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Sample records for macarthur competence assessment

  1. Cross-Cultural Adaptations of the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool for Treatment in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saber

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background According to general ethical and legal principles, valid consent must be obtained before starting any procedure. Objectives Due to the lack of a standard tool for assessing patients’ capacity to consent to medical treatment in Iran, the present study was carried out aiming to devise a Persian version of a cross-cultural adaptation of the MacArthur competence assessment tool. Patients and Methods By reviewing different methods of cultural translation and adaptation for assessment tools, and due to the lack of consensus on its processes, we selected Wild’s model as one of the most comprehensive methods in this regard. Wild’s (2005 10-stage model includes preparation, forward translation, reconciliation of the forward translation, back translation of reconciliation, back translation review, cognitive debriefing and cognitive review, and finalization, proofreading and final reporting. Using this model, we translated the MacArthur assessment tool and made it adaptable to Iranian patients. Results The MacArthur assessment tool is not dependent on any specific culture and language. As a result, if translation and its scientific adaptation are done based on an integrated and detailed model, the tool can be used for every culture and language. In other words, this tool is not culture-specific; so, it is applicable in cases where a translation is needed, and it can be culturally adapted to suit different societies. Conclusions In the present study, we are able to focus on and prove the efficacy and benefits of this measurement tool.

  2. [Spanish validation of the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool for Treatment interview to assess patients competence to consent treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Marrodán, Ignacio; Baón Pérez, Beatriz; Navío Acosta, Mercedes; López-Antón, Raul; Lobo Escolar, Elena; Ventura Faci, Tirso

    2014-09-09

    To validate the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool for Treatment (MacCAT-T) Spanish version, which assesses the mental capacity of patients to consent treatment, by examining 4 areas (Understanding, Appreciation, Reasoning and Expressing a choice). 160 subjects (80 Internal Medicine inpatients, 40 Psychiatric inpatients and 40 healthy controls). MacCAT-T, Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE). Feasibility study, reliability and validity calculations (against to gold standard of clinical expert). Mean duration of the MacCAT-T interview was 18min. Inter-rater reliability: Intraclass correlation coefficient for Understanding=0.98, Appreciation=0.97, Reasoning=0.98, Expressing a choice=0.91. Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha): Understanding=0.87, for Appreciation=0.76, for Reasoning=0.86. Patients considered to be incapable (gold standard) scored lower in all the MacCAT-T areas. Poor performance on the MacCAT-T was related to cognitive impairment assessed by MMSE. Spanish version of the MacCAT-T is feasible, reliable, and valid for assessing the capacity of patients to consent treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessing Early Communicative Ability: A Cross-Reporter Cumulative Score for the MacArthur CDI

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Houwer, Annick; Bornstein, Marc H.; Leach, Diane B.

    2005-01-01

    Thirty middle- to upper middle-class monolingual Dutch speaking families consisting of at least a mother and a father completed the Infant Form "Words and Gestures" of the Dutch adaptation of the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventory for the same child at 1;1. Considerable inter- and intrafamily variation emerged in how two (or three)…

  4. Assessment of Innovation Competency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jan Alexis

    2015-01-01

    of the recorded talk in interaction that occurred in teacher group discussion sessions at 5 upper secondary schools. Based on the analysis, it was possible to extrapolate assessment criteria for 5 subcompetencies relevant to innovation (creative competency, collaboration competency, navigation competency, action...... competency, and communication competency) as well as assessment criteria for a number of skills relevant to these subcompetencies. These assessment criteria, it is argued, largely resonate with existing literature and they provide a detailed glimpse into how assessment of innovation competency could...

  5. Ellen MacArthur

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Teodora; Lazarova

    2006-01-01

    Just over a year since breaking the round theworld solo record on board her 75 foot trimaranB&O,Ellen MacArthur embarked on a newventure:the Asian Record Circuit 2006,incorpo-rating the ‘Tour Of China’,and bringing a differ-ent set of challenges into new territories.Wespoke to Ellen and her team during their recent(April)stopover in Oingdao.When did you start sailing and what inspiredyou(you grew up in Derbyshire,in the UK,quite far away from the water)?I was introduced to sailing by my Aunt Thea ona small sailing boat called Cabaret.We wentsailing along the east coast of EngLand andbefore I knew it,I was hooked on sailing.I wasso inspired that when I was at school,I saved

  6. Gun Violence and Victimization of Strangers by Persons With a Mental Illness: Data From the MacArthur Violence Risk Assessment Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steadman, Henry J; Monahan, John; Pinals, Debra A; Vesselinov, Roumen; Robbins, Pamela Clark

    2015-11-01

    Highly publicized incidents in which people with apparent mental illnesses use guns to victimize strangers have important implications for public views of people with mental illnesses and the formation of mental health and gun policy. The study aimed to provide more data about this topic. MacArthur Violence Risk Assessment Study data were analyzed to determine the prevalence of violence by 951 patients after discharge from a psychiatric hospital, including gun violence, violence toward strangers, and gun violence toward strangers. Two percent of patients committed a violent act involving a gun, 6% committed a violent act involving a stranger, and 1% committed a violent act involving both a gun and a stranger. When public perceptions and policies regarding mental illness are shaped by highly publicized but infrequent instances of gun violence toward strangers, they are unlikely to help people with mental illnesses or to improve public safety.

  7. Competencies and Their Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drisko, James W.

    2014-01-01

    This article explores competencies and methods for their assessment in higher education and in social work's accreditation standards. Many contemporary policy and educational accreditation efforts employ the model of competency assessment. The current emphasis on accountability in higher education, including the Council on Social Work…

  8. [The assessment of competence to stand trial in juveniles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    León Mayer, Elizabeth; Iseas, Celeste; Campagnolo, Luciana; Elias, Camila; Del Castillo, Betina R; Delucchi, Gustavo; Goldstein, Naomi E S; Folino, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Despite the relevance of adolescents' psycholegal capacities to judicial decisions, no assessment tool exists in Latin America to evaluate these competence-related abilities. To explore aspects of the reliability of the Test de competencia para el desempeño en proceso del fuero de responsabilidad penal juvenil MacArthur: Versión Argentina - MacCAT-CA:VA, wich is the Argentinian adaptation of the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool-Criminal Adjudication (MacCAT-CA). Mental health professionals trained in the use of MacCAT-CA:VA administered the instrument to 46 adolescents (23 court-ordered to a secure facility; 23 public high school students). Prior to data collection, the instrument was translated, back-translated, and adapted for use in Argentina; the publisher of the original version authorized the translation of the instrument and use of the adapated version for this study. Descriptive statistics and reliability indicators were generated. Cronbach's alpha coeficients were 0.69, 0.67, and 0.75 for the Understanding, Reasoning and Appreciation scales, respectively. The intraclass correlation coefficient for each item was within the good to excellent range (mean ICC=0.71; median ICC=0.75; ICC range=0.40-0.90); for the Understanding, Reasoning, and Appreciation scales, ICC values indicated excellent internal consistency (0.84, 0.81, 0.85, respectively). Compared with the student subsample, a greater proportion of the court-ordered adolescents in secure placement demonstrated significant clinical impairment.

  9. Assessment of Innovation Competency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jan Alexis

    2015-01-01

    The author employed a 3-step qualitative research design with multiple instances of source validation to capture expert teachers’ (n = 28) reflections on which manifest signs they would look for when they asses students’ innovation competency. The author reports on the thematic analysis of the re......The author employed a 3-step qualitative research design with multiple instances of source validation to capture expert teachers’ (n = 28) reflections on which manifest signs they would look for when they asses students’ innovation competency. The author reports on the thematic analysis...... of the recorded talk in interaction that occurred in teacher group discussion sessions at 5 upper secondary schools. Based on the analysis, it was possible to extrapolate assessment criteria for 5 subcompetencies relevant to innovation (creative competency, collaboration competency, navigation competency, action...... competency, and communication competency) as well as assessment criteria for a number of skills relevant to these subcompetencies. These assessment criteria, it is argued, largely resonate with existing literature and they provide a detailed glimpse into how assessment of innovation competency could...

  10. Competencies, skills and assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    This paper is an analysis of the challenge of assessing student learning and how that is affected by using descriptions of competencies as a core element when describing the aims of the learning process. Assessment is modelled as a three step process; characterising, identifying and judging, to a...

  11. Assessing cataract surgical competency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Andrew G.; Greenlee, Emily; Oetting, Thomas A.; Beaver, Hilary A.; Johnson, A. Tim; Boldt, H. Culver; Abramoff, Michael; Olson, Richard; Carter, Keith

    2007-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has mandated that all residency training programs teach and assess 6 general competencies.1 A.G. Lee and K.D. Carter, Managing the new mandate in resident education: A blueprint for translating a national mandate into local compliance, Ophthal

  12. Assessing cataract surgical competency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Andrew G.; Greenlee, Emily; Oetting, Thomas A.; Beaver, Hilary A.; Johnson, A. Tim; Boldt, H. Culver; Abramoff, Michael; Olson, Richard; Carter, Keith

    2007-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has mandated that all residency training programs teach and assess 6 general competencies.1 A.G. Lee and K.D. Carter, Managing the new mandate in resident education: A blueprint for translating a national mandate into local compliance,

  13. Assessing cataract surgical competency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Andrew G.; Greenlee, Emily; Oetting, Thomas A.; Beaver, Hilary A.; Johnson, A. Tim; Boldt, H. Culver; Abramoff, Michael; Olson, Richard; Carter, Keith

    2007-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has mandated that all residency training programs teach and assess 6 general competencies.1 A.G. Lee and K.D. Carter, Managing the new mandate in resident education: A blueprint for translating a national mandate into local compliance, Ophthal

  14. Structured assessments of clinical competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boursicot, Katharine A M

    2010-06-01

    Clinical teachers are often involved in assessing clinical competence in the workplace, in universities and colleges. Assessments commonly used to formally assess clinical competence include long and short cases and the objective structured clinical examination which, if well designed, is a fair and reliable method of assessing clinical competence.

  15. Assessing teamwork competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrelles Nadal, Cristina; Paris Mañas, Georgina; Sabrià Bernadó, Betlem; Alsinet Mora, Carles

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, organizations of all types have undergone major changes, and teamwork is one of them. This way of working generates greater profits for an organization. This article aims to assess the teamwork competence of the employees of various Spanish companies in order to determine how effective the team members are in their professional actions. We contacted 55 teams from different organizations and obtained a non-probabilistic sample comprised of 55 participants (subjects tested) and 218 observers (evaluators: coordinators and co-workers). The instrument used for data collection was the Teamwork Rubric (Torrelles, 2011) and data analysis was based on 360º feedback. 80% of the teams analyzed obtained median scores for teamwork competence that were greater than 3, whereas 20% obtained scores between 2 and 3. The results showed that the workers in the companies studied had not fully acquired teamwork competence. It is necessary to find training solutions to improve their level of acquisition, particularly the dimensions of performance and regulation.

  16. Competency assessment of nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Lynn

    2006-01-01

    Changes in the healthcare industry have created great challenges for leaders of acute-care organizations. One of the greatest challenges is ensuring a competent nursing staff to care for patients within this changing environment (Boylan & Westra, 1998). Patients are more acutely ill and have shorter lengths of stay, placing greater demands on nurses who must demonstrate competency in caring for increasingly complex patients in a continually changing healthcare environment. Competency is defined as "the knowledge, skills, ability and behaviors that a person possesses in order to perform tasks correctly and skillfully" (O'Shea, 2002, p. 175). Competency assessment involves more than a checklist and a test. Hospitals are required to assess, maintain, demonstrate, track, and improve the competence of the staff. Competency assessment is an ongoing process of initial development, maintenance of knowledge and skills, educational consultation, remediation, and redevelopment. Methods to assess competencies include competency fairs, Performance Based Development System and online programs. Certain key people should be involved in the development of competencies. The department managers can give input related to department-specific competencies. Experienced staff members can provide valuable insight into the competencies that need to be assessed. Educators should be involved for providing the input for the methods used to validate competencies. Competencies are an important part of the work world. They are a part of a continual process to help ensure that the organization provides a high-quality care to its customers and patients.

  17. Assessment of Clinical Supervisor Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, Hildy

    1999-01-01

    Presents a focus and process to assist those training clinical supervisors to assess competencies of the supervisor. States that process creates a practical framework that can be adapted for supervision competencies in other fields. Concludes that assessment methodology gives meaning to the support and structure vital at all levels of training…

  18. Competencies assessment using fuzzy logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Jevšček

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Research Question: Competencies evaluation is complex. The question is how to evaluate a competency which was assessed with 360° feedback, in one result using fuzzy logic tools so the result represents an actual competency development in an individual. Purpose: The purpose and goal of the study is to determine a possible process of competency evaluation that would enable creating a single competency assessment using fuzzy logic methods. Method: The theoretical part examines the current state and terminology of competencies and fuzzy logic. The empirical part consists of a quantitative research study. Data from the survey questionnaire was used for model testing. Results: An example of an »Initiative« competency evaluation model is created and tested in the research study. Testing confirmed that evaluation using fuzzy logic is efficient. Organization: The study directly affects the development of the HR function in organizations. It enables an easier and more oriented competency evaluation. Society: The study enables easier orientation in competencies development that can improve the social order as well as social responsibility and the environment indirectly. Originality: The study presents a new competency evaluation model using fuzzy logic. Limitations/Future Research: The study is restricted to one competency and certain assessors. Further research could explore the model with several assessors of the same rank.

  19. Global assessment of internal audit competence

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kirstam

    4Key words: certified internal auditor, competency assessment, internal auditing, internal .... different perceptions of internal audit competencies needed: 11 general competencies essential to perform ...... report writing, presentation) ccxxxii.

  20. Assessing Core Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2004-12-01

    Catherine Palomba and Trudy Banta offer the following definition of assessment, adapted from one provided by Marches in 1987. Assessment in the systematic collection, review, and use of information about educational programs undertaken for the purpose of improving student learning and development. (Palomba and Banta 1999). It is widely recognized that sophisticated computing technologies are becoming a key element in today's classroom instructional techniques. Regardless, the Professor must be held responsible for creating an instructional environment in which the technology actually supplements learning outcomes of the students. Almost all academic disciplines have found a niche for computer-based instruction in their respective professional domain. In many cases, it is viewed as an essential and integral part of the educational process. Educational institutions are committing substantial resources to the establishment of dedicated technology-based laboratories, so that they will be able to accommodate and fulfill students' desire to master certain of these specific skills. This type of technology-based instruction may raise some fundamental questions about the core competencies of the student learner. Some of the most important questions are : 1. Is the utilization of these fast high-powered computers and user-friendly software programs creating a totally non-challenging instructional environment for the student learner ? 2. Can technology itself all too easily overshadow the learning outcomes intended ? 3. Are the educational institutions simply training students how to use technology rather than educating them in the appropriate field ? 4. Are we still teaching content-driven courses and analysis oriented subject matter ? 5. Are these sophisticated modern era technologies contributing to a decline in the Critical Thinking Capabilities of the 21st century technology-savvy students ? The author tries to focus on technology as a tool and not on the technology

  1. Assessment of Clinical Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newble, David I.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews current approaches to the examination of medical students' clinical competence, mentioning differences in approaches adopted in Australia, Great Britain, and North America. Test methods used in examination are discussed critically and their separate strengths and weaknesses are highlighted. Newer approaches involving multiple methods and…

  2. Assessment Mathematics Teacher's Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnoor, A. G.; Yuanxiang, Guo; Abudhuim, F. S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper aimed to identifying the professional efficiencies for the intermediate schools mathematics teachers and tries to know at what level the math teachers experience those competencies. The researcher used a descriptive research approach, the study data collected from specialist educators and teacher's experts and previous studies to…

  3. The assessment of medical competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureda-Demeulemeester, E; Ramis-Palmer, C; Sesé-Abad, A

    2017-06-27

    To describe the most widely used tools in the assessment of medical competencies, analyse their prevalence of use, their advantages and disadvantages and propose an appropriate model for our context. We conducted a narrative review of articles from MEDLINE, following the PRISM protocol, and analysed a total of 62 articles. The assessment of competencies is heterogeneous, especially in the educational and professional settings. The specific and technical competencies acquired during university education are mainly assessed using the objective structured clinical assessment. In the professional setting, core competencies are assessed using the 360° technique. We need a rigorous empiric comparison of the efficiency of the tools according to the type of competency. We propose a competency management model for the «undergraduate/graduate/active professional» continuum, whose goal is to improve training and professional practice and thereby increase the quality of patient care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  4. Operationalizing TIGER NI Competencies for Online Assessment of Perceived Competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Kathy M; Dee, McGonigle; Hebda, Toni

    2012-01-01

    Competencies in nursing informatics (NI) are needed by every nurse. The TIGER Initiative published a set of NI competencies for every nurse in 2009. A research project focused on using these competencies is underway. A systematic instrument-development process is used to adapt these competencies for use in an online instrument. Results of a modified Delphi method, content-validity assessment, and pilot testing are related. Plans for ongoing research are shared.

  5. Assessing Romantic Competence in Adolescence: The Romantic Competence Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Joanne; Steinberg, Sara J.; Miller, Melissa Ramsay; Stroud, Catherine B.; Starr, Lisa R.; Yoneda, Athena

    2009-01-01

    This article presents preliminary psychometric data on the reliability and validity of the newly developed Romantic Competence Interview (RCI). The RCI is an interviewer-assessed measure designed to assess competence among adolescents regardless of romantic relationship status. Eighty-three early adolescent girls (m age = 13.45 years) recruited…

  6. Feasibility of an Assessment Tool for Children's Competence to Consent to Predictive Genetic Testing: a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Irma M; Troost, Pieter W; Lindeboom, Robert; Christiaans, Imke; Grisso, Thomas; van Goudoever, Johannes B; Lindauer, Ramón J L

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge on children's capacities to consent to medical treatment is limited. Also, age limits for asking children's consent vary considerably between countries. Decision-making on predictive genetic testing (PGT) is especially complicated, considering the ongoing ethical debate. In order to examine just age limits for alleged competence to consent in children, we evaluated feasibility of a standardized assessment tool, and investigated cutoff ages for children's competence to consent to PGT. We performed a pilot study, including 17 pediatric outpatients between 6 and 18 years at risk for an autosomal dominantly inherited cardiac disease, eligible for predictive genetic testing. The reference standard for competence was established by experts trained in the relevant criteria for competent decision-making. The MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool for Treatment (MacCAT-T) served as index test. Data analysis included raw agreement between competence classifications, difference in mean ages between children judged competent and judged incompetent, and estimation of cutoff ages for judgments of competence. Twelve (71 %) children were considered competent by the reference standard, and 16 (94 %) by the MacCAT-T, with an overall agreement of 76 %. The expert judgments disagreed in most cases, while the MacCAT-T judgments agreed in 65 %. Mean age of children judged incompetent was 9.3 years and of children judged competent 12.1 years (p = .035). With 90 % sensitivity, children younger than 10.0 years were judged incompetent, with 90 % specificity children older than 11.8 years were judged competent. Feasibility of the MacCAT-T in children is confirmed. Initial findings on age cutoffs are indicative for children between the age of 12 and 18 to be judged competent for involvement in the informed consent process. Future research on appropriate age-limits for children's alleged competence to consent is needed.

  7. Systematic approach in petroleum personnel competence assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanyuk, Vera; Nekhoda, Evgeniya; Dmitriev, Andrey; Khudyakov, Dmitriy; Pozdeeva, Galina

    2016-09-01

    The article is devoted to professional competence improvement of personnel in the petroleum industry. The technique for competence assessment optimization in oil and gas well drilling is developed. The specification for the oil and gas industry competence profiles has been provided.

  8. The States' Role in Ensuring Assessment Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Michael S.

    2002-01-01

    Argues that because of research evidence linking competent assessment with academic achievement, all states should require assessment competence for teacher, administrator, and counselor licenses; reviews current status of state requirements; briefly describes assessment standards developed by several national organizations; describes several…

  9. The Wheel of Competency Assessment: Presenting Quality Criteria for Competency Assessment Programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baartman, Liesbeth; Bastiaens, Theo; Kirschner, Paul A.; Van der Vleuten, Cees

    2009-01-01

    Baartman, L. K. J., Bastiaens, T. J., Kirschner, P. A., & Van der Vleuten, C. P. M. (2006). The wheel of competency assessment: Presenting quality criteria for Competency Assessment Programmes. Studies in Educational Evaluation, 32, 153-170.

  10. The Wheel of Competency Assessment: Presenting Quality Criteria for Competency Assessment Programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baartman, Liesbeth; Bastiaens, Theo; Kirschner, Paul A.; Van der Vleuten, Cees

    2009-01-01

    Baartman, L. K. J., Bastiaens, T. J., Kirschner, P. A., & Van der Vleuten, C. P. M. (2006). The wheel of competency assessment: Presenting quality criteria for Competency Assessment Programmes. Studies in Educational Evaluation, 32, 153-170.

  11. Assessing clinical competency: reports from discussion groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnwald, Grant; Stone, Elizabeth; Bristol, David; Fuentealba, Carmen; Hardie, Lizette; Hellyer, Peter; Jaeger, Laurie; Kerwin, Sharon; Kochevar, Deborah; Lissemore, Kerry; Olsen, Christopher; Rogers, Kenita; Sabin, Beth; Swanson, Cliff; Warner, Angeline

    2008-01-01

    This report describes proposed new models for assessment of eight of the nine clinical competencies the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education requires for accreditation. The models were developed by discussion groups at the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges' Clinical Competency Symposium. Clinical competencies and proposed models (in parentheses) are described. Competency 1: comprehensive patient diagnosis (neurologic examination on a dog, clinical reasoning skills); Competency 2: comprehensive treatment planning (concept mapping, computerized case studies); Competency 3: anesthesia, pain management (student portfolio); Competency 4: surgery skills (objective structured clinical examination, cased-based examination, "super dog" model); Competency 5: medicine skills (clinical reasoning and case management, skills checklist); Competency 6: emergency and intensive care case management (computerized case study or scenario); Competency 7: health promotion, disease prevention/biosecurity (360 degrees evaluation, case-based computer simulation); Competency 8: client communications and ethical conduct (Web-based evaluation forms, client survey, communicating with stakeholders, telephone conversation, written scenario-based cases). The report also describes faculty recognition for participating in clinical competency assessments.

  12. [Competency-based assessment in medical education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champin, Denisse

    2014-01-01

    At present, competency-based curriculum is considered to be the most appropriate model in medical education. Much has been written about this model; however, a crucial aspect of the model is the assessment of competency development which is a different point compared to the traditional model of cognitive assessment. Assessment in the context of the competencybased curriculum model must be aligned with the profile of the competencies that the institution offers. This publication reports the evaluation experience in a Medical School of Peru that applies a competency-based curriculum.

  13. Assessing Competence in Pediatric Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Apul E.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    In response to the need to assure physician competence, a rating scale was developed at the University of Minnesota Medical School for use in evaluating clinical competence in pediatric cardiology. It was tested on first- and second-year specialists. Development and testing procedures are described. (JT)

  14. Assessing Competence in Pediatric Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Apul E.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    In response to the need to assure physician competence, a rating scale was developed at the University of Minnesota Medical School for use in evaluating clinical competence in pediatric cardiology. It was tested on first- and second-year specialists. Development and testing procedures are described. (JT)

  15. Competences, competences assessment, validity of instruments, Preschool Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rigoberto Marín Uribe

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to describe the design process, validation and assurance of an instrument for the assessment of the success level of competences in preschool children. Initially is presented a theoretical and contextual framework of the competences in preschool. With this, it is problematized about the absence of tools for that the educators could perform the diagnostic evaluation of competences required in the reform of preschool education 2004. In the design of the instrument, the concept of “situation” is central. The validation and assurance included a process of pilotage with 512 preschool children with the implementing in practice of three different ways of application of the instrument. The results show high levels of assurance and power of discrimination that allow to distinguish significantly people by age and socioeconomic level, not finding differences by genre.

  16. Taxonomy for Assessing Evaluation Competencies in Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Michelle S.; Hillaker, Barbara D.; Haas, Bruce E.; Peters, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of public service programming is becoming increasingly important with current funding realities. The taxonomy of evaluation competencies compiled by Ghere et al. (2006) provided the starting place for Taxonomy for Assessing Evaluation Competencies in Extension. The Michigan State University Extension case study described here presents a…

  17. Nursing students' views of clinical competence assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Carmel; O'Connor, Maureen; Egan, Geraldine; Tierney, Katie; Butler, Mary Pat; Fahy, Anne; Tuohy, Dympna; Cassidy, Irene; Quillinan, Bernie; McNamara, Mary C

    This paper reports on some outcomes of a research study evaluating a new assessment framework of clinical competence used in undergraduate nursing programmes in the Mid West Region of Ireland. First, this paper presents both the strengths and weaknesses of the present model, as articulated by student nurses. Second, it generates a broader critical debate around the concept of competency assessment. The model of competence in question was developed by the Irish Nursing Board then elaborated on by the University of Limerick in partnership with local health service providers in 2002. Methodology involved a triangulated approach, comprising a series of focus group interviews with students (n=13) and preceptors (n=16) followed by a survey of students (n=232) and preceptors (n=837). Findings from the student focus groups are reported here. Themes identified using Burnard's (1991) framework for analysis are preparation for competency assessment, competency documentation, supporting assessment in practice, organisational and resource factors and the competency assessment structure and process. Results from this research have implications for refinement and revision of the present competency assessment framework, for student and staff preparation and for collaboration between stakeholders.

  18. Evaluating Adult's Competency: Application of the Competency Assessment Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, Dominique; Tétreault, Sylvie; Landry, Marie-Pier

    2015-01-01

    Competency assessment of adults with cognitive impairment or mental illness is a complex process that can have significant consequences for their rights. Some models put forth in the scientific literature have been proposed to guide health and social service professionals with this assessment process, but none of these appear to be complete. A new model, the Competency Assessment Process (CAP), was presented and validated in other studies. This paper adds to this corpus by presenting both the CAP model and the results of a survey given to health and social service professionals on its practical application in their clinical practice. The survey was administered to 35 participants trained in assessing competency following the CAP model. The results show that 40% of participants use the CAP to guide their assessment and the majority of those who do not yet use it plan to do so in the future. A large majority of participants consider this to be a relevant model and believe that all interdisciplinary teams should use it. These results support the relevance of the CAP model. Further research is planned to continue the study of the application of CAP in healthcare facilities.

  19. Assessing competencies during education in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Holly J; Marcangelo, Michael; Rodriguez, Elizabeth R; Spitz, Deborah

    2013-06-01

    The utilization of competencies in medical education is relatively recent. In 1999 the United States Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) established six main competencies. Since then, the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology have approved a specific list of competencies for their specialities in each of the ACGME's core competency areas. Assessment of competencies in both medical students and residents can be achieved through such methods as structured case discussion, direct observation, simulation, standardized patients, and 360-degree assessments, etc. Each assessment methodology has specific applications in the discipline of psychiatry. This paper reviews the different methods for assessing competencies with specific examples in psychiatric education. It is not intended as a comprehensive review of all assessment methods, but to provide examples and strategies to guide psychiatric educators in their practice. Students and residents were intentionally separated because there are differences in the teaching goals and objectives, and thus in the assessment purposes and design. Students are general, undifferentiated physicians-in-training who need to learn about psychiatric nosology, examinations, and treatment. Residents are mental health professionals who need more in-depth supervision in order to hone skills in all the specialized areas that arise in psychiatric practices, making supervision a vital part of residency programs.

  20. Administrator Certification Requirements for Student Assessment Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Michael S.

    1999-01-01

    State-level administrator certification requirements were studied with respect to student-assessment expectations, using responses of state certification offices. Only 18 states require some form of student-assessment knowledge and skills, and only Washington state requires the assessment competencies promulgated by the National Policy Board for…

  1. How should paediatricians assess Gillick competence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larcher, Vic; Hutchinson, Anna

    2010-04-01

    Competence is an essential legal requirement for valid consent to medical treatment. Children under 16 may be considered 'Gillick competent' to make treatment decisions, but may need to demonstrate this. Applied tests for competence are wide-ranging and context dependent. Competence is related to cognitive ability and experience and may be enhanced by education, encouragement etc.; there is a general duty for professionals to enhance the competence of children in their care. The need to assess a child's competence may occur when s/he wishes to make a controversial decision whose wisdom others dispute. Potential assessors should have the necessary practical skills and an understanding of the child in their social and medical context. Assessments should be developmentally appropriate, explore systemic influences, and consider the child's emotional state, cognitive development and ability to balance risks and benefits. The involvement of a psychologist or other independent third party should be considered in cases that raise serious concerns about competency, or that involve complex decisions or conflict between the various parties. In rare cases courts may be involved.

  2. Quality assessment in competency based physiotherapy education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    to monitor and improve didactics and teaching methods in alignment with these competencies. Description: This competence based assessment model for education is build on a combination of three curriculum types (Glatthorn;1987), 4 levels of evaluation (KirkPatrick;1998) and single and double loop learning...... with information at the level of premises, in relation to the development of the written curriculum and the institutional framework supporting the education. In this way the three curriculum types are interconnected through 4 levels of evaluation and single and double loop learning, in order to ensure......Purpose: To ensure a transparent and competency related assessment of physiotherapy education, in order to accomplish a close relationship between competencies at entry level to the profession and challenges in current and future health practice. Relevance: Perspectives and metods regarding...

  3. Contemplating modes of assessing citizenship competences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daas, R.; ten Dam, G.; Dijkstra, A.B.

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of citizenship competences has become common practice following the statutory assignment of citizenship education to schools in many countries. Assessment can serve various goals. The suitability of various types of instruments depends on the alignment with the goals intended. In this pap

  4. Assessing Students – Clinical Competence Versus Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Ruedy

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent elaboration of the range of physiciancompetencies upon which the quality of health care isdependent has fostered the development of a variety ofmethods of assessing medical student competencies andperformance. Such assessments are essential inproviding feedback to students to guide their learningand to faculty on the success of the curriculum inachieving competency outcomes. In addition theyprovide evidence that students have achieved minimumrequirements for progressing. Well-designed ObservedStructured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs, MiniClinical Examinations (Mini-CEXs and some forms ofMulti-Source Feedback (MSF can meet acceptablestandards of validity and reliability and are feasible.Competency assessments are limited in predicting howa student will actually act in the work situationparticularly in humanistic skills. More emphasis needsto be placed on student performance, in suchcompetencies as communication and professionalism, ina variety of settings by a number of observers.

  5. Assessment of intercultural competence in the FL classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Saška Horvat

    2011-01-01

    Acquiring intercultural competence is an important objective of foreign language learning. Problems occur because current testing still focuses on checking grammar skills, listening comprehension and writing skills, whereas intercultural competence assessment does not favour traditional testing and numerical grading. Developing and Assessing Intercul tural Competence, published in 2007 in European Centre for Modern Languages in Graz, introduces ways of assessing various competences/components...

  6. Multicultural Counseling Competencies: Lessons from Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaoka, Sean Kia i

    2005-01-01

    This article addresses multicultural counseling competencies from the perspective of quantitative assessment. A conceptual review of the current measures identifies 4 relevant issues: (a) diverse factor structures, (b) the working definition of multicultural awareness, (c) test takers' frame of reference, and (d) the implications of an inclusive…

  7. COMPETENCE ASSESSMENT: BEST PRACTICES IN EUROPEAN COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena VELCIU

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the current changing environment of work, the process of competence assessment is increasingly relevant as workers gain knowledge and practical skills through fulfilling different and new working tasks and through self-education. In this context, innovative tools for competence assessment and validation are very useful for encouraging movement of individuals between jobs and from unemployment or inactivity to employment and for increasing the capacity of companies to respond and adapt to changing and challenging environments. This article presents an overview of best practices for competence assessment and validation in order to identify and select methods that have been effective in various European countries including Romania. The article concludes with a set of „learned lessons” and short recommendations in order to improve the framework of competence assessment in Romanian context. Our findings are useful for the new human resources management that aims toward efficiently usage of the workforce, inside companies and in a global labour market, encouraging flexibility and adaptability.

  8. COMPETENCE ASSESSMENT: BEST PRACTICES IN EUROPEAN COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena VELCIU

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the current changing environment of work, the process of competence assessment is increasingly relevant as workers gain knowledge and practical skills through fulfilling different and new working tasks and through self-education. In this context, innovative tools for competence assessment and validation are very useful for encouraging movement of individuals between jobs and from unemployment or inactivity to employment and for increasing the capacity of companies to respond and adapt to changing and challenging environments. This article presents an overview of best practices for competence assessment and validation in order to identify and select methods that have been effective in various European countries including Romania. The article concludes with a set of „learned lessons” and short recommendations in order to improve the framework of competence assessment in Romanian context. Our findings are useful for the new human resources management that aims toward efficiently usage of the workforce, inside companies and in a global labour market, encouraging flexibility and adaptability.

  9. Assessment of Competence in EVAR Procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm, M; Lönn, L; Bech, B

    2017-01-01

    items with tentative anchors. Iterative Delphi rounds were executed. The panellists rated the importance of each item on a 5 point Likert scale. Consensus was defined as 80% of the panel rating an item 4 or 5 in the primary round and 90% in subsequent rounds. Consensus on the final assessment tool......, and superior performance on a 5 point Likert scale. CONCLUSION: The Delphi methodology allowed for international consensus on a new procedure specific global rating scale for assessment of competence in EVAR. The resulting scale, EndoVascular Aortic Repair Assessment of Technical Expertise (EVARATE......OBJECTIVE/BACKGROUND: To develop a procedure specific global rating scale for assessment of operator competence in endovascular aortic repair (EVAR). METHODS: A Delphi approach was used to achieve expert consensus. A panel of 32 international experts (median 300 EVAR procedures, range 200...

  10. Responsive Assessment: Assessing Student Nurses' Clinical Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neary, Mary

    2001-01-01

    A study involving 300 nursing students, 155 nurse practitioners, and 80 assessors tested a model of responsive assessment that includes identification of learning needs and potential, assignment to suitable placements, continuous assessment of clinical practice and patient care, and alignment of teaching and assessment with patient needs and…

  11. Assessment of intercultural competence in the FL classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saška Horvat

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Acquiring intercultural competence is an important objective of foreign language learning. Problems occur because current testing still focuses on checking grammar skills, listening comprehension and writing skills, whereas intercultural competence assessment does not favour traditional testing and numerical grading. Developing and Assessing Intercul tural Competence, published in 2007 in European Centre for Modern Languages in Graz, introduces ways of assessing various competences/components of intercultural competence.

  12. Assessing clinical competency in the health sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzarella, Karen Joanne

    To test the success of integrated curricula in schools of health sciences, meaningful measurements of student performance are required to assess clinical competency. This research project analyzed a new performance assessment tool, the Integrated Standardized Patient Examination (ISPE), for assessing clinical competency: specifically, to assess Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) students' clinical competence as the ability to integrate basic science knowledge with clinical communication skills. Thirty-four DPT students performed two ISPE cases, one of a patient who sustained a stroke and the other a patient with a herniated lumbar disc. Cases were portrayed by standardized patients (SPs) in a simulated clinical setting. Each case was scored by an expert evaluator in the exam room and then by one investigator and the students themselves via videotape. The SPs scored each student on an overall encounter rubric. Written feedback was obtained from all participants in the study. Acceptable reliability was demonstrated via inter-rater agreement as well as inter-rater correlations on items that used a dichotomous scale, whereas the items requiring the use of the 4-point rubric were somewhat less reliable. For the entire scale both cases had a significant correlation between the Expert-Investigator pair of raters, for the CVA case r = .547, p < .05 and for the HD case r = .700, p < .01. The SPs scored students higher than the other raters. Students' self-assessments were most closely aligned with the investigator. Effects were apparent due to case. Content validity was gathered in the process of developing cases and patient scenarios that were used in this study. Construct validity was obtained from the survey results analyzed from the experts and students. Future studies should examine the effect of rater training upon the reliability. Criterion or predictive validity could be further studied by comparing students' performances on the ISPE with other independent estimates

  13. A proposal for generic competence assessment in a serious game

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the design of a serious game for the teaching and assessment of generic competences, placing particular emphasis on the competences assessment aspect. Taking into account important aspects of competence assessment such as context, feedback and transparency, among other aspects, and using the University of Deusto's Generic Competences Assessment Model based on the defining of levels, indicators and descriptors as a reference point, a serious game has been designed for the...

  14. 42 CFR 493.1235 - Standard: Personnel competency assessment policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard: Personnel competency assessment policies... Nonwaived Testing General Laboratory Systems § 493.1235 Standard: Personnel competency assessment policies... written policies and procedures to assess employee and, if applicable, consultant competency....

  15. Beyond NAVMEC: competency-based veterinary education and assessment of the professional competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Jennifer L; Pelzer, Jacquelyn M; Inzana, Karen D

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of competency-based curricula within the health sciences has been an important paradigm shift over the past 30 years. As a result, one of the five strategic goals recommended by the North American Veterinary Medical Education Consortium (NAVMEC) report was to graduate career-ready veterinarians who are proficient in, and have the confidence to use, an agreed-upon set of core competencies. Of the nine competencies identified as essential for veterinary graduates, seven could be classified as professional or non-technical competencies: communication; collaboration; management (self, team, system); lifelong learning, scholarship, value of research; leadership; diversity and multicultural awareness; and adaptation to changing environments. Traditionally, the professional competencies have received less attention in veterinary curricula and their assessment is often sporadic or inconsistent. In contrast, the same or similar competencies are being increasingly recognized in other health professions as essential skills and abilities, and their assessment is being undertaken with enhanced scrutiny and critical appraisal. Several challenges have been associated with the assessment of professional competencies, including agreement as to their definition and therefore their evaluation, the fact that they are frequently complex and require multiple integrative assessments, and the ability and/or desire of faculty to teach and assess these competencies. To provide an improved context for assessment of the seven professional competencies identified in the NAVMEC report, this article describes a broad framework for their evaluation as well as specific examples of how these or similar competencies are currently being measured in medical and veterinary curricula.

  16. Exploring Examiner Judgement of Professional Competence in Rater Based Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Fiona L.; Marshall, Stephen; Shulruf, Boaz; Jones, Philip D.

    2016-01-01

    Exercise physiology courses have transitioned to competency based, forcing Universities to rethink assessment to ensure students are competent to practice. This study built on earlier research to explore rater cognition, capturing factors that contribute to assessor decision making about students' competency. The aims were to determine the source…

  17. The Social Validity Assessment of Social Competence Intervention Behavior Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Jennifer J.; Wehby, Joseph H.; Feurer, Irene D.

    2010-01-01

    Social validation is the value judgment from society on the importance of a study. The social validity of behavior goals used in the social competence intervention literature was assessed using the Q-sort technique. The stimulus items were 80 different social competence behavior goals taken from 78 classroom-based social competence intervention…

  18. Assessing Multicultural Competence of Helping-Profession Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hladik, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I focus on assessing multicultural competence of helping-profession students. The "Multicultural Competence Scale of Helping-Profession Students" was used for data collection. The aim of the research was to find out the level of students' multicultural competence due to the current lack of this information in Central…

  19. Cultural competence models and cultural competence assessment instruments in nursing: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zuwang

    2015-05-01

    The author reviewed cultural competence models and cultural competence assessment instruments developed and published by nurse researchers since 1982. Both models and instruments were examined in terms of their components, theoretical backgrounds, empirical validation, and psychometric evaluation. Most models were not empirically tested; only a few models developed model-based instruments. About half of the instruments were tested with varying levels of psychometric properties. Other related issues were discussed, including the definition of cultural competence and its significance in model and instrument development, limitations of existing models and instruments, impact of cultural competence on health disparities, and further work in cultural competence research and practice. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Assessing Competencies in a Master of Science in Clinical Research Program: The Comprehensive Competency Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Georgeanna F W B; Moore, Charity G; McTigue, Kathleen M; Rubio, Doris M; Kapoor, Wishwa N

    2015-12-01

    Competencies in Master of Science Clinical Research programs are becoming increasingly common. However, students and programs can only benefit fully from competency-based education if students' competence is formally assessed. Prior to a summative assessment, students must have at least one formative, formal assessment to be sure they are developing competence appropriate for their stage of training. This paper describes the comprehensive competency review (CCR), a milestone for MS students in Clinical Research at the University of Pittsburgh's Institute for Clinical Research Education. The CCR involves metacognitive reflection of the student's learning as a whole, written evidence of each competency, a narrative explaining the choice of evidence for demonstrating competencies, and a meeting in which two faculty members review the evidence and solicit further oral evidence of competence. CCRs allow for individualized feedback at the midpoint in degree programs, providing students with confidence that they will have the means and strategies to develop competence in all areas by the summative assessment of competence at their thesis defense. CCRs have also provided programmatic insight on the need for curricular revisions and additions. These benefits outweigh the time cost on the part of students and faculty in the CCR process.

  1. Preservice Teachers and Self-Assessing Digital Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maderick, Joseph A.; Zhang, Shaoan; Hartley, Kendall; Marchand, Gwen

    2016-01-01

    This study compares matched surveys of subjective self-assessment and objective assessment on seven domains of digital competence for preservice teachers at a large Southwest public university. The results, consistent with earlier studies, confirm that the participating preservice teachers inaccurately self-assessed their digital competence. The…

  2. A proposal for generic competence assessment in a serious game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Bezanilla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the design of a serious game for the teaching and assessment of generic competences, placing particular emphasis on the competences assessment aspect. Taking into account important aspects of competence assessment such as context, feedback and transparency, among other aspects, and using the University of Deusto's Generic Competences Assessment Model based on the defining of levels, indicators and descriptors as a reference point, a serious game has been designed for the development and evaluation of two Generic Competences: Problem Solving and Entrepreneurship, aimed at final-year undergraduate and first-year postgraduate students. The design process shows that having a Competence Assessment Model based on levels, indicators and descriptors is of great help in defining the game's scenarios and learning and assessment activities. Serious games can also be excellent resources to help in the development and assessment of generic competences, but not as a unique tool, since the concept of competence in itself is highly complex (integrating knowledge, skills, attitudes and values and some elements might require other methods and techniques for its development. It also reveals the difficulties of evaluating competences in general and through serious games in particular.

  3. METHODS OF ASSESSING THE COMMUNICATIVE COMPETENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Nikolaevich ZUBAREV

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The author describes various techniques of evaluating communicative competence. In the context of the study, taking into consideration the specificity of communicative competence and sphere of professional activities of gradu-ates from humanitarian higher educational institutions, the author makes the conclusions related to the methods of demonstrating the competence. The author also presents methods of evaluating the competence of graduates from humanitarian higher educational institutions in the form of detailed description of each method. Finally, the author makes conclusions on choosing the best method.

  4. Assessment of the digital competence in Russian adolescents and parents: Digital Competence Index.

    OpenAIRE

    Soldatova G.V.; Rasskazova E.I.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we developed a psychological model of digital competence including four components (knowledge, skills, motivation and responsibility) and four spheres (work with online content, communication, technical activity and consumption). The Digital Competence Index (DCI) is a 52-item instrument assessing an index and an entire profile of digital competence. In the Russian population study (1203 adolescents 12-17 years old and 1209 parents), acceptable reliability (.72-.90 for all of t...

  5. Assessing Romantic Competence among Older Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Shmuel; Davila, Joanne; Shachar-Shapira, Lital

    2011-01-01

    Davila and colleagues (Davila et al., 2009) developed the Romantic Competence Interview to capture the potential for romantic competence during early adolescence. Considering that at later stages of adolescence the majority are likely to be involved in some kind of romantic relationship, the current paper adapts, extends, and examines the concept…

  6. School Nurse Cultural Competence Needs Assessment: Results and Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matza, Maria; Maughan, Erin; Barrows, Beth M

    2015-11-01

    NASN conducted a needs assessment to learn about the cultural competence skills needed by school nurses. The purpose of this article is to describe the results of the needs assessment and describe actions taken to address cultural competency needs for the U.S. school nurse workforce.

  7. Valuing Assessment in Teacher Education - Multiple-Choice Competency Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Dona L.; Itter, Diane

    2014-01-01

    When our focus is on assessment educators should work to value the nature of assessment. This paper presents a new approach to multiple-choice competency testing in mathematics education. The instrument discussed here reflects student competence, encourages self-regulatory learning behaviours and links content with current curriculum documents and…

  8. [Current state of competence assessment in nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmann-Finck, Ingrid; Reuschenbach, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Competency measurement is central to the optimisation of outcome oriented educational processes in nursing, similar to the concept of evidence based practice. The classification of measurement tools provides the basis for describing the current state of research and development in relation to competence measurement in nursing science, and any gaps are identified. The article concludes with questioning the importance of outcome oriented quality orientation in order to achieve an increase in quality during training. Further methodological developments and qualitative studies are needed to examine the context specific processes of interaction and learning, beyond competence diagnostics. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  9. Assessment and self-assessment of the pharmacists' competencies using the global competency framework (GbCF in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojkov Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Pharmacists' competence represents a dynamic framework of knowledge, skills and abilities to carry out tasks, and it reflects on improving the quality of life and on patients’ health. One of the documents for the Evaluation and Competency Development of Pharmacists is the Global Competency Framework (GbCF. The aim of this study was to implement the GBCF document into Serbian pharmacies, to perform assessment and self assessment of the competencies. Methods. The assessment and self-assessment of pharmacists’ competencies were performed during the period 2012−13 year in eight community pharmacy chains, in seven cities in Serbia. For assessment and self-assessment of pharmacists competencies the GbCF model was applied, which was adjusted to pharmaceutical practice and legislation in Serbia. External assessment was conducted by teams of pharmacists using the structured observation of the work of pharmacists during regular working hours. Evaluated pharmacists filled out the questionnaire about demographic indicators about the pharmacist and the pharmacy where they work. Results. A total of 123 pharmacists were evaluated. Pharmacists’ Professional Competency Cluster (KK1 had the lowest score (average value 2.98, while the cluster Management and Organizational Competency (KK2 had the highest score (average value 3.15. The competence Recognition of the Diagnosis and Patient Counseling (K8, which belonged to the cluster KK1, had the lowest score (average value for assessment and self-assessment were 2.09, and 2.34, respectively among the all evaluated competencies. Conclusion. GbCF might be considered as an instrument for the competencies' evaluation/selfevaluation and their improvement, accordingly.

  10. Assessment of Health Informatics Competencies in Undergraduate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    making process. As health information technologies increasingly become part of the health care environment, the ... in which new educational opportunities needed to be developed .... was developed from the nursing informatics competencies.

  11. Assessment of Military Cultural Competence: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Eric G; Hall-Clark, Brittany N; Hamaoka, Derrick; Peterson, Alan L

    2015-08-01

    Cultural competence is widely considered a cornerstone of patient care. Efforts to improve military cultural competency have recently gained national attention. Assessment of cultural competence is a critical component to this effort, but no assessment of military cultural competence currently exists. An assessment of military cultural competence (AMCC) was created through broad input and consensus. Careful review of previous cultural competency assessment designs and analysis techniques was considered. The AMCC was organized into three sections: skills, attitudes, and knowledge. In addition to gathering data to determine absolute responses from groups with different exposure levels to the military (direct, indirect, and none), paired questions were utilized to assess relative competencies between military culture and culture in general. Piloting of the AMCC revealed significant differences between military exposure groups. Specifically, those with personal military exposure were more likely to be in absolute agreement that the military is a culture, were more likely to screen for military culture, and had increased knowledge of military culture compared to those with no military exposure. Relative differences were more informative. For example, all groups were less likely to agree that their personal culture could be at odds with military culture as compared to other cultures. Such perceptions could hinder asking difficult questions and thus undermine care. The AMCC is a model for the measurement of the skills, attitudes, and knowledge related to military cultural competence. With further validity testing, the AMCC will be helpful in the critical task of measuring outcomes in ongoing efforts to improve military cultural competence. The novel approach of assessing variance appears to reduce bias and may also be helpful in the design of other cultural competency assessments.

  12. An Electronic Competency-Based Evaluation Tool for Assessing Humanitarian Competencies in a Simulated Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Andrea B; Hulme, Jennifer M; Nugus, Peter; Cranmer, Hilarie H; Coutu, Melanie; Johnson, Kirsten

    2017-06-01

    The evaluation tool was first derived from the formerly Consortium of British Humanitarian Agencies' (CBHA; United Kingdom), now "Start Network's," Core Humanitarian Competency Framework and formatted in an electronic data capture tool that allowed for offline evaluation. During a 3-day humanitarian simulation event, participants in teams of eight to 10 were evaluated individually at multiple injects by trained evaluators. Participants were assessed on five competencies and a global rating scale. Participants evaluated both themselves and their team members using the same tool at the end of the simulation exercise (SimEx). All participants (63) were evaluated. A total of 1,008 individual evaluations were completed. There were 90 (9.0%) missing evaluations. All 63 participants also evaluated themselves and each of their teammates using the same tool. Self-evaluation scores were significantly lower than peer-evaluations, which were significantly lower than evaluators' assessments. Participants with a medical degree, and those with humanitarian work experience of one month or more, scored significantly higher on all competencies assessed by evaluators compared to other participants. Participants with prior humanitarian experience scored higher on competencies regarding operating safely and working effectively as a team member. This study presents a novel electronic evaluation tool to assess individual performance in five of six globally recognized humanitarian competency domains in a 3-day humanitarian SimEx. The evaluation tool provides a standardized approach to the assessment of humanitarian competencies that cannot be evaluated through knowledge-based testing in a classroom setting. When combined with testing knowledge-based competencies, this presents an approach to a comprehensive competency-based assessment that provides an objective measurement of competency with respect to the competencies listed in the Framework. There is an opportunity to advance the use of

  13. Electronic Rubrics to Assess Competences in ICT Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Manuela Raposo; De La Serna, Manuel Cebrian; Martinez-Figueira, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Helping students to acquire specific competences is nowadays one of the basic pillars of university teaching; therefore its evaluation and accreditation is of key importance. As of late, rubrics and in particular electronic rubrics (e-rubrics) have become an important resource to assess competences and guide students in their learning processes.…

  14. Assessment of competence and progressive independence in postgraduate clinical training.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijksterhuis, M.G.; Voorhuis, M.; Teunissen, P.W.; Schuwirth, L.W.; Cate, O.T.J. ten; Braat, D.D.M.; Scheele, F.

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: At present, competency-based, outcome-focused training is gradually replacing more traditional master-apprentice teaching in postgraduate training. This change requires a different approach to the assessment of clinical competence, especially given the decisions that must be made about the

  15. Assessing Speaking/Listening Competencies through Experiential Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlken, Bob

    This paper offers three experiental assessment procedures for speaking/listening competencies. First, five important elements in assessing speaking and listening are presented: defiinition; the establishment of a specific purpose for the assessment; determining what is being measured; identifying the type of communication being assessed; and a…

  16. An assessment of organizational multicultural competences of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... The findings revealed that the universities lacked policy frameworks, units, practices and programmes ... It is imperative that university leadership adopt multicultural competence as an essential ... policy and procedures; personnel practices; attitudes, knowledge and skills ...

  17. Changing times, changing paradigm (2): The Macarthur experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, M A; Dwyer, J

    1989-04-01

    Part 2 delves more deeply into the program which the Macarthur Institute of Higher Education has implemented; a problem-based learning curriculum with the focus on self directed learning and the transfer of concepts and principles related to the various sciences associated with health care. Through exploration of specific patient problems students are able to integrate the components of the course using a process of enquiry. This new approach has implications for the student, the new graduate, the teacher/facilitator, the workforce and the recipients of nursing care. A broad overview of the impact of the new paradigm on nursing thus far is provided with a suggested model for formal evaluation of the program.

  18. Opportunities for Counselors from the Competency Assessment Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, David C.; Boyatzis, Richard E.

    1980-01-01

    Innovations in testing emerging from the competency assessment movement offer counselors new capabilities in helping clients to understand aspects of themselves and their problems, as well as to establish directions for development and improvement efforts. (Author)

  19. Opportunities for Counselors from the Competency Assessment Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, David C.; Boyatzis, Richard E.

    1980-01-01

    Innovations in testing emerging from the competency assessment movement offer counselors new capabilities in helping clients to understand aspects of themselves and their problems, as well as to establish directions for development and improvement efforts. (Author)

  20. [Assessing the clinical competence of dental students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonheim-Klein, M E; van Selms, M K A; Volgenant, C M C; Wiegman, H P; Vervoorn, J M

    2012-06-01

    Nowadays, the competences of dental students are tested more on the basis of quality of their achievements than the quantity. 'Objective Structured Clinical Examinations' (OSCEs) can be used in a pre-clinical phase to test these clinical competences. For the clinical phase, the general examination and the digital portfolio have been developed. Tests are used to stimulate the learning process and to determine whether students are ready for the next step; in addition, the quality of the programme is protected by the set of examinations. The results of the last 5 general examinations reveal the pattern that the number of correct answers increases as the study progresses. The Amsterdam Academic Centre for Dentistry (ACTA) introduced a digital portfolio which was evaluated 1 year later with the help ofan anonymous questionnaire. Students judged the use of the digital portfolio in the clinic to be useful but also costly in time.

  1. Assessing intern core competencies with an objective structured clinical examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Matthew W; Jorgensen, Jennifer E; Edwards, John A; Blankenship, Robert B; Roth, Bernard J

    2009-09-01

    Residents are evaluated using Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core competencies. An Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) is a potential evaluation tool to measure these competencies and provide outcome data. Create an OSCE to evaluate and demonstrate improvement in intern core competencies of patient care, medical knowledge, practice-based learning and improvement, interpersonal and communication skills, professionalism, and systems-based practice before and after internship. From 2006 to 2008, 106 interns from 10 medical specialties were evaluated with a preinternship and postinternship OSCE at Madigan Army Medical Center. The OSCE included eight 12-minute stations that collectively evaluated the 6 ACGME core competencies using human patient simulators, standardized patients, and clinical scenarios. Interns were scored using objective and subjective criteria, with a maximum score of 100 for each competency. Stations included death notification, abdominal pain, transfusion consent, suture skills, wellness history, chest pain, altered mental status, and computer literature search. These stations were chosen by specialty program directors, created with input from board-certified specialists, and were peer reviewed. All OSCE testing on the 106 interns (ages 25 to 44 [average, 28.6]; 70 [66%] men; 65 [58%] allopathic medical school graduates) resulted in statistically significant improvement in all ACGME core competencies: patient care (71.9% to 80.0%, P core competencies and test for interval improvement. The OSCE is a valuable assessment tool to provide outcome measures on resident competency performance and evaluate program effectiveness.

  2. Students' Assessment and Self-assessment of Nursing Clinical Faculty Competencies: Important Feedback in Clinical Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovrić, Robert; Prlić, Nada; Zec, Davor; Pušeljić, Silvija; Žvanut, Boštjan

    2015-01-01

    The students' assessment of clinical faculty competencies and the faculty members' self-assessment can provide important information about nursing clinical education. The aim of this study was to identify the differences between the students' assessment of the clinical faculty member's competencies and the faculty member's self-assessment. These differences can reveal interesting insights relevant for improving clinical practice.

  3. Variability in multi-rater competency assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Theron

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine if significant differences exist between the multi-rater competency evaluations of employees operating within a flat organisational structure. Sixty-eight marketing employees were each evaluated by a number of raters including themselves, their managers, customers and peers. A competency questionnaire was developed by using the input of the employees who took part in the appraisal. Using paired t- tests significant differences between the various groups of raters were found. These findings and the implications thereof are discussed. Opsomming Die doel van hierdie studie was om te bepaal of daar beduidende verskille bestaan tussen die multi-beoordelaar bevoegdheidsevaluerings van werknemers wat binne 'n plat organisasiestruktuur funksioneer. Agt-en-sestig bemarkingswerknemers is elk beoordeel deur 'n aantal beoordelaars wat die werknemers self, hul bestuurders, kliente en kollegas ingesluit het. 'n Bevoegdheidsvraelys is ontwikkel deur gebruik te maak van die insette van die werknemers wat deel geneem het aan die evaluering. Deur die gebruik van gepaarde t-toetse is gevind dat daar beduidende verskille bestaan tussen sommige van die groepe beoordelaars. Hierdie bevindinge en die implikasies daarvan word bespreek.

  4. Developing a tool for assessing competency in root cause analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Priyanka; Varkey, Prathibha

    2009-01-01

    Root cause analysis (RCA) is a tool for identifying the key cause(s) contributing to a sentinel event or near miss. Although training in RCA is gaining popularity in medical education, there is no published literature on valid or reliable methods for assessing competency in the same. A tool for assessing competency in RCA was pilot tested as part of an eight-station Objective Structured Clinical Examination that was conducted at the completion of a three-week quality improvement (QI) curriculum for the Mayo Clinic Preventive Medicine and Endocrinology fellowship programs. As part of the curriculum, fellows completed a QI project to enhance physician communication of the diagnosis and treatment plan at the end of a patient visit. They had a didactic session on RCA, followed by process mapping of the information flow at the project clinic, after which fellows conducted an actual RCA using the Ishikawa fishbone diagram. For the RCA competency assessment, fellows performed an RCA regarding a scenario describing an adverse medication event and provided possible solutions to prevent such errors in the future. All faculty strongly agreed or agreed that they were able to accurately assess competency in RCA using the tool. Interrater reliability for the global competency rating and checklist scoring were 0.96 and 0.85, respectively. Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) was 0.76. Six of eight of the fellows found the difficulty level of the test to be optimal. Assessment methods must accompany education programs to ensure that graduates are competent in QI methodologies and are able to apply them effectively in the workplace. The RCA assessment tool was found to be a valid, reliable, feasible, and acceptable method for assessing competency in RCA. Further research is needed to examine its predictive validity and generalizability.

  5. Assessing Pharmacy Students’ Self-Perception of Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverri, Margarita; Brookover, Cecile; Kennedy, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacists play an increasingly important role in medication therapy management, which requires communicating effectively with patients. Pharmacy students completed the Self-Assessment of Perceived Level of Cultural Competence (SAPLCC) questionnaire, and their results were used to identify patterns in self-assessment of cultural competence. In general, students rated their knowledge as less than their skills and attitudes. Important differences were found by race, comparing each group with its counterparts: African American students rated their perceived competencies regarding patient discrimination and barriers to health care at a significantly higher level; Asian American students rated their attitudes to engaging in self-reflection and their knowledge in multicultural issues at significantly lower level; and White students rated their awareness regarding racial dynamics at a significantly lower level. It is recommended to consider the students’ cultural, racial, and ethnic backgrounds before developing curriculum in cultural competence and, perhaps, to develop targeted educational interventions for specific groups. PMID:23395945

  6. Entrustable Professional Activities: Teaching and Assessing Clinical Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaliwal, Upreet; Gupta, Piyush; Singh, Tejinder

    2015-07-01

    Entrustable Professional Activities are gaining acceptance as tools to demonstrate acquisition of competencies in a competency-based curriculum. The main advantage of Entrustable Professional Activities are that they are observable activities (thus assessable), are related to day-to-day functioning as a health care provider (thus relevant), and are awarded once the learner can be trusted to perform the activity effectively and safely, without supervision, and by integrating across different competency domains. In this article, we describe how Entrustable Professional Activities can serve as a useful learning and assessment tool. We have described the steps in formulation, the pitfalls to avoid, and the possible role of the Medical Council of India and the Indian Academy of Pediatrics in encouraging the use of Entrustable Professional Activities for executing competency-based modules.

  7. Evaluating competency to stand trial with evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Richard; Johansson-Love, Jill

    2009-01-01

    Evaluations for competency to stand trial are distinguished from other areas of forensic consultation by their long history of standardized assessment beginning in the 1970s. As part of a special issue of the Journal on evidence-based forensic practice, this article examines three published competency measures: the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool-Criminal Adjudication (MacCAT-CA), the Evaluation of Competency to Stand Trial-Revised (ECST-R), and the Competence Assessment for Standing Trial for Defendants with Mental Retardation (CAST-MR). Using the Daubert guidelines as a framework, we examined each competency measure regarding its relevance to the Dusky standard and its error and classification rates. The article acknowledges the past polarization of forensic practitioners on acceptance versus rejection of competency measures. It argues that no valuable information, be it clinical acumen or standardized data, should be systematically ignored. Consistent with the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law Practice Guideline, it recommends the integration of competency interview findings with other sources of data in rendering evidence-based competency determinations.

  8. Automatic and unbiased assessment of competence in colonoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Louise; Søndergaard Svendsen, Morten Bo; Søndergaard, Bo;

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Colonoscopy is a difficult procedure to master. Increasing demands for colonoscopy, due to screening and surveillance programs, have highlighted the need for competent performers. Valid methods for assessing technical skills are pivotal for training and assessment. This study...

  9. The Comprehensiveness of Competing Higher Education Sustainability Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Graham; Wilder, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyze the comprehensiveness of competing higher education sustainability assessments. Higher education institutions (HEIs) have been increasingly communicating their sustainability commitments to the public. To assist the public in evaluating these claims, a broad range of actors have assessed the…

  10. Validation of a rubric to assess innovation competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Watts

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the development and validation of rubrics, materials and situations for the assessment of innovation competence. Research was carried out to verify the viability of the first draft of the assessment criteria, which led to refinement of the criteria and proposals to enhance the ensuing validation process that will include students and raters of different language backgrounds.

  11. The Comprehensiveness of Competing Higher Education Sustainability Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Graham; Wilder, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyze the comprehensiveness of competing higher education sustainability assessments. Higher education institutions (HEIs) have been increasingly communicating their sustainability commitments to the public. To assist the public in evaluating these claims, a broad range of actors have assessed the…

  12. PLA Binaries in the Context of Competency-Based Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Viktoria; Clougherty, R. J., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors report that, as the importance of competency-based learning (CBL) in higher education discourse surges, it not only further validates prior learning assessment (PLA), but it demonstrates PLA's essential nature as an important framework for assessing learning that has been acquired outside of traditional academia.…

  13. Assessing Graduate Attributes: Building a Criteria-Based Competency Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipperciel, Donald; ElAtia, Samira

    2014-01-01

    Graduate attributes (GAs) have become a necessary framework of reference for the 21st century competency-based model of higher education. However, the issue of evaluating and assessing GAs still remains unchartered territory. In this article, we present a criteria-based method of assessment that allows for an institution-wide comparison of the…

  14. What am I capable? Self-Assessment of Basic Competences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Ramírez García

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this research are focus in evaluate linguistic communication and mathematics competences of students in sixth grade of primary education from their perception, and to develop a valid and reliable questionnaire in order to perform a self-assessment. The methodology has quantitative, descriptive and correlational character. In this research 1424 students from 46 schools in Cordova and its province participated. The results show that variables such as gender, age, number of siblings and type of center have influence for a better or worse self-assessment of students; but extracurricular activities undertaken by students and the increased weekly time devoted are those which cause a greater appreciation of each competence. On the other hand, a lower daily use of television, computer and games console allows that students make a self-assess more capeble to different aspects of both competences.

  15. Competency Assessment Tool (CAT). The Evaluation of an Innovative Competency-Based Assessment Experience in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ion, Georgeta; Cano, Elena; Cabrera, Nati

    2016-01-01

    This article examines an innovation in teaching-learning and assessment processes through the use of a platform called the Competency Assessment Tool (CAT). It allows for the tracking of student blogs with the objective of improving self-reflective processes and providing feedback. The experiment was carried out in six universities in Catalonia,…

  16. Assessment of the digital competence in Russian adolescents and parents: Digital Competence Index.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soldatova G.V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we developed a psychological model of digital competence including four components (knowledge, skills, motivation and responsibility and four spheres (work with online content, communication, technical activity and consumption. The Digital Competence Index (DCI is a 52-item instrument assessing an index and an entire profile of digital competence. In the Russian population study (1203 adolescents 12-17 years old and 1209 parents, acceptable reliability (.72-.90 for all of the scales, except motivation of DCI was demonstrated. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the superiority of the four-component structure with the second-order index. Mean DCI was 34% of the maximally possible level in adolescents and 31% in parents, indicating the necessity for the educational programs in Russia. The motivation component was both the lowest and the least homogeneous factor, indicating that important special efforts to improve motivation to learn in Russian adolescents are needed.

  17. Core principles of assessment in competency-based medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockyer, Jocelyn; Carraccio, Carol; Chan, Ming-Ka; Hart, Danielle; Smee, Sydney; Touchie, Claire; Holmboe, Eric S; Frank, Jason R

    2017-06-01

    The meaningful assessment of competence is critical for the implementation of effective competency-based medical education (CBME). Timely ongoing assessments are needed along with comprehensive periodic reviews to ensure that trainees continue to progress. New approaches are needed to optimize the use of multiple assessors and assessments; to synthesize the data collected from multiple assessors and multiple types of assessments; to develop faculty competence in assessment; and to ensure that relationships between the givers and receivers of feedback are appropriate. This paper describes the core principles of assessment for learning and assessment of learning. It addresses several ways to ensure the effectiveness of assessment programs, including using the right combination of assessment methods and conducting careful assessor selection and training. It provides a reconceptualization of the role of psychometrics and articulates the importance of a group process in determining trainees' progress. In addition, it notes that, to reach its potential as a driver in trainee development, quality care, and patient safety, CBME requires effective information management and documentation as well as ongoing consideration of ways to improve the assessment system.

  18. Communicative Competence in Oral Language Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Rhonda; Haig, Yvonne; Rochecouste, Judith

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on a review of the teaching and assessment of oral language in Western Australian secondary schools. Results show that teachers have considerable difficulty in incorporating oral language tasks into their pedagogy because of a curriculum biased towards developing writing skills. Teachers also revealed that they do not have the…

  19. Teacher Assessment: the Concept of 'Diagnostic Competence'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelenbos, Peter; Kubanek-German, Angelika

    2005-01-01

    In the light of recent trends in educational assessment, language testing and the pedagogical discussion about new teacher roles, this article focuses on the skills and abilities required of a language teacher wishing to respond to these developments, with specific reference to the primary (elementary) foreign language classroom. A new concept is…

  20. Evaluating Adult’s Competency: Application of the Competency Assessment Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Giroux

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Competency assessment of adults with cognitive impairment or mental illness is a complex process that can have significant consequences for their rights. Some models put forth in the scientific literature have been proposed to guide health and social service professionals with this assessment process, but none of these appear to be complete. A new model, the Competency Assessment Process (CAP, was presented and validated in other studies. This paper adds to this corpus by presenting both the CAP model and the results of a survey given to health and social service professionals on its practical application in their clinical practice. The survey was administered to 35 participants trained in assessing competency following the CAP model. The results show that 40% of participants use the CAP to guide their assessment and the majority of those who do not yet use it plan to do so in the future. A large majority of participants consider this to be a relevant model and believe that all interdisciplinary teams should use it. These results support the relevance of the CAP model. Further research is planned to continue the study of the application of CAP in healthcare facilities.

  1. Assessing Interprofessional Education Collaborative Competencies in Service-Learning Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevin, Alexa M; Hale, Kenneth M; Brown, Nicole V; McAuley, James W

    2016-03-25

    Objective. To investigate the effect of an interprofessional service-learning course on health professions students' self-assessment of Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) competencies. Design. The semester-long elective course consisted of two components: a service component where students provided patient care in an interprofessional student-run free clinic and bi-weekly workshops in which students reflected on their experiences and discussed roles, team dynamics, communication skills, and challenges with underserved patient populations. Assessment. All fifteen students enrolled in the course completed a validated 42-question survey in a retrospective post-then-pre design. The survey instrument assessed IPEC competencies in four domains: Values and Ethics, Roles and Responsibilities, Interprofessional Communication, and Teams and Teamwork. Students' self-assessment of IPEC competencies significantly improved in all four domains after completion of the course. Conclusion. Completing an interprofessional service-learning course had a positive effect on students' self-assessment of interprofessional competencies, suggesting service-learning is an effective pedagogical platform for interprofessional education.

  2. Assessing medical student cultural competence: what really matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrill, Windsor W; Mayo, Rachel M; Truong, Khoa D; Pribonic, Anne P; Schalkoff, Christine A

    2016-07-30

    The study aimed to explore medical students' attitudes and beliefs toward Latino patients, specifically: to assess students' levels of knowledge, cultural competence, and comfort with Latinos; to determine students' exposure to and previous experience with Latinos; and to evaluate whether factors such as study abroad, living abroad, previous clinical experience with Latinos, and language proficiency predict Latino knowledge, cultural competence, and comfort with Latinos. This study utilized a cross-sectional survey design. Participants were third and fourth year medical students at three medical schools in the Southeastern United States. Three composite measures: Latino knowledge, Cultural competence, and Comfort with Latino patients, were predicted in a multivariate regression model including individual sociodemographic characteristics and past clinical or social experience with Latinos. A total of 170 medical students completed the survey (43% response rate). Spanish language proficiency was a statistically significant predictor (t(131)=2.72, pcultural competence. Previous clinical experience with Latinos was not significantly associated with the three composite dependent variables, and comfort with Latino patients was not significantly predicted by any of the six Latino-related explanatory variables. Factors prior to medical school matriculation and during medical education may contribute to increased cultural competence and comfort with multicultural patients. Cultural patient-partner programs may be an effective way to increase cultural competence within the confines of medical school curricula.

  3. Objective and Structured Assessment of Lung Ultrasound Competence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaarup, Søren Helbo; Laursen, Christian B; Bjerrum, Anne Sofie

    2017-01-01

    RATIONALE: Point-of-care lung ultrasound imaging has substantial diagnostic value and is widely used in respiratory, emergency and critical care medicine. Like other ultrasound examinations, lung ultrasound is operator-dependent. The current recommendations for competence in lung ultrasound sets...... a fixed number of ultrasound procedures to be performed without considering different learning rates. Recommendations do not consider different uses of lung ultrasound across specialties. OBJECTIVE: To create a reliable, valid and feasible instrument to assess lung ultrasound competence that includes...... 23 ultrasound operators of different competence levels. Examination time was measured and skill was rated by experienced observers using the assessment tool. Inter-rater agreement was examined by two observers in 9 lung ultrasound examinations. RESULTS: Consensus was obtained within 3 Delphi rounds...

  4. Developing Competency-Based Assessment for Library Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilyn Harhai

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The assessment process for student learning is often influenced and guided by well-defined standards and competencies dictated by various accrediting bodies that oversee graduate professional programs culminating in the master’s degree. When applied in an accredited library and information science (LIS program, traditional assessment techniques, such as portfolios, grades, and authentic assessments consistently affirmed student high performance, leaving little room to demonstrate student learning and program improvement. Consequently, the program redefined its assessment plan through the development of a pre-/post-test survey instrument that aligned with learning outcomes, the curriculum, and professional competencies. Pre-test responses were analyzed through SPSS to ascertain initial findings and effectiveness of the instrument to gauge student learning and workplace performance. Implications for student advisement, curriculum adjustments, program improvement, and strengthening the assessment plan for accreditation emerged. Areas for further development, particularly in the work environment, and research were also identified.

  5. Assessing Cultural Competence among Florida's Allied Dental Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Garvan, Cyndi W; Su, Yu; Feng, Xiaoying; Catalanotto, Frank A

    2016-06-01

    The Commission on Dental Accreditation requires that dental, dental hygiene and dental assisting schools offer educational experiences to ensure that prospective dental health care providers become culturally competent, socially responsible practitioners. To assert that these mandates are met requires that the faculty are knowledgeable and capable of providing this type of training. Currently, little is known about the cultural competence of the state of Florida allied dental faculty. The purpose of this study was to assess the cultural competence among the dental hygiene and dental assistant faculty in the state of Florida. One hundred ninety-three faculty were invited to take the Knowledge, Efficacy and Practices Instrument (KEPI), a validated measure of cultural competence. Respondents included 77 (74%) full-time and 27 (26%) part-time faculty. Data were analyzed descriptively and reliabilities (Cronbach's alpha) were computed. Mean scores and internal estimates of reliability on the KEPI subscales were: knowledge of diversity 3.3 (ɑ=0.88), culture-centered practice 3.6 (ɑ=0.88) and efficacy of assessment 2.9 (ɑ=0.74). The participant's score of 3.6 on the culture-centered practice exceeds scores among dental students and faculty who participated in previous studies suggesting the allied dental faculty have a greater awareness of sociocultural and linguistically diverse dental patients' oral health needs. Participants' score on knowledge of diversity subscales suggests a need for moderate training, while their score on the efficacy of assessment subscale indicates a need for more intense training. Assessing faculty beliefs, knowledge and skills about cultural competency is critically important in ensuring that accreditation standards are being met and represents one step in the process of ensuring that faculty demonstrate the type of sensitivity and responsiveness, which characterizes behaviors associated with cultural competence. Copyright © 2016 The

  6. Clinical application of Assessment of Parenting Competencies (APC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine Lindahl

    (numbers, graphs, and descriptions) of parent-child interaction and parenting competencies including nonverbal communication, level of attunement in the dyad, and level of emotional support from the parent. It is based on video analysis and a fixed assessment protocol. It was developed through a completed...

  7. Assessment of Clinical Competence: Written and Computer-Based Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, David B.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Literature concerning the validity and reliability of both written and computer-based simulations in assessing clinical competence in the health professions is reviewed, and suggestions are given for the improvement of the psychometric qualities of simulation-based tests. (MSE)

  8. Self-Assessment of Competences in Management Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández López, Lidia; de Saá Pérez, Petra; Ballesteros Rodríguez, Jose Luis; García Almeida, Desiderio

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the theoretical and practical need for research into the learning conditions that influence a student's self-assessment of their competences in management education. By means of a theoretical review, the paper introduces a model that integrates various learning conditions related to a student's…

  9. Self-Assessment of Competences in Management Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández López, Lidia; de Saá Pérez, Petra; Ballesteros Rodríguez, Jose Luis; García Almeida, Desiderio

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the theoretical and practical need for research into the learning conditions that influence a student's self-assessment of their competences in management education. By means of a theoretical review, the paper introduces a model that integrates various learning conditions related to a student's…

  10. Best Practices for Competency Development and Assessment in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo Duarte, Sara; Learreta Ramos, Begoña; Ruiz Rosillo, María Auxiliadora; Alperstedt, Cristiane; Hazé, Emmanuël

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this article is to present the results of a study aimed at determining, classifying and evaluating practices of interest for general competency development and assessment in undergraduate programmes. The study encompassed the following phases: (1) focus group in order to establish a starting point regarding competency…

  11. Advanced Practice Nursing Competency Assessment Instrument (APNCAI): clinimetric validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre-Fullana, Pedro; Morales-Asencio, Jose Miguel; Sesé-Abad, Albert; Fernández-Domínguez, Juan Carlos; De Pedro-Gómez, Joan

    2017-01-01

    Objective To describe the development and clinimetric validation of the Advanced Practice Nursing Competency Assessment Instrument (APNCAI) through several evidence sources about reliability and validity in the Spanish context. Design and setting APNCAI development was based on a multisequential and systematic process: literature review, instrument content consensus through qualitative Delphi method approach (a panel of 51 Advanced Practice in Nursing –APN– experts was selected) and the clinimetric validation process based on a sample of 600 nurses from the Balearic Islands public healthcare setting. Methods An initial step for tool's content development process based on Delphi method approach of expert consensus was implemented. A subsequent phase of tool validation started from the analysis of APN core competencies latent measurement model, including exploratory and confirmatory techniques. Reliability evidence for each latent factor was also obtained. Items' scores were submitted to descriptive analysis, plus univariate and multivariate normality tests. Results An eight-factor competency assessment latent model obtained adequate fit, and it was composed by ‘Research and Evidence-Based Practice’, ‘Clinical and Professional Leadership’, ‘Interprofessional Relationship and Mentoring’, ‘Professional Autonomy’, ‘Quality Management’, ‘Care Management’, ‘Professional Teaching and Education’ and ‘Health Promotion’. Conclusions Adequate empirical evidence of reliability and validity for APNCAI makes it useful for application in healthcare policy programmes for APN competency assessment in Spain. PMID:28235968

  12. A Framework for Enhancing and Assessing Cultural Competency Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Désirée Lie

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The globalization of medical practice using accepted evidence-based approaches is matched by a growing trend for shared curricula in medicine and other health professions across international boundaries. Interest in the common challenges of curricular design, delivery and assessment is expressed in conferences and dialogues focused on topics such as teaching of professionalism, humanism, integrative medicine, bioethics and cultural competence. The spirit of collaboration, sharing, acknowledgment and mutual respect is a guiding principle in cross-cultural teaching. This paper uses the Tool for Assessing Cultural Competency Training to explore methods for designing and implementing cultural competency curricula. The intent is to identify elements shared across institutional, national and cross-cultural borders and derive common principles for the assessment of learners and the curricula. Two examples of integrating new content into existing clerkships are provided to guide educators interested in an integrated and learner-centered approach to assimilate cultural competency teaching into existing required courses, clerkships and elective experiences. The paper follows an overarching principle that “every patient–doctor encounter is a cross-cultural encounter”, whether based on ethnicity, age, socioeconomic status, sex, religious values, disability, sexual orientation or other differences; and whether the differences are explicit or implicit.

  13. Demonstration of portfolios to assess competency of residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Patricia S; Reckase, Mark D; McClain, Tina; Savidge, Mildred A; Clardy, James A

    2004-01-01

    Residency educators are identifying approaches to measure resident competence. Portfolios are well suited since they require work already completed as part of patient care where competency must be demonstrated. This paper describes assessment of the reliability and validity of portfolios in a psychiatry residency program. This was a cross-sectional study across 4years of residency education. Using guidelines, 18 residents assembled portfolios containing five entries chosen from 13 skills. Trained raters scored the portfolios. Residents and faculty were interviewed about their perceptions. Generalizability results indicated five entries and two raters were sufficient for relative decisions. Six entries or a third rater would be sufficient for absolute decisions. Portfolio scores tended to improve with years of training and correlated with psychiatric knowledge but not clinical performance. Residents and faculty identified benefits to assembling a portfolio. Portfolios incorporate tasks embedded in the residency to provide evidence of resident competency. The results support that the score is reliable and valid.

  14. Competency-based Medical Education, Entrustment and Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Jyoti Nath; Gupta, Piyush; Singh, Tejinder

    2015-05-01

    The realization that medical graduates are failing to serve the health needs of the society has compelled the medical educationists and regulatory authorities worldwide to review the medical training. A medical curriculum oriented towards developing the key competencies that enable a fresh graduate to be delivering socially responsive health care is seen as a promising step towards alleviating this problem. This calls for a departure from the traditional approach of organizing the curricular components around educational objectives, to a competency-based approach for planning the curriculum. The present article discusses the concept of competency-based medical education in Indian context, the steps in planning and implementing such a curriculum, and the key aspects of assessment for its effective implementation.

  15. Competence assessment of nursing graduates of Jordanian universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safadi, Reema; Jaradeh, Malak; Bandak, Amal; Froelicher, Erika

    2010-06-01

    This cross-sectional survey assessed the level of competence of nursing graduates of Jordanian universities (2001-2004 cohorts) in relation to the type of university, sex, hospital type, and working area. A convenience sample (n = 258) of full-time nurses (6 months-4 years' experience) was selected from public, private, and teaching hospitals. A specifically designed tool with a rating scale of 1-5 was used to evaluate the nurses' competence in five nursing competencies (management, professionalism, problem-solving, nursing process, and knowledge of basic skills). The findings showed a satisfactory competency level with no significant differences related to the type of university or sex. General ward nurses scored significantly better than those in intensive care units in relation to management, professionalism, and nursing process, while the teaching hospital nurses showed significantly better performance in professionalism and management skills than did the nurses in the other two sectors. We recommend that nurse recruitment policies should consider individual competencies rather than innate characteristics in their selection of employees.

  16. Clinical application of Assessment of Parenting Competencies (APC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine Lindahl

    This paper is part of a symposium on music therapy with families with Kirsi Tuomi as Chair. It revolves around the clinical application of a new music therapy assessment model on parent-child interaction and parenting competencies. APC was developed for emotional neglected children and their pare......This paper is part of a symposium on music therapy with families with Kirsi Tuomi as Chair. It revolves around the clinical application of a new music therapy assessment model on parent-child interaction and parenting competencies. APC was developed for emotional neglected children......, child somatic hospitals, centers for refuges and other populations where it would be clinical relevant to assess the parent-child interaction. APC is an observational and improvisational based assessment model evaluating dyads of parent and child (child age range is 5-12). It produces information...... (numbers, graphs, and descriptions) of parent-child interaction and parenting competencies including nonverbal communication, level of attunement in the dyad, and level of emotional support from the parent. It is based on video analysis and a fixed assessment protocol. It was developed through a completed...

  17. Competency assessment of microbiology medical laboratory technologists in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Marc; Fleming, Christine Ann

    2014-08-01

    Accreditation in Ontario, Canada, requires that licensed clinical laboratories participate in external quality assessment (also known as proficiency testing) and perform competency evaluation of their staff. To assess the extent of ongoing competency assessment practices, the Quality Management Program--Laboratory Services (QMP-LS) Microbiology Committee surveyed all 112 licensed Ontario microbiology laboratories. The questionnaire consisted of a total of 21 questions that included yes/no, multiple-choice, and short-answer formats. Participants were asked to provide information about existing programs, the frequency of testing, what areas are evaluated, and how results are communicated to the staff. Of the 111 responding laboratories, 6 indicated they did not have a formal evaluation program since they perform only limited bacteriology testing. Of the remaining 105 respondents, 87% perform evaluations at least annually or every 2 years, and 61% include any test or task performed, whereas 16% and 10% focus only on problem areas and high-volume complex tasks, respectively. The most common methods of evaluation were review of external quality assessment (EQA) challenges, direct observation, and worksheet review. With the exception of one participant, all communicate results to staff, and most take remedial action to correct the deficiencies. Although most accredited laboratories have a program to assess the ongoing competency of their staff, the methods used are not standardized or consistently applied, indicating that there is room for improvement. The survey successfully highlighted potential areas for improvement and allowed the QMP-LS Microbiology Committee to provide guidance to Ontario laboratories for establishing or improving existing microbiology-specific competency assessment programs.

  18. Assessing competence: the European Survey on Aging Protocol (ESAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ballesteros, Rocío; Zamarrón, María Dolores; Rudinger, Georg; Schroots, Johannes J F; Hekkinnen, Eino; Drusini, Andrea; Paul, Constanza; Charzewska, Jadwiga; Rosenmayr, Leopold

    2004-01-01

    The main goal of this research project was to translate and adapt the European Survey on Ageing Protocol (ESAP) to 7 European countries/cultures. This article presents preliminary results from the ESAP, the basic assessment instrument of EXCELSA (European Longitudinal Study of Aging). 672 individuals aged 30-85, selected through quota sampling (by age, gender, education and living conditions), participated in this study, with 96 subjects from each of the 7 European countries. The basic research protocol for assessing competence and its determinants was designed to be administered in a 90-min in-home face-to-face interview. It contains a series of questions, instruments, scales and physical tests assessing social relationships and caregiving, mental abilities, well-being, personality, mastery and perceived control, self-reported health, lifestyles, anthropometry, biobehavioral measures and sociodemographic variables. 84% of ESAP measures are age-dependent and 75% of them discriminate between education levels. Minor differences were found due to gender, and between people living in rural and urban areas. Exploratory factor analysis yielded 10 factors accounting for 67.85% of total variance, one of which was identified as cognitive and physical 'competence'. This factorial structure was tested across countries through concordance coefficients. Finally, using structural equation modeling, our data were fitted into a model of competence. When the sample was split into younger groups (aged 30-49 years) and older ones (50 and more years), the same model was appropriate for our data. The results are discussed in accordance with other findings on psychosocial, biophysical and sociodemographic components of competence, and also in accordance with theories on competence and successful aging. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  19. Transforming a Competency Model to Parameterised Questions in Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitthisak, Onjira; Gilbert, Lester; Davis, Hugh C.

    The problem of comparing and matching different learners’ knowledge arises when assessment systems use a one-dimensional numerical value to represent “knowledge level”. Such assessment systems may measure inconsistently because they estimate this level differently and inadequately. The multi-dimensional competency model called COMpetence-Based learner knowledge for personalized Assessment (COMBA) is being developed to represent a learner’s knowledge in a multi-dimensional vector space. The heart of this model is to treat knowledge, not as possession, but as a contextualized space of capability either actual or potential. The paper discusses a system for automatically generating questions from the COMBA competency model as a “guide-on-the-side”. The system’s novel design and implementation involves an ontological database that represents the intended learning outcome to be assessed across a number of dimensions, including level of cognitive ability and subject matter. The system generates all the questions that are possible from a given learning outcome, which may then be used to test for understanding, and so could determine the degree to which learners actually acquire the desired knowledge.

  20. Students Explaining Science—Assessment of Science Communication Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulgemeyer, Christoph; Schecker, Horst

    2013-12-01

    Science communication competence (SCC) is an important educational goal in the school science curricula of several countries. However, there is a lack of research about the structure and the assessment of SCC. This paper specifies the theoretical framework of SCC by a competence model. We developed a qualitative assessment method for SCC that is based on an expert-novice dialog: an older student (explainer, expert) explains a physics phenomenon to a younger peer (addressee, novice) in a controlled test setting. The explanations are video-recorded and analysed by qualitative content analysis. The method was applied in a study with 46 secondary school students as explainers. Our aims were (a) to evaluate whether our model covers the relevant features of SCC, (b) to validate the assessment method and (c) to find characteristics of addressee-adequate explanations. A performance index was calculated to quantify the explainers' levels of competence on an ordinal scale. We present qualitative and quantitative evidence that the index is adequate for assessment purposes. It correlates with results from a written SCC test and a perspective taking test (convergent validity). Addressee-adequate explanations can be characterized by use of graphical representations and deliberate switches between scientific and everyday language.

  1. Analysis of key competencies in museums. Proposal for a tool to assess key competencies in museum managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zara Marcela Arguello Arciniegas

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Within the field of Cultural Management, such a wide world and sometimes so difficult to outline in terms of all-encompassing, key competencies play a very important role. Therefore, we have tried to propose a tool to assess key competencies in cultural managers who perform their professional work in museums. We present a set of key competencies and then, a list of ten key competencies which are considered important for the staff of cultural management of a museum. For this it is assumed, first, the key competencies proposed by the universities offering master's degrees in official Cultural Management in Spain and, second, the key competencies proposed for the ICOM museum workers. Finally, we present a tool for the evaluation of the chosen key competencies.

  2. The role of assessment in competency-based medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmboe, Eric S; Sherbino, Jonathan; Long, Donlin M; Swing, Susan R; Frank, Jason R

    2010-01-01

    Competency-based medical education (CBME), by definition, necessitates a robust and multifaceted assessment system. Assessment and the judgments or evaluations that arise from it are important at the level of the trainee, the program, and the public. When designing an assessment system for CBME, medical education leaders must attend to the context of the multiple settings where clinical training occurs. CBME further requires assessment processes that are more continuous and frequent, criterion-based, developmental, work-based where possible, use assessment methods and tools that meet minimum requirements for quality, use both quantitative and qualitative measures and methods, and involve the wisdom of group process in making judgments about trainee progress. Like all changes in medical education, CBME is a work in progress. Given the importance of assessment and evaluation for CBME, the medical education community will need more collaborative research to address several major challenges in assessment, including "best practices" in the context of systems and institutional culture and how to best to train faculty to be better evaluators. Finally, we must remember that expertise, not competence, is the ultimate goal. CBME does not end with graduation from a training program, but should represent a career that includes ongoing assessment.

  3. Teaching and assessing nutrition competence in a changing curricular environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abood, Sarah K

    2008-01-01

    In the past, the required introductory veterinary nutrition course at Michigan State University's College of Veterinary Medicine (MSU-CVM) has provided 29 hours of didactic lectures, with student performance evaluated by short-answer or multiple-choice questions. Because of a 50% reduction in allotted course credits and a change in prerequisites for admission, the course is being redesigned to focus on three of 29 nutrition competencies outlined by the American College of Veterinary Nutrition. Professional communication skills will be developed through small-group learning experiences, case-based problems, and videotaped interviews with standardized clients to teach and assess nutrition competencies. Assessment strategies will differ from traditional multiple-choice examinations and include pre- and post-course self-efficacy ratings, written evaluations from trained standardized clients, and oral and written evaluations from coaches or facilitators.

  4. Special competencies for psychological assessment of torture survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huminuik, Kirby

    2017-04-01

    In spite of the absolute prohibition against torture in international law, this grave human rights abuse is still practiced systematically and with impunity in the majority of countries around the world. Mental health professionals can play a positive role in the fight against torture and impunity, by developing competencies to assess the psychological sequelae of torture. High-quality psychological evidence can help to substantiate allegations of torture, thereby increasing the likelihood of success in civil, administrative, and criminal proceedings. This article will orient mental health professionals to issues specific to forensic assessment of torture survivors. It provides a brief introduction to the sociopolitical context of torture, reviews literature on the psychological sequelae of torture, introduces the reader to key competencies, offers information on strategies for producing documentary evidence and expert opinion, highlights ethical considerations, and suggests areas for development in the field.

  5. Assessment of Competence in EVAR Stent Graft Sizing and Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm, M; Lönn, L.; Bech, B.

    2017-01-01

    = .007, respectively), while there was no significant difference between the two non-expert groups (p = 1). A credible passing standard with appropriate consequences was established using the contrasting groups methods. Conclusion: This study presents a standardised and objective assessment tool...... of competence in vessel analysis and stent graft selection for endovascular aortic repair. This was supported by strong validity evidence with good internal consistency and discriminatory ability. The tool may be used to facilitate training and certification of future endovascular specialists....

  6. Assessing medical students’ competence in calculating drug doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Harries

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that healthcare professionals are not optimally able to calculate medicine doses and various strategies have been employed to improve these skills. In this study, the performance of third and fourth year medical students was assessed and the success of various educational interventions investigated. Students were given four types of dosing calculations typical of those required in an emergency setting. Full competence (at the 100% level was defined as correctly answering all four categories of calculation at any one time. Three categories correct meant competence at the 75% level. Interventions comprised an assignment with a model answer for self-assessment in the third year and a small group tutorial in the fourth year. The small groups provided opportunities for peer-assisted learning. A subgroup of 23 students received individual tuition from the lecturer prior to the start of the fourth year. Amongst the 364 eligible students, full competence rose from 23% at the beginning of the third year to 66% by the end of the fourth year. More students succeeded during the fourth than the third year of study. Success of small group tuition was assessed in a sample of 200 students who had formal assessments both before and after the fourth year tuition. Competence at the 75% level improved by 10% in attendees and decreased by 3% in non-attendees, providing evidence of the value of students receiving assistance from more able same-language peers. Good results were achieved with one-on-one tuition where individualised assistance allowed even struggling students to improve.

  7. Competence and teaching skills: reflections on the concept and assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Guzmán Ibarra

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses some concepts of competence, to identify their common elements that can be transferred to educational practices on competition. The intention is to establish levels of consistency among the components of the concept with educational practices and competitions. On this basis, we discuss some strategies for teaching skills to identify and propose strategies and tools that focus on authentic assessment to evaluate teaching skills.

  8. Needs Assessment Competencies: Are They Important for Extension Educators?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nav R. Ghimire

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the importanceof eleven professional competencies related to needs assessment and program development; a secondary purpose wasto identify the best time these competencies should be learned.The study followed a survey research design, in which 441randomly selected extension educators in the North CentralRegion of the United States responded to a questionnairethrough an online survey. Results suggest that respondentsperceived nine of the eleven competencies as highly importantfor their professional development. High percentages of therespondents also reported that six competencies should belearned on the job. Stepwise regression analysis revealed thedemographics of “gender” and “education” as statistically significant predictors in determining respondents’ perceptions.Findings indicate a need for flexible staff development programsfor extension educators through graduate education, in-serviceprograms, and on-the-job training. Findings have implicationsfor designing new policies for employee selection, training,professional development, and performance appraisal. Furtherstudy was recommended to determine whether the findingswould be valid at the national level.

  9. STUDENTS CONFLICTOLOGICAL COMPETENCE ASSESSMENT INVOLVED INTO PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PEDAGOGICAL MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakovleva I. P.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the investigation is students’ conflictological competence assessment method elaboration. The methodological foundations are system approach (considered the pedagogical monitoring as education quality management component, personal oriented approach (focused the educational process on student persona, competence oriented approach (oriented the educational process to personally-professional abilities formation which integrated the knowledge, skills, motives, values and ability to their control and quality measurement approach (we have considered the conflictological competence preparedness as a multi-criterion parameter. The theoretical foundations are socially-philosophic works dedicated to students’ conflictological competence formation, and pedagogical works, dedicated to education quality management. The normative foundations of investigation are Law “About Education” (2012, state educational standards for vocational training (2009, “Strategy of state youth policy in Russian Federation”, state program “Patriotic education of Russian Federation citizens during 2011-2015”. The methods of investigation are scientific literature and pedagogical practice analysis, survey, modeling, pedagogical monitoring, quality measurement and complex systems polyvalent analysis

  10. Cultural Competence Assessment Instrument: Initial Italian validation and proposed refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caricati, Luca; Dicembrino, Rita Bruna; Gionti, Luciano; Petre, Lucica; Ungurean, Liana

    2015-09-09

    Italy has become a target of immigration in the last three decades. Accordingly, the Italian population is progressively changing, becoming increasingly culturally different. Cultural competences are a fundamental requirement for many industries and, especially, for healthcare organizations. The aim of this paper is to propose an initial Italian validation of the Cultural Competence Assessment Instrument (CCAI) and to propose a refinement of this scale in terms of measured constructs. The CCAI was translated into Italian through a team-based iterative approach and then administered to a sample of 289 nurses with symbolic and realistic threat scale and social dominance orientation scale. An on-line cross-sectional survey questionnaire was used. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the original two dimensions of the CCAI can be divided into two other sub-scales, thus leaving us with the following dimensions: cultural awareness, cultural sensitivity, seeking information and active behavior. These dimensions appeared to be sufficiently reliable and independent one from another. Moreover, they showed specific and different correlations with other measured constructs. The Italian version of the CCAI would seem to be a useful instrument for measuring both attitudes and behavioral intention of nurses with respect to intercultural care. Using four dimensions instead of two appears to increase the understanding of professionals' cultural competence and supply a deeper picture of dimensions which compose cultural competence in healthcare settings.

  11. An Examination of Cultural Competence Training in US Medical Education Guided by the Tool for Assessing Cultural Competence Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernigan, Valarie Blue Bird; Hearod, Jordan B; Tran, Kim; Norris, Keith C; Buchwald, Dedra

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, medical students must demonstrate a standard level of "cultural competence," upon graduation. Cultural competence is most often defined as a set of congruent behaviors, attitudes, and policies that come together in a system, organization, or among professionals that enables effective work in cross-cultural situations. The Association of American Medical Colleges developed the Tool for Assessing Cultural Competence Training (TACCT) to assist schools in developing and evaluating cultural competence curricula to meet these requirements. This review uses the TACCT as a guideline to describe and assess pedagogical approaches to cultural competence training in US medical education and identify content gaps and opportunities for curriculum improvement. A total of 18 programs are assessed. Findings support previous research that cultural competence training can improve the knowledge, attitudes, and skills of medical trainees. However, wide variation in the conceptualization, implementation, and evaluation of cultural competence training programs exists, leading to differences in training quality and outcomes. More research is needed to establish optimal approaches to implementing and evaluating cultural competence training that incorporate cultural humility, the social determinants of health, and broader structural competency within the medical system.

  12. An Examination of Cultural Competence Training in US Medical Education Guided by the Tool for Assessing Cultural Competence Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernigan, Valarie Blue Bird; Hearod, Jordan B.; Tran, Kim; Norris, Keith C.; Buchwald, Dedra

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, medical students must demonstrate a standard level of “cultural competence,” upon graduation. Cultural competence is most often defined as a set of congruent behaviors, attitudes, and policies that come together in a system, organization, or among professionals that enables effective work in cross-cultural situations. The Association of American Medical Colleges developed the Tool for Assessing Cultural Competence Training (TACCT) to assist schools in developing and evaluating cultural competence curricula to meet these requirements. This review uses the TACCT as a guideline to describe and assess pedagogical approaches to cultural competence training in US medical education and identify content gaps and opportunities for curriculum improvement. A total of 18 programs are assessed. Findings support previous research that cultural competence training can improve the knowledge, attitudes, and skills of medical trainees. However, wide variation in the conceptualization, implementation, and evaluation of cultural competence training programs exists, leading to differences in training quality and outcomes. More research is needed to establish optimal approaches to implementing and evaluating cultural competence training that incorporate cultural humility, the social determinants of health, and broader structural competency within the medical system. PMID:27818848

  13. An Assessment of Competency-Based Simulations on E-Learners' Management Skills Enhancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Yair; Ramim, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the assessment of tangible skills and competence. Specifically, there is an increase in the offerings of competency-based assessments, and some academic institutions are offering college credits for individuals who can demonstrate adequate level of competency on such assessments. An increased interest has been placed…

  14. Reverse Discourse Completion Task as an Assessment Tool for Intercultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanik, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a prototypic assessment tool for intercultural communicative competence. Because traditional discourse completion tasks (DCTs) focus on illocutionary competence rather than sociolinguistic competence, a modified version of a DCT was created to target sociolinguistic competence. The modified DCT employs speech acts as prompts…

  15. Comparison of motor competence levels on two assessments across childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ré, Alessandro H N; Logan, Samuel W; Cattuzzo, Maria T; Henrique, Rafael S; Tudela, Mariana C; Stodden, David F

    2017-01-05

    This study compared performances and motor delay classifications for the Test of Gross Motor Development-2nd edition (TGMD-2) and the Körperkoordinationstest Für Kinder (KTK) in a sample of 424 healthy children (47% girls) between 5 and 10 years of age. Low-to-moderate correlations (r range = 0.34-0.52) were found between assessments across age. In general, both boys and girls demonstrated higher raw scores across age groups. However, percentile scores indicated younger children outperformed older children, denoting a normative percentile-based decrease in motor competence (MC) in the older age groups. In total, the TGMD-2 and KTK classified 39.4% and 18.4% children, respectively, as demonstrating very low MC (percentile ≤5). In conclusion, the TGMD-2 classified significantly more children with motor delays than the KTK and the differences between children's motor skill classification levels by these assessments became greater as the age groups increased. Therefore, the TGMD-2 may demonstrate more susceptibility to sociocultural influences and be more influenced by cumulative motor experiences throughout childhood. Low-to-moderate correlations between assessments also suggest the TGMD-2 and KTK may measure different aspects of MC. As such, it may be important to use multiple assessments to comprehensively assess motor competence.

  16. Assessing Multilingual Competencies: Adopting Construct Valid Assessment Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shohamy, Elana

    2011-01-01

    All assessment policies and practices are based on monolingual constructs whereby test-takers are expected to demonstrate their language proficiency in one language at a time. Thus, the construct underlying these assessment approaches and/or scales (e.g., the CEFR) is of language as a closed and finite system that does not enable other languages…

  17. Comparison of student self-assessment with faculty assessment of clinical competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root Kustritz, Margaret V; Molgaard, Laura K; Rendahl, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    At the University of Minnesota, fourth-year veterinary students assessed their clinical competence after completion of a small-animal, internal-medicine clinical rotation using the same rotation assessment form used by supervising faculty. Grades were compared between the two groups. Students identified by faculty as low-performing were more likely to overestimate their competence in the areas of knowledge, clinical skill, and professionalism than were students identified by faculty as higher performing. This finding mirrors research results in human health professional training. Self-assessment should not be used as the primary or sole measure of clinical competence in veterinary medical training without the introduction of measures to ensure the accuracy of student self-assessment, measures that include active faculty mentoring of student self-assessment, student goal-setting and reflection, and availability of subsequent opportunities to practice additional self-assessment.

  18. Integrating learning assessment and supervision in a competency framework for clinical workplace education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embo, M; Driessen, E; Valcke, M; van der Vleuten, C P M

    2015-02-01

    Although competency-based education is well established in health care education, research shows that the competencies do not always match the reality of clinical workplaces. Therefore, there is a need to design feasible and evidence-based competency frameworks that fit the workplace reality. This theoretical paper outlines a competency-based framework, designed to facilitate learning, assessment and supervision in clinical workplace education. Integration is the cornerstone of this holistic competency framework.

  19. The "Praxis" of Narrative Assessment: Communication Competence in an Information Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneson, Pat; Arnett, Ronald C.

    1998-01-01

    States that instruments currently used to assess communication competence reveal the prevalence of social scientific approaches to assessing competence. Suggests addressing communication competence from a perspective outside the behavioral orientation to communication. Contends that shifting the perspective to a narrative approach to interaction…

  20. Rezension von: Sally Macarthur: Towards a Twenty-First-Century Feminist Politics of Music. Aldershot: Ashgate 2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kordula Knaus

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Sally Macarthur unternimmt mit Rückgriff auf Philosophien von Deleuze und Guattari bzw. deren feministische Weiterentwicklung u. a. durch Grosz und Braidotti eine Neupositionierung der Figur der Komponistin in der zeitgenössischen Musikproduktion. Auf der Grundlage von Denkkonzepten wie ‚Differenz‘, ‚Virtualität‘, ‚Werden‘ oder ‚Deterritorialisierung‘ dekonstruiert Macarthur die Master-Narrative von autonomer, innovativer, schöpferischer, männlicher Musikproduktion. Ihre Thesen exemplifiziert Macarthur durch die Analyse der Musik der Komponistinnen Sofia Gubaidulina, Elena Kats-Chernin und Anne Boyd sowie in der Auseinandersetzung mit den Bedingungen und Inhalten des gegenwärtigen Kompositionsunterrichts.

  1. Physics Competence Assessment in Engineering Higher Education Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. An

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In designing the undergraduate programmes, a development of objectified procedures to assess students and graduates’ level of skills and learning outcomes aimed at achieving the ultimate goals of training is an important task for Higher Education Institutions (HEI.The purpose of this work is to develop a description of the physics course objectives differentiated according to levels of learning achievements for engineering HEI, as well as the assessment procedures and diagnostic means associated with this description to specify and define the degree of their achievement.The taxonomy of levels to master learning content is proposed and tested. Its aim is to assess rapidly a degree of achieved objectives i.e. meeting requirements for student and graduate’s competences in physics. Classification is given according to which the reproductive activity is a manifestation of the levels of recognition, reproduction and reproductive use of knowledge while the productive activity is an ability to use previously learned information, methods of action for the new scenarios, situations, conditions. The paper presents content of the main features of learning the study materials in physics at each taxonomic level. It offers a developed package of assessment materials based on traditional (tests, training tasks and competence-oriented control methods (professionally oriented and case studies, integrative assignments. The paper proves that when designing the diagnostic means it is expedient to take into consideration the analysis results of the expert assessments that the physics course curricular elements are of significance for fundamental and ideological studies and successful learning of the module of professional disciplines. It also shows that there is a need to use the content of typical tasks in disciplines of professional cycle of the undergraduate programme.The proposed approaches and results can serve as a basis for teaching improvement in physics

  2. Assessment of Motor Competence Across the Life Span

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermundur Sigmundsson

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the psychometric properties of a new test battery aimed at quantifying motor competence across the life span are explored. The battery was designed to be quantitative, simple to administer, applicable for large-group testing, and reliably to monitor life span motor development. A total of 638 participants between 5 and 83 years of age completed assessment of four different motor tasks (two fine and two gross motor tasks, enabling us to investigate its feasibility, internal consistency, construct validity, and test–retest reliability. Feasibility: Overall pattern of results suggest that the test battery for motor competence presented here is applicable for the age-span studied (5-83. Important consideration in this regard is that the same tasks are applied for all ages. A u-shaped curve between age and total test score indicate the adequate sensitivity of the test battery for the age range examined. Internal consistency: All individual test item scores correlated positively with the total test score with correlations ranging from .48 to .64. Correlations between scores on individual test items were moderate to high (.31-.69. The Cronbach’s alpha value for the standardized items was .79. Construct validity: Pearson correlation coefficient between total score Test of Motor Competence (TMC and Movement Assessment Battery for Children (MABC were .47 for 7- to 8-years-old children (n = 70 and .45 for 15- to 16-years-old (n = 101. Test-retest reliability: Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs between test and retest scores ranged from .75 to .94, and test–retest coefficient for the total score was .87.

  3. Assessing the assessment’ : Development and use of quality criteria for Competence Assessment Programmes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baartman, L.K.J.

    2008-01-01

    Competence-based (vocational) education has gained a firm foothold in our society, causing assessment practices to change accordingly, along with ideas of what constitutes good assessment. The subject of this thesis is the (1) development, (2) validation and (3) practical use of a framework of quali

  4. Assessment of Competence in EVAR Stent Graft Sizing and Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strøm, M; Lönn, L; Bech, B; Schroeder, T V; Konge, L

    2017-06-01

    The aims of this study were to develop a test of competence in endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) stent graft sizing and selection; to examine the test for evidence of validity; and to explore the experience required for the task. The test was developed based on a literature review resulting in 22 anatomical assessment points and a graft selection. Validity evidence was explored in an international cross sectional study. Twenty-two consultants with varying levels of experience in the field (novices, intermediates, and experts) were presented with computed tomography angiography of the aortic vessels from three patients. Test scores were based on summed z-scores using the anatomical measurements and graft choices of the experts as a reference. A proficiency score was established using the contrasting groups standard setting method. The assessment was shown to be reliable with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.83 (p<.001) and high internal consistency with a Cronbach's α of .91 (p<.001). Mann-Whitney U test showed that experts performed significantly better than novices and intermediates (p<.002 and p<.005, respectively). Regarding anatomical measurements, Mann-Whitney U test could discriminate between experts and novices (p=.002), between experts and intermediates (p=.010), and between novices and intermediates (p=.036). In stent selection the experts performed significantly better than both the novices and the intermediates (p=.002 and p=.007, respectively), while there was no significant difference between the two non-expert groups (p=1). A credible passing standard with appropriate consequences was established using the contrasting groups methods. This study presents a standardised and objective assessment tool of competence in vessel analysis and stent graft selection for endovascular aortic repair. This was supported by strong validity evidence with good internal consistency and discriminatory ability. The tool may be used to facilitate training and

  5. Assessing interprofessional competence using a prospective reflective portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domac, Sezer; Anderson, Liz; O'Reilly, Michelle; Smith, Roger

    2015-05-01

    The assessment of interprofessional competence or capability following interprofessional education (IPE) remains essential if we are to ensure future practitioners who are able to work in teams and collaborate for improved health outcomes. Any IPE curriculum must design and describe its theoretical stance and this also applies to how learning will be assessed. This article reports on a study of the use of an IPE portfolio by students across 10 professions as a flexible framework for students to demonstrate their learning. Using a qualitative approach, the completed portfolios of a proportion of students from medicine, social work, and speech and language therapy were read, and a sub-set of students were interviewed to gain their perceptions of this assessment process. The findings are discussed in the light of the value of reflection for learning to consolidate interprofessional understanding. The study highlights how emotional and cognitive learning triggers lead to new understandings for collaborative practice reached only because students were able to reflect on their experiences. The portfolio is now summative and includes other assessment components.

  6. The validity and reliability of an instrument to assess nursing competencies in spiritual care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Rene; Tiesinga, Lucas J.; Middel, Berrie; Post, Doeke; Jochemsen, Henk

    2009-01-01

    Aim. This study contributes to the development of a valid and reliable instrument, the spiritual care competence scale, as an instrument to assess nurses' competencies in providing spiritual care. Background. Measuring these competencies and their development is important and the construction of a r

  7. The validity and reliability of an instrument to assess nursing competencies in spiritual care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, R.R.; Tiesinga, L.J.; Middel, L.J.; Post, D.; Jochemsen, H.

    2009-01-01

    Aim. This study contributes to the development of a valid and reliable instrument, the spiritual care competence scale, as an instrument to assess nurses’ competencies in providing spiritual care. Background. Measuring these competencies and their development is important and the construction of a r

  8. E-assessment of student-teachers’ competence as new teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Admiraal, Wilfried; Janssen, Tanja; Huizenga, Jantina; Kranenburg, Frans|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833096; Taconis, Ruurd; Corda, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    In teacher education programmes, text-based portfolios are generally used to assess student-teachers’ competence as new teachers. However, striking discrepancies are known to exist between the competencies reflected in a written portfolio and the competencies observed in actual classroom practice.

  9. E-assessment of student-teachers’ competence as new teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Admiraal, Wilfried; Janssen, Tanja; Huizenga, Jantina; Kranenburg, Frans; Taconis, Ruurd; Corda, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    In teacher education programmes, text-based portfolios are generally used to assess student-teachers’ competence as new teachers. However, striking discrepancies are known to exist between the competencies reflected in a written portfolio and the competencies observed in actual classroom practice. M

  10. E-assessment of student-teachers' competence as new teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Admiraal, W.; Janssen, T.; Huizenga, J.; Kranenburg, F.; Taconis, R.; Corda, A.

    2014-01-01

    In teacher education programmes, text-based portfolios are generally used to assess student-teachers’ competence as new teachers. However, striking discrepancies are known to exist between the competencies reflected in a written portfolio and the competencies observed in actual classroom practice. M

  11. Risks, risk assessment and risk competence in toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahlmann, Ralf; Horvath, Aniko

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the toxic effects of xenobiotics requires sound knowledge of physiology and biochemistry. The often described lack of understanding pharmacology/toxicology is therefore primarily caused by the general absence of the necessary fundamental knowledge. Since toxic effects depend on exposure (or dosage) assessing the risks arising from toxic substances also requires quantitative reasoning. Typically public discussions nearly always neglect quantitative aspects and laypersons tend to disregard dose-effect-relationships. One of the main reasons for such disregard is the fact that exposures often occur at extremely low concentrations that can only be perceived intellectually but not by the human senses. However, thresholds in the low exposure range are often scientifically disputed. At the same time, ignorance towards known dangers is wide-spread. Thus, enhancing the risk competence of laypersons will have to be initially restricted to increasing the awareness of existing problems.

  12. Risks, risk assessment and risk competence in toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stahlmann, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the toxic effects of xenobiotics requires sound knowledge of physiology and biochemistry. The often described lack of understanding pharmacology/toxicology is therefore primarily caused by the general absence of the necessary fundamental knowledge. Since toxic effects depend on exposure (or dosage assessing the risks arising from toxic substances also requires quantitative reasoning. Typically public discussions nearly always neglect quantitative aspects and laypersons tend to disregard dose-effect-relationships. One of the main reasons for such disregard is the fact that exposures often occur at extremely low concentrations that can only be perceived intellectually but not by the human senses. However, thresholds in the low exposure range are often scientifically disputed. At the same time, ignorance towards known dangers is wide-spread. Thus, enhancing the risk competence of laypersons will have to be initially restricted to increasing the awareness of existing problems.

  13. Understanding the current state of infection preventionists through competency, role, and activity self-assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalp, Ericka L; Marx, James F; Davis, James

    2017-06-01

    The Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC) MegaSurvey, administered in 2015, was completed by approximately 4,079 APIC members. The survey sought to gain a better understanding the current state of 4 components of infection prevention practice: demographic characteristics, compensation, organizational structure, and practice and competency. The data for this analysis come from the APIC MegaSurvey Practice and Competency domain. Descriptive statistics and χ(2) analyses were conducted to examine differences in infection preventionist (IP) competency, roles, and activity self-assessments. The majority of IPs self-assessed their competency as Proficient compared with Novice or Expert for each of the 8 IP core competency activities. Forty percent of IPs self-rated their competency as Expert in the Preventing/Controlling the Transmission of Infectious Agents/HAIs component. IPs reported Novice competency in Employee/Occupational Health (29%); Cleaning, Sterilization, Disinfection, and Asepsis (23%); and Education and Research categories (22%). Differences in self-rated competency among IPs by discipline type (public health, nurse, and laboratory) were identified. Differences in self-rated competency were identified for each of the 8 IP core competency activities. IPs report using various resource types to gain competency. Future research is needed to identify opportunities to increase competency levels in the weakest-rated competency activities. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Assessing competency in spasticity management: a method of development and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escaldi, Steven V; Cuccurullo, Sara J; Terzella, Matthew; Petagna, Ann Marie; Strax, Thomas E

    2012-03-01

    This project endeavored to create an educational module including methodology to instruct physical medicine and rehabilitation residents in the evaluation and appropriate treatment of patients with spasticity and other sequelae of the upper motor neuron syndrome. It further sought to verify acquired competencies in spasticity management through objective evaluation methodology. A physical medicine and rehabilitation board-certified physician with 10 yrs clinical experience in spasticity management trained 16 residents using a standardized competency-based module. Assessment tools developed for this program address the basic competencies outlined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. The 16 residents successfully demonstrated proficiency in every segment of the evaluation module by the end of the Postgraduate Year 3 spasticity management rotation. Objective measures compared resident scores on an institution-specific standardized test administered before and after training. Resident proficiency in the skills and knowledge pertaining to spasticity management was objectively verified after completion of the standardized educational module. Validation of the assessment tool is evidenced by significantly improved postrotational institution-specific standardized test scores (mean pretest score, 61.1%; mean posttest score, 95.4%) as well as oral testing. In addition, the clinical development tool was validated by residents being individually observed performing skills and deemed competent by a board-certified physical medicine and rehabilitation physician specializing in spasticity management. The standardized educational module and evaluation methodology provide a potential framework for the definition of baseline competency in the clinical skill area of spasticity management.

  15. A comprehensive clinical competency-based assessment in periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiloah, J; Scarbecz, M; Bland, P S; Hottel, T L

    2017-05-01

    Traditional periodontics clinical examinations in dental education frequently assess a narrow set of clinical skills and do not adequately assess the ability of students to independently manage a periodontal patient. As an alternative, the authors developed a comprehensive periodontics competency case experience (CCCE) for senior dental students and surveyed students regarding their experience with the CCCE. Students challenging the CCCE must treat a patient with moderate periodontitis and must independently decide when a state of periodontal and oral health has been achieved. Students are also required to conduct an oral presentation to periodontology faculty. Dental students who completed the CCCE had a favourable impression of the experience, compared with the traditional clinical examinations taken in the junior year. The majority of students rated all the components of the CCCE as 'somewhat' or 'very helpful'. About 72.4% of students felt that being able to work independently on the examination was very helpful for learning about the clinical management of patients with periodontal disease, followed by 'simulation of care in private practice' (65.5%), and oral photography experience (55.2%). The greatest difficulty reported by students was finding an acceptable patient. About 62.1% of students rated 'finding the right patient' as very difficult. Students reported having to screen a mean of 5.9 patients (SD: 4.5) to find a qualified patient. The results of the survey will be useful in improving the examination as an assessment tool in periodontal therapy.

  16. Assessing Toddler Language Competence: Agreement of Parents' and Preschool Teachers' Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanovic-Umek, Ljubica; Fekonja, Urska; Podlesek, Anja; Kranjc, Simona

    2011-01-01

    According to the findings of several studies, parents' assessments of their toddler's language are valid and reliable evaluations of children's language competence, especially at early development stages. This study examined whether preschool teachers, who spend a relatively great deal of time with toddlers in various preschool activities and…

  17. Students' Self-Assessment: Other Way to Assess Competences at Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrandiz-Vindel, Isabel-Maria

    2011-01-01

    At the High Education European Frame (EEES), we propose the necessity to generate a change in assess procedures and not only at the designs or at the methodology proposals to favour the development of the specific and transversal competences of each degree. The objective of this work is to show how the student receives his/her learning process…

  18. Determining nurses\\' clinical competence in hospitals of Bushehr University of Medical Sciences by self assessment method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood mahreini

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nurses’ self awareness of their own level of clinical competence is essential in maintaining high standards of care and identifying areas of educational need and professional development. Self-assessment is a method for measuring clinical competence, and encourages nurses to use reflective thinking and take an active part in the learning process. Although nurse competence may vary between hospitals, very few studies have been done on this subject. Methods: In this cross sectional study, we analyzed clinical competency of 190 registered nurses working in different hospitals in Bushehr by self assessment method. The instrument for data collection was a valid and reliable questionnaire consisting of 73 items from seven categories which were devised from Benner's “from Novice to Expert” framework. The level of competence was assessed on a scale of 0-100 and the frequency of using the competencies was assessed on a Likert scale. Results: the nurses reported their overall level of competence as “good” (51-75. They felt more competent in the categories of “managing situations” and “helping role” (with maximum score of 79.54 and least competent in “teaching – coaching” and “ensuring quality” categories (with minimum score of 61.15. The frequency of practicing competencies had a positive correlation with the level of nursing clinical competence. Conclusion: The level of nursing competence and frequency of using competencies varied in different hospitals. Although the nurses reported their overall level of competence as good, we should be concerned about 24% of competencies which are not used by the nurses, especially in "teaching – coaching" and "ensuring quality" categories.

  19. Development of the Competency Assessment Tool-Mental Health, an instrument to assess core competencies for mental health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clasen, Carla; Meyer, Cheryl; Brun, Carl; Mase, William; Cauley, Kate

    2003-01-01

    As the focus on accountability in health care increases, there has been a corresponding emphasis on establishing core competencies for health care workers. This article discusses the development of an instrument to establish core competencies for workers in inpatient mental health settings. Twenty-six competencies were identified and rated by mental health care personnel on two subscales: the importance of the competency and how much behavioral health care workers could benefit from training on the competency. The reliability of the scale and its contributions to the training, retention and recruitment of direct care workers for behavioral health are discussed.

  20. Towards an Adaptive competency-based learning System using assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noureddine El Faddouli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available E-learning is not restricted to publishing online content. The challenge is to apply pedagogical models using new information and communication technologies in order to adjust the learning process. This adaptation will take place by proposing an adaptive learning system. There are several e-learning environment adaptation approaches such as adaptive hypermedia and semantic web. In our proposed system, we focus on evaluation that has not been, up till now, given its real value in the e-learning environment. The purpose is to implement an adaptive learning system for individualized pedagogical paths through a personalized diagnosis of learners' performances. This proposed system relies mainly on assessment and the competency-based approach as a framework. To achieve this goal, we adopt an enhanced cycle of formative assessment while adhering to a service-oriented architecture. The system will be implemented as an activity in a pedagogical scenario defined responding to the learner's needs, while aligning with norms and standards.

  1. Designing a process for simulation-based annual nurse competency assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterval, Eugene M E; Stephan, Kelly; Peczinka, Denise; Shaw, Amber

    2012-01-01

    The education council at Orlando Regional Medical Center identified a need to improve the annual nurse competency assessment. A revision process was implemented to improve the method and efficiency of assessing nurse competency. This process included evaluating population-specific competencies using simulation-based scenarios that were developed by a multidisciplinary team. The results showed high participant satisfaction scores and cost savings because of an individualized, efficient approach and bundling of resources.

  2. Assessing Knowledge Base on Geriatric Competencies for Emergency Medicine Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresita M. Hogan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emergency care of older adults requires specialized knowledge of their unique physiology, atypical presentations, and care transitions. Older adults often require distinctive assessment, treatment and disposition. Emergency medicine (EM residents should develop expertise and efficiency in geriatric care. Older adults represent over 25% of most emergency department (ED volumes. Yet many EM residencies lack curricula or assessment tools for competent geriatric care. Fully educating residents in emergency geriatric care can demand large amounts of limited conference time. The Geriatric Emergency Medicine Competencies (GEMC are high-impact geriatric topics developed to help residencies efficiently and effectively meet this training demand. This study examines if a 2-hour didactic intervention can significantly improve resident knowledge in 7 key domains as identified by the GEMC across multiple programs. Methods: A validated 29-question didactic test was administered at six EM residencies before and after a GEMC-focused lecture delivered in summer and fall of 2009. We analyzed scores as individual questions and in defined topic domains using a paired student t test. Results: A total of 301 exams were administered; 86 to PGY1, 88 to PGY2, 86 to PGY3, and 41 to PGY4 residents. The testing of didactic knowledge before and after the GEMC educational intervention had high internal reliability (87.9%. The intervention significantly improved scores in all 7 GEMC domains (improvement 13.5% to 34.6%; p<0.001. For all questions, the improvement was 23% (37.8% pre, 60.8% post; P<0.001 Graded increase in geriatric knowledge occurred by PGY year with the greatest improvement post intervention seen at the PGY 3 level (PGY1 19.1% versus PGY3 27.1%. Conclusion: A brief GEMC intervention had a significant impact on EM resident knowledge of critical geriatric topics. Lectures based on the GEMC can be a high-yield tool to enhance resident knowledge of

  3. Assessment of Competence: The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education/Residency Review Committee Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, John R

    2016-02-01

    Competency is an individual trait. As an agency that accredits programs and institutions, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) does not define or access competency. However, in the past 15 years the ACGME has promulgated several initiatives to aid programs in the assessment of the competence of their residents and fellows. Those initiatives include the Outcomes Project (which codified the competencies), the Milestones, and the Clinical Learning Environment Review Program. In the near future, the ACGME will implement an initiative by which programs can develop and study the results of competency-based residency curricula.

  4. Company Commander Competency Assessment for the United States Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    simple assumptions and how it can be created and maintained. (2,5) Berlo , David K., The Process of Comunication: An Introduction to Theory and Practice...is not a competency" [Ref. 23: pp. 1-2]. ’- David McClelland was one of the first researchers to indicate an interest in the concept of competency

  5. Increasing Cultural Competence through Needs Assessment and Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Natasha L.; Bahr, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing cultural diversity of American students makes it imperative for school-based professionals to engage in culturally-competent practice, thereby ensuring high-quality mental health services. Although most cultural competence training occurs in university programs, research shows practicing mental health professionals would benefit…

  6. Video Narratives to Assess Student Teachers' Competence as New Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admiraal, Wilfried; Berry, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    In teacher education programmes, written portfolios or text-based self-evaluations are generally used to document the development of student teachers' competence. However, such approaches do no justice to the complex nature of teaching as they tend to lead to evidence in which teacher competencies are disconnected and removed from the actual…

  7. Digital Competence Assessment: A Proposal for Operationalizing the Critical Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortoni, Ida; LoPresti, Veronica; Cervelli, Pierluigi

    2015-01-01

    The European Commission considers the development of digital competences a strategic action to spread and to develop a more active digital participation of citizens. The objective is to increase the level of digital competence in the European citizens up to 2015 and to reduce the number of those who don't use new technologies and don't surf the…

  8. Predictive validity of measurements of clinical competence using the team objective structured bedside assessment (TOSBA): assessing the clinical competence of final year medical students.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Meagher, Frances M

    2009-11-01

    The importance of valid and reliable assessment of student competence and performance is gaining increased recognition. Provision of valid patient-based formative assessment is an increasing challenge for clinical teachers in a busy hospital setting. A formative assessment tool that reliably predicts performance in the summative setting would be of value to both students and teachers.

  9. Competence assessment in minors, illustrated by the case of bariatric surgery for morbidly obese children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolt, L.L.E.; Summeren van, M

    2014-01-01

    Clinicians have to assess children's competence frequently. In order to do justice to children who are competent to make decisions and to protect incompetent children, valid assessment is essential. We address this issue by using bariatric surgery for morbidly obese minors as a case study. Our previ

  10. Integrating Authentic Assessment with Competence-Based Learning in Vocational Education: The Protocol Portfolio Scoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluijsmans, Dominique M. A.; Straetmans, Gerard J. J. M.; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how competence-based learning (CBL) can be organised in vocational education by integrating elements from a holistic instructional design model with recent ideas on assessment. A curriculum based on this model is pre-eminently suitable for an assessment approach emphasising that proof of competence is gathered by having…

  11. Identification and Assessment of Intercultural Competence as a Student Outcome of Internationalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deardorff, Darla K.

    2006-01-01

    This study seeks to determine a definition and appropriate assessment methods of inter-cultural competence as agreed on by a panel of internationally known intercultural scholars. This information is validated by a sample of higher education administrators and can be used by administrators in identifying and assessing intercultural competence as a…

  12. Conducting Spiritual Assessments with Native Americans: Enhancing Cultural Competency in Social Work Practice Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, David R.; Limb, Gordon E.

    2010-01-01

    Developing competency in diversity and assessment are key educational priorities. With Native American clients a spiritual assessment is typically required because spirituality is often instrumental to health and wellness in Native cultures. In keeping with the movement toward competency-based education, this qualitative study sought to answer the…

  13. Assessment challenges in competency-based education: A case study in health professions education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, James T; Burkhardt, John C; Kasten, Steven J; Mullan, Patricia B; Santen, Sally A; Sheets, Kent J; Tsai, Antonius; Vasquez, John A; Gruppen, Larry D

    2016-05-01

    There is a growing demand for health sciences faculty with formal training in education. Addressing this need, the University of Michigan Medical School created a Master in Health Professions Education (UM-MHPE). The UM-MHPE is a competency-based education (CBE) program targeting professionals. The program is individualized and adaptive to the learner's situation using personal mentoring. Critical to CBE is an assessment process that accurately and reliably determines a learner's competence in educational domains. The program's assessment method has two principal components: an independent assessment committee and a learner repository. Learners submit evidence of competence that is evaluated by three independent assessors. The assessments are presented to an Assessment Committee who determines whether the submission provides evidence of competence. The learner receives feedback on the submission and, if needed, the actions needed to reach competency. During the program's first year, six learners presented 10 submissions for review. Assessing learners in a competency-based program has created challenges; setting standards that are not readily quantifiable is difficult. However, we argue it is a more genuine form of assessment and that this process could be adapted for use within most competency-based formats. While our approach is demanding, we document practical learning outcomes that assess competence.

  14. Self-assessment of nursing informatics competencies for doctor of nursing practice students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeungok; Zucker, Donna M

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the informatics competencies of doctor of nursing practice (DNP) students and whether these competencies differed between DNP students in the post-baccalaureate (BS) and post-master's (MS) tracks. Self-reported informatics competencies were collected from 132 DNP students (68 post-BS and 64 post-MS students) in their first year in the program (2007 to 2010). Students were assessed in 18 areas of 3 competency categories: computer skills, informatics knowledge, and informatics skills. Post-BS students were competent in 4 areas (computer skills in communication, systems, documentation, and informatics knowledge about impact of information management), whereas post-MS students were competent in only 1 area (computer skills in communication). Students in both tracks reported computer skills in decision support as their least competent area. Overall, post-BS students reported slightly higher than or similar competency scores as post-MS students, but scores were statistically significant in only 3 of 18 areas. The assessment indicated that knowledge and skills on informatics competencies need to be improved, especially in computer skills for data access and use of decision support systems. Strategies are suggested to integrate competencies into existing informatics course and DNP curricula. Further studies are recommended using an objective measure of informatics competencies.

  15. Preliminary Analysis of Competency Assessment of Organ Donation Coordinators in Hunan Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, A; Xie, W; Luo, J; Deng, X

    The organ donation coordinator is indispensable in the process of organ donation and transplantation. The competency of coordinators is closely related to the organ donation rate. 1) To construct a competency assessment system for organ donation coordinators; and 2) to evaluate the competency level of coordinators in Hunan province. We constructed the competency model framework for coordinators based on the McClelland competency model and then extracted and screened the competency indicators by interview and Delphi methods. Next, we determined the weight of the indicators by an analytic hierarchy process method. Finally, we evaluated the competency level of 42 coordinators in Hunan province with the use of our assessment system. 1) We constructed the competency evaluation system for organ donation coordinators, which included 6 dimensions and 21 competency indicators. 2) The average competency score of 42 coordinators was 79.43 ± 8.51. Five coordinators were at qualified level (11.9%), 18 at moderate level (42.9%), 12 at good level (25.6%), and 7 at excellent level (16.7%). 1) This competency evaluation system for organ donation coordinators will provide scientific evidence for human resource management in health institutions. 2) The organ donation coordinators in Hunan were qualified, but their number was insufficient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Construct validation of teacher portfolio assessment : Procedures for improving teacher competence assessment illustrated by teaching students research skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaaf, M.F. van der

    2005-01-01

    The study aims to design and test procedures for teacher portfolio assessments. What are suitable procedures to assess teachers' competencies in developing students' research skills? We first searched into the tasks teachers have in teaching students research skills and the competencies needed to f

  17. Construct validation of teacher portfolio assessment : Procedures for improving teacher competence assessment illustrated by teaching students research skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaaf, M.F. van der

    2005-01-01

    The study aims to design and test procedures for teacher portfolio assessments. What are suitable procedures to assess teachers' competencies in developing students' research skills? We first searched into the tasks teachers have in teaching students research skills and the competencies needed to

  18. Reliable and valid assessment of ultrasound operator competence in obstetrics and gynecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolsgaard, M G; Ringsted, C; Dreisler, E

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore the reliability and validity of a recently developed instrument for assessment of ultrasound operator competence, the Objective Structured Assessment of Ultrasound Skills (OSAUS). METHODS: Three groups of 10 doctors with different levels of ultrasound experience in obstetri...

  19. Developing schemas for assessing personal and social competences among unskilled young people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarkrog, Vibe; Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    competences. The schema was developed in cooperation with practitioners, i.e. representatives from workplaces, from municipal youth guidance centres, and from VET colleges. Based on the experiences accrued in developing the schema, the article discusses how personal and social competences can be assessed......Personal and social competences are crucial parts of VET competences. As part of a development project preparing unskilled young people for vocational education and training, a research project was conducted with the aim of developing a schema for assessing and grading personal and social...

  20. Music therapy for the Assessment of Parental Competencies for Children in need of Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine; Wigram, Tony

    2007-01-01

    using the autonomy profile of the Improvisation Assessment Profiles. Results demonstrate the strengths, weaknesses, and potential in the parent, and quantifiable observed musical events in the gradients of autonomy provide evidence of positive and/or negative interactional behaviour. The therapist has......The assessment for parenting competencies for parents of children potentially in need of care involves an evaluation of their relationship with their child, and the interaction that underpins that relationship. The "Assessment of Parenting Competences" (APC) music therapy assessment provides...

  1. Assessment of intercultural competence of vocational teachers in Croatia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Višnja Rajić; Tomislav Rajić

    2015-01-01

    Due to the changes in society and the new era of “super-diversity” (Vertovec, 2007) in European countries, intercultural competence is gaining importance both in everyday life situations and teacher training...

  2. Development of the Knowledge of Dementia Competencies Self-Assessment Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curyto, Kimberly J; Vriesman, Deedre K

    2016-02-01

    Competent dementia care requires caregivers with specialized knowledge and skills. The Knowledge of Dementia Competencies Self-Assessment Tool was developed to help direct care workers (DCWs) assess their knowledge of 7 dementia competencies identified by the Michigan Dementia Coalition. Item selection was guided by literature review and expert panel consultation. It was given to 159 DCWs and readministered to 57 DCWs in a range of long-term care settings and revised based on qualitative feedback and statistical item analyses, resulting in 82 items demonstrating good internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Performance on items assessing competencies rated as most important was significantly related to training in these competencies. The DCWs in day care obtained higher scores than those in home care settings, and their sites reported a greater number of hours of dementia training. Validation in a more diverse group of DCWs and assessing its relationship to other measures of knowledge and skill is needed.

  3. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENTS’ MEDIA COMPETENCE: TEST RESULTS ANALYSI

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander Fedorov

    2011-01-01

    Ascertaining levels of media competence (development in the field of media culture) of students is based on the classification of indicators developed by the author. In accordance with this classification, audience is invited to a basic blocks of questions and tasks. The gargets are: to detect the levels of motivational indicators of audience’s media competence (genre, thematic, psychological, therapeutic, emotional, cognitive, moral, intellectual, creative and aesthetic reasons which the aud...

  4. Identifying Factors Associated with Risk Assessment Competencies of Public Health Emergency Responders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jiejing; Ren, Jiaojiao; Wu, Qunhong; Hao, Yanhua; Sun, Hong; Ning, Ning; Ding, Ding

    2017-06-04

    This study aimed to better understand the current situation of risk assessment and identify the factors associated with competence of emergency responders in public health risk assessment. The participants were selected by a multi-stage, stratified cluster sampling method in Heilongjiang Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The questionnaires that measured their perceptions on risk assessment competences were administered through the face-to-face survey. A final sample of 1889 staff was obtained. Of this sample, 78.6% of respondents rated their own risk assessment competences as "relatively low", contrasting with 21.4% rated as "relatively high". Most of the respondents (62.7%) did not participate in any risk assessment work. Only 13.7% and 42.7% of respondents reported participating in risk assessment training and were familiar with risk assessment tools. There existed statistical significance between risk assessment-related characteristics of respondents and their self-rated competences scores. Financial support from the government and administrative attention were regarded as the important factors contributing to risk assessment competences of CDC responders. Higher attention should be given to risk assessment training and enhancing the availability of surveillance data. Continuous efforts should be made to remove the financial and technical obstacles to improve the competences of risk assessment for public health emergency responders.

  5. Assessing Dual-Role Staff-Interpreter Linguistic Competency in an Integrated Healthcare System

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno, Maria R.; Otero-Sabogal, Regina; Newman, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    Background Interpreter services for medical care increase physician–patient communication and safety, yet a “formal certification” process to demonstrate interpreter competence does not exist. Testing and training is left to individual health care facilities nationwide. Bilingual staff are often used to interpret, without any assessment of their skills. Assessing interpreters’ linguistic competence and setting standards for testing is a priority. Objective To assess dual-role staff interprete...

  6. Analysis of the use and design of rubrics in competency assessment in engineering degrees

    OpenAIRE

    Velasco-Martínez, Leticia-Concepción; Tójar Hurtado, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The defining, implementation and assessment of competencies are challenges for new undergraduate and Master’s degrees which must respond to current education demands. The use of rubrics in universities is considered an instrument of innovation and educational change that transforms assessment practices, both for students and educators. Furthermore, new education, focusing on the development of student competencies, implies a profound modification, not only of assessment approaches, but also o...

  7. Assessment of effectiveness of Chinese aid in competence building and financing development in Sudan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nour, S.

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of effectiveness of Chinese aid in competence building and financing development in Sudan by S. Nour [abstract] This paper discusses the effectiveness of Chinese aid for competence building and financing development in Sudan using new primary data at the micro level. We find that Chinese

  8. Programmatic assessment of competency-based workplace learning: when theory meets practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bok, H.G.; Teunissen, P.W.; Favier, R.P.; Rietbroek, N.J.; Theyse, L.F.; Brommer, H.; Haarhuis, J.C.; Beukelen, P. van; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Jaarsma, D.A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In competency-based medical education emphasis has shifted towards outcomes, capabilities, and learner-centeredness. Together with a focus on sustained evidence of professional competence this calls for new methods of teaching and assessment. Recently, medical educators advocated the use

  9. Validity of Subjective Self-Assessment of Digital Competence among Undergraduate Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maderick, Joseph Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Technology is now integrated into the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) required to be a highly qualified 21st century teacher. Accurate measurement of digital competence has become critical. Self-assessment has been used widely to measure the digital competence of preservice teachers who are expected to integrate technology into…

  10. Perceptions of Spanish/English Bilingual School Psychologists Regarding Competency in Assessment and Future Training Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Anne Marie

    2012-01-01

    With the changing demographics of the school population, the need for bilingually competent school psychologists has become increasingly important. The current study examined the influence of training and regional factors on Spanish-speaking, bilingual school psychologists' self-perceptions of competence regarding assessment of non-native…

  11. Assessment of effectiveness of Chinese aid in competence building and financing development in Sudan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nour, S.

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of effectiveness of Chinese aid in competence building and financing development in Sudan by S. Nour [abstract] This paper discusses the effectiveness of Chinese aid for competence building and financing development in Sudan using new primary data at the micro level. We find that Chinese

  12. Teachers' Emotional Competence and Social Support: Assessing the Mediating Role of Teacher Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorilli, Caterina; Albanese, Ottavia; Gabola, Piera; Pepe, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the relationships among teachers' emotional competence, burnout as a mediator, and social support. Teachers' emotional competence was assessed via measures of emotional intensity and emotional regulation. Social support was evaluated in terms of external versus internal support, and teacher dissatisfaction with support…

  13. Design of a Competency-Based Assessment Model in the Field of Accounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciudad-Gómez, Adelaida; Valverde-Berrocoso, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the phases involved in the design of a methodology to contribute both to the acquisition of competencies and to their assessment in the field of Financial Accounting, within the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) framework, which we call MANagement of COMpetence in the areas of Accounting (MANCOMA). Having selected and…

  14. Methodical approach to the assessment of professional competence for the innovation economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Podmolodina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In modern economic conditions effectively carry out innovative activity could only highly professional personnel. For an assessment of competences of the enterprise employees we offer the methodical approach, allowing defining readiness of the enterprise employee for innovative activity from the point of view of its competences and personal qualities.

  15. Teachers' Emotional Competence and Social Support: Assessing the Mediating Role of Teacher Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorilli, Caterina; Albanese, Ottavia; Gabola, Piera; Pepe, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the relationships among teachers' emotional competence, burnout as a mediator, and social support. Teachers' emotional competence was assessed via measures of emotional intensity and emotional regulation. Social support was evaluated in terms of external versus internal support, and teacher dissatisfaction with support…

  16. A Modified Delphi Process to Define Competencies for Assessment Leads Supporting a Doctor of Pharmacy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Kristin K; Kelley, Katherine A; Sweet, Burgunda V; Kuba, Sarah E

    2016-12-25

    Objective. To define the competencies for individuals designated as assessment leads in colleges and schools of pharmacy. Methods. Twenty-three assessment experts in pharmacy participated in a modified Delphi process to describe competencies for an assessment lead, defined as the individual responsible for curricular assessment and assessment-related to doctor of pharmacy program accreditation. Round 1 asked open-ended questions about knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Round 2 grouped responses for comment and rating for consensus, which was prospectively set at 80%. Results. Twelve competencies were defined and grouped into 3 areas: Context for Assessment, Managing the Process of Assessment, and Leadership of Assessment Activities. In order to verify the panel's work, assessment competencies from other disciplines were reviewed and compared. Conclusions. The competencies describe roles for assessment professionals as experts, managers, and leaders of assessment processes. They can be used by assessment professionals in self-assessing areas for professional development and by administrators in selecting, developing, and supporting designated leads.

  17. Assessing capacity for providing culturally competent services to LGBT older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portz, Jennifer Dickman; Retrum, Jessica H; Wright, Leslie A; Boggs, Jennifer M; Wilkins, Shari; Grimm, Cathy; Gilchrist, Kay; Gozansky, Wendolyn S

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative, interview-based study assessed the cultural competence of health and social service providers to meet the needs of LGBT older adults in an urban neighborhood in Denver, Colorado, known to have a large LGBT community. Only 4 of the agencies were categorized as "high competency"; 12 were felt to be "seeking improvement" and 8 were considered "not aware." These results indicate significant gaps in cultural competency for the majority of service providers. Social workers are well-suited to lead efforts directed at improving service provision and care competencies for the older LGBT community.

  18. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENTS’ MEDIA COMPETENCE: TEST RESULTS ANALYSI

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    Alexander Fedorov

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Ascertaining levels of media competence (development in the field of media culture of students is based on the classification of indicators developed by the author. In accordance with this classification, audience is invited to a basic blocks of questions and tasks. The gargets are: to detect the levels of motivational indicators of audience’s media competence (genre, thematic, psychological, therapeutic, emotional, cognitive, moral, intellectual, creative and aesthetic reasons which the audience contact with media texts; to identify the level of the user / contact rate (frequency of contacts with various kinds of media, user skills in relation to the media; to identify the level of cognitive / information index (knowledge of terminology, history and theory of media culture of university students’ media competence.

  19. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENTS’ PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCIES – THE FUTURE TEACHERS OF MATHEMATICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariya B. Shashkina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is to describe the authors’ approach to the assessment of the professional competence of the future teacher of mathematics.Methods. The methods involve comparative analysis of the Professional Standard of the teacher and the Federal State Educational Standards in teacher education, as well as the method of predictive analysis of modern educational situation.Results. Qualimetric approach to the structuring of the professional competencies of students is described; it allows concretizing the assessment object, to select the criteria and levels of its formedness, to trace the dynamics of development in the medium of profile preparation of a bachelor. The methodology of assessment a professional-profile competence of the future mathematics teachers is proposed; examples of the competence-assessment tools are provided.Scientific novelty. The study gives a detailed analysis of developing the innovative approach to competencies assessment as metasubject learning outcomes.Practical significance. The proposed method of competencies assessment can be used in the mathematical preparation of the future mathematics teacher, and can serve as a basis for monitoring the professional competencies of students.

  20. Multi-institutional validation of a web-based core competency assessment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabuenca, Arnold; Welling, Richard; Sachdeva, Ajit K; Blair, Patrice G; Horvath, Karen; Tarpley, John; Savino, John A; Gray, Richard; Gulley, Julie; Arnold, Teresa; Wolfe, Kevin; Risucci, Donald A

    2007-01-01

    The Association of Program Directors in Surgery and the Division of Education of the American College of Surgeons developed and implemented a web-based system for end-of-rotation faculty assessment of ACGME core competencies of residents. This study assesses its reliability and validity across multiple programs. Each assessment included ratings (1-5 scale) on 23 items reflecting the 6 core competencies. A total of 4241 end-of-rotation assessments were completed for 332 general surgery residents (> or =5 evaluations each) at 5 sites during the 2004-2005 and 2005-2006 academic years. The mean rating for each resident on each item was computed for each academic year. The mean rating of items representing each competency was computed for each resident. Additional data included USMLE and ABSITE scores, PGY, and status in program (categorical, designated preliminary, and undesignated preliminary). Coefficient alpha was greater than 0.90 for each competency score. Mean ratings for each competency increased significantly (p competencies at all PGY levels. Competency ratings of PGY 1 residents correlated significantly with USMLE Step I, ranging from (r = 0.26, p competencies correlated significantly with the 2006 ABSITE Total Percentile Score (range: r = 0.20, p core competencies are internally consistent. The pattern of statistically significant correlations between competency ratings and USMLE and ABSITE scores supports the postdictive and concurrent validity, respectively, of faculty perceptions of resident knowledge. The pattern of increased ratings as a function of PGY supports the construct validity of faculty ratings of resident core competencies.

  1. Competency assessment in laboratory medicine: Standardization and utility for technical staff assessment and recertification in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemenqani, Dalal M; Tekian, Ara; Park, Yoon Soo

    2017-04-01

    The assessment of technical staff members' competency has been a challenge for laboratory workers, to ensure patient safety and high quality services. The aim of this study was to (1) investigate awareness on best ways to assess lab competencies; (2) identify existing institutional methods of competency assessment and how staff perceptions; and (3) gather opinions of respondents about a proposed program for competency assessment in laboratory medicine. A cross-sectional survey was conducted, followed by an interview and discussion with laboratory stakeholders about a proposed competency assessment program that included all the six procedural elements of laboratory personnel competency assessment. An online questionnaire was sent via email to different hospitals in Saudi Arabia through survey monkey. A proposed competency assessment program was circulated via email to laboratory stakeholders who agreed to be enrolled in structured interviews. A total of 47 out of the 168 (25.3%) laboratory workers responded to the emailed survey administered via survey monkey. Among the survey respondents, 16 out of the 47 (34%) participated in the structured interview and the discussion and formed the community of practice group that provided insight and opinion about the proposed competency program. Among stakeholders, 87.2% practiced in accredited laboratories. Over half (52%) of respondents positively rated the proposed program. Results of interviews and discussions revealed suggestions about continuous ongoing assessment, such as the inclusion of laboratory quality management and safety as separate items to be unified for all sections. The proposed competency assessment program overcomes challenges noted in competency assessment and has been positively received by stakeholders. This program will be validated by a group of experts then implemented as part of a core curriculum for laboratory staff, in their assessment, certification, recertification, registration, evaluation and

  2. Suicide Risk Assessment Training for Psychology Doctoral Programs: Core Competencies and a Framework for Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Robert J; Johnson, Shara M; McLaughlin, Jennifer; Rausch, Emilie M; Conroy, Mary Alice

    2013-02-01

    Clinical and counseling psychology programs currently lack adequate evidence-based competency goals and training in suicide risk assessment. To begin to address this problem, this article proposes core competencies and an integrated training framework that can form the basis for training and research in this area. First, we evaluate the extent to which current training is effective in preparing trainees for suicide risk assessment. Within this discussion, sample and methodological issues are reviewed. Second, as an extension of these methodological training issues, we integrate empirically- and expert-derived suicide risk assessment competencies from several sources with the goal of streamlining core competencies for training purposes. Finally, a framework for suicide risk assessment training is outlined. The approach employs Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) methodology, an approach commonly utilized in medical competency training. The training modality also proposes the Suicide Competency Assessment Form (SCAF), a training tool evaluating self- and observer-ratings of trainee core competencies. The training framework and SCAF are ripe for empirical evaluation and potential training implementation.

  3. Assessment of cultural competence in Texas nursing faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzilli, Collen

    2016-10-01

    Cultural competence [CC] is an essential component of nursing education and nursing practice yet there is a gap in the research evaluating CC in faculty and how to practically develop this skillset for faculty members. To explore CC in faculty as evaluated with the Nurses' Cultural Competence Scale [NCCS] and apply the findings to the Purnell Model of Cultural Competence [PMCC] to guide professional development opportunities for faculty members. This was a concurrent mixed-methods study. Faculty members teaching in Texas nursing programs were recruited for the study. Quantitative data was collected using an online survey tool and qualitative data was collected over the phone. 89 Texas faculty members completed the quantitative strand and a subset of 10 faculty members completed the qualitative strand. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the quantitative data and Strauss and Corbin's methodology guided the evaluation of the qualitative data. These two strands were used to support the results. Faculty in Texas are moderately culturally competent. The qualitative findings support the application of the PMCC to the areas identified by the NCCS. The PMCC may be applied to the application of culture and values in nursing professional education as supported by the NCCS. Recommendations are to include the PMCC as a structure for the creation of professional development opportunities for faculty. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessment of Communication Competencies in Engineering Design Projects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, Gerrit W.; van der Geest, Thea

    2003-01-01

    Reforms in engineering education have caused a shift from the traditional stand-alone course in technical communication for Engineering students towards communication training integrated in courses and design projects that allows students to develop four layers of competence. This shift creates

  5. Assessment of Communication Competencies in Engineering Design Projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, Gert W.; Geest, van der Thea M.

    2003-01-01

    Reforms in engineering education have caused a shift from the traditional stand-alone course in technical communication for Engineering students towards communication training integrated in courses and design projects that allows students to develop four layers of competence. This shift creates oppo

  6. Assessment of Students' Media Competence: Test Results Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Ascertaining levels of media competence (development in the field of media culture) of students is based on the classification of indicators developed by the author. In accordance with this classification, audience is invited to a basic blocks of questions and tasks. The targets are: to detect the levels of motivational indicators of audience's…

  7. Assessment of Communication Competencies in Engineering Design Projects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, Gerrit W.; van der Geest, Thea

    2003-01-01

    Reforms in engineering education have caused a shift from the traditional stand-alone course in technical communication for Engineering students towards communication training integrated in courses and design projects that allows students to develop four layers of competence. This shift creates oppo

  8. Mental health learning needs assessment: competency-based instrument for best practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Sylvia E

    2013-06-01

    A learning needs assessment focused on psychiatric/mental health nursing competency development is a central component of nursing education in specialty mental health nursing practice. The provision of education for mental health nursing relies on the underlying assumption that the learning needs of experienced mental health nurses have been assessed and educational programs implemented to address educational needs for competency in professional practice. Few professional learning needs assessments have been developed to identify learning needs in mental health nursing practice. The majority of available professional learning needs assessments focus on medical nursing practice applications rather than the psychosocial aspects of a mental health assessment. The mental health field addresses very different assessment criteria such as knowledge of suicide assessment and therapeutic interventions. The purpose of this article is to present and describe the process of developing a learning needs assessment focused on competency development for the specialty practice of mental health nursing that addresses and resolves complex learning needs.

  9. Identifying and using 'core competencies' to help design and assess undergraduate neuroscience curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerchner, Michael; Hardwick, Jean C; Thornton, Janice E

    2012-01-01

    There has been a growing emphasis on the use of core competencies to design and inform curricula. Based on our Faculty for Undergraduate Neuroscience workshop at Pomona we developed a set of neuroscience core competencies. Following the workshop, faculty members were asked to complete an online survey to determine which core competencies are considered most essential and the results are presented. Backward Design principles are then described and we discuss how core competencies, through a backward design process, can be used to design and assess an undergraduate neuroscience curriculum. Oberlin College is used as a case study to describe the use of core competencies to help develop learning objectives, activities, and assessment measures for an undergraduate neuroscience major.

  10. Teaching and Assessing Systems-based Competency in Ophthalmology Residency Training Programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Andrew G.; Beaver, Hilary A.; Greenlee, Emily; Oetting, Thomas A.; Boldt, H. Culver; Olson, Richard; Abramoff, Michael; Carter, Keith

    2007-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has mandated that residency programs, including ophthalmology, teach and assess specific competencies, including systems-based learning. We review the pertinent literature on systems-based learning for ophthalmology and recommend speci

  11. Student perspectives on assessment: experience in a competency-based portfolio system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altahawi, Faysal; Sisk, Bryan; Poloskey, Stacey; Hicks, Caitlin; Dannefer, Elaine F

    2012-01-01

    Despite considerable evidence recognizing the importance of learners' perceptions of the assessment process, there is little literature depicting the participants' experience. We aim to capture these perceptions in order to gain insights into the strengths and weaknesses of a competency-based assessment system. Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine has implemented a learner-centered portfolio assessment system built around competency standards and continuous formative feedback. Promotion of students is based upon their feedback-supported portfolio essays, but feedback itself is individualized and formative in nature under the umbrella of the competencies. Importantly, there are no grades or ranking awarded for the competencies or at promotion. Four students share personal reflections of their experience to illuminate themes from the subjective experience of the learner and to understand how to align the learners' interests with the requirements of an assessment program.

  12. Integrating authentic assessment with competency based learning: the Protocol Portfolio Scoring.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluijsmans, Dominique; Straetmans, Gerard; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen

    2009-01-01

    Sluijsmans, D. M. A., Straetmans, G., & Van Merriënboer, J. (2008). Integrating authentic assessment with competency based learning: the Protocol Portfolio Scoring. Journal of Vocational Education and Training, 60(2), 157-172.

  13. Formal and Informal Means of Assessing the Communicative Competence of Kindergarten Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Janet

    1979-01-01

    This investigation suggests that observation of children's language in an informal context generally provides more comprehensive information about a kindergarten child's communicative competence than formal oral language assessment instruments. (DD)

  14. Determining the quality of competences assessment programs: A self-evaluation procedure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baartman, Liesbeth; Prins, Frans; Kirschner, Paul A.; Van der Vleuten, Cees

    2009-01-01

    Baartman, L. K. J., Prins, F. J., Kirschner, P. A., & Van der Vleuten, C. P. M. (2007). Determining the quality of Competence Assessment Programs: A self-evaluation procedure. Studies in Educational Evaluation, 33, 258-281.

  15. Determining the quality of competences assessment programs: A self-evaluation procedure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baartman, Liesbeth; Prins, Frans; Kirschner, Paul A.; Van der Vleuten, Cees

    2009-01-01

    Baartman, L. K. J., Prins, F. J., Kirschner, P. A., & Van der Vleuten, C. P. M. (2007). Determining the quality of Competence Assessment Programs: A self-evaluation procedure. Studies in Educational Evaluation, 33, 258-281.

  16. Evaluating assessment quality in competence-based education: A qualitative comparison of two frameworks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baartman, Liesbeth; Bastiaens, Theo; Kirschner, Paul A.; Van der Vleuten, Cees

    2009-01-01

    Baartman, L. K. J., Bastiaens, T. J., Kirschner, P. A., & Van der Vleuten, C. P. M. (2007). Evaluation assessment quality in competence-based education: A qualitative comparison of two frameworks. Educational Research Review, 2, 114-129.

  17. Methodological Considerations concerning the Assessment of Oral Competency in a Second Language (L2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José González-Such

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we review methodological considerations about the assessment of oral proficiency in a second language. We discuss the characteristics of the construct and its definition, in this case with reference to proficiency, including competence in listening comprehension and oral expression. Also, we review concepts like how to design instruments and/or evaluative techniques for assessing the competencies that are involved, and considerations about reliability, validity and standard setting.

  18. Assessing Motor Skill Competency in Elementary School Students: A Three-Year Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weiyun; Mason, Steve; Hypnar, Andrew; Bennett, Austin

    2016-03-01

    This study was to examine how well fourth- and fifth-grade students demonstrated motor skill competency assessed with selected PE Metrics assessment rubrics (2009). Fourth- and fifth-grade students (n = 1,346-1,926) were assessed on their performance of three manipulative skills using the PE Metrics Assessment Rubrics during the pre-intervention year, the post-intervention year 1, and the post-intervention year 3. Descriptive statistics, independent t-test, ANOVA, and follow-up comparisons were conducted for data analysis. The results indicated that the post-intervention year 2 cohort performed significantly more competent than the pre-intervention cohort and the post-intervention year 1 cohort on the three manipulative skill assessments. The post-intervention year 1 cohort significantly outperformed the pre-intervention cohort on the soccer dribbling, passing, and receiving and the striking skill assessments, but not on the throwing skill assessment. Although the boys in the three cohorts performed significantly better than the girls on all three skills, the girls showed substantial improvement on the overhand throwing and the soccer skills from baseline to the post-intervention year 1 and the post-intervention year 2. However, the girls, in particular, need to improve striking skill. The CTACH PE was conducive to improving fourth- and fifth-grade students' motor skill competency in the three manipulative skills. This study suggest that PE Metrics assessment rubrics are feasible tools for PE teachers to assess levels of students' demonstration of motor skill competency during a regular PE lesson. Key pointsCATCH PE is an empirically-evidenced quality PE curricular that is conducive to improving students' manipulative skill competency.Boys significantly outperformed than girls in all three manipulative skills.Girls need to improve motor skill competency in striking skill. PE Metrics are feasible assessment rubrics that can be easily used by trained physical

  19. Learning theories and tools for the assessment of core nursing competencies in simulation: A theoretical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Patrick; Michaud, Cécile; Bélisle, Marilou; Boyer, Louise; Gosselin, Émilie; Grondin, Myrian; Larue, Caroline; Lavoie, Stéphan; Pepin, Jacinthe

    2017-08-16

    To identify the theories used to explain learning in simulation and to examine how these theories guided the assessment of learning outcomes related to core competencies in undergraduate nursing students. Nurse educators face the challenge of making explicit the outcomes of competency-based education, especially when competencies are conceptualized as holistic and context dependent. Theoretical review. Research papers (N = 182) published between 1999-2015 describing simulation in nursing education. Two members of the research team extracted data from the papers, including theories used to explain how simulation could engender learning and tools used to assess simulation outcomes. Contingency tables were created to examine the associations between theories, outcomes and tools. Some papers (N = 79) did not provide an explicit theory. The 103 remaining papers identified one or more learning or teaching theories; the most frequent were the National League for Nursing/Jeffries Simulation Framework, Kolb's theory of experiential learning and Bandura's social cognitive theory and concept of self-efficacy. Students' perceptions of simulation, knowledge and self-confidence were the most frequently assessed, mainly via scales designed for the study where they were used. Core competencies were mostly assessed with an observational approach. This review highlighted the fact that few studies examined the use of simulation in nursing education through learning theories and via assessment of core competencies. It also identified observational tools used to assess competencies in action, as holistic and context-dependent constructs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The portfolio approach to competency-based assessment at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannefer, Elaine F; Henson, Lindsey C

    2007-05-01

    Despite the rapid expansion of interest in competency-based assessment, few descriptions of assessment systems specifically designed for a competency-based curriculum have been reported. The purpose of this article is to describe the design of a portfolio approach to a comprehensive, competency-based assessment system that is fully integrated with the curriculum to foster an educational environment focused on learning. The educational design goal of the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University was to create an integrated educational program-curriculum and instructional methods, student assessment processes, and learning environment-to prepare medical students for success in careers as physician investigators. The first class in the five-year program matriculated in 2004. To graduate, a student must demonstrate mastery of nine competencies: research, medical knowledge, communication, professionalism, clinical skills, clinical reasoning, health care systems, personal development, and reflective practice. The portfolio provides a tool for collecting and managing multiple types of assessment evidence from multiple contexts and sources within the curriculum to document competence and promote reflective practice skills. This article describes how the portfolio was developed to provide both formative and summative assessment of student achievement in relation to the program's nine competencies.

  1. Acquired and Participatory Competencies in Health Professions Education: Definition and Assessment in Global Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichbaum, Quentin

    2016-09-06

    Many health professions education programs in high-income countries (HICs) have adopted a competency-based approach to learning. Although global health programs have followed this trend, defining and assessing competencies has proven problematic, particularly in resource-constrained settings of low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) where HIC students and trainees perform elective work. In part, this is due to programs failing to take sufficient account of local learning, cultural, and health contexts.A major divide between HIC and LMIC settings is that the learning contexts of HICs are predominantly individualist, whereas those of LMICs are generally collectivist. Individualist cultures view learning as something that the individual acquires independent of context and can possess; collectivist cultures view learning as arising dynamically from specific contexts through group participation.To bridge the individualist-collectivist learning divide, the author proposes that competencies be classified as either acquired or participatory. Acquired competencies can be transferred across contexts and assessed using traditional psychometric approaches; participatory competencies are linked to contexts and require alternative assessment approaches. The author proposes assessing participatory competencies through the approach of self-directed assessment seeking, which includes multiple members of the health care team as assessors.The proposed classification of competencies as acquired or participatory may apply across health professions. The author suggests advancing participatory competencies through mental models of sharing. In global health education, the author recommends developing three new competency domains rooted in participatory learning, collectivism, and sharing: resourceful learning; transprofessionalism and transformative learning; and social justice and health equity.

  2. Competence assessment for vocational school students based on business and industry chamber to improve graduate entrepreneurship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsudi, Widodo, Joko; Margunani

    2017-03-01

    Vocational school's skill competence assessment is an important phase to complete learning process at vocational school. For vocational school this phase should be designed and implemented not only to measure learning objective target, but also to provide entrepreneurship experience for the graduates. Therefore competence assessment implementation should be done comprehensively in cooperation with Business and Industry Chamber. The implementation of skill competence aspect covering materials, methods, strategies, tools and assessors, need to be designed and optimized with respect to vocational school together with Business and Industry Chamber. This aims to measure the learning objective target and produce improved entrepreneurship graduates. 4M-S strategy in students' skill competence assessment could be done to ensure that the material, method, tool and assessor have been well designed and implemented in both institutions: vocational school and Business and Industry Chamber to improve entrepreneurship graduates.

  3. Clinical utility of the Hopkins Competency Assessment Test on an inpatient geropsychiatry unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Kirsten M; Lund, Brian C; McAdams, Jimmie D; Yates, William R

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the clinical use of routine administration of the Hopkins Competency Assessment Test on an inpatient geropsychiatry unit. The purpose was to determine whether the Hopkins Competency Assessment Test results influenced the psychiatrist's capacity assessment or confidence in that determination. The test was administered to all patients admitted voluntarily during an 18-week period. The attending psychiatrist determined treatment consent capacity and rated confidence in that determination, before and after review of the test results. Fifty seven patients were assessed. After review of the test results, the psychiatrist's capacity rating changed in only 2 (3.5%) cases. However, the test increased the psychiatrist's confidence ratings, particularly among the patients with cognitive impairment. The Hopkins Competency Assessment Test is not suited for routine administration among geropsychiatry inpatients. However, the test may serve a role as a supplementary tool for assessing treatment consent capacity among patients with evidence of cognitive impairment.

  4. Reverse discourse completion task as an assessment tool for intercultural competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Kanik

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a prototypic assessment tool for intercultural communicative competence. Because traditional discourse completion tasks (DCTs focus on illocutionary competence rather than sociolinguistic competence, a modified version of a DCT was created to target sociolinguistic competence. The modified DCT employs speech acts as prompts and asks respondents to write about a situation in which a given speech act would be appropriate. This new tool is named a reverse discourse completion task (R-DCT. The task was given to learners of Turkish as a second language. Data from 12 participants were analyzed for their provision of sociopragmatic factors such as power, distance and imposition and also with respect to whether the situation was relevant to a given speech act. Responses from the participants show that R-DCTs can be used to assess intercultural competence as they help reveal respondents’ knowledge of sociolinguistic context in which a given speech act may be appropriate. By removing the need for comparison with native speaker data and the limitations that emerge from the lack of linguistic formula at respondents’ disposal, R-DCT is a promising elicitation task to assess sociolinguistic competence, an integral part of Byram’s (1997 model of intercultural communicative competence.

  5. Assessment Criteria for Competency-Based Education: A Study in Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fastré, Greet M. J.; van der Klink, Marcel R.; Amsing-Smit, Pauline; van Merriënboer, Jeroen J.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effects of type of assessment criteria (performance-based vs. competency-based), the relevance of assessment criteria (relevant criteria vs. all criteria), and their interaction on secondary vocational education students' performance and assessment skills. Students on three programmes in the domain of nursing and care…

  6. Towards a Formative Assessment of Classroom Competencies (FACCs for postgraduate medical trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Andrew

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An assumption of clinical competency is no longer acceptable or feasible in routine clinical practice. We sought to determine the feasibility, practicability and efficacy of undertaking a formal assessment of clinical competency for all postgraduate medical trainees in a large NHS foundation trust. Methods FY1 doctors were asked to complete a questionnaire to determine prior experience and self reported confidence in performing the GMC core competencies. From this a consensus panel of key partners considered and developed an 8 station Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE circuit to assess clinical competencies in all training grade medical staff... The OSCE was then administered to all training grade doctors as part of their NHS trust induction process. Results 106 (87.6% of all trainees participated in the assessment during the first 14 days of appointment. Candidates achieved high median raw percentage scores for the majority of stations however analysis of pre defined critical errors and omissions identified important areas for concern. Performance of newly qualified FY1 doctor was significantly better than other grades for the arterial blood gas estimation and nasogastric tube insertion stations. Discussion Delivering a formal classroom assessment of clinical competencies to all trainees as part of the induction process was both feasible and useful. The assessment identified areas of concern for future training and also served to reassure as to the proficiency of trainees in undertaking the majority of core competencies.

  7. Towards a Formative Assessment of Classroom Competencies (FACCs) for postgraduate medical trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Christopher S; Hildreth, Anthony J; Fisher, Catherine; Brown, Andrew; Jones, Anita; Turner, Ruth; Boobis, Leslie

    2008-12-17

    An assumption of clinical competency is no longer acceptable or feasible in routine clinical practice. We sought to determine the feasibility, practicability and efficacy of undertaking a formal assessment of clinical competency for all postgraduate medical trainees in a large NHS foundation trust. FY1 doctors were asked to complete a questionnaire to determine prior experience and self reported confidence in performing the GMC core competencies. From this a consensus panel of key partners considered and developed an 8 station Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) circuit to assess clinical competencies in all training grade medical staff... The OSCE was then administered to all training grade doctors as part of their NHS trust induction process. 106 (87.6% of all trainees) participated in the assessment during the first 14 days of appointment. Candidates achieved high median raw percentage scores for the majority of stations however analysis of pre defined critical errors and omissions identified important areas for concern. Performance of newly qualified FY1 doctor was significantly better than other grades for the arterial blood gas estimation and nasogastric tube insertion stations. Delivering a formal classroom assessment of clinical competencies to all trainees as part of the induction process was both feasible and useful. The assessment identified areas of concern for future training and also served to reassure as to the proficiency of trainees in undertaking the majority of core competencies.

  8. Computer Usage and the Validity of Self-Assessed Computer Competence among First-Year Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantine, Joan A.; McCourt Larres, Patricia; Oyelere, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluates the reliability of self-assessment as a measure of computer competence. This evaluation is carried out in response to recent research which has employed self-reported ratings as the sole indicator of students' computer competence. To evaluate the reliability of self-assessed computer competence, the scores achieved by students…

  9. Assessing the Impact of the Competency Level on the Success of Companies’ Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Nikolayevna Rudenko

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The integration of companies is crucially important in the ongoing globalization processes. Companies must unify the material assets and optimize property. The integration of the company, incrementally, and competency development is also essential in order to expand the competitiveness of the company’s integrated structure. Identification and management of competencies are especially important for the enterprise structures, which carry out the integration processes. The level of competency development and the types of competencies may or may not be similar. The aim of this research is to specify and develop an organizational competency structure, which groups individual competencies of an organization into various segments based on their similarity. This research is relevant due to the need to systematize and streamline competencies in order to better identify them and develop a set of measures for their monitoring. The theoretical literature analysis allowed us to create a model that characterizes the assumed impact of the competencies on the successful integration of companies. Based on the data, we divided the organizational competencies into five major categories are. An empirical assessment of the impact of the competencies on the market success of the integration of enterprise structures is provided. This research indicates that the success of such integration is substantially determined by the formation and development of the competencies. The authors interviewed top managers of 225 medium and large-sized companies from all over the country were (the questionnaire was created by Rudenko M.N. The time lag is 5 years. Thereby, the results can be used in the process of regional policy formation.

  10. Assessing child and adolescent pragmatic language competencies: toward evidence-based assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Robert L; Grizzle, Kenneth L

    2008-06-01

    Using language appropriately and effectively in social contexts requires pragmatic language competencies (PLCs). Increasingly, deficits in PLCs are linked to child and adolescent disorders, including autism spectrum, externalizing, and internalizing disorders. As the role of PLCs expands in diagnosis and treatment of developmental psychopathology, psychologists and educators will need to appraise and select clinical and research PLC instruments for use in assessments and/or studies. To assist in this appraisal, 24 PLC instruments, containing 1,082 items, are assessed by addressing four questions: (1) Can PLC domains targeted by assessment items be reliably identified?, (2) What are the core PLC domains that emerge across the 24 instruments?, (3) Do PLC questionnaires and tests assess similar PLC domains?, and (4) Do the instruments achieve content, structural, diagnostic, and ecological validity? Results indicate that test and questionnaire items can be reliably categorized into PLC domains, that PLC domains featured in questionnaires and tests significantly differ, and that PLC instruments need empirical confirmation of their dimensional structure, content validity across all developmental age bands, and ecological validity. Progress in building a better evidence base for PLC assessments should be a priority in future research.

  11. An Inventory for Self-assessment of Teaching Competences as Foundation for Faculty Development Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Graaff, Erik; Kolmos, Anette

    . Based on experiences with the development of several faculty development programmes an instrument has been developed allowing professors to list their relevant teaching training and to assess their own teaching competences. As the instrument is based on the same grid as that of a teaching portfolio...... of the curriculum. In particular when a school wants to change to a new pedagogical methods the skills and commitment of the teaching staff are essential. In order to set up a programme for training pedagogical competences of teachers in higher education it is necessary to assess the present level of competences......, filling in the instrument could be seen as a first step in developing such a teaching portfolio. The presentation will describe the characteristics of the instrument and discuss how it can be used in the development of a didactic competences training programme....

  12. Assessing Capacity for Providing Culturally Competent Services to LGBT Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portz, Jennifer Dickman; Retrum, Jessica H.; Wright, Leslie A.; Boggs, Jennifer M.; Wilkins, Shari; Grimm, Cathy; Gilchrist, Kay; Gozansky, Wendolyn S.

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative, interview-based study assessed the cultural competence of health and social service providers to meet the needs of LGBT older adults in an urban neighborhood in Denver, Colorado, known to have a large LGBT community. Only 4 of the agencies were categorized as “high competency” while 12 were felt to be “seeking improvement” and 8 were considered “not aware.” These results indicate significant gaps in cultural competency for the majority of service providers. Social workers are well-suited to lead efforts directed at improving service provision and care competencies for the older LGBT community. PMID:24798180

  13. Assessment of student competency in a simulated speech-language pathology clinical placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Anne E; Davidson, Bronwyn J; McAllister, Sue; Wright, Judith; Theodoros, Deborah G

    2014-10-01

    Clinical education programs in speech-language pathology enable the transition of students' knowledge and skills from the classroom to the workplace. Simulated clinical learning experiences provide an opportunity to address the competency development of novice students. This study reports on the validation of an assessment tool designed to evaluate speech-language pathology students' performance in a simulated clinical placement. The Assessment of Foundation Clinical Skills (AFCS) was designed to link to concepts and content of COMPASS(®): Competency Assessment in Speech Pathology, a validated assessment of performance in the workplace. It incorporates units and elements of competency relevant to the placement. The validity of the AFCS was statistically investigated using Rasch analysis. Participants were 18 clinical educators and 130 speech-language pathology students undertaking the placement. Preliminary results support the validity of the AFCS as an assessment of foundation clinical skills of students in this simulated clinical placement. All units of competency and the majority of elements were relevant and representative of these skills. The use of a visual analogue scale which included a pre-Novice level to rate students' performance on units of competency was supported. This research provides guidance for development of quality assessments of performance in simulated placements.

  14. Implementation of a competency assessment tool for agency nurses working in an acute paediatric setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hennerby, Cathy

    2012-02-01

    AIM: This paper reports on the implementation of a competency assessment tool for registered general agency nurses working in an acute paediatric setting, using a change management framework. BACKGROUND: The increased number of registered general agency nurses working in an acute children\\'s hospital alerted concerns around their competency in working with children. These concerns were initially raised via informal complaints about \\'near misses\\

  15. Family Medicine Maternity Care Call to Action: Moving Toward National Standards for Training and Competency Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Susanna R; Eidson-Ton, W Suzanne; Leeman, Larry; Tuggy, Michael; Kim, Thomas O; Nothnagle, Melissa; Breuner, Joseph; Loafman, Mark

    2017-03-01

    Maternity care is an integral part of family medicine, and the quality and cost-effectiveness of maternity care provided by family physicians is well documented. Considering the population health perspective, increasing the number of family physicians competent to provide maternity care is imperative, as is working to overcome the barriers discouraging maternity care practice. A standard that clearly defines maternity care competency and a systematic set of tools to assess competency levels could help overcome these barriers. National discussions between 2012 and 2014 revealed that tools for competency assessment varied widely. These discussions resulted in the formation of a workgroup, culminating in a Family Medicine Maternity Care Summit in October 2014. This summit allowed for expert consensus to describe three scopes of maternity practice, draft procedural and competency assessment tools for each scope, and then revise the tools, guided by the Family Medicine and OB/GYN Milestones documents from the respective residency review committees. The summit group proposed that achievement of a specified number of procedures completed should not determine competency; instead, a standardized competency assessment should take place after a minimum number is performed. The traditionally held required numbers for core procedures were reassessed at the summit, and the resulting consensus opinion is proposed here. Several ways in which these evaluation tools can be disseminated and refined through the creation of a learning collaborative across residency programs is described. The summit group believed that standardization in training will more clearly define the competencies of family medicine maternity care providers and begin to reduce one of the barriers that may discourage family physicians from providing maternity care.

  16. Competency-based veterinary education: an integrative approach to learning and assessment in the clinical workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Harold G J

    2015-04-01

    When graduating from veterinary school, veterinary professionals must be ready to enter the complex veterinary profession. Therefore, one of the major responsibilities of any veterinary school is to develop training programmes that support students' competency development on the trajectory from novice student to veterinary professional. The integration of learning and assessment in the clinical workplace to foster this competency development in undergraduate veterinary education was the central topic of this thesis.

  17. Assessing Engineering Competencies: The Conditions for Educational Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musekamp, Frank; Pearce, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Low-stakes assessment is supposed to improve educational practice by providing feedback to different actors in educational systems. However, the process of assessment from design to the point of a final impact on student learning outcomes is complex and diverse. It is hard to identify reasons for substandard achievement on assessments, let alone…

  18. Competence Assessment Integrating Reflective Practice in a Professional Psychology Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Deborah; Virden, Tom; Hutchings, Philinda Smith; Bhargava, Ruchi

    2011-01-01

    The Midwestern University Clinical Psychology Program--Glendale Campus (MWU) created a Comprehensive Assessment Method in Psychology (CAMP) comprised of 35 different "tasks" of authentic work products representing a variety of assessment techniques based on pedagogical theory. Each task assesses one or more components of one of the program's five…

  19. Assessment of physician competency in patient education : Reliability and validity of a model-based instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouda, Jan C.; Zandbelt, Linda C.; Smets, Ellen M. A.; van de Wiel, Harry B. M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Establish the inter-rater reliability and the concept, convergent and construct validity of an instrument for assessing the competency of physicians in patient education. Methods: Three raters assessed the quality of patient education in 30 outpatient consultations with the CELI instrumen

  20. Aligning CASAS Competencies and Assessments to Basic Skills Content Standards. Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    CASAS - Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment Systems (NJ1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    Since its inception, the Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System (CASAS) has focused on teaching and assessing basic skills in contexts that are relevant and important to adult learners. CASAS has developed and continues to refine a highly formalized hierarchy of competencies, the application of basic skills that adults need to be fully…

  1. Assessment of Teacher Competence Using Video Portfolios: Reliability, Construct Validity, and Consequential Validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admiraal, Wilfried; Hoeksma, Mark; van de Kamp, Marie-Therese; van Duin, Gee

    2011-01-01

    The richness and complexity of video portfolios endanger both the reliability and validity of the assessment of teacher competencies. In a post-graduate teacher education program, the assessment of video portfolios was evaluated for its reliability, construct validity, and consequential validity. Although video portfolio facilitated a reliable and…

  2. Implementation of portfolio assessment of student competence in two dental school populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; McCracken, Michael S; Woldt, Janet L; Brennan, Robert

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the process and procedures involved in the implementation of portfolio assessment at two dental schools. Portfolios can be defined as a purposeful collection of student work that involves reflection in which students identify gaps in their knowledge and abilities and develop strategies for correcting those gaps. Framed within the current context of dental education and the calls for change in the ways dental students are taught and assessed, these two dental schools embarked upon an assessment strategy aimed at engaging students in self-directed learning and self-assessment. Where one school chose the implementation of programmatic portfolios based on all program competencies, the other school implemented portfolio assessment around specific program competencies not typically captured easily with traditional assessment measures such as ethics and ethical decision making. In a competency-based dental curriculum in which competence has been defined as the ability to accurately self-assess, it makes sense that strategies aimed at developing the skill of self-assessment should be the goal of every dental education program.

  3. Student Perceptions of Assessment and Student Self-Efficacy in Competence-Based Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dinther, Mart; Dochy, Filip; Segers, Mien; Braeken, Johan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide insight into the interplay between student perceptions of competence-based assessment and student self-efficacy, and how this influences student learning outcomes. Results reveal that student perceptions of the form authenticity aspect and the quality feedback aspect of assessment do predict student…

  4. Assessment of teacher competence using video portfolios: reliability, construct validity and consequential validity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Admiraal, W.; Hoeksma, M.; van de Kamp, M.-T.; van Duin, G.

    2011-01-01

    The richness and complexity of video portfolios endanger both the reliability and validity of the assessment of teacher competencies. In a post-graduate teacher education program, the assessment of video portfolios was evaluated for its reliability, construct validity, and consequential validity. Al

  5. Assessing Competencies in Couples and Family Therapy/Counseling: A Call to the Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perosa, Linda M.; Perosa, Sandra L.

    2010-01-01

    Psychometrically sound measures of family therapy competencies are necessary to assess the effectiveness of training on student performance. This article critiques the self-report and observer rating measures developed to date to assess the clinical skills of trainees in the individual and in the family therapy fields. Suggestions are made to…

  6. QTI for self-assessment and embeddedassessment in competence oriented scenarios: The Agora Case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, Patricia; Llobet, Wenceslao; Hernández-Leo, Davinia; Blat, Josep

    2009-01-01

    Santos, P., Llobet, W., Hernández-Leo, D., & Blat, J. (2009). QTI for self-assessment and embedded assessment in competence oriented scenarios: The Agora Case. Proceedings of the 2009 International Conference on Intelligent Networking and Collaborative Systems (pp. 39-45). November, 4-6, 2009, Barce

  7. Social Validity Assessment in Social Competence Interventions for Preschool Children: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Jennifer J.

    2012-01-01

    Social competence intervention studies published from 1970 to 2008 for preschoolers were reviewed for reports of social validity assessment. Analysis of 90 studies indicated that nearly 27% (n = 24) of studies reported at least one measure of social validity assessment for the goals (n = 7), procedures (n = 8), or effects (n = 19). The methods…

  8. Competencies That Count: Strategies for Assessing High-Performance Skills. LAB Working Paper No. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Lili

    This guide provides a "road map" to the various ways that schools and employers assess high-performance competencies, such as problem solving, information management, and communication and negotiation skills. The guide begins with a brief analysis of why it is important to assess these skills in light of the current standards environment…

  9. Facilitating evaluations of innovative, competence-based assessments: creating understanding and involving multiple stakeholders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gulikers, J.T.M.; Baartman, L.; Biemans, H.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Schools are held more responsible for evaluating, quality assuring and improving their student assessments. Teachers’ lack of understanding of new, competence-based assessments as well as the lack of key stakeholders’ involvement, hamper effective and efficient self-evaluations by teachers of innova

  10. [Civil competence assessment of the mental disorders involved in contract dispute].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qin-Ting; Pang, Yan-Xia; Cai, Wei-Xiong; Tang, Tao; Wang, Jian-Jun

    2009-04-01

    To search the criteria for evaluating the civil competence of the mental disorders involved in contract dispute. Data on the interviewee's mental status and the forensic expertise were collected retrospectively. And 6 indexes were selected and graded: awareness of situation, factual understanding of issues, appreciation of likely consequences, rational manipulation of information, functioning in one's own environment and communication of choice. All of the data were analyzed by SPSS. Fifty six cases were included and interviewee's civil competence was graded to three levels: full civil competence, diminished civil competence, and no civil competence. These cases included two types of contract: the real estate related contract (38 cases) and the labor related contract (14 cases). All of the 6 indexes were well correlated to the forensic expertise. The related coefficient was from 0.703 to 0.834, and the interrelated coefficient of the 6 items was also high, from 0.712 to 0.877. It is feasible to divide the civil competence of the mental disorders into three grades. As the basis, these 6 indexes mentioned above are representative and can be applied in further standardized and quantified assessment of civil competence.

  11. International survey of veterinarians to assess the importance of competencies in professional practice and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Harold G J; Teunissen, Pim W; Boerboom, Tobias B B; Rhind, Susan M; Baillie, Sarah; Tegzes, John; Annandale, Henry; Matthew, Susan; Torgersen, Anne; Hecker, Kent G; Härdi-Landerer, Christina M; Gomez-Lucia, Esperanza; Ahmad, Bashir; Muijtjens, Arno M M; Jaarsma, Debbie A D C; van der Vleuten, Cees P M; van Beukelen, Peter

    2014-10-15

    To determine the perceived importance of specific competencies in professional veterinary practice and education among veterinarians in several countries. Survey-based prospective study. 1,137 veterinarians in 10 countries. Veterinarians were invited via email to participate in the study. A framework of 18 competencies grouped into 7 domains (veterinary expertise, communication, collaboration, entrepreneurship, health and welfare, scholarship, and personal development) was used. Respondents rated the importance of each competency for veterinary professional practice and for veterinary education by use of a 9-point Likert scale in an online questionnaire. Quantitative statistical analyses were performed to assess the data. All described competencies were perceived as having importance (with overall mean ratings [all countries] ≥ 6.45/9) for professional practice and education. Competencies related to veterinary expertise had the highest ratings (overall mean, 8.33/9 for both professional practice and education). For the veterinary expertise, entrepreneurship, and scholarship domains, substantial differences (determined on the basis of statistical significance and effect size) were found in importance ratings among veterinarians in different countries. Results indicated a general consensus regarding the importance of specific types of competencies in veterinary professional practice and education. Further research into the definition of competencies essential for veterinary professionals is needed to help inform an international dialogue on the subject.

  12. Informal and Formal Means of Assessing Kindergarten Children's Communicative Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Janet K.

    Methods of assessing children's oral language ability are explored in this paper. Following a discussion of problems involved in the formal assessment of oral language ability, a study is described that revealed that the evaluation of the oral language of 12 kindergarten children in the social context of the natural classroom environment,…

  13. Developing a Competency-Based Assessment Approach for Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, Pamela T.

    2014-01-01

    Higher education accrediting bodies are increasing the emphasis on assessing student learning outcomes as opposed to teaching methodology. The purpose of this article is to describe the process used by Troy University's Master of Public Administration program to change their assessment approach from a course learning objective perspective to a…

  14. Training Needs Assessment for Leaders in Nursing Based on Comparison of Competency Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kvas Andreja

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: The main purpose behind the formation of leadership competency models must be the improvement of leadership. A competency model should serve as one of the tools for selecting the most suitable leaders, appraising their work, assessing training needs and preparing programmes of functional and formal education. The objective of this research is to assess the training needs of leaders in health care. A comparison of leadership competency models between different professional groups should serve as one of the tools with which to assess the training needs of various levels of leaders. Design/Methodology/Approach: A descriptive study using a survey design was conducted on 141 nurse leaders in Slovenia. Respondents indicated to what extent each of 95 different behaviours was characteristic of a person at their leadership level. Results: The most important competence dimensions (groups of behaviours for leaders in health care are (1 at the first - top leadership level: strategic thinking, openness to change and responsibility; (2 for leaders at the second - middle leadership level: relations with co-workers, animation, resistance to stress; and (3 for leaders at the third leadership level: realisation skills, execution of procedures, communication. Training needs assessments were done for three leadership levels in nursing care. Conclusions: The greatest need for training of nurse leaders can be observed at the third leadership level. Special training programmes should be organised in the competency areas of realisation skills, execution of procedures, communication, education and ethics

  15. Using Competencies to Assess Entry-Level Knowledge of Students Graduating from Parks and Recreation Academic Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, Amy R.; Elkins, Daniel J.; Beggs, Brent A.

    2014-01-01

    To address the Council on Accreditation of Parks, Recreation, Tourism, and Related Professions accreditation standard 7.01.01, the Entry Level Competency Assessment was developed to measure 46 competencies in four categories needed by entry level professionals. Students rated their competence prior to beginning their senior internship. The results…

  16. Non satis scire : To know is not enough e-assessment of student-teachers' competence as new teachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Admiraal, Wilfried; Janssen, Tanja; Huizenga, Jantina; Kranenburg, Frans; Taconis, Ruurd; Corda, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    In teacher education programmes, text-based portfolios are generally used to assess student-teachers' competence as new teachers. However, striking discrepancies are known to exist between the competencies reflected in a written portfolio and the competencies observed in actual classroom practice. M

  17. The Design Model of Multilevel Estimation Means for Students’ Competence Assessment at Technical Higher School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. F. Shikhova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the research findings aimed at the developing the new quality testing technique for students assessment at Technical Higher School. The model of multilevel estimation means is provided for diagnosing the level of general cultural and professional competences of students doing a bachelor degree in technological fields. The model implies the integrative character of specialists training - the combination of both the psycho-pedagogic (invariable and engineering (variable components, as well as the qualimetric approach substantiating the system of students competence estimation and providing the most adequate assessment means. The principles of designing the multilevel estimation means are defined along with the methodology approaches to their implementation. For the reasonable selection of estimation means, the system of quality criteria is proposed by the authors, being based on the group expert assessment. The research findings can be used for designing the competence-oriented estimation means. 

  18. Development and Psychometric Assessment of the Healthcare Provider Cultural Competence Instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua L. Schwarz PhD

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the measurement properties of 5 scales used in the Healthcare Provider Cultural Competence Instrument (HPCCI. The HPCCI measures a health care provider’s cultural competence along 5 primary dimensions: (1 awareness/sensitivity, (2 behaviors, (3 patient-centered communication, (4 practice orientation, and (5 self-assessment. Exploratory factor analysis demonstrated that the 5 scales were distinct, and within each scale items loaded as expected. Reliability statistics indicated a high level of internal consistency within each scale. The results indicate that the HPCCI effectively measures the cultural competence of health care providers and can provide useful professional feedback for practitioners and organizations seeking to increase a practitioner’s cultural competence.

  19. Assessment of knowledge and competencies related to implant dentistry in undergraduate and postgraduate university education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattheos, N; Ucer, C; Van de Velde, T; Nattestad, A

    2009-02-01

    Learning in academic settings is strongly related to the way the students are tested or examined. Assessment therefore must be integrated in the curriculum design, coordinated and should reflect the learning outcomes of the education. Assessment within the field of implant dentistry must fulfil four major objectives: complete and direct the learning process with feedback (formative), ensure that students are adequately prepared (summative), assess attitudes and skills such as critical thinking, reflection and self-assessment ability, and supply continuous feedback to teachers on curricular content and impact. Different assessment methods should be used to assess different levels of competencies throughout the curriculum. Various forms of written or oral assessment methodologies are applicable at earlier stages in the curriculum. At intermediate levels, interactive assessment methods, such as patient simulations (paper based or virtual) and more could encourage the necessary synthesis of several disciplines and aspects of the theoretical knowledge. At higher levels of competence, documentation of clinical proficiency by means of reflective portfolios and diaries is an appropriate assessment method with both formative and summative potential. The highest level of competence requires performance assessment using structured, objective, clinical criteria. The group strongly encourages the use of reflective forms of assessment methods which engage the students in a process of self-appraisal, identification of individual learning needs and self-directed learning. The ultimate goal of this would be to allow the student to develop a lifelong learning attitude.

  20. Improvement of communication and interpersonal competence in telenursing--development of a self-assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christina; Wilhelmsson, Susan; Börjeson, Sussanne; Lindberg, Malou

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a self-assessment tool aiming to raise telenurses' awareness of their communication and interpersonal competence, and highlight areas in need of improvement. Several studies have revealed the need for development of communication competence in telenursing. Structured analyses of conversations with patients/callers, is one way to increase telenurses' awareness of their unique communication and interpersonal competence. Instrument development, Validation assessment using the method Content Validity Index. The process to determine content validity was done in two stages; the development stage and the assessment stage. The development stage started with a literature search. The assessment stage was separated into two phases, assessment by an expert group and assessment and test by telenurses. The telenurses also participated in consensus discussions. A telenursing self-assessment tool with 58 items was developed. The items were sorted into five sections according to the nursing process. This study describes the thorough development process of the telenursing self-assessment tool to be used by telenurses in order to become aware of their unique communication and interpersonal competence when analysing their own conversations with patients/callers. As a formative tool it is meant to provide self-direction, feedback and coaching, and create learning opportunities. The self-assessment tool helps the telenurse to follow the nursing process, to be patient-centred, and it is meant to provide self-direction, feedback, and coaching, as well as create learning opportunities. The tool can contribute to the development of communication and interpersonal competence in telephone advice nursing. Further development of the tool may provide an objective scoring instrument for evaluating communication training and education in the field. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Development of a self-assessment tool for measuring competences of obstetric nurses in rooming-in wards in China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ju; Ye, Wenqin; Fan, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: To provide high-quality nursing care, a reliable and feasible competency assessment tool is critical. Although several questionnaire-based competency assessment tools have been reported, a tool specific for obstetric nurses in rooming-in wards is lacking. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to develop a competency assessment tool for obstetric rooming-in ward nurses. Methods: A literature review was conducted to create an individual intensive interview with 14 nurse manag...

  2. The Impact of Elaborated Feedback on Competency Assessment of IT Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Alexandra TOADER

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Feedback represents an important component in the process of assessing the competencies of the IT professionals as it allows to evaluate their performance and helps their managers to personalize the learning content according to employees’ needs and profiles. In the current paper we propose a computer-based formative feedback framework that provides personalized feedback for the technical employees. Extensive research has been carried out focusing on formative assessment aspects that includes the elaborate feedback. An online competency assessment tool was designed and it is going to be implemented in order to measure the professionals’ performance in software organizations. The subjects of the study are going to be software developers, working in departments of IT Romanian companies. Their performance is going to be evaluated through the competency-based assessment tool. At the end of the assessment process, an elaborate feedback is provided in order to improve their current level of competency acquired. The current paper reveals the role of the computer-based formative assessment within software organizations as well as the importance of an elaborate feedback that can improve the employees’ knowledge and skills.

  3. Radiology education. The evaluation and assessment of clinical competence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hibbert, Kathryn M.; Van Deven, Teresa [The Univ. of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada). Dept. of Medical Imaging; Chhem, Rethy K. [Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiology; Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). Atomic Bomb Disease Inst.; Wang, Shih-chang (eds.) [Univ. of Sydney Westmead Hospital (Australia). Dept. of Radiology; Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists, Sydney (Australia). Faculty of Radiodiagnosis

    2012-11-01

    Third volume of a trilogy devoted to radiology education and improvement of medical imaging students' learning, teaching, and scholarship. Reviews the philosophies, theories, and principles that underpin assessment and evaluation in radiology education. Includes a series of rich case studies. Written by an international group of experienced educators and medical professionals. This book reviews the philosophies, theories, and principles that underpin assessment and evaluation in radiology education, highlighting emerging practices and work done in the field. The sometimes conflicting assessment and evaluation needs of accreditation bodies, academic programs, trainees, and patients are carefully considered. The final section of the book examines assessment and evaluation in practice, through the development of rich case studies reflecting the implementation of a variety of approaches. This is the third book in a trilogy devoted to the scholarship of radiology education and is the culmination of an important initiative to improve medical imaging students' learning, teaching, and scholarship by bringing together experienced educators and medical professionals. The previous two books focused on the culture and the learning organizations in which our future radiologists are educated and on the application of educational principles in the education of radiologists. Here, the trilogy comes full circle: attending to the assessment and evaluation of the education of its members has much to offer back to the learning of the organization.

  4. Developing and Testing the Short-Form Knowledge, Efficacy, and Practices Instrument for Assessing Cultural Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvan, Gerard J; Garvan, Cynthia W; Behar-Horenstein, Linda S

    2016-10-01

    The importance of educating dental students in cultural competence has been widely emphasized, but there is a need to assess cultural competence in a consistent and reliable way. The aims of this study were to determine latent constructs for the initial measure of cultural competence for oral health providers, the Knowledge, Efficacy, and Practices Instrument (KEPI), and to determine how well these factors related to previously identified latent constructs. Data were collected in surveys of dental students and from dental hygiene, dental assisting, and dental faculty members in 44 academic dental institutions from 2012 to 2015. There were a total of 1,786 respondents to the surveys; response rates to individual surveys ranged from 35% to 100%. There were 982 (55%) female and 804 (45%) male respondents, 286 (16%) underrepresented minority (URM) and 1,500 (84%) non-URM respondents, and 339 (19%) faculty and 1,447 (81%) student respondents. Three latent constructs were identified. Female respondents scored significantly higher on the culture-centered practice and efficacy of assessment factors, while URM respondents had significantly higher scores on all three of the KEPI factors. Measurements indicated that the long-form KEPI could be shortened by ten questions and still have three meaningful measurements. Continued research in assessing other health care providers' cultural competence is needed to expand the KEPI to measure providers' cultural competence with patients with minority sexual orientation and gender identity issues and those with physical disabilities, mental illness, and autism to advance patient-centric communication.

  5. An exploratory study of an assessment tool derived from the competencies of the interprofessional education collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Alan W; DiazGranados, Deborah; Mazmanian, Paul E; Retchin, Sheldon M

    2014-07-01

    Linking the outcomes from interprofessional education to improvements in patient care has been hampered by educational assessments that primarily measure the short-term benefits of specific curricular interventions. Competencies, recently published by the Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC), elaborate overarching goals for interprofessional education by specifying desired outcomes for graduating health professions students. The competencies define a transition point between the prescribed and structured educational experience of a professional degree program and the more self-directed, patient-oriented learning associated with professional practice. Drawing on the IPEC competencies for validity, we created a 42-item questionnaire to assess outcomes related to collaborative practice at the degree program level. To establish the usability and psychometric properties of the questionnaire, it was administered to all the students on a health science campus at a large urban university in the mid-Atlantic of the United States. The student responses (n = 481) defined four components aligned in part with the four domains of the IPEC competencies. In addition, the results demonstrated differences in scores by domain that can be used to structure future curricula. These findings suggest a questionnaire based on the IPEC competencies might provide a measure to assess programmatic outcomes related to interprofessional education. We discuss directions for future research, such as a comparison of results within and between institutions, and how these results could provide valuable insights about the effect of different curricular approaches to interprofessional education and the success of various educational programs at preparing students for collaborative practice.

  6. Core competency requirements among extension workers in peninsular Malaysia: Use of Borich's needs assessment model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Sulaiman; Man, Norsida; Nawi, Nolila Mohd; Latif, Ismail Abd; Samah, Bahaman Abu

    2017-06-01

    The study described the perceived importance of, and proficiency in core agricultural extension competencies among extension workers in Peninsular Malaysia; and evaluating the resultant deficits in the competencies. The Borich's Needs Assessment Model was used to achieve the objectives of the study. A sample of 298 respondents was randomly selected and interviewed using a pre-tested structured questionnaire. Thirty-three core competency items were assessed. Instrument validity and reliability were ensured. The cross-sectional data obtained was analysed using SPSS for descriptive statistics including mean weighted discrepancy score (MWDS). Results of the study showed that on a scale of 5, the most important core extension competency items according to respondents' perception were: "Making good use of information and communication technologies/access and use of web-based resources" (M=4.86, SD=0.23); "Conducting needs assessments" (M=4.84, SD=0.16); "organizing extension campaigns" (M=4.82, SD=0.47) and "Managing groups and teamwork" (M=4.81, SD=0.76). In terms of proficiency, the highest competency identified by the respondents was "Conducting farm and home visits (M=3.62, SD=0.82) followed by 'conducting meetings effectively' (M=3.19, SD=0.72); "Conducting focus group discussions" (M=3.16, SD=0.32) and "conducting community forums" (M=3.13, SD=0.64). The discrepancies implying competency deficits were widest in "Acquiring and allocating resources" (MWDS=12.67); use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) and web-based resources in agricultural extension (MWDS=12.59); and report writing and sharing the results and impacts (MWDS=11.92). It is recommended that any intervention aimed at developing the capacity of extension workers in Peninsular Malaysia should prioritize these core competency items in accordance with the deficits established in this study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Tools to Assess Behavioral and Social Science Competencies in Medical Education: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Patricia A.; Palmer, Ryan T.; Miller, Marissa Fuqua; Thayer, Erin K.; Estroff, Sue E.; Litzelman, Debra K.; Biagioli, Frances E.; Teal, Cayla R.; Lambros, Ann; Hatt, William J.; Satterfield, Jason M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Behavioral and social science (BSS) competencies are needed to provide quality health care, but psychometrically validated measures to assess these competencies are difficult to find. Moreover, they have not been mapped to existing frameworks, like those from the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). This systematic review aimed to identify and evaluate the quality of assessment tools used to measure BSS competencies. Method The authors searched the literature published between January 2002 and March 2014 for articles reporting psychometric or other validity/reliability testing, using OVID, CINAHL, PubMed, ERIC, Research and Development Resource Base, SOCIOFILE, and PsycINFO. They reviewed 5,104 potentially relevant titles and abstracts. To guide their review, they mapped BSS competencies to existing LCME and ACGME frameworks. The final, included articles fell into three categories: instrument development, which were of the highest quality; educational research, which were of the second highest quality; and curriculum evaluation, which were of lower quality. Results Of the 114 included articles, 33 (29%) yielded strong evidence supporting tools to assess communication skills, cultural competence, empathy/compassion, behavioral health counseling, professionalism, and teamwork. Sixty-two (54%) articles yielded moderate evidence and 19 (17%) weak evidence. Articles mapped to all LCME standards and ACGME core competencies; the most common was communication skills. Conclusions These findings serve as a valuable resource for medical educators and researchers. More rigorous measurement validation and testing and more robust study designs are needed to understand how educational strategies contribute to BSS competency development. PMID:26796091

  8. Psychometric properties of virtual reality vignette performance measures: a novel approach for assessing adolescents' social competency skills

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paschall, Mallie J; Fishbein, Diana H; Hubal, Robert C; Eldreth, Diana

    This study examined the psychometric properties of performance measures for three novel, interactive virtual reality vignette exercises developed to assess social competency skills of at-risk adolescents...

  9. Student Teachers' Appraisal of the Importance of Assessment in Teacher Education and Self-Reports on the Development of Assessment Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Christoph; Bodensohn, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Competence in assessment has been identified as a key feature in teachers' professional success. However, assessment competence is a complex field, comprising capacity in both summative and formative assessment. Hence, a detailed view on how student teachers perceive assessment is the focus of this study. Based on an official catalogue of…

  10. Counselor Competence, Performance Assessment, and Program Evaluation: Using Psychometric Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Kevin A.; Bloom, Margaret L.; Tassara, Marcel H.; Caperton, William

    2014-01-01

    Psychometric instruments have been underutilized by counselor educators in performance assessment and program evaluation efforts. As such, we conducted a review of the literature that revealed 41 instruments fit for such efforts. We described and critiqued these instruments along four dimensions--"Target Domain," "Format,"…

  11. Counselor Competence, Performance Assessment, and Program Evaluation: Using Psychometric Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Kevin A.; Bloom, Margaret L.; Tassara, Marcel H.; Caperton, William

    2014-01-01

    Psychometric instruments have been underutilized by counselor educators in performance assessment and program evaluation efforts. As such, we conducted a review of the literature that revealed 41 instruments fit for such efforts. We described and critiqued these instruments along four dimensions--"Target Domain," "Format,"…

  12. Assessing competence: The European survey on aging protocol (ESAP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez-Ballesteros, R.; Zamarron, M.D.; Rudinger, G.; Schroots, J.J.F.

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: The main goal of this research project was to translate and adapt the European Survey on Ageing Protocol (ESAP) to 7 European countries/cultures. This article presents preliminary results from the ESAP, the basic assessment instrument of EXCELSA (European Longitudinal Study of Aging). Me

  13. Using Hybrid Assessments to Develop Civic Competency in History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, Lamont E.; Saye, John W.

    2017-01-01

    This article addresses the problem of how to best design authentic writing assessments in history that support learners in demonstrating the types of higher order thinking skills needed for effective citizenship. Recent research has primarily focused on curriculum interventions intended to build disciplinary literacies through various types of…

  14. Assessing competence: The European survey on aging protocol (ESAP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez-Ballesteros, R.; Zamarron, M.D.; Rudinger, G.; Schroots, J.J.F.

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: The main goal of this research project was to translate and adapt the European Survey on Ageing Protocol (ESAP) to 7 European countries/cultures. This article presents preliminary results from the ESAP, the basic assessment instrument of EXCELSA (European Longitudinal Study of Aging). Me

  15. Competence in Teaching Mindfulness-Based Courses: Concepts, Development and Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Rebecca S; Kuyken, Willem; Williams, J Mark G; Hastings, Richard P; Cooper, Lucinda; Fennell, Melanie J V

    2012-03-01

    There has been a groundswell of interest in the UK in Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and its derivatives, particularly Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT). Many health, education and social work practitioners have sought ways to develop their competencies as mindfulness-based teachers, and increasing numbers of organisations are developing mindfulness-based training programmes. However, the rapid expansion of interest in mindfulness-based approaches has meant that those people offering training for MBSR and MBCT teachers have had to consider some quite fundamental questions about training processes, standards and competence. They also need to consider how to develop a robust professional context for the next generation of mindfulness-based teachers. The ways in which competencies are addressed in the secular mainstream contexts in which MBSR and MBCT are taught are examined to enable a consideration of the particularities of mindfulness-based teaching competence. A framework suggesting how competencies develop in trainees is presented. The current status of methodologies for assessing competencies used in mindfulness-based training and research programmes is reviewed. We argue that the time is ripe to continue to develop these dialogues across the international community of mindfulness-based trainers and teachers.

  16. Newly graduated doctors' competence in managing cardiopulmonary arrests assessed using a standardized Advanced Life Support (ALS) assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Marianne Lidang; Hesselfeldt, R.; Rasmussen, M.B.

    2008-01-01

    and to study whether teaching site affects their resuscitation competence. Materials and methods: The entire cohort of medical students from Copenhagen University expected to graduate in June 2006 was invited to participate in the study. Participants’ ALS- competence was assessed using the Advanced Life...... Support Provider (ALS) examination standards as issued by the European Resuscitation Council (ERC). The emergency medicine course is con- ducted at three different university hospital teaching sites and teaching and assessment might vary across sites, despite the common end objectives regarding...... resuscitation teaching issued by the university. Results: Participation was accepted by 154/240 (64%) graduates. Only 23% of the participants met the ALS pass criteria. They primarily lacked skills in managing cardiopulmonary arrest. There were significant differences in ALS-competence between teaching sites....

  17. Implementation of a competency assessment tool for agency nurses working in an acute paediatric setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennerby, Cathy; Joyce, Pauline

    2011-03-01

    This paper reports on the implementation of a competency assessment tool for registered general agency nurses working in an acute paediatric setting, using a change management framework. The increased number of registered general agency nurses working in an acute children's hospital alerted concerns around their competency in working with children. These concerns were initially raised via informal complaints about 'near misses', parental dissatisfaction, perceived competency weaknesses and rising cost associated with their use. [Young's (2009) Journal of Organisational Change, 22, 524-548] nine-stage change framework was used to guide the implementation of the competency assessment tool within a paediatric acute care setting. The ongoing success of the initiative, from a nurse manager's perspective, relies on structured communication with the agency provider before employing competent agency nurses. Sustainability of the change will depend on nurse managers' persistence in attending the concerns of those resisting the change while simultaneously supporting those championing the change. These key communication and supporting roles highlight the pivotal role held by nurse managers, as gate keepers, in safe-guarding children while in hospital. Leadership qualities of nurse managers will also be challenged in continuing to manage and drive the change where resistance might prevail. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. ASSESSING STUDENTS’ COMPETENCE IN DEVELOPING CHOROPLETH MAPS COMBINED WITH DIAGRAM MAPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GABRIELA OSACI-COSTACHE

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Choropleth maps combined with diagram maps are frequently used in geography. For this reason, based on the maps developed by students, the study aims at the following: identifying and analyzing the errors made by the students; establishing and analyzing the competence level of the students; identifying the causes that led to these errors; and finding the best solutions to improve both the educational process aiming at the formation of this kind of competences and the students’ results. The map assessment was accomplished during two academic years (2013-2014 and 2014-2015, in the aftermath of the activities meant to train the competence. We assessed 105 maps prepared by the students in Cartography (Faculty of Geography, University of Bucharest based on an analytical evaluation grid, with dichotomous scale, comprising 15 criteria. This tool helped us identify the errors made by the students, as well as their competence level. By applying a questionnaire, we identified the source of the errors from the students’ perspective, while by comparing the errors and the competence levels at the end of the two academic years we were able to come up with potential solutions for the improvement of the teaching and learning process.

  19. Automatic and unbiased assessment of competence in colonoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Louise; Svendsen, Morten Bo Søndergaard; Søndergaard, Bo

    2016-01-01

    . The Generalizability coefficient (G-coefficient) was 0.80, and a Decision-study (D-study) revealed that four recordings were sufficient to ensure a G-coefficient above 0.80. We showed a positive correlation between CoPS and experience with Pearson's r of 0.61 (P ... is the first clinical descriptive report of a novel colonoscopy assessment tool based on Magnetic Endoscopic Imaging (MEI) data and the aim was to gather validity evidence based on the data collected using the "Colonoscopy Progression Score" (CoPS). Methods: We recorded 137 colonoscopy procedures performed...

  20. Combining different methods improves assessment of competence in colonoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konge, Lars; Svendsen, Morten Bo Søndergaard; Preisler, Louise

    2017-01-01

    score calculations were used to explore different combinations of the measures. RESULTS: Twenty physicians were included in the study. The reliability (Cronbach's alpha) were 0.92, 0.57, 0.87 and 0.55 for the subjective score assessed under direct observation, time to cecum, distance between operator......'s hands and colonoscopy progression score, respectively. Equal weight (=25%) to all four methods resulted in a reliability of 0.91 and optimal weighting of the methods (55%, 10%, 25% and 10%, respectively) resulted in a maximum reliability of 0.95. CONCLUSION: Combining subjective expert ratings...

  1. Assessing children’s competence to consent in research by a standardized tool: a validity study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hein Irma M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently over 50% of drugs prescribed to children have not been evaluated properly for use in their age group. One key reason why children have been excluded from clinical trials is that they are not considered able to exercise meaningful autonomy over the decision to participate. Dutch law states that competence to consent can be presumed present at the age of 12 and above; however, in pediatric practice children’s competence is not that clearly presented and the transition from assent to active consent is gradual. A gold standard for competence assessment in children does not exist. In this article we describe a study protocol on the development of a standardized tool for assessing competence to consent in research in children and adolescents. Methods/design In this study we modified the MacCAT-CR, the best evaluated competence assessment tool for adults, for use in children and adolescents. We will administer the tool prospectively to a cohort of pediatric patients from 6 to18 years during the selection stages of ongoing clinical trials. The outcomes of the MacCAT-CR interviews will be compared to a reference standard, established by the judgments of clinical investigators, and an expert panel consisting of child psychiatrists, child psychologists and medical ethicists. The reliability, criterion-related validity and reproducibility of the tool will be determined. As MacCAT-CR is a multi-item scale consisting of 13 items, power was justified at 130–190 subjects, providing a minimum of 10–15 observations per item. MacCAT-CR outcomes will be correlated with age, life experience, IQ, ethnicity, socio-economic status and competence judgment of the parent(s. It is anticipated that 160 participants will be recruited over 2 years to complete enrollment. Discussion A validity study on an assessment tool of competence to consent is strongly needed in research practice, particularly in the child and adolescent population. In

  2. Student perceptions of assessment and student self-efficacy in competence-based education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dinther, van M.; Dochy, F.; Segers, M.; Braeken, J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide insight into the interplay between student perceptions of competence-based assessment and student self-efficacy, and how this influences student learning outcomes. Results reveal that student perceptions of the form authenticity aspect and the quality feedbac

  3. Making Intercultural Communicative Competence and Identity-Development Visible for Assessment Purposes in Foreign Language Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Stephanie Ann

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on an action research case study conducted at a university in Japan, which explored how student identity-development can be made visible in potentially assessable ways through materials design in intercultural communicative competence (ICC)-oriented foreign language education. It suggests that identity-development can be…

  4. Personal Constructs in Rehabilitation Counseling: Empirically Derived Dimensions for Competence Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scofield, Michael E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Identified six dimensions of personal constructs related to rehabilitation counseling as the first part of an investigation into how these variables influence clinical problem solving. Findings have implications for competence assessment research, definition of the affective domain in rehabilitation counseling, and identification of its unique…

  5. Methods and Problems of Pre- and Post-Communication Competency Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Gustav W.

    This paper suggests guidelines designed for use by speech communication teachers in assessing the competency of their students. The author proposes four kinds of evaluation of cognitive, affective, and psychomotor learning (three types of learning essential for the speech communication classroom): placement, formative, diagnostic, and summative.…

  6. Emotional Competencies in Geriatric Nursing: Empirical Evidence from a Computer Based Large Scale Assessment Calibration Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, Roman; Hartig, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The care of older people was described as involving substantial emotion-related affordances. Scholars in vocational training and nursing disagree whether emotion-related skills could be conceptualized and assessed as a professional competence. Studies on emotion work and empathy regularly neglect the multidimensionality of these phenomena and…

  7. Workplace-Based Competence Measurement: Developing Innovative Assessment Systems for Tomorrow's VET Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achtenhagen, Frank; Winther, Esther

    2014-01-01

    As a consequence of the large-scale assessment studies (TIMMS; PISA) in compulsory schooling, attention is now being given to the modelling and measurement of competencies in initial vocational education and training. This new output-led perspective of teaching/training and learning/working processes demands new approaches to research. Using the…

  8. Theoretical and Practical Advances in the Assessment of Cross-Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    region-specific knowledge; (3) attitudinal and motivational dispositions such as ethnocentrism , interest in culture, and motivation to learn; and (4...behavioral competencies is the classic assessment center, this method is costly and time consuming . By including antecedent measurement in the mix

  9. Refining a self-assessment of informatics competency scale using Mokken scaling analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sunmoo; Shaffer, Jonathan A; Bakken, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare environments are increasingly implementing health information technology (HIT) and those from various professions must be competent to use HIT in meaningful ways. In addition, HIT has been shown to enable interprofessional approaches to health care. The purpose of this article is to describe the refinement of the Self-Assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies Scale (SANICS) using analytic techniques based upon item response theory (IRT) and discuss its relevance to interprofessional education and practice. In a sample of 604 nursing students, the 93-item version of SANICS was examined using non-parametric IRT. The iterative modeling procedure included 31 steps comprising: (1) assessing scalability, (2) assessing monotonicity, (3) assessing invariant item ordering, and (4) expert input. SANICS was reduced to an 18-item hierarchical scale with excellent reliability. Fundamental skills for team functioning and shared decision making among team members (e.g. "using monitoring systems appropriately," "describing general systems to support clinical care") had the highest level of difficulty, and "demonstrating basic technology skills" had the lowest difficulty level. Most items reflect informatics competencies relevant to all health professionals. Further, the approaches can be applied to construct a new hierarchical scale or refine an existing scale related to informatics attitudes or competencies for various health professions.

  10. Validation of Assessment Vignettes and Scoring Rubric of Multicultural and International Competency in Faculty Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Sheila J.; Horton, Ruth A.; Saito, Paul K.; Shorter-Gooden, Kumea

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a new tool for assessing multicultural and international competency in faculty teaching through vignette scenarios of university classroom critical incidents--across disciplines of clinical and forensics psychology, business, and education. Construct and content validity of the initial draft vignettes…

  11. QTI for self-assessment and embeddedassessment in competence oriented scenarios: The Agora Case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, Patricia; Llobet, Wenceslao; Hernández-Leo, Davinia; Blat, Josep

    2009-01-01

    Santos, P., Llobet, W., Hernández-Leo, D., & Blat J. (2009). QTI for self-assessment and embeddedassessment in competence oriented scenarios: The Agora Case. Proceedings of the International Conference on Intelligent Networking and Collaborative Systems (INCoS 2009). November, 4-6, 2009, Barcelona,

  12. Implementation of Portfolio Assessment in a Competency-based Dental Hygiene Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C.; Holt, Lorie P.; Overman, Pamela R.; Schmidt, Colleen R.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the implementation of a portfolio assessment program in the dental hygiene program at the University of Missouri School of Dentistry. Tables provide examples of program competencies and related portfolio entries, the complete scoring rubric for portfolios, and the student portfolio evaluation survey. Concludes that although portfolio…

  13. Student perceptions of assessment and student self-efficacy in competence-based education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dinther, van M.; Dochy, F.; Segers, M.; Braeken, J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide insight into the interplay between student perceptions of competence-based assessment and student self-efficacy, and how this influences student learning outcomes. Results reveal that student perceptions of the form authenticity aspect and the quality feedbac

  14. [Progress in standard assessment on competency to stand trial of mentally disordered offenders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Bing; Cai, Wei-Xiong

    2012-08-01

    Competency to stand trial relates directly to legal rights of the appraised individual as well as whether criminal procedure can be carried out smoothly. Foreign scholars have conducted a large number of theoretical researches, and developed a series of standardized evaluation tools. However, the assessment on competency to stand trial has mainly focused on medical criteria in China for a long time, and most cases were judged by forensic psychiatrists' experience. Recently, Chinese scholars have started the initial research on standardized evaluation. This paper reviews the notion of competency to stand trial, the evaluation criteria, and the assessment tools domestically and abroad. The main focus is on foreign assessment tools, which included three categories. First category includes checklist, self-report questionnaires and sentence-completion tasks. Second category is the interview-based instruments without criterion-based scoring. Last category is the interview-based instruments with criterion-based scoring. This literature may be helpful for further research and standardization on assessment tools of competency to stand trial of mentally disordered offenders.

  15. Assessing Students' Emotional Competence in Higher Education: Development and Validation of the Widener Emotional Learning Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Young, Thomas; Wilhite, Stephen C.; Marczyk, Geoffrey

    2011-01-01

    This article reports the development and validation studies of the Widener Emotional Learning Scale (WELS), a self-report measure, for assessing students' social and emotional competence in higher education. Conceptual specifications, item development, psychometric properties, and factor structure of the instrument are reported in the article. The…

  16. Assessing Motor Skill Competency in Elementary School Students: A Three-Year Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiyun Chen, Steve Mason, Andrew Hypnar, Austin Bennett

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was to examine how well fourth- and fifth-grade students demonstrated motor skill competency assessed with selected PE Metrics assessment rubrics (2009. Fourth- and fifth-grade students (n = 1,346-1,926 were assessed on their performance of three manipulative skills using the PE Metrics Assessment Rubrics during the pre-intervention year, the post-intervention year 1, and the post-intervention year 3. Descriptive statistics, independent t-test, ANOVA, and follow-up comparisons were conducted for data analysis. The results indicated that the post-intervention year 2 cohort performed significantly more competent than the pre-intervention cohort and the post-intervention year 1 cohort on the three manipulative skill assessments. The post-intervention year 1 cohort significantly outperformed the pre-intervention cohort on the soccer dribbling, passing, and receiving and the striking skill assessments, but not on the throwing skill assessment. Although the boys in the three cohorts performed significantly better than the girls on all three skills, the girls showed substantial improvement on the overhand throwing and the soccer skills from baseline to the post-intervention year 1 and the post-intervention year 2. However, the girls, in particular, need to improve striking skill. The CTACH PE was conducive to improving fourth- and fifth-grade students’ motor skill competency in the three manipulative skills. This study suggest that PE Metrics assessment rubrics are feasible tools for PE teachers to assess levels of students’ demonstration of motor skill competency during a regular PE lesson.

  17. Peer and Self-Assessment of Teamwork Collaboration Competencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maribo, Peder

    2015-01-01

    The ability to collaborate in teams is a central learning objective in a course for students enrolled in the elective 6th semester Civil Engineering Program. Therefore, methods for project management and team collaboration were facilitated through a designated course. The teamwork collaboration...... an Agreement of Collaboration (AC) for the project, including listing of values, norms and rules defining their mutual understanding of good teamwork behavior. The AC was discussed with the supervisors and finally signed by each member of the team. At the completion of the project period each team member...... to themselves than the average grade they received from their team mates. There was only a little difference in team mates’ grading of a given fellow team mate. Students expressed that the work with the AC was useful for the teamwork process, and that the peer assessment process had a positive effect...

  18. Peer and Self-Assessment of Teamwork Collaboration Competencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maribo, Peder

    2015-01-01

    The ability to collaborate in teams is a central learning objective in a course for students enrolled in the elective 6th semester Civil Engineering Program. Therefore, methods for project management and team collaboration were facilitated through a designated course. The teamwork collaboration...... an Agreement of Collaboration (AC) for the project, including listing of values, norms and rules defining their mutual understanding of good teamwork behavior. The AC was discussed with the supervisors and finally signed by each member of the team. At the completion of the project period each team member...... to themselves than the average grade they received from their team mates. There was only a little difference in team mates’ grading of a given fellow team mate. Students expressed that the work with the AC was useful for the teamwork process, and that the peer assessment process had a positive effect...

  19. Assessment of Advanced Life Support competence when combining different test methods--reliability and validity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringsted, C; Lippert, F; Hesselfeldt, R

    2007-01-01

    Summary Robust assessment of Advanced Life Support (ALS) competence is paramount to the credibility of ALS-provider certification and for estimating the learning outcome and retention of ALS competence following the courses. The Euro- pean Resuscitation Council (ERC) provides two sets of MCQs and...... Correlation Coefficients between 0.766 and 0.977. Inter-rater agreements on pass/fail decisions were not perfect. The one MCQ test was significantly more difficult than the other. There were no significant differences between CASTests....

  20. Development of scales to assess patients' perception of physicians' cultural competence in health care interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Rukhsana; Bates, Benjamin R

    2012-07-01

    This study describes the development of scales to measure patients' perception of physicians' cultural competence in health care interactions and thus contributes to promoting awareness of physician-patient intercultural interaction processes. Surveys were administrated to a total of 682 participants. Exploratory factor analyses were employed to assess emergent scales and subscales to develop reliable instruments. The first two phases were devoted to formative research and pilot study. The third phase was devoted to scale development, which resulted in a five-factor solution to measure patient perception of physicians' cultural competence for patient satisfaction.

  1. The Range of the Availability and Practice of Authentic Assessment Competencies for Intermediate Stage Teachers in Sharurah Governorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Shehri, Mohammad; Otoum, Abedalqader; AL-Magableh, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the range of the availability and practice of authentic assessment competencies for intermediate stage teachers in Sharurah governorate, and to know the effect of these variables (gender, major, experience) on the range of the availability and practice of authentic assessment competencies. A questionnaire was designed…

  2. Intersubjectivity as a Measure of Social Competence among Children Attending Head Start: Assessing the Measure's Validity and Relation to Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garte, Rebecca R.

    2015-01-01

    The present paper reported on a new method and procedure for assessing preschooler's social competence. This method utilized an observational measure of intersubjectivity to assess the social competence that develops in real time during interaction between two or more children. The measure of intersubjectivity reflected a conceptualization of the…

  3. Determination of Evaluative Devices for Adequate Assessment of Levels of Competence in Certain Physical Education Activities. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Ruth M.

    This investigation sought to study separately evaluative devices for assessing levels of performance and knowledge competency in basketball, swimming, and gymnastics. Subjects were women students at the University of Washington, 1968-69. For assessment of basketball competence, indications are that: (1) evaluation, by one individual, of films of…

  4. Development and validation of the ACE tool: assessing medical trainees’ competency in evidence based medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background While a variety of instruments have been developed to assess knowledge and skills in evidence based medicine (EBM), few assess all aspects of EBM - including knowledge, skills attitudes and behaviour - or have been psychometrically evaluated. The aim of this study was to develop and validate an instrument that evaluates medical trainees’ competency in EBM across knowledge, skills and attitude. Methods The ‘Assessing Competency in EBM’ (ACE) tool was developed by the authors, with content and face validity assessed by expert opinion. A cross-sectional sample of 342 medical trainees representing ‘novice’, ‘intermediate’ and ‘advanced’ EBM trainees were recruited to complete the ACE tool. Construct validity, item difficulty, internal reliability and item discrimination were analysed. Results We recruited 98 EBM-novice, 108 EBM-intermediate and 136 EBM-advanced participants. A statistically significant difference in the total ACE score was observed and corresponded to the level of training: on a 0-15-point test, the mean ACE scores were 8.6 for EBM-novice; 9.5 for EBM-intermediate; and 10.4 for EBM-advanced (p EBM. The ACE tool provides a novel assessment that measures user performance across the four main steps of EBM. To provide a complete suite of instruments to assess EBM competency across various patient scenarios, future refinement of the ACE instrument should include further scenarios across harm, diagnosis and prognosis. PMID:24909434

  5. Evaluating the Quality of Competency Assessment in Pharmacy: A Framework for Workplace Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailly Shah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Demonstration of achieved competencies is critical in the pharmacy workplace. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quality of the competency assessment program for pharmacy residents at an academic medical center. The competency assessment program (CAP survey is a validated, 48-item instrument that evaluates the quality of an assessment program based on 12 criteria, each measured by four questions on a scale of 0 to 100. The CAP was completed by residents (n = 23 and preceptors (n = 28 from the pharmacy residency program between 2010 and 2013. Results were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Cronbach’s alpha, and non-parametric tests. Educational Consequences was the only quality criteria falling below the standard for “good quality.” Participants that completed residency training elsewhere rated the Comparability (0.04 and Meaningfulness (0.01 of the assessment program higher than those that completed residency at the academic medical center. There were no significant differences between resident and preceptor scores. Overall, the quality of the assessment program was rated highly by residents and preceptors. The process described here provides a useful framework for understanding the quality of workplace learning assessments in pharmacy practice.

  6. Making the Case for Simulation-Based Assessments to Overcome the Challenges in Evaluating Clinical Competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Gwen; Stueben, Frances; Harrington, Deedra; Hetherman, Stephen

    2016-05-13

    The use of simulation in nursing has increased substantially in the last few decades. Most schools of nursing have incorporated simulation into their curriculum but few are using simulation to evaluate clinical competency at the end of a semester or prior to graduation. Using simulation for such high stakes evaluation is somewhat novel to nursing. Educators are now being challenged to move simulation to the next level and use it as a tool for evaluating clinical competency. Can the use of simulation for high-stakes evaluation add to or improve our current evaluation methods? Using patient simulation for evaluation in contrast to a teaching modality has important differences that must be considered. This article discusses the difficulties of evaluating clinical competency, and makes the case for using simulation based assessment as a method of high stakes evaluation. Using simulation for high-stakes evaluation has the potential for significantly impacting nursing education.

  7. Framework for assessment of children's social competence, with particular focus on children with brain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Rebecca

    2016-12-07

    Children's social competence is important for their general wellbeing and life satisfaction. Often it is an area identified as problematic for children brought to the attention of a psychologist, particularly for children with brain injuries. However, it can be difficult to pin down exactly where social difficulties lie, and therefore how best to help. The current article draws together the literature on social competence from brain injury and from more general developmental research. A hierarchical model is presented with three layers: social adjustment, social functioning, and social cognition. Additional factors likely to be relevant for children with brain injuries are noted. This framework can be used to guide psychologists' casework around social competence, aiming to provide a practical and coherent structure for assessment that can then support formulation, person centred planning, and tailored interventions.

  8. Validation of a New Instrument for Self-Assessment of Nurses’ Core Competencies in Palliative Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari Slåtten

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Competence can be seen as a prerequisite for high quality nursing in clinical settings. Few research studies have focused on nurses’ core competencies in clinical palliative care and few measurement tools have been developed to explore these core competencies. The purpose of this study was to test and validate the nurses’ core competence in palliative care (NCPC instrument. A total of 122 clinical nurse specialists who had completed a postbachelor program in palliative care at two university colleges in Norway answered the questionnaire. The initial analysis, with structural equation modelling, was run in Mplus 7. A modified confirmatory factor analysis revealed the following five domains: knowledge in symptom management, systematic use of the Edmonton symptom assessment system, teamwork skills, interpersonal skills, and life closure skills. The actual instrument needs to be tested in a practice setting with a larger sample to confirm its usefulness. The instrument has the potential to be used to refine clinical competence in palliative care and be used for the training and evaluation of palliative care nurses.

  9. Validation of a new instrument for self-assessment of nurses' core competencies in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slåtten, Kari; Hatlevik, Ove; Fagerström, Lisbeth

    2014-01-01

    Competence can be seen as a prerequisite for high quality nursing in clinical settings. Few research studies have focused on nurses' core competencies in clinical palliative care and few measurement tools have been developed to explore these core competencies. The purpose of this study was to test and validate the nurses' core competence in palliative care (NCPC) instrument. A total of 122 clinical nurse specialists who had completed a postbachelor program in palliative care at two university colleges in Norway answered the questionnaire. The initial analysis, with structural equation modelling, was run in Mplus 7. A modified confirmatory factor analysis revealed the following five domains: knowledge in symptom management, systematic use of the Edmonton symptom assessment system, teamwork skills, interpersonal skills, and life closure skills. The actual instrument needs to be tested in a practice setting with a larger sample to confirm its usefulness. The instrument has the potential to be used to refine clinical competence in palliative care and be used for the training and evaluation of palliative care nurses.

  10. Issues in implementing a real competency-based training and assessment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, Kathleen; Hunt, Graham; Windsor, John

    2007-05-04

    "First, do no harm" is a medical admonition; but harm does occur. There is thus mounting pressure for Medicine to adopt more rigorous systems to ensure professional competency. Traditionally, medical education and professional development has focussed on developing clinical expertise and technical skills within each speciality. Recent studies into the causes of adverse events have highlighted that the failure of non-technical aspects of competency are more common than the failure of technical skills amongst health professionals. Traditional training has also focussed on the individual and yet error management strategies in organisations that require high reliability processes for maintaining safe practice puts the emphasis on the team. It is our contention that the delivery of safe patient care requires a redefinition of professional competency--in terms of the interface between members of the team, patients and the organisational and social requirements of the health system. A change to competency-based training and assessment will require a team-orientated definition of professional competency that may challenge individual professionals and the sovereignty of medical specialities.

  11. Facilitating reflective practice and self-assessment of competence through the use of narratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levett-Jones, Tracy Lynn

    2007-03-01

    Reflective practice is a skill that is central to nursing students' professional development. Although there is an abundance of literature on the value of reflective practice there are few concrete methods that facilitate self-assessment of competence through the use of reflective practice. One such method is narrative reflection. A nursing narrative is a brief recount of an actual situation or episode in clinical practice that is significant because it resulted in new learning and/or new understanding. Narratives provide important opportunities for uncovering nursing practices that often go unnoticed and a new appreciation of the knowledge and skills of clinical practice. Nursing narratives reveal the richness of the clinical knowledge embedded in practice and provide a way for knowledge and practice to be linked together in meaningful dialogue, promoting interpretive analysis and reflection. A narrative approach contextualises knowledge and values and builds upon the clinical experiences of the student. Narratives afford opportunities for nursing students to: Learn from practice through reflection. Describe and critically analyse episodes of their clinical practice. Illuminate and assess their own level of competence by applying competency standards as a benchmark. Identify areas of strength and those requiring development. Develop practice-driven clinical learning objectives. Narratives have proven to be a successful means of developing students' ability to reflect upon and assess competence in a clinically relevant and motivating way. This paper will explore the possibilities that narratives hold for developing clinical acumen, promoting reflective practice, and assessing competence. It will provide an overview of narrative writing, and discuss some of the challenges encountered in the implementation of this clinical learning innovation at the author's university in Australia.

  12. Music Therapy Assessment and Development of Parental Competences in Families Where Children Have Experienced Emotional Neglect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine Lindahl

    2012-01-01

    In trying to aid difficulties within social services of assessing families at risk, the thesis sat out to strengthen, further develop, and test a music therapy assessment tool, Assessment of Parenting Competencies (APC). The study also aimed to examine the effect of music therapy on parenting...... competencies and parent-child interaction measured by scores from APC and by the Parenting Stress Index and Parent-Child Relationship-Inventory. The study had a multiple strategy sequential design. The fixed design was a between and within groups design to test the APCs reliability and validity in a clinical....... The study developed five APC scores, an Autonomy Score, Turn Analysis Score, Negative Response Type, Positive Response Type, and a total score, Parent-Child Interaction in Music. Results from the flexible design helped develop an additional analysis of turn-giving that yielded concurrent validity...

  13. Validity and reliability of the Greek version of the Multisource Assessment of Social Competence Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magotsiou, Evmorfia; Goudas, Marios; Hasandra, Maria

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this study was to adapt the Multisource Assessment of Social Competence Scale to the Greek language. The validity and reliability of the scale were examined in three studies with 209, 192, and 147 sixth-grade students, respectively. The subscale structure of the Multisource Assessment of Social Competence Scale was supported through exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. The hypothesized two main dimensions, Prosocial and Antisocial behavior, were divided into two factors, Cooperating skills and Empathy for Prosocial behavior and Quick-temperedness and Disruptiveness for Antisocial behavior. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were high. Additionally, correlations between each factor and social desirability scores were nonsignificant. The resultant model of the present study is a behavior rating scale that should be considered a reliable choice for assessing Greek middle school students' social skills.

  14. [Diagnostic and formative assessment of competencies at the beginning of undergraduate medical internship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-González, Adrián; Lifshitz-Guinzberg, Alberto; Trejo-Mejía, Juan Andrés; Torruco-García, Uri; Fortoul-van der Goes, Teresa I; Flores-Hernández, Fernando; Peña-Balderas, Jorge; Martínez-Franco, Adrián Israel; Hernández-Nava, Alejandro; Elena-González, Diana; Sánchez-Mendiola, Melchor

    2017-01-01

    Research on diagnostic and formative assessment competencies during undergraduate medical training is scarce in Latin America. To assess the level of clinical competence of students at the beginning of their medical internship in a new curriculum. This was an observational cross-sectional study in UNAM Faculty of Medicine students in Mexico City: a formative assessment of the second class of Curriculum 2010 students as part of the integral evaluation of the program. The assessment had two components: theoretical and practical. We assessed 577 students (65.5%) of the 880 total population that finished the 9th semester of Curriculum 2010. The written exam consisted of 232 items, with a mean of 61.0 ± 19.6, a difficulty index of 0.61, and Cronbach's alpha of 0.89. The mean of the objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) was 62.2 ± 16.8, with a mean Cronbach's alpha of 0.51. Results were analyzed by knowledge area and exam stations. The overall results provide evidence that students achieve sufficiently the competencies established in the curriculum at the beginning of the internship, that they have the necessary foundation for learning new and more complex information, and integrate it with existing knowledge to achieve significant learning and continue their training.

  15. Neuromuscular medicine competency in physical medicine and rehabilitation residents: a method of development and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lei; Cuccurullo, Sara J; Innerfield, Caitlin E; Strax, Thomas E; Petagna, Anne

    2013-03-01

    This project endeavored to create an educational module including methodology to instruct physical medicine and rehabilitation residents in the evaluation and appropriate treatment of patients with neuromuscular disorders. It further sought to verify acquired competencies in neuromuscular rehabilitation through objective evaluation methodology. An American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine board-certified physician with 10 yrs of clinical experience in neuromuscular and general rehabilitation trained 19 residents using a standardized competency-based module. The residents were trained through clinical training, lectures, and review of self-assessment examination concepts from the American Academy of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation syllabus provided in the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. After delivery of the educational module, knowledge acquisition and skill proficiency were measured in (1) completion of neuromuscular history and physical examination satisfactorily, (2) diagnosis and ability to design a patient care management plan via chart stimulated recall examinations, (3) physician-patient interaction via patient surveys, (4) physician-staff interaction via 360-degree global ratings, and (5) ability to write a comprehensive patient care report and to document a patient care management plan in accordance with Medicare guidelines via written patient reports. Assessment tools developed for this program address the basic competencies outlined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. To test the success of the standardized educational module, data were collected on an ongoing basis. The objective measures compared resident self-assessment examination scores in neuromuscular rehabilitation before and after the institution of the comprehensive neuromuscular competency module in the residency program. Nineteen (100%) of 19 residents successfully demonstrated proficiency in every segment of the

  16. [Civil competence assessment of the mental disorders involved in compensation of personal injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yan-xia; Zhang, Qin-ting; Cai, Wei-xiong; Huang, Fu-yin; Tang, Tao; Wu, Jia-sheng; Wang, Jian-jun; Dong, Ri-xia

    2009-02-01

    To seek and ascertain indicators that can be used in the civil competence assessment of the mental disorders involved in compensation of personal injury. A retrospective study was made on the data related to the interviewee's mental status assessed by forensic experts during the period from 2003 to 2005 in Institute of Forensic Science, Ministry of Justice, P.R.China. The 6 indicators, including awareness of situation, factual understanding of issues, appreciation of likely consequences, rational manipulation of information, functioning in one's own environment, and communication of choice, were graded and statistically analyzed using SPSS 11.5 software. The 6 indicators correlated well with the assessment of forensic experts ,with the related coefficient between 0.632 and 0.876, and the inter-related coefficient among the 6 indicators between 0.575 and 0.911. The 6 indicators could be used for the civil competence assessment and may also be taken as the basis for further standardization and quantification of civil competence.

  17. Environmental Assessment for Slope Stabilization Projects at Fort MacArthur, San Pedro, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    brittlebush, and Common deerweed ( Lotus scoparius). Implementation of the Proposed Action would have no impact on federal or state-listed threatened and...cancer, birth defects, genetic damage, and other adverse health effects. The source and effects of hazardous air pollutants are generally local

  18. Environmental Assessment for Perimeter Security Lighting at Fort MacArthur, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    salt marsh communities. Typical species include California sagebrush (Artemesia californica), deerweed ( Lotus scoparius), pickleweed (Salicornia...affected by regional birth and death rates as well as net migration. Economic activity typically comprises employment, personal income, and industrial

  19. Assessment of Competence in EVAR Procedures: A Novel Rating Scale Developed by the Delphi Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strøm, M; Lönn, L; Bech, B; Schroeder, T V; Konge, L

    2017-07-01

    To develop a procedure specific global rating scale for assessment of operator competence in endovascular aortic repair (EVAR). A Delphi approach was used to achieve expert consensus. A panel of 32 international experts (median 300 EVAR procedures, range 200-3000) from vascular surgery (n = 21) and radiology (n = 11) was established. The first Delphi round was based on a review of endovascular skills assessment papers, stent graft instructions for use, and structured interviews. It led to a primary pool of 83 items that were formulated as global rating scale items with tentative anchors. Iterative Delphi rounds were executed. The panellists rated the importance of each item on a 5 point Likert scale. Consensus was defined as 80% of the panel rating an item 4 or 5 in the primary round and 90% in subsequent rounds. Consensus on the final assessment tool was defined as Cronbach's alpha > .8 after a minimum of three rounds. Thirty-two of 35 invited experts participated. Three rounds of surveys were completed with a completion rate of 100% in the first two rounds and 91% in round three. The 83 primary assessment items were supplemented with five items suggested by the panel and reduced to seven pivotal assessment items that reached consensus, Cronbach's alpha = 0.82. The seven item rating scale covers key elements of competence in EVAR stent placement and deployment. Each item has well defined grades with explicit anchors at unacceptable, acceptable, and superior performance on a 5 point Likert scale. The Delphi methodology allowed for international consensus on a new procedure specific global rating scale for assessment of competence in EVAR. The resulting scale, EndoVascular Aortic Repair Assessment of Technical Expertise (EVARATE), represents key elements in the procedure. EVARATE constitutes an assessment tool for providing structured feedback to endovascular operators in training. Copyright © 2017 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier

  20. Integrating and Assessing Structural Competency in an Innovative Prehealth Curriculum at Vanderbilt University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzl, Jonathan M; Petty, JuLeigh

    2017-03-01

    Structural competency is a framework for conceptualizing and addressing health-related social justice issues that emphasizes diagnostic recognition of economic and political conditions producing and racializing inequalities in health. Strategies are needed to teach prehealth undergraduate students concepts central to structural competency (e.g., structural inequity, structural racism, structural stigma) and to evaluate their impact. The curriculum for Vanderbilt University's innovative prehealth major in medicine, health, and society (MHS) was reshaped in 2013 to incorporate structural competency concepts and skills into undergraduate courses. The authors developed the Structural Foundations of Health (SFH) evaluation instrument, with closed- and open-ended questions designed to assess undergraduate students' core structural competency skills. They piloted the SFH instrument in 2015 with MHS seniors. Of the 85 students included in the analysis, most selected one or more structural factors as among the three most important in explaining U.S. regional childhood obesity rates (85%) and racial disparities in heart disease (92%). More than half described individual- or family-level structural factors (66%) or broad social and political factors (56%) as influencing geographic disparities in childhood obesity. Nearly two-thirds (66%) described racial disparities in heart disease as consequences of socioeconomic differences, discrimination/stereotypes, or policies with racial implications. Preliminary data suggest that the MHS major trained students to identify and analyze relationships between structural factors and health outcomes. Future research will include a comparison of structural competency skills among MHS students and students in the traditional premedical track and assessment of these skills in incoming first-year students.

  1. Cultural Competence of Healthcare Providers: A Systematic Review of Assessment Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Jung; Lee, Chia-Kuei; Huang, Mei-Chih

    2017-06-01

    Few articles in the literature identify and describe the instruments that are regularly used by scholars to measure cultural competence in healthcare providers. This study reviews the psychometric properties of the several instruments that are used regularly to assess the cultural competence of healthcare providers. Researchers conducted a systematic review of the relevant articles that were published between 1983 and 2013 and listed on academic and government Web sites or on one or more of the following databases: CINAHL, MEDLINE, ERIC, PsycINFO, Psyc ARTICLES, PubMed, Cochrane, Pro Quest, Google Scholar, CNKI (China), and the National Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations (Taiwan). This study included 57 articles. Ten instruments from these articles were identified and analyzed. These instruments included five that were presented in English and five that were presented in Chinese. All were self-administered and based on respondent perceptions. Five of the 10 instruments were designed to measure cultural competence, two were designed to measure cultural sensitivity, two were designed to measure transcultural self-efficacy, and one was designed to measure cultural awareness. The six cultural dimensions addressed by these instruments were attitudes, knowledge, skills, behaviors, desires, and encounters. An expert panel validated the content of the 10 instruments. The subscales explained 33%-90% of the variance in scores for eight of the instruments. The reliability of the 10 instruments was estimated based on the internal consistency, which ranged from .57 to .97. This systematic review may assist researchers to choose appropriate instruments to assess the cultural competence of healthcare providers. The findings of this review indicate that no single instrument is adequate to evaluate cultural competence in all contexts.

  2. Citizen Science: Dune Restoration with Sea Oats by Junior Friends of MacArthur Beach State Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, S.

    2016-12-01

    As a crucial part of the dune ecosystem, Sea Oats are a protected species in Florida. They provide excellent habitat for small birds and mammals and prevent dune erosion with their fibrous roots.Citizen science is a research and education tool that involves everyday people in real and meaningful forms of science. My volunteer group, Junior friends of Macarthur Beach State Park, used citizen science to restore dunes by growing and planting Sea Oats. Junior friends is a group of 6-12th grade students whose purpose is to support the park through monthly activities and special events. Junior Friends asked,what is the best way to germinate/grow/and plant Sea Oats to renourish the beach dune. Specifically, what planting medium is most conducive for maximizing growth of Sea Oats? We tested three scenarios: 100% potting soil, 100% sand from the beach, 50% sand-50% potting soil mixture.Using harvested Sea Oat seeds from Macarthur Beach State Park, we separated the seeds from their casings, known as spiklets. We then monitored the plant's weekly over the course of 14 weeks and charted their growth. All the seeds had similar growth rates, but the seeds that grew in 100% potting soil consistently grew the tallest. The second tallest Sea Oats were 100% sand; the 50% sand-50% potting soil mixture produced the least amount of growth. When seedlings reached their desired growth of 6-8 inches and established a root ball, we planted the Sea Oats on the dune for restoration. After planting them,we monitored the growth of the Sea Oats on the MacArthur Beach dune throughout the rest of the year, charting the height of the planted Sea Oats. Using Citizen science we had meaningful data that helped us have a better understanding of restoring Sea Oats on Florida dunes and will help further future restorations.

  3. Evaluation of an eportfolio for the assessment of clinical competence in a baccalaureate nursing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Bernard M; MacPhee, Maura; Jackson, Cathryn

    2013-10-01

    This paper reports a study undertaken to evaluate the implementation of an electronic portfolio (eportfolio) tool for the assessment of clinical competence in a Bachelor of Science in Nursing program. Baccalaureate nursing programs increasingly use information and communications technologies to support student learning, assess and record progress. Portfolio based practice assessment and electronic portfolios represent growing trends to enhance learning via student reflection and self-identification of further learning needs. Using an action-research process, a mixed-methods evaluation strategy explored the efficacy of the eportfolio in its second year of use. Website tracking analytics and descriptive statistics were used to explore trends in eportfolio usage. Instructor and student surveys and focus groups were carried out at the end of the second year. Instructors valued the eportfolios convenience, improved transparency, an improved ability to track student progress, enhanced theory-practice links, and the competency based assessment framework. Students valued accessibility and convenience, but expressed concerns over assessment data openness and processes for standardization. Both groups felt that the eportfolio navigation required simplification. Electronic portfolios represent a technological evolution from paper-based clinical assessment systems. Although there appear to be many student and instructor advantages in using eportfolios, to maximize successful implementation, clinical teachers require additional training in this new pedagogic approach. Strategies to assist an institutional culture shift towards more transparent assessment processes may also need consideration.

  4. Proficiency in identifying, managing and communicating medical errors: feasibility and validity study assessing two core competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Dabrh, Abd Moain; Murad, Mohammad Hassan; Newcomb, Richard D; Buchta, William G; Steffen, Mark W; Wang, Zhen; Lovett, Amanda K; Steinkraus, Lawrence W

    2016-09-02

    Communication skills and professionalism are two competencies in graduate medical education that are challenging to evaluate. We aimed to develop, test and validate a de novo instrument to evaluate these two competencies. Using an Objective Standardized Clinical Examination (OSCE) based on a medication error scenario, we developed an assessment instrument that focuses on distinctive domains [context of discussion, communication and detection of error, management of error, empathy, use of electronic medical record (EMR) and electronic medical information resources (EMIR), and global rating]. The aim was to test feasibility, acceptability, and reliability of the method. Faculty and standardized patients (SPs) evaluated 56 trainees using the instrument. The inter-rater reliability of agreement between faculty was substantial (Fleiss k = 0.71) and intraclass correlation efficient was excellent (ICC = 0.80). The measured agreement between faculty and SPs evaluation of resident was lower (Fleiss k = 0.36). The instrument showed good conformity (ICC = 0.74). The majority of the trainees (75 %) had satisfactory or higher performance in all six assessed domains and 86 % found the OSCE to be realistic. Sixty percent reported not receiving feedback on EMR use and asked for subsequent training. An OSCE-based instrument using a medical error scenario can be used to assess competency in professionalism, communication, using EMRs and managing medical errors.

  5. Development of basic competences of students in Higher Education through Learning Oriented e-Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez-Ruiz, Miguel-Ángel

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Learning Oriented e-Assessment (e-LOA is an ICT mediated learning process. It promotes the development of competences that are relevant to both students’ academic present and professional future. In this quasi-experimental research a pretest-posttest design with experimental and control groups is implemented. We believe that the actions of e-LOA favors further development of competences. The results show that in the experimental groups there is an improvement on the level of competence. Significant differences have been found between the pretest and posttest. In addition, there is a consistency between the competences that have improved and those considered in the literature (creativity, problem solving .... La e-Evaluación orientada al aprendizaje (e-EOA es un proceso de aprendizaje, mediado por las TIC, que promueve el desarrollo de competencias útiles para el presente académico y el futuro laboral de los estudiantes. En esta investigación cuasi-experimental, con diseño pretest-postest con grupos experimentales y de control, consideramos que las actuaciones de la e-EOA (VI favorecen un mayor desarrollo de competencias (VD. Los resultados revelan que en los grupos experimentales se mejora el nivel competencial y existen diferencias significativas entre su pretest-postest. Además, se comprueba que las competencias que mejoran son coherentes con la teoría planteada (creatividad, resolución de problemas….

  6. Assessing Urban and Rural Teachers’ Competencies in STEM Integrated Education in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairani Ahmad Zamri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to fulfil the need of sizeable skill workers, Malaysia will introduce STEM integration education in mainstream schools throughout the country. However, like any educational reform, one important issue that needs to be taken into account is the teachers’ readiness especially in terms of their skills and competency in implementing the reform. As such, the purpose of this study is to assess differences between teachers’ competency for STEM integration education between urban and rural teachers. A total of 244 teachers (urban = 129, rural = 115 are employed as sample in this cross-sectional quantitative study. Responses from an 18-item questionnaire were analysed using Rasch Model analysis to determine characteristics of item that measure competency between urban and rural teachers. The DIF analysis shows that items related to competency in (1 ICT integration, and (2 organizing co-curricular activities showed a significant difference in their measures between both sets of teachers. The result from this study would certainly provide useful information to relevant stakeholders, especially with regards to providing training for the teachers in the designated areas.

  7. Methods of sociological diagnostics in the assessment of staff's competencies: a case of a state museum (St. Petersburg, Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asiia Usiaeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study is dedicated to research of methods of sociological diagnostics, which can be used in the assessment of staff's competencies. Theoretical framework of this survey is T. Parson’s structural functionalism, the approach that sees the society as a complex system. The research questions were how we can analyze competencies by using sociological diagnostics and what the features of sociological diagnostics are. In order to achieve the target, it was analyzed the assessment of staff's competencies in the museum complex “The Cathedral”, Saint-Petersburg, Russia. Methodology of the research was structured observation, data collected by using “Mystery shopper” method. As a result, it was showed which techniques were applied in the staff’s assessment in this museum. Besides, the researcher discovered the level of museum staff’s competencies and revealed that the least developed employees’ competence was communication with visitors.

  8. Application of ''Earl's Assessment "as", Assessment "for", and Assessment "of" Learning Model'' with Orthopaedic Assessment Clinical Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafave, Mark R.; Katz, Larry; Vaughn, Norman

    2013-01-01

    Context: In order to study the efficacy of assessment methods, a theoretical framework of Earl's model of assessment was introduced. Objective: (1) Introduce the predictive learning assessment model (PLAM) as an application of Earl's model of learning; (2) test Earl's model of learning through the use of the Standardized Orthopedic Assessment Tool…

  9. Application of ''Earl's Assessment "as", Assessment "for", and Assessment "of" Learning Model'' with Orthopaedic Assessment Clinical Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafave, Mark R.; Katz, Larry; Vaughn, Norman

    2013-01-01

    Context: In order to study the efficacy of assessment methods, a theoretical framework of Earl's model of assessment was introduced. Objective: (1) Introduce the predictive learning assessment model (PLAM) as an application of Earl's model of learning; (2) test Earl's model of learning through the use of the Standardized Orthopedic Assessment Tool…

  10. Competencies in Geriatric Nursing: Empirical Evidence from a Computer-Based Large-Scale Assessment Calibration Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, Roman; Döring, Ottmar; Wittmann, Eveline; Hartig, Johannes; Weyland, Ulrike; Nauerth, Annette; Möllers, Michaela; Rechenbach, Simone; Simon, Julia; Worofka, Iberé

    2016-01-01

    Valid and reliable standardized assessment of nursing competencies is needed to monitor the quality of vocational education and training (VET) in nursing and evaluate learning outcomes for care work trainees with increasingly heterogeneous learning backgrounds. To date, however, the modeling of professional competencies has not yet evolved into…

  11. The effects of self-assessment and supervisor feedback on residents' patient-education competency using videoed outpatient consultations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouda, Jan C.; van de Wiel, Harry B. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the effects of residents' communication self-assessment and supervisor feedback on residents' communication-competency awareness, on their patient-education competency, and on their patients' opinion. Methods: The program consisted of the implementation of a communication se

  12. Assessment of Pharmacists' Perception of Patient Care Competence and Need for Training in Rural and Urban Areas in North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Few studies have examined pharmacists' level of patient care competence and need for continuous professional development in rural areas. Purpose: To assess North Dakota pharmacists' practice setting, perceived level of patient care competencies, and the need for professional development in urban and rural areas. Methods: A survey was…

  13. Examination of the metric characteristics of a Switzerland Competence Assessment Scale as an indicator of school readiness of preschool children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joško Sindik

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Competence is “ability at work”, ability that is recognized in a certain activity, while the formation of a competent individual begins as early as preschool. The main objective of this research was to determine the psychometric properties of the Competence Assessment Scale, based on practical experience in the Swiss canton of Glarus, and to describe readiness of children to attend school. The sample of children that involved four kindergartens in Zagreb, Split and Ivanić Grad was examined, with a mean age of 6.26±0.42 years, of which there was 112 girls and 146 boys. Behavioral characteristics of children using the Competence Assessment Scale have been evaluated by 60 children educators from 30 school groups of all kindergartens. There was a positive, although low to medium-high correlation between the estimated level of children's competencies. All items of all SPK subscales were satisfactorily saturated corresponding to principal components. However, SPK shows somewhat lower discriminability. Preliminary testing showed that SPK, applied to a sample of preschool children in Croatia provides a valid and reliable results, and as such can help in assessment of each child for school. Scale is more sensitive at lower levels of competencies, which allows for identification of children with less developed competencies, but not in assessing the most competent children.

  14. Assessment of Management Competencies Possessed by Postgraduate University Business Education Students to Handle Entrepreneurship Business Challenges in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoro, James

    2015-01-01

    University Business Education graduates, by the nature of their programme, ought to possess relevant management competencies for successful entrepreneurship but casual observation and empirical reports indicate that they are not doing well in this aspect. Therefore, this study assessed the management competencies possessed by the university…

  15. Development and Validation of an Assessment Tool for Competency in Critical Care Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrawalla, Paru; Eisen, Lewis Ari; Shiloh, Ariel; Shah, Brijen J.; Savenkov, Oleksandr; Wise, Wendy; Evans, Laura; Mayo, Paul; Szyld, Demian

    2015-01-01

    Background Point-of-care ultrasound is an emerging technology in critical care medicine. Despite requirements for critical care medicine fellowship programs to demonstrate knowledge and competency in point-of-care ultrasound, tools to guide competency-based training are lacking. Objective We describe the development and validity arguments of a competency assessment tool for critical care ultrasound. Methods A modified Delphi method was used to develop behaviorally anchored checklists for 2 ultrasound applications: “Perform deep venous thrombosis study (DVT)” and “Qualify left ventricular function using parasternal long axis and parasternal short axis views (Echo).” One live rater and 1 video rater evaluated performance of 28 fellows. A second video rater evaluated a subset of 10 fellows. Validity evidence for content, response process, and internal consistency was assessed. Results An expert panel finalized checklists after 2 rounds of a modified Delphi method. The DVT checklist consisted of 13 items, including 1.00 global rating step (GRS). The Echo checklist consisted of 14 items, and included 1.00 GRS for each of 2 views. Interrater reliability evaluated with a Cohen kappa between the live and video rater was 1.00 for the DVT GRS, 0.44 for the PSLA GRS, and 0.58 for the PSSA GRS. Cronbach α was 0.85 for DVT and 0.92 for Echo. Conclusions The findings offer preliminary evidence for the validity of competency assessment tools for 2 applications of critical care ultrasound and data on live versus video raters. PMID:26692968

  16. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of an Instrument to Assess Cross-Cultural Competence of Healthcare Professionals (CCCHP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Gerda; Knibbe, Ronald A; von Wolff, Alessa; Dingoyan, Demet; Schulz, Holger; Mösko, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Cultural competence of healthcare professionals (HCPs) is recognized as a strategy to reduce cultural disparities in healthcare. However, standardised, valid and reliable instruments to assess HCPs' cultural competence are notably lacking. The present study aims to 1) identify the core components of cultural competence from a healthcare perspective, 2) to develop a self-report instrument to assess cultural competence of HCPs and 3) to evaluate the psychometric properties of the new instrument. The conceptual model and initial item pool, which were applied to the cross-cultural competence instrument for the healthcare profession (CCCHP), were derived from an expert survey (n = 23), interviews with HCPs (n = 12), and a broad narrative review on assessment instruments and conceptual models of cultural competence. The item pool was reduced systematically, which resulted in a 59-item instrument. A sample of 336 psychologists, in advanced psychotherapeutic training, and 409 medical students participated, in order to evaluate the construct validity and reliability of the CCCHP. Construct validity was supported by principal component analysis, which led to a 32-item six-component solution with 50% of the total variance explained. The different dimensions of HCPs' cultural competence are: Cross-Cultural Motivation/Curiosity, Cross-Cultural Attitudes, Cross-Cultural Skills, Cross-Cultural Knowledge/Awareness and Cross-Cultural Emotions/Empathy. For the total instrument, the internal consistency reliability was .87 and the dimension's Cronbach's α ranged from .54 to .84. The discriminating power of the CCCHP was indicated by statistically significant mean differences in CCCHP subscale scores between predefined groups. The 32-item CCCHP exhibits acceptable psychometric properties, particularly content and construct validity to examine HCPs' cultural competence. The CCCHP with its five dimensions offers a comprehensive assessment of HCPs' cultural competence, and has the

  17. PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION QUALITY DEVELOPMENT AND ITS ASSESSMENT IN COMPETENCE-BASED MODEL OF LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina N. Emelyanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the problem of professional education assessment that has become more serious due to competence-based model of learning implementation in higher professional education. The purpose of the article is to reveal the contradictions occurred while implementing competence-based model of learning in higher professional education, and justify rationale for professional training improvement in accordance with professional and federal state educational standards. Methods. The methods involve: the comparative analysis – to study educational occupational standards and federal state educational standards on pedagogical education; and prognostic analysis – to study the analysis of development of a modern educational situation. Results. The basic problem aspects of education quality assessment of modern vocational training are formulated. The study has revealed the following contradictions: a in occupational and federal state educational standards; b in educational matters approaching the career conditions and occupational behaviour pattern development mechanism, and real-time correction of occupational behaviour pattern; c in main educational programs thematic structuring and meta-concreteness of competences content; d in education quality improvement requirements and lack of clear quality criteria; e in new teaching techniques and teachers’ readiness to work with them. The contradictions mentioned require some new resources for their adjustment. Scientific novelty. The research findings include a verification and explanation of the professional education idea and mechanism based on professional behaviour pattern and focused on gradual professional socialization. Some ways of professional education formation and quality improvement are suggested. They involve the mechanisms of coordination at all stages of professional training: occupational standards and educational standards development, main educational programmes and

  18. Competencies development and self-assessment in maintenance management e-training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathanassiou, Nikos; Pistofidis, Petros; Emmanouilidis, Christos

    2013-10-01

    The maintenance management function requires staff to possess a truly multidisciplinary set of skills. This includes competencies from engineering and information technology to health and safety, management and finance, while also taking into account the normative and legislative issues. This body of knowledge is rarely readily available within a single university course. The potential of e-learning in this field is significant, as it is a flexible and less costly alternative to conventional training. Furthermore, trainees can follow their own pace, as their available time is often a commodity. This article discusses the development of tools to support competencies development and self-assessment in maintenance management. Based on requirements arising from professional bodies' guidelines and a user survey, the developed tools implement a dedicated maintenance management training curriculum. The results from pilot testing on academic and industrial user groups are discussed and user evaluations are linked with specific e-learning design issues.

  19. [Development of a portfolio for competency-based assessment in a clinical clerkship curriculum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, HyeRin; Lee, Jong-Tae; Yoon, Yoo Sang; Rhee, Byoung Doo

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this report was to describe our experience in planning and developing a portfolio for a clinical clerkship curriculum. We have developed a portfolio for assessing student competency since 2007. During an annual workshop on clinical clerkship curricula, clerkship directors from five Paik hospitals of Inje University met to improve the assessment of the portfolio. We generated templates for students to record their activities and reflection and receive feedback. We uploaded these templates to our school's website for students to download freely. Annually, we have held a faculty development seminar and a workshop for portfolio assessment and feedback. Also, we established an orientation program on how to construct a learning portfolio for students. Future actions include creating a ubiquitous portfolio system, extending the portfolio to the entire curriculum, setting up an advisor system, and managing the quality of the portfolio. This study could be helpful for medical schools that plan to improve their portfolio assessment with an outcome-based approach.

  20. Assessing Social Competence and Behavior Problems in a Sample of Italian Preschoolers Using the Social Competence and Behavior Evaluation Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sette, Stefania; Baumgartner, Emma; MacKinnon, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings: The main goals of this study were to examine the factor validity of the Social Competence and Behavior Evaluation (SCBE-30) scale using exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis and to test factor invariance across gender in a sample of Italian preschool-age children (241 boys, 252 girls). The concurrent…

  1. Measuring Mastery: Best Practices for Assessment in Competency-Based Education. AEI Series on Competency-Based Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClarty, Katie Larsen; Gaertner, Matthew N.

    2015-01-01

    Competency-based education (CBE) programs are growing in popularity as an alternative path to a postsecondary degree. Freed from the seat-time constraints of traditional higher education programs, CBE students can progress at their own pace and complete their postsecondary education having gained relevant and demonstrable skills. The CBE model has…

  2. Electrodiagnostic medicine skills competency in physical medicine and rehabilitation residents: a method for development and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David; Cuccurullo, Sara; Lee, Joseph; Petagna, Ann; Strax, Thomas

    2008-08-01

    This project sought to create an educational module including evaluation methodology to instruct physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R) residents in electrodiagnostic evaluation of patients with neuromuscular problems, and to verify acquired competencies in those electrodiagnostic skills through objective evaluation methodology. Sixteen residents were trained by board-certified neuromuscular and electrodiagnostic medicine physicians through technical training, lectures, and review of self-assessment examination (SAE) concepts from the American Academy of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation syllabus provided in the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. After delivery of the educational module, knowledge acquisition and skill attainment were measured in (1) clinical skill in diagnostic procedures via a procedure checklist, (2) diagnosis and ability to design a patient-care management plan via chart simulated recall (CSR) exams, (3) physician/patient interaction via patient surveys, (4) physician/staff interaction via 360-degree global ratings, and (5) ability to write a comprehensive patient-care report and to document a patient-care management plan in accordance with Medicare guidelines via written patient reports. Assessment tools developed for this program address the basic competencies outlined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). To test the success of the standardized educational module, data were collected on an ongoing basis. Objective measures compared resident SAE scores in electrodiagnostics (EDX) before and after institution of the comprehensive EDX competency module in a PM&R residency program. Fifteen of 16 residents (94%) successfully demonstrated proficiency in every segment of the evaluation element of the educational module by the end of their PGY-4 electrodiagnostic rotation. The resident who did not initially pass underwent remedial coursework and passed on the second attempt. Furthermore, the

  3. Rating scale for the assessment of competence in ultrasound-guided peripheral vascular access - a Delphi Consensus Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primdahl, Stine C; Todsen, Tobias; Clemmesen, Louise;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Peripheral vascular access is vital for treatment and diagnostics of hospitalized patients. Ultrasound-guided vascular access (UGVA) is superior to the landmark technique. To ensure competence-based education, an assessment tool of UGVA competence is needed. We aimed to develop...... a global rating scale (RS) for assessment of UGVA competence based on opinions on the content from ultrasound experts in a modified Delphi consensus study. METHODS: We included experts from anesthesiology, emergency medicine and radiology across university hospitals in Denmark. Nine elements were drafted...

  4. Social competence in pediatric brain tumor survivors: evaluating the psychometric properties of assessment tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Fiona; Barrera, Maru

    2014-02-01

    This study was conducted to identify and describe the instruments that have been used to measure social competence in pediatric brain tumor patients and to summarize the psychometric properties of the most common instruments used to measure social competence in pediatric brain tumor patients. The following psychometric properties were assessed: (a) construct validity; (b) internal consistency reliability; (c) test retest and inter-rater reliability; and (d) responsiveness. Measures were evaluated based on published criteria for psychometric suitability. Ten studies met inclusion criteria for the current review. Based on review of these studies, the Social Skills Rating System (SSRS) yielded the most comprehensive data on psychometric properties. Psychometric properties for the SSRS were considered to be adequate in a pediatric brain tumor population. Specifically, the SSRS meets criteria for construct validity, internal consistency and responsiveness. Other commonly used measures included the CBCL/YSR, the PedsQL4.0 and the Revised Class Play each with sufficient psychometric properties. The SSRS is an appropriate tool to measure social competence in pediatric brain tumor patients. Data for inter-rater reliability and responsiveness in this population is still lacking.

  5. Miller's Pyramid and Core Competency Assessment: A Study in Relationship Construct Validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Betsy White; Byrne, Phil D; Welindt, Dillon; Williams, Michael V

    2016-01-01

    Continuous professional development relies on the link between performance and an educational process aimed at improving knowledge and skill. One of the most broadly used frameworks for assessing skills is Miller's Pyramid. This Pyramid has a series of levels of achievement beginning with knowledge (at the base) and ending with routine application in the clinical setting. The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of convergence of two measurement methods, one based on Miller's framework, the second using the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education/American Board of Medical Specialties (ACGME/ABMS) Core Competency framework. The data were gathered from the faculty of a large, Midwestern regional health care provider and hospital system. Data from 264 respondents were studied. The 360° data were from raters of physicians holding supervisory roles in the organization. The scale items were taken from an instrument that has been validated for both structure and known group prediction. The Miller scale was purposely built for this application. The questions were designed to describe each level of the model. The Miller scale was reduced to a single dimension. This result was then regressed on the items from the 360° item ratings. Results of a multivariate analysis of variance isolated a significant relationship between the Miller's Pyramid score and the competency items (P core competencies. Equally important is the finding that while they are related they are not identical. These findings have implications for continuous professional development programing design.

  6. School Competence and Fluent Academic Performance: Informing Assessment of Educational Outcomes in Survivors of Pediatric Medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Alice Ann; Hughes, Carroll W; Stavinoha, Peter L

    2015-01-01

    Academic difficulties are widely acknowledged but not adequately studied in survivors of pediatric medulloblastoma. Although most survivors require special education services and are significantly less likely than healthy peers to finish high school, measured academic skills are typically average. This study sought to identify potential factors associated with academic difficulties in this population and focused on school competence and fluent academic performance. Thirty-six patients (ages 7-18 years old) were recruited through the Departments of Neurosurgery and Neuro-Oncology at Children's Medical Center Dallas and Cook Children's Medical Center in Fort Worth, TX. Participants completed a neuropsychological screening battery including selected Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Achievement subtests. Parents completed the Child Behavior Checklist. School competence was significantly correlated with measured academic skills and fluency. Basic academic skill development was broadly average, in contrast to significantly worse fluent academic performance. School competence may have utility as a measure estimating levels of educational success in this population. Additionally, academic difficulties experienced by childhood medulloblastoma survivors may be better captured by measuring deficits in fluent academic performance rather than skills. Identification of these potential factors associated with educational outcomes of pediatric medulloblastoma survivors has significant implications for research, clinical assessment, and academic services/interventions.

  7. Faculty development in assessment: the missing link in competency-based medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmboe, Eric S; Ward, Denham S; Reznick, Richard K; Katsufrakis, Peter J; Leslie, Karen M; Patel, Vimla L; Ray, Donna D; Nelson, Elizabeth A

    2011-04-01

    As the medical education community celebrates the 100th anniversary of the seminal Flexner Report, medical education is once again experiencing significant pressure to transform. Multiple reports from many of medicine's specialties and external stakeholders highlight the inadequacies of current training models to prepare a physician workforce to meet the needs of an increasingly diverse and aging population. This transformation, driven by competency-based medical education (CBME) principles that emphasize the outcomes, will require more effective evaluation and feedback by faculty.Substantial evidence suggests, however, that current faculty are insufficiently prepared for this task across both the traditional competencies of medical knowledge, clinical skills, and professionalism and the newer competencies of evidence-based practice, quality improvement, interdisciplinary teamwork, and systems. The implication of these observations is that the medical education enterprise urgently needs an international initiative of faculty development around CBME and assessment. In this article, the authors outline the current challenges and provide suggestions on where faculty development efforts should be focused and how such an initiative might be accomplished. The public, patients, and trainees need the medical education enterprise to improve training and outcomes now.

  8. Norwegian Football Academy Players-Players Self-Assessed Competence, Perfectionism, Goal Orientations and Motivational Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eirik Nerland

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Grounded in the theoretical framework of achievement goal theory and perfectionism theory, the purpose of this study was to examine how self-assessed perceived abilities covariance these variables among Norwegian football academy players. 140 adolescent football players participated, representing three football academies. Perceived competence was reported as equivalent to or better than others. Perfectionism scores showed personal standards as the highest of the dimensions of perfectionism, while perceived parental pressure was lowest. In contrast, mean task orientation and perceived mastery climate were higher than ego orientation and perceived performance climate. The correlation analysis showed that perceived competence correlated positively with personal standards. Personal standards correlated positively with the rest of the perfectionism dimensions as well as ego orientation, perceived mastery- and performance climate. Concern over mistakes was positively correlated with ego-orientation. Overall, findings suggested that personal standards correlate with perceived competence, while these variables also relate to other perfectionism dimensions, goal orientations and perceived motivational climate. Therefore, coaches should highlight the importance of high personal standards, as a potentially maladaptive function on talent development.

  9. Workplace based assessment: a step to promote competency based postgraduate training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tejinder; Modi, Jyoti Nath

    2013-06-08

    There has been an increasing emphasis on defining outcomes of medical education in terms of performance of trainees. This is a step beyond the description of outcomes in terms of competence that encompasses mostly potential abilities rather than the actual performance. The contextual adaptations and behavior judgments of the trainees are best assessed by a program of in-training assessment. Workplace based assessment (WPBA) is one of the modalities, which assesses the trainee in authentic settings. Though Postgraduate (PG) medical training in India is said to be competency-based, most institutions do not have any formative or in-training assessment program for the same. The two cardinal elements of WPBA are direct observation and conducted in work place in addition to provision of feedback to the trainee. The WPBA conforms to the highest (Level 4: Does) of Millers pyramid and also has the potential to assess at all four levels. Some of the tools used for WPBA are: Logbooks, Clinical Encounter Cards (CEC), mini-Clinical Evaluation Exercise (mini-CEX), Case based discussions, Direct Observation of Procedural Skills (DOPS), Multisource feedback (peers, co-workers, seniors, patients) etc. These can be documented in the form of a portfolio that provides a longitudinal view of experiences and progress of the trainee. The WPBA scores high on validity and educational impact by virtue of being based on direct observation in real situation and contextual feedback. The feasibility and acceptability is enhanced by making appropriate choices of tools, advance planning, building of mutual trust, and training of assessors. Given the established benefits of WPBA in shaping clinical learning, there is an imminent need for including this mode of assessment in our clinical training programs especially PG training.

  10. Voice-based assessments of trustworthiness, competence, and warmth in blind and sighted adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleszkiewicz, Anna; Pisanski, Katarzyna; Lachowicz-Tabaczek, Kinga; Sorokowska, Agnieszka

    2017-06-01

    The study of voice perception in congenitally blind individuals allows researchers rare insight into how a lifetime of visual deprivation affects the development of voice perception. Previous studies have suggested that blind adults outperform their sighted counterparts in low-level auditory tasks testing spatial localization and pitch discrimination, as well as in verbal speech processing; however, blind persons generally show no advantage in nonverbal voice recognition or discrimination tasks. The present study is the first to examine whether visual experience influences the development of social stereotypes that are formed on the basis of nonverbal vocal characteristics (i.e., voice pitch). Groups of 27 congenitally or early-blind adults and 23 sighted controls assessed the trustworthiness, competence, and warmth of men and women speaking a series of vowels, whose voice pitches had been experimentally raised or lowered. Blind and sighted listeners judged both men's and women's voices with lowered pitch as being more competent and trustworthy than voices with raised pitch. In contrast, raised-pitch voices were judged as being warmer than were lowered-pitch voices, but only for women's voices. Crucially, blind and sighted persons did not differ in their voice-based assessments of competence or warmth, or in their certainty of these assessments, whereas the association between low pitch and trustworthiness in women's voices was weaker among blind than sighted participants. This latter result suggests that blind persons may rely less heavily on nonverbal cues to trustworthiness compared to sighted persons. Ultimately, our findings suggest that robust perceptual associations that systematically link voice pitch to the social and personal dimensions of a speaker can develop without visual input.

  11. Developing standards for malaria microscopy: external competency assessment for malaria microscopists in the Asia-Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Sania

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria diagnosis has received renewed interest in recent years, associated with the increasing accessibility of accurate diagnosis through the introduction of rapid diagnostic tests and new World Health Organization guidelines recommending parasite-based diagnosis prior to anti-malarial therapy. However, light microscopy, established over 100 years ago and frequently considered the reference standard for clinical diagnosis, has been neglected in control programmes and in the malaria literature and evidence suggests field standards are commonly poor. Microscopy remains the most accessible method for parasite quantitation, for drug efficacy monitoring, and as a reference of assessing other diagnostic tools. This mismatch between quality and need highlights the importance of the establishment of reliable standards and procedures for assessing and assuring quality. This paper describes the development, function and impact of a multi-country microscopy external quality assurance network set up for this purpose in Asia. Methods Surveys were used for key informants and past participants for feedback on the quality assurance programme. Competency scores for each country from 14 participating countries were compiled for analyses using paired sample t-tests. In-depth interviews were conducted with key informants including the programme facilitators and national level microscopists. Results External assessments and limited retraining through a formalized programme based on a reference slide bank has demonstrated an increase in standards of competence of senior microscopists over a relatively short period of time, at a potentially sustainable cost. The network involved in the programme now exceeds 14 countries in the Asia-Pacific, and the methods are extended to other regions. Conclusions While the impact on national programmes varies, it has translated in some instances into a strengthening of national microscopy standards and offers a

  12. A longitudinal assessment of vocabulary retention in symbol-competent chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beran, Michael J; Heimbauer, Lisa A

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies from the 1960s to 1990s assessed the symbolic competence of great apes and other animals. These studies provided varying forms of evidence that some species were capable of symbolically representing their worlds, both through productive symbol use and comprehension of symbolic stimuli. One such project at the Language Research Center involved training chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) to use lexigram symbols (geometric visual stimuli that represented objects, actions, locations, and individuals). Those studies now are more than 40 years old, and only a few of the apes involved in those studies are still alive. Three of these chimpanzees (and a fourth, control chimpanzee) were assessed across a 10-year period from 1999 to 2008 for their continued knowledge of lexigram symbols and, in the case of one chimpanzee, the continued ability to comprehend human speech. This article describes that longitudinal assessment and outlines the degree to which symbol competence was retained by these chimpanzees across that decade-long period. All chimpanzees showed retention of lexigram vocabularies, although there were differences in the number of words that were retained across the individuals. One chimpanzee also showed continual retention of human speech perception. These retained vocabularies largely consisted of food item names, but also names of inedible objects, locations, individuals, and some actions. Many of these retained words were for things that are not common in the daily lives of the chimpanzees and for things that are rarely requested by the chimpanzees. Thus, the early experiences of these chimpanzees in symbol-rich environments have produced long-lasting memories for symbol meaning, and those competencies have benefited research in a variety of topics in comparative cognition.

  13. A longitudinal assessment of vocabulary retention in symbol-competent chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Beran

    Full Text Available A number of studies from the 1960s to 1990s assessed the symbolic competence of great apes and other animals. These studies provided varying forms of evidence that some species were capable of symbolically representing their worlds, both through productive symbol use and comprehension of symbolic stimuli. One such project at the Language Research Center involved training chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes to use lexigram symbols (geometric visual stimuli that represented objects, actions, locations, and individuals. Those studies now are more than 40 years old, and only a few of the apes involved in those studies are still alive. Three of these chimpanzees (and a fourth, control chimpanzee were assessed across a 10-year period from 1999 to 2008 for their continued knowledge of lexigram symbols and, in the case of one chimpanzee, the continued ability to comprehend human speech. This article describes that longitudinal assessment and outlines the degree to which symbol competence was retained by these chimpanzees across that decade-long period. All chimpanzees showed retention of lexigram vocabularies, although there were differences in the number of words that were retained across the individuals. One chimpanzee also showed continual retention of human speech perception. These retained vocabularies largely consisted of food item names, but also names of inedible objects, locations, individuals, and some actions. Many of these retained words were for things that are not common in the daily lives of the chimpanzees and for things that are rarely requested by the chimpanzees. Thus, the early experiences of these chimpanzees in symbol-rich environments have produced long-lasting memories for symbol meaning, and those competencies have benefited research in a variety of topics in comparative cognition.

  14. Intercultural competence in medical education - essential to acquire, difficult to assess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, John

    2009-09-01

    Determining student acquisition of intercultural competence (awareness, skills, knowledge and attitudes) is necessary in medical courses. However, addressing students' learning needs and developing effective tools to measure development of intercultural competence is challenging. Where this is done inadequately, skills may be overlooked or simplistic, one dimensional notions of culture be reinforced. This article examines aspects of the OSCE station development process, raising questions about how and when to assess acquisition of IC in undergraduate medical courses. It cautions against development of assessment tools which may lack authenticity and require students to engage in interactions which are unnatural. It argues for skills consistent with IC to be viewed as part of, and not separate from, the broad spectrum of skills which are a feature of any sensitive and appropriate doctor-patient interaction. Finally it advocates careful consideration of the optimum time to assess students' capacity to demonstrate IC in their interactions with patients, peers and staff, suggesting that this should come in later rather than earlier years, following theoretical, experiential and reflective learning.

  15. Assessment of core competencies in childhood attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jennifer J; Hertzer, John L; Findling, Robert L

    2011-02-01

    The study assessed competencies and practices of a large group of healthcare providers in childhood attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and identified barriers to improving care. Methods were self-assessment using an Internet questionnaire with a standardized patient case; analysis compared with professional association recommendations; and measurement of provider self-efficacy levels. Of 2,103 participants who completed the assessment, 44% were only "somewhat confident" and 20% "not at all confident" in being up-to-date in diagnosis and management of ADHD. Based on American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology's Child and Adolescent Core Competencies and American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Practice Parameters, participants selected appropriate responses 60% of the time, 57% for items on diagnosis, and 62% for treatment. Providers under-used the family interview, and relied on ADHD rating scales for diagnosis. Lack of effective communication between provider, child, family, and teachers was the top barrier cited, yet participants rated involving the child and family as very important. In conclusion, education should include training on effective communication with the family to improve care for children with ADHD and dedication of further health education resources in the area of ADHD is needed.

  16. [The assessment of free volitional competence in cases of suicide with life insurance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cording, C; Sass, H

    2009-09-01

    The German insurance law stipulates that in cases of suicide, life insurance providers are not obligated to pay within a restriction period of 3 years, except if it can be proven that the suicide was committed in a state that precludes the insured's ability to make free choices. The relevant psychiatric assessment criteria are identical with those of mental and volitional competence in general. However, a different profile of patients and other disorders are involved, mainly depressive syndromes, but also chronic alcoholism as well as schizophrenic and paranoid syndromes. The assessment has to be based on the legal concept of mental disorder, which is different from the current diagnostic classifications in psychiatry. Decisive psychopathological symptoms are impairment of reality control, of volition and/or of judgement. These posthumous assessments are particularly difficult and require a thorough knowledge of psychopathology as well as of the relevant jurisdiction. The latter is summarised in this article.

  17. The Construct Validity and Reliability of an Assessment Tool for Competency in Cochlear Implant Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patorn Piromchai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We introduce a rating tool that objectively evaluates the skills of surgical trainees performing cochlear implant surgery. Methods. Seven residents and seven experts performed cochlear implant surgery sessions from mastoidectomy to cochleostomy on a standardized virtual reality temporal bone. A total of twenty-eight assessment videos were recorded and two consultant otolaryngologists evaluated the performance of each participant using these videos. Results. Interrater reliability was calculated using the intraclass correlation coefficient for both the global and checklist components of the assessment instrument. The overall agreement was high. The construct validity of this instrument was strongly supported by the significantly higher scores in the expert group for both components. Conclusion. Our results indicate that the proposed assessment tool for cochlear implant surgery is reliable, accurate, and easy to use. This instrument can thus be used to provide objective feedback on overall and task-specific competency in cochlear implantation.

  18. Assessment of competence in clinical practice--a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girot, E A

    1993-04-01

    Continuous practical assessments for those programmes leading to registration began to be introduced in the UK in the late 1970s and were generally hailed, certainly by educationalists, as being a much more valid, reliable and realistic method of assessment (Quinn 1989). However, now, with the increasing pressures on the role of the ward manager, the introduction of supernumerary status for learner nurses and shorter clinical placements, it could be argued that continuous practical assessment is in great danger of becoming no assessment at all. The extent to which experienced nurses are able to supervise and give the continued feedback on learners' progress that was considered such a significant improvement on the previous systems of assessments is questioned. On examination of the literature, consideration will be given to how experienced nurses measure and help others measure performance. The tools practitioners use to assist them in forming their judgements need to be examined. Are practitioners concerned with students' successful completion of tasks or do they rely on intuitive judgements in the complexity of the 'real life' situation? If intuitive judgements are involved, do they have any foundations, or are they concerned with mere random form completion and personality measures? In particular examination will be made of the various measurement tools available and different approaches to the assessment of competency in the 'real world' of nursing practice. Since the United Kingdom Central Council (UKCC) formally introduced the Nurses' Rules (Nurses, Midwives and Health Visitors Act 1979) in 1983, all courses throughout the UK, leading to registration had to begin to formally prepare students to work towards the achievement of the identified competencies.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Can Source Triangulation Be Used to Overcome Limitations of Self-Assessments? Assessing Educational Needs and Professional Competence of Pharmacists Practicing in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheir, Nadir; Al-Ismail, Muna Said; Al-Nakeeb, Reem

    2017-01-01

    Continuing professional development activities should be designed to meet the identified personal goals of the learner. This article aims to explore the self-perceived competency levels and the professional educational needs of pharmacists in Qatar and to compare these with observations of pharmacy students undergoing experiential training in pharmacies (students) and pharmacy academics, directors, and managers (managers). Three questionnaires were developed and administered to practicing pharmacists, undergraduate pharmacy students who have performed structured experiential training rotations in multiple pharmacy outlets in Qatar and pharmacy managers. The questionnaires used items extracted from the National Association of Pharmacy Regulatory Authorities (NAPRA) Professional competencies for Canadian pharmacists at entry to practice and measured self- and observed pharmacists' competency and satisfaction with competency level. Training and educational needs were similar between the pharmacists and observers, although there was trend for pharmacists to choose more fact-intensive topics compared with observers whose preferences were toward practice areas. There was no association between the competency level of pharmacists as perceived by observers and as self-assessed by pharmacists (P ≤ .05). Pharmacists' self-assessed competency level was consistently higher than that reported by students (P ≤ .05). The results suggest that the use of traditional triangulation might not be sufficient to articulate the professional needs and competencies of practicing pharmacists as part of a strategy to build continuing professional development programs. Pharmacists might have a limited ability to accurately self-assess, and observer assessments might be significantly different from self-assessments which present a dilemma on which assessment to consider closer to reality. The processes currently used to evaluate competence may need to be enhanced through the use of well

  20. Addressing Mental Health Disparities through Clinical Competence Not Just Cultural Competence: The Need for Assessment of Sociocultural Issues in the Delivery of Evidence-Based Psychosocial Rehabilitation Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Ann-Marie; Brekke, John S

    2008-01-01

    Recognition of ethnic/racial disparities in mental health services has not directly resulted in the development of culturally responsive psychosocial interventions. There remains a fundamental need for assessment of sociocultural issues that have been linked with the expectations, needs, and goals of culturally diverse consumers with severe and persistent mental illness. The authors posit that embedding the assessment of sociocultural issues into psychosocial rehabilitation practice is one step in designing culturally relevant empirically supported practices. It becomes a foundation on which practitioners can examine the relevance of their interventions to the diversity encountered in everyday practice. This paper provides an overview of the need for culturally and clinically relevant assessment practices and asserts that by improving the assessment of sociocultural issues the clinical competence of service providers is enhanced. The authors offer a conceptual framework for linking clinical assessment of sociocultural issues to consumer outcomes and introduce an assessment tool adapted to facilitate the process in psychosocial rehabilitation settings. Emphasizing competent clinical assessment skills will ultimately offer a strategy to address disparities in treatment outcomes for understudied populations of culturally diverse consumers with severe and persistent mental illness. PMID:18778881

  1. Development of RAD-Score: A Tool to Assess the Procedural Competence of Diagnostic Radiology Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isupov, Inga; McInnes, Matthew D F; Hamstra, Stan J; Doherty, Geoffrey; Gupta, Ashish; Peddle, Susan; Jibri, Zaid; Rakhra, Kawan; Hibbert, Rebecca M

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a tool to assess the procedural competence of radiology trainees, with sources of evidence gathered from five categories to support the construct validity of tool: content, response process, internal structure, relations to other variables, and consequences. A pilot form for assessing procedural competence among radiology residents, known as the RAD-Score tool, was developed by evaluating published literature and using a modified Delphi procedure involving a group of local content experts. The pilot version of the tool was tested by seven radiology department faculty members who evaluated procedures performed by 25 residents at one institution between October 2014 and June 2015. Residents were evaluated while performing multiple procedures in both clinical and simulation settings. The main outcome measure was the percentage of residents who were considered ready to perform procedures independently, with testing conducted to determine differences between levels of training. A total of 105 forms (for 52 procedures performed in a clinical setting and 53 procedures performed in a simulation setting) were collected for a variety of procedures (eight vascular or interventional, 42 body, 12 musculoskeletal, 23 chest, and 20 breast procedures). A statistically significant difference was noted in the percentage of trainees who were rated as being ready to perform a procedure independently (in postgraduate year [PGY] 2, 12% of residents; in PGY3, 61%; in PGY4, 85%; and in PGY5, 88%; p radiology trainees with high levels of construct validity in multiple domains. Implementation of the tool in the radiology residency curriculum is planned and can play an instrumental role in the transition to competency-based radiology training.

  2. Using cloud-based mobile technology for assessment of competencies among medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferenchick, Gary S; Solomon, David

    2013-01-01

    Valid, direct observation of medical student competency in clinical settings remains challenging and limits the opportunity to promote performance-based student advancement. The rationale for direct observation is to ascertain that students have acquired the core clinical competencies needed to care for patients. Too often student observation results in highly variable evaluations which are skewed by factors other than the student's actual performance. Among the barriers to effective direct observation and assessment include the lack of effective tools and strategies for assuring that transparent standards are used for judging clinical competency in authentic clinical settings. We developed a web-based content management system under the name, Just in Time Medicine (JIT), to address many of these issues. The goals of JIT were fourfold: First, to create a self-service interface allowing faculty with average computing skills to author customizable content and criterion-based assessment tools displayable on internet enabled devices, including mobile devices; second, to create an assessment and feedback tool capable of capturing learner progress related to hundreds of clinical skills; third, to enable easy access and utilization of these tools by faculty for learner assessment in authentic clinical settings as a means of just in time faculty development; fourth, to create a permanent record of the trainees' observed skills useful for both learner and program evaluation. From July 2010 through October 2012, we implemented a JIT enabled clinical evaluation exercise (CEX) among 367 third year internal medicine students. Observers (attending physicians and residents) performed CEX assessments using JIT to guide and document their observations, record their time observing and providing feedback to the students, and their overall satisfaction. Inter-rater reliability and validity were assessed with 17 observers who viewed six videotaped student-patient encounters and by

  3. Using cloud-based mobile technology for assessment of competencies among medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary S. Ferenchick

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Valid, direct observation of medical student competency in clinical settings remains challenging and limits the opportunity to promote performance-based student advancement. The rationale for direct observation is to ascertain that students have acquired the core clinical competencies needed to care for patients. Too often student observation results in highly variable evaluations which are skewed by factors other than the student’s actual performance. Among the barriers to effective direct observation and assessment include the lack of effective tools and strategies for assuring that transparent standards are used for judging clinical competency in authentic clinical settings. We developed a web-based content management system under the name, Just in Time Medicine (JIT, to address many of these issues. The goals of JIT were fourfold: First, to create a self-service interface allowing faculty with average computing skills to author customizable content and criterion-based assessment tools displayable on internet enabled devices, including mobile devices; second, to create an assessment and feedback tool capable of capturing learner progress related to hundreds of clinical skills; third, to enable easy access and utilization of these tools by faculty for learner assessment in authentic clinical settings as a means of just in time faculty development; fourth, to create a permanent record of the trainees’ observed skills useful for both learner and program evaluation. From July 2010 through October 2012, we implemented a JIT enabled clinical evaluation exercise (CEX among 367 third year internal medicine students. Observers (attending physicians and residents performed CEX assessments using JIT to guide and document their observations, record their time observing and providing feedback to the students, and their overall satisfaction. Inter-rater reliability and validity were assessed with 17 observers who viewed six videotaped student

  4. Using cloud-based mobile technology for assessment of competencies among medical students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, David

    2013-01-01

    Valid, direct observation of medical student competency in clinical settings remains challenging and limits the opportunity to promote performance-based student advancement. The rationale for direct observation is to ascertain that students have acquired the core clinical competencies needed to care for patients. Too often student observation results in highly variable evaluations which are skewed by factors other than the student’s actual performance. Among the barriers to effective direct observation and assessment include the lack of effective tools and strategies for assuring that transparent standards are used for judging clinical competency in authentic clinical settings. We developed a web-based content management system under the name, Just in Time Medicine (JIT), to address many of these issues. The goals of JIT were fourfold: First, to create a self-service interface allowing faculty with average computing skills to author customizable content and criterion-based assessment tools displayable on internet enabled devices, including mobile devices; second, to create an assessment and feedback tool capable of capturing learner progress related to hundreds of clinical skills; third, to enable easy access and utilization of these tools by faculty for learner assessment in authentic clinical settings as a means of just in time faculty development; fourth, to create a permanent record of the trainees’ observed skills useful for both learner and program evaluation. From July 2010 through October 2012, we implemented a JIT enabled clinical evaluation exercise (CEX) among 367 third year internal medicine students. Observers (attending physicians and residents) performed CEX assessments using JIT to guide and document their observations, record their time observing and providing feedback to the students, and their overall satisfaction. Inter-rater reliability and validity were assessed with 17 observers who viewed six videotaped student-patient encounters and by

  5. Assessment Training: A Precondition for Teachers' Competencies and Use of Classroom Assessment Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koloi-Keaikitse, Setlhomo

    2016-01-01

    Student assessment, particularly at classroom level, remains an integral part of teaching and learning and is a driving force for the implementation of educational policies and practices in many countries. Nevertheless, problems associated with teachers' classroom assessment practices continue to exist in schools and research shows that teachers…

  6. Assessment Training: A Precondition for Teachers' Competencies and Use of Classroom Assessment Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koloi-Keaikitse, Setlhomo

    2016-01-01

    Student assessment, particularly at classroom level, remains an integral part of teaching and learning and is a driving force for the implementation of educational policies and practices in many countries. Nevertheless, problems associated with teachers' classroom assessment practices continue to exist in schools and research shows that teachers…

  7. [Competency to provide cross-cultural nursing care for people with disability: a self-assessment instrument].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliuca, Lorita Marlena Freitag; Maia, Evanira Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    This study addresses the Cross-Cultural Nursing Theory, which develops foundations for care delivery, as the essence of nursing work, based on anthropology, which supports and explains culture and care aspects. This reflexive study was based on the Theory Analysis method to study the concepts aimed at constructing a Self-Assessment Instrument of Competencies for Cross-Cultural Care to Disabled People. After analyzing the main concepts, Culturally Competent Care and Cultural Communication, were analyzed, as well as the sub-concepts: assessment, values, bio-cultural diversity, skill, knowledge, identity, code and cultural empathy. The analysis cycle of cultural values supporting self-assessment was summarized. The Self-Assessment Instrument of Competencies for Cross-Cultural Nursing Care to Disabled People was constructed, specifically deafness, blindness or low sight, physical impairment and mental impairment, regarding greeting, accepting, helping, knowing and advocating. It is concluded that the theory joins characteristics for care delivery to disabled people.

  8. Criterion validity of a competency-based assessment center in medical education – a 4-year follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Rotthoff

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Core competencies have progressively gained importance in medical education. In other contexts, especially personnel selection and development, assessment centers (ACs are used to assess competencies, but there is only a limited number of studies on competency-based ACs in medical education. To the best of our knowledge, the present study provides the first data on the criterion-related validity of a competency-based AC in medical education. Methods: We developed an AC tailored to measure core competencies relevant to medical education (social-ethical, communicative, self, and teaching and tested its validity in n=30 first-year medical students using 3- to 4-year follow-up measures such as (a objective structured clinical examinations (OSCE on basic clinical skills (n=26, (b OSCE on communication skills (n=21, and (c peer feedback (n=18. The AC contained three elements: interview, group discussion, and role play. Additionally, a self-report questionnaire was provided as a basis for the interview. Results: Baseline AC average score and teaching competency correlated moderately with the communication OSCE average score (r=0.41, p=0.03, and r=0.38, p=0.04, respectively. Social-ethical competency in the AC showed a very strong convergent association with the communication OSCE average score (r=0.60, p0.05. Conclusion: The results showed that competency-based ACs can be used at a very early stage of medical training to successfully predict future performance in core competencies.

  9. Competency Skills Assessment: Successes and Areas for Improvement Identified During Collaboration Between Informaticists and a National Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipes, Carolyn; Hunter, Kathy; McGonigle, Dee; Hebda, Toni; Hill, Taryn; Lamblin, Jean

    2016-01-01

    The Association of periOperative Registered Nurses (AORN) approached the Nursing Informatics Research Team (NIRT) with a request to collaborate and conduct a competency assessment for their organization. An online tool was developed to determine current technology in perioperative settings. This presentation shares the process used to conduct research that led to a method for assessing perioperative nurses' competencies skills in their practice as well as identified gaps in curricula that faculty could address. Both successes and areas for improvement are detailed. The outcome of the process demonstrated a need to understand what skills are being assessed as AORN did not know what technology existed or how existing equipment was being used.

  10. Using Virtual Reality Simulation Environments to Assess Competence for Emergency Medicine Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Jillian L; Taekman, Jeffrey M; Dev, Parvati; Danforth, Douglas R; Mohan, Deepika; Kman, Nicholas; Crichlow, Amanda; Bond, William F

    2017-09-09

    Immersive learning environments that use virtual simulation technology are increasingly relevant as medical learners train in an environment of restricted clinical training hours and a heightened focus on patient safety. We conducted a consensus process with a breakout group of the 2017 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference "Catalyzing System Change Through Health Care Simulation: Systems, Competency, and Outcomes." This group examined the current uses of virtual simulation in training and assessment, including limitations and challenges in implementing virtual simulation into medical education curricula. We discuss the role of virtual environments in formative and summative assessment. Finally, we offer recommended areas of focus for future research examining virtual simulation technology for assessment, including high stakes assessment in medical education. Specifically, we discuss needs for determination of areas of focus for virtual simulation training and assessment, development and exploration of virtual platforms, automated feedback within such platforms, and evaluation of effectiveness and validity of virtual simulation education. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Educational Assessment Attitudes, Competence, Knowledge, and Practices: An Exploratory Study of Muscat Teachers in the Sultanate of Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkharusi, Hussain; Aldhafri, Said; Alnabhani, Hilal; Alkalbani, Muna

    2012-01-01

    Educational assessment can be a powerful tool in enhancing classroom instruction and student performance. Yet, its effectiveness relies on the beliefs and knowledge of those who apply it on a daily classroom basis. This study explored attitudes, competence, knowledge, and practices of teachers about educational assessment. Participants were 165…

  12. Development and assessment of generic competences in engineering degrees through creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Anguís

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Now more than ever, the social demands on the University require huge amounts of creativity to respond to the socio-economic context of today’s society. Creativity is an ability that requires teamwork as a framework for discussion of the particular ideas of its members, and a scenario for the development of necessary attitudes of tolerance. The experience described was developed with the help received by the University of Seville, within the Call for Teaching Innovation and Improvement Projects of the University’s First Teaching Plan during the 2010-2011 academic year, in a subject corresponding to the second term of the first year of Building Engineering. The experience was designed to develop a very short video with subject-related content to motivate the development of creativity among the students, and which would allow them to understand their own strengths and weaknesses in this area. It was also designed to achieve certain transverse competences included within the learning objectives of the subject, such as the ability to communicate through word and image in the context of a project in which teamwork is promoted. Given that such competences are always difficult to assess, the experience also sought to explore different approaches through peer assessment (using rubrics designed specifically for this case and assessments involving agents external to the educational process. The results obtained show that, from the context of teaching technical subjects, it is possible to develop creativity together with the specific knowledge of the subject, and this experience is proposed as a new model for its teaching.

  13. Rater agreement of a test battery designed to assess adolescents' resistance training skill competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Lisa; Reynolds, John; Faigenbaum, Avery D; Smith, Jordan J; Harries, Simon; Lubans, David R

    2015-01-01

    The study aim was to assess rater agreement of the Resistance Training Skills Battery (RTSB) for adolescents. The RTSB provides an assessment of resistance training skill competency and includes six exercises. The RTSB can be used to assess performance and progress in adolescent resistance training programmes and to provide associated feedback to participants. Individual skill scores are based on the number of performance criteria successfully demonstrated and an overall resistance training skill quotient (RTSQ) is created by summing the six skill scores. The eight raters had varying experience in movement skill assessment and resistance training and completed a 2-3h training session in how to assess resistance training performance using the RTSB. The raters then completed an assessment on six skills for 12 adolescents (mean age=15.1 years, SD=1.0, six male and six female) in a randomised order. Agreement between seven of the eight raters was high (20 of the 21 pairwise correlations were greater than 0.7 and 13 of the 21 were greater than 0.8). Correlations between the eighth rater and each of the other seven raters were generally lower (0.45-0.78). Most variation in the assigned RTSB scores (67%) was between cases, a relatively small amount of the variation (10%) was between raters and the remainder (23%) was between periods within raters. The between-raters coefficient of variation was approximately 5%. The RTSB can be used reliably by those with experience in movement skill assessment and resistance training to assess the resistance skill of adolescents. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Assessing Nephrological Competence among Geriatricians: A Proof of Concept Internet Survey.

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    Raffaele Antonelli Incalzi

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is highly prevalent in the elderly and negatively impacts survival and health status. Thus, nephrological competence is mandatory for a skilled geriatrician. The present study aimed to assess nephrological competence in a sample of geriatricians recruited through a web survey. To this aim, a 12-items questionnaire was produced by an expert panel of nephrologists and geriatricians and was available online for members of the Italian Society of Gerontology and Geriatrics (SIGG. Two-hundred-eighty-seven geriatricians volunteered to fill in the questionnaire. The majority of them indirectly estimated the glomerular filtration rate (GFR using mainly the Cockroft-Gault (C-G formula. Selected nephrological exams, such as urinary Na and serum D-vitamin measurements, did not qualify as routine exams although the majority of geriatricians supplemented their patients with fat-soluble secosteroids. Ten percent of geriatricians asked for nephrological consultation only for stage 5 CKD patients and 30,9% only for stage 4 or 5. Erythropoietin supplementation was common practice for the majority of geriatricians, while only one third of them systematically used a procedure intended to prevent the contrast induced nephropathy (CIN. Finally, an alleged 50% adherence to the international guidelines for the management of CKD patients emerged from the questionnaire. Overall, results from this survey strongly recommend promoting nephrological education among geriatricians. Didactic standards for in training geriatricians need to be updated and the cooperation between geriatrics and nephrological societies promoted.

  15. COMPETENCY ASSESSMENT OF CLOTHING FASHION DESIGN: RASCH MEASUREMENT MODEL FOR CONSTRUCT VALIDITY AND RELIABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arasinah Kamis

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Clothing Fashion Design (CFaD assessment instrument was used to measure the level of competence among instructors in Skills Training Institute (STI. This study was conducted to select items that are valid, fair, and of quality. The CFaD instrument consists of 97 Likert scale items with six constructs of designing, pattern drafting, computer, sewing, creative, and trade/entrepreneurship. The instrument was administered for the first stage of testing to 95 instructors in STI who teach in the field of fashion and clothing. The Rasch measurement model was used to obtain the reliability, validity, relevance of person items and unidimensionality of items. Therefore, Winsteps software version 3.72.3 was used to analyze the data. The findings showed that the items in the six constructs of skill competency have high reliability, from 0.63 to 0.96 for the Likert scale items. Meanwhile, the reliability of the respondents was estimated between 0.93-0.98. The analysis also indicate that 11 out of the 97 items were misfit while 32 items need to be repaired prior to the decision of dropping some of them due to lack of unidimensionality and differing levels of difficulty. Decisions to remove or repair were made so that the instrument is more fair and equitable to all respondents, and reliable.

  16. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of an Instrument to Assess Cross-Cultural Competence of Healthcare Professionals (CCCHP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerda Bernhard

    Full Text Available Cultural competence of healthcare professionals (HCPs is recognized as a strategy to reduce cultural disparities in healthcare. However, standardised, valid and reliable instruments to assess HCPs' cultural competence are notably lacking. The present study aims to 1 identify the core components of cultural competence from a healthcare perspective, 2 to develop a self-report instrument to assess cultural competence of HCPs and 3 to evaluate the psychometric properties of the new instrument.The conceptual model and initial item pool, which were applied to the cross-cultural competence instrument for the healthcare profession (CCCHP, were derived from an expert survey (n = 23, interviews with HCPs (n = 12, and a broad narrative review on assessment instruments and conceptual models of cultural competence. The item pool was reduced systematically, which resulted in a 59-item instrument. A sample of 336 psychologists, in advanced psychotherapeutic training, and 409 medical students participated, in order to evaluate the construct validity and reliability of the CCCHP.Construct validity was supported by principal component analysis, which led to a 32-item six-component solution with 50% of the total variance explained. The different dimensions of HCPs' cultural competence are: Cross-Cultural Motivation/Curiosity, Cross-Cultural Attitudes, Cross-Cultural Skills, Cross-Cultural Knowledge/Awareness and Cross-Cultural Emotions/Empathy. For the total instrument, the internal consistency reliability was .87 and the dimension's Cronbach's α ranged from .54 to .84. The discriminating power of the CCCHP was indicated by statistically significant mean differences in CCCHP subscale scores between predefined groups.The 32-item CCCHP exhibits acceptable psychometric properties, particularly content and construct validity to examine HCPs' cultural competence. The CCCHP with its five dimensions offers a comprehensive assessment of HCPs' cultural competence, and has

  17. Validation of a New Instrument for Self-Assessment of Nurses’ Core Competencies in Palliative Care

    OpenAIRE

    Kari Slåtten; Ove Hatlevik; Lisbeth Fagerström

    2014-01-01

    Competence can be seen as a prerequisite for high quality nursing in clinical settings. Few research studies have focused on nurses’ core competencies in clinical palliative care and few measurement tools have been developed to explore these core competencies. The purpose of this study was to test and validate the nurses’ core competence in palliative care (NCPC) instrument. A total of 122 clinical nurse specialists who had completed a postbachelor program in palliative care at two university...

  18. Review and Assessment of Personnel Competencies and Job Description Models and Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    and Tier 3 ( workplace competencies such as teamwork , customer focus, and problem solving). The next level comprises industry-related competencies...competencies that all employees should possess (e.g., teamwork ). There are also common competencies that cluster for a group of jobs (e.g., project...expected for all/most employees (e.g., communicate clearly) or considered standard workplace skills (e.g., attention to detail). In addition, general

  19. Random Number Simulations Reveal How Random Noise Affects the Measurements and Graphical Portrayals of Self-Assessed Competency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Nuhfer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-assessment measures of competency are blends of an authentic self-assessment signal that researchers seek to measure and random disorder or "noise" that accompanies that signal. In this study, we use random number simulations to explore how random noise affects critical aspects of self-assessment investigations: reliability, correlation, critical sample size, and the graphical representations of self-assessment data. We show that graphical conventions common in the self-assessment literature introduce artifacts that invite misinterpretation. Troublesome conventions include: (y minus x vs. (x scatterplots; (y minus x vs. (x column graphs aggregated as quantiles; line charts that display data aggregated as quantiles; and some histograms. Graphical conventions that generate minimal artifacts include scatterplots with a best-fit line that depict (y vs. (x measures (self-assessed competence vs. measured competence plotted by individual participant scores, and (y vs. (x scatterplots of collective average measures of all participants plotted item-by-item. This last graphic convention attenuates noise and improves the definition of the signal. To provide relevant comparisons across varied graphical conventions, we use a single dataset derived from paired measures of 1154 participants' self-assessed competence and demonstrated competence in science literacy. Our results show that different numerical approaches employed in investigating and describing self-assessment accuracy are not equally valid. By modeling this dataset with random numbers, we show how recognizing the varied expressions of randomness in self-assessment data can improve the validity of numeracy-based descriptions of self-assessment.

  20. Using core competencies to build an evaluative framework: outcome assessment of the University of Guelph Master of Public Health program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britten, Nicole; Wallar, Lauren E; McEwen, Scott A; Papadopoulos, Andrew

    2014-07-31

    Master of Public Health programs have been developed across Canada in response to the need for graduate-level trained professionals to work in the public health sector. The University of Guelph recently conducted a five-year outcome assessment using the Core Competencies for Public Health in Canada as an evaluative framework to determine whether graduates are receiving adequate training, and identify areas for improvement. A curriculum map of core courses and an online survey of University of Guelph Master of Public Health graduates comprised the outcome assessment. The curriculum map was constructed by evaluating course outlines, assignments, and content to determine the extent to which the Core Competencies were covered in each course. Quantitative survey results were characterized using descriptive statistics. Qualitative survey results were analyzed to identify common themes and patterns in open-ended responses. The University of Guelph Master of Public Health program provided a positive learning environment in which graduates gained proficiency across the Core Competencies through core and elective courses, meaningful practicums, and competent faculty. Practice-based learning environments, particularly in collaboration with public health organizations, were deemed to be beneficial to students' learning experiences. The Core Competencies and graduate surveys can be used to conduct a meaningful and informative outcome assessment. We encourage other Master of Public Health programs to conduct their own outcome assessments using a similar framework, and disseminate these results in order to identify best practices and strengthen the Canadian graduate public health education system.

  1. Competency Assessment in Senior Emergency Medicine Residents for Core Ultrasound Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jessica N; Kendall, John; Smalley, Courtney

    2015-11-01

    Quality resident education in point-of-care ultrasound (POC US) is becoming increasingly important in emergency medicine (EM); however, the best methods to evaluate competency in graduating residents has not been established. We sought to design and implement a rigorous assessment of image acquisition and interpretation in POC US in a cohort of graduating residents at our institution. We evaluated nine senior residents in both image acquisition and image interpretation for five core US skills (focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST), aorta, echocardiogram (ECHO), pelvic, central line placement). Image acquisition, using an observed clinical skills exam (OSCE) directed assessment with a standardized patient model. Image interpretation was measured with a multiple-choice exam including normal and pathologic images. Residents performed well on image acquisition for core skills with an average score of 85.7% for core skills and 74% including advanced skills (ovaries, advanced ECHO, advanced aorta). Residents scored well but slightly lower on image interpretation with an average score of 76%. Senior residents performed well on core POC US skills as evaluated with a rigorous assessment tool. This tool may be developed further for other EM programs to use for graduating resident evaluation.

  2. Veterinary student competence in equine lameness recognition and assessment: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starke, Sandra D; May, Stephen A

    2017-08-12

    The development of perceptual skills is an important aspect of veterinary education. The authors investigated veterinary student competency in lameness evaluation at two stages, before (third year) and during (fourth/fifth year) clinical rotations. Students evaluated horses in videos, where horses were presented during trot on a straight line and in circles. Eye-tracking data were recorded during assessment on the straight line to follow student gaze. On completing the task, students filled in a structured questionnaire. Results showed that the experienced students outperformed inexperienced students, although even experienced students may classify one in four horses incorrectly. Mistakes largely arose from classifying an incorrect limb as lame. The correct detection of sound horses was at chance level. While the experienced student cohort primarily looked at upper body movement (head and sacrum) during lameness assessment, the inexperienced cohort focused on limb movement. Student self-assessment of performance was realistic, and task difficulty was most commonly rated between 3 and 4 out of 5. The inexperienced students named a considerably greater number of visual lameness features than the experienced students. Future dedicated training based on the findings presented here may help students to develop more reliable lameness assessment skills. © British Veterinary Association (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Integrating learning assessment and supervision in a competency framework for clinical workplace education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Embo, M.; Driessen, E.; Valcke, M.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2015-01-01

    Although competency-based education is well established in health care education, research shows that the competencies do not always match the reality of clinical workplaces. Therefore, there is a need to design feasible and evidence-based competency frameworks that fit the workplace reality. This t

  4. Assessing Changes in Counselor Trainees' Multicultural Competence Related to Service Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Debbiesiu L.; Rosen, Adam D.; McWhirter, J. Jeffries

    2014-01-01

    This mixed methods study examined changes in self-reported multicultural competence and distress reactions of 32 counselor trainees engaged in service learning. Whereas 3 trainees significantly increased in self-reported multicultural competence, 5 significantly decreased. Trainees who significantly increased in multicultural competence reported…

  5. ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK BASED METHOD OF ASSESSMENT OF STUDENTS` FOREIGN LANGUAGE COMPETENCE BY THE GROUP OF EXPERTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olha V. Zastelo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article the method of the integral assessment of the level of students` foreign language communicative competence by the group of experts through the complex test in a foreign language is considered. The use of mathematical methods and modern specialized software during complex testing of students significantly improves the expert methods, particularly in the direction of increasing the reliability of the assessment. Capitalizing analytical software environment realizes the simulation of non-linear generalizations based on artificial neural networks, which increases the accuracy of the estimate and allows further efficient use of the competent experts` experience gained in the model.

  6. An evaluation of a collaborative approach to the assessment of competence among nursing students of three universities in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Tom; Fealy, Gerard M; Kelly, Mary; Mc Guinness, Ann Martina; Timmins, Fiona

    2009-07-01

    This paper describes a collaborative project conducted by the three principal universities in Dublin to implement and evaluate a competence assessment tool for use by nursing students and their assessors while on clinical placements. In the greater Dublin area, students from three universities are required to share clinical placement sites in specialist practice areas. Accordingly, a liaison group was established among the three universities, in order to develop a common competence-based assessment tool and related protocols for its use. The newly developed competence assessment tool was implemented in 2004, and in 2006, an evaluation of its use was conducted by means of a survey among a non-probability sample of students and their preceptors. Results from the survey data indicate generally positive attitudes to the structure of the tool and positive experiences of its operation in practice. However, respondents indicated dissatisfaction with the amount of time spent completing the assessment tool and the amount of preparation needed to carry out the assessment process. Recommendations for practice include the need to consider placement length in the design process and the need to focus on user preparation. This study also points to the benefits of inter-institutional collaboration in competence assessment and the possible implications for future work in this area.

  7. A Training Program Using an Audience Response System to Calibrate Dental Faculty Members Assessing Student Clinical Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Michael J; Metz, Cynthia J; Durski, Marcelo T; Aiken, Sean A; Mayfield, Theresa G; Lin, Wei-Shao

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of calibration training of departmental faculty and competency graders using an audience response system on operative dentistry concepts across 12 months. The training sessions were designed to further solidify the process and equilibration of clinical opinions among faculty members and provide a more calibrated grading assessment during patient care for student performance feedback. Four (quarterly) calibration sessions occurred over 12 months in 2015. The first session was considered the baseline (control value) for this study. Pre- and post-calibration interrater agreement was assessed. Additionally, a pre and post assessment with ten Likert-scale questions was used to measure students' perceptions of instructional consistency. The results showed that a statistically significant increase in conceptual knowledge scores occurred for both departmental faculty members and competency graders across each of the four sessions (one-factor ANOVA; paudience response system for departmental and competency graders was found to be effective in facilitating a discussion forum, calibrating clinical assessments, and improving student perceptions. The positive results from this study support the value of dental schools' introducing faculty development programs to ensure consistent instruction for assessing dental student competence.

  8. Gap analysis: a method to assess core competency development in the curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fater, Kerry H

    2013-01-01

    To determine the extent to which safety and quality improvement core competency development occurs in an undergraduate nursing program. Rapid change and increased complexity of health care environments demands that health care professionals are adequately prepared to provide high quality, safe care. A gap analysis compared the present state of competency development to a desirable (ideal) state. The core competencies, Nurse of the Future Nursing Core Competencies, reflect the ideal state and represent minimal expectations for entry into practice from pre-licensure programs. Findings from the gap analysis suggest significant strengths in numerous competency domains, deficiencies in two competency domains, and areas of redundancy in the curriculum. Gap analysis provides valuable data to direct curriculum revision. Opportunities for competency development were identified, and strategies were created jointly with the practice partner, thereby enhancing relevant knowledge, attitudes, and skills nurses need for clinical practice currently and in the future.

  9. Using portfolios in the assessment of learning and competence: the impact of four models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endacott, Ruth; Gray, Morag A; Jasper, Melanie A; McMullan, Mirjam; Miller, Carolyn; Scholes, Julie; Webb, Christine

    2004-12-01

    This paper discusses the diversity of portfolio use highlighted in a study funded by the English National Board for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting exploring the effectiveness of portfolios in assessing learning and competence (). Data collection was undertaken in two stages: through a national telephone survey of Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) delivering nursing programmes (stage 1); and through four in-depth case studies of portfolios use (stage 2). Data collection for stage two was undertaken through field work in four HEIs purporting to use portfolios as an assessment strategy, and their associated clinical placement settings. Four approaches to the structure and use of portfolios were evident from the stage 2 case study data; these were characterised as: the shopping trolley; toast rack; spinal column and cake mix. The case study data also highlighted the evolutionary nature of portfolio development and a range of additional factors influencing the effectiveness of their use, including language of assessment, degree of guidance and expectations of clinical and academic staff.

  10. The development and application of an instrument for assessing resident competence during preanesthesia consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Filho, Getúlio Rodrigues; Schonhorst, Leonardo

    2004-07-01

    In this study, we aimed to construct, validate, and apply an instrument for assessing resident performance at outpatient preanesthesia consultation (PAC). A focus group and a Delphi panel of experts defined component items of a typical outpatient PAC, which could be used as indicators of competence. Items were incorporated in a checklist, which was further validated in a sample of consultations performed by board-certified anesthesiologists. The resulting instrument contained 37 items, grouped into five domains (physician-patient relationship, medical history, physical examination, patient education, and preanesthesia records), with high construct validity, high discriminant validity, moderate internal consistency, and high probability of inter-raters agreement. The instrument was applied to evaluate the performance of seven first-year residents at 317 consecutive PAC. Data were analyzed by constructing exponentially weighted moving average charts for domain and total scores. Statistically significant differing levels of performance could be consistently detected. Applying exponentially weighted moving average charts to the sequential analysis of the developed checklist scores can reliably assess resident performance at the devised criteria. The Preanesthesia Consultation Scoring Checklist is a potentially useful instrument for both formative and summative assessment of residents during their training in processes involved in outpatient preanesthesia evaluation.

  11. Competency assessment and development among health-care leaders: results of a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarbrough Landry, Amy; Stowe, Michael; Haefner, James

    2012-05-01

    In light of the challenges involved in leading a health care organization, it is important that the executives and managers charged with doing so are competent in a variety of areas. However, leading at all organizational levels does not necessarily require the same levels and types of competencies. The purpose of this research is to determine how well competency training works in health care organizations, and to obtain a better understanding of the competencies needed for leaders at different points of their careers and at various organizational levels. Ten health care management competency domains thought to positively influence job performance for health care executives are presented. The study seeks to answer four hypotheses related to self-perceptions of competencies and training opportunities at various hierarchical levels. A survey method was used to sample a subset of the healthcare executive population in the USA, based on three variables of interest, competency training opportunities, self-reported level of competency and hierarchical level. A series of Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests were conducted to identify perceived differences in both competency level and training opportunities among respondents of various hierarchical levels. The most significant result of our research is that competency training is effective in health care organizations. The implications and need for additional research are discussed.

  12. La supuesta neutralidad de la evaluación por competencias The alleged neutrality of competence-based assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Revilla Castro

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available La gestión por competencias se ha convertido en los últimos treinta años en uno de los temas recurrentes cuando se habla de la gestión integral en las organizaciones del siglo xxi. Los cuatro pilares sobre los que descansa dicha gestión son la selección, la formación, la retribución y la evaluación. El objetivo del presente artículo es el análisis de uno de esos elementos clave: la evaluación por competencias. El punto de partida de esta investigación es la tendencia, en aumento, a valorar a los trabajadores tanto por sus cualificaciones como por sus actitudes, dos elementos centrales en la definición de competencia. A través del análisis de diferentes entrevistas a expertos y encargados de recursos humanos implicados en la gestión por competencias, se pretende visualizar las dificultades de encontrar elementos objetivos a los que atenerse a la hora de evaluar las competencias de los trabajadores.In the last 30 years competence-based management has become a recurring theme in the integral management of 21st-century institutions. The four pillars that support competence-based management are selection, training, remuneration and assessment. The aim of the present article is to analyse one of these key elements: competence-based assessment. The starting point of the study is the increasing tendency to assess employees on the basis not only of their qualifications but also of their attitudes, two elements that are fundamental to the definition of competence. By analyzing a variety of interviews with experts and people in charge of human resources involved in competence-based management, we aim to highlight how difficult it is to find objective elements on which to base an assessment of the competences of employees.

  13. The development of stereotype content: The use of warmth and competence in assessing social groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussos, Gina; Dunham, Yarrow

    2016-01-01

    Past research suggests that warmth and competence are primary dimensions of social perception used by adults to understand social groups. The current study investigated whether children use these two dimensions to structure their representations of familiar groups. Results indicated that adult warmth and competence judgments were independent from one another and placed groups in warmth by competence space in ways consistent with past work. However, children showed some sensitivity to both dimensions but did not treat them as independent. Children's judgments of competence were closely aligned with adult judgments, but their judgments of warmth were influenced by factors that solely influenced adult judgments of competence. These data suggest that children develop an understanding of competence as an independent dimension prior to developing an understanding of warmth as an independent dimension and that their judgments of warmth may reflect a more general summing of all available evaluative information. Implications for children's developing understanding of the broader intergroup landscape are discussed.

  14. Validity and reliability of portfolio assessment of competency in a baccalaureate dental hygiene program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C.

    This study examined validity and reliability of portfolio assessment using Messick's (1996, 1995) unified framework of construct validity. Theoretical and empirical evidence was sought for six aspects of construct validity. The sample included twenty student portfolios. Each portfolio were evaluated by seven faculty raters using a primary trait analysis scoring rubric. There was a significant relationship (r = .81--.95; p portfolio and rubric (1.15%) indicating that while the seven subscales varied in difficulty level, the relative standing of individual portfolios was maintained across subscales. Faculty rater variance accounted for only 1.28% of total variance. A phi coefficient of .86, analogous to a reliability coefficient in classical test theory, was obtained in the Decision study by increasing the subscales to fourteen and decreasing faculty raters to three. There was a significant relationship between portfolios and grade point average (r = .70; p portfolios and the Central Regional Dental Testing Service examination was both weak and nonsignificant (r = .19; p > .05). An open-ended survey was used to elicit student feedback on portfolio development. A majority of the students (76%) perceived value in the development of programmatic portfolios. In conclusion, the pattern of findings from this study suggest that portfolios can serve as a valid and reliable measure for assessing student competency.

  15. [NIC as a tool for assessing competences of nursing students in clinical placement at surgical units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celma Vicente, Matilde; Ajuria-Imaz, Eloisa; Lopez-Morales, Manuel; Fernandez-Marín, Pilar; Menor-Castro, Alicia; Cano-Caballero Galvez, Maria Dolores

    2015-01-01

    This paper shows the utility of a NIC standardized language to assess the extent of nursing student skills at Practicum in surgical units To identify the nursing interventions classification (NIC) that students can learn to perform in surgical units. To determine the level of difficulty in learning interventions, depending on which week of rotation in clinical placement the student is. Qualitative study using Delphi consensus technique, involving nurses with teaching experience who work in hospital surgical units, where students undertake the Practicum. The results were triangulated through a questionnaire to tutors about the degree of conformity. A consensus was reached about the interventions that students can achieve in surgical units and the frequency in which they can be performed. The level of difficulty of each intervention, and the amount of weeks of practice that students need to reach the expected level of competence was also determined. The results should enable us to design better rotations matched to student needs. Knowing the frequency of each intervention that is performed in each unit determines the chances of learning it, as well as the indicators for its assessment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Information Competence of Doctoral Students in Information Science in Spain and Latin America: A Self-Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Maria; Fernandez-Ramos, Andres; Sanchez, Gerardo; Meneses, Grizly

    2013-01-01

    The study was carried out with students of official doctoral programs of Information Science in four universities in Spain and Latin America with the purpose of finding out, through self-assessments, student perceptions of their own information competence. A survey was designed to determine self-perceptions of knowledge, skills and attitudes…

  17. Development and evaluation of a student-centered multimedia self-assessment instrument for social-communicative competence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakx, A.W.E.A.; Sijtsma, K.; van der Sanden, J.M.M.; Taconis, R.

    2002-01-01

    Communication plays an important role in many professional contexts. This is especially true for students in the field of social work. The aim of this study was to develop formative, self-regulated multimedia self-assessment of social-communicative competencies for social work students. First, a

  18. Modifying Defining Issues Test (DIT) as a Tool for Assessing Secondary Students' Social-Emotional Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ee, Jessie

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of an alternative instrument to assess the social-emotional competence (SEC) of secondary school students in Singapore. The instrument was used in a larger study to explore an approach to infuse social-emotional learning in the curriculum for children in school. The design of this research instrument is based on the…

  19. A Framework for Assessing High School Students' Intercultural Communicative Competence in a Computer-Mediated Language Learning Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hsinyi; Lu, Wei-Hsin; Wang, Chao-I

    2009-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to identify the essential dimensions of intercultural communicative competence (ICC) and to establish a framework for assessing the ICC level of high school students that included a self-report inventory and scoring rubrics for online interaction in intercultural contexts. A total of 472 high school students from…

  20. Development and evaluation of a student-centered multimedia self-assessment instrument for social-communicative competence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakx, A.W.E.A.; Sijtsma, K.; van der Sanden, J.M.M.; Taconis, R.

    2002-01-01

    Communication plays an important role in many professional contexts. This is especially true for students in the field of social work. The aim of this study was to develop formative, self-regulated multimedia self-assessment of social-communicative competencies for social work students. First, a pil

  1. Development and evaluation of a student-centered multimedia self-assessment instrument for social-communicative competence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakx, A.W.E.A.; Sijtsma, K.; van der Sanden, J.M.M.; Taconis, R.

    2002-01-01

    Communication plays an important role in many professional contexts. This is especially true for students in the field of social work. The aim of this study was to develop formative, self-regulated multimedia self-assessment of social-communicative competencies for social work students. First, a pil

  2. Contradictions in the Practices of Training for and Assessment of Competency: A Case Study from the Maritime Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emad, Gholamreza; Roth, Wolff Michael

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to highlight the contradictions in the current maritime education and training system (MET), which is based on competency-based education, training and assessment, and to theorize the failure to make the training useful. Design/methodology/approach: A case study of education and training in the international…

  3. Self-reported confidence in prescribing skills correlates poorly with assessed competence in fourth-year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, David J; Tichelaar, Jelle; van Agtmael, Michiel A; de Vries, Theo P G M; Richir, Milan C

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between students' self-reported confidence and their objectively assessed competence in prescribing. We assessed the competence in several prescribing skills of 403 fourth-year medical students at the VU University Medical Center, the Netherlands, in a formative simulated examination on a 10-point scale (1 = very low; 10 = very high). Afterwards, the students were asked to rate their confidence in performing each of the prescribing skills on a 5-point Likert scale (1 = very unsure; 5 = very confident). Their assessments were then compared with their self-confidence ratings. Students' overall prescribing performance was adequate (7.0 ± 0.8), but they lacked confidence in 2 essential prescribing skills. Overall, there was a weak positive correlation (r = 0.2, P confidence and actual competence. Therefore, this study suggests that self-reported confidence is not an accurate measure of prescribing competence, and that students lack insight into their own strengths and weaknesses in prescribing. Future studies should focus on developing validated and reliable instruments so that students can assess their prescribing skills.

  4. Face validity and reliability of a pictorial instrument for assessing fundamental movement skill perceived competence in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Lisa M; Ridgers, Nicola D; Zask, Avigdor; Salmon, Jo

    2015-01-01

    To determine reliability and face validity of an instrument to assess young children's perceived fundamental movement skill competence. Validation and reliability study. A pictorial instrument based on the Test Gross Motor Development-2 assessed perceived locomotor (six skills) and object control (six skills) competence using the format and item structure from the physical competence subscale of the Pictorial Scale of Perceived Competence and Acceptance for Young Children. Sample 1 completed object control items in May (n=32) and locomotor items in October 2012 (n=23) at two time points seven days apart. Children were asked at the end of the test-retest their understanding of what was happening in each picture to determine face validity. Sample 2 (n=58) completed 12 items in November 2012 on a single occasion to test internal reliability only. Sample 1 children were aged 5-7 years (M=6.0, SD=0.8) at object control assessment and 5-8 years at locomotor assessment (M=6.5, SD=0.9). Sample 2 children were aged 6-8 years (M=7.2, SD=0.73). Intra-class correlations assessed in Sample 1 children were excellent for object control (intra-class correlation=0.78), locomotor (intra-class correlation=0.82) and all 12 skills (intra-class correlations=0.83). Face validity was acceptable. Internal consistency was adequate in both samples for each subscale and all 12 skills (alpha range 0.60-0.81). This study has provided preliminary evidence for instrument reliability and face validity. This enables future alignment between the measurement of perceived and actual fundamental movement skill competence in young children. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A Quantitative Assessment of the Research Chefs Association Core Competencies for the Practicing Culinologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissett, Rachel L.; Cheng, Michael S. H.; Brannan, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Professional organizations have linked core competency to professional success and competitive strategy. The Research Chefs Assn. (RCA) recently released 43 core competencies for practicing culinologists. Culinology[R] is a profession that links skills of culinary arts and food science and technology in the development of food products. An online…

  6. Cultural Competence and Social Work Education: Moving toward Assessment of Practice Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, Jayshree S.; Osteen, Philip; Shipe, Stacy

    2016-01-01

    Social work educators are responsible for ensuring that future practitioners are culturally competent and have the ability to work effectively with people from different backgrounds. The purpose of this article is to address the current limitations in measuring cultural competence and to report the results of a qualitative study examining…

  7. The Assessment of the Relationships among Loneliness, Affinity-Seeking Competence, and Communication Apprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woltjen, Lisa M.; Zakahi, Walter R.

    A study investigated the relationships among dyadic apprehension and levels of loneliness, dyadic apprehension and affinity-seeking competence, and affinity-seeking competence and levels of loneliness. Subjects, 198 undergraduate students, completed the Revised University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) Loneliness Scale, the Personal Report of…

  8. Continuing Medical Education Reform for Competency-Based Education and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahrwold, David L.

    2005-01-01

    The development of competency-based education and evaluation for residents and practicing physicians by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS), respectively, includes the competency of practice-based learning and improvement. Efforts to implement this and the other competencies…

  9. A Case Study of Higher Education Competency Models Utilizing an Assessment Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uden, Jayme

    2012-01-01

    The overall purpose of this study is to explore the creation and implementation of competency models in higher education masters level preparation programs. The study answers five research questions. Why and how did two higher education preparation programs create a professional competency model for the graduate students in the program and what…

  10. A novel pain interprofessional education strategy for trainees: assessing impact on interprofessional competencies and pediatric pain knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Judith P; Stinson, Jennifer; Campbell, Fiona; Stevens, Bonnie; Wagner, Susan J; Simmons, Brian; White, Meghan; van Wyk, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Health care trainees⁄students lack knowledge and skills for the comprehensive clinical assessment and management of pain. Moreover, most teaching has been limited to classroom settings within each profession. To develop and evaluate the feasibility and preliminary outcomes of the 'Pain-Interprofessional Education (IPE) Placement', a five-week pain IPE implemented in the clinical setting. The utility (content validity, readability, internal consistency and practical considerations) of the outcome measures was also evaluated. A convenience sample of 21 trainees from eight professions was recruited over three Pain-IPE Placement cycles. Pre- and postcurriculum assessment included: pain knowledge (Pediatric Pain Knowledge and Attitudes Survey), IPE attitudes (Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale [IEPS]) and IPE competencies (Interprofessional Care Core Competencies Global Rating Scales [IPC-GRS]), and qualitative feedback on process⁄acceptability. Recruitment and retention met expectations. Qualitative feedback was excellent. IPE measures (IEPS and IPC-GRS) exhibited satisfactory utility. Postcurriculum scores improved significantly: IEPS, PIEPS and IPC-GRS are useful measures of IPE-related learning. At more advanced training levels, a single pain-knowledge questionnaire may not accurately reflect learning across diverse professions. The Pain-IPE Placement is a successful collaborative learning model within a clinical context that successfully changed interprofessional competencies. The present study represents a first step at defining and assessing change in interprofessional competencies gained from Pain-IPE.

  11. The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) as a strategy for assessing clinical competence in midwifery education in Ireland: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Valerie; Muldoon, Kathryn; Biesty, Linda

    2012-09-01

    In Ireland, to register as a midwife, all student midwives must be deemed competent to practice with the assessment of competence an essential component of midwifery education. A variety of assessment strategies, including observed practice, clinical interviews, portfolios of reflection, the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) and written examination papers, are utilised to assess midwifery students' clinical competence. In this paper, a critical review of the OSCE as a strategy for assessing clinical competence in one third level institution in Ireland is offered. Although utilised for assessing competence across a range of areas (e.g. obstetric emergencies and pharmacology/drug administration), the use of the OSCE for assessing midwifery students' competence in lactation and infant feeding practices, as an example for this paper, is described. The advantages, disadvantages, validity and reliability of the OSCE, as an assessment strategy, are critically explored. Recognising that no single assessment strategy can provide all the information required to assess something as complex as clinical performance, the OSCE, when viewed alongside other forms of assessment, and with relevance to the topic under examination, may be considered a valuable strategy for enhancing the assessment of students' clinical competence, and for embracing diversity within midwifery education and training.

  12. Training and assessment of experimental competencies from a distance: Optical spectrometry via the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoms, L.-J.; Girwidz, R.

    2016-05-01

    Assessment of experimental competencies is not yet well established. We just began an empirical pilot study, too. This study aims to examine if secondary school students may successfully use a predefined remote lab activity to introduce themselves to atomic physics. The analysis of spectra is a fundamental component for the understanding of wave optics and color perception. Hence, every student should have the opportunity to conduct own optical emission experiments. Since spectrometers are expensive and an accurate calibration is necessary to achieve energy distribution spectra of high quality, we developed a remotely controlled laboratory. We evaluated the experimental set-up and the accompanying worksheet with groups of two to four students in a laboratory condition. Additionally, the emerged learning material was brought to school and tested as a homework activity with 9th-graders replacing the regular introduction to atomic physics. The results show that the experiment presented here can be used by ninth grade students and is useful in connection with the created material for the self-regulated introduction to atomic physics in the context of homework.

  13. Perceived sports competence mediates the relationship between childhood motor skill proficiency and adolescent physical activity and fitness: a longitudinal assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Beurden Eric

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this paper was to investigate whether perceived sports competence mediates the relationship between childhood motor skill proficiency and subsequent adolescent physical activity and fitness. Methods In 2000, children's motor skill proficiency was assessed as part of a school-based physical activity intervention. In 2006/07, participants were followed up as part of the Physical Activity and Skills Study and completed assessments for perceived sports competence (Physical Self-Perception Profile, physical activity (Adolescent Physical Activity Recall Questionnaire and cardiorespiratory fitness (Multistage Fitness Test. Structural equation modelling techniques were used to determine whether perceived sports competence mediated between childhood object control skill proficiency (composite score of kick, catch and overhand throw, and subsequent adolescent self-reported time in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness. Results Of 928 original intervention participants, 481 were located in 28 schools and 276 (57% were assessed with at least one follow-up measure. Slightly more than half were female (52.4% with a mean age of 16.4 years (range 14.2 to 18.3 yrs. Relevant assessments were completed by 250 (90.6% students for the Physical Activity Model and 227 (82.3% for the Fitness Model. Both hypothesised mediation models had a good fit to the observed data, with the Physical Activity Model accounting for 18% (R2 = 0.18 of physical activity variance and the Fitness Model accounting for 30% (R2 = 0.30 of fitness variance. Sex did not act as a moderator in either model. Conclusion Developing a high perceived sports competence through object control skill development in childhood is important for both boys and girls in determining adolescent physical activity participation and fitness. Our findings highlight the need for interventions to target and improve the perceived sports competence of youth.

  14. Dealing with Daily Challenges in Dementia (Deal-id Study): An Experience Sampling Study to Assess Caregivers' Sense of Competence and Experienced Positive Affect in Daily Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Knippenberg, Rosalia J M; de Vugt, Marjolein E; Ponds, Rudolf W; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Verhey, Frans R J

    2017-08-01

    Positive emotions and feelings of competence seem to play an important role in the well-being of caregivers of people with dementia. Both are likely to fluctuate constantly throughout the caretaking process. Unlike standard retrospective methods, momentary assessments in daily life can provide insight into these moment-to-moment fluctuations. Therefore, in this study both retrospective and momentary assessments were used to examine the relationship between caregivers' sense of competence and their experienced positive affect (PA) in daily life. Thirty Dutch caregivers provided momentary data on PA and daily sense of competence ratings for 6 consecutive days using the experience sampling methodology. Additionally, they reported retrospectively on their sense of competence with a traditional questionnaire. A positive association was found between retrospective and daily measured sense of competence. Caregivers reported corresponding levels of sense of competence on both measures. Both daily and retrospective sense of competence were positively associated with the experienced levels of PA. However, daily sense of competence appeared to be the strongest predictor. Regarding the variability in PA, only daily sense of competence showed a significant association, with a higher daily sense of competence predicting a more stable PA pattern. This study provides support for redirecting caregiver support interventions toward enhancement of positive rather than negative experiences and focusing more on caregivers' momentary emotional experiences. Momentary assessments are a valuable addition to standard retrospective measures and provide a more comprehensive and dynamic view of caregiver functioning. Copyright © 2016 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Proposed Model for Assessing Defendant Competence to Self-Represent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mitzi M S; Gutheil, Thomas G

    2016-12-01

    The increasing number of criminal defendants who are choosing to self-represent poses special challenges for legal systems with regard to the types of limits that should be placed on a defendant's basic human right to defend himself without the assistance of counsel. While courts strive to respect the dignity and autonomy of the defendant that are encompassed in this right, they also want to ensure that justice is delivered and the dignity of the courtroom is maintained. The Supreme Court of the United States, in its opinion in Indiana v. Edwards (2008), held that while the right to self-represent recognized in Faretta v. California (1975) remains, states and trial judges can place limits on a defendant's right to self-representation when a defendant lacks the mental capacities needed to prepare and conduct an adequate defense. Following the court's lead, we first examine the types and range of tasks that a defendant who chooses to self-represent must perform. Based on this analysis, we propose a five-part model that forensic practitioners can use as a conceptual framework for assessing whether a defendant has deficits that would affect his competence to perform critical self-representation tasks. The five areas that the model recommends practitioners assess are whether a defendant can engage in goal-directed behaviors, has sufficient communication skills, can engage in constructive social intercourse, can control his emotions in an adversarial arena, and has the cognitive abilities needed to argue his case adequately. It is recommended that practitioners use the model in their testimony to provide the trier of fact with a comprehensive report of the areas in which a defendant has deficits that will prevent him from protecting his interests in receiving a fair and equitable trial. © 2016 American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law.

  16. Assessing dental students' competence: best practice recommendations in the performance assessment literature and investigation of current practices in predoctoral dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albino, Judith E N; Young, Stephen K; Neumann, Laura M; Kramer, Gene A; Andrieu, Sandra C; Henson, Lindsey; Horn, Bruce; Hendricson, William D

    2008-12-01

    In this article, the Task Force on Student Outcomes Assessment of the American Dental Education Association's Commission on Change and Innovation in Dental Education describes the current status of student outcomes assessment in U.S. dental education. This review is divided into six sections. The first summarizes the literature on assessment of dental students' performance. Section two discusses catalysts, with a focus on problem-based learning, for development of new assessment methods, while the third section presents several resources and guides that can be used to inform selection of assessment techniques for various domains of competence. The fourth section describes the methodology and results of a 2008 survey of current assessment practices in U.S. dental schools. In the fifth section, findings from this survey are discussed within the context of competency-based education, the educational model for the predoctoral curriculum endorsed by the American Dental Education Association and prescribed by the Commission on Dental Accreditation. The article concludes with a summary of assessments recommended as optimal strategies to measure three components of professional competence based on the triangulation model. The survey of assessment practices in predoctoral education was completed by 931 course directors, representing 45 percent of course directors nationwide, from fifty-three of the fifty-six U.S. dental schools. Survey findings indicate that five traditional mainstays of student performance evaluation-multiple-choice testing, lab practicals, daily grades, clinical competency exams, and procedural requirements-still comprise the primary assessment tools in dental education. The survey revealed that a group of newer assessment techniques, although frequently identified as best practices in the literature and commonly used in other areas of health professions education, are rarely employed in predoctoral dental education.

  17. Assessing the impact on intercultural competencies when engineering students solve problems in multicultural teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Peter; Nygaard, Bjørn; Madsen, Linda

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a research project regarding internationalization and development of intercultural competencies at 4 different engineering educations in Denmark. All Danish engineering education institutes have for several years been educating both Danish and foreign students coming either......’ intercultural competencies. It was decided to start a formal research project to investigate some of the existing experiments helping mixed teams to cope with project work in intercultural teams. During spring 2010 the setup for the research project was developed by a group of representatives from...... of intercultural competencies amongst the students, especially if there was a measurable influence in their appreciation of working with people from another culture than their own. The setup was to setup a baseline for the individual student’s intercultural competencies at the beginning of the semester, using...

  18. Global assessment of internal audit competence: Does one size fi t all?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Business Review ... the perceived levels of importance of general competencies, technical skills and behavioural skills needed by internal auditors. The results indicated that globally internal auditors have similar perceptions ...

  19. International survey of veterinarians to assess the importance of competencies in professional practice and education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bok, H.G.; Teunissen, P.W.; Boerboom, T.B.; Rhind, S.M.; Baillie, S.; Tegzes, J.; Annandale, H.; Matthew, S.; Torgersen, A.; Hecker, K.G.; Hardi-Landerer, C.M.; Gomez-Lucia, E.; Ahmad, B.; Muijtjens, A.M.; Jaarsma, D.A.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Beukelen, P. van

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the perceived importance of specific competencies in professional veterinary practice and education among veterinarians in several countries. DESIGN: Survey-based prospective study. SAMPLE: 1,137 veterinarians in 10 countries. PROCEDURES: Veterinarians were invited via email

  20. Integrating and Assessing Structural Competency in an Innovative Prehealth Curriculum at Vanderbilt University

    OpenAIRE

    Metzl, Jonathan M.; Petty, JuLeigh

    2016-01-01

    Problem Structural competency is a framework for conceptualizing and addressing health-related social justice issues that emphasizes diagnostic recognition of economic and political conditions producing and racializing inequalities in health. Strategies are needed to teach prehealth undergraduate students concepts central to structural competency (e.g., structural inequity, structural racism, structural stigma) and to evaluate their impact. Approach The curriculum for Vanderbilt University?s ...

  1. Instruments for competing claims on natural resources : preliminary assessment of KB 2011 projects

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    This report results from the project ‘Competing Claims on Natural Resources (overkoepelend instrumentarium)’ in the KB programme of 2011. In short the terms of reference of this report are as follows: Give an overview of instruments developed in other KB projects relevant for the analysis of Competing Claims on Natural Resources. Questions include: What are feasible instruments? What are their advantages and disadvantages? What can or should be applied in specific cases? Is there a need to va...

  2. About the digital competence of new University students. An initial assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinta ESPUNY VIDAL

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Planning how to teach nuclear competence in icT in the new eHea adapted degrees is a new challenge that implies different actions: among them stands out an initial, necessary evaluation about the digital competence, by the means of a questionnaire, to design the process of icT-learning along the whole degree, focusing on the Campus Terres de l’ebre at the Universitat Rovira i Virgili.

  3. The Application of Fuzzy-ANP and SD Software in the Assessment of Organic Chemistry Teachers' Bilingual Teaching Competency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijun Zhang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of organic chemistry teachers' bilingual teaching competency plays a crucial role in improving their teaching quality. In this study, 13 indices in five aspects: teaching quality, teaching content, teaching organization, teaching methods, and teaching effects, have been identified as impact indices for assessing the bilingual teaching competency of organic chemistry teachers. Meanwhile, the ANP (Analytic Network Process model is set up, and the Super Decisions software is used to compute the comprehensive weight of the 13 impact factors. A five-degree fuzzy comment set including very satisfied, satisfied, mediocre, dissatisfied, and very dissatisfied is established. The five-degree evaluation data on the 13 impact indices are collected through questionnaires distributed to students. Index weights and evaluation data are synthesized to obtain the final assessment results of organic chemistry teachers' bilingual teaching competency. The Fuzzy-ANP model has taken the internal relations and external dependency of 13 indices into consideration, which makes the assessment results more authentic and reliable. Therefore, this model is worthy of a more extensive application.

  4. The Taxonomy for Learning, Teaching and Assessing: Current Practices at Polytechnics in Bangladesh and its Effects in Developing Students' Competences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruque A. Haolader

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Polytechnics in Bangladesh endeavour to produce quality graduates for national and international job markets. The quality of graduates depends on several factors. This study examines the implementation process of the polytechnic curriculum with the objectives of determining the current level of practices in learn-ing/teaching material design, in delivering curriculum content, in assessing students and its effect on students' competence development. Data was collected through observation, opinion survey and competence test. Qualitative and quantitative methodologies were used for data interpretation and analysis in this descriptive type of research study. Findings revealed that the learning materials are mainly theory oriented and mostly cover those contents usually common in exams. About half of teachers are aware of the taxonomy for learning, teaching and assessing, but they rarely put importance on it. In the classroom, teachers spend only a little time for delivering content at the level of apply/analyse. However, a significant number of tasks performed in labs are practical and occupation relevant and can be classified at higher levels of the taxonomy. In student assessment, the test-items assess mainly theoretical knowledge at the level of remember. The effect of these practices is reflected in demonstrating student performance in a competence test. The study concludes with some recommendations.

  5. Assessing an organizational culture instrument based on the Competing Values Framework: Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohr David C

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Competing Values Framework (CVF has been widely used in health services research to assess organizational culture as a predictor of quality improvement implementation, employee and patient satisfaction, and team functioning, among other outcomes. CVF instruments generally are presented as well-validated with reliable aggregated subscales. However, only one study in the health sector has been conducted for the express purpose of validation, and that study population was limited to hospital managers from a single geographic locale. Methods We used exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses to examine the underlying structure of data from a CVF instrument. We analyzed cross-sectional data from a work environment survey conducted in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA. The study population comprised all staff in non-supervisory positions. The survey included 14 items adapted from a popular CVF instrument, which measures organizational culture according to four subscales: hierarchical, entrepreneurial, team, and rational. Results Data from 71,776 non-supervisory employees (approximate response rate 51% from 168 VHA facilities were used in this analysis. Internal consistency of the subscales was moderate to strong (α = 0.68 to 0.85. However, the entrepreneurial, team, and rational subscales had higher correlations across subscales than within, indicating poor divergent properties. Exploratory factor analysis revealed two factors, comprising the ten items from the entrepreneurial, team, and rational subscales loading on the first factor, and two items from the hierarchical subscale loading on the second factor, along with one item from the rational subscale that cross-loaded on both factors. Results from confirmatory factor analysis suggested that the two-subscale solution provides a more parsimonious fit to the data as compared to the original four-subscale model. Conclusion This study suggests that there may be problems

  6. Comparing the MMPI-2 scale scores of parents involved in parental competency and child custody assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resendes, John; Lecci, Len

    2012-12-01

    MMPI-2 scores from a parent competency sample (N = 136 parents) are compared with a previously published data set of MMPI-2 scores for child custody litigants (N = 508 parents; Bathurst et al., 1997). Independent samples t tests yielded significant and in some cases substantial differences on the standard MMPI-2 clinical scales (especially Scales 4, 8, 2, and 0), with the competency sample obtaining higher clinical scores as well as higher scores on F, FB, VRIN, TRIN, and L, but lower scores on K, relative to the custody sample. Despite the higher scores in the competency sample, MMPI-2 mean scores did not exceed the clinical cutoff (T > 65). Moreover, the present competency sample essentially replicates the MMPI-2 scores of a previously published competency sample, suggesting that the present findings are representative of that population. The present findings suggest that separate reference groups be used when conducting child custody vs. parental competency evaluations, as these appear to be distinct populations despite there being similarities in the testing circumstances.

  7. Competence is Competence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bramming, Pia

    2004-01-01

    The article will address competence, its' diffusion, application, and the consequence of this application within the field of Human Resource Management (HRM). The concept competence-in-practice will be presented and in conclusion the article will consider implications and possibilities of compete...

  8. AN INTERNAL MEDICINE SIMULATED PRACTICAL EXAM FOR ASSESSMENT OF CLINICAL COMPETENCY IN 3RD YEAR MEDICAL STUDENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodamer, Cheryl; Feldman, Moshe; Kushinka, Jeffrey; Brock, Ellen; Dow, Alan; Evans, Jessica A.; Bearman, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Achieving standardized assessment of medical student competency in patient care is a challenge. Simulation may provide unique contributions to overall assessment. We developed an Internal Medicine Standardized Simulation Based Examination (SSBE) for the 3rd year clerkship to assess students’ medical knowledge, diagnostic skills, and clinical management skills. We assessed convergent and test-criterion validity by comparing the relationship of SSBE scores with USMLE Step 2 clinical knowledge, shelf exam, eQuiz, OSCE, ward evaluation scores, and overall clerkship grades. We hypothesize that use of the SSBE will allow for a more reliable assessment of these competencies and add value to existing assessments. Methods A prospective study design was used. The SSBE consisted of a computer based photo quiz and cases on high fidelity simulators. Performance on the SSBE was compared to standardized examinations, clinical evaluations, and overall clerkship grades. Students completed an evaluation of the experience. Results Two hundred seven students completed the SSBE, with a mean score of 76.69 (SD 7.78). SSBE performance was positively related to other assessments of medical knowledge (eQuiz scores (r(203) =.33, p< .01), shelf exam scores (r(158) =.53, p< .01), and clinical performance (ward scores) (r(163) =.31, p<.01) but not to OSCE scores. There was a positive relationship to final class grades (r(163) = .45, p<.01), shelf exam (r (158) =.52, p<.01) and Step 2 clinical knowledge scores (r(76) =.54, p<.01). The majority (93%) of students agreed that it was a fair exam. Conclusion Our results provide validity evidence for the SSBE as an additional assessment tool that uses a novel approach for evaluating competency in patient care at the clerkship level. PMID:26650701

  9. Designing and implementing web-based tools to assess information competences of social science students at Spanish universities

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We describe the process of designing and applying four web-based tools that assess information competences, focused on Social Science students at Spanish universities. We draw on our previous experience in developing web resources, tests and tutorials for learning information skills (E-coms, Alfamedia, Alfineees, Infolitrans, IL-HUMASS). The toolkit includes: 1) a corpus of texts with a controlled degree of difficulty to be used by students when acquiri...

  10. Driving Care Quality: Aligning Trainee Assessment and Supervision Through Practical Application of Entrustable Professional Activities, Competencies, and Milestones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraccio, Carol; Englander, Robert; Holmboe, Eric S; Kogan, Jennifer R

    2016-02-01

    To address the long-standing challenge of meaningful trainee assessment, the authors reviewed and expanded on the Accountable Assessment for Quality Care and Supervision (AAQCS) equation. The equation proposes that care quality is the product of the interaction between trainee performance (measured by workplace assessment) and supervision (required level of intervention to ensure care quality) in the context of the environment where the care occurs: Trainee performance × Appropriate supervision = Safe, effective patient-centered care. Assessing trainee performance and matching that performance to "appropriate" supervision, however, is fraught with challenges. The authors suggest a unifying framework that integrates entrustable professional activities (EPAs), competencies, and milestones to inform trainee assessment and supervision, thereby enabling the practical application of the AAQCS equation in the workplace. Because the unit of measure for an EPA is the outcome of whether the trainee can safely and effectively perform the professional activity without supervision, the proposed unifying framework directly aligns with the dependent variable in the AAQCS equation: care quality.The value of applying a unifying framework that integrates EPAs, competencies, and milestones to the AAQCS equation in the clinical learning environment lies in its ability to provide supervisors with a shared mental model of performance expectations for trainees, reducing unwanted variability and improving assessment accuracy; guidance for aligning performance milestones of trainees with the needed level of supervisor intervention to ensure care quality; and substrate for specific feedback to improve the trainee's professional development as a way to ensure future care quality.

  11. Assessing the efficacy of LGBT cultural competency training for aging services providers in California's central valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva, Valerie L; Breshears, Elizabeth M; Ringstad, Robin

    2014-01-01

    This study reviews the outcomes of a cultural competency training for aging services providers regarding lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) older adults. Results indicate that participants significantly increased their knowledge, skills, and positive attitudes about working with LGBT older adults, with men and non-LGBT individuals reporting the most gain. Recommendations for future research include determining which factors influence the enduring effects of this type of training and developing a standardized instrument for measuring such success. Legislative and policy changes targeted at requiring this type of cultural competency training for all direct service providers are considered.

  12. Evaluando la competencia social en los ninos (Assessing Young Children's Social Competence). ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, Diane E.; Katz, Lilian G.

    During the past two decades, a convincing body of evidence has accumulated to indicate that unless children achieve minimal social competence by about the age of 6 years, they have a high probability of being at risk into adulthood in several ways. This digest presents a checklist of attributes of child social behavior that teachers are encouraged…

  13. Comparing the MMPI-2 Scale Scores of Parents Involved in Parental Competency and Child Custody Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resendes, John; Lecci, Len

    2012-01-01

    MMPI-2 scores from a parent competency sample (N = 136 parents) are compared with a previously published data set of MMPI-2 scores for child custody litigants (N = 508 parents; Bathurst et al., 1997). Independent samples t tests yielded significant and in some cases substantial differences on the standard MMPI-2 clinical scales (especially Scales…

  14. Validation of a Standardized Multiple-Choice Multicultural Competence Test: Implications for Training, Assessment, and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillem, Angela R.; Bartoli, Eleonora; Bertsch, Kristin N.; McCarthy, Maureen A.; Constant, Kerra; Marrero-Meisky, Sheila; Robbins, Steven J.; Bellamy, Scarlett

    2016-01-01

    The Multicultural Counseling and Psychotherapy Test (MCPT), a measure of multicultural counseling competence (MCC), was validated in 2 phases. In Phase 1, the authors administered 451 test items derived from multicultural guidelines in counseling and psychology to 32 multicultural experts and 30 nonexperts. In Phase 2, the authors administered the…

  15. The Development and Assessment of a New Examination of the Clinical Competence of Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newble, David I.

    1982-01-01

    A problem-based, criterion-referenced examination of clinical competence was developed in order to positively influence students' learning in the direction of the faculty's clinical objectives. High satisfaction and high perceived relevance among students accompanied high reliability and validity. (MSE)

  16. Teaching in Offshore Programmes: An Assessment of University Faculty's Self-Efficacy, Cultural Competence and Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pi-Yun

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to examine the teacher self-efficacy and cultural competence of university faculty in the context of offshore programmes, and the impact of these two constructs on teaching satisfaction, intention and preparedness. A questionnaire survey collected data from the faculty members of universities in Taiwan, a non-English-speaking…

  17. Deficiencies in culturally competent asthma care for ethnic minority children: a qualitative assessment among care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seeleman Conny

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthma outcomes are generally worse for ethnic minority children. Cultural competence training is an instrument for improving healthcare for ethnic minority patients. To develop effective training, we explored the mechanisms in paediatric asthma care for ethnic minority patients that lead to deficiencies in the care process. Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews on care for ethnic minority children with asthma (aged 4-10 years with paediatricians (n = 13 and nurses (n = 3 in three hospitals. Interviews were analysed qualitatively with a framework method, using a cultural competence model. Results Respondents mentioned patient non-adherence as the central problem in asthma care. They related non-adherence in children from ethnic minority backgrounds to social context factors, difficulties in understanding the chronic nature of asthma, and parents’ language barriers. Reactions reported by respondents to patients’ non-adherence included retrieving additional information, providing biomedical information, occasionally providing referrals for social context issues, and using informal interpreters. Conclusions This study provides keys to improve the quality of specialist paediatric asthma care to ethnic minority children, mainly related to non-adherence. Care providers do not consciously recognise all the mechanisms that lead to deficiencies in culturally competent asthma care they provide to ethnic minority children (e.g. communicating mainly from a biomedical perspective and using mostly informal interpreters. Therefore, the learning objectives of cultural competence training should reflect issues that care providers are aware of as well as issues they are unaware of.

  18. Informal Assessment of Competences in the Context of Science Standards in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffl, Iris

    2016-01-01

    Science standards have been a topic in educational research in Austria for about ten years now. Starting in 2005, competency structure models have been developed for junior and senior classes of different school types. After evaluating these models, prototypic tasks were created to point out the meaning of the models to teachers. At the moment,…

  19. National Survey Assessing Perceived Multicultural Competence in Art Therapy Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Multicultural competence is essential to contemporary art therapy practice. Current education standards require that culturally sound theories and practices be taught along with self-awareness, but there is little research on the effects of such training in art therapy. The current study examined data from the Multicultural Awareness, Knowledge,…

  20. An Assessment of Business Competencies Needed by Business Education Students for Entrepreneurial Development in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binuomote, M. O.; Okoli, B. E.

    2015-01-01

    The paper examined the business competencies required by business education students for entrepreneurial development in Nigeria. To achieve the objective, two research questions and two hypotheses were formulated to guide the study. Survey design was adopted for the study. The population comprised 6002 business education students. Six hundred…

  1. Assessing Educational Fundraisers for Competence and Fit Rather than Experience: A Challenge to Conventional Hiring Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Zachary A.

    2010-01-01

    This article challenges current recruitment and hiring practices in educational advancement organizations, while proposing a paradigm shift in addressing the talent shortage of fundraising professionals. A case is presented that competence and fit is more important than experience for successful and productive fundraising outcomes. The paper…

  2. National Survey Assessing Perceived Multicultural Competence in Art Therapy Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Multicultural competence is essential to contemporary art therapy practice. Current education standards require that culturally sound theories and practices be taught along with self-awareness, but there is little research on the effects of such training in art therapy. The current study examined data from the Multicultural Awareness, Knowledge,…

  3. Competency-based veterinary education - An integrative approach to learning and assessment in the clinical workplace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bok, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    When graduating from veterinary school, veterinary professionals must be ready to enter the complex veterinary profession. Therefore, one of the major responsibilities of any veterinary school is to develop training programmes that support students’ competency development on the trajectory from novi

  4. Assessment of Innovation Competency: A Thematic Analysis of Upper Secondary School Teachers' Talk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jan Alexis

    2015-01-01

    The author employed a 3-step qualitative research design with multiple instances of source validation to capture expert teachers' (n = 28) reflections on which manifest signs they would look for when they asses students' innovation competency. The author reports on the thematic analysis of the recorded talk in interaction that occurred in teacher…

  5. Instruments for competing claims on natural resources : preliminary assessment of KB 2011 projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silvis, H.J.; Bodegom, van A.J.

    2011-01-01

    This report results from the project ‘Competing Claims on Natural Resources (overkoepelend instrumentarium)’ in the KB programme of 2011. In short the terms of reference of this report are as follows: Give an overview of instruments developed in other KB projects relevant for the analysis of Competi

  6. Clear the Confusion in Community College-University Transfer: Assess Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Gary W.

    1981-01-01

    An alternative to improve the process of credit transfer from community colleges to universities is described. Aritculation, whereby students move from lower division to upper division educational programs, is based on the measured achievement of competencies rather than the number, level, or kinds of courses taken and credits accumulated. (MLW)

  7. Development of a Tool to Assess Resident Physicians' Perceived Competence for Patient-Centered Obesity Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Amy M.; Brezausek, Carl M.; Hendricks, Peter S.; Agne, April A.; Hankins, Shirley L.; Cherrington, Andrea L.

    2015-01-01

    Physicians report a number of barriers to obesity counseling, among them low perceived competence in the ability to counsel. While there is increasing recognition of the need for resident training on counseling, implementation requires residency programs to have the necessary curricula and tools to evaluate training effectiveness. This study's…

  8. Competencies Development and Self-Assessment in Maintenance Management E-Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathanassiou, Nikos; Pistofidis, Petros; Emmanouilidis, Christos

    2013-01-01

    The maintenance management function requires staff to possess a truly multidisciplinary set of skills. This includes competencies from engineering and information technology to health and safety, management and finance, while also taking into account the normative and legislative issues. This body of knowledge is rarely readily available within a…

  9. Core personal competencies important to entering students' success in medical school: what are they and how could they be assessed early in the admission process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Thomas W; Parrish, Samuel K; Terregino, Carol A; Williams, Joy P; Dunleavy, Dana M; Volsch, Joseph M

    2013-05-01

    Assessing applicants' personal competencies in the admission process has proven difficult because there is not an agreed-on set of personal competencies for entering medical students. In addition, there are questions about the measurement properties and costs of currently available assessment tools. The Association of American Medical College's Innovation Lab Working Group (ILWG) and Admissions Initiative therefore engaged in a multistep, multiyear process to identify personal competencies important to entering students' success in medical school as well as ways to measure them early in the admission process. To identify core personal competencies, they conducted literature reviews, surveyed U.S and Canadian medical school admission officers, and solicited input from the admission community. To identify tools with the potential to provide data in time for pre-interview screening, they reviewed the higher education and employment literature and evaluated tools' psychometric properties, group differences, risk of coaching/faking, likely applicant and admission officer reactions, costs, and scalability. This process resulted in a list of nine core personal competencies rated by stakeholders as very or extremely important for entering medical students: ethical responsibility to self and others; reliability and dependability; service orientation; social skills; capacity for improvement; resilience and adaptability; cultural competence; oral communication; and teamwork. The ILWG's research suggests that some tools hold promise for assessing personal competencies, but the authors caution that none are perfect for all situations. They recommend that multiple tools be used to evaluate information about applicants' personal competencies in deciding whom to interview.

  10. Assessing tomorrow's learners: in competency-based education only a radically different holistic method of assessment will work. Six things we could forget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuwirth, Lambert; Ash, Julie

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we are challenging six traditional notions about assessment that are unhelpful when designing 'assessment for learning'-programmes for competency-based education. We are arguing for the following: Reductionism is not the only way to assure rigour in high-stakes assessment; holistic judgements can be equally rigorous. Combining results of assessment parts only because they are of the same format (like different stations in an OSCE) is often not defensible; instead there must be a logically justifiable combination. Numbers describe the quality of the assessment. Therefore, manipulating the numbers is usually not the best way to improve its quality. Not every assessment moment needs to be a decision moment, disconnecting both makes combining summative and formative functions of assessment easier. Standardisation is not the only route to equity. Especially with diverse student groups tailoring is more equitable than standardisation. The most important element to standardise is the quality of the process and not the process itself. Finally, most assessment is too much focussed on detecting deficiencies and not on valuing individual student differences. In competency-based education--especially with a focus on learner orientation--this 'deficiency-model' is not as well aligned as a 'differences-model'.

  11. Assessing undergraduate nursing students' knowledge, attitudes, and cultural competence in caring for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Kristy L; Folse, Victoria N

    2015-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) patients experience barriers to health care that include fear of discrimination, as well as insensitivity and lack of knowledge about LGBT-specific health needs among providers. This study examined the effectiveness of an educational intervention designed to improve knowledge and attitudes of baccalaureate nursing students regarding LGBT patient care. Education focused on key terminology, health disparities, medical needs of transgender patients, and culturally sensitive communication skills for competent LGBT patient care. Knowledge level and attitudes were evaluated before and after the intervention using a survey based on a modified Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men Scale and two assessment tools developed for this study. A statistically significant increase in positive attitudes and knowledge level was found immediately after the intervention. Findings from this study support the inclusion of education related to LGBT patient health care in undergraduate nursing curricula to promote cultural competence and sensitivity.

  12. Assessing nursing clinical skills competence through objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) for open distance learning students in Open University Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oranye, Nelson Ositadimma; Ahmad, Che'an; Ahmad, Nora; Bakar, Rosnida Abu

    2012-06-01

    The objective structured clinical skills examination (OSCE) has over the years emerged as a method of evaluating clinical skills in most medical and allied professions. Although its validity and objectivity has evoked so much debate in the literature, little has been written about its application in non-traditional education systems such as in distance learning. This study examined clinical skills competence among practising nursing students who were enrolled in a distance learning programme. The study examined the effect of work and years of nursing practice on nurses' clinical skills competence. This study used observational design whereby nursing students' clinical skills were observed and scored in five OSCE stations. Two instruments were used for the data collection - A self-administered questionnaire on the students' bio-demographic data, and a check list on the clinical skills which the examiners rated on a four point scale. The findings revealed that 14% of the nurses had level four competence, which indicated that they could perform the tasks correctly and complete. However, 12% failed the OSCE, even though they had more than 10 years experience in nursing and post basic qualifications. Inter-rater reliability was 0.92 for the five examiners. Factor analysis indicated that five participant factors accounted for 74.1% of the variations in clinical skills performance. An OSCE is a necessary assessment tool that should be continuously applied in nursing education, regardless of the mode of the education program, the student's years of experience or his/her clinical placement. This study validates the need for OSCE in both the design of tertiary nursing degree programs and the assessment of nurses' clinical competency level.

  13. [The Computer Book of the Internal Medicine resident: validity and reliability of a questionnaire for self-assessment of competences in internal medicine residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oristrell, J; Casanovas, A; Jordana, R; Comet, R; Gil, M; Oliva, J C

    2012-12-01

    There are no simple and validated instruments for evaluating the training of specialists. To analyze the reliability and validity of a computerized self-assessment method to quantify the acquisition of medical competences during the Internal Medicine residency program. All residents of our department participated in the study during a period of 28 months. Twenty-two questionnaires specific for each rotation (the Computer-Book of the Internal Medicine Resident) were constructed with items (questions) corresponding to three competence domains: clinical skills competence, communication skills and teamwork. Reliability was analyzed by measuring the internal consistency of items in each competence domain using Cronbach's alpha index. Validation was performed by comparing mean scores in each competence domain between senior and junior residents. Cut-off levels of competence scores were established in order to identify the strengths and weaknesses of our training program. Finally, self-assessment values were correlated with the evaluations of the medical staff. There was a high internal consistency of the items of clinical skills competences, communication skills and teamwork. Higher scores of clinical skills competence and communication skills, but not in those of teamwork were observed in senior residents than in junior residents. The Computer-Book of the Internal Medicine Resident identified the strengths and weaknesses of our training program. We did not observe any correlation between the results of the self- evaluations and the evaluations made by staff physicians. The items of Computer-Book of the Internal Medicine Resident showed high internal consistency and made it possible to measure the acquisition of medical competences in a team of Internal Medicine residents. This self-assessment method should be complemented with other evaluation methods in order to assess the acquisition of medical competences by an individual resident. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Espa

  14. Commentary: Urgently needed: a safe place for self-assessment on the path to maintaining competence and improving performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellande, Bruce J; Winicur, Zev M; Cox, Kathleen M

    2010-01-01

    Traditional continuing medical education (CME), necessary for keeping physicians current and competent, is insufficient in translating physician practice into better patient outcomes. CME, then, must be transformed from a system of episodic interventions to a more personalized, contextual, flexible, and targeted process within a continuing professional development framework. The core of this transformation must be a formal process of physician self-assessment. Unfortunately, health care providers tend toward inaccurate self-assessment, regardless of training, specialty, or manner of self-assessment. Therefore, the development of an external validation system conducted by credible, informal peer review in a safe environment is essential. Clinicians must be able to access practice and patient data without concerns about accuracy, timeliness, confidentiality, attribution, or unintended consequences. New analytical tools are also needed to illuminate the data compilations and present them in compelling, individualized, and comparative formats. However, such developmental work will not be possible without strong community leadership coordinating a collaboration of resources and a sharing of data. Ensuring physician competence has long been an issue for medical societies, state licensing boards, and others invested in improving patient care. Now it's time to get serious. Current efforts at massive health care reform provide the perfect opportunity to fully integrate physician self-assessment and performance improvement into the larger health care system through a continuing professional development model. Practitioners in CME have been far too complacent with the current practices. A shift to a focused and dedicated sense of urgency must occur to ensure physicians' continuous learning and change.

  15. Initial construct validity evidence of a virtual human application for competency assessment in breaking bad news to a cancer patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guetterman TC

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Timothy C Guetterman,1 Frederick W Kron,1 Toby C Campbell,2 Mark W Scerbo,3 Amy B Zelenski,4 James F Cleary,5 Michael D Fetters1 1Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 2Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, WI, 3Department of Psychology, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA, 4Department of General Internal Medicine, University of Wisconsin–Madison, University of Wisconsin Medical Foundation, 5Department of Medicine, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Clinical Science Center, Madison, WI, USA Background: Despite interest in using virtual humans (VHs for assessing health care ­communication, evidence of validity is limited. We evaluated the validity of a VH application, MPathic-VR, for assessing performance-based competence in breaking bad news (BBN to a VH patient.Methods: We used a two-group quasi-experimental design, with residents participating in a 3-hour seminar on BBN. Group A (n=15 completed the VH simulation before and after the seminar, and Group B (n=12 completed the VH simulation only after the BBN seminar to avoid the possibility that testing alone affected performance. Pre- and postseminar differences for Group A were analyzed with a paired t-test, and comparisons between Groups A and B were analyzed with an independent t-test.Results: Compared to the preseminar result, Group A’s postseminar scores improved significantly, indicating that the VH program was sensitive to differences in assessing performance-based competence in BBN. Postseminar scores of Group A and Group B were not significantly different, indicating that both groups performed similarly on the VH program.Conclusion: Improved pre–post scores demonstrate acquisition of skills in BBN to a VH patient. Pretest sensitization did not appear to influence posttest assessment. These results provide initial construct validity evidence that the VH program is effective for

  16. Application of an embryonated chicken egg model to assess the vector competence of Australian Culicoides midges for bluetongue viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VAN DER Saag, M R; Ward, M P; Kirkland, P D

    2017-09-01

    Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are vectors of a number of globally important arboviruses that affect livestock, including bluetongue virus (BTV), African horse sickness virus and the recently emerged Schmallenberg virus. In this study, a model using embryonated chicken eggs (ECEs) was utilized to undertake vector competence studies of Australian Culicoides spp. for 13 laboratory-adapted or wild-type virus strains of BTV. A total of 7393 Culicoides brevitarsis were reared from bovine dung, and 3364 Culicoides were induced to feed from ECEs infected with different strains of BTV. Of those, 911 (27%) survived the putative extrinsic incubation period of 9-12 days. In some trials, virus was also transmitted onward to uninfected ECEs, completing the transmission cycle. This model does not rely on the use of colonized midges and has the capacity to assess the vector competence of field-collected insects with strains of virus that have not previously been passaged in laboratory culture systems. There is also potential for this model to be used in investigations of the competence of Culicoides spp. for other arboviruses. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  17. Definition and Assessment of Clinieal Competence%临床胜任能力及其评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏丹; 刘秋颖; 苏彦捷; 倪敬年

    2012-01-01

    临床胜任能力既包括与医疗实践相关的专业知识和技能,又包括人际交往能力、终身学习能力、人格特征等.运用知识和技能处理实际工作中遇到的问题,并最终使患者获得好的健康状态才是评价临床胜任能力的金标准.因此,医学教育应以培养医学生的临床胜任能力为目标,医学生考评也应与此目标相一致.%In addition to medical knowledge and skills, clinical competence consists of interpersonal communication, lifelong learning, personal attributes, and so on. It's considered to be the gold standard for the assessment of competence that patients get better health outcomes by practical use of knowledge and skills to deal with the problems encountered in the work. Therefore, clinical competence should be the goal of medical education, and it should be measured in clinical examination

  18. Assessment of Office Education Operating Competencies Possessed by Postgraduate University Business Education Students to Handle Entrepreneurship Business Challenges in Nigeria

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    James Okoro

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the office education operating competencies possessed by the university postgraduate business education students to handle entrepreneurship business challenges in Nigeria. One research question and five null hypotheses guided the study. Descriptive survey design was adopted for the study. The population and sample consisted of 388 business education graduates who are postgraduate students in universities in Nigeria. A 31-item structured questionnaire was validated and was also subjected to reliability which had internal consistency of 0.96 was used for data collection. The mean and standard deviation was used to answer the research questions while Z-test was used to test the null hypotheses at 0.05 level of significance. The results revealed that the respondents are competent in office education operating skills such as ability to file documents properly, knowledge handling office machines, ability to take minutes during meeting, among others. However, the respondents are not competent in knowledge of insurance policy and can do approach.

  19. Assessment of Knowledge, Attitudes and Competencies of Health Professionals Attended an International Training Programme in Public Health

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    Despena Andrioti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Continuing education is a fundamental aspect of health personnel professional life. These enable health professionals improve patient-centred care, stay current and provide quality services.Objectives: To assess knowledge, attitudes and competencies from the interprofessional training programme in public health held in cooperation with WHO/EURO.Methods: A structured questioner for self-ratings on perceived seminar usefulness and implementation was placed on the internet followed by email notification to the 300 participants. We have received 128 completed questionnaires (42.5%.Programme effects were tested by categorical analysis using Pearson chi-Square or Fisher's exact test. Logistic regression was used to reveal correlation between implementation of competencies according to discipline and type of employer. All tests were considered to be significant at a 5% level. Analysis was carried out using SPSS 20.0. Findings: 85.9% (p = 0.021 <0.05 of the participants applied the knowledge they acquired in the seminar. The application of the competencies in public health services differed according to position (p<0.05. Supervisors achieved higher scores (81.4% in the administration and management than the officers (48.5%. Health professionals felt that their performance has been improved and consequently the quality of the services (75%. Conclusion: The international programme gave them confidence that the acquired knowledge and skills were equal to those of their European colleagues and that they are able to deal with public health issues and to provide the respective services.

  20. Structuring a written examination to assess ASBH health care ethics consultation core knowledge competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Bruce D; Jankowski, Jane B; Shelton, Wayne N

    2014-01-01

    As clinical ethics consultants move toward professionalization, the process of certifying individual consultants or accrediting programs will be discussed and debated. With certification, some entity must be established or ordained to oversee the standards and procedures. If the process evolves like other professions, it seems plausible that it will eventually include a written examination to evaluate the core knowledge competencies that individual practitioners should possess to meet peer practice standards. The American Society for Bioethics and Humanities (ASBH) has published core knowledge competencies for many years that are accepted by experts as the prevailing standard. Probably any written examination will be based upon the ASBH core knowledge competencies. However, much remains to be done before any examination may be offered. In particular, it seems likely that a recognized examining board must create and validate examination questions and structure the examination so as to establish meaningful, defensible parameters after dealing with such challenging questions as: Should the certifying examination be multiple choice or short-answer essay? How should the test be graded? What should the pass rate be? How may the examination be best administered? To advance the field of health care ethics consultation, thought leaders should start to focus on the written examination possibilities, to date unaddressed carefully in the literature. Examination models-both objective and written-must be explored as a viable strategy about how the field of health care ethics consultations can grow toward professionalization.

  1. Digital slides and ACGME resident competencies in anatomic pathology: An altered paradigm for acquisition and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassell, Lewis A; Fung, Kar-Ming; Chaser, Brad

    2011-01-01

    Whole slide digital imaging technology has matured considerably over the past decade. Applications in pathology education are widespread and are rapidly transforming the manner in which medical students learn pathology and histology, and they have a novel and significant impact on postgraduate continuing medical education. Whole slide digital images for use in pathology graduate education have been slower in adoption and remain much less widespread. Emphasis on professional competency by the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and credentialing organizations, however, appear poised to significantly increase. The convergence of these two forces is propitious for pathology training. This article examines the opportunities for the use of whole slide images (WSI) in pathology residency training along with the developing potential uses in each of the areas of competency, as categorized by the ACGME. Barriers to WSI adoption in the pathology community are identified along with potentially significant promoters for adoption in training and practice. Current literature and recent presentations are reviewed. Digital pathology coupled with emphasis on competency is a shift of tremendous magnitude that can dramatically improve our abilities to help trainees acquire, demonstrate, and maintain the skills to practice pathology in the generation ahead.

  2. Digital slides and ACGME resident competencies in anatomic pathology: An altered paradigm for acquisition and assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis A Hassell

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Whole slide digital imaging technology has matured considerably over the past decade. Applications in pathology education are widespread and are rapidly transforming the manner in which medical students learn pathology and histology, and they have a novel and significant impact on postgraduate continuing medical education. Whole slide digital images for use in pathology graduate education have been slower in adoption and remain much less widespread. Emphasis on professional competency by the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME and credentialing organizations, however, appear poised to significantly increase. The convergence of these two forces is propitious for pathology training. This article examines the opportunities for the use of whole slide images (WSI in pathology residency training along with the developing potential uses in each of the areas of competency, as categorized by the ACGME. Barriers to WSI adoption in the pathology community are identified along with potentially significant promoters for adoption in training and practice. Current literature and recent presentations are reviewed. Digital pathology coupled with emphasis on competency is a shift of tremendous magnitude that can dramatically improve our abilities to help trainees acquire, demonstrate, and maintain the skills to practice pathology in the generation ahead.

  3. A novel approach to assessing technical competence of colorectal surgery residents: the development and evaluation of the Colorectal Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill (COSATS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Montbrun, Sandra L; Roberts, Patricia L; Lowry, Ann C; Ault, Glenn T; Burnstein, Marcus J; Cataldo, Peter A; Dozois, Eric J; Dunn, Gary D; Fleshman, James; Isenberg, Gerald A; Mahmoud, Najjia N; Reznick, Richard K; Satterthwaite, Lisa; Schoetz, David; Trudel, Judith L; Weiss, Eric G; Wexner, Steven D; MacRae, Helen

    2013-12-01

    To develop and evaluate an objective method of technical skills assessment for graduating subspecialists in colorectal (CR) surgery-the Colorectal Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill (COSATS). It may be reasonable for the public to assume that surgeons certified as competent have had their technical skills assessed. However, technical skill, despite being the hallmark of a surgeon, is not directly assessed at the time of certification by surgical boards. A procedure-based, multistation technical skills examination was developed to reflect a sample of the range of skills necessary for CR surgical practice. These consisted of bench, virtual reality, and cadaveric models. Reliability and construct validity were evaluated by comparing 10 graduating CR residents with 10 graduating general surgery (GS) residents from across North America. Expert CR surgeons, blinded to level of training, evaluated performance using a task-specific checklist and a global rating scale. The mean global rating score was used as the overall examination score and a passing score was set at "borderline competent for CR practice." The global rating scale demonstrated acceptable interstation reliability (0.69) for a homogeneous group of examinees. Both the overall checklist and global rating scores effectively discriminated between CR and GS residents (P Technical Skill effectively discriminated between CR and GS residents. With further validation, the Colorectal Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill could be incorporated into the colorectal board examination where it would be the first attempt of a surgical specialty to formally assess technical skill at the time of certification.

  4. Nursing student and professor perceptions and assessments of the achievement of practicum competencies: A mixed method approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Pumarola, Concepció; Ballester-Ferrando, David; Gelabert-Vilella, Sandra; Bosch-Farré, Cristina; Malagón-Aguilera, M Carme; Rascón-Hernán, Carolina; Bonmatí-Tomàs, Anna; Fernandez-Peña, Rosario

    2016-10-01

    Within the context of the European Higher Education Area's requirement of competency-based assessments, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the Nursing Degree Practicum experience at the University of Girona (Spain) and ascertain student and faculty perceptions of the degree of competency achieved as a result of the practicum. This cross-sectional, descriptive, study combined quantitative analysis of a questionnaire and qualitative analysis of focus group comments. In the quantitative part of the study, 163 fourth-year nursing students completed the questionnaire; the qualitative analysis was derived from a focus group of 5 students and 5 professors. On the questionnaire, overall practicum evaluation was 8.39 on a 10-point Likert scale; scores evaluating the nurse mentor/instructor and nursing professor were 8.43 and 7.98, respectively. The geriatrics practicum experience received the lowest overall score (7.81), while the surgical practicum received the lowest score on the adequacy of knowledge acquired in the classroom in previous courses (5.54). The best scores were earned by the mental health and intensive/emergency care practicum experiences (a mean of 9.05 and 8.70, respectively). Students and professors in the focus group agreed that the practicum met the Nursing degree program's competency goals, highlighting practical activity as the best methodology to evaluate competencies. Participants highlighted the importance of reflective practice and the role of the nurse mentor/instructor in student learning, and indicated that it is essential for the university and the health care centers where students take practicum courses to maintain a strong relationship and good communication. Finally, feedback from the nurse mentor/instructor and Nursing professor was very important to students, both to motivate them and to help them learn.

  5. Motor competence assessment in children: convergent and discriminant validity between the BOT-2 Short Form and KTK testing batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransen, Job; D'Hondt, Eva; Bourgois, Jan; Vaeyens, Roel; Philippaerts, Renaat M; Lenoir, Matthieu

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated convergent and discriminant validity between two motor competence assessment instruments in 2485 Flemish children: the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency 2 Short Form (BOT-2 Short Form) and the KörperKoördinationsTest für Kinder (KTK). A Pearson correlation assessed the relationship between BOT-2 Short Form total, gross and fine motor composite scores and KTK Motor Quotient in three age cohorts (6-7, 8-9, 10-11 years). Crosstabs were used to measure agreement in classification in children scoring below percentile 5 and 15 and above percentile 85 and 95. Moderately strong positive (r=0.44-0.64) associations between BOT-2 total and gross motor composite scores and KTK Motor Quotient and weak positive correlations between BOT-2 Short Form fine motor composite and KTK Motor Quotient scores (r=0.25-0.37) were found. Levels of agreement were fair to moderate. Therefore, some proof of convergent and discriminant validity between BOT-2 Short Form and KTK was established in this study, underlining the notion that the evaluation of motor competence should not be based upon a single assessment instrument.

  6. Assessment of pharmacy students' communication competence using the Roter Interaction Analysis System during objective structured clinical examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Yoshie; Yano, Yoshitaka; Seki, Susumu; Takada, Kaori; Sakuma, Mio; Morimoto, Takeshi; Akaike, Akinori; Hiraide, Atsushi

    2011-04-11

    To determine the value of using the Roter Interaction Analysis System during objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) to assess pharmacy students' communication competence. As pharmacy students completed a clinical OSCE involving an interview with a simulated patient, 3 experts used a global rating scale to assess students' overall performance in the interview, and both the student's and patient's languages were coded using the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS). The coders recorded the number of utterances (ie, units of spoken language) in each RIAS category. Correlations between the raters' scores and the number and types of utterances were examined. There was a significant correlation between students' global rating scores on the OSCE and the number of utterances in the RIAS socio-emotional category but not the RIAS business category. The RIAS proved to be a useful tool for assessing the socio-emotional aspect of students' interview skills.

  7. Implementation competences as an attribute of executive employees of the flexible organisation – an attempt of their assessment among manufacturers of the agricultural machinery sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nogalski Bogdan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on theoretical knowledge, own professional experience and conducted research, according to the authors, the paper’s objective is to develop and empirically verify the theoretical model of implementation competences of the executive employees of manufacturing companies of the agricultural machinery sector. The main objective achievement required to formulate and reach partial objectives, which include: a discussion and organisation of terminological issues in terms of understanding the term of implementation competences, b development of a general model of the executive employees’ implementation competences, which is a sign of knowledge, skills, personality features, attitudes and values, c empirical verification of the theoretical model; prioritisation of individual implementation competences in the assessment of executive employees or owners of selected companies and determination of competence weaknesses, which are characteristic of the executive personnel of these companies.

  8. Traning raters for assessment of MBT adherence and competence: Experiences from a Danish traning project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Sebastian; Folmo, Espen; Karterud, Sigmund

    Background: Previously, the developers of the MBT adherence and competence scale (MBT-ACS) have demonstrated that it is possible to train raters to an acceptable level of reliability. However, no studies of training or reliability have been conducted outside the Norwegian Quality Laboratory...... for Mentalization-Based Treatment. The aim of this project is to gather experience with regards to training and to test whether it is possible to replicate acceptable reliability within a clinical setting outside the quality laboratory. Methods: Six Danish raters were trained in MBT-ACS. During a six month period...

  9. Strategies for the assessment of competence in laboratory animal science courses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Sørensen, Dorte Bratbo

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of skills, knowledge and competencies is an essential part of education in laboratory animal science. In Europe, a greater emphasis will be placed on such evaluations going forward, because the European Union will base its education and training framework on learning outcomes rather than...... on course time and syllabuses, as done previously. The authors present their experiences administering different written, oral and practical examinations for Federation of European Laboratory Animal Science Associations categories B, C and D courses. Examinations can be administered online as well...

  10. Self-directed learning competence assessment within different healthcare professionals and amongst students in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadorin, Lucia; Suter, Nicoletta; Dante, Angelo; Williamson, Swapna Naskar; Devetti, Angie; Palese, Alvisa

    2012-05-01

    In the last few years the significance of life-long learning skills has been greatly realised with regard to adult learning, which is based on self-motivation, engagement in learning and making full use of a person's resources. In this context, it is paramount that healthcare professionals take responsibility for their profession by being innovative, creative and flexible to change in order to facilitate the adaptation process and encourage responsiveness to change. The main principles can be summarized as lifelong learning, which are strictly linked to self-directed learning. The aims of this study were to describe (a) the self-directed learning competence of nurses (registered nurse, RN) and radiologist technicians (RT); (b) the self-directed learning competence of RN and RT students before their graduation. A comparative cross-sectional study approach was adopted; a consecutive sample of RNs and RTs attending continuing education seminars, workshops and other initiatives from 2009 to 2010 were considered for this study. Moreover, all nursing and radiology technicians students about to graduate in the same course and studying in the same region were included. The self-rating scale of self-directed learning (SRSSDL) was used to collect data for the purpose of the study. Eight hundred and forty-seven participants were involved (453 RNs, 141 RTs, 182 RN students and 68 RT students) who obtained an average SRSSDL score of 224.7 (±25.0). RNs and RTs got on average a medium-high score (229.1 ± 22.9 and 219.6 ± 29.2, respectively) and the majority of them (63.8-51.1%) reached a high level of self-directed learning. In order to promote tailored continuing education programs and interprofessional continuing education strategies, and identify the support to offer to healthcare workers according to their needs, educators should be aware of their self-directed learning skills. Therefore, individuals with high competence should adopt different strategies from those who

  11. Development of a new valid, reliable, and internationally applicable assessment tool of residents' competence in ophthalmic surgery (an American Ophthalmological Society thesis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnik, C; Beaver, Hilary; Gauba, Vinod; Lee, Andrew G; Mayorga, Eduardo; Palis, Gabriela; Saleh, George M

    2013-09-01

    To test the validity and reliability of a new tool for assessing residents' competence in ophthalmic surgery. Changing paradigms of ophthalmic education in the United States have influenced worldwide ophthalmic education and necessitated new methods of assessing resident competence. Accordingly, a new tool for assessing residents' competence in ophthalmic surgery (phacoemulsification) that could be applicable internationally was developed. We hypothesize that this instrument is valid and reliable. A panel of six international content experts adapted a previously published tool for assessing phacoemulsification. The tool (called the International Council of Ophthalmology's Ophthalmology Surgical Competency Assessment Rubric, or ICO-OSCAR:phaco) was reviewed by 12 international content experts for their constructive comments, which were incorporated to ensure content validity. Ten expert cataract surgery teachers then graded six recorded phacoemulsification surgeries with the ICO-OSCAR:phaco to investigate inter-rater reliability. The coefficient alpha statistic (a measure of reliability/internal consistency) for the ICO-OSCAR:phaco as a whole was 0.92, and 17 of its 20 dimensions had alpha coefficients greater than 0.70. The ICO-OSCAR:phaco is a valid and reliable assessment tool that could be applied internationally to satisfy the global need of new instruments to comply with emerging trends in ophthalmic education. A toolbox of similar surgical competency assessment tools is being developed.

  12. Development of a New Valid, Reliable, and Internationally Applicable Assessment Tool of Residents’ Competence in Ophthalmic Surgery (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnik, C.; Beaver, Hilary; Gauba, Vinod; Lee, Andrew G.; Mayorga, Eduardo; Palis, Gabriela; Saleh, George M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To test the validity and reliability of a new tool for assessing residents’ competence in ophthalmic surgery. Changing paradigms of ophthalmic education in the United States have influenced worldwide ophthalmic education and necessitated new methods of assessing resident competence. Accordingly, a new tool for assessing residents’ competence in ophthalmic surgery (phacoemulsification) that could be applicable internationally was developed. We hypothesize that this instrument is valid and reliable. Methods: A panel of six international content experts adapted a previously published tool for assessing phacoemulsification. The tool (called the International Council of Ophthalmology’s Ophthalmology Surgical Competency Assessment Rubric, or ICO-OSCAR:phaco) was reviewed by 12 international content experts for their constructive comments, which were incorporated to ensure content validity. Ten expert cataract surgery teachers then graded six recorded phacoemulsification surgeries with the ICO-OSCAR:phaco to investigate inter-rater reliability. Results: The coefficient alpha statistic (a measure of reliability/internal consistency) for the ICO-OSCAR:phaco as a whole was 0.92, and 17 of its 20 dimensions had alpha coefficients greater than 0.70. Conclusions: The ICO-OSCAR:phaco is a valid and reliable assessment tool that could be applied internationally to satisfy the global need of new instruments to comply with emerging trends in ophthalmic education. A toolbox of similar surgical competency assessment tools is being developed. PMID:24072944

  13. Avaliação da competência social em crianças em situação de risco Assessment of social competence in children under risk situation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Marques Cecconello

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo descreve a adaptação do Teste das Histórias Incompletas (THI para avaliação da competência social com crianças brasileiras que vivem em situação de risco. O THI consiste em quinze histórias incompletas que avaliam competência social por meio de três subescalas, que são confiança, auto-eficácia e iniciativa. Participaram deste estudo 100 crianças escolares entre seis e nove anos. As análises mostraram diferença significativa entre os sexos e entre as idades, nas quais as meninas e as crianças mais velhas obtiveram melhores resultados do que as demais, sendo mais competentes socialmente. Este estudo permite considerar que características como confiança, auto-eficácia e iniciativa podem ser analisadas como atributos de competência social, as quais podem servir para embasar o planejamento de programas de intervenção que visem ao desenvolvimento da competência social. Neste sentido, o THI consiste em um importante instrumento que pode ser utilizado como recurso de avaliação para subsidiar tais programas.This paper describes the Incomplete Stories Test (IST adaptation to assessment of social competence in Brazilian children living under risk situation. The IST consists of fifteen incomplete stories that assess social competence through three subscales, trust, self-efficacy and active coping. A hundred school children, ranged from six to nine years old, participated in this study. The analysis demonstrated sex and age-groups significant difference, in which the girls and the oldest group achieved better results than the others, being more socially competent. This study permits to consider that characteristics of trust, self-efficacy, and active coping could be analyzed as social competence attributes, which can serve to subsidiate the planning of intervention programs that aim to develop social competence. So, the IST consists in an important measure, that can be useful as an assessment resource to these programs.

  14. Developing and successfully implementing a competency-based portfolio assessment system in a postgraduate family medicine residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Laura A; Griffiths, Jane; Schultz, Karen

    2015-11-01

    The use of portfolios in postgraduate medical residency education to support competency development is increasing; however, the processes by which these assessment systems are designed, implemented, and maintained are emergent. The authors describe the needs assessment, development, implementation, and continuing quality improvement processes that have shaped the Portfolio Assessment Support System (PASS) used by the postgraduate family medicine program at Queen's University since 2009. Their description includes the impetus for change and contextual realities that guided the effort, plus the processes used for selecting assessment components and developing strategic supports. The authors discuss the identification of impact measures at the individual, programmatic, and institutional levels and the ways the department uses these to monitor how PASS supports competency development, scaffolds residents' self-regulated learning skills, and promotes professional identity formation. They describe the "academic advisor" role and provide an appendix covering the portfolio elements. Reflection elements include learning plans, clinical question logs, confidence surveys, and reflections about continuity of care and significant incidents. Learning module elements cover the required, online bioethics, global health, and consult-request modules. Assessment elements cover each resident's research project, clinical audits, presentations, objective structured clinical exam and simulated office oral exam results, field notes, entrustable professional activities, multisource feedback, and in-training evaluation reports. Document elements are the resident's continuing medical education activities including procedures log, attendance log, and patient demographic summaries.The authors wish to support others who are engaged in the systematic portfolio-design process or who may adapt aspects of PASS for their local programs.

  15. Formative feedback, rubrics, and assessment of professional competency through a speech-language pathology graduate program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Adrienne B; Brundage, Shelley B

    2010-01-01

    Professional competencies independent of discipline-specific knowledge and skills are addressed by most allied health professions. This paper presents the process of developing and testing a Graduate Student Development Profile (GSDP) in rubric format. In addition to documenting behaviors, a rubric system provides formative feedback helpful to student learning and development as a professional. A rubric for rating responsibility for learning, critical thinking, cognitive flexibility, professionalism, and communication, each with specific subcategories, was created, developed, and implemented by faculty and clinical staff to guide the three sequential evaluations each master's level student receives during the five-semester speech-language pathology program. Pilot scoring of master's students was used to calibrate and refine the GSDP before official implementation. Two evaluations were completed during faculty meetings to familiarize users with the GSDP. A third evaluation was conducted via a secured website. In each case, resulting scores and specific comments for each student were shared during a faculty meeting before being presented to students individually. The GSDP documents the speech-language pathology student's professional competency demonstrated across academic, clinical, and interpersonal settings. The web-based version brings convenience and efficiency to the often formidable, but fundamentally necessary, process of providing formative and summative feedback to students.

  16. How Good Is Good Enough? A Community-Based Assessment of Teacher Competencies for Gifted Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria P. Gómez-Arizaga

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the major challenges of addressing diversity in the classroom is to meet the needs of gifted students, which are often invisible in countries such as Chile, in which providing services for highly able students is still considered elitist. The purpose of this study was to analyze the perceptions of community members about the critical competencies of instructors who work with gifted students. Six focus groups were conducted with students, instructors, and staff members of an enrichment program for the gifted. Qualitative analyses were conducted throughout open, axial, and selective coding. Traits and competencies were grouped into three themes: knowledge, teaching, and socio-emotional characteristics. Differences were found between the perceptions of students and staff members: Whereas students’ emphasis was on socio-affective characteristics, the staff highlighted the importance of content and pedagogical knowledge. The novelty and contribution of the study are related on how to recognize and acknowledge the voices of active members of a community for educational improvement. These community perceptions contributed to depict a profile of an effective teacher for gifted students, and were used to improve instructors’ current performance and to design a more rigorous selection process for future teachers. The implications of the study also shed light about how to improve teacher preparation programs to meet the needs of this group of students.

  17. Psychometric properties of virtual reality vignette performance measures: a novel approach for assessing adolescents' social competency skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschall, Mallie J; Fishbein, Diana H; Hubal, Robert C; Eldreth, Diana

    2005-02-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of performance measures for three novel, interactive virtual reality vignette exercises developed to assess social competency skills of at-risk adolescents. Performance data were collected from 117 African-American male 15-17 year olds. Data for 18 performance measures were obtained, based on adolescents' interaction with a provocative virtual teenage character. Twelve of the 18 performance measures loaded on two factors corresponding to emotional control and interpersonal communication skills, providing support for their factorial validity. The internal reliability coefficients for the two multi-item measures were 0.88 and 0.91, respectively. Additional analyses with established measures of three psychosocial factors (beliefs supporting aggression, aggressive conflict-resolution style and hostility) and behavioral criteria (e.g., self-reported behavioral misconduct and drug use) provided limited support for the construct and criterion-related validity of the performance measures. Study findings suggest that the virtual reality vignette exercises may represent a promising approach for assessing adolescents' social competency skills.

  18. The Future of Self-Assessment in Classroom Practice: Reframing Self-Assessment as a Core Competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gavin T. L.; Harris, Lois R.

    2014-01-01

    Formative assessment policies and self-regulation theories argue that student self-assessment of their own work and processes are useful for raising academic performance and self-regulatory skills. However, research into student self-evaluation raises serious doubts about the quality of self-assessment as an assessment process and identifies…

  19. Health information literacy and competencies of information age students: results from the interactive online Research Readiness Self-Assessment (RRSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanitskaya, Lana; O'Boyle, Irene; Casey, Anne Marie

    2006-04-21

    In an era of easy access to information, university students who will soon enter health professions need to develop their information competencies. The Research Readiness Self-Assessment (RRSA) is based on the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education, and it measures proficiency in obtaining health information, evaluating the quality of health information, and understanding plagiarism. This study aimed to measure the proficiency of college-age health information consumers in finding and evaluating electronic health information; to assess their ability to discriminate between peer-reviewed scholarly resources and opinion pieces or sales pitches; and to examine the extent to which they are aware of their level of health information competency. An interactive 56-item online assessment, the Research Readiness Self-Assessment (RRSA), was used to measure the health information competencies of university students. We invited 400 students to take part in the study, and 308 participated, giving a response rate of 77%. The RRSA included multiple-choice questions and problem-based exercises. Declarative and procedural knowledge were assessed in three domains: finding health information, evaluating health information, and understanding plagiarism. Actual performance was contrasted with self-reported skill level. Upon answering all questions, students received a results page that summarized their numerical results and displayed individually tailored feedback composed by an experienced librarian. Even though most students (89%) understood that a one-keyword search is likely to return too many documents, few students were able to narrow a search by using multiple search categories simultaneously or by employing Boolean operators. In addition, nearly half of the respondents had trouble discriminating between primary and secondary sources of information as well as between references to journal articles and other published documents. When presented with

  20. Assessment of the situation of centres of competence in the fields of nuclear fission and radiation protection. Final report

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfert, K; Glaeser, H; Klener, V; Métivier, H; Richard, P; Riebold, W L; Vasa, I; Zimmermann, M

    2003-01-01

    An assessment of the present situation concerning centres of competence in the fields of Nuclear Fission and Radiation Protection has been carried out with the intention to draw strategic conclusions as regards further needs in these fields, based on the actual situation and perceived future developments. This study was initiated by the programme committee for the Euratom research and training programme in the field of Nuclear Energy (1998 - 2002). To carry out this exercise, a Panel of four independent experts had been set up. The Panel had prepared a questionnaire comprising a comprehensive set of questions aiming at the acquisition of the information needed to carry out the assessment exercise. The questionnaire consisted in ten different form sheets and had been put on the Internet in order to ease the access and offer a comfortable way of filling in the form sheets. Out of 420 organisations invited to participate in the exercise, 293 organisations from EU member states, Central and Eastern European Acces...

  1. Assessing the impact on intercultural competencies when engineering students solve problems in multicultural teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Peter; Nygaard, Bjørn; Madsen, Linda

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a research project regarding internationalization and development of intercultural competencies at 4 different engineering educations in Denmark. All Danish engineering education institutes have for several years been educating both Danish and foreign students coming either...... the engineering schools and universities in Denmark and an intercultural researcher that was employed to carry out the actual research. The plan was to investigate the outcome of an experiment at four different engineering educations using mixed teams in the autumn semester 2010, focusing on the development...... as exchange students or to take a full degree. Project organized Problem based Learning is used to a high extent at most of the engineering educations in Denmark, using large scale project work (up to 15 ECTS each semester) solved in teams (3-7 students in each team). In more and more situations the teams...

  2. A collaborative national model to assess competencies for medical students, residents, and other healthcare practitioners in gait and falls risk evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Hal H; Tan, Zaldy S; Brennan, Maura; Granville, Lisa

    2014-06-01

    To ensure that the healthcare workforce is adequately prepared to care for the growing population of older adults, minimum competencies in geriatrics have been published for medical students and primary care residents. Approaches to teaching and assessing these competencies are needed to guide medical schools, residencies, and continuing medical education programs. With sponsorship by the Education Committee and Teachers Section of the American Geriatrics Society (AGS), geriatrics educators from multiple institutions collaborated to develop a model to teach and assess a major domain of student and resident competency: Gait and Falls Risk Evaluation. The model was introduced as a workshop at annual meetings of the AGS and the American College of Physicians in 2011 and 2012. Participants included medical students, residents, geriatrics fellows, practicing physicians, and midlevel practitioners. At both national meetings, participants rated the experience highly and reported statistically significant gains in overall competence in gait and falls risk evaluation. The largest gains were observed for medical students, residents, and practicing physicians (P competence and therefore had a lower magnitude of improvement, albeit still significant (P = .02). Finally, the majority of participants reported intent to disseminate the model in their institutions. This article describes the design, implementation, and evaluation of this collaborative national model. A number of institutions have used the model, and the goal of this article is to aid in further dissemination of this successful approach to teaching and assessing geriatrics competencies.

  3. Regimes of Language Skill and Competency Assessment in an Age of Migration: The In/Visibility of Social Relations and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, Tara

    2015-01-01

    This paper draws on ethnographic research to discuss the textual practices and social relations of language assessment. It examines the tensions that language educators and assessment practitioners encounter while making decisions about immigrant professionals' language competence. It also analyzes the role of other social actors in constituting…

  4. The Swiss Health Literacy Survey: development and psychometric properties of a multidimensional instrument to assess competencies for health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jen; Thombs, Brett D.; Schmid, Margareta R.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background  Growing recognition of the role of citizens and patients in health and health care has placed a spotlight on health literacy and patient education. Objective  To identify specific competencies for health in definitions of health literacy and patient‐centred concepts and empirically test their dimensionality in the general population. Methods  A thorough review of the literature on health literacy, self‐management, patient empowerment, patient education and shared decision making revealed considerable conceptual overlap as competencies for health and identified a corpus of 30 generic competencies for health. A questionnaire containing 127 items covering the 30 competencies was fielded as a telephone interview in German, French and Italian among 1255 respondents randomly selected from the resident population in Switzerland. Findings  Analyses with the software MPlus to model items with mixed response categories showed that the items do not load onto a single factor. Multifactorial models with good fit could be erected for each of five dimensions defined a priori and their corresponding competencies: information and knowledge (four competencies, 17 items), general cognitive skills (four competencies, 17 items), social roles (two competencies, seven items), medical management (four competencies, 27 items) and healthy lifestyle (two competencies, six items). Multiple indicators and multiple causes models identified problematic differential item functioning for only six items belonging to two competencies. Conclusions  The psychometric analyses of this instrument support broader conceptualization of health literacy not as a single competence but rather as a package of competencies for health. PMID:22390287

  5. Enhancing leadership and governance competencies to strengthen health systems in Nigeria: assessment of organizational human resources development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uneke, Chigozie J; Ezeoha, Abel E; Ndukwe, Chinwendu D; Oyibo, Patrick G; Onwe, Fri Day

    2012-02-01

    The lack of effective leadership and governance in the health sector has remained a major challenge in Nigeria and contributes to the failure of health systems and poor development of human resources. In this cross-sectional intervention study, leadership and governance competencies of policy makers were enhanced through a training workshop, and an assessment was conducted of organizational activities designed to promote evidence-informed leadership and governance to improve human resources for health (HRH). The training workshop increased the understanding of policy makers with regard to leadership and governance factors that ensure the functionality of health systems and improve human resources development, including policy guidance, intelligence and oversight, collaboration and coalition building, regulation, system design and accountability. Findings indicated that systems for human resources development exist in all participants' organizations, but the functionality of these systems was suboptimal. More systematic and standardized processes are required to improve competencies of leadership and governance for better human resources development in low-income settings.

  6. The Direct Assessment of Competence for Degrees in Large Public Universities: A Multidisciplinary Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, John R.

    The concept of attainment requirement and the development and assessment of attainment requirements for natural science majors is discussed. Structures involving several different kinds and levels of terminal and generic attainment are presented. The implications of such levels of attainment and performance standards for assessment strategies are…

  7. Reciprocal Accountability for Transformative Change: New Hampshire's Performance Assessment of Competency Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Scott F.; Vander Els, Jonathan; Leather, Paul

    2017-01-01

    In New Hampshire, a new performance assessment system focuses on reciprocal accountability and shared leadership among teachers and leaders at the school, district, and state levels. This concept of reciprocal accountability, developed by school improvement expert Richard Elmore, is at the core of New Hampshire's Performance Assessment of…

  8. Using Rubrics to Support Graded Assessment in a Competency Based Environment. Occasional Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Sherridan

    2010-01-01

    Rubrics are a tool that can be used to provide graded assessment for articulation from vocational education and training (VET) into higher education. By mentoring teachers to use rubrics and interviewing them to determine their experiences in using them, the author explored the potential of rubrics as an assessment tool. Overall, teachers found…

  9. Validity and reliability of portfolio assessment of student competence in two dental school populations: a four-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; McCracken, Michael S; Woldt, Janet L; Brennan, Robert L

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to empirically investigate the validity and reliability of portfolio assessment in two U.S. dental schools using a unified framework for validity. In the process of validation, it is not the test that is validated but rather the claims (interpretations and uses) about test scores that are validated. Kane's argument-based validation framework provided the structure for reporting results where validity claims are followed by evidence to support the argument. This multivariate generalizability theory study found that the greatest source of variance was attributable to faculty raters, suggesting that portfolio assessment would benefit from two raters' evaluating each portfolio independently. The results are generally supportive of holistic scoring, but analytical scoring deserves further research. Correlational analyses between student portfolios and traditional measures of student competence and readiness for licensure resulted in significant correlations between portfolios and National Board Dental Examination Part I (r=0.323, pportfolio assessment to determine if the claims and evidence arguments set forth in this study support the proposed claims for and decisions about portfolio assessment in their respective institutions.

  10. An audit of competency assessments on court-referred rape survivors in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Anthony L

    2008-12-01

    This report concerns rape survivors with mental retardation referred by the courts for evaluation of their competencies to (i) provide testimony in court and (ii) consent to sexual intercourse. Being a relatively new area of work in South Africa, it seems important to document findings to (i) examine the challenges facing such rape survivors, (ii) inform quality improvement in this forensic mental health task, and (iii) inform and support advocacy programmes for this vulnerable group. Of 106 rape survivors referred by courts over a 3-yr. period, 91.5% were females, 21.7% were under 16 years of age, and over two-thirds were from rural communities. In 77.4% of the cases the alleged perpetrators were people they had previously seen in the community but had not befriended. Almost 80% were classified as showing Moderate or Severe Mental Retardation, and over 90% were able to testify. However, almost two-thirds were not able to make an informed decision to consent to sexual intercourse.

  11. How to Assess the Existence of Competing Strategies in Cognitive Tasks: A Primer on the Fixed-Point Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Maanen, Leendert; de Jong, Ritske; van Rijn, Hedderik

    2014-01-01

    When multiple strategies can be used to solve a type of problem, the observed response time distributions are often mixtures of multiple underlying base distributions each representing one of these strategies. For the case of two possible strategies, the observed response time distributions obey the fixed-point property. That is, there exists one reaction time that has the same probability of being observed irrespective of the actual mixture proportion of each strategy. In this paper we discuss how to compute this fixed-point, and how to statistically assess the probability that indeed the observed response times are generated by two competing strategies. Accompanying this paper is a free R package that can be used to compute and test the presence or absence of the fixed-point property in response time data, allowing for easy to use tests of strategic behavior. PMID:25170893

  12. Assessment Work: Examining the Prevalence and Nature of Assessment Competencies and Skills in Student Affairs Job Postings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, John L.; Bresciani, Marilee J.

    2010-01-01

    This mixed method study explored the assessment-related skills and job duties that student affairs administrators expect from new employees as reflected in 1,759 job openings posted in 2008, of which seven job postings were specialist positions in outcomes-based assessment. The skills and duties required of these seven positions were primarily…

  13. Performance factors in associative learning: assessment of the sometimes competing retrieval model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witnauer, James E; Wojick, Brittany M; Polack, Cody W; Miller, Ralph R

    2012-09-01

    Previous simulations revealed that the sometimes competing retrieval model (SOCR; Stout & Miller, Psychological Review, 114, 759-783, 2007), which assumes local error reduction, can explain many cue interaction phenomena that elude traditional associative theories based on total error reduction. Here, we applied SOCR to a new set of Pavlovian phenomena. Simulations used a single set of fixed parameters to simulate each basic effect (e.g., blocking) and, for specific experiments using different procedures, used fitted parameters discovered through hill climbing. In simulation 1, SOCR was successfully applied to basic acquisition, including the overtraining effect, which is context dependent. In simulation 2, we applied SOCR to basic extinction and renewal. SOCR anticipated these effects with both fixed parameters and best-fitting parameters, although the renewal effects were weaker than those observed in some experiments. In simulation 3a, feature-negative training was simulated, including the often observed transition from second-order conditioning to conditioned inhibition. In simulation 3b, SOCR predicted the observation that conditioned inhibition after feature-negative and differential conditioning depends on intertrial interval. In simulation 3c, SOCR successfully predicted failure of conditioned inhibition to extinguish with presentations of the inhibitor alone under most circumstances. In simulation 4, cue competition, including blocking (4a), recovery from relative validity (4b), and unblocking (4c), was simulated. In simulation 5, SOCR correctly predicted that inhibitors gain more behavioral control than do excitors when they are trained in compound. Simulation 6 demonstrated that SOCR explains the slower acquisition observed following CS-weak shock pairings.

  14. Assessment of Rice Market Competiveness Using Horizontal Price Transmission: Empirical Evidence from Southern Region of Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Akpan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study examined the horizontal price transmission and market integration between the local and foreign rice market in the Southern region of Nigeria. The study used average monthly prices of local and foreign rice in the rural and urban markets from January 2005 to June 2014. The findings show that, prices of local and foreign rice in the rural and urban markets have constant exponential growth rate of 0.60%. The Pearson correlation coefficient revealed a strong positive relationship between prices of local and foreign rice in both rural and urban markets. The cross-product Granger causality test revealed bidirectional relationship between prices of local and foreign rice in the region. The results of the cross co-integration test revealed the presence of co-integration between prices of the two products. The coefficients of the price variable in the cross co-integration equations for the local and foreign rice markets converge to the law of one price which connotes instantaneous price adjustment and competitiveness. The result of the cross - product error correction model also confirmed the existence of the short run market integration between the two markets. The study established the fact that, price of local rice competes favorably with its foreign counter part and thus a perfect substitute especially in the rural area. Based on the finding, it is recommended that, short term policies should be used to intervene in the rice sub sector in the region. Policies aimed at boosting local production of rice should be encouraged, while value additions in the domestic produced rice should be pursuit vigorously.

  15. Competence of birth attendants at providing emergency obstetric care under India's JSY conditional cash transfer program for institutional delivery: an assessment using case vignettes in Madhya Pradesh province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Sarika; Upadhyay, Sourabh; De Costa, Ayesha

    2014-05-24

    Access to emergency obstetric care by competent staff can reduce maternal mortality. India has launched the Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY) conditional cash transfer program to promote institutional births. During implementation of the JSY, India witnessed a steep increase in the proportion of institutional deliveries-from 40% in 2004 to 73% in 2012. However, maternal mortality reduction follows a secular trend. Competent management of complications, when women deliver in facilities under the JSY, is essential for reduction in maternal mortality and therefore to a successful program outcome. We investigate, using clinical vignettes, whether birth attendants at institutions under the program are competent at providing appropriate care for obstetric complications. A facility based cross-sectional study was conducted in three districts of Madhya Pradesh (MP) province. Written case vignettes for two obstetric complications, hemorrhage and eclampsia, were administered to 233 birth attendant nurses at 73 JSY facilities. Their competence at (a) initial assessment, (b) diagnosis, and (c) making decisions on appropriate first-line care for these complications was scored. The mean emergency obstetric care (EmOC) competence score was 5.4 (median = 5) on a total score of 20, and 75% of participants scored below 35% of the maximum score. The overall score, although poor, was marginally higher in respondents with Skilled Birth Attendant (SBA) training, those with general nursing and midwifery qualifications, those at higher facility levels, and those conducting >30 deliveries a month. In all, 14% of respondents were competent at assessment, 58% were competent at making a correct clinical diagnosis, and 20% were competent at providing first-line care. Birth attendants in the JSY facilities have low competence at EmOC provision. Hence, births in the JSY program cannot be considered to have access to competent EmOC. Urgent efforts are required to effectively increase the

  16. Self-assessment of nursing competency among final year nursing students in Thailand: a comparison between public and private nursing institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaengdee, Krisada; Kantamaturapoj, Kanang; Seneerattanaprayul, Parinda; Putthasri, Weerasak; Suphanchaimat, Rapeepong

    2016-01-01

    Nurses play a major role in Thailand's health care system. In recent years, the production of nurses, in both the public and private sectors, has been growing rapidly to respond to the shortage of health care staff. Alongside concerns over the number of nurses produced, the quality of nursing graduates is of equal importance. This study therefore aimed to 1) compare the self-assessed competency of final year Thai nursing students between public and private nursing schools, and 2) explore factors that were significantly associated with competency level. A cross-sectional clustered survey was conducted on 40 Thai nursing schools. Data were collected through self-administered questionnaires. The questionnaire consisted of questions about respondents' background, their education profile, and a self-measured competency list. Descriptive statistics, factor analysis, and multivariate regression analysis were applied. A total of 3,349 students participated in the survey. Approximately half of the respondents had spent their childhood in rural areas. The majority of respondents reported being "confident" or "very confident" in all competencies. Private nursing students reported a higher level of "public health competency" than public nursing students with statistical significance. However, there was no significant difference in "clinical competency" between the two groups. Nursing students from private institutions seemed to report higher levels of competency than those from public institutions, particularly with regard to public health. This phenomenon might have arisen because private nursing students had greater experience of diverse working environments during their training. One of the key limitations of this study was that the results were based on the subjective self-assessment of the respondents, which might risk respondent bias. Further studies that evaluate current nursing curricula in both public and private nursing schools to assess whether they meet the health

  17. Toward core inter-professional health promotion competencies to address the non-communicable diseases and their risk factors through knowledge translation: Curriculum content assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Dean, Elizabeth; Moffat, Marilyn; Skinner, Margot; Dornelas de Andrade, Armele; Myezwa, Hellen; Söderlund, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Background To increase the global impact of health promotion related to non-communicable diseases, health professionals need evidence-based core competencies in health assessment and lifestyle behavior change. Assessment of health promotion curricula by health professional programs is a first step. Such program assessment is a means of 1. demonstrating collective commitment across health professionals to prevent non-communicable diseases; 2. addressing the knowledge translation gap between wh...

  18. Assessing preregistration nursing students' clinical competence: a systematic review of objective measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cant, Robyn; McKenna, Lisa; Cooper, Simon

    2013-04-01

    Nursing students are required to develop clinical knowledge, skills and attitudes for professional practice. However, objectivity and parity of students' clinical assessments has been questioned. In the last decade, more objective techniques have been developed, with increased use of Objective Structured Clinical Examinations. We reviewed objective clinical assessment measures used in preregistration nursing courses to determine utilization and the validity and reliability of assessment techniques. A systematic search was made of quantitative research publications between 2000 and May 2011, identifying 16 studies that were subsequently reviewed. The validity and reliability of studies varied, with six studies judged as high quality, using various methodologies. This paper describes methods of instrument development and reports on their application in preregistration nursing programs.

  19. Developing Teachers' Models for Assessing Students' Competence in Mathematical Modelling through Lesson Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogan Yenmez, Arzu; Erbas, Ayhan Kursat; Cakiroglu, Erdinc; Alacaci, Cengiz; Cetinkaya, Bulent

    2017-01-01

    Applications and modelling have gained a prominent role in mathematics education reform documents and curricula. Thus, there is a growing need for studies focusing on the effective use of mathematical modelling in classrooms. Assessment is an integral part of using modelling activities in classrooms, since it allows teachers to identify and manage…

  20. Assessing Spoken Language Competence in Children with Selective Mutism: Using Parents as Test Presenters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Evelyn R.; Armstrong, Sharon Lee; Shipon-Blum, Elisa

    2013-01-01

    Children with selective mutism (SM) display a failure to speak in select situations despite speaking when comfortable. The purpose of this study was to obtain valid assessments of receptive and expressive language in 33 children (ages 5 to 12) with SM. Because some children with SM will speak to parents but not a professional, another purpose was…