WorldWideScience

Sample records for macdonnell calipso a-train

  1. Use of A-train satellite observations (CALIPSO-PARASOL) to evaluate tropical cloud properties in the LMDZ5 GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konsta, D.; Dufresne, J.-L.; Chepfer, H.; Idelkadi, A.; Cesana, G.

    2016-08-01

    The evaluation of key cloud properties such as cloud cover, vertical profile and optical depth as well as the analysis of their intercorrelation lead to greater confidence in climate change projections. In addition, the comparison between observations and parameterizations of clouds in climate models is improved by using collocated and instantaneous data of cloud properties. Simultaneous and independent observations of the cloud cover and its three-dimensional structure at high spatial and temporal resolutions are made possible by the new space-borne multi-instruments observations collected with the A-train. The cloud cover and its vertical structure observed by CALIPSO and the visible directional reflectance (a surrogate for the cloud optical depth) observed by PARASOL, are used to evaluate the representation of cloudiness in two versions of the atmospheric component of the IPSL-CM5 climate model (LMDZ5). A model-to-satellite approach, applying the CFMIP Observation Simulation Package (COSP), is used to allow a quantitative comparison between model results and observations. The representation of clouds in the two model versions is first evaluated using monthly mean data. This classical approach reveals biases of different magnitudes in the two model versions. These biases consist of (1) an underestimation of cloud cover associated to an overestimation of cloud optical depth, (2) an underestimation of low- and mid-level tropical clouds and (3) an overestimation of high clouds. The difference in the magnitude of these biases between the two model versions clearly highlights the improvement of the amount of boundary layer clouds, the improvement of the properties of high-level clouds, and the improvement of the simulated mid-level clouds in the tropics in LMDZ5B compared to LMDZ5A, due to the new convective, boundary layer, and cloud parametrizations implemented in LMDZ5B. The correlation between instantaneous cloud properties allows for a process-oriented evaluation

  2. An Investigation of Interaction of Saharan Dust and Atlantic ITCZ Using Cloudsat-Calipso and A-Train Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, W.; Matsui, Toshi; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Reale, Oreste; Colarco, P.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the radiative forcing of Saharan dust, its interactions with the Atlantic Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), through African easterly waves (AEW), African easterly jets (AEJ), and its impacts in short term numerical forecasts of tropical cyclogenesis using the GOCART-GEOS5 forecast system. Our approach is to develop and use an A-Train satellite simulator (ATSS) to constrain the observed aerosol index of refraction and particle size distribution by finding the values that simultaneously minimize the difference between observed CALIOP, CloudSat, OMI, and MODIS radiances and simulated radiances inverted from atmospheric model output using procedures and physical principles consistent with those used in corresponding retrieval algorithms. We use observations from the A-train and TRMM to determine relationships among the Saharan dust layer, transport by the AEW, and possible responses to dust radiative forcing in developing tropical cyclones in the A-ITCZ. Preliminary model results showing physical processes associated with the generation and transport of the Saharan dust layer, their interactions with the incipient moisture, clouds and rainfall in developing tropical cyclones will be presented. Also presented will be results of a case study of possible radiative impacts on AEW and AEJ during the NAMMA field campaign.

  3. An Object-Oriented Approach for Analyzing CALIPSO's Profile Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepte, C. R.

    2016-12-01

    The CALIPSO satellite mission is a pioneering international partnership between NASA and the French Space Agency, CNES. Since launch on 28 April 2006, CALIPSO has been acquiring near-continuous lidar profile observations of clouds and aerosols in the Earth's atmosphere. Many studies have profitably used these observations to advance our understanding of climate, weather and air quality. For the most part, however, these studies have considered CALIPSO profile measurements independent from one another and have not related each to neighboring or family observations within a cloud element or aerosol feature. In this presentation we describe an alternative approach that groups measurements into objects visually identified from CALIPSO browse images. The approach makes use of the Visualization of CALIPSO (VOCAL) software tool that enables a user to outline a region of interest and save coordinates into a database. The selected features or objects can then be analyzed to explore spatial correlations over the feature's domain and construct bulk statistical properties for each structure. This presentation will show examples that examine cirrus and dust layers and will describe how this object-oriented approach can provide added insight into physical processes beyond conventional statistical treatments. It will further show results with combined measurements from other A-Train sensors to highlight advantages of viewing features in this manner.

  4. NASA 3D Models: CALIPSO

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    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite provides new insight into the role that clouds and atmospheric aerosols...

  5. Optimizing Saharan dust CALIPSO retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Amiridis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate improvements in CALIPSO dust extinction retrievals over North Africa and Europe when corrections are applied regarding the Saharan dust lidar ratio assumption, the separation of dust portion in detected dust mixtures, and the averaging scheme introduced in the Level 3 CALIPSO product. First, a universal, spatially constant lidar ratio of 58 sr instead of 40 sr is applied to individual Level 2 dust-related backscatter products. The resulting aerosol optical depths show an improvement compared with synchronous and co-located AERONET measurements. An absolute bias of the order of −0.03 has been found, improving on the statistically significant biases of the order of −0.10 reported in the literature for the original CALIPSO product. When compared with the MODIS co-located AOD product, the CALIPSO negative bias is even less for the lidar ratio of 58 sr. After introducing the new lidar ratio for the domain studied, we examine potential improvements to the climatological CALIPSO Level 3 extinction product: (1 by introducing a new methodology for the calculation of pure dust extinction from dust mixtures and (2 by applying an averaging scheme that includes zero extinction values for the non-dust aerosol types detected. The scheme is applied at a horizontal spatial resolution of 1° × 1° for ease of comparison with the instantaneous and co-located dust extinction profiles simulated by the BSC-DREAM8b dust model. Comparisons show that the extinction profiles retrieved with the proposed methodology reproduce the well-known model biases per sub-region examined. The very good agreement of the proposed CALIPSO extinction product with respect to AERONET, MODIS and the BSC-DREAM8b dust model, makes this dataset an ideal candidate for the provision of an accurate and robust multi-year dust climatology over North Africa and Europe.

  6. EARLINET Correlative Measurements For CALIPSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, G.

    2006-12-01

    EARLINET, the European Aerosol Research Lidar Network, is the first aerosol lidar network, established in 2000, with the main goal to provide a comprehensive, quantitative, and statistically significant data base for the aerosol distribution on a continental scale. At present, 24 stations distributed over Europe are part of the network: 10 single backscatter lidar stations, 7 Raman lidar stations with the Raman channel in the UV for independent measurements of aerosol extinction and backscatter, and 7 multi-wavelength Raman lidar stations (elastic channel at 1064 nm, 532 nm, 355 nm, Raman channels at 532 nm and 355 nm, plus depolarization channel at 532 nm) for the retrieval of aerosol microphysical properties. The network activity is based on scheduled measurements, a rigorous quality assurance program addressing both instruments and evaluation algorithms, and a standardized data exchange format. In order to collect unbiased data, all the network stations perform measurements simultaneously at three fixed dates a week. Lidar observations are performed on a regular schedule of one daytime measurement on Monday around noon, when the boundary layer is usually well developed, and two night time measurements per week (Monday and Thursday), with low background light, in order to perform Raman extinction measurements. Additional network measurements are performed to address specifically important processes that are localized either in space or time, like Saharan dust outbreaks, forest fires, volcanic eruptions, photochemical smog. EARLINET represents an optimal tool to validate CALIPSO lidar data and to provide the necessary information to fully exploit the information from that mission. In particular, aerosol extinction measurements, provided by the network, will be important for the aerosol retrievals from the CALIPSO backscatter lidar. EARLINET started correlative measurements for CALIPSO since 14 June 2006. These EARLINET correlative measurements are performed at

  7. Laser Remote Sensing from ISS: the CATS-CALIPSO Cloud and Aerosol Data Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodier, S. D.; Palm, S. P.; Jensen, M. H.; Yorks, J. E.; McGill, M. J.; Vaughan, M.; Trepte, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Cloud Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is a dual-beam, multi-wavelength (1064, 532 and 355 nm), polarization sensitive (1064 and 532 nm) lidar developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) for deployment to the International Space Station (ISS) in late 2014. CATS will be mounted on the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility and will provide near-continuous, altitude-resolved measurements of clouds and aerosols in the Earth's atmosphere. The ISS orbit path provides a unique opportunity to capture the full diurnal cycle of cloud and aerosol development and transport, allowing for studies that are not possible with the lidar aboard the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) mission, which flies in the sun-synchronous A-Train orbit. One of the primary objectives of CATS is to continue the CALIPSO data record to provide continuity of aerosol and cloud lidar observations during the transition from CALIPSO to EarthCARE. To accomplish this, the CATS project at GSFC and the CALIPSO project at NASA's Langley Research Center are closely collaborating to develop and deliver a full suite of CALIPSO-like level 2 data products generated from the newly acquired CATS level 1B data. Now in its eighth year of on-orbit operations, the CALIPSO project has developed a robust set of mature and well-validated science algorithms to retrieve the spatial and optical properties of clouds and aerosols from multi-wavelength lidar backscatter signal. By leveraging both new and existing NASA technical resources, this joint effort by the CATS-CALIPSO team will enable rapid delivery of high-quality lidar data sets to the user community at the earliest possible opportunity. In this work we outline the development of the CALIPSO- CATS level 2 software and data products and describe the modifications made to the input CATS data stream and the CALIPSO processing algorithms in order to successfully interface two disparate data processing

  8. CALIPSO lidar ratio retrieval over the ocean.

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    Josset, Damien; Rogers, Raymond; Pelon, Jacques; Hu, Yongxiang; Liu, Zhaoyan; Omar, Ali; Zhai, Peng-Wang

    2011-09-12

    We are demonstrating on a few cases the capability of CALIPSO to retrieve the 532 nm lidar ratio over the ocean when CloudSat surface scattering cross section is used as a constraint. We are presenting the algorithm used and comparisons with the column lidar ratio retrieved by the NASA airborne high spectral resolution lidar. For the three cases presented here, the agreement is fairly good. The average CALIPSO 532 nm column lidar ratio bias is 13.7% relative to HSRL, and the relative standard deviation is 13.6%. Considering the natural variability of aerosol microphysical properties, this level of accuracy is significant since the lidar ratio is a good indicator of aerosol types. We are discussing dependencies of the accuracy of retrieved aerosol lidar ratio on atmospheric aerosol homogeneity, lidar signal to noise ratio, and errors in the optical depth retrievals. We are obtaining the best result (bias 7% and standard deviation around 6%) for a nighttime case with a relatively constant lidar ratio (in the vertical) indicative of homogeneous aerosol type.

  9. Looking Into CALIPSO Climatological Products: Evaluation and Suggestions from EARLINET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Mona, Lucia; Alados-Alboledas, Lucas; Amiridis, Vassilis; Bortoli, Daniele; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Joao Costa, Maria; Pereira, Sergio; Spinelli, Nicola; Wandinger, Ulla; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-06-01

    CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Pathfinder Satellite Observations) Level 3 (CL3) data were compared against EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network) monthly averages obtained by profiles during satellite overpasses. Data from EARLINET stations of Évora, Granada, Leipzig, Naples and Potenza, equipped with advanced multi-wavelength Raman lidars were used for this study. Owing to spatial and temporal differences, we reproduced the CL3 filtering rubric onto the CALIPSO Level 2 data. The CALIPSO monthly mean profiles following this approach are called CALIPSO Level 3*, CL3*. This offers the possibility to achieve direct comparable datasets. In respect to CL3 data, the agreement typically improved, in particular above the areas directly affected by the anthropogenic activities within the planetary boundary layer. However in most of the cases a subtle CALIPSO underestimation was observed with an average bias of 0.03 km-1. We investigated the backscatter coefficient applying the same screening criteria, where the mean relative difference in respect to the extinction comparison improved from 15.2% to 11.4%. Lastly, the typing capabilities of CALIPSO were assessed outlining the importance of the correct aerosol type (and associated lidar ratio value) assessment to the CALIPSO aerosol properties retrieval.

  10. Looking Into CALIPSO Climatological Products: Evaluation and Suggestions from EARLINET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papagiannopoulos Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Pathfinder Satellite Observations Level 3 (CL3 data were compared against EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network monthly averages obtained by profiles during satellite overpasses. Data from EARLINET stations of Évora, Granada, Leipzig, Naples and Potenza, equipped with advanced multi-wavelength Raman lidars were used for this study. Owing to spatial and temporal differences, we reproduced the CL3 filtering rubric onto the CALIPSO Level 2 data. The CALIPSO monthly mean profiles following this approach are called CALIPSO Level 3*, CL3*. This offers the possibility to achieve direct comparable datasets. In respect to CL3 data, the agreement typically improved, in particular above the areas directly affected by the anthropogenic activities within the planetary boundary layer. However in most of the cases a subtle CALIPSO underestimation was observed with an average bias of 0.03 km-1. We investigated the backscatter coefficient applying the same screening criteria, where the mean relative difference in respect to the extinction comparison improved from 15.2% to 11.4%. Lastly, the typing capabilities of CALIPSO were assessed outlining the importance of the correct aerosol type (and associated lidar ratio value assessment to the CALIPSO aerosol properties retrieval.

  11. New insights about cloud vertical structure from CloudSat and CALIPSO observations

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    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Cho, Nayeong; Lee, Dongmin

    2017-09-01

    Active cloud observations from A-Train's CloudSat and CALIPSO satellites offer new opportunities to examine the vertical structure of hydrometeor layers. We use the 2B-CLDCLASS-LIDAR merged CloudSat-CALIPSO product to examine global aspects of hydrometeor vertical stratification. We group the data into major cloud vertical structure (CVS) classes based on our interpretation of how clouds in three standard atmospheric layers overlap and provide their global frequency of occurrence. The two most frequent CVS classes are single-layer (per our definition) low and high clouds that represent 53% of cloudy skies, followed by high clouds overlying low clouds, and vertically extensive clouds that occupy near-contiguously a large portion of the troposphere. The prevalence of these configurations changes seasonally and geographically, between daytime and nighttime, and between continents and oceans. The radiative effects of the CVS classes reveal the major radiative warmers and coolers from the perspective of the planet as a whole, the surface, and the atmosphere. Single-layer low clouds dominate planetary and atmospheric cooling and thermal infrared surface warming. We also investigate the consistency between passive and active views of clouds by providing the CVS breakdowns of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer cloud regimes for spatiotemporally coincident MODIS-Aqua (also on the A-Train) and CloudSat-CALIPSO daytime observations. When the analysis is expanded for a more in-depth look at the most heterogeneous of the MODIS cloud regimes, it ultimately confirms previous interpretations of their makeup that did not have the benefit of collocated active observations.

  12. CALIPSO climatological products: evaluation and suggestions from EARLINET

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    Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Mona, Lucia; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas; Amiridis, Vassilis; Baars, Holger; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Bortoli, Daniele; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Giunta, Aldo; Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; Schwarz, Anja; Pereira, Sergio; Spinelli, Nicola; Wandinger, Ulla; Wang, Xuan; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-02-01

    The CALIPSO Level 3 (CL3) product is the most recent data set produced by the observations of the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument onboard the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) space platform. The European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET), based mainly on multi-wavelength Raman lidar systems, is the most appropriate ground-based reference for CALIPSO calibration/validation studies on a continental scale. In this work, CALIPSO data are compared against EARLINET monthly averaged profiles obtained by measurements performed during CALIPSO overpasses. In order to mitigate uncertainties due to spatial and temporal differences, we reproduce a modified version of CL3 data starting from CALIPSO Level 2 (CL2) data. The spatial resolution is finer and nearly 2° × 2° (latitude × longitude) and only simultaneous measurements are used for ease of comparison. The CALIPSO monthly mean profiles following this approach are called CALIPSO Level 3*, CL3*. We find good agreement on the aerosol extinction coefficient, yet in most of the cases a small CALIPSO underestimation is observed with an average bias of 0.02 km-1 up to 4 km and 0.003 km-1 higher above. In contrast to CL3 standard product, the CL3* data set offers the possibility to assess the CALIPSO performance also in terms of the particle backscatter coefficient keeping the same quality assurance criteria applied to extinction profiles. The mean relative difference in the comparison improved from 25 % for extinction to 18 % for backscatter, showing better performances of CALIPSO backscatter retrievals. Additionally, the aerosol typing comparison yielded a robust identification of dust and polluted dust. Moreover, the CALIPSO aerosol-type-dependent lidar ratio selection is assessed by means of EARLINET observations, so as to investigate the performance of the extinction retrievals. The aerosol types of dust, polluted dust, and clean continental

  13. CALIPSO Combined Lidar L3 Data V1-30

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  14. CALIPSO Combined Lidar L3 Data V1-30

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the...

  15. Towards Improved Cirrus Cloud Optical Depths from CALIPSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, Anne; Vaughan, Mark; Pelon, Jacques; Winker, David; Trepte, Chip; Young, Stuart

    2016-06-01

    This paper reviews recent advances regarding the retrieval of optical depths of semi-transparent cirrus clouds using synergetic analyses of perfectly collocated observations from the CALIOP lidar and the IIR infrared radiometer aboard the CALIPSO satellite.

  16. CALIPSO Combined Lidar L3 Data V1-00

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  17. CALIPSO Observations of Aerosol Properties Near Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas; Yang, Weidong

    2010-01-01

    Clouds are surrounded by a transition zone of rapidly changing aerosol properties. Characterizing this zone is important for better understanding aerosol-cloud interactions and aerosol radiative effects as well as for improving satellite measurements of aerosol properties. We present a statistical analysis of a global dataset of CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) Lidar observations over oceans. The results show that the transition zone extends as far as 15 km away from clouds and it is ubiquitous over all oceans. The use of only high confidence level cloud-aerosol discrimination (CAD) data confirms the findings. However, the results underline the need for caution to avoid biases in studies of satellite aerosol products, aerosol-cloud interactions, and aerosol direct radiative effects.

  18. Towards improved understanding of cloud influence on polar surface energy budgets using CloudSat and CALIPSO observations

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    Kay, J. E.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; McIlhattan, E.; Chepfer, H.; Morrison, A.

    2015-12-01

    The spaceborne radar CloudSat and the spaceborne lidar platform Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) have provided nearly a decade of groundbreaking observations of polar cloud and precipitation processes. Specifically relevant to this AGU session, the CloudSat 2B-FLXHR-LIDAR product (hereafter, 2BFLX) is an observationally constrained radiative flux and heating rate calculation that leverages constraints from A-train observations, including CloudSat+CALIPSO. The surface radiative fluxes calculated within 2BFLX represent an important advance because unlike top-of-atmosphere (TOA) fluxes, surface radiative fluxes cannot be directly measured by satellite, yet directly impact surface heating, sea ice melt, and ice sheet mass balance. In this presentation, we will highlight the influence of supercooled liquid on polar surface radiation budgets constrained within 2BFLX data. We will also use 2BFLX data in concert with the fully attenuated signal and cloud phase information from CALIPSO as an observational constraint on polar cloud-climate feedbacks in the Community Earth System Model (CESM).

  19. Data assimilation of CALIPSO aerosol observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. T. Sekiyama

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed an advanced data assimilation system for a global aerosol model with a four-dimensional ensemble Kalman filter in which the Level 1B data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO were successfully assimilated for the first time, to the best of the authors' knowledge. A one-month data assimilation cycle experiment for dust, sulfate, and sea-salt aerosols was performed in May 2007. The results were validated via two independent observations: 1 the ground-based lidar network in East Asia, managed by the National Institute for Environmental Studies of Japan, and 2 weather reports of aeolian dust events in Japan. Detailed four-dimensional structures of aerosol outflows from source regions over oceans and continents for various particle types and sizes were well reproduced. The intensity of dust emission at each grid point was also corrected by this data assimilation system. These results are valuable for the comprehensive analysis of aerosol behavior as well as aerosol forecasting.

  20. Integrated Analysis of Asian Dust Events from CALIPSO Space Lidar Data in Conjunction with Passive Remote Sensing and Ground-Based Observations

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    Choi, H.; Sokolik, I. N.; Winker, D. M.; Kurosaki, Y.

    2008-05-01

    The vast arid regions of East Asia are active dust sources. Each spring, large amounts of mineral dust are emitted into the atmosphere, affecting the regional air quality, environment and climate. This study presents analyses of Asian dust events by integrating CALIPSO lidar data with A-Train satellite multi-sensor observations (Ozone Monitoring Instrument, OMI, and Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, MODIS) as well as ground-based observations. We use data from WMO meteorological stations located in China, Mongolia, Korea and Japan that report different present weather types related to dust events. Also, lidar data from Asian network sites were included in the analysis. The focus is on dust events that occurred during the spring seasons of 2006- 2008. The capability of CALIPSO to detect dust was investigated by analyzing the CALIPSO features against independent observations for selected CALPSO overpasses on a case-by-case basis. The changes in the linear depolarization ratio were analyzed in conjunction with T-matrix optical modeling to constrain the particle nonsphericity and size distribution. The dust properties and vertical distribution in different dust sources (the Taklamakan vs. Gobi) were analyzed. The evolution of dust properties during the mid-range transport was also investigated from combined CALIPSO and lidar data.

  1. A-Train Data Depot (ATDD)

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    Smith, Peter M.; Kempler, Steven; Leptoukh, Gregory; Savtchenko, Andrey; Kummerer, Robert; Gopolan, Arun

    2008-01-01

    ATDD is a web based tool which provides collocated data and display products for a number of A-train instruments Cloudsat, Calipso, OMI, AIRS, MODIS, MLS, POLDER-3, and ECWMF model data. Products provided include Clouds, Aerosols, Water Vapor, Temperatures and trace gases. All input data is online and in HDF4, HDF5 format. Display products include curtain images, horizontal strips, line plot overlays, and GE kmz files. Sample products are shown for two type of events. Hurricane event, Norbert, Oct 8, 2008 and a dust storm event over the Arabian Sea, Nov 13-14, 2008.

  2. Far-Reaching Impacts of African Dust- A Calipso Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongbin; Chin, Mian; Yuan, Tianle; Bian, Huisheng; Prospero, Joseph; Omar, Ali; Remer, Lorraine; Winker, David; Yang, Yuekui; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Zhibo

    2014-01-01

    African dust can transport across the tropical Atlantic and reach the Amazon basin, exerting far-reaching impacts on climate in downwind regions. The transported dust influences the surface-atmosphere interactions and cloud and precipitation processes through perturbing the surface radiative budget and atmospheric radiative heating and acting as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei. Dust also influences biogeochemical cycle and climate through providing nutrients vital to the productivity of ocean biomass and Amazon forests. Assessing these climate impacts relies on an accurate quantification of dust transport and deposition. Currently model simulations show extremely large diversity, which calls for a need of observational constraints. Kaufman et al. (2005) estimated from MODIS aerosol measurements that about 144 Tg of dust is deposited into the tropical Atlantic and 50 Tg of dust into the Amazon in 2001. This estimated dust import to Amazon is a factor of 3-4 higher than other observations and models. However, several studies have argued that the oversimplified characterization of dust vertical profile in the study would have introduced large uncertainty and very likely a high bias. In this study we quantify the trans-Atlantic dust transport and deposition by using 7 years (2007-2013) observations from CALIPSO lidar. CALIPSO acquires high-resolution aerosol extinction and depolarization profiles in both cloud-free and above-cloud conditions. The unique CALIPSO capability of profiling aerosols above clouds offers an unprecedented opportunity of examining uncertainties associated with the use of MODIS clear-sky data. Dust is separated from other types of aerosols using the depolarization measurements. We estimated that on the basis of 7-year average, 118142 Tg of dust is deposited into the tropical Atlantic and 3860 Tg of dust into the Amazon basin. Substantial interannual variations are observed during the period, with the maximum to minimum ratio of about 1

  3. Quantifying Above-Cloud Aerosols through Integrating Multi-Sensor Measurements from A-Train Satellites

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    Zhang, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying above-cloud aerosols can help improve the assessment of aerosol intercontinental transport and climate impacts. Large-scale measurements of aerosol above low-level clouds had been generally unexplored until very recently when CALIPSO lidar started to acquire aerosol and cloud profiles in June 2006. Despite CALIPSO s unique capability of measuring above-cloud aerosol optical depth (AOD), such observations are substantially limited in spatial coverage because of the lidar s near-zero swath. We developed an approach that integrates measurements from A-Train satellite sensors (including CALIPSO lidar, OMI, and MODIS) to extend CALIPSO above-cloud AOD observations to substantially larger areas. We first examine relationships between collocated CALIPSO above-cloud AOD and OMI absorbing aerosol index (AI, a qualitative measure of AOD for elevated dust and smoke aerosol) as a function of MODIS cloud optical depth (COD) by using 8-month data in the Saharan dust outflow and southwest African smoke outflow regions. The analysis shows that for a given cloud albedo, above-cloud AOD correlates positively with AI in a linear manner. We then apply the derived relationships with MODIS COD and OMI AI measurements to derive above-cloud AOD over the whole outflow regions. In this talk, we will present spatial and day-to-day variations of the above-cloud AOD and the estimated direct radiative forcing by the above-cloud aerosols.

  4. Characterization of Polar Stratospheric Clouds With Spaceborne Lidar: CALIPSO and the 2006 Antarctic Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Michael C.; Thomason, L. W.; Poole, Lamont R.; Winker, David M.

    2007-01-01

    The role of polar stratospheric clouds in polar ozone loss has been well documented. The CALIPSO satellite mission offers a new opportunity to characterize PSCs on spatial and temporal scales previously unavailable. A PSC detection algorithm based on a single wavelength threshold approach has been developed for CALIPSO. The method appears to accurately detect PSCs of all opacities, including tenuous clouds, with a very low rate of false positives and few missed clouds. We applied the algorithm to CALIPSO data acquired during the 2006 Antarctic winter season from 13 June through 31 October. The spatial and temporal distribution of CALIPSO PSC observations is illustrated with weekly maps of PSC occurrence. The evolution of the 2006 PSC season is depicted by time series of daily PSC frequency as a function of altitude. Comparisons with virtual solar occultation data indicate that CALIPSO provides a different view of the PSC season than attained with previous solar occultation satellites. Measurement-based time series of PSC areal coverage and vertically-integrated PSC volume are computed from the CALIPSO data. The observed area covered with PSCs is significantly smaller than would be inferred from a temperature-based proxy such as TNAT but is similar in magnitude to that inferred from TSTS. The potential of CALIPSO measurements for investigating PSC microphysics is illustrated using combinations of lidar backscatter coefficient and volume depolarization to infer composition for two CALIPSO PSC scenes.

  5. Cloud Vertical Structure variability within MODIS Cloud Regimes according to CloudSat-CALIPSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, N.; Oreopoulos, L.; Lee, D.

    2016-12-01

    To advance the understanding of the relationships and associations between active and passive views of cloud systems systematic comparisons are needed. We take advantage of A-Train's capability to collect a multitude of coincident measurements of atmospheric hydrometeors to develop a framework for examining cloud vertical structure (CVS). The backbone of our comparisons are cloud regimes (CRs) derived from co-varying cloud optical thickness and cloud top pressure retrieved from the MODIS radiometer. CloudSat and CALIPSO observations containing information about cloud occurrence throughout atmospheric layers are segregated and composited according to the MODIS regime classification for Aqua-only CR occurrences. With this approach, vertical profiles of cloud systems are organized in a way that allows them to be thoroughly studied and compared. We examine the frequency of occurrence within each MODIS CR of coarsely resolved CVS permutations (namely the possible combinations of clouds occurring at high, middle, and low altitudes either in isolation or in various configurations of contiguous or non-contiguous overlap). We look for similarities and extreme contrasts in CVS among MODIS CRs, dependence of CVS on the degree of deviation from the CR centroid, and regional dependences within the occurrences of the same CR. The presentation aims to demonstrate pathways towards a better knowledge of the information content of each type (i.e., active/passive) of measurement and to expose categories of cloud systems where the combination of measurements with different strengths and sensitivities is helping rather than confounding interpretations of the nature of cloudiness.

  6. Global CALIPSO Observations of Aerosol Changes Near Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnai, Tamas; Marshak, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Several recent studies have found that clouds are surrounded by a transition zone of rapidly changing aerosol optical properties and particle size. Characterizing this transition zone is important for better understanding aerosol-cloud interactions and aerosol radiative effects, and also for improving satellite retrievals of aerosol properties. This letter presents a statistical analysis of a monthlong global data set of Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) lidar observations over oceans. The results show that the transition zone is ubiquitous over all oceans and extends up to 15 km away from clouds. They also show that near-cloud enhancements in backscatter and particle size are strongest at low altitudes, slightly below the top of the nearest clouds. Also, the enhancements are similar near illuminated and shadowy cloud sides, which confirms that the asymmetry of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer reflectances found in an earlier study comes from 3-D radiative processes and not from differences in aerosol properties. Finally, the effects of CALIPSO aerosol detection and cloud identification uncertainties are discussed. The findings underline the importance of accounting for the transition zone to avoid potential biases in studies of satellite aerosol products, aerosol-cloud interactions, and aerosol direct radiative effects.

  7. Adapting CALIPSO Climate Measurements for Near Real Time Analyses and Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Mark A.; Trepte, Charles R.; Winker, David M.; Avery, Melody A.; Campbell, James; Hoff, Ray; Young, Stuart; Getzewich, Brian J.; Tackett, Jason L.; Kar, Jayanta

    2011-01-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder satellite Observations (CALIPSO) mission was originally conceived and designed as a climate measurements mission, with considerable latency between data acquisition and the release of the level 1 and level 2 data products. However, the unique nature of the CALIPSO lidar backscatter profiles quickly led to the qualitative use of CALIPSO?s near real time (i.e., ? expedited?) lidar data imagery in several different forecasting applications. To enable quantitative use of their near real time analyses, the CALIPSO project recently expanded their expedited data catalog to include all of the standard level 1 and level 2 lidar data products. Also included is a new cloud cleared level 1.5 profile product developed for use by operational forecast centers for verification of aerosol predictions. This paper describes the architecture and content of the CALIPSO expedited data products. The fidelity and accuracy of the expedited products are assessed via comparisons to the standard CALIPSO data products.

  8. Comparison of AOD between CALIPSO and MODIS: significant differences over major dust and biomass burning regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Ma

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cloud–Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO provide global vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties for the first time. In this study, we employed about 6 yr (2006–2011 of CALIPSO level 3 monthly mean gridded aerosol optical depth (AOD products (daytime and nighttime for cloud-free conditions, to compare with the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS Terra/Aqua level 3 monthly mean AOD dataset for the same time period. While the spatial distribution and seasonal variability of CALIPSO AOD is generally consistent with that of MODIS, CALIPSO is overall lower than MODIS as MODIS has higher frequency than CALIPSO for most bins of AOD. The correlation between MODIS and CALIPSO is better over ocean than over land. We focused on four regions that have large systematic differences: two over dust regions (the Sahara and Northwest China and two over biomass burning regions (South Africa and South America. It is found that CALIPSO AOD is significantly lower than MODIS AOD over dust regions during the whole time period, with a maximum difference of 0.3 over the Saharan region and 0.25 over Northwest China. For biomass burning regions, CALIPSO AOD is significantly higher than MODIS AOD over South Africa, with a maximum difference of 0.25. Additionally CALIPSO AOD is slightly higher than MODIS AOD over South America for most of the time period, with a few exceptions in 2006, 2007, and 2010, when biomass burning is significantly stronger than during other years. We analyzed the impact of the satellite spatial and temporal sampling issue by using level 2 CALIPSO and MODIS products, and these systematic differences can still be found. The results of this study indicate that systematic differences of CALIPSO relative to MODIS are closely associated with aerosol types, which vary by location and season. Large differences over dust and biomass burning regions may suggest that assumptions made in satellite

  9. CALIPSO Lidar L2 5 km Cloud Profile Data V2-01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  10. CALIPSO Imaging Infrared Radiometer L2 Data Track V2-01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  11. CALIPSO Lidar L2 5 km Cloud Layer Data V2-01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  12. CALIPSO Lidar L2 Polar Stratospheric Cloud Data V1-00

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  13. CALIPSO Lidar L2 Aerosol Layer Data V3-02

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  14. CALIPSO Lidar L2 Aerosol Layer Data V3-30

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  15. CALIPSO Lidar L1B Profile Data V2-02

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  16. CALIPSO All-Sky Lidar L3 Data V1-00

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  17. CALIPSO All-Sky Lidar L3 Data V1-30

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  18. CALIPSO Lidar L2 Vertical Feature Mask Data V2-01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  19. CALIPSO Lidar L1B Profile Data V1-22

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  20. CALIPSO Lidar L2 Aerosol Layer Data V1-10

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the...

  1. CALIPSO Imaging Infrared Radiometer L2 Data Swath V2-02

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the...

  2. CALIPSO Imaging Infrared Radiometer (IIR) L1B Radiance Data V1-11

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  3. CALIPSO Lidar L2 Vertical Feature Mask Data V3-02

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  4. CALIPSO Lidar L2 5 km Cloud Layer Data V1-10

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  5. CALIPSO Lidar L2 5 km Cloud Layer Data V3-01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  6. CALIPSO Imaging Infrared Radiometer L2 Data Swath V2-02

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  7. CALIPSO Lidar L2 1 km Cloud Layer Data V3-02

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  8. CALIPSO Lidar L1B Profile Data V1-20

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  9. CALIPSO Lidar L2 Aerosol Layer Data V2-01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  10. CALIPSO Lidar L2 1/3 km Cloud Layer Data V3-02

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  11. CALIPSO Lidar L2 1 km Cloud Layer Data V2-01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  12. CALIPSO Lidar L2 1 km Cloud Layer Data V1-10

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  13. CALIPSO Lidar L2 5 km Cloud Profile Data V3-02

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  14. CALIPSO Lidar L2 Vertical Feature Mask Data V3-01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  15. CALIPSO Lidar L2 1 km Cloud Layer Data V3-01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  16. CALIPSO Lidar L2 1/3 km Cloud Layer Data V2-02

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  17. CALIPSO Lidar L2 Vertical Feature Mask Data V3-30

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  18. CALIPSO Imaging Infrared Radiometer (IIR) L1B Radiance Data V1-10

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  19. CALIPSO Lidar L2 1 km Cloud Layer Data V3-30

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  20. CALIPSO Lidar L2 Vertical Feature Mask Data V2-02

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  1. CALIPSO Lidar L2 1/3 km Cloud Layer Data V3-01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  2. CALIPSO Lidar L1B Profile Data V3-30

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  3. CALIPSO Lidar L2 1/3 km Cloud Layer Data V3-30

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  4. CALIPSO Lidar L2 1/3 km Cloud Layer Data V1-20

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  5. CALIPSO L1.5 Special Product Data V3-30

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  6. CALIPSO Lidar L2 5 km Cloud Layer Data V1-20

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  7. CALIPSO Lidar L2 Aerosol Layer Data V3-01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  8. CALIPSO Lidar L2 Aerosol Profile Data V3-01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  9. CALIPSO Imaging Infrared Radiometer L2 Data Track V2-02

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  10. CALIPSO Lidar L2 5 km Cloud Layer Data V3-30

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  11. CALIPSO Lidar L2 5 km Cloud Profile Data V3-01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  12. CALIPSO Lidar L2 5 km Cloud Profile Data V2-02

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  13. CALIPSO Lidar L2 1/3 km Cloud Layer Data V1-10

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  14. CALIPSO Lidar L1B Profile Data V3-00

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  15. CALIPSO Lidar L2 Aerosol Profile Data V3-30

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  16. CALIPSO Lidar L2 Vertical Feature Mask Data V1-20

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  17. CALIPSO Lidar L2 1 km Cloud Layer Data V2-02

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  18. CALIPSO Lidar L1B Profile Data V3-01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  19. CALIPSO Lidar L1B Profile Data V1-10

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  20. CALIPSO Imaging Infrared Radiometer (IIR) L1B Radiance Data V1-12

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  1. CALIPSO Lidar L2 5 km Cloud Layer Data V2-02

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  2. CALIPSO Imaging Infrared Radiometer L2 Data Track V3-30

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  3. CALIPSO Lidar L2 Vertical Feature Mask Data V1-10

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  4. CALIPSO Imaging Infrared Radiometer L2 Data Track V3-01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  5. CALIPSO Lidar L1B Profile Data V2-01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  6. CALIPSO Lidar L2 Aerosol Layer Data V1-20

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  7. CALIPSO Lidar L1B Profile Data V4-00

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  8. CALIPSO Lidar L2 Aerosol Profile Data V3-02

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  9. CALIPSO Lidar L2 1 km Cloud Layer Data V1-20

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  10. CALIPSO Lidar L2 5 km Cloud Layer Data V3-02

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  11. CALIPSO Lidar L2 5 km Cloud Profile Data V3-30

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  12. CALIPSO Lidar L2 1/3 km Cloud Layer Data V2-01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  13. CALIPSO Lidar L2 Aerosol Layer Data V2-02

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  14. CALIPSO Lidar L1B Profile Data V3-02

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  15. CALIPSO Imaging Infrared Radiometer L2 Data Track V3-02

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  16. Atmospheric aerosol layers over Bangkok Metropolitan Region from CALIPSO observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridhikitti, Arika

    2013-06-01

    Previous studies suggested that aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Earth Observing System satellite retrievals could be used for inference of ground-level air quality in various locations. This application may be appropriate if pollution in elevated atmospheric layers is insignificant. This study investigated the significance of elevated air pollution layers over the Bangkok Metropolitan Region (BMR) from all available aerosol layer scenes taken from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) for years 2007 to 2011. The results show that biomass burning smoke layers alone were the most frequently observed. The smoke layers accounted for high AOD variations and increased AOD levels. In the dry seasons, the smoke layers alone with high AOD levels were likely brought to the BMR via northeasterly to easterly prevailing winds and found at altitudes above the typical BMR mixing heights of approximately 0.7 to 1.5 km. The smoke should be attributed to biomass burning emissions outside the BMR.

  17. Comparison of AOD between CALIPSO and MODIS: significant differences over major dust and biomass burning regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Ma

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO provide, for the first time, global vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties, but further research is needed to evaluate the CALIPSO products. In this study, we employed about 6 yr (2006–2011 of CALIPSO level-3 monthly mean gridded aerosol optical depth (AOD products (daytime and nighttime, for cloud free conditions, to compare with the MODIS Terra/Aqua level-3 monthly mean AOD dataset for the same time period. While the spatial distribution and seasonal variability of CALIPSO AOD is generally consistent with that of MODIS, CALIPSO is overall lower than MODIS as much more of the CALIPSO data is smaller than 0.1, while more of the MODIS data is greater than 0.1. We will focus on four regions that have large systematic differences: two over dust regions (the Sahara and Northwest China and two over biomass burning regions (South Africa and South America. It is found that CALIPSO AOD is significantly lower than MODIS AOD over dust regions during the whole time period, with a maximum low bias of 0.3 over the Saharan region, and 0.25 over Northwest China. For biomass burning regions, CALIPSO AOD is significantly higher than MODIS AOD over South Africa, with a maximum high bias of 0.25. Additionally CALIPSO AOD is slightly higher than MODIS AOD over South America for most of the time period, with a few exceptions in 2006, 2007, and 2010, when biomass burning is significantly stronger than during other years. The results in this study indicate that systematic biases of CALIPSO relative to MODIS are closely associated with aerosol types, which vary by location and season. Large differences over dust and biomass burning regions may suggest that assumptions made in satellite retrievals, such as the assumed lidar ratios for CALIPSO retrievals over dust and biomass burning regions, or the surface reflectance information and/or the aerosol model utilized by MODIS algorithm

  18. Comparison of Aerosol Classification from Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar and the CALIPSO Vertical Feature Mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Omar, A. H.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Rogers, R.; Obland, M. D.; Butler, C. F.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-1) on the NASA B200 aircraft has acquired large datasets of aerosol extinction (532nm), backscatter (532 and 1064nm), and depolarization (532 and 1064nm) profiles during 349 science flights in 19 field missions across North America since 2006. The extinction-to-backscatter ratio ("lidar ratio"), aerosol depolarization ratios, and backscatter color ratio measurements from HSRL-1 are scale-invariant parameters that depend on aerosol type but not concentration. These four aerosol intensive parameters are combined to qualitatively classify HSRL aerosol measurements into eight separate composition types. The classification methodology uses models formed from "training cases" with known aerosol type. The remaining measurements are then compared with these models using the Mahalanobis distance. Aerosol products from the CALIPSO satellite include aerosol type information as well, which is used as input to the CALIPSO aerosol retrieval. CALIPSO aerosol types are inferred using a mix of aerosol loading-dependent parameters, estimated aerosol depolarization, and location, altitude, and surface type information. The HSRL instrument flies beneath the CALIPSO satellite orbit track, presenting the opportunity for comparisons between the HSRL aerosol typing and the CALIPSO Vertical Feature Mask Aerosol Subtype product, giving insight into the performance of the CALIPSO aerosol type algorithm. We find that the aerosol classification from the two instruments frequently agree for marine aerosols and pure dust, and somewhat less frequently for pollution and smoke. In addition, the comparison suggests that the CALIPSO polluted dust type is overly inclusive, encompassing cases of dust combined with marine aerosol as well as cases without much evidence of dust. Qualitative classification of aerosol type combined with quantitative profile measurements of aerosol backscatter and extinction has many useful

  19. Evaluation of clouds and precipitation in the ECHAM5 general circulation model using CALIPSO and CloudSat satellite data

    OpenAIRE

    Nam, Christine C. W.; Quaas, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Observations from Cloud–Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) and CloudSat satellites are used to evaluate clouds and precipitation in the ECHAM5 general circulation model. Active lidar and radar instruments on board CALIPSO and CloudSat allow the vertical distribution of clouds and their optical properties to be studied on a global scale. To evaluate the clouds modeled by ECHAM5 with CALIPSO and CloudSat, the lidar and radar satellite simulators of the Cloud ...

  20. Ground-Based Lidar Measurements During the CALIPSO and Twilight Zone (CATZ) Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkoff, Timothy; Qian, Li; Kleidman, Richard; Stewart, Sebastian; Welton, Ellsworth; Li, Zhu; Holbem, Brent

    2008-01-01

    The CALIPSO and Twilight Zone (CATZ) field campaign was carried out between June 26th and August 29th of 2007 in the multi-state Maryland-Virginia-Pennsylvania region of the U.S. to study aerosol properties and cloud-aerosol interactions during overpasses of the CALIPSO satellite. Field work was conducted on selected days when CALIPSO ground tracks occurred in the region. Ground-based measurements included data from multiple Cimel sunphotometers that were placed at intervals along a segment of the CALIPSO ground-track. These measurements provided sky radiance and AOD measurements to enable joints inversions and comparisons with CALIPSO retrievals. As part of this activity, four ground-based lidars provided backscatter measurements (at 523 nm) in the region. Lidars at University of Maryland Baltimore County (Catonsville, MD) and Goddard Space Flight Center (Greenbelt, MD) provided continuous data during the campaign, while two micro-pulse lidar (MPL) systems were temporarily stationed at various field locations directly on CALIPSO ground-tracks. As a result, thirteen on-track ground-based lidar observations were obtained from eight different locations in the region. In some cases, nighttime CALIPSO coincident measurements were also obtained. In most studies reported to date, ground-based lidar validation efforts for CALIPSO rely on systems that are at fixed locations some distance away from the satellite ground-track. The CATZ ground-based lidar data provide an opportunity to examine vertical structure properties of aerosols and clouds both on and off-track simultaneously during a CALIPSO overpass. A table of available ground-based lidar measurements during this campaign will be presented, along with example backscatter imagery for a number of coincident cases with CALIPSO. Results indicate that even for a ground-based measurements directly on-track, comparisons can still pose a challenge due to the differing spatio-temporal properties of the ground and satellite

  1. Using in situ airborne measurements to evaluate three cloud phase products derived from CALIPSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesana, G.; Chepfer, H.; Winker, D.; Getzewich, B.; Cai, X.; Jourdan, O.; Mioche, G.; Okamoto, H.; Hagihara, Y.; Noel, V.; Reverdy, M.

    2016-05-01

    We compare the cloud detection and cloud phase determination of three independent climatologies based on Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) to airborne in situ measurements. Our analysis of the cloud detection shows that the differences between the satellite and in situ measurements mainly arise from three factors. First, averaging CALIPSO Level l data along track before cloud detection increases the estimate of high- and low-level cloud fractions. Second, the vertical averaging of Level 1 data before cloud detection tends to artificially increase the cloud vertical extent. Third, the differences in classification of fully attenuated pixels among the CALIPSO climatologies lead to differences in the low-level Arctic cloud fractions. In another section, we compare the cloudy pixels detected by colocated in situ and satellite observations to study the cloud phase determination. At midlatitudes, retrievals of homogeneous high ice clouds by CALIPSO data sets are very robust (more than 94.6% of agreement with in situ). In the Arctic, where the cloud phase vertical variability is larger within a 480 m pixel, all climatologies show disagreements with the in situ measurements and CALIPSO-General Circulation Models-Oriented Cloud Product (GOCCP) report significant undefined-phase clouds, which likely correspond to mixed-phase clouds. In all CALIPSO products, the phase determination is dominated by the cloud top phase. Finally, we use global statistics to demonstrate that main differences between the CALIPSO cloud phase products stem from the cloud detection (horizontal averaging, fully attenuated pixels) rather than the cloud phase determination procedures.

  2. Determination of cloud and aerosol layers using CALIPSO and image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alias, A. N.; MatJafri, M. Z.; Lim, H. S.; Abdullah, K.; Saleh, N. Mohd.

    2008-10-01

    The height of cloud and aerosol layers in the atmosphere is believed to affect climate change and air pollution because both of them have important direct effects on the radiation balance of the earth. In this paper, we study the ability of Cloud Aerosol LIDAR and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) data to detect, locate and distinguish between cloud and aerosol layers in the atmosphere over Peninsula Malaysia. We also used image processing technique to differentiate between cloud and aerosol layers from the CALIPSO images. The cloud and aerosol layers mostly are seen at troposphere (>10 km) and lower stratosphere (>15km). The results shows that CALIPSO can be used to determine cloud and aerosol layers and image processing technique has successfully distinguished them in the atmosphere.

  3. Comparing simulated PSC optical properties with CALIPSO observations during the 2010 Antarctic winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yunqian; Toon, Owen B.; Pitts, Michael C.; Lambert, Alyn; Bardeen, Charles; Kinnison, Douglas E.

    2017-01-01

    We simulate polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) during the Antarctic winter of 2010 using the Specified Dynamics version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model/Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (SD-WACCM/CARMA) model. The current PSC model contains microphysical schemes for supercooled ternary solutions (STS) and nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles, as well as a prognostic treatment for PSC ice particles and dehydration. Our simulations and CALIPSO satellite data suggest two major NAT particle formation mechanisms. The first mechanism is the nucleation of NAT from STS. Our model, with homogeneous nucleation rates of NAT from STS constrained by observations from the Arctic winter of 2010-2011, reproduces optical properties observed by CALIPSO over Antarctica in May and the timing of denitrification observed by the Microwave Limb Sounder within their uncertainties. On the other hand, the CALIPSO data indicate that our simulations are missing clouds containing small NAT particles with large number densities. We suggest these particles are most likely to form from ice clouds or STS in gravity waves, as found by previous investigations. The simulated cloud coverage agrees with the CALIPSO cloud coverage within a few percent on average with a correlation coefficient of 0.83. However, using the CALIPSO classification algorithm, simulated ice clouds often fall into Mix categories under the denitrified and dehydrated conditions. The model needs an improved ice microphysical representation, not only to allow ice particles to be a source of NAT but also to provide information on ice cloud particle number and size so that ice cloud optical properties can be more precisely calculated for comparison with CALIPSO data.

  4. Utilizing The Synergy of Airborne Backscatter Lidar and In-Situ Measurements for Evaluating CALIPSO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsekeri Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Airborne campaigns dedicated to satellite validation are crucial for the effective global aerosol monitoring. CALIPSO is currently the only active remote sensing satellite mission, acquiring the vertical profiles of the aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficients. Here we present a method for CALIPSO evaluation from combining lidar and in-situ airborne measurements. The limitations of the method have to do mainly with the in-situ instrumentation capabilities and the hydration modelling. We also discuss the future implementation of our method in the ICE-D campaign (Cape Verde, August 2015.

  5. Correlation among Cirrus Ice Content, Water Vapor and Temperature in the TTL as Observed by CALIPSO and Aura-MLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flury, T.; Wu, D. L.; Read, W. G.

    2012-01-01

    Water vapor in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) has a local radiative cooling effect. As a source for ice in cirrus clouds, however, it can also indirectly produce infrared heating. Using NASA A-Train satellite measurements of CALIPSO and Aura/MLS we calculated the correlation of water vapor, ice water content and temperature in the TTL. We find that temperature strongly controls water vapor (correlation r =0.94) and cirrus clouds at 100 hPa (r = -0.91). Moreover we observe that the cirrus seasonal cycle is highly (r =-0.9) anticorrelated with the water vapor variation in the TTL, showing higher cloud occurrence during December-January-February. We further investigate the anticorrelation on a regional scale and find that the strong anticorrelation occurs generally in the ITCZ (Intertropical Convergence Zone). The seasonal cycle of the cirrus ice water content is also highly anticorrelated to water vapor (r = -0.91) and our results support the hypothesis that the total water at 100 hPa is roughly constant. Temperature acts as a main regulator for balancing the partition between water vapor and cirrus clouds. Thus, to a large extent, the depleting water vapor in the TTL during DJF is a manifestation of cirrus formation.

  6. Comparison of the MODIS Multilayer Cloud Detection and Thermodynamic Phase Products with CALIPSO and CloudSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platnick, Steven; King, Michael D.; Wind, Gala; Holz, Robert E.; Ackerman, Steven A.; Nagle, Fred W.

    2008-01-01

    CALIPSO and CloudSat, launched in June 2006, provide global active remote sensing measurements of clouds and aerosols that can be used for validation of a variety of passive imager retrievals derived from instruments flying on the Aqua spacecraft and other A-Train platforms. The most recent processing effort for the MODIS Atmosphere Team, referred to as the "Collection 5" stream, includes a research-level multilayer cloud detection algorithm that uses both thermodynamic phase information derived from a combination of solar and thermal emission bands to discriminate layers of different phases, as well as true layer separation discrimination using a moderately absorbing water vapor band. The multilayer detection algorithm is designed to provide a means of assessing the applicability of 1D cloud models used in the MODIS cloud optical and microphysical product retrieval, which are generated at a 1 h resolution. Using pixel-level collocations of MODIS Aqua, CALIOP, and CloudSat radar measurements, we investigate the global performance of the thermodynamic phase and multilayer cloud detection algorithms.

  7. A Synopsis of CALIPSO PSC Observations from 2006-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Lamont; Pitts, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are known to play key roles in the springtime chemical depletion of ozone at high latitudes. PSC particles (primarily supercooled ternary solution, or STS droplets) provide sites for heterogeneous chemical reactions that transform stable chlorine and bromine reservoir species into highly reactive ozone-destructive forms. Furthermore, large nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) PSC particles can irreversibly redistribute odd nitrogen through gravitational sedimentation (a process commonly known as denitrification), which prolongs the ozone depletion process by slowing the reformation of the stable chlorine reservoirs. The observational database on PSCs has been augmented tremendously in recent years by data from the polarization-sensitive CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization) lidar system onboard the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) spacecraft. CALIOP began data collection in mid-June 2006 and has since acquired, on average, over 300,000 backscatter profiles daily at latitudes between 55o and 82o in both hemispheres. PSCs are detected in the CALIOP backscatter profiles using a successive horizontal averaging scheme that enables detection of strongly scattering PSCs (e.g., ice) at the finest possible spatial resolution (5 km), while enhancing the detection of very tenuous PSCs (e.g., low number density NAT) at larger spatial scales (up to 135 km). CALIOP PSCs are also separated into composition classes (STS; liquid/NAT mixtures; and ice) based on the ensemble 532-nm scattering ratio (the ratio of total-to-molecular backscatter) and 532-nm particulate depolarization ratio (which is sensitive to the presence of non-spherical, i.e. NAT and ice particles). The composition classification scheme has been modified recently to account for denitrification, the primary effect of which is the misclassification of ice clouds as liquid/NAT mixtures. This paper will use these CALIOP

  8. CALIPSO Wide Field Camera (WFC) L1B Science 1 km Native Science Data V3-01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  9. CALIPSO Wide Field Camera (WFC) L1B Science 1 km Registered Science Data V3-01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  10. CALIPSO Wide Field Camera (WFC) L1B Science 125 m Native Science Data V3-02

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  11. CALIPSO Wide Field Camera (WFC) L1B Science 1 km Registered Science Data V1-10

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  12. CALIPSO Wide Field Camera (WFC) L1B Science 125 m Native Science Data V1-10

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  13. CALIPSO Wide Field Camera (WFC) L1B Science 1 km Registered Science Data V3-02

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  14. CALIPSO Wide Field Camera (WFC) L1B Science 1 km Native Science Data V3-02

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  15. CALIPSO Wide Field Camera (WFC) L1B Science 125 m Native Science Data V3-01

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  16. CALIPSO Wide Field Camera (WFC) L1B Science 1 km Native Science Data V1-10

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) was launched on April 28, 2006 to study the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth’s...

  17. A 6-year global cloud climatology from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder AIRS and a statistical analysis in synergy with CALIPSO and CloudSat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Stubenrauch

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a six-year global climatology of cloud properties, obtained from observations of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS onboard the NASA Aqua satellite. Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO combined with CloudSat observations, both missions launched as part of the A-Train in 2006, provide a unique opportunity to evaluate the retrieved AIRS cloud properties such as cloud amount and height as well as to explore the vertical structure of different cloud types. AIRS-LMD cloud detection agrees with CALIPSO about 85% over ocean and about 75% over land. Global cloud amount has been estimated as about 66% to 74%, depending on the weighting of not cloudy AIRS footprints by partial cloud cover (0 or 0.3. 40% of all clouds are high clouds, and about 44% of all clouds are single layer low-level clouds. The "radiative" cloud height determined by the AIRS-LMD retrieval corresponds well to the height of the maximum backscatter signal and of the "apparent middle" of the cloud. Whereas the real cloud thickness of high opaque clouds often fills the whole troposphere, their "apparent" cloud thickness (at which optical depth reaches about 5 is on average only 2.5 km. The real geometrical thickness of optically thin cirrus as identified by AIRS-LMD is identical to the "apparent" cloud thickness with an average of about 2.5 km in the tropics and midlatitudes. High clouds in the tropics have slightly more diffusive cloud tops than at higher latitudes. In general, the depth of the maximum backscatter signal increases nearly linearly with increasing "apparent" cloud thickness. For the same "apparent" cloud thickness optically thin cirrus show a maximum backscatter about 10% deeper inside the cloud than optically thicker clouds. We also show that only the geometrically thickest opaque clouds and (the probably surrounding anvil cirrus penetrate the stratosphere in the tropics.

  18. A 6-year global cloud climatology from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder AIRS and a statistical analysis in synergy with CALIPSO and CloudSat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Cros

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a six-year global climatology of cloud properties, obtained from observations of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS onboard the NASA Aqua satellite. Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO combined with CloudSat observations, both missions launched as part of the A-Train in 2006, provide a unique opportunity to evaluate the retrieved AIRS cloud properties such as cloud amount and height. In addition, they permit to explore the vertical structure of different cloud types. AIRS-LMD cloud detection agrees with CALIPSO about 85% over ocean and about 75% over land. Global cloud amount has been estimated from 66% to 74%, depending on the weighting of not cloudy AIRS footprints by partial cloud cover from 0 to 0.3. 42% of all clouds are high clouds, and about 42% of all clouds are single layer low-level clouds. The "radiative" cloud height determined by the AIRS-LMD retrieval corresponds well to the height of the maximum backscatter signal and of the "apparent middle" of the cloud. Whereas the real cloud thickness of high opaque clouds often fills the whole troposphere, their "apparent" cloud thickness (at which optical depth reaches about 5 is on average only 2.5 km. The real geometrical thickness of optically thin cirrus as identified by AIRS-LMD is identical to the "apparent" cloud thickness with an average of about 2.5 km in the tropics and midlatitudes. High clouds in the tropics have slightly more diffusive cloud tops than at higher latitudes. In general, the depth of the maximum backscatter signal increases nearly linearly with increasing "apparent" cloud thickness. For the same "apparent" cloud thickness optically thin cirrus show a maximum backscatter about 10% deeper inside the cloud than optically thicker clouds. We also show that only the geometrically thickest opaque clouds and (the probably surrounding anvil cirrus penetrate the stratosphere in the tropics.

  19. A new retrieval method for the ice water content of cirrus using data from the CloudSat and CALIPSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Honglin; Bu, Lingbing; Kumar, K. Raghavendra; Gao, Haiyang; Huang, Xingyou; Zhang, Wentao

    2017-08-01

    The CloudSat and CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) are the members of satellite observation system of A-train to achieve the quasi-synchronization observation on the same orbit. With the help of active (CALIOP and CPR) and passive payloads from these two satellites, respectively, unprecedented detailed information of microphysical properties of ice cloud can be retrieved. The ice water content (IWC) is regarded as one of the most important microphysical characteristics of cirrus for its prominent role in cloud radiative forcing. In this paper, we proposed a new joint (Combination) retrieval method using the full advantages of different well established retrieval methods, namely the LIDAR method (for the region Lidar-only), the MWCR method (for the region Radar-only), and Wang method (for the region Lidar-Radar) proposed by Wang et al. (2002). In retrieval of cirrus IWC, empirical formulas of the exponential type were used for both thinner cirrus (detected by Lidar-only), thicker cirrus (detected by radar-only), and the part of cirrus detected by both, respectively. In the present study, the comparison of various methods verified that our proposed new joint method is more comprehensive, rational and reliable. Further, the retrieval information of cirrus is complete and accurate for the region that Lidar cannot penetrate and Radar is insensitive. On the whole, the retrieval results of IWC showed certain differences retrieved from the joint method, Ca&Cl, and ICARE which can be interpreted from the different hypothesis of microphysical characteristics and parameters used in the retrieval method. In addition, our joint method only uses the extinction coefficient and the radar reflectivity factor to calculate the IWC, which is simpler and reduces to some extent the accumulative error. In future studies, we will not only compare the value of IWC but also explore the detailed macrophysical and microphysical characteristics of

  20. Airborne dust distributions over the Tibetan Plateau and surrounding areas derived from the first year of CALIPSO lidar observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Liu

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Using an analysis of the first full year of CALIPSO lidar measurements, this paper derives unprecedented, altitude-resolved seasonal distributions of desert dust transported over the Tibetan Plateau (TP and the surrounding areas. The CALIPSO lidar observations include numerous large dust plumes over the northern slope and eastern part of the TP, with the largest number of dust events occurring in the spring of 2007, and some layers being lofted to altitudes of 11–12 km. Generation of the Tibetan airborne dusts appears to be largely associated with source regions to the north and on the eastern part of the plateau. Examination of the CALIPSO time history reveals an "airborne dust corridor" due to the eastward transport of dusts originating primarily in these source areas. This corridor extends from west to east and shows a seasonality largely modulated by the TP through its dynamical and thermal forcing on the atmospheric flows. On the southern side, desert dust particles originate predominately in Northwest India and Pakistan. The dust transport occurs primarily in dry seasons around the TP western and southern slopes and dust particles become mixed with local polluted aerosols. No significant amount of dust appears to be transported over the Himalayas. Extensive forward trajectory simulations are also conducted to confirm the dust transport pattern from the nearby sources observed by the CALIPSO lidar. Comparisons with the OMI and MODIS measurements show the unique capability of the CALIPSO lidar to provide unambiguous, altitude-resolved dust measurements.

  1. 3D Online Visualization and Synergy of NASA A-Train Data Using Google Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Aijun; Kempler, Steven; Leptoukh, Gregory; Smith, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This poster presentation reviews the use of Google Earth to assist in three dimensional online visualization of NASA Earth science and geospatial data. The NASA A-Train satellite constellation is a succession of seven sun-synchronous orbit satellites: (1) OCO-2 (Orbiting Carbon Observatory) (will launch in Feb. 2013), (2) GCOM-W1 (Global Change Observation Mission), (3) Aqua, (4) CloudSat, (5) CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar & Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations), (6) Glory, (7) Aura. The A-Train makes possible synergy of information from multiple resources, so more information about earth condition is obtained from the combined observations than would be possible from the sum of the observations taken independently

  2. Lidar Ratios for Dust Aerosols Derived From Retrievals of CALIPSO Visible Extinction Profiles Constrained by Optical Depths from MODIS-Aqua and CALIPSO/CloudSat Ocean Surface Reflectance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Stuart A.; Josset, Damien B.; Vaughan, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    CALIPSO's (Cloud Aerosol Lidar Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) analysis algorithms generally require the use of tabulated values of the lidar ratio in order to retrieve aerosol extinction and optical depth from measured profiles of attenuated backscatter. However, for any given time or location, the lidar ratio for a given aerosol type can differ from the tabulated value. To gain some insight as to the extent of the variability, we here calculate the lidar ratio for dust aerosols using aerosol optical depth constraints from two sources. Daytime measurements are constrained using Level 2, Collection 5, 550-nm aerosol optical depth measurements made over the ocean by the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) on board the Aqua satellite, which flies in formation with CALIPSO. We also retrieve lidar ratios from night-time profiles constrained by aerosol column optical depths obtained by analysis of CALIPSO and CloudSat backscatter signals from the ocean surface.

  3. A-Train Observations of Deep Convective Storm Tops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setvak, Martin; Bedka, Kristopher; Lindsey, Daniel T.; Sokol, Alois; Charvat, Zdenek; Stastka, Jindrich; Wang, Pao K.

    2013-01-01

    The paper highlights simultaneous observations of tops of deep convective clouds from several space-borne instruments including the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) of the Aqua satellite, Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) of the CloudSat satellite, and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) flown on the CALIPSO satellite. These satellites share very close orbits, thus together with several other satellites they are referred to as the "A-Train" constellation. Though the primary responsibility of these satellites and their instrumentation is much broader than observations of fine-scale processes atop convective storms, in this study we document how data from the A-Train can contribute to a better understanding and interpretation of various storm-top features, such as overshooting tops, cold-U/V and cold ring features with their coupled embedded warm areas, above anvil ice plumes and jumping cirrus. The relationships between MODIS multi-spectral brightness temperature difference (BTD) fields and cloud top signatures observed by the CPR and CALIOP are also examined in detail to highlight the variability in BTD signals across convective storm events.

  4. A-Train Datalist - A New GES DISC Service to Allow One-Stop Shopping for A-Train Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jennifer; Li, Angela; Savtchenko, Andrey; Alfred, Jerome; Shen, Suhung; Petrenko, Maksym

    2017-01-01

    The currently available services at the Goddard Earth Sciences Data Information Services Center (GES DISC) only allow users to select variables from a single data set at a time. Because entire variables from a data set are often displayed, user selection of variables of interest can be overwhelming. At the American Geophysical Union (AGU) 2016 Fall Meeting, GES DISC unveiled a new service called Datalist: a collection of predefined or user-defined data variables from one or more archived data sets. Our science support team has been curating Datalists and providing added value to the user community.Originally known as Afternoon Constellation, A-Train includes six currently on polar-orbiting Earth observation satellites: OCO-2, GCOM-W1, Aqua, CALIPSO, CloudSat, and Aura, which travel a few minutes apart from each other. This constellation arrangement has enabled coordinated science observations further forming comprehensive pictures of Earth weather and climate that are readily for use in crucial studies such as climate change.GES DISC Datalists are based on the software architecture of the new GES DISC website (also unveiled at the AGU 2016 Fall Meeting). The GES DISC science support team has created a Datalist to support the A-Train Data Depot (ATDD). Using pre-defined Datalist should hopefully save users significant effort in their data searches.

  5. Evaluation of Retrieval Algorithms for Ice Microphysics Using CALIPSO/CloudSat and Earthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Hajime; Sato, Kaori; Hagihara, Yuichiro; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Borovoi, Anatoli; Konoshonkin, Alexander; Kustova, Natalia

    2016-06-01

    We developed lidar-radar algorithms that can be applied to Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) lidar and CloudSat data to retrieve ice microphysics. The algorithms were the extended version of previously reported algorithm [1] and can treat both of nadir pointing of CALIPSO lidar period and 3°-off-nadir pointing one. We used the scattering data bank produced by the physical optics methods [2] and created lidar look-up tables of quasi-horizontally oriented ice plates (Q2D-plate) for nadir- and off-nadir lidar pointing periods. Then LUTs were implemented in the ice retrieval algorithms. We performed several sensitivity studies to evaluate uncertainties in the retrieved ice microphysics due to ice particle orientation and shape. It was found that the implementation of orientation of horizontally oriented ice plate model in the algorithm drastically improved the retrieval results in both for nadir- and off-nadir lidar pointing periods. Differences in the retrieved microphysics between only randomly oriented ice model (3D-ice) and mixture of 3D-ice and Q2Dplate model were large especially in off-nadir period, e.g., 100% in effective radius and one order in ice water content, respectively. And differences in the retrieved ice microphysics among different mixture models were smaller than about 50% for effective radius in nadir period.

  6. Ice Cloud Backscatter Study and Comparison with CALIPSO and MODIS Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jiachen; Yang, Ping; Holz, Robert E.; Platnick, Steven; Meyer, Kerry G.; Vaughan, Mark A.; Hu, Yongxiang; King, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    An invariant imbedding T-matrix (II-TM) method is used to calculate the single-scattering properties of 8-column aggregate ice crystals. The II-TM based backscatter values are compared with those calculated by the improved geometric-optics method (IGOM) to refine the backscattering properties of the ice cloud radiative model used in the MODIS Collection 6 cloud optical property product. The integrated attenuated backscatter-to-cloud optical depth (IAB-ICOD) relation is derived from simulations using a CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite) lidar simulator based on a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model. By comparing the simulation results and co-located CALIPSO and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) observations, the non-uniform zonal distribution of ice clouds over ocean is characterized in terms of a mixture of smooth and rough ice particles. The percentage of the smooth particles is approximately 6 percent and 9 percent for tropical and mid-latitude ice clouds, respectively.

  7. Chasing the Black Smoke: Building Software for CALIPSO Satellite Data to Aid in Tracking and Identifying Sources of Aerosols and their Impact on the Earth's Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, G. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite is a NASA Earth observation that analyzes aerosol particles suspended in the Earth's atmosphere. Researchers use visualized CALIPSO data to track the global distribution, dispersion, and source of aerosols. There currently exists a tool for displaying CALIPSO data, but this tool does not support needed features for tracking aerosols such as selecting regions of data and sharing those selected regions, making tracking specific airborne objects difficult for researchers. Adding these necessary features to the current CALIPSO visualization tool is difficult, as the tool is written in Interactive Data Language (IDL), a proprietary and obscure language and writing additional features for the tool would require a specialized development team. This topic will focus on release of a new tool for visualization CALIPSO's atmospheric data, or the Visualization of CALIPSO (VOCAL) open source Python program. The talk will explain why VOCAL will serve as the successor to the current visualization tool for CALIPSO data, what new features VOCAL brings to the table for researchers, and how this new tool can further support the tracking and identification of aerosols in the Earth's atmosphere.

  8. Airborne dust distributions over the Tibetan Plateau and surrounding areas derived from the first year of CALIPSO lidar observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoyan Liu

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Airborne dust is a major environmental hazard in Asia. Using an analysis of the first full year of CALIPSO lidar measurements, this paper derives unprecedented, altitude-resolved seasonal distributions of desert dust transported over the Tibetan Plateau (TP and the surrounding areas. The CALIPSO lidar observations include numerous large dust plumes over the northern slope and eastern part of the TP, with the largest number of dust events occurring in the spring of 2007, and some layers being lofted to altitudes of 10 km and higher. Generation of the Tibetan airborne dusts appears to be largely associated with source regions to the north and on the eastern part of the plateau. Examination of the CALIPSO time history reveals an "airborne dust corridor" due to the eastward transport of dusts originating primarily in these source areas. This corridor extends from west to east and shows a seasonality largely modulated by the TP through its dynamical and thermal forcing on the atmospheric flows. On the southern side, desert dust particles originate predominately in North India and Pakistan. The dust transport occurs primarily in dry seasons around the TP western and southern slopes and dust particles become mixed with local polluted aerosols. No significant amount of dust appears to be transported over the Himalayas. Extensive forward trajectory simulations are also conducted to confirm the dust transport pattern from the nearby sources observed by the CALIPSO lidar.

  9. Validation of CALIPSO space-borne-derived attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles using a ground-based lidar in Athens, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Mamouri

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We present initial aerosol validation results of the space-borne lidar CALIOP -onboard the CALIPSO satellite- Level 1 attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles, using coincident observations performed with a ground-based lidar in Athens, Greece (37.9° N, 23.6° E. A multi-wavelength ground-based backscatter/Raman lidar system is operating since 2000 at the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA in the framework of the European Aerosol Research LIdar NETwork (EARLINET, the first lidar network for tropospheric aerosol studies on a continental scale. Since July 2006, a total of 40 coincidental aerosol ground-based lidar measurements were performed over Athens during CALIPSO overpasses. The ground-based measurements were performed each time CALIPSO overpasses the station location within a maximum distance of 100 km. The duration of the ground–based lidar measurements was approximately two hours, centred on the satellite overpass time. From the analysis of the ground-based/satellite correlative lidar measurements, a mean bias of the order of 22% for daytime measurements and of 8% for nighttime measurements with respect to the CALIPSO profiles was found for altitudes between 3 and 10 km. The mean bias becomes much larger for altitudes lower that 3 km (of the order of 60% which is attributed to the increase of aerosol horizontal inhomogeneity within the Planetary Boundary Layer, resulting to the observation of possibly different air masses by the two instruments. In cases of aerosol layers underlying Cirrus clouds, comparison results for aerosol tropospheric profiles become worse. This is attributed to the significant multiple scattering effects in Cirrus clouds experienced by CALIPSO which result in an attenuation which is less than that measured by the ground-based lidar.

  10. Direct radiative forcing of aerosols in cloudy condition using CALIPSO satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, E.; Nakajima, T.; Winker, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    The aerosol direct effect occurs by direct scattering and absorption of solar and thermal radiation. Shortwave direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF) under clear-sky condition is estimated about 5 Wm-2 from satellite retrievals and model simulations [Yu et al., 2006ACP]. Simultaneous observations of aerosols and clouds are very limited, thus it is difficult to validate the estimation of DARF under cloudy-sky condition. In 2006, the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) satellite was launched with the space-borne lidar, CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization). This enabled us to get data of the vertical distribution of aerosols and clouds all over the world. Oikawa et al. [2013JGR] estimated DARF under clear-sky, cloudy-sky, and all-sky conditions using CALIPSO and MODIS (Moderate resolution Imaging Spectrometer) data. Over Atlantic Ocean off southwest Africa, biomass burning aerosols are transported above low-level clouds and cause large positive DARF [Oikawa et al., 2013JGR; Chand et al., 2009Nat. Geosci.; De Graaf et al., 2012JGR; Takemura et al., 2005JGR]. We calculate DARF using CALIOP Level 2 Cloud and Aerosol Layer Products Version 3 and the method of Oikawa et al. [2013]. In this study, we focus on the case that aerosols exist above clouds (above-cloud case) in 2007. Over Atlantic Ocean off southwest Africa, DARF caused by smoke aerosols is +7.1 Wm-2 in September. On the other hand, aerosol optical thickness (AOT) of smoke is small as close to 0 Wm-2 in spring season. Over North Pacific, yellow sand and industrial smoke are transported from Asia and DARF is +5.2 Wm-2 in May. Dust AOT at 532 nm is 0.014 and polluted dust AOT at 532 nm is 0.052; in other words, a large part of dust emitted from Taklamakan and Gobi deserts are mixed with the industrial smoke and transported to the Pacific Ocean according to the CALIPSO algorithms.

  11. Small Earth Observing Satellites Flying with Large Satellites in the A-Train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Angelita C.; Loverro, Adam; Case, Warren F.; Queruel, Nadege; Marechal, Chistophe; Barroso, Therese

    2009-01-01

    This paper/poster presents a real-life example of the benefits of flying small satellites with other satellites, large or small, and vice versa. Typically, most small satellites fly payloads consisting of one or two instruments and fly in orbits that are independent from that of other satellites. The science data from these satellites are either used in isolation or correlated with instrument data from other satellites. Data correlation with other satellites is greatly improved when the measurements of the same point or air mass are taken at approximately the same time. Scientists worldwide are beginning to take advantage of the opportunities for improved data correlation, or coincidental science, offered by the international Earth Observing Constellation known as the A-Train (sometimes referred to as the Afternoon Constellation). Most of the A-Train satellites are small - the A-Train is anchored by two large NASA satellites (EOS-Aqua and EOS-Aura), but consists also of 5 small satellites (CloudSat, CALIPSO, PARASOL, OCO and Glory these last two will join in 2009). By flying in a constellation, each mission benefits from coincidental observations from instruments on the other satellites in the constellation. Essentially, from a data point of view, the A-Train can be envisioned as a single, virtual science platform with multiple instruments. Satellites in the A-Train fly at 705 km in sun-synchronous orbits. Their mean local times at the equator are within seconds to a few minutes of each other. This paper describes the challenges of operating an international constellation of independent satellites from the U.S. and Europe to maximize the coincidental science opportunities while at the same time minimizing the level of operational interactions required between team members. The A-Train mission teams have been able to demonstrate that flying as members of an international constellation does not take away the flexibility to accommodate new requirements. Specific

  12. Effect of CALIPSO Cloud Aerosol Discrimination (CAD) Confidence Levels on Observations of Aerosol Properties near Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weidong; Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas; Liu, Zhaoyan

    2012-01-01

    CALIPSO aerosol backscatter enhancement in the transition zone between clouds and clear sky areas is revisited with particular attention to effects of data selection based on the confidence level of cloud-aerosol discrimination (CAD). The results show that backscatter behavior in the transition zone strongly depends on the CAD confidence level. Higher confidence level data has a flatter backscatter far away from clouds and a much sharper increase near clouds (within 4 km), thus a smaller transition zone. For high confidence level data it is shown that the overall backscatter enhancement is more pronounced for small clear-air segments and horizontally larger clouds. The results suggest that data selection based on CAD reduces the possible effects of cloud contamination when studying aerosol properties in the vicinity of clouds.

  13. Cirrus cloud properties from combined IIR and lidar observations of CALIPSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, Anne; Pelon, Jacques; Winker, Dave M.; Dubuisson, Philippe; Vaughan, Mark A.; Pascal, Nicolas

    2013-05-01

    Cirrus clouds are of particular importance for the understanding and the survey of climate change due to their impact on the Earth radiation budget. However, their optical and microphysical properties are still poorly known. The NASA-CNES CALIPSO mission provides new pieces of information by combining observations of active (lidar) and passive (radiometer) remote sensing instruments. Cirrus cloud optical depths derived in the thermal infrared (12 μm) from the IIR are found in excellent agreement with those retrieved in the visible spectrum (532 nm) from the CALIOP lidar, down to optical depths smaller than 0.05. The ice water paths derived from the two instruments use very different approaches, and show a highly correlated linear relationship. On average, CALIOP retrievals are 1.7 times larger than IIR estimates, requiring further studies.

  14. Direct atmosphere opacity observations from CALIPSO provide new constraints on cloud-radiation interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, R.; Chepfer, H.; Noel, V.; Vaillant de Guélis, T.; Kay, J. E.; Raberanto, P.; Cesana, G.; Vaughan, M. A.; Winker, D. M.

    2017-01-01

    The spaceborne lidar CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) directly measures atmospheric opacity. In 8 years of CALIPSO observations, we find that 69% of vertical profiles penetrate through the complete atmosphere. The remaining 31% do not reach the surface, due to opaque clouds. The global mean altitude of full attenuation of the lidar beam (z_opaque) is 3.2 km, but there are large regional variations in this altitude. Of relevance to cloud-climate studies, the annual zonal mean longwave cloud radiative effect and annual zonal mean z_opaque weighted by opaque cloud cover are highly correlated (0.94). The annual zonal mean shortwave cloud radiative effect and annual zonal mean opaque cloud cover are also correlated (-0.95). The new diagnostics introduced here are implemented within a simulator framework to enable scale-aware and definition-aware evaluation of the LMDZ5B global climate model. The evaluation shows that the model overestimates opaque cloud cover (31% obs. versus 38% model) and z_opaque (3.2 km obs. versus 5.1 km model). In contrast, the model underestimates thin cloud cover (35% obs. versus 14% model). Further assessment shows that reasonable agreement between modeled and observed longwave cloud radiative effects results from compensating errors between insufficient warming by thin clouds and excessive warming due to overestimating both z_opaque and opaque cloud cover. This work shows the power of spaceborne lidar observations to directly constrain cloud-radiation interactions in both observations and models.

  15. Analysis of co-located MODIS and CALIPSO observations near clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Várnai

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at helping synergistic studies in combining data from different satellites for gaining new insights into two critical yet poorly understood aspects of anthropogenic climate change, aerosol-cloud interactions and aerosol radiative effects. In particular, the paper examines the way cloud information from the MODIS imager can refine our perceptions based on CALIOP lidar measurements about the systematic aerosol changes that occur near clouds.

    The statistical analysis of a yearlong dataset of co-located global maritime observations from the Aqua and CALIPSO satellites reveals that MODIS's multispectral imaging ability can greatly help the interpretation of CALIOP observations. The results show that imagers on Aqua and CALIPSO yield very similar pictures, and that the discrepancies – due mainly to wind drift and differences in view angle – do not significantly hinder aerosol measurements near clouds. By detecting clouds outside the CALIOP track, MODIS reveals that clouds are usually closer to clear areas than CALIOP data alone would suggest. The paper finds statistical relationships between the distances to clouds in MODIS and CALIOP data, and proposes a rescaling approach to statistically account for the impact of clouds outside the CALIOP track even when MODIS cannot reliably detect low clouds, for example at night or over sea ice. Finally, the results show that the typical distance to clouds depends on both cloud coverage and cloud type, and accordingly varies with location and season. The global median distance to clouds in maritime clear-sky areas is in the 4–5 km range.

  16. Analysis of co-located MODIS and CALIPSO observations near clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Várnai

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at helping synergistic studies in combining data from different satellites for gaining new insights into two critical yet poorly understood aspects of anthropogenic climate change, aerosol-cloud interactions and aerosol radiative effects. In particular, the paper examines the way cloud information from the MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer imager can refine our perceptions based on CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization lidar measurements about the systematic aerosol changes that occur near clouds.

    The statistical analysis of a yearlong dataset of co-located global maritime observations from the Aqua and CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation satellites reveals that MODIS's multispectral imaging ability can greatly help the interpretation of CALIOP observations. The results show that imagers on Aqua and CALIPSO yield very similar pictures, and that the discrepancies – due mainly to wind drift and differences in view angle – do not significantly hinder aerosol measurements near clouds. By detecting clouds outside the CALIOP track, MODIS reveals that clouds are usually closer to clear areas than CALIOP data alone would suggest. The paper finds statistical relationships between the distances to clouds in MODIS and CALIOP data, and proposes a rescaling approach to statistically account for the impact of clouds outside the CALIOP track even when MODIS cannot reliably detect low clouds, for example at night or over sea ice. Finally, the results show that the typical distance to clouds depends on both cloud coverage and cloud type, and accordingly varies with location and season. In maritime areas perceived cloud free, the global median distance to clouds below 3 km altitude is in the 4–5 km range.

  17. CALIPSO inferred most probable heights of global dust and smoke layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jingfeng; Guo, Jianping; Wang, Fu; Liu, Zhaoyan; Jeong, Myeong-Jae; Yu, Hongbin; Zhang, Zhibo

    2015-05-01

    The vertical location of aerosol layers is critical for determining predominance of aerosol radiative and microphysical effects in aerosol-cloud-precipitation-climate interaction. The spaceborne lidar system, the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO), provides an unprecedented opportunity to observe vertical distributions of global aerosol layers. In this study we examine the most probable height (MPH) of dust and smoke layers, which are calculated either from aerosol occurrence frequency (OF) in vertical feature mask or aerosol extinction profile. The study focuses on six high-aerosol-loading regions where aerosols are of great interest in a range of scientific topics: Saharan Air Layer (SAL) over Tropical Atlantic, West African Monsoon region (WAM), Southeast Atlantic Ocean (SAO), Southeast Asia (SEA) and South China Sea, Amazon (AMZ), and Northwestern Pacific (NWP). The analysis revealed interesting spatial and seasonal variability of different vertical mixture features over these regions: seasonal migration of dust layers over SAL, separation and mixture of dust and smoke layers over WAM and NWP, and smoke layer above clouds over SAO, SEA, and AMZ. Results also indicated that the OF-based MPH tends to be much higher than the aerosol optical depth (AOD)-based MPH, owing to the predominating near-surface sources. Within the same vertical resolution grid of CALIPSO, aerosols are found with higher OF at higher levels but AOD tends to increase toward lower levels, because most aerosol sources are near the surface and the aerosol layers transported to high altitudes are generally much more diluted over larger spatial domain than those near the surface.

  18. Polluted Dust Classification and Its Optical Properties Analysis Using CALIPSO Data and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, J.; Yang, P.; Holz, R.; Vaughan, M. A.; Hu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In CALIPSO Level 2 aerosol data, dust particles are classified into two subtypes, namely, pure dust and polluted dust based on lidar backscatter, depolarization ratio and surface types. In this research, the polluted dust subtype is found to have two distinct modes in terms of integrated depolarization ratio (IDR) and integrated total color ratio (ICR). Dust with smaller IDR and ICR occurs mainly over areas with strong smoke emissions such as industrial cities. This kind of polluted dust originating from East Asia is also found over the Pacific Ocean. In contrast, the other type originating from the Saharan desert with larger IDR and ICR occurs mainly over the Atlantic Ocean. The disparities of IDR and ICR may result from different pollutants. The polluted dust with smaller ICR and IDR should have stronger absorption of light and may contain black carbon. Other chemical compounds such as sea salts may account for polluted dust with larger ICR and IDR. To further separate the types of polluted dust, cluster analysis is applied to determine the centroid of each type in terms of IDR and ICR. Furthermore, scattering models of dust mixed with various pollutants are constructed to be included in a CALIPSO simulator. The simulated IDR and ICR values are compared with data to retrieve the chemical compositions of polluted dust. The difference of polluted dust over the Pacific and Atlantic Ocean provides new evidence about long-range transport of Asian dust to North America. The distribution of dust polluted by black carbon is determined, which can improve knowledge about the effect of black carbon on the earth's radiation budget.

  19. Developing a training package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minogue, Virginia; Donskoy, Anne-Laure

    2017-06-12

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to outline the development of a training package for service users and carers with an interest in NHS health and social care research. It demonstrates how the developers used their unique experience and expertise as service users and carers to inform their work. Design/methodology/approach Service users and carers, NHS Research and Development Forum working group members, supported by health professionals, identified a need for research training that was tailored to other service user and carer needs. After reviewing existing provision and drawing on their training and support experience, they developed a training package. Sessions from the training package were piloted, which evaluated positively. In trying to achieve programme accreditation and training roll-out beyond the pilots, the group encountered several challenges. Findings The training package development group formed good working relationships and a co-production model that proved sustainable. However, challenges were difficult to overcome owing to external factors and financial constraints. Practical implications Lessons learnt by the team are useful for other service users and carer groups working with health service professionals. Training for service users and carers should be designed to meet their needs; quality and consistency are also important. The relationships between service user and carer groups, and professionals are important to understanding joint working. Recognising and addressing challenges at the outset can help develop strategies to overcome challenges and ensure project success. Originality/value The training package was developed by service users and carers for other service users and carers. Their unique health research experience underpinned the group's values and training development.

  20. Efficient and fast 511-keV γ detection through Cherenkov radiation: the CaLIPSO optical detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, E.; Kochebina, O.; Yvon, D.; Verrecchia, P.; Sharyy, V.; Tauzin, G.; Mols, J. P.; Starzinski, P.; Desforges, D.; Flouzat, Ch.; Bulbul, Y.; Jan, S.; Mancardi, X.; Canot, C.; Alokhina, M.

    2016-11-01

    The CaLIPSO project aims to develop a high precision brain-scanning PET device with time-of-flight capability. The proposed device uses an innovative liquid, the TriMethyl Bismuth, as the detection medium. It detects simultaneously the ionization and optical signals from the 511 keV gamma conversion. In this paper we present the design, the Monte Carlo simulation, and the tests results for the CaLIPSO optical prototype. In this prototype we demonstrated the ability to detect efficiently the low number of the optical photons produced by the relativistic electron from the gamma conversion through the Cherenkov effect. The time resolution of the current prototype is limited by the moderate time transition spread of the PMT, but should be improved to the level better than 100 ps (FWHM) by using micro-channel-plate PMT according to the Geant 4 simulation.

  1. Démonstrateur optique CaLIPSO pour l’imagerie TEP clinique et préclinique

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos, Emilie,

    2014-01-01

    PET detectors are usually based on scintillation crystals or semiconductor materials. The CaLIPSO project aims to build a PET detector working on the double detection of Cerenkov light and pair productions in a novel detection material called TriMethylBismuth. This would allow at the same time an enhanced time resolution (thanks to the Cerenkov signal) and a excellent spatial resolution (thanks to the ionization signal). Liquid TMBi (at room temperature), thanks to its good photo fraction (47...

  2. Cloud-Aerosol Interactions: Retrieving Aerosol Ångström Exponents from Calipso Measurements of Opaque Water Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaughan Mark

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Backscatter and extinction from water clouds are well-understood, both theoretically and experimentally, and thus changes to the expected measurement of layer-integrated attenuated backscatter can be used to infer the optical properties of overlying layers. In this paper we offer a first look at a new retrieval technique that uses CALIPSO measurements of opaque water clouds to derive optical depths and Ångström exponents for overlying aerosol layers.

  3. Nearly a Decade of CALIPSO Observations of Asian and Saharan Dust Properties near Source and Transport Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, A. H.; Tackett, J. L.; Liu, Z.; Vaughan, M. A.; Trepte, C. R.; Winker, D. M.; Yu, H.

    2015-12-01

    The lidar on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) mission, makes robust measurements of dust and has generated a length of record that is significant both seasonally and inter-annually. We exploit this record to determine a multi-year climatology of the properties of Asian and Saharan dust, in particular seasonal optical depths, layer frequencies, and layer heights of dust gridded in accordance with the Level 3 data products protocol between 2006 and 2015. The data are screened using standard CALIPSO quality assurance flags, cloud aerosol discrimination (CAD) scores, overlying features and layer properties. To evaluate the effects of transport on small-scale phenomena such as morphology, vertical extent and size of the dust layers, we compare probability distribution functions of the layer integrated volume depolarization ratios, geometric depths and integrated attenuated color ratios near the source to the same distributions in the far field or transport region. CALIPSO is collaboration between NASA and Centre National d'Études Spatiales (CNES), was launched in April 2006 to provide vertically resolved measurements of cloud and aerosol distributions. The primary instrument on the CALIPSO satellite is the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), a near-nadir viewing two-wavelength polarization-sensitive instrument. The unique nature of CALIOP measurements make it quite challenging to validate backscatter profiles, aerosol type, and cloud phase, all of which are used to retrieve extinction and optical depth. To evaluate the uncertainty in the lidar ratios, we compare the values computed from dust layers overlying opaque water clouds, considered nominal, with the constant lidar ratio value used in the CALIOP algorithms for dust. We also explore the effects of noise on the CALIOP retrievals at daytime by comparing the distributions of the properties at daytime to the nighttime distributions.

  4. Dust aerosol impact on the retrieval of cloud top height from satellite observations of CALIPSO, CloudSat and MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wencai; Sheng, Lifang; Dong, Xu; Qu, Wenjun; Sun, Jilin; Jin, Hongchun; Logan, Timothy

    2017-02-01

    Dust aerosol effect on the retrievals of dusty cloud top height (DCTH) are analyzed over Northwest China using cloud products from MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on Aqua, Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO), and CloudSat for the Spring season of March-May over the years 2007-2011. An excellent agreement is found between CloudSat and CALIPSO derived DCTHs for all cloud types, suggesting that the effect of dust aerosols plays a small role in DCTHs determination for lidar and radar measurements. However, the presence of dust aerosols greatly affects the retrievals of DCTHs for MODIS compared with pure clouds and the active sensors derived results. The differences of DCTHs retrieving from CloudSat and MODIS range from -2.30 to 6.8 km. Likewise, the differences of DCTHs retrieving from CALIPSO and MODIS range from -2.66 to 6.78 km. In addition, the results show that the differences in DCTHs for active and passive sensors are dependent on cloud type. On the whole, dust aerosols have the largest effect on cloud top heights (CTH) retrieved of nimbostratus (Ns), followed by altocumulus (Ac) and altostratus (As), the last is cirrus (Ci) over Northwest China. Our results also indicate that the accuracy of MODIS-derived retrievals reduces accompanied with a decrease of height.

  5. Extinction-to-Backscatter Ratios of Saharan Dust Layers Derived from In-Situ Measurements and CALIPSO Overflights During NAMMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Ali H.; Liu, Zhaoyan; Vaughan, Mark A.; Hu, Yongxiang; Ismail, Syed; Powell, Kathleen A.; Winker, David M.; Trepte, Charles R.; Anderson, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    We determine the aerosol extinction-to-backscatter (Sa) ratios of dust using airborne in-situ measurements of microphysical properties, and CALIPSO observations during the NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (NAMMA). The NAMMA field experiment was conducted from Sal, Cape Verde during Aug-Sept 2006. Using CALIPSO measurements of the attenuated backscatter of lofted Saharan dust layers, we apply the transmittance technique to estimate dust Sa ratios at 532 nm and a 2-color method to determine the corresponding 1064 nm Sa. Using this method, we found dust Sa ratios of 39.8 plus or minus 1.4 sr and 51.8 plus or minus 3.6 sr at 532 nm and 1064 nm, respectively. Secondly, Sa ratios at both wavelengths is independently calculated using size distributions measured aboard the NASA DC-8 and estimates of Saharan dust complex refractive indices applied in a T-Matrix scheme. We found Sa ratios of 39.1 plus or minus 3.5 sr and 50.0 plus or minus 4 sr at 532 nm and 1064 nm, respectively, using the T-Matrix calculations applied to measured size spectra. Finally, in situ measurements of the total scattering (550 nm) and absorption coefficients (532 nm) are used to generate an extinction profile that is used to constrain the CALIPSO 532 nm extinction profile.

  6. The 2009–2010 Arctic polar stratospheric cloud season: a CALIPSO perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Pitts

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Spaceborne lidar measurements from CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations are used to provide a vortex-wide perspective of the 2009–2010 Arctic polar stratospheric cloud (PSC season to complement more focused measurements from the European Union RECONCILE (reconciliation of essential process parameters for an enhanced predictability of Arctic stratospheric ozone loss and its climate interactions field campaign. The 2009–2010 Arctic winter was unusually cold at stratospheric levels, especially from mid-December 2009 until the end of January 2010, and was one of only a few winters from the past 52 years with synoptic-scale regions of temperatures below the frost point. More PSCs were observed by CALIPSO during the 2009–2010 Arctic winter than in the previous three Arctic seasons combined. In particular, there were significantly more observations of high number density nitric acid trihydrate (NAT mixtures (referred to as Mix 2-enh and ice PSCs. We found that the 2009–2010 season could roughly be divided into four periods with distinctly different PSC optical characteristics. The early season (15–30 December 2009 was characterized by patchy, tenuous PSCs, primarily low number density liquid/NAT mixtures. The second phase of the season (31 December 2009–14 January 2010 was characterized by frequent mountain wave ice clouds that nucleated widespread NAT particles throughout the vortex, including Mix 2-enh. The third phase of the season (15–21 January 2010 was characterized by synoptic-scale temperatures below the frost point which led to a rare outbreak of widespread ice clouds. The fourth phase of the season (22–28 January was characterized by a major stratospheric warming that distorted the vortex, displacing the cold pool from the vortex center. This final phase was dominated by supercooled ternary solution (STS PSCs, although NAT particles may have been present in low number densities, but were

  7. Multi-year analysis of ice microphysics derived from CloudSat and CALIPSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, H.; Sato, K.; Hagihara, Y.

    2012-12-01

    We conducted multi-year analys of ice microphysics using CloudSat and CALIPSO data. Inter-annual variability, land-ocean differences and seasonal changes of ice microphysical properties were reported for the observation periods from 2006 to 2009. CALIPSO changed the laser tilt angle from 0.3 degrees to 3 degrees off nadir direction on November 2007 and the zonal mean properties of backscattering coefficient and depolarization ratio were significantly decreased and increased, respectively, for low altitude after November 2007. This could be explained by the different backscattering behavior of horizontally oriented ice crystals for the different laser tilt angles. On the other hand, inter-annual variability of zonal mean properties of reflectivity factor observed by CloudSat showed the very similar characteristics during the four years. In addition, the lidar observables were similar when the monthly mean properties were compared for different years before November 2007 and also the same was true for the comparisons after November 2007. These analyses of observables suggested that the inter-annual variability of zonal mean properties of ice microphysics could be considered to be similar. Application of the radar-lidar algorithm showed that the change of the laser tilt angle introduced the large gap between the ice microphysical properties before and after November 2007, if the proper treatment of the oriented ice crystals were not conducted in the retrievals. Global analysis of cloud particle types showed that the frequent occurrence of oriented ice crystals were identified in the temperature range between -10 to -20 degrees C. It is also noted that the significant overestimation of ice water content and significant underestimation of ice effective radius were found if the scattering properties of the horizontally oriented ice particles were not considered. Therefore it is highly demanded that the realistic ice orientation model is implemented in the look up tables

  8. CALIPSO Observations of PSCs and Cirrus During the 2015-2016 Arctic Winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Michael; Poole, Lamont

    2016-04-01

    The POLSTRACC (POlar STRAtosphere in a Changing Climate) field campaign was conducted in the Arctic during December 2015 - March 2016 to investigate the chemical, microphysical, and dynamical processes of the Arctic lowermost stratosphere and upper troposphere. The primary measurement platform for POLSTRACC was the German HALO (High Altitude LOng range) research aircraft carrying a large suite of in situ and remote sensing instruments to measure key chemical species, tracers, as well as aerosol and cloud particles and meteorological parameters. Two primary science objectives of POLSTRACC are to improve our understanding of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particle characteristics and formation processes and investigate the impact of Arctic cirrus clouds on radiative forcing and chlorine activation. To complement the more focused measurements from the POLSTRACC field campaign, we have used spaceborne lidar measurements from CALIPSO to characterize PSC occurrence and composition, as well as the occurrence of Arctic cirrus during the 2015-2016 season on vortex-wide scales. In this paper, we present a general overview of the 2015-2016 winter, examine in detail the evolution of PSCs and cirrus during the season, and explore the unique aspects of this season in attempt to understand the underlying physical mechanisms.

  9. Psoriasis severity and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function: results from the CALIPSO study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Brunoni

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease that significantly impacts life quality, being associated with stress and mental disorders. We investigated whether the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis was associated with psoriasis severity, daily life stress and anxiety, and depressive symptoms. In this ancillary study, which was part of the CALIPSO (coronary artery calcium in psoriasis study, saliva was collected from 102 patients with psoriasis immediately upon awakening, 30, and 60 min after awakening, at 2:00 pm and at bedtime (five time points to determine salivary cortisol levels. We used Pearson's correlation coefficient to evaluate the association of clinical and psychopathological variables with HPA activity. We found a direct correlation between bedtime cortisol and psoriasis severity evaluated by the psoriasis area severity index (PASI; r=0.39, P<0.001. No correlations between other clinical and psychopathological variables or with other cortisol assessments were observed. The findings indicated that HPA dysfunction may be present in psoriasis, as bedtime cortisol was correlated with psoriasis severity. Our study is limited by the lack of a control group; therefore, we were not able to explore whether these cortisol values were different compared with a concurrent, healthy sample.

  10. CALIPSO Observations of Transatlantic Dust: Vertical Stratification and Effect of Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weidong; Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas; Kalashnikova, Olga V.; Kostinski, Alexander B.

    2014-01-01

    We use CALIOP nighttime measurements of lidar backscatter, color and depolarization ratios, as well as particulate retrievals during the summer of 2007 to study transatlantic dust properties downwind of Saharan sources, and to examine the influence of nearby clouds on dust. Our analysis suggests that (1) under clear skies, while lidar backscatter and color ratio do not change much with altitude and longitude in the Saharan Air Layer (SAL), depolarization ratio increases with altitude and decreases westward in the SAL (2) the vertical lapse rate of dust depolarization ratio, introduced here, increases within SAL as plumes move westward (3) nearby clouds barely affect the backscatter and color ratio of dust volumes within SAL but not so below SAL. Moreover, the presence of nearby clouds tends to decrease the depolarization of dust volumes within SAL. Finally, (4) the odds of CALIOP finding dust below SAL next to clouds are about of those far away from clouds. This feature, together with an apparent increase in depolarization ratio near clouds, indicates that particles in some dust volumes loose asphericity in the humid air near clouds, and cannot be identified by CALIPSO as dust.

  11. October Cloud Increases Over the Arctic Ocean as Observed by MISR and CALIPSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong L.; Lee, Jae N.

    2011-01-01

    The Beaufort and East Siberian Sea (BESS) shows a large increase in surface air temperature (SAT) in the recent decade for months of Sep-Nov, and NASA's Terra satellite have provided valuable measurements for this important decade of the intensified Arctic warming. In particular, MISR data since 2000 and CALIPSO cloud measurements since 2006 reveal a significant increase of low cloud cover in October, which is largest in the daylight Arctic months (March-October). Causes of the warming remain unclear; but increased absorption of summer solar radiation and autumn low cloud formation have been suggested as a positive ice-temperature-cloud feedback in the Arctic. The observed increase of low cloud cover supports the theorized positive ice-temperature-cloud feedback, whereby more open water in the Arctic Ocean increases summer absorption of solar radiation, and subsequent evaporation, which leads to more low clouds in autumn. Trapping longwave radiation, these clouds effectively lengthen the melt season and reduce perennial ice pack formation, making sea ice more vulnerable to the next melt season

  12. CALIPSO: an interactive image analysis software package for desktop PACS workstations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratib, Osman M.; Huang, H. K.

    1990-07-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop a low cost workstation for quantitative analysis of multimodality images using a Macintosh II personal computer. In the current configuration the Macintosh operates as a stand alone workstation where images are imported either from a central PACS server through a standard Ethernet network or recorded through video digitizer board. The CALIPSO software developed contains a large variety ofbasic image display and manipulation tools. We focused our effort however on the design and implementation ofquantitative analysis methods that can be applied to images from different imaging modalities. Analysis modules currently implemented include geometric and densitometric volumes and ejection fraction calculation from radionuclide and cine-angiograms Fourier analysis ofcardiac wall motion vascular stenosis measurement color coded parametric display of regional flow distribution from dynamic coronary angiograms automatic analysis ofmyocardial distribution ofradiolabelled tracers from tomoscintigraphic images. Several of these analysis tools were selected because they use similar color coded andparametric display methods to communicate quantitative data extracted from the images. 1. Rationale and objectives of the project Developments of Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) in clinical environment allow physicians and radiologists to assess radiographic images directly through imaging workstations (''). This convenient access to the images is often limited by the number of workstations available due in part to their high cost. There is also an increasing need for quantitative analysis ofthe images. During thepast decade

  13. Comparative Study on Cloud Parameter Estimation Among GOSAT/CAI, MODIS, CALIPSO/CALIOP and Landsat-8/OLI with Laser Radar: Lidar as Truth Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Arai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study on cloud parameter estimation among GOSAT/CAI, MODIS, CALIPSO/CALIOP and Landsat-8/OLI is carried out using Laser Radar: Lidar as a truth data. Optical depth, size distribution, as well as cirrus type of clouds are cloud parameters. In particular, cirrus cloud detection is tough issue. 1.38 µm channel is required for its detection. Although MODIS and Landsat-8/OLI have such channel, the other mission instruments, CAI and CALIPSO/CALIOP do not have such channel. As a truth data of cloud parameter, ground based Lidar is used in this comparative study. From the Lidar, backscattered echo signal and depolarization coefficient are obtained as a function of altitude. Therefore, cloud type, vertical profile can be derived from the Lidar data. CALIPSO/CALIOP is satellite based Lidar which allows observation of clouds from space. Although the directions of laser light emissions between CALIPSO/CALIOP and the ground based Lidar are different, their principles are same. Therefore, it is expected that CALIPSO/CALIOP data derived cloud parameters are similar to the ground based Lidar data derived cloud parameters. The experimental results show the aforementioned facts and are useful for improvement of cloud parameter estimation accuracy with several sensor data combinations.

  14. Evaluating Arctic cloud radiative effects simulated by NICAM with A-train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashino, Tempei; Satoh, Masaki; Hagihara, Yuichiro; Kato, Seiji; Kubota, Takuji; Matsui, Toshihisa; Nasuno, Tomoe; Okamoto, Hajime; Sekiguchi, Miho

    2016-06-01

    Evaluation of cloud radiative effects (CREs) in global atmospheric models is of vital importance to reduce uncertainties in weather forecasting and future climate projection. In this paper, we describe an effective way to evaluate CREs from a 3.5 km mesh global nonhydrostatic model by comparing it against A-train satellite data. The model is the Nonhydrostatic Icosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM), and its output is run through a satellite-sensor simulator (Joint Simulator for satellite sensors) to produce the equivalent CloudSat radar, CALIPSO lidar, and Aqua Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) data. These simulated observations are then compared to real observations from the satellites. We focus on the Arctic, which is a region experiencing rapid climate change over various surface types. The NICAM simulation significantly overestimates the shortwave CREs at top of atmosphere and surface as large as 24 W m-2 for the month of June. The CREs were decomposed into cloud fractions and footprint CREs of cloud types that are defined based on the CloudSat-CALIPSO cloud top temperature and maximum radar reflectivity. It turned out that the simulation underestimates the cloud fraction and optical thickness of mixed-phase clouds due to predicting too little supercooled liquid and predicting overly large snow particles with too little mass content. This bias was partially offset by predicting too many optically thin high clouds. Offline sensitivity experiments, where cloud microphysical parameters, surface albedo, and single scattering parameters are varied, support the diagnosis. Aerosol radiative effects and nonspherical single scattering of ice particles should be introduced into the NICAM broadband calculation for further improvement.

  15. Clear-Sky Remote Sensing in the Vicinity of Clouds: What We Learned from MODIS and CALIPSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas; Wen, Guoyong; Cahalan, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Studies on aerosol direct and indirect effects require a precise separation of cloud-free and cloudy air. However, separation between cloud-free and cloudy areas from remotely-sensed measurements is ambiguous. The transition zone in the regions around clouds often stretches out tens of km, which are neither precisely clear nor precisely cloudy. We study the transition zone between cloud-free and cloudy air using MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) measurements. Both instruments show enhanced clear-sky reflectance (MODIS) and clear-sky backscatterer (CALIPSO) near clouds, Analyzing a large dataset of MODIS observations we examine the effect of three-dimensional (3D) radiative interactions between clouds and cloud-free areas, also known as a cloud adjacency effect. Comparing with CALIPSO clear-sky backscatterer measurements, we show that the cloud adjacency effect may be responsible for a large portion of the enhanced clear sky reflectance observed by MODIS. While aerosol particles are responsible for a large part of the near-cloud enhancements in CALIPSO observations, misidentified or undetected cloud particles are also likely to contribute. As a result, both the nature of these particles (cloud vs. aerosol) and the processes creating them need to be clarified using a quantitative assessment of remote sensing limitations in particle detection and identification. The width and ubiquity of the transition zone near clouds imply that studies of aerosol-cloud interactions and aerosol direct radiative effects need to account for aerosol changes near clouds. Not accounted, these changes can cause systematic biases toward smaller aerosol radiative forcing. On the other hand, including aerosol products near clouds despite their uncertainties may overestimate aerosol radiative forcing. Therefore, there is an urgent need for developing methods that can assess and account for

  16. Polar stratospheric cloud evolution and chlorine activation measured by CALIPSO and MLS, and modeled by ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hideaki; Wohltmann, Ingo; Wegner, Tobias; Takeda, Masanori; Pitts, Michael C.; Poole, Lamont R.; Lehmann, Ralph; Santee, Michelle L.; Rex, Markus

    2016-03-01

    We examined observations of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) by CALIPSO, and of HCl and ClO by MLS along air mass trajectories, to investigate the dependence of the inferred PSC composition on the temperature history of the air parcels and the dependence of the level of chlorine activation on PSC composition. Several case studies based on individual trajectories from the Arctic winter 2009/2010 were conducted, with the trajectories chosen such that the first processing of the air mass by PSCs in this winter occurred on the trajectory. Transitions of PSC composition classes were observed to be highly dependent on the temperature history. In cases of a gradual temperature decrease, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and super-cooled ternary solution (STS) mixture clouds were observed. In cases of rapid temperature decrease, STS clouds were first observed, followed by NAT/STS mixture clouds. When temperatures dropped below the frost point, ice clouds formed and then transformed into NAT/STS mixture clouds when temperature increased above the frost point. The threshold temperature for rapid chlorine activation on PSCs is approximately 4 K below the NAT existence temperature, TNAT. Furthermore, simulations of the ATLAS chemistry and transport box model along the trajectories were used to corroborate the measurements and show good agreement with the observations. Rapid chlorine activation was observed when an air mass encountered PSCs. Usually, chlorine activation was limited by the amount of available ClONO2. Where ClONO2 was not the limiting factor, a large dependence on temperature was evident.

  17. Subtropical and Polar Cirrus Clouds Characterized by Ground-Based Lidars and CALIPSO/CALIOP Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Córdoba-Jabonero Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cirrus clouds are product of weather processes, and then their occurrence and macrophysical/optical properties can vary significantly over different regions of the world. Lidars can provide height-resolved measurements with a relatively good both vertical and temporal resolutions, making them the most suitable instrumentation for high-cloud observations. The aim of this work is to show the potential of lidar observations on Cirrus clouds detection in combination with a recently proposed methodology to retrieve the Cirrus clouds macrophysical and optical features. In this sense, a few case studies of cirrus clouds observed at both subtropical and polar latitudes are examined and compared to CALIPSO/CALIOP observations. Lidar measurements are carried out in two stations: the Metropolitan city of Sao Paulo (MSP, Brazil, 23.3°S 46.4°W, located at subtropical latitudes, and the Belgrano II base (BEL, Argentina, 78ºS 35ºW in the Antarctic continent. Optical (COD-cloud optical depth and LR-Lidar Ratio and macrophysical (top/base heights and thickness properties of both the subtropical and polar cirrus clouds are reported. In general, subtropical Cirrus clouds present lower LR values and are found at higher altitudes than those detected at polar latitudes. In general, Cirrus clouds are detected at similar altitudes by CALIOP. However, a poor agreement is achieved in the LR retrieved between ground-based lidars and space-borne CALIOP measurements, likely due to the use of a fixed (or low-variable LR value in CALIOP inversion procedures.

  18. Aerosol classification from airborne HSRL and comparisons with the CALIPSO vertical feature mask

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Burton

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol classification products from the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-1 on the NASA B200 aircraft are compared with coincident V3.01 aerosol classification products from the CALIOP instrument on the CALIPSO satellite. For CALIOP, aerosol classification is a key input to the aerosol retrieval, and must be inferred using aerosol loading-dependent observations and location information. In contrast, HSRL-1 makes direct measurements of aerosol intensive properties, including the lidar ratio, that provide information on aerosol type. In this study, comparisons are made for 109 underflights of the CALIOP orbit track. We find that 62% of the CALIOP marine layers and 54% of the polluted continental layers agree with HSRL-1 classification results. In addition, 80% of the CALIOP desert dust layers are classified as either dust or dusty mix by HSRL-1. However, agreement is less for CALIOP smoke (13% and polluted dust (35% layers. Specific case studies are examined, giving insight into the performance of the CALIOP aerosol type algorithm. In particular, we find that the CALIOP polluted dust type is overused due to an attenuation-related depolarization bias. Furthermore, the polluted dust type frequently includes mixtures of dust plus marine aerosol. Finally, we find that CALIOP's identification of internal boundaries between different aerosol types in contact with each other frequently do not reflect the actual transitions between aerosol types accurately. Based on these findings, we give recommendations which may help to improve the CALIOP aerosol type algorithms.

  19. Polar Stratospheric Cloud evolution and chlorine activation measured by CALIPSO and MLS, and modelled by ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, H.; Wohltmann, I.; Wegner, T.; Takeda, M.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Lehmann, R.; Santee, M. L.; Rex, M.

    2015-08-01

    We examined observations of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) by CALIPSO and of HCl, ClO and HNO3 by MLS along air mass trajectories to investigate the dependence of the inferred PSC composition on the temperature history of the air parcels, and the dependence of the level of chlorine activation on PSC composition. Several case studies based on individual trajectories from the Arctic winter 2009/10 were conducted, with the trajectories chosen such that the first processing of the air mass by PSCs in this winter occurred on the trajectory. Transitions of PSC composition classes were observed to be highly dependent on the temperature history. In cases of a gradual temperature decrease, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and super-cooled ternary solution (STS) mixture clouds were observed. In cases of rapid temperature decrease, STS clouds were first observed, followed by NAT/STS mixture clouds. When temperatures dropped below the frost point, ice clouds formed, and then transformed into NAT/STS mixture clouds when temperature increased above the frost point. The threshold temperature for rapid chlorine activation on PSCs is approximately 4 K below the NAT existence temperature, TNAT. Furthermore, simulations of the ATLAS chemistry and transport box model along the trajectories were used to corroborate the measurements and show good agreement with the observations. Rapid chlorine activation was observed when an airmass encountered PSCs. The observed and modelled dependence of the rate of chlorine activation on the PSC composition class was small. Usually, chlorine activation was limited by the amount of available ClONO2. Where ClONO2 was not the limiting factor, a large dependence on temperature was evident.

  20. Polar Stratospheric Cloud evolution and chlorine activation measured by CALIPSO and MLS, and modelled by ATLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nakajima

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We examined observations of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs by CALIPSO and of HCl, ClO and HNO3 by MLS along air mass trajectories to investigate the dependence of the inferred PSC composition on the temperature history of the air parcels, and the dependence of the level of chlorine activation on PSC composition. Several case studies based on individual trajectories from the Arctic winter 2009/10 were conducted, with the trajectories chosen such that the first processing of the air mass by PSCs in this winter occurred on the trajectory. Transitions of PSC composition classes were observed to be highly dependent on the temperature history. In cases of a gradual temperature decrease, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT and super-cooled ternary solution (STS mixture clouds were observed. In cases of rapid temperature decrease, STS clouds were first observed, followed by NAT/STS mixture clouds. When temperatures dropped below the frost point, ice clouds formed, and then transformed into NAT/STS mixture clouds when temperature increased above the frost point. The threshold temperature for rapid chlorine activation on PSCs is approximately 4 K below the NAT existence temperature, TNAT. Furthermore, simulations of the ATLAS chemistry and transport box model along the trajectories were used to corroborate the measurements and show good agreement with the observations. Rapid chlorine activation was observed when an airmass encountered PSCs. The observed and modelled dependence of the rate of chlorine activation on the PSC composition class was small. Usually, chlorine activation was limited by the amount of available ClONO2. Where ClONO2 was not the limiting factor, a large dependence on temperature was evident.

  1. Subtropical and Polar Cirrus Clouds Characterized by Ground-Based Lidars and CALIPSO/CALIOP Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba-Jabonero, Carmen; Lopes, Fabio J. S.; Landulfo, Eduardo; Ochoa, Héctor; Gil-Ojeda, Manuel

    2016-06-01

    Cirrus clouds are product of weather processes, and then their occurrence and macrophysical/optical properties can vary significantly over different regions of the world. Lidars can provide height-resolved measurements with a relatively good both vertical and temporal resolutions, making them the most suitable instrumentation for high-cloud observations. The aim of this work is to show the potential of lidar observations on Cirrus clouds detection in combination with a recently proposed methodology to retrieve the Cirrus clouds macrophysical and optical features. In this sense, a few case studies of cirrus clouds observed at both subtropical and polar latitudes are examined and compared to CALIPSO/CALIOP observations. Lidar measurements are carried out in two stations: the Metropolitan city of Sao Paulo (MSP, Brazil, 23.3°S 46.4°W), located at subtropical latitudes, and the Belgrano II base (BEL, Argentina, 78ºS 35ºW) in the Antarctic continent. Optical (COD-cloud optical depth and LR-Lidar Ratio) and macrophysical (top/base heights and thickness) properties of both the subtropical and polar cirrus clouds are reported. In general, subtropical Cirrus clouds present lower LR values and are found at higher altitudes than those detected at polar latitudes. In general, Cirrus clouds are detected at similar altitudes by CALIOP. However, a poor agreement is achieved in the LR retrieved between ground-based lidars and space-borne CALIOP measurements, likely due to the use of a fixed (or low-variable) LR value in CALIOP inversion procedures.

  2. Aerosol classification from airborne HSRL and comparisons with the CALIPSO vertical feature mask

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Burton

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol classification products from the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-1 on the NASA B200 aircraft are compared with coincident V3.01 aerosol classification products from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP instrument on the CALIPSO satellite. For CALIOP, aerosol classification is a key input to the aerosol retrieval, and must be inferred using aerosol loading-dependent observations and location information. In contrast, HSRL-1 makes direct measurements of aerosol intensive properties, including the lidar ratio, that provide information on aerosol type. In this study, comparisons are made for 109 underflights of the CALIOP orbit track. We find that 62% of the CALIOP marine layers and 54% of the polluted continental layers agree with HSRL-1 classification results. In addition, 80% of the CALIOP desert dust layers are classified as either dust or dusty mix byHSRL-1. However, agreement is less for CALIOP smoke (13% and polluted dust (35% layers. Specific case studies are examined, giving insight into the performance of the CALIOP aerosol type algorithm. In particular, we find that the CALIOP polluted dust type is overused due to an attenuation-related depolarization bias. Furthermore, the polluted dust type frequently includes mixtures of dust plus marine aerosol. Finally, we find that CALIOP's identification of internal boundaries between different aerosol types in contact with each other frequently do not reflect the actual transitions between aerosol types accurately. Based on these findings, we give recommendations which may help to improve the CALIOP aerosol type algorithms.

  3. Thermal-hydraulic characteristics of a Westinghouse Model 51 steam generator. Volume 2. Appendix A, numerical results. Interim report. [CALIPSOS code numerical data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanselau, R.W.; Thakkar, J.G.; Hiestand, J.W.; Cassell, D.

    1981-03-01

    The Comparative Thermal-Hydraulic Evaluation of Steam Generators program represents an analytical investigation of the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of four PWR steam generators. The analytical tool utilized in this investigation is the CALIPSOS code, a three-dimensional flow distribution code. This report presents the steady state thermal-hydraulic characteristics on the secondary side of a Westinghouse Model 51 steam generator. Details of the CALIPSOS model with accompanying assumptions, operating parameters, and transport correlations are identified. Comprehensive graphical and numerical results are presented to facilitate the desired comparison with other steam generators analyzed by the same flow distribution code.

  4. A Sample of What We Have Learned from A-Train Cloud Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, Joanna; Vasilkov, Alexander; Ziemke, Jerry; Chandra, Sushil; Spurr, Robert; Bhartia, P. K.; Krotkov, Nick; Sneep, Maarten; Menzel, Paul; Platnick, Steve; hide

    2008-01-01

    The A-train active sensors CloudSat and CALIPSO provide detailed information about cloud vertical structure. Coarse vertical information can also be obtained from a combination of passive sensors (e.g. cloud liquid water content from AMSR-E, cloud ice properties from MLS and HIRDLS, cloud-top pressure from MODIS and AIRS, and UVNISINear IR absorption and scattering from OMI, MODIS, and POLDER). In addition, the wide swaths of instruments such as MODIS, AIRS, OMI, POLDER, and AMSR-E can be exploited to create estimates of the three-dimensional cloud extent. We will show how data fusion from A-train sensors can be used, e.g., to detect and map the presence of multiple layer/phase clouds. Ultimately, combined cloud information from Atrain instruments will allow for estimates of heating and radiative flux at the surface as well as UV/VIS/Near IR trace-gas absorption at the overpass time on a near-global daily basis. CloudSat has also dramatically improved our interpretation of visible and UV passive measurements in complex cloudy situations such as deep convection and multiple cloud layers. This has led to new approaches for unique and accurate constituent retrievals from A-train instruments. For example, ozone mixing ratios inside tropical deep convective clouds have recently been estimated using the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). Field campaign data from TC4 provide additional information about the spatial variability and origin of trace-gases inside convective clouds. We will highlight some of the new applications of remote sensing in cloudy conditions that have been enabled by the synergy between the A-train active and passive sensors.

  5. The Bihar Pollution Pool as observed from MOPITT (version 4, CALIPSO (version 3 and tropospheric ozone residual data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kar

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The Bihar pollution pool is a large wintertime increase in pollutants over the eastern parts of the Indo Gangetic basin. We use improved carbon monoxide (CO retrievals from the recent Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT version 4 data along with the aerosol data from the latest version 3 of the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO lidar instrument and the tropospheric ozone residual products from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS/Solar Backscattered Ultraviolet (SBUV and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI/Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS database to characterize this pollution pool. The feature is seen primarily in the lower troposphere from about November to February with strong concomitant increase in CO, aerosol optical depth and tropospheric ozone columns. The height resolved aerosol data from CALIPSO confirm the trapping of the pollution pool at the lowest altitudes. The observations indicate that MOPITT can capture this low altitude phenomenon even in winter conditions as indicated by the averaging kernels.

  6. Effects of the Hawaiian Islands on the vertical structure of low-level clouds from CALIPSO lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-Wu; Xie, Shang-Ping; Zhang, Su-Ping

    2015-01-01

    steady northeast trade winds impinge on the Hawaiian Islands, producing prominent island wakes of multispatial scales from tens to thousands of kilometers. Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) reveal rich three-dimensional structures of low-level clouds that are induced by the islands, distinct from the background environment. The cloud frequency peaks between 1.5 and 2.0 km in cloud top elevation over the windward slopes of the islands of Kauai and Oahu due to orographic lifting and daytime island heating. In the nighttime near-island wake of Kauai, CALIPSO captures a striking cloud hole below 1.6 km as the cold advection from the island suppresses low-level clouds. The cyclonic eddy of the mechanical wake behind the island of Hawaii favors the formation of low-level clouds (below 2.5 km), and the anticyclonic eddy suppresses the low-level cloud formation, indicative of the dynamical effect on the vertical structure of low-level clouds. In the long Hawaiian wake due to air-sea interaction, low-level clouds form over both the warmer and colder waters, but the cloud tops are 400-600 m higher over the warm than the cold waters. In addition, the day-night differences and the sensitivity of low-level clouds to the background trade wind inversion height are also studied.

  7. A development of cloud top height retrieval using thermal infrared spectra observed with GOSAT and comparison with CALIPSO data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Someya, Yu; Imasu, Ryoichi; Saitoh, Naoko; Ota, Yoshifumi; Shiomi, Kei

    2016-05-01

    An algorithm based on CO2 slicing, which has been used for cirrus cloud detection using thermal infrared data, was developed for high-resolution radiance spectra from satellites. The channels were reconstructed based on sensitivity height information of the original spectral channels to reduce the effects of measurement errors. Selection of the reconstructed channel pairs was optimized for several atmospheric profile patterns using simultaneous studies assuming a cloudy sky. That algorithm was applied to data by the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT). Results were compared with those obtained from the space-borne lidar instrument on-board Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO). Monthly mean cloud amounts from the slicing generally agreed with those from CALIPSO observations despite some differences caused by surface temperature biases, optically very thin cirrus, multilayer structures of clouds, extremely low cloud tops, and specific atmospheric conditions. Comparison of coincident data showed good agreement, except for some cases, and revealed that the improved slicing method is more accurate than the traditional slicing method. Results also imply that improved slicing can detect low-level clouds with cloud top heights as low as approximately 1.5 km.

  8. Analysis of Co-Located MODIS and CALIPSO Observations Near Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnai, Tamas; Marshak, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to help researchers combine data from different satellites and thus gain new insights into two critical yet poorly understood aspects of anthropogenic climate change, aerosol-cloud interactions and aerosol radiative effects, For this, the paper explores whether cloud information from the Aqua satellite's MODIS instrument can help characterize systematic aerosol changes near clouds by refining earlier perceptions of these changes that were based on the CALIPSO satellite's CALIOP instrument. Similar to a radar but using visible and ncar-infrared light, CALIOP sends out laser pulses and provides aerosol and cloud information along a single line that tracks the satellite orbit by measuring the reflection of its pulses. In contrast, MODIS takes images of reflected sunlight and emitted infrared radiation at several wavelengths, and covers wide areas around the satellite track. This paper analyzes a year-long global dataset covering all ice-free oceans, and finds that MODIS can greatly help the interpretation of CALIOP observations, especially by detecting clouds that lie outside the line observed by CALlPSO. The paper also finds that complications such as differences in view direction or clouds drifting in the 72 seconds that elapse between MODIS and CALIOP observations have only a minor impact. The study also finds that MODIS data helps refine but does not qualitatively alter perceptions of the systematic aerosol changes that were detected in earlier studies using only CALIOP data. It then proposes a statistical approach to account for clouds lying outside the CALIOP track even when MODIS cannot as reliably detect low clouds, for example at night or over ice. Finally, the paper finds that, because of variations in cloud amount and type, the typical distance to clouds in maritime clear areas varies with season and location. The overall median distance to clouds in maritime clear areas around 4-5 km. The fact that half of all clear areas is

  9. CALIPSO satellite validation using an elastic backscattering Lidar system and the AERONET sun photometer data; Validacao dos dados do satelite CALIPSO utilizando um sistema Lidar de retroespelhamento elastico e o fotometro solar da rede AERONET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Fabio Juliano da Silva

    2011-07-01

    Aerosol and clouds play an important role in the Earth's climate process through their direct and indirect contributions to the radiation budget. The largest difficulty in predicting the climate change processes is associated with uncertainties in the distribution and properties of aerosols and clouds, as well as their interactions on a global scale. The CALIPSO mission was developed as part of the NASA program, in collaboration with the French space agency CNES, with the main goal to develop studies that will help to quantify the uncertainties about aerosols and clouds. The CALIPSO satellite carried a Lidar system on board, named CALIOP, as a primary instrument, able to provide the aerosol and cloud vertical profiles and distribution, as well as their interactions. Once the optical properties measured by CALIOP are retrieved, using a complex set of algorithms, it is necessary to study and develop methodologies in order to assess the accuracy of the CALIOP products. In this context, a validation methodology was developed in order to verify the assumed values of the Lidar Ratio selected by the CALIOP algorithms, using two ground-based remote sensing instruments, an elastic backscatter Lidar system (MSP) installed at IPEN in Sao Paulo and the AERONET sun photometers operating at five different locations in Brazil, Rio Branco - Acre (RB), Alta Floresta - Mato Grosso (AF), Cuiaba - Mato Grosso (CB), Campo Grande - Mato Grosso do Sul (CG) e Sao Paulo - Sao Paulo (SP). Those days when the CALIOP system and ground-based instruments spatially coincided, were selected and analyzed under cloud-free conditions, as well as days when the trajectories of air masses indicated the transport of air parcels from the CALIOP track towards the ground-based sensors. The Lidar Ratio values from the Aeronet/Caliop proposed model was determined and showed good consistency with those initially assumed by the CALIOP Algorithm. Based on the quantitative comparison, a mean difference of

  10. Aerosol indirect effect on warm clouds over South-East Atlantic, from co-located MODIS and CALIPSO observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Costantino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we provide a comprehensive analysis of aerosol interaction with warm boundary layer clouds over the South-East Atlantic. We use aerosol and cloud parameters derived from MODIS observations, together with co-located CALIPSO estimates of the layer altitudes, to derive statistical relationships between aerosol concentration and cloud properties. The CALIPSO products are used to differentiate between cases of mixed cloud-aerosol layers from cases where the aerosol is located well-above the cloud top. This technique allows us to obtain more reliable estimates of the aerosol indirect effect than from simple relationships based on vertically integrated measurements of aerosol and cloud properties. Indeed, it permits us to somewhat distinguish the effects of aerosol and meteorology on the clouds, although it is not possible to fully ascertain the relative contribution of each on the derived statistics.

    Consistently with the results from previous studies, our statistics clearly show that aerosol affects cloud microphysics, decreasing the Cloud Droplet Radius (CDR. The same data indicate a concomitant strong decrease in cloud Liquid Water Path (LWP, which is inconsistent with the hypothesis of aerosol inhibition of precipitation (Albrecht, 1989. We hypothesise that the observed reduction in LWP is the consequence of dry air entrainment at cloud top. The combined effect of CDR decrease and LWP decrease leads to rather small sensitivity of the Cloud Optical Thickness (COT to an increase in aerosol concentration. The analysis of MODIS-CALIPSO coincidences also evidences an aerosol enhancement of low cloud cover. Surprisingly, the Cloud Fraction (CLF response to aerosol invigoration is much stronger when (absorbing particles are located above cloud top than in cases of physical interaction. This result suggests a relevant aerosol radiative effect on low cloud occurrence: absorbing particles above the cloud top may heat the

  11. Characterization of the Temporal-Spatial Variability of Trans-Atlantic Dust Transport Based on CALIPSO Lidar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    The trans-Atlantic dust transport has important implications for human and ecosystem health, the terrestrial and oceanic biogeochemical cycle, weather systems, and climate. A reliable assessment of these influences requires the characterization of dust distributions in three dimensions and over long time periods. We provide an observation-based multiyear estimate of trans-Atlantic dust transport by using a 7-year (2007 - 2013) lidar record from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) in both cloud-free and above-cloud conditions. We estimate that on a basis of the 7-year average and integration over 10S - 30N, 182 Tg a-1 dust leaves the coast of North Africa at 15W, of which 132 Tg a-1 and 43 Tg a-1 reaches 35W and 75W, respectively. These flux estimates have an overall known uncertainty of (45 - 70). The 7-year average of dust deposition into the Amazon Basin is estimated to be 28 (8 - 48) Tg a-1 or 29 (8 - 50) kg ha-1 a-1. This imported dust could provide about 0.022 (0.006 - 0.037) Tg P of phosphorus per year, equivalent to 23 (7 - 39) g P ha-1 a-1 to fertilize the Amazon rainforest, which is comparable to the loss of phosphorus to rainfall. Significant seasonal variations are observed in both the magnitude of total dust transport and its meridional and vertical distributions. The observed large interannual variability of annual dust transport is highly anti-correlated with the prior-year Sahel Precipitation Index. Comparisons of CALIPSO measurements with surface-based observations and model simulations will also be discussed.

  12. Vertical Structure of Ice Cloud Layers From CloudSat and CALIPSO Measurements and Comparison to NICAM Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Seung-Hee; Sohn, Byung-Ju; Kato, Seiji; Satoh, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    The shape of the vertical profile of ice cloud layers is examined using 4 months of CloudSat and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) global measurements taken on January, April, July, and October 2007. Ice clouds are selected using temperature profiles when the cloud base is located above the 253K temperature level. The obtained ice water content (IWC), effective radius, or extinction coefficient profiles are normalized by their layer mean values and are expressed in the normalized vertical coordinate, which is defined as 0 and 1 at the cloud base and top heights, respectively. Both CloudSat and CALIPSO observations show that the maximum in the IWC and extinction profiles shifts toward the cloud bottom, as the cloud depth increases. In addition, clouds with a base reaching the surface in a high-latitude region show that the maximum peak of the IWC and extinction profiles occurs near the surface, which is presumably due to snow precipitation. CloudSat measurements show that the seasonal difference in normalized cloud vertical profiles is not significant, whereas the normalized cloud vertical profile significantly varies depending on the cloud type and the presence of precipitation. It is further examined if the 7 day Nonhydrostatic Icosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM) simulation results from 25 December 2006 to 1 January 2007 generate similar cloud profile shapes. NICAM IWC profiles also show maximum peaks near the cloud bottom for thick cloud layers and maximum peaks at the cloud bottom for low-level clouds near the surface. It is inferred that oversized snow particles in the NICAM cloud scheme produce a more vertically inhomogeneous IWC profile than observations due to quick sedimentation.

  13. The OCO-2 oxygen A-band response to liquid marine cloud properties from CALIPSO and MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Mark; McDuffie, James; Stephens, Graeme L.; Cronk, Heather Q.; Taylor, Tommy E.

    2017-08-01

    Spectra of reflected sunlight in the oxygen A-band contain information about cloud properties such as cloud top pressure, optical depth, and pressure thickness. Here we show, for the first time, that high-spectral-resolution A-band Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) spectra respond largely as simulated to the optical properties of water clouds over ocean during November 2015 (N = 184,318) using input cloud properties from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on Aqua and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization on Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO). In A-band continuum channels the standard deviation of simulated minus observed radiance is ±37%. Selecting horizontally homogeneous clouds to mitigate three-dimensional cloud effects and collocation error with the other satellites, the standard deviation of the residuals is reduced to ±18%. Using a look-up table developed from simulations, OCO-2's estimated cloud top pressure for low clouds (Ptop > 680 hPa) has a standard deviation of ±61 hPa relative to CALIPSO retrievals, and bias is dependent on assumed cloud pressure thickness, with our smallest value being -5 hPa. Versus MODIS optical depth, the standard deviation is ±9.0 and the bias is -2.0, although these shrink for clouds of τ < 30. These values include collocation error between the different satellites, meaning that they place an upper bound on the OCO-2 retrieval uncertainty. The theoretical precision limit from OCO-2's instrumental uncertainty is shown to be ±2.4 hPa in above-cloud path and ±0.2% in optical depth for a two-channel retrieval. Options for retrieving cloud optical depth, cloud top pressure, and pressure thickness are discussed in the context of a formal OCO-2 cloud property retrieval.

  14. A Decade of Volcanic Observations from Aura and the A-Train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carn, Simon A.; Krotkov, Nickolay Anatoly; Yang, Kai; Krueger, Arlin J.; Hughes, Eric J.; Wang, Jun; Flower, Verity; Telling, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Aura observations have made many seminal contributions to volcanology. Prior to the Aura launch, satellite observations of volcanic degassing (e.g., from TOMS) were mostly restricted to large eruptions. However, the vast majority of volcanic gases are released during quiescent 'passive' degassing between eruptions. The improved sensitivity of Aura OMI permitted the first daily, space-borne measurements of passive volcanic SO2 degassing, providing improved constraints on the source locations and magnitude of global SO2 emissions for input to atmospheric chemistry and climate models. As a result of this unique sensitivity to volcanic activity, OMI data were also the first satellite SO2 measurements to be routinely used for volcano monitoring at several volcano observatories worldwide. Furthermore, the Aura OMI SO2 data also offer unprecedented sensitivity to volcanic clouds in the UTLS, elucidating the transport, fate and lifetime of volcanic SO2 and providing critical input to aviation hazard mitigation efforts. Another major advance has been the improved vertical resolution of volcanic clouds made possible by synergy between Aura and other A-Train instruments (e.g., AIRS, CALIPSO, CloudSat), advanced UV SO2 altitude retrievals, and inverse trajectory modeling of detailed SO2 cloud maps. This altitude information is crucial for climate models and aviation hazards. We will review some of the highlights of a decade of Aura observations of volcanic activity and look ahead to the future of volcanic observations from space.

  15. A-Train Based Observational Metrics for Model Evaluation in Extratropical Cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naud, Catherine M.; Booth, James F.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; van den Heever, Susan C.; Posselt, Derek J.

    2015-01-01

    Extratropical cyclones contribute most of the precipitation in the midlatitudes, i.e. up to 70 during winter in the northern hemisphere, and can generate flooding, extreme winds, blizzards and have large socio-economic impacts. As such, it is important that general circulation models (GCMs) accurately represent these systems so their evolution in a warming climate can be understood. However, there are still uncertainties on whether warming will increase their frequency of occurrence, their intensity and how much rain or snow they bring. Part of the issue is that models have trouble representing their strength, but models also have biases in the amount of clouds and precipitation they produce. This is caused by potential issues in various aspects of the models: convection, boundary layer, and cloud scheme to only mention a few. In order to pinpoint which aspects of the models need improvement for a better representation of extratropical cyclone precipitation and cloudiness, we will present A-train based observational metrics: cyclone-centered, warm and cold frontal composites of cloud amount and type, precipitation rate and frequency of occurrence. Using the same method to extract similar fields from the model, we will present an evaluation of the GISS-ModelE2 and the IPSL-LMDZ-5B models, based on their AR5 and more recent versions. The AR5 version of the GISS model underestimates cloud cover in extratropical cyclones while the IPSL AR5 version overestimates it. In addition, we will show how the observed CloudSat-CALIPSO cloud vertical distribution across cold fronts changes with moisture amount and cyclone strength, and test if the two models successfully represent these changes. We will also show how CloudSat-CALIPSO derived cloud type (i.e. convective vs. stratiform) evolves across warm fronts as cyclones age, and again how this is represented in the models. Our third process-based analysis concerns cumulus clouds in the post-cold frontal region and how their

  16. An accuracy assessment of the CALIOP/CALIPSO version 2 aerosol extinction product based on a detailed multi-sensor, multi-platform case study

    OpenAIRE

    Kacenelenbogen, M.; VAUGHAN, M.A.; Redemann, J.; Hoff, R. M.; R. R. Rogers; Ferrare, R. A.; P. B. Russell; Hostetler, C. A.; J. W. Hair; Holben, B.N.

    2010-01-01

    The Cloud Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), on board the CALIPSO platform, has measured profiles of total attenuated backscatter coefficient (level 1 products) since June 2006. CALIOP's level 2 products, such as the aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficient profiles, are retrieved using a complex succession of automated algorithms. The goal of this study is to help identify potential shortcomings in the CALIOP version 2 level 2 aerosol extinction product and to il...

  17. A 3-D evaluation of the MACC reanalysis dust product over the greater European region using CALIOP/CALIPSO satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgoulias, Aristeidis K.; Tsikerdekis, Athanasios; Amiridis, Vassilis; Marinou, Eleni; Benedetti, Angela; Zanis, Prodromos; Kourtidis, Konstantinos

    2016-04-01

    Significant amounts of dust are being transferred on an annual basis over the Mediterranean Basin and continental Europe from Northern Africa (Sahara Desert) and Middle East (Arabian Peninsula) as well as from other local sources. Dust affects a number of processes in the atmosphere modulating weather and climate also having an impact on human health and the economy. Therefore, the ability of simulating adequately the amount and optical properties of dust is essential. This work focuses on the evaluation of the MACC reanalysis dust product over the regions mentioned above. The evaluation procedure is based on pure dust satellite retrievals from CALIOP/CALIPSO that cover the period 2007-2012. The CALIOP/CALIPSO data utilized here come from an optimized retrieval scheme that was originally developed within the framework of the LIVAS (Lidar Climatology of Vertical Aerosol Structure for Space-Based LIDAR Simulation Studies) project. CALIOP/CALIPSO dust extinction coefficients and dust optical depth patterns at 532 nm are used for the validation of MACC natural aerosol extinction coefficients and dust optical depth patterns at 550 nm. Overall, it is shown in this work that space-based lidars may play a major role in the improvement of the MACC aerosol product. This research has been financed under the FP7 Programme MarcoPolo (Grand Number 606953, Theme SPA.2013.3.2-01).

  18. Initial approach in biomass burning aerosol transport tracking with CALIPSO and MODIS satellites, sunphotometer, and a backscatter lidar system in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landulfo, E.; Lopes, F. J. S.

    2009-09-01

    Nowadays there is an increasing concern about the direct and indirect influence of the aerosols in the Earth's radiative budget. Aerosols from biomass burning activities have been identified as a significant radiative forcing agent. A significant concentration quantity of aerosol particles observed in the atmosphere can be associated with intense anthropogenic biomass burning activity. The CALIPSO satellite and ground-based Lidar systems are indispensable to provide the vertical structure and optical properties of aerosol and clouds on global and local scale, respectively. The Brazilian mid-western region is one of the biggest producers of biomass burning in the whole continent. Aerosols from biomass burning can be transported to distances of hundreds or thousands of kilometers. It has been developed a computational routine to map the CALIPSO overpasses over the whole country in order to retrieve the total coverage taking special attention in the Brazilian AERONET sites. In this context, the measured data from AERONET, CALIPSO and MODIS Satellite and the MSP-Lidar system from Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN) can be used to map the aerosols biomass burning plumes transported from the mid-western to the southeastern region. In total 5 sites were chosen spanning from 0 to 23 South latitude and 46 to 60 West in longitude in coverage during 2007 and we were able to identify such transports during the months of August and September.

  19. Trans-boundary aerosol transport during a winter haze episode in China revealed by ground-based Lidar and CALIPSO satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Kai; Wu, Lixin; Wong, Man Sing; Letu, Husi; Hu, Mingyu; Lang, Hongmei; Sheng, Shijie; Teng, Jiyao; Xiao, Xin; Yuan, Limei

    2016-09-01

    By employing PM2.5 observation data, ground-based lidar measurements, MODIS and CALIPSO satellite images, meteorological data, and back trajectories analysis, we investigate a trans-boundary transport of aerosols during a large-area haze episode in China during 3-5 January 2015. The ground-based lidar observations indicated similar episodes of external aerosols passing through and mixing into three East China cities. A considerable amount of total AOD below 3 km (46% in average) was contributed by the external aerosol layers during passing over and importing. CALIPSO satellite observations of central and eastern China revealed a high altitude pollutant belt on January 3. Although the severest ground pollution was found in central and south-eastern Hebei, the high altitude pollution transport was greater in south-western Shandong, north-western Jiangsu, and north-western Anhui. These observations along with the analysis of air mass trajectories and wind fields indicates pollutants moving from Hebei, Henan and Hubei probably contributed to the haze pollution in Shandong and Jiangsu. This study reveals haze transports from North China Plain to East China could be a common phenomenon influenced by the winter monsoon in northern China. Hence, effective control of air pollution requires collaboration among different cities and provinces throughout China. The long-term measurements of aerosol vertical properties by ground-based lidar and CALIPSO are extremely valuable in quantifying the contributions of external factors and will be helpful in validating and improving various air quality models.

  20. CALIPSO Borehole Instrumentation Project at Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat, BWI: Data Acquisition, Telemetry, Integration, and Archival Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, G. S.; Linde, A. T.; Sacks, I. S.; Malin, P. E.; Shalev, E.; Elsworth, D.; Hidayat, D.; Voight, B.; Young, S. R.; Dunkley, P. N.; Herd, R.; Norton, G.

    2003-12-01

    The CALIPSO Project (Caribbean Andesite Lava Island-volcano Precision Seismo-geodetic Observatory) has greatly enhanced the monitoring and scientific infrastructure at the Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat with the recent installation of an integrated array of borehole and surface geophysical instrumentation at four sites. Each site was designed to be sufficiently hardened to withstand extreme meteorological events (e.g. hurricanes) and only require minimum routine maintenance over an expected observatory lifespan of >30 y. The sensor package at each site includes: a single-component, very broad band, Sacks-Evertson strainmeter, a three-component seismometer ( ˜Hz to 1 kHz), a Pinnacle Technologies series 5000 tiltmeter, and a surface Ashtech u-Z CGPS station with choke ring antenna, SCIGN mount and radome. This instrument package is similar to that envisioned by the Plate Boundary Observatory for deployment on EarthScope target volcanoes in western North America and thus the CALIPSO Project may be considered a prototype PBO installation with real field testing on a very active and dangerous volcano. Borehole sites were installed in series and data acquisition began immediately after the sensors were grouted into position at 200 m depth, with the first completed at Trants (5.8 km from dome) in 12-02, then Air Studios (5.2 km), Geralds (9.4 km), and Olveston (7.0 km) in 3-03. Analog data from the strainmeter (50 Hz sync) and seismometer (200 Hz) were initially digitized and locally archived using RefTek 72A-07 data acquisition systems (DAS) on loan from the PASSCAL instrument pool. Data were downloaded manually to a laptop approximately every month from initial installation until August 2003, when new systems were installed. Approximately 0.2 Tb of raw data in SEGY format have already been acquired and are currently archived at UARK for analysis by the CALIPSO science team. The July 12th dome collapse and vulcanian explosion events were recorded at 3 of the 4

  1. A global survey of aerosol-liquid water cloud overlap based on four years of CALIPSO-CALIOP data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devasthale, A.; Thomas, M. A.

    2011-02-01

    Simulating the radiative impacts of aerosols located above liquid water clouds presents a significant challenge. In particular, absorbing aerosols, such as smoke, may have significant impact in such situations and even change the sign of net radiative forcing. It is not possible to reliably obtain information on such overlap events from existing passive satellite sensors. However, the CALIOP instrument onboard NASA's CALIPSO satellite allows us to examine these events with unprecedented accuracy. Using four years of collocated CALIPSO 5 km Aerosol and Cloud Layer Version 3 Products (June 2006-May 2010), we quantify, for the first time, the characteristics of overlapping aerosol and water cloud layers globally. We investigate seasonal variability in these characteristics over six latitude bands to understand the hemispheric differences when all aerosol types are included in the analysis (the AAO case). We also investigate frequency of smoke aerosol-cloud overlap (the SAO case). Globally, the frequency is highest during the JJA months in the AAO case, while for the SAO case, it is highest in the SON months. The seasonal mean overlap frequency can regionally exceed 20% in the AAO case and 10% in the SAO case. In about 5-10% cases the vertical distance between aerosol and cloud layers is less than 100 m, while about in 45-60% cases it less than a kilometer in the annual means for different latitudinal bands. In about 70-80% cases, aerosol layers are less than a kilometer thick, while in about 18-22% cases they are 1-2 km thick. The frequency of aerosol layers 2-3 km thick is about 4-5% in the tropical belts during overlap events. Over the regions where high aerosol loadings are present, the overlap frequency can be up to 50% higher when quality criteria on aerosol/cloud feature detection are relaxed. Over the polar regions, more than 50% of the overlapping aerosol layers have optical thickness less than 0.02, but the contribution from the relatively optically thicker

  2. A global survey of aerosol-liquid water cloud overlap based on four years of CALIPSO-CALIOP data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Devasthale

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Simulating the radiative impacts of aerosols located above liquid water clouds presents a significant challenge. In particular, absorbing aerosols, such as smoke, may have significant impact in such situations and even change the sign of net radiative forcing. It is not possible to reliably obtain information on such overlap events from existing passive satellite sensors. However, the CALIOP instrument onboard NASA's CALIPSO satellite allows us to examine these events with unprecedented accuracy. Using four years of collocated CALIPSO 5 km Aerosol and Cloud Layer Version 3 Products (June 2006–May 2010, we quantify, for the first time, the characteristics of overlapping aerosol and water cloud layers globally. We investigate seasonal variability in these characteristics over six latitude bands to understand the hemispheric differences when all aerosol types are included in the analysis (the AAO case. We also investigate frequency of smoke aerosol-cloud overlap (the SAO case. Globally, the frequency is highest during the JJA months in the AAO case, while for the SAO case, it is highest in the SON months. The seasonal mean overlap frequency can regionally exceed 20% in the AAO case and 10% in the SAO case. In about 5–10% cases the vertical distance between aerosol and cloud layers is less than 100 m, while about in 45–60% cases it less than a kilometer in the annual means for different latitudinal bands. In about 70–80% cases, aerosol layers are less than a kilometer thick, while in about 18–22% cases they are 1–2 km thick. The frequency of aerosol layers 2–3 km thick is about 4–5% in the tropical belts during overlap events. Over the regions where high aerosol loadings are present, the overlap frequency can be up to 50% higher when quality criteria on aerosol/cloud feature detection are relaxed. Over the polar regions, more than 50% of the overlapping aerosol layers have optical thickness less than 0.02, but the contribution from

  3. Optical depth distribution of optically thin clouds and surface elevation variability derived from CALIPSO lidar measurements (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaoyan; Lin, Bing; Obland, Michael D.; Campbell, Joel

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is one of the major greenhouse gases in the Earth's climate system. The CO2 concentration in the atmosphere has been significantly increased over the last 150 years, due mainly to anthropogenic activities. Comprehensive measurements of global atmospheric CO2 distributions are urgently needed to develop a more complete understanding of CO2 sources and sinks. Because of the importance of the atmospheric CO2 measurements, satellite missions with passive sensors such as GOSAT and OCO-2 have been launched, and those with active sensors like Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) using an integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar are being studied. The required accuracy and precision for the column-integrated CO2 mixing ratios (XCO2) is high, within 1.0 ppm or approximately 0.26%, which calls for unbiased CO2 measurements and accurate determinations of the path length. The presence of clouds and aerosols can make the measurement complicated, especially for passive instruments. The heterogeneity generated by the surface elevation changes within the field of view of the sensors and the grid boxes of averaged values of atmospheric CO2 would also cause significant uncertainties in XCO2 estimates if the path length is not accurately known. Thus, it is required to study the cloud and aerosol distributions as well as the surface elevation variability in assessing the performance of the CO2 measurements from both active and passive instruments. The CALIPSO lidar has acquired nearly 10 years of global measurement data. It provides a great opportunity to study the global distribution of clouds and aerosols as well as the statistics of the surface elevation variations. In this study we have analyzed multiple years of the CALIPSO Level 2 data to derive the global occurrence of aerosols and optically thin clouds. The results show that clear sky does not occur as frequently as expected. The global average

  4. Aerosol indirect effect on warm clouds over South-East Atlantic, from co-located MODIS and CALIPSO observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Costantino

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we provide a comprehensive analysis of aerosol interaction with warm boundary layer clouds, over South-East Atlantic. We use MODIS retrievals to derive statistical relationships between aerosol concentration and cloud properties, together with co-located CALIPSO estimates of cloud and aerosol layer altitudes. The latter are used to differentiate between cases of mixed and interacting cloud-aerosol layers from cases where the aerosol is located well-above the cloud top. This strategy allows, to a certain extent, to isolate real aerosol-induced effect from meteorology.

    Similar to previous studies, statistics clearly show that aerosol affects cloud microphysics, decreasing the Cloud Droplet Radius (CDR. The same data indicate a concomitant strong decrease in cloud Liquid Water Path (LWP, in evident contrast with the hypothesis of aerosol inhibition of precipitation (Albrecht, 1989. Because of this water loss, probably due to the entrainment of dry air at cloud top, Cloud Optical Thickness (COT is found to be almost insensitive to changes in aerosol concentration. The analysis of MODIS-CALIPSO coincidences also evidenced an aerosol enhancement of low cloud cover. Surprising, the Cloud Fraction (CLF response to aerosol invigoration is much stronger when (absorbing particles are located above cloud top, than in cases of physical interaction, This result suggests a relevant aerosol radiative effect on low cloud occurrence. Heating the atmosphere above the inversion, absorbing particles above cloud top may decrease the vertical temperature gradient, increase the low tropospheric stability and provide favorable conditions for low cloud formation.

    We also focus on the impact of anthropogenic aerosols on precipitation, through the statistical analysis of CDR-COT co-variations. A COT value of 10 is found to be the threshold beyond which precipitation mostly forms, in both clean and polluted environments. For larger COT

  5. A global survey of aerosol-liquid water cloud overlap based on four years of CALIPSO-CALIOP data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Devasthale

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence of aerosols over highly reflective liquid water cloud tops poses a big challenge in simulating their radiative impacts. Particularly, absorbing aerosols, such as smoke, may have significant impact in such situations and even change the sign of net radiative forcing. Until now, it was not possible to obtain information on such overlap events realistically from the existing passive satellite sensors. However, the CALIOP instrument onboard NASA's CALIPSO satellite allows us to examine these events with an unprecedented accuracy.

    Using four years of collocated CALIPSO 5 km Aerosol and Cloud Layer Version 3 Products (June 2006–May 2010, we quantify, for the first time, the macrophysical characteristics of overlapping aerosol and water cloud layers globally. We investigate seasonal variability in these characteristics over six latitude bands to understand the hemispheric differences. We compute a the percentage cases when such overlap is seen globally and seasonally when all aerosol types are included (AAO case in the analysis, b the joint histograms of aerosol layer base height and cloud layer top height, and c the joint histograms of aerosol and cloud geometrical thicknesses in such overlap cases. We also investigate frequency of smoke aerosol-cloud overlap (SAO case.

    The results show a distinct seasonality in overlap frequency in both AAO and SAO cases. Globally, the frequency is highest during JJA months in AAO case, while for the SAO case, it is highest in SON months. The seasonal mean overlap frequency can regionally exceed 20% in AAO case and 10% in SAO case. There is a tendency that the vertical separation between aerosol and cloud layers increases from high to low latitude regions in the both hemispheres. In about 5–10% cases the vertical distance between aerosol and cloud layers is less than 100 m, while about in 45–60% cases it less than a kilometer in the annual means for different latitudinal bands

  6. Cloud overlapping parameter obtained from CloudSat/CALIPSO dataset and its application in AGCM with McICA scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xianwen; Zhang, Hua; Peng, Jie; Li, Jiangnan; Barker, Howard W.

    2016-03-01

    Vertical decorrelation length (Lcf) as used to determine overlap of cloudy layers in GCMs was obtained from CloudSat/CALIPSO measurements, made between 2007 and 2010, and analyzed in terms of monthly means. Global distributions of Lcf were produced for several cross-sectional lengths. Results show that: Lcf over the tropical convective regions typically exceeds 2 km and shift meridionally with season; the smallest Lcf (radiation routines within the Beijing Climate Center's GCM (BCC_AGCM2.0.1). Additionally, the GCM was run with two other descriptions of Lcf: one varied with latitude only, and the other was simply 2 km everywhere all the time. It is shown that using the observationally-based Lcf in the GCM led to local and seasonal changes in total cloud fraction and shortwave (longwave) cloud radiative effects that serve mostly to reduce model biases. This indicates that usage of Lcf that vary according to location and time has the potential to improve climate simulations.

  7. Statistical Comparison of Cloud and Aerosol Vertical Properties between Two Eastern China Regions Based on CloudSat/CALIPSO Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujun Qiu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between cloud and aerosol properties was investigated over two 4° × 4° adjacent regions in the south (R1 and in the north (R2 in eastern China. The CloudSat/CALIPSO data were used to extract the cloud and aerosol profiles properties. The mean value of cloud occurrence probability (COP was the highest in the mixed cloud layer (−40°C~0°C and the lowest in the warm cloud layer (>0°C. The atmospheric humidity was more statistically relevant to COP in the warm cloud layer than aerosol condition. The differences in COP between the two regions in the mixed cloud layer and ice cloud layer (<−40°C had good correlations with those in the aerosol extinction coefficient. A radar reflectivity factor greater than −10 dBZ occurred mainly in warm cloud layers and mixed cloud layers. A high-COP zone appeared in the above-0°C layer with cloud thicknesses of 2-3 km in both regions and in all the four seasons, but the distribution of the zonal layer in R2 was more continuous than that in R1, which was consistent with the higher aerosol optical thickness in R2 than in R1 in the above-0°C layer, indicating a positive correlation between aerosol and cloud probability.

  8. Climate impact of volcanic aerosol in the stratosphere and upper troposphere - CALIPSO observations from 2006-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friberg, Johan; Martinsson, Bengt G.; Andersson, Sandra M.; Sandvik, Oscar S.; Hermann, Markus; van Velthoven, Peter F. J.; Zahn, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    We have investigated the climate impact of volcanic eruptions in the period 2006-2015, and found that the volcanic perturbations of the stratospheric aerosol is stronger and lasts longer than previously thought. Recent studies (Ridley et al., 2014, Andersson et al., 2015) show that a large portion of volcanic climate impact stems from aerosol in the LMS (lowermost stratosphere). Although the LMS holds >40% of the stratospheric mass (Appenzeller et al., 1996) it is generally neglected in estimations of the stratospheric AOD (aerosol optical depth). In the past decade the stratospheric aerosol load was perturbed by a number of volcanic eruptions. We cover that period by using the CALIPSO level 1b night-time data to study the volcanic influence on the global and regional climate. CALIPSO data were averaged to a resolution of 180 m vertically and 1×1° horizontally, cleaned from ice clouds by means of the depolarization ratio (Vernier et al., 2009), and a method was developed to remove polar stratospheric clouds (PSC). This approach enables identification of aerosol also at low altitudes (currently using 4 km minimum altitude) and in the Antarctic region (60 to 90°S) where PSCs are frequent during winter. In the current study, we estimate the total stratospheric AOD and radiative forcing and find that significant fractions of volcanic aerosol were located below the static tropopause after volcanic eruptions. Volcanic aerosol was generally observed down to the dynamic tropopause, and detected down to potential vorticities of 1.5-2 PVU (almost 1 km below the static tropopause). Hence, the dynamic tropopause was found to better enclose the volcanic aerosol. Furthermore, large concentrations of aerosol from the Kasatochi eruption (Aug 2008) is found to linger in the extratropical UT (upper troposphere) for several months after the eruption. Sulphate-rich volcanic aerosol transported from the LMS may influence cirrus clouds in the extratropical UT, inducing an indirect

  9. Evaluation of tropical cloud and precipitation statistics of CAM3 using CloudSat and CALIPSO data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y; Klein, S; Boyle, J; Mace, G G

    2008-11-20

    The combined CloudSat and CALIPSO satellite observations provide the first simultaneous measurements of cloud and precipitation vertical structure, and are used to examine the representation of tropical clouds and precipitation in the Community Atmosphere Model Version 3 (CAM3). A simulator package utilizing a model-to-satellite approach facilitates comparison of model simulations to observations, and a revised clustering method is used to sort the subgrid-scale patterns of clouds and precipitation into principal cloud regimes. Results from weather forecasts performed with CAM3 suggest that the model underestimates the horizontal extent of low and mid-level clouds in subsidence regions, but overestimates that of high clouds in ascending regions. CAM3 strongly overestimates the frequency of occurrence of the deep convection with heavy precipitation regime, but underestimates the horizontal extent of clouds and precipitation at low and middle levels when this regime occurs. This suggests that the model overestimates convective precipitation and underestimates stratiform precipitation consistent with a previous study that used only precipitation observations. Tropical cloud regimes are also evaluated in a different version of the model, CAM3.5, which uses a highly entraining plume in the parameterization of deep convection. While the frequency of occurrence of the deep convection with heavy precipitation regime from CAM3.5 forecasts decreases, the incidence of the low clouds with precipitation and congestus regimes increases. As a result, the parameterization change does not reduce the frequency of precipitating convection that is far too high relative to observations. For both versions of CAM, clouds and precipitation are overly reflective at the frequency of the CloudSat radar and thin clouds that could be detected by the lidar only are underestimated.

  10. Can CFMIP2 models reproduce the leading modes of cloud vertical structure in the CALIPSO-GOCCP observations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Yang, Song

    2017-02-01

    Using principal component (PC) analysis, three leading modes of cloud vertical structure (CVS) are revealed by the GCM-Oriented CALIPSO Cloud Product (GOCCP), i.e. tropical high, subtropical anticyclonic and extratropical cyclonic cloud modes (THCM, SACM and ECCM, respectively). THCM mainly reflect the contrast between tropical high clouds and clouds in middle/high latitudes. SACM is closely associated with middle-high clouds in tropical convective cores, few-cloud regimes in subtropical anticyclonic clouds and stratocumulus over subtropical eastern oceans. ECCM mainly corresponds to clouds along extratropical cyclonic regions. Models of phase 2 of Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project (CFMIP2) well reproduce the THCM, but SACM and ECCM are generally poorly simulated compared to GOCCP. Standardized PCs corresponding to CVS modes are generally captured, whereas original PCs (OPCs) are consistently underestimated (overestimated) for THCM (SACM and ECCM) by CFMIP2 models. The effects of CVS modes on relative cloud radiative forcing (RSCRF/RLCRF) (RSCRF being calculated at the surface while RLCRF at the top of atmosphere) are studied in terms of principal component regression method. Results show that CFMIP2 models tend to overestimate (underestimated or simulate the opposite sign) RSCRF/RLCRF radiative effects (REs) of ECCM (THCM and SACM) in unit global mean OPC compared to observations. These RE biases may be attributed to two factors, one of which is underestimation (overestimation) of low/middle clouds (high clouds) (also known as stronger (weaker) REs in unit low/middle (high) clouds) in simulated global mean cloud profiles, the other is eigenvector biases in CVS modes (especially for SACM and ECCM). It is suggested that much more attention should be paid on improvement of CVS, especially cloud parameterization associated with particular physical processes (e.g. downwelling regimes with the Hadley circulation, extratropical storm tracks and others), which

  11. A process oriented characterization of tropical oceanic clouds for climate model evaluation, based on a statistical analysis of daytime A-train observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konsta, Dimitra [Ecole Polytechnique, LMD, Palaiseau (France); Academy of Athens, Research Center of Atmospheric Physics and Climatology, Athens (Greece); Chepfer, Helene [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, LMD/IPSL, Paris (France); Dufresne, Jean-Louis [CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, LMD/IPSL, Paris (France)

    2012-11-15

    This paper aims at characterizing how different key cloud properties (cloud fraction, cloud vertical distribution, cloud reflectance, a surrogate of the cloud optical depth) vary as a function of the others over the tropical oceans. The correlations between the different cloud properties are built from 2 years of collocated A-train observations (CALIPSO-GOCCP and MODIS) at a scale close to cloud processes; it results in a characterization of the physical processes in tropical clouds, that can be used to better understand cloud behaviors, and constitute a powerful tool to develop and evaluate cloud parameterizations in climate models. First, we examine a case study of shallow cumulus cloud observed simultaneously by the two sensors (CALIPSO, MODIS), and develop a methodology that allows to build global scale statistics by keeping the separation between clear and cloudy areas at the pixel level (250, 330 m). Then we build statistical instantaneous relationships between the cloud cover, the cloud vertical distribution and the cloud reflectance. The vertical cloud distribution indicates that the optically thin clouds (optical thickness <1.5) dominate the boundary layer over the trade wind regions. Optically thick clouds (optical thickness >3.4) are composed of high and mid-level clouds associated with deep convection along the ITCZ and SPCZ and over the warm pool, and by stratocumulus low level clouds located along the East coast of tropical oceans. The cloud properties are analyzed as a function of the large scale circulation regime. Optically thick high clouds are dominant in convective regions (CF > 80 %), while low level clouds with low optical thickness (<3.5) are present in regimes of subsidence but in convective regimes as well, associated principally to low cloud fractions (CF < 50 %). A focus on low-level clouds allows us to quantify how the cloud optical depth increases with cloud top altitude and with cloud fraction. (orig.)

  12. A Training Manual for Nuclear Medicine Technologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Guy H.; Alexander, George W.

    This manual was prepared for a training program in Nuclear Medicine Technology at the University of Cincinnati. Instructional materials for students enrolled in these courses in the training program include: Nuclear Physics and Instrumentation, Radionuclide Measurements, Radiation Protection, and Tracer Methodology and Radiopharmaceuticals. (CS)

  13. Assessment of the CALIPSO Lidar 532 nm attenuated backscatter calibration using the NASA LaRC airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Rogers

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP instrument on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO spacecraft has provided global, high-resolution vertical profiles of aerosols and clouds since it became operational on 13 June 2006. On 14 June 2006, the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL was deployed aboard the NASA Langley B-200 aircraft for the first of a series of 86 underflights of the CALIPSO satellite to provide validation measurements for the CALIOP data products. To better assess the range of conditions under which CALIOP data products are produced, these validation flights were conducted under both daytime and nighttime lighting conditions, in multiple seasons, and over a large range of latitudes and aerosol and cloud conditions. This paper presents a quantitative assessment of the CALIOP 532 nm calibration (through the 532 nm total attenuated backscatter using internally calibrated airborne HSRL underflight data and is the most extensive study of CALIOP 532 nm calibration. Results show that HSRL and CALIOP 532 nm total attenuated backscatter agree on average within 2.7% ± 2.1% (CALIOP lower at night and within 2.9% ± 3.9% (CALIOP lower during the day, demonstrating the accuracy of the CALIOP 532 nm calibration algorithms. Additionally, comparisons with HSRL show consistency of the CALIOP calibration before and after the laser switch in 2009 as well as improvements in the daytime version 3.01 calibration scheme compared with the version 2 calibration scheme. Potential biases and uncertainties in the methodology relevant to validating satellite lidar measurements with an airborne lidar system are discussed and found to be less than 4.5% ± 3.2% for this validation effort with HSRL. Results from this study are also compared with prior assessments of the CALIOP 532 nm attenuated backscatter calibration.

  14. Tropical cloud and precipitation regimes as seen from near-simultaneous TRMM, CloudSat, and CALIPSO observations and comparison with ISCCP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhengzhao Johnny; Anderson, Ricardo C.; Rossow, William B.; Takahashi, Hanii

    2017-06-01

    Although Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and CloudSat/CALIPSO fly in different orbits, they frequently cross each other so that for the period between 2006 and 2010, a total of 15,986 intersect lines occurred within 20 min of each other from 30°S to 30°N, providing a rare opportunity to study tropical cloud and precipitation regimes and their internal vertical structure from near-simultaneous measurements by these active sensors. A k-means cluster analysis of TRMM and CloudSat matchups identifies three tropical cloud and precipitation regimes: the first two regimes correspond to, respectively, organized deep convection with heavy rain and cirrus anvils with moderate rain; the third regime is a convectively suppressed regime that can be further divided into three subregimes, which correspond to, respectively, stratocumulus clouds with drizzle, cirrus overlying low clouds, and nonprecipitating cumulus. Inclusion of CALIPSO data adds to the dynamic range of cloud properties and identifies one more cluster; subcluster analysis further identifies a thin, midlevel cloud regime associated with tropical mountain ranges. The radar-lidar cloud regimes are compared with the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) weather states (WSs) for the extended tropics. Focus is placed on the four convectively active WSs, namely, WS1-WS4. ISCCP WS1 and WS2 are found to be counterparts of Regime 1 and Regime 2 in radar-lidar observations, respectively. ISCCP WS3 and WS4, which are mainly isolated convection and broken, detached cirrus, do not have a strong association with any individual radar and lidar regimes, a likely effect of the different sampling strategies between ISCCP and active sensors and patchy cloudiness of these WSs.

  15. Investigation on the monthly variation of cirrus optical properties over the Indian subcontinent using cloud-aerosol lidar and infrared pathfinder satellite observation (Calipso)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaman, Reji K.; Satyanarayana, Malladi; Jayeshlal, G. S.; Mahadevan Pillai, V. P.; Krishnakumar, V.

    2016-05-01

    Cirrus clouds have been identified as one of the atmospheric component which influence the radiative processes in the atmosphere and plays a key role in the Earth Radiation Budget. CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) is a joint NASA-CNES satellite mission designed to provide insight in understanding of the role of aerosols and clouds in the climate system. This paper reports the study on the variation of cirrus cloud optical properties of over the Indian sub - continent for a period of two years from January 2009 to December 2010, using cloud-aerosol lidar and infrared pathfinder satellite observations (Calipso). Indian Ocean and Indian continent is one of the regions where cirrus occurrence is maximum particularly during the monsoon periods. It is found that during the south-west monsoon periods there is a large cirrus cloud distribution over the southern Indian land masses. Also it is observed that the north-east monsoon periods had optical thick clouds hugging the coast line. The summer had large cloud formation in the Arabian Sea. It is also found that the land masses near to the sea had large cirrus presence. These cirrus clouds were of high altitude and optical depth. The dependence of cirrus cloud properties on cirrus cloud mid-cloud temperature and geometrical thickness are generally similar to the results derived from the ground-based lidar. However, the difference in macrophysical parameter variability shows the limits of space-borne-lidar and dissimilarities in regional climate variability and the nature and source of cloud nuclei in different geographical regions.

  16. An accuracy assessment of the CALIOP/CALIPSO version 2 aerosol extinction product based on a detailed multi-sensor, multi-platform case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kacenelenbogen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Cloud Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP, on board the CALIPSO platform, has measured profiles of total attenuated backscatter coefficient (level 1 products since June 2006. CALIOP's level 2 products, such as the aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficient profiles, are retrieved using a complex succession of automated algorithms. The goal of this study is to help identify potential shortcomings in the CALIOP version 2 level 2 aerosol extinction product and to illustrate some of the motivation for the changes that will be introduced in the next version of CALIOP data (version 3, currently being processed. As a first step, we compared CALIOP version 2-derived AOD with the collocated MODerate Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS AOD retrievals over the Continental United States. The best statistical agreement between those two quantities was found over the Eastern part of the United States with, nonetheless, a weak correlation (R ~0.4 and an apparent CALIOP version 2 underestimation (by ~66% of MODIS AOD. To help quantify the potential factors contributing to the uncertainty of the CALIOP aerosol extinction retrieval, we then focused on a one-day, multi-instrument, multiplatform comparison study during the CALIPSO and Twilight Zone (CATZ validation campaign on August 04, 2007. This case study illustrates the following potential reasons for a bias in the CALIOP AOD: (i CALIOP's low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR leading to the misclassification and/or lack of aerosol layer identification, especially close to the Earth's surface; (ii the cloud contamination of CALIOP version 2 aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles; (iii potentially erroneous assumptions of the backscatter-to-extinction ratio (Sa used in CALIOP's extinction retrievals; and (iv calibration coefficient biases in the CALIOP daytime attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles.

  17. Relationships Between Ice Cloud Properties and Radiative Effects from A-Train Observations and Global Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, B. J.; Mace, G. G.

    2014-12-01

    Using data from the A-Train satellites, we investigate the distribution of clouds and their microphysical and radiative properties in Southeast Asia during the summer monsoon. We find an approximate balance in the top of the atmosphere (TOA) cloud radiative effect, which is largely due to commonly occurring cirrus layers that warm the atmosphere, and less frequent deep layer clouds, which produce a strong cooling at the surface. The distribution of cloud ice water path (IWP) in cirrus layers, obtained from the 2C-ICE CloudSat data product, is highly skewed with a mean value of 170 g m-2 and a median of 16 g m-2. We evaluate the fraction of the total IWP observed by CloudSat and CALIPSO individually and find that both instruments are necessary for describing the overall IWP statistics and particularly the values that are most important to cirrus radiative impact. In examining how cirrus cloud radiative effects at the TOA vary as a function of IWP, we find that cirrus with IWP less than 200 g m-2 produce a net warming. Weighting the distribution of radiative effect by the frequency of occurrence of IWP values, we find that cirrus with IWP around 20 g m-2 contribute most to heating at the TOA. We conclude that the mean IWP is a poor diagnostic of radiative impact. We suggest that climate model intercomparisons with data should focus on the median IWP because that statistic is more descriptive of the cirrus that contribute most to the radiative impacts of tropical ice clouds. Given these findings, we use the A-Train observations to address the issues of IWP occurrence and high cloud forcing in a global climate model (GCM). Our goal is to determine whether the clouds that heat the upper troposphere in the model are the same genre of clouds that heat the upper troposphere in the real atmosphere. First, we define a cloud radiative kernel that's a function of IWP to determine whether the modeled ice clouds produce similar shortwave and longwave radiative effects at the TOA

  18. New Insight into Polar Stratospheric Cloud Processes from A-Train Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.

    2016-12-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) play essential roles in the chemical depletion of stratospheric ozone at high latitudes. Heterogeneous reactions occurring on PSC particles, primarily supercooled ternary (H2SO4-H2O-HNO3) solution (STS) droplets, convert stable chlorine reservoir species to highly reactive ozone-destructive forms. Also, sedimentation and evaporation of large nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) particles irreversibly redistributes odd nitrogen and prolongs ozone depletion by slowing the reformation of stable chlorine reservoirs. Even after three decades of research, significant gaps in our understanding of PSC processes still exist, particularly concerning NAT nucleation and the extent to which chlorine is activated on cold background aerosol prior to PSC formation. These uncertainties limit our ability to represent PSCs accurately in global models and call into question predictions of ozone recovery in a changing climate. PSC observations from the A-Train satellite constellation have stimulated a number of new research activities that have both extended and challenged our knowledge of PSC processes and modeling capabilities. Specifically, the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) lidar on the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) satellite is providing information on PSC morphology and composition in unprecedented detail, while the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Aura satellite is providing nearly coincident measurements of gas-phase HNO3 and H2O, the major constituents of all PSC particles. The combined analyses of these datasets enable better PSC composition discrimination and provide valuable new insight into processes such as PSC-catalyzed chlorine activation and PSC particle growth kinetics. The more than ten years of CALIOP and MLS measurements have uniquely captured the primary aspects of the seasonal and multi-year variability of PSCs in the Arctic and Antarctic and are enabling the

  19. Survivors’ experiences from a train crash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Forsberg

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Rarely described are people's lived experiences from severe injury events such as train crashes. The number of train crashes named disasters with ≥10 killed and/or ≥100 nonfatally injured grows globally and the trend shows that more people survive these disasters today than did so in the past. This results in an increased number of survivors needing care. The aim of the study was to explore survivors’ experiences from a train crash. Narrative interviews were performed with 14 passengers 4 years after a train crash event. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the interviews. Experiences were captured in three main themes: (1 Living in the mode of existential threat describes how the survivors first lost control, then were thrown into a state of unimaginable chaos as they faced death. (2 Dealing with the unthinkable described how survivors restored control, the central role of others, and the importance of reconstructing the event to move forward in their processing. (3 Having cheated death shows how some became shackled by their history, whereas others overcame the haunting of unforgettable memories. Furthermore, the result shows how all experienced a second chance in life. Experiencing a train crash meant that the passengers experienced severe vulnerability and a threat to life and interdependence turned out to play a crucial role. Focusing on helping other passengers on site was one way to regain the loss of control and kept the chaos at bay. Family, friends, and fellow passengers turned out to be extremely important during the recovery process why such closeness should be promoted and facilitated.

  20. Survivors' experiences from a train crash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Rebecca; Saveman, Britt-Inger

    2011-01-01

    Rarely described are people's lived experiences from severe injury events such as train crashes. The number of train crashes named disasters with ≥10 killed and/or ≥100 nonfatally injured grows globally and the trend shows that more people survive these disasters today than did so in the past. This results in an increased number of survivors needing care. The aim of the study was to explore survivors' experiences from a train crash. Narrative interviews were performed with 14 passengers 4 years after a train crash event. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the interviews. Experiences were captured in three main themes: (1) Living in the mode of existential threat describes how the survivors first lost control, then were thrown into a state of unimaginable chaos as they faced death. (2) Dealing with the unthinkable described how survivors restored control, the central role of others, and the importance of reconstructing the event to move forward in their processing. (3) Having cheated death shows how some became shackled by their history, whereas others overcame the haunting of unforgettable memories. Furthermore, the result shows how all experienced a second chance in life. Experiencing a train crash meant that the passengers experienced severe vulnerability and a threat to life and interdependence turned out to play a crucial role. Focusing on helping other passengers on site was one way to regain the loss of control and kept the chaos at bay. Family, friends, and fellow passengers turned out to be extremely important during the recovery process why such closeness should be promoted and facilitated.

  1. An accuracy assessment of the CALIOP/CALIPSO version 2/version 3 daytime aerosol extinction product based on a detailed multi-sensor, multi-platform case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kacenelenbogen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The Cloud Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP, on board the CALIPSO platform, has measured profiles of total attenuated backscatter coefficient (level 1 products since June 2006. CALIOP's level 2 products, such as the aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficient profiles, are retrieved using a complex succession of automated algorithms. The goal of this study is to help identify potential shortcomings in the CALIOP version 2 level 2 aerosol extinction product and to illustrate some of the motivation for the changes that have been introduced in the next version of CALIOP data (version 3, released in June 2010. To help illustrate the potential factors contributing to the uncertainty of the CALIOP aerosol extinction retrieval, we focus on a one-day, multi-instrument, multiplatform comparison study during the CALIPSO and Twilight Zone (CATZ validation campaign on 4 August 2007. On that day, we observe a consistency in the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD values recorded by four different instruments (i.e. space-borne MODerate Imaging Spectroradiometer, MODIS: 0.67 and POLarization and Directionality of Earth's Reflectances, POLDER: 0.58, airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar, HSRL: 0.52 and ground-based AErosol RObotic NETwork, AERONET: 0.48 to 0.73 while CALIOP AOD is a factor of two lower (0.32 at 532 nm. This case study illustrates the following potential sources of uncertainty in the CALIOP AOD: (i CALIOP's low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR leading to the misclassification and/or lack of aerosol layer identification, especially close to the Earth's surface; (ii the cloud contamination of CALIOP version 2 aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles; (iii potentially erroneous assumptions of the aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio (Sa used in CALIOP's extinction retrievals; and (iv calibration coefficient biases in the CALIOP daytime attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles. The use of version 3 CALIOP extinction

  2. An accuracy assessment of the CALIOP/CALIPSO version 2/version 3 daytime aerosol extinction product based on a detailed multi-sensor, multi-platform case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacenelenbogen, M.; Vaughan, M. A.; Redemann, J.; Hoff, R. M.; Rogers, R. R.; Ferrare, R. A.; Russell, P. B.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Holben, B. N.

    2011-04-01

    The Cloud Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), on board the CALIPSO platform, has measured profiles of total attenuated backscatter coefficient (level 1 products) since June 2006. CALIOP's level 2 products, such as the aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficient profiles, are retrieved using a complex succession of automated algorithms. The goal of this study is to help identify potential shortcomings in the CALIOP version 2 level 2 aerosol extinction product and to illustrate some of the motivation for the changes that have been introduced in the next version of CALIOP data (version 3, released in June 2010). To help illustrate the potential factors contributing to the uncertainty of the CALIOP aerosol extinction retrieval, we focus on a one-day, multi-instrument, multiplatform comparison study during the CALIPSO and Twilight Zone (CATZ) validation campaign on 4 August 2007. On that day, we observe a consistency in the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) values recorded by four different instruments (i.e. space-borne MODerate Imaging Spectroradiometer, MODIS: 0.67 and POLarization and Directionality of Earth's Reflectances, POLDER: 0.58, airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar, HSRL: 0.52 and ground-based AErosol RObotic NETwork, AERONET: 0.48 to 0.73) while CALIOP AOD is a factor of two lower (0.32 at 532 nm). This case study illustrates the following potential sources of uncertainty in the CALIOP AOD: (i) CALIOP's low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) leading to the misclassification and/or lack of aerosol layer identification, especially close to the Earth's surface; (ii) the cloud contamination of CALIOP version 2 aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles; (iii) potentially erroneous assumptions of the aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio (Sa) used in CALIOP's extinction retrievals; and (iv) calibration coefficient biases in the CALIOP daytime attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles. The use of version 3 CALIOP extinction retrieval for our case

  3. An Accuracy Assessment of the CALIOP/CALIPSO Version 2/Version 3 Daytime Aerosol Extinction Product Based on a Detailed Multi-Sensor, Multi-Platform Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacenelenbogen, M.; Vaughan, M. A.; Redemann, J.; Hoff, R. M.; Rogers, R. R.; Ferrare, R. A.; Russell, P. B.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Holben, B. N.

    2011-01-01

    The Cloud Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), on board the CALIPSO platform, has measured profiles of total attenuated backscatter coefficient (level 1 products) since June 2006. CALIOP s level 2 products, such as the aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficient profiles, are retrieved using a complex succession of automated algorithms. The goal of this study is to help identify potential shortcomings in the CALIOP version 2 level 2 aerosol extinction product and to illustrate some of the motivation for the changes that have been introduced in the next version of CALIOP data (version 3, released in June 2010). To help illustrate the potential factors contributing to the uncertainty of the CALIOP aerosol extinction retrieval, we focus on a one-day, multi-instrument, multiplatform comparison study during the CALIPSO and Twilight Zone (CATZ) validation campaign on 4 August 2007. On that day, we observe a consistency in the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) values recorded by four different instruments (i.e. spaceborne MODerate Imaging Spectroradiometer, MODIS: 0.67 and POLarization and Directionality of Earth s Reflectances, POLDER: 0.58, airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar, HSRL: 0.52 and ground-based AErosol RObotic NETwork, AERONET: 0.48 to 0.73) while CALIOP AOD is a factor of two lower (0.32 at 532 nm). This case study illustrates the following potential sources of uncertainty in the CALIOP AOD: (i) CALIOP s low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) leading to the misclassification and/or lack of aerosol layer identification, especially close to the Earth s surface; (ii) the cloud contamination of CALIOP version 2 aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles; (iii) potentially erroneous assumptions of the aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio (Sa) used in CALIOP s extinction retrievals; and (iv) calibration coefficient biases in the CALIOP daytime attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles. The use of version 3 CALIOP extinction retrieval for our case

  4. Diversity on subtropical and polar cirrus clouds properties as derived from both ground-based lidars and CALIPSO/CALIOP measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba-Jabonero, Carmen; Lopes, Fabio J. S.; Landulfo, Eduardo; Cuevas, Emilio; Ochoa, Héctor; Gil-Ojeda, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Cirrus (Ci) cloud properties can change significantly from place to place over the globe as a result of weather processes, reflecting their likely different radiative and climate implications. In this work Cirrus clouds (Ci) features observed in late autumn/early winter season at both subtropical and polar latitudes are examined and compared to CALIPSO/CALIOP observations. Lidar measurements were carried out in three stations: São Paulo (MSP, Brazil) and Tenerife (SCO, Canary Islands, Spain), as subtropical sites, and the polar Belgrano II base (BEL, Argentina) in the Antarctic continent. The backscattering ratio (BSR) profiles and the top and base heights of the Ci layers together to their Cirrus Cloud Optical Depth (CCOD) and Lidar Ratio (LR) for Ci clouds were derived. In addition, temperatures at the top and base boundaries of the Ci clouds were also obtained from local radiosoundings to verify pure ice Ci clouds occurrence using a given temperature top threshold ( 70 km far), inferring the irregular extension and inhomogeneity of the Ci clouds over each study area. These considerations can be useful for assimilation of the Ci features into climate models and evaluation of future space-borne lidar observations of Ci clouds, especially for the future ESA/Copernicus-Sentinel and ESA/EarthCARE missions.

  5. Ticosonde CFH at Costa Rica: A Seasonal Climatology of Tropical UT-LS Water Vapor and Inter-Comparisons with MLS and CALIPSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkirk, Henry B.; Voemel, Holger; Avery, Melody; Rosenlof, Karen; Davis, Sean; Hurst, Dale; Schoeberl, Mark; Diaz, Jorge Andres; Morris, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Balloon sonde measurements of tropical water vapor using the Cryogenic Frostpoint Hygrometer were initiated in Costa Rica in July 2005 and have continued to the present day. Over the nine years through July 2014, the Ticosonde program has launched 174 CFH payloads, representing the longest-running and most extensive single-site balloon dataset for tropical water vapor. In this presentation we present a seasonal climatology for water vapor and ozone at Costa Rica and examine the frequency of upper tropospheric supersaturation with comparisons to cloud fraction and cloud ice water content observations from the Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on the CALIPSO mission. We then make a critical comparison of these data to water vapor measurements from the MLS instrument on board Aura in light of recently published work for other sites. Finally, we examine time series of 2-km altitude averages in the upper troposphere-lower stratosphere at Costa Rica in light of anomalies and trends seen in various large-scale indices of tropical water vapor.

  6. Validation of MODIS cloud mask and multilayer flag using CloudSat-CALIPSO cloud profiles and a cross-reference of their cloud classifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Fetzer, Eric J.; Wong, Sun; Kahn, Brian H.; Yue, Qing

    2016-10-01

    Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Collection 6 cloud observations (MYD06) at 1 km are collocated with daytime CloudSat-Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) (C-C) cloud vertical structures (2B-CLDCLASS-LIDAR). For 2007-2010, over 267 million C-C cloud profiles are used to (1) validate MODIS cloud mask and cloud multilayer flag and (2) cross-reference between C-C cloud types and MODIS cloud regimes defined by joint histograms of cloud top pressure (CTP) and cloud optical depth (τ). Globally, of total observations, C-C reports 27.1% clear and 72.9% cloudy, whereas MODIS reports 30.0% confidently clear and 58.7% confidently cloudy, with the rest 7.1% as probably clear and 4.2% as probably cloudy. Agreement between MODIS and C-C is 77.8%, with 20.9% showing both clear and 56.9% showing both cloudy. The 9.1% of observations are clear in MODIS but cloudy in C-C, indicating clouds missed by MODIS; 1.8% of observations are cloudy in MODIS but clear in C-C, likely due to aerosol/dust or surface snow layers misidentified by MODIS. C-C reports 47.4/25.5% single-layer/multilayer clouds, while MODIS reports 26.7/14.0%. For C-C single-layer clouds, 90% of tropical MODIS high (CTP 23) clouds are recognized as deep convective in C-C. Approximately 70% of MODIS low-level (CTP > 680 hPa) clouds are classified as stratocumulus in C-C regardless of region and optical thickness. No systematic relationship exists between MODIS middle-level (680 < CTP < 440 hPa) clouds and C-C cloud types, largely due to different definitions adopted.

  7. Optical depths of semi-transparent cirrus clouds over oceans from CALIPSO infrared radiometer and lidar measurements, and an evaluation of the lidar multiple scattering factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Garnier

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a detailed evaluation of cloud absorption optical depths retrieved at 12.05 μm and comparisons to extinction optical depths retrieved at 0.532 μm from perfectly co-located observations of single-layered semi-transparent cirrus over ocean made by the Imaging Infrared Radiometer (IIR and the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP flying on-board the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations satellite. The blackbody radiance taken in the IIR Version 3 algorithm is evaluated, and IIR retrievals are corrected accordingly. IIR infrared absorption optical depths are then compared to CALIOP visible extinction optical depths when the latter can be directly derived from the measured apparent 2-way transmittance through the cloud. Numerical simulations and IIR retrievals of ice crystal sizes suggest that the ratios of CALIOP extinction and IIR absorption optical depths should remain roughly constant with respect to temperature. Instead, these ratios are found to increase quasi-linearly by about 40% as the temperature at the layer centroid altitude decreases from 240 to 200 K. This behavior is explained by variations of the multiple scattering factor ηT to be applied to correct the measured transmittance, which is taken equal to 0.6 in the CALIOP Version 3 algorithm, and which is found here to vary with temperature (and hence cloud particle size from ηT = 0.8 at 200 K to ηT = 0.5 at 240 K for clouds with optical depth larger than 0.3. The revised parameterization of ηT introduces a concomitant temperature dependence in the simultaneously derived CALIOP lidar ratios that is consistent with observed changes in CALIOP depolarization ratios and particle habits derived from IIR measurements.

  8. On the optimal method for evaluating cloud products from passive satellite imagery using CALIPSO-CALIOP data: example investigating the CM SAF CLARA-A1 dataset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.-G. Karlsson

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A method for detailed evaluation of a new satellite-derived global 28-yr cloud and radiation climatology (Climate Monitoring SAF Cloud, Albedo and Radiation dataset from AVHRR data, named CLARA-A1 from polar orbiting NOAA and Metop satellites is presented. The method combines 1 km and 5 km resolution cloud datasets from the CALIPSO-CALIOP cloud lidar for estimating cloud detection limitations and the accuracy of cloud top height estimations.

    Cloud detection is shown to work efficiently for clouds with optical thicknesses above 0.30 except for at twilight conditions when this value increases to 0.45. Some misclassifications generating erroneous clouds over land surfaces in semi-arid regions in the sub-tropical and tropical regions are revealed. In addition, a substantial fraction of all clouds remains undetected in the Polar regions during the polar winter season due to the lack of or an inverted temperature contrast between Earth surfaces and clouds.

    Subsequent cloud top height evaluation took into account the derived information about the cloud detection limits. It was shown that this has fundamental importance for the achieved results. An overall bias of −274 m was achieved compared to a bias of −2762 m if no measures were taken to compensate for cloud detection limitations. Despite this improvement it was concluded that high-level clouds still suffer from substantial height underestimations while the opposite is true for low-level (boundary layer clouds.

    The validation method and the specifically collected satellite dataset with optimal matching in time and space are suggested for a wider use in the future for evaluation of other cloud retrieval methods based on passive satellite imagery.

  9. Consistency of aerosols above clouds characterization from A-Train active and passive measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. T. Deaconu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a comparison between the retrieval of optical properties of aerosol above clouds (AAC from different techniques developed for the A-Train sensors CALIOP/CALIPSO and POLDER/PARASOL. The main objective is to analyse the consistency between the results derived from the active and the passive measurements. We compare the aerosol optical thickness (AOT above optically thick clouds (cloud optical thickness (COT larger than 3 and their Ångström exponent (AE. These parameters are retrieved with the CALIOP operational method, the POLDER operational polarization method and the CALIOP-based depolarization ratio method (DRM – for which we also propose a calibrated version (denominated DRMSODA, where SODA is the Synergized Optical Depth of Aerosols. We analyse 6 months of data over three distinctive regions characterized by different types of aerosols and clouds. Additionally, for these regions, we select three case studies: a biomass-burning event over the South Atlantic Ocean, a Saharan dust case over the North Atlantic Ocean and a Siberian biomass-burning event over the North Pacific Ocean. Four and a half years of data are studied over the entire globe for distinct situations where aerosol and cloud layers are in contact or vertically separated. Overall, the regional analysis shows a good correlation between the POLDER and the DRMSODA AOTs when the microphysics of aerosols is dominated by fine-mode particles of biomass-burning aerosols from southern Africa (correlation coefficient (R2 of 0.83 or coarse-mode aerosols of Saharan dust (R2 of 0.82. A good correlation between these methods (R2 of 0.68 is also observed in the global treatment, when the aerosol and cloud layers are separated well. The analysis of detached layers also shows a mean difference in AOT of 0.07 at 532 nm between POLDER and DRMSODA at a global scale. The correlation between the retrievals decreases when a complex mixture of aerosols is expected (R2 of 0.37

  10. Consistency of aerosols above clouds characterization from A-Train active and passive measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaconu, Lucia T.; Waquet, Fabien; Josset, Damien; Ferlay, Nicolas; Peers, Fanny; Thieuleux, François; Ducos, Fabrice; Pascal, Nicolas; Tanré, Didier; Pelon, Jacques; Goloub, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    This study presents a comparison between the retrieval of optical properties of aerosol above clouds (AAC) from different techniques developed for the A-Train sensors CALIOP/CALIPSO and POLDER/PARASOL. The main objective is to analyse the consistency between the results derived from the active and the passive measurements. We compare the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) above optically thick clouds (cloud optical thickness (COT) larger than 3) and their Ångström exponent (AE). These parameters are retrieved with the CALIOP operational method, the POLDER operational polarization method and the CALIOP-based depolarization ratio method (DRM) - for which we also propose a calibrated version (denominated DRMSODA, where SODA is the Synergized Optical Depth of Aerosols). We analyse 6 months of data over three distinctive regions characterized by different types of aerosols and clouds. Additionally, for these regions, we select three case studies: a biomass-burning event over the South Atlantic Ocean, a Saharan dust case over the North Atlantic Ocean and a Siberian biomass-burning event over the North Pacific Ocean. Four and a half years of data are studied over the entire globe for distinct situations where aerosol and cloud layers are in contact or vertically separated. Overall, the regional analysis shows a good correlation between the POLDER and the DRMSODA AOTs when the microphysics of aerosols is dominated by fine-mode particles of biomass-burning aerosols from southern Africa (correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.83) or coarse-mode aerosols of Saharan dust (R2 of 0.82). A good correlation between these methods (R2 of 0.68) is also observed in the global treatment, when the aerosol and cloud layers are separated well. The analysis of detached layers also shows a mean difference in AOT of 0.07 at 532 nm between POLDER and DRMSODA at a global scale. The correlation between the retrievals decreases when a complex mixture of aerosols is expected (R2 of 0.37) - as in the

  11. Influence of the Arctic Oscillation on the vertical distribution of clouds as observed by the A-Train constellation of satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Devasthale

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of the Arctic Oscillation (AO, the dominant mode of natural variability over the northerly high latitudes, on the spatial (horizontal and vertical distribution of clouds in the Arctic. To that end, we use a suite of sensors onboard NASA's A-Train satellites that provide accurate observations of the distribution of clouds along with information on atmospheric thermodynamics. Data from three independent sensors are used (AQUA-AIRS, CALIOP-CALIPSO and CPR-CloudSat covering two time periods (winter half years, November through March, of 2002–2011 and 2006–2011, respectively along with data from the ERA-Interim reanalysis.

    We show that the zonal vertical distribution of cloud fraction anomalies averaged over 67–82° N to a first approximation follows a dipole structure (referred to as "Greenland cloud dipole anomaly", GCDA, such that during the positive phase of the AO, positive and negative cloud anomalies are observed eastwards and westward of Greenland respectively, while the opposite is true for the negative phase of AO. By investigating the concurrent meteorological conditions (temperature, humidity and winds, we show that differences in the meridional energy and moisture transport during the positive and negative phases of the AO and the associated thermodynamics are responsible for the conditions that are conducive for the formation of this dipole structure. All three satellite sensors broadly observe this large-scale GCDA despite differences in their sensitivities, spatio-temporal and vertical resolutions, and the available lengths of data records, indicating the robustness of the results. The present study also provides a compelling case to carry out process-based evaluation of global and regional climate models.

  12. Validation of the CALIPSO-CALIOP extinction coefficients from in situ observations in midlatitude cirrus clouds during the CIRCLE-2 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mioche, Guillaume; Josset, Damien; Gayet, Jean-FrançOis; Pelon, Jacques; Garnier, Anne; Minikin, Andreas; Schwarzenboeck, Alfons

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of combined Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) extinction retrievals with airborne lidar and in situ cirrus cloud measurements. Specially oriented research flights were carried out in western Europe in May 2007 during the Cirrus Cloud Experiment (CIRCLE-2) with the German Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) and the French Service des Avions Français Instrumentés pour la Recherche en Environnement (SAFIRE) Falcon aircraft equipped for remote and in situ measurements, respectively. Four cirrus cloud situations including thin cirrus layers and outflow cirrus linked to midlatitude fronts and convective systems were chosen to perform experimental collocated observations along the satellite overpasses. The measurements were carried out with temperatures ranging between -38°C and -60°C and with extinction coefficients no larger than 2 km-1. Comparisons between CALIOP and airborne lidar (LEANDRE New Generation (LNG)) attenuated backscatter coefficients reveal much larger CALIOP values for one frontal cirrus situation which could be explained by oriented pristine ice crystals. During the four selected cases the CALIOP cirrus extinction profiles were compared with in situ extinction coefficients derived from the Polar Nephelometer. The results show a very good agreement for two situations (frontal and outflow cases) despite very different cloud conditions. The slope parameters of linear fittings of CALIOP extinction coefficients with respect to in situ measurements are 0.90 and 0.94, with correlation coefficients of 0.69 and only 0.36 for the latter case because of a small number of measurements. On the contrary, significant differences are evidenced for two other situations. In thin frontal cirrus at temperatures ranging between -58°C and -60°C, systematic larger CALIOP extinctions can be explained by horizontally

  13. Extension of radiative transfer code MOMO, matrix-operator model to the thermal infrared - Clear air validation by comparison to RTTOV and application to CALIPSO-IIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doppler, Lionel; Carbajal-Henken, Cintia; Pelon, Jacques; Ravetta, François; Fischer, Jürgen

    2014-09-01

    1-D radiative transfer code Matrix-Operator Model (MOMO), has been extended from [0.2-3.65 μm] the band to the whole [0.2-100 μm] spectrum. MOMO can now be used for the computation of a full range of radiation budgets (shortwave and longwave). This extension to the longwave part of the electromagnetic radiation required to consider radiative transfer processes that are features of the thermal infrared: the spectroscopy of the water vapor self- and foreign-continuum of absorption at 12 μm and the emission of radiation by gases, aerosol, clouds and surface. MOMO's spectroscopy module, Coefficient of Gas Absorption (CGASA), has been developed for computation of gas extinction coefficients, considering continua and spectral line absorptions. The spectral dependences of gas emission/absorption coefficients and of Planck's function are treated using a k-distribution. The emission of radiation is implemented in the adding-doubling process of the matrix operator method using Schwarzschild's approach in the radiative transfer equation (a pure absorbing/emitting medium, namely without scattering). Within the layer, the Planck-function is assumed to have an exponential dependence on the optical-depth. In this paper, validation tests are presented for clear air case studies: comparisons to the analytical solution of a monochromatic Schwarzschild's case without scattering show an error of less than 0.07% for a realistic atmosphere with an optical depth and a blackbody temperature that decrease linearly with altitude. Comparisons to radiative transfer code RTTOV are presented for simulations of top of atmosphere brightness temperature for channels of the space-borne instrument MODIS. Results show an agreement varying from 0.1 K to less than 1 K depending on the channel. Finally MOMO results are compared to CALIPSO Infrared Imager Radiometer (IIR) measurements for clear air cases. A good agreement was found between computed and observed radiance: biases are smaller than 0.5 K

  14. Lidar multiple scattering factors inferred from CALIPSO lidar and IIR retrievals of semi-transparent cirrus cloud optical depths over oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, A.; Pelon, J.; Vaughan, M. A.; Winker, D. M.; Trepte, C. R.; Dubuisson, P.

    2015-07-01

    Cirrus cloud absorption optical depths retrieved at 12.05 μm are compared to extinction optical depths retrieved at 0.532 μm from perfectly co-located observations of single-layered semi-transparent cirrus over ocean made by the Imaging Infrared Radiometer (IIR) and the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) flying on board the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) satellite. IIR infrared absorption optical depths are compared to CALIOP visible extinction optical depths when the latter can be directly derived from the measured apparent two-way transmittance through the cloud. An evaluation of the CALIOP multiple scattering factor is inferred from these comparisons after assessing and correcting biases in IIR and CALIOP optical depths reported in version 3 data products. In particular, the blackbody radiance taken in the IIR version 3 algorithm is evaluated, and IIR retrievals are corrected accordingly. Numerical simulations and IIR retrievals of ice crystal sizes suggest that the ratios of CALIOP extinction and IIR absorption optical depths should remain roughly constant with respect to temperature. Instead, these ratios are found to increase quasi-linearly by about 40 % as the temperature at the layer centroid altitude decreases from 240 to 200 K. It is discussed that this behavior can be explained by variations of the multiple scattering factor ηT applied to correct the measured apparent two-way transmittance for contribution of forward-scattering. While the CALIOP version 3 retrievals hold ηT fixed at 0.6, this study shows that ηT varies with temperature (and hence cloud particle size) from ηT = 0.8 at 200 K to ηT = 0.5 at 240 K for single-layered semi-transparent cirrus clouds with optical depth larger than 0.3. The revised parameterization of ηT introduces a concomitant temperature dependence in the simultaneously derived CALIOP lidar ratios that is consistent with observed changes in CALIOP

  15. Evidence for Convective Invigoration from A-Train Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mülmenstädt, Johannes; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Sourdeval, Odran; Quaas, Johannes; Delanoë, Julien

    2016-04-01

    The 'convective invigoration' hypothesis posits that aerosol affects precipitating clouds by delaying the onset of precipitation until the cloud has grown above the freezing level, making more efficient ice-phase precipitation processes available and leading to more intense precipitation than would have been produced by the same cloud in a less polluted atmosphere. In the IPCC AR5, evidence for a systematic aerosol effect on precipitation intensity (i.e., not limited to individual storms) is described as 'limited and ambiguous'. We use a combined dataset of spaceborne radar (CloudSat) and lidar (CALIPSO) retrievals of precipitation and cloud thermodynamic phase to derive a climatology of rain occurrence from liquid-phase cloud ('warm rain') and ice-phase cloud ('cold rain'). The cloud-top phase of precipitating cloud serves as a proxy for rain intensity, with warm clouds preferentially producing drizzle and cold clouds preferentially producing more intense rain. This proxy is useful over land, where CloudSat does not retrieve precipitation intensity. In conjunction with aerosol data, the cloud-top phase can be used to test convective invigoration; according to the hypothesis, increasing aerosols should lead to an increase in the cold-rain fraction. We find that warm rain is extremely rare over the extratropical continents (1.5% of rain occurrences). Warm rain is rarer in the most polluted tercile of observations (measured by reanalysis dry AOD) over wide areas of land and ocean outside the tropics, consistent with expectations under the convective invigoration hypothesis. (In the tropics, the effect is reversed, presumably due to wet scavenging.) Extrapolating the observed relationship between warm-rain fraction and reanalysis dry AOD to preindustrial conditions shows a large anthropogenic aerosol influence on precipitation over the extratropical continents. We propose this as evidence supporting the convective invigoration hypothesis.

  16. The CLAS App - A training app to improve medical handovers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maher, Bridget; Drachsler, Hendrik; Kalz, Marco; Marcus, Specht

    2012-01-01

    Maher, B., Drachsler, H., Kalz, M., & Specht, M. (2012, 16-18 October). The CLAS App - A training app to improve medical handovers. Presentation at the 11th World Conference on Mobile and Contextual Learning, Helsinki, Finland. Please see also: http://hdl.handle.net/1820/4613

  17. Effect of a training model in local anesthesia teaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Baart, J.A.; Maas, N.E.; Bachet, I.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the preclinical use of a training model in local anesthesia teaching on the subsequent clinical administration of a local anesthetic. Sixty-five dental students gave their first injection to a fellow dental student: twenty-two students after previous experience

  18. A training course for experts in diabetology in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hart, Huberta E.; Rutten, Guy E H M

    2015-01-01

    In the Netherlands so-called Diabetes Care Groups organize the primary diabetes care centrally with delegation to different health care providers. A training course for general practitioners who would like to become experts in diabetology in the primary care setting meets the need to guide the quali

  19. ANALYSIS RESULTS FOR BUILDING 241 702-AZ A TRAIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DUNCAN JB; FRYE JM; COOKE CA; LI SW; BROCKMAN FJ

    2006-12-13

    This report presents the analyses results for three samples obtained under RPP-PLAN-28509, Sampling and Analysis Plan for Building 241 702-AZ A Train. The sampling and analysis was done in response to problem evaluation request number PER-2004-6139, 702-AZ Filter Rooms Need Radiological Cleanup Efforts.

  20. Taking Control of Alzheimer's Disease: A Training Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Nina M.; Sherman, Robin

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate a training program for persons with early-stage Alzheimer's disease and their care partners. Care partners were mailed two surveys, one for themselves and one for the person with dementia. Domains covered in the training included an overview of cognitive disorders, treatment of symptoms including…

  1. Effect of a training model in local anesthesia teaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Baart, J.A.; Maas, N.E.; Bachet, I.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the preclinical use of a training model in local anesthesia teaching on the subsequent clinical administration of a local anesthetic. Sixty-five dental students gave their first injection to a fellow dental student: twenty-two students after previous experience

  2. Taking Control of Alzheimer's Disease: A Training Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Nina M.; Sherman, Robin

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate a training program for persons with early-stage Alzheimer's disease and their care partners. Care partners were mailed two surveys, one for themselves and one for the person with dementia. Domains covered in the training included an overview of cognitive disorders, treatment of symptoms including…

  3. The CLAS App - A training app to improve medical handovers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maher, Bridget; Drachsler, Hendrik; Kalz, Marco; Marcus, Specht

    2012-01-01

    Maher, B., Drachsler, H., Kalz, M., & Specht, M. (2012, 16-18 October). The CLAS App - A training app to improve medical handovers. Presentation at the 11th World Conference on Mobile and Contextual Learning, Helsinki, Finland. Please see also: http://hdl.handle.net/1820/4613

  4. A Training Class for Women Cadres on the Nairobi Strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    DURING the last five days of October 1993, the All-China Women’s Federation (ACWF) held a training course to realize the goals of the document,"Future Strategies for Women’s Advancement Through the Year 2000." (The document is referred to as the "Nairobi Strategies" in the story.) The

  5. Evaluating a Training Using the "Four Levels Model"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steensma, Herman; Groeneveld, Karin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study are: to present a training evaluation based on the "four levels model"; to demonstrate the value of experimental designs in evaluation studies; and to take a first step in the development of an evidence-based training program. Design/methodology/approach: The Kirkpatrick four levels model was used to…

  6. A training package of document search in HTA

    OpenAIRE

    Vidale, Claudia; Guarrera, Giovanni Maria; Troncon, Maria Grazia; Fontana, Fabrizio; Favaretti, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    The University Hospital of Udine (AOUUD) has developed a training package for a variety of professionals interested in document search in HTA. The package is divided into a basic version for lectures to medium and large-sized groups and into an advanced version for immersion training to small groups. The basic version consists of 4 hours training and provides an illustration of national and international HTA sites, the presentation of the AOUUD search engine called "Health Technology Assessme...

  7. Aerosol patterns and aerosol-cloud-interactions off the West African Coast based on the A-train formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Julia; Bendix, Jörg; Cermak, Jan

    2013-04-01

    ). Satellite data from the A-train formation, including the Aqua, CloudSat and CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) are used to analyze aerosol-cloud-interactions in detail, along with re-analysis data to constrain by meteorological conditions. Information about the vertical and geographical distribution of different aerosol types and cloud parameters will lead to a process-oriented understanding of these issues on a regional scale. Ackerman, A., Kirkpatrick, M., Stevens, D., & Toon, O. (2004). The impact of humidity above stratiform clouds on indirect aerosol climate forcing. Nature, 432(December), 1014-1017. doi:10.1038/nature03137.1. Feingold, G. (2003). First measurements of the Twomey indirect effect using ground-based remote sensors. Geophysical Research Letters, 30(6), 1287. doi:10.1029/2002GL016633 IPCC. (2007). Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Interfovernmental Panel on climate Change. Change [Solomon, S., D. Qin, M. Manning, Z. Chen, M. Marquis, K.B. Averyt, M.Tignor and H.L. Miller (eds.)]. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA. Kaufman, Y. J., Koren, I., Remer, L. A., Tanré, D., Ginoux, P., & Fan, S. (2005). Dust transport and deposition observed from the Terra-Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) spacecraft over the Atlantic Ocean. Journal of Geophysical Research, 110(D10), 1-16. doi:10.1029/2003JD004436 McFiggans, G., Artaxo, P., Baltensperger, U., Coe, H., Facchini, M. C., Feingold, G., Fuzzi, S., et al. (2006). The effect of physical and chemical aerosol properties on warm cloud droplet activation. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 6(9), 2593-2649. doi:10.5194/acp-6-2593-2006

  8. Trip optimization system and method for a train

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Ajith Kuttannair; Shaffer, Glenn Robert; Houpt, Paul Kenneth; Movsichoff, Bernardo Adrian; Chan, David So Keung

    2017-08-15

    A system for operating a train having one or more locomotive consists with each locomotive consist comprising one or more locomotives, the system including a locator element to determine a location of the train, a track characterization element to provide information about a track, a sensor for measuring an operating condition of the locomotive consist, a processor operable to receive information from the locator element, the track characterizing element, and the sensor, and an algorithm embodied within the processor having access to the information to create a trip plan that optimizes performance of the locomotive consist in accordance with one or more operational criteria for the train.

  9. [Hypogastric artery ligation. Safety and efficacy of a training program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García López, A; Martínez Aguirre, R; Hernández Romero, F; Naranjo Gutierrez, A; Montes Reyes, J

    2001-11-01

    Bilateral hypogastric artery ligation is a technique described in the antiquity to restrain the hemorrhage in the gynecological and obstetric surgery. There are few Gineco-obstetricians that dominate the technique, for what intended a training program, in which was to demonstrate their security and effectiveness. We carry out a program where were qualified 14 gineco-obstetricians, theoretical and surgically. Results were analyzed finding an acceptable security with 1.5% of complications and an effectiveness demonstrated when having to the program 92.9% of students that reached the competition. We intend to reply the course in other hospital units, in order to decrease the maternal mortality for hemorrhage obstetric or gynecological.

  10. SIDH: A Game-Based Architecture for a Training Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Backlund

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Game-based simulators, sometimes referred to as “lightweight” simulators, have benefits such as flexible technology and economic feasibility. In this article, we extend the notion of a game-based simulator by introducing multiple screen view and physical interaction. These features are expected to enhance immersion and fidelity. By utilizing these concepts we have constructed a training simulator for breathing apparatus entry. Game hardware and software have been used to produce the application. More important, the application itself is deliberately designed to be a game. Indeed, one important design goal is to create an entertaining and motivating experience combined with learning goals in order to create a serious game. The system has been evaluated in cooperation with the Swedish Rescue Services Agency to see which architectural features contribute to perceived fidelity. The modes of visualization and interaction as well as level design contribute to the usefulness of the system.

  11. Optimization of a train of bunches for plasma wakefield acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martorelli, Roberto

    2016-05-10

    Particle accelerators are a fundamental instrument for the understanding of fundamental mechanism in nature. The need of always higher energies for the particle beams requires a huge increase of the sizes of the accelerators using the actual technology. Moreover the highest energies are achieved nowadays by circular colliders, not perfectly suitable for acceleration of electrons and positrons due to the radiation losses. In order to overcome this problem a new branch of physics studying alternative technique for particle acceleration has been developed. Among the various alternatives a promising one is the plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA), in which a driver bunch interacts with a cold background plasma, exciting a plasma wave. The electric field of the plasma wave is then used for the acceleration of a second bunch. Such a mechanism allows to reach fields strength far beyond currently available, limited by the dielectric strength of the material. Among the different driver configurations, a promising one is the use of a modulated beam, namely a train of bunches, that provides a coherent interference among the electric fields generated by the single bunches. Such mechanism is subjected to a renewed interest in view of the forthcoming AWAKE experiment at CERN in which the long proton beam produced at the SPS facility is used as a driver. This possibility is achieved thanks to the onset of the self-modulation instability that modulates the long beam in a train of approximately 100 bunches. In order to accelerate the witness bunch to high energies is necessary on the other hand an efficient exchange of energy from the driver to the accelerated bunch, as well as a long duration of the driver so that can propagates for kilometers. This thesis deals with this two last aspects. The aim of this work is to provide an optimization for the modulated driver in order to improve specific features of the PWFA. This work shows the possibility to achieve an improved efficiency

  12. Development of a Training Program for Commercial Building Technicians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinholm, Rod

    2013-05-31

    This project focused on developing and deploying a comprehensive program of 22 training modules, including certification requirements, and accreditation standards for commercial building technicians, to help achieve the full savings potential of energy efficient buildings, equipment, and systems. This curriculum extended the currently available commercial building technician programs -- training a labor force in a growing market area focused on energy efficiency. The program helps to remove a major market impediment to low energy/zero energy commercial building system acceptance, namely a lack of operating personnel capable of handling more complex high efficiency systems. The project developed a training curriculum for commercial building technicians, with particular focus on high-efficiency building technology, and systems. In Phase 1, the project team worked collaboratively in developing a draft training syllabus to address project objectives. The team identified energy efficiency knowledge gaps in existing programs and plans and plans to address the gaps with either modified or new curricula. In Phase 2, appropriate training materials were developed to meet project objectives. This material was developed for alternative modes of delivery, including classroom lecture materials, e-learning elements, video segments, exercises, and hands-on training elements. A Certification and Accreditation Plan and a Commercialization and Sustainability Plan were also investigated and developed. The Project Management Plan was updated quarterly and provided direction on the management approaches used to accomplish the expected project objectives. GTI project management practices tightly coordinate project activities using management controls to deliver optimal customer value. The project management practices include clear scope definition, schedule/budget tracking, risk/issue resolution and team coordination.

  13. MONITORING SWIMMING SPRINT PERFORMANCE DURING A TRAINING CYCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Marinho

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The preparation for a major competition is an important concern of coaches and athletes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the evolution in sprint performance during a training macro cycle in age-group swimmers of both genders. The sample comprised twenty four age-group swimmers (12.0 ± 0.72 years old, 41.43 ± 6.88 kg, 1.51 ± 0.09 m. The evaluations occurred during nine weeks of swimming training in the first macro cycle. During this period the subjects performed 54 training units (6 units per week. In all weeks, the performance in two trials of a 25 m front crawl all out test, with 15 min of rest, was recorded. Only the bestperformance was used to assess the effects of training. Comparisons between the first week and the following weeks were conducted using pair-sample t-test. The significance level was set at 5%. The sprint performance did not change during the first 6 weeks of preparation. In the last three weeks the performance in the 25 m front crawl test was improved when compared with the first week, although the major changes occurred at the last week of preparation.It seems that in age-group swimmers seven weeks of specific swimming training enables improving swimmer’s sprint performance, although some differences exists between male and female swimmers. Thesedata could be used by coaches to program the training season and the evolution of the load components.

  14. Robotic Surgery Simulator: Elements to Build a Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillou, Xavier; Collon, Sylvie; Martin-Francois, Sandrine; Doerfler, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Face, content, and construct validity of robotic surgery simulators were confirmed in the literature by several studies, but elements to build a training program are still lacking. The aim of our study was to validate a progressive training program and to assess according to prior surgical experience the amount of training needed with a robotic simulator to complete the program. Exercises using the Da Vinci Skill Simulator were chosen to ensure progressive learning. A new exercise could only be started if a minimal score of 80% was achieved in the prior one. The number of repetitions to achieve an exercise was not limited. We devised a "performance index" by calculating the ratio of the sum of scores for each exercise over the number of repetitions needed to complete the exercise with at least an 80% score. The study took place at the François Baclesse Cancer Center. Participants all work at the primary care university Hospital located next to the cancer center. A total of 32 surgeons participated in the study- 2 experienced surgeons, 8 junior and 8 senior residents in surgery, 6 registrars, and 6 attending surgeons. There was no difference between junior and senior residents, whereas the registrars had better results (p < 0.0001). The registrars performed less exercise repetitions compared to the junior or senior residents (p = 0.012). Attending surgeons performed significantly more repetitions than registrars (p = 0.024), but they performed fewer repetitions than junior or senior residents with no statistical difference (p = 0.09). The registrars had a performance index of 50, which is the best result among all novice groups. Attending surgeons were between senior and junior residents with an index at 33.85. Choice of basic exercises to manipulate different elements of the robotic surgery console in a specific and progressive order enables rapid progress. The level of prior experience in laparoscopic surgery affects outcomes. More advanced laparoscopic expertise

  15. Evaluating the Implementation of a Training Program for Improving Quality Service: An Action Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Ketly Dieudonne

    2014-01-01

    There is a need to implement a comprehensive training program to build employees' knowledge, skills, and attitudes in order to improve quality service at ABC Restaurant because of a surge in customer complaints. The purpose of this study was to develop a training program that included an employee handbook as a training tool, a handbook designed…

  16. Deriving the effect of wind speed on clean marine aerosol optical properties using the A-Train satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Kiliyanpilakkil

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between "clean marine" aerosol optical properties and ocean surface wind speed is explored using remotely sensed data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP on board the CALIPSO satellite and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E on board the AQUA satellite. Detailed data analyses are carried out over 15 regions selected to be representative of different areas of the global ocean for the time period from June 2006 to April 2011. Based on remotely sensed optical properties the CALIPSO algorithm is capable of discriminating "clean marine" aerosols from other types often present over the ocean (such as urban/industrial pollution, desert dust and biomass burning. The global mean optical depth of "clean marine" aerosol at 532 nm (AOD532 is found to be 0.052 ± 0.038 (mean plus or minus standard deviation. The mean layer integrated particulate depolarization ratio of marine aerosols is 0.02 ± 0.016. Integrated attenuated backscatter and color ratio of marine aerosols at 532 nm were found to be 0.003 ± 0.002 sr−1 and 0.530 ± 0.149, respectively. A logistic regression between AOD532 and 10-m surface wind speed (U10 revealed three distinct regimes. For U10 ≤ 4 m s−1 the mean CALIPSO-derived AOD532 is found to be 0.02 ± 0.003 with little dependency on the surface wind speed. For 4 < U10 ≤ 12 m s−1, representing the dominant fraction of all available data, marine aerosol optical depth is linearly correlated with the surface wind speed values, with a slope of 0.006 s m−1. In this intermediate wind speed region, the AOD532 vs. U10 regression slope derived here is comparable to previously reported values. At very high wind speed values (U10 > 18 m s−1, the AOD532-wind speed relationship

  17. Back Facts: A Training Workbook to Prevent Back Injuries in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to prevent back injuries in nursing homes Back Facts - A training workbook to prevent back injuries in ... past 10 years? List three or four responses. Fact Sheet 1 Good news, bad news and back ...

  18. A study of warm rain detection using A-Train satellite data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruiyue Chen; Zhanqing Li; Robert J. Kuligowski; Ralph Ferraro; Fuzhong Weng

    2011-01-01

    .... This study exploits multi-sensor data from the A-Train satellite constellation to investigate the rain contribution from warm clouds and the potential of using cloud microphysical parameters for warm rain detection...

  19. Computation of Solar Radiative Fluxes by 1D and 3D Methods Using Cloudy Atmospheres Inferred from A-train Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Howard W.; Kato, Serji; Wehr, T.

    2012-01-01

    The main point of this study was to use realistic representations of cloudy atmospheres to assess errors in solar flux estimates associated with 1D radiative transfer models. A scene construction algorithm, developed for the EarthCARE satellite mission, was applied to CloudSat, CALIPSO, and MODIS satellite data thus producing 3D cloudy atmospheres measuring 60 km wide by 13,000 km long at 1 km grid-spacing. Broadband solar fluxes and radiances for each (1 km)2 column where then produced by a Monte Carlo photon transfer model run in both full 3D and independent column approximation mode (i.e., a 1D model).

  20. Ocean, Land and Meteorology Studies Using Space-Based Lidar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu,Yongxiang

    2009-01-01

    CALIPSO's main mission objective is studying the climate impact of clouds and aerosols in the atmosphere. CALIPSO also collects information about other components of the Earth's ecosystem, such as oceans and land. This paper introduces the physics concepts and presents preliminary results for the valueadded CALIPSO Earth system science products. These include ocean surface wind speeds, column atmospheric optical depths, ocean subsurface backscatter, land surface elevations, atmospheric temperature profiles, and A-train data fusion products.

  1. Becoming an education architect. How to design a training program that fits your department's needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Robert G

    2006-07-01

    This article has discussed the concept of instructional design and the initial processes involved in creating high-quality, comprehensive training sessions that meet the needs of the EMS organization and its employees. Conducting a training needs assessment, as well as a training needs analysis, provides essential information about the types of training necessary to enhance overall performance. Additionally, knowing the audience and location for the training will afford insight into limitations on the program. This essential information leads to the creation of behavioral or performance objectives as the developing curriculum progresses.

  2. Development of a Training Program for Enhancement of Technology Competencies of University Lecturers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruthaka, Chomsupak; Pinngern, Ouen

    2016-01-01

    The objectives were: (1) the components of the technology competencies of university lecturers were studied. The researchers also described and analyzed (2) the development of a training program for enhancement of the technology competencies of these lecturers. Also, the researchers evaluated (3) the program they had constructed. The sample…

  3. Enhancing Digital Fluency through a Training Program for Creative Problem Solving Using Computer Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, SugHee; Chung, KwangSik; Yu, HeonChang

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to propose a training program for creative problem solving based on computer programming. The proposed program will encourage students to solve real-life problems through a creative thinking spiral related to cognitive skills with computer programming. With the goal of enhancing digital fluency through this proposed…

  4. Improving Social Understanding of Preschool Children: Evaluation of a Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Moises; Sidera, Francesc; Serrano, Jessica; Amado, Anna; Rostan, Carles

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: This study tested the effects of a training program intending to foster social understanding or the capacity which enables them to understand themselves and others in terms of intentions, beliefs, desires, and emotions in children at preschool age. A number of studies have shown that in the context of shared narratives, children are…

  5. Using a Training Video to Improve Agricultural Workers' Knowledge of On-Farm Food Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiasen, Lisa; Morley, Katija; Chapman, Benjamin; Powell, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    A training video was produced and evaluated to assess its impact on the food safety knowledge of agricultural workers. Increasing food safety knowledge on the farm may help to improve the safety of fresh produce. Surveys were used to measure workers' food safety knowledge before and after viewing the video. Focus groups were used to determine…

  6. MACBETH: Development of a Training Game for the Mitigation of Cognitive Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Norah E.; Wilson, Scott N.; Adame, Bradley J.; Elizondo, Javier; Jensen, Matthew L.; Miller, Claude H.; Kauffman, Abigail Allums; Seltsam, Toby; Bessarabova, Elena; Vincent, Cindy; Straub, Sara K.; Ralston, Ryan; Dulawan, Christopher L.; Ramirez, Dennis; Squire, Kurt; Valacich, Joseph S.; Burgoon, Judee K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the process of rapid iterative prototyping used by a research team developing a training video game for the Sirius program funded by the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA). Described are three stages of development, including a paper prototype, and builds for alpha and beta testing. Game development is…

  7. Development of a Training Plan for DCW Juvenile Service Unit Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human Resources Research Organization, Fort Knox, KY. Div. 2.

    A study was conducted to ascertain the job requirements and training needs of juvenile service unit workers. A training needs assessment inventory questionnaire was mailed to all juvenile service unit workers in the Kentucky Department of Child Welfare (DCW). Data from 146 questionnaires were analyzed to provide job descriptive information, which…

  8. Effects of a Training Package to Improve the Accuracy of Descriptive Analysis Data Recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Kimberly L.; DiGennaro Reed, Florence D.

    2013-01-01

    Functional behavior assessment is an important precursor to developing interventions to address a problem behavior. Descriptive analysis, a type of functional behavior assessment, is effective in informing intervention design only if the gathered data accurately capture relevant events and behaviors. We investigated a training procedure to improve…

  9. Using a Training Video to Improve Agricultural Workers' Knowledge of On-Farm Food Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathiasen, Lisa; Morley, Katija; Chapman, Benjamin; Powell, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    A training video was produced and evaluated to assess its impact on the food safety knowledge of agricultural workers. Increasing food safety knowledge on the farm may help to improve the safety of fresh produce. Surveys were used to measure workers' food safety knowledge before and after viewing the video. Focus groups were used to determine…

  10. "Running a Train": Adolescent Boys' Accounts of Sexual Intercourse Involving Multiple Males and One Female

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Emily F.; Decker, Michele R.; Reed, Elizabeth; Raj, Anita; Silverman, Jay G.; Miller, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    The authors used qualitative research methods to explore the context and sexual risk behavior associated with sexual intercourse involving multiple males and one female, commonly called "running a train." Participants were 20 adolescent males aged 14 to 22 years who were either perpetrators of dating violence or perceived by teachers to…

  11. The Temporal Effect of Training Utility Perceptions on Adopting a Trained Method: The Role of Perceived Organizational Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madera, Juan M.; Steele, Stacey T.; Beier, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined the temporal effect of perceived training utility on adoption of a trained method and how perceived organizational support influences the relationship between perceived training utility perceptions and adoption of a trained method. With the use of a correlational-survey-based design, this longitudinal study required…

  12. Improving Peripheral and Central Vascular Adjustments during Exercise through a Training Program in Adolescents with Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Valérie Julian; David Thivel; Bruno Pereira; Frédéric Costes; Ruddy Richard; Martine Duclos

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The effects of a training program (TP) on muscle microvascularization during exercise remained to be explored in adolescents with obesity. We hypothesized that a TP would lead to better microvascular adaptations to exercise in skeletal muscle. Methods: 15 inactive adolescents followed a 12-week TP where both peripheral (muscular microvascularization) and central (cardiac) adaptations to exercise (40 min exercise set at 70% V̇O2peak) were assessed before and after interventio...

  13. Tubulo - a train-like miniature inspection climbing robot for ferromagnetic tubes

    OpenAIRE

    Schoeneich, Patrick; Rochat, Frédéric; Truong-Dat Nguyen, Olivier; Caprari, Gilles; Moser, Roland; Bleuler, Hannes; Mondada, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    A train-like miniature climbing inspection robot for ferromagnetic tubes is presented in this paper. Using magnetic wheels, it climbs in tubes of 25 mm of diameter and bigger in any orientation, and pass bends with curvatures above 150 mm in some cases. It has embedded electronics and energy, and can transmit images through a cable. Applications are in tubes inspections as found in power plant boilers for example.

  14. [Tasks performed by nurses at inpatient units in a training hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Rita de Almeida; Shimizu, Helena Eri

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and analyze tasks performed by nurses at inpatient units in a large general hospital in Brasilia, Federal District, which also functions as a training hospital. A quantitative, exploratory, descriptive study was carried out and involved a total of 612 hours of direct observation of the activities performed by 18 nurses at the General Medicine, Surgical, Pediatric and Maternity units. The tasks observed were classified as: administration, nursing care delivery, education and related to information system. Nurses dedicate a large part of their time to administrative tasks, followed by tasks related to nursing care delivery and information system, performing almost no educative tasks.

  15. Evaluation of patient wristbands and patient identification process in a training hospital in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Canan; Celik, Yusuf; Hikmet, Neset

    2016-10-10

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the utilisation of patient wristbands (PWs) and patient identification (PI) process in a training hospital in Ankara, Turkey. Design/methodology/approach This descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted in a training hospital with 640 beds, accreditied by Joint Commission International. The views of 348 patients and 419 hospital personnel on the implementation of patient wristbands and identification process were evaluated. Findings The results indicated that lack of information among patients about the importance of PWs and the misknowledge among staff participants on when, where, and by whom PWs should be put on and verified were the weakest points in this hospital. Research limitations/implications PI process must be strictly implemented according to the standard procedures of patient safety. Both patients and hospital personnel should be trained continuously, and training sessions must be held to increase their awareness about the importance of PWs and identification process. Practical implications Finding new ways and using new methods for increasing knowledge about PI and PWs are necessary. Hospital management should prepare a written PI and PW policy and procedure documents by taking the views of patients and hospital personnel and share these with them. Originality/value This study incorporates the views and attitudes of patients and health care personnel in improving health care quality by increasing awareness about PI and wristbands.

  16. Improving Peripheral and Central Vascular Adjustments during Exercise through a Training Program in Adolescents with Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Julian

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The effects of a training program (TP on muscle microvascularization during exercise remained to be explored in adolescents with obesity. We hypothesized that a TP would lead to better microvascular adaptations to exercise in skeletal muscle. Methods: 15 inactive adolescents followed a 12-week TP where both peripheral (muscular microvascularization and central (cardiac adaptations to exercise (40 min exercise set at 70% V̇O2peak were assessed before and after intervention. Microvascular adaptations were evaluated in the Musculus vastus lateralis with near-infrared spectroscopy, by measurement of muscular blood volume (IR-BV and tissue oxygen saturation (IR-SO2. Central adaptations were evaluated using thoracic impedance. Results: The TP favored lower BMI (p 2peak relative to weight (p = 0.008 and maximum power output increased (p = 0.0003. A smaller initial drop in IR-BV and IR-SO2 (p 2 all times taken together (p Conclusion: We demonstrate for the first time by noninvasive techniques that a training program induces peripheral and central vascular adaptations to exercise in adolescents with obesity.

  17. Designing simulator tools for rail research: the case study of a train driving microworld.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naweed, A; Hockey, G R J; Clarke, S D

    2013-05-01

    The microworld simulator paradigm is well established in the areas of ship-navigation and spaceflight, but has yet to be applied to rail. This paper presents a case study aiming to address this research gap, and describes the development of a train driving microworld as a tool to overcome some common research barriers. A theoretical framework for microworld design is tested and used to explore some key methodological issues and characteristics of train driving, enhancing theory development and providing a useful guideline for the designers of other collision-avoidance systems. A detailed description is given of the ATREIDES (Adaptive Train Research Enhanced Information Display & Environment Simulator) microworld, which simulates the work environment of a train driver in a high-speed passenger train. General indications of the testable driving scenarios that may be simulated are given, and an example of an ATREIDES-based study is presented to illustrate its applied research potential. The article concludes with a review of the design process, considers some strengths and limitations, and explores some future initiatives towards enhancing the systematic study of rail research in the human factors community. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Scientist-Teacher-Student Interactions: Experiences around the Fall 2010 A-Train Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, L. H.; Rogers, M. A.; Charlevoix, D. J.; Kennedy, T.; Oostra, D. H.

    2010-12-01

    In late October 2010, the second A-Train Science Symposium will be held in New Orleans, LA. (The first such event was hosted by CNES in France in 2007.) In conjunction with the symposium, a multi-faceted education event is also being planned. This will include: - Onsite one-day teacher workshops for local teachers introducing remote sensing and the use of satellite data in the classroom - Visits by scientists to local classrooms for direct interaction with students the day after the symposium - A Student-Scientist Observation Campaign which will engage A-Train scientists in a social media website with teachers and students from around the world. This paper will focus primarily on the observation campaign. It will describe the rapid development and testing of a web-based framework to support student-scientist interaction. It will lay out the steps used to activate a (hopefully significant) number of students and teachers through the GLOBE Program (www.globe.gov) and the S’COOL Project (scool.larc.nasa.gov). It will describe the interaction during the event, which will be a 3-week period before, during and after the symposium. During this time, A-Train scientists will be posting interesting satellite observations on a social media website. Students will be able to comment, ask questions, and post their own observations of related phenomena observed from the ground. Scientists will respond to student questions, and comment or ask questions on student observations. In addition, student observations will be collected through the existing S’COOL and GLOBE websites, and combined into a common visualization tool that is easily accessible through the social media framework. A photo upload pilot system is also planned, taking advantage of advances in exif photo metadata in new electronics (cell phones, smart phones, digital cameras) to easily geolocate this imagery for correlation to satellite remote sensing data and images. It is our hope that this approach will be

  19. Extending the features of RBMK refuelling machine simulator with a training tool based on virtual reality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoudiakov, M.; Slonimsky, V.; Mitrofanov, S. (and others)

    2004-07-01

    The paper describes a continuation of efforts of an international Russian - Norwegian joint team to improve operational safety during the refuelling process of an RBMK-type reactor by implementing a training simulator based on an innovative Virtual Reality (VR) approach. During the preceding 1st stage of the project a display-based simulator was extended with VR models of the real Refuelling Machine (RM) and its environment in order to improve both the learning process and operation's effectiveness. The simulator's challenge is to support the performance (operational activity) of RM operational staff firstly by helping them to develop basic knowledge and skills as well as to keep skilled staff in close touch with the complex machinery of the Refuelling Machine. During the 2nd stage of the joint project the functional scope of the VR-simulator was greatly enhanced - firstly, by connecting to the RBMK-unit full-scope simulator, and, secondly, by including a training program and simulator model upgrade. The present 3rd stage of the Project is primarily oriented towards the improvement of the training process for maintenance and operational personnel by means of a development of the Training Support Methodology and Courses (TSMC) to be based on Virtual Reality and enlarged functionality of 3D and process modelling. The TMSC development is based on Russian and International Regulatory Bodies requirements and recommendations. Design, development and creation of a specialised VR-based Training System for RM Maintenance Personnel are very important for the Russian RBMK plants. The main goal is to create a powerful, autonomous VR-based simulator for training technical maintenance personnel on the Refuelling Machine. VR based training is expected to improve the effect of training compared to the current training based on traditional methods using printed documentation. The LNPP management and the Regulatory Bodies supported this goal. The VR-based Training System

  20. Scenarios Approach to the Electromagnetic Exposure: The Case Study of a Train Compartment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Paffi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies identified the train compartment as the place where people can experience the highest exposure levels (still below the international guideline limits to electromagnetic fields in the radiofrequency range. Here a possible scenario of a train compartment has been reproduced and characterized, both numerically and experimentally. A good agreement between the simulated electric field distributions and measurements has been found. Results indicate that the higher values of exposure in specific positions inside the train compartment depend on the number of active cell phones, the bad coverage condition, the cell orientation, and the presence of metallic walls. This study shows that the proposed approach, based on the scenarios characterization, may efficiently support the assessment of the individual electromagnetic exposure.

  1. Experimental Investigation of Aerodynamic Noise Generated by a Train-Car Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizushima, Fumio; Takakura, Hiroyuki; Kurita, Takeshi; Kato, Chisachi; Iida, Akiyoshi

    To investigate the mechanism of noise generation by a train-car gap, which is one of a major source of noise in Shinkansen trains, experiments were carried out in a wind tunnel using a 1/5-scale model train. We measured velocity profiles of the boundary layer that approaches the gap and confirmed that the boundary layer is turbulent. We also measured the power spectrum of noise and surface pressure fluctuations around the train-car gap. Peak noise and broadband noise were observed. It is found that strong peak noise is generated when the vortex shedding frequency corresponds to the acoustic resonance frequency determined by the geometrical shape of the gap, and that broadband noise is generated at the downstream edge of the gap where vortexes collide. It is estimated that the convection velocity of the vortices in the gap is approximately 45% of the uniform flow velocity.

  2. E-LEARNING AS AN INSTRUMENT FOR CHANGE: THE PEDAGOGICAL DESIGN OF A TRAINING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Lucer Fustes

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development and a summary of the results of a Training Experience implemented in the University of Extremadura. This experience is the innovative design of an online Postgraduate Course for Secondary School Teachers. The research team, which has been committed to online teaching for longer than a decade, began an innovative experience to test their singular conception of e-learning. So, a continuous process of group-negotiation began in order to design a course where the educational method should be the main part of the course. The design is innovative because of the tutorial approach and the learning evaluation process (as the quality of the evaluation is expected to be high although this is just implemented online. At present the results of the experience are being studied, however some strong and weak points have been already found out, so they might guide our teaching methods in order to get good practices for online learning.

  3. Satisfaction of nurses with a training course for the operationalization of protocol on pressure ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayara Vasconcelos Santos

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify the degree of satisfaction of nurses with a training course for operationalization of protocol on pressure ulcers. Methods: a descriptive exploratory study made in a philanthropic hospital in the northeast of Brazil. An instrument on satisfaction was applied to 21 participant nurses of the course on pressure ulcer based on care protocol. Results: young adults predominated (23-33 years old, female (87.5%, with significant participation in events, courses and research activities (81.0%, and 19.0% of research publication. The overall rate of satisfaction with the course made at the workplace was 84.34%. Conclusion: when the fundaments of practice based on evidence were cleared, the rate of satisfaction of the professionals who participate in Permanent Education activities is high, which makes clinical protocol operationalization possible.

  4. Characterization of the thermal refraction in ionic liquids induced by a train of femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Lago, E.; Nóvoa, J. A.; Nóvoa, D.; Michinel, H.; Cabeza, O.; Rodríguez, J. R.; Varela, L. M.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the nonlinear refraction induced by a train of ultrashort laser pulses (repetition rate 80.75MHz) in a set of ionic liquids: [EMIM][BF4], [BMIM] [BF4], [HMIM] [BF4], [OMIM] [BF4] and [DMIM] [BF4]. Due to the high repetition rate, linear absorption processes are developed which cause a non local increase of temperature that generates an inhomogeneous and non local spatial variation of the refractive index. This effect is known as thermal refraction. The goal of this work is to characterize by z-scan the induced changes in the refractive index at λ=810nm and to determine the thermooptic coefficient of this liquids at this wavelength

  5. Shared decision-making in medication management: development of a training intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stead, Ute; Morant, Nicola; Ramon, Shulamit

    2017-08-01

    Shared decision-making is a collaborative process in which clinicians and patients make treatment decisions together. Although it is considered essential to patient-centred care, the adoption of shared decision-making into routine clinical practice has been slow, and there is a need to increase implementation. This paper describes the development and delivery of a training intervention to promote shared decision-making in medication management in mental health as part of the Shared Involvement in Medication Management Education (ShIMME) project. Three stakeholder groups (service users, care coordinators and psychiatrists) received training in shared decision-making, and their feedback was evaluated. The programme was mostly well received, with all groups rating interaction with peers as the best aspect of the training. This small-scale pilot shows that it is feasible to deliver training in shared decision-making to several key stakeholders. Larger studies will be required to assess the effectiveness of such training.

  6. A training effect on electrical properties in nanoscale BiFeO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Sudipta; Bhattacharya, Dipten; Li, Wuxia; Cui, Ajuan; Jiang, QianQing; Gu, Chang-zhi

    2013-04-05

    We report our observation of the training effect on dc electrical properties in a nanochain of BiFeO3 as a result of large scale migration of defects under the combined influence of electric field and Joule heating. We show that an optimum number of cycles of electric field within the range zero to ~1.0 MV cm(-1) across a temperature range 80-300 K helps in reaching the stable state via a glass-transition-like process in the defect structure. Further treatment does not give rise to any substantial modification. We conclude that such a training effect is ubiquitous in pristine nanowires or chains of oxides and needs to be addressed for applications in nanoelectronic devices.

  7. A training manual for event history data management using Health and Demographic Surveillance System data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocquier, Philippe; Ginsburg, Carren; Herbst, Kobus; Sankoh, Osman; Collinson, Mark A

    2017-06-26

    The objective of this research note is to introduce a training manual for event history data management. The manual provides a first comprehensive guide to longitudinal Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) data management that allows for a step-by-step description of the process of structuring and preparing a dataset for the calculation of demographic rates and event history analysis. The research note provides some background information on the INDEPTH Network, and the iShare data repository and describes the need for a manual to guide users as to how to correctly handle HDSS datasets. The approach outlined in the manual is flexible and can be applied to other longitudinal data sources. It facilitates the development of standardised longitudinal data management and harmonization of datasets to produce a comparative set of results.

  8. Scenarios approach to the electromagnetic exposure: the case study of a train compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paffi, A; Apollonio, F; Pinto, R; Liberti, M

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies identified the train compartment as the place where people can experience the highest exposure levels (still below the international guideline limits) to electromagnetic fields in the radiofrequency range. Here a possible scenario of a train compartment has been reproduced and characterized, both numerically and experimentally. A good agreement between the simulated electric field distributions and measurements has been found. Results indicate that the higher values of exposure in specific positions inside the train compartment depend on the number of active cell phones, the bad coverage condition, the cell orientation, and the presence of metallic walls. This study shows that the proposed approach, based on the scenarios characterization, may efficiently support the assessment of the individual electromagnetic exposure.

  9. Macmillan nurse facilitators: conducting a training needs assessment for district nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Annette; Byron, Shirley; Moriarty, Deirdre

    2007-12-01

    This article will describe how Macmillan nurse facilitators conducted a training needs analysis in order to inform and develop an education programme in palliative care for district nurses. A questionnaire was developed and distributed to all 250 district nursing staff in the north/east sector of Glasgow to identify the priority training issues relating to palliative care. This included all district nursing sisters, first and second level registered nurses and auxiliary nursing staff working within the community setting. An 85% response rate to the questionnaire was achieved and an education programme was developed and delivered to address the needs identified by staff. This article goes on to describe the process of the training needs analysis and the benefits of providing an education programme that addresses the educational needs of staff members. Reference is made to a larger evaluation study which highlights staff members' views on both these points.

  10. Dynamic Measurement for the Diameter of A Train Wheel Based on Structured-Light Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zheng; Sun, Junhua; Zhang, Guangjun

    2016-04-20

    Wheels are very important for the safety of a train. The diameter of the wheel is a significant parameter that needs regular inspection. Traditional methods only use the contact points of the wheel tread to fit the rolling round. However, the wheel tread is easily influenced by peeling or scraping. Meanwhile, the circle fitting algorithm is sensitive to noise when only three points are used. This paper proposes a dynamic measurement method based on structured-light vision. The axle of the wheelset and the tread are both employed. The center of the rolling round is determined by the axle rather than the tread only. Then, the diameter is calculated using the center and the contact points together. Simulations are performed to help design the layout of the sensors, and the influences of different noise sources are also analyzed. Static and field experiments are both performed, and the results show it to be quite stable and accurate.

  11. Dynamic Measurement for the Diameter of A Train Wheel Based on Structured-Light Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Gong

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Wheels are very important for the safety of a train. The diameter of the wheel is a significant parameter that needs regular inspection. Traditional methods only use the contact points of the wheel tread to fit the rolling round. However, the wheel tread is easily influenced by peeling or scraping. Meanwhile, the circle fitting algorithm is sensitive to noise when only three points are used. This paper proposes a dynamic measurement method based on structured-light vision. The axle of the wheelset and the tread are both employed. The center of the rolling round is determined by the axle rather than the tread only. Then, the diameter is calculated using the center and the contact points together. Simulations are performed to help design the layout of the sensors, and the influences of different noise sources are also analyzed. Static and field experiments are both performed, and the results show it to be quite stable and accurate.

  12. MPC&A training needs of the NIS/Baltics States.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, David Franklin; Stoy-McLeod, Carol L.

    2006-07-01

    This report serves to document contract deliverables considered to be of continuing interest associated with two workshops conducted as part of an initial assessment of Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC&A) training needs of the Newly Independent and Baltic States (NIS/Baltics). These workshops were held in Kiev, Ukraine, ca. 2003-2004, with the assistance of personnel from the George Kuzmycz Training Center (GKTC) of the Kiev Institute of Nuclear Research (KINR). Because of the dominant role Ukraine plays in the region in terms of the nuclear industry, one workshop focused exclusively on Ukrainian training needs, with participants attending from twelve Ukrainian organizations (plus U.S. DOE/NNSA representatives). The second workshop included participation by a further ten countries from the NIS/Baltics region. In addition, the training needs data developed during the workshop were supplemented by the outcomes of surveys and studies conducted by the GKTC.

  13. Impact of a small cell on the RF-EMF exposure in a train.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, Sam; Plets, David; Thielens, Arno; Martens, Luc; Joseph, Wout

    2015-02-27

    The deployment of a miniature mobile-phone base station or small cell in a train car significantly improves the coverage and the capacity of a mobile network service on the train. However, the impact of the small cell on the passengers' exposure to radio-frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) is unknown. In this study, we assessed experimentally the RF-EMF exposure of a mobile-phone user who is either connected to the outdoor macrocell network or to an in-train small cell, while traveling on the train, by means of the absorbed-dose concept, which combines the base station downlink exposure with the mobile-phone uplink exposure. For Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) technology at 1800 MHz, we found that by connecting to a small cell, the brain exposure of the user could realistically be reduced by a factor 35 and the whole-body exposure by a factor 11.

  14. How to Enter, Fly In, and Exit the A-Train Constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The collaborative science obtained from the satellites in the A-Train is an unparalleled success. The constellation framework that has evolved is well-formulated and documented by its international members. Communication between teams is enhanced by a web-based Constellation Coordination System. Safety and correlated observations are ensured by defining independent control boxes with buffers in between. Each mission stays within its control box by regular drag makeup maneuvers. Annual inclination adjustments are coordinated by all missions to maintain their absolute and relative Mean Local Time of Ascending Node (MLTAN). Since the satellites are in different orbit planes their separation involves a three-dimensional triad made up of the along track separations, reference groundtracks and MLTAN's. For further safety, a Constellation Envelope has been defined to determine safe entry and exit orbits.

  15. Initial validation of a training program focused on laparoscopic radical nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enciso, S; Díaz-Güemes, I; Serrano, Á; Bachiller, J; Rioja, J; Usón, J; Sánchez-Margallo, F M

    2016-05-01

    To assess a training model focused on laparoscopic nephrectomy. 16 residents participated in the study, who attended a training program with a theoretical session (1hour) and a dry (7hours) and a wet lab (13hours). During animal training, the first and last nephrectomies were assessed through the completion time and the global rating scale "Objective and Structured Assessment of Technical Skills" (OSATS). Before and after the course, they performed 3 tasks on the virtual reality simulator LAPMentor (1) eye-hand coordination; 2) hand-hand coordination; and 3) transference of objects), registering time and movement metrics. All participants completed a questionnaire related to the training components on a 5-point rating scale. The participants performed the last nephrectomy faster (P<.001) and with higher OSATS scores (P<.001). After the course, they completed the LAPMentor tasks faster (P<.05). The number of movements decreased in all tasks (1) P<.001, 2) P<.05, and 3) P<.05), and the path length in tasks 1 (P<.05) and 2 (P<.05). The movement speeds increased in tasks 2 (P<.001) and 3 (P<.001). With regards to the questionnaire, the usefulness of the animal training and the necessity of training on them prior to their laparoscopic clinical practice were the questions with the highest score (4.92±.28). The combination of physical simulation and animal training constitute an effective training model for improving basic and advanced skills for laparoscopic nephrectomy. The component preferred by the urology residents was the animal training. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Water balance and ad libitum water intake in football players during a training session

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Diego Hernández-Camacho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is known that hydration plays a crucial performance in sports performance. But a great number of studies assessing hydration during football practice have shown that many players have a dehydration state prior to this sport and that most players are not able to replace water loss by sweating with ad libitum water intake. Objectives: To analyze ad libitum water consumption, water balance, thirst sensation and rate of perceived exertion on a sample of young football players during a training session. Material and Methods: A total of 57 players from three teams in the youth category voluntary participated in this study. Weight was collected at the beginning and at the end of training; thirst sensation, rate of perceived exertion and quantification of ingested water were assessed. We used descriptive statistics, correlational and ratio analysis. Results: Mean global intake of players studied was 844.74±351.95mL and an average loss of body water 1274.56±385.82mL. Average rate of dehydration of the initial weight was 0.63%. Average score of 2.81±1.32 on the scale of thirst sensation was obtained. Discussion and conclusions: Rate of loss of body water similar to previous studies is obtained. The players were not able to replace water loss by drinking liquid ad libitum, so the intake of an amount previously scheduled could become helpful.

  17. Professional development as seen by children’s education teachers in a training-research context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Regina Brostolin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents part of a broader research developed between July 2010 and October 2013 and proposes an analysis of the professional development of four children’s education teachers participating in a training-research group. The resource used to give support to the reflections was the production of (auto biographical narratives stimulated by mnemonic resources such as photos, films, objects, etc. The analysis reflects their formative journeys and professional development. The fragments analyzed showed the progress of the teachers, from getting to know the school as a space for learning and professional development, remembering moments of initial training, teaching initiation and, later, investing in their career by means of new courses, lato and strictu sensu. The narratives also show that the teachers are aware of their obligation and of the complexity involved in educating a child universally, and of their vulnerability, as well as of the need for constructing their specific professional life that integrates knowledge on childhood in the 21st century.

  18. A-Train Observations of Stratosphere-Troposphere Exchange During 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, D. E.; McMillan, W. W.; Osterman, G.; Livesey, N.; Browell, E.; Irion, F. W.

    2007-12-01

    Studies of jet stream and frontal boundary dynamics with atmospheric tracer measurements provide insight to the coupled stratosphere-troposphere system. A-Train satellite instruments possess the horizontal and vertical resolution along with temporal and spatial coincidence necessary to identify stratospheric intrusions, investigate their three-dimensional structure, and estimate cross-tropopause exchange. We present results from our analysis of tropospheric chemistry and dynamics using AIRS and Aura instruments to observe stratospheric intrusions along the polar jet during the 2006 Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment Phase B (INTEX-B) field experiment. Focusing on April-May 2006, we explore the temporal and spatial evolution of STE events over the Pacific Ocean originating off the eastern coast of China and traveling along the storm track to the North American west coast. With the broad swath of AIRS and the higher vertical resolution of Aura instruments like TES, ozone and water vapor retrievals show typical features of stratosphere-troposphere exchange in the UTLS near dominant meteorological structures. Analyses of in-situ and aircraft remote sensing measurements of these trace gases compare well with the satellite observations.

  19. Running safety analysis of a train on the Tsing Ma Bridge under turbulent winds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Weiwei; Xia He; Xu Youlin

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic responses of the Tsing Ma suspension bridge and the running behaviors of trains on the bridge under turbulent wind actions are analyzed by a three-dimensional wind-train-bridge interaction model. This model consists of a spatial finite element bridge model, a train model composed of eight 4-axle identical coaches of 27 degrees-of-freedom, and a turbulent wind model. The fluctuating wind forces, including the buffeting forces and the self-excited forces, act on the bridge only, since the train runs inside the bridge deck. The dynamic responses of the bridge are calculated and some results are compared with data measured from Typhoon York. The runnability of the train passing through the Tsing Ma suspension bridge at different speeds is researched under turbulent winds with different wind velocities. Then, the threshold curve of wind velocity for ensuring the running safety of the train in the bridge deck is proposed, from which the allowable train speed at different wind velocities can be determined. The numerical results show that rail traffic on the Tsing Ma suspension bridge should be closed as the mean wind velocity reaches 30 m/s.

  20. A multi-method evaluation of a training course on dual diagnosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rani, S

    2012-08-01

    A training course on dual diagnosis was developed within the Irish forensic mental health service, to bridge the gap in the lack of training on dual diagnosis in Ireland. The course was designed for service providers within mental health and addiction services. Twenty participants involving nursing, social work, police and social welfare disciplines attended the first training course. A mixed methodology research design was adapted to describe participants\\' evaluation of the training course. Data were collected using multiple methods: pre- and post-test, daily evaluation and focus group interviews. Quantitative data were analysed using the spss Version 16.0 and qualitative data were analysed thematically. Findings from the pre- and post-test suggest an increase in participants\\' knowledge of dual diagnosis and an increase in confidence in conducting groups. Daily evaluation indicates that the course content largely met participants\\' needs. Finally, three themes emerged from the focus group interview: increased confidence, the training course\\/teaching methods and personal\\/organizational challenges. This study implies that service providers within mental health and addiction services benefit from inter-professional, needs and skills based courses incorporating a variety of teaching methods. The way forward for future dual diagnosis training course developments would be working in partnership with service users and carers.

  1. A training platform for many-dimensional prosthetic devices using a virtual reality environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putrino, David; Wong, Yan T; Weiss, Adam; Pesaran, Bijan

    2015-04-15

    Brain machine interfaces (BMIs) have the potential to assist in the rehabilitation of millions of patients worldwide. Despite recent advancements in BMI technology for the restoration of lost motor function, a training environment to restore full control of the anatomical segments of an upper limb extremity has not yet been presented. Here, we develop a virtual upper limb prosthesis with 27 independent dimensions, the anatomical dimensions of the human arm and hand, and deploy the virtual prosthesis as an avatar in a virtual reality environment (VRE) that can be controlled in real-time. The prosthesis avatar accepts kinematic control inputs that can be captured from movements of the arm and hand as well as neural control inputs derived from processed neural signals. We characterize the system performance under kinematic control using a commercially available motion capture system. We also present the performance under kinematic control achieved by two non-human primates (Macaca Mulatta) trained to use the prosthetic avatar to perform reaching and grasping tasks. This is the first virtual prosthetic device that is capable of emulating all the anatomical movements of a healthy upper limb in real-time. Since the system accepts both neural and kinematic inputs for a variety of many-dimensional skeletons, we propose it provides a customizable training platform for the acquisition of many-dimensional neural prosthetic control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Vibration analysis of concrete bridges during a train pass-by using various models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Wang, Ke; Cheng, Shili; Li, Wuqian; Song, Xiaodong

    2016-09-01

    The vibration of a bridge must be determined in order to predict the bridge noise during a train pass-by. It can be generally solved with different models either in the time domain or the frequency domain. The computation cost and accuracy of these models vary a lot in a wide frequency band. This study aims to compare the results obtained from various models for recommending the most suitable model in further noise prediction. First, train-track-bridge models in the time domain are developed by using the finite element method and mode superposition method. The rails are modeled by Timoshenko beam elements and the bridge is respectively modeled by shell elements and volume elements. Second, power flow models for the coupled system are established in the frequency domain. The rails are modelled by infinite Timoshenko beams and the bridge is respectively represented by three finite element models, an infinite Kirchhoff plate, and an infinite Mindlin plate model. The vibration at given locations of the bridge and the power input to the bridges through the rail fasteners are calculated using these models. The results show that the shear deformation of the bridge deck has significant influences on the bridge vibration at medium-to-high frequencies. The Mindlin plate model can be used to represent the U-shaped girder to obtain the power input to the bridge with high accuracy and efficiency.

  3. A Training Method to Improve Police Use of Force Decision Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith P. Andersen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Police safety and use of force decisions during critical incidents are an ongoing source of concern for both police practitioners and the public. Prior research in the area of police performance reveals that psychological and physiological stress responses during critical incidents can shape the outcome of the incident, either positively or negatively. The goal of this study was to test a training method to improve use of force decision making among police. This randomized controlled pilot study consisted of training officers to apply techniques to enhance psychological and physiological control during stressful critical incidents. Of a pool of 80 police officers, potential participants were invited based on equivalent age, years of experience, physiological characteristics (i.e., body mass index [BMI] and cardiovascular reactivity, and expertise. Results revealed that the intervention group displayed significantly better physiological control, situational awareness, and overall performance, and made a greater number of correct use of force decisions than officers in the control group (all ps < .01. The relevant improvements in use of force decision-making found in this pilot study indicate that this training method warrants further investigation. Improved use of force decision making directly translates into potential lifesaving decisions for police and the civilians they are working with.

  4. Aerodynamic Optimization of the Nose Shape of a Train Using the Adjoint Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Munoz-Paniagua

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The adjoint method is used in this paper for the aerodynamic optimization of the nose shape of a train. This method has been extensively applied in aircraft or ground vehicle aerodynamic optimization, but is still in progress in train aerodynamics. Here we consider this innovative optimization method and present its application to reduce the aerodynamic drag when the train is subjected to front wind. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method, highlighting the requirements, limitations and capabilities of it. Furthermore, a significant reduction of the aerodynamic drag in a short number of solver calls is aimed as well. The independence of the computational cost with respect to the number of design variables that define the optimal candidate is stressed as the most interesting characteristic of the adjoint method. This behavior permits a more complete modification of the shape of the train nose because the number of design variables is not a constraint anymore. The information obtained from the sensitivity field permits determining the regions of the geometry where a small modification of the nose shape might introduce a larger improvement of the train performance. A good agreement between this information and the successive geometry modifications is observed here.

  5. Transmission of Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) Virus in a Train in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Fuqiang; Luo, Huiming; Zhou, Lei; Yin, Dapeng; Zheng, Canjun; Wang, Dingming; Gong, Jian; Fang, Gang; He, Jianfeng; McFarland, Jeffrey; Yu, Hongjie

    2011-01-01

    Background Pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus emerged in North America in April 2009 and spread globally. We describe the epidemiology and public health response to the first known outbreak of 2009 H1N1 in a train, which occurred in June 2009 in China. Methods After 2 provinces provided initial reports of 2009 H1N1 infection in 2 persons who had travelled on the same train, we conducted a retrospective epidemiologic investigation to collect information from the passengers, crew members, contacts, and health care providers. We explored the source of infection and possible routes of transmission in the train. All cases were confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction testing. Results Train #1223 traveled 40 hours, made 28 stops in 4 Chinese provinces, and boarded 2555 passengers, who logged a total of 59 144 person-hours of travel time. Nineteen confirmed 2009 H1N1 cases were identified. Of these, 13 were infected and developed symptoms on the train and 6 occurred among contacts who developed illness during medical monitoring. In addition, 3 asymptomatic cases were identified based on RT-PCR testing of respiratory swabs from contacts. The attack rate among contacts of confirmed cases in the same car was higher than that among contacts in other cars (3.15% vs. 0%, P train. Trains may have played an important role in the 2009 influenza pandemic. PMID:21646746

  6. EFFECT OF A TRAINING PROGRAM ON THE IMPROVEMENT OF BASKETBALL PLAYERS' DECISION MAKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Alarc\\u00F3n

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyse whether a tactical training program based on a constructivist model can improve decision making related to keeping control of the ball for a men's senior basketball team composed of ten players. The dependent variables were: player distribution around the ball, and achieving support on both sides of the ball at an effective passing distance. Data collection was made through observational analysis utilizing a previously validated tool. A pretest-posttest design without a control group was used. Results demonstrated an improvement in decision making after the posttest for both the number of support players near the player with the ball, as it increased from 85% in the pretest to 100% in the posttest, and the number of collective or team actions around the player with the ball (from 5% to 76.5% with highly significant differences. The primary conclusion is that a training program for teaching team tactics based on a constructivist model has a positive influence on players' capability to facilitate the pass to their teammates.

  7. A Training Strategy for Learning Pattern Recognition Control for Myoelectric Prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Michael A; Thakor, Nitish V

    2013-01-01

    Pattern recognition-based control of myoelectric prostheses offers amputees a natural, intuitive way of controlling the increasing functionality of modern myoelectric prostheses. While this approach to prosthesis control is certainly attractive, it is a significant departure from existing control methods. The transition from the more traditional methods of direct or proportional control to pattern recognition-based control presents a training challenge that will be unique to each amputee. In this paper we describe specific ways that a transradial amputee, prosthetist, and occupational therapist team can overcome these challenges by developing consistent and distinguishable muscle patterns. A central part of this process is the employment of a computer-based pattern recognition training system with which an amputee can learn and improve pattern recognition skills throughout the process of prosthesis fitting and testing. We describe in detail the manner in which four transradial amputees trained to improve their pattern recognition-based control of a virtual prosthesis by focusing on building consistent, distinguishable muscle patterns. We also describe a three-phase framework for instruction and training: 1) initial demonstration and conceptual instruction, 2) in-clinic testing and initial training, and 3) at-home training.

  8. A multi-method evaluation of a training course on dual diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, S; Byrne, H

    2012-08-01

    A training course on dual diagnosis was developed within the Irish forensic mental health service, to bridge the gap in the lack of training on dual diagnosis in Ireland. The course was designed for service providers within mental health and addiction services. Twenty participants involving nursing, social work, police and social welfare disciplines attended the first training course. A mixed methodology research design was adapted to describe participants' evaluation of the training course. Data were collected using multiple methods: pre- and post-test, daily evaluation and focus group interviews. Quantitative data were analysed using the spss Version 16.0 and qualitative data were analysed thematically. Findings from the pre- and post-test suggest an increase in participants' knowledge of dual diagnosis and an increase in confidence in conducting groups. Daily evaluation indicates that the course content largely met participants' needs. Finally, three themes emerged from the focus group interview: increased confidence, the training course/teaching methods and personal/organizational challenges. This study implies that service providers within mental health and addiction services benefit from inter-professional, needs and skills based courses incorporating a variety of teaching methods. The way forward for future dual diagnosis training course developments would be working in partnership with service users and carers.

  9. Moral Dilemmas in a Military Context. a Case Study of a Train the Trainer Course on Military Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Baarle, Eva; Bosch, Jolanda; Widdershoven, Guy; Verweij, Desiree; Molewijk, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Moral competence is important for soldiers who have to deal with complex moral dilemmas in practice. However, openly dealing with moral dilemmas and showing moral competence is not always easy within the culture of a military organization. In this article, based on analysis of experiences during a train the trainer course on military ethics, we…

  10. Moral Dilemmas in a Military Context. a Case Study of a Train the Trainer Course on Military Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Baarle, Eva; Bosch, Jolanda; Widdershoven, Guy; Verweij, Desiree; Molewijk, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Moral competence is important for soldiers who have to deal with complex moral dilemmas in practice. However, openly dealing with moral dilemmas and showing moral competence is not always easy within the culture of a military organization. In this article, based on analysis of experiences during a train the trainer course on military ethics, we…

  11. Management of Information Services. Reports and Papers of a Training Course (Arusha, Tanzania, April 11-22, 1988).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musana, A., Ed.; And Others

    These reports and papers from a training course which brought together information services professionals from Uganda, Tanzania, Kenya, the Sudan, Ethiopia, Malawi, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Lesotho, Botswana, and Swaziland address the following topics: (1) information systems analysis; (2) the state of the art in bibliographic control in Eastern and…

  12. A Training Programme on Managing Science Class Interactions: Its Impact on Teachers' Practises and on Their Pupils' Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morge, Ludovic; Toczek, Marie-Christine; Chakroun, Nadia

    2010-01-01

    This research evaluates the impact of a training programme on trainee physics and chemistry teachers, focusing on the way pupils' explanations are dealt with during teacher-pupil interaction. The population is composed of 10 teachers and 303 pupils, from which the experimental sample was taken (8 teachers and 172 pupils). The qualitative analysis…

  13. The Effect of a Training Programme in Creativity on Developing the Creative Abilities among Children with Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dababneh, Kholoud A.; al-Masa'deh, Mu'tasem M.; Oliemat, Enass M.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of a training programme in creativity on developing creative abilities among 9-10-year-old children with visual impairment in Jordan. The study sample consisted of 41 students from fourth and fifth grades, who were randomly selected and divided into two experimental groups and two control groups. To…

  14. Information Technology Infusion Case Study: Integrating Google Earth(Trademark) into the A-Train Data Depot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter; Kempler, Steven; Leptoukh, Gregory; Chen, Aijun

    2010-01-01

    This poster paper represents the NASA funded project that was to employ the latest three dimensional visualization technology to explore and provide direct data access to heterogeneous A-Train datasets. Google Earth (tm) provides foundation for organizing, visualizing, publishing and synergizing Earth science data .

  15. Requesting wrist radiographs in emergency department triage: developing a training program and diagnostic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streppa, Joanna; Schneidman, Valerie; Biron, Alain D

    2014-01-01

    Crowding is extremely problematic in Canada, as the emergency department (ED) utilization is considerably higher than in any other country. Consequently, an increase has been noted in waiting times for patients who present with injuries of lesser acuity such as wrist injuries. Wrist fractures are the most common broken bone in patients younger than 65 years. Many nurses employed within EDs are requesting wrist radiographs for patients who present with wrist complaints as a norm within their working practice. Significant potential advantages can ensue if EDs adopt a triage nurse-requested radiographic protocol; patients can benefit from a significant time-saving of 36% in ED length of stay (M. Lindley-Jones & B. J Finlayson, 2000)— when nurses initiated radiographs in triage. In addition, the literature suggests that increased rates of patient and staff satisfaction may be achieved, without compromising quality of radiographic request or quality of service (W. Parris,S. McCarthy, A. M. Kelly, & S. Richardson, 1997). Studies have shown that nurses are capable of requesting appropriate radiographs on the basis of a preset protocol. As there are no standardized set of rules for assessing patients, presenting with suspected wrist fractures, a training program as well as a diagnostic algorithm was developed to prepare emergency nurses to appropriately request wrist radiographs. The triage nurse-specific training program includes the following topics: wrist anatomy and physiology, commonly occurring wrist injuries, mechanisms of injury, physical assessment techniques, and types of radiographic images required. The triage nurse algorithm includes the clinical decision-making process. Providing triage nurses with up-to-date evidence-based educational material not only allowed triage nurses to independently assess and request wrist radiographs for patients with potential wrist fractures but also strengthening the link between competent nursing care and better patient

  16. Effectiveness of a training programme to improve hand hygiene compliance in primary healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Ferradal Inmaculada

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hand hygiene is the most effective measure for preventing infections related to healthcare, and its impact on the reduction of these infections is estimated at 50%. Non-compliance has been highlighted in several studies in hospitals, although none have been carried out in primary healthcare. Main objective To evaluated the effect of a "Hand Hygiene for the reduction of healthcare-associated infections" training program for primary healthcare workers, measured by variation from correct hand hygiene compliance, according to regulatory and specific criteria, 6 months after the baseline, in the intervention group (group receiving a training program and in the control group (a usual clinical practice. Secondary objectives -To describe knowledges, attitudes and behaviors as regards hand hygiene among the professionals, and their possible association with "professional burnout", stratifying the results by type of group (intervention and usual clinical practice. -To estimate the logistic regression model that best explains hand hygiene compliance. Methods/Design Experimental study of parallel groups, with a control group, and random assignment by Health Center. Area of study.- Health centers in north-eastern Madrid (Spain. Sample studied.- Healthcare workers (physicians, odontostomatologists, pediatricians, nurses, dental hygienists, midwife and nursing auxiliaries. Intervention.- A hand hygiene training program, including a theoretical-practical workshop, provision of alcohol-based solutions and a reminder strategy in the workplace. Other variables: sociodemographic and professional knowledges, attitudes, and behaviors with regard to hand hygiene. Statistical Analysis: descriptive and inferential, using multivariate methods (covariance analysis and logistic regression. Discussion This study will provide valuable information on the prevalence of hand hygiene non-compliance, and improve healthcare.

  17. Maintaining nutrition in aged care residents with a train-the-trainer intervention and Nutrition Coordinator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskill, D; Isenring, E A; Black, L J; Hassall, S; Bauer, J D

    2009-12-01

    To investigate the impact of a train-the-trainer program on the nutritional status of older people in residential care. Prospective, randomized controlled study. Eight nursing homes in Southeast Queensland, Australia. A total of 352 residents participated - 245 were female (69.6%). The mean age was 84.2 years and the majority (79.4%) were classified as high dependency. Residents from four nursing homes were randomly selected for a nutrition education program coordinated by Nutrition Coordinators. Residents from the other four nursing homes (control) received usual care. The Subjective Global Assessment was used to determine prevalence of malnutrition at baseline and six months post intervention. The Resident Classification Scale measured functional dependency. Prescribed diet, fluids, oral hygiene status and allied health referrals were obtained by chart audit. Approximately half the residents were well nourished with 49.4% moderately or severely malnourished. Residents in the intervention group were more likely to maintain or improve their nutritional status compared with the control group who were more likely to experience a deterioration (P=0.027). The odds of the control group being malnourished post test was 1.6 times more likely compared with the intervention group but this did not reach statistical significance (P=0.1). The results of the study encourage the implementation of a Nutrition Coordinator program to maintain nutritional status of aged care residents. Nevertheless, malnutrition rates continue to be unacceptably high. In a rapidly aging society, the aged care sector needs to confront malnutrition and provide better resources for staff to take measures against this problem.

  18. Global Variability of Mesoscale Convective System Anvil Structure from A-Train Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jian; Houze, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) in the tropics produce extensive anvil clouds, which significantly affect the transfer of radiation. This study develops an objective method to identify MCSs and their anvils by combining data from three A-train satellite instruments: Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for cloud-top size and coldness, Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) for rain area size and intensity, and CloudSat for horizontal and vertical dimensions of anvils. The authors distinguish three types of MCSs: small and large separated MCSs and connected MCSs. The latter are MCSs sharing a contiguous rain area. Mapping of the objectively identified MCSs shows patterns of MCSs that are consistent with previous studies of tropical convection, with separated MCSs dominant over Africa and the Amazon regions and connected MCSs favored over the warm pool of the Indian and west Pacific Oceans. By separating the anvil from the raining regions of MCSs, this study leads to quantitative global maps of anvil coverage. These maps are consistent with the MCS analysis, and they lay the foundation for estimating the global radiative effects of anvil clouds. CloudSat radar data show that the modal thickness of MCS anvils is about 4-5 km. Anvils are mostly confined to within 1.5-2 times the equivalent radii of the primary rain areas of the MCSs. Over the warm pool, they may extend out to about 5 times the rain area radii. The warm ocean MCSs tend to have thicker non-raining and lightly raining anvils near the edges

  19. Evaluation of cloud resolving model simulations of midlatitude cirrus with ARM and A-Train observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlbauer, A. D.; Ackerman, T. P.; Lawson, P.; Xie, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    This paper evaluates cloud resolving model (CRM) and cloud system-resolving model (CSRM) simulations of a midlatitude cirrus case with comprehensive observations collected under the auspices of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program and with spaceborne observations from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) A-train satellites. Vertical profiles of temperature, relative humidity and wind speeds are reasonably well simulated by the CSRM and CRM but there are remaining biases in the temperature, wind speeds and relative humidity, which can be mitigated through nudging the model simulations toward the observed radiosonde profiles. Simulated vertical velocities are underestimated in all simulations except in the CRM simulations with grid spacings of 500m or finer, which suggests that turbulent vertical air motions in cirrus clouds need to be parameterized in GCMs and in CSRM simulations with horizontal grid spacings on the order of 1km. The simulated ice water content and ice number concentrations agree with the observations in the CSRM but are underestimated in the CRM simulations. The underestimation of ice number concentrations is consistent with the overestimation of radar reflectivity in the CRM simulations and suggests that the model produces too many large ice particles especially toward cloud base. Simulated cloud profiles are rather insensitive to perturbations in the initial conditions or the dimensionality of the model domain but the treatment of the forcing data has a considerable effect on the outcome of the model simulations. Despite considerable progress in observations and microphysical parameterizations, simulating the microphysical, macrophysical and radiative properties of cirrus remains challenging. Comparing model simulations with observations from multiple instruments and observational platforms is important for revealing model deficiencies and for providing rigorous benchmarks. However, there still is considerable

  20. Monitoring volcanic systems through cross-correlation of coincident A-Train satellite data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower, V. J. B.; Carn, S. A.; Wright, R.

    2014-12-01

    The remote location and inaccessibility of many active volcanic systems around the world hinders detailed investigation of their eruptive dynamics. One methodology for monitoring such locations is through the utilisation of multiple satellite datasets to elucidate underlying eruption dynamics and aid volcanic hazard mitigation. Whilst satellite datasets are often analysed individually, here we exploit the multi-platform NASA A-Train satellite constellation, including the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on Aura and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on Aqua. OMI measures volcanic emissions (e.g. sulphur dioxide, ash) whilst MODIS enables monitoring of thermal anomalies (e.g. lava flows, lava lakes, pyroclastic deposits), allowing analysis of a more diverse range of volcanic unrest than is possible using a single measurement technique alone, and permitting cross-correlation between datasets for specific locations to assess cyclic activity. A Multi-taper (MTM) Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis was implemented at an initial sample site (Soufriere Hills volcano [SHV], Montserrat) facilitating cycle identification and subsequent comparison with existing ground-based data. Corresponding cycles at intervals of 8, 12 and ~50 days were identified in both the satellite-based SO2 and thermal infrared signals and ground-based SO2 measurements (Nicholson et al. 2013), validating the methodology. Our analysis confirms the potential for identification of cyclical volcanic activity through synergistic analysis of satellite data, which would be of particular value at poorly monitored volcanic systems. Following our initial test at SHV, further sample sites have been selected in locations with varied eruption dynamics and monitoring capabilities including Ambrym (Vanuatu), Kilauea (Hawaii), Nyiragongo (DR Congo) and Etna (Italy) with the intention of identifying not only cyclic signals that can be attributed to volcanic systems but also those which are

  1. Global Variability of Mesoscale Convective System Anvil Structure from A-Train Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jian; Houze, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) in the tropics produce extensive anvil clouds, which significantly affect the transfer of radiation. This study develops an objective method to identify MCSs and their anvils by combining data from three A-train satellite instruments: Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for cloud-top size and coldness, Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) for rain area size and intensity, and CloudSat for horizontal and vertical dimensions of anvils. The authors distinguish three types of MCSs: small and large separated MCSs and connected MCSs. The latter are MCSs sharing a contiguous rain area. Mapping of the objectively identified MCSs shows patterns of MCSs that are consistent with previous studies of tropical convection, with separated MCSs dominant over Africa and the Amazon regions and connected MCSs favored over the warm pool of the Indian and west Pacific Oceans. By separating the anvil from the raining regions of MCSs, this study leads to quantitative global maps of anvil coverage. These maps are consistent with the MCS analysis, and they lay the foundation for estimating the global radiative effects of anvil clouds. CloudSat radar data show that the modal thickness of MCS anvils is about 4-5 km. Anvils are mostly confined to within 1.5-2 times the equivalent radii of the primary rain areas of the MCSs. Over the warm pool, they may extend out to about 5 times the rain area radii. The warm ocean MCSs tend to have thicker non-raining and lightly raining anvils near the edges

  2. Rapid Transpacific Transport in Autumn Observed by the A-Train Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li. Can; Hsu, N. Christina; Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Liang, Qing; Yang, Kai; Tsay, Si-Chee

    2011-01-01

    Transpacific transport of dust and pollutants is well documented for spring, but less so for other seasons. Here we investigate rapid transpacific transport in autumn utilizing the A-train satellites. In three episodes studied as examples, SO2 plumes over East Asia were detected by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument aboard the Aura satellite, and found to reach North America in 5-6 days. They were likely derived from anthropogenic sources, given that identical transport patterns of CO, a tracer for incomplete combustion, were simultaneously observed by the Aqua satellite. Trajectory analysis and meteorological data were employed to explore the meteorological circumstances surrounding these events: like many of their counterparts in spring, all three plumes were lifted to the free troposphere in warm conveyor belt associated with mid-latitude wave cyclones, and their migration to downwind region was regulated by the meteorology over the East Pacific. These cases provide further evidence that a fraction of S02 could escape wet scavenging, and be transported at much greater efficiency than NOx (NO + N02). An analysis of the S02 and CO data from September to November during 2005-2008 found 16 S02 long-range transport episodes, out of 62 Asian outflow events. While the counts are sensitive to the choice of criteria, they suggest that the long-range transport of Asian sulfur species occurs quite frequently, and could exert strong impacts on large downstream areas. This study also highlights the importance of transpacific transport in autumn, which has thus far been rarely studied and deserves more attention from the community.

  3. NASA A-Train and Terra Observations of the 2010 Russian Wildfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, J. C.; Douglass, A. R.; DaSilva, A.; Torres, O.; Levy, R.; Duncan, B. N.

    2011-01-01

    Wildfires raged throughout western Russia and parts of Eastern Europe during a persistent heat wave in the summer of 2010. Anomalously high surface temperatures (35 - 41 C) and low relative humidity (9 - 25 %) from mid- June to mid-August 2010 shown by analysis of radiosonde data from multiple sites in western Russia were ideal conditions for the wildfires to thrive. Measurements of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) over western Russian indicate persistent subsidence during the heat wave. Daily three-day back-trajectories initiated over Moscow reveal a persistent anticyclonic circulation for 18 days in August, coincident with the most intense period of fire activity observed by Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). This unfortunate meteorological coincidence allowed transport of polluted air from the region of intense fires to Moscow and the surrounding area. We demonstrate that the 2010 Russian wildfires are unique in the record of observations obtained by remote-sensing instruments on-board NASA satellites: Aura and Aqua (part of the A-Train Constellation) and Terra. Analysis of the distribution of MODIS fire products and aerosol optical thickness (AOT), UV aerosol index (AI) and single-scattering albedo (SSA) from Aura's Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), and total column carbon monoxide (CO) from Aqua s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) show that the region in the center of western Russia surrounding Moscow (52-58 deg N, 33 -43 deg E) is most severely impacted by wildfire emissions. Over this area, AIRS CO, OMI AI, and MODIS AOT are significantly enhanced relative to the historical satellite record during the first 18 days in August when the anti-cyclonic circulation persisted. By mid-August, the anti-cyclonic circulation was replaced with westerly transport over Moscow and vicinity. The heat wave

  4. PACS: Do clinical users benefit from it as a training adjunct?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J van Heerden

    2011-06-01

    as a training adjunct included the frustrations associated with PACS downtime (especially during the period in 2009 when many electrical power cuts were experienced nationwide, resulting in network interruptions and slow image retrieval during peak work-flow times. The advantages of PACS as a positive training adjunct were highlighted in the areas of multi-site viewing and consultation, the possibility of image manipulation and measurement tools, and better overall image quality. Clinicians felt that their training experience was also enhanced because of better patient follow-up made possible by access to all previous radiological imaging of a particular patient. Of the clinicians who completed the questionnaires, 63.5% felt that the PACS at Steve Biko Academic Hospital contributed positively to their training by creating more overall learning opportunities than other training environments without a PACS.

  5. NASA A-Train and Terra observations of the 2010 Russian wildfires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Witte

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Wildfires raged throughout western Russia and parts of Eastern Europe during a persistent heat wave in the summer of 2010. Anomalously high surface temperatures (35–41 °C and low relative humidity (9–25 % from mid-June to mid-August 2010 shown by analysis of radiosonde data from multiple sites in western Russia were ideal conditions for the wildfires to thrive. Measurements of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS over western Russian indicate persistent subsidence during the heat wave. Daily three-day back-trajectories initiated over Moscow reveal a persistent anti-cyclonic circulation for 18 days in August, coincident with the most intense period of fire activity observed by Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS. This unfortunate meteorological coincidence allowed transport of polluted air from the region of intense fires to Moscow and the surrounding area. We demonstrate that the 2010 Russian wildfires are unique in the record of observations obtained by remote-sensing instruments on-board NASA satellites: Aura and Aqua (part of the A-Train Constellation and Terra. Analysis of the distribution of MODIS fire products and aerosol optical thickness (AOT, UV aerosol index (AI and single-scattering albedo (SSA from Aura's Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI, and total column carbon monoxide (CO from Aqua's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS show that the region in the center of western Russia surrounding Moscow (52°–58° N, 33°–43° E is most severely impacted by wildfire emissions. Over this area, AIRS CO, OMI AI, and MODIS AOT are significantly enhanced relative to the historical satellite record during the first 18 days in August when the anti-cyclonic circulation persisted. By mid-August, the anti-cyclonic circulation was replaced with westerly transport over Moscow and vicinity. The heat wave ended as anomalies of surface temperature and relative humidity, and OLR disappeared

  6. NASA A-Train and Terra observations of the 2010 Russian wildfires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Witte

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Wildfires raged throughout western Russia and parts of Eastern Europe during a persistent heat wave in the summer of 2010. Anomalously high surface temperatures (35–41 °C and low relative humidity (9–25 % from mid-June to mid-August 2010 shown by analysis of radiosonde data from multiple sites in western Russia were ideal conditions for the wildfires to thrive. Measurements of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS over western Russian indicate persistent subsidence during the heat wave. Daily three-day back-trajectories initiated over Moscow reveal a persistent anti-cyclonic circulation for 18 days in August, coincident with the most intense period of fire activity observed by Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS. This unfortunate meteorological coincidence allowed transport of polluted air from the region of intense fires to Moscow and the surrounding area. We demonstrate that the 2010 Russian wildfires are unique in the record of observations obtained by remote-sensing instruments on-board NASA satellites: Aura and Aqua (part of the A-Train Constellation and Terra. Analysis of the distribution of MODIS fire products and aerosol optical thickness (AOT, UV aerosol index (AI and single-scattering albedo (SSA from Aura's Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI, and total column carbon monoxide (CO from Aqua's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS show that the region in the center of western Russia surrounding Moscow (52°–58° N, 33°–43° E is most severely impacted by wildfire emissions. Over this area, AIRS CO, OMI AI, and MODIS AOT are significantly enhanced relative to the historical satellite record during the first 18 days in August when the anti-cyclonic circulation persisted. By mid-August, the anti-cyclonic circulation was replaced with westerly transport over Moscow and vicinity. The heat wave ended as anomalies of surface temperature and relative humidity, and OLR disappeared

  7. Assessment of laparoscopic skills of Gynecology and Obstetrics residents after a training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Carla Ferreira Kikuchi; Ruano, José Maria Cordeiro; Kati, Lea Mina; Noguti, Alberto Sinhiti; Girão, Manoel João Batista Castello; Sartori, Marair Gracio Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate laparoscopic skills of third-year Gynecology and Obstetrics residents after training at a training and surgical experimentation center. Use of a prospective questionnaire analyzing demographic data, medical residency, skills, competences, and training in a box trainer and in pigs. After the training, there was significant improvement in laparoscopic skills according to the residents (before 1.3/after 2.7; p=0.000) and preceptors (before 2.1/after 4.8; p=0.000). There was also significant improvement in the feeling of competence in surgeries with level 1 and 2 of difficulty. All residents approved the training. The training was distributed into 12 hours in the box trainer and 20 hours in animals, and led to better laparoscopic skills and a feeling of more surgical competence in laparoscopic surgery levels 1 and 2. Avaliar a habilidade laparoscópica dos residentes do terceiro ano de residência médica em Ginecologia e Obstetrícia após treinamento em um centro de treinamento e experimentação cirúrgica. Aplicação de questionário de forma prospectiva analisando dados demográficos, da residência médica, da habilidade, da competência e do treinamento em caixa preta e em porcas. Após o treinamento, houve melhora da habilidade em laparoscopia de forma significativa na avaliação dos residentes (antes 1,3/depois 2,7; p=0,000) e preceptores (antes 2,1/depois 4,8; p=0,000). Houve melhora significativa na sensação de competência em cirurgias de níveis 1 e 2 de dificuldade. Todos os residentes aprovaram o treinamento. O treinamento dividido em 12 horas de caixa preta e 20 horas em animais trouxe melhora na habilidade em laparoscopia e na sensação de melhora na competência cirúrgica em cirurgias laparoscópicas de níveis 1 e 2.

  8. Detection of multi-layer and vertically-extended clouds using A-train sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Joiner

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The detection of multiple cloud layers using satellite observations is important for retrieval algorithms as well as climate applications. In this paper, we describe a relatively simple algorithm to detect multiple cloud layers and distinguish them from vertically-extended clouds. The algorithm can be applied to coincident passive sensors that derive both cloud-top pressure from the thermal infrared observations and an estimate of solar photon pathlength from UV, visible, or near-IR measurements. Here, we use data from the A-train afternoon constellation of satellites: cloud-top pressure, cloud optical thickness, the multi-layer flag from the Aqua MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS and the optical centroid cloud pressure from the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI. For the first time, we use data from the CloudSat radar to evaluate the results of a multi-layer cloud detection scheme. The cloud classification algorithms applied with different passive sensor configurations compare well with each other as well as with data from CloudSat. We compute monthly mean fractions of pixels containing multi-layer and vertically-extended clouds for January and July 2007 at the OMI spatial resolution (12 km×24 km at nadir and at the 5 km×5 km MODIS resolution used for infrared cloud retrievals. There are seasonal variations in the spatial distribution of the different cloud types. The fraction of cloudy pixels containing distinct multi-layer cloud is a strong function of the pixel size. Globally averaged, these fractions are approximately 20% and 10% for OMI and MODIS, respectively. These fractions may be significantly higher or lower depending upon location. There is a much smaller resolution dependence for fractions of pixels containing vertically-extended clouds (~20% for OMI and slightly less for MODIS globally, suggesting larger spatial scales for these clouds. We also find higher fractions of vertically-extended clouds over land as

  9. Workplace health promotion: analysis of actions proposed by graduates of a training course (2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francielle Bertusso

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The incorporation of the workers knowledge in the actions of health promotion and prevention can strengthen the search for better working conditions and the protection of workers' health. This bibliographic study aimed to analyze, from the theoretical framework of occupational health, the actions proposed by graduates of a training course for health promotion for healthcare workers in 2012. Of the 221 projects analyzed, 1Enfermeira, aluna especial do Programa de Mestrado em Biociências e Saúde da Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Paraná, campus de Cascavel. E-mail: franbertusso@hotmail.com 2 Doutora em Saúde Coletiva, Professora adjunta do Curso de Enfermagem do Centro de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde da Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Paraná, campus de Cascavel, Pr. 3 Enfermeiro da Secretaria de Estado da Saúde do Paraná - SESA. Aluno especial do Programa de Mestrado em Biociências e Saúde da Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Paraná, Campus de Cascavel, Pr. 4 Doutora em Enfermargem pela Universidade de São Paulo. Professora do Programa de Mestrado em Biociências e Saúde do Centro de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde da Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Paraná, campus de Cascavel health workers were the priority target audience (84%, as well as managers (12%, from various regions of the country with a predominance of proposals from the southeast region (107 projects and northeast region (55 projects, and in several workplace activities. Program proposals attempted to solve or minimize three sets of problems: a related to the work environment, b labor management and c the workers' health. Examination of the proposals pointed to a working reality permeated by incidents of accidents by exposure to biological material, ionizing radiation, needlestick and sharps injuries, and injuries related to musculoskeletal overload, mental health and mental and behavioral disorder such as depression, alcoholism, stress, burnout and moral

  10. Effects of a training program after surgically treated ankle fracture: a prospective randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekdahl Charlotte S

    2009-09-01

    out of nine outcome measures showed a difference, the beneficial effect from an additional standardised individually suited training program can be expected to be limited. There is need for further studies to elucidate how a training program should be designed to increase and optimise function in patients middle-aged or older. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ACTRN12609000327280

  11. Detection of Multi-Layer and Vertically-Extended Clouds Using A-Train Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, J.; Vasilkov, A. P.; Bhartia, P. K.; Wind, G.; Platnick, S.; Menzel, W. P.

    2010-01-01

    The detection of mUltiple cloud layers using satellite observations is important for retrieval algorithms as well as climate applications. In this paper, we describe a relatively simple algorithm to detect multiple cloud layers and distinguish them from vertically-extended clouds. The algorithm can be applied to coincident passive sensors that derive both cloud-top pressure from the thermal infrared observations and an estimate of solar photon pathlength from UV, visible, or near-IR measurements. Here, we use data from the A-train afternoon constellation of satellites: cloud-top pressure, cloud optical thickness, the multi-layer flag from the Aqua MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the optical centroid cloud pressure from the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). For the first time, we use data from the CloudSat radar to evaluate the results of a multi-layer cloud detection scheme. The cloud classification algorithms applied with different passive sensor configurations compare well with each other as well as with data from CloudSat. We compute monthly mean fractions of pixels containing multi-layer and vertically-extended clouds for January and July 2007 at the OMI spatial resolution (l2kmx24km at nadir) and at the 5kmx5km MODIS resolution used for infrared cloud retrievals. There are seasonal variations in the spatial distribution of the different cloud types. The fraction of cloudy pixels containing distinct multi-layer cloud is a strong function of the pixel size. Globally averaged, these fractions are approximately 20% and 10% for OMI and MODIS, respectively. These fractions may be significantly higher or lower depending upon location. There is a much smaller resolution dependence for fractions of pixels containing vertically-extended clouds (approx.20% for OMI and slightly less for MODIS globally), suggesting larger spatial scales for these clouds. We also find higher fractions of vertically-extended clouds over land as compared with

  12. The North Dakota Mental Health and Aging Education Project: Curriculum Design and Training Outcomes for a Train-the-Trainer Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Margaret A.; Chromy, Barbara; Philbrick, Candace A.; Sanders, Gregory F.; Muske, Kara L.; Bratteli, Marlys

    2009-01-01

    A training curriculum on mental health and aging was developed and disseminated to 32 natural caregivers throughout a frontier state using a train-the-trainer model. Those certified as trainers included social workers, religious professionals, volunteers, long-term care employees, nurses, home health workers, and professional and informal…

  13. The North Dakota Mental Health and Aging Education Project: Curriculum Design and Training Outcomes for a Train-the-Trainer Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Margaret A.; Chromy, Barbara; Philbrick, Candace A.; Sanders, Gregory F.; Muske, Kara L.; Bratteli, Marlys

    2009-01-01

    A training curriculum on mental health and aging was developed and disseminated to 32 natural caregivers throughout a frontier state using a train-the-trainer model. Those certified as trainers included social workers, religious professionals, volunteers, long-term care employees, nurses, home health workers, and professional and informal…

  14. DYNAMICS OF TECHNICAL ELEMENTS TEACHING WIHIN A TRAINING MEZZO-CYCLE IN WOMEN’S ARTISTIC GYMNASTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    POTOP Vladimir

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper is meant to point out the contents of the technical elements teaching at different apparatus within a training mezzo-cycle in women’s artistic gymnastics. With this aim in view, we have considered that the efficient use of the preparatory exercises during the training sessions will emphasize the dynamics of the technical elements teaching at various apparatus in women’s artistic gymnastics

  15. Triggering and guiding electric discharge by a train of UV picosecond pulses combined with a long UV pulse

    CERN Document Server

    Ionin, A A; Levchenko, A O; Seleznev, L V; Shutov, A V; Sinitsyn, D V; Smetanin, I V; Ustinovsky, N N; Zvorykin, V D

    2012-01-01

    Non-self-sustained electric discharge and electric breakdown were triggered and guided by a train of picosecond UV pulses overlapped with a long free-running UV pulse of a hybrid Ti:Sapphire-KrF laser facility. Photocurrent sustained by this train is two orders of magnitude higher, and electric breakdown distance is twice longer than those for the discharge triggered by the long UV pulse only.

  16. Forest Canopy Height Estimation from Calipso Lidar Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaomei; Hu, Yongxiang; Lucker, Patricia L.; Trepte, Charles

    2016-06-01

    The canopy height is an important parameter in aboveground biomass estimation. Lidar remote sensing from airborne or satellite platforms, has a unique capability for forestry applications. This study introduces an innovative concept to estimate canopy height using CALIOP two wavelengths lidar measurements. One main advantage is that the concept proposed here is dependent on the penetration depths at two wavelengths without making assumption about the last peak of waveform as the ground location, and it does not require the ancillary Digital Elevation Model (DEM) data in order to obtain the slope information of terrain. Canopy penetration depths at two wavelengths indicate moderately strong relationships for estimating the canopy height. Results show that the CALIOP-derived canopy heights were highly correlated with the ICESat/GLAS-derived values with a mean RMSE of 3.4 m and correlation coefficient (R) of 0.89. Our findings present a relationship between the penetration difference and canopy height, which can be used as another metrics for canopy height estimation, except the full waveforms.

  17. Implementation of a training program to improve pharmacy services for high-risk neonatal and maternal populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Mary E; Jakubecz, Michael A; Link, Nicholas A

    2013-01-15

    A training program aimed at increasing pharmacists' role in the care of high-risk maternal, neonatal, and pediatric patients is described. In preparation for the planned expansion of a large Ohio hospital's maternal and neonatal critical care services, the pharmacy department developed a training program to increase the knowledge and skill sets of staff pharmacists, especially those who lacked residency training. The program also supported the department's transition to an integrated patient-centered pharmacy practice model. Clinical practice guidelines, policy statements, and other sources were used to develop a series of 57 one-hour lectures on a wide range of topics in maternal-neonatal critical care. The lectures were delivered one morning each week, every other week, over 30 months, with additional case-based homework assigned; a passing score (80%) on all module examinations and homework assignments was required for continued course participation. Trainees who completed the voluntary program earned a certificate from the department head and continuing-education credit from the Ohio State Board of Pharmacy, and they were eligible to engage in expanded rounding and patient counseling activities. The program appeared to have a positive impact on patient satisfaction and efforts to reduce medication misadventures in the neonatal intensive care unit. The implementation of a training program to educate non-residency-trained pharmacists in selected areas of maternal, neonatal, and pediatric health care helped enable the expansion of pharmacy services to include admission, daily, and discharge counseling.

  18. Development and Validation of Cognitive Rehearsal as a Training Strategy for Arthroscopic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacevic, David; Hodgins, Justin Lane; Lowe, Dylan T.; He, Janice; Popkin, Charles Aaron; Lynch, Thomas Sean; Ahmad, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    cognitive rehearsal scores of the junior and senior residents. A nonparametric Mann-Whitney test was used to evaluate performance of each group before and after the training session on each item of the questionnaire. Results: 53 of 62 (85%) residents completed the demographics survey prior to the training session, while 44 of 62 (71%) residents were available to complete the training exercise. A Cronbach alpha of 0.9494 for the pre-training (n=44) and 0.9394 (n=44) for the post-training suggested that the cognitive rehearsal questionnaire was internally consistent, allowing for the reliable summation of individual items to a composite score. The median composite cognitive rehearsal scores of the junior residents significantly improved from 24 pre- to 42 post-training exercise (p = 0.002). Senior resident median composite scores improved after training from 38 pre- to 46 post-exercise (p = 0.041). Those with previous musical training and kinetic / visual learners performed better during the training session. Both groups found the entire process valuable. Conclusion: This is the first study to develop and validate cognitive rehearsal as a low cost, high touch training strategy for arthroscopic surgery in orthopaedic residents. Cognitive rehearsal holds promise as a training tool for mastery of executive routine, performance quality, and increasing knowledge, comfort, and confidence for both junior and senior residents learning arthroscopic surgery.

  19. SUDBIOTECH: A Training Initiative in Plant Biotechnology Dedicated to Scientific Communities in Developing and Emerging Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain RIVAL

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The SudBiotech project is targeting PhD and Masters Programmes in Universities and Excellence Research Centres located in developing countries. It proposes an integrative and multidisciplinary approach under the form of a one-week discovery and training itinerary. SudBiotech is aimed at addressing various different fields of Plant Biotechnology, under the specific socioeconomic context of scientific communities from these countries. Our main goal is to train students, research staff, deciders, professionals and journalists to the basic knowledge underlying applications of plant biotechnologies, in order to both update the amount of knowledge which is requested at Master’s level and to acquire a solid body of information which is indispensable for any decision making, in a field of research which is often the target of political, social and media-related pressure. The team of Professors involved in the project shares a strong experience in teaching and training in overseas French Speaking Universities (AUPELF-UREF projects in Marocco, Tunisia, Togo, Côte d’Ivoire, TEMPUS Programme in Lebanon, AUF-Actions de Recherche en Réseau in Benin. The team is composed of senior scientists acting in various complementary fields, namely: Biochemistry/Physiology (A. Nato, Plant Breeding/Molecular Biology (Y. Henry, Tropical Agriculture/Epigenetics (A. Rival. Thanks to these complementarities, SudBiotech is able to propose a training itinerary which is diversified and integrated, covering areas from the plant cell and its original potentialities to the most recent industrial applications of plant biotechnologies (GMOs, their public acceptance in developing and emerging nations and their applicability to tropical plant commodities. The training offer is amplified and enriched through the active role of local research and training staff, who are encouraged to actively participate in the SudBiotech project under various forms including lectures, field visits

  20. Study on the Spatial and Temporal Variability of Stratosphere-Troposphere Exchange with A-Train Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollonige, D. W.; McMillan, W.; Sparling, L.; Avery, M.; Diskin, G.; Sachse, G.; Browell, E.; Hair, J. W.

    2008-12-01

    An understanding of isentropic transport of trace atmospheric constituents near the jet stream and frontal boundaries provides insight to the coupled stratosphere-troposphere system. Observations from NASA's A- Train satellites can assist in the determination of the global frequency, distribution and spatial extent of irreversible mixing of chemical species due to stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE). The Tropospheric Emission Sounder (TES) and HIgh Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) onboard the Aura satellite yield high vertical resolution profiles of ozone, water vapor, and other trace species that capture the vertical structure of STE along upper tropospheric fronts associated with the jet stream as well as cut-off low- pressure systems. The Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) onboard the Aqua satellite supplies wider horizontal coverage of the same atmospheric tracers near STE. Together, these A-Train instruments provide a more complete three-dimensional view of STE than previously possible. We explore the temporal and spatial evolution of STE events over the Pacific Ocean originating off the eastern coast of China and traveling along the storm track to the North American west coast, during NASA's Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment - Phase B (INTEX-B) in April and May of 2006. To study the variability of the STE events, we use chemical and dynamical analyses, including tracer-tracer correlations from A-Train observations and potential vorticity gradients from the NCEP's NARR (North American Regional Reanalysis) data in the vicinity of stratosphere-to-troposphere transport. We also compare our observations with in-situ and aircraft remote sensing measurements of similar trace gases evaluating the satellite instruments' sensitivity in the troposphere and stratosphere.

  1. Boundary layer regulation in the southeast Atlantic cloud microphysics during the biomass burning season as seen by the A-train satellite constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painemal, David; Kato, Seiji; Minnis, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    Solar radiation absorption by biomass burning aerosols has a strong warming effect over the southeast Atlantic. Interactions between the overlying smoke aerosols and low-level cloud microphysics and the subsequent albedo perturbation are, however, generally ignored in biomass burning radiative assessments. In this study, Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) are combined with Aqua satellite observations from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E), and Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) to assess the effect of variations in the boundary layer height and the separation distance between the cloud and aerosol layers on the cloud microphysics. The merged data analyzed at a daily temporal resolution suggest that overlying smoke aerosols modify cloud properties by decreasing cloud droplet size despite an increase in the cloud liquid water as boundary layer deepens, north of 5°S. These changes are controlled by the proximity of the aerosol layer to the cloud top rather than increases in the column aerosol load. The correlations are unlikely driven by meteorological factors, as three predictors of cloud variability, lower tropospheric stability, surface winds, and mixing ratio suggest that cloud effective radius, cloud top height, and liquid water path should correlate positively. Because cloud effective radius anticorrelates with cloud liquid water over the region with large microphysical changes—north of 5°S—the overall radiative consequence at the top of the atmosphere is a strong albedo susceptibility, equivalent to a 3% albedo increase due to a 10% decrease in cloud effective radius. This albedo enhancement partially offsets the aerosol solar absorption. Our analysis emphasizes the importance of accounting for the indirect effect of smoke aerosols in the cloud microphysics when estimating the radiative impact of the biomass burning at the

  2. A training network for introducing telemedicine, telecare and hospital informatics in the Adriatic-Danube-Black Sea region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anogeianaki, Antonia; Ilonidis, George; Anogianakis, George; Lianguris, John; Katsaros, Kyriakos; Pseftogianni, Dimitra; Klisarova, Anelia; Negrev, Negrin

    2004-01-01

    DIMNET is a training mechanism for a region of central Europe. The aim is to upgrade the information technology skills of local hospital personnel and preserve their employability following the introduction of medical informatics. DIMNET uses Internet-based virtual classrooms to provide a 200-hour training course in medical informatics. Training takes place in the cities of Drama, Kavala, Xanthi and Varna. So far, more than 600 people have benefited from the programme. Initial results are encouraging. DIMNET promotes a new vocational training culture in the Balkans and is supported by local governments that perceive health-care as a fulcrum for economic development.

  3. A study on the effectiveness of task manager board game as a training tool in managing project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Shahrul Azmi Mohd; Radzi, Shanizan Herman Md; Din, Sharifah Nadera Syed; Khalid, Nurhafizah

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays, games have become one of the useful tools in training. Many instructors choose to use games to enhance the way of delivering the subject. Failure to apply the suitable tool in training will lead to discouragement in learning and causing waste to the resources. An effective game will help the student understand the concept quickly. It can also help students to get involve in experiential learning where the student can manage and solve the problem as in the actual situation. This study will focus on the effectiveness of board game as a training tool for managing projects. This game has 4 tasks to be completed by students. They will be divided into a group of 4 or 5. Two methods are used in this study, pilot test, and post-test. These methods are chosen to analyze the effectiveness of using Task Manager Board Game as a teaching tool and the improvement of student's knowledge in project management. Three sub-components assessed were motivation, user experience and learning using case studies on Kirkpatrick's level one base on the perception of the students. The result indicated that the use of Task Manager board game as a training tool for managing project has a positive impact on students. It helps students to experience the situation of managing projects. It is one of the easiest ways for improving time management, human resources and communication skill.

  4. An A-train and MERRA view of cloud, thermodynamic, and dynamic variability within the subtropical marine boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Brian H.; Matheou, Georgios; Yue, Qing; Fauchez, Thomas; Fetzer, Eric J.; Lebsock, Matthew; Martins, João; Schreier, Mathias M.; Suzuki, Kentaroh; Teixeira, João

    2017-08-01

    The global-scale patterns and covariances of subtropical marine boundary layer (MBL) cloud fraction and spatial variability with atmospheric thermodynamic and dynamic fields remain poorly understood. We describe an approach that leverages coincident NASA A-train and the Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) data to quantify the relationships in the subtropical MBL derived at the native pixel and grid resolution. A new method for observing four subtropical oceanic regions that capture transitions from stratocumulus to trade cumulus is demonstrated, where stratocumulus and cumulus regimes are determined from infrared-based thermodynamic phase. Visible radiances are normally distributed within stratocumulus and are increasingly skewed away from the coast, where trade cumulus dominates. Increases in MBL depth, wind speed, and effective radius (re), and reductions in 700-1000 hPa moist static energy differences and 700 and 850 hPa vertical velocity correspond with increases in visible radiance skewness. We posit that a more robust representation of the cloudy MBL is obtained using visible radiance rather than retrievals of optical thickness that are limited to a smaller subset of cumulus. The method using the combined A-train and MERRA data set has demonstrated that an increase in re within shallow cumulus is strongly related to higher MBL wind speeds that further correspond to increased precipitation occurrence according to CloudSat, previously demonstrated with surface observations. Hence, the combined data sets have the potential of adding global context to process-level understanding of the MBL.

  5. Analyzing Seasonal Variation of Clouds over the Asian Monsoon Regions and the Tibetan Plateau Region using CloudSat/CALIPSO Data%用CloudSat/CALIPSO资料分析亚洲季风区和青藏高原地区云的季节变化特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪会; 罗亚丽; 张人禾

    2011-01-01

    利用2006年9月至2009年8月的CloudSat/CALIPSO资料,分析了东亚季风区(EAMR)、印度季风区( IMR)、西北太平洋季风区(WNPMR)和青藏高原地区(TPR)的云最和云层垂直结构(包括云层的垂直位置、物理厚度、相邻云层间的垂直距离和雷达反射率垂直分布)及其季节变化特征,进一步分析了亚洲季风区低云量的分布及其与对流层低层稳定性(LTS)的相关.有如下结论:(1)这期间,EAMR、IMR、WNPMR和TPR总云量分别为69%、72%、83%和69%,其中单层云占56%(IMR和WNPMR)至77% (TPR),多层云中二层和三层云合起来占95%以上.IMR的总云量在夏季(>90%)明显高于冬季(约50%),EAMR和TPR春夏季略高于秋冬季,而WNPMR总云量的季节变化不大.(2)同属热带季风区的IMR和WNPMR全年都有底部在10 km以上的冰晶云,其月平均云量为20%(冬季)~70%(夏季);海洋边界层云在WNPMR全年较常见(月平均云量为20%~40%),而IMR的低云主要出现在夏季(20%~40%);属副热带季风区的EAMR云层主要位于对流层中低层,10 km以上高云仅在夏季较多(30%左右),但其发生频率和垂直位置相对IMR和WNPMR的高云(12~16 km高度的云量为60%~70%)较低;TPR的云主要位于4~11 km,等高度上云内滴谱较宽.(3)云顶在4km以下的低云在亚洲季风区的分布在春秋季相似、夏冬季差异较大,冬季低云量最多,主要分布在西北太平洋、中国大陆南部及其以东的洋面和日本附近地区,低云量为45%~70%;低云量与LTS的相关性在冬季不强,而其他季节相关性较好.(4)这四个地区都以薄云为主,有30%~40%的云层物理厚度小于1km,而且多层云中相邻云层间的垂直距离约有10%小于1km,说明现有大气环流模式需要提高垂直分辨率.%Using the CloudSat/CALIPSO data products during the period of September 2006 - August 2009, seasonal variations of cloud properties (including

  6. Development of a training program to support health care professionals to deliver the SPACE for COPD self-management program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blackmore C

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Claire Blackmore,1 Vicki L Johnson-Warrington,2 Johanna EA Williams,2 Lindsay D Apps,2 Hannah ML Young,2 Claire LA Bourne,2 Sally J Singh2 1Kettering General Hospital National Health Service (NHS Trust, Kettering, Northamptonshire, 2Centre for Exercise and Rehabilitation Science, Leicester Respiratory Biomedical Research Unit, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester, UK Background: With the growing burden of COPD and associated morbidity and mortality, a need for self-management has been identified. The Self-management Programme of ­Activity, Coping and Education for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (SPACE for COPD manual was developed to support self-management in COPD patients. Currently, there is no literature available regarding health care professionals’ training needs when supporting patients with COPD on self-management.Aim: This study sought to identify these needs to inform, design and develop a training program for health care professionals being trained to deliver a self-management program in COPD.Methods: Fourteen health care professionals from both primary and secondary care COPD services participated in face-to-face semistructured interviews. Thematic analysis was used to produce a framework and identify training needs and views on delivery of the SPACE for COPD self-management program. Components of training were web-based knowledge training, with pre- and posttraining knowledge questionnaires, and a 1-day program to introduce the self-management manual. Feedback was given after training to guide the development of the training program.Results: Health care professionals were able to identify areas where they required increased knowledge to support patients. This was overwhelming in aspects of COPD seen to be outside of their current clinical role. Skills in goal setting and behavioral change were not elicited as a training need, suggesting a lack of understanding of components of supporting self

  7. Transformation of the frequency-modulated continuous-wave field into a train of short pulses by resonant filters

    CERN Document Server

    Shakhmuratov, R N

    2016-01-01

    The resonant filtering method transforming frequency modulated radiation field into a train of short pulses is proposed to apply in optical domain. Effective frequency modulation can be achieved by electro-optic modulator or by resonant frequency modulation of the filter with a narrow absorption line. Due to frequency modulation narrow-spectrum CW radiation field is seen by the resonant filter as a comb of equidistant spectral components separated by the modulation frequency. Tuning narrow-bandwidth filter in resonance with $n$-th spectral component of the comb transforms the radiation field into bunches of pulses with $n$ pulses in each bunch. The transformation is explained by the interference of the coherently scattered resonant component of the field with the whole comb. Constructive interference results in formation of pulses, while destructive interference is seen as dark windows between pulses. It is found that the optimal thickness of the resonant filter is several orders of magnitude smaller than the...

  8. Investigation on bragg reflection of surface water waves induced by a train of fixed floating pontoon breakwaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Huei-Tau; Chen, Kue-Hong; Tsai, Chi-Ming

    2015-11-01

    The water wave characteristics of Bragg reflections from a train of fixed floating pontoon breakwaters was studied numerically. A numerical model of boundary discretization type was developed to calculate the wave field. The model was verified by comparing to analytical data in literature and good agreements were achieved. Series of parametric studies were conducted systematically to investigate the dependence of the reflected coefficients by the Bragg scattering on the design variables, including the spacing between the breakwaters, the total number of installed breakwaters, the draft and width do the breakwater, and wave length. Certain wave characteristics of the Bragg reflections were observed and discussed in details which might be of help for practical engineering applications in shoreline protection from incident waves.

  9. Protestant ethics in ER nurses and doctors' training. Some acquisitions and considerations before and after a training course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Pesenti Campagnoni

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The article explores some of the preliminary reasons for and effectsof a training course on “Institutional, organisational and professionalidentification processes”, carried out at Aosta local HealthAuthority Accident and Emergency Dept. The article is based onthe analysis of a number of critical points that emerged ex ante,in itinere ed ex post regarding a complex and rarely examined topic,focusing on how training makes it possible to explore latentaspects of the organisation. The use of an appropriate methodologyhas revealed explicit requests for greater attention to typicallyorganisational aspects, which are typically neglected in the PublicServices. The hypothesis put forward is that the same dimensionscould provide a focus for research and productive application. Thearticle suggests that methodologies and instruments developed inthe public sector achieved an adequate degree of managerial knowledge to be “translated” into a National Health Service Accidentand Emergency Department setting.

  10. The source of discrepancies in aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions between GCM and A-Train retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michibata, Takuro; Suzuki, Kentaroh; Sato, Yousuke; Takemura, Toshihiko

    2016-12-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions are one of the most uncertain processes in climate models due to their nonlinear complexity. A key complexity arises from the possibility that clouds can respond to perturbed aerosols in two opposite ways, as characterized by the traditional "cloud lifetime" hypothesis and more recent "buffered system" hypothesis. Their importance in climate simulations remains poorly understood. Here we investigate the response of the liquid water path (LWP) to aerosol perturbations for warm clouds from the perspective of general circulation model (GCM) and A-Train remote sensing, through process-oriented model evaluations. A systematic difference is found in the LWP response between the model results and observations. The model results indicate a near-global uniform increase of LWP with increasing aerosol loading, while the sign of the response of the LWP from the A-Train varies from region to region. The satellite-observed response of the LWP is closely related to meteorological and/or macrophysical factors, in addition to the microphysics. The model does not reproduce this variability of cloud susceptibility (i.e., sensitivity of LWP to perturbed aerosols) because the parameterization of the autoconversion process assumes only suppression of rain formation in response to increased cloud droplet number, and does not consider macrophysical aspects that serve as a mechanism for the negative responses of the LWP via enhancements of evaporation and precipitation. Model biases are also found in the precipitation microphysics, which suggests that the model generates rainwater readily even when little cloud water is present. This essentially causes projections of unrealistically frequent and light rain, with high cloud susceptibilities to aerosol perturbations.

  11. The effectiveness of a 'train the trainer' model of resuscitation education for rural peripheral hospital doctors in Sri Lanka.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishan N Rajapakse

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sri Lankan rural doctors based in isolated peripheral hospitals routinely resuscitate critically ill patients but have difficulty accessing training. We tested a train-the-trainer model that could be utilised in isolated rural hospitals. METHODS: Eight selected rural hospital non-specialist doctors attended a 2-day instructor course. These "trained trainers" educated their colleagues in advanced cardiac life support at peripheral hospital workshops and we tested their students in resuscitation knowledge and skills pre and post training, and at 6- and 12-weeks. Knowledge was assessed through 30 multiple choice questions (MCQ, and resuscitation skills were assessed by performance in a video recorded simulated scenario of a cardiac arrest using a Resuci Anne Skill Trainer mannequin. RESULTS/DISCUSSION/CONCLUSION: Fifty seven doctors were trained. Pre and post training assessment was possible in 51 participants, and 6-week and 12-week follow up was possible for 43, and 38 participants respectively. Mean MCQ scores significantly improved over time (p<0.001, and a significant improvement was noted in "average ventilation volume", "compression count", and "compressions with no error", "adequate depth", "average depth", and "compression rate" (p<0.01. The proportion of participants with compression depth ≥40mm increased post intervention (p<0.05 and at 12-week follow up (p<0.05, and proportion of ventilation volumes between 400-1000mls increased post intervention (p<0.001. A significant increase in the proportion of participants who "checked for responsiveness", "opened the airway", "performed a breathing check", who used the "correct compression ratio", and who used an "appropriate facemask technique" was also noted (p<0.001. A train-the-trainer model of resuscitation education was effective in improving resuscitation knowledge and skills in Sri Lankan rural peripheral hospital doctors. Improvement was sustained to 12 weeks for most

  12. Effects of a training program at the crossover point on the cluster of metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémy B. Coquart

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the effects of a training program at a special exercise intensity—the crossover point of substrate utilization (COP—on the metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular risk factors in obese women with metabolic syndrome (MetS. Eighteen postmenopausal obese women with MetS (age, 54.8 ± 8.4 years; height, 160 ± 6 cm followed a 12-week training program consisting of three 45-minute sessions/wk on a cycle ergometer. The intensity imposed during the training sessions corresponded to COP. Before and after the training program, anthropometric, biological, and blood pressure data were collected and compared. After the training program, body mass (88.4 ± 12.3 kg vs. 85.7 ± 11.1 kg, fat mass (43.2 ± 4.8% vs. 41.8 ± 4.8% body mass, body mass index (34.3 ± 3.9 kg/m2 vs. 33.2 ± 3.6 kg/m2, and waist circumference (105 ± 10 cm vs. 100 ± 9 cm were significantly lower (p < 0.01. Moreover, fasting plasma glucose was significantly lower after the training program (114 ± 20 mg/dL vs. 107 ± 15 mg/dL; p = 0.02 and the quantitative insulin-sensitivity check index was significantly higher (0.58 ± 0.08 vs. 0.61 ± 0.05; p = 0.05. A significant reduction in systolic blood pressure was also observed (141 ± 15 mmHg vs. 129 ± 11 mmHg; p = 0.02. After the program, the number of patients with fasting plasma hyperglycemia and arterial hypertension was significantly decreased by 54.4% and 44.4%, respectively, and the number of patients with MetS was nonsignificantly reduced by 22.2% (p = 0.10. The present study shows that a training program at COP is an efficient means to treat MetS.

  13. Strangers on a Train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Cathy N.

    2011-01-01

    Early on in her first tenure-track job at Michigan State University, in the late 1970s, the author happened to be riding the same train from Lansing, Michigan, to Chicago as the department chair who hired her, Alan Hollingsworth, who had since become dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. It had taken her three years to land a tenure-track…

  14. Celebrity on a Train

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BRANDON; TAYLOR

    2011-01-01

    It was another Monday morning as I rode Line 2 toward Fuchengmen, the closest subway station to my office in west Beijing. I had missed the morning rush and a few empty seats near the end of the bench awaited my still sleepy body.With headphones firmly planted into each ear

  15. Strangers on a Train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Cathy N.

    2011-01-01

    Early on in her first tenure-track job at Michigan State University, in the late 1970s, the author happened to be riding the same train from Lansing, Michigan, to Chicago as the department chair who hired her, Alan Hollingsworth, who had since become dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. It had taken her three years to land a tenure-track…

  16. Indirect Methods of Assessing Maximal Oxygen Uptake in Rowers: Practical Implications for Evaluating Physical Fitness in a Training Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klusiewicz, Andrzej; Borkowski, Lech; Sitkowski, Dariusz; Burkhard-Jagodzińska, Krystyna; Szczepańska, Beata; Ładyga, Maria

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of indirect methods of assessment of VO2max for estimation of physical capacity of trained male and female rowers during a training cycle. A group of 8 female and 14 male rowers performed the maximal intensity test simulating the regatta distance (a 2 km test) and a submaximal incremental exercise test on a rowing ergometer. The suitability of the indirect methods of predicting VO2max during the training cycle was evaluated by performing the tests twice: in females at an interval of five months and in males at an interval of seven months. To indirectly estimate VO2max, regression formulas obtained for the linear relationship between the examined effort indices were utilized based on 1) mean power obtained in the 2 km test, and 2) submaximal exercises after the estimation of PWC170. Although the suitability of the two indirect methods of assessment of VO2max was statisticaly confirmed, their usefulness for estimation of changes in physical fitness of trained rowers during the training cycle was rather low. Such an opinion stems from the fact that the total error of these methods (range between 4.2-7.7% in female and 5.1-7.4% in male rowers) was higher than the real differences in VO2max values determined in direct measurements (between the first and the second examination maximal oxygen uptake rose by 3.0% in female rowers and decreased by 4.3% in male rowers).

  17. Application of the NASA A-Train to Evaluate Clouds Simulated by the Weather Research and Forecast Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molthan, Andrew L.; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Lapenta, William M.

    2008-01-01

    The CloudSat Mission, part of the NASA A-Train, is providing the first global survey of cloud profiles and cloud physical properties, observing seasonal and geographical variations that are pertinent to evaluating the way clouds are parameterized in weather and climate forecast models. CloudSat measures the vertical structure of clouds and precipitation from space through the Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR), a 94 GHz nadir-looking radar measuring the power backscattered by clouds as a function of distance from the radar. One of the goals of the CloudSat mission is to evaluate the representation of clouds in forecast models, thereby contributing to improved predictions of weather, climate and the cloud-climate feedback problem. This paper highlights potential limitations in cloud microphysical schemes currently employed in the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) modeling system. The horizontal and vertical structure of explicitly simulated cloud fields produced by the WRF model at 4-km resolution are being evaluated using CloudSat observations in concert with products derived from MODIS and AIRS. A radiative transfer model is used to produce simulated profiles of radar reflectivity given WRF input profiles of hydrometeor mixing ratios and ambient atmospheric conditions. The preliminary results presented in the paper will compare simulated and observed reflectivity fields corresponding to horizontal and vertical cloud structures associated with midlatitude cyclone events.

  18. Implementation and evaluation of a training program as part of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program in Azerbaijan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April eJohnson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A training program for animal and human health professionals has been implemented in Azerbaijan through a joint agreement between the United States Defense Threat Reduction Agency and the Government of Azerbaijan. The training program is administered as part of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program, and targets key employees in Azerbaijan’s disease surveillance system including physicians, veterinarians, epidemiologists, and laboratory personnel. Training is aimed at improving detection, diagnosis, and response to especially dangerous pathogens, although the techniques and methodologies can be applied to other pathogens and diseases of concern. Biosafety and biosecurity training is provided to all trainees within the program. Prior to 2014, a variety of international agencies and organizations provided training, which resulted in gaps related to lack of coordination of training materials and content. In 2014 a new training program was implemented in order to address those gaps. This paper provides an overview of the Cooperative Biological Engagement Program training program in Azerbaijan, a description of how the program fits into existing national training infrastructure, and an evaluation of the new program’s effectiveness to date. Long-term sustainability of the program is also discussed.

  19. Developing a systematic evaluation approach for training programs within a train-the-trainer model for youth cognitive behavior therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Brad J; Selbo-Bruns, Alexandra; Okamura, Kelsie; Chang, Jaime; Slavin, Lesley; Shimabukuro, Scott

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this small pilot study was three-fold: (a) to begin development of a coding scheme for supervisor and therapist skill acquisition, (b) to preliminarily investigate a pilot train-the-trainer paradigm for skill development, and (c) to evaluate self-reported versus observed indicators of skill mastery in that pilot program. Participants included four supervisor-therapist dyads (N = 8) working with public mental health sector youth. Master trainers taught cognitive-behavioral therapy techniques to supervisors, who in turn trained therapists on these techniques. Supervisor and therapist skill acquisition and supervisor use of teaching strategies were repeatedly assessed through coding of scripted role-plays with a multiple-baseline across participants and behaviors design. The coding system, the Practice Element Train the Trainer - Supervisor/Therapist Versions of the Therapy Process Observational Coding System for Child Psychotherapy, was developed and evaluated though the course of the investigation. The coding scheme demonstrated excellent reliability (ICCs [1,2] = 0.81-0.91) across 168 video recordings. As calculated through within-subject effect sizes, supervisor and therapist participants, respectively, evidenced skill improvements related to teaching and performing therapy techniques. Self-reported indicators of skill mastery were inflated in comparison to observed skill mastery. Findings lend initial support for further developing an evaluative approach for a train-the-trainer effort focused on disseminating evidence-based practices.

  20. Establishment of an operating room committee and a training program to improve aseptic techniques for rodent and large animal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héon, Hélène; Rousseau, Nathalie; Montgomery, Jane; Beauregard, Gilles; Choiniére, Manon

    2006-11-01

    Investigators of our research facility generally accept the concept of asepsis as an important component of adequate surgical care for animals. However, they experience difficulties putting it into practice, especially in the case of rodents. The reasons for this are inconvenience, cost, and lack of training. To better assist investigators in the implementation of aseptic surgical techniques in their laboratories, we have created an Operating Room (OR) Committee modeled after OR committees found in human hospitals. A reconstructive surgeon, a veterinarian, a research scientist, a nurse involved in the training of OR personnel, interns, graduate students, and an animal health technician were chosen as committee members in light of their OR and animal care expertise. The first task of the OR Committee was to establish institutional guidelines for aseptic surgery, taking into account the costs imposed on research budgets by these procedures. The OR Committee also supports a complete training program in aseptic surgery techniques, which consists of lectures, a training manual, videos, and a practical course. Furthermore, when experimental procedures require specialized equipment, the OR Committee collaborates with researchers to develop strategies to achieve asepsis. This OR Committee and the training program proved to be important tools to promote and improve the quality of animal care during surgery.

  1. An assessment of cloud top thermodynamic phase products obtained from A-Train passive and active sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zeng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The A-Train observations provide an unprecedented opportunity for the production of high quality dataset describing cloud properties. We illustrate in this study the use of one year of coincident POLDER (Polarization and Directionality of the Earth Reflectance, MODIS (MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization observations to establish a reference dataset for the description of cloud top thermodynamic phase at global scale. We present the results of an extensive comparison between POLDER and MODIS cloud top phase products and discuss those in view of cloud vertical structure and optical properties derived simultaneously from collocated CALIOP active measurements. These results allow to identify and quantify potential biases present in the 3 considered dataset. Among those, we discuss the impacts of observation geometry, thin cirrus in multilayered and single layered cloud systems, supercooled liquid droplets, aerosols, fractional cloud cover and snow/ice or bright surfaces on global statistics of cloud phase derived from POLDER and MODIS passive measurements. Based on these analysis we define criteria for the selection of high confidence cloud phase retrievals which in turn can serve for the establishment of a reference cloud phase product. This high confidence joint product derived from POLDER/PARASOL and MODIS/Aqua can be used in the future as a benchmark for the evaluation of other cloud climatologies, for the assessment of cloud phase representation in models and the development of better cloud phase parametrization in the general circulation models (GCMs.

  2. Inter-active and dynamic approaches on forest and land-use planning - proceedings from a training workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandewall, Mats [ed.

    1999-07-01

    This document summarises the outcome of a training workshop, 'Inter-active and dynamic approaches on forest and land-use planning', that was organised in Vietnam and Lao PDR during April 1999. The workshop was arranged by researchers from SLU, Umeaa in cooperation with SIDA and it's CCB programme, The National Board of Forestry and concerned government institutions in Lao PDR - The national Programme for Shifting Cultivation Stabilisation, Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry , and in Vietnam - the Forest Inventory and Planning Institute, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development. The main purpose of this paper are: (1) to review and conclude the outcome of the workshop to all those who have participated or been concerned with it; (2) to summarise an evaluation of the somewhat unique arrangement, with participants from different sectors, administrative levels, gender and countries; and (3) to present 'the APM approach' on land use planning, which was put forward, tested and discussed during the workshop.

  3. Using Ancient Chinese and Greek Astronomical Data: A Training Sequence in Elementary Astronomy for Pre-Service Primary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Hosson, Cécile; Décamp, Nicolas

    2014-04-01

    A great amount of research has been carried out world-wide to promote history of science as a powerful science teaching tool. Because the ways of choosing and using historical elements depend on teachers' or researchers' educational purpose, any attempt to support a single model-to-use seems difficult and probably irrelevant. However, specific purposes may reflect specific and prescriptive terms for using historical materials. Our work aims to show up this aspect. It is an attempt to make elements of the history of astronomy involved in the elaboration of a training session for future primary school teachers. Here, ancients' Greek and Chinese historical elements are chosen and organized according to specific educational and conceptual constraints that include the construction of the quasi-parallelism of solar rays reaching Earths' surface, and the spontaneous modeling of the propagation of Sunlight leaning on divergent rays. This leads to an original teaching sequence were historical elements are mixed with non historical ones. This organization forms the support of a pre-service training session developed for future primary school teachers. This session aims to provide future teachers with elementary cosmological knowledge (parallelism of Sunrays, shape and size of the Earth, Sun-Earth distance…), to provide some reference marks of history of ancient cosmologies (spherical and flat Earth) resulting from two distinct contexts, and to approach some aspects associated with Nature of Science (NOS).

  4. Retrieving co-occurring cloud and precipitation properties of warm marine boundary layer clouds with A-Train data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Gerald G.; Avey, Stephanie; Cooper, Steven; Lebsock, Matthew; Tanelli, Simone; Dobrowalski, Greg

    2016-04-01

    In marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds the formation of precipitation from the cloud droplet distribution in the presence of variable aerosol plays a fundamental role in determining the coupling of these clouds to their environment and ultimately to the climate system. Here the degree to which A-Train satellite measurements can diagnose simultaneously occurring cloud and precipitation properties in MBL clouds is examined. Beginning with the measurements provided by CloudSat and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (including a newly available microwave brightness temperature from CloudSat), and a climatology of MBL cloud properties from past field campaigns, an assumption is made that any hydrometeor volume could contain both cloud droplet and precipitation droplet modes. Bayesian optimal estimation is then used to derive atmospheric states by inverting a measurement vector carefully accounting for uncertainties due to instrument noise, forward model error, and assumptions. It is found that in many cases where significant precipitation coexists with cloud, due to forward model error driven by uncertainties in assumptions, the uncertainty in retrieved cloud properties is greater than the variance in the prior climatology. It is often necessary to average several thousand (hundred) precipitating (weakly precipitating) profiles to obtain meaningful information regarding the properties important to microphysical processes. Regardless, if such process level information is deemed necessary for better constraining predictive models of the climate system, measurement systems specifically designed to accomplish such retrievals must be considered for the future.

  5. Effectiveness of a training-of-trainers model in a HIV counseling and testing program in the Caribbean Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLaughlin Robert

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and sustainability of a voluntary counseling and testing (VCT training program based on a training-of-trainers (TOT model in the Caribbean Region, we gathered data on the percentage of participants trained as VCT providers who were providing VCT services, and those trained as VCT trainers who were conducting VCT training. Methods The VCT training program trained 3,489 providers in VCT clinical skills and 167 in VCT training skills within a defined timeframe. An information-monitoring system tracked HIV trainings conducted, along with information about course participants and trainers. Drawing from this database, a telephone survey followed up on program-trained VCT providers; an external evaluation analyzed data on VCT trainers. Results Almost 65% of trained VCT providers could be confirmed as currently providing VCT services. This percentage did not decrease significantly with time. Of the VCT trainers, 80% became certified as trainers by teaching at least one course; of these, 66% taught more than one course. Conclusion A TOT-based training program is an effective and sustainable method for rapid scale-up of VCT services and training capacity in a large-scale VCT program.

  6. Numerical Analysis of a Train-Bridge System Subjected to Earthquake and Running Safety Evaluation of Moving Train

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the dynamic response of a train-bridge system subjected to earthquakes, and the running safety indices of the train on the bridge under earthquake are studied. Taking a long span cable-stayed bridge across the Huangpu River as an example, a full three-dimensional finite element model of the train-bridge system was established, in which the soil-bridge and rail-train interactions were considered. Parallel computing based on contact balance was utilized to deal with this large-scale numerical simulation problem. The dynamic nonlinear analysis was performed on a Hummingbird supercomputer using the finite element code LS-DYNA 971. The results show that the acceleration responses of the train subjected to an earthquake are much greater than the ones without earthquake input, and the running safety of a moving train is affected by both the earthquake intensity and the running speed of the train. The running safety of the moving train can be evaluated by the threshold curve between earthquake intensity and train speed. The proposed modeling strategies and the simulated results can give a reference prediction of the dynamic behaviour of the train-bridge subjected to an earthquake.

  7. Effects of a training program about breast cancer and breast self-examination among female students at Taif University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desouky, Dalia E; Taha, Azza A

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in Saudi women. It is spreading three times faster in the Kingdom than in other countries. One-third of breast cancers are preventable through healthy life styles. This study aimed to assess the impact of a training program on breast cancer and breast self-examination (BSE) among female students at Taif University. This study was carried out using a pre-post test design on a sample of female university students from seven colleges in Taif University (Faculty of Science, Faculty of Economics and Management, Faculty of Art, Faculty of Education, Faculty of Medicine, Faculty of Pharmacy, and the Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences) in the academic year 2012-2013. None of the participants had ever practiced BSE before training, and only 16% of them believed that BSE is necessary, whereas 8.7% were willing to teach others BSE. There was limited knowledge of breast cancer. After the training program, a significant improvement was observed in all knowledge items, and 83.6% of the students practiced BSE compared with 0% practice before training. This study showed the effectiveness of the intervention program in improving students' knowledge of breast cancer and their practice of BSE. Thus, campaigns focusing on females in this age group should be carried out in the Saudi society.

  8. Remote sensing of aerosols by using polarized, directional and spectral measurements within the A-Train: the PARASOL mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Tanré

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aerosol remote sensing from space has started in the 1980's using observations provided by geostationary satellites or by polar orbiting platforms not specifically designed for observing aerosols. As a result, the number of retrieved parameters was limited and retrievals in the visible restricted over ocean. Over land, because of the important surface contribution, the aerosol detection was performed in the UV (or in the dark blue where most of the earth surfaces are dark enough but with overlap of multiple aerosols parameters, content, altitude and absorption. Instruments dedicated to aerosol monitoring are recently available and the POLDER instrument on board the PARASOL mission is one of them. By measuring the wavelength, angular and polarization properties of the radiance at the top of the atmosphere, in coordination with the other A-Train instruments, PARASOL can better quantify aerosol optical depths (AOD and improve the derivation of the radiative and physical properties. The instrument, the inversion schemes and the list of aerosol parameters are described. Examples of retrieved aerosol parameters are provided as well as innovative approaches and further inversion techniques.

  9. A training framework for stack and Boolean filtering-fast optimal design procedures and robustness case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabus, I; Petrescu, D; Gabbouj, M

    1996-01-01

    A training framework is developed in this paper to design optimal nonlinear filters for various signal and image processing tasks. The targeted families of nonlinear filters are the Boolean filters and stack filters. The main merit of this framework at the implementation level is perhaps the absence of constraining models, making it nearly universal in terms of application areas. We develop fast procedures to design optimal or close to optimal filters, based on some representative training set. Furthermore, the training framework shows explicitly the essential part of the initial specification and how it affects the resulting optimal solution. Symmetry constraints are imposed on the data and, consequently, on the resulting optimal solutions for improved performance and ease of implementation. The case study is dedicated to natural images. The properties of optimal Boolean and stack filters, when the desired signal in the training set is the image of a natural scene, are analyzed. Specifically, the effect of changing the desired signal (using various natural images) and the characteristics of the noise (the probability distribution function, the mean, and the variance) is analyzed. Elaborate experimental conditions were selected to investigate the robustness of the optimal solutions using a sensitivity measure computed on data sets. A remarkably low sensitivity and, consequently, a good generalization power of Boolean and stack filters are revealed. Boolean-based filters are thus shown to be not only suitable for image restoration but also robust, making it possible to build libraries of "optimal" filters, which are suitable for a set of applications.

  10. Improvements to the OMI Near-uv Aerosol Algorithm Using A-train CALIOP and AIRS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, O.; Ahn, C.; Zhong, C.

    2014-01-01

    The height of desert dust and carbonaceous aerosols layers and, to a lesser extent, the difficulty in assessing the predominant size mode of these absorbing aerosol types, are sources of uncertainty in the retrieval of aerosol properties from near UV satellite observations. The availability of independent, near-simultaneous measurements of aerosol layer height, and aerosol-type related parameters derived from observations by other A-train sensors, makes possible the direct use of these parameters as input to the OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) near UV retrieval algorithm. A monthly climatology of aerosol layer height derived from observations by the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) sensor, and real-time AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) CO observations are used in an upgraded version of the OMI near UV aerosol algorithm. AIRS CO measurements are used as a reliable tracer of carbonaceous aerosols, which allows the identification of smoke layers in areas and times of the year where the dust-smoke differentiation is difficult in the near-UV. The use of CO measurements also enables the identification of elevated levels of boundary layer pollution undetectable by near UV observations alone. In this paper we discuss the combined use of OMI, CALIOP and AIRS observations for the characterization of aerosol properties, and show a significant improvement in OMI aerosol retrieval capabilities.

  11. Microphysical, Macrophysical and Radiative Signatures of Volcanic Aerosols in Trade Wind Cumulus Observed by the A-Train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, T.; Remer, L. A.; Yu, H.

    2011-01-01

    Increased aerosol concentrations can raise planetary albedo not only by reflecting sunlight and increasing cloud albedo, but also by changing cloud amount. However, detecting aerosol effect on cloud amount has been elusive to both observations and modeling due to potential buffering mechanisms and convolution of meteorology. Here through a natural experiment provided by long-tem1 degassing of a low-lying volcano and use of A-Train satellite observations, we show modifications of trade cumulus cloud fields including decreased droplet size, decreased precipitation efficiency and increased cloud amount are associated with volcanic aerosols. In addition we find significantly higher cloud tops for polluted clouds. We demonstrate that the observed microphysical and macrophysical changes cannot be explained by synoptic meteorology or the orographic effect of the Hawaiian Islands. The "total shortwave aerosol forcin", resulting from direct and indirect forcings including both cloud albedo and cloud amount. is almost an order of magnitude higher than aerosol direct forcing alone. Furthermore, the precipitation reduction associated with enhanced aerosol leads to large changes in the energetics of air-sea exchange and trade wind boundary layer. Our results represent the first observational evidence of large-scale increase of cloud amount due to aerosols in a trade cumulus regime, which can be used to constrain the representation of aerosol-cloud interactions in climate models. The findings also have implications for volcano-climate interactions and climate mitigation research.

  12. A train-the-trainer approach to a shared pharmacogenomics curriculum for US colleges and schools of pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kelly C; Ma, Joseph D; Hudmon, Karen Suchanek; Kuo, Grace M

    2012-12-12

    To assess pharmacy faculty trainers' perceptions of a Web-based train-the-trainer program for PharmGenEd, a shared pharmacogenomics curriculum for health professional students and licensed clinicians. Pharmacy faculty trainers (n=58, representing 39 colleges and schools of pharmacy in the United States and 1 school from Canada) participated in a train-the-trainer program consisting of up to 9 pharmacogenomics topics. Posttraining survey instruments assessed faculty trainers' perceptions toward the training program and the likelihood of their adopting the educational materials as part of their institution's curriculum. Fifty-five percent of faculty trainers reported no prior formal training in pharmacogenomics. There was a significant increase (ptrain licensed health professionals, and 95% indicated that they would recommend the program to other pharmacy faculty members. As a result of participating in the train-the-trainer program in pharmacogenomics, faculty member participants gained confidence in teaching pharmacogenomics to their students, and the majority of participants indicated a high likelihood of adopting the program at their institution. A Web-based train-the-trainer model appears to be a feasible strategy for training pharmacy faculty in pharmacogenomics.

  13. Therapeutical Intervention, Relaxation, Mental Images, and Spirituality (RIME for Spiritual Pain in Terminal Patients. A Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Catarina de Araújo Elias

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic intervention involving the technique of Relaxation, Mental Images, and Spirituality (RIME can foster the redefinition of spiritual pain in terminal patients. A training course was developed to instruct health care professionals in its use, and the results were followed up by evaluating reactions of professionals to its use in intervention with patients. Six subjects (a nurse, a doctor, three psychologists, and an alternative therapist, all skilled in palliative care, were invited to take part in the experience. They worked with 11 terminal patients in public hospitals of the cities of Campinas, Piracicaba, and São Paulo, located in Brazil. The theoretical basis for the study involves action research and phenomenology, and the results were analyzed using both qualitative and quantitative methods. The analysis of the experience of the professionals revealed 5 categories and 15 subcategories. The analysis of the nature of spiritual pain revealed 6 categories and 11 subcategories. The administration of RIME revealed statistically significant differences (p < 0.0001, i.e., patients reported a greater level of well-being at the end than at the beginning of sessions, which suggests that RIME led to the redefinition of spiritual pain for these terminal patients. The training program proposed has shown itself to be effective in preparing health care professionals for the use of RIME intervention.

  14. Microphysical, macrophysical and radiative signatures of volcanic aerosols in trade wind cumulus observed by the A-Train

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Yuan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Increased aerosol concentrations can raise planetary albedo not only by reflecting sunlight and increasing cloud albedo, but also by changing cloud amount. However, detecting aerosol effect on cloud amount has been elusive to both observations and modeling due to potential buffering mechanisms and convolution of meteorology. Here through a natural experiment provided by long-term degassing of a low-lying volcano and use of A-Train satellite observations, we show modifications of trade cumulus cloud fields including decreased droplet size, decreased precipitation efficiency and increased cloud amount are associated with volcanic aerosols. In addition we find significantly higher cloud tops for polluted clouds. We demonstrate that the observed microphysical and macrophysical changes cannot be explained by synoptic meteorology or the orographic effect of the Hawaiian Islands. The "total shortwave aerosol forcin", resulting from direct and indirect forcings including both cloud albedo and cloud amount, is almost an order of magnitude higher than aerosol direct forcing alone. Furthermore, the precipitation reduction associated with enhanced aerosol leads to large changes in the energetics of air-sea exchange and trade wind boundary layer. Our results represent the first observational evidence of large-scale increase of cloud amount due to aerosols in a trade cumulus regime, which can be used to constrain the representation of aerosol-cloud interactions in climate models. The findings also have implications for volcano-climate interactions and climate mitigation research.

  15. Microphysical, macrophysical and radiative signatures of volcanic aerosols in trade wind cumulus observed by the A-Train

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Yuan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Increased aerosol concentrations can raise planetary albedo not only by reflecting sunlight and increasing cloud albedo, but also by changing cloud amount. However, detecting aerosol effect on cloud amount has been elusive to both observations and modeling due to potential buffering mechanisms and convolution of meteorology. Here through a natural experiment provided by long-term degassing of a low-lying volcano and use of A-Train satellite observations, we show aerosols are associated strongly with modification of trade cumulus cloud fields including decreased droplet size, decreased precipitation efficiency and increased cloud amount. We also demonstrate that the observed microphysical and macrophysical changes cannot be explained by synoptic meteorology or the orographic effect of the Hawaiian Islands. The "total shortwave aerosol forcing", resulting from direct and indirect forcings including both cloud albedo and cloud amount, is almost an order of magnitude higher than aerosol direct forcing alone. The precipitation reduction associated with enhanced aerosol leads to large changes in the energetics of air-sea exchange. Our results represent the first observational evidence of large-scale increase of cloud amount due to aerosols in a trade cumulus regime, which can be used to constrain the representation of aerosol-cloud interactions in climate models. The findings also have implications for volcano-climate interactions and climate mitigation research.

  16. The Role of Pictures and Gestures as a Support Mechanism for Novel Word Learning: A Training Study with 2-Year-Old Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapalková, Svetlana; Polišenská, Kamila; Süssová, Martina

    2016-01-01

    A training study examined novel word learning in 2-year-old children and assessed two nonverbal mechanisms, pictures and gestures, which are commonly used as communication support. The aim was to (1) compare these two support mechanisms and measure their effects on expressive word learning and (2) to investigate these effects on word production…

  17. Comparison of Heart Rate Response to Tennis Activity between Persons with and without Spinal Cord Injuries: Implications for a Training Threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfield, J. P.; Malone, Laurie A.; Coleman, Tristica A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) to reach a training threshold during on-court sport activity. Monitors collected heart rate (HR) data every 5 s for 11 wheelchair tennis players (WCT) with low paraplegia and 11 able-bodied controls matched on experience and skill level (ABT).…

  18. “Sooner or later most of us get hooked”: the question of insanity in Patricia Highsmith’s 'Strangers on a train' and 'The talented Mr. Ripley'

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This article considers constructions of insanity in 'Strangers on a Train' and 'The Talented Mr. Ripley' in the context of historical understandings of psychopathy and sociopathic personality disturbance. It examines Patricia Highsmith’s psychological influences and assesses how her novels have been read in relation to changing notions of criminal insanity in psychiatry, law, and culture.

  19. Improving problem solving in primary school students: The effect of a training programme focusing on metacognition and working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornoldi, Cesare; Carretti, Barbara; Drusi, Silvia; Tencati, Chiara

    2015-09-01

    Despite doubts voiced on their efficacy, a series of studies has been carried out on the capacity of training programmes to improve academic and reasoning skills by focusing on underlying cognitive abilities and working memory in particular. No systematic efforts have been made, however, to test training programmes that involve both general and specific underlying abilities. If effective, these programmes could help to increase students' motivation and competence. This study examined the feasibility of improving problem-solving skills in school children by means of a training programme that addresses general and specific abilities involved in problem solving, focusing on metacognition and working memory. The project involved a sample of 135 primary school children attending eight classes in the third, fourth, and fifth grades (age range 8-10 years). The classes were assigned to two groups, one attending the training programme in the first 3 months of the study (Training Group 1) and the other serving as a waiting-list control group (Training Group 2). In the second phase of the study, the role of the two groups was reversed, with Training Group 2 attending the training instead of Training Group 1. The training programme led to improvements in both metacognitive and working memory tasks, with positive-related effects on the ability to solve problems. The gains seen in Training Group 1 were also maintained at the second post-test (after 3 months). Specific activities focusing on metacognition and working memory may contribute to modifying arithmetical problem-solving performance in primary school children. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  20. Preparing palliative home care nurses to act as facilitators for physicians' learning: Evaluation of a training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pype, Peter; Mertens, Fien; Wens, Johan; Stes, Ann; Van den Eynden, Bart; Deveugele, Myriam

    2015-05-01

    Palliative care requires a multidisciplinary care team. General practitioners often ask specialised palliative home care teams for support. Working with specialised nurses offers learning opportunities, also called workplace learning. This can be enhanced by the presence of a learning facilitator. To describe the development and evaluation of a training programme for nurses in primary care. The programme aimed to prepare palliative home care team nurses to act as facilitators for general practitioners' workplace learning. A one-group post-test only design (quantitative) and semi-structured interviews (qualitative) were used. A multifaceted train-the-trainer programme was designed. Evaluation was done through assignments with individual feedback, summative assessment through videotaped encounters with simulation-physicians and individual interviews after a period of practice implementation. A total of 35 nurses followed the programme. The overall satisfaction was high. Homework assignments interfered with the practice workload but showed to be fundamental in translating theory into practice. Median score on the summative assessment was 7 out of 14 with range 1-13. Interviews revealed some aspects of the training (e.g. incident analysis) to be too difficult for implementation or to be in conflict with personal preferences (focus on patient care instead of facilitating general practitioners' learning). Training palliative home care team nurses as facilitator of general practitioners' workplace learning is a feasible but complex intervention. Personal characteristics, interpersonal relationships and contextual variables have to be taken into account. Training expert palliative care nurses to facilitate general practitioners' workplace learning requires careful and individualised mentoring. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. A training image evaluation and selection method based on minimum data event distance for multiple-point geostatistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wenjie; Wu, Shenghe; Yin, Yanshu; Zhang, Jiajia; Zhang, Ke

    2017-07-01

    A training image (TI) can be regarded as a database of spatial structures and their low to higher order statistics used in multiple-point geostatistics (MPS) simulation. Presently, there are a number of methods to construct a series of candidate TIs (CTIs) for MPS simulation based on a modeler's subjective criteria. The spatial structures of TIs are often various, meaning that the compatibilities of different CTIs with the conditioning data are different. Therefore, evaluation and optimal selection of CTIs before MPS simulation is essential. This paper proposes a CTI evaluation and optimal selection method based on minimum data event distance (MDevD). In the proposed method, a set of MDevD properties are established through calculation of the MDevD of conditioning data events in each CTI. Then, CTIs are evaluated and ranked according to the mean value and variance of the MDevD properties. The smaller the mean value and variance of an MDevD property are, the more compatible the corresponding CTI is with the conditioning data. In addition, data events with low compatibility in the conditioning data grid can be located to help modelers select a set of complementary CTIs for MPS simulation. The MDevD property can also help to narrow the range of the distance threshold for MPS simulation. The proposed method was evaluated using three examples: a 2D categorical example, a 2D continuous example, and an actual 3D oil reservoir case study. To illustrate the method, a C++ implementation of the method is attached to the paper.

  2. Indirect Methods of Assessing Maximal Oxygen Uptake in Rowers: Practical Implications for Evaluating Physical Fitness in a Training Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klusiewicz Andrzej

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of indirect methods of assessment of VO2max for estimation of physical capacity of trained male and female rowers during a training cycle. A group of 8 female and 14 male rowers performed the maximal intensity test simulating the regatta distance (a 2 km test and a submaximal incremental exercise test on a rowing ergometer. The suitability of the indirect methods of predicting VO2max during the training cycle was evaluated by performing the tests twice: in females at an interval of five months and in males at an interval of seven months. To indirectly estimate VO2max, regression formulas obtained for the linear relationship between the examined effort indices were utilized based on 1 mean power obtained in the 2 km test, and 2 submaximal exercises after the estimation of PWC170. Although the suitability of the two indirect methods of assessment of VO2max was statisticaly confirmed, their usefulness for estimation of changes in physical fitness of trained rowers during the training cycle was rather low. Such an opinion stems from the fact that the total error of these methods (range between 4.2-7.7% in female and 5.1-7.4% in male rowers was higher than the real differences in VO2max values determined in direct measurements (between the first and the second examination maximal oxygen uptake rose by 3.0% in female rowers and decreased by 4.3% in male rowers.

  3. A training program for novice paramedics provides initial laryngeal mask airway insertion skill and improves skill retention at 6 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Cindy; Owen, Harry; Plummer, John

    2010-02-01

    Major resuscitation councils endorse the use of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) by paramedics for lifesaving airway interventions. Learning and maintaining adequate skill level is important for patient safety. The aim of this project was to develop a training program that provides student paramedics with initial knowledge and experience in LMA insertion skills but equally important to provide ongoing skill retention. After ethics approval and informed consent, 55 first year Paramedic degree students watched a manufacturer's LMA instruction video and practiced insertion in three different part task trainers. Six months later, subjects were randomized to an intervention (reviewing the video and 10 minutes unsupervised practice) or control group before participating in a high-fidelity simulated clinical scenario. For equity of training, the control group received the intervention after the scenario. Main outcomes measured were time to insertion; success rate; and LMA skill retention (sum of LMA orientation; cuff inflation; bite block; securing; patient positioning; and overall subject performance). Fifty subjects completed the study. Those in the intervention group displayed significantly shorter insertion times (P = 0.029), fewer attempts to achieve success (P = 0.033), and had significantly higher LMA skill performance levels (P = 0.019) at 6 months. We devised a short intervention based on our training program using a video and practice in part task trainers. In an assessment using high-fidelity simulation, we demonstrated significant improvements in maintenance of LMA insertion skills in student paramedics at 6 months. Our model of just-in-time assessment and reinforcement of training prevents skill decay and has implications for healthcare skills training in general.

  4. [Child abuse in Cameroon: evaluation of a training course on awareness, detection, and reporting of child abuse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menick, D Mbassa; Ngoh, F

    2005-01-01

    The twofold purpose of this study was to promote and facilitate awareness, detection and reporting of child abuse by improving the diagnostic ability of a group of pediatric care providers working in pediatric emergency rooms and to evaluate the impact of training on awareness, detection and reporting of child abuse. This study was conducted in three phases. In the first phase data were retrospectively collected for a three-month period prior to the study (May, June, and July 1996). In the second phase a training seminar about awareness, detection, and reporting of child abuse was organized from April 29 to 30, 1997 for pediatric care providers working in the pediatric emergency rooms of several facilities in Yaoundé, Cameroon. Trainees included pediatricians, general practitioners, nurses, and social workers. An oral presentation using 137-slides (visual diagnosis of physical abuse) from the American Academy of Paediatrics (1994) was used as a teaching aid. In the third phase the same data as in the first phase was prospectively collected on the same three-month period after the seminar (May, June and July 1997). As in the first phase data was collected by the same person from emergency room registers according to the WHO protocol (1994) (study of interpersonal physical abuse of children). During the first phase 39 cases of physical abuse were reported in a population 1269 consulting patients, i.e. 3.1% of the cohort. In the third phase prospective analysis of reporting following the training seminar showed that 161 cases of physical abuse were reported in a population of 1425 consulting patients, i.e., 11.3% of the cohort. The victim group (n=161) in the third phase was four-fold larger than the victim group in the first phase (n = 39). These findings suggest that the seminar achieved its main goals, i.e., to improve the diagnostic ability of the trainees and to increase detection and screening of physical abuse of children.

  5. Comparison of SEVIRI-Derived Cloud Occurrence Frequency and Cloud-Top Height with A-Train Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu-Yong Chung

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the characteristics of Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI-derived products from the UK Met Office algorithm, one year of cloud occurrence frequency (COF and cloud-top height (CTH data from May 2013 to April 2014 was analysed in comparison with Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR and Cloud-Aerosol LiDAR with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP cloud products observed from the A-Train constellation. Because CPR operated in daylight-only data collection mode, daytime products were validated in this study. It is important to note that the different sensor characteristics cause differences in CTH retrievals. The CTH of active instruments, CPR and CALIOP, is derived from the return time of the backscattered radar or LiDAR signal, while the infrared sensor, SEVIRI, measures a radiatively effective CTH. Therefore, some systematic differences in comparison results are expected. However, similarities in spatial distribution and seasonal variability of COFs were noted among SEVIRI, CALIOP, and CPR products, although COF derived by the SEVIRI algorithm showed biases of 14.35% and −3.90% compared with those from CPR and CALIOP measurements, respectively. We found that the SEVIRI algorithm estimated larger COF values than the CPR product, especially over oceans, whereas smaller COF was detected by SEVIRI measurements over land and in the tropics than by CALIOP, where multi-layer clouds and thin cirrus clouds are dominant. CTHs derived from SEVIRI showed better agreement with CPR than with CALIOP. Further comparison with CPR showed that SEVIRI CTH was highly sensitive to the CO2 bias correction used in the Minimum Residual method. Compared with CPR CTHs, SEVIRI has produced stable CTHs since the bias correction update in November 2013, with a correlation coefficient of 0.93, bias of −0.27 km, and standard deviation of 1.61 km.

  6. Evaluation of cloud-resolving model simulations of midlatitude cirrus with ARM and A-train observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhlbauer, A.; Ackerman, T. P.; Lawson, R. P.; Xie, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-07-01

    Cirrus clouds are ubiquitous in the upper troposphere and still constitute one of the largest uncertainties in climate predictions. This paper evaluates cloud-resolving model (CRM) and cloud system-resolving model (CSRM) simulations of a midlatitude cirrus case with comprehensive observations collected under the auspices of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program and with spaceborne observations from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration A-train satellites. The CRM simulations are driven with periodic boundary conditions and ARM forcing data, whereas the CSRM simulations are driven by the ERA-Interim product. Vertical profiles of temperature, relative humidity, and wind speeds are reasonably well simulated by the CSRM and CRM, but there are remaining biases in the temperature, wind speeds, and relative humidity, which can be mitigated through nudging the model simulations toward the observed radiosonde profiles. Simulated vertical velocities are underestimated in all simulations except in the CRM simulations with grid spacings of 500 m or finer, which suggests that turbulent vertical air motions in cirrus clouds need to be parameterized in general circulation models and in CSRM simulations with horizontal grid spacings on the order of 1 km. The simulated ice water content and ice number concentrations agree with the observations in the CSRM but are underestimated in the CRM simulations. The underestimation of ice number concentrations is consistent with the overestimation of radar reflectivity in the CRM simulations and suggests that the model produces too many large ice particles especially toward the cloud base. Simulated cloud profiles are rather insensitive to perturbations in the initial conditions or the dimensionality of the model domain, but the treatment of the forcing data has a considerable effect on the outcome of the model simulations. Despite considerable progress in observations and microphysical parameterizations, simulating

  7. Improved Ozone and Carbon Monoxide Profile Retrievals Using Multispectral Measurements from NASA "A Train", NPP, and TROPOMI Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, D.; Bowman, K. W.; Kulawik, S. S.; Miyazaki, K.; Worden, J. R.; Worden, H. M.; Livesey, N. J.; Payne, V.; Luo, M.; Natraj, V.; Veefkind, P.; Aben, I.; Landgraf, J.; Flynn, L. E.; Han, Y.; Liu, X.; Strow, L. L.; Kuai, L.

    2015-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone is at the juncture of air quality and climate. Ozone directly impacts human and plant health, and directly forces the climate system through absorption of thermal radiation. Carbon monoxide is a chemical precursor of greenhouse gases CO2 and tropospheric O3, and is also an ideal tracer of transport processes due to its medium life time (weeks to months). The Aqua-AIRS and Aura-OMI instruments in the NASA "A-Train", CrIS and OMPS instruments on the NOAA Suomi-NPP, IASI and GOME-2 on METOP and TROPOMI aboard the Sentinel 5 precursor (S5p) have the potential to provide the synoptic chemical and dynamical context for ozone necessary to quantify long-range transport at global scales and to provide an anchor to the near-term constellation of geostationary sounders: NASA TEMPO, ESA Sentinel 4, and the Korean GEMS. We introduce the JPL MUlti-SpEctral, MUlti-SpEcies, MUlti-SatEllite (MUSES) retrieval algorithm, which ingests panspectral observations across multiple platforms in a non-linear optimal estimation framework. MUSES incorporates advances in remote sensing science developed during the EOS-Aura era including rigorous error analysis diagnostics and observation operators needed for trend analysis, climate model evaluation, and data assimilation. Its performance has been demonstrated through prototype studies for multi-satellite missions (AIRS, CrIS, TROPOMI, TES, OMI, and OMPS). We present joint tropospheric ozone retrievals from AIRS/OMI and CrIS/OMPS over global scales, and demonstrate the potential of joint carbon monoxide profiles from TROPOMI/CrIS. These results indicate that ozone can be retrieved with ~2 degrees of freedom for signal (dofs) in the troposphere, which is similar to TES. Joint CO profiles have dofs similar to the MOPITT multispectral retrieval but with higher spatial resolution and coverage. Consequently, multispectral retrievals show promise in providing continuity with NASA EOS observations and pave the way towards a new

  8. Retrieval, Inter-Comparison, and Validation of Above-Cloud Aerosol Optical Depth from A-train Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jethva, Hiren; Torres, Omar; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Remer, Lorraine; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen E.; Livingston, John; Shinozuka, Yohei; Kacenelenbogen, Meloe; Segal-Rosenbeimer, Michal; hide

    2014-01-01

    Absorbing aerosols produced from biomass burning and dust outbreaks are often found to overlay lower level cloud decks and pose greater potentials of exerting positive radiative effects (warming) whose magnitude directly depends on the aerosol loading above cloud, optical properties of clouds and aerosols, and cloud fraction. Recent development of a 'color ratio' (CR) algorithm applied to observations made by the Aura/OMI and Aqua/MODIS constitutes a major breakthrough and has provided unprecedented maps of above-cloud aerosol optical depth (ACAOD). The CR technique employs reflectance measurements at TOA in two channels (354 and 388 nm for OMI; 470 and 860 nm for MODIS) to retrieve ACAOD in near-UV and visible regions and aerosol-corrected cloud optical depth, simultaneously. An inter-satellite comparison of ACAOD retrieved from NASA's A-train sensors reveals a good level of agreement between the passive sensors over the homogeneous cloud fields. Direct measurements of ACA such as carried out by the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS) and Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) can be of immense help in validating ACA retrievals. We validate the ACA optical depth retrieved using the CR method applied to the MODIS cloudy-sky reflectance against the airborne AATS and 4STAR measurements. A thorough search of the historic AATS-4STAR database collected during different field campaigns revealed five events where biomass burning, dust, and wildfire-emitted aerosols were found to overlay lower level cloud decks observed during SAFARI-2000, ACE-ASIA 2001, and SEAC4RS- 2013, respectively. The co-located satellite-airborne measurements revealed a good agreement (RMSE less than 0.1 for AOD at 500 nm) with most matchups falling within the estimated uncertainties in the MODIS retrievals. An extensive validation of satellite-based ACA retrievals requires equivalent field measurements particularly over the regions where ACA are often

  9. Retrievals of Effective Aerosol Layer Height and Single Scattering Albedo for Biomass-Burning Smoke and Mineral Dust Aerosols from A-Train Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, M.; Hsu, C.

    2010-12-01

    Launches of state-of-the-art satellite sensors dedicated to aerosol remote sensing in recent years marked the beginning of a new era in aerosol-related studies by virtue of the well-coordinated observing system consisting of an array of satellites flown in formation, so called A-Train (Afternoon satellites constellation). The capabilities of the individual sensors aboard the A-Train satellites are complementary and overlapping in terms of retrievable aerosol parameters, sensitivity, spatial resolution and coverage. Thus, there is a great potential to gain value-added information about aerosols by merging observations from the A-Train sensors. In this study, we introduce a new algorithm, which can be utilized to derive aerosol layer height (ALH) and single scattering albedo (SSA) for biomass-burning smoke and airborne mineral dust aerosols by synthesizing observations from three A-Train satellite sensors: CALIOP, MODIS, and OMI. By using this algorithm, it is presented that ALH and SSA of biomass-burning smoke aerosols over North America, Southeast Asia, and Europe can be derived successfully. We show the retrieved values of SSA bear reasonable agreements with those from AERONET. The results of this study also reveal that the algorithm has a basic skill to estimate ALH by combining only MODIS and OMI observations, allowing us to separate smoke aerosols residing within the boundary layer from those elevated in the free troposphere. Currently, another version of the algorithm to be applicable for mineral dust aerosols is under development, and earlier results will be presented. Results from this study are expected to provide a better understanding of transport and radiative effects of biomass-burning smoke and mineral dust aerosols.

  10. Competency in health care management: a training model in epidemiologic methods for assessing and improving the quality of clinical practice through evidence-based decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudak, R P; Jacoby, I; Meyer, G S; Potter, A L; Hooper, T I; Krakauer, H

    1997-01-01

    This article describes a training model that focuses on health care management by applying epidemiologic methods to assess and improve the quality of clinical practice. The model's uniqueness is its focus on integrating clinical evidence-based decision making with fundamental principles of resource management to achieve attainable, cost-effective, high-quality health outcomes. The target students are current and prospective clinical and administrative executives who must optimize decision making at the clinical and managerial levels of health care organizations.

  11. Cyclic State Orientation of Polar Molecules Produced by a Train of Half-Cycle Pulse Clusters of a Long Repetition Period

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yu-Xin; YANG Yu-Jun; WU Bin; GUO Fu-Ming; ZHU Qi-Ren

    2008-01-01

    @@ Using a variational method, we derive the optimal population distribution of angular momentum eigenstates for any given population range in a rotational wavepacket within the field-free cyclic state orientation framework.Correspondingly, we devise a train of half-cycle pulse clusters to purposively make the structure of the computed wavepacket approach the optimal population distribution, so that we can now utilize much more powerful means to realize an ideal orientation goal.

  12. A-train CALIOP and MLS observations of early winter antarctic polar stratospheric clouds and nitric acid in 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lambert

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A-train Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS observations are used to investigate the development of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs and the gas phase nitric acid distribution in the early 2008 Antarctic winter. Observational evidence of gravity-wave activity is provided by Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS radiances and infrared spectroscopic detection of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT in PSCs is obtained from the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS. Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS-5 DAS analyses are used to derive Lagrangian trajectories and to determine temperature-time histories of air parcels. We use CALIOP backscatter and depolarization measurements to classify PSCs and the MLS measurements to determine the corresponding gas phase HNO3 as a function of temperature. For liquid PSCs the uptake of HNO3 follows the theoretical equilibrium curve for supercooled ternary solutions (STS, but at temperatures about 1 K lower as determined from GEOS-5. In the presence of solid phase PSCs, above the ice frost-point, the HNO3 depletion occurs over a wider range of temperatures (+2 to −7 K distributed about the NAT equilibrium curve. Rapid gas phase HNO3 depletion is first seen by MLS from from 23–25 May 2008, consisting of a decrease in the volume mixing ratio (parts per billion by volume from 14 ppbv to 7 ppbv on the 46–32 hPa (hectopascal pressure levels and accompanied by a 2–3 ppbv increase by renitrification at the 68 hPa pressure level. Temperature-time histories of air parcels demonstrate that the depleted HNO3 region is more clearly correlated with prior low temperature exposure of a few kelvin above the frost-point than with either the region bounded by the NAT existence temperature threshold or the region of minimum temperatures. From the combined data we infer the

  13. A-train CALIOP and MLS observations of early winter Antarctic polar stratospheric clouds and nitric acid in 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lambert

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A-train Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS observations are used to investigate the development of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs and the gas-phase nitric acid distribution in the early 2008 Antarctic winter. Observational evidence of gravity-wave activity is provided by Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS radiances and infrared spectroscopic detection of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT in PSCs is obtained from the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS. Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS-5 DAS analyses are used to derive Lagrangian trajectories and to determine temperature-time histories of air parcels. We use CALIOP backscatter and depolarization measurements to classify PSCs and the MLS measurements to determine the corresponding gas-phase HNO3 as a function of temperature. For liquid PSCs the uptake of HNO3 follows the theoretical equilibrium curve for supercooled ternary solutions (STS, but at temperatures about 1 K lower as determined from GEOS-5. In the presence of solid phase PSCs, above the ice frost-point, the HNO3 depletion occurs over a wider range of temperatures (+2 to −7 K distributed about the NAT equilibrium curve. Rapid gas-phase HNO3 depletion is first seen by MLS from from 23–25 May 2008, consisting of a decrease in the volume mixing ratio from 14 ppbv (parts per billion by volume to 7 ppbv on the 46–32 hPa (hectopascal pressure levels and accompanied by a 2–3 ppbv increase by renitrification at the 68 hPa pressure level. The observed region of depleted HNO3 is substantially smaller than the region bounded by the NAT existence temperature threshold. Temperature-time histories of air parcels demonstrate that the depletion is more clearly correlated with prior exposure to temperatures a few kelvin above the frost-point. From the combined data we infer the presence

  14. Tracking working status of HIV/AIDS-trained service providers by means of a training information monitoring system in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadew Mesrak

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Federal Ministry of Health of Ethiopia is implementing an ambitious and rapid scale-up of health care services for the prevention, care and treatment of HIV/AIDS in public facilities. With support from the United States President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, 38 830 service providers were trained, from early 2005 until December 2007, in HIV-related topics. Anecdotal evidence suggested high attrition rates of providers, but reliable quantitative data have been limited. Methods With that funding, Jhpiego supports a Training Information Monitoring System, which stores training information for all HIV/AIDS training events supported by the same funding source. Data forms were developed to capture information on providers' working status and were given to eight partners who collected data during routine site visits on individual providers about working status; if not working at the facility, date of and reason for leaving; and source of information. Results Data were collected on 1744 providers (59% males in 53 hospitals and 45 health centres in 10 regional and administrative states. The project found that 32.6% of the providers were no longer at the site, 57.6% are still working on HIV/AIDS services at the same facility where they were trained and 10.4% are at the facility, but not providing HIV/AIDS services. Of the providers not at the facility, the two largest groups were those who had left for further study (27.6% and those who had gone to another public facility (17.6%. Of all physicians trained, 49.2% had left the facility. Regional and cadre variation was found, for example Gambella had the highest percent of providers no longer at the site (53.7% while Harari had the highest percentage of providers still working on HIV/AIDS (71.6%. Conclusion Overall, the project found that the information in the Training Information Monitoring System can be used to track the working status of trained providers. Data generated from

  15. Anger as a Train and State, Anger Management Methods, and People\\\\\\'s Tendency towards Collective Aggression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariborz Nikdel

    2015-09-01

    significant relationship between anger-out control with tendency to collective aggression . Also, there is a negative and significant relationship between anger-in control and tendency to collective aggression . Indeed, the more people control anger–in and anger-out, the less the tendency to collective aggression . Also, the results showed that 3 variables of state anger, anger–in control and trait anger, are the best predictors of tendency to collective aggression, respectively. In addition, the results of path analysis showed that there is a direct and significant relationship between state anger, trait anger and anger-in control and independent variables and tendency to collective aggression and dependent variable. The relationship between anger-out control and none of the dependent variables was significant so it was excluded from the model.   Therefore, based on the results of the study, state-trait anger variable and anger control and personality specifications can be turning points of many collective aggressions in the Kohgiluye and Buyerahmad province. Therefore, it is recommended to the authorities that states anger factors should controlled and reduced. It is also recommended to train good anger control methods which help people who are under critical condition. By improving these psychological variables among people and families we can be hopeful to reduce tendency of people towards collective aggression .     Keywords: Anger as a Train and State, Anger Management Methods, and People's Tendency towards Collective Aggression

  16. The afterhyperpolarizing potential following a train of action potentials is suppressed in an acute epilepsy model in the rat Cornu Ammonis 1 area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernig, K; Kirschstein, T; Würdemann, T; Rohde, M; Köhling, R

    2012-01-10

    In hippocampal Cornu Ammonis 1 (CA1) neurons, a prolonged depolarization evokes a train of action potentials followed by a prominent afterhyperpolarizing potential (AHP), which critically dampens neuronal excitability. Because it is not known whether epileptiform activity alters the AHP and whether any alteration of the AHP is independent of inhibition, we acutely induced epileptiform activity by bath application of the GABA(A) receptor blocker gabazine (5 μM) in the rat hippocampal slice preparation and studied its impact on the AHP using intracellular recordings. Following 10 min of gabazine wash-in, slices started to develop spontaneous epileptiform discharges. This disinhibition was accompanied by a significant shift of the resting membrane potential of CA1 neurons to more depolarized values. Prolonged depolarizations (600 ms) elicited a train of action potentials, the number of which was not different between baseline and gabazine treatment. However, the AHP following the train of action potentials was significantly reduced after 20 min of gabazine treatment. When the induction of epileptiform activity was prevented by co-application of 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione disodium (CNQX, 10 μM) and D-(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (D-AP5, 50 μM) to block α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazolepropionate (AMPA) and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, respectively, the AHP was preserved despite of GABA(A) receptor inhibition suggesting that the epileptiform activity was required to suppress the AHP. Moreover, the AHP was also preserved when the slices were treated with the protein kinase blockers H-9 (100 μM) and H-89 (1 μM). These results demonstrate that the AHP following a train of action potentials is rapidly suppressed by acutely induced epileptiform activity due to a phosphorylation process-presumably involving protein kinase A.

  17. A new Maglev. Permanent magnets to make a train levitate; Un nouveau Maglev. Des aimants permanents pour faire leviter un train

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2000-02-01

    A new, more stable and economical magnetic levitation system has been developed at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (USA) which uses permanent magnets instead of expensive superconducting or electro-magnets. In this new type of levitated train, the skates of the wagons are made of series of permanent magnets organized as a Hallbach net while the levitating coils are included in the rails. The construction of such a train using this 'indutrack' system would be 3 times less expensive than the German Maglev. Short paper. (J.S.)

  18. Coherent manipulation of four-level double lambda-like atomic system by a train of ultra-short few-cycle-optical pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Pawan

    2014-01-01

    We have demonstrated that near complete coherence can be achieved in a four level double lambda-like systems using a train of ultra-short optical pulses. The effect of the Doppler broadening has been analyzed and a scheme has been proposed for establishing high and uniform coherence across different velocity groups in the atomic ensemble. We have also presented a novel scheme of excitation using chirped pulses and shown that in addition to generating coherence in the system it is possible to alter the translational states of the atoms.

  19. Impact of iron depletion without anemia on performance in trained endurance athletes at the beginning of a training season: a study of female collegiate rowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaValle, Diane M; Haas, Jere D

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the impact of iron depletion without anemia on performance in a sample of female collegiate rowers at the beginning of a training season (August 2008, January 2009, and September 2009). One hundred sixty-five female collegiate rowers from 5 colleges and universities in central New York State participated in a screening of iron status. Blood hemoglobin (Hgb), serum ferritin (sFer), and soluble transferrin receptor were measured to determine prevalence of iron depletion and anemia. Rowers' habitual moderate and vigorous physical activity, as well as their best time to complete a 2-km simulated race during the previous 3 months, were self-reported. Sixteen rowers (10%) were identified as anemic (Hgb iron depleted without anemia and reported 2-km times ~21 s slower (p iron status. Given the high prevalence of iron depletion reported in this and other studies, screening for low iron stores at the start of a training program in female athletes involved in an endurance sport may be clinically useful. In this study, iron-depleted rowers (sFer iron stores.

  20. On-dimensional numerical simulation of a compression wave induced by a train entering a tunnel; Tunnel nai asshukuha no ichijigen suchi simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, R.; Higashino, F. [Tokyo Univ. of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Technology; Fujii, K. [Institute of the Space and Astronautical Science, Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-12-25

    One-dimensional unsteady Euler equations are solved for the investigation of the flow field induced by a train entering a tunnel. The effect of the moving train is included in the basic equations as an area change in time. The equations are discretized by the finite difference method, and the calculations are performed for trains with various speeds, cross-sectional areas and nose area gradients. Effects of these parameters on the strength of a compression wave and the maximum pressure gradient are studied. Computed strength of the compression wave shows good agreement with the theoretical 1-D analysis and the axisymmetric numerical simulation. The one-dimensional flow model is validated through the comparison of computed pressure gradient with multidimensional numerical simulations. 15 refs., 11 figs.

  1. Comparison of Corporate Image a nd Patient Loyalty Perceptions of Outpatients and Inpatients: Example of a Training and Research Hospital in Ankara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Rıfkı Önder

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the level of corporate image and patient loyalty of outpatients and inpatients who get services from a hospital and to evaluate the relationship between corporate images’ factors and patient loyalty. Totally 600 patients from a training and research hospitals in Ankara, formed the study sample. As a result, outpatients’ loyalty and image perceptions found medium level; while inpatients’ level found high. In addition, the effect of corporate image factors on patient loyalty was determined that there is a statistically significant , strong and positive correlation and 83% of patient loyalty is explained by corporate image factors. Based on the research findings, making improvements especially in quality and also physical, communication, social responsibility factors can obtain loyal patients. It is suggested to adopt different strategies to outpatients and inpatients while implementing these improvements.

  2. Feasibility study of the zebrafish assay as an alternative method to screen for developmental toxicity and embryotoxicity using a training set of 27 compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selderslaghs, Ingrid W T; Blust, Ronny; Witters, Hilda E

    2012-04-01

    To anticipate to increased testing needs for reproductive toxicity and 3R approaches, we studied zebrafish embryo/larva as an alternative for animal testing for developmental toxicity and embryotoxicity and evaluated a training set of 27 compounds with a standardized protocol. The classification of compounds in the zebrafish embryo/larva assay, based on a prediction model using a TI (teratogenic index) cut-off value of 2, was compared to available animal and human data. When comparing the classification of compounds in the zebrafish embryo/larva assay to available animal classification, a sensitivity of 72% and specificity of 100% were obtained. The predictive values obtained in comparison to a limited set of human data were 50, 60% respectively for teratogens, non-teratogens. Overall, we demonstrated that the zebrafish embryo/larva assay, may be used as screening tool for prioritization of compounds and could contribute to reduction of animal experiments in the field of developmental toxicology.

  3. Effectiveness of a training package for implementing a community-based occupational therapy program in dementia: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döpp, Carola M E; Graff, Maud J L; Teerenstra, Steven; Olde Rikkert, Marcel G M; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra J F J

    2015-10-01

    Evaluate the effectiveness of a training package to implement a community occupational therapy program for people with dementia and their caregiver (COTiD). Cluster randomized controlled trial. A total of 45 service units including 94 occupational therapists, 48 managers, 80 physicians, treating 71 client-caregiver couples. Control intervention: A postgraduate course for occupational therapists only. A training package including the usual postgraduate course, additional training days, outreach visits, regional meetings, and access to a reporting system for occupational therapists. Physicians and managers received newsletters, had access to a website, and were approached by telephone. The intended adherence of therapists to the COTiD program. This was assessed using vignettes. clients' daily functioning, caregivers' sense of competence, quality of life, and self-perceived performance of daily activities of both clients and caregivers. Between-group differences were assessed using multilevel analyses with therapist and intervention factors as covariates. No significant between-group differences between baseline and 12 months were found for adherence (1.58, 95% CI -0.10 to 3.25), nor for any client or caregiver outcome. A higher number of coaching sessions and higher self-perceived knowledge of dementia at baseline positively correlated with adherence scores. In contrast, experiencing more support from occupational therapy colleagues or having conducted more COTiD treatments at baseline negatively affected adherence scores. The training package was not effective in increasing therapist adherence and client-caregiver outcomes. This study suggests that coaching sessions and increasing therapist knowledge on dementia positively affect adherence. NCT01117285. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Dust aerosol impact on North Africa climate: a GCM investigation of aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions using A-Train satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Gu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The climatic effects of dust aerosols in North Africa have been investigated using the atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM developed at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA. The model includes an efficient and physically based radiation parameterization scheme developed specifically for application to clouds and aerosols. Parameterization of the effective ice particle size in association with the aerosol first indirect effect based on ice cloud and aerosol data retrieved from A-Train satellite observations have been employed in climate model simulations. Offline simulations reveal that the direct solar, IR, and net forcings by dust aerosols at the top of the atmosphere (TOA generally increase with increasing aerosol optical depth. When the dust semi-direct effect is included with the presence of ice clouds, positive IR radiative forcing is enhanced since ice clouds trap substantial IR radiation, while the positive solar forcing with dust aerosols alone has been changed to negative values due to the strong reflection of solar radiation by clouds, indicating that cloud forcing associated with aerosol semi-direct effect could exceed direct aerosol forcing. With the aerosol first indirect effect, the net cloud forcing is generally reduced in the case for an ice water path (IWP larger than 20 g m−2. The magnitude of the reduction increases with IWP.

    AGCM simulations show that the reduced ice crystal mean effective size due to the aerosol first indirect effect results in less OLR and net solar flux at TOA over the cloudy area of the North Africa region because ice clouds with smaller size trap more IR radiation and reflect more solar radiation. The precipitation in the same area, however, increases due to the aerosol indirect effect on ice clouds, corresponding to the enhanced convection as indicated by reduced OLR. Adding the aerosol direct effect into the model simulation reduces the precipitation in the

  5. Microprocessor Simulation: A Training Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oscarson, David J.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the design and application of a microprocessor simulation using BASIC for formal training of technicians and managers and as a management tool. Illustrates the utility of the modular approach for the instruction and practice of decision-making techniques. (SK)

  6. Inductive Reasoning: A Training Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauer, Karl Josef; Phye, Gary D.

    2008-01-01

    Researchers have examined inductive reasoning to identify different cognitive processes when participants deal with inductive problems. This article presents a prescriptive theory of inductive reasoning that identifies cognitive processing using a procedural strategy for making comparisons. It is hypothesized that training in the use of the…

  7. The Establishment of an Organic Farmers’ Market as a Training Case Study and Research for Graduate Students of Organic Agriculture at the University of Palermo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Schifani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available  Despite the modest regional consumption of organic products, Sicily is one of the most important European regions in surface area per number of companies active in organic farming. The University of Palermo, as early as 2000, to promote the development and success in this industry, the Faculty of Agriculture, introduced two major degree programs in "Organic Farming". The objective of these courses is to train graduates who are technically capable of supporting the organic farmers market, to promote and facilitate the expansion of the consumption of organic products, and to create employment opportunities for young graduates. At the end of 2009, in the area of these activities, a training and research program involved numerous students in the creation of an "joint consumption" association whose purpose is the expansion of the consumption of organic products through the enhancement of a direct relationship with small organic farms who would be unlikely to penetrate large markets, or have relationships with large distribution networks.The project aims to assess the ability of the students of the Faculty to transmit the knowledge acquired in the program, and to investigate the relative issues regarding the new phenomenon emerging in recent years in Italy, represented by the spread of various forms of ethically-conscious consumption groups called "Gruppi di Acquisto Solidale (GAS" or Solidarity Purchase Groups.

  8. Emotional and behavioural barriers to learning and development in the inclusive education classrooms in South Africa: Developing a training programme for teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potgieter-Groot, Lucia; Visser, Maretha; Lubbe-de Beer, Carien

    2012-07-01

    The interaction between teachers, classroom strategies and learners experiencing emotional and behavioural barriers to learning and development in a system of inclusive education results in multiple dynamics on different levels. Many teachers in mainstream education lack training to deal with learners experiencing emotional and behavioural barriers. Resistance towards inclusive education is therefore evident. This paper describes the process of developing an in-service training programme for teachers who deal with learners with emotional and behavioural barriers in their classrooms. A process of action research was used to allow the researcher, in collaboration with 47 teachers from 2 primary schools, to develop a training programme to address the specific needs of teachers in dealing with learners experiencing emotional and behavioural barriers in their classes. Qualitative feedback from teachers and observations by the researcher and external observers were used to evaluate the appropriateness of the training. Teachers experienced that appropriate classroom management strategies made a significant difference in the behaviour of learners experiencing emotional and behavioural barriers. The training affected teachers' attitudes, teacher-learner interaction, learner behaviour and school organisation. In-service training for teachers can affect the effective implementation of inclusive education. This programme can be adapted to address the needs of teachers in other areas.

  9. Development and Validation of a Training Program Using a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Approach with the Purpose of Enabling Community Pharmacists to Provide Empathic Patient Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanuma, Kazunori; Watanabe, Fumiyuki; Maeda, Hatsuyo; Shiina, Miki; Hara, Kazuo; Kamei, Miwako

    2017-01-01

     To enable community pharmacists to provide empathic patient counseling, we developed and validated a training program based on cognitive reframing, which is one of the cognitive behavioral therapies. We divided 24 community pharmacists into two groups, providing training to the intervention group. The duration of the training program was two hours per session, with a total of eight hours. We conducted a survey of the intervention group to evaluate their training experience. In addition, we performed two role-play scenarios on patient counseling using simulated patients, evaluating the patient counseling alliance scores and the degrees of the psychological distance between the patients and pharmacists. The degree of satisfaction correlated with four training items, including "explanation by comics". When pharmacists felt that the cognitive behavioral therapy approach was successful, no significant differences were found in the patient counseling alliance grades. However, the psychological distance between the patients and pharmacists was smaller. We were able to infer that a cognitive behavioral therapy approach could decrease the psychological distance between patients and pharmacists, thereby enabling empathic patient counseling.

  10. A-Train Aerosol Observations Preliminary Comparisons with AeroCom Models and Pathways to Observationally Based All-Sky Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redemann, J.; Livingston, J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; Russell, P.; LeBlanc, S.; Vaughan, M.; Ferrare, R.; Hostetler, C.; Rogers, R.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a technique for combining CALIOP aerosol backscatter, MODIS spectral AOD (aerosol optical depth), and OMI AAOD (absorption aerosol optical depth) retrievals for the purpose of estimating full spectral sets of aerosol radiative properties, and ultimately for calculating the 3-D distribution of direct aerosol radiative forcing. We present results using one year of data collected in 2007 and show comparisons of the aerosol radiative property estimates to collocated AERONET retrievals. Use of the recently released MODIS Collection 6 data for aerosol optical depths derived with the dark target and deep blue algorithms has extended the coverage of the multi-sensor estimates towards higher latitudes. We compare the spatio-temporal distribution of our multi-sensor aerosol retrievals and calculations of seasonal clear-sky aerosol radiative forcing based on the aerosol retrievals to values derived from four models that participated in the latest AeroCom model intercomparison initiative. We find significant inter-model differences, in particular for the aerosol single scattering albedo, which can be evaluated using the multi-sensor A-Train retrievals. We discuss the major challenges that exist in extending our clear-sky results to all-sky conditions. On the basis of comparisons to suborbital measurements, we present some of the limitations of the MODIS and CALIOP retrievals in the presence of adjacent or underlying clouds. Strategies for meeting these challenges are discussed.

  11. OMMYDCLD: a New A-train Cloud Product that Co-locates OMI and MODIS Cloud and Radiance Parameters onto the OMI Footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Brad; Joiner, Joanna; Vasilkov, Alexander; Veefkind, Pepijn; Platnick, Steven; Wind, Galina

    2014-01-01

    Clouds cover approximately 60% of the earth's surface. When obscuring the satellite's field of view (FOV), clouds complicate the retrieval of ozone, trace gases and aerosols from data collected by earth observing satellites. Cloud properties associated with optical thickness, cloud pressure, water phase, drop size distribution (DSD), cloud fraction, vertical and areal extent can also change significantly over short spatio-temporal scales. The radiative transfer models used to retrieve column estimates of atmospheric constituents typically do not account for all these properties and their variations. The OMI science team is preparing to release a new data product, OMMYDCLD, which combines the cloud information from sensors on board two earth observing satellites in the NASA A-Train: Aura/OMI and Aqua/MODIS. OMMYDCLD co-locates high resolution cloud and radiance information from MODIS onto the much larger OMI pixel and combines it with parameters derived from the two other OMI cloud products: OMCLDRR and OMCLDO2. The product includes histograms for MODIS scientific data sets (SDS) provided at 1 km resolution. The statistics of key data fields - such as effective particle radius, cloud optical thickness and cloud water path - are further separated into liquid and ice categories using the optical and IR phase information. OMMYDCLD offers users of OMI data cloud information that will be useful for carrying out OMI calibration work, multi-year studies of cloud vertical structure and in the identification and classification of multi-layer clouds.

  12. How Do A-train Sensors Intercompare in the Retrieval of Above-cloud Aerosol Optical Depth? A Case Study-based Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jethva, Hiren; Torres, Omar; Waquet, Fabien; Chand, Duli; Hu, Yongxiang

    2014-01-01

    We intercompare the above-cloud aerosol optical depth (ACAOD) of biomass burning plumes retrieved from A-train sensors, i.e., Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), Polarization and Directionality of Earth Reflectances (POLDER), and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). These sensors have shown independent capabilities to retrieve aerosol loading above marine boundary layer clouds-a kind of situation often found over the southeast Atlantic Ocean during dry burning season. A systematic comparison reveals that all passive sensors and CALIOP-based research methods derive comparable ACAOD with differences mostly within 0.2 over homogeneous cloud fields. The 532 nm ACAOD retrieved by CALIOP operational algorithm is underestimated. The retrieved 1064 nm AOD however shows closer agreement with passive sensors. Given the different types of measurements processed with different algorithms, the reported close agreement between them is encouraging. Due to unavailability of direct measurements above cloud, the validation of satellite-based ACAOD remains an open challenge. The intersatellite comparison however can be useful for the relative evaluation and consistency check

  13. CALIPSO Observations of Near-Cloud Aerosol Properties as a Function of Cloud Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weidong; Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas; Wood, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses spaceborne lidar data to study how near-cloud aerosol statistics of attenuated backscatter depend on cloud fraction. The results for a large region around the Azores show that: (1) far-from-cloud aerosol statistics are dominated by samples from scenes with lower cloud fractions, while near-cloud aerosol statistics are dominated by samples from scenes with higher cloud fractions; (2) near-cloud enhancements of attenuated backscatter occur for any cloud fraction but are most pronounced for higher cloud fractions; (3) the difference in the enhancements for different cloud fractions is most significant within 5km from clouds; (4) near-cloud enhancements can be well approximated by logarithmic functions of cloud fraction and distance to clouds. These findings demonstrate that if variability in cloud fraction across the scenes used to composite aerosol statistics are not considered, a sampling artifact will affect these statistics calculated as a function of distance to clouds. For the Azores-region dataset examined here, this artifact occurs mostly within 5 km from clouds, and exaggerates the near-cloud enhancements of lidar backscatter and color ratio by about 30. This shows that for accurate characterization of the changes in aerosol properties with distance to clouds, it is important to account for the impact of changes in cloud fraction.

  14. Polar stratospheric cloud evolution and chlorine activation measured by CALIPSO and MLS, and modeled by ATLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Nakajima

    2016-03-01

    TNAT. Furthermore, simulations of the ATLAS chemistry and transport box model along the trajectories were used to corroborate the measurements and show good agreement with the observations. Rapid chlorine activation was observed when an air mass encountered PSCs. Usually, chlorine activation was limited by the amount of available ClONO2. Where ClONO2 was not the limiting factor, a large dependence on temperature was evident.

  15. Evaluation of Retrieval Algorithms for Ice Microphysics Using CALIPSO/CloudSat and Earthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okamoto Hajime

    2016-01-01

    We performed several sensitivity studies to evaluate uncertainties in the retrieved ice microphysics due to ice particle orientation and shape. It was found that the implementation of orientation of horizontally oriented ice plate model in the algorithm drastically improved the retrieval results in both for nadir- and off-nadir lidar pointing periods. Differences in the retrieved microphysics between only randomly oriented ice model (3D-ice and mixture of 3D-ice and Q2Dplate model were large especially in off-nadir period, e.g., 100% in effective radius and one order in ice water content, respectively. And differences in the retrieved ice microphysics among different mixture models were smaller than about 50% for effective radius in nadir period.

  16. Pautas para Organizar Una Actividad de Capacitacion: Un Seminario-Taller para el Desarrollo de Personal de Direccion de Sistemas Educativos (Guidelines to Organize a Training Activity: A Workshop for Management Development of Educational Systems).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Victor M.

    Often personnel performing managerial functions within educational systems are educators with almost no training in management. This paper presents ideas on how to organize a training activity intended to develop management knowledge and skills among educational systems officials and to implement an organizational self-study on management…

  17. Learning through Play for School Readiness: A Training Program for Parents and Other Caregivers of Preschool Children. Learning Games To Strengthen Children's School Readiness Skills. [Videotape with Facilitator's Manual].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Jerome; Singer, Dorothy

    This video-based program trains parents and other child caregivers to engage 3- to 5-year-olds in simple, motivating learning games to strengthen cognitive, social, and motor school-readiness skills. The training materials consist of a manual for training facilitators and a training video demonstrating how to play each learning game with preschool…

  18. How do A-train Sensors Inter-Compare in the Retrieval of Above-Cloud Aerosol Optical Depth? A Case Study based Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jethva, H. T.; Torres, O.; Waquet, F.; Chand, D.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are known to produce a net cooling effect in the cloud-free conditions. However, when present over the reflective cloud decks, absorbing aerosols such as biomass burning generated smoke and wind-blown dust can potentially exert a large positive forcing through enhanced atmospheric heating resulting from cloud-aerosol radiative interactions. The interest on this aspect of aerosol science has grown significantly in the recent years. Particularly, development of the satellite-based retrieval techniques and unprecedented knowledge on the above-cloud aerosol optical depth (ACAOD) is of great relevance. A direct validation of satellite ACAOD is a difficult task primarily due to lack of ample in situ and/or remote sensing measurements of aerosols above cloud. In these circumstances, a comparative analysis on the inter-satellite ACAOD retrievals can be performed for the sack of consistency check. Here, we inter-compare the ACAOD of biomass burning plumes observed from different A-train sensors, i.e., MODIS [Jethva et al., 2013], CALIOP [Chand et al., 2008], POLDER [Waquet et al., 2009], and OMI [Torres et al., 2012]. These sensors have been shown to acquire sensitivity and independent capabilities to detect and retrieve aerosol loading above marine stratocumulus clouds--a kind of situation often found over the southeastern Atlantic Ocean during dry burning season. A systematic one-to-one comparison reveals that, in general, all passive sensors and CALIOP-based research methods retrieve comparable ACAOD over homogeneous cloud fields. The high-resolution sensors (MODIS and CALIOP) are able to retrieve aerosols over thin clouds but with larger discrepancies. Given the different types of sensor measurements processed with different algorithms, a reasonable agreement between them is encouraging. A direct validation of satellite-based ACAOD remains an open challenge for which dedicated field measurements over the region of frequent aerosol/cloud overlap are

  19. 某训练基地地域卫生流行病学调查分析%Sanitary-epidemiological reconnaissance on the area of a training base

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏德江; 贾德胜; 李丙军; 王长军; 杨文宏; 王大勇; 梁洪军; 谭维国

    2014-01-01

    目的:掌握某训练基地地域的卫生学流行病学现况。方法现场调查和实验室分析相结合,对某训练基地地域的地理气候、水源水质、环境质量和卫生状况、传染病和地方病、医学昆虫动物等方面进行全面调查研究。结果该训练基地地域的饮用水水源都使用地面水,水质为Ⅲ级,超标项目主要为耗氧量、细菌总数、总大肠菌群、耐热大肠菌群、浑浊度、铝、氯化物;主副食品来源复杂,安全隐患多;肠道传染病、呼吸道传染病、血源和性传播传染病占较大比重,自然疫源性及虫媒传染病比例较少。该地区对部队威胁较大的是肠道传染病,存在威胁的是呼吸道传染病,有潜在危害的是流行性出血热。主要媒介生物的活动期在5~11月份。结论部队在该训练基地地域驻训时应加强饮水消毒、饮食安全工作,落实传染病预防措施。%Objective To know well the sanitary-epidemiological situations of the area of a training base .Methods The combination of field investigation with laboratory test was taken to investigate comprehensively the situations of geography and climate , water and environmental quality ,infectious disease and endemic disease ,medical insect and animal on the area of a training base .Re-sults Drinking water sources used all were in surface water ,and water quality was class Ⅲ.Indicators of oxygen consumption ,total bacteria count,total coliforms,thermotolerant coliforms,turbidity,aluminum,chloride in water exceed the standard.The sources of main foods were complex and there were many potential safety hazards .On epidemic situation,intestinal infectious diseases ,respiratory tract infectious diseases ,blood borne diseases ,sexually transmitted diseases accounted for the larger proportion of notifiable communicable diseases,and the proportions of vector borne diseases and natural focal diseases were less low .The main threat of

  20. Dust aerosol impact on North Africa climate: a GCM investigation of aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions using A-Train satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Gu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The climatic effects of dust aerosols in North Africa have been investigated using the atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM developed at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA. The model includes an efficient and physically based radiation parameterization scheme developed specifically for application to clouds and aerosols. Parameterization of the effective ice particle size in association with the aerosol first indirect effect based on ice cloud and aerosol data retrieved from A-Train satellite observations have been employed in climate model simulations. Offline simulations reveal that the direct solar, IR, and net forcings by dust aerosols at the top of the atmosphere (TOA generally increase with increasing aerosol optical depth (AOD. When the dust semi-direct effect is included with the presence of ice clouds, positive IR radiative forcing is enhanced since ice clouds trap substantial IR radiation, while the positive solar forcing with dust aerosols alone has been changed to negative values due to the strong reflection of solar radiation by clouds, indicating that cloud forcing associated with aerosol semi-direct effect could exceed direct aerosol forcing. With the aerosol first indirect effect, the net cloud forcing is generally reduced for an ice water path (IWP larger than 20 g m−2. The magnitude of the reduction increases with IWP.

    AGCM simulations show that the reduced ice crystal mean effective size due to the aerosol first indirect effect results in less OLR and net solar flux at the top of the atmosphere over the cloudy area of the North Africa region because ice clouds with smaller size trap more IR radiation and reflect more solar radiation. The precipitation in the same area, however, increases due to the aerosol indirect effect on ice clouds, corresponding to the enhanced convection as indicated by reduced OLR. The increased precipitation appears to be associated with enhanced ice water

  1. Effects of Short-Interval and Long-Interval Swimming Protocols on Performance, Aerobic Adaptations, and Technical Parameters: A Training Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalamitros, Athanasios A; Zafeiridis, Andreas S; Toubekis, Argyris G; Tsalis, George A; Pelarigo, Jailton G; Manou, Vasiliki; Kellis, Spiridon

    2016-10-01

    Dalamitros, AA, Zafeiridis, AS, Toubekis, AG, Tsalis, GA, Pelarigo, JG, Manou, V, and Kellis, S. Effects of short-interval and long-interval swimming protocols on performance, aerobic adaptations, and technical parameters: A training study. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2871-2879, 2016-This study compared 2-interval swimming training programs of different work interval durations, matched for total distance and exercise intensity, on swimming performance, aerobic adaptations, and technical parameters. Twenty-four former swimmers were equally divided to short-interval training group (INT50, 12-16 × 50 m with 15 seconds rest), long-interval training group (INT100, 6-8 × 100 m with 30 seconds rest), and a control group (CON). The 2 experimental groups followed the specified swimming training program for 8 weeks. Before and after training, swimming performance, technical parameters, and indices of aerobic adaptations were assessed. ΙΝΤ50 and ΙΝΤ100 improved swimming performance in 100 and 400-m tests and the maximal aerobic speed (p ≤ 0.05); the performance in the 50-m swim did not change. Posttraining V[Combining Dot Above]O2max values were higher compared with pretraining values in both training groups (p ≤ 0.05), whereas peak aerobic power output increased only in INT100 (p ≤ 0.05). The 1-minute heart rate and blood lactate recovery values decreased after training in both groups (p training in both groups (p ≤ 0.05); no changes were observed in stroke rate after training. Comparisons between groups on posttraining mean values, after adjusting for pretraining values, revealed no significant differences between ΙΝΤ50 and ΙΝΤ100 for all variables; however, all measures were improved vs. the respective values in the CON (p training.

  2. Sugammadex and neostigmine dose-finding study for reversal of residual neuromuscular block at a train-of-four ratio of 0.2 (SUNDRO20)†,.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufhold, N; Schaller, S J; Stäuble, C G; Baumüller, E; Ulm, K; Blobner, M; Fink, H

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this dose-finding study was to evaluate the dose-response relationship of sugammadex and neostigmine to reverse a commonly observed level of incomplete recovery from rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block, that is, a train-of-four ratio (TOFR) ≥0.2. Ninety-nine anaesthetized patients received rocuronium 0.6 mg kg(-1) i.v. for tracheal intubation and, if necessary, incremental doses of 0.1-0.2 mg kg(-1). Neuromuscular monitoring was performed by calibrated electromyography. Once the TOFR recovered to 0.2, patients were randomized to receive sugammadex (0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, or 1.25 mg kg(-1) i.v.), neostigmine (10, 25, 40, 55, or 70 µg kg(-1) i.v.), or saline (n=9 per group). Primary and secondary end points were the doses necessary to restore neuromuscular function to a TOFR≥0.9 with an upper limit of 5 and 10 min for 95% of patients, respectively. Neostigmine was not able to fulfil the end points. Based on the best-fitting model, the sugammadex dose estimation for recovery to a TOFR≥0.9 for 95% of patients within 5 and 10 min was 0.49 and 0.26 mg kg(-1), respectively. A residual neuromuscular block of a TOFR of 0.2 cannot be reversed reliably with neostigmine within 10 min. In the conditions studied, substantially lower doses of sugammadex than the approved dose of 2.0 mg kg(-1) may be sufficient to reverse residual rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block at a recovery of TOFR≥0.2. NCT01006720. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Effects of a Health Promotion Program Based on a Train-the-Trainer Approach on Quality of Life and Mental Health of Long-Term Unemployed Persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limm, Heribert; Heinmüller, Mechthild; Gündel, Harald; Liel, Katrin; Seeger, Karin; Salman, Ramazan; Angerer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background. Long-term unemployment is associated with poorer mental health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a health promotion program using the train-the-trainer approach on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and mental health of long-term unemployed persons. Methods. A prospective parallel-group study was conducted among 365 long-term unemployed persons. 287 participants (179 members of the intervention group IG and 108 members of the control group) were reassessed after three months. The intervention comprised both individual sessions based on Motivational Interviewing and participatory group sessions; no health promotion program was administered in the control group. The endpoints were HRQoL (SF-12), depression, and anxiety. The effect size of the change across time in the IG and CG was measured by Cohen's d. To assess the significance of group differences in the change across time, a random effects model was used. Results. Within three months HRQoL improved and anxiety and depression decreased significantly in the IG. A significant intervention effect was observed for anxiety (p = 0.012). Effect sizes in the IG were small to moderate in terms of Cohen's d (anxiety: d = -0.33; SF-12 mental: d = 0.31; depression: d = -0.25; SF-12 physical: d = 0.19). Conclusions. The health promotion program, based on a train-the-trainer approach, showed positive effects on HRQoL and mental health, especially anxiety, of long-term unemployed persons, a highly burdened target group where an improvement in mental health is a crucial prerequisite to social participation and successful reintegration into the job market. PMID:26380293

  4. Can a community health worker and a trained traditional birth attendant work as a team to deliver child health interventions in rural Zambia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeboah-Antwi, Kojo; Hamer, Davidson H; Semrau, Katherine; Waltensperger, Karen Z; Snetro-Plewman, Gail; Kambikambi, Chilobe; Sakala, Amon; Filumba, Stephen; Sichamba, Bias; Marsh, David R

    2014-10-27

    Teaming is an accepted approach in health care settings but rarely practiced at the community level in developing countries. Save the Children trained and deployed teams of volunteer community health workers (CHWs) and trained traditional birth attendants (TBAs) to provide essential newborn and curative care for children aged 0-59 months in rural Zambia. This paper assessed whether CHWs and trained TBAs can work as teams to deliver interventions and ensure a continuum of care for all children under-five, including newborns. We trained CHW-TBA teams in teaming concepts and assessed their level of teaming prospectively every six months for two years. The overall score was a function of both teamwork and taskwork. We also assessed personal, community and service factors likely to influence the level of teaming. We created forty-seven teams of predominantly younger, male CHWs and older, female trained TBAs. After two years of deployment, twenty-one teams scored "high", twelve scored "low," and fourteen were inactive. Teamwork was high for mutual trust, team cohesion, comprehension of team goals and objectives, and communication, but not for decision making/planning. Taskwork was high for joint behavior change communication and outreach services with local health workers, but not for intra-team referral. Teams with members residing within one hour's walking distance were more likely to score high. It is feasible for a CHW and a trained TBA to work as a team. This may be an approach to provide a continuum of care for children under-five including newborns.

  5. Top-of-the-atmosphere shortwave flux estimation from satellite observations: an empirical neural network approach applied with data from the A-train constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pawan; Joiner, Joanna; Vasilkov, Alexander; Bhartia, Pawan K.

    2016-07-01

    Estimates of top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) radiative flux are essential for the understanding of Earth's energy budget and climate system. Clouds, aerosols, water vapor, and ozone (O3) are among the most important atmospheric agents impacting the Earth's shortwave (SW) radiation budget. There are several sensors in orbit that provide independent information related to these parameters. Having coincident information from these sensors is important for understanding their potential contributions. The A-train constellation of satellites provides a unique opportunity to analyze data from several of these sensors. In this paper, retrievals of cloud/aerosol parameters and total column ozone (TCO) from the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) have been collocated with the Aqua Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) estimates of total reflected TOA outgoing SW flux (SWF). We use these data to develop a variety of neural networks that estimate TOA SWF globally over ocean and land using only OMI data and other ancillary information as inputs and CERES TOA SWF as the output for training purposes. OMI-estimated TOA SWF from the trained neural networks reproduces independent CERES data with high fidelity. The global mean daily TOA SWF calculated from OMI is consistently within ±1 % of CERES throughout the year 2007. Application of our neural network method to other sensors that provide similar retrieved parameters, both past and future, can produce similar estimates TOA SWF. For example, the well-calibrated Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) series could provide estimates of TOA SWF dating back to late 1978.

  6. The Vertical Structure of Relative Humidity and Ozone in the Tropical Upper Troposphere: Intercomparisons Among In Situ Observations, A-Train Measurements and Large-Scale Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkirk, Henry B.; Manyin, Michael; Douglass, Anne R.; Oman, Luke; Pawson, Steven; Ott, Lesley; Benson, Craig; Stolarski, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In situ measurements in the tropics have shown that in regions of active convection, relative humidity with respect to ice in the upper troposphere is typically close to saturation on average, and supersaturations greater than 20% are not uncommon. Balloon soundings with the cryogenic frost point hygrometer (CFH) at Costa Rica during northern summer, for example, show this tendency to be strongest between 11 and 15.5 km (345-360 K potential temperature, or approximately 250-120 hPa). this is the altitude range of deep convective detrainment. Additionally, simultaneous ozonesonde measurements show that stratospheric air (O3 greater than 150 ppbv) can be found as low as approximately 14 km (350 K/150 hPa). In contrast, results from northern winter show a much drier upper troposphere and little penetration of stratospheric air below the tropopause at 17.5 km (approximately 383 K). We show that these results are consistent with in situ measurements from the Measurement of Ozone and water vapor by Airbus In-service airCraft (MOZAIC) program which samples a wider, though still limited, range of tropical locations. To generalize to the tropics as a whole, we compare our insitu results to data from two A-Train satellite instruments, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Aqua and Aura satellites respectively. Finally, we examine the vertical structure of water vapor, relative humidity and ozone in the NASA Goddard MERRA analysis, an assimilation dataset, and a new version of the GEOS CCM, a free-running chemistry-climate model. We demonstrate that conditional probability distributions of relative humidity and ozone are a sensitive diagnostic for assessing the representation of deep convection and upper troposphere/lower stratosphere mixing processes in large-scale analyses and climate models.

  7. EQUIP training the trainers: an evaluation of a training programme for service users and carers involved in training mental health professionals in user-involved care planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, C; Grundy, A; Meade, O; Callaghan, P; Lovell, K

    2017-01-20

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: UK NHS policy highlights the importance of user and carer involvement in health professional training. We know little about service user and carer motivations and experiences of accessing training courses for delivering training to health professionals and how well such courses prepare them for delivering training to healthcare professionals. 'Involvement' in training has often been tokenistic and too narrowly focused on preregistration courses. There is limited data on how best to prepare and support potential service user and carer trainers. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This study adds to the international literature by highlighting service user and carer motivations for accessing a training course for delivering training to health professionals. Service users and carers wanted to gain new skills and confidence in presentation/facilitation as well as to make a difference to healthcare practice. We also learned that service users desired different levels of involvement in training facilitation - some wanted to take a more active role than others. A one-size-fits-all approach is not always appropriate. Encountering resistance from staff in training was a previously unidentified challenge to service user and carers' experience of delivering training in practice and is a key challenge for trainers to address in future. Professional training involvement can be enhanced via specialist training such as the EQUIP training the trainers programme evaluated here. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: When training service users and carers to deliver training to mental health professionals, it is important that service users are equipped to deal with resistance from staff. It is important that service user and carer roles are negotiated and agreed prior to delivering training to healthcare professionals to accommodate individual preferences and allay anxieties. Training for service users and carers must be offered

  8. Evaluation of the channelized Hotelling observer with an internal-noise model in a train-test paradigm for cardiac SPECT defect detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brankov, Jovan G

    2013-10-21

    The channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) has become a widely used approach for evaluating medical image quality, acting as a surrogate for human observers in early-stage research on assessment and optimization of imaging devices and algorithms. The CHO is typically used to measure lesion detectability. Its popularity stems from experiments showing that the CHO's detection performance can correlate well with that of human observers. In some cases, CHO performance overestimates human performance; to counteract this effect, an internal-noise model is introduced, which allows the CHO to be tuned to match human-observer performance. Typically, this tuning is achieved using example data obtained from human observers. We argue that this internal-noise tuning step is essentially a model training exercise; therefore, just as in supervised learning, it is essential to test the CHO with an internal-noise model on a set of data that is distinct from that used to tune (train) the model. Furthermore, we argue that, if the CHO is to provide useful insights about new imaging algorithms or devices, the test data should reflect such potential differences from the training data; it is not sufficient simply to use new noise realizations of the same imaging method. Motivated by these considerations, the novelty of this paper is the use of new model selection criteria to evaluate ten established internal-noise models, utilizing four different channel models, in a train-test approach. Though not the focus of the paper, a new internal-noise model is also proposed that outperformed the ten established models in the cases tested. The results, using cardiac perfusion SPECT data, show that the proposed train-test approach is necessary, as judged by the newly proposed model selection criteria, to avoid spurious conclusions. The results also demonstrate that, in some models, the optimal internal-noise parameter is very sensitive to the choice of training data; therefore, these models are prone

  9. Evaluation of the channelized Hotelling observer with an internal-noise model in a train-test paradigm for cardiac SPECT defect detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brankov, Jovan G.

    2013-10-01

    The channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) has become a widely used approach for evaluating medical image quality, acting as a surrogate for human observers in early-stage research on assessment and optimization of imaging devices and algorithms. The CHO is typically used to measure lesion detectability. Its popularity stems from experiments showing that the CHO's detection performance can correlate well with that of human observers. In some cases, CHO performance overestimates human performance; to counteract this effect, an internal-noise model is introduced, which allows the CHO to be tuned to match human-observer performance. Typically, this tuning is achieved using example data obtained from human observers. We argue that this internal-noise tuning step is essentially a model training exercise; therefore, just as in supervised learning, it is essential to test the CHO with an internal-noise model on a set of data that is distinct from that used to tune (train) the model. Furthermore, we argue that, if the CHO is to provide useful insights about new imaging algorithms or devices, the test data should reflect such potential differences from the training data; it is not sufficient simply to use new noise realizations of the same imaging method. Motivated by these considerations, the novelty of this paper is the use of new model selection criteria to evaluate ten established internal-noise models, utilizing four different channel models, in a train-test approach. Though not the focus of the paper, a new internal-noise model is also proposed that outperformed the ten established models in the cases tested. The results, using cardiac perfusion SPECT data, show that the proposed train-test approach is necessary, as judged by the newly proposed model selection criteria, to avoid spurious conclusions. The results also demonstrate that, in some models, the optimal internal-noise parameter is very sensitive to the choice of training data; therefore, these models are prone

  10. Laser Remote Sensing From ISS: CATS Cloud and Aerosol Level 2 Data Products (Heritage Edition)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodier, Sharon; Vaughan, Mark; Palm, Steve; Jensen, Mike; Yorks, John; McGill, Matt; Trepte, Chip; Murray, Tim; Lee, Kam-Pui

    2015-01-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) instrument was developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and deployed to the International Space Station (ISS) on 10 January 2015. CATS is mounted on the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility (JEM_EF) and will provide near-continuous, altitude-resolved measurements of clouds and aerosols in the Earth's atmosphere. The CATS ISS orbit path provides a unique opportunity to capture the full diurnal cycle of cloud and aerosol development and transport, allowing for studies that are not possible with the lidar aboard the CALIPSO platform, which flies in the sun-synchronous A-Train orbit." " One of the primary science objectives of CATS is to continue the CALIPSO aerosol and cloud profile data record to provide continuity of lidar climate observations during the transition from CALIPSO to EarthCARE. To accomplish this, the CATS project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and the CALIPSO project at NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC) are closely collaborating to develop and deliver a full suite of CALIPSO-like level 2 data products that will be produced using the newly acquired CATS level 1B data whenever CATS is operating in science modes 1. The CALIPSO mission is now well into its ninth year of on-orbit operations, and has developed a robust set of mature and well-validated science algorithms to retrieve the spatial and optical properties of clouds and aerosols from multi-wavelength lidar backscatter signals. By leveraging both new and existing NASA technical resources, this joint effort by the CATS and CALIPSO teams will deliver validated lidar data sets to the user community at the earliest possible opportunity. The science community will have access to two sets of CATS Level 2 data products. The "Operational" data products will be produced by the GSFC CATS team utilizing the new instrument capabilities (e.g., multiple FOVs and 1064 nm depolarization), while the "Heritage" data products created

  11. A training program for trainers of community nurses%社区护士师资培训方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨玲; 王永利; 杜雪平; 苏秀玉

    2011-01-01

    目的 开展社区护士师资培训,为后期社区护士培训提供参考.方法 通过文献查阅、专家咨询制定培训大纲;试卷考核、问卷调查、访谈法进行效果评价.结果 培训大纲的培训方式、培训内容及要求、组织管理、培训教材、培训效果总体满意度等43人综合评分分值>90分,满意率100%;培训前摸底考试成绩>70分7人(16.28%),培训后结业考试成绩>70分37人(86.05%),理论水平明显提高;对教师的理论水平、实践经验、授课形式、授课态度、语言、表达技巧、教学效果、互动等综合评价37人评分>90分,优秀率86.05%,6人评分为80~90分,良好率13.95%.结论 培训大纲科学性、可操作性强,培训总体满意度、教师满意度评分较高.%Objective To develop a training program for trainers of community nurses, and to provide information for training community nurses. Methods Teaching syllable was established by using literature review and experts consultation, and then examination, questionnaire survey and interview were employed to evaluate the training effect. Results All the participants (43 cases) satisfied the training mode, training contents and requirements, organization and management, training textbook, and overall training effect, with the scores being greater than 90 points; 7(16. 28%) participants got greater than 70 points before the training program, and 37 participants(86. 05%) scored greater than 70 points in final examination; all the participants expressed high satisfaction on teachers'theory level, practice experience, teaching mode, teaching attitude, language and expression skills, training effect, and interaction (37 participants scored > 90 points, accounting for 86. 05%, and the other 6 scored 80 to 90 points, accounting for 13. 95%). Conclusion The training syllable is scientific and practical, and the overall satisfaction with the training program and teachers are high.

  12. Neostigmine Administration after Spontaneous Recovery to a Train-of-Four Ratio of 0.9 to 1.0: A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Effect on Neuromuscular and Clinical Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Glenn S; Szokol, Joseph W; Avram, Michael J; Greenberg, Steven B; Shear, Torin D; Deshur, Mark A; Benson, Jessica; Newmark, Rebecca L; Maher, Colleen E

    2017-09-27

    When a muscle relaxant is administered to facilitate intubation, the benefits of anticholinesterase reversal must be balanced with potential risks. The aim of this double-blinded, randomized noninferiority trial was to evaluate the effect of neostigmine administration on neuromuscular function when given to patients after spontaneous recovery to a train-of-four ratio of 0.9 or greater. A total of 120 patients presenting for surgery requiring intubation were given a small dose of rocuronium. At the conclusion of surgery, 90 patients achieving a train-of-four ratio of 0.9 or greater were randomized to receive either neostigmine 40 μg/kg or saline (control). Train-of-four ratios were measured from the time of reversal until postanesthesia care unit admission. Patients were monitored for postextubation adverse respiratory events and assessed for muscle strength. Ninety patients achieved a train-of-four ratio of 0.9 or greater at the time of reversal. Mean train-of-four ratios in the control and neostigmine groups before reversal (1.02 vs. 1.03), 5 min postreversal (1.05 vs. 1.07), and at postanesthesia care unit admission (1.06 vs. 1.08) did not differ. The mean difference and corresponding 95% CI of the latter were -0.018 and -0.046 to 0.010. The incidences of postoperative hypoxemic events and episodes of airway obstruction were similar for the groups. The number of patients with postoperative signs and symptoms of muscle weakness did not differ between groups (except for double vision: 13 in the control group and 2 in the neostigmine group; P = 0.001). Administration of neostigmine at neuromuscular recovery was not associated with clinical evidence of anticholinesterase-induced muscle weakness.

  13. Research and development of a training approach combining face-to-face and on-line instruction for improving the technology skills and self-efficacy of science teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giza, Brian Humphrey

    2001-10-01

    A training environment for the technology professional development of science teachers was developed that incorporated three components: an online multimedia tutorial website, an interactive WebCT-based collaboration area, and a weekly face-to-face training session. The research design incorporated a pilot study in June 2000 and a main study in October--November 2000. Journal-writing and paired work approaches were used to help develop an atmosphere of collegiality and collaboration. Participant K--12 science teachers showed significant gains in both technology skills and Internet teaching self-efficacy when measured in a pre- and post-test manner.

  14. Impact of Obesity on Tamoxifen Chemoprevention in a Model of Ductal Carcinoma in Situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    drug delivery, surgeries, necropsy, cardiac puncture), and statistical analysis Postdoctoral Fellow- NeuroOncology Department of Pathology...1998 University of Texas, Arlington (Dr. Frederick M. MacDonnell) • Developed the protocol to synthesize a chiral ruthenium dimmer, then connect the

  15. CALIPSO observations of wave-induced PSCs with near-unity optical depth over Antarctica in 2006-2007

    CERN Document Server

    Noel, Vincent; Chepfer, Hélène

    2009-01-01

    Ground-based and satellite observations have hinted at the existence of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) with relatively high optical depths, even if optical depth values are hard to come by. This study documents a type II PSC observed from spaceborne lidar, with visible optical depths up to 0.8. Comparisons with multiple temperature fields, including reanalyses and results from mesoscale simulations, suggest that intense small-scale temperature fluctuations due to gravity waves play an important role in its formation, while nearby observations show the presence of a potentially related type Ia PSC farther downstream inside the polar vortex. Following this first case, the geographic distribution and microphysical properties of PSCs with optical depths above 0.3 are explored over Antarctica during the 2006 and 2007 austral winters. These clouds are rare (less than 1% of profiles) and concentrated over areas where strong winds hit steep ground slopes in the Western Hemisphere, especially over the peninsula. Su...

  16. Food and nutrient intakes of French frequent seafood consumers with regard to fish consumption recommendations: results from the CALIPSO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirot, Véronique; Dumas, Céline; Leblanc, Jean-Charles; Margaritis, Irène

    2011-05-01

    Besides providing n-3 fatty acids with nutritional and health benefits, seafood consumption may contribute to the reduction of nutrient prevalences of inadequacy. To evaluate the contributions of seafood and other food groups to nutrient intakes of frequent seafood consumers, food consumption was evaluated through an FFQ on 991 French men and women (18-81 years) consuming seafood at least twice a week. Intakes, prevalence of inadequacies, risks of upper limit excess and food contributions to intakes were assessed for thirty-three nutrients. Mean fat contributions to total energy intakes (38·3 and 39·0 % for men and women, respectively) met French recommendations, but mean carbohydrate intakes (40·9 and 39·7 %, respectively) were insufficient. Micronutrient inadequacies were lower than in the French general population, the highest being for vitamin C (41·3 and 40·1 % for men and women, respectively), vitamin E (35·0 and 35·3 % for men and women, respectively) and Mg (37·5 and 25·5 % for men and women, respectively). Upper safety limits (USL) were exceeded mostly for Zn (6·2 %), Ca (3·7 %), retinol (2·0 %) and Cu (0·9 %). Mean contributions of seafood to vitamin D, B12, I and Se intakes ranged 40-65 %. Molluscs and crustaceans significantly contributed to vitamin B12 (13·7 %), Cu (11·4 %), Fe (11·5 %), Zn (8·4 %) and I (6·1 %) intakes, and canned fish contributed to vitamin D intake (13·4 %). Besides fish, contributions of mollusc and crustacean consumption to nutrient intakes should be considered from a public health viewpoint. Consuming seafood at least twice a week induces moderate inadequacies and risks of exceeding USL for some micronutrients, whereas macronutrient intakes remained imbalanced.

  17. Gulf of Mexico Air Quality: CALIPSO Support for Gulf of Mexico Air Quality Relating to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Myngoc T.; Lapointe, Stephen; Jennings, Brittney; Zoumplis, Angela

    2011-01-01

    On April 20, 2010, an oil platform belonging to BP exploded and leaked a huge volume of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. In an effort to control the spread of the oil, BP applied dispersants such as Corexit and conducted in-situ burnings of the oil. This catastrophe created a complex chain of events that affected not only the fragile water and land ecosystems, but the humans who breathe the air every day. Thousands of people were exposed to fumes associated with oil vapors from the spill, burning of the oil, and the toxic mixture of dispersants. While aiding in clean-up efforts, local fishermen were directly exposure to fumes when working on the Gulf. A notable amount of Gulf Coast residents were also exposed to the oil fumes as seasonal southeasterly winds blew vapors toward land. The Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) found in oil vapors include: benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, xylene, naphthalene, hydrogen sulfide and particulate matter (PM). Increases in water temperature and sunlight due to the summer season allow for these VOCs and PM to evaporate into the air more rapidly. Aside from the VOCs found in oil vapors, the dispersant being used to break up the oil is highly toxic and is thought to be even more toxic than the oil itself (EPA website, 2010). To protect human health, the environment, and to make informed policy decisions relevant to the spill, the EPA Region 6 has continuously monitored the affected areas carefully for levels of pollutants in the outdoor air that are associated with petroleum products and the burning of oil along the coast. In an effort to prevent, prepare for, and respond to future oil spills that occur in and around inland waters of the United States, the EPA has been working with local, state, and federal response partners. Air quality measurements were collected by the EPA at five active monitoring systems stationed along the coast.

  18. as a training tool for anaesthesia nurses

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite very high levels of mobile phone ownership amongst healthcare workers in Africa, this form of educational delivery ... eLearning, or the use of electronic media and ... intervention and control groups, and it would have been ethically.

  19. A train for the bus(bars)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    On 8 April, the first SMACC (Superconducting Magnets and Circuits Consolidation) teams began work in the LHC tunnel. They are responsible for opening the interconnects between the magnets, laying the groundwork for the series of operations that will be performed by the team riding the ‘consolidation train’.   A technician installs the machine tool that allows them to prepare the surface of the section of the bar where the shunt will be fixed. The LHC’s 1,670 dipoles and quadrupoles are powered by power converters and connected by copper 'busbars’. The superconducting cables run through these bars, carrying a current of up to 11,850 amps. Six superconducting cables meet at each interconnect, where they are held together by a soldered (see box) electrical connection sandwiched between two pieces of copper, forming the splice between the busbars of the neighbouring magnets. The integrity of the electrical circuit is depen...

  20. Connecting strangers at a train station

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serafin, Stefania; Böttcher, Niels; Pellarin, Lars

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we describe a virtual instrument or a performance space, placed at Høje Tåstrup train station in Denmark, which is meant to establish communicative connections between strangers, by letting users of the system create soundscapes together across the rails. We discuss mapping...... to the development of an interactive installation which takes place in Hoje Taastrup train station in Denmark....

  1. A training program for scientific supercomputing users

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, F.; Moher, T.; Sabelli, N.; Solem, A.

    1988-01-01

    There is need for a mechanism to transfer supercomputing technology into the hands of scientists and engineers in such a way that they will acquire a foundation of knowledge that will permit integration of supercomputing as a tool in their research. Most computing center training emphasizes computer-specific information about how to use a particular computer system; most academic programs teach concepts to computer scientists. Only a few brief courses and new programs are designed for computational scientists. This paper describes an eleven-week training program aimed principally at graduate and postdoctoral students in computationally-intensive fields. The program is designed to balance the specificity of computing center courses, the abstractness of computer science courses, and the personal contact of traditional apprentice approaches. It is based on the experience of computer scientists and computational scientists, and consists of seminars and clinics given by many visiting and local faculty. It covers a variety of supercomputing concepts, issues, and practices related to architecture, operating systems, software design, numerical considerations, code optimization, graphics, communications, and networks. Its research component encourages understanding of scientific computing and supercomputer hardware issues. Flexibility in thinking about computing needs is emphasized by the use of several different supercomputer architectures, such as the Cray X/MP48 at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IBM 3090 600E/VF at the Cornell National Supercomputer Facility, and Alliant FX/8 at the Advanced Computing Research Facility at Argonne National Laboratory. 11 refs., 6 tabs.

  2. Teaching focus in psychotherapy: a training essential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Richard F; Xuan, Yan; Tavakoli, Donald N

    2013-03-01

    Practical application of psychodynamic therapy technique requires that the therapist focus the treatment. The authors review the current evidence about focus in psychotherapy, which suggests that it has a beneficial impact on outcome and patient satisfaction. The core psychodynamic problem is proposed as a valuable conceptual model for providing focus for patient, psychotherapist, and supervisor. The authors narrate a case history from the perspective of both the psychotherapist and the supervisor to demonstrate the opportunities and challenges in using this concept. Finally, the authors suggest that a focus on focus is desirable in residency psychotherapy training programs, and they make suggestions for educational methods that enhance resident training in this area.

  3. A Training Transfer Study of Simulation Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    protagonist, Ender , was a 12-year-old boy who played video games well. He did so well, in fact, that the government sent him to Battle School for... Ender made a risky move in the game and consequently won the day. Exhausted, he left the simulator to find out the secret of the game and of Battle...the Third Invasion. There were no games , the battles were real, and the only enemy you fought was the buggers. (p. 296) Ender , in fact, had been

  4. Development of a training curriculum for microsurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasundaram, Indran; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Darzi, Lord Ara

    2010-12-01

    Recent changes in healthcare necessitate revision of the current apprenticeship model of surgical training. Current methods of assessment such as examinations and logbooks are not criteria-based, so are subjective and lack validity and reliability. The objective feedback of technical skills is crucial to the structured learning of surgical skills. We review current publications about training and methods of assessment in microsurgery. Searches on PubMed using keywords (microsurgery, training, assessment, simulation, and skill) were used to retrieve relevant articles, and further cross-referencing was done to obtain more information. New methods of assessment that are objective include checklists, global rating scales (GRS), and dexterity analysis, which give feedback of technical skills during training. Vital (living), non-vital, prosthetic, and virtual reality simulation models can be used to train surgeons to a proficient level outside the operating theatre before they operate on real patients. After reviewing the current evidence we propose a curriculum for microsurgical training that starts outside the operating theatre. The surgical community should follow the example of other high-risk industries such as aviation, where continuous assessment on simulators is a part of training, but further research is necessary before such methods can be used for summative assessment and revalidation. Copyright © 2009 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A Training Module for Laparoscopic Urology

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: A fellowship training model in laparoscopic urological surgery has been established for interested urologists to help them proceed from the pelvic trainer/ animal laboratory environment to safe clinical practice. The objective of the model is to provide trainees with clinical experience under direct mentor supervision before embarking on independent laparoscopic urological surgery at their own base hospitals. Methods: The fellowship model incorporates 9 fluid phases: Phase 1 to co...

  6. Facilitating LOS Debriefings: A Training Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Lori K.; Jobe, Kimberly K.; Dismukes, R. Key

    1997-01-01

    This manual is a practical guide to help airline instructors effectively facilitate debriefings of Line Oriented Simulations (LOS). It is based on a recently completed study of Line Oriented Flight Training (LOFT) debriefings at several U.S. airlines. This manual presents specific facilitation tools instructors can use to achieve debriefing objectives. The approach of the manual is to be flexible so it can be tailored to the individual needs of each airline. Part One clarifies the purpose and objectives of facilitation in the LOS setting. Part Two provides recommendations for clarifying roles and expectations and presents a model for organizing discussion. Part Tree suggests techniques for eliciting active crew participation and in-depth analysis and evaluation. Finally, in Part Four, these techniques are organized according to the facilitation model. Examples of how to effectively use the techniques are provided throughout, including strategies to try when the debriefing objectives are not being fully achieved.

  7. A training model for laparoscopic urethrovesical anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chun; Lin, Tianxin; Zhang, Caixia; Guo, Zhenghui; Xu, Kewei; Dong, Wen; Han, Jinli; Huang, Hai; Yin, Xinbao; Huang, Jian

    2008-07-01

    To create and evaluate the effectiveness of an in vitro training model for laparoscopic urethrovesical anastomosis. Chicken posterior trunks and porcine colons were used to construct the training model, which was later compared with the chicken skin model. The posterior trunk of a chicken was used to simulate a human pelvis, and a 3-mm cloacal stump was used to simulate a human urethral stump. A 15-cm segment of porcine colon with a 1-cm orifice was used to simulate a human bladder or neobladder. An imitation urethrovesical anastomosis was performed with laparoscopic instruments in a laparoscopic training box. The simulated urethral stump and bladder neck were anastomosed with six interrupted stitches. Forty urologic residents were randomized into two groups. The residents in group A (n = 20) practiced using this model for 8 hours, while those in group B (n = 20) practiced using the chicken skin model for 8 hours. The residents' skills were assessed using the porcine model before and after training. All residents accomplished the training course and both assessments. There was no significant difference between the groups in anastomosis time (122.65 +/- 19.98 minutes v 120.70 +/- 17.30 minutes, P > 0.05) and quality (3.80 +/- 1.24 v 3.75 +/- 1.16, P > 0.05) before training. After the training sessions, both groups improved in anastomosis time and quality. Compared with residents in group B, residents in group A required less time (63.55 +/- 11.08 minutes v 76.55 +/- 12.46 minutes, P model more accurately resembles the structure and characteristic of the human pelvis, urethral stump, and bladder (neobladder). In addition, all the materials needed for this model are inexpensive and easily obtained. Therefore, it is an effective, convenient training model for laparoscopic urethrovesical anastomosis.

  8. Connecting strangers at a train station

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serafin, Stefania; Böttcher, Niels; Pellarin, Lars

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we describe a virtual instrument or a performance space, placed at Høje Tåstrup train station in Denmark, which is meant to establish communicative connections between strangers, by letting users of the system create soundscapes together across the rails. We discuss mapping...... to the development of an interactive installation which takes place in Hoje Taastrup train station in Denmark....

  9. Scriptwriting for Educational Broadcasting: A Training Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrington, Richard

    1976-01-01

    Outlines a possible syllabus for training educational scriptwriters under the following headings: objectives, audience analysis, message planning, media semiology, format variables, production constraints, and tricks of the trade. (BD)

  10. Evaluating a training programme for executive coaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolyne Beets

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The evaluation of training programmes provides methodological and logistical challenges to evaluators and human resource (HR managers. The training of executive coaches is no exception in this regard. Research purpose: The study aimed to investigate one particular aspect of the results of an executive coach training programme, and the extent to which knowledge, skills and attitudes acquired during the programme were applied in practical settings.Motivation for the study: Too little is known in South Africa about the effectiveness of training programmes, including executive coach training programmes. There is a need to demonstrate methodological approaches that would provide valid and reliable data.Research design, approach and method: The success case method (SCM was used to guide the study, consisting first of a survey of 80 participants in the training programme, followed by eight interviews to compare successful with less successful cases of skills transfer.Main findings: All six successful coaches were applying the proximal outcomes from the training with good results, with several valuable consequences resulting from the training. Barriers to successful implementation included personal circumstances and unfulfilled expectations of the programme content.Practical/managerial implications: Aspects of the training programme that could be improved included: the buddy selection system, more individualised feedback about self-development, closer supervision, and more support from programme managers.Contribution/value-add: This evaluation contributes to the evaluation literature by providing a documented exploration of a systematic application of the SCM. It also contributes to the coach training literature by providing a systematic evaluation of a coach training intervention in South Africa.

  11. Entwicklung und Evaluation eines Schulungsprogramms für Studenten im Praktischen Jahr in der Inneren Medizin [Development and evaluation of a training scheme for final year students in internal medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kraus, Bernd

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available [english] Aims: Due to the discontinuation of the 18-month practical period called "Arzt im Praktikum" students need to be fit for their job as hospital doctors earlier than they used to which is supposed to be achieved by a change of the German curriculum towards a more practical approach. After a needs assessment by focus groups a training scheme for students in their final year matching these needs was being established and assessed at the Medical Hospital Heidelberg. Methods: We established a training scheme composed of four units: (1 Medical didactics, (2 time-management and training on ward rounds, (3 and difficult communication situations (4 on ward. These trainings were attended by 21 final year students from May to July 2005. Outcomes: The students were highly satisfied with the individual training units (values ranging from 1.56±0.81 to 1.93±1.16 / 1= "excellent", 6= "insufficient". The qualitative analysis of the questionnaire comments also shows a consistently positive response. Especially the communication and ward round trainings were seen as being "close to reality", and it was considered very "sensible" training to practise difficult situations in a simulated setting at first. Conclusion: For the final year students, an important training segment for future medical work, options for clinical-practical training schemes, adequate in difficulty and setting, were established. This is a first step towards a curriculum for the final year. [german] Zielsetzung: Durch den Wegfall des Ausbildungsabschnittes "Arzt im Praktikum" ist eine frühere Berufsfähigkeit der Medizinstudenten mit dem Abschluss des Praktischen Jahres geboten. Diese soll bei den Studierenden der Medizin unter anderem mit der Änderung der Approbationsordnung durch die Betonung einer verstärkten Praxisorientierung gefördert werden. Dennoch sind insbesondere für den Abschnitt des Praktischen Jahres vertiefte Anstrengungen notwendig, um die Medizinstudenten auf den

  12. A cluster randomised controlled trial and process evaluation of a training programme for mental health professionals to enhance user involvement in care planning in service users with severe mental health issues (EQUIP): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Peter; Roberts, Chris; O'Leary, Neil; Callaghan, Patrick; Bee, Penny; Fraser, Claire; Gibbons, Chris; Olleveant, Nicola; Rogers, Anne; Davies, Linda; Drake, Richard; Sanders, Caroline; Meade, Oonagh; Grundy, Andrew; Walker, Lauren; Cree, Lindsey; Berzins, Kathryn; Brooks, Helen; Beatty, Susan; Cahoon, Patrick; Rolfe, Anita; Lovell, Karina

    2015-08-13

    Involving service users in planning their care is at the centre of policy initiatives to improve mental health care quality in England. Whilst users value care planning and want to be more involved in their own care, there is substantial empirical evidence that the majority of users are not fully involved in the care planning process. Our aim is to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of training for mental health professionals in improving user involvement with the care planning processes. This is a cluster randomised controlled trial of community mental health teams in NHS Trusts in England allocated either to a training intervention to improve user and carer involvement in care planning or control (no training and care planning as usual). We will evaluate the effectiveness of the training intervention using a mixed design, including a 'cluster cohort' sample, a 'cluster cross-sectional' sample and process evaluation. Service users will be recruited from the caseloads of care co-ordinators. The primary outcome will be change in self-reported involvement in care planning as measured by the validated Health Care Climate Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes include involvement in care planning, satisfaction with services, medication side-effects, recovery and hope, mental health symptoms, alliance/engagement, well-being and quality of life. Cost- effectiveness will also be measured. A process evaluation informed by implementation theory will be undertaken to assess the extent to which the training was implemented and to gauge sustainability beyond the time-frame of the trial. It is hoped that the trial will generate data to inform mental health care policy and practice on care planning. ISRCTN16488358 (14 May 2014).

  13. 单板U型场地滑雪动态平衡力量训练器的研制%Development of a Training Appliance for Half-pipe Snow boarders' Dynamic Balance Strength

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张连涛

    2011-01-01

    我国单板U型场地滑雪运动员由于陆地训练时间是雪上训练时间的1倍,陆地训练手段的多样化、系统化和专项化对运动员显得尤为重要。目前,国内能实现单板U型场地滑雪运动员回荡平衡与提高力量的训练器械处于空白状态。从运动技术的生物力学与运动员技能的形成机制为视角,提出单板U型场地滑雪动态平衡力量训练器设计的基本要求与结构特征,添补国内空白,同时论述其工作原理与使用方法。%For Chinese half-pipe snowboarders,the diversification,systematization and specialization of land training means are particularly important because the land training doubles the time of snow training.At present,it's still a blank in China about the balance training appliance which can touch the characteristics of half-pipe snowboard's swing technique.Starting from the biomechanical factor of technique and the formation of snowboarders' skill,the paper suggests the basic requirements and architectural feature in designing a training appliance for half-pipe snowboarders' dynamic balance strength.It also indicates its running principle and usage.

  14. Accuracy VS Performance: Finding the Sweet Spot in the Geospatial Resolution of Satellite Metadata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskin, W. E.; Mangosing, D. C.; Rinsland, P. L.

    2010-12-01

    NASA’s Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) and the Cloud-Aerosol LIDAR and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) team at the NASA Langley Research Center recently collaborated in the development of a new CALIPSO Search and Subset web application. The web application is comprised of three elements: (1) A PostGIS-enabled PostgreSQL database system, which is used to store temporal and geospatial metadata from CALIPSO’s LIDAR, Infrared, and Wide Field Camera datasets, (2) the SciFlo engine, which is a data flow engine that enables semantic, scientific data flow executions in a grid or clustered network computational environment, and (3) PHP-based web application that incorporates some Web 2.0 / AJAX technologies used in the web interface. The search portion of the web application leverages geodetic indexing and search capabilities that became available in the February 2010 release of PostGIS version1.5. This presentation highlights the lessons learned in experimenting with various geospatial resolutions of CALIPSO’s LIDAR sensor ground track metadata. Details of the various spatial resolutions, spatial database schema designs, spatial indexing strategies, and performance results will be discussed. The focus will be on illustrating our findings on the spatial resolutions for ground track metadata that optimized search time and search accuracy in the CALIPSO Search and Subset Application. The CALIPSO satellite provides new insight into the role that clouds and atmospheric aerosols (airborne particles) play in regulating Earth's weather, climate, and air quality. CALIPSO combines an active LIDAR instrument with passive infrared and visible imagers to probe the vertical structure and properties of thin clouds and aerosols over the globe. The CALIPSO satellite was launched on April 28, 2006 and is part of the A-train satellite constellation. The ASDC in Langley’s Science Directorate leads NASA’s program for the processing, archival and

  15. The PULSAR primary care protocol: a stepped-wedge cluster randomized controlled trial to test a training intervention for general practitioners in recovery-oriented practice to optimize personal recovery in adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enticott, Joanne C; Shawyer, Frances; Brophy, Lisa; Russell, Grant; Fossey, Ellie; Inder, Brett; Mazza, Danielle; Vasi, Shiva; Weller, Penelope June; Wilson-Evered, Elisabeth; Edan, Vrinda; Meadows, Graham

    2016-12-20

    General practitioners (GPs) in Australia play a central role in the delivery of mental health care. This article describes the PULSAR (Principles Unite Local Services Assisting Recovery) Primary Care protocol, a novel mixed methods evaluation of a training intervention for GPs in recovery-oriented practice. The aim of the intervention is to optimize personal recovery in patients consulting study GPs for mental health issues. The intervention mixed methods design involves a stepped-wedge cluster randomized controlled trial testing the outcomes of training in recovery-oriented practice, together with an embedded qualitative study to identify the contextual enablers and challenges to implementing recovery-oriented practice. The project is conducted in Victoria, Australia between 2013 and 2017. Eighteen general practices and community health centers are randomly allocated to one of two steps (nine months apart) to start an intervention comprising GP training in the delivery of recovery-oriented practice. Data collection consists of cross-sectional surveys collected from patients of participating GPs at baseline, and again at the end of Steps 1 and 2. The primary outcome is improvement in personal recovery using responses to the Questionnaire about the Process of Recovery. Secondary outcomes are improvements in patient-rated measures of personal recovery and wellbeing, and of the recovery-oriented practice they have received, using the INSPIRE questionnaire, the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale, and the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale. Participant data will be analyzed in the group that the cluster was assigned to at each study time point. Another per-protocol dataset will contain all data time-stamped according to the date of intervention received at each cluster site. Qualitative interviews with GPs and patients at three and nine months post-training will investigate experiences and challenges related to implementing recovery-oriented practice in primary

  16. E-LEARNING COMO AGENTE DE CAMBIO. DISEÑO PEDAGÓGICO DE UN PROCESO DE FORMACIÓN E-LEARNING AS AN INSTRUMENT FOR CHANGE: THE PEDAGOGICAL DESIGN OF A TRAINING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Lucer Fustes

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se presenta el desarrollo y resumen de los resultados de una experiencia desarrollada en la Universidad de Extremadura para el diseño e implementación en Moodle de un Curso Virtual de Especialista Universitario en Docencia en Educación Secundaria. Nuestro grupo de trabajo, implicado en la enseñanza en línea desde hace más de una década, decidió emprender en el año 2004 una experiencia innovadora donde ensayar nuestra particular concepción del e-learning. De este modo, se inició el diseño de una acción formativa de posgrado a través de un proceso continuo de negociación grupal, en el que tratamos de experimentar nuevas fórmulas de aprendizaje que se alejaran del ya señalado tecnocentrismo. El diseño del curso pretende ser innovador desde su planteamiento tutorial y en su sistema de evaluación de los aprendizajes, pues buscamos la certeza de la calidad del aprendizaje en una evaluación realizada únicamente de modo virtual. Actualmente estamos estudiando los resultados del mismo, pero, tal y como exponemos en el artículo, ya comenzamos a entrever sus fortalezas y sus aspectos susceptibles de mejora, que sin duda alguna nos reorientan y guían hacia buenas prácticas de enseñanza virtual. This paper presents the development and a summary of the results of a Training Experience implemented in the University of Extremadura. This experience is the innovative design of an online Postgraduate Course for Secondary School Teachers. The research team, which has been committed to online teaching for longer than a decade, began an innovative experience to test their singular conception of e-learning. So, a continuous process of group-negotiation began in order to design a course where the educational method should be the main part of the course. The design is innovative because of the tutorial approach and the learning evaluation process (as the quality of the evaluation is expected to be high although this is just

  17. Metabolismo de repouso de mulheres pós-menopausadas submetidas a programa de treinamento com pesos (hipertrofia Resting metabolism of post-menopause women submitted to a training program with weights (hypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Cléia Trevisan

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available O estudo objetivou avaliar o gasto energético de repouso (GER de mulheres pós-menopausadas submetidas a programa de treinamento com pesos. Foram estudadas 30 mulheres (FSH > 40mIU/mL entre 45 e 70 anos, separadas em dois grupos (GT: treinamento, n = 15 e GC: controle, n = 15. Calculou-se o índice de massa corporal (kg/m² e por meio da impedância bioelétrica (BIA determinaram-se o percentual de gordura corporal e a massa muscular. O GER foi obtido por meio da calorimetria indireta (O2 e CO2 respiratórios e calculado pela equação de Weir. A mensuração ocorreu após 12 horas de jejum, durante 30 minutos sob temperatura e umidade controladas. O GT participou do programa de treinamento com pesos durante 16 semanas, na freqüência de três vezes por semana. Os dados analisados pelos testes t de Student, Mann-Whitney e ANOVA (p The study had as objective to evaluate the resting energy expenditure (REE of post-menopause women submitted to a training program with weights. Thirty women, age between 45 and 70 years (FSH > 40 mIUmL, separated in two groups (TG: training n = 15 and CG: control n = 15 were studied. The body mass index (kg/m² was calculated and the body fat percentage and the muscular mass were determined through bioelectric impedance (BIA. The REE was obtained through indirect calorimetry (respiratory O2 and CO2 and calculated by the Weir equation. The measurement occurred after 12 hours of fasting, during 30 minutes under controlled temperature and humidity. The TG participated of the training program with weights during 16 weeks, in the frequency of three times per week. The analyzed data by the t-Student, Mann-Whitney and ANOVA tests (p < 0.05 demonstrated that the TG had body mass increased in the 1.8 kg mean, muscular mass in 2.0 kg and the REE presented increase of 8.4% in relation to the CG. In conclusion, the training with weights increased muscular mass and REE. Therefore, this kind of exercise is recommended part of

  18. Efeito de um programa de treinamento de facilitação neuromuscular proprioceptiva sobre a mobilidade torácica Effect of a training program based on proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation onto thoracic mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Aparecida Moreno

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A proposta deste estudo foi analisar o efeito de um programa de treinamento de membros superiores baseado nas técnicas de facilitação neuromuscular proprioceptiva (FNP sobre a mobilidade torácica. Foram estudadas 24 voluntárias sedentárias, idade 22,9 ± 2,9 anos, divididas em grupo controle (GC, que não participou do treinamento, e grupo treinado (GT. O protocolo de treinamento físico foi constituído por um programa de exercícios de FNP, realizado três vezes por semana, durante quatro semanas. Os dois grupos foram submetidos à avaliação da mobilidade torácica por meio de cirtometria, antes e após o período de treinamento. Os dados colhidos foram analisados estatisticamente, com nível de significância α = 5%. Os valores da cirtometria axilar e xifoideana do GC antes e após o período de intervenção não apresentaram alterações significativas (p>0,05. No GT os valores das variáveis foram significantemente maiores após a intervenção (pThe purpose of this study was to analyse the effect of an upper limb training program based on proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF techniques on thoracic mobility. The study was carried out with 24 sedentary female volunteers, aged 22.9±2.9 years. Participants were divided into a control group (CG, who did not perform any exercise, and a trained group (TG, submitted to training. The physical training protocol consisted of a PNF exercise program, three times a week for four weeks. The two groups were assessed as to thoracic mobility by means of cirtometry before and after the training period. Data were statistically analysed and significance level set at α=5%. In CG, initial axillary and xiphoid cirtometry values showed no significant differences when compared to data obtained on the final evaluation (p>0.05. TG measures, in turn, were significantly higher after the training program (p<0.05. The PNF protocol here proposed seems hence to be an efficient exercise program to

  19. A new studying method for safety of a train with attitude changing in side wind%基于姿态变化的列车侧风安全性研究的新方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔涛; 张卫华

    2011-01-01

    针对列车空气动力学与列车系统动力学联合同步仿真的耗时问题,提出一种新的基于Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE)的列车空气动力学与列车系统动力学联合仿真方法.首先,分别建立列车侧风计算流体动力学模型和列车多体系统动力学模型.然后,通过参数传递、求解控制和动态网格的使用实现列车侧风计算流体动力学和列车多体系统动力学的联合仿真,其中列车系统动力学模型不考虑轨道激励,侧风环境下列车以平衡状态逐步逼近最终平衡状态,从而以更快的计算速度得到侧风环境下列车的稳定姿态和该姿态下的气动载荷.最后将此气动载荷加载到列车多体系统动力学模型,并考虑轨道激励,进行动力学分析,评价侧风环境下列车的安全性指标.%In order to treat a time-consuming problem of synchronous simulation of aero-dynamics and dynamics of a train system, a new simulation method was proposed based on arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian ( ALE ). Firstly, models for side-wind computational fluid dynamics and train multibody system dynamics were built, respectively. Then, the combined simulation was performed through using parameters passing, solution control and dynamic grid not considering track excitations, the final equilibrium state of the train in side-wind was approached gradually, and the steady attitude and the corresponding aerodynamic loads caused by the side-wind were computed more efficiently. Finally, the aerodynamic loads and track excitations were applied to the train multibody system, its dynamical performance and safety index were analyzed.

  20. 基于GIS的某训练场土壤重金属污染评价%Evaluation of Heavy Metal Pollution in Soils from a Training Ground Based on GIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玉通; 方振东; 杨琴; 谢朝新; 王大勇; 毛华军

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,a tank shooting range in a training ground in the southwest of China was investigated,and the content of Cu,Pb,Zn,Co and Ni in the soil was monitored and analyzed.Evaluation of pollution in the sampling area was applied through the single factor index method and the composite pollution index Nemrow method,and the pollution index distribution map was worked out by Arcgis software.The evaluation result shows that: Cu,Pb,Zn,Co and Ni in the tank shooting range have different degrees of pollution respectively,the average composite pollution index Nemrow reaches 1.64.The highest single-factor pollution index of Co reaches 3.84,so Co is the priority element to be monitored in the heavy metal pollution control of soil in future.The pollution index distribution map shows that: the heavy metal pollution is particularly serious in the area of dropping bombs.The pollution distributing characters of Cu and Pb are similar,Zn,Co and Ni have similar characters.The author considers that,the migration of Ni and Pb is strong under the combined effect of various conditions in the shooting range,and the migration of Cu is weak.The sources of heavy metal pollution comprise residual cannonballs,bullets,and explosives.The residual shells and bullets in the soil could lead to a permanent soil contamination of heavy metals.%以中国西南地区某训练场的坦克射击区为研究对象,监测并分析了土壤中Pb、Cu、Zn、Co和Ni的含量;采用单因子指数法和内梅罗综合污染指数法评价了采样区的重金属污染状况,同时运用Arcgis软件分析制定出了采样区的污染指数分布图.评价结果表明,坦克射击区Pb、Cu、Zn、Co和Ni分别存在不同程度的污染,重金属内梅罗综合污染指数平均为1.64;Co的单因子指数最高达到了3.84,是未来土壤重金属污染控制中优先关注的元素;污染指数分布图显示,落弹区土壤的重金属污染尤为严重.Cu和Pb污染分布特征较相似,Zn、Co

  1. Una práctica de lectura académica en una experiencia de formación de docentes universitarios (An academic reading practice in a training experience of university teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Narváez Cardona

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available ResumenDiseñamos y analizamos una propuesta de formación de docentes universitarios sobre lectura académica, la cual se sustenta en el reconocimiento mutuo de las experticias tanto de los docentes especialistas en lengua como de los docentes de otros campos, con el fin de explorar un camino que nos permita comprender lo viable y lo pertinente para la transformación de las prácticas con la lectura en las asignaturas profesionales. Este artículo focaliza la reflexión sobre la manera como se planeó y desarrolló el trabajo con dos documentos escritos, con el propósito de incidir en la creencia de los docentes de que no es su responsabilidad ocuparse de la lectura en la universidad. El documento se organiza en cuatro momentos: El primero justifica la propuesta de formación; el segundo la caracteriza; el tercero presenta los sucesos emergentes durante el trabajo con los dos documentos de lectura y, por último, se plantean algunos elementos de la discusión. La reflexión desarrollada por el grupo investigador podría mostrar que la transformación de las instituciones –hacia prácticas académicas con la lectura– pasa por la necesaria formación de equipos docentes.AbstractWe designed and analyzed a proposal on a training for university teachers about academic reading, which is supported in the mutual acknowledgement of the experiences of both - language teachers, as well as teachers of other fields, in order to explore a path that allows us to understand what is feasible and relevant for the transformation of the reading practices of the practitioners. This paper focuses on the reflection about the way the work was planned and developed with two written documents, with the purpose of influencing the teachers’ belief that it is not their responsibility to look after reading at the university. The paper is organized in four moments: The first one justifies the training proposal; the second one characterizes it; the third one makes the

  2. Study of MPLNET-Derived Aerosol Climatology over Kanpur, India, and Validation of CALIPSO Level 2 Version 3 Backscatter and Extinction Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Amit; Tripathi, S. N.; Kaul, D. S.; Welton, Ellsworth J.

    2012-01-01

    The level 2 aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles from the NASA Micropulse Lidar Network (MPLNET) at Kanpur, India, have been studied from May 2009 to September 2010. Monthly averaged extinction profiles from MPLNET shows high extinction values near the surface during October March. Higher extinction values at altitudes of 24 km are observed from April to June, a period marked by frequent dust episodes. Version 3 level 2 Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) aerosol profile products have been compared with corresponding data from MPLNET over Kanpur for the above-mentioned period. Out of the available backscatter profiles, the16 profiles used in this study have time differences less than 3 h and distances less than 130 km. Among these profiles, four cases show good comparison above 400 m with R2 greater than 0.7. Comparison with AERONET data shows that the aerosol type is properly identified by the CALIOP algorithm. Cloud contamination is a possible source of error in the remaining cases of poor comparison. Another source of error is the improper backscatter-to-extinction ratio, which further affects the accuracy of extinction coefficient retrieval.

  3. Module 3 My First Ride on a Train

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    1.train vt.& vi.训l练;培训;接受训练 (1)train(sb)as/in/for We are not trained in the matter of agricultural business 我们在农业生意方面没有受到训练。They spend two hours training for the race every day.他们每天花两个小时的时间练习赛跑。They trained him asan engineer他们把他培养成一名工程师。(2)train to do

  4. Removing Hazardous Materials from Buildings: A Training Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Regulated as universal waste • E-waste (electronics, wiring, computer cables) – Depends on your state • Household products (window cleaner , furniture...Todd F. Shupe, Richard P. Vlosky, and H.M. Barnes. 2003. “Past, Present, and Future of the Wood Preservation Industry.” Forest Products Journal 53(10...approval of the use of such commercial products . All product names and trademarks cited are the property of their respective owners. The findings of this

  5. A Training Study of the Hercules Observer Trainer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    des tâches et des exigences en matière de formation, et a déterminé une solution technique qui a été mise en œuvre dans toute une gamme de contrats ...CAE Professional Services Inc. Call-up 7949-08 under Standing Offer W7711-057949. April 2007 – March 2008. [7] Hercules Observer Trainer System...Development. CAE Professional Services Inc. Call-up 7949-06 under Standing Offer W7711-057949. December 2006 – March 2007. [8] High Performance Visual

  6. A Training Program in Breast Cancer Research Using NMR Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    relative fluorescence of the oxonol-stained cell types. Oxonol fluorescence intensity measures membrane po- tential when the extracellular potassium ...final temperature of 290jC and hold for 0.75 min. Helium was used as the carrier gas at a constant velocity of 41 cm/s. Electron impact ionization at...fresh dilution 1:3 by volume with deionized water was prepared and a 5-mL droplet was micropi- petted onto a standard 200-mesh transmission electron

  7. F-35A Training Basing Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    recreation center < 65 Yes El Pueblo Park/Recreation Center Ramada, barbecue pits, pool, playground, play courts, recreation center < 65 Yes Fiesta Park...3.10–4 indicates which sites would experience noise levels above 65 dB DNL. Under Scenario T1, noise levels at one location, Fiesta Park, would...Scenario T2 (48 Aircraft) Scenario T3 (72 Aircraft) Challenger Middle School < 65 ឱ ឱ 65–70 Fiesta Park < 65 65–70 65–70 65–70 Mission

  8. Pollution prevention opportunity assessments, a training and resource guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VALERO, O.J.

    1998-11-03

    The intention of the ''Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment Training and Resource Guide'' is to help Hanford waste generators identify ways to reduce waste through the Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (P20A) process. This document presents pollution prevention tools and provides a step-by-step approach for conducting assessments.

  9. Export Management Specialist. A Training Program. Instructor's Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This publication provides instructors with materials for an export management specialist (EMS) training program. The objective of the training program is to assist companies in reaching their export goals by educating current and potential managers about the basics of exporting. It provides a foundation for considering international trade and for…

  10. Oscillatory EEG correlates of arithmetic strategies: A training study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland H. Grabner

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available There has been a long tradition of research on mathematics education showing that children and adults use different strategies to solve arithmetic problems. Neurophysiological studies have recently begun to investigate the brain correlates of these strategies. The existing body of data, however, reflect static end points of the learning process and do not provide information on how brain activity changes in response to training or intervention. In this study, we explicitly address this issue by training participants in using fact retrieval strategies. We also investigate whether brain activity related to arithmetic fact learning is domain-specific or whether this generalizes to other learning materials, such as the solution of figural-spatial problems. Twenty adult students were trained on sets of two-digit multiplication problems and figural-spatial problems. After the training, they were presented with the trained and untrained problems while their brain activity was recorded by means of electroencephalography (EEG . In both problem types, the training resulted in accuracies over 90 % and significant decreases in solution times. Analyses of the oscillatory EEG data also revealed training effects across both problem types. Specifically, we observed training-related activity increases in the theta band (3-6 Hz and decreases in the lower alpha band (8-10 Hz, especially over parieto-occipital and parietal brain regions. These results provide the first evidence that a short term fact retrieval training results in significant changes in oscillatory EEG activity. These findings further corroborate the role of the theta band in the retrieval of semantic information from memory and suggest that theta activity is not only sensitive to fact retrieval in mental arithmetic but also in other domains.

  11. A Trained Network Solution for Multi-State Structural Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-12

    for 1% spring stiffness loss…………………………………………...6 4 General SIMO data flow…………………………………………………………………..7 5 Transmissibility estimation in noise...distribution is unlimited. 4 primary objective is, under an assumed single-input/multiple-output ( SIMO ) vibration test and estimator, to propose a...and produce a confidence level for decision- making. 4.0 STATISTICAL UNCERTAINTY MODELING APPROACHES A single-input-multiple-output ( SIMO ) flow

  12. Determinants of effective medical intern training at a training hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-07-11

    Jul 11, 2012 ... misunderstanding regarding skills and competencies of doctors that were generally ... such as team work, ethics, confidence, professionalism and ..... interpersonal relationship reduces the conflicts at the workplace and intern.

  13. Customer care a training manual for library staff

    CERN Document Server

    Gannon-Leary, Pat

    2010-01-01

    Customer Care provides a detailed course suitable for delivery to library staff at all levels. It can be used as a stand-alone reference work for customer care processes and procedures or, alternatively, it can be used by library staff to tailor a customer care course to suit the requirements and training needs of their own staff.Dual use - reference work and/or training manualPotential as a text bookApplicable to a wider context than LIS - could be used for a whole HEI institutional approach to customer care or in local authorities/public services

  14. A Training Model for Peer Tutoring with Mentally Retarded Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacc, Nicholas

    A program in which mentally retarded persons are trained to tutor their peers is described. Considered are selection and training aspects of such a program, and emphasized is the importance of the relationship between tutor and student. Tutors are explained to learn principles of establishing specific plans and keeping basic records. (CL)

  15. A training syllabus for radiation protection in dental radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, A; Dowling, A; Renehan, J; Clarke, D; Malone, J F

    2008-01-01

    The EU Council Directive 97/43/EURATOM (MED) states that Member States shall ensure that adequate theoretical and practical training is provided for dental practitioners working with ionising radiation; this also includes the provision of continuing education and training programmes, post-qualification. The area of dental radiology is specifically mentioned in this legally binding document. The Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, St James's Hospital, Dublin, is particularly interested in the area of radiation protection training and routinely provides educational courses both at national and international levels. A recent review of their dental radiation protection course was undertaken in conjunction with a number of Principal Dental Surgeons within the Health Service Executive in Ireland. The revised course was delivered to over 200 dental staff members at two separate meetings during 2006. The response from attendees was very positive. It is proposed to extend this course to other dental professionals, working both in the Irish private and public health sectors in the future.

  16. Original Research Article Development and Evaluation of a Training ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    2009-12-02

    Dec 2, 2009 ... disciplines (including medicine, pharmacy, nursing, biotechnology, cell and ... published and not under consideration for publication) will be published without delay. ... identification of risk factors and high risk groups,.

  17. Mental health nurses' diabetes care skills - a training needs analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Michael

    2009-05-28

    This article explores mental health nurses' diabetes training needs. A survey of inpatient and community mental health nurses was undertaken using a 16-item self-reporting questionnaire. Two hundred and twenty questionnaires were sent out and 138 returned, providing a response rate of 63%. Analysis shows that mental health nurses are currently involved in a range of diabetes care activities, however, their knowledge and skills may not be up to date. Mental health nurses also report the growing impact of diabetes care on their workload. Areas of identified training needs include taking blood glucose readings, giving dietary advice, liaison with diabetes nurse specialists and weight management. Mental health services and education providers need to consider developing specific training courses for mental health nurses.

  18. Guidelines for a Training Course in Noise Survey Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadley, John; And Others

    The course is designed to train noise survey technicians during a 3-5 day period to make reliable measurements of 75 percent of the noise problems encountered in the community. The more complex noise problems remaining will continue to be handled by experienced specialists. These technicians will be trained to assist State and local governments in…

  19. Promoting theory of mind during middle childhood: a training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecce, Serena; Bianco, Federica; Devine, Rory T; Hughes, Claire; Banerjee, Robin

    2014-10-01

    Evidence that conversations about the mind foster improvements in theory of mind (ToM) is growing, but their efficacy in typically developing school-aged children has yet to be demonstrated. To address this gap, we designed a conversation-based training program for 9- and 10-year-olds and measured its effectiveness by pre- and post-test comparisons of performance on age-appropriate ToM tasks for two groups (matched at pre-test for gender, age, socioeconomic background, verbal ability, reading comprehension, executive functions, and ToM) who were assigned to either the intervention condition (n=45) or an active control condition (n=46). The intervention group showed significantly greater gains in ToM than the control group; this contrast was stable over 2 months, and (in a subsample) the improvement in ToM was independent of any changes in executive functions. Implications for the role of conversations about the mind in children's mental state reasoning are discussed.

  20. A Training Program in Breast Cancer Research Using NMR Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    mice coexpressing mutant presenilin I and amyloid precursor proteins., Neuron, 19 (1997) 939-45. 4. Cavalieri, B. Geometria indivibilibus continuorum...Bononi: Typis Clementis Ferronij, 1635. Reprint from: Geometria degli indivisibili. Torino: Unione Tipografico-Editrice Torinese, 1966.’ 5. Convit, A

  1. Translating and validating a Training Needs Assessment tool into Greek

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicks Carolyn M

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The translation and cultural adaptation of widely accepted, psychometrically tested tools is regarded as an essential component of effective human resource management in the primary care arena. The Training Needs Assessment (TNA is a widely used, valid instrument, designed to measure professional development needs of health care professionals, especially in primary health care. This study aims to describe the translation, adaptation and validation of the TNA questionnaire into Greek language and discuss possibilities of its use in primary care settings. Methods A modified version of the English self-administered questionnaire consisting of 30 items was used. Internationally recommended methodology, mandating forward translation, backward translation, reconciliation and pretesting steps, was followed. Tool validation included assessing item internal consistency, using the alpha coefficient of Cronbach. Reproducibility (test – retest reliability was measured by the kappa correlation coefficient. Criterion validity was calculated for selected parts of the questionnaire by correlating respondents' research experience with relevant research item scores. An exploratory factor analysis highlighted how the items group together, using a Varimax (oblique rotation and subsequent Cronbach's alpha assessment. Results The psychometric properties of the Greek version of the TNA questionnaire for nursing staff employed in primary care were good. Internal consistency of the instrument was very good, Cronbach's alpha was found to be 0.985 (p 1.0, KMO (Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin measure of sampling adequacy = 0.680 and Bartlett's test of sphericity, p Conclusion The translated and adapted Greek version is comparable with the original English instrument in terms of validity and reliability and it is suitable to assess professional development needs of nursing staff in Greek primary care settings.

  2. General practitioners as educators in adolescent health: a training evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Mortel, Thea; Bird, Jennifer; Chown, Peter; Trigger, Robert; Ahern, Christine

    2016-03-22

    General practitioners play an important role in the primary care of adolescents in both community and clinical settings. Yet studies show that GPs can lack confidence, skills and knowledge in adolescent health. This study evaluates the effectiveness of an innovative training intervention on medical participants' knowledge and confidence as adolescent health educators in a school setting. 15 general practitioners, 12 general practice registrars and 18 medical students participated in an adolescent health education workshop followed by field experience in health education sessions in secondary schools. The mixed method design included a pre and post intervention survey and focus group interviews. Mean scores on the Confidence to Teach scale increased significantly (3.34 ± 0.51 to 4.09 ± 0.33) (p teaching skills especially lesson planning and design, practicing experiential teaching strategies and finding the 'sweet spot' when communicating with adolescents. Some participants reported that these skills would transfer to the practice setting. An applied training intervention that uses evidence-based, experiential teaching strategies and focuses on developing knowledge and practical teaching skills appropriate for the health education of adolescents can enhance knowledge and confidence to engage in community-based adolescent health education.

  3. Paint and Surface Preparation: A Training Program for Shipyard Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    algae and other marine growths. Cuprous oxide, a biotoxin, is the major anti-fouling ingredient in the various16 coatings which are used on...Proper choice and consistent use of respirators and protective creams and clothing shield the body from these harmful substances. Adequate ventilation in...prevented by using protective skin creams and protective clothing, including heavy duty gloves. Abrasive blast cleaning also demands the use of protective

  4. Virtual vitreoretinal surgery: validation of a training programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vergmann, Anna Stage; Vestergaard, Anders Højslet; Grauslund, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To test the validity of the eyesi surgical simulator as an assessment tool in a virtual reality vitreoretinal training programme. METHODS: In collaboration with an experienced vitreoretinal surgeon, a virtual vitreoretinal training programme was composed on the eyesi surgical simulator...... surgical simulator as an assessment tool for overall score and for four of six vitreoretinal modules. These findings could potentially make the programme a useful tool in the training of future vitreoretinal surgeons....

  5. Speech-in-Speech Recognition: A Training Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Engen, Kristin J.

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to identify aspects of speech-in-noise recognition that are susceptible to training, focusing on whether listeners can learn to adapt to target talkers ("tune in") and learn to better cope with various maskers ("tune out") after short-term training. Listeners received training on English sentence recognition in…

  6. AGAINST A TRAINING FOR AN EDUCATION IN HUMAN RIGHTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Marinho Pimenta

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The theme of Human Rights is now consensual even in the counter-ideologies of the contemporary world. In support of mainly on theory and cultural criticism of slovenian Slavoj Zizek and the marxist theory, from a review of the literature, this article of exploratory nature, aims demonstrate how the Human Rights are today a liberal consensus and ideological very useful for capitalist hegemony of the post-cold war. Perceives the risk of advocating the theme of Human Rights as central to emancipatory education and training for it.

  7. A training syllabus for radiation protection in dental radiology.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, A

    2008-01-01

    The EU Council Directive 97\\/43\\/EURATOM (MED) states that Member States shall ensure that adequate theoretical and practical training is provided for dental practitioners working with ionising radiation; this also includes the provision of continuing education and training programmes, post-qualification. The area of dental radiology is specifically mentioned in this legally binding document. The Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, St James\\'s Hospital, Dublin, is particularly interested in the area of radiation protection training and routinely provides educational courses both at national and international levels. A recent review of their dental radiation protection course was undertaken in conjunction with a number of Principal Dental Surgeons within the Health Service Executive in Ireland. The revised course was delivered to over 200 dental staff members at two separate meetings during 2006. The response from attendees was very positive. It is proposed to extend this course to other dental professionals, working both in the Irish private and public health sectors in the future.

  8. A Training Tool for Internet Crimes Against Children Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Sudhir; Breeden, Bob; Henry, Peter; Mulholland, Judie

    The Internet has greatly increased the vulnerability of children to those who would commit crimes against them. In response to Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) legislation, law enforcement agencies have dedicated resources to educate the public of the threat, respond to ongoing attacks, and assist victims. A significant trend in the investigation of ICAC cases is the proactive masquerading of law enforcement agents as vulnerable prey in Internet forums. This approach has shown great promise, and agents who have mastered it possess valuable knowledge and skills that could assist others. The Predator and Prey Alert (PAPA) system, a hardware and software suite of tools, originally developed for proactive shadowing, assistance and direct manipulation of a cyberstalking victim's computer, shows potential as a proactive forensic tool for ICAC investigations. This paper discusses the use of PAPA as a networked application to train law enforcement agents to investigate online cases involving the exploitation of children and teenagers.

  9. Community-Based Solid Waste Management: A Training Facilitator's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div.

    Urban environmental management and environmental health issues are of increasing concern worldwide. The need for urban environmental management work at the local level where the Peace Corps works most effectively is significant, but training materials dedicated specifically to community-based solid waste management work in urban areas are lacking.…

  10. Programming Community Resources; A Training Program For Alcohol Program Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Alcohol Education, Arlington, VA.

    This guide is designed to upgrade and/or develop the assessment and negotiation skills of management personnel who are involved in developing and coordinating resources among community agencies to provide comprehensive services for individuals with alcohol problems. This training program addresses the following topics: (1) community assessment;…

  11. Preparing radiology staff to meet service goals: a training model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardone, E B; Stepanovich, P H; West, V T

    1994-01-01

    This article describes a model used to train radiology staff in customer service relations at a large southeastern medical center. Information about the needs of the radiology department and staff was acquired through quantitative and qualitative assessments. The primary goal of the training was twofold: 1) to develop employee awareness of customer expectations and 2) to develop problem-solving skills to respond to customer service related issues. Instructional methods compatible with adult learning were used and training results were assessed. Positive changes in employee attitudes and behaviors are described and recommendations for training development and implementation are discussed.

  12. Designing a Training Tool for Imaging Mental Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-11-01

    about how to weave together their disparate fields into a seamless web of knowledge . Learners often cannot visualize how the concepts and skills they...a seamless web of knowledge ? " How does the availability of a mental modeling tool enhance the ability of instructional designers to prepare

  13. Children's Question Asking and Curiosity: A Training Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirout, Jamie; Klahr, David

    2011-01-01

    A primary instructional objective of most early science programs is to foster children's scientific curiosity and question-asking skills (Jirout & Klahr, 2011). However, little is known about the relationship between curiosity, question-asking behavior, and general inquiry skills. While curiosity and question asking are invariably mentioned in…

  14. Uso de la STFT en el análisis de vibraciones para detectar y caracterizar la presencia de un defecto en la superficie de las ruedas de un tren/Use of the STFT in the Vibration Analisys to Detect and Characterice Defects at the Wheels Surface of a Train

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elkin G. Flórez Serrano.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available El artículo muestra el procedimiento experimental utilizado para registrar las vibraciones que genera el paso deun tren por un punto fijo del carril. Igualmente muestra la forma de identificar y caracterizar un defecto en la superficie de una rueda, mediante el análisis en el dominio conjunto tiempo-frecuencia de dichas vibraciones utilizando la transformada de Fourier en tiempos cortos -STFT. Los resultados demuestran las ventajas de la STFT en esta aplicación, y cómo el uso de un sistema de monitorizado de las vibraciones generadas en el carril es eficiente y práctico en el mantenimiento predictivo de las ruedas de los trenes.The paper shows the experimental procedure used to record the vibrations generated by the passage of a train in a fixed point of the rail. Moreover, it also shows how to identify and characterize a defect on the surface of a wheel, by analyzing the joined time–frequency domain of these vibrations, using the short time Fourier transform – STFT. The results demonstrate the advantages of the STFTin this application, and that the use of a monitorizazing system of the vibration generated on the railway line is efficient and practical to implement a predictive maintenance of the train wheels.

  15. The Construction and Application of a Training System for Research-oriented Innovative Engineers%研究型工程创新人才培养体系的构建与实践--以江南大学食品发酵类专业为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴月波; 饶志明; 张光生

    2013-01-01

    Adhering to the equality of teaching with scientific research and engineering, Jiangnan University lauched a training system for research-oriented innovative engineers by cultivating a first-class teaching faculty in China, establishing high-quality teaching resources and a teaching module by innovating practices and reforming teaching administration mechanism. The construction of such a system is proved effective in enhancing the engineering innovation of the students and in the rapid development of the scientific research of the food fermentation industry in China.%江南大学确立教学、科研与工程并重的教学理念,打造国家级一流师资队伍,建设优质教学资源,创新实践教学模式,优化育人环境,改革教学管理机制,系统开展了培养研究型工程创新人才培养体系的研究与实践,事实证明这一体系的构建提高了学生工程创新能力,为推动我国食品发酵科学研究与产业蓬勃发展做出了巨大贡献。

  16. New capabilities for space-based cloud and aerosols measurements: The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorks, J. E.; McGill, M. J.; Hlavka, D. L.; Palm, S. P.; Hart, W. D.; Nowottnick, E. P.; Vaughan, M.; Rodier, S. D.; Colarco, P. R.; da Silva, A.; Buchard-Marchant, V.

    2013-12-01

    Current uncertainties in cloud and aerosol properties limit our ability to accurately model the Earth's climate system and predict climate change. These limitations are due primarily to difficulties in adequately measuring aerosols and clouds on a global scale. NASA's A-Train satellites provide an unprecedented opportunity to address these uncertainties. In particular, the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar Infrared Pathfinder Spaceborne Observations (CALIPSO) satellite provides vertical profiles of cloud and aerosol properties. The CALIOP lidar onboard CALIPSO has reached its seventh year of operation, well past its expected lifetime. The ATLID lidar on EarthCARE is not expected to launch until 2016 or later. If the CALIOP lidar fails before a new mission is operational, there will be a gap in global lidar measurements. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS), built at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center as a payload for the International Space Station (ISS), is set to launch in the summer of 2014. CATS is an elastic backscatter lidar with three wavelengths (1064, 532, 355 nm) and HSRL capability at 532 nm. Depolarization measurements will be made at all three wavelengths. The ISS orbit is a 51 degree inclination orbit at an altitude of about 405 km. This orbit provides more comprehensive coverage of the tropics and mid-latitudes than sun-synchronous orbiting sensors, with nearly a three day repeat cycle. Thus, science applications of CATS include cloud and aerosol climate studies, air quality monitoring, and smoke/volcanic plume tracking. The primary science objectives of CATS include: continuing the CALIPSO aerosol and cloud vertical profile data record, providing near real time data to support operational applications such as air quality modeling, and advancing technology in support of future mission development using the HSRL channel. Furthermore, the vertical profiles of cloud and aerosol properties provided by CATS will complement current and future passive satellite

  17. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS): A New Lidar for Aerosol and Cloud Profiling from the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; McGill, Mathew J.; Yorks. John E.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Hart, William D.; Palm, Stephen P.; Colarco, Peter R.

    2012-01-01

    Spaceborne lidar profiling of aerosol and cloud layers has been successfully implemented during a number of prior missions, including LITE, ICESat, and CALIPSO. Each successive mission has added increased capability and further expanded the role of these unique measurements in wide variety of applications ranging from climate, to air quality, to special event monitoring (ie, volcanic plumes). Many researchers have come to rely on the availability of profile data from CALIPSO, especially data coincident with measurements from other A-Train sensors. The CALIOP lidar on CALIPSO continues to operate well as it enters its fifth year of operations. However, active instruments have more limited lifetimes than their passive counterparts, and we are faced with a potential gap in lidar profiling from space if the CALIOP lidar fails before a new mission is operational. The ATLID lidar on EarthCARE is not expected to launch until 2015 or later, and the lidar component of NASA's proposed Aerosols, Clouds, and Ecosystems (ACE) mission would not be until after 2020. Here we present a new aerosol and cloud lidar that was recently selected to provide profiling data from the International Space Station (ISS) starting in 2013. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is a three wavelength (1064,532,355 nm) elastic backscatter lidar with HSRL capability at 532 nm. Depolarization measurements will be made at all wavelengths. The primary objective of CATS is to continue the CALIPSO aerosol and cloud profile data record, ideally with overlap between both missions and EarthCARE. In addition, the near real time (NRT) data capability ofthe ISS will enable CATS to support operational applications such as aerosol and air quality forecasting and special event monitoring. The HSRL channel will provide a demonstration of technology and a data testbed for direct extinction retrievals in support of ACE mission development. An overview of the instrument and mission will be provided, along with a

  18. Characteristics and Evaluation of Noises in the Tourist Cabin of a Train Running at More than 350 km/h%350km/h 以上高速列车观光区噪声特性及其评价研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张捷; 肖新标; 王谛; 周仲荣; 金学松

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of field measurements, the characteristics of noises in the tourist cabin of a high-speed train running at the speeds from 350 km/h to 400 km/h were analyzed. The dynamic characteristics of the interior noises and the law of their changing with speeds were made clear. Our main concern is how to evaluate the effect of noises on human hearing when a train runs at more than 350 km/h. At present, there are no unified criteria for evaluation of high-speed train noises both at home and abroad, so the A-weighted sound level continues to be adopted generally. However,the A-weighted sound level has deficiencies in noise measurement and evaluation. In order to study whether the A-weighted sound level was suitable or some other noise evaluation indexes were feasible for interior noise evaluation of a high-speeds train,different noise evaluation indexes were applied in evaluating interior noises of a train running at more than 350 km/h. The research results indicate as follows: Noises inside the tourist cabin of a high-speed train running at more than 350 km/h are dominated by low and middle frequencies ; the effect of such noises will be underestimated when using the A-weighted sound level in evaluation; auxiliary noise evaluation indexes inclusive of the loudness, noisiness, NR curve and RC curve are selected so as to achieve more accurate reflection of the subjective feelings of crew members and passengers. This paper provides a basis for working out new proper noise evaluation criteria for high-speed trains.%基于现场测试,对350~400 km/h速度下的高速列车车内观光区噪声特性进行分析,明确了350km/h以上区域车内噪声的动态特性及其随速度的变化规律.在考虑对其评价时,由于国内外对高速列车的噪声评价还没有统一标准,目前基本在沿用A声级.但是,A声级在噪声测量和评价中存在不足.为了研究A声级能否作为高速列车车内噪声评价的合理指标,以及其他噪声评

  19. A Research on Establishing a Training System for College Minority Students from the Perspective of National Culture Integration%民族文化融入视域下高校少数民族学生培养机制构建研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈龙涛; 李亮; 杨卫东; 张爽

    2016-01-01

    当前我国区域间交流不断加深,教育水平快速发展,少数民族学生的教育培养得到更多重视。高校少数民族学生具有民族特色鲜明、群体融入存在差异及性格与心理特征明显等特点。民族文化融入民族教育是实现少数民族学生良好发展的基础、是培养优秀少数民族地区人才及促进中华民族繁荣发展的有效途径。在民族文化融入民族教育促进其发展的过程中存在诸多问题。以“互联网+”为主渠道,搭建民族文化交流平台;以“一带一路”为契机,创新发展民族教育;以“五个认同”为基本点,增强多民族团结教育;秉承民族文化多样性理念,融合中求同存异是构建高校少数民族学生培养机制的有效途径。%Nowadays, with the increasing regional communication and the rapid development of education in China, greater attention has been paid to the education of minority students. Given their distinct national features, differential minority group integration and obvious mental profile, it is an effective approach to blend ethnic culture into national education with the view to realizing a better development of college minority students, cultivating outstanding talents for minority area and promoting the booming of Chinese ethnic people, though several problems remain unsolved. The paper puts forward ways to establish a training system for college minority students in the following aspects: employing Internet+ as the main channel to establish the national cultural communication platform, taking the strategy of “One Belt & One Road” as the chance to develop national advantage culture innovatively, and centering around the concept of “Five Identity” as the basic point to enhance the education of ethnic solidarity. All in all, we should obedient to the concept of ethnic cultural diversity and seek the common points while receiving the difference during the integration.

  20. Aerosol Properties From Combined Oxygen A Band Radiances and Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winker, Dave; Zhai, Peng-Wang; Hu, Yongxiang

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a new aerosol retrieval technique based on combing high-resolution A band spectra with lidar profiles. Our goal is the development of a technique to retrieve aerosol absorption, one of the critical parameters affecting the global radiation budget and one which is currently poorly constrained by satellite measurements. Our approach relies on two key factors: 1) the use of high spectral resolution (17,000:1) measurements which resolve the A-band line structure, and 2) the use of co-located lidar profile measurements to constrain the vertical distribution of scatterers in the forward model. The algorithm has been developed to be applied to observations from the CALIPSO and OCO-2 satellites, flying in formation as part of the A-train constellation. We describe the approach and present simulated retrievals to illustrate performance potential.

  1. Elaboració d'un programa de formació per promoure la participació activa en societats multiculturals Designing a training program in order to promote active participation in Elaboración de un programa de formación para promover la

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Folgueiras Bertomeu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aquest article exposa les bases teòriques i l’estudi diagnòstic que fonamenten l’elaboració i l’aplicació d’un programa de formació, específicament dissenyat per a dones, per promoure una participació activa. El programa, que inclou vint-i-dues activitats organitzades en cinc blocs temàtics, busca crear i promoure espais de participació on es fomenti el dret i la responsabilitatd de participar, s’adquireixin les competències ciutadanes necessàries per tenir presència activa a l’espai públic, i es promogui un tipus d’identitat cívica a partir del diàleg i les relacions que es generen entre les persones participants. ___________________________________ Cet article a pour but d’exposer les bases théoriques et l’étude diagnostique qui fondent l’élaboration ainsi que l’application d’un programme de formation, tout spécialement conçu pour les femmes, visant à promouvoir une participation active. Le programme comprend vingt-deux activités organisées en cinq blocs thématiques et il cherche à créer et à promouvoir des espaces de participation dans lesquels sont développés le droit ainsi que la responsabilité de participer, où l’on peut acquérir les compétences citoyennes nécessaires pour avoir une présence active dans l’espace public, et où l’on promeut un type d’identité civique à partir du dialogue et des relations qui se développent parmi les personnes participantes.This paper presents the theoretical framework and the diagnostic study in order to design and implement a training program specifically for women to promote their active participation. The program includes 22 activities organised into five thematic blocks. It seeks to create and promote spaces for participation where the right to participate and the responsibility for participating are enhanced, where the citizens’ skills necessary for an cctive presence in the public space are acquired, and where a civic identity is

  2. Safety of a training program for ultrasound-guided internal jugular vein catheterization in critically ill patients Segurança de um programa de treinamento para punção de veia jugular interna guiada por ultrassom em pacientes críticos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felippe Leopoldo Dexheimer Neto

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a training program for performing ultrasound-guided internal jugular vein cannulation in critically ill patients. METHODS: Cohort prospective study, evaluating adult patients admitted in a teaching intensive care unit (ICU. Catheter placement was performed by an ICU medical resident. The patient's baseline characteristics, vessel's position and operator experience were the evaluated variables. The main outcomes were cannulation success rate and incidence of major complications. RESULTS: A total of 118 consecutive patients were enrolled between May 2008 and November 2009. The success rate of ultrasound guided catheter placement was 90% (106/118, 77% in the first attempt. Major complications occurred in 4% of the cases (n = 5 and were not associated with the analyzed variables. Inability to place the guide wire was the reason for 58% (7/12 of the failures. Operators with more than 15 previous ultrasound guided cannulations had an increased success rate (95% vs. 79%, p = 0.01 and increased failure was related to previous catheterization (26% vs. 7%, p = 0.02. CONCLUSION: Learning ultrasound guidance for IJV vein cannulation was safe and feasible in ICU patients. This process was not associated to complications and better results were achieved across the spectrum of operator experienceOBJETIVO: Avaliar a segurança e efetividade de um programa de treinamento para cateterização da veia jugular interna guiada por ultrassom em pacientes críticos. MÉTODOS: Estudo de coorte prospectivo, avaliando pacientes adultos internados em uma unidade de terapia intensiva com programa de ensino. Os médicos residentes do serviço realizaram as punções de veia jugular interna guiadas por ultrassom. Foram avaliadas as características de base dos pacientes, sintopia dos vasos e experiência dos operadores. Os desfechos primários foram a taxa de sucesso da cateterização e a incidência de complica

  3. Changes in FDB and soleus muscle activity after a train of stimuli during upright stance Alterações pós-trem de estímulo, na atividade dos músculos FDB e sóleus durante a postura ortostática

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liria A. Okai

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evidence of self-sustained muscle activation following a brief electrical stimulation has been reported in the literature for certain muscles. OBJECTIVES: This report shows that the foot muscle (Flexor Digitorum Brevis - FDB shows a self-sustained increase in muscle activity during upright stance in some subjects following a train of stimuli to the tibial nerve. METHODS: Healthy subjects were requested to stand upright and surface EMG electrodes were placed on the FDB, Soleus and Tibialis Anterior muscles. After background muscle activity (BGA acquisition, a 50 Hz train of stimuli was applied to the tibial nerve at the popliteal fossa. The root mean square values (RMS of the BGA and the post-stimulus muscle activation were computed. RESULTS: There was a 13.8% average increase in the FDB muscle EMG amplitude with respect to BGA after the stimulation was turned off. The corresponding post-stimulus Soleus EMG activity decreased by an average of 9.2%. We hypothesize that the sustained contraction observed in the FDB following stimulus may be evidence of persistent inward currents (PIC generated in FDB spinal motoneurons. The post-stimulus decrease in soleus activity may have occurred due to the action of inhibitory interneurons caused by the PICs, which were triggered by the stimulus train. CONCLUSIONS: These sustained post-stimulation changes in postural muscle activity, found in different levels in different subjects, may be part of a set of possible responses that contribute to overall postural control.CONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: Existem evidências de ativação autossustentada em certos músculos pós-estimulação elétrica. OBJETIVOS: Mostrar que, em alguns sujeitos, o músculo do pé (Flexor Digitorum Brevis - FDB também pode apresentar aumento de atividade autossustentada na posição ortostática pós-trem de estímulo no nervo tibial. MÉTODOS: Sujeitos foram solicitados a permanecer na posição ortostática e sinais eletromiogr

  4. Desempenho de hemiplégicos no giro de 180º realizado em direção ao lado parético e não parético antes e após um programa de treinamento Performance of hemiplegic patients in 180º turns in the direction of the paretic and non-paretic sides before and after a training program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina D. C. M. Faria

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Investigar o desempenho de hemiplégicos no giro de 180º antes e após um programa de treinamento, o qual foi eficaz na melhora do desempenho de outras atividades funcionais, considerando o efeito do lado em direção ao qual o giro foi realizado. MÉTODOS: Trinta hemiplégicos crônicos (17 homens/13 mulheres; 56,36±10,86 anos participaram de um programa de treinamento (atividades aeróbicas e de fortalecimento muscular e foram avaliados pré/pós intervenção pelo teste Step Quick Turn (STQ/Balance Master®, que envolve a atividade de giro de 180º durante a atividade de marcha. Também avaliou-se a velocidade da marcha e a habilidade para subir escadas. ANOVA mista com medidas repetidas (2x2 foi utilizada para comparação entre a direção de giro (lado parético e não parético e as avaliações pré e pós-intervenção. Testes-t pareados foram utilizados para investigar o impacto do treinamento na velocidade da marcha e habilidade para subir escadas (a=0,05. ANOVA mista com medidas repetidas (2x2 foi utilizada para verificar efeitos principais e de interação entre o lado em direção ao qual o giro foi realizado e as avaliações pré/pós intervenção e testes-t pareados para investigar o impacto do treinamento na velocidade da marcha e habilidade para subir escadas (α=0,05. RESULTADOS: Não houve diferença significativa para nenhuma das variáveis do SQT quando se considerou o lado de realização do giro (0,23OBJECTIVE: To investigate the performance of hemiplegic patients in 180° turns before and after a training program which is effective in improving other functional tasks, considering the effect of the turning direction. METHODS: Thirty chronic hemiplegics (17 men and 13 women; 56.36±10.86 years participated in a training program (aerobic activities and muscular strengthening and were evaluated before and after the intervention by means of the Step/Quick Turn (SQT; Balance Master®, which involves a 180° turn

  5. Engaging observers to look at clouds from both sides: connecting NASA mission science with authentic STEM experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, L. H.; Taylor, J.; Ellis, T. D.; McCrea, S.; Rogerson, T. M.; Falcon, P.

    2016-12-01

    In 1997, NASA's Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) team began engaging K-12 schools as ground truth observers of clouds. CERES seeks to understand cloud effects on Earth's energy budget; thus accurate detection and characterization of clouds is key. While satellite remote sensing provides global information about clouds, it is limited in time and resolution. Ground observers, on the other hand, can observe clouds at any time of day (and sometimes night), and can see small and thin clouds that are challenging to detect from space. In 2006, two active sensing satellites, CloudSat and CALIPSO, were launched into the A-Train, which already contained 2 CERES instruments on the Aqua spacecraft. The CloudSat team also engaged K-12 schools to observe clouds, through The GLOBE Program, with a specialized observation protocol customized for the narrow radar swath. While providing valuable data for satellite assessment, these activities also engage participants in accessible, authentic science that gets people outdoors, helps them develop observation skills, and is friendly to all ages. The effort has evolved substantially since 1997, adopting new technology to provide a more compelling experience to citizen observers. Those who report within 15 minutes of the passage of a wide range of satellites (Terra, Aqua, CloudSat, CALIPSO, NPP, as well as a number of geostationary satellites) are sent a satellite image centered on their location and are invited to extend the experience beyond simple observation to include analysis of the two different viewpoints. Over the years these projects have collected large amounts of cloud observations from every continent and ocean basin on Earth. A number of studies have been conducted comparing the ground observations to the satellite results. This presentation will provide an overview of those results and also describe plans for a coordinated, thematic cloud observation and data analysis activity going forward.

  6. An Overview of Ocean Lidar Studies At NRL Stennis, NOAA ESRL and NASA LaRC (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Y.; Arnone, R. A.; Churnside, J. H.

    2009-12-01

    between the two surveys. With no time delay the correlation is well above 0.9, and the correlation is essentially zero after about four days. The ocean lidar studies at NASA Langley Research Center started from the launch of the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite. The lidar, designed for cloud and aerosol observation, also provides information about (1) ocean subsurface particulate backscatter, and (2) high resolution ocean surface wind speeds / mean square wave slopes. More than three years of global ocean measurements from CALIPSO are analyzed and available to the community. Ocean and atmospheric seasonal and inter-annual variations are studied using the CALIPSO observations combined with measurements from other A-train satellites. Future studies at NASA Langley Research Center includes: (1) Improvement of CALIPSO ocean product; (2) Theoretical radiative transfer modeling, such as lidar multiple scatter and coupled ocean-atmospheric Stokes vector, and new retrieval concepts with combined lidar and multi-angle, multi-spectral polarimeter; (3) Aircraft based measurements of next generation lidar, polarimeter and hyperspectral measurements.

  7. Why a Train Set Helps Participants Co-Construct Meaning in Business Model Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beuthel, Maria Rosa; Buur, Jacob

    In this position paper we show how participants in an innovation workshop employ tangible material – a toy train set – to co-construct understandings of a new business model. In multidisciplinary teams the process of developing new terms and concepts together is crucial for work to progress. Every...... to understand how they construct a concept. We observe that the final result of the workshop is indeed innovative and is co-constructed by all group members. We discuss why the toy train works: It keeps both hands and mind busy, it allows silent participation, and it expands the vocabulary of the discussion....

  8. Constraining cloud lifetime effects of aerosols using A-Train satellite observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ecuyer, Tristan L.; Zhang, Kai; Morrison, H.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Easter, Richard C.; Marchand, Roger; Chand, Duli; Qian, Yun; Penner, Joyce E.

    2012-08-15

    Aerosol indirect effects have remained the largest uncertainty in estimates of the radiative forcing of past and future climate change. Observational constraints on cloud lifetime effects are particularly challenging since it is difficult to separate aerosol effects from meteorological influences. Here we use three global climate models, including a multi-scale aerosol-climate model PNNL-MMF, to show that the dependence of the probability of precipitation on aerosol loading, termed the precipitation frequency susceptibility (S{sub pop}), is a good measure of the liquid water path response to aerosol perturbation ({lambda}), as both Spop and {lambda} strongly depend on the magnitude of autoconversion, a model representation of precipitation formation via collisions among cloud droplets. This provides a method to use satellite observations to constrain cloud lifetime effects in global climate models. S{sub pop} in marine clouds estimated from CloudSat, MODIS and AMSR-E observations is substantially lower than that from global climate models and suggests a liquid water path increase of less than 5% from doubled cloud condensation nuclei concentrations. This implies a substantially smaller impact on shortwave cloud radiative forcing (SWCF) over ocean due to aerosol indirect effects than simulated by current global climate models (a reduction by one-third for one of the conventional aerosol-climate models). Further work is needed to quantify the uncertainties in satellite-derived estimates of S{sub pop} and to examine S{sub pop} in high-resolution models.

  9. A training intervention on child feeding among primary healthcare workers in Ibadan Municipality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folake O. Samuel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Health workers at the primary level are well positioned to provide health information and counselling on child feeding to mothers on antenatal visits. The study was designed to evaluate the effect of training on the knowledge, attitudes and provision of infant and young child feeding (IYCF information and counselling among primary healthcare (PHC workers. Methods: A two-stage cluster sample was used to select health workers for training on IYCF in Ibadan, Nigeria. Baseline, immediate and 4-week post-training surveys were conducted to assess knowledge, attitudes and practices of health workers regarding IYCF. Paired t-tests were used to measure differences (p < 0.05 before and after the training. Results: A total of 124 health workers were trained on current global IYCF recommendations. Participants included community health extension workers (59.7%, nurses (27.4%, community health officers (11.3%, and pharmacy technicians (1.6%. Mean age was 41.8 ± 8.2 years and 95.2% were women. Knowledge of health workers regarding IYCF, particularly complementary feeding, was low at baseline but improved significantly following the training intervention. Attitudes and practices regarding provision of IYCF were suboptimal among health workers at the PHC facilities, but this improved with training. Conclusion: Health workers at the PHC level need regular retraining exercises to ensure effective counselling on IYCF.

  10. Activity Budgets of Captive Cape Fur Seals (Arctocephalus pusillus) Under a Training Regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierucka, Kaja; Siemianowska, Sonia; Woźniak, Marta; Jasnosz, Katarzyna; Kieliszczyk, Magdalena; Kozak, Paulina; Sergiel, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Ethograms and time budgets are crucial for the behavioral assessment of nonhuman animals in zoos, and they serve as references for welfare research. This study was conducted to obtain detailed time budgets of trained Cape fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus) in captivity, to evaluate variations of these patterns, and to determine whether abnormal behaviors had been displayed. Behavioral data for 3 Cape fur seals in the Wroclaw Zoo were collected, and more than 300 observation hours (during a 12-month period) per individual were analyzed. The studied animals exhibited a diversified repertoire of natural behaviors with apparent seasonal and daily patterns, and they did not present stereotypic behaviors. Significant differences of interaction rates between individuals suggest more frequent affiliative interactions among related animals. The absence of stereotypic behaviors, good health of individuals, and the presence of diversified natural behaviors indicated relatively good welfare of Cape fur seals kept in the Wroclaw Zoo.

  11. Observation of Electromagnetically Induced Transparency by a Train of Short Pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Cun-Yun

    2004-01-01

    @@ We report the experimental demonstration of electromagnetically induced transparency in hot rubidium (85 Rb)atomic vapour by using an actively mode-locked external cavity diode laser in Littman-Metcalf configuration.We can make opaque resonant transitions transparent to any two optical comb components in the pulse trains which excite atomic coherence in the ground states of 85Rb.

  12. Theories of intelligence in children with reading disabilities: a training proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepi, Annamaria; Alesi, Marianna; Geraci, Maria

    2004-12-01

    A recent trend in the study of reading difficulties promotes multidimensional intervention, focusing on the reciprocal influences exerted by cognitive and emotional-motivational variables. This study evaluated improvements in reading performance as a function of metacognitive training in 36 children (M age = 8.7 yr.) with different representations of intelligence. Posttest evaluations show significantly more improvement in reading comprehension in children with an incremental theory of intelligence. These results indicate the importance of treatment programmes that take into account both the specificity of deficits and factors relating to the domain of motivation.

  13. Influence of a training session on postural stability and foot loading patterns in soccer players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa K.N. Petry

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sport specific movements coming along with characteristic plantar pressure distribution and a fatigue of muscles result in an increasing postural sway and therefore lead to a decrease in balance control. Although single soccer specific movements were expatiated with respect to these parameters, no information is available for a complete training session. The objective of the present observational study was to analyze the direct influence of soccer training on postural stability and gait patterns and whether or not these outcomes were altered by age. One hundred and eighteen experienced soccer players participated in the study and were divided into two groups. Group 1 contained 64 soccer players (age 13.31±0.66 years and Group 2 contains 54 ones (age 16.74±0.73 years. Postural stability, static plantar pressure distribution and dynamic foot loading patterns were measured. Our results showed that the soccer training session, as well as the age, has relevant influence on postural stability, while the age only (excluding the training has an influence on static plantar pressure distribution. The parameters of dynamic assessment seem therefore to be affected by age, training and a combination of both. Training and young age correlate with a decreased postural stability; they lead to a significant increase of peak pressure in the previously most loaded areas, and, after reaching a certain age and magnitude of absolute values, to a change in terminal stance and preswing phase of the roll-over. Moreover, younger players show an inhomogenous static plantar pressure distribution which might be the result of the decreased postural control in the young age.

  14. A Training Program for College Residence Hall Advisors: Rincon Hall, California State University, Northridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthias, Ruth

    This program was devised in an attempt to train more effective resident advisors for the 1972-73 school year at a dormitory at California State University. The special characteristics of the dormitory--racially mixed and discordant--seemed to indicate a need for a special kind of resident advisor training program, one that attempted to better…

  15. [Evaluation of a training program for child welfare case workers on trauma sequelae in foster children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Sylvia H; Fegert, Jörg M; Goldbeck, Lutz

    2013-01-01

    Foster children are exposed to multiple psychosocial and biological risk factors and have an elevated risk for developmental delays and the development of mental disorders. Many children experienced compromising situations such as neglect, physical abuse, or sexual abuse before out-of-home placement. Consequently, they show a higher need for mental health services than other children. However, out-of-home placement is often considered as the sufficient measure to help these children. Hence this project had the aim to sensitize child welfare agencies and foster parent organisations for the special needs and history of foster children, to provide them with instruments for the assessment of emotional and behaviour problems and to promote the cooperation at the interface between child welfare system and mental health system. Twenty-four child welfare agencies and four foster parent organisations participated. The control group consisted of 16 non-participating child welfare agencies. After one year, participants recorded more often children's social history (p = .023), conducted more often standardized psychosocial assessments (p = .001), assessed more often the medical needs of foster children (p = .029), and informed foster parents more often about behaviour problems of their foster child (p = .034). In summary, child welfare agencies were very interested, could be sensitized for mental disorders following traumata and implemented the offered instruments in their work. Limits of resources could be observed due to the case workers' high case load.

  16. Organ donation after brain death in India: A trained intensivist is the key to success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayanand Palaniswamy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Organ donation after brain death in India is gaining momentum but only in a few states. Tamil Nadu is leading in the country in this regard. Certain cities have performed well compared to Chennai′s results. A single tertiary hospital performed 28 donations in a 17 months period with a team of an intensivist and a transplant coordinator. An intensivist needs training and interest in this noble cause. There is no formal training program in this noble cause for doctors in India. A structured formal training needs to be introduced and made mandatory for the doctors in intensive care to make this donation process a successful program.

  17. Healthy Skin: Cancer Education for School Teachers and Nurses Using a "Train and Equip" Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, E Robert

    2017-03-01

    Skin cancer, especially malignant melanoma, continues on the increase. Different interventions are attempting to impact on this problem. The approach used by the Partners in Health Sciences program at the University of Arkansas for Medical Science is to both "train" and, importantly, "equip" classroom teachers and school nurses in a "Healthy Skin" professional development curriculum. Each participant not only received face-to-face interactive content training in a workshop setting that lasted 6 h; each also received a resource kit of supplies, materials, and equipment used in the workshop and designed for the trainee to use with students in a classroom/school setting. This single "hit" professional development event then can be replicated by each trainee annually for the span of her/his teaching/school-nursing career. A total of 588 trainees participated in "Healthy Skin" workshops that were held in 17 communities throughout the state. Participants attended from 188 different towns/cities. Of those in attendance, 511 (87 %) were females, 77 (13 %) males, 81 % Caucasian, 16 % African Americans, and the remaining 3 % self-identified as "other". There were 471 teachers, 85 nurses, and 32 "others" (administrators, school counselors). Trainees completed anonymous pre/post test measures with an increase in knowledge of 28.5 %. A short-term evaluation was conducted at the end of the workshop. After a minimum of 6 months had elapsed, a long-term evaluation was used to capture data on how the workshop experience transferred into new curricular/learning activities for the students of the workshop participants. There was a high level of satisfaction with the workshop experience and use of workshop content and resource kits. Our experiences in this type of professional development outreach provide a model of how institutions of higher education could contribute to the professional development of K-12 teachers and their students in any content area.

  18. U.S. Combat Commands’ Participation in the Proliferation Security Initiative: A Training Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    goals and activities of the PSI. — *Japan hosted its first PSI Maritime Interdiction Exercise “Team Samurai 04” in October 2004. (2) Variety of...Team Samurai 04, the port inspection exercise was conducted for the first time in the exercise hosted by Japan. As for Japan’s law-enforcement...increased significantly compared to Team Samurai 04*. Observers from those countries had active exchanges with other participants/observers during the 3-day

  19. From Training Institution to Workplace: Towards a Training Model in the Industrial Training Institutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rus, Ridzwan Che; Yasin, Ruhizan M.; Rubi, Dalilah Mohd; Nazri, A. R. M.; Mamat, Abu Bakar; Hanapi, Zaliza; Hasnan, Khairul Anuar

    2015-01-01

    The Malaysian Education Development Blueprint's (2013-2025) emphasis on the holistic formation of students in line with quality human capital formation is based on the national philosophy of education. This blueprint is in line with the Government Transformation Program (GTP), which propels Malaysia towards becoming a developed and high-income…

  20. A training method for locomotion mode prediction using powered lower limb prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Aaron J; Simon, Ann M; Hargrove, Levi J

    2014-05-01

    Recently developed lower-limb prostheses are capable of actuating the knee and ankle joints, allowing amputees to perform advanced locomotion modes such as step-over-step stair ascent and walking on sloped surfaces. However, transitions between these locomotion modes and walking are neither automatic nor seamless. This study describes methods for construction and training of a high-level intent recognition system for a lower-limb prosthesis that provides natural transitions between walking, stair ascent, stair descent, ramp ascent, and ramp descent. Using mechanical sensors onboard a powered prosthesis, we collected steady-state and transition data from six transfemoral amputees while the five locomotion modes were performed. An intent recognition system built using only mechanical sensor data was 84.5% accurate using only steady-state training data. Including training data collected while amputees performed seamless transitions between locomotion modes improved the overall accuracy rate to 93.9%. Training using a single analysis window at heel contact and toe off provided higher recognition accuracy than training with multiple analysis windows. This study demonstrates the capability of an intent recognition system to provide automatic, natural, and seamless transitions between five locomotion modes for transfemoral amputees using powered lower limb prostheses.