show that the proposed train-test approach is necessary, as judged by the newly proposed model selection criteria, to avoid spurious conclusions. The results also demonstrate that, in some models, the optimal internal-noise parameter is very sensitive to the choice of training data; therefore, these models are prone

  12. Evaluation of the channelized Hotelling observer with an internal-noise model in a train-test paradigm for cardiac SPECT defect detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brankov, Jovan G

    2013-10-21

    The channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) has become a widely used approach for evaluating medical image quality, acting as a surrogate for human observers in early-stage research on assessment and optimization of imaging devices and algorithms. The CHO is typically used to measure lesion detectability. Its popularity stems from experiments showing that the CHO's detection performance can correlate well with that of human observers. In some cases, CHO performance overestimates human performance; to counteract this effect, an internal-noise model is introduced, which allows the CHO to be tuned to match human-observer performance. Typically, this tuning is achieved using example data obtained from human observers. We argue that this internal-noise tuning step is essentially a model training exercise; therefore, just as in supervised learning, it is essential to test the CHO with an internal-noise model on a set of data that is distinct from that used to tune (train) the model. Furthermore, we argue that, if the CHO is to provide useful insights about new imaging algorithms or devices, the test data should reflect such potential differences from the training data; it is not sufficient simply to use new noise realizations of the same imaging method. Motivated by these considerations, the novelty of this paper is the use of new model selection criteria to evaluate ten established internal-noise models, utilizing four different channel models, in a train-test approach. Though not the focus of the paper, a new internal-noise model is also proposed that outperformed the ten established models in the cases tested. The results, using cardiac perfusion SPECT data, show that the proposed train-test approach is necessary, as judged by the newly proposed model selection criteria, to avoid spurious conclusions. The results also demonstrate that, in some models, the optimal internal-noise parameter is very sensitive to the choice of training data; therefore, these models are prone

  13. Evaluation of a training program for device operators in the Australian Government's Point of Care Testing in General Practice Trial: issues and implications for rural and remote practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, Mark D; Mazzachi, Beryl C; Watkinson, Les; Shephard, Anne K; Laurence, Caroline; Gialamas, Angela; Bubner, Tanya

    2009-01-01

    From September 2005 to February 2007 the Australian Government funded the Point of Care Testing (PoCT) in General Practice Trial, a multi-centre, cluster randomised controlled trial to determine the safety, clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and satisfaction of PoCT in General Practice. In total, 53 practices (23 control and 30 intervention) based in urban, rural or remote locations across three states (South Australia [SA], New South Wales [NSW] and Victoria [VIC]) participated in the Trial. Control practices had pathology testing performed by their local laboratory, while intervention practices conducted pathology testing by PoCT. In total, 4968 patients (1958 control and 3010 intervention) participated in the Trial. The point-of-care (PoC) tests performed by intervention practices were: haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and urine albumin:creatinine ratio (ACR) on patients with diabetes, total cholesterol, triglyceride and high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol on patients with hyperlipidaemia, and international normalised ratio (INR) on patients on anticoagulant therapy. Three PoCT devices measured these tests: the Siemens DCA 2000 (Siemens HealthCare Diagnostics, Melbourne, VIC, Australia) for HbA1c and urine ACR; Point of Care Diagnostics Cholestech LDX analyser (Point of Care Diagnostics; Sydney, NSW, Australia) for lipids; and the Roche CoaguChek S (Roche Diagnostics; Sydney, NSW, Australia) for INR. Point-of-care testing in the General Practice Trial was underpinned by a quality management framework which included an on-going training and competency program for PoCT device operators. This article describes the design, implementation and results of the training and competency program. An education and training resource package was developed for the Trial consisting of a training manual, a set of A3 laminated posters and a CD ROM. Five initial training workshops were held for intervention practices from each geographic region between August and October 2005

  14. Asian dust outflow in the PBL and free atmosphere retrieved by NASA CALIPSO and an assimilated dust transport model

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Hara; K. Yumimoto; I. Uno; A. Shimizu; N. Sugimoto; Z. Liu; D. M. Winker

    2009-01-01

    International audience; Three-dimensional structures of Asian dust transport in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and free atmosphere occurring successively during the end of May 2007 were clarified using results of space-borne backscatter lidar, Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), and results simulated using a data-assimilated version of a dust transport model (RC4) based on a ground-based NIES lidar network. Assimilated results mitigated overestimation of dust concen...

  15. Food and nutrient intakes of French frequent seafood consumers with regard to fish consumption recommendations: results from the CALIPSO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirot, Véronique; Dumas, Céline; Leblanc, Jean-Charles; Margaritis, Irène

    2011-05-01

    Besides providing n-3 fatty acids with nutritional and health benefits, seafood consumption may contribute to the reduction of nutrient prevalences of inadequacy. To evaluate the contributions of seafood and other food groups to nutrient intakes of frequent seafood consumers, food consumption was evaluated through an FFQ on 991 French men and women (18-81 years) consuming seafood at least twice a week. Intakes, prevalence of inadequacies, risks of upper limit excess and food contributions to intakes were assessed for thirty-three nutrients. Mean fat contributions to total energy intakes (38·3 and 39·0 % for men and women, respectively) met French recommendations, but mean carbohydrate intakes (40·9 and 39·7 %, respectively) were insufficient. Micronutrient inadequacies were lower than in the French general population, the highest being for vitamin C (41·3 and 40·1 % for men and women, respectively), vitamin E (35·0 and 35·3 % for men and women, respectively) and Mg (37·5 and 25·5 % for men and women, respectively). Upper safety limits (USL) were exceeded mostly for Zn (6·2 %), Ca (3·7 %), retinol (2·0 %) and Cu (0·9 %). Mean contributions of seafood to vitamin D, B12, I and Se intakes ranged 40-65 %. Molluscs and crustaceans significantly contributed to vitamin B12 (13·7 %), Cu (11·4 %), Fe (11·5 %), Zn (8·4 %) and I (6·1 %) intakes, and canned fish contributed to vitamin D intake (13·4 %). Besides fish, contributions of mollusc and crustacean consumption to nutrient intakes should be considered from a public health viewpoint. Consuming seafood at least twice a week induces moderate inadequacies and risks of exceeding USL for some micronutrients, whereas macronutrient intakes remained imbalanced.

  16. Gulf of Mexico Air Quality: CALIPSO Support for Gulf of Mexico Air Quality Relating to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Myngoc T.; Lapointe, Stephen; Jennings, Brittney; Zoumplis, Angela

    2011-01-01

    On April 20, 2010, an oil platform belonging to BP exploded and leaked a huge volume of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. In an effort to control the spread of the oil, BP applied dispersants such as Corexit and conducted in-situ burnings of the oil. This catastrophe created a complex chain of events that affected not only the fragile water and land ecosystems, but the humans who breathe the air every day. Thousands of people were exposed to fumes associated with oil vapors from the spill, burning of the oil, and the toxic mixture of dispersants. While aiding in clean-up efforts, local fishermen were directly exposure to fumes when working on the Gulf. A notable amount of Gulf Coast residents were also exposed to the oil fumes as seasonal southeasterly winds blew vapors toward land. The Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) found in oil vapors include: benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, xylene, naphthalene, hydrogen sulfide and particulate matter (PM). Increases in water temperature and sunlight due to the summer season allow for these VOCs and PM to evaporate into the air more rapidly. Aside from the VOCs found in oil vapors, the dispersant being used to break up the oil is highly toxic and is thought to be even more toxic than the oil itself (EPA website, 2010). To protect human health, the environment, and to make informed policy decisions relevant to the spill, the EPA Region 6 has continuously monitored the affected areas carefully for levels of pollutants in the outdoor air that are associated with petroleum products and the burning of oil along the coast. In an effort to prevent, prepare for, and respond to future oil spills that occur in and around inland waters of the United States, the EPA has been working with local, state, and federal response partners. Air quality measurements were collected by the EPA at five active monitoring systems stationed along the coast.

  17. Uncertainty Estimate of Surface Irradiances Computed with MODIS-, CALIPSO-, and CloudSat-Derived Cloud and Aerosol Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Seiji; Loeb, Norman G.; Rutan, David A.; Rose, Fred G.; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Miller, Walter F.; Chen, Yan

    2012-07-01

    Differences of modeled surface upward and downward longwave and shortwave irradiances are calculated using modeled irradiance computed with active sensor-derived and passive sensor-derived cloud and aerosol properties. The irradiance differences are calculated for various temporal and spatial scales, monthly gridded, monthly zonal, monthly global, and annual global. Using the irradiance differences, the uncertainty of surface irradiances is estimated. The uncertainty (1σ) of the annual global surface downward longwave and shortwave is, respectively, 7 W m-2 (out of 345 W m-2) and 4 W m-2 (out of 192 W m-2), after known bias errors are removed. Similarly, the uncertainty of the annual global surface upward longwave and shortwave is, respectively, 3 W m-2 (out of 398 W m-2) and 3 W m-2 (out of 23 W m-2). The uncertainty is for modeled irradiances computed using cloud properties derived from imagers on a sun-synchronous orbit that covers the globe every day (e.g., moderate-resolution imaging spectrometer) or modeled irradiances computed for nadir view only active sensors on a sun-synchronous orbit such as Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation and CloudSat. If we assume that longwave and shortwave uncertainties are independent of each other, but up- and downward components are correlated with each other, the uncertainty in global annual mean net surface irradiance is 12 W m-2. One-sigma uncertainty bounds of the satellite-based net surface irradiance are 106 W m-2 and 130 W m-2.

  18. The Fertilizing Role of African Dust in the Amazon Rainforest: A First Multiyear Assessment Based on CALIPSO Lidar Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongbin; Chin, Mian; Yuan, Tianle; Bian, Huisheng; Remer, Lorraine A.; Prospero, Joseph M.; Omar, Ali; Winker, David; Yang, Yuekui; Zhang, Yan; hide

    2015-01-01

    The productivity of the Amazon rainforest is constrained by the availability of nutrients, in particular phosphorus (P). Deposition of long-range transported African dust is recognized as a potentially important but poorly quantified source of phosphorus. This study provides a first multiyear satellite-based estimate of dust deposition into the Amazon Basin using three dimensional (3D) aerosol measurements over 2007-2013 from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). The 7-year average of dust deposition into the Amazon Basin is estimated to be 28 (8 to approximately 48) Tg a(exp -1) or 29 (8 to approximately 50) kg ha(exp -1) a(exp -1). The dust deposition shows significant interannual variation that is negatively correlated with the prior-year rainfall in the Sahel. The CALIOP-based multi-year mean estimate of dust deposition matches better with estimates from in-situ measurements and model simulations than a previous satellite-based estimate does. The closer agreement benefits from a more realistic geographic definition of the Amazon Basin and inclusion of meridional dust transport calculation in addition to the 3D nature of CALIOP aerosol measurements. The imported dust could provide about 0.022 (0.0060.037) Tg P of phosphorus per year, equivalent to 23 (7 to approximately 39) g P ha(exp -1) a(exp -1) to fertilize the Amazon rainforest. This out-of-Basin P input largely compensates the hydrological loss of P from the Basin, suggesting an important role of African dust in preventing phosphorus depletion on time scales of decades to centuries.

  19. Evaluation of Multilayer Cloud Detection Using a MODIS CO2-Slicing Algorithm With CALIPSO-CloudSat Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viudez-Mora, Antonio; Kato, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    This work evaluates the multilayer cloud (MCF) algorithm based on CO2-slicing techniques against CALISPO-CloudSat (CLCS) measurement. This evaluation showed that the MCF underestimates the presence of multilayered clouds compared with CLCS and are retrained to cloud emissivities below 0.8 and cloud optical septs no larger than 0.3.

  20. Comparison of Aerosol Classification Results from Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) Measurements and the Calipso Vertical Feature Mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Rogers, R. R.; Obland, M. D.; Butler, C. F.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.; Froyd, K. D.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the vertical profile, composition, concentration, and size of aerosols is required for assessing the direct impact of aerosols on radiation, the indirect effects of aerosols on clouds and precipitation, and attributing these effects to natural and anthropogenic aerosols. Because anthropogenic aerosols are predominantly submicrometer, fine mode fraction (FMF) retrievals from satellite have been used as a tool for deriving anthropogenic aerosols. Although column and profile satellite retrievals of FMF have been performed over the ocean, such retrievals have not yet been been done over land. Consequently, uncertainty in satellite estimates of the anthropogenic component of the aerosol direct radiative forcing is greatest over land, due in large part to uncertainties in the FMF. Satellite measurements have been used to detect and evaluate aerosol impacts on clouds; however, such efforts have been hampered by the difficulty in retrieving vertically-resolved cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration, which is the most direct parameter linking aerosol and clouds. Recent studies have shown correlations between average satellite derived column aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and in situ measured CCN. However, these same studies, as well as others that use detailed airborne in situ measurements have noted that vertical variability of the aerosol distribution, impacts of relative humidity, and the presence of coarse mode aerosols such as dust introduce large uncertainties in such relations.

  1. CORRIGENDUM of the MJO Transition from Shallow to Deep Convection in Cloudsat-Calipso Data and GISS GCM Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Genio, Anthony; Chen, Yonghua; Kim, Daehyun; Yao, Mao-Sung

    2015-01-01

    We have identified several errors in the calculations that were performed to create Fig. 3 of Del Genio et al. (2012). These errors affect the composite evolution of precipitation and column water vapor versus lag relative to the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) peak presented in that figure. The precipitation and column water vapor data for the April and November 2009 MJO events were composited incorrectly because the date of the MJO peak at a given longitude was assigned to the incorrect longitude band. In addition, the precipitation data for all MJO events were first accumulated daily and the daily accumulations averaged at each lag to create the composite, rather than the averaging of instantaneous values that was used for other composite figures in the paper. One poorly sampled day in the west Pacific therefore biases the composite precipitation in that region at several lags after the MJO peak. Finally, a 4-day running mean was mistakenly applied to the precipitation and column water vapor data rather than the intended 5-day running mean. The results of the corrections are that an anomalous west Pacific precipitation maximum510 days after the MJO peak is removed and the maximum in west Pacific precipitation one pentad before the MJO peak is now more evident; there is now a clear maximum in precipitation for the entire warm pool one pentad before the MJO peak; west Pacific column water vapor now varies more strongly as a function of lag relative to the peak; and precipitation, and to a lesser extent column water vapor, in general vary more smoothly with time. The corrections do not affect any other parts of the paper nor do they change the scientific conclusions we reached. The 4-day running mean error also affects Figs. 1 and 2 therein, with almost imperceptible impacts that do not affect any results or necessitate major changes to the text.

  2. A train for the bus(bars)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    On 8 April, the first SMACC (Superconducting Magnets and Circuits Consolidation) teams began work in the LHC tunnel. They are responsible for opening the interconnects between the magnets, laying the groundwork for the series of operations that will be performed by the team riding the ‘consolidation train’.   A technician installs the machine tool that allows them to prepare the surface of the section of the bar where the shunt will be fixed. The LHC’s 1,670 dipoles and quadrupoles are powered by power converters and connected by copper 'busbars’. The superconducting cables run through these bars, carrying a current of up to 11,850 amps. Six superconducting cables meet at each interconnect, where they are held together by a soldered (see box) electrical connection sandwiched between two pieces of copper, forming the splice between the busbars of the neighbouring magnets. The integrity of the electrical circuit is depen...

  3. A training program for scientific supercomputing users

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, F.; Moher, T.; Sabelli, N.; Solem, A.

    1988-01-01

    There is need for a mechanism to transfer supercomputing technology into the hands of scientists and engineers in such a way that they will acquire a foundation of knowledge that will permit integration of supercomputing as a tool in their research. Most computing center training emphasizes computer-specific information about how to use a particular computer system; most academic programs teach concepts to computer scientists. Only a few brief courses and new programs are designed for computational scientists. This paper describes an eleven-week training program aimed principally at graduate and postdoctoral students in computationally-intensive fields. The program is designed to balance the specificity of computing center courses, the abstractness of computer science courses, and the personal contact of traditional apprentice approaches. It is based on the experience of computer scientists and computational scientists, and consists of seminars and clinics given by many visiting and local faculty. It covers a variety of supercomputing concepts, issues, and practices related to architecture, operating systems, software design, numerical considerations, code optimization, graphics, communications, and networks. Its research component encourages understanding of scientific computing and supercomputer hardware issues. Flexibility in thinking about computing needs is emphasized by the use of several different supercomputer architectures, such as the Cray X/MP48 at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IBM 3090 600E/VF at the Cornell National Supercomputer Facility, and Alliant FX/8 at the Advanced Computing Research Facility at Argonne National Laboratory. 11 refs., 6 tabs.

  4. Peer Tutoring: A Training and Facilitation Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirini, Jesse

    2017-01-01

    Students can make huge gains in academic grades and confidence with the help of peer tutoring. This book provides practical, research-based strategies for anyone wanting to run a peer tutoring programme or to improve their own tutoring practice. The book focuses on two key components of tutoring: the tutoring relationship and tutoring tools. The…

  5. A Training Transfer Study of Simulation Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    past, ranging from single shooters to platoon sized elements executing complex attacks, integrating direct and indirect fires with victim actuated ...IED attack IOT target first responders and security forces. The enemy typically uses red or bright pink detonation cord to prime shots, and white or...120mm mortars with possible 122mm rocket fire. The enemy will use their indirect fires to cover their emplaced mines and obstacles IOT disrupt

  6. Clinical psychology of religion. A training model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uden, M.H.F. van; Pieper, J.Z.T.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we will show you a part of a course "Clinical Psychology of Religion" that has been developed in the Netherlands for introducing mental health professionals in the field of clinical psychology of religion. Clinical psychology of religion applies insights from general psychology of

  7. A train wreck on board the Titanic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senak, M

    1996-07-01

    Combination therapy has created a paradox for people with HIV. Although the drugs, after being discovered at a fast pace, are manufactured quickly, they are not available to many persons because of the high cost. Future policy regulations must allow government subsidies to give persons drug therapy early in the course of the disease.

  8. Voltage control on a train system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Susanna P.; Evans, John A.

    2004-01-20

    The present invention provides methods for preventing low train voltages and managing interference, thereby improving the efficiency, reliability, and passenger comfort associated with commuter trains. An algorithm implementing neural network technology is used to predict low voltages before they occur. Once voltages are predicted, then multiple trains can be controlled to prevent low voltage events. Further, algorithms for managing inference are presented in the present invention. Different types of interference problems are addressed in the present invention such as "Interference During Acceleration", "Interference Near Station Stops", and "Interference During Delay Recovery." Managing such interference avoids unnecessary brake/acceleration cycles during acceleration, immediately before station stops, and after substantial delays. Algorithms are demonstrated to avoid oscillatory brake/acceleration cycles due to interference and to smooth the trajectories of closely following trains. This is achieved by maintaining sufficient following distances to avoid unnecessary braking/accelerating. These methods generate smooth train trajectories, making for a more comfortable ride, and improve train motor reliability by avoiding unnecessary mode-changes between propulsion and braking. These algorithms can also have a favorable impact on traction power system requirements and energy consumption.

  9. Connecting strangers at a train station

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serafin, Stefania; Böttcher, Niels; Pellarin, Lars

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we describe a virtual instrument or a performance space, placed at Høje Tåstrup train station in Denmark, which is meant to establish communicative connections between strangers, by letting users of the system create soundscapes together across the rails. We discuss mapping...

  10. A Training Course for Waiters and Waitresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Dean A.

    The tremendous growth of the food service industry has created a need for well-trained employees in the restaurant business. This manual provides material for waiter and waitress training in developing the overall required skills. The course is presented in four major sections: (1) relations-human and customer, (2) sanitation and food handling,…

  11. A training tool for lower extremity amputees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neutelings, I.M.P.; Hengeveld, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract People with a prosthetic limb miss a sense of touch at this particular part of their body. The work described in this paper focuses on providing people with a lower extremity amputation with an alternative sensory stimulus in order to help them experience what they can no longer feel. To

  12. Spectrum Management From A Training Range Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    right up to the part where you got killed. • Goose: The defense department regrets to inform you that your sons are dead because they were stupid ...cost (time and lives) 4 Images source: Google images Training Basics • The “prime directives” of training: “Train As You’ll Fight – Fight As...Recording ground truth (movement, C2, actions) – Timely feedback and lessons learned 5 Image source: Google images The Realities of Live Training

  13. Tourette Syndrome: A Training Day for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Uttom; Christie, Deborah

    2002-01-01

    This article describes a Tourette syndrome training day for teachers facilitated by members of the Tic Disorders Clinic at Great Ormond Street Hospital in England. The day provided a mix of information giving and discussion of current practice. Outcomes of the day are related to professional knowledge and experience. (Contains references.) (CR)

  14. Analysis Thermo-hydraulic of trajectories related to procedures for operation of Emergency (POE). Application to the loss of a train of the DTH; Analisis termohidraulico de trayectorias vinculadas a Procedimientos de Operacion de emergencia (POE). Aplicacion a la perdida de un tren de RHR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Saez, F.; Martorell Alsina, S.; Carlos Alberola, A.; Villanueva Lopez, J. F.; Martorell Aygues, P.

    2012-07-01

    This work explores different possible sequences at the loss of a train of the DTH when the plant is lowering power. The study of the different possible trajectories has been done through the collapse tool and study thermo-hydraulic each of these paths is done by the code TRACE Thermo-hydraulic.

  15. [Evaluation of the impact of a training program on vitamin K antagonists (VKA) implemented by pharmacy students aiming at improving the knowledge of patients receiving vitamin K antagonists during their hospital clinical training course].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conort, O; Siguret, V; Bourdon, O; Nazaraly, S; Brignone, M; Pons-Kerjean, N; Houze, S; Laribe Cage, S; Berthet, F; Golmard, J-L; Brion, F; Tilleul, P

    2014-07-01

    We developed a training program for pharmacy students aiming at supporting patients receiving vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). The objective was to estimate how the program impacts VKA-treated patient knowledge acquisition and/or improvement on their anticoagulant treatment. Using dedicated tools, pharmacy students received education on VKA treatment. Once appointed to clinical wards of Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, they were in charge of evaluating patient's knowledge on VKA treatment before and after training. Evaluation was conducted using a face-to-face standardized interview (14-item questionnaire). A global score was calculated for each patient. An univariate and multivariate analysis was performed to identify potential variables influencing score result. One hundred and seventy VKA-treated patients were recruited in seven hospitals for evaluation of their knowledge on VKA treatment and on clinical at risk situations. Before intervention, patients obtained an average score of 12.3±3.2 (maximum: 18). Factors significantly associated with the score were possession of a VKA information booklet, VKA treatment duration, treatment initiation and age. Fifty-two patients with a low score were further trained by the pharmacy student. After intervention, their initial score was improved significantly, from 9.9±3.3 to 13.5±2.3 (P<0.0001). Increasing patient knowledge is a way to decrease the rate of adverse effects. This study demonstrates that patients with primary poor knowledge improved it significantly thanks to pharmacy students' intervention. This may contribute to lower the VKA-associated risk of adverse events and consequently to the improvement of patients quality of life and healthcare expenditures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Detection and monitoring of super sandstorm and its impacts on Arabian Sea-Remote sensing approach

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kunte, P.D.; Aswini, M.A.

    ) satellite is part of the "A Train", flying in formation with several other satellites (Aqua, Aura and CloudSat). CALIPSO data is used to study vertical column of dust storm. Other sensors on MODIS also provide information on sea surface temperature (SST... in the 7th band. Therefore, this enhancement is used for separating clouds from dust only over the land. There is a very good contrast between brightness temperatures at 12 µm and 11 µm for dust over cool surface of water. The BTD (12, 11) is positive...

  17. Efeito de um programa de treinamento de facilitação neuromuscular proprioceptiva sobre a mobilidade torácica Effect of a training program based on proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation onto thoracic mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Aparecida Moreno

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A proposta deste estudo foi analisar o efeito de um programa de treinamento de membros superiores baseado nas técnicas de facilitação neuromuscular proprioceptiva (FNP sobre a mobilidade torácica. Foram estudadas 24 voluntárias sedentárias, idade 22,9 ± 2,9 anos, divididas em grupo controle (GC, que não participou do treinamento, e grupo treinado (GT. O protocolo de treinamento físico foi constituído por um programa de exercícios de FNP, realizado três vezes por semana, durante quatro semanas. Os dois grupos foram submetidos à avaliação da mobilidade torácica por meio de cirtometria, antes e após o período de treinamento. Os dados colhidos foram analisados estatisticamente, com nível de significância α = 5%. Os valores da cirtometria axilar e xifoideana do GC antes e após o período de intervenção não apresentaram alterações significativas (p>0,05. No GT os valores das variáveis foram significantemente maiores após a intervenção (pThe purpose of this study was to analyse the effect of an upper limb training program based on proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF techniques on thoracic mobility. The study was carried out with 24 sedentary female volunteers, aged 22.9±2.9 years. Participants were divided into a control group (CG, who did not perform any exercise, and a trained group (TG, submitted to training. The physical training protocol consisted of a PNF exercise program, three times a week for four weeks. The two groups were assessed as to thoracic mobility by means of cirtometry before and after the training period. Data were statistically analysed and significance level set at α=5%. In CG, initial axillary and xiphoid cirtometry values showed no significant differences when compared to data obtained on the final evaluation (p>0.05. TG measures, in turn, were significantly higher after the training program (p<0.05. The PNF protocol here proposed seems hence to be an efficient exercise program to

  18. Metabolismo de repouso de mulheres pós-menopausadas submetidas a programa de treinamento com pesos (hipertrofia Resting metabolism of post-menopause women submitted to a training program with weights (hypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Cléia Trevisan

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available O estudo objetivou avaliar o gasto energético de repouso (GER de mulheres pós-menopausadas submetidas a programa de treinamento com pesos. Foram estudadas 30 mulheres (FSH > 40mIU/mL entre 45 e 70 anos, separadas em dois grupos (GT: treinamento, n = 15 e GC: controle, n = 15. Calculou-se o índice de massa corporal (kg/m² e por meio da impedância bioelétrica (BIA determinaram-se o percentual de gordura corporal e a massa muscular. O GER foi obtido por meio da calorimetria indireta (O2 e CO2 respiratórios e calculado pela equação de Weir. A mensuração ocorreu após 12 horas de jejum, durante 30 minutos sob temperatura e umidade controladas. O GT participou do programa de treinamento com pesos durante 16 semanas, na freqüência de três vezes por semana. Os dados analisados pelos testes t de Student, Mann-Whitney e ANOVA (p The study had as objective to evaluate the resting energy expenditure (REE of post-menopause women submitted to a training program with weights. Thirty women, age between 45 and 70 years (FSH > 40 mIUmL, separated in two groups (TG: training n = 15 and CG: control n = 15 were studied. The body mass index (kg/m² was calculated and the body fat percentage and the muscular mass were determined through bioelectric impedance (BIA. The REE was obtained through indirect calorimetry (respiratory O2 and CO2 and calculated by the Weir equation. The measurement occurred after 12 hours of fasting, during 30 minutes under controlled temperature and humidity. The TG participated of the training program with weights during 16 weeks, in the frequency of three times per week. The analyzed data by the t-Student, Mann-Whitney and ANOVA tests (p < 0.05 demonstrated that the TG had body mass increased in the 1.8 kg mean, muscular mass in 2.0 kg and the REE presented increase of 8.4% in relation to the CG. In conclusion, the training with weights increased muscular mass and REE. Therefore, this kind of exercise is recommended part of

  19. The PULSAR primary care protocol: a stepped-wedge cluster randomized controlled trial to test a training intervention for general practitioners in recovery-oriented practice to optimize personal recovery in adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enticott, Joanne C; Shawyer, Frances; Brophy, Lisa; Russell, Grant; Fossey, Ellie; Inder, Brett; Mazza, Danielle; Vasi, Shiva; Weller, Penelope June; Wilson-Evered, Elisabeth; Edan, Vrinda; Meadows, Graham

    2016-12-20

    General practitioners (GPs) in Australia play a central role in the delivery of mental health care. This article describes the PULSAR (Principles Unite Local Services Assisting Recovery) Primary Care protocol, a novel mixed methods evaluation of a training intervention for GPs in recovery-oriented practice. The aim of the intervention is to optimize personal recovery in patients consulting study GPs for mental health issues. The intervention mixed methods design involves a stepped-wedge cluster randomized controlled trial testing the outcomes of training in recovery-oriented practice, together with an embedded qualitative study to identify the contextual enablers and challenges to implementing recovery-oriented practice. The project is conducted in Victoria, Australia between 2013 and 2017. Eighteen general practices and community health centers are randomly allocated to one of two steps (nine months apart) to start an intervention comprising GP training in the delivery of recovery-oriented practice. Data collection consists of cross-sectional surveys collected from patients of participating GPs at baseline, and again at the end of Steps 1 and 2. The primary outcome is improvement in personal recovery using responses to the Questionnaire about the Process of Recovery. Secondary outcomes are improvements in patient-rated measures of personal recovery and wellbeing, and of the recovery-oriented practice they have received, using the INSPIRE questionnaire, the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale, and the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale. Participant data will be analyzed in the group that the cluster was assigned to at each study time point. Another per-protocol dataset will contain all data time-stamped according to the date of intervention received at each cluster site. Qualitative interviews with GPs and patients at three and nine months post-training will investigate experiences and challenges related to implementing recovery-oriented practice in primary

  20. Study of MPLNET-Derived Aerosol Climatology over Kanpur, India, and Validation of CALIPSO Level 2 Version 3 Backscatter and Extinction Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Amit; Tripathi, S. N.; Kaul, D. S.; Welton, Ellsworth J.

    2012-01-01

    The level 2 aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles from the NASA Micropulse Lidar Network (MPLNET) at Kanpur, India, have been studied from May 2009 to September 2010. Monthly averaged extinction profiles from MPLNET shows high extinction values near the surface during October March. Higher extinction values at altitudes of 24 km are observed from April to June, a period marked by frequent dust episodes. Version 3 level 2 Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) aerosol profile products have been compared with corresponding data from MPLNET over Kanpur for the above-mentioned period. Out of the available backscatter profiles, the16 profiles used in this study have time differences less than 3 h and distances less than 130 km. Among these profiles, four cases show good comparison above 400 m with R2 greater than 0.7. Comparison with AERONET data shows that the aerosol type is properly identified by the CALIOP algorithm. Cloud contamination is a possible source of error in the remaining cases of poor comparison. Another source of error is the improper backscatter-to-extinction ratio, which further affects the accuracy of extinction coefficient retrieval.

  1. The impact of aerosol vertical distribution on aerosol optical depth retrieval using CALIPSO and MODIS data : Case study over dust and smoke regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Y.; de Graaf, M.; Menenti, M.

    2017-01-01

    Global quantitative aerosol information has been derived from MODerate Resolution Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MODIS) observations for decades since early 2000 and widely used for air quality and climate change research. However, the operational MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) products Collection

  2. Assessment of cirrus cloud and aerosol radiative effect in South-East Asia by ground-based NASA MPLNET lidar network data and CALIPSO satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lolli, Simone; Campbell, James R.; Lewis, Jasper R.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Di Girolamo, Paolo; Fatkhuroyan, Fatkhuroyan; Gu, Yu; Marquis, Jared W.

    2017-10-01

    Aerosol, together with cirrus clouds, play a fundamental role in the earth-atmosphere system radiation budget, especially at tropical latitudes, where the Earth surface coverage by cirrus cloud can easily reach 70%. In this study we evaluate the combined aerosol and cirrus cloud net radiative effects in a wild and barren region like South East Asia. This part of the world is extremely vulnerable to climate change and it is source of important anthropogenic and natural aerosol emissions. The analysis has been carried out by computing cirrus cloud and aerosol net radiative effects through the Fu-Liou-Gu atmospheric radiative transfer model, adequately adapted to input lidar measurements, at surface and top-of-the atmosphere. The aerosol radiative effects were computed respectively using the retrieved lidar extinction from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization in 2011 and 2012 and the lidar on-board of Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations for the South East Asia Region (27N-12S, 77E-132E) with 5° x 5° spatial resolution. To assess the cirrus cloud radiative effect, we used the ground-based Micro Pulse Lidar Network measurements at Singapore permanent observational site. Results put in evidence that strong aerosol emission areas are related on average to a net surface cooling. On the contrary, cirrus cloud radiative effect shows a net daytime positive warming of the system earth-atmosphere. This effect is weak over the ocean where the albedo is lower and never counter-balances the net cooling produced by aerosols. The net cooling is stronger in 2011, with an associated reduction in precipitations by the four of the five rain-gauges stations deployed in three regions as Sumatra, Kalimantan and Java with respect to 2012. We can speculate that aerosol emissions may be associated with lower rainfall, however some very important phenomena as El Nino Southern Oscillation , Madden-Julian Oscillation, Monsoon and Indian Dipole are not considered in the analysis.

  3. An elevated large-scale dust veil from the Taklimakan Desert: Intercontinental transport and three-dimensional structure as captured by CALIPSO and regional and global models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shimizu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available An intense dust storm occurred during 19–20 May 2007 over the Taklimakan Desert in northwestern China. Over the following days, the space-borne lidar CALIOP tracked an optically thin, highly elevated, horizontally extensive dust veil that was transported intercontinentally over eastern Asia, the Pacific Ocean, North America, and the Atlantic Ocean. A global aerosol transport model (SPRINTARS simulated the dust veil quite well and provided a three-dimensional view of the intercontinental dust transport. The SPRINTARS simulation revealed that the dust veil traveled at 4–10 km altitudes with a thickness of 1–4 km along the isentropic surface between 310 and 340 K. The transport speed was about 1500 km/day. The estimated dust amount exported to the Pacific was 30.8 Gg, of which 65% was deposited in the Pacific and 18% was transported to the North Atlantic. These results imply that dust veils can fertilize open oceans, add to background dust, and affect the radiative budget at high altitudes through scattering and absorption.

    The injection mechanism that lifts dust particles into the free atmosphere is important for understanding the formation of the dust veil and subsequent long-range transport. We used a regional dust transport model (RC4 to analyze the dust emission and injection over the source region. The RC4 analysis revealed that strong northeasterly surface winds associated with low pressures invaded the Taklimakan Desert through the eastern corridor. These winds then formed strong upslope wind along the high, steep mountainsides of the Tibetan Plateau and blew large amounts of dust into the air. The updraft lifted the dust particles farther into the upper troposphere (about 9 km above mean sea level, MSL, where westerlies are generally present. The unusual terrain surrounding the Taklimakan Desert played a key role in the injection of dust to the upper troposphere to form the dust veil.

  4. Characterization of Wildfire-Induced Aerosol Emissions From the Maritime Continent Peatland and Central African Dry Savannah with MISR and CALIPSO Aerosol Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Huikyo; Jeong, Su-Jong; Kalashnikova, Olga; Tosca, Mika; Kim, Sang-Woo; Kug, Jong-Seong

    2018-03-01

    Aerosol plumes from wildfires affect the Earth's climate system through regulation of the radiative budget and clouds. However, optical properties of aerosols from individual wildfire smoke plumes and their resultant impact on regional climate are highly variable. Therefore, there is a critical need for observations that can constrain the partitioning between different types of aerosols. Here we present the apparent influence of regional ecosystem types on optical properties of wildfire-induced aerosols based on remote sensing observations from two satellite instruments and three ground stations. The independent observations commonly show that the ratio of the absorbing aerosols is significantly lower in smoke plumes from the Maritime Continent than those from Central Africa, so that their impacts on regional climate are different. The observed light-absorbing properties of wildfire-induced aerosols are explained by dominant ecosystem types such as wet peatlands for the Maritime Continent and dry savannah for Central Africa, respectively. These results suggest that the wildfire-aerosol-climate feedback processes largely depend on the terrestrial environments from which the fires originate. These feedbacks also interact with climate under greenhouse warming. Our analysis shows that aerosol optical properties retrieved based on satellite observations are critical in assessing wildfire-induced aerosols forcing in climate models. The optical properties of carbonaceous aerosol mixtures used by state-of-the-art chemistry climate models may overestimate emissions for absorbing aerosols from wildfires over the Maritime Continent.

  5. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS): A New Lidar for Aerosol and Cloud Profiling from the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; McGill, Mathew J.; Yorks. John E.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Hart, William D.; Palm, Stephen P.; Colarco, Peter R.

    2012-01-01

    Spaceborne lidar profiling of aerosol and cloud layers has been successfully implemented during a number of prior missions, including LITE, ICESat, and CALIPSO. Each successive mission has added increased capability and further expanded the role of these unique measurements in wide variety of applications ranging from climate, to air quality, to special event monitoring (ie, volcanic plumes). Many researchers have come to rely on the availability of profile data from CALIPSO, especially data coincident with measurements from other A-Train sensors. The CALIOP lidar on CALIPSO continues to operate well as it enters its fifth year of operations. However, active instruments have more limited lifetimes than their passive counterparts, and we are faced with a potential gap in lidar profiling from space if the CALIOP lidar fails before a new mission is operational. The ATLID lidar on EarthCARE is not expected to launch until 2015 or later, and the lidar component of NASA's proposed Aerosols, Clouds, and Ecosystems (ACE) mission would not be until after 2020. Here we present a new aerosol and cloud lidar that was recently selected to provide profiling data from the International Space Station (ISS) starting in 2013. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is a three wavelength (1064,532,355 nm) elastic backscatter lidar with HSRL capability at 532 nm. Depolarization measurements will be made at all wavelengths. The primary objective of CATS is to continue the CALIPSO aerosol and cloud profile data record, ideally with overlap between both missions and EarthCARE. In addition, the near real time (NRT) data capability ofthe ISS will enable CATS to support operational applications such as aerosol and air quality forecasting and special event monitoring. The HSRL channel will provide a demonstration of technology and a data testbed for direct extinction retrievals in support of ACE mission development. An overview of the instrument and mission will be provided, along with a

  6. Adaptive scenarios: a training model for today's public health workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uden-Holman, Tanya; Bedet, Jennifer; Walkner, Laurie; Abd-Hamid, Nor Hashidah

    2014-01-01

    With the current economic climate, money for training is scarce. In addition, time is a major barrier to participation in trainings. To meet the public health workforce's rising demand for training, while struggling with less time and fewer resources, the Upper Midwest Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center has developed a model of online training that provides the public health workforce with individually customized, needs-based training experiences. Adaptive scenarios are rooted in case-based reasoning, a learning approach that focuses on the specific knowledge needed to solve a problem. Proponents of case-based reasoning argue that learners benefit from being able to remember previous similar situations and reusing information and knowledge from that situation. Adaptive scenarios based on true-to-life job performance provide an opportunity to assess skills by presenting the user with choices to make in a problem-solving context. A team approach was used to develop the adaptive scenarios. Storylines were developed that incorporated situations aligning with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes outlined in the Public Health Preparedness and Response Core Competency Model. This article examines 2 adaptive scenarios: "Ready or Not? A Family Preparedness Scenario" and "Responding to a Crisis: Managing Emotions and Stress Scenario." The scenarios are available on Upper Midwest Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center's Learning Management System, the Training Source (http://training-source.org). Evaluation data indicate that users' experiences have been positive. Integrating the assessment and training elements of the scenarios so that the training experience is uniquely adaptive to each user is one of the most efficient ways to provide training. The opportunity to provide individualized, needs-based training without having to administer separate assessments has the potential to save time and resources. These adaptive scenarios continue to be marketed to target audiences through partner organizations, various Web sites, electronic newsletters, and social media. Next steps include the implementation of a 6-month follow-up evaluation, using Kirkpatrick level III. Kirkpatrick level III evaluation measures whether there was actual transfer of learning to the work setting.

  7. Teaching Written Communication Strategies: A Training to Improve Writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanane Benali Taouis

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This research can be described as an experimental quantitative one including: a strategy training; two homogenous experimental groups with different levels of proficiency; and two homogenous control groups. The subjects are 60 Spanish high school students, who have been selected after taking the Oxford Quick Placement-Test. The study aims at investigating the possible relationship between the effect of the strategy training and the subjects' level of proficiency. It is also designed to analyze the effect of the training on the use of communication strategies in the written medium. It is meant to study the effect of the strategy training on the subjects' writing skill in English. The results show that the students' level of proficiency exerts a strong effect on the subjects' use of written communication strategies (CSs and on their strategy preference in written production. They also demonstrate how strategy training improves the subjects' written communication ability.

  8. A training and educational tool for neutron coincidence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huszti, J.; Bagi, J.; Langner, D.

    2009-01-01

    Neutron coincidence counting techniques are widely used for nuclear safeguards inspection. They are based on the detection of time correlated neutrons created from spontaneous or induced fission of plutonium and some other actinides. IAEA inspectors are trained to know and to use this technique, but it is not easy to illustrate and explain the basics of the neutron coincidence counting. The traditional shift registers or multiplicity counters give only multiplicity distributions and the singles, doubles and triples count rates. Using the list mode method for the recording and evaluation of neutron coincidence data makes it easier to teach this technique. List mode acquisition is a relatively new way to collect data in neutron coincidence counting. It is based on the recording of the follow-up times of neutron pulses originating from a neutron detector into a file. The recorded pulse train can be evaluated with special software after the measurement. Hardware and software for list mode neutron coincidence acquisition have been developed in the Institute of Isotopes and is called a Pulse Train Reader. A system called Virtual Source for replaying pulse trains registered with the list mode device has also been developed. The list mode device and the pulse train 're-player' together build a good educational tool for teaching the basics of neutron coincidence counting. Some features of the follow-up time, multiplicity and Rossi-alpha distributions can be well demonstrated by replaying artificially generated or pre-recorded pulse trains. The choice of real sources is stored on DVD. There is no need to transport and maintain real sources for the training. Virtual sources also give the possibility of investigating rare sources that trainees would not have access to otherwise. (authors)

  9. Virtual vitreoretinal surgery: validation of a training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergmann, Anna Stage; Vestergaard, Anders Højslet; Grauslund, Jakob

    2017-02-01

    To test the validity of the eyesi surgical simulator as an assessment tool in a virtual reality vitreoretinal training programme. In collaboration with an experienced vitreoretinal surgeon, a virtual vitreoretinal training programme was composed on the eyesi surgical simulator, software version 2.9.2 (VRmagic GmbH, Manheim, Germany). It was completed twice by three groups: 20 medical students, ten residents of ophthalmology and five trained vitreoretinal surgeons. The programme contained six training modules: navigation level 2 (Nav2), forceps training level 5 (ForT5), bimanual training level 3 (BimT3), laser coagulation level 3 (LasC3), posterior hyaloid level 3 (PostH3) and internal limiting membrane peeling level 3 (ILMP3). The scores in each module were assessed from two to five different factors (tissue treatment, efficiency, target achievement, instrument handling and microscope handling), and it was possible to achieve 100 points in each module. At the final training session, the highest overall median score was found for the vitreoretinal surgeons (vitreoretinal surgeons: 434 points, residents: 394.5 points, medical students: 272.5 points, p training programme with validity for the eyesi surgical simulator as an assessment tool for overall score and for four of six vitreoretinal modules. These findings could potentially make the programme a useful tool in the training of future vitreoretinal surgeons. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Children's Question Asking and Curiosity: A Training Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirout, Jamie; Klahr, David

    2011-01-01

    A primary instructional objective of most early science programs is to foster children's scientific curiosity and question-asking skills (Jirout & Klahr, 2011). However, little is known about the relationship between curiosity, question-asking behavior, and general inquiry skills. While curiosity and question asking are invariably mentioned in…

  11. Development of a training simulator for offshore crane operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, S.J.

    2003-01-01

    The crane simulator, trade name KraneSIM-6000, underpins an integrated training package developed to provide crane operator exposure to simulated normal and dangerous conditions in a safe training environment. The prototype simulator is significantly more sophisticated than the system initially envisaged: a number of conceptual changes incorporated during its development ensured that the very latest in simulation computer technology was incorporate unique in that it offers the opportunity to practice the lifting and laying down of loads between a moving (floating) rig and moving supply vessels, together with the possibility of benchmarking crane operator competency. Concludes that there is great scope for expansion of the simulator facilities so far developed. In particular, it is recognised that training and competency testing of teams of personnel such as banksman and supply ship's master could be integrated into crane simulator training scenarios, and that this approach offers great potential for reducing the number of crane related accidents. (Author)

  12. Environmental Assessment Temporary Use of a Training Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    NOISE LEVEL COMMON INDOOR NOISE LEVELS (dBA) NOISE LEVELS -- 110 Rock Band - - 100 Gas Lawn Mower at 3 ft. Inside Subway Train (New York) - - 90...Diesel Truck at 50 ft. Food Blender at 3 ft. Noise Urban Daytime - -80 Garbage Disposal at 3 ft. Shouting at 3 ft. Gas Lawn Mower at 100 ft

  13. Evaluating the morphological completeness of a training image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mingliang; Teng, Qizhi; He, Xiaohai; Feng, Junxi; Han, Xue

    2017-05-01

    Understanding the three-dimensional (3D) stochastic structure of a porous medium is helpful for studying its physical properties. A 3D stochastic structure can be reconstructed from a two-dimensional (2D) training image (TI) using mathematical modeling. In order to predict what specific morphology belonging to a TI can be reconstructed at the 3D orthogonal slices by the method of 3D reconstruction, this paper begins by introducing the concept of orthogonal chords. After analyzing the relationship among TI morphology, orthogonal chords, and the 3D morphology of orthogonal slices, a theory for evaluating the morphological completeness of a TI is proposed for the cases of three orthogonal slices and of two orthogonal slices. The proposed theory is evaluated using four TIs of porous media that represent typical but distinct morphological types. The significance of this theoretical evaluation lies in two aspects: It allows special morphologies, for which the attributes of a TI can be reconstructed at a special orthogonal slice of a 3D structure, to be located and quantified, and it can guide the selection of an appropriate reconstruction method for a special TI.

  14. A training purpose for the Bachelor: physics and Fiction Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacas Leal, P.; Martin, M.J.; Perera Cendal, F.; Pizarro Galan, A.M.

    1997-01-01

    Science fiction can be used in the classroom as a fantastic narrative which exploits the imaginative outlooks of modern science. In this paper some of the teaching prospects which science fiction offers are analysed, and for instance, those offered by A.C. Clarke's Maelstrom II are developed. (Author)

  15. The Reflecting Team: A Training Method for Family Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    The reflecting team (RT) is an innovative method used in the training and supervision of family counselors. In this article, I trace the history, development, and current uses of RTs and review current findings on RTs. In my opinion, many users of RTs have diverged from their original theoretical principles and have adopted RTs mainly as a…

  16. Investigation of slightly forced buoyant flow in a training reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legradi, G.; Aszodi, A.; Por, G.

    2001-01-01

    A measurement based on the temperature noise analysis method was carried out in the Training Reactor of the Budapest University of Technology and Economics. The main goals were the estimation of the flow velocity immediately above the reactor core and investigation of the thermal-hydraulical conditions of the reactor, mainly in the core. Subsequently 2D and 3D computations were carried out with the aid of the code CFX- 4.3. The main objective of the 2D calculation was to clarify the thermal-hydraulical conditions of the whole reactor tank with a reasonable computing demand. It was also necessary to accomplish 3D numerical investigations of the reactor core and the space above since three dimensional effects of the flow could only be studied in this way. In addition, obtaining certain boundary conditions of the 3D computations was another significant aim of the 2D investigations. It is important that the results of the noise analysis and the operational measuring system of the reactor gave us a basis for verifying our computations.(author)

  17. Guidelines for a Training Course in Noise Survey Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadley, John; And Others

    The course is designed to train noise survey technicians during a 3-5 day period to make reliable measurements of 75 percent of the noise problems encountered in the community. The more complex noise problems remaining will continue to be handled by experienced specialists. These technicians will be trained to assist State and local governments in…

  18. AGAINST A TRAINING FOR AN EDUCATION IN HUMAN RIGHTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Marinho Pimenta

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The theme of Human Rights is now consensual even in the counter-ideologies of the contemporary world. In support of mainly on theory and cultural criticism of slovenian Slavoj Zizek and the marxist theory, from a review of the literature, this article of exploratory nature, aims demonstrate how the Human Rights are today a liberal consensus and ideological very useful for capitalist hegemony of the post-cold war. Perceives the risk of advocating the theme of Human Rights as central to emancipatory education and training for it.

  19. Drop Jumping as a Training Method for Jumping Ability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, Maarten F.

    1990-01-01

    Vertical jumping ability is of importance for good performance in sports such as basketball and volleyball. Coaches are in need of exercises that consume only little time and still help to improve their players’ jumping ability, without involving a high risk of injury. Drop jumping is assumed to

  20. Export Management Specialist. A Training Program. Instructor's Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This publication provides instructors with materials for an export management specialist (EMS) training program. The objective of the training program is to assist companies in reaching their export goals by educating current and potential managers about the basics of exporting. It provides a foundation for considering international trade and for…

  1. You Have a Train to Catch !

    OpenAIRE

    Courcoux, Charles-Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Spider-Man et M. Indestructible respectivement crucifiés sur le devant d’une rame de métro dont ils tentent d’enrayer la course (Spider-Man 2 ; Les Indestructibles, 2004), Ethan Hunt agrippé au toit d’un TGV lancé à toute vitesse (Mission impossible, 1996), James West aux prises avec les accessoires mécaniques d’un train à vapeur (Wild Wild West, 1999), Batman piégé au sein du métro aérien de Gotham (Batman Begins, 2005), etc. L’évocation conjointe de ces quelques scènes issues du cinéma holl...

  2. A training syllabus for radiation protection in dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallagher, A.; Dowling, A.; Renehan, J.; Clarke, D.; Malone, J. F.

    2008-01-01

    The EU Council Directive 97/43/EURATOM (MED) states that Member States shall ensure that adequate theoretical and practical training is provided for dental practitioners working with ionising radiation; this also includes the provision of continuing education and training programmes, post-qualification. The area of dental radiology is specifically mentioned in this legally binding document. The Dept. of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, St James's Hospital, Dublin, is particularly interested in the area of radiation protection training and routinely provides educational courses both at national and international levels. A recent review of their dental radiation protection course was undertaken in conjunction with a number of Principal Dental Surgeons within the Health Service Executive in Ireland. The revised course was delivered to over 200 dental staff members at two separate meetings during 2006. The response from attendees was very positive. It is proposed to extend this course to other dental professionals, working both in the Irish private and public health sectors in the future. (authors)

  3. Oscillatory EEG correlates of arithmetic strategies: A training study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland H. Grabner

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available There has been a long tradition of research on mathematics education showing that children and adults use different strategies to solve arithmetic problems. Neurophysiological studies have recently begun to investigate the brain correlates of these strategies. The existing body of data, however, reflect static end points of the learning process and do not provide information on how brain activity changes in response to training or intervention. In this study, we explicitly address this issue by training participants in using fact retrieval strategies. We also investigate whether brain activity related to arithmetic fact learning is domain-specific or whether this generalizes to other learning materials, such as the solution of figural-spatial problems. Twenty adult students were trained on sets of two-digit multiplication problems and figural-spatial problems. After the training, they were presented with the trained and untrained problems while their brain activity was recorded by means of electroencephalography (EEG . In both problem types, the training resulted in accuracies over 90 % and significant decreases in solution times. Analyses of the oscillatory EEG data also revealed training effects across both problem types. Specifically, we observed training-related activity increases in the theta band (3-6 Hz and decreases in the lower alpha band (8-10 Hz, especially over parieto-occipital and parietal brain regions. These results provide the first evidence that a short term fact retrieval training results in significant changes in oscillatory EEG activity. These findings further corroborate the role of the theta band in the retrieval of semantic information from memory and suggest that theta activity is not only sensitive to fact retrieval in mental arithmetic but also in other domains.

  4. A training syllabus for radiation protection in dental radiology.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, A

    2008-01-01

    The EU Council Directive 97\\/43\\/EURATOM (MED) states that Member States shall ensure that adequate theoretical and practical training is provided for dental practitioners working with ionising radiation; this also includes the provision of continuing education and training programmes, post-qualification. The area of dental radiology is specifically mentioned in this legally binding document. The Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, St James\\'s Hospital, Dublin, is particularly interested in the area of radiation protection training and routinely provides educational courses both at national and international levels. A recent review of their dental radiation protection course was undertaken in conjunction with a number of Principal Dental Surgeons within the Health Service Executive in Ireland. The revised course was delivered to over 200 dental staff members at two separate meetings during 2006. The response from attendees was very positive. It is proposed to extend this course to other dental professionals, working both in the Irish private and public health sectors in the future.

  5. Customer care a training manual for library staff

    CERN Document Server

    Gannon-Leary, Pat

    2010-01-01

    Customer Care provides a detailed course suitable for delivery to library staff at all levels. It can be used as a stand-alone reference work for customer care processes and procedures or, alternatively, it can be used by library staff to tailor a customer care course to suit the requirements and training needs of their own staff.Dual use - reference work and/or training manualPotential as a text bookApplicable to a wider context than LIS - could be used for a whole HEI institutional approach to customer care or in local authorities/public services

  6. Fatal Consequences: Obstructive Sleep Apnea in a Train Engineer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Mary Pat

    2015-11-01

    This special report describes the findings of the National Transportation Safety Board's investigation into the probable cause of the derailment of a Metro-North passenger train in the Bronx, New York on December 1, 2013, that resulted in 4 deaths and injuries to 59 additional persons. A key finding in the medical investigation was the engineer's post-accident diagnosis of severe, obstructive sleep apnea, and the probable cause of the accident was determined to be the result of the engineer having fallen asleep while operating the train. This accident highlights the importance of screening, evaluating, and ensuring adequate treatment of obstructive sleep apnea, particularly among patients working in positions where impairment of physical or cognitive function or sudden incapacitation may result in serious harm to the public. © 2015 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  7. A Training Intervention to Improve Information Management in Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schifferdecker, Karen E.; Reed, Virginia A.; Homa, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives Training programs designed to improve information management have been implemented but not adequately tested. Three critical components for information management were tested in a randomized control study: (1) knowledge of valid, synthesized summary information, (2) skills to use Web-based resources that provide access to these summaries, and (3) use of Web-based resources in clinical practice. Methods Twenty-four primary care practices were provided with computers and high-speed Internet access and then matched, with half randomly assigned to receive training and half to receive training at a later date. Training was designed to address knowledge, skills, and use of Web-based information. Outcomes were assessed by comparing baseline and follow-up questionnaires that focused on five conceptual domains related to Web-based resource use for patient care decisions and patient education. Results Compared to the delayed training group, the initial training group increased their knowledge and skill of Web-based resources and use for patient care decisions. Some measures of communication with patients about using Web-based resources and of incorporating use of Web-based resources into daily practice increased from baseline to follow-up for all participants. Conclusions Our findings suggest that training and providing computers and Internet connections have measurable effects on information management behaviors. PMID:18773781

  8. Community-Based Solid Waste Management: A Training Facilitator's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div.

    Urban environmental management and environmental health issues are of increasing concern worldwide. The need for urban environmental management work at the local level where the Peace Corps works most effectively is significant, but training materials dedicated specifically to community-based solid waste management work in urban areas are lacking.…

  9. F-35A Training Basing Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    experience natural soundscapes in national park units, and could similarly diminish the qualities of natural quiet that are intrinsic to recreational...Tables HO 3.10–9 and HO 3.10–10. Increased noise could diminish opportunities for visitors to experience natural soundscapes in national park units...characterized by a natural quite soundscape but has few visitors. The greatest impact could occur for recreation on the Otero Mesa of McGregor Range and the

  10. ENCOURAGING COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT, A TRAINING GUIDE FOR LOCAL WORKERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BIDDLE, LOUREIDE J.; BIDDLE, WILLIAM W.

    THIS TRAINING GUIDE IS WRITTEN TO MEET THE NEEDS OF UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES TO WHICH THE PEACE CORPS, VISTA, CHURCHES, AND OTHER VOLUNTEER-USING AGENCIES TURN FOR HELP IN TRAINING THE NONPROFESSIONAL OR PREPROFESSIONAL LOCAL WORKER IN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT. THE LESSONS ARE DIRECTED TO THE "ENCOURAGER" WHO LIVES WITH THE PEOPLE PARTICIPATING IN…

  11. PROFESSIONAL DEONTOLOGY IN TEACHER TRAINING. REPORT ON A TRAINING EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Sadio

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the report of a pedagogical experience of Pre-Service Teacher Training on the subject of Professional Deontology, a curricular unit which is part of the degrees on Primary and Pre-School Education taught at Escola Superior de Educação do Instituto Politécnico de Coimbra (Portugal. The foundation of the curricular unit and its characteristics are presented, as well as the analysis of the students’ evaluation on its teaching effects as perceived by them. The analysis of the data, based on some contents of a portfolio, shows a considerable positive perception of those effects.

  12. Preparing radiology staff to meet service goals: a training model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardone, E B; Stepanovich, P H; West, V T

    1994-01-01

    This article describes a model used to train radiology staff in customer service relations at a large southeastern medical center. Information about the needs of the radiology department and staff was acquired through quantitative and qualitative assessments. The primary goal of the training was twofold: 1) to develop employee awareness of customer expectations and 2) to develop problem-solving skills to respond to customer service related issues. Instructional methods compatible with adult learning were used and training results were assessed. Positive changes in employee attitudes and behaviors are described and recommendations for training development and implementation are discussed.

  13. Developing a training module on Gender & spatial justice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tummers, L.C.

    2015-01-01

    Justice is more than a legal matter: it has spatial and environmental implications and is related to engineering. The concept of ‘spatial justice’ was introduced in 2010 in planning by Eduard Soja. It indicates the accessibility of urban resources such as education and healthcare. Under democratic

  14. Translating and validating a Training Needs Assessment tool into Greek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicks Carolyn M

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The translation and cultural adaptation of widely accepted, psychometrically tested tools is regarded as an essential component of effective human resource management in the primary care arena. The Training Needs Assessment (TNA is a widely used, valid instrument, designed to measure professional development needs of health care professionals, especially in primary health care. This study aims to describe the translation, adaptation and validation of the TNA questionnaire into Greek language and discuss possibilities of its use in primary care settings. Methods A modified version of the English self-administered questionnaire consisting of 30 items was used. Internationally recommended methodology, mandating forward translation, backward translation, reconciliation and pretesting steps, was followed. Tool validation included assessing item internal consistency, using the alpha coefficient of Cronbach. Reproducibility (test – retest reliability was measured by the kappa correlation coefficient. Criterion validity was calculated for selected parts of the questionnaire by correlating respondents' research experience with relevant research item scores. An exploratory factor analysis highlighted how the items group together, using a Varimax (oblique rotation and subsequent Cronbach's alpha assessment. Results The psychometric properties of the Greek version of the TNA questionnaire for nursing staff employed in primary care were good. Internal consistency of the instrument was very good, Cronbach's alpha was found to be 0.985 (p 1.0, KMO (Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin measure of sampling adequacy = 0.680 and Bartlett's test of sphericity, p Conclusion The translated and adapted Greek version is comparable with the original English instrument in terms of validity and reliability and it is suitable to assess professional development needs of nursing staff in Greek primary care settings.

  15. Translating and validating a Training Needs Assessment tool into Greek

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markaki, Adelais; Antonakis, Nikos; Hicks, Carolyn M; Lionis, Christos

    2007-01-01

    Background The translation and cultural adaptation of widely accepted, psychometrically tested tools is regarded as an essential component of effective human resource management in the primary care arena. The Training Needs Assessment (TNA) is a widely used, valid instrument, designed to measure professional development needs of health care professionals, especially in primary health care. This study aims to describe the translation, adaptation and validation of the TNA questionnaire into Greek language and discuss possibilities of its use in primary care settings. Methods A modified version of the English self-administered questionnaire consisting of 30 items was used. Internationally recommended methodology, mandating forward translation, backward translation, reconciliation and pretesting steps, was followed. Tool validation included assessing item internal consistency, using the alpha coefficient of Cronbach. Reproducibility (test – retest reliability) was measured by the kappa correlation coefficient. Criterion validity was calculated for selected parts of the questionnaire by correlating respondents' research experience with relevant research item scores. An exploratory factor analysis highlighted how the items group together, using a Varimax (oblique) rotation and subsequent Cronbach's alpha assessment. Results The psychometric properties of the Greek version of the TNA questionnaire for nursing staff employed in primary care were good. Internal consistency of the instrument was very good, Cronbach's alpha was found to be 0.985 (p 1.0, KMO (Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin) measure of sampling adequacy = 0.680 and Bartlett's test of sphericity, p < 0.001. Conclusion The translated and adapted Greek version is comparable with the original English instrument in terms of validity and reliability and it is suitable to assess professional development needs of nursing staff in Greek primary care settings. PMID:17474989

  16. Translating and validating a Training Needs Assessment tool into Greek

    OpenAIRE

    Markaki, Adelais; Antonakis, Nikos; Hicks, Carolyn M; Lionis, Christos

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The translation and cultural adaptation of widely accepted, psychometrically tested tools is regarded as an essential component of effective human resource management in the primary care arena. The Training Needs Assessment (TNA) is a widely used, valid instrument, designed to measure professional development needs of health care professionals, especially in primary health care. This study aims to describe the translation, adaptation and validation of the TNA questionnaire...

  17. Fighting Downtown: A Training Necessity for the Heavy Brigade

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Seigel, David

    2001-01-01

    .... This monograph also analyzes the lessons learned and impacts of the relatively recent post-Cold War battles of Mogadishu and Grozny to identify the methods that potential adversaries will likely use...

  18. A Training Program in Breast Cancer Research Using NMR Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    of Mammographic Masses, IEEE Transactions on Medical Imaging, 2002, vol. 21, No. 2, (Accepted for publication). 9. Mendez AJ, Tahoces PG, Lado MJ...Medical Physics, 2001, Vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 250-258. [7] Mendez AJ, Tahoces PG, Lado MJ, Souto M., Vidal JJ, Computer-aided diagnosis: Automatic...resistant epidermal carcinoma cells Xing-Jie Liang,a Jun-Jie Yin,b Jien-Wei Zhou,c Paul C. Wang,c Barbara Taylor,a Carol Cardarelli,a Michael Kozar,d Raynard

  19. Supporting Local Seed Businesses : A Training Manual for ISSD Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mastenbroek, A.; Chebet, A.; Muwanika, C.T.; Adong, C.J.; Okot, F.; Otim, G.; Birungi, J.; Kansiime, M.; Oyee, P.; Ninsiima, P.

    2015-01-01

    The training manual is developed in Uganda to train partner organisations in coaching farmer groups to become sustainable local seed businesses. It introduces the Integrated Seed Sector Development Programme in Uganda and the concept of local seed businesses (LSBs). The manual has 5 modules covering

  20. The collector library. A training for the artistic 'taste'?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorit Raines

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper argues that art collectors leveraged their library as one of the formative places of artistic taste. Acquiring knowledge through books may have helped shaping one’s artistic judgment, usually a mix of both intellective and emotional processes. Based on the Venetian case study of 17th-18th centuries patrician libraries, the paper explores the works used by art collectors in order to increase their discernment and artistic judgment: emblem, hieroglyphic and exempla books served as database of both pictorial and textual symbols which helped decipher paintings’ symbols and scenes. The Venetian libraries’ inventories and catalogues reveal the existence of two distinct phenomena: the inclusion of generic emblem printed books (with rare manuscript exceptions in almost all surveyed libraries and the presence of rare and sometimes costly emblem books, specifically tailored to the collector’s field of interest in several libraries. Moreover, the more professional art collectors shared knowledge and titles in order to cut on expenses, relying on the fact that at least one copy was to be found in Venice.

  1. Teasing Out Cognitive Development from Cognitive Style: A Training Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globerson, Tamar; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Tested whether or not cognitive development (as measured by mental capacity) and cognitive style (as measured by field-dependence/independence) are different dimensions. Results are discussed with regard to Pascual-Leone's model of cognitive development, relevance to stylistic dimension of reflection/impulsivity, and educational implications.…

  2. Fighting Downtown: A Training Necessity for the Heavy Brigade

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-02-01

    Concept Technology Demonstration, and the Army Transformation Urban Franchise exploration of future operations.”57 CAMTF has identified three...fighting in a downtown area with tall buildings and underground sewers and or subways , but it must also apply to the outlying urban sprawl that is now

  3. Resilience and motivation: a training course for primary teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Schiavone

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The research starts from a reflection on educational resilience as a prerequisite for the development of inclusive competences for teachers. 42 teachers and 226 students were involved from three primary schools in the province of Trapani and Palermo, situated in contexts at risk of cultural degradation, early school dropout and high multiculturalism. Research enabled teachers to know and deal with the sense of resilience, not yet widely known, in view of the educational/developmental context, providing them with tools and materials to be used in the classroom, in order to carry out activities, promote resilience and support processes of inclusion by providing causes for reflection on their professional motivation.Resilienza e motivazione: un percorso per la formazione dei docenti di scuola primariaLa ricerca nasce dalla riflessione sull’aspetto educativo della resilienza come presupposto per lo sviluppo di competenze inclusive per i docenti. Sono stati coinvolti 42 docenti e 226 studenti di tre scuole primarie della provincia di Trapani e Palermo, situate in contesti a rischio di degrado culturale, dispersione scolastica ed alta multiculturalità. Il percorso di ricerca ha permesso agli insegnanti di conoscere e di affrontare il costrutto di resilienza, non ancora ampiamente conosciuto, in un’ottica di tipo educativo/evolutivo fornendo loro strumenti e materiali da applicare in classe per la realizzazione di attività per promuovere la resilienza e favorire processi di inclusione ed offrendo spunti di riflessione sulla loro motivazione alla professione.

  4. Russian Navy Fresh Fuel MPC and A Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forehand, Harry M.; O'Shell, Parker; Opanassiouk, Yuri R.; Rexroth, Paul E.; Shmelev, Vladimir; Sukhoruchkin, Vladimir K.

    1999-01-01

    The goal of the Russian Navy Fuels Program is to incorporate nuclear fuel that is in the custody of the Russian Navy into a materials protection, control and accounting program. In addition to applying MPC and A upgrades to existing facilities, a program is underway to train site personnel in MPC and A activities. The goal is to assure that the upgraded facilities are managed, operated and maintained in an effective, sustainable manner. Training includes both the conceptual and necessary operational aspects of the systems and equipment. The project began with a Needs Assessment to identify priorities and objectives of required training. This led to the creation of a series of classes developed by Kurchatov Institute. One course was developed to allow attendees to get a general understanding of goals and objectives of nuclear MPC and A systems in the context of the Russian Navy. A follow-on course provided the detailed skills necessary for the performance of specialized duties. Parallel sessions with hands-on exercises provided the specific training needed for different personnel requirements. The courses were presented at KI facilities in Moscow. This paper reviews the work to date and future plans for this program

  5. Removing Hazardous Materials from Buildings: A Training Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    1825. • Iron – Mentioned in the Old Testament of the Bible. • Lead – Widely used by the ancient Romans, in everything from wine to shingles to...determine which is the best overall value, with price AND other benefits considered. In this process, the contract award is not limited to the bidder with

  6. Experience report: a training center for health response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurmo, Alexandre M.; Leite, Teresa C.S.B.

    2009-01-01

    The Professor Nelson Valverde Training Center was created within FEAM (The ELETRONUCLEAR Medical Assistance Foundation) with the objective of capacitating Radio Nuclear Accident Responders for the Health Area in the Almirante Alvaro Alberto Nuclear Central (Angra dos Reis - RJ - Brazil). The first step was structuring the contents for this training using IAEA's Manuals as base (EPR Medical - 2005, EPR First Responders - 2006 and TMT - Handbook - 2009) and data from REAC/TS. The second step was to capacitate instructors. The third step was the integration with the Company's Radiological Protection Division, giving radiological assessment. Finally, the development of training applications, ending with Drills, Tests and Assessment, gathering data and suggestions, objectifying the constant improvement. Training Programs with pre and post evaluations have been started. Since 2004 training internal courses were ministered for 125 professionals with annual re-training and were ministered to 130 professionals from several external institutions. During the same period training courses were ministered to 140 trainees from the Radiological Protection Division of The Nuclear Power Plant of Angra dos Reis, as First Lay Responders, objectifying the improvement of the quality of the emergency response. (author)

  7. Mental health nurses' diabetes care skills - a training needs analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Michael

    2009-05-28

    This article explores mental health nurses' diabetes training needs. A survey of inpatient and community mental health nurses was undertaken using a 16-item self-reporting questionnaire. Two hundred and twenty questionnaires were sent out and 138 returned, providing a response rate of 63%. Analysis shows that mental health nurses are currently involved in a range of diabetes care activities, however, their knowledge and skills may not be up to date. Mental health nurses also report the growing impact of diabetes care on their workload. Areas of identified training needs include taking blood glucose readings, giving dietary advice, liaison with diabetes nurse specialists and weight management. Mental health services and education providers need to consider developing specific training courses for mental health nurses.

  8. Pollution prevention opportunity assessments, a training and resource guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VALERO, O.J.

    1998-11-03

    The intention of the ''Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment Training and Resource Guide'' is to help Hanford waste generators identify ways to reduce waste through the Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (P20A) process. This document presents pollution prevention tools and provides a step-by-step approach for conducting assessments.

  9. Preparing future doctors to meet ethical challenges a training course ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Training in human rights and ethics for health professionals is a critical strategy for the prevention of torture and human rights violations. Despite South Africa's history of human rights violations under apartheid and evidence of medical involvement in such abuses, South African medical students have to date received little ...

  10. The Americleft Speech Project: A Training and Reliability Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Kathy L; Baylis, Adriane; Trost-Cardamone, Judith; Cordero, Kelly Nett; Dixon, Angela; Dobbelsteyn, Cindy; Thurmes, Anna; Wilson, Kristina; Harding-Bell, Anne; Sweeney, Triona; Stoddard, Gregory; Sell, Debbie

    2016-01-01

    To describe the results of two reliability studies and to assess the effect of training on interrater reliability scores. The first study (1) examined interrater and intrarater reliability scores (weighted and unweighted kappas) and (2) compared interrater reliability scores before and after training on the use of the Cleft Audit Protocol for Speech-Augmented (CAPS-A) with British English-speaking children. The second study examined interrater and intrarater reliability on a modified version of the CAPS-A (CAPS-A Americleft Modification) with American and Canadian English-speaking children. Finally, comparisons were made between the interrater and intrarater reliability scores obtained for Study 1 and Study 2. The participants were speech-language pathologists from the Americleft Speech Project. In Study 1, interrater reliability scores improved for 6 of the 13 parameters following training on the CAPS-A protocol. Comparison of the reliability results for the two studies indicated lower scores for Study 2 compared with Study 1. However, this appeared to be an artifact of the kappa statistic that occurred due to insufficient variability in the reliability samples for Study 2. When percent agreement scores were also calculated, the ratings appeared similar across Study 1 and Study 2. The findings of this study suggested that improvements in interrater reliability could be obtained following a program of systematic training. However, improvements were not uniform across all parameters. Acceptable levels of reliability were achieved for those parameters most important for evaluation of velopharyngeal function.

  11. Russian Navy fresh fuel MPC and A training and regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forehand, H.M.; Rexroth, P.; Dove, A.; Shmelev, V.; Sukhoruchkin, V.; Roumiantsev, A.

    1998-01-01

    The Regulations and Training Projects are part of the US-Russian Federation Materials Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC ampersand A) cooperative program to protect Russian Navy Fuels. This paper describes the general status of the projects, progress achieved to date, and long-term plans for further work in producing regulatory documents and training to support this effort. The regulatory development will result in a document set that will include general requirements and rules for the Russian Navy MPC ampersand A as well as specific instructions for operation and maintenance of each facility. The goals of the training program are to instill in managers a culture of sustainable commitment to MPC ampersand A through the understanding of its principles and philosophies. In addition, the training program will help ensure that upgrades are effectively utilized and maintained by training operators and maintenance personnel in MPC ampersand A principles as well in as the detailed operations of the systems

  12. Uso de la STFT en el análisis de vibraciones para detectar y caracterizar la presencia de un defecto en la superficie de las ruedas de un tren/Use of the STFT in the Vibration Analisys to Detect and Characterice Defects at the Wheels Surface of a Train

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elkin G. Flórez Serrano.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available El artículo muestra el procedimiento experimental utilizado para registrar las vibraciones que genera el paso deun tren por un punto fijo del carril. Igualmente muestra la forma de identificar y caracterizar un defecto en la superficie de una rueda, mediante el análisis en el dominio conjunto tiempo-frecuencia de dichas vibraciones utilizando la transformada de Fourier en tiempos cortos -STFT. Los resultados demuestran las ventajas de la STFT en esta aplicación, y cómo el uso de un sistema de monitorizado de las vibraciones generadas en el carril es eficiente y práctico en el mantenimiento predictivo de las ruedas de los trenes.The paper shows the experimental procedure used to record the vibrations generated by the passage of a train in a fixed point of the rail. Moreover, it also shows how to identify and characterize a defect on the surface of a wheel, by analyzing the joined time–frequency domain of these vibrations, using the short time Fourier transform – STFT. The results demonstrate the advantages of the STFTin this application, and that the use of a monitorizazing system of the vibration generated on the railway line is efficient and practical to implement a predictive maintenance of the train wheels.

  13. Calipso não se consolava com a partida de Ulisses: a ilha da igualdade Calypso could not get over the departure of Ulysses: an isle of equality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Douailler

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Quando, em 1987, Jacques Rancière publicou O mestre ignorante, de Joseph Jacotot, o método universal de emancipação intelectual e o aprendizado de leitura sem mestre explicador inscreviam o nome de seu autor no livro de ouro dos precursores da escola e da pedagogia. Após uma releitura do estatuto que, em 1911, o Dictionnaire de pédagogie de Ferdinand Buisson lhe havia conferido, Stéphane Douailler, professor do departamento de filosofia da Universidade Paris VIII, busca ressaltar, neste breve artigo, algumas das linhas de ruptura graças às quais o livro de Jacques Rancière conseguiu estilizar a aventura de Jacotot num paradigma excepcional da questão filosófica da igualdade das inteligências e da emancipação universal, na contramão das verdades em torno das quais, historicamente, a escola se fundou.When, in 1987, Jacques Rancière published The ignorant schoolmaster, by Joseph Jacotot, the universal method of intellectual emancipation and reading training without an explaining master definitively entered the gallery of school and education precursors. After reviewing the status he was given by the Dictionnaire de Pédagogie edited by Buisson, in 1911, Stéphane Douailler, professor at the department of philosophy at the University of Paris 8, attempts to draw out some of the rupture lines through which Rancière's book succeeded to stylize the adventure of Jacotot into an exceptional paradigm of the philosophical question of intelligence equality and universal emancipation, that went against the tide of the truths around which school was historically founded.

  14. Safety of a training program for ultrasound-guided internal jugular vein catheterization in critically ill patients Segurança de um programa de treinamento para punção de veia jugular interna guiada por ultrassom em pacientes críticos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felippe Leopoldo Dexheimer Neto

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a training program for performing ultrasound-guided internal jugular vein cannulation in critically ill patients. METHODS: Cohort prospective study, evaluating adult patients admitted in a teaching intensive care unit (ICU. Catheter placement was performed by an ICU medical resident. The patient's baseline characteristics, vessel's position and operator experience were the evaluated variables. The main outcomes were cannulation success rate and incidence of major complications. RESULTS: A total of 118 consecutive patients were enrolled between May 2008 and November 2009. The success rate of ultrasound guided catheter placement was 90% (106/118, 77% in the first attempt. Major complications occurred in 4% of the cases (n = 5 and were not associated with the analyzed variables. Inability to place the guide wire was the reason for 58% (7/12 of the failures. Operators with more than 15 previous ultrasound guided cannulations had an increased success rate (95% vs. 79%, p = 0.01 and increased failure was related to previous catheterization (26% vs. 7%, p = 0.02. CONCLUSION: Learning ultrasound guidance for IJV vein cannulation was safe and feasible in ICU patients. This process was not associated to complications and better results were achieved across the spectrum of operator experienceOBJETIVO: Avaliar a segurança e efetividade de um programa de treinamento para cateterização da veia jugular interna guiada por ultrassom em pacientes críticos. MÉTODOS: Estudo de coorte prospectivo, avaliando pacientes adultos internados em uma unidade de terapia intensiva com programa de ensino. Os médicos residentes do serviço realizaram as punções de veia jugular interna guiadas por ultrassom. Foram avaliadas as características de base dos pacientes, sintopia dos vasos e experiência dos operadores. Os desfechos primários foram a taxa de sucesso da cateterização e a incidência de complica

  15. Changes in FDB and soleus muscle activity after a train of stimuli during upright stance Alterações pós-trem de estímulo, na atividade dos músculos FDB e sóleus durante a postura ortostática

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liria A. Okai

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evidence of self-sustained muscle activation following a brief electrical stimulation has been reported in the literature for certain muscles. OBJECTIVES: This report shows that the foot muscle (Flexor Digitorum Brevis - FDB shows a self-sustained increase in muscle activity during upright stance in some subjects following a train of stimuli to the tibial nerve. METHODS: Healthy subjects were requested to stand upright and surface EMG electrodes were placed on the FDB, Soleus and Tibialis Anterior muscles. After background muscle activity (BGA acquisition, a 50 Hz train of stimuli was applied to the tibial nerve at the popliteal fossa. The root mean square values (RMS of the BGA and the post-stimulus muscle activation were computed. RESULTS: There was a 13.8% average increase in the FDB muscle EMG amplitude with respect to BGA after the stimulation was turned off. The corresponding post-stimulus Soleus EMG activity decreased by an average of 9.2%. We hypothesize that the sustained contraction observed in the FDB following stimulus may be evidence of persistent inward currents (PIC generated in FDB spinal motoneurons. The post-stimulus decrease in soleus activity may have occurred due to the action of inhibitory interneurons caused by the PICs, which were triggered by the stimulus train. CONCLUSIONS: These sustained post-stimulation changes in postural muscle activity, found in different levels in different subjects, may be part of a set of possible responses that contribute to overall postural control.CONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: Existem evidências de ativação autossustentada em certos músculos pós-estimulação elétrica. OBJETIVOS: Mostrar que, em alguns sujeitos, o músculo do pé (Flexor Digitorum Brevis - FDB também pode apresentar aumento de atividade autossustentada na posição ortostática pós-trem de estímulo no nervo tibial. MÉTODOS: Sujeitos foram solicitados a permanecer na posição ortostática e sinais eletromiogr

  16. Engaging observers to look at clouds from both sides: connecting NASA mission science with authentic STEM experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, L. H.; Taylor, J.; Ellis, T. D.; McCrea, S.; Rogerson, T. M.; Falcon, P.

    2016-12-01

    In 1997, NASA's Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) team began engaging K-12 schools as ground truth observers of clouds. CERES seeks to understand cloud effects on Earth's energy budget; thus accurate detection and characterization of clouds is key. While satellite remote sensing provides global information about clouds, it is limited in time and resolution. Ground observers, on the other hand, can observe clouds at any time of day (and sometimes night), and can see small and thin clouds that are challenging to detect from space. In 2006, two active sensing satellites, CloudSat and CALIPSO, were launched into the A-Train, which already contained 2 CERES instruments on the Aqua spacecraft. The CloudSat team also engaged K-12 schools to observe clouds, through The GLOBE Program, with a specialized observation protocol customized for the narrow radar swath. While providing valuable data for satellite assessment, these activities also engage participants in accessible, authentic science that gets people outdoors, helps them develop observation skills, and is friendly to all ages. The effort has evolved substantially since 1997, adopting new technology to provide a more compelling experience to citizen observers. Those who report within 15 minutes of the passage of a wide range of satellites (Terra, Aqua, CloudSat, CALIPSO, NPP, as well as a number of geostationary satellites) are sent a satellite image centered on their location and are invited to extend the experience beyond simple observation to include analysis of the two different viewpoints. Over the years these projects have collected large amounts of cloud observations from every continent and ocean basin on Earth. A number of studies have been conducted comparing the ground observations to the satellite results. This presentation will provide an overview of those results and also describe plans for a coordinated, thematic cloud observation and data analysis activity going forward.

  17. Vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties over central Illinois and comparison with surface and satellite measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Sheridan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Between June 2006 and September 2009, an instrumented light aircraft measured over 400 vertical profiles of aerosol and trace gas properties over eastern and central Illinois. The primary objectives of this program were to (1 measure the in situ aerosol properties and determine their vertical and temporal variability and (2 relate these aircraft measurements to concurrent surface and satellite measurements. The primary profile location was within 15 km of the NOAA/ESRL surface aerosol monitoring station near Bondville, Illinois. Identical instruments at the surface and on the aircraft ensured that the data from both platforms would be directly comparable and permitted a determination of how representative surface aerosol properties were of the lower column. Aircraft profiles were also conducted occasionally at two other nearby locations to increase the frequency of A-Train satellite underflights for the purpose of comparing in situ and satellite-retrieved aerosol data. Measurements of aerosol properties conducted at low relative humidity over the Bondville site compare well with the analogous surface aerosol data and do not indicate any major sampling issues or that the aerosol is radically different at the surface compared with the lowest flyby altitude of ~ 240 m above ground level. Statistical analyses of the in situ vertical profile data indicate that aerosol light scattering and absorption (related to aerosol amount decreases substantially with increasing altitude. Parameters related to the nature of the aerosol (e.g., single-scattering albedo, Ångström exponent, etc., however, are relatively constant throughout the mixed layer, and do not vary as much as the aerosol amount throughout the profile. While individual profiles often showed more variability, the median in situ single-scattering albedo was 0.93–0.95 for all sampled altitudes. Several parameters (e.g., submicrometer scattering fraction, hemispheric backscattering fraction, and

  18. Climbing Mont Blanc - A Training Site for Energy Efficient Programming on Heterogeneous Multicore Processors

    OpenAIRE

    Natvig, Lasse; Follan, Torbjørn; Støa, Simen; Magnussen, Sindre; Guirado, Antonio Garcia

    2015-01-01

    Climbing Mont Blanc (CMB) is an open online judge used for training in energy efficient programming of state-of-the-art heterogeneous multicores. It uses an Odroid-XU3 board from Hardkernel with an Exynos Octa processor and integrated power sensors. This processor is three-way heterogeneous containing 14 different cores of three different types. The board currently accepts C and C++ programs, with support for OpenCL v1.1, OpenMP 4.0 and Pthreads. Programs submitted using the graphical user in...

  19. Elective laparoscopic recto-sigmoid resection for diverticular disease is suitable as a training operation

    OpenAIRE

    Bosker, Robbert; Hoogenboom, Froukje; Groen, Henk; Hoff, Christiaan; Ploeg, Rutger; Pierie, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Some authors state that elective laparoscopic recto-sigmoid resection is more difficult for diverticular disease as compared with malignancy. For this reason, starting laparoscopic surgeons might avoid diverticulitis, making the implementation phase unnecessary long. The aim of this study was to determine whether laparoscopic resection for diverticular disease should be included during the implementation phase. Methods All consecutive patients who underwent an elective laparoscopic re...

  20. Elective laparoscopic recto-sigmoid resection for diverticular disease is suitable as a training operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosker, Robbert; Hoogenboom, Froukje; Groen, Henk; Hoff, Christiaan; Ploeg, Rutger; Pierie, Jean-Pierre

    2010-04-01

    Some authors state that elective laparoscopic recto-sigmoid resection is more difficult for diverticular disease as compared with malignancy. For this reason, starting laparoscopic surgeons might avoid diverticulitis, making the implementation phase unnecessary long. The aim of this study was to determine whether laparoscopic resection for diverticular disease should be included during the implementation phase. All consecutive patients who underwent an elective laparoscopic recto-sigmoid resection in our hospital for diverticulitis or cancer from 2003 to 2007 were analysed. A total of 256 consecutive patients were included in this prospective cohort study. One hundred and fifty-one patients were operated on for diverticulitis and 105 for cancer. There was no significant difference in operation time (168 vs. 172 min), blood loss (189 vs. 208 ml), conversion rates (9.9% vs. 11.4%), hospital stay (8 vs. 8 days), total number of peroperative (2.3% vs. 1.6%) or postoperative complications (21.9% vs. 26.9%). The occurrence of anastomotic leakages was associated with higher American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification, which differed between the groups (86.8% vs. 64.8% ASA I-II, p < 0.001). Since there are no differences in operation time, blood loss, conversion rate and total complications, there is no need to avoid laparoscopic recto-sigmoid resection for diverticular disease early in the learning curve.

  1. CFD study on aerodynamics of a train passing an underground railroad platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khayrullina, A.; Blocken, B.J.E.; Janssen, W.D.; Straathof, J.; Schlünzen, K.H.

    2014-01-01

    The Dutch railways provide transport for more than 1.2 million passengers a day, resulting in more than 5200 train rides. In order to avoid overcrowded trains during rush hours, it is planned to increase the amount of passenger and freight trains, and their running velocities. Pedestrian discomfort

  2. A training intervention on child feeding among primary healthcare workers in Ibadan Municipality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folake O. Samuel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Health workers at the primary level are well positioned to provide health information and counselling on child feeding to mothers on antenatal visits. The study was designed to evaluate the effect of training on the knowledge, attitudes and provision of infant and young child feeding (IYCF information and counselling among primary healthcare (PHC workers. Methods: A two-stage cluster sample was used to select health workers for training on IYCF in Ibadan, Nigeria. Baseline, immediate and 4-week post-training surveys were conducted to assess knowledge, attitudes and practices of health workers regarding IYCF. Paired t-tests were used to measure differences (p < 0.05 before and after the training. Results: A total of 124 health workers were trained on current global IYCF recommendations. Participants included community health extension workers (59.7%, nurses (27.4%, community health officers (11.3%, and pharmacy technicians (1.6%. Mean age was 41.8 ± 8.2 years and 95.2% were women. Knowledge of health workers regarding IYCF, particularly complementary feeding, was low at baseline but improved significantly following the training intervention. Attitudes and practices regarding provision of IYCF were suboptimal among health workers at the PHC facilities, but this improved with training. Conclusion: Health workers at the PHC level need regular retraining exercises to ensure effective counselling on IYCF.

  3. Virtual Reality As a Training Tool to Treat Physical Inactivity in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Adam W.; Pincus, David; Richardson, Michael J.; Myer, Gregory D.

    2017-01-01

    Lack of adequate physical activity in children is an epidemic that can result in obesity and other poor health outcomes across the lifespan. Physical activity interventions focused on motor skill competence continue to be developed, but some interventions, such as neuromuscular training (NMT), may be limited in how early they can be implemented due to dependence on the child’s level of cognitive and perceptual-motor development. Early implementation of motor-rich activities that support motor skill development in children is critical for the development of healthy levels of physical activity that carry through into adulthood. Virtual reality (VR) training may be beneficial in this regard. VR training, when grounded in an information-based theory of perceptual-motor behavior that modifies the visual information in the virtual world, can promote early development of motor skills in youth akin to more natural, real-world development as opposed to strictly formalized training. This approach can be tailored to the individual child and training scenarios can increase in complexity as the child develops. Ultimately, training in VR may help serve as a precursor to “real-world” NMT, and once the child reaches the appropriate training age can also augment more complex NMT regimens performed outside of the virtual environment. PMID:29376045

  4. Mental health first aid for eating disorders: pilot evaluation of a training program for the public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Laura M; Jorm, Anthony F; Paxton, Susan J

    2012-08-02

    Eating disorders cause significant burden that may be reduced by early and appropriate help-seeking. However, despite the availability of effective treatments, very few individuals with eating disorders seek treatment. Training in mental health first aid is known to be effective in increasing mental health literacy and supportive behaviours, in the social networks of individuals with mental health problems. Increases in these domains are thought to improve the likelihood that effective help is sought. However, the efficacy of mental health first aid for eating disorders has not been evaluated. The aim of this research was to examine whether specific training in mental health first aid for eating disorders was effective in changing knowledge, attitudes and behaviours towards people with eating disorders. A repeated measures, uncontrolled trial was conducted to establish proof of concept and provide guidance on the future design of a randomised controlled trial. Self-report questionnaires, administered at baseline, post-training and 6-month follow-up, assessed the effectiveness of the 4-hour, single session, mental health first aid training. 73 participants completed the training and all questionnaires. The training intervention was associated with statistically significant increases in problem recognition and knowledge of appropriate mental health first aid strategies, which were maintained at 6-month follow-up. Sustained significant changes in attitudes and behaviours were less clear. 20 participants reported providing assistance to someone with a suspected eating disorder, seven of whom sought professional help as a result of the first aid interaction. Results provided no evidence of a negative impact on participants or the individuals they provided assistance to. This research provides preliminary evidence for the use of training in mental health first aid as a suitable intervention for increasing community knowledge of and support for people with eating disorders to seek appropriate help. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12611001181998.

  5. Reducing Sex Differences in Children's Empathy for Animals through a Training Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angantyr, Malin; Hansen, Eric M.; Eklund, Jakob Håkansson; Malm, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Humane education programs designed to increase children's empathy for animals are becoming more common. A quasi-experiment tested the effectiveness of one such program by comparing 80 children who had completed the program with a control group of 57 children who had not. The children read a story involving an injured dog and rated the degree of…

  6. MODELING DISPERSION FROM CHEMICALS RELEASED AFTER A TRAIN COLLISION IN GRANITEVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, R; Chuck Hunter, C; Robert Addis, R; Matt Parker, M

    2006-08-07

    The Savannah River National Laboratory's (SRNL) Weather INformation and Display (WIND) System was used to provide meteorological and atmospheric modeling/consequence assessment support to state and local agencies following the collision of two Norfolk Southern freight trains on the morning of January 6, 2005. This collision resulted in the release of several toxic chemicals to the environment, including chlorine. The dense and highly toxic cloud of chlorine gas that formed in the vicinity of the accident was responsible for nine fatalities, and caused injuries to more than five hundred others. Transport model results depicting the forecast path of the ongoing release were made available to emergency managers in the county's Unified Command Center shortly after SRNL received a request for assistance. Support continued over the ensuing two days of the active response. The SRNL also provided weather briefings and transport/consequence assessment model results to responders from South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Emergency Operations Center (EOC), Department of Energy Headquarters, and hazmat teams dispatched from the SRS. Although model-generated forecast winds used in consequence assessments conducted during the incident were provided at 2-km horizontal grid spacing during the accident response, a high-resolution Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS, version 4.3.0) simulation was later performed to examine potential influences of local topography on plume migration. The detailed RAMS simulation was used to determine meteorology using multiple grids with an innermost grid spacing of 125 meters. Results from the two simulations are shown to generally agree with meteorological observations at the time; consequently, local topography did not significantly affect wind in the area. Use of a dense gas dispersion model to simulate localized plume behavior using the higher resolution winds indicated agreement with fatalities in the immediate area and visible damage to vegetation.

  7. Development and Evaluation of a Training Program for Organ Procurement Coordinators Using Standardized Patient Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odabasi, Orhan; Elcin, Melih; Uzun Basusta, Bilge; Gulkaya Anik, Esin; Aki, Tuncay F; Bozoklar, Ata

    2015-12-01

    The low rate of consent by next of kin of donor-eligible patients is a major limiting factor in organ transplant. Educating health care professionals about their role may lead to measurable improvements in the process. Our aim was to describe the developmental steps of a communication skills training program for health care professionals using standardized patients and to evaluate the results. We developed a rubric and 5 cases for standardized family interviews. The 20 participants interviewed standardized families at the beginning and at the end of the training course, with interviews followed by debriefing sessions. Participants also provided feedback before and after the course. The performance of each participant was assessed by his or her peers using the rubric. We calculated the generalizability coefficient to measure the reliability of the rubric and used the Wilcoxon signed rank test to compare achievement among participants. Statistical analyses were performed with SPSS software (SPSS: An IBM Company, version 17.0, IBM Corporation, Armonk, NY, USA). All participants received higher scores in their second interview, including novice participants who expressed great discomfort during their first interview. The participants rated the scenarios and the standardized patients as very representative of real-life situations, with feedback forms showing that the interviews, the video recording sessions, and the debriefing sessions contributed to their learning. Our program was designed to meet the current expectations and implications in the field of donor consent from next of kin. Results showed that our training program developed using standardized patient methodology was effective in obtaining the communication skills needed for family interviews during the consent process. The rubric developed during the study was a valid and reliable assessment tool that could be used in further educational activities. The participants showed significant improvements in communication skills.

  8. Organization and logistics of drug-induced sleep endoscopy in a training hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoist, L B L; de Vries, N

    2015-09-01

    Drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) is a rapidly growing method to evaluate airway collapse in patients receiving non-CPAP therapies for sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). The growing number of DISEs has consequences for the organization of clinical protocols. In this paper we present our recent experiences with DISE, performed by an ENT resident, with sedation given by a nurse anesthetist, in an outpatient endoscopy setting, while the staff member/sleep surgeon discusses the findings and the recommended treatment proposal on the same day.

  9. Nonsuicidal Self-Injury among Adolescents: A Training Priority for Primary Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taliaferro, Lindsay A.; Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J.; Hetler, Joel; Edwall, Glenace; Wright, Catherine; Edwards, Anne; Borowsky, Iris W.

    2013-01-01

    Primary care providers were surveyed to determine how prepared they feel to address nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) among adolescents, their interest in training on NSSI, and factors associated with routinely asking about NSSI when providing health supervision. Participants included family medicine physicians ("n" = 260), pediatricians…

  10. Development of Health Promoting Leadership--Experiences of a Training Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Andrea; Axelsson, Runo; Axelsson, Susanna Bihari

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyse the experiences of an intervention programme for development of health promoting leadership in Gothenburg in Sweden. The more specific purpose is to identify critical aspects of such a programme as part of the development of a health promoting workplace. Design/methodology/approach: A…

  11. Computer-Assisted Visual Search/Decision Aids as a Training Tool for Mammography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nodine, Calvin

    2000-01-01

    .... In the first two years we carried out two experiments. The first equated experience by comparing perceptual skills of expert radiologists with lay people searching non-medical pictorial scenes for hidden targets...

  12. [Mediate evaluation of replicating a Training Program in Nonverbal Communication in Gerontology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimidt, Teresa Cristina Gioia; Duarte, Yeda Aparecida de Oliveira; Silva, Maria Julia Paes da

    2015-04-01

    Replicating the training program in non-verbal communication based on the theoretical framework of interpersonal communication; non-verbal coding, valuing the aging aspects in the perspective of active aging, checking its current relevance through the content assimilation index after 90 days (mediate) of its application. A descriptive and exploratory field study was conducted in three hospitals under direct administration of the state of São Paulo that caters exclusively to Unified Health System (SUS) patients. The training lasted 12 hours divided in three meetings, applied to 102 health professionals. Revealed very satisfactory and satisfactory mediate content assimilation index in 82.9%. The program replication proved to be relevant and updated the setting of hospital services, while remaining efficient for healthcare professionals.

  13. Theories of intelligence in children with reading disabilities: a training proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepi, Annamaria; Alesi, Marianna; Geraci, Maria

    2004-12-01

    A recent trend in the study of reading difficulties promotes multidimensional intervention, focusing on the reciprocal influences exerted by cognitive and emotional-motivational variables. This study evaluated improvements in reading performance as a function of metacognitive training in 36 children (M age = 8.7 yr.) with different representations of intelligence. Posttest evaluations show significantly more improvement in reading comprehension in children with an incremental theory of intelligence. These results indicate the importance of treatment programmes that take into account both the specificity of deficits and factors relating to the domain of motivation.

  14. Improved OMI Nitrogen Dioxide Retrievals Aided by NASA's A-Train High-Resolution Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamsal, L. N.; Krotkov, N. A.; Vasilkov, A. P.; Marchenko, S. V.; Qin, W.; Yang, E. S.; Fasnacht, Z.; Haffner, D. P.; Swartz, W. H.; Spurr, R. J. D.; Joiner, J.

    2017-12-01

    Space-based global observation of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is among the main objectives of the NASA Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) mission, aimed at advancing our understanding of the sources and trends of nitrogen oxides (NOx). These applications benefit from improved retrieval techniques and enhancement in data quality. Here, we describe our recent and planned updates to the NASA OMI standard NO2 products. The products and documentation are publicly available from the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (https://disc.gsfc.nasa.gov/datasets/OMNO2_V003/summary/). The major changes include (1) improvements in spectral fitting algorithms for NO2 and cloud, (2) improved information in the vertical distribution of NO2, and (3) use of geometry-dependent surface reflectivity information derived from NASA's Aqua MODIS over land and the Cox-Munk slope distribution over ocean with a contribution from water-leaving radiance. These algorithm updates, which lead to more accurate tropospheric NO2 retrievals from OMI, are relevant for other past, contemporary, and future satellite instruments.

  15. Back Facts: A Training Workbook to Prevent Back Injuries in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adequate staffing levels. Implement effective injury prevention programs. Purchase and use lifting machines and devices. Conduct effective ... an expert about the job you do. The experience of nursing assistants all over the country tells ...

  16. The Speech Anxiety Program at UTK: A Training Program for Students with High Public Speaking Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambler, Bob

    The University of Tennessee (Knoxville) offers as a special section of the public speaking curriculum, a "speech anxiety" program, taught by faculty and graduate students from the speech and theatre and educational psychology departments and staff from the counseling services center. The students spend the first few weeks of the special…

  17. Computer-Assisted Visual Search/Decision Aids as a Training Tool for Mammography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nodine, Calvin

    2000-01-01

    The primary goal of the project is to develop a computer-assisted visual search (CAVS) mammography training tool that will improve the perceptual and cognitive skills of trainees leading to mammographic expertise...

  18. Functional and biochemical adaptations of elite level futsal players from Brazil along a training season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rômulo Pillon Barcelos

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The tapering strategy was successful considering players presented lower levels of muscle damage, inflammation and oxidative stress makers before T2, which preceded the main championship of the year. These results are of great relevance, considering the team won the FIFA®-Intercontinental-Futsal-Cup, which happened at T2. Thus, it seems that routine-based biochemical markers may be useful as training control means in this population.

  19. Emergency Victim Care. A Training Manual for Emergency Medical Technicians. Module 5. CPR, Oxygen Therapy. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This student manual, the fifth in a set of 14 modules, is designed to train emergency medical technicians (EMTs) in Ohio. The module contains two sections covering the following course content; cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) (including artificial ventilation, foreign body obstructions, adjunctive equipment and special techniques, artificial…

  20. Design and implementation of a training strategy in chronic stroke with an arm robotic exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisoli, Antonio; Sotgiu, Edoardo; Procopio, Caterina; Bergamasco, Massimo; Rossi, Bruno; Chisari, Carmelo

    2011-01-01

    The distinguishing features of active exoskeletons are the capability of guiding arm movement at the level of the full kinematic chain of the human arm, and training full 3D spatial movements. We have specifically developed a PD sliding mode control for upper limb rehabilitation with gain scheduling for providing "assistance as needed", according to the force capability of the patient, and an automatic measurement of the impaired arm joint torques, to evaluate the hypertonia associated to the movement during the execution of the training exercise. Two different training tasks in Virtual Reality were devised, that make use of the above control, and allow to make a performance based evaluation of patient's motor status. The PERCRO L-Exos (Light-Exoskeleton) was used to evaluate the proposed algorithms and training exercises in two clinical case studies of patients with chronic stroke, that performed 6 weeks of robotic assisted training. Clinical evaluation (Fugl-Meyer Scale, Modified Ashworth Scale, Bimanual Activity Test) was conducted before and after treatment and compared to the scores and the quantitative indices, such as task time, position/joint error and resistance torques, associated to the training exercises. © 2011 IEEE

  1. ACHIEVING THE NATURAL VOICE: THE ANALYSIS OF THE LINKLATER METHOD FROM A TRAINING PERSPECTİVE–

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asli YILMAZ DAVUTOGLU

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the 20th century, one of the most widespread of the voice training methods that start with the concepts “natural voice” and “the rediscovery of voice” is the Linklater Method. The primary target group of this method is actors. With its exercises designed for the "reconstruction of the body, the voice and the mind", this method aims at utilizing the innate voice capacity. As a multidisciplinary method fostered by many a scientific discipline and Eastern teaching, Linklater method comes with a language that is imbued with sophisticated and metaphorical expressions, scientific terminology and acting jargon, which makes the method prone to false and/or superficial references. The target of the present study is to explicate with a “trainer's perspective” the fundamental concepts and propositions of the Linklater Method, most notably the “natural voice”. Also, the present study aims at analysing the relation between the basic practices of the method and recent scientific data, thus examining the mental substructure these practices are based on and their physical/technical goals. In this direction, the present study involves the adopting of a general framework with respect to the inclinations and scientific sources of voice training in the 20th century that affected Linklater's propositions, a simplified summarisation of the neuro-anatomic process producing the voice, the selection of exercises on which the principles and goals of the method can be seen concretely and the grouping of these exercises under titles pertaining to the four basic steps of voice production. In the conclusion part of the study, it is argued that this method, despite being regarded as “alternative/experimental” when compared to conventional methods in Turkey, is one of the mainstream methods in contemporary voice training and that it is shaped through a multi-purpose system whose aim is not only voice training but also to develop the creativity and originality of the actor.

  2. Effects of a training workshop on suicide prevention among emergency room nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, Yasuhiro; Otsuka, Kotaro; Akiyama, Keiko; Yamada, Tomoki; Sakamoto, Yumiko; Yanagisawa, Yaeko; Morimura, Hiroshi; Kawanishi, Chiaki; Higashioka, Hiroaki; Miyake, Yasushi; Thurber, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Suicide attempts are frequently encountered by emergency department nurses. Such encounters can potentially provide a foundation for secondary suicide prevention. The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the effect of a 7-hr training program for emergency room nursing personnel in Japan. In all, 52 nurses completed the questionnaires before the workshop and 1 month after the workshop. The nurses' understanding of and willingness to care for suicidal patients positively changed. It is feasible to provide a 7-hr, relatively short, workshop on suicidal prevention aimed at emergency medical staff and to improve attitudes during a follow-up of 1 month. It is uncertain whether the positive attitudes of emergency nurses toward suicide and/or educational interventions could impact the outcomes of these interventions. Further studies are needed to address these important questions in this field.

  3. "Quality Handling" a training program to reduce fear and stress in farm animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boivin, X.; Ruis, M.A.W.

    2011-01-01

    Research programs such as the European Welfare Quality® program, have attempted to improve animal welfare by developing training programs for improving stockperson behaviour towards the animals. The authors will illustrate different approches in this paper, with a special focus on the Quality

  4. Looking beyond the face: a training to improve perceivers' impressions of people with facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogart, Kathleen R; Tickle-Degnen, Linda

    2015-02-01

    Healthcare providers and lay people alike tend to form inaccurate first impressions of people with facial movement disorders such as facial paralysis (FP) because of the natural tendency to base impressions on the face. This study tested the effectiveness of the first interpersonal sensitivity training for FP. Undergraduate participants were randomly assigned to one of two training conditions or an untrained control. Education raised awareness about FP symptoms and experiences and instructed participants to form their impressions based on cues from the body and voice rather than the face. Education+feedback added feedback about the correctness of participants' judgments. Subsequently, participants watched 30s video clips of people with FP and rated their extraversion. Participants' bias and accuracy in the two training conditions did not significantly differ, but they were significantly less biased than controls. Training did not improve the more challenging task of accurately detecting individual differences in extraversion. Educating people improves bias, but not accuracy, of impressions of people with FP. Information from the education condition could be delivered in a pamphlet to those likely to interact with this population such as healthcare providers and educators. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Mediate evaluation of replicating a Training Program in Nonverbal Communication in Gerontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Cristina Gioia Schimidt

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE Replicating the training program in non-verbal communication based on the theoretical framework of interpersonal communication; non-verbal coding, valuing the aging aspects in the perspective of active aging, checking its current relevance through the content assimilation index after 90 days (mediate of its application. METHOD A descriptive and exploratory field study was conducted in three hospitals under direct administration of the state of São Paulo that caters exclusively to Unified Health System (SUS patients. The training lasted 12 hours divided in three meetings, applied to 102 health professionals. RESULTS Revealed very satisfactory and satisfactory mediate content assimilation index in 82.9%. CONCLUSION The program replication proved to be relevant and updated the setting of hospital services, while remaining efficient for healthcare professionals.

  6. Design and Implementation of a Training Course on Big Data Use in Water Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Koudelova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Big Data has great potential to be applied to research in the field of geosciences. Motivated by the opportunity provided by the Data Integration and Analysis System (DIAS of Japan, we organized an intensive two-week course that aims to educate participants on Big Data and its exploitation to solve water management problems. When developing and implementing the Program, we identified two main challenges: (1 assuring that the training has a lasting effect and (2 developing an interdisciplinary curriculum suitable for participants of diverse professional backgrounds. To address these challenges, we introduced several distinctive features. The Program was based on experiential learning – the participants were required to solve real problems and worked in international and multidisciplinary teams. The lectures were strictly relevant to the case-study problems. Significant time was devoted to hands-on exercises, and participants received immediate feedback on individual assignments to ensure skills development. Our evaluation of the two occasions of the Program in 2015 and 2016 indicates significant positive outcomes. The successful completion of the individual assignments confirmed that the participants gained key skills related to the usage of DIAS and other tools. The final solutions to the case-study problems showed that the participants were able to integrate and apply the obtained knowledge, indicating that the Program’s format and curriculum were effective. We found that participants used DIAS in subsequent studies and work, thus suggesting that the Program had long-lasting effects. Our experience indicates that despite time constraints, short courses can effectively encourage researchers and practitioners to explore opportunities provided by Big Data.

  7. SILOETTE, a training centre for reactor physics at the Nuclear Research Centre of Grenoble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Destot, M.

    1983-10-01

    The Reactor Department of Grenoble has created, based on Siloette, an activity of training in reactor physics, wich is running since 1975 to meet the important needs generated by the development of electronuclear power stations. Its essential goal is to provide an initiation to the basic physical phenomena which determine the operation of the reactors. For that purpose, a rather comprehensive program of practical works on reactor (SILOETTE) and on nuclear power station simulators (PWR, UNGG) is proposed besides lectures and conferences, general and specialized teaching on the reactor operation principle, kinetics, dynamics and thermics

  8. Empowering public service workers to face bystander conflict : Enhancing resources through a training intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Erp, K.J.P.M.; Gevers, J.M.P.; Rispens, S.; Demerouti, E.

    2018-01-01

    Public service employees work in occupations that are accompanied with high psychosocial risks. Police, firefighters, and paramedics are increasingly being confronted with argumentative, conflicting bystanders that frustrate them in executing their task. We developed a resource-enhancement

  9. Achievement of a training simulator for PWR power plant: application to control parametric studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomon-Sigogne, A.

    1982-09-01

    A simulation tool adapted to training tasks is developed. One presents the description of the simulator. One studies the management of a model by NEPTUN X2. A general description of a 900 MW PWR power station and the modelling of the power station are presented. The results obtained on the FIDIANE version of the simulator are finally analyzed [fr

  10. The elimination of complications in hypospadias surgery : a training in analytical thought or a mission impossible?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meulen, JC; van der Werf, J.F.A.

    This is a critical review of 376 patients with hypospadias that were treated by the first author. The techniques used were a one-stage procedure for the correction of hypospadias without chordee (type I) and a two-stage procedure for hypospadias with chordee (type II). Development of these

  11. Preparing Specialized Undergraduate Pilot Training Graduates for F-35A Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    the two sides of this argument and analyze the new data acquired from an F-22A lead-in program and the fact that the F-35A has started flying with...flight operations under Instrument or Visual Flight Rules to include day / night IFR operations in the terminal and enroute environment. Have limited

  12. Evaluating a training programme at Viet Duc University Hospital in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dung, Phan Thi; Chinh, Nguyen Duc; Hanh, Bui My; Notter, Joy

    2016-06-23

    Vietnam's nursing competency standards (VNCS) were issued in 2012 as the legal framework on which the continuous nursing training programme are designed and developed. The study aimed to assess the knowledge, skills, and attitudes as well as the confidence of nurses regarding wound care at Viet Duc University Hospital before and after a new educational intervention. A comparative descriptive study was carried out in 2014 at Viet Duc University Hospital. The study reviewed knowledge, skills, attitude and confidence among nurses working in seven clinical departments. The data collection tools included a 48-knowledge-item self-administered questionnaire, a sixteen-item skills set, and attitude-item observation sheet and a thirteen confidence level-item observation sheet, adapted for the field of wound care. Data were loaded into Epidata version 3.1 and analysed with SPSS version 16.0. The mean pre-training knowledge, skill, attitude and confidence scores were (117.78±24.94), (53.61±10.26), (54.39±8.02) and (1.18-3.59), respectively, while the corresponding post-training scores were (148.68±16.54), (62.33±8.40), (60.80±8.75) and (1.50-4.15) p<0.0001. This was the first cohort to undergo the new training programme and has shown promising initial results; however, it also demonstrates that the training content, while leading to positive changes, does in some areas need to be further developed and then disseminated across the hospital to all nurses who provide direct wound care for patients.

  13. Why a Train Set Helps Participants Co-Construct Meaning in Business Model Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beuthel, Maria Rosa; Buur, Jacob

    In this position paper we show how participants in an innovation workshop employ tangible material – a toy train set – to co-construct understandings of a new business model. In multidisciplinary teams the process of developing new terms and concepts together is crucial for work to progress. Every...... to understand how they construct a concept. We observe that the final result of the workshop is indeed innovative and is co-constructed by all group members. We discuss why the toy train works: It keeps both hands and mind busy, it allows silent participation, and it expands the vocabulary of the discussion....

  14. Nurses' self-reported knowledge about and attitude to nutrition - before and after a training programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Merete; Tewes, Marianne; Pedersen, Preben Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    the patients' hospital stay. But putting evidence of nutritional topics into practice is challenging and nutrition care seems to be a low priority nursing task. Aim: to investigate the impact of an educational programme targeted nurses with special responsibilities for nutrition on the nurses' knowledge...... of nutrition, and whether it enhanced their attitude to their responsibility for nutrition care in relation to assessment and management. Methods: An intervention study was conducted with 16 nurses from either medical or surgical wards who participated in a 12-month educational programme. These nurses were...... divided into two groups and interviewed twice before and after the intervention. Focus group interviews were used to gather data about their daily clinical work in relation to nutrition.  Deductive content analysis was used to analyse the described data. Results: the educational programme did have...

  15. Medical Information for the Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor--A Training Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, William R.

    This paper presents information helpful to the vocational rehabilitation counselor and can be utilized in training programs for the newly employed untrained vocational rehabilitation practitioner. Areas covered include medical terminology, common prefixes and suffixes, speciality boards; paramedic professions, and medical education. Undergraduate…

  16. Blood Pressure and Hemodynamic Adaptations after a Training Program in Young Individuals with Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Barboza Seron

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiovascular diseases affect people worldwide. Individuals with Down Syndrome (DS have an up to sixteen-time greater risk of mortality from cardiovascular diseases. Objective: To evaluate the effects of aerobic and resistance exercises on blood pressure and hemodynamic variables of young individuals with DS. Methods: A total of 29 young individuals with DS participated in the study. They were divided into two groups: aerobic training (AT (n = 14, and resistance training (TR (n = 15. Their mean age was 15.7 ± 2.82 years. The training program lasted 12 weeks, and had a frequency of three times a week for AT and twice a week for RT. AT was performed in treadmill/ bicycle ergometer, at an intensity between 50%-70% of the HR reserve. RT comprised nine exercises with three sets of 12 repetition-maximum. Systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, mean blood pressure (MBP and hemodynamic variables were assessed beat-to-beat using the Finometer device before/after the training program. Descriptive analysis, the Shapiro-Wilk test to check the normality of data, and the two-way ANOVA for repeated measures were used to compare pre- and post-training variables. The Pearson’s correlation coefficient was calculated to correlate hemodynamic variables. The SPSS version 18.0 was used with the significance level set at p < 0.05. Results: After twelve weeks of aerobic and/or resistance training, significant reductions in variables SBP, DBP and MBP were observed. Conclusion: This study suggests a chronic hypotensive effect of moderate aerobic and resistance exercises on young individuals with DS.

  17. A Brief History of the Development of Abnormal Psychology: A Training Guide. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, William R.

    Presented for practitioners is a history of the development of abnormal psychology. Areas covered include the following: Early medical concepts, ideas carried over from literature, early treatment of the mentally ill, development of the psychological viewpoint, Freud's psychoanalytic theory, Jung's analytic theory, the individual psychology of…

  18. University teaching in the prospective of Web 2.0. The Forum as a training environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Fabbri

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available L’articolo documenta e discute sul piano pedagogico un’esperienza di utilizzazione della modalità telematica del “Forum” all’interno dell’insegnamento di Tecnologie dell’educazione rivolto agli studenti del terzo anno del Corso di Laurea in Educatore sociale della Facoltà di Scienze della Formazione, Università di Bologna, sede di Rimini. L’esperienza ha previsto la partecipazione di studenti di un analogo Corso di Studio dell’Università spagnola di Caceres. A partire da una breve analisi del contesto complessivo in cui si colloca il Forum, l’autrice presenta una descrizione dei principali dati quantitativi dell’esperienza, ne fa emergere alcune riflessioni di natura qualitativa e giunge ad alcune considerazioni finali relative agli aspetti positivi e ai limiti dell’utilizzazione di strumenti di natura telematica nella formazione degli adulti.

  19. Follow-the-leader control for a train-like-vehicle. Implementation and experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micaelli, A.; Louveau, F.; Sabourin, D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents some practical implementation aspects and results of a particular control law dedicated to Train-Like-Vehicles (TLV) for trajectory tracking purpose. The CEA's demonstrator consists of two modules. It is a partial but representative mockup of a future 4-modules vehicle devoted to maintenance and intervention in nuclear plants, which is now on development within the frame of the Teleman/MESSINA project. The main principles of the control are first recalled; then the reference trajectory and its on line computation, and the robot's reference configuration are investigated; tuning the control parameters and control saturation are studied. Experimental and successful results of a real implementation on a TLV mockup are given and discussed. 10 figs., 3 refs

  20. Follow-the-leader control for a train-like-vehicle. Implementation and experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micaelli, A; Louveau, F; Sabourin, D [CEA Centre d` Etudes de Grenoble, 38 (France). Direction des Technologies Avancees; Canudas de Wit, C; Ndoudi-Likoho, A D [Laboratoire d` Automatique de Grenoble, 38 - Saint-martin d` Heres (France)

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents some practical implementation aspects and results of a particular control law dedicated to Train-Like-Vehicles (TLV) for trajectory tracking purpose. The CEA`s demonstrator consists of two modules. It is a partial but representative mockup of a future 4-modules vehicle devoted to maintenance and intervention in nuclear plants, which is now on development within the frame of the Teleman/MESSINA project. The main principles of the control are first recalled; then the reference trajectory and its on line computation, and the robot`s reference configuration are investigated; tuning the control parameters and control saturation are studied. Experimental and successful results of a real implementation on a TLV mockup are given and discussed. 10 figs., 3 refs.

  1. A training system of orientation and mobility for blind people using acoustic virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Yoshikazu; Sato, Tetsuji

    2011-02-01

    A new auditory orientation training system was developed for blind people using acoustic virtual reality (VR) based on a head-related transfer function (HRTF) simulation. The present training system can reproduce a virtual training environment for orientation and mobility (O&M) instruction, and the trainee can walk through the virtual training environment safely by listening to sounds such as vehicles, stores, ambient noise, etc., three-dimensionally through headphones. The system can reproduce not only sound sources but also sound reflection and insulation, so that the trainee can learn both sound location and obstacle perception skills. The virtual training environment is described in extensible markup language (XML), and the O&M instructor can edit it easily according to the training curriculum. Evaluation experiments were conducted to test the efficiency of some features of the system. Thirty subjects who had not acquired O&M skills attended the experiments. The subjects were separated into three groups: a no-training group, a virtual-training group using the present system, and a real-training group in real environments. The results suggested that virtual-training can reduce "veering" more than real-training and also can reduce stress as much as real training. The subjective technical and anxiety scores also improved.

  2. Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2): Science Overview and A-Train Synergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, David

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) was designed to provide global estimates of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) with the sensitivity, accuracy and sampling density needed to quantify regional scale carbon sources and sinks and characterize their behavior over the annual cycle.

  3. Recommendations for the elaboration of a training program and personnel qualification of the regulatory body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina Gironzini, E.; Bonacossa de Almeida, C.; Jimenez Rojas, M.; Pacheco Jimenez, R.; Prendes Alonso, M.; Tomas Zerquera, J.

    2013-01-01

    In this work are defined training methods and provides details on the qualifications of staff and the use of the method of the four quadrants where competencies are established: legal framework and regulatory responsibilities, technical disciplines, regulatory procedures and personal attributes. It is the first time that will make these recommendations in the region and is expected to be very useful for the regulator institutions

  4. The development of a training model for the formation of positive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    research project may be useful for teachers, inclusive education practitioners and for training institutions preparing student teachers for ..... with disabilities Speak on ...,” “Music Inside,” .... motivation and cognition: Foundations of social.

  5. Implementation of a Training Course Increased the Diagnosis of Histoplasmosis in Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caceres, Diego H.; Zuluaga, Alejandra; Arango-Bustamante, Karen; de Bedout, Catalina; Tobón, Ángela Maria; Restrepo, Ángela; Gómez, Beatriz L.; Cano, Luz Elena; González, Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Histoplasmosis causes a significant mortality, especially persons living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) from developing countries where access to both appropriate diagnostic methods and antiretroviral therapy are limited. A total of 81 physicians assigned to 17 Colombian departments (states) received training in the clinical, epidemiological, and diagnostic aspects of histoplasmosis. Once this training was received and during the period of October 2009–November 2012, these physicians sent biological samples for immunodiagnostic, mycological, and molecular tests from their patients with suspicion of histoplasmosis. A total of 1,536 samples from 768 patients were evaluated. Of the 768 patients studied, 463 (60%) were HIV positive, 214 (28%) HIV negative, and in 91 (12%) this diagnosis was unknown, and 538 (70%) were males. The 1,536 specimens studied comprised 722 sera, 439 blood samples, and 241 urines, which were tested by immunodiffusion (ID), culture, and antigenuria, respectively; in addition, 134 specimens were tested by performing a molecular assay. Histoplasmosis was diagnosed in 133 patients (17%). After the training, we observed more diagnoses from 27 to 44 cases per year. In this study, a significantly increased number of histoplasmosis cases reported by year were observed after implementing an educational training program. PMID:26123961

  6. Effects of a Training Intervention to Foster Argumentation Skills While Processing Conflicting Scientific Positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefter, Markus H.; Berthold, Kirsten; Renkl, Alexander; Riess, Werner; Schmid, Sebastian; Fries, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Argumentation skills play a crucial role in science education and in preparing school students to act as informed citizens. While processing conflicting scientific positions regarding topics such as sustainable development in the domain of ecology, argumentation skills such as evaluating arguments or supporting theories with evidence are…

  7. A randomized trial of emotion-focused therapy for couples in a training clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, W H; Burleson, B R; Clark, T E; Rodriguez, C P; Hobbs, B V

    2000-01-01

    Forty married couples participated in a randomized trial comparing 8 weekly sessions of emotion-focused therapy (EFT) for couples to a group of couples who were placed on an 8-week waiting list. A composite marital satisfaction score was created from scores on the Dyadic Adjustment Scale, Positive Feelings Questionnaire, and Personal Assessment of Intimacy in Relationships scale. Controlling for pretest scores, participants in the treatment group had significantly higher levels of marital satisfaction after 8 weeks than wait-list participants. Supplementary analyses identified variables associated with gains in therapy and with dropping out of the study.

  8. Improving Low-Income Preschoolers’ Theory of Mind: A Training Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the efficacy of training theory of mind via storybook interactions focused on characters' mental states (i.e., beliefs and emotions) in a sample of 73 low-income preschoolers, and determined if training transferred to social competence. Children in the experimental group participated in experimenter-led book interactions in which characters' false beliefs and emotions were discussed. Children in the first control group were read the same stories, but without the embedded discussions; children in the second control group were not read books. Children's false belief understanding, emotion understanding, and social competence were assessed at pretest, an immediate posttest, and a delayed posttest two months later. Children in the experimental group outperformed both controls on false belief understanding, but not emotion understanding or social competence, at both posttests. PMID:26294810

  9. Companies closely concerned with the mining industry have a training requirement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossekemper, H.J.; Schmidt, B.; Schulenberg, F.

    1994-01-01

    In view of the serious economic situation the future decisions are extremely difficult for some companies closely concerned with the mining industry. The required orientation of the company towards new markets and new products requires not less, but more training and rethinking in all company divisions: from business management via personnel management to plant organisation and from marketing via development to quality assurance. This is proved by practical examples. An analysis by the ''Training'' working group has produced valuable information on the actual training requirement in the North Rhine-Westphalian engineering industry. It has worked out the concrete situation of the companies closely concerned with the mining industry in North Rhine-Westphalia from the point of view of their own training requirements. It is now the task of each individual company to analyse and reflect its concrete situation against the mirror of the results and to base the specific training requirement on the company aim. (orig.)

  10. Computer-Assisted Visual Search/Decision Aids as a Training Tool for Mammography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nodine, Calvin

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of the project is to develop a computer-assisted visual search (CAVS) mammography training tool that will improve the perceptual and cognitive skills of trainees leading to mammographic expertise...

  11. Computer-Assisted Visual Search/Decision Aids as a Training Tool for Mammography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nodine, Calvin

    1998-01-01

    The primary goal of the project is to develop a computer-assisted visual search (CAVS) mammography training tool that will improve the perceptual and cognitive skills of trainees leading to mammographic expertise...

  12. A pilot of the use of Short Message Service (SMS) as a training tool ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this setting, short in-service training interventions are a pragmatic attempt at improving ... education. A pragmatic approach to training these nurses is to provide in- service .... outcomes.1 The need for quality training interventions and trained ...

  13. Evaluation of Knowledge and Attitudes of the Nurses Working in a Training Hospital about Patients' Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulkadir Teke

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Term of patients’ rights defines rights and responsibilities between health care organizations and patients. Health care professionals have very important responsibilities, in order to guard the rights of patients. Nurses can be seen to have more responsibility than another health care professional, because they have some kind of partnership relation with patients. This study aims to determine the knowledge level and attitudes of patient rights among the nurses of the Gulhane Military Medical Academy (GATA Training Hospital. The study universe consisted of all the nurses at the hospital (n=603 and 120 nurses were chosen with simple random sampling for the study. In general, 41.1% of the study group didn’t receive any education about patients’ rights, 21.7% stated that they didn’t encounter any patient rights issue in their day to day practice, and 64.2% stated that they learned something about the patient rights another resource like TV or mass media. Attitudes of study group were observed changeable from 69.2% to 100% about the universal patients’ rights. A comprehensive effort should be sustained to make the patients rights an essential part of healthcare. Because of that, patients’ rights office should be established in hospitals. These offices should carry out education of healthcare staff and patients about the patient rights, solve the problems which emerged from violation of patients rights, and verify the healthcare is appropriate for patients’ satisfaction. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(4.000: 259-266

  14. Improving Executive Function in childhood: Evaluation of a training intervention for 5- year-old children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eTraverso

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Executive function (EF refers to a set of higher order cognitive processes that control and modulate cognition under continuously changing and multiple task demands. EF plays a central role in early childhood, is associated and predictive of important cognitive achievements and has been recognized as a significant aspect of school readiness. This study examines the efficacy of a group based intervention for five-year-old children that focuses on basic components of EF (working memory, inhibitory control, cognitive flexibility. The intervention included 12 sessions, lasted one month and used low-cost materials. Seventy-five children took part in the study. The results indicate that the children who attended the intervention outperformed controls in simple and more complex EF tasks. Specifically, these children exhibited increased abilities to delay gratification, to control on-going responses, to process and update information and to manage high cognitive conflict. These results suggest the possibility that this intervention, which may be easily implemented in educational services, can promote EF during preschool period before the entrance in primary school.

  15. Improving executive function in childhood: evaluation of a training intervention for 5-year-old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, Laura; Viterbori, Paola; Usai, Maria Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Executive function (EF) refers to a set of higher order cognitive processes that control and modulate cognition under continuously changing and multiple task demands. EF plays a central role in early childhood, is associated and predictive of important cognitive achievements and has been recognized as a significant aspect of school readiness. This study examines the efficacy of a group based intervention for 5-year-old children that focuses on basic components of EF (working memory, inhibitory control, cognitive flexibility). The intervention included 12 sessions, lasted 1 month and used low-cost materials. Seventy-five children took part in the study. The results indicate that the children who attended the intervention outperformed controls in simple and more complex EF tasks. Specifically, these children exhibited increased abilities to delay gratification, to control on-going responses, to process and update information, and to manage high cognitive conflict. These results suggest the possibility that this intervention, which may be easily implemented in educational services, can promote EF during preschool period before the entrance in primary school.

  16. Strategic Use of Role Playing in a Training Workshop for Chemistry Laboratory Teaching Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekhi, Priyanka; Nussbaum, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Many Canadian universities have created professional development programs for their teaching assistants (TA) but may be uncertain about how to bridge the gap between TAs' knowledge of effective teaching strategies and TAs' confident applications of these strategies. We present a technique used in a two-day training workshop to enhance graduate…

  17. Use of a vegetable model as a training tool for PCNL puncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Maneesh; Krishnamoorthy, Venkatesh

    2015-01-01

    Training residents to perform a PCNL puncture is hampered by the non-availability of a good inanimate model that can be used for demonstration and practice. The ethics of surgical training during actual surgeries is being questioned and the role of simulation is increasingly important. Virtual reality trainers, however, are prohibitively expensive and the use of animal models is fraught with regulatory and ethical concerns. We have devised a model that can be used to teach the concept of depth perception during a PCNL puncture. A bottle gourd was used to mimic the posterior abdominal wall. Cotton pledgets dipped in intravenous contrast were fitted into 4 mm holes made at staggered levels in the bottle gourd which was strapped onto the operating table with the cotton pledgets facing away from the surgeon. Surgeons with varying degrees of experience made fluoroscopy-guided punctures onto the cotton pledgets. We recorded the time taken for puncture in seconds and the distance of the needle exit site from the center of the cotton ball. Speed was measured by recording the fluoroscopy time in seconds on the C-arm. Accuracy was documented by using a Vernier caliper to measure the distance from the edge of the target to the actual puncture. One second of fluoroscopy time and 0.1 mm distance were each given one point. The total points accumulated over a set of 10 punctures was added to give a total score. Longer fluoroscopy times and inaccurate punctures resulted in higher scores. A surgeon with more than 1000 PCNLs to his credit had a score of 99. The average score of five residents was 555. The bottle gourd model provides an ethically acceptable, inexpensive, easy to replicate model that can be used to train residents in the PCNL puncture.

  18. A Preliminary Empirical Evaluation of Virtual Reality as a Training Tool for Visual-Spatial Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-01

    Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Craik , F.I.M., & Lockhart , R.S. (1972). Levels of processing ; A framework for memory research. Journal of...short-term memory (Bower, 1972; Kanigel, 1981), elaborative rehearsai in short-term memory, and subsequent retrieval from long-term memory ( Craik ... Lockhart , 1972; Chase & Ericsson, 1981), ?nd the superiority of gist over verbatim recall of sentences (Bransford & Franks, 1971). Even memory for simple

  19. Improving Preschoolers' Theory of Mind Skills with Digital Games: A Training Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolayev, Mariya

    2015-01-01

    This single-subject research study examined functional relation between digital games enriched with voice-overs and theory of mind (ToM) when game play was either followed or not followed by a discussion focused on the game's content. The study employed multiple baseline design across participants to evaluate the effects of games with mental state…

  20. A Training Intervention for Supervisors to Support a Work-Life Policy Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laharnar, Naima; Glass, Nancy; Perrin, Nancy; Hanson, Ginger; Kent Anger, W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Effective policy implementation is essential for a healthy workplace. The Ryan-Kossek 2008 model for work-life policy adoption suggests that supervisors as gatekeepers between employer and employee need to know how to support and communicate benefit regulations. This article describes a workplace intervention on a national employee benefit, Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), and evaluates the effectiveness of the intervention on supervisor knowledge, awareness, and experience with FMLA. Methods The intervention consisted of computer-based training (CBT) and a survey measuring awareness and experience with FMLA. The training was administered to 793 county government supervisors in the state of Oregon, USA. Results More than 35% of supervisors reported no previous training on FMLA and the training pre-test revealed a lack of knowledge regarding benefit coverage and employer responsibilities. The CBT achieved: (1) a significant learning effect and large effect size of d = 2.0, (2) a positive reaction to the training and its design, and (3) evidence of increased knowledge and awareness regarding FMLA. Conclusion CBT is an effective strategy to increase supervisors' knowledge and awareness to support policy implementation. The lack of supervisor training and knowledge of an important but complex employee benefit exposes a serious impediment to effective policy implementation and may lead to negative outcomes for the organization and the employee, supporting the Ryan-Kossek model. The results further demonstrate that long-time employees need supplementary training on complex workplace policies such as FMLA. PMID:24106648

  1. Acute hemodynamic responses following a training session with active video game in wheelchair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael José Perrier Melo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aimed:This study aimed to analyze the hemodynamic responses during an active game session (VGA with the use of a wheelchair. Method: Twelve subjects (6 men and 6 women (24 ± 3.98 years; 22.6 ± 2.17 kg / m2 , apparently healthy (PAR-Q, not wheelchair users. Rest measures for heart rate (HR: bpm, blood pressure (BP;mmHg and calculation of double product (DP; mmHg/bpm were taken following the anthropometric assessment. Subsequently, they performed a session of Kinect Sports Boxing game for 15 minutes. The variables HR, BP and DP were measured at rest, during and after the session. Data was analyzed using the Friedman’s test with Dunn’s post hoc test for no parametric data to compare pre, during and post session. Values of p<0.05 were accepted as significant. Results: Immediately post session data showed significant increases in HR, SBP and DP for both men (HR: 68.00 ± 8.99 vs 105.17 ± 22.55; PAS: 123.67 ± 68 vs 134.17 ± 8.23; DP = 8446.00 ± 1453.54 vs 3628.76 ± 14217.50 and women (HR: 68.00 ± 8.00 vs 126.00 ± 20.44; PAS: 100.33 ± 8.82 vs 113.17 ± 9.15; DP: 6.843 ± 1160.36 vs 3597.45 ± 14 405. Similarly, after the experimental session were observed significant decreases in HR, SBP and DP compared to the immediately post session, for both boys and for girls. (HR: 74.67 ± 9.46 vs 105.17 ± 22.55; SBP: 121 ± 5.62 vs 134.17 ± 8.23; SD: 9066.50 ± 1449.98 vs 14217.50 ± 3628.76 and for women (HR: 76.83 ± 9.02 vs 126.00 ± 20.44; PAS: 100.67 ± 3.01 vs 113.17 ± 9.15; DP= 7745.33 ± 1025.34 vs 3597.45 ± 14.405. Conclusion: The practice of VGAs contributes to increased hemodynamic demands, being a safe alternative in the period of rehabilitation and training for athletes using wheelchair.

  2. Working safely in gamma radiography. A training manual for industrial radiographers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, S.A.; Peabody, C.A.

    1982-09-01

    This manual is designed for classroom training in working safely in industrial radiography using gamma sources. The purpose is to train radiographers' assistants to work safely as a qualified gamma radiographer. The contents cover the essentials of radiation, radiation protection, emergency procedures, gamma cameras, and biological effects of radiation. (ACR)

  3. The Science and Issues of Human DNA Polymoprhisms: A Training Workshop for High School Biology Teachers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David. A Micklos

    2006-10-30

    This project achieved its goal of implementing a nationwide training program to introduce high school biology teachers to the key uses and societal implications of human DNA polymorphisms. The 2.5-day workshop introduced high school biology faculty to a laboratory-based unit on human DNA polymorphisms – which provides a uniquely personal perspective on the science and Ethical, Legal and Social Implications (ELSI) of the Human Genome Project. As proposed, 12 workshops were conducted at venues across the United States. The workshops were attended by 256 high school faculty, exceeding proposed attendance of 240 by 7%. Each workshop mixed theoretical, laboratory, and computer work with practical and ethical implications. Program participants learned simplified lab techniques for amplifying three types of chromosomal polymorphisms: an Alu insertion (PV92), a VNTR (pMCT118/D1S80), and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the mitochondrial control region. These polymorphisms illustrate the use of DNA variations in disease diagnosis, forensic biology, and identity testing - and provide a starting point for discussing the uses and potential abuses of genetic technology. Participants also learned how to use their Alu and mitochondrial data as an entrée to human population genetics and evolution. Our work to simplify lab techniques for amplifying human DNA polymorphisms in educational settings culminated with the release in 1998 of three Advanced Technology (AT) PCR kits by Carolina Biological Supply Company, the nation’s oldest educational science supplier. The kits use a simple 30-minute method to isolate template DNA from hair sheaths or buccal cells and streamlined PCR chemistry based on Pharmacia Ready-To-Go Beads, which incorporate Taq polymerase, deoxynucleotide triphosphates, and buffer in a freeze-dried pellet. These kits have greatly simplified teacher implementation of human PCR labs, and their use is growing at a rapid pace. Sales of human polymorphism kits by Carolina Biological rose from 700 units in 1999 to 1,132 in 2000 – a 62% increase. Competing kits using the Alu system, and based substantially on our earlier work, are also marketed by Biorad and Edvotek. In parallel with the lab experiments, we developed a suite of database/statistical applications and easy-to-use interfaces that allow students to use their own DNA data to explore human population genetics and to test theories of human evolution. Database searches and statistical analyses are launched from a centralized workspace. Workshop participants were introduced to these and other resources available at the DNALC WWW site (http://vector.cshl.org/bioserver/): 1) Allele Server tests Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and statistically compares PV92 data from world populations. 2) Sequence Server uses DNA sequence data to search Genbank using BLASTN, compare sequences using CLUSTALW, and create phylogenetic trees using PHYLIP. 3) Simulation Server uses a Monte Carlo generator to model the long-term effects of drift, selection, and population bottlenecks. By targeting motivated and innovative biology faculty, we believe that this project offered a cost-effective means to bring high school biology education up-to-the-minute with genomic biology. The workshop reached a target audience of highly professional faculty who have already implemented hands-on labs in molecular genetics and many of whom offer laboratory electives in biotechnology. Many attend professional meetings, develop curriculum, collaborate with scientists, teach faculty workshops, and manage equipment-sharing programs. These individuals are life-long learners, anxious for deeper insight and additional training to further extend their leadership. This contention was supported by data from a mail survey, conducted in February-March 2000 and 2001, of 256 faculty who participated in workshops conducted during the current term of DOE support. Seventy percent of participants responded, providing direct reports on how their teaching behavior had changed since taking the DOE workshop. About nine of ten respondents said they had provided new classroom materials and first-hand accounts of DNA typing, sequencing, or PCR. Three-fourths had introduced new units on human molecular genetics. Most strikingly, half had students use PCR to amplify their own insertion polymorphisms (PV92), and better than one-fourth amplified a VNTR polymorphism and the mitochondrial control region. One in five had mitochondrial DNA sequenced by the DNALC Sequencing Service. A majority (58%) used online materials at the DNALC WWW site, and 28% analyzed student polymorphism data with Bioservers at the DNALC site. A majority (58%) assisted other faculty with student labs on polymorphisms, reaching an additional 786 teachers.

  4. 77 FR 36277 - Academic Development of a Training Program for Good Laboratory Practices in High Containment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-18

    ...- based learning techniques designed to bring researchers and regulators together to educate each other on... program using problem-based learning techniques designed to bring researchers and regulators together to... clinical parameters, such as body temperature, heart rate, respiration rate, and blood pressure is a...

  5. Developing a Business Intelligence Process for a Training Module in SharePoint 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtchen, Bryce; Solano, Wanda M.; Albasini, Colby

    2015-01-01

    Prior to this project, training information for the employees of the National Center for Critical Processing and Storage (NCCIPS) was stored in an array of unrelated spreadsheets and SharePoint lists that had to be manually updated. By developing a content management system through a web application platform named SharePoint, this training system is now highly automated and provides a much less intensive method of storing training data and scheduling training courses. This system was developed by using SharePoint Designer and laying out the data structure for the interaction between different lists of data about the employees. The automation of data population inside of the lists was accomplished by implementing SharePoint workflows which essentially lay out the logic for how data is connected and calculated between certain lists. The resulting training system is constructed from a combination of five lists of data with a single list acting as the user-friendly interface. This interface is populated with the courses required for each employee and includes past and future information about course requirements. The employees of NCCIPS now have the ability to view, log, and schedule their training information and courses with much more ease. This system will relieve a significant amount of manual input and serve as a powerful informational resource for the employees of NCCIPS in the future.

  6. Assessment of a training programme for the prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jam Gatell, M Rosa; Santé Roig, Montserrat; Hernández Vian, Óscar; Carrillo Santín, Esther; Turégano Duaso, Concepción; Fernández Moreno, Inmaculada; Vallés Daunis, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most frequent nosocomial infection in intensive care units (ICUs). Most published studies have analysed nurses' theoretical knowledge about a specific procedure; however, the transfer of this knowledge to the practice has received little attention. To assess the impact of training session on nurses' knowledge regarding VAP, compliance with VAP preventive measures, VAP incidence and determining whether nursing workload affects compliance. A prospective, quasiexperimental, pre- and post-study of the nursing team in a 16-bed medical/surgical ICU. Pre-intervention phase: a questionnaire to assess nurses' knowledge of VAP prevention measures, direct observation and review of clinical records to assess compliance. Intervention phase: eight training sessions for nurses. The post-intervention phase mirrored the pre-intervention phase. Nurses answered more questions correctly on the post-intervention questionnaire than on the pre-intervention (17·87 ± 2·69 versus 15·91 ± 2·68, p = 0·002). Compliance with the following measures was better during the post-intervention period (p = 0·001): use of the smallest possible nasogastric tube, controlled aspiration of subglottic secretions and endotracheal tube cuff pressure, use of oral chlorhexidine and recording the endotracheal tube fixation number. VAP incidence remained unchanged throughout the study. However, a trend towards lower incidence of late (>4 days after intubation) VAP was observed (4·6 versus 3·1 episodes/1000 ventilation days, p = 0·37). The programme improved both knowledge of and compliance with VAP preventive measures, although improved knowledge did not always result in improved compliance. © 2012 The Authors. Nursing in Critical Care © 2012 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  7. Assessment of a training programme for the prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Jam Gatell, M Rosa; Santé Roig, Montserrat; Hernández Vian, Óscar; Carrillo Santín, Esther; Turégano Duaso, Concepción; Fernández Moreno, Inmaculada; Vallés Daunis, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Background Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most frequent nosocomial infection in intensive care units (ICUs). Most published studies have analysed nurses' theoretical knowledge about a specific procedure; however, the transfer of this knowledge to the practice has received little attention. Aim To assess the impact of training session on nurses' knowledge regarding VAP, compliance with VAP preventive measures, VAP incidence and determining whether nursing workload affects complia...

  8. Hybrid Switching Controller Design for the Maneuvering and Transit of a Training Ship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomera Mirosław

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the design of a hybrid controller used to control the movement of a ship in different operating modes, thereby improving the performance of basic maneuvers. This task requires integrating several operating modes, such as maneuvering the ship at low speeds, steering the ship at different speeds in the course or along the trajectory, and stopping the ship on the route. These modes are executed by five component controllers switched on and off by the supervisor depending on the type of operation performed. The desired route, containing the coordinates of waypoints and tasks performed along consecutive segments of the reference trajectory, is obtained by the supervisory system from the system operator. The former supports switching between component controllers and provides them with new set-points after each change in the reference trajectory segment, thereby ensuring stable operation of the entire hybrid switching controller.

  9. How Long Should a Training Program Be? A Field Study of "Rules-of-Thumb"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Nina

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine the question of how long a behavioral skills training program should be in order to result in measurable behavioral change. Design/methodology/approach: An empirical field study was conducted to compare two different lengths of time for a managerial skills training program aimed at achieving behavioral change.…

  10. How Children Learn the Ins and Outs: A Training Study of Toddlers' Categorization of Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Chris A.; Fisher, Anna V.; Rakison, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Young children are able to categorize animals on the basis of unobservable features such as shared biological properties (e.g., bones). For the most part, children learn about these properties through explicit verbalizations from others. The present study examined how such input impacts children's learning about the properties of categories. In a…

  11. PACS: Do clinical users benefit from it as a training adjunct? | van ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although a PACS relates specifically to the archiving and retrieval of radiological images and reports, it became clear from the feedback received from medical clinicians (who ... The advantages of PACS as a positive training adjunct were highlighted in the areas of multi-site viewing and consultation, the possibility of image ...

  12. Changing Professional Discourses in Teacher Education Policy Back Towards a Training Paradigm: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Dennis; Bagley, Carl

    2013-01-01

    Modern definitions of professions connect professional knowledge to scientific studies and higher education. In the present article we examine the changing nature of this relationship in initial teacher education in two European countries: Sweden and England. The article is based on policy analyses from recent decades of teacher education reforms.…

  13. Uncertainty management in stratigraphic well correlation and stratigraphic architectures: A training-based method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jonathan; Lallier, Florent; Caumon, Guillaume; Carpentier, Cédric

    2018-02-01

    We discuss the sampling and the volumetric impact of stratigraphic correlation uncertainties in basins and reservoirs. From an input set of wells, we evaluate the probability for two stratigraphic units to be associated using an analog stratigraphic model. In the presence of multiple wells, this method sequentially updates a stratigraphic column defining the stratigraphic layering for each possible set of realizations. The resulting correlations are then used to create stratigraphic grids in three dimensions. We apply this method on a set of synthetic wells sampling a forward stratigraphic model built with Dionisos. To perform cross-validation of the method, we introduce a distance comparing the relative geological time of two models for each geographic position, and we compare the models in terms of volumes. Results show the ability of the method to automatically generate stratigraphic correlation scenarios, and also highlight some challenges when sampling stratigraphic uncertainties from multiple wells.

  14. A Training Intervention for Supervisors to Support a Work-Life Policy Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naima Laharnar

    2013-09-01

    Conclusion: CBT is an effective strategy to increase supervisors' knowledge and awareness to support policy implementation. The lack of supervisor training and knowledge of an important but complex employee benefit exposes a serious impediment to effective policy implementation and may lead to negative outcomes for the organization and the employee, supporting the Ryan-Kossek model. The results further demonstrate that long-time employees need supplementary training on complex workplace policies such as FMLA.

  15. Developing a training program for radiation protection officers in industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinda, R.

    2013-04-01

    Non-Destructive Testing employs a variety of techniques which are used to test objects e.g. pipes, vessels, welded joints, castings and other devices for imperfections without interfering with their physical structure. The common methods of testing include magnetic particle, ultrasound, dye penetrant and industrial radiography using gamma emitting radiation sources and electronic x-ray emitting devices. Other methods used are acoustic emission testing, acoustic resonance testing, electromagnetic testing, infrared testing and leak testing. This project work focuses on training of RPOs in the areas where radiation is used, as improper use may lead to high radiation exposure. In order to ensure adequate protection and safety of staff and the public, the Radiation Protection Officers need to be thoroughly trained. With proper training the Radiation Protection Officer will have the ability to interpret legislative instruments and understand the requirements. The RPO will also be able to develop a Radiation Protection Plan and train fellow staff on radiation safety issues. A number of companies currently specialize in Industrial Radiography and this number is growing on a yearly basis. Since the increased use of radiation sources cannot be curbed, training Radiation Protection Officers will improve the radiation safety standards within these companies and promote the safe use of the radiation sources. Therefore this project covers the fundamental elements required to train Radiation Protection Officers in Industrial Radiography. (author)

  16. F-35A Training Basing Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2. Appendix A through Appendix C

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Tortugas in 1969 as to whether behavioral response of adults to sonic booms from extremely low-flying military jets ( meters AGL) or overgrowth of...island vegetation were causal factors (Gladwin et al. 1988). Actions were taken to curb planes breaking the sound barrier within range of the Tortugas

  17. Virtual Reality As a Training Tool to Treat Physical Inactivity in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam W. Kiefer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Lack of adequate physical activity in children is an epidemic that can result in obesity and other poor health outcomes across the lifespan. Physical activity interventions focused on motor skill competence continue to be developed, but some interventions, such as neuromuscular training (NMT, may be limited in how early they can be implemented due to dependence on the child’s level of cognitive and perceptual-motor development. Early implementation of motor-rich activities that support motor skill development in children is critical for the development of healthy levels of physical activity that carry through into adulthood. Virtual reality (VR training may be beneficial in this regard. VR training, when grounded in an information-based theory of perceptual-motor behavior that modifies the visual information in the virtual world, can promote early development of motor skills in youth akin to more natural, real-world development as opposed to strictly formalized training. This approach can be tailored to the individual child and training scenarios can increase in complexity as the child develops. Ultimately, training in VR may help serve as a precursor to “real-world” NMT, and once the child reaches the appropriate training age can also augment more complex NMT regimens performed outside of the virtual environment.

  18. Development of a training simulator to operators of the IEA-R1 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Ricardo Pinto de

    2006-01-01

    This work reports the development of a Simulator for the IEA-R1 Research Reactor. The Simulator was developed with Visual C++ in two stages: construction of the mathematics models and development and configuration of graphics interfaces in a Windows XP executable. A simplified modeling was used for main physics phenomena, using a point kinetics model for the nuclear process and the energy and mass conservation laws in the average channel of the reactor for the thermal hydraulic process. The dynamics differential equations were solved by using finite differences through the 4th order Runge- Kutta method. The reactivity control, reactor cooling, and reactor protection systems were also modeled. The process variables are stored in ASCII files. The Simulator allows navigating by screens of the systems and monitoring tendencies of the operational transients, being an interactive tool for teaching and training of IEA-R1 operators. It also can be used by students, professors, and researchers in teaching activities in reactor and thermal hydraulics theory. The Simulator allows simulations of operations of start up, power maneuver, and shut down. (author)

  19. An Evaluation of a Training Program to Prepare Faculty for Online Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee-Swope, Kinyata

    2010-01-01

    The expansion of distance education makes it necessary for many faculty to take on the role of online instructor. As a result, higher education institutions face the challenge of training their faculty to make a shift from teaching in traditional to virtual environments. The Higher Learning Commission's Best Practices for Electronically Offered…

  20. Elective laparoscopic recto-sigmoid resection for diverticular disease is suitable as a training operation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosker, Robbert; Hoogenboom, Froukje; Groen, Henk; Hoff, Christiaan; Ploeg, Rutger; Pierie, Jean-Pierre

    Some authors state that elective laparoscopic recto-sigmoid resection is more difficult for diverticular disease as compared with malignancy. For this reason, starting laparoscopic surgeons might avoid diverticulitis, making the implementation phase unnecessary long. The aim of this study was to

  1. [The specialty program as a training tool: an individual training plan for each resident].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez González, R; Capilla Cabezuelo, E

    2010-01-01

    The official training program for the specialty "Diagnostic Imaging" establishes minimum learning objectives that must be fulfilled. Each accredited teaching unit is responsible for designing and carrying out a curriculum to ensure that these objectives are met, and this approach permits a degree of flexibility. Various aspects must be considered in the individual training plans for each resident: the rotation scheme according to the way the department is organized, plans for recovering missed material or reinforcing weak points, optional rotations, increasing degrees of responsibility as skills are acquired during training, and accommodating special needs of handicapped persons. Nevertheless, the individual plan must be fitted to the established curriculum and guarantee that the content of the official program is covered and that the objectives stipulated therein are met. Furthermore, the methods of teaching must be adapted to the individual characteristics of the residents, and this is the most important aspect of the individualization of training. To this end, it is fundamental for residents to take on an active role in their training, guided by their tutor and with the participation of all the radiologists in the department including the other residents, all of whom should act as teachers. Copyright © 2010 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. USING SECOND LIFE VIRTUAL COMPUTER WORLD AS A TRAINING TOOL FOR THE SUBJECTIVE GLOBAL ASSESSMENT (sga.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Clark Connery

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The SGA is a clinical tool used to assess protein energy wasting. Although well validated, it is still not widely incorporated into clinical practice. A barrier to use may be the physical assessment section. Therefore, the purpose of this project was to develop a free and effective tool to train clinicians on performing the SGA. Second Life (SL is a free virtual reality program accessed through the internet using human-like “avatars.” A museum environment was created with panels presenting SGA background information through text, images, and videos of SGA being performed. Users are able to navigate the information by logging onto a provided avatar. After the initial panels, this avatar is able to interact with avatar bots and perform animations which mimic each body assessment within the SGA. Two trial periods were conducted to assess the efficacy of this training tool. The alpha trial consisted of 3 hospital dietitians and 3 nutrition students. These subjects came to the investigators’ facility to test the program. Subjective responses were collected and used to improve the training tool. Feedback was positive regarding the information, delivery, and direction of the project; however, they did complain of difficulty with controlling the avatar. The beta trial consists of users accessing the module remotely. These users include academic and clinical dietitians. Responses are being collected via 5 surveys covering each portion of the module. While 16 dietitians responded to the beta trial, only 4 have completed the training. Current survey responses state: the use of SL is easy and enjoyable; all SGA information was clear and in a desirable format; tactile comparison objects were beneficial for understanding; the in depth description of each assessment is beneficial; the animations that the avatars perform on the bots needs improvement; a patient avatar on which users could perform the full SGA is desirable; the use of SL in the learning process is beneficial, but it can also be distracting; the module increased the users’ familiarity, confidence, and desire to employ the SGA, amongst both current users and those new to the SGA. In summary, this training tool provides clinicians a free and effective way to learn the SGA.

  3. Longitudinal evaluation of a training program to promote routine antenatal enquiry for domestic violence by midwives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Kathleen; Creedy, Debra K; Saito, Amornrat S; Eustace, Jennifer

    2018-01-15

    Routine enquiry about domestic violence during pregnancy is accepted best practice. Training is essential to improve knowledge and practice. Few studies have undertaken a comprehensive evaluation of training impact over time. To evaluate the longitudinal impact of a domestic violence training and support program to promote midwives' routine antenatal enquiry for domestic violence using a mixed methods design. Data sources included (1) surveys of midwives at 6 months post-training, (2) interviews with key stakeholders at 12 months, (3) chart audit data of screening, risk, and disclosure rates (for 16 months). Measures included midwives' knowledge, preparation for routine enquiry, knowledge of domestic violence and perceptions of impact of the training and support for practice change. Forty (out of 83) participant surveys could be matched and responses compared to baseline and post-training scores. Wilcoxon signed-rank test identified that all 6-month follow-up scores were significantly higher than those at baseline. Level of preparedness increased from 42.3 to 51.05 (Z=4.88, p90%) reported improved confidence to undertake routine inquiry. A chart audit of screening rates revealed that of the 6671 women presenting for antenatal care, nearly 90% were screened. Disclosure of domestic violence was low (<2%) with most women at risk or experiencing violence declining referral. Training, support processes, and referral pathways, contributed to midwives' sustained preparedness and knowledge to conduct routine enquiry and support women disclosing domestic violence. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Investigating the influence of volcanic sulfate aerosol on cloud properties Along A-Train tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, G. G.

    2017-12-01

    Marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds are central actors in the climate system given their extensive coverage on the Earth's surface, their 1-way influence on the radiative balance (cooling), and their intimate coupling between air motions, anthropogenic and natural aerosol sources, and processes within the upper ocean mixed layer. Knowledge of how MBL shallow cumulus clouds respond to changes in aerosol is central to understanding how MBL clouds modulate the climate system. A frequent approach to investigating how sulfate aerosol influences MBL clouds has been to examine sulfate plumes extending downstream of active island volcanoes. This approach is challenging due to modification of the air motions in the plumes downstream of islands and due to the tendency of most researchers to examine only level-2 retrievals ignoring the actual data collected by sensors such as MODIS. Past studies have concluded that sulfate aerosols have large effects consistent with the 1st aerosol indirect effect (AIE). We reason that if such effects are as large as suggested in level-2 retrievals then evidence should also be present in the raw MODIS reflectance data as well as other data sources. In this paper we will build on our recently published work where we tested that hypothesis from data collected near Mount Kilauea during a 3-year period. Separating data into aerosol optical depth (A) quartiles, we found little support for a large 1st AIE response. We did find an unambiguous increase in sub 1km-scale cloud fraction with A. This increase in sub 1 km cloud fraction was entirely consistent with increased reflectance with increasing A that is used, via the level 2 retrievals, to argue for a large AIE response of MBL clouds. While the 1-km pixels became unambiguously brighter, that brightening was due to increased sub 1 km cloud fraction and not necessarily due to changes in pixel-level cloud microphysics. We also found that MBL cloud top heights increase as do surface wind speeds as aerosol increases while the radar reflectivity from CloudSat does not change implying that increased aerosols may have caused invigoration of the MBL clouds with little effect on precipitation. We have since expanded upon this initial analysis by exmaining data near other volcanic islands. These expanded results support our initial findings.

  5. HVAC-DYNAMIC; A training simulator for dynamic analysis of HVAC plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintz, M; Novakovic, V [SINTEF Division of Applied Thermodynamic, HVAC Group, Trondheim (Norway); Oegaard, O [SINTEF Division of Automatic Control, Trondheim (Norway); Brustad, G [Computer Aided Modelling, CAMO A/S, Trondheim (Norway)

    1989-01-01

    HVAC-DYNAMIC is a software tool for the dynamic simulation of Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) plants. The program is designed to be used by HVAC engineers during design or troubleshooting of plants and by plant operators in their training. The program is based on a set of the most-used HVAC plant configurations and requires only a minimum of knowledge in numeric methods and programming. A brief presentation of the program structure and examples showing some of the application of the program are given. 4 figs., 4 refs.

  6. HVAC-DYNAMIC: a training simulator for dynamic analysis of HVAC plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Heintz

    1989-07-01

    Full Text Available HVAC-DYNAMIC is a software tool for the dynamic simulation of Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC plants. The program is designed to be used by HVAC engineers during design or troubleshooting of plants and by plant operators in their training. The program is based on a set of the most-used HVAC plant configurations and requires only a minimum of knowledge in numeric methods and programming. A brief presentation of the program structure and examples showing some of the application of the program are given.

  7. Goat′s eye integrated with a human cataractous lens: A training model for phacoemulsification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabyasachi Sengupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A relatively simple and inexpensive technique to train surgeons in phacoemulsification using a goat′s eye integrated with a human cataractous nucleus is described. The goat′s eye is placed on a bed of cotton within the lumen of a cylindrical container. This is then mounted on a rectangular thermocol so that the limbus is presented at the surgical field. After making a clear corneal entry with a keratome, the trainer makes a 5-5.5 mm continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis in the anterior lens capsule, creates a crater of adequate depth in the cortex and inserts the human nucleus within this crater in the goat′s capsular bag. The surgical wound is sutured, and the goat′s eye is ready for training. Creating the capsulorhexis with precision and making the crater of adequate depth to snugly accommodate the human nucleus are the most important steps to prevent excessive wobbling of the nucleus while training.

  8. 42 CFR 63a.4 - Who is eligible for a training grant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... in cooperation with, the Pan American Health Organization or the World Health Organization. ...) International training grants for AIDS research. Any international organization concerned with public health is..., preference shall be given to: (1) Training activities conducted by, or in cooperation with, the World Health...

  9. Goat's eye integrated with a human cataractous lens: A training model for phacoemulsification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Sabyasachi; Dhanapal, Praveen; Nath, Manas; Haripriya, Aravind; Venkatesh, Rengaraj

    2015-03-01

    A relatively simple and inexpensive technique to train surgeons in phacoemulsification using a goat's eye integrated with a human cataractous nucleus is described. The goat's eye is placed on a bed of cotton within the lumen of a cylindrical container. This is then mounted on a rectangular thermocol so that the limbus is presented at the surgical field. After making a clear corneal entry with a keratome, the trainer makes a 5-5.5 mm continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis in the anterior lens capsule, creates a crater of adequate depth in the cortex and inserts the human nucleus within this crater in the goat's capsular bag. The surgical wound is sutured, and the goat's eye is ready for training. Creating the capsulorhexis with precision and making the crater of adequate depth to snugly accommodate the human nucleus are the most important steps to prevent excessive wobbling of the nucleus while training.

  10. Revisiting the iris effect of tropical cirrus clouds with TRMM and A-Train satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yong-Sang; Kim, WonMoo; Yeh, Sang-Wook; Masunaga, Hirohiko; Kwon, Min-Jae; Jo, Hyun-Su; Huang, Lei

    2017-06-01

    Just as the iris of human eye controls the light influx (iris effect), tropical anvil cirrus clouds may regulate the Earth's surface warming by controlling outgoing longwave radiation. This study examines this possible effect with monthly satellite observations such as Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer cirrus fraction, and Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System top-of-the-atmosphere radiative fluxes averaged over different tropical domains from March 2000 to October 2014. To confirm that high-level cirrus is relevant to this study, Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization high cloud observations were also analyzed from June 2006 to December 2015. Our analysis revealed that the increase in sea surface temperature in the tropical western Pacific tends to concentrate convective cloud systems. This concentration effect very likely induces the significant reduction of both stratiform rain rate and cirrus fraction, without appreciable change in the convective rain rate. This reduction of stratiform rain rate and cirrus fraction cannot be found over its subregion or the tropical eastern Pacific, where the concentration effect of anvil cirrus is weak. Consistently, over the tropical western Pacific, the higher ratio of convective rain rate to total rain rate (i.e., precipitation efficiency) significantly correlates with warmer sea surface temperature and lower cirrus fraction. The reduced cirrus eventually increased outgoing longwave radiation to a greater degree than absorbed solar radiation. Finally, the negative relationship between precipitation efficiency and cirrus fraction tends to correspond to a low global equilibrium climate sensitivity in the models in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5. This suggests that tropical anvil cirrus clouds exert a negative climate feedback in strong association with precipitation efficiency.

  11. Rational drug use--evaluation of a training programme for interns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natu, M V; Zachariah, P; Zachariah, A; Chand, S; Singh, T; Choudhry, K

    1995-09-01

    A workshop covering various aspects of rational drug use was conducted for interns of Christian Medical College, Ludhiana. Evaluation of the workshop revealed that it was able to bring about an attitudinal change regarding rational drug use. The methodology and evaluation procedures have been described. It is suggested that similar attempts should be made at all medical colleges so that every graduate enters medical practice with a positive attitude towards rational drug use.

  12. Relevant radiological anatomy of the pig as a training model in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dondelinger, R.F.; Ghysels, M.P.; Brisbois, D.; Donkers, E.; Snaps, F.R.; Saunders, J.; Deviere, J.

    1998-01-01

    The use of swine for teaching purposes in medicine and surgery has largely increased in recent years. Detailed knowledge of the porcine anatomy and physiology is a prerequisite for proper use of pigs as a teaching or an experimental model in interventional radiology. A systematic study of the radiological anatomy was undertaken in more than 100 female pigs aged 6-8 weeks. All studies were performed under general anesthesia in a single session. Animals were sacrificed at the end of the study. Selective angiographies were systematically obtained in all anatomical territories. In other animals CT and MRI examinations were performed and were correlated to anatomical sections and acrylic casts of the vascular structures. Endoscopical examinations of the upper gastrointestinal tract, including retrograde opacification of the biliary and pancreatic ducts, were added in selected animals. The main angiographic aspects of the brain, head and neck, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis were recorded. Similarities and differences in comparison with human anatomy are stressed. Potential applications in interventional radiology are indicated. (orig.)

  13. Forward lunge: a training study of eccentric exercises of the lower limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönhagen, Sven; Ackermann, Paul; Saartok, Tönu

    2009-05-01

    A few studies have shown that eccentric exercise is effective for prevention and treatment of muscle injuries. Most earlier studies on eccentric exercises have used training with advanced equipment. Forward lunges are considered eccentric exercises, and they may be performed without any equipment. These exercises are commonly used by sprint runners. We performed a prospective, randomized, 6-week training study comparing the effects of walking or jumping forward lunges on hamstring and quadriceps strength and function. Thirty-two soccer players were included in the study. The forward lunge training was done as an addition to ordinary soccer training twice a week for 6 weeks. The outcome was measured by the maximal hamstring and quadriceps strength tests and by functional tests with 1-leg hop tests and 30-m sprint runs. Overall muscle pain was evaluated using a visual analogue scale score, and local pain was estimated with an algometer. Whereas the walking lunge improved hamstring strength, the jumping lunge resulted in sprint running improvements. Algometer testing showed a general increase in the pain detection thresholds of all subjects, including the controls. Thus, precautions should be taken when algometers are used for temporal studies of pain. Walking and jumping forward lunges can be used for improving hamstring strength and running speed in young soccer player. The findings may have relevance when designing protocols for prevention and rehabilitation of muscle injuries.

  14. Resident Workflow and Psychiatric Emergency Consultation: Identifying Factors for Quality Improvement in a Training Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Thomas; Wiener, Zev; Seroussi, Ariel; Tang, Lingqi; O'Hora, Jennifer; Cheung, Erick

    2017-06-01

    Quality improvement to optimize workflow has the potential to mitigate resident burnout and enhance patient care. This study applied mixed methods to identify factors that enhance or impede workflow for residents performing emergency psychiatric consultations. The study population consisted of all psychiatry program residents (55 eligible, 42 participating) at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, University of California, Los Angeles. The authors developed a survey through iterative piloting, surveyed all residents, and then conducted a focus group. The survey included elements hypothesized to enhance or impede workflow, and measures pertaining to self-rated efficiency and stress. Distributional and bivariate analyses were performed. Survey findings were clarified in focus group discussion. This study identified several factors subjectively associated with enhanced or impeded workflow, including difficulty with documentation, the value of personal organization systems, and struggles to communicate with patients' families. Implications for resident education are discussed.

  15. Scaffolding for Motivation by Parents, and Child Homework Motivations and Emotions: Effects of a Training Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moè, Angelica; Katz, Idit; Alesi, Marianna

    2018-01-01

    Background and aims: Based on the principles of scaffolding for motivation and on the assumptions of self-determination theory, two studies aimed to assess the role played by perceived parental autonomy-supportive scaffolding on child homework autonomous motivation, self-efficacy, affect, and engagement. Samples and results: The results of Study…

  16. A training approach to improve stepping automaticity while dual-tasking in Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomiak, Taylor; Watts, Alexander; Meyer, Nicole; Pereira, Fernando V.; Hu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Deficits in motor movement automaticity in Parkinson's disease (PD), especially during multitasking, are early and consistent hallmarks of cognitive function decline, which increases fall risk and reduces quality of life. This study aimed to test the feasibility and potential efficacy of a wearable sensor-enabled technological platform designed for an in-home music-contingent stepping-in-place (SIP) training program to improve step automaticity during dual-tasking (DT). Methods: This was a 4-week prospective intervention pilot study. The intervention uses a sensor system and algorithm that runs off the iPod Touch which calculates step height (SH) in real-time. These measurements were then used to trigger auditory (treatment group, music; control group, radio podcast) playback in real-time through wireless headphones upon maintenance of repeated large amplitude stepping. With small steps or shuffling, auditory playback stops, thus allowing participants to use anticipatory motor control to regain positive feedback. Eleven participants were recruited from an ongoing trial (Trial Number: ISRCTN06023392). Fear of falling (FES-I), general cognitive functioning (MoCA), self-reported freezing of gait (FOG-Q), and DT step automaticity were evaluated. Results: While we found no significant effect of training on FES-I, MoCA, or FOG-Q, we did observe a significant group (music vs podcast) by training interaction in DT step automaticity (Ptraining to increase motor automaticity for people living with PD. The training approach described here can be implemented at home to meet the growing demand for self-management of symptoms by patients. PMID:28151878

  17. A training approach to improve stepping automaticity while dual-tasking in Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chomiak, Taylor; Watts, Alexander; Meyer, Nicole; Pereira, Fernando V.; Hu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Deficits in motor movement automaticity in Parkinson's disease (PD), especially during multitasking, are early and consistent hallmarks of cognitive function decline, which increases fall risk and reduces quality of life. This study aimed to test the feasibility and potential efficacy of a wearable sensor-enabled technological platform designed for an in-home music-contingent stepping-in-place (SIP) training program to improve step automaticity during dual-tasking (DT). M...

  18. Pilot study of a training program to enhance transformational leadership in Spinal Cord Injury Peer Mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin Ginis, Kathleen A; Shaw, Robert B; Stork, Matthew J; Battalova, Alfiya; McBride, Christopher B

    2018-01-01

    Experimental, pragmatic design. (1) To determine the effects of a transformational leadership (TFL) training program on spinal cord injury (SCI) peer mentors and their mentees; (2) To document characteristics of mentorship within a community-based SCI peer mentor program. In total 23 SCI peer mentors (70% male; M age = 47.4 ± 12.1) were randomly allocated to an Experimental or Control condition. Experimental condition mentors received a half-day TFL workshop and bi-weekly emailed information on using TFL in SCI peer mentorship. Sixteen SCI mentees (50% male; M age = 49.1 ± 12.9) enrolled in the study and 9 completed measures of self-efficacy and their mentors' use of TFL and supportiveness at 3 and 6-months. Mentors completed monthly reports of mentorship activities. Community-based peer mentorship program in British Columbia, Canada. There were no between-groups differences in mentee self-efficacy, mentor use of TFL or mentor supportiveness. In the Experimental condition only, total mentorship time and sessions were positively correlated with mentors' use of TFL and supportiveness. Mentorship occurred in-person, by phone, text, and email and mentors discussed an average of 11 topics. The intervention did not increase SCI peer mentors' use of TFL relative to a Control condition. Nevertheless, there may be merit in coaching SCI peer mentors to use TFL given the positive correlations between mentorship time and sessions, TFL use, and perceived supportiveness of the mentor. Although inherently challenging, research involving community-based SCI peer mentorship programs provides opportunities for scientists and community organizations to extend knowledge of peer mentorship beyond the context of hospital-based programs. Research supported by a SSHRC Partnership Development Grant.

  19. 78 FR 43925 - Solicitation for a Cooperative Agreement-Executive Excellence a Training and Development Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-22

    ... leadership skill building, exposure to ethical and value based issues, self-awareness, strategic thinking... development, communication, feedback, Type Theory, emotional intelligence, self awareness and group dynamics... Requirements: Documents or other media that are produced under this award must follow these guidelines: Prior...

  20. Faith Boxes: A Training Activity for Educators and Human Service Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Donald; Turner, Yolanda

    2011-01-01

    The issues of faith and religion are frequently avoided by instructors in training institutes for fear of inciting divisive conversations in the context of the classroom. Within secular training institutes, however, there is a growing momentum to incorporate an understanding of the spiritual aspects of individuals, families, and communities into…

  1. Swiss-Slovak cooperation program: a training strategy for safety analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husarcek, J.

    2000-01-01

    During the 1996-1999 period, a new training strategy for safety analyses was implemented at the Slovak Nuclear Regulatory Authority (UJD) within the Swiss-Slovak cooperation programme in nuclear safety (SWISSLOVAK). The SWISSLOVAK project involved the recruitment, training, and integration of the newly established team into UJD's organizational structure. The training strategy consisted primarily of the following two elements: a) Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) applications (regulatory review and technical evaluation of Level-1/Level-2 PSAs; PSA-based operational events analysis, PSA applications to assessment of Technical Specifications; and PSA-based hardware and/or procedure modifications) and b) Deterministic accident analyses (analysis of accidents and regulatory review of licensee Safety Analysis Reports; analysis of severe accidents/radiological releases and the potential impact of the containment and engineered safety systems, including the development of technical bases for emergency response planning; and application of deterministic methods for evaluation of accident management strategies/procedure modifications). The paper discusses the specific aspects of the training strategy performed at UJD in both the probabilistic and deterministic areas. The integration of team into UJD's organizational structure is described and examples of contributions of the team to UJD's statutory responsibilities are provided. (author)

  2. Preparing future teachers against racism: A training experience at the University of Almería

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario Isabel Herrada Valverde

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The arrival of a large number of immigrants at Spanish schools has turned classrooms into multicultural spaces. This is the reason why prospective teachers must receive appropriate training in cultural diversity. This paper presents a detailed study of the concept of racism as perceived by a group of prospective teachers who took the course on “Education and Socio-cultural Diversity”, and this concept’s influence to promote a change in their views and attitudes in topics associated with racism. The results show how students dealt with this concept and acknowledged some of their main prejudices. This research demands the inclusion of subjects related to cultural diversity in tertiary education, particularly at the initial stage of teacher-training studies.

  3. Paradoxical vocal changes in a trained singer by focally cooling the right superior temporal gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katlowitz, Kalman A; Oya, Hiroyuki; Howard, Matthew A; Greenlee, Jeremy D W; Long, Michael A

    2017-04-01

    The production and perception of music is preferentially mediated by cortical areas within the right hemisphere, but little is known about how these brain regions individually contribute to this process. In an experienced singer undergoing awake craniotomy, we demonstrated that direct electrical stimulation to a portion of the right posterior superior temporal gyrus (pSTG) selectively interrupted singing but not speaking. We then focally cooled this region to modulate its activity during vocalization. In contrast to similar manipulations in left hemisphere speech production regions, pSTG cooling did not elicit any changes in vocal timing or quality. However, this manipulation led to an increase in the pitch of speaking with no such change in singing. Further analysis revealed that all vocalizations exhibited a cooling-induced increase in the frequency of the first formant, raising the possibility that potential pitch offsets may have been actively avoided during singing. Our results suggest that the right pSTG plays a key role in vocal sensorimotor processing whose impact is dependent on the type of vocalization produced. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A training module for quality management in calibration, maintenance and repair of nuclear instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This learning module aims to provide practical guidelines for the organization of work and quality management practice in electronics laboratories in Member States. Nowadays, increased number of customers requires that the products are supplied with quality characteristics that satisfy their needs and expectations. The accelerated development of electronics and instrumentation during the last decades makes the electronics practice a field where competitiveness is ultimately defined by the confidence of the customers, based on their acceptance of the products and services provided. Quality management constitutes a practice encouraging the organizations to analyse customer requirements, to define the processes that contribute to the achievement of a product which is acceptable to the customer, and to keep these processes under control in order to improve the quality of the provided services and to increase customer satisfaction. The contents of this learning module are presented in three independent courses, designed for different level of interest: - Basic advice and recommendations: Practical advice for the organization of work, safety regulations and resource management. - Advanced quality management: Recommendations for the organization of a quality management system (QMS) compliant with ISO 9001 and ISO/IEC 17025 requirements and establishment of good practices. - Pursuing ISO 9001 and ISO/IEC 17025 accreditation: Recommendations for the organization of the QMS, templates of quality manual, operational procedures, records and forms. Customers' needs and expectations are changing, and due to competitive pressures and technological advances suppliers are forced to continually improve their products and services. Although the terms, definitions and concepts provided in this module are taken from the ISO 9000 standard series, the course does not constitute an ISO document as such. The recommendations and guidelines constitute an effort to help the understanding of ISO 9001 and ISO/IEC 17025 requirements in the implementation of quality management systems in electronics practice

  5. Digital Learning in Higher Education: A Training Course for Teaching Online--Universidade Aberta, Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, José António; José António, Susana; Goulão, Maria de Fátima; Barros, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    This paper uses qualitative evidence to describe, explore and discuss the progress of the online teaching training course taught at the Universidade Aberta to Portuguese and foreign professors of higher education institutions. As this is an entirely online course, its pedagogical design results from the combination of the basics of open distance…

  6. Build and Demonstrate a Training Program that Integrates Human Dimension to Optimize Human Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    health, and sports medicine to the overall fitness level of Soldiers.  Social: The social component focuses on the ways in which Army...has, then you can approach that person from a different perspective and knock down some barriers. You have to understand where the student is...and sports medicine contributions for optimal physical performance. (TRADOC Pam 525-3-7 (05/2014). The U.S. Army Human Dimension Concept) Human

  7. Effectiveness of a training program in supervisors' ability to provide feedback on residents' communication skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junod Perron, N.; Nendaz, M.; Louis-Simonet, M.; Sommer, J.; Gut, A.; Baroffio, A.; Dolmans, D.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2013-01-01

    Teaching communication skills (CS) to residents during clinical practice remains problematic. Direct observation followed by feedback is a powerful way to teach CS in clinical practice. However, little is known about the effect of training on feedback skills in this field. Controlled studies are

  8. [Accidents with biological materials among nurses in a training hospital: case-control study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalarosa, Micheline Gisele; Lautert, Liana

    2009-03-01

    This case-control study aimed at analyzing the association between occupational stress and disagreement between chronotype and the work shift of nurses who suffered accidents with biological materials in a hospital of Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. A number of 99 workers who suffered accidents (cases) and 232 that had not suffered accidents (controls) were interviewed. Data were collected through the Job Stress Scale according to Karasek's model and the Horne-Ostberg scale The occurrence of accident was not statistically associated with high work requirement scores (p = 0.317), with a chronobiological profile discordant with work shift (p = 0.563), or with other labor variables associated to accidents--overtime, having two jobs (p = 1.000). In addition, there was no significant difference (chi2 Pearson; p = 1.00) among the scores of professionals with high work requirements who work in shifts discordant with their chronotype, both in the case group and in the control group as well.

  9. Group 13 1990 ASCAN Ochoa talks to NASA staff pilot during T-38A training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Astronaut candidate (ASCAN) Ellen Ochoa reviews T-38A flight procedures with a NASA staff pilot while standing on an Ellington Field runway. Later, Ochoa, along with classmates from the Group 13 1990 Astronaut class, took a T-38A familiarization flight. Ellington Field is located near JSC.

  10. Assessment of a training programme for the prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jam Gatell, M Rosa; Santé Roig, Montserrat; Hernández Vian, Óscar; Carrillo Santín, Esther; Turégano Duaso, Concepción; Fernández Moreno, Inmaculada; Vallés Daunis, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Background Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most frequent nosocomial infection in intensive care units (ICUs). Most published studies have analysed nurses' theoretical knowledge about a specific procedure; however, the transfer of this knowledge to the practice has received little attention. Aim To assess the impact of training session on nurses' knowledge regarding VAP, compliance with VAP preventive measures, VAP incidence and determining whether nursing workload affects compliance. Method A prospective, quasiexperimental, pre- and post-study of the nursing team in a 16-bed medical/surgical ICU. Pre-intervention phase: a questionnaire to assess nurses' knowledge of VAP prevention measures, direct observation and review of clinical records to assess compliance. Intervention phase: eight training sessions for nurses. The post-intervention phase mirrored the pre-intervention phase. Findings Nurses answered more questions correctly on the post-intervention questionnaire than on the pre-intervention (17·87 ± 2·69 versus 15·91 ± 2·68, p = 0·002). Compliance with the following measures was better during the post-intervention period (p = 0·001): use of the smallest possible nasogastric tube, controlled aspiration of subglottic secretions and endotracheal tube cuff pressure, use of oral chlorhexidine and recording the endotracheal tube fixation number. VAP incidence remained unchanged throughout the study. However, a trend towards lower incidence of late (>4 days after intubation) VAP was observed (4·6 versus 3·1 episodes/1000 ventilation days, p = 0·37). Conclusion The programme improved both knowledge of and compliance with VAP preventive measures, although improved knowledge did not always result in improved compliance. PMID:23061618

  11. 78 FR 43923 - Solicitation for a Cooperative Agreement-Executive Excellence a Training and Development Program...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-22

    ... leadership skill building, exposure to ethical and value based issues, self-awareness, strategic thinking... critical thinking through a variety of experiential activities and group sessions. This project will be a..., or design aspects proposed that are new to NIC and will enhance the project? Organizational (35%) Do...

  12. "I am a trained nurse": the nursing identity of anarchist and radical Emma Goldman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Cynthia Anne

    2010-01-01

    For more than a century, scholars have analyzed the many dimensions of Emma Goldman. Remembered as an agent of revolution, feminism, sexual freedom, anarchy, and atheism, Goldman's motives, personality, and actions have generated an entire subgenre of historical scholarship. But although Goldman practiced nursing in New York City for ten years, one facet of her life that has been neglected is her nursing identity. Goldman's autobiography, Living My Life, reveals the way her nursing experiences informed her evolving anarchist political philosophy and international activism. She valued nursing for many reasons--for the economic independence it offered, identity it provided, and sense of community and connectivity she believed it encouraged. Finally, for Goldman, nursing represented was a vehicle to understand people's struggles and as a way of translating political philosophy into meaningful, practical solutions.

  13. Animating Research with Counseling Values: A Training Model to Address the Research-to-Practice Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kristi A.; Dewell, John A.; Holmes, Courtney M.

    2014-01-01

    The persistent research-to-practice gap poses a problem for counselor education. The gap may be caused by conflicts between the humanistic values that guide much of counseling and the values that guide research training. In this article, the authors address historical concerns regarding research training for students and the conducting of research…

  14. A training program to improve neuromuscular and performance indices in female high school basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, Frank R; Barber-Westin, Sue D; Smith, Stephanie T; Campbell, Thomas; Garrison, Tiina T

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a sports-specific training program could improve neuromuscular and performance indices in female high school basketball players. We combined components from a published anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention program for jump and strength training with other exercises and drills to improve speed, agility, overall strength, and aerobic conditioning. We hypothesized that this sports-specific training program would lead to significant improvements in neuromuscular and performance indices in high school female basketball players. Fifty-seven female athletes aged 14-17 years participated in the supervised 6-week program, 3 d·wk(-1) for approximately 90-120 minutes per session. The program was conducted on the basketball court and in weight room facilities in high schools. The athletes underwent a video drop-jump test, multistage fitness test, vertical jump test, and an 18-m sprint test before and upon completion of the training program. All the subjects attended at least 14 training sessions. After training, a significant increase was found in the mean estimated VO2max (p basketball players.

  15. Using "Relationship Marketing" Theory To Develop a Training Model for Admissions Recruiters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyure, James F.; Arnold, Susan G.

    2001-01-01

    Addresses a critical aspect of enrollment management by providing a "conceptual training outline" based on relationship marketing and management principles for admissions recruiters and other appropriate enrollment staff. Provides a set of "Attitude Tools" to suggest how various training methods might benefit from a consistent…

  16. Impact of a training course on the quality of malaria diagnosis by microscopy in Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Sofia; Fançony, Cláudia; Mirante, Clara; Neves, Marcela; Bernardino, Luís; Fortes, Filomeno; Sambo, Maria do Rosário; Brito, Miguel

    2014-11-18

    In Angola, malaria is an endemic disease having a major impact on the economy. The WHO recommends testing for all suspected malaria cases, to avoid the presumptive treatment of this disease. In malaria endemic regions laboratory technicians must be very comfortable with microscopy, the golden standard for malaria diagnosis, to avoid the incorrect diagnosis. The improper use of medication promotes drug resistance and undesirable side effects. The present study aims to assess the impact of a three-day refresher course on the knowledge of technicians, quality of blood smears preparation and accuracy of microscopy malaria diagnosis, using qPCR as reference method. This study was implemented in laboratories from three hospitals in different provinces of Angola: Bengo, Benguela and Luanda. In each laboratory samples were collected before and after the training course (slide with thin and thick blood smears, a dried blood spot and a form). The impact of the intervention was evaluated through a written test, the quality of slide preparation and the performance of microscopy. It was found a significant increase on the written test median score, from 52.5% to 65.0%. A total of 973 slides were analysed to evaluate the quality of thick and thin blood smears. Considering all laboratories there was a significant increase in quality of thick and thin blood smears. To determine the performance of microscopy using qPCR as the reference method we used 1,028 samples. Benguela presented the highest values for specificity, 92.9% and 98.8% pre and post-course, respectively and for sensitivity the best pre-course was Benguela (75.9%) and post-course Luanda (75.0%). However, no significant increase in sensitivity and specificity after the training course was registered in any laboratory analysed. The findings of this study support the need of continuous refresher training for microscopists and other laboratory staff. The laboratories should have a quality control programme to supervise the diagnosis and also to assess the periodicity of new training. However, other variables needed to be considered to have a correct malaria diagnosis, such as adequate equipment and reagents for staining and visualization, good working conditions, motivated and qualified personnel.

  17. The Science and Issues of Human DNA Polymorphisms: A Training Workshop for High School Biology Teachers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micklos, David A.

    2006-10-30

    This project achieved its goal of implementing a nationwide training program to introduce high school biology teachers to the key uses and societal implications of human DNA polymorphisms. The 2.5-day workshop introduced high school biology faculty to a laboratory-based unit on human DNA polymorphisms â which provides a uniquely personal perspective on the science and Ethical, Legal and Social Implications (ELSI) of the Human Genome Project. As proposed, 12 workshops were conducted at venues across the United States. The workshops were attended by 256 high school faculty, exceeding proposed attendance of 240 by 7%. Each workshop mixed theoretical, laboratory, and computer work with practical and ethical implications. Program participants learned simplified lab techniques for amplifying three types of chromosomal polymorphisms: an Alu insertion (PV92), a VNTR (pMCT118/D1S80), and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the mitochondrial control region. These polymorphisms illustrate the use of DNA variations in disease diagnosis, forensic biology, and identity testing - and provide a starting point for discussing the uses and potential abuses of genetic technology. Participants also learned how to use their Alu and mitochondrial data as an entrée to human population genetics and evolution. Our work to simplify lab techniques for amplifying human DNA polymorphisms in educational settings culminated with the release in 1998 of three Advanced Technology (AT) PCR kits by Carolina Biological Supply Company, the nationâÂÂs oldest educational science supplier. The kits use a simple 30-minute method to isolate template DNA from hair sheaths or buccal cells and streamlined PCR chemistry based on Pharmacia Ready-To-Go Beads, which incorporate Taq polymerase, deoxynucleotide triphosphates, and buffer in a freeze-dried pellet. These kits have greatly simplified teacher implementation of human PCR labs, and their use is growing at a rapid pace. Sales of human polymorphism kits by Carolina Biological rose from 700 units in 1999 to 1,132 in 2000 â a 62% increase. Competing kits using the Alu system, and based substantially on our earlier work, are also marketed by Biorad and Edvotek. In parallel with the lab experiments, we developed a suite of database/statistical applications and easy-to-use interfaces that allow students to use their own DNA data to explore human population genetics and to test theories of human evolution. Database searches and statistical analyses are launched from a centralized workspace. Workshop participants were introduced to these and other resources available at the DNALC WWW site (http://vector.cshl.org/bioserver/): 1) Allele Server tests Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and statistically compares PV92 data from world populations. 2) Sequence Server uses DNA sequence data to search Genbank using BLASTN, compare sequences using CLUSTALW, and create phylogenetic trees using PHYLIP. 3) Simulation Server uses a Monte Carlo generator to model the long-term effects of drift, selection, and population bottlenecks. By targeting motivated and innovative biology faculty, we believe that this project offered a cost-effective means to bring high school biology education up-to-the-minute with genomic biology. The workshop reached a target audience of highly professional faculty who have already implemented hands-on labs in molecular genetics and many of whom offer laboratory electives in biotechnology. Many attend professional meetings, develop curriculum, collaborate with scientists, teach faculty workshops, and manage equipment-sharing programs. These individuals are life-long learners, anxious for deeper insight and additional training to further extend their leadership. This contention was supported by data from a mail survey, conducted in February-March 2000 and 2001, of 256 faculty who participated in workshops conducted during the current term of DOE support. Seventy percent of participants responded, providing direct reports on how their teaching behavior had changed since taking the DOE workshop. About nine of ten respondents said they had provided new classroom materials and first-hand accounts of DNA typing, sequencing, or PCR. Three-fourths had introduced new units on human molecular genetics. Most strikingly, half had students use PCR to amplify their own insertion polymorphisms (PV92), and better than one-fourth amplified a VNTR polymorphism and the mitochondrial control region. One in five had mitochondrial DNA sequenced by the DNALC Sequencing Service. A majority (58%) used online materials at the DNALC WWW site, and 28% analyzed student polymorphism data with Bioservers at the DNALC site. A majority (58%) assisted other faculty with student labs on polymorphisms, reaching an additional 786 teachers.

  18. A training simulator ensures the competence of operating and maintenance staff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaivola, R.; Tamminen, L. [ed.

    1997-11-01

    IVO Generation Services Ltd (IGS) has overall responsibility made on the basis of long-term contracts for the operation and maintenance of the customers` power plants. Partnership is the key concept, and customers are thus able to concentrate on their own specific business activities. Research and development projects are primarily aimed at cutting the customer`s power generation costs and at increasing the efficiency of operation and maintenance

  19. Development of a training programme for radiation protection officers in industrial irradiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mumuni, I. I.

    2014-01-01

    The International Basic Safety Standards (BSS) for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources establish the basic requirements for protection against the risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources that may deliver such exposure. One important aspect of the Safety Standard is education and training of all personnel involved in the activities of radiation and radioactive sources. According to the BSS a Radiation Protection Officer is an individual technically competent in radiation protection matters relevant for a given type of practice who is designated by the registrant or licensee to oversee the application of the requirements of the standards. By this assigned role, radiation protection officers for industrial irradiators should be adequately trained since these facilities involve very high dose rates during irradiation, such that a person accidentally exposed can receive a lethal dose within minutes or seconds and fatalities can occur. This training among others things will enable the radiation protection officers to understand practical application of the IAEA Safety Standard to industrial irradiator facilities, understand the requirements for safety assessments and emergency plans, be able to develop a radiation protection programme for irradiators, be familiar with the different types of industrial irradiators and their applications and understand the safety philosophy and design requirements for industrial irradiators. (author)

  20. Emergency Victim Care. A Training Manual for Emergency Medical Technicians. Module 3--Anatomy and Physiology. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This student manual, the third in a set of 14 modules, is designed to train emergency medical technicians (EMTs) in Ohio. The module contains one section covering the following topics: general anatomical terms, the body cavities and contents, the integumentary system, the skeletal system, the muscular system, the nervous system, the respiratory…

  1. The Recording of Student Performance in the Microbiology Laboratory as a Training, Tutorial, and Motivational Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Lipson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The laboratory component of a microbiology course consists of exercises which mandate a level of proficiency and manual dexterity equal to and often beyond that recognized among other biology courses. Bacterial growth, maintenance, identification (e.g., Gram stain, biochemical tests, genomics, as well as the continuous need to maintain laboratory safety and sterile technique, are only a few skills/responsibilities critical to the discipline of microbiology. Performance of the Gram stain remains one of the most basic and pivotal skills that must be mastered in the microbiology laboratory. However, a number of students continually have difficulty executing the Gram stain and preparative procedures associated with the test. In order to address this issue, we incorporated real-time digital recording as a supplemental teaching aid in the microbiology laboratory. Our use of the digital movie camera in the teaching setting served to enhance interest, motivate students, and in general, improve student performance.

  2. The recording of student performance in the microbiology laboratory as a training, tutorial, and motivational tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipson, Steven M; Gair, Marina

    2011-01-01

    The laboratory component of a microbiology course consists of exercises which mandate a level of proficiency and manual dexterity equal to and often beyond that recognized among other biology courses. Bacterial growth, maintenance, identification (e.g., Gram stain, biochemical tests, genomics), as well as the continuous need to maintain laboratory safety and sterile technique, are only a few skills/responsibilities critical to the discipline of microbiology. Performance of the Gram stain remains one of the most basic and pivotal skills that must be mastered in the microbiology laboratory. However, a number of students continually have difficulty executing the Gram stain and preparative procedures associated with the test. In order to address this issue, we incorporated real-time digital recording as a supplemental teaching aid in the microbiology laboratory. Our use of the digital movie camera in the teaching setting served to enhance interest, motivate students, and in general, improve student performance.

  3. Scaffolding for motivation by parents, and child homework motivations and emotions: Effects of a training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moè, Angelica; Katz, Idit; Alesi, Marianna

    2018-06-01

    Based on the principles of scaffolding for motivation and on the assumptions of self-determination theory, two studies aimed to assess the role played by perceived parental autonomy-supportive scaffolding on child homework autonomous motivation, self-efficacy, affect, and engagement. The results of Study 1, which involved 122 parents and their children, showed that the higher the parental autonomous motivation, the more their children perceived them as autonomy-supportive while scaffolding for motivation, and hence developed autonomous motivation, self-efficacy, and engagement in homework. In Study 2, 37 parents were involved in a four-session training programme that focused on sustaining autonomy-supportive scaffolding modalities. The training decreased parental negative affect, prevented child negative affect increase, and maintained child homework motivation. The discussion focuses on the strength that parents have with regard to helping their children develop less negative, and potentially also more positive attitude towards homework, through autonomy support as a scaffold for motivation. © 2018 The British Psychological Society.

  4. Video Games as a Training Tool to Prepare the Next Generation of Cyber Warriors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    expected to grow beyond 6,000 employees in 2016 compared to an 16 estimate of 1,800 by the end of 2014 (Baldor et al. 2014). 17 • The GAO reported a 22...gamers spend a combined estimate of 1900 years per day playing some ver-24 sion of their Call of Duty franchise games online (Activision & Blizzard

  5. Emotional state talk and emotion understanding: a training study with preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavazzi, Ilaria Grazzani; Ornaghi, Veronica

    2011-11-01

    ABSTRACTThe present study investigates whether training preschool children in the active use of emotional state talk plays a significant role in bringing about greater understanding of emotion terms and improved emotion comprehension. Participants were 100 preschool children (M=52 months; SD=9·9; range: 35-70 months), randomly assigned to experimental or control conditions. They were pre- and post-tested to assess their language comprehension, metacognitive language comprehension and emotion understanding. Analyses of pre-test data did not show any significant differences between experimental and control groups. During the intervention phase, the children were read stories enriched with emotional lexicon. After listening to the stories, children in the experimental group took part in conversational language games designed to stimulate use of the selected emotional terms. In contrast, the control group children did not take part in any special linguistic activities after the story readings. Analyses revealed that the experimental group outperformed the control group in the understanding of inner state language and in the comprehension of emotion.

  6. Safe and competent opioid prescribing education: Increasing dissemination with a train-the-trainer program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zisblatt, Lara; Hayes, Sean M; Lazure, Patrice; Hardesty, Ilana; White, Julie L; Alford, Daniel P

    2017-01-01

    Due to the high prevalence of prescription opioid misuse, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) mandated a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) requiring manufacturers of extended-release/long-acting (ER/LA) opioids to fund continuing education based on an FDA curricular Blueprint. This paper describes the Safe and Competent Opioid Prescribing Education (SCOPE of Pain) train-the-trainer program and its impact on (1) disseminating the SCOPE of Pain curriculum and (2) knowledge, confidence, attitudes, and performance of the participants of trainer-led compared with expert-led meetings. SCOPE of Pain is a 3-hour ER/LA opioid REMS education. In addition to expert-led live statewide meetings, a 2-hour train-the-trainer (TTT) workshop was developed to increase dissemination nationally. The trainers were expected to conduct SCOPE of Pain meetings at their institutions. Participants of both the trainer-led and expert-led SCOPE of Pain programs were surveyed immediately post and 2 months post meetings to assess improvements in knowledge, confidence, attitudes, and self-reported safe opioid prescribing practices. During 9 months (May 2013 to February 2014), 89 trainers were trained during 9 TTT workshops in 9 states. Over 24 months (May 2013 to April 2015), 33% of the trainers conducted at least 1 SCOPE of Pain training, with a total of 79 meetings that educated 1419 participants. The average number of meetings of those who conducted at least 1 meeting was 2.8 (range: 1-19). The participants of the trainer-led programs were significantly more likely to be practicing in rural settings than those who participated in the expert-led meetings (39% vs. 26%, P strategy to increase guideline-based safe opioid prescribing knowledge, confidence, attitudes, and self-reported practices.

  7. [Development of a training program for Japanese dyslexic children and its short-term efficacy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakamiya, Eiji; Takeshita, Takashi; Nakanishi, Makoto; Mizuta, Mekumi; Kurimoto, Naoko; Okumura, Tomohito; Tamai, Hiroshi; Koeda, Tatsuya; Inagaki, Masumi

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a computer training program of reading for the Japanese dyslexic children and to examine its short-term efficacy on their reading and writing abilities. Fifteen dyslexic children underwent two sets of training programs, one for single-hiragana and non-word reading, and the other for the reading of real words, in which each hiragana was followed by the correctly read sound. Subjects were required to use a given program for five minutes a day for three weeks, switching to the other program after a three-week interval. Four kinds of reading test and one writing test were done at the beginning and end of each program period. The averages reading speeds increased, and the single-hiragana reading error average was lower after the training. Hiragana-writing errors also decreased, even though no writing procedure was involved in the programs. The results indicate the usefulness of these training programs as an early intervention of reading and writing for the Japanese dyslexic children.

  8. Team awareness for workplace substance abuse prevention: the empirical and conceptual development of a training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, J B; Lehman, W E; Reynolds, G S

    2000-09-01

    This paper describes the empirical and theoretical development of a workplace training program to help reduce/prevent employee alcohol and drug abuse and enhance aspects of the work group environment that support ongoing prevention. The paper (1) examines the changing social context of the workplace (e.g., teamwork, privacy issues) as relevant for prevention, (2) reviews studies that assess risks and protective factors in employee substance abuse (work environment, group processes, and employee attitudes), (3) provides a conceptual model that focuses on work group processes (enabling, neutralization of deviance) as the locus of prevention efforts, (4) describes an enhanced team-oriented training that was derived from previous research and the conceptual model, and (5) describes potential applications of the program. It is suggested that the research and conceptual model may help prevention scientists to assess the organizational context of any workplace prevention strategy. The need for this team-oriented approach may be greater among employees who experience psychosocial risks such as workplace drinking climates, social alienation, and policies that emphasize deterrence (drug testing) over educative prevention. Limitations of the model are also discussed.

  9. Evaluation of Procedural Simulation as a Training and Assessment Tool in General Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Flemming; Strandbygaard, Jeanett; Rosthøj, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic appendectomy is a commonly performed surgical procedure, but few training models have been described for it. We examined a virtual reality module for practising a laparoscopic appendectomy. METHODS: A prospective cohort study with the following 3 groups of surgeons (n = 45...

  10. Experiments on resonator concept of plasma wakefield accelerator driven by a train of relativistic electron bunches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiselev, V.A.; Linnik, A.F.; Mirny, V. I; Onishchenko, I.N.; Uskov, V.V.

    2008-01-01

    The experimental installation was elaborated to increase plasma wakefield amplitude by means of using plasma resonator that allows all bunches of the train to participate in wakefield build-up contrary to waveguide case, in which due to group velocity effect only a part of the bunches participates. Experiments on plasma producing with resonant density, at which a coincidence of the plasma frequency and bunch repetition frequency is provided, are carried out. The first results of the measurements of beam energy loss on plasma wakefield excitation and energy gain by accelerated electrons are presented

  11. Customers’ Complaints and its Determinants: The Case of a Training Educational Hospital in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ebrahimipour

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundToday, despite the efforts of the medical community and healthcare staff along with the advancements in medical technology, patients’ dissatisfaction and complaints have been increased. The present study aimed at making a survey on the patients’ complaints in a large training hospital affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (MUMS. MethodsThis descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted on written and verbal complaints of patients and their relatives in a tertiary (specialty and sub-specialty training hospital. All the recorded patients’ complaints, from March to December 2012, were reviewed. Data were categorized and analyzed using descriptive statistics by Microsoft Excel 2007. ResultsA total of 233 complaints were reviewed, of which 46.35%, 31.34% and 22.31%, respectively, were verbal, written and made on the phone. The main reasons for complaints were accessibility to medical staff (21.46%, communication failures (20.17% and dissatisfaction with the provided care (14.59%. Thirty one (13.31% cases were solved at first place, 194 (83.26% referred to the complaints from the committee and 3.43% referred to the legal authorities. The average response time was about six to seven days. ConclusionThe findings of the study suggest that sufficient availability of medical staff, improvement in communication skills and paying attention to the patients’ needs and expectations may reduce complaints from public health facilities.

  12. Need Assessment: Winnowing Expressed Concerns for Critical Needs. A Training Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastmond, Jefferson N.

    A procedure is given for determining various concerns for the identification of priority needs or important problems. Chapters deal with procedures for harvesting educational concerns, illustrations of the systematic harvesting of concerns, concerns classification and analysis, and conducting the need assessment. A diagram of the procedure for…

  13. Active Video Games as a Training Tool for Individuals With Chronic Respiratory Diseases: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Stacey J; Lee, Annemarie L; Goldstein, Roger S; Brooks, Dina

    2018-02-26

    Exercise is an effective treatment for reducing symptom severity and improving quality of life for patients with chronic respiratory diseases. Active video games offer a new and enjoyable way to exercise and have gained popularity in a rehabilitation setting. However, it is unclear whether they achieve comparable physiological and clinical effects as traditional exercise training. A systematic literature search was performed to identify studies that included an active video game component as a form of exercise training and a comparator group in chronic respiratory disease. Two assessors independently reviewed study quality using the Cochrane risk of bias tool and extracted data for exercise capacity, quality of life, and preference of exercise model. Six studies were included in this review. Because of the heterogeneity of the populations, study designs, length of intervention, and outcome measures, meta-analysis could not be performed. Active video game training resulted in comparable training maximal heart rate and dyspnea levels to those achieved when exercising using a treadmill or cycle (n = 5). There was insufficient evidence (n = 3) to determine whether active video game training improved exercise capacity as measured by 6-min walk test or treadmill endurance walking. Although the quality of evidence was low, in a small number of studies active video games induced peak heart rates and dyspnea levels comparable with traditional exercise training. Larger and longer-term randomized controlled trials are needed to establish the impact of video game training for individuals with chronic respiratory diseases.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  14. Basic Botany On-Line: A Training Tool for the Master Gardener Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDerZanden, Ann Marie; Rost, Bob; Eckel, Rick

    2002-01-01

    A noncredit, online training module on botany was offered to participants in the Oregon Master Gardener program. The 48 participants felt the module was a useful training tool. They also noted that the convenience of completing the material at their own pace and during a time that fit into their schedule. (SK)

  15. Lessons from a Train-the-Trainer Professional Development Program: The Sustainable Trainer Engagement Program (STEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shupla, Christine; Gladney, Alicia; Dalton, Heather; LaConte, Keliann; Truxillo, Jeannette; Shipp, Stephanie

    2015-11-01

    The Sustainable Trainer Engagement Program (STEP) is a modified train-the-trainer professional development program being conducted by the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI). STEP has provided two cohorts of 6-8th grade science specialists and lead teachers in the Houston region with in-depth Earth and Space Science (ESS) content, activities, and pedagogy over 15 days each, aligned with Texas science standards. This project has two over-arching goals: to improve middle school ESS instruction, and to create and test an innovative model for Train-the-Trainer.This poster will share details regarding STEP’s activities and resources, program achievements, and its main findings to date. STEP is being evaluated by external evaluators at the Research Institute of Texas, part of the Harris County Department of Education. External evaluation shows an increase after one year in STEP participants’ knowledge (cohort 1 showed a 10% increase; cohort 2 showed a 20% increase), confidence in teaching Earth and Space Science effectively (cohort 1 demonstrated a 10% increase; cohort 2 showed a 20% increase), and confidence in preparing other teachers (cohort 1 demonstrated a 12% increase; cohort 2 showed a 20% increase). By September 2015, STEP participants led (or assisted in leading) approximately 40 workshops for about 1800 science teachers in Texas. Surveys of teachers attending professional development conducted by STEP participants show very positive responses, with averages for conference workshop evaluations ranging from 3.6 on a 4 point scale, and other evaluations averaging from 4.1 to 5.0 on a 5 point scale.Main lessons for the team on the train-the-trainer model include: a lack of confidence by leaders in K-12 science education in presenting ESS professional development, difficulties in arranging for school or district content-specific professional development, the minimal duration of most school and district professional development sessions, and uncertainties in partnerships between scientists and educators.

  16. Working safely in gamma radiography. A training manual for industrial radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, S.A.; Peabody, C.A.

    1982-09-01

    This manual is designed for classroom training in working safely in industrial radiography using gamma sources. The purpose is to train radiographers' assistants to work safely as a qualified gamma radiographer. The contents cover the essentials of radiation, radiation protection, emergency procedures, gamma cameras, and biological effects of radiation

  17. Volleyball players training intensity monitoring through the use of spectral analysis of heart rate variability during a training microcycle [Kontrola zatížení hráčů volejbalu metodou spektrální analýzy variability srdeční frekvence během týdenního tréninkového mikrocyklu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Jakubec

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Volleyball players in different specializations are required to meet specific demands in terms of movement behaviour and skills performance. These specific demands need to be individualized according to the training ability level (adaptability to sports training of particular players, which is mainly dependent on the activity of the autonomic nervous system (ANS. Spectral analysis of heart rate variability (SA HRV gives us information on cardiac activity regulation, where the activity of ANS participates in a significant way. Longitudinal assessment of SA HRV within a certain part of a training period can help us to observe the dynamics of the ANS activity and adaptability (training ability changes of an observed player to training. OBJECTIVE: The goal of the work was to verify the possibility of volleyball players' training load optimalization during a one week training microcycle based on the longitudinal observation of dynamics of SA HRV complex indices. METHODS: The SA HRV method was used for the evaluation of autonomic cardiac regulation. The study group consisted of eight volleyball players who took part in 28 training sessions focused on conditioning and volleyball skills development. During the microcycle, there were 7 HRV examinations. RESULTS: The results demonstrated that notable and considerably varied changes in the activity of ANS in players were assessed owing to both training and extra-training stimuli. The results in two players show a high activity of ANS which enables them to increase their training intensity. Four players achieved average values of their ANS activity, which reflects a corresponding training load. In the last two players we found a very low level of their ANS activity and it refers to their reduced adaptability to the training load, which was too high for them. CONCLUSIONS: The presented results support the necessity of the individualization of, at least a part of, team training. Such an

  18. Quantifying Uncertainties in Mass-Dimensional Relationships Through a Comparison Between CloudSat and SPartICus Reflectivity Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascio, J.; Mace, G. G.

    2015-12-01

    CloudSat and CALIPSO, two of the satellites in the A-Train constellation, use algorithms to calculate the scattering properties of small cloud particles, such as the T-matrix method. Ice clouds (i.e. cirrus) cause problems with these cloud property retrieval algorithms because of their variability in ice mass as a function of particle size. Assumptions regarding the microphysical properties, such as mass-dimensional (m-D) relationships, are often necessary in retrieval algorithms for simplification, but these assumptions create uncertainties of their own. Therefore, ice cloud property retrieval uncertainties can be substantial and are often not well known. To investigate these uncertainties, reflectivity factors measured by CloudSat are compared to those calculated from particle size distributions (PSDs) to which different m-D relationships are applied. These PSDs are from data collected in situ during three flights of the Small Particles in Cirrus (SPartICus) campaign. We find that no specific habit emerges as preferred and instead we conclude that the microphysical characteristics of ice crystal populations tend to be distributed over a continuum and, therefore, cannot be categorized easily. To quantify the uncertainties in the mass-dimensional relationships, an optimal estimation inversion was run to retrieve the m-D relationship per SPartICus flight, as well as to calculate uncertainties of the m-D power law.

  19. Advances in Understanding the Role of Frozen Precipitation in High Latitude Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Ecuyer, T. S.; Wood, N.; Smalley, M.; McIlhattan, E.; Kulie, M.

    2017-12-01

    Satellite-based millimeter wavelength radar observations provide a unique perspective on the global character of frozen precipitation that has been difficult to detect using conventional spaceborne precipitation sensors. This presentation will describe the methodology underpinning the ten-year CloudSat global snowfall product and discuss the results of a number of complementary approaches that have been adopted to quantify its uncertainties. These datasets are shedding new light on the distribution, character, and impacts of frozen precipitation on high latitude hydrology. Inferred regional snowfall accumulations, for example, provide valuable constraints on projected changes in precipitation and mass balance on the Antarctic ice sheet in climate models. When placed in the broader context of complementary observations from other A-Train sensors, instantaneous snowfall estimates also hint at the large-scale processes that influence snow formation including air-sea interactions associated with cold-air outbreaks, lake-effect snows, and orographic enhancement. Simultaneous CloudSat and CALIPSO observations further emphasize the important role snowfall plays in the lifetime of super-cooled liquid containing clouds in the Arctic and highlight a model deficiency with important implications for surface energy and mass balance on the Greenland ice sheet.

  20. Subtropical Low Cloud Responses to Central and Eastern Pacific El Nino Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, A. D.; Bennartz, R.; Jiang, J. H.; Kato, S.; Olson, W. S.; Pinker, R. T.; Su, H.; Taylor, P. C.

    2014-12-01

    The eastern Pacific El Niño event in 2006-2007 and the central Pacific El Niño event during 2009-2010 exhibit opposite responses in the top of atmosphere (TOA) cloud radiative effects. These responses are driven by differences in large-scale circulation that result in significant low cloud anomalies in the subtropical southeastern Pacific. Both the vertical profile of cloud fraction and cloud water content are reduced during the eastern Pacific El Niño; however, the shift in the distribution of cloud characteristics and the physical processes underlying these changes need further analysis. The NASA Energy and Water Cycle Study (NEWS) Clouds and Radiation Working Group will use a synthesis of NEWS data products, A-Train satellite measurements, reanalysis, and modeling approaches to further explore the differences in the low cloud response to changes in the large-scale forcing, as well as try to understand the physical mechanism driving the observed changes in the low clouds for the 2006/07 and 2009/10 distinct El Niño events. The distributions of cloud macrophysical, microphysical, and radiative properties over the southeast Pacific will first be compared for these two events using a combination of MODIS, CloudSat/CALIPSO, and CERES data. Satellite and reanalysis estimates of changes in the vertical temperature and moisture profiles, lower tropospheric stability, winds, and surface heat fluxes are then used to identify the drivers for observed differences in the clouds and TOA radiative effects.

  1. Laser Remote Sensing from ISS: CATS Cloud and Aerosol Level 2 Data Products (Heritage Edition)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodier, Sharon; Palm, Steve; Vaughan, Mark; Yorks, John; McGill, Matt; Jensen, Mike; Murray, Tim; Trepte, Chip

    2016-01-01

    With the recent launch of the Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) we have the opportunity to acquire a continuous record of space based lidar measurements spanning from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) era to the start of the EarthCARE mission. Utilizing existing well-validated science algorithms from the CALIPSO mission, we will ingest the CATS data stream and deliver high-quality lidar data sets to the user community at the earliest possible opportunity. In this paper we present an overview of procedures necessary to generate CALIPSO-like lidar level 2 data products from the CATS level 1 data products.

  2. Constellations: A New Paradigm for Earth Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Angelita C.; Volz, Stephen M.; Yuhas, Cheryl L.; Case, Warren F.

    2009-01-01

    The last decade has seen a significant increase in the number and the capabilities of remote sensing satellites launched by the international community. A relatively new approach has been the launching of satellites into heterogeneous constellations. Constellations provide the scientists a capability to acquire science data, not only from specific instruments on a single satellite, but also from instruments on other satellites that fly in the same orbit. Initial results from the A-Train (especially following the CALIPSO/CloudSat launch) attest to the tremendous scientific value of constellation flying. This paper provides a history of the constellations (particularly the A-Train) and how the A-Train mission design was driven by science requirements. The A-Train has presented operational challenges which had not previously been encountered. Operations planning had to address not only how the satellites of each constellation operate safely together, but also how the two constellations fly in the same orbits without interfering with each other when commands are uplinked or data are downlinked to their respective ground stations. This paper discusses the benefits of joining an on-orbit constellation. When compared to a single, large satellite, a constellation infrastructure offers more than just the opportunities for coincidental science observations. For example, constellations reduce risks by distributing observing instruments among numerous satellites; in contrast, a failed launch or a system failure in a single satellite would lead to loss of all observations. Constellations allow for more focused, less complex satellites. Constellations distribute the development, testing, and operations costs among various agencies and organizations for example, the Morning and Afternoon Constellations involve several agencies within the U.S. and in other countries. Lastly, this paper addresses the need to plan for the long-term evolution of a constellation. Agencies need to have

  3. Highlights from e-EPS: Coordinated Access to Light sources

    CERN Multimedia

    e-EPS News

    2014-01-01

    The CALIPSO project, which runs until May 2015, will contribute to the effective exploitation of European synchrotrons and free electron lasers. CALIPSO (Coordinated Access to Light sources to Promote Standards and Optimisation) includes 20 partners forming one of the largest Research Networks in the world.   e-EPS interviewed M. Bertolo, CALIPSO project manager and his assistant C. Blasetti. Which challenges are addressed by CALIPSO? CALIPSO’s goal is to optimize the exploitation of the European synchrotrons and Free Electron Lasers. With respect to previous projects funded by the European Commission, it foresees significant improvements in integration, innovation and user-friendliness in all three areas of networking, transnational access and instrumentation. The Transnational Access program potentially benefits a community of 25,000 estimated users offering free open access to 12 synchrotrons and 5 free electron lasers solely based on scientific merit. In ad...

  4. The Captive Helicopter as a Training Device: Experimental Evaluation of a Concept. Technical Report 68-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, Paul W., Jr.; And Others

    As part of the Army's effort to use synthetic devices to improve training, researchers evaluated a captive helicopter attached to a ground effects machine. Experimental groups received varying amounts of pre-flight practice tasks designed to develop flight skills, while control groups received no device training. Student flight performance during…

  5. Investigating a training supporting shared decision making (IT'S SDM 2011: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geiger Friedemann

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Shared Decision Making (SDM is regarded as the best practice model for the communicative challenge of decision making about treatment or diagnostic options. However, randomized controlled trials focusing the effectiveness of SDM trainings are rare and existing measures of SDM are increasingly challenged by the latest research findings. This study will 1 evaluate a new physicians' communication training regarding patient involvement in terms of SDM, 2 validate SDMMASS, a new compound measure of SDM, and 3 evaluate the effects of SDM on the perceived quality of the decision process and on the elaboration of the decision. Methods In a multi-center randomized controlled trial with a waiting control group, 40 physicians from 7 medical fields are enrolled. Each physician contributes a sequence of four medical consultations including a diagnostic or treatment decision. The intervention consists of two condensed video-based individual coaching sessions (15min. supported by a manual and a DVD. The interventions alternate with three measurement points plus follow up (6 months. Realized patient involvement is measured using the coefficient SDMMASS drawn from the Multifocal Approach to the Sharing in SDM (MAPPIN'SDM which includes objective involvement, involvement as perceived by the patient, and the doctor-patient concordance regarding their judges of the involvement. For validation purposes, all three components of SDMMASS are supplemented by similar measures, the OPTION observer scale, the Shared Decision Making Questionnaire (SDM-Q and the dyadic application of the Decisional Conflict Scale (DCS. Training effects are analyzed using t-tests. Spearman correlation coefficients are used to determine convergent validities, the influence of involvement (SDMMASS on the perceived decision quality (DCS and on the elaboration of the decision. The latter is operationalised by the ELAB coefficient from the UP24 (Uncertainty Profile, 24 items version. Discussion Due to the rigorous blinded randomized controlled design, the current trial promises valid and reliable results. On the one hand, we expect this condensed time-saving training to be adopted in clinical routine more likely than previous trainings. On the other hand, the exhaustivity of the MAPPIN'SDM measurement system qualifies it as a reference measure for simpler instruments and to deepen understanding of decision-making processes. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN78716079

  6. An Evaluation of a Train-the-Trainer Workshop for Social Service Workers to Develop Community-Based Family Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Y. Lai

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionEvaluation studies on train-the-trainer workshops (TTTs to develop family well-being interventions are limited in the literature. The Logic Model offers a framework to place some important concepts and tools of intervention science in the hands of frontline service providers. This paper reports on the evaluation of a TTT for a large community-based program to enhance family well-being in Hong Kong.MethodsThe 2-day TTT introduced positive psychology themes (relevant to the programs that the trainees would deliver and the Logic Model (which provides a framework to guide intervention development and evaluation for social service workers to guide their community-based family interventions. The effectiveness of the TTT was examined by self-administered questionnaires that assessed trainees’ changes in learning (perceived knowledge, self-efficacy, attitude, and intention, trainees’ reactions to training content, knowledge sharing, and benefits to their service organizations before and after the training and then 6 months and 1 year later. Missing data were replaced by baseline values in an intention-to-treat analysis. Focus group interviews were conducted approximately 6 months after training.ResultsFifty-six trainees (79% women joined the TTT. Forty-four and 31 trainees completed the 6-month and 1-year questionnaires, respectively. The trainees indicated that the workshop was informative and well organized. The TTT-enhanced trainees’ perceived knowledge, self-efficacy, and attitudes toward the application of the Logic Model and positive psychology constructs in program design. These changes were present with small to large effect size that persisted to the 1 year follow-up. The skills learned were used to develop 31 family interventions that were delivered to about 1,000 families. Qualitative feedback supported the quantitative results.ConclusionThis TTT offers a practical example of academic-community partnerships that promote capacity among community social service workers. Goals included sharing basic tools of intervention development and evaluation, and the TTT offered, therefore, the potential of learning skills that extended beyond the lifetime of a single program.Clinical trial registrationThe research protocol was registered at the National Institutes of Health (identifier number: NCT01796275.

  7. Training simulated patients: evaluation of a training approach using self-assessment and peer/tutor feedback to improve performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Juriah

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most medical schools use simulated patients (SPs for teaching. In this context the authenticity of role play and quality of feedback provided by SPs is of paramount importance. The available literature on SP training mostly addresses instructor led training where the SPs are given direction on their roles. This study focuses on the use of peer and self evaluation as a tool to train SPs. Methods SPs at the medical school participated in a staff development and training programme which included a self-assessment of their performance while observing video-tapes of their role play using a structured guide and b peer group assessment of their performance under tutor guidance. The pre and post training performance in relation to authenticity of role play and quality of feedback was blindly assessed by students and tutors using a validated instrument and the scores were compared. A focus group discussion and a questionnaire assessed acceptability of the training programme by the SPs. Results The post-training performance assessment scores were significantly higher (p Conclusion Use of structured self-reflective and peer-interactive, practice based methods of SP training is recommended to improve SP performance. More studies on these methods of training may further refine SP training and lead to improvement of SP performance which in turn may positively impact medical education.

  8. Training simulated patients: evaluation of a training approach using self-assessment and peer/tutor feedback to improve performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Jennifer; Perera, Joachim; Abdullah, Juriah; Lee, Nagarajah

    2009-06-29

    Most medical schools use simulated patients (SPs) for teaching. In this context the authenticity of role play and quality of feedback provided by SPs is of paramount importance. The available literature on SP training mostly addresses instructor led training where the SPs are given direction on their roles. This study focuses on the use of peer and self evaluation as a tool to train SPs. SPs at the medical school participated in a staff development and training programme which included a) self-assessment of their performance while observing video-tapes of their role play using a structured guide and b) peer group assessment of their performance under tutor guidance. The pre and post training performance in relation to authenticity of role play and quality of feedback was blindly assessed by students and tutors using a validated instrument and the scores were compared. A focus group discussion and a questionnaire assessed acceptability of the training programme by the SPs. The post-training performance assessment scores were significantly higher (p performance. More studies on these methods of training may further refine SP training and lead to improvement of SP performance which in turn may positively impact medical education.

  9. Implantation and Evaluation of a Training Program in Radiation Protection of the Exposed Workers in our Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil Agudo, A.; Ruiz Rodriguez, J. C.; Zapata Jimenez, J. C.; Munoz Cuevas, R.; Gil Tomas, S.

    2004-01-01

    The object of this work is to introduce the training program in Radiation Protection implemented in our Hospital, and its evaluation and follow-up. Material AND Methods: The training program in Radiation Protection implanted by the Department of Radiation Protection in the Hospital de la Ribera consists of three types of training modalities: Annual Seminars: applicable to all the exposed workers and divided in a general part and a specific one for each area; Informative lectures: applicable to a specific department, deal with specific issues of interest without predetermined frequency; Individualised training: applicable to pregnant, new workers, job moves and duties change. The follow-up of the program is carried out by mean of inquiries about general and site-specific knowledge on radiation protection. Results The results of the inquiries are analysed and related with the continuous training program. Conclusion: It is remarkable that departments with workers without academic training in radiation protection (Intensive Care Unit, Surgery, Endoscopy,) need a more dedicated training. The results confirm the validity of the three training modalities: The annual seminar provides a continuous training to all exposed workers; the informative lecture is useful to handle immediately issues of current interest in a specific department and the individual training are useful to acquire specific knowledge about radiation risks and radiation protection rules in new working situations. (Author)

  10. The impact of CPR and AED training on healthcare professionals' self-perceived attitudes to performing resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Källestedt Marie-Louise

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Healthcare professionals have shown concern about performing mouth-to-mouth ventilation due to the risks to themselves with the procedure. However, little is known about healthcare professionals' fears and attitudes to start CPR and the impact of training. Objective To examine whether there were any changes in the attitudes among healthcare professionals to performing CPR from before to after training. Methods Healthcare professionals from two Swedish hospitals were asked to answer a questionnaire before and after training. The questions were relating to physical and mental discomfort and attitudes to CPR. Statistical analysis used was generalized McNemar's test. Results Overall, there was significant improvement in 10 of 11 items, reflecting various aspects of attitudes to CPR. All groups of health care professionals (physicians, nurses, assistant nurses, and "others" = physiotherapists, occupational therapists, social welfare officers, psychologists, biomedical analysts felt more secure in CPR knowledge after education. In other aspects, such as anxiety prior to a possible cardiac arrest, only nurses and assistant nurses improved. The concern about being infected, when performing mouth to mouth ventilation, was reduced with the most marked reduction in physicians (75%; P Conclusion In this hospital-based setting, we found a positive outcome of education and training in CPR concerning healthcare professionals' attitudes to perform CPR. They felt more secure in their knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. In some aspects of attitudes to resuscitation nurses and assistant nurses appeared to be the groups that were most markedly influenced. The concern of being infected by a disease was low.

  11. The Evolution of a Teacher during a training of future-teachers in Chemistry in a socio-environmental perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Rios Melo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The research aims to interpret the changes in teacher’s beliefs and teaching practice: she was committed to encourage her future teachers to adopt the socio-environmental issues for the development of scientific content in classrooms. The work is an action research conducted by a teacher at a private institution of Higher Education (IHE, in collaboration with other researchers over four years. The analysis used as a reference some concepts of Melanie Klein and the Teacher’s Discourses, drawn from analogies with Lacan’s Discourses. Data analysis allowed raising the difficulties, dilemmas and successes she encountered along the experience, as well as some changes in her educational beliefs and teaching practice. As a result of the process some social and environmental indicators were established which allowed to assess both the evolution of the teacher and the teaching projects of the students.

  12. Teachers' Perceptions of the Learning Environment and Their Knowledge Base in a Training Program for Novice University Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannes, Christine; Fendler, Jan; Seidel, Tina

    2013-01-01

    Despite the complexity of teaching, learning to teach in universities is often "learning by doing". To provide novice university teachers with pedagogic teaching knowledge and to help them develop specific teaching objectives, we created a structured, video-based, one-year training program. In focusing on the core features of…

  13. A trained demonstrator has a calming effect on naïve horses when crossing a novel surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørvang, Maria Vilain; Ahrendt, Line Peerstrup; Christensen, Janne Winther

    2015-01-01

    horse being led five times across a novel surface. Immediately afterwards the observer horses were given the opportunity to cross the novel surface themselves to obtain food on the other side. Controls (n = 11) were allowed to observe the demonstrator eating on the opposite side of the novel surface...

  14. A controlled study of the short- and long-term effects of a Train the Trainers course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubak, S.; Mortensen, L.; Ringsted, C.

    2008-01-01

    assessed by a written test. Teaching behaviour and learning climate were evaluated by questionnaires. Results In the I-group, 98.4% of doctors, both specialists and trainees, participated in a TTC. Response rates on the written test varied from 90% at baseline to 70% at 6 months after the intervention....... Knowledge about teaching skills increased in the I-group by 25% after the TTC and was sustained at 6 months. Questionnaire response rates varied from 98.4% at baseline to 84.8% at 6 months. Post-course, the teaching behaviour of the I-group significantly changed and its learning climate improved compared...

  15. Simulations and Measurements for a concept of powering CALICE-AHCAL at a train-cycled accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Göttlicher, P

    2013-01-01

    Improving calorimetry by usage of the particle-flow algorithm requires to record the details of the shower development. Therefore a high granularity analogue readout hadron calorimeter (AHCAL) with small sensors and with electronics handling the enormous amount of channels, ≈ 40 000/m 3 , is required. Homogeneity is maintained by avoiding cooling tubes in the active volume and only cooling at the service end. For this concept low power consumption per channel, 40 μW, is essential. Future linear e+e − − collider designs, ILC or CLIC, foresee duty cycles for the bunch delivery. At ILC bunch trains of 1 ms duration are followed by long breaks of 200 ms. Power cycling the front end electronics with the train structure can reduce power consumption by a factor 100. However for a full scale CALICE-AHCAL switched currents reach magnitudes of kilo-amperes. This paper describes the design chain from front end PCB's through to external power supplies. By simulations a concept is developed, in which effects of electromagnetic interferences are kept small and localized. The goal is to keep current loops small, to limit the switched current to the region near the switched consumer and to allow only small frequency currents to spread out further into the system. By that analogue performance can be kept high and parasitic couplings to the surrounding metal structures and other sub-detectors will be minimized. Measurements with existing prototypes support the validity of the simulations.

  16. Motivation and Commitment: Pre-Service Teachers from Hong Kong and Mainland China at a Training Institute in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Mingyue; Lai, Chun

    2012-01-01

    Research indicates that historical and social backgrounds influence individuals' motivation to teach and their commitment to teaching (Gordon, 2000; Su, Hawkins, Huang & Zhao, 2001). This article reports on a comparative study exploring the motivation to teach and the commitment to teaching among non-local prospective student teachers from…

  17. Using Visual Support for Language and Learning in Children with SLCN: A Training Programme for Teachers and Teaching Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellington, Wendy; Stackhouse, Joy

    2011-01-01

    The majority of children with speech, language and communication needs (SLCN) are educated in mainstream classrooms where they can have difficulties with the language needed for learning. Although visual support in the classroom can help to scaffold children's learning and socialization, many teachers feel ill equipped to use this. They do not…

  18. A training course on laboratory animal science: an initiative to implement the Three Rs of animal research in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratap, Kunal; Singh, Vijay Pal

    2016-03-01

    There is a current need for a change in the attitudes of researchers toward the care and use of experimental animals in India. This could be achieved through improvements in the provision of training, to further the integration of the Three Rs concept into scientific research and into the regulations of the Committee for the Purpose of Control and Supervision of Experiments on Animals (CPCSEA). A survey was performed after participants undertook the Federation of European Laboratory Animal Science Associations (FELASA) Category C-based course on Laboratory Animal Science (in 2013 and 2015). It revealed that the participants subsequently employed, in their future research, the practical and theoretical Three Rs approaches that they had learned. This is of great importance in terms of animal welfare, and also serves to benefit their research outcomes extensively. All the lectures, hands-on practical sessions and supplementary elements of the courses, which also involved the handling of small animals and procedures with live animals, were well appreciated by the participants. Insight into developments in practical handling and welfare procedures, norms, directives, and ethical use of laboratory animals in research, was also provided, through the comparison of results from the 2013 and 2015 post-course surveys. 2016 FRAME.

  19. Development and Evaluation of a Train-the-Trainer Workshop for Hong Kong Community Social Service Agency Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qianling; Stewart, Sunita M; Wan, Alice; Leung, Charles Sai-Cheong; Lai, Agnes Y; Lam, Tai Hing; Chan, Sophia Siu-Chee

    2017-01-01

    Capacity building approaches are useful in large-scale community-based health promotion interventions. However, models to guide and evaluate capacity building among social service agency staff in community settings are rare in the literature. This paper describes the development and evaluation of a 1-day (7 h) train-the-trainer (TTT) workshop for the "Enhancing Family Well-Being Project". The workshop aimed at equipping staff from different community agencies with the knowledge and skills to design, implement, and evaluate positive psychology-based interventions for their clients in Sham Shui Po, an over-crowded and low-income district in Hong Kong. The current TTT extended and improved on our previous successful model by adding research and evaluation methods (including the Logic Model, process evaluation, and randomized controlled trial), which are important to plan and evaluate the community interventions. Evaluation of the TTT was guided by the Integrated Model of Training Evaluation and Effectiveness (IMTEE), with quantitative and qualitative methods. Quantitative data were collected from pretraining (T1), post-training (T2), and 6-month (T3) and 12-month (T4) follow-up surveys. Qualitative data were collected from four focus groups of agency staff after the intervention. Ninety-three staff from 30 community agencies attended the training, and 90 completed the baseline survey. Eighty-eight, 63, and 57 staff performed the evaluations at T2, T3, and T4, respectively. Agency staff were satisfied with the TTT. Immediate enhancement of knowledge, self-efficacy, and positive attitudes toward the training content was found at T2 (Cohen's d ranged from 0.24 to 1.22, all p  agency staff, and delivered to 1,586 participants. The agency staff indicated their intention to utilize the skills they had learned for other interventions (score ≥4 out of 6) and to share these skills with their colleagues. Qualitative feedbacks from 23 agency staff supported the quantitative results. Our brief TTT was effectively delivered to a large number of agency staff and showed effects that persisted up to 12 months. Our training and evaluation models may offer a template for capacity building among social service agency staff for community brief, universal family health promotion interventions in diverse settings.

  20. F-35A Training Basing Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2. Appendix D - Comment Response Document. Book 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Luke Forward F-35A Support Campaign Letter No. Last Name First Name City State 6360 Steider Opal Sun City West AZ 10131 Steiger Denise...mitigation? 2) The Preface re- N0-4 1016 HO assuring says "Readers who wish to quickly (emphasis mine !) review the document and compare the...of the Drafl EIS. ·~ )t)Ur mal!ng ~~to reoet"’C MINe I"’Itice$ abOut the r -3SA. T1~rw~ Bcl!ling EIS 1401 LU Final June 2012 F-35A