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Sample records for m13 phage peptide

  1. Identification of a cardiac specific protein transduction domain by in vivo biopanning using a M13 phage peptide display library in mice.

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    Maliha Zahid

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A peptide able to transduce cardiac tissue specifically, delivering cargoes to the heart, would be of significant therapeutic potential for delivery of small molecules, proteins and nucleic acids. In order to identify peptide(s able to transduce heart tissue, biopanning was performed in cell culture and in vivo with a M13 phage peptide display library. METHODS AND RESULTS: A cardiomyoblast cell line, H9C2, was incubated with a M13 phage 12 amino acid peptide display library. Internalized phage was recovered, amplified and then subjected to a total of three rounds of in vivo biopanning where infectious phage was isolated from cardiac tissue following intravenous injection. After the third round, 60% of sequenced plaques carried the peptide sequence APWHLSSQYSRT, termed cardiac targeting peptide (CTP. We demonstrate that CTP was able to transduce cardiomyocytes functionally in culture in a concentration and cell-type dependent manner. Mice injected with CTP showed significant transduction of heart tissue with minimal uptake by lung and kidney capillaries, and no uptake in liver, skeletal muscle, spleen or brain. The level of heart transduction by CTP also was greater than with a cationic transduction domain. CONCLUSIONS: Biopanning using a peptide phage display library identified a peptide able to transduce heart tissue in vivo efficiently and specifically. CTP could be used to deliver therapeutic peptides, proteins and nucleic acid specifically to the heart.

  2. Oligopeptide M13 Phage Display in Pathogen Research

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    Michael Hust

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Phage display has become an established, widely used method for selection of peptides, antibodies or alternative scaffolds. The use of phage display for the selection of antigens from genomic or cDNA libraries of pathogens which is an alternative to the classical way of identifying immunogenic proteins is not well-known. In recent years several new applications for oligopeptide phage display in disease related fields have been developed which has led to the identification of various new antigens. These novel identified immunogenic proteins provide new insights into host pathogen interactions and can be used for the development of new diagnostic tests and vaccines. In this review we focus on the M13 oligopeptide phage display system for pathogen research but will also give examples for lambda phage display and for applications in other disease related fields. In addition, a detailed technical work flow for the identification of immunogenic oligopeptides using the pHORF system is given. The described identification of immunogenic proteins of pathogens using oligopeptide phage display can be linked to antibody phage display resulting in a vaccine pipeline.

  3. Improvement and efficient display of Bacillus thuringiensis toxins on M13 phages and ribosomes.

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    Pacheco, Sabino; Cantón, Emiliano; Zuñiga-Navarrete, Fernando; Pecorari, Frédéric; Bravo, Alejandra; Soberón, Mario

    2015-12-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) produces insecticidal proteins that have been used worldwide in the control of insect-pests in crops and vectors of human diseases. However, different insect species are poorly controlled by the available Bt toxins or have evolved resistance to these toxins. Evolution of Bt toxicity could provide novel toxins to control insect pests. To this aim, efficient display systems to select toxins with increased binding to insect membranes or midgut proteins involved in toxicity are likely to be helpful. Here we describe two display systems, phage display and ribosome display, that allow the efficient display of two non-structurally related Bt toxins, Cry1Ac and Cyt1Aa. Improved display of Cry1Ac and Cyt1Aa on M13 phages was achieved by changing the commonly used peptide leader sequence of the coat pIII-fusion protein, that relies on the Sec translocation pathway, for a peptide leader sequence that relies on the signal recognition particle pathway (SRP) and by using a modified M13 helper phage (Phaberge) that has an amber mutation in its pIII genomic sequence and preferentially assembles using the pIII-fusion protein. Also, both Cry1Ac and Cyt1Aa were efficiently displayed on ribosomes, which could allow the construction of large libraries of variants. Furthermore, Cry1Ac or Cyt1Aa displayed on M13 phages or ribosomes were specifically selected from a mixture of both toxins depending on which antigen was immobilized for binding selection. These improved systems may allow the selection of Cry toxin variants with improved insecticidal activities that could counter insect resistances.

  4. Cell-adhesive RGD peptide-displaying M13 bacteriophage/PLGA nanofiber matrices for growth of fibroblasts.

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    Shin, Yong Cheol; Lee, Jong Ho; Jin, Linhua; Kim, Min Jeong; Oh, Jin-Woo; Kim, Tai Wan; Han, Dong-Wook

    2014-01-01

    M13 bacteriophages can be readily fabricated as nanofibers due to non-toxic bacterial virus with a nanofiber-like shape. In the present study, we prepared hybrid nanofiber matrices composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, PLGA) and M13 bacteriophages which were genetically modified to display the RGD peptide on their surface (RGD-M13 phage). The surface morphology and chemical composition of hybrid nanofiber matrices were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. Immunofluorescence staining was conducted to investigate the existence of M13 bacteriophages in RGD-M13 phage/PLGA hybrid nanofibers. In addition, the attachment and proliferation of three different types of fibroblasts on RGD-M13 phage/PLGA nanofiber matrices were evaluated to explore how fibroblasts interact with these matrices. SEM images showed that RGD-M13 phage/PLGA hybrid matrices had the non-woven porous structure, quite similar to that of natural extracellular matrices, having an average fiber diameter of about 190 nm. Immunofluorescence images and Raman spectra revealed that RGD-M13 phages were homogeneously distributed in entire matrices. Moreover, the attachment and proliferation of fibroblasts cultured on RGD-M13 phage/PLGA matrices were significantly enhanced due to enriched RGD moieties on hybrid matrices. These results suggest that RGD-M13 phage/PLGA matrices can be efficiently used as biomimetic scaffolds for tissue engineering applications.

  5. Amplification and polyclonal antibody preparation of M13 phage display library%M13噬菌体肽库扩增及兔抗血清制备

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任晓峰; 马晓微

    2013-01-01

    为制备M13噬菌体多克隆抗体,将噬菌体十二肽原始文库进行大量扩增,作为免疫原制备兔抗M13的多克隆抗体血清并进行间接ELISA鉴定.结果表明,该多抗效价达1∶1 048 576,说明此多抗可与扩增噬菌体文库发生很好的抗原抗体反应.将制备的噬菌体M13多克隆抗体与商业化M13抗体水平比较,制备多抗与商业化M13抗体效果相当.本研究成功制备兔抗M13噬菌体多克隆抗体,为深入研究噬菌体展示技术提供了材料.%In order to generate polyclonal antibodies of the M13 Phage,one M13 of Ph..D.-12TM Phage Display Peptide Library was amplified and used to immunize a rabbit to generate polyclonal antibody.Indirect ELISA analysis showed that the titer of the polyclonal antibody was approximately 1∶1 048 576,showing that the anti-M13 antibody had a high titer.Compared this polyclonal antibody with a Rabbit polyclonal antibody (Rb pAb) to M13 Bacteriophage Coat Proteins (commercialization),the binding activity of the produced polyclonal antibody to the identical target was as good as that of the Rb pAb to M13 Bacteriophage Coat Proteins.In the study,polyclonal antibody to this M13 of phage library was successfully generated and such phage polyclonal antibody is important material for functional analysis with phage.

  6. RGD peptide-displaying M13 bacteriophage/PLGA nanofibers as cell-adhesive matrices for smooth muscle cells

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    Shin, Yong Cheol; Lee, Jong Ho; Jin, Oh Seong; Lee, Eun Ji; Jin, Lin Hua; Kim, Chang Seok; Hong, Suck Won; Han, Dong Wook; Kim, Chun Tae; Oh, Jin Woo [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Extracellular matrices (ECMs) are network structures that play an essential role in regulating cellular growth and differentiation. In this study, novel nanofibrous matrices were fabricated by electrospinning M13 bacteriophage and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and were shown to be structurally and functionally similar to natural ECMs. A genetically-engineered M13 bacteriophage was constructed to display Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides on its surface. The physicochemical properties of RGD peptide-displaying M13 bacteriophage (RGD-M13 phage)/PLGA nanofibers were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. We used immunofluorescence staining to confirm that M13 bacteriophages were homogenously distributed in RGD-M13 phage/PLGA matrices. Furthermore, RGD-M13 phage/PLGA nanofibrous matrices, having excellent biocompatibility, can enhance the behaviors of vascular smooth muscle cells. This result suggests that RGD-M13 phage/PLGA nanofibrous matrices have potentials to serve as tissue engineering scaffolds.

  7. A Biological Approach for the Synthesis of Bismuth Nanoparticles: Using Thiolated M13 Phage as Scaffold.

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    Vera-Robles, L Irais; Escobar-Alarcón, Luis; Picquart, Michel; Hernández-Pozos, J Luis; Haro-Poniatowski, Emmanuel

    2016-04-01

    We report the synthesis of Bi nanoparticles (Bi NPs) using the M13 phage as scaffold. The p8 protein of the phage is functionalized with thiol groups of different lengths, and these thiolated regions act as nucleation centers for Bi(3+) ions. The size distribution, shape, and resilience to oxidation of the Bi NPs depend on the length of the thiol group used. The NPs are characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy, Raman, and IR spectroscopies, matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization, and optical absorption. These results show that the nanoparticles are crystalline and have a typical diameter of ∼3.0 nm. The method of preparation presented here is reproducible and implies "greener" conditions than those reported elsewhere. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of bismuth nanoparticles synthesized by a biomineralization method.

  8. Phage M13 for the treatment of Alzheimer and Parkinson disease.

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    Messing, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    The studies of microbes have been instrumental in combatting infectious diseases, but they have also led to great insights into basic biological mechanism like DNA replication, transcription, and translation of mRNA. In particular, the studies of bacterial viruses, also called bacteriophage, have been quite useful to study specific cellular processes because of the ease to isolate their DNA, mRNA, and proteins. Here, I review the recent discovery of how properties of the filamentous phage M13 emerge as a novel approach to combat neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Membrane insertion and assembly of epitope-tagged gp9 at the tip of the M13 phage

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    Kuhn Andreas

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Filamentous M13 phage extrude from infected Escherichia coli with a tip structure composed of gp7 and gp9. This tip structure is extended by the assembly of the filament composed of the major coat protein gp8. Finally, gp3 and gp6 terminate the phage structure at the proximal end. Up to now, gp3 has been the primary tool for phage display technology. However, gp7, gp8 and gp9 could also be used for phage display and these phage particles should bind to two different or more surfaces when the modified coat proteins are combined. Therefore, we tested here if the amino-terminal end of gp9 can be modified and whether the modified portion is exposed and detectable on the M13 phage particles. Results The amino-terminal region of gp9 was modified by inserting short sequences that encode antigenic epitopes. We show here that the modified gp9 proteins correctly integrate into the membrane using the membrane insertase YidC exposing the modified epitope into the periplasm. The proteins are then efficiently assembled onto the phage particles. Also extensions up to 36 amino acid residues at the amino-terminal end of gp9 did not interfere with membrane integration and phage assembly. The exposure of the antigenic tags on the phage was visualised with immunogold labelling by electron microscopy and verified by dot blotting with antibodies to the tags. Conclusions Our results suggest that gp9 at the phage tip is suitable for the phage display technology. The modified gp9 can be supplied in trans from a plasmid and fully complements M13 phage with an amber mutation in gene 9. The modified phage tip is very well accessible to antibodies.

  10. [Peptide phage display in biotechnology and biomedicine].

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    Kuzmicheva, G A; Belyavskaya, V A

    2016-07-01

    To date peptide phage display is one of the most common combinatorial methods used for identifying specific peptide ligands. Phage display peptide libraries containing billions different clones successfully used for selection of ligands with high affinity and selectivity toward wide range of targets including individual proteins, bacteria, viruses, spores, different kind of cancer cells and variety of nonorganic targets (metals, alloys, semiconductors etc.) Success of using filamentous phage in phage display technologies relays on the robustness of phage particles and a possibility to genetically modify its DNA to construct new phage variants with novel properties. In this review we are discussing characteristics of the most known non-commercial peptide phage display libraries of different formats (landscape libraries in particular) and their successful applications in several fields of biotechnology and biomedicine: discovery of peptides with diagnostic values against different pathogens, discovery and using of peptides recognizing cancer cells, trends in using of phage display technologies in human interactome studies, application of phage display technologies in construction of novel nano materials.

  11. Screening for PreS specific binding ligands with a phage displayed peptides library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Deng; Ming Zhuang; Yu-Ying Kong; You-Hua Xie; Yuan Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To construct a random peptide phage display library and search for peptides that specifically bind to the PreS region of hepatitis B virus (HBV).METHODS: A phage display vector, pFuse8, based on the gene 8 product (pⅧ) of M13 phage was made and used to construct a random peptide library. E. coli derived thioredoxin-PreS was purified with Thio-bond beads, and exploited as the bait protein for library screening. Five rounds of bio-panning were performed. The PreS-binding specificities of enriched phages were characterized with phage ELISA assay.RESULTS: A phage display vector was successfully constructed as demonstrated to present a pⅧ fused HBV PreS1 epitope on the phage surface with a high efficiency.A cysteine confined random peptide library was constructed containing independent clones exceeding 5±108 clone forming unit (CFU). A pool of phages showing a PreS-binding specificity was obtained after the screening against thioPres with an enrichment of approximately 400 times. Five phages with high PreS-binding specificities were selected and characterized. Sequences of the peptides displayed on these phages were determined.CONCLUSION: A phage library has been constructed,with random peptides displaying as pⅧ-fusion proteins.Specific PreS-binding peptides have been obtained, which may be useful for developing antivirals against HBV infection.

  12. Trinucleotide cassettes increase diversity of T7 phage-displayed peptide library

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    McMahon James B

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amino acid sequence diversity is introduced into a phage-displayed peptide library by randomizing library oligonucleotide DNA. We recently evaluated the diversity of peptide libraries displayed on T7 lytic phage and M13 filamentous phage and showed that T7 phage can display a more diverse amino acid sequence repertoire due to differing processes of viral morphogenesis. Methods In this study, we evaluated and compared the diversity of a 12-mer T7 phage-displayed peptide library randomized using codon-corrected trinucleotide cassettes with a T7 and an M13 12-mer phage-displayed peptide library constructed using the degenerate codon randomization method. Results We herein demonstrate that the combination of trinucleotide cassette amino acid codon randomization and T7 phage display construction methods resulted in a significant enhancement to the functional diversity of a 12-mer peptide library. This novel library exhibited superior amino acid uniformity and order-of-magnitude increases in amino acid sequence diversity as compared to degenerate codon randomized peptide libraries. Comparative analyses of the biophysical characteristics of the 12-mer peptide libraries revealed the trinucleotide cassette-randomized library to be a unique resource. Conclusion The combination of T7 phage display and trinucleotide cassette randomization resulted in a novel resource for the potential isolation of binding peptides for new and previously studied molecular targets.

  13. Cell-Adhesive Matrices Composed of RGD Peptide-Displaying M13 Bacteriophage/Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) Nanofibers Beneficial to Myoblast Differentiation.

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    Shin, Yong Cheol; Lee, Jong Ho; Jin, Linhua; Kim, Min Jeong; Kim, Chuntae; Hong, Suck Won; Oh, Jin Woo; Han, Dong-Wook

    2015-10-01

    Recently, there has been considerable effort to develop suitable scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. Cell adhesion is a prerequisite for cells to survive. In nature, the extracellular matrix (ECM) plays this role. Therefore, an ideal scaffold should be structurally similar to the natural ECM and have biocompatibility and biodegradability. In addition, the scaffold should have biofunctionality, which provides the potent ability to enhance the cellular behaviors, such as adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. This study concentrates on fabricating cell-adhesive matrices composed of RGD peptide-displaying M13 bacteriophage (RGD-M13 phage) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, PLGA) nanofibers. Long rod-shaped M13 bacteriophages are non-toxic and can express many desired proteins on their surface. A genetically engineered M13 phage was constructed to display RGD peptides on its surface. PLGA is a biodegradable polymer with excellent biocompatibility and suitable physicochemical property for adhesive matrices. In this study, RGD-M13 phage/PLGA hybrid nanofiber matrices were fabricated by electrospinning. The physicochemical properties of these matrices were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and contact angle measurement. In addition, the cellular behaviors, such as the initial attachment, proliferation and differentiation, were analyzed by a CCK-8 assay and immunofluorescence staining to evaluate the potential application of these matrices to tissue engineering scaffolds. The RGD-M13 phage/PLGA nanofiber matrices could enhance the cellular behaviors and promote the differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts. These results suggest that the RGD-M13 phage/PLGA nanofiber matrices are beneficial to myoblast differentiation and can serve as effective tissue engineering scaffolds.

  14. Design and Screening of M13 Phage Display cDNA Libraries

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    Yuliya Georgieva

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has seen a steady increase in screening of cDNA expression product libraries displayed on the surface of filamentous bacteriophage. At the same time, the range of applications extended from the identification of novel allergens over disease markers to protein-protein interaction studies. However, the generation and selection of cDNA phage display libraries is subjected to intrinsic biological limitations due to their complex nature and heterogeneity, as well as technical difficulties regarding protein presentation on the phage surface. Here, we review the latest developments in this field, discuss a number of strategies and improvements anticipated to overcome these challenges making cDNA and open reading frame (ORF libraries more readily accessible for phage display. Furthermore, future trends combining phage display with next generation sequencing (NGS will be presented.

  15. Phage display screen for peptides that bind Bcl-2 protein.

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    Park, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Joungmok; Cho, June-Haeng; Moon, Ji Young; Lee, Su-Jae; Yoon, Moon-Young

    2011-01-01

    Bcl-2 family proteins are key regulators of apoptosis associated with human disease, including cancer. Bcl-2 protein has been found to be overexpressed in many cancer cells. Therefore, Bcl-2 protein is a potential diagnostic target for cancer detection. In the present study, the authors have identified several Bcl-2 binding peptides with high affinity (picomolar range) from a 5-round M13 phage display library screening. These peptides can be used to develop novel diagnostic probes or potent inhibitors with diverse polyvalencies.

  16. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

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    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  17. Recognition of epoxy with phage displayed peptides.

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    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2013-07-01

    The development of a general approach for non-destructive chemical and biological functionalization of epoxy could expand opportunities for both fundamental studies and creating various device platforms. Epoxy shows unique electrical, mechanical, chemical and biological compatibility and has been widely used for fabricating a variety of devices. Phage display has emerged as a powerful method for selecting peptides that possess enhanced selectivity and binding affinity toward a variety of targets. In this letter, we demonstrate for the first time a powerful yet benign approach for identifying binding motifs to epoxy via comprehensively screened phage displayed peptides. Our results show that the epoxy can be selectively recognized with peptide-displaying phages. Further, along with the development of epoxy-based microstructures; recognition of the epoxy with phage displayed peptides can be specifically localized in these microstructures. We anticipate that these results could open up exciting opportunities in the use of peptide-recognized epoxy in fundamental biochemical recognition studies, as well as in applications ranging from analytical devices, hybrid materials, surface and interface, to cell biology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Synthesis of dispersive iron or iron–silver nanoparticles on engineered capsid pVIII of M13 virus with electronegative terminal peptides

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    Zhang, Shuai; Nakano, Kazuhiko; Zhang, Shu-liang; Yu, Hui-min, E-mail: yuhm@tsinghua.edu.cn [Tsinghua University, Key Laboratory of Industrial Biocatalysis of the Ministry of Education, Department of Chemical Engineering (China)

    2015-10-15

    M13 is a filamentous Escherichia coli virus covered with five types of capsid proteins, in which pVIII with ∼2700 copies was around the cylindered surface and pIII with five copies located at one end of the phage particle. The pIII-engineered M13 phages with enhanced binding specificity toward Fe were screened after five rounds of biopanning, and the one containing ATPTVAMSLSPL peptide at pIII-terminus was selected for mediated synthesis of zero valent (ZV) Fe nanoparticles (NPs) with the wild M13 as control. Under a reducing environment, uniformly dispersed ZVFeNPs with diameter of 5–10 nm were both synthesized and the morphologies after annealing were confirmed to be face-centered cubic type. The synthesized FeNPs mediated by the two phages showed no significant difference, revealing that the pVIII capsid did dominant contribution to metal binding in comparison with the pIII. A novel pVIII-engineered M13 containing AAEEEDPAK at terminus, named as 4ED-pVIII-M13, was constructed and it carried one more negatively charged residue than the wild one (AEGDDPAK). Metal adsorption quantification showed that the binding affinity of the 4ED-pVIII-M13 toward Ag and Ni ions improved to 62 and 18 % from original 21 and 6 %, respectively. The binding affinity toward Fe remained constant (∼85 %). ZVFe–Ag bi-NPs were successfully synthesized through mediation of 4ED-pVIII-M13. Particularly, the Fe:Ag ratio in the bi-NPs was conveniently controlled through changing the molar concentration of FeCl{sub 2} and AgNO{sub 3} solution before reduction.

  19. Screening of TACE Peptide Inhibitors from Phage Display Peptide Library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To obtain the recombinant tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE) ectodomain and use it as a selective molecule for the screening of TACE peptide inhibitors, the cDNA coding catalytic domain (T800) and full-length ectodomain (T1300) of TACE were amplified by RTPCR, and the expression plasmids were constructed by inserting T800 and T1300 into plasmid pET28a and pET-28c respectively. The recombinant T800 and T1300 were induced by IPTG, and SDSPAGE and Western blotting analysis results revealed that T800 and T1300 were highly expressed in the form of inclusion body. After Ni2+-NTA resin affinity chromatography, the recombinant proteins were used in the screening of TACE-binding peptides from phage display peptide library respectively. After 4 rounds of biopanning, the positive phage clones were analyzed by ELISA, competitive inhibition assay and DNA sequencing. A common amino acid sequence (TRWLVYFSRPYLVAT) was found and synthesized. The synthetic peptide could inhibit the TNF-α release from LPS-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) up to 60.3 %. FACS analysis revealed that the peptide mediated the accumulation of TNF-α on the cell surface. These results demonstrate that the TACE-binding peptide is an effective antagonist of TACE.

  20. Chemical posttranslational modification of phage-displayed peptides.

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    Ng, Simon; Tjhung, Katrina F; Paschal, Beth M; Noren, Christopher J; Derda, Ratmir

    2015-01-01

    Phage-displayed peptide library has fueled the discovery of novel ligands for diverse targets. A new type of phage libraries that displays not only linear and disulfide-constrained cyclic peptides but moieties that cannot be encoded genetically or incorporated easily by bacterial genetic machinery has emerged recently. Chemical posttranslational modification of phage library is one of the simplest approaches to encode nonnatural moieties. It confers the library with new functionality and makes it possible to select and evolve molecules with properties not found in the peptides, for instance, glycopeptides recognized by carbohydrate-binding protein and peptides with photoswitching capability. To this end, we describe the newly emerging techniques to chemically modify the phage library and quantify the efficiency of the reaction with a biotin-capture assay. Finally, we provide the methods to construct N-terminal Ser peptide library that allows site-selective modification of phage.

  1. Cyclic RGD peptide incorporation on phage major coat proteins for improved internalization by HeLa cells.

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    Choi, Dong Shin; Jin, Hyo-Eon; Yoo, So Young; Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2014-02-19

    Delivering therapeutic materials or imaging reagents into specific tumor tissues is critically important for development of novel cancer therapeutics and diagnostics. Genetically engineered phages possess promising structural features to develop cancer therapeutic materials. For cancer targeting purposes, we developed a novel engineered phage that expressed cyclic RGD (cRGD) peptides on the pVIII major coat protein using recombinant DNA technology. Using a type 88 phage engineering approach, which inserts a new gene to express additional major coat protein in the noncoding region of the phage genome, we incorporated an additional pVIII major coat protein with relatively bulky cRGD and assembled heterogeneous major coat proteins on the F88.4 phage surfaces. With IPTG control, we could tune different numbers of cRGD peptide displayed on the phage particles up to 140 copies. The resulting phage with cRGD on the recombinant pVIII protein exhibited enhanced internalization efficiency into HeLa cells in a ligand density and conformational structure dependent manner when comparing with the M13 phages modified with either linear RGD on pVIII or cRGD on pIII. Our cRGD peptide engineered phage could be useful for cancer therapy or diagnostic purposes after further modifying the phage with drug molecules or contrast reagents in the future.

  2. Inhibition of bacterial conjugation by phage M13 and its protein g3p: quantitative analysis and model.

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    Abraham Lin

    Full Text Available Conjugation is the main mode of horizontal gene transfer that spreads antibiotic resistance among bacteria. Strategies for inhibiting conjugation may be useful for preserving the effectiveness of antibiotics and preventing the emergence of bacterial strains with multiple resistances. Filamentous bacteriophages were first observed to inhibit conjugation several decades ago. Here we investigate the mechanism of inhibition and find that the primary effect on conjugation is occlusion of the conjugative pilus by phage particles. This interaction is mediated primarily by phage coat protein g3p, and exogenous addition of the soluble fragment of g3p inhibited conjugation at low nanomolar concentrations. Our data are quantitatively consistent with a simple model in which association between the pili and phage particles or g3p prevents transmission of an F plasmid encoding tetracycline resistance. We also observe a decrease in the donor ability of infected cells, which is quantitatively consistent with a reduction in pili elaboration. Since many antibiotic-resistance factors confer susceptibility to phage infection through expression of conjugative pili (the receptor for filamentous phage, these results suggest that phage may be a source of soluble proteins that slow the spread of antibiotic resistance genes.

  3. Potential of phage-displayed peptide library technology to identify functional targeting peptides

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    Krumpe, Lauren RH; Mori, Toshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    Combinatorial peptide library technology is a valuable resource for drug discovery and development. Several peptide drugs developed through phage-displayed peptide library technology are presently in clinical trials and the authors envision that phage-displayed peptide library technology will assist in the discovery and development of many more. This review attempts to compile and summarize recent literature on targeting peptides developed through peptide library technology, with special emphasis on novel peptides with targeting capacity evaluated in vivo. PMID:20150977

  4. Phage display of peptide / major histocompatibility class I complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vest Hansen, N; Ostergaard Pedersen, L; Stryhn, A;

    2001-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules sample peptides from the intracellular environment and present them to cytotoxic T cells (CTL). To establish a selection system, and, thereby, enable a library approach to identify the specificities involved (that of the MHC-I for peptides...... and subsequently that ot the T cell receptor for peptide-MHC-I complex), we have fused a single chain peptide-MHC-I complex to the phage minor coat protein, gpIII, and displayed it on filamentous phage. Expression of peptide-MHC-I complexes was shown with relevant conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies and...

  5. Identification of Soft Matter Binding Peptide Ligands Using Phage Display.

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    Günay, Kemal Arda; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2015-10-21

    Phage display is a powerful tool for the selection of highly affine, short peptide ligands. While originally primarily used for the identification of ligands to proteins, the scope of this technique has significantly expanded over the past two decades. Phage display nowadays is also increasingly applied to identify ligands that selectively bind with high affinity to a broad range of other substrates including natural and biological polymers as well as a variety of low-molecular-weight organic molecules. Such peptides are of interest for various reasons. The ability to selectively and with high affinity bind to the substrate of interest allows the conjugation or immobilization of, e.g., nanoparticles or biomolecules, or generally, facilitates interactions at materials interfaces. On the other hand, presentation of peptide ligands that selectively bind to low-molecular-weight organic materials is of interest for the development of sensor surfaces. The aim of this article is to highlight the opportunities provided by phage display for the identification of peptide ligands that bind to synthetic or natural polymer substrates or to small organic molecules. The article will first provide an overview of the different peptide ligands that have been identified by phage display that bind to these "soft matter" targets. The second part of the article will discuss the different characterization techniques that allow the determination of the affinity of the identified ligands to the respective substrates.

  6. Identification of peptides that selectively bind to myoglobin by biopanning of phage displayed-peptide library.

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    Padmanaban, Guruprasath; Park, Hyekyung; Choi, Ji Suk; Cho, Yong-Woo; Kang, Woong Chol; Moon, Chan-Il; Kim, In-San; Lee, Byung-Heon

    2014-10-10

    Biopanning of phage displayed-peptide library was performed against myoglobin, a marker for the early assessment of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), to identify peptides that selectively bind to myoglobin. Using myoglobin-conjugated magnetic beads, phages that bound to myoglobin were collected and amplified for the next round of screening. A 148-fold enrichment of phage titer was observed after five rounds of screening relative to the first round. After phage binding ELISA, three phage clones were selected (3R1, 3R7 and 3R10) and the inserted peptides were chemically synthesized. The analysis of binding affinity showed that the 3R7 (CPSTLGASC) peptide had higher binding affinity (Kd=57 nM) than did the 3R1 (CNLSSSWIC) and 3R10 (CVPRLSAPC) peptide (Kd=125 nM and 293 nM, respectively). Cross binding activity to other proteins, such as bovine serum albumin, troponin I, and creatine kinase-MB, was minimal. In a peptide-antibody sandwich ELISA, the selected peptides efficiently captured myoglobin. Moreover, the concentrations of myoglobin in serum samples measured by a peptide-peptide sandwich assay were comparable to those measured by a commercial antibody-based kit. These results indicate that the identified peptides can be used for the detection of myoglobin and may be a cost effective alternative to antibodies.

  7. Targeting Leishmania major parasite with peptides derived from a combinatorial phage display library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhaiem, Rafik Ben; Houimel, Mehdi

    2016-07-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a global problem caused by intracellular protozoan pathogens of the genus Leishmania for which there are no suitable vaccine or chemotherapy options. Thus, de novo identification of small molecules binding to the Leishmania parasites by direct screening is a promising and appropriate alternative strategy for the development of new drugs. In this study, we used a random linear hexapeptide library fused to the gene III protein of M13 filamentous bacteriophage to select binding peptides to metacyclic promastigotes from a highly virulent strain of Leishmania major (Zymodeme MON-25; MHOM/TN/94/GLC94). After four rounds of stringent selection and amplification, polyclonal and monoclonal phage-peptides directed against L. major metacyclic promastigotes were assessed by ELISA, and the optimal phage-peptides were grown individually and characterized for binding to L. major by monoclonal phage ELISA. The DNA of 42 phage-peptides clones was amplified by PCR, sequenced, and their amino acid sequences deduced. Six different peptide sequences were obtained with frequencies of occurrence ranging from 2.3% to 85.7%. The biological effect of the peptides was assessed in vitro on human monocytes infected with L. major metacyclic promastigotes, and in vivo on susceptible parasite-infected BALB/c mice. The development of cutaneous lesions in the right hind footpads of infected mice after 13 weeks post-infection showed a protection rate of 81.94% with the injected peptide P2. Moreover, Western blots revealed that the P2 peptide interacted with the major surface protease gp63, a protein of 63kDa molecular weight. Moreover, bioinformatics were used to predict the interaction between peptides and the major surface molecule of the L. major. The molecular docking showed that the P2 peptide has the minimum interaction energy and maximum shape complimentarity with the L. major gp63 active site. Our study demonstrated that the P2 peptide occurs at high frequency

  8. Identification of gliadin-binding peptides by phage display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Östman Sofia

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coeliac disease (CD is a common and complex disorder of the small intestine caused by intolerance to wheat gluten and related edible cereals like barley and rye. Peptides originating from incomplete gliadin digestion activate the lamina propria infiltrating T cells to release proinflammatory cytokines, which in turn cause profound tissue remodelling of the small intestinal wall. There is no cure for CD except refraining from consuming gluten-containing products. Results Phage from a random oligomer display library were enriched by repeated pannings against immobilised gliadin proteins. Phage from the final panning round were plated, individual plaques picked, incubated with host bacteria, amplified to a population size of 1011 to 1012 and purified. DNA was isolated from 1000 purified phage populations and the region covering the 36 bp oligonucleotide insert from which the displayed peptides were translated, was sequenced. Altogether more than 150 different peptide-encoding sequences were identified, many of which were repeatedly isolated under various experimental conditions. Amplified phage populations, each expressing a single peptide, were tested first in pools and then one by one for their ability to inhibit binding of human anti-gliadin antibodies in ELISA assays. These experiments showed that several of the different peptide-expressing phage tested inhibited the interaction between gliadin and anti-gliadin antibodies. Finally, four different peptide-encoding sequences were selected for further analysis, and the corresponding 12-mer peptides were synthesised in vitro. By ELISA assays it was demonstrated that several of the peptides inhibited the interaction between gliadin molecules and serum anti-gliadin antibodies. Moreover, ELISA competition experiments as well as dot-blot and western blot revealed that the different peptides interacted with different molecular sites of gliadin. Conclusions We believe that several of

  9. Rapid development of new protein biosensors utilizing peptides obtained via phage display.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wu

    Full Text Available There is a consistent demand for new biosensors for the detection of protein targets, and a systematic method for the rapid development of new sensors is needed. Here we present a platform where short unstructured peptides that bind to a desired target are selected using M13 phage display. The selected peptides are then chemically synthesized and immobilized on gold, allowing for detection of the target using electrochemical techniques such as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM is also used as a diagnostic tool during biosensor development. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by creating a novel peptide-based electrochemical biosensor for the enzyme alanine aminotransferase (ALT, a well-known biomarker of hepatotoxicity. Biopanning of the M13 phage display library over immobilized ALT, led to the rapid identification of a new peptide (ALT5-8 with an amino acid sequence of WHWRNPDFWYLK. Phage particles expressing this peptide exhibited nanomolar affinity for immobilized ALT (K(d,app = 85±20 nM. The newly identified ALT5-8 peptide was then chemically synthesized with a C-terminal cysteine for gold immobilization. The performance of the gold-immobilized peptides was studied with cyclic voltammetry (CV, QCM, and EIS. Using QCM, the sensitivity for ALT detection was 8.9±0.9 Hz/(µg/mL and the limit of detection (LOD was 60 ng/mL. Using EIS measurements, the sensitivity was 142±12 impedance percentage change %/(µg/mL and the LOD was 92 ng/mL. In both cases, the LOD was below the typical concentration of ALT in human blood. Although both QCM and EIS produced similar LODs, EIS is preferable due to a larger linear dynamic range. Using QCM, the immobilized peptide exhibited a nanomolar dissociation constant for ALT (K(d = 20.1±0.6 nM. These results demonstrate a simple and rapid platform for developing and assessing the performance of sensitive, peptide-based biosensors for new protein

  10. Intra-domain phage display (ID-PhD of peptides and protein mini-domains censored from canonical pIII phage display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina F Tjhung

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe multivalent display of peptide and protein sequences typically censored from traditional N-terminal display on protein pIII of filamentous bacteriophage M13. Using site-directed mutagenesis of commercially available M13KE phage cloning vector, we introduced sites that permit efficient cloning using restriction enzymes between domains N1 and N2 of the pIII protein. As infectivity of phage is directly linked to the integrity of the connection between N1 and N2 domains, intra-domain phage display (ID-PhD allows for simple quality control of the display and the natural variations in the displayed sequences. Additionally, direct linkage to phage propagation allows efficient monitoring of sequence cleavage, providing a convenient system for selection and evolution of protease-susceptible or protease-resistant sequences. As an example of the benefits of such an ID-PhD system, we displayed a charged FLAG sequence, which is known to be post-translationally excised from pIII when displayed on the N-terminus. ID-PhD of FLAG exhibited sub-nanomolar apparent Kd suggesting multivalent nature of the display. A TEV-protease recognition sequence (TEVrs co-expressed in tandem with FLAG, allowed us to demonstrate that 99.9997% of the phage displayed the FLAG-TEVrs tandem and can be recognized and cleaved by TEV-protease. The residual 0.0003% consisted of phage clones that have excised the insert from their genome. ID-PhD is also amenable to display of protein mini-domains, such as the 33-residue minimized Z-domain of protein A. We show that it is thus possible to use ID-PhD for multivalent display and selection of mini-domain proteins (Affibodies, scFv, etc..

  11. Role of damage-specific DNA polymerases in M13 phage mutagenesis induced by a major lipid peroxidation product trans-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janowska, Beata [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Pawinskiego 5a, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland); Kurpios-Piec, Dagmara [Department of Biochemistry, Medical University of Warsaw, Banacha 1, 02-097 Warsaw (Poland); Prorok, Paulina [Institute of Genetics and Biotechnology, Warsaw University, Pawinskiego 5a, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland); Szparecki, Grzegorz [Medical University of Warsaw, Zwirki i Wigury 61, 02-097 Warsaw (Poland); Komisarski, Marek [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Pawinskiego 5a, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland); Kowalczyk, Pawel [Interdisciplinary Centre for Mathematical and Computational Modelling, Warsaw University, Pawinskiego 5a, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland); Janion, Celina [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Pawinskiego 5a, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland); Tudek, Barbara, E-mail: tudek@ibb.waw.pl [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Pawinskiego 5a, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Genetics and Biotechnology, Warsaw University, Pawinskiego 5a, 02-106 Warsaw (Poland)

    2012-01-03

    One of the major lipid peroxidation products trans-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), forms cyclic propano- or ethenoadducts bearing six- or seven-carbon atom side chains to G > C Much-Greater-Than A > T. To specify the role of SOS DNA polymerases in HNE-induced mutations, we tested survival and mutation spectra in the lacZ{alpha} gene of M13mp18 phage, whose DNA was treated in vitro with HNE, and which was grown in uvrA{sup -}Escherichia coli strains, carrying one, two or all three SOS DNA polymerases. When Pol IV was the only DNA SOS polymerase in the bacterial host, survival of HNE-treated M13 DNA was similar to, but mutation frequency was lower than in the strain containing all SOS DNA polymerases. When only Pol II or Pol V were present in host bacteria, phage survival decreased dramatically. Simultaneously, mutation frequency was substantially increased, but exclusively in the strain carrying only Pol V, suggesting that induction of mutations by HNE is mainly dependent on Pol V. To determine the role of Pol II and Pol IV in HNE induced mutagenesis, Pol II or Pol IV were expressed together with Pol V. This resulted in decrease of mutation frequency, suggesting that both enzymes can compete with Pol V, and bypass HNE-DNA adducts in an error-free manner. However, HNE-DNA adducts were easily bypassed by Pol IV and only infrequently by Pol II. Mutation spectrum established for strains expressing only Pol V, showed that in uvrA{sup -} bacteria the frequency of base substitutions and recombination increased in relation to NER proficient strains, particularly mutations at adenine sites. Among base substitutions A:T {yields} C:G, A:T {yields} G:C, G:C {yields} A:T and G:C {yields} T:A prevailed. The results suggest that Pol V can infrequently bypass HNE-DNA adducts inducing mutations at G, C and A sites, while bypass by Pol IV and Pol II is error-free, but for Pol II infrequent.

  12. An efficient method for isolating antibody fragments against small peptides by antibody phage display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duan, Zhi; Siegumfeldt, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    We generated monoclonal scFv (single chain variable fragment) antibodies from an antibody phage display library towards three small synthetic peptides derived from the sequence of s1-casein. Key difficulties for selection of scFv-phages against small peptides were addressed. Small peptides do....... The scFvs were sequenced and characterized, and specificity was characterized by ELISA. The methods developed in this study are universally applicable for antibody phage display to efficiently produce antibody fragments against small peptides....

  13. Screening of a specific peptide binding to esophageal squamous carcinoma cells from phage displayed peptide library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Caixia; Li, Chunyan; Jiang, Dongliang; Gao, Xiaojie; Han, Juanjuan; Xu, Nan; Wu, Qiong; Nie, Guochao; Chen, Wei; Lin, Fenghuei; Hou, Yingchun

    2015-06-01

    To select a specifically binding peptide for imaging detection of human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), a phage-displayed 12-mer peptide library was used to screen the peptide that bind to ESCC cells specifically. After four rounds of bio-panning, the phage recovery rate gradually increased, and specific phage clones were effectively enriched. The 60 randomly selected phage clones were tested using cellular enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and 41 phage clones were identified as positive clones with the over 2.10 ratio of absorbance higher than other clones, IRP and PBS controls. From the sequencing results of the positive clones, 14 peptide sequences were obtained and ESCP9 consensus sequence was identified as the peptide with best affinity to ESCC cells via competitive inhibition, fluorescence microscopy, and flow cytometry. The results indicate that the peptide ESCP9 can bind to ESCC cells specifically and sensitively, and it is a potential candidate to be developed as an useful molecule to the imaging detection and targeting therapy for ESCC.

  14. Multifunctional g3p-peptide tag for current phage display systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, C; Haase, B; Timmis, K N; Tesar, M

    1998-03-15

    We have previously described a monoclonal antibody (mAb), 10C3, directed against the gene-3 protein (g3p) of filamentous phage M13, which was produced to study g3p fusion protein expression in Escherichia coli and its incorporation in the phage capsid [Tesar, M., Beckmann, C., Röttgen, P., Haase, B., Faude, U., Timmis, K., 1995. Monoclonal antibody against pIII of filamentous phage: an immunological tool to study pIII fusion protein expression in phage display systems. Immunology 1, 53-54]. In this study we report mapping of the antigenic epitope of the mAb 10C3, by means of short overlapping peptide-sequences [Frank, R., Overwin, H., 1996. Spot synthesis. In: Morris, G.E. (Ed.), Methods in Molecular Biology, Vol. 66: Epitope Mapping Protocols. Humana Press, Totowa, NJ, pp. 149-169.] comprising the C-terminal half of the g3-protein. A minimal recognizable peptide was found which is represented in the 11 amino acid sequence from positions 292 to 302 of g3p [Wezenbeek van, P.M.G.P., Hulsebos, T.J.M., Schoenmakers, J.G.G., 1980. Nucleotide sequence of the filamentous bacteriophage M13 DNA genome: comparison with phage fd. Gene 11, 129-148]. In order to use the antibody also for detection and purification of recombinant proteins, such as single chain antibodies, the epitope was introduced as a tag sequence into the phagemid pHEN1 [Hoogenboom, H.R., Griffith, A.D., Johnson, K., Chiswell, D.J., Hudson, P., Winter, G., 1991. Multi-subunit proteins on the surface of the filamentous phage: methodologies for displaying antibody (Fab) heavy and light chains. Nucleic Acid Res. 19, 4133-4137; Nissim, A., Hoogenboom, H.R., Tomlinson, I.M., Flynn, G., Midgley, C., Lane, D., Winter, G., 1994. Antibody fragments from a single pot phage display library as immunochemical reagents. EMBO J. 13 (3) 692-698]. Purified single chain antibodies containing this tag were detectable down to a concentration of 2 ng ml(-1) under non-denaturing conditions (ELISA) or 4 ng per lane on immunoblots

  15. Engineering RNA phage MS2 virus-like particles for peptide display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Sheldon Keith

    Phage display is a powerful and versatile technology that enables the selection of novel binding functions from large populations of randomly generated peptide sequences. Random sequences are genetically fused to a viral structural protein to produce complex peptide libraries. From a sufficiently complex library, phage bearing peptides with practically any desired binding activity can be physically isolated by affinity selection, and, since each particle carries in its genome the genetic information for its own replication, the selectants can be amplified by infection of bacteria. For certain applications however, existing phage display platforms have limitations. One such area is in the field of vaccine development, where the goal is to identify relevant epitopes by affinity-selection against an antibody target, and then to utilize them as immunogens to elicit a desired antibody response. Today, affinity selection is usually conducted using display on filamentous phages like M13. This technology provides an efficient means for epitope identification, but, because filamentous phages do not display peptides in the high-density, multivalent arrays the immune system prefers to recognize, they generally make poor immunogens and are typically useless as vaccines. This makes it necessary to confer immunogenicity by conjugating synthetic versions of the peptides to more immunogenic carriers. Unfortunately, when introduced into these new structural environments, the epitopes often fail to elicit relevant antibody responses. Thus, it would be advantageous to combine the epitope selection and immunogen functions into a single platform where the structural constraints present during affinity selection can be preserved during immunization. This dissertation describes efforts to develop a peptide display system based on the virus-like particles (VLPs) of bacteriophage MS2. Phage display technologies rely on (1) the identification of a site in a viral structural protein that is

  16. Development of a renal collecting duct homing peptide using phage display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Per; Peti-Peterdi, Janos

    Homing peptides are useful for in vivo labeling and nonviral gene transfer to selective tissues and cell types. The aim of this project was to develop a renal collecting duct homing peptide. Using phage display, we identified a phage expressing a cyclic 7 amino acid peptide, which was internalize...

  17. Selection of trkB-binding peptides from a phage-displayed random peptide library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马仲才; 吴晓兰; 曹明媚; 潘卫; 朱分禄; 陈景山; 戚中田

    2003-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) shows potential in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, but the therapeutic application of BDNF has been greatly limited because it is too large in molecular size to permeate blood-brain barrier. To develop low-molecular-weight BDNF-like peptides, we selected a phage-displayed random peptide library using trkB expressed on NIH 3T3 cells as target in the study. With the strategy of peptide library incubation with NIH 3T3 cells and competitive elution with 1 υg/mL of BDNF in the last round of selection, the specific phages able to bind to the natural conformation of trkB and antagonize BDNF binding to trkB were enriched effectively. Five trkB-binding peptides were obtained, in which a core sequence of CRA/TXφXXφXXC (X represents the random amino acids, φ represents T, L or I) was identified. The BDNF-like activity of these five peptides displayed on phages was not observed, though all of them antagonized the activity of BDNF in a dose-dependent manner. Similar results were obtained with the synthetic peptide of C1 clone, indicating that the 5 phage-derived peptides were trkB antagonists. These low-molecular-weight antagonists of trkB may be of potential application in the treatment of neuroblastoma and chronic pain. Meanwhile, the obtained core sequence also could be used as the base to construct the secondary phage-displayed peptide library for further development of small peptides mimicking BDNF activity.

  18. Phage Selection of Chemically Stabilized α-Helical Peptide Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diderich, Philippe; Bertoldo, Davide; Dessen, Pierre; Khan, Maola M; Pizzitola, Irene; Held, Werner; Huelsken, Joerg; Heinis, Christian

    2016-05-20

    Short α-helical peptides stabilized by linkages between constituent amino acids offer an attractive format for ligand development. In recent years, a range of excellent ligands based on stabilized α-helices were generated by rational design using α-helical peptides of natural proteins as templates. Herein, we developed a method to engineer chemically stabilized α-helical ligands in a combinatorial fashion. In brief, peptides containing cysteines in position i and i + 4 are genetically encoded by phage display, the cysteines are modified with chemical bridges to impose α-helical conformations, and binders are isolated by affinity selection. We applied the strategy to affinity mature an α-helical peptide binding β-catenin. We succeeded in developing ligands with Kd's as low as 5.2 nM, having >200-fold improved affinity. The strategy is generally applicable for affinity maturation of any α-helical peptide. Compared to hydrocarbon stapled peptides, the herein evolved thioether-bridged peptide ligands can be synthesized more easily, as no unnatural amino acids are required and the cyclization reaction is more efficient and yields no stereoisomers. A further advantage of the thioether-bridged peptide ligands is that they can be expressed recombinantly as fusion proteins.

  19. Automated Detection of Conformational Epitopes Using Phage Display Peptide Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra S Negi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Precise determination of conformational epitopes of neutralizing antibodies represents a key step in the rational design of novel vaccines. A powerful experimental method to gain insights on the physical chemical nature of conformational epitopes is the selection of linear peptides that bind with high affinities to a monoclonal antibody of interest by phage display technology. However, the structural characterization of conformational epitopes from these mimotopes is not straightforward, and in the past the interpretation of peptide sequences from phage display experiments focused on linear sequence analysis to find a consensus sequence or common sequence motifs.Results: We present a fully automated search method, EpiSearch that predicts the possible location of conformational epitopes on the surface of an antigen. The algorithm uses peptide sequences from phage display experiments as input, and ranks all surface exposed patches according to the frequency distribution of similar residues in the peptides and in the patch. We have tested the performance of the EpiSearch algorithm for six experimental data sets of phage display experiments, the human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2/neu, the antibody mAb Bo2C11 targeting the C2 domain of FVIII, antibodies mAb 17b and mAb b12 of the HIV envelope protein gp120, mAb 13b5 targeting HIV-1 capsid protein and 80R of the SARS coronavirus spike protein. In all these examples the conformational epitopes as determined by the X-ray crystal structures of the antibody-antigen complexes, were found within the highest scoring patches of EpiSearch, covering in most cases more than 50% residues of experimental observed conformational epitopes. Input options of the program include mapping of a single peptide or a set of peptides on the antigen structure, and the results of the calculation can be visualized on our interactive web server.Availability: Users can access the EpiSearch from our web

  20. A novel peptide, selected from phage display library of random peptides, can efficiently target into human breast cancer cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Jian; LIU WeiQing; JIANG AiMei; ZHANG KeJian; CHEN MingQing

    2008-01-01

    To develop a targeting vector for breast cancer biotherapy, MDA-MB-231 cell, a human breast cancer cell line, was co-cultured with pC89 (9 aa) phage display library of random peptides. In multiple inde-pendent peptide-presenting phage screening trials, subtilisin was used as a protease to inactivate ex-tra-cellular phages. The internalized phages were collected by cell lysising and amplified in E. coli XLI-Blue. Through five rounds of selection, the peptide-presenting phages which could be internalized in MDA-MB-231 cells were isolated. A comparison was made between internalization capacities of pep-tide-presenting phages isolated from MDA-MB-231 cells and RGD-integrin binding phage by cocultur-ing them with other human tumor cell lines and normal cells. The nucleotide sequences of isolated peptide-presenting phages were then determined by DNA sequencing. To uncover whether phage coat protein or amino acid order was required for the character of the peptide to MDA-MB-231 cells, three peptides were synthesized. They are CASPSGALRSC, ASPSGALRS and CGVIFDHSVPC (the shifted sequence of CASPSGALRSC), and after coculturing them with different cell lines, their targeting ca-pacities to MDA-MB-231 cells were detected. These data suggested that the internalization process was highly selective, and capable of capturing a specific peptide from parent peptide variants. Moreover, the targeting internalization event of peptides was an amino acid sequence dependent manner. The results demonstrated the feasibility of using phage display library of random peptides to develop new targeting system for intracellular delivery of macromolecules, and the peptide we obtained might be modified as a targeting vector for breast cancer gene therapy.

  1. A polystyrene binding target-unrelated peptide isolated in the screening of phage display library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2016-11-01

    Phage display is a powerful methodology for the identification of peptide ligands binding to any desired target. However, the selection of target-unrelated peptides (TUPs) appears as a huge problem in the screening of phage display libraries through biopanning. The phage-displayed peptide TLHPAAD has been isolated both in our laboratory and by another reserach group on completely different screening targets prompting us to hypothesize that it may be a potential TUP. In the current study, we analyzed the binding characteristics and propagation rate of phage clone displaying TLHPAAD peptide (SW-TUP clone). The results of ELISA experiment and phage recovery assay provided strong support for the notion that SW-TUP phage binds to polystyrene with a significantly higher affinity than control phage clones. Furthermore, this polystyrene binding was demonstrated to occur in a concentration- and pH-dependent mode. Characterization of the propagation profile of phage clones within a specified time course revealed no statistically significant difference between the amplification rate of SW-TUP and control phages. Our findings lead us to the conclusion that SW-TUP phage clone with the displayed peptide TLHPAAD is not a true target binder and its selection in biopanning experiments results from its bidning affinity to the polystyrene surface of the solid phase.

  2. Selection of a peptide mimicking neutralization epitope of hepatitis E virus with phage peptide display technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Gu; Jun Zhang; Ying-Bing Wang; Shao-Wei Li; Hai-Jie Yang; Wen-Xin Luo; Ning-Shao Xia

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To select the peptide mimicking the neutralization epitope of hepatitis E virus which bound to non-type-specific and conformational monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) 8C11 and 8H3 fromed 7-peptide phage display library, and expressed the peptide recombinant with HBcAg in E.coli, and to observe whether the recombinant HBcAg could still form virus like particle (VLP) and to test the activation of the recombinant polyprotein and chemo-synthesized peptide that was selected by mAb 8H3.METHODS: 8C11 and 8H3 were used to screen for binding peptides through a 7-peptide phage display library. After 4rounds of panning, monoclonal phages were selected and sequenced. The obtained dominant peptide coding sequences was then synthesized and inserted into amino acid 78 to 83 of hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg), and then expressed in E. coli. Activity of the recombinant proteins was detected by Western blotting, VLPs of the recombinant polyproteins were tested by transmission electron microscopy and binding activity of the chemo-synthesized peptide was confirmed by BIAcore biosensor.RESULTS: Twenty-one positive monoclonal phages (10for 8CL1, and 11 for 8H3) were selected and the inserted fragments were sequenced. The DNA sequence coding for the obtained dominant peptides 8C11 (N′-His-Pro-Thr-LeuLeu-Arg-Ile-C′, named 8C11A) and 8H3 (N′-Ser-Ile-LeuPro- Tyr-Pro-Tyr-C′, named 8H3A) were then synthesized and cloned to the HBcAg vector, then expressed in E. coli.The recombinant proteins aggregated into homodimer or polymer on SDS-PAGE, and could bind to mAb 8C11 and 8H3 in Western blotting. At the same time, the recombinant polyprotein could form virus like particles (VLPs), which could be visualized on electron micrograph. The dominant peptide 8H3A selected by mAb 8H3 was further chemosynthesized, and its binding to mAb 8H3 could be detected by BIAcore biosensor.CONCLUSION: These results implicate that conformational neutralizing epitope can be partially modeled by a short

  3. Biomimetic self-templating optical structures fabricated by genetically engineered M13 bacteriophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won-Geun; Song, Hyerin; Kim, Chuntae; Moon, Jong-Sik; Kim, Kyujung; Lee, Seung-Wuk; Oh, Jin-Woo

    2016-11-15

    Here, we describe a highly sensitive and selective surface plasmon resonance sensor system by utilizing self-assembly of genetically engineered M13 bacteriophage. About 2700 copies of genetically expressed peptide copies give superior selectivity and sensitivity to M13 phage-based SPR sensor. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the M13 phage-based SPR sensor was enhanced due to the aligning of receptor matrix in specific direction. Incorporation of specific binding peptide (His Pro Gln: HPQ) gives M13 bacteriophage high selectivity for the streptavidin. Our M13 phage-based SPR sensor takes advantage of simplicity of self-assembly compared with relatively complex photolithography techniques or chemical conjugations. Additionally, designed structure which is composed of functionalized M13 bacteriophage can simultaneously improve the sensitivity and selectivity of SPR sensor evidently. By taking advantages of the genetic engineering and self-assembly, we propose the simple method for fabricating novel M13 phage-based SPR sensor system which has a high sensitivity and high selectivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification of a novel skin penetration enhancement peptide by phage display peptide library screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunny; Sahdev, Preety; Perumal, Omathanu; Tummala, Hemachand

    2012-05-07

    Skin is an important site for local or systemic application of drugs. However, a majority of drugs have poor permeability through the skin's topmost layer, stratum corneum (SC). The aim of this study was to identify safe and smaller peptides that could enhance the skin penetration of drug molecules. By screening phage display peptide library, we have identified a T2 peptide (LVGVFH), which enhanced the penetration of bacteriophages (~800 nm long bacterial viruses) across porcine and mouse skin. Pretreating the skin with synthetic T2 peptide at pH 4.5 resulted in significant penetration enhancement of hydrophilic drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) across skin. FTIR spectroscopy showed that the T2 peptide interacted with skin lipids to enhance the skin penetration. Pretreating the skin with T2 peptide enhanced the partitioning of small molecules with different lipophilicities (5-FU, fluorescein isothiocyanate, and rhodamine 123 hydrochloride) into skin. Fluorescence studies showed that T2 peptide enhanced the diffusion of these molecules into intercellular lipids of SC and thus enhanced the penetration into the skin. Histidine at the c-terminus of T2 peptide was identified to be critical for the skin penetration enhancement. T2 peptide interacted with skin lipids to cause skin penetration enhancement. The study identified a novel, safe, and noninvasive peptide to improve the skin penetration of drugs without chemical conjugation.

  5. Peptide substrate identification for yeast Hsp40 Ydj1 by screening the phage display library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jingzhi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We have identified a peptide substrate for molecular chaperone Hsp40 Ydj1 by utilizing the combination of phage display library screening and isothemol titration calirimetry (ITC. The initial peptide substrate screening for Hsp40 Ydj1 has been carried out by utilizing a 7-mer phage display library. The peptide sequences from the bio-panning were synthesized and object to the direct affinity measurement for Hsp40 Ydj1 by isothemol titration calirimetry studies. The peptide which has the measurable affinity with Ydj1 shows enriched hydrophobic residues in the middle of the substrate fragment. The peptide substrate specificity for molecular chaperone Hsp40 has been analyzed.

  6. Screening Peptide Inhibitors Using Phage Peptide Library with Isocitrate Lyase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis as Target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Yu-he; NIU Xue; SUN Bo; TENG Guo-sheng; ZHAO Yun-hui; WU Cong-mei

    2011-01-01

    When devoured by macrophages,Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains persistent in macrophages and gains energy through the glyoxylate bypass to maintain its long-term existence in host cells.Therefore it is possible to stop persistent infections by interdicting the glyoxylate bypass in which the isocitrate lyase(ICL) is the key rate-limiting enzyme and a persistence factor.ICL is the target of anti-TB(TB:tubercular) drugs,which could screen ICL out and effectively inhibit the activity of ICL in Mycobacterium tuberculosis,and because of this,anti-TB drugs can be used to kill persistent Mycobacterium tuberculosis.In this study,the ICL gene of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv was cloned successfully and recombinant protein with bioactivity was obtained through the enzyme characteristic appraisal.The specific activity of the recombined ICL is 24 μmol·mg-1 -min-1.The recombined ICL protein was used as the target,and phages which can specifically combine to ICL were screened in the phage 7 peptide library.According to the results of the ELISA and DNA sequence detection,eventually three 7-peptide chains were synthesized.Then the peptide chains were reacted with ICL,respectively,to detect their inhibitory effects on ICL.The results show that all the three 7-peptide chains possessed varying inhibitory effects on the activity of ICL.This study provided lead compounds for the research and development of new peptide anti-TB drugs.

  7. Targeting Phosphatidylserine on Apoptotic Cells with Phages and Peptides Selected from a Bacteriophage Display Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruping Shao

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Phosphatidylserine (PS is a well-characterized biomarker for apoptosis. Ligands that bind to PS can be used for noninvasive imaging of therapy-induced cell death, particularly apoptosis. In this study, we screened a random 12-mer peptide phage library on liposomes prepared from PS. One clone displaying the peptide SVSVGMKPSPRP (designated as PS3-10 bound to PS approximately 4-fold better than its binding to phosphatidylcholine and 18-fold better than to bovine serum albumin in a solid-phase binding assay. In addition, the binding of the corresponding PS3-10 peptide to PS was significantly higher than that of a scrambled peptide. PS3-10 phages, but not a control 4-2-2 phage, bound to aged red blood cells that had PS exposed on their surface. Binding of PS3-10 phages and PS3-10 peptide to TRAIL-induced apoptotic DLD1 cells was 3.2 and 5.4 times higher than their binding to untreated viable cells, respectively. Significantly, immunohistochemical staining confirmed selective binding of PS3-10 phages to apoptotic cells. Our data suggest that panning of phage display libraries may allow the selection of suitable peptide ligands for apoptotic cells and that PS3-10 peptide may serve as a template for further development of molecular probes for in vitro and in vivo imaging of apoptosis.

  8. Novel ZnO-binding peptides obtained by the screening of a phage display peptide library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golec, Piotr [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Molecular Biology (affiliated with the University of Gdansk) (Poland); Karczewska-Golec, Joanna [University of Gdansk and Medical University of Gdansk, Laboratory of Molecular Bacteriology, Intercollegiate Faculty of Biotechnology (Poland); Los, Marcin; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz, E-mail: wegrzyn@biotech.univ.gda.pl [University of Gdansk, Department of Molecular Biology (Poland)

    2012-11-15

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a semiconductor compound with a potential for wide use in various applications, including biomaterials and biosensors, particularly as nanoparticles (the size range of ZnO nanoparticles is from 2 to 100 nm, with an average of about 35 nm). Here, we report isolation of novel ZnO-binding peptides, by screening of a phage display library. Interestingly, amino acid sequences of the ZnO-binding peptides reported in this paper and those described previously are significantly different. This suggests that there is a high variability in sequences of peptides which can bind particular inorganic molecules, indicating that different approaches may lead to discovery of different peptides of generally the same activity (e.g., binding of ZnO) but having various detailed properties, perhaps crucial under specific conditions of different applications.

  9. Phage-displayed peptide library screening for preferred human substrate peptide sequences for transglutaminase 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramoto, Katsuma; Yamasaki, Risa; Shimizu, Yoshitaka; Tatsukawa, Hideki; Hitomi, Kiyotaka

    2013-09-01

    Transglutaminases are a family of enzymes that catalyze cross-linking reactions between proteins. Among the members, there is currently no information regarding the substrate preferences of transglutaminase 7 (TG7), that would clarify its physiological significance. We previously obtained several highly reactive substrate peptide sequences of transglutaminases from a random peptide library. In this study, we screened for preferred substrate sequences for TG7 from a phage-displayed 12-mer peptide library. The most preferred sequence was selected based on reactivity and isozyme specificity. We firstly exhibited the tendency for the preference of substrate sequence for TG7. Then, using the most efficient peptide, Z3S, we established an in vitro assay system to assess enzymatic activity of TG7.

  10. Identification of peptides that bind hepatitis C virus envelope protein E2 and inhibit viral cellular entry from a phage-display peptide library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Xin; Yao, Min; Zhang, Jian-Min; Yang, Jing; Lei, Ying-Feng; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Jia, Zhan-Sheng; Ma, Li; Lan, Hai-Yun; Xu, Zhi-Kai; Yin, Wen

    2014-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope protein E2 is required for the entry of HCV into cells. Viral envelope proteins interact with cell receptors in a multistep process, which may be a promising target for the development of novel antiviral agents. In this study, a heptapeptide M13 phage-display library was screened for peptides that bind specifically to prokaryotically expressed, purified truncated HCV envelope protein E2. ELISA assay was used to quantify the binding of the peptides to HCV E2 protein. Flow cytometry, quantitative reverse-transcription PCR and western blotting were used to investigate the inhibition effect of one peptide on HCV infection in hepatoma cells (Huh7.5) in vitro. Four peptides capable of binding specifically to HCV E2 protein were obtained after three rounds of biopanning. Peptide C18 (WPWHNHR), with the highest affinity for binding HCV E2 protein, was synthesized. The results showed that peptide C18 inhibited the viral infectivity of both HCV pseudotype particles (HCVpp) harboring HCV envelope glycoproteins and cell-culture produced HCV (HCVcc). Thus, this study demonstrated that peptide C18 is a potential candidate for anti-HCV therapy as a novel viral entry inhibitor.

  11. Immunodiagnosis of Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis Using Mimotope Peptides Selected from Phage Displayed Combinatorial Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Monerat Toledo-Machado

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ELISA and RIFI are currently used for serodiagnosis of canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL. The accuracy of these tests is controversial in endemic areas where canine infections by Trypanosoma cruzi may occur. We evaluated the usefulness of synthetic peptides that were selected through phage display technique in the serodiagnosis of CVL. Peptides were chosen based on their ability to bind to IgGs purified from infected dogs pooled sera. We selected three phage clones that reacted only with those IgGs. Peptides were synthesized, polymerized with glutaraldehyde, and used as antigens in ELISA assays. Each individual peptide or a mix of them was reactive with infected dogs serum. The assay was highly sensitive and specific when compared to soluble Leishmania antigen that showed cross-reactivity with anti-T. cruzi IgGs. Our results demonstrate that phage display technique is useful for selection of peptides that may represent valuable synthetic antigens for an improved serodiagnosis of CVL.

  12. Identification of nose-to-brain homing peptide through phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiao-Mei; Chen, Yong-Ping; Xu, Wen-Rui; Yang, Wen-Jun; Wen, Long-Ping

    2009-02-01

    Brain delivery of drug molecules through the nasal passage represents a viable approach for bypassing the blood-brain barrier (BBB) but remains a major challenge due to lack of efficient homing carriers. To screen for potential peptides with the ability to transport into the brain via the nasal passage, we applied a C7C phage peptide display library (Ph.D.-C7C) intra-nasally to anesthetized rats and recovered phage from the brain tissue 45 min after phage administration. After three rounds of panning, 10 positive phage clones were selected and sequenced. Clone7, which exhibited highest translocation efficiency, was chosen for further studies. After nasal administration, Clone7 entered the brain within 30 min and exhibited translocation efficiency about 50-fold higher than a random phage. A 11-amino acid synthetic peptide derived from the displayed sequence of Clone7 (ACTTPHAWLCG) efficiently inhibited the nasal-brain translocation of Clone7. Both phage recovery results and fluorescent microscopy images revealed the presence of many more Clone7 phage in the brain than in the liver, kidney and other internal organs after the nasal administration, suggesting that Clone7 bypassed the BBB and entered brain directly. Furthermore, both Clone7 and the ACTTPHAWLCG peptide were found to be heavily distributed along the olfactory nerve after the nasal administration, further suggesting a direct passage route into the brain via the olfactory region. These results demonstrated the feasibility of using the in vivo phage display approach for selecting peptides with the nose-to-brain homing capability and may have implications for the development of novel targeting carriers useful for brain delivery.

  13. A LIVER-TUMOR ADHESION PEPTIDE FROM RANDOM PHAGE DISPLAY LIBRARY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Miao; DU Bing; WANG Lei; ZHOU Zhong-liang; QIAN Min

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To identify and localize the synthesized targeting peptide A54 to liver cancer cell line BEL-7402 in vivo and in vitro for confirming the potential clinical application of peptide A54 in hepatocarcinoma targeting therapy. Methods: Phage A54 was confirmed by ELISA. Biotin and FAM labeled A54 peptides were identified and localized by means of immunohistochemistry and immunocytochemistry. Results: A54 peptide could target the liver-tumor tissue in vivo and adhere to several liver-tumor cells in vitro. FAM-labeled A54 peptides were localized on the membrane surface of liver-tumor cells. Conclusion: Synthesized A54 peptide obtained from in vivo phage display technology still kept special ability to adhere liver-tumor cell in vivo and in vitro. The A54 peptide could be a candidate carrier for hepatocarcinoma targeting therapy.

  14. M13 Bacteriophage Based Protein Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Hun

    Despite significant progress in biotechnology and biosensing, early detection and disease diagnosis remains a critical issue for improving patient survival rates and well-being. Many of the typical detection schemes currently used possess issues such as low sensitivity and accuracy and are also time consuming to run and expensive. In addition, multiplexed detection remains difficult to achieve. Therefore, developing advanced approaches for reliable, simple, quantitative analysis of multiple markers in solution that also are highly sensitive are still in demand. In recent years, much of the research has primarily focused on improving two key components of biosensors: the bio-recognition agent (bio-receptor) and the transducer. Particular bio-receptors that have been used include antibodies, aptamers, molecular imprinted polymers, and small affinity peptides. In terms of transducing agents, nanomaterials have been considered as attractive candidates due to their inherent nanoscale size, durability and unique chemical and physical properties. The key focus of this thesis is the design of a protein detection and identification system that is based on chemically engineered M13 bacteriophage coupled with nanomaterials. The first chapter provides an introduction of biosensors and M13 bacteriophage in general, where the advantages of each are provided. In chapter 2, an efficient and enzyme-free sensor is demonstrated from modified M13 bacteriophage to generate highly sensitive colorimetric signals from gold nanocrystals. In chapter 3, DNA conjugated M13 were used to enable facile and rapid detection of antigens in solution that also provides modalities for identification. Lastly, high DNA loadings per phage was achieved via hydrozone chemistry and these were applied in conjunction with Raman active DNA-gold/silver core/shell nanoparticles toward highly sensitive SERS sensing.

  15. Affinity peptide developed by phage display selection for targeting gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Jie Zhang; Yan-Xia Sui; Arun Budha; Jian-Bao Zheng; Xue-Jun Sun; Ying-Chun Hou; Thomas D Wang; Shao-Ying Lu

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To develop an affinity peptide that binds to gastric cancer used for the detection of early gastric cancer.METHODS:A peptide screen was performed by biopanning the PhD-12 phage display library,clearing non-specific binders against tumor-adjacent normal appearing gastric mucosa and obtaining selective binding against freshly harvested gastric cancer tissues.Tumortargeted binding of selected peptides was confirmed by bound phage counts,enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay,competitive inhibition,fluorescence microscopy and semi-quantitative analysis on immunohistochemistry using different types of cancer tissues.RESULTS:Approximately 92.8% of the non-specific phage clones were subtracted from the original phage library after two rounds of biopanning against normalappearing gastric mucosa.After the third round of positive screening,the peptide sequence AADNAKTKSFPV (AAD) appeared in 25% (12/48) of the analyzed phages.For the control peptide,these values were 6.8 ± 2.3,5.1 ± 1.7,3.5 ± 2.1,4.6 ± 1.9 and 1.1 ± 0.5,respectively.The values for AAD peptide were statistically significant (P < 0.01) for gastric cancer as compared with other histological classifications and control peptide.CONCLUSION:A novel peptide is discovered to have a specific binding activity to gastric cancer,and can be used to distinguish neoplastic from normal gastric mucosa,demonstrating the potential for early cancer detection on endoscopy.

  16. In Vivo Selection of Phage Sequences and Characterization of Peptide-specific Binding to Breast Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Wang; Ruifang Niu; Lin Zhang; Hongkai Zhang; Xiyin Wei; Yi Yang; Shiwu Zhang; Jing Wu; Min Wu; Youjia Cao

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To screen specific polypeptide target binding to breast cancer xenografts in vivo from a phage-displayed peptide library in order to provide peptide sequences for breast cancer tumor-targeting diagnosis and therapy.METHODS A mouse model for carrying breast cancer xenografts was established using Tientsin Albinao Ⅱ mice (TAII). A 12-peptide library was biopanned through 4 rounds.Phages were recovered and titrated from tumor xenografts and control tissue (liver). The distribution of phages was detected by immunohistochemical staining.RESULTS Phage homing to breast cancer was enriched through 4 rounds of biopanning, being 14-fold of that recovered from liver tissue. A peptide sequence, ASANPFPTKALL was characterized by randomly picked-up clones which appeared most frequently.Immunohistochemical staining revealed phage localization in cancer xenografts 40 min after injection of the enriched phages.When a specific phage was tested individually, the phage reclaimed from breast cancer xenografts was 14 times as those from control tissues.CONCLUSION Tumor-specific homing peptides may provide an effective tool for breast cancer target therapy. The in vivo phage display selection technique employed in this study was feasible and applicable to screening peptides that home to.breast cells.

  17. Targeted binding of the M13 bacteriophage to thiamethoxam organic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Whirang; Fowler, Jeffrey D; Furst, Eric M

    2012-04-10

    Phage display screening with a combinatorial library was used to identify M13-type bacteriophages that express peptides with selective binding to organic crystals of thiamethoxam. The six most strongly binding phages exhibit at least 1000 times the binding affinity of wild-type M13 and express heptapeptide sequences that are rich in hydrophobic, hydrogen-bonding amino acids and proline. Among the peptide sequences identified, M13 displaying the pIII domain heptapeptide ASTLPKA exhibits the strongest binding to thiamethoxam in competitive binding assays. Electron and confocal microscopy confirm the specific binding affinity of ASTLPKA to thiamethoxam. Using atomic force microscope (AFM) probes functionalized with ASTLPKA expressing phage, we found that the average adhesion force between the bacteriophage and a thiamethoxam surface is 1.47 ± 0.80 nN whereas the adhesion force of wild-type M13KE phage is 0.18 ± 0.07 nN. Such a strongly binding bacteriophage could be used to modify the surface chemistry of thiamethoxam crystals and other organic solids with a high degree of specificity.

  18. Partial protection induced by phage library-selected peptides mimicking epitopes of Schistosoma japonicum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Objective To obtain peptide mimicking epitopes of Schistosoma japonicum (S.japonicum) through screening of a phage peptide library and to test their potential for induction of protection. Methods S.japonicum infected sera from Microtus fortis (IMFS) and normal sera from Microtus fortis (NMFS) were used respectively to screen a 12-mers random peptide library by testing the reactivity of anti-S.japonicum serum with the phagotopes. After three rounds of biopanning, the pooled phages were used to immunize mice, after which challenge infection was performed. Results Of 12 randomly picked clones, 10 clones selected using IMFS and 7 clones selected using NMFS were shown to be antigenic. Significant reduction in adult worms (22.6%) and a high reduction (68.9%) in liver eggs were achieved following immunization with phages screened with IMFS. However, no protection was elicited by those selected with NMFS. Conclusion The results show that the phagotopes are both antigenic and immunogenic, suggesting a potential use of phage displayed peptide as novel vaccines against S. japonicum.

  19. Identification of binding peptides of the ADAM15 disintegrin domain using phage display

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jing Wu; Min-Chen Wu; Lian-Fen Zhang; Jian-Yong Lei; Lei Feng; Jian Jin

    2009-06-01

    ADAM15 plays an important role in tumour development by interacting with integrins. In this study, we investigated the target peptides of the ADAM15 disintegrin domain. First, we successfully produced the recombinant human ADAM15 disintegrin domain (RADD) that could inhibit melanoma cell adhesion by using Escherichia coli. Second, four specific binding peptides (peptides A, B, C, and D) were selected using a phage display 12-mer peptide library. The screening protocol involved 4 rounds of positive panning on RADD and 2 rounds of subtractive selection with streptavidin. By using the BLAST software and a relevant protein database, integrin v3 was found to be homologous to peptide A. Synthetic peptide A had a highly inhibitory effect on RADD–integrin v3 binding. The results demonstrate the potential application of short peptides for disrupting high-affinity ADAM–integrin interactions.

  20. Screening and Identification of a Novel Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Binding Peptide by Using a Phage Display Library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohua ZHU; Hua WU; Sha LUO; Zhiqun XIANYU; Dan ZHU

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to screen peptides that can specifically bind to human hepatocellular carcinoma (hHCC) cells using phage display of random peptide library in order to develope a peptide-based carrier for the diagnosis or therapy of hHCC. A peptide 12-mer phage display library was employed and 4 rounds of subtractive panning were performed using the hHCC cell line HepG2 as the target. After panning, the phages that specifically bound to and internalized in hHCC cells were selected. The selected phages demonstrated highly specific affinity to HepG2 cells analyzed by ELISA and immunofluorescence analysis. 57.3% of the selected phage clones displayed repeated sequence FLLEPHLMDTSM, and 4 amino acid residues, FLEP were extremely conservative. Based on the sequencing results, a 16-mer peptide (WH-16) was synthesized. The competitive ELISA showed that the binding of the phage clones displayed sequence FLLEPHLMDTSM to HepG2 cells was efficiently inhibited by WH-16. Our findings indicate that cellular binding of phage is mediated via its displayed peptide and the synthesized 16-mer peptide may have the potential to be a delivery Carrier in target diagnosis or therapy for hHCC.

  1. Selection of Immunogenic Peptide Mimics of Male Worm Origin of Schistosoma Japonicum using Phage Display Peptide Library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈欲晓; 易新元; 曾宪芳; 王林纤; 唐连飞; 章洁; McreynoldsLarry

    2004-01-01

    To select the immunogenic short peptide mimics of male worm origin of Schistosoma japonicum (Sj) and to explore their protection effect against schistosomiasis in mice, the random phage display peptide hbrary of 12 - mer was screened with IgG to soluble male worm antigen of Sj, and the specific positive clones selected through three rounds of screenings were detected by Dot-ELISA, and then injected subcutaneously into mice for vaccination and protection assessment against Sj. It was found that 18 randomly picked phage displayed clones all showed definite antigenicity with various intensities. The pooled phages displayed clones could induce production of specific antibodies and cause 31.72% of worm reduction rate and 51.54 % of egg reduction rate in mice, revealing a significant difference ( P < 0. 001 ) in comparison with those of the controls. It concludes that the short peptide mimics of male worm origin of Sj obtained by affinity screening phage display ptide library can elicit partial protection against this pathogen.

  2. A novel phage-library-selected peptide inhibits human TNF-α binding to its receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Jlenia; Lelli, Barbara; Scali, Silvia; Falciani, Chiara; Bracci, Luisa; Pini, Alessandro

    2014-06-03

    We report the identification of a new human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) specific peptide selected by competitive panning of a phage library. Competitive elution of phages was obtained using the monoclonal antibody adalimumab, which neutralizes pro-inflammatory processes caused by over-production of TNF-α in vivo, and is used to treat severe symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. The selected peptide was synthesized in monomeric and branched form and analyzed for binding to TNF-α and competition with adalimumab and TNF-α receptors. Results of competition with TNF-α receptors in surface plasmon resonance and melanoma cells expressing both TNF receptors make the peptide a candidate compound for the development of a novel anti-TNF-α drug.

  3. Anti-Mycobacterial Peptides: From Human to Phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tieshan Teng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the major pathogen of tuberculosis (TB. With the growing problem of M. tuberculosis resistant to conventional antibiotics, especially multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB and extensively-drug resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB, the need for new TB drugs is now more prominent than ever. Among the promising candidates for anti-TB drugs, anti-mycobacterial peptides have a few advantages, such as low immunogenicity, selective affinity to prokaryotic negatively charged cell envelopes, and diverse modes of action. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in the anti-mycobacterial peptides, highlighting the sources, effectiveness and bactericidal mechanisms of these antimicrobial peptides. Most of the current anti-mycobacterial peptides are derived either from host immune cells, bacterial extraction, or mycobacteriophages. Besides trans-membrane pore formation, which is considered to be the common bactericidal mechanism, many of the anti-mycobacterial peptides have the second non-membrane targets within mycobacteria. Additionally, some antimicrobial peptides play critical roles in innate immunity. However, a few obstacles, such as short half-life in vivo and resistance to antimicrobial peptides, need overcoming before clinical applications. Nevertheless, the multiple functions of anti-mycobacterial peptides, especially direct killing of pathogens and immune-modulators in infectious and inflammatory conditions, indicate that they are promising candidates for future drug development.

  4. Epitope Mapping of Dengue-Virus-Enhancing Monoclonal-Antibody Using Phage Display Peptide Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-I Rai

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Antibody-Dependent Enhancement (ADE hypothesis has been proposed to explain why more severe manifestations of Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever and Dengue Shock Syndrome (DHF/DSS occur predominantly during secondary infections of Dengue Virus (DV with different serotypes. However, the epitopes recognized by these enhancing antibodies are unclear. Recently, anti-pre-M monoclonal antibody (mAb 70-21, which recognized all DV serotypes without neutralizing activity, were generated and demonstrated as an enhancing antibody for DV infection. In the present study, the epitope recognized by mAb 70-21 was identified using a phage-displayed random-peptide library. After three rounds of biopanning, ELISA showed that immunopositive phage clones specifically bound to mAb 70-21 but not to serum or purified IgG from naive mice. DNA sequencing of these phage clones showed a consensus sequence, QNNLGPR. Like mAb70-21, these phage-induced antisera also enhanced the DV infection of cells. In addition, indirect fluorescent assays showed phage-induced antisera bound to human rhabdomyosarcoma or Vero cells. Western blotting and immunoprecipitation analysis showed that phage-induced antisera recognized hsp 60 in BHK cell lysate. Moreover, the sera levels of antibodies against the synthetic peptide QNNLGPR correlated with the disease severity of dengue patients. Taken together, these results suggest that antibodies which recognized epitopes shared by pre-M of DV and hsp 60 of host cells may enhance DV infection and be involved in the development of DHF or DSS.

  5. Phage-protease-peptide: a novel trifecta enabling multiplex detection of viable bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaine, S D; Tilton, L; Serrano, M A C; Wang, M; Vachet, R W; Nugen, S R

    2015-10-01

    Bacteriophages represent rapid, readily targeted, and easily produced molecular probes for the detection of bacterial pathogens. Molecular biology techniques have allowed researchers to make significant advances in the bioengineering of bacteriophage to further improve speed and sensitivity of detection. Despite their host specificity, bacteriophages have not been meaningfully leveraged in multiplex detection of bacterial pathogens. We propose a proof-of-principal phage-based scheme to enable multiplex detection. Our scheme involves bioengineering bacteriophage to carry a gene for a specific protease, which is expressed during infection of the target cell. Upon lysis, the protease is released to cleave a reporter peptide, and the signal detected. Here we demonstrate the successful (i) modification of T7 bacteriophage to carry tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease; (ii) expression of TEV protease by Escherichia coli following infection by our modified T7, an average of 2000 units of protease per phage are produced during infection; and (iii) proof-of-principle detection of E. coli in 3 h after a primary enrichment via TEV protease activity using a fluorescent peptide and using a designed target peptide for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis. This proof-of-principle can be translated to other phage-protease-peptide combinations to enable multiplex bacterial detection and readily adopted on multiple platforms, like MALDI-TOF MS or fluorescent readers, commonly found in labs.

  6. Peptide Phage Display as a Tool for Drug Discovery: Targeting Membrane Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaz Bratkovic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ligands selected from phage-displayed random peptide libraries tend to be directed to biologically relevant sites on the surface of the target protein. Consequently, peptides derived from library screenings often modulate the target protein’s activity in vitro and in vivo and can be used as lead compounds in drug design and as alternatives to antibodies for target validation in both genomics and drug discovery. This review discusses the use of phage display to identify membrane receptor modulators with agonistic or antagonistic activities. Because isolating or producing recombinant membrane proteins for use as target molecules in library screening is often impossible, innovative selection strategies such as panning against whole cells or tissues, recombinant receptor ectodomains, or neutralizing antibodies to endogenous binding partners were devised. Prominent examples from a two-decade history of peptide phage display will be presented, focusing on the design of affinity selection experiments, methods for improving the initial hits, and applications of the identified peptides.

  7. Phage-displayed peptides selected for binding to Campylobacter jejuni are antimicrobial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop-Hurley, Sharon L; Rea, Philippa J; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2010-10-01

    In developed countries, Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of zoonotic bacterial gastroenteritis in humans with chicken meat implicated as a source of infection. Campylobacter jejuni colonises the lower gastrointestinal tract of poultry and during processing is spread from the gastrointestinal tract onto the surface of dressed carcasses. Controlling or eliminating C.jejuni on-farm is considered to be one of the best strategies for reducing human infection. Molecules on the cell surface of C.jejuni interact with the host to facilitate its colonisation and persistence in the gastrointestinal tract of poultry. We used a subtractive phage-display protocol to affinity select for peptides binding to the cell surface of a poultry isolate of C.jejuni with the aim of finding peptides that could be used to control this microorganism in chickens. In total, 27 phage peptides, representing 11 unique clones, were found to inhibit the growth of C.jejuni by up to 99.9% in vitro. One clone was bactericidal, reducing the viability of C.jejuni by 87% in vitro. The phage peptides were highly specific. They completely inhibited the growth of two of the four poultry isolates of C.jejuni tested with no activity detected towards other Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.

  8. Blocking peptides against HBV: PreS1 protein selected from a phage display library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Yang; Zu, Xiangyang; Jin, Rui [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Xiao, Gengfu, E-mail: xiaogf@wh.iov.cn [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Successfully selected specific PreS1-interacting peptides by using phage displayed library. {yields} Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a consensus PreS1 binding motif. {yields} A highly enriched peptide named P7 had a strong binding ability for PreS1. {yields} P7 could block PreS1 attachment. -- Abstract: The PreS1 protein is present on the outermost part of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface and has been shown to have a pivotal function in viral infectivity and assembly. The development of reagents with high affinity and specificity for PreS1 is of great significance for early diagnosis and treatment of HBV infection. A phage display library of dodecapeptide was screened for interactions with purified PreS1 protein. Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a putative consensus PreS1 binding motif of HX{sub n}HX{sub m}HP/R. Moreover, a peptide named P7 (KHMHWHPPALNT) was highly enriched and occurred with a surprisingly high frequency of 72%. A thermodynamic study revealed that P7 has a higher binding affinity to PreS1 than the other peptides. Furthermore, P7 was able to abrogate the binding of HBV virions to the PreS1 antibody, suggesting that P7 covers key functional sites on the native PreS1 protein. This newly isolated peptide may, therefore, be a new therapeutic candidate for the treatment of HBV. The consensus motif could be modified to deliver imaging, diagnostic, and therapeutic agents to tissues affected by HBV.

  9. Collection of phage-peptide probes for HIV-1 immunodominant loop-epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Rodríguez, Yadira; Gazarian, Tatiana; Rowley, Merrill; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham; Gazarian, Karlen

    2007-02-01

    Early diagnosis and prevention of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection, which remains a serious public health threat, is inhibited by the lack of reagents that elicit antiviral responses in the immune system. To create mimotopes (peptide models of epitopes) of the most immunodominant epitope, CSGKLIC, that occurs as a loop on the envelope gp41 glycoprotein and is a key participant in infection, we used phage-display technology involving biopanning of large random libraries with IgG of HIV-1-infected patients. Under the conditions used, library screening with IgG from patient serum was directed to the CSGKLIC epitope. Three rounds of selection converted a 12 mer library of 10(9) sequences into a population in which up to 79% of phage bore a family of CxxKxxC sequences ("x" designates a non-epitope amino acid). Twenty-one phage clones displaying the most frequently selected peptides were obtained and were shown to display the principal structural (sequence and conformational), antigenic and immunogenic features of the HIV-1 immunodominant loop-epitope. Notably, when the mixture of the phage mimotopes was injected into mice, it induced 2- to 3-fold higher titers of antibody to the HIV-1 epitope than could be induced from individual mimotopes. The described approach could be applicable for accurately reproducing HIV-1 epitope structural and immunological patterns by generation of specialized viral epitope libraries for use in diagnosis and therapy.

  10. Enhanced pulmonary absorption of a macromolecule through coupling to a sequence-specific phage display-derived peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Christopher J; Smith, Mathew W; Griffiths, Peter C; McKeown, Neil B; Gumbleton, Mark

    2011-04-10

    With the aim of identifying a peptide sequence that promotes pulmonary epithelial transport of macromolecule cargo we used a stringent peptide-phage display library screening protocol against rat lung alveolar epithelial primary cell cultures. We identified a peptide-phage clone (LTP-1) displaying the disulphide-constrained 7-mer peptide sequence, C-TSGTHPR-C, that showed significant pulmonary epithelial translocation across highly restrictive polarised cell monolayers. Cell biological data supported a differential alveolar epithelial cell interaction of the LTP-1 peptide-phage clone and the corresponding free synthetic LTP-1 peptide. Delivering select phage-clones to the intact pulmonary barrier of an isolated perfused rat lung (IPRL) resulted in 8.7% of lung deposited LTP-1 peptide-phage clone transported from the IPRL airways to the vasculature compared (pprobes. This study shows proof-of principle that array technologies can be effectively exploited to identify peptides mediating enhanced transmucosal delivery of macromolecule therapeutics across an intact organ.

  11. Thermal Stability of RNA Phage Virus-Like Particles Displaying Foreign Peptides

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    Peabody David S

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To be useful for genetic display of foreign peptides a viral coat protein must tolerate peptide insertions without major disruption of subunit folding and capsid assembly. The folding of the coat protein of RNA phage MS2 does not normally tolerate insertions in its AB-loop, but an engineered single-chain dimer readily accepts them as long as they are restricted to one of its two halves. Results Here we characterize the effects of peptide insertions on the thermal stabilities of MS2 virus-like particles (VLPs displaying a variety of different peptides in one AB-loop of the coat protein single-chain dimer. These particles typically denature at temperatures around 5-10°C lower than unmodified VLPs. Even so, they are generally stable up to about 50°C. VLPs of the related RNA phage PP7 are cross-linked with intersubunit disulfide bonds and are therefore significantly more stable. An AB-loop insertion also reduces the stability of PP7 VLPs, but they only begin to denature above about 70°C. Conclusions VLPs assembled from MS2 single-chain dimer coat proteins with peptide insertions in one of their AB-loops are somewhat less stable than the wild-type particle, but still resist heating up to about 50°C. Because they possess disulfide cross-links, PP7-derived VLPs provide an alternate platform with even higher stability.

  12. Potential of Peptides as Inhibitors and Mimotopes: Selection of Carbohydrate-Mimetic Peptides from Phage Display Libraries

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    Teruhiko Matsubara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycoconjugates play various roles in biological processes. In particular, oligosaccharides on the surface of animal cells are involved in virus infection and cell-cell communication. Inhibitors of carbohydrate-protein interactions are potential antiviral drugs. Several anti-influenza drugs such as oseltamivir and zanamivir are derivatives of sialic acid, which inhibits neuraminidase. However, it is very difficult to prepare a diverse range of sugar derivatives by chemical synthesis or by the isolation of natural products. In addition, the pathogenic capsular polysaccharides of bacteria are carbohydrate antigens, for which a safe and efficacious method of vaccination is required. Phage-display technology has been improved to enable the identification of peptides that bind to carbohydrate-binding proteins, such as lectins and antibodies, from a large repertoire of peptide sequences. These peptides are known as “carbohydrate-mimetic peptides (CMPs” because they mimic carbohydrate structures. Compared to carbohydrate derivatives, it is easy to prepare mono- and multivalent peptides and then to modify them to create various derivatives. Such mimetic peptides are available as peptide inhibitors of carbohydrate-protein interactions and peptide mimotopes that are conjugated with adjuvant for vaccination.

  13. Phage display: concept, innovations, applications and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Jyoti; Szewczyk, Magdalena M; Grover, Ashok K

    2010-01-01

    Phage display is the technology that allows expression of exogenous (poly)peptides on the surface of phage particles. The concept is simple in principle: a library of phage particles expressing a wide diversity of peptides is used to select those that bind the desired target. The filamentous phage M13 is the most commonly used vector to create random peptide display libraries. Several methods including recombinant techniques have been developed to increase the diversity of the library. On the other extreme, libraries with various biases can be created for specific purposes. For instance, when the sequence of the peptide that binds the target is known, its affinity and selectivity can be increased by screening libraries created with limited mutagenesis of the peptide. Phage libraries are screened for binding to synthetic or native targets. The initial screening of library by basic biopanning has been extended to column chromatography including negative screening and competition between selected phage clones to identify high affinity ligands with greater target specificity. The rapid isolation of specific ligands by phage display is advantageous in many applications including selection of inhibitors for the active and allosteric sites of the enzymes, receptor agonists and antagonists, and G-protein binding modulatory peptides. Phage display has been used in epitope mapping and analysis of protein-protein interactions. The specific ligands isolated from phage libraries can be used in therapeutic target validation, drug design and vaccine development. Phage display can also be used in conjunction with other methods. The past innovations and those to come promise a bright future for this field.

  14. Synthetic Phage for Tissue Regeneration

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    So Young Yoo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlling structural organization and signaling motif display is of great importance to design the functional tissue regenerating materials. Synthetic phage, genetically engineered M13 bacteriophage has been recently introduced as novel tissue regeneration materials to display a high density of cell-signaling peptides on their major coat proteins for tissue regeneration purposes. Structural advantages of their long-rod shape and monodispersity can be taken together to construct nanofibrous scaffolds which support cell proliferation and differentiation as well as direct orientation of their growth in two or three dimensions. This review demonstrated how functional synthetic phage is designed and subsequently utilized for tissue regeneration that offers potential cell therapy.

  15. Phage display against corneal epithelial cells produced bioactive peptides that inhibit Aspergillus adhesion to the corneas.

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    Ge Zhao

    Full Text Available Dissection of host-pathogen interactions is important for both understanding the pathogenesis of infectious diseases and developing therapeutics for the infectious diseases like various infectious keratitis. To enhance the knowledge about pathogenesis infectious keratitis, a random 12-mer peptide phage display library was screened against cultured human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC. Fourteen sequences were obtained and BLASTp analysis showed that most of their homologue counterparts in GenBank were for defined or putative proteins in various pathogens. Based on known or predicted functions of the homologue proteins, ten synthetic peptides (Pc-A to Pc-J were measured for their affinity to bind cells and their potential efficacy to interfere with pathogen adhesion to the cells. Besides binding to HCEC, most of them also bound to human corneal stromal cells and umbilical endothelial cells to different extents. When added to HCEC culture, the peptides induced expression of MyD88 and IL-17 in HCEC, and the stimulated cell culture medium showed fungicidal potency to various extents. While peptides Pc-C and Pc-E inhibited Aspergillus fumigatus (A.f adhesion to HCEC in a dose-dependent manner, the similar inhibition ability of peptides Pc-A and Pc-B required presence of their homologue ligand Alb1p on A.f. When utilized in an eyeball organ culture model and an in vivo A.f keratitis model established in mouse, Pc-C and Pc-E inhibited fungal adhesion to corneas, hence decreased corneal disruption caused by inflammatory infiltration. Affinity pull-down of HCEC membrane proteins with peptide Pc-C revealed several molecules as potential receptors for this peptide. In conclusion, besides proving that phage display-selected peptides could be utilized to interfere with adhesion of pathogens to host cells, hence could be exploited for managing infectious diseases including infectious keratitis, we also proposed that the phage display technique and the

  16. Identification of human embryonic progenitor cell targeting peptides using phage display.

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    Paola A Bignone

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem (hPS cells are capable of differentiation into derivatives of all three primary embryonic germ layers and can self-renew indefinitely. They therefore offer a potentially scalable source of replacement cells to treat a variety of degenerative diseases. The ability to reprogram adult cells to induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells has now enabled the possibility of patient-specific hPS cells as a source of cells for disease modeling, drug discovery, and potentially, cell replacement therapies. While reprogramming technology has dramatically increased the availability of normal and diseased hPS cell lines for basic research, a major bottleneck is the critical unmet need for more efficient methods of deriving well-defined cell populations from hPS cells. Phage display is a powerful method for selecting affinity ligands that could be used for identifying and potentially purifying a variety of cell types derived from hPS cells. However, identification of specific progenitor cell-binding peptides using phage display may be hindered by the large cellular heterogeneity present in differentiating hPS cell populations. We therefore tested the hypothesis that peptides selected for their ability to bind a clonal cell line derived from hPS cells would bind early progenitor cell types emerging from differentiating hPS cells. The human embryonic stem (hES cell-derived embryonic progenitor cell line, W10, was used and cell-targeting peptides were identified. Competition studies demonstrated specificity of peptide binding to the target cell surface. Efficient peptide targeted cell labeling was accomplished using multivalent peptide-quantum dot complexes as detected by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The cell-binding peptides were selective for differentiated hPS cells, had little or no binding on pluripotent cells, but preferential binding to certain embryonic progenitor cell lines and early endodermal hPS cell derivatives. Taken

  17. Analysis of the Resveratrol-binding Protein using Phage-displayed Random Peptide Library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei FENG; Jian JIN; Lian-Feng ZHANG; Ting YAN; Wen-Yi TAO

    2006-01-01

    Resveratrol, a plant polyphenol, is found in significant amounts in the skin of grapes and in some traditional herbs. It is reported to exert different biological activities, such as inhibiting lipid peroxidation,scavenging free radicals, inhibiting platelet aggregation, and anticancer activity. In order to screen the resveratrol-binding proteins, we synthesized biotinylated resveratrol, purified by liquid chromatography and immobilized it into streptavidin-coated microplate wells. 3-(4,5-Demethylthiazol-)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay showed little change in the anticancer activity of biotinylated resveratrol in vitro. A random library of phage-displayed peptides was screened for binding to immobilized resveratrol to isolate resveratrolbinding proteins. Several peptides were found to bind to resveratrol specifically, which was proven by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Through amino acid sequence analysis of the selected peptides and human proteins using the BLAST program, the results showed that resveratrol has an affinity for various proteins such as breast cancer-associated antigen, breast cancer resistance protein, death-associated transcription factor, and human cyclin-dependent kinase. These results demonstrate that our study provides a feasible method for the study of binding proteins of natural compounds using a phage-displayed random peptide library.

  18. Error Analysis of Deep Sequencing of Phage Libraries: Peptides Censored in Sequencing

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    Wadim L. Matochko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing techniques empower selection of ligands from phage-display libraries because they can detect low abundant clones and quantify changes in the copy numbers of clones without excessive selection rounds. Identification of errors in deep sequencing data is the most critical step in this process because these techniques have error rates >1%. Mechanisms that yield errors in Illumina and other techniques have been proposed, but no reports to date describe error analysis in phage libraries. Our paper focuses on error analysis of 7-mer peptide libraries sequenced by Illumina method. Low theoretical complexity of this phage library, as compared to complexity of long genetic reads and genomes, allowed us to describe this library using convenient linear vector and operator framework. We describe a phage library as N×1 frequency vector n=ni, where ni is the copy number of the ith sequence and N is the theoretical diversity, that is, the total number of all possible sequences. Any manipulation to the library is an operator acting on n. Selection, amplification, or sequencing could be described as a product of a N×N matrix and a stochastic sampling operator (Sa. The latter is a random diagonal matrix that describes sampling of a library. In this paper, we focus on the properties of Sa and use them to define the sequencing operator (Seq. Sequencing without any bias and errors is Seq=Sa IN, where IN is a N×N unity matrix. Any bias in sequencing changes IN to a nonunity matrix. We identified a diagonal censorship matrix (CEN, which describes elimination or statistically significant downsampling, of specific reads during the sequencing process.

  19. Immunodiagnosis of human neurocysticercosis using a synthetic peptide selected by phage-display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hell, R C R; Amim, P; de Andrade, H M; de Avila, R A M; Felicori, L; Oliveira, A G; Oliveira, C A; Nascimento, E; Tavares, C A P; Granier, C; Chávez-Olórtegui, C

    2009-04-01

    The usefulness of a synthetic peptide in the serodiagnosis of Taenia solium human neurocysticercosis (NC) has been evaluated. Phage-displayed peptides were screened with human antibodies to scolex protein antigen from cysticercus cellulosae (SPACc). One clone was found to interact specifically with anti-SPACc IgGs. The corresponding synthetic peptide was found to be recognized in ELISA by NC patient's sera. The study was carried out with sera from 28 confirmed NC patients, 13 control sera and 73 sera from patients suffering from other infectious diseases. A 93% sensibility and a 94.3% specificity was achieved. Figures of 89% and 31.4% of sensibility and specificity were obtained in a SPACc-based ELISA. Immunoblotting of SPACc with anti-peptide antibodies revealed a single band of approximately 45 kDa in 1D and four 45 kDa isoforms in 2D-gel electrophoresis. A strong and specific immunostaining in the fibers beneath the suckers, at the base of the rostellum, and in the tissue surrounding the scolex of cysticerci was observed by immunomicroscopy. Our results show that a peptide-based immunodiagnostic of neurocisticercosis can be envisioned.

  20. Screening of Peptide Inhibitors of TACE from a Phage Display Random 15-Peptide Library by Recombinant TACE Ectodomain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Wei; Yang Yuzhen; Wang Zhen; Hang Ling

    2006-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-oc-converting enzyme (TACE) is the major protease responsible for processing pro-TNF-α from membrane-anchored precursors to secreted TNF-α.In the present study,a 15-peptide library was used to identify potential TACE antagonists.To obtain the recombinant TACE ectodomain and to use it as a selective molecule for the screening of peptide inhibitors of TACE,cDNA coding for the catalytic domain (T800) and full-length ectodomain (T1300) of TACE were amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.The expression plasmid were constructed by inserting T800/T1300 into plasmid pET-28a/c respectively and were transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3).Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDSPAGE) and Western blot analysis revealed that T800/T1300 were highly expressed in the form of an inclusion body induced by isopropylthiogalactoside.After Ni2+-NTA resin affinity chromatography,the purity of the recombinant T800/T1300 protein was more than 90%.T800 and T1300 proteins were used in the screening of T800/T1300-binding peptides from a phage display random 15-peptide library.Aider four rounds of biopanning,the positive phage clones were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay,competitive inhibition assay (ELESA),and DNA sequencing.A common amino acid sequence (TRWLVYFS RPYLVAT) was confirmed and synthesized.A synthetic peptide was shown to bind to TACE and to inhibit TNF-α release from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by up to 60.3%.Fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis revealed that the peptide mediated the accumulation of TNF-α on an LPS-stimulated PBMC surface.These results demonstrate that the TACE-binding peptide is an effective antagonist of TACE and that the deduced motif might be applied to the molecular design of anti-inflammatory drugs.

  1. Phage-free peptide ELISA for ochratoxin A detection based on biotinylated mimotope as a competing antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xuqiang; Chen, Chaochao; Huang, Xiaolin; Chen, Xuelan; Wang, Lv; Xiong, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    To perform the biopanning of a mimotope peptide with reduced affinity to anti-ochratoxin A (OTA) monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), we executed two improved biopanning approaches with a commercial 7-mer peptide library. In the first approach, anti-mouse IgG antibodies were used to erect the anti-OTA mAbs; in the second approach, an ultralow OTA concentration (0.1 ng/mL) was used to perform the competitive elution of phage particles. After the fourth round of biopanning was completed, 30 identified clones were positive phage particles; of these phage particles, 16 exhibited strong competitive inhibition with a low OTA concentration of 0.1 ng/mL. DNA sequencing results revealed that the 16 phage particles represented six different peptide sequences. Among these particles, the phage particle with a peptide sequence of "GMVQTIF" showed the highest sensitivity to OTA detection. The biotinylated 12-mer peptide "GMVQTIF-GGGSK-biotin" was designed as a competing antigen to develop a competitive peptide ELISA. Under the optimal parameters, the proposed peptide ELISA with the biotinylated 12-mer peptide as a competing antigen exhibited good dynamic linear detection for OTA in the range of 0.005 ng/mL-0.2 ng/mL with a detection limit of 0.001 ng/mL. The median inhibition concentration of OTA was 0.024 ng/mL (n=6), which is approximately fivefold more efficient as a competing antigen than the OTA-HRP conjugates. Reaction kinetics revealed that the biotinylated 12-mer peptide exhibited lower affinity to anti-OTA mAbs than the conventional chemical OTA antigen. The practicality of the proposed peptide ELISA was compared with a conventional ELISA method. In summary, this study demonstrated a novel concept of the development of phage-free peptide ELISA for the detection of OTA by using a biotinylated mimotope peptide as a competing antigen. This novel strategy can be applied to sensitively detect other toxic small molecules during food safety monitoring.

  2. Phage display biopanning and isolation of target-unrelated peptides: in search of nonspecific binders hidden in a combinatorial library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Zade, Hesam Motaleb; Shekarabi, Hosna Sadat Zahed; Neman, Sara

    2016-12-01

    Phage display is known as a powerful methodology for the identification of targeting ligands that specifically bind to a variety of targets. The high-throughput screening of phage display combinatorial peptide libraries is performed through the affinity selection method of biopanning. Although phage display selection has proven very successful in the discovery of numerous high-affinity target-binding peptides with potential application in drug discovery and delivery, the enrichment of false-positive target-unrelated peptides (TUPs) without any actual affinity towards the target remains a major problem of library screening. Selection-related TUPs may emerge because of binding to the components of the screening system rather than the target. Propagation-related TUPs may arise as a result of faster growth rate of some phage clones enabling them to outcompete slow-propagating clones. Amplification of the library between rounds of biopanning makes a significant contribution to the selection of phage clones with propagation advantage. Distinguishing nonspecific TUPs from true target binders is of particular importance for the translation of biopanning findings from basic research to clinical applications. Different experimental and in silico approaches are applied to assess the specificity of phage display-derived peptides towards the target. Bioinformatic tools are playing a rapidly growing role in the analysis of biopanning data and identification of target-irrelevant TUPs. Recent progress in the introduction of efficient strategies for TUP detection holds enormous promise for the discovery of clinically relevant cell- and tissue-homing peptides and paves the way for the development of novel targeted diagnostic and therapeutic platforms in pharmaceutical areas.

  3. K-Ras(G12D)-selective inhibitory peptides generated by random peptide T7 phage display technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Kotaro; Kamada, Yusuke; Sameshima, Tomoya; Yaguchi, Masahiro; Niida, Ayumu; Sasaki, Shigekazu; Miwa, Masanori; Ohkubo, Shoichi; Sakamoto, Jun-Ichi; Kamaura, Masahiro; Cho, Nobuo; Tani, Akiyoshi

    2017-03-11

    Amino-acid mutations of Gly(12) (e.g. G12D, G12V, G12C) of V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (K-Ras), the most promising drug target in cancer therapy, are major growth drivers in various cancers. Although over 30 years have passed since the discovery of these mutations in most cancer patients, effective mutated K-Ras inhibitors have not been marketed. Here, we report novel and selective inhibitory peptides to K-Ras(G12D). We screened random peptide libraries displayed on T7 phage against purified recombinant K-Ras(G12D), with thorough subtraction of phages bound to wild-type K-Ras, and obtained KRpep-2 (Ac-RRCPLYISYDPVCRR-NH2) as a consensus sequence. KRpep-2 showed more than 10-fold binding- and inhibition-selectivity to K-Ras(G12D), both in SPR analysis and GDP/GTP exchange enzyme assay. KD and IC50 values were 51 and 8.9 nM, respectively. After subsequent sequence optimization, we successfully generated KRpep-2d (Ac-RRRRCPLYISYDPVCRRRR-NH2) that inhibited enzyme activity of K-Ras(G12D) with IC50 = 1.6 nM and significantly suppressed ERK-phosphorylation, downstream of K-Ras(G12D), along with A427 cancer cell proliferation at 30 μM peptide concentration. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a K-Ras(G12D)-selective inhibitor, contributing to the development and study of K-Ras(G12D)-targeting drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A new peptide ligand for targeting human carbonic anhydrase IX, identified through the phage display technology.

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    Vasileios Askoxylakis

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX is a transmembrane enzyme found to be overexpressed in various tumors and associated with tumor hypoxia. Ligands binding this target may be used to visualize hypoxia, tumor manifestation or treat tumors by endoradiotherapy. METHODS: Phage display was performed with a 12 amino acid phage display library by panning against a recombinant extracellular domain of human carbonic anhydrase IX. The identified peptide CaIX-P1 was chemically synthesized and tested in vitro on various cell lines and in vivo in Balb/c nu/nu mice carrying subcutaneously transplanted tumors. Binding, kinetic and competition studies were performed on the CAIX positive human renal cell carcinoma cell line SKRC 52, the CAIX negative human renal cell carcinoma cell line CaKi 2, the human colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT 116 and on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC. Organ distribution studies were carried out in mice, carrying SKRC 52 tumors. RNA expression of CAIX in HCT 116 and HUVEC cells was investigated by quantitative real time PCR. RESULTS: In vitro binding experiments of (125I-labeled-CaIX-P1 revealed an increased uptake of the radioligand in the CAIX positive renal cell carcinoma cell line SKRC 52. Binding of the radioligand in the colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT 116 increased with increasing cell density and correlated with the mRNA expression of CAIX. Radioligand uptake was inhibited up to 90% by the unlabeled CaIX-P1 peptide, but not by the negative control peptide octreotide at the same concentration. No binding was demonstrated in CAIX negative CaKi 2 and HUVEC cells. Organ distribution studies revealed a higher accumulation in SKRC 52 tumors than in heart, spleen, liver, muscle, intestinum and brain, but a lower uptake compared to blood and kidney. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that CaIX-P1 is a promising candidate for the development of new ligands targeting human carbonic anhydrase IX.

  5. Identification of Peptides Inhibiting Adhesion of Monocytes to the Injured Vascular Endothelial Cells through Phage-displaying Screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu GUO; Jia ZHANG; Ji-Cheng WANG; Feng-Xiang YAN; Bing-Yang ZHU; Hong-Lin HUANG; Duan-Fang LIAO

    2005-01-01

    Using oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-injured vascular endothelial cells (ECs) as target cells, peptides specifically binding to the injured ECs were screened from a phage-displaying peptide library by using the whole-cell screening technique after three cycles of the "adsorption-elution-amplification"procedure. Positive phage clones were identified by ELISA, and the inserted amino acid sequences in the displaying peptides were deduced from confirmation with DNA sequencing. The adhesion rate of ECs to monocytes was evaluated by cell counting. The activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and the expression levels of caveolin- 1 and intercellular adhesion molecule- 1 (ICAM- 1) were determined by Western blotting. Six positive clones specifically binding to injured ECV304 endothelial cells were selected from fourteen clones. Interestingly, four phages had peptides with tandem leucine, and two of these even shared an identical sequence. Functional analysis demonstrated that the YCPRYVRRKLENELLVL peptide shared by two clones inhibited the expression of ICAM-1, increased nitric oxide concentration in the culture media, and upregulated the expression of caveolin-1 and eNOS. As a result, the adhesion rate of monocytes to ECV304 cells was significantly reduced by 12.1%. These data suggest that the anti-adhesion effect of these novel peptides is related to the regulation of the caveolin-1/nitric oxide signal transduction pathway, and could be of use in potential therapeutic agents against certain cardiovascular diseases initiated by vascular endothelial cell damage.

  6. Peptide sequences identified by phage display are immunodominant functional motifs of Pet and Pic serine proteases secreted by Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulises, Hernández-Chiñas; Tatiana, Gazarian; Karlen, Gazarian; Guillermo, Mendoza-Hernández; Juan, Xicohtencatl-Cortes; Carlos, Eslava

    2009-12-01

    Plasmid-encoded toxin (Pet) and protein involved in colonization (Pic), are serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) secreted by enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC), which display the GDSGSG sequence or the serine motif. Our research was directed to localize functional sites in both proteins using the phage display method. From a 12mer linear and a 7mer cysteine-constrained (C7C) libraries displayed on the M13 phage pIII protein we selected different mimotopes using IgG purified from sera of children naturally infected with EAEC producing Pet and Pic proteins, and anti-Pet and anti-Pic IgG purified from rabbits immunized with each one of these proteins. Children IgG selected a homologous group of sequences forming the consensus sequence, motif, PQPxK, and the motifs PGxI/LN and CxPDDSSxC were selected by the rabbit anti-Pet and anti-Pic IgGs, respectively. Analysis of the amino terminal region of a panel of SPATEs showed the presence in all of them of sequences matching the PGxI/LN or CxPDDSSxC motifs, and in a three-dimensional model (Modeller 9v2) designed for Pet, both these motifs were found in the globular portion of the protein, close to the protease active site GDSGSG. Antibodies induced in mice by mimotopes carrying the three aforementioned motifs were reactive with Pet, Pic, and with synthetic peptides carrying the immunogenic mimotope sequences TYPGYINHSKA and LLPQPPKLLLP, thus confirming that the peptide moiety of the selected phages induced the antibodies specific for the toxins. The antibodies induced in mice to the PGxI/LN and CxPDDSSxC mimotopes inhibited fodrin proteolysis and macrophage chemotaxis biological activities of Pet. Our results showed that we were able to generate, by a phage display procedure, mimotopes with sequence motifs PGxI/LN and CxPDDSSxC, and to identify them as functional motifs of the Pet, Pic and other SPATEs involved in their biological activities.

  7. Schistosoma japonicum:Isolation and Identification of Peptides Mimicking Ferritin Epitopes from Phage Display Library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian-Fei TANG; Xin-Yuan YI; Xian-Fang ZENG; Lin-Qian WANG; Shun-Ke ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    In an attempt to isolate and identify the antigenic epitopes on ferritin of Schistosoma japonicum(SjFer)and to test their protective potentiality against Schistosomajaponicum(S.j),polyclonal antisera against SjFer was prepared to screen a 12-mer random peptide library.Three rounds of biopanning were performed and resulted in an enrichment.Six peptides selected randomly from the third elute were all found to be positive by evaluating the binding to anti-SjFer sera by ELISA and Western blotting.Three amino acid sequences were deduced from the six phage clones by sequencing.When they were used to vaccinate mice,the three peptides could induce significant reduction in adult worms(26.7% ,20.4%,and 25.9%)as well as in liver eggs per gram(LEPG)(40.0%,38.2%,and 40.8%).This result showed that three mimotopes on SjFer were obtained and they could induce significant protective efficacy against S.j.

  8. Challenges and Future Prospects of Antibiotic Therapy: From Peptides to Phages Utilization

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    Santi M. Mandal

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections are raising serious concern across the globe. The effectiveness of conventional antibiotics is decreasing due to global emergence of multi-drug-resistant (MDR bacterial pathogens. This process seems to be primarily caused by an indiscriminate and inappropriate use of antibiotics in non-infected patients and in the food industry. New classes of antibiotics with different actions against MDR pathogens need to be developed urgently. In this context, this review focuses on several ways and future directions to search for the next generation of safe and effective antibiotics compounds including antimicrobial peptides, phage therapy, phytochemicals, metalloantibiotics, LPS and efflux pump inhibitors to control the infections caused by MDR pathogens.

  9. A resistin binding peptide selected by phage display inhibits 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Background Resistin, a newly discovered cysteine-rich hormone secreted mainly by adipose tissues, has been proposed to form a biochemical link between obesity and type 2 diabetes. However, the resistin receptor has not yet been identified. This study aimed to identify resistin binding proteins/receptor.Methods Three cDNA fragments with the same 11 bp 5' sequence were found by screening a cDNA phage display library of rat multiple tissues. As the reading frames of the same 11 bp 5' sequence were interrupted by a TGA stop codon, plaque lift assay was consequently used to prove the readthrough phenomenon. The stop codon in the same 11 bp 5' sequence was replaced by tryptophan, and the binding activity of the coded peptide [AWIL, which was designated as resistin binding peptide (RBP)] with resistin was identified by the confocal microscopy technique and the affinity chromatography experiment. pDual GC-resistin and pDual GC-resistin binding peptide were co-transfected into 3T3-L1 cells to confirm the function of resistin binding peptide.Results Three cDNA fragments with the same 11 bp 5' sequence were found. The TGA stop codon in reading frames of the same 11 bp 5' sequence was proved to be readthroughed. The binding activity of RBP with resistin was consequently identified. The expression of the resistin binding peptide in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes expressing pDual GC-resistin significantly inhibited the adipogenic differentiation.Conclusion RBP could effectively rescue the promoted differentiation of resistin overxepressed 3T3-L1 preadipocyte.

  10. A Label-Free Electrochemical Impedance Cytosensor Based on Specific Peptide-Fused Phage Selected from Landscape Phage Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lei; Liu, Pei; Petrenko, Valery A.; Liu, Aihua

    2016-02-01

    One of the major challenges in the design of biosensors for cancer diagnosis is to introduce a low-cost and selective probe that can recognize cancer cells. In this paper, we combined the phage display technology and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to develop a label-free cytosensor for the detection of cancer cells, without complicated purification of recognition elements. Fabrication steps of the cytosensing interface were monitored by EIS. Due to the high specificity of the displayed octapeptides and avidity effect of their multicopy display on the phage scaffold, good biocompatibility of recombinant phage, the fibrous nanostructure of phage, and the inherent merits of EIS technology, the proposed cytosensor demonstrated a wide linear range (2.0 × 102 ‑ 2.0 × 108 cells mL‑1), a low limit of detection (79 cells mL‑1, S/N = 3), high specificity, good inter-and intra-assay reproducibility and satisfactory storage stability. This novel cytosensor designing strategy will open a new prospect for rapid and label-free electrochemical platform for tumor diagnosis.

  11. A Label-Free Electrochemical Impedance Cytosensor Based on Specific Peptide-Fused Phage Selected from Landscape Phage Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lei; Liu, Pei; Petrenko, Valery A; Liu, Aihua

    2016-02-24

    One of the major challenges in the design of biosensors for cancer diagnosis is to introduce a low-cost and selective probe that can recognize cancer cells. In this paper, we combined the phage display technology and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to develop a label-free cytosensor for the detection of cancer cells, without complicated purification of recognition elements. Fabrication steps of the cytosensing interface were monitored by EIS. Due to the high specificity of the displayed octapeptides and avidity effect of their multicopy display on the phage scaffold, good biocompatibility of recombinant phage, the fibrous nanostructure of phage, and the inherent merits of EIS technology, the proposed cytosensor demonstrated a wide linear range (2.0 × 10(2) - 2.0 × 10(8) cells mL(-1)), a low limit of detection (79 cells mL(-1), S/N = 3), high specificity, good inter-and intra-assay reproducibility and satisfactory storage stability. This novel cytosensor designing strategy will open a new prospect for rapid and label-free electrochemical platform for tumor diagnosis.

  12. Identification of peptide sequences that selectively bind to pentaerythritol trinitrate hemisuccinate-a surrogate of PETN, via phage display technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubas, George; Rees, William; Caguiat, Jonathan; Asch, David; Fagan, Diana; Cortes, Pedro

    2017-03-01

    The present research investigates the identification of amino acid sequences that selectively bind to a pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) explosive surrogate. Through the use of a phage display technique and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), a peptide library was tested against pentaerythritol trinitrate hemisuccinate (PETNH), a surrogate of PETN, to screen for those with amino acids having affinity toward the explosive. The results suggest that the library contains peptides selective to PETNH. Following three rounds of panning, clones were picked and tested for specificity toward PETNH. ELISA results from these samples show that each phage clone has some level of selectivity for binding to PETNH. The peptides from these clones have been sequenced and shown to contain certain common amino acid segments among them. This work represents a technological platform for identifying amino-acid sequences selective toward any bio-chem analyte of interest.

  13. Antagonist peptides of human interferon-α2b isolated from phage display library inhibit interferon induced antiviral activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang TIAN; Gang BAI; Zheng-he LI; Wen-bo YANG

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To screen human interferon (IFN)-α2b antagonist peptides from a phage displayed heptapeptide library. Methods: WISH cells and polyclonal anti-IFN-α2b antibodies were used to select IFN receptor-binding peptides from a phage displayed heptapeptide library. The specific binding of phage clones was examined by phage ELISA and immunohistochemistry. The specific binding activities of synthetic peptides to WISH cells were detected by competition assay. Effects of synthetic peptides to IFN-induced antiviral activity were analyzed by evaluating the cytopathic effect (CPE) using the MTT method. Results: Twenty-three positive clones were obtained after seven rounds of selection. Ten clones were randomly picked from the positive clones and were sequenced. The corresponding amino acid sequences suggested 3 groups homologous to the 3 domains of IFN-α2b, defined by residues 24-41, 43-49, and 148-158 of IFN-α2b. As they presented as corresponding to IFN receptor-binding domains, AB loop and E helix, clone № 26 and 35 were chosen for further characterization and shown to bind to WISH cells. Two peptides corresponding to clone № 26 and 35, designated SP-7(SLSPGLP) and FY-7(FSAPVRY) were shown to compete with GFP-IFN-α2b for binding to its receptor and to inhibit the IFN-α2b-induced antiviral activity. Conclusion: Both IFN-α2b antagonist peptides, SP-7 and FY-7, were able to inhibit the IFN-induced antiviral activity, and could be helpful in laying the foundation for the molecular mechanism of the interaction between IFN and its receptor.

  14. Phage Display Screening for Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-Binding Peptides: Detection of Inflammation in a Mouse Model of Hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coralie Sclavons

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available TNF-α is one of the most abundant cytokines produced in many inflammatory and autoimmune conditions such as multiple sclerosis, chronic hepatitis C, or neurodegenerative diseases. These pathologies remain difficult to diagnose and consequently difficult to treat. The aim of this work is to offer a new diagnostic tool by seeking new molecular probes for medical imaging. The target-specific part of the probe consists here of heptameric peptides selected by the phage display technology for their affinity for TNF-α. Several affinity tests allowed isolating 2 peptides that showed the best binding capacity to TNF-α. Finally, the best peptide was synthesized in both linear and cyclic forms and tested on the histological sections of concanavalin-A-(ConA-treated mice liver. In this well-known hepatitis mouse model, the best results were obtained with the cyclic form of peptide 2, which allowed for the staining of inflamed areas in the liver. The cyclic form of peptide 2 (2C was, thus, covalently linked to iron oxide nanoparticles (magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agent and tested in the ConA-induced hepatitis mouse model. The vectorized nanoparticles allowed for the detection of inflammation as well as of the free peptide. These ex vivo results suggest that phage display-selected peptides can direct imaging contrast agents to inflammatory areas.

  15. Phage-displayed peptides that mimic epitopes of hepatitis E virus capsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larralde, Osmany; Petrik, Juraj

    2017-08-01

    Hepatitis E is an emerging zoonotic infection of increasing public health threat for the UK, especially for immunosuppressed individuals. A human recombinant vaccine has been licensed only in China and is not clear whether it protects against hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotype 3, the most prevalent in Europe. The aim of this study was to use phage display technology as a tool to identify peptides that mimic epitopes of HEV capsid (mimotopes). We identified putative linear and conformational mimotopes using sera from Scottish blood donors that have the immunological imprint of past HEV infection. Four mimotopes did not have homology with the primary sequence of HEV ORF2 capsid but competed effectively with a commercial HEV antigen for binding to anti-HEV reference serum. When the reactivity profile of each mimotope was compared with Wantai HEV-IgG ELISA, the most sensitive HEV immunoassay, mimotopes showed 95.2-100% sensitivity while the specificity ranged from 81.5 to 95.8%. PepSurf algorithm was used to map affinity-selected peptides onto the ORF2 crystal structure of HEV genotype 3, which predicted that these four mimototopes are clustered in the P domain of ORF2 capsid, near conformational epitopes of anti-HEV neutralising monoclonal antibodies. These HEV mimotopes may have potential applications in the design of structural vaccines and the development of new diagnostic tests.

  16. Peptide-binding motif prediction by using phage display library for SasaUBA*0301, a resistance haplotype of MHC class I molecule from Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Heng; Hermsen, Trudi; Stet, Rene J M;

    2008-01-01

    -terminus. Meanwhile, phage display peptide library encoding random 12mer peptides was also screened against beta(2)m/SasaUBA*0301. Eighty-five percentages of the corresponding peptides have an enrichment of leucine, methionine, valine, or isoleucine at the C-terminus. We predict that this particular allele of Salmon...

  17. An integrated microfluidic system for screening of phage-displayed peptides specific to colon cancer cells and colon cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Yu-Jui; Wu, Huei-Wen; Hung, Lien-Yu; Liu, Ching-Ann; Chang, Hwan-You; Wang, Kuan; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2015-09-01

    Affinity reagents recognizing biomarkers specifically are essential components of clinical diagnostics and target therapeutics. However, conventional methods for screening of these reagents often have drawbacks such as large reagent consumption, the labor-intensive or time-consuming procedures, and the involvement of bulky or expensive equipment. Alternatively, microfluidic platforms could potentially automate the screening process within a shorter period of time and reduce reagent and sample consumption dramatically. It has been demonstrated recently that a subpopulation of tumor cells known as cancer stem cells possess high drug resistance and proliferation potential and are regarded as the main cause of metastasis. Therefore, a peptide that recognizes cancer stem cells and differentiates them from other cancer cells will be extremely useful in early diagnosis and target therapy. This study utilized M13 phage display technology to identify peptides that bind, respectively, to colon cancer cells and colon cancer stem cells using an integrated microfluidic system. In addition to positive selection, a negative selection process was integrated on the chip to achieve the selection of peptides of high affinity and specificity. We successfully screened three peptides specific to colon cancer cells and colon cancer stem cells, namely, HOLC-1, HOLC-2, and COLC-1, respectively, and their specificity was measured by the capture rate between target, control, and other cell lines. The capture rates are 43.40 ± 7.23%, 45.16 ± 7.12%, and 49.79 ± 5.34% for colon cancer cells and colon cancer stem cells, respectively, showing a higher specificity on target cells than on control and other cell lines. The developed technique may be promising for early diagnosis of cancer cells and target therapeutics.

  18. Recent advances in M13 bacteriophage-based optical sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Inhong; Moon, Jong-Sik; Oh, Jin-Woo

    2016-10-01

    Recently, M13 bacteriophage has started to be widely used as a functional nanomaterial for various electrical, chemical, or optical applications, such as battery components, photovoltaic cells, sensors, and optics. In addition, the use of M13 bacteriophage has expanded into novel research, such as exciton transporting. In these applications, the versatility of M13 phage is a result of its nontoxic, self-assembling, and specific binding properties. For these reasons, M13 phage is the most powerful candidate as a receptor for transducing chemical or optical phenomena of various analytes into electrical or optical signal. In this review, we will overview the recent progress in optical sensing applications of M13 phage. The structural and functional characters of M13 phage will be described and the recent results in optical sensing application using fluorescence, surface plasmon resonance, Förster resonance energy transfer, and surface enhanced Raman scattering will be outlined.

  19. Monoclonal antibody proteomics: use of antibody mimotope displaying phages and the relevant synthetic peptides for mAb scouting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajdú, István; Flachner, Beáta; Bognár, Melinda; Végh, Barbara M; Dobi, Krisztina; Lőrincz, Zsolt; Lázár, József; Cseh, Sándor; Takács, László; Kurucz, István

    2014-08-01

    Monoclonal antibody proteomics uses nascent libraries or cloned (Plasmascan™, QuantiPlasma™) libraries of mAbs that react with individual epitopes of proteins in the human plasma. At the initial phase of library creation, cognate protein antigen and the epitope interacting with the antibodies are not known. Scouting for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with the best binding characteristics is of high importance for mAb based biomarker assay development. However, in the absence of the identity of the cognate antigen the task represents a challenge. We combined phage display, and surface plasmon resonance (Biacore) experiments to test whether specific phages and the respective mimotope peptides obtained from large scale studies are applicable to determine key features of antibodies for scouting. We show here that mAb captured phage-mimotope heterogeneity that is the diversity of the selected peptide sequences, is inversely correlated with an important binding descriptor; the off-rate of the antibodies and that represents clues for driving the selection of useful mAbs for biomarker assay development. Carefully chosen synthetic mimotope peptides are suitable for specificity testing in competitive assays using the target proteome, in our case the human plasma.

  20. Dissecting the Binding Mode of Low Affinity Phage Display Peptide Ligands to Protein Targets by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Coupled to Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leurs, Ulrike; Lohse, Brian; Ming, Shonoi A;

    2014-01-01

    Phage display (PD) is frequently used to discover peptides capable of binding to biological protein targets. The structural characterization of peptide-protein complexes is often challenging due to their low binding affinities and high structural flexibility. Here, we investigate the use of hydro......Phage display (PD) is frequently used to discover peptides capable of binding to biological protein targets. The structural characterization of peptide-protein complexes is often challenging due to their low binding affinities and high structural flexibility. Here, we investigate the use...

  1. Biomagnetic separation of Salmonella Typhimurium with high affine and specific ligand peptides isolated by phage display technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steingroewer, Juliane [Institute of Food Technology and Bioprocess Engineering, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)]. E-mail: juliane.steingroewer@tu-dresden.de; Bley, Thomas [Institute of Food Technology and Bioprocess Engineering, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Bergemann, Christian [Chemicell GmbH, D-10823, Berlin (Germany); Boschke, Elke [Institute of Food Technology and Bioprocess Engineering, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    Analyses of food-borne pathogens are of great importance in order to minimize the health risk for customers. Thus, very sensitive and rapid detection methods are required. Current conventional culture techniques are very time consuming. Modern immunoassays and biochemical analysis also require pre-enrichment steps resulting in a turnaround time of at least 24 h. Biomagnetic separation (BMS) is a promising more rapid method. In this study we describe the isolation of high affine and specific peptides from a phage-peptide library, which combined with BMS allows the detection of Salmonella spp. with a similar sensitivity as that of immunomagnetic separation using antibodies.

  2. Identification of Hitherto Undefined B-Cell Epitopes by Antibodies in the Sera of Vitiligo Patients Using Phage-Display Peptide Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Jadali

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available A random 12 mers phage library was used to screen a pool of immunoglo¬bulin fractions obtained from vitiligo patients. Subsequent to panning experiments, a panel of affinity selected phage from vitiligo patients were obtained. This panel was tested using an ELIS A for their reactivity with pooled sera from patients and normal controls. Among the 16 randomly selected clones, two of clones showed distinct positive reactivity with the patient's sera compared with controls. The peptides displayed by these phages expressed the following amino acid sequences: SHMPLANQYQWA and NHVQAWEQFWDS. Thus, screening with phage-displayed random peptide library of vitiligo sera can reveal peptide sequences that mimic vitiligo-related self-antigen.

  3. Identification of antigenic epitopes of the SapA protein of Campylobacter fetus using a phage display peptide library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hailing; Yu, Shenye; Liu, Huifang; Si, Wei; Wang, Chunlai; Liu, Siguo

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we immunized mice with prokaryotically expressed recombinant surface layer protein, SapA, of Campylobacter fetus, generated hybridomas secreting mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAb) targeting SapA, and purified the mAb A2D5 from mouse ascites using saturated ammonium sulfate solution. The mAb A2D5, coated onto ELISA plates, was used to screen the phage random 12-peptide library through three rounds of panning. Following panning, 15 phage clones were randomly chosen and tested for reactivity with mAb A2D5 by indirect ELISA. Single-stranded DNA from positive clones was sequenced and compared with the sequence of SapA to predict the key epitope. ELISA and/or Western blot analyses further validated that synthetic peptides and recombinant peptide mimotopes all interact with mAb A2D5. Nine of ten positive phage clones identified by screening were sequenced successfully. Seven clones shared the same sequence HYDRHNYHWWHT; one had the sequence LSKNLPLTALGN; and the final one had the sequence SGMKEPELRSYS. These three sequences shared high homology with SapA J05577 in the region GNEKDFVTKIYSIALGNTSDVDGINYW, in which the underlined amino acids may serve as key residues in the epitope. ELISA and/or Western blot analyses showed that mAb A2D5 not only interacted with the four synthetic peptide mimotopes, but also with 14 prokaryotically expressed recombinant peptide mimotopes. The mimotopes identified in this study will aid future studies into the pathological processes and immune mechanisms of the SapA protein of C. fetus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification of a novel peptide ligand targeting visceral adipose tissue via transdermal route by in vivo phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nam Kyung; Kim, Hong Shin; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Kim, Eun-Bae; Cho, Chong Su; Kang, Sang Kee; Choi, Yun Jaie

    2011-11-01

    To find novel peptide ligands targeting visceral adipose tissue (visceral fat) via transdermal route, in vivo phage display screening was conducted by dermal administration of a phage-peptide library to rats and a peptide sequence, CGLHPAFQC (designated as TDA1), was identified as a targeting ligand to visceral adipose tissue through the consecutive transdermal biopannings. Adipocyte-specific affinity and transdermal activity of the TDA1 were validated in vitro and targeting ability of the dermally administered TDA1 to visceral adipose tissue was also confirmed in vivo. TDA1 was effectively translocated into systemic circulation after dermal administration and selectively targeted visceral adipose tissue without any preference to other organs tested. Fluorescent microscopic analysis revealed that the TDA1 could be specifically localized in the hair follicles of the skin, as well as in the visceral adipose tissue. Thus, we inferred that dermally administered TDA1 would first access systemic circulation via hair follicles as its transdermal route and then could target visceral fat effectively. The overall results suggest that the TDA1 peptide could be potentially applied as a homing moiety for delivery of anti-obesity therapeutics to visceral fat through the convenient transdermal pathway.

  5. Identification of Bacterial Surface Antigens by Screening Peptide Phage Libraries Using Whole Bacteria Cell-Purified Antisera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yun-Fei; Zhao, Dun; Yu, Xing-Long; Hu, Yu-Li; Li, Run-Cheng; Ge, Meng; Xu, Tian-Qi; Liu, Xiao-Bo; Liao, Hua-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial surface proteins can be good vaccine candidates. In the present study, we used polyclonal antibodies purified with intact Erysipelothrix rhusiopthiae to screen phage-displayed random dodecapeptide and loop-constrained heptapeptide libraries, which led to the identification of mimotopes. Homology search of the mimotope sequences against E. rhusiopthiae-encoded ORF sequences revealed 14 new antigens that may localize on the surface of E. rhusiopthiae. When these putative surface proteins were used to immunize mice, 9/11 antigens induced protective immunity. Thus, we have demonstrated that a combination of using the whole bacterial cells to purify antibodies and using the phage-displayed peptide libraries to determine the antigen specificities of the antibodies can lead to the discovery of novel bacterial surface antigens. This can be a general approach for identifying surface antigens for other bacterial species. PMID:28184219

  6. Biopanning and characterization of peptides with Fe3O4 nanoparticles-binding capability via phage display random peptide library technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Fei; Yin, Guangfu; Pu, Ximing; Li, Yucan; Hu, Yang; Huang, Zhongbin; Liao, Xiaoming; Yao, Yadong; Chen, Xianchun

    2016-05-01

    Functionalization of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) play an important role in biomedical applications. A proper functionalization of NPs can improve biocompatibility, avoid a loss of bioactivity, and further endow NPs with unique performances. Modification with vairous specific binding biomolecules from random biological libraries has been explored. In this work, two 7-mer peptides with sequences of HYIDFRW and TVNFKLY were selected from a phage display random peptide library by using ferromagnetic NPs as targets, and were verified to display strong binding affinity to Fe3O4 NPs. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, fluorescence microscopy, thermal analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the presence of peptides on the surface of Fe3O4 NPs. Sequence analyses revealed that the probable binding mechanism between the peptide and Fe3O4 NPs might be driven by Pearson hard acid-hard base specific interaction and hydrogen bonds, accompanied with hydrophilic interactions and non-specific electrostatic attractions. The cell viability assay indicated a good cytocompatibility of peptide-bound Fe3O4 NPs. Furthermore, TVNFKLY peptide and an ovarian tumor cell A2780 specific binding peptide (QQTNWSL) were conjugated to afford a liner 14-mer peptide (QQTNWSLTVNFKLY). The binding and targeting studies showed that 14-mer peptide was able to retain both the strong binding ability to Fe3O4 NPs and the specific binding ability to A2780 cells. The results suggested that the Fe3O4-binding peptides would be of great potential in the functionalization of Fe3O4 NPs for the tumor-targeted drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia.

  7. Targeting essential Eimeria ninakohlyakimovae sporozoite ligands for caprine host endothelial cell invasion with a phage display peptide library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, A; Pérez, D; Muñoz, M C; Molina, J M; Taubert, A; Jacobs-Lorena, M; Vega-Rodríguez, J; López, A M; Hermosilla, C

    2015-11-01

    Eimeria ninakohlyakimovae is an important coccidian parasite of goats which causes severe diarrhoea in young animals. Specific molecules that mediate E. ninakohlyakimovae host interactions and molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis are still unknown. Although strong circumstantial evidence indicates that E. ninakohlyakimovae sporozoite interactions with caprine endothelial host cells (ECs) are specific, hardly any information is available about the interacting molecules that confer host cell specificity. In this study, we describe a novel method to identify surface proteins of caprine umbilical vein endothelial cells (CUVEC) using a phage display library. After several panning rounds, we identified a number of peptides that specifically bind to the surface of CUVEC. Importantly, caprine endothelial cell peptide 2 (PCEC2) and PCEC5 selectively reduced the infection rate by E. ninakohlyakimovae sporozoites. These preliminary data give new insight for the molecular identification of ligands involved in the interaction between E. ninakohlyakimovae sporozoites and host ECs. Further studies using this phage approach might be useful to identify new potential target molecules for the development of anti-coccidial drugs or even new vaccine strategies.

  8. Engineered phages for electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yue

    2016-11-15

    Phages are traditionally widely studied in biology and chemistry. In recent years, engineered phages have attracted significant attentions for functionalization or construction of electronic devices, due to their specific binding, catalytic, nucleating or electronic properties. To apply the engineered phages in electronics, these are a number of interesting questions: how to engineer phages for electronics? How are the engineered phages characterized? How to assemble materials with engineered phages? How are the engineered phages micro or nanopatterned? What are the strategies to construct electronics devices with engineered phages? This review will highlight the early attempts to address these questions and explore the fundamental and practical aspects of engineered phages in electronics, including the approaches for selection or expression of specific peptides on phage coat proteins, characterization of engineered phages in electronics, assembly of electronic materials, patterning of engineered phages, and construction of electronic devices. It provides the methodologies and opens up ex-cit-ing op-por-tu-ni-ties for the development of a variety of new electronic materials and devices based on engineered phages for future applications.

  9. Deep sequencing analysis of phage libraries using Illumina platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matochko, Wadim L; Chu, Kiki; Jin, Bingjie; Lee, Sam W; Whitesides, George M; Derda, Ratmir

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents an analysis of phage-displayed libraries of peptides using Illumina. We describe steps for the preparation of short DNA fragments for deep sequencing and MatLab software for the analysis of the results. Screening of peptide libraries displayed on the surface of bacteriophage (phage display) can be used to discover peptides that bind to any target. The key step in this discovery is the analysis of peptide sequences present in the library. This analysis is usually performed by Sanger sequencing, which is labor intensive and limited to examination of a few hundred phage clones. On the other hand, Illumina deep-sequencing technology can characterize over 10(7) reads in a single run. We applied Illumina sequencing to analyze phage libraries. Using PCR, we isolated the variable regions from M13KE phage vectors from a phage display library. The PCR primers contained (i) sequences flanking the variable region, (ii) barcodes, and (iii) variable 5'-terminal region. We used this approach to examine how diversity of peptides in phage display libraries changes as a result of amplification of libraries in bacteria. Using HiSeq single-end Illumina sequencing of these fragments, we acquired over 2×10(7) reads, 57 base pairs (bp) in length. Each read contained information about the barcode (6bp), one complimentary region (12bp) and a variable region (36bp). We applied this sequencing to a model library of 10(6) unique clones and observed that amplification enriches ∼150 clones, which dominate ∼20% of the library. Deep sequencing, for the first time, characterized the collapse of diversity in phage libraries. The results suggest that screens based on repeated amplification and small-scale sequencing identify a few binding clones and miss thousands of useful clones. The deep sequencing approach described here could identify under-represented clones in phage screens. It could also be instrumental in developing new screening strategies, which can preserve

  10. Phage display selection on whole cells yields a small peptide specific for HCV receptor human CD81

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIE CAO; PING ZHAO; X1AO HUI MIAO; LAN JUAN ZHAO; LI JUN XUE; ZHONG TIAN QI

    2003-01-01

    The human CD81(hCD81),the most recently proposed receptor of hepatitis C virus(HCV),can especifically bind to HCV envelope glycoprotein 2(E2).In this study,hCD81-expressing murine NIH/3T3 cells were used to select hCD81-binding peptides from a phage displayed nonapeptide library(PVIII9aaCys).Eighteen of the 75clones selected from the library showed specific binding to the hCD81-expressing NIH/3T3 cells by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA)and competitive inhibition test.Twelve out of the 18 clones shared the amino acid motif SPQYWTGPA.Sequence comparison of the motif showed no amino acid homology with the native HCV E2.The motif-containing phages could competitively inhibit the ability of HCV E2 binding to native hCD81-expressing MOLT-4 cells,and induce HCV E2 specific immune response in vivo.These results suggest that the selected motif SPQYWTGPA should be a mimotope of HCV E2 to bind to hCD81 molecules.Our findings cast new light on developing HCV receptor antagonists.

  11. A phage display selected 7-mer peptide inhibitor of the Tannerella forsythia metalloprotease-like enzyme Karilysin can be truncated to Ser-Trp-Phe-Pro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Durand Skottrup

    Full Text Available Tannerella forsythia is a gram-negative bacteria, which is strongly associated with the development of periodontal disease. Karilysin is a newly identified metalloprotease-like enzyme, that is secreted from T. forsythia. Karilysin modulates the host immune response and is therefore considered a likely drug target. In this study peptides were selected towards the catalytic domain from Karilysin (Kly18 by phage display. The peptides were linear with low micromolar binding affinities. The two best binders (peptide14 and peptide15, shared the consensus sequence XWFPXXXGGG. A peptide15 fusion with Maltose Binding protein (MBP was produced with peptide15 fused to the N-terminus of MBP. The peptide15-MBP was expressed in E. coli and the purified fusion-protein was used to verify Kly18 specific binding. Chemically synthesised peptide15 (SWFPLRSGGG could inhibit the enzymatic activity of both Kly18 and intact Karilysin (Kly48. Furthermore, peptide15 could slow down the autoprocessing of intact Kly48 to Kly18. The WFP motif was important for inhibition and a truncation study further demonstrated that the N-terminal serine was also essential for Kly18 inhibition. The SWFP peptide had a Ki value in the low micromolar range, which was similar to the intact peptide15. In conclusion SWFP is the first reported inhibitor of Karilysin and can be used as a valuable tool in structure-function studies of Karilysin.

  12. A phage display selected 7-mer peptide inhibitor of the Tannerella forsythia metalloprotease-like enzyme Karilysin can be truncated to Ser-Trp-Phe-Pro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skottrup, Peter Durand; Sørensen, Grete; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Potempa, Jan; Riise, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a gram-negative bacteria, which is strongly associated with the development of periodontal disease. Karilysin is a newly identified metalloprotease-like enzyme, that is secreted from T. forsythia. Karilysin modulates the host immune response and is therefore considered a likely drug target. In this study peptides were selected towards the catalytic domain from Karilysin (Kly18) by phage display. The peptides were linear with low micromolar binding affinities. The two best binders (peptide14 and peptide15), shared the consensus sequence XWFPXXXGGG. A peptide15 fusion with Maltose Binding protein (MBP) was produced with peptide15 fused to the N-terminus of MBP. The peptide15-MBP was expressed in E. coli and the purified fusion-protein was used to verify Kly18 specific binding. Chemically synthesised peptide15 (SWFPLRSGGG) could inhibit the enzymatic activity of both Kly18 and intact Karilysin (Kly48). Furthermore, peptide15 could slow down the autoprocessing of intact Kly48 to Kly18. The WFP motif was important for inhibition and a truncation study further demonstrated that the N-terminal serine was also essential for Kly18 inhibition. The SWFP peptide had a Ki value in the low micromolar range, which was similar to the intact peptide15. In conclusion SWFP is the first reported inhibitor of Karilysin and can be used as a valuable tool in structure-function studies of Karilysin.

  13. Phage displaying peptides mimic schistosoma antigenic epitopes selected by rat natural antibodies and protective immunity induced by their immunization in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Wang; Xin-Yuan Yi; Xian-Ping Li; Dong-Ming Zhou; McReynolds Larry; Xian-Fang Zeng

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To obtain the short peptides mimic antigenic epitopes selected by rat natural antibodies to schistosomes, and to explore their immunoprotection against schistosomiasis in mice.METHODS: Adults worm antigens (AWA) were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and enzyme-linked transferred immunoblotting methods with normal SD rat sera (NRS). The killing effects on schistosomula with fresh and heat-inactivated sera from SD rats were observed. Then the purified IgG from sera of SD rats was used to biopan a phage random peptide library and 20 randomly selected positive clones were detected by ELISA and 2 of them were sequenced.Sixty female mice were immunized thrice with positive phage clones (0, 2nd, 4th wk). Each mouse was challenged with 40 cercariae, and all mice were killed 42 d after challenge. The worms and the liver eggs were counted. RESULTS: NRS could specifically react to the molecules of 75 000, 47 000, 34 500 and 23 000 of AWA. Sera from SD rats showed that the mortality rate of schistosomula was 76.2%, and when the sera were heat-inactivated in vitro, the mortality rate was decreased to 41.0% after being cultured for 48 h. The specific phages bound to IgG were enriched about 300-folds after three rounds of biopanning. Twenty clones were detected by ELISA, 19 of them bound to the specific IgG of rat sera. Immunization with these epitopes was carried out in mice. Compared with the control groups, the mixture of two mimic peptides could induce 34.9% (P = 0.000) worm reduction and 67.6% (P = 0.000) total liver egg reduction in mice. Two different mimic peptides could respectively induce 31.0% (P = 0.001), 14.5% (P = 0.074) worm reduction and 61.2% (P = 0.000), 35.7% (P = 0.000) total liver egg reduction. The specific antibody could be induced by immunization of the mimic peptides, and the antibody titer in immunized mice reached more than 1:6 400 as detected by ELISA.CONCLUSION: Specific peptides mimic antigenic

  14. Injected phage-displayed-VP28 vaccine reduces shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei mortality by white spot syndrome virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís-Lucero, G; Manoutcharian, K; Hernández-López, J; Ascencio, F

    2016-08-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is the most important viral pathogen for the global shrimp industry causing mass mortalities with huge economic losses. Recombinant phages are capable of expressing foreign peptides on viral coat surface and act as antigenic peptide carriers bearing a phage-displayed vaccine. In this study, the full-length VP28 protein of WSSV, widely known as potential vaccine against infection in shrimp, was successfully cloned and expressed on M13 filamentous phage. The functionality and efficacy of this vaccine immunogen was demonstrated through immunoassay and in vivo challenge studies. In ELISA assay phage-displayed VP28 was bind to Litopenaeus vannamei immobilized hemocyte in contrast to wild-type M13 phage. Shrimps were injected with 2 × 10(10) cfu animal(-1) single dose of VP28-M13 and M13 once and 48 h later intramuscularly challenged with WSSV to test the efficacy of the vaccine against the infection. All dead challenged shrimps were PCR WSSV-positive. The accumulative mortality of the vaccinated and challenged shrimp groups was significantly lower (36.67%) than the unvaccinated group (66.67%). Individual phenoloxidase and superoxide dismutase activity was assayed on 8 and 48 h post-vaccination. No significant difference was found in those immunological parameters among groups at any sampled time evaluated. For the first time, phage display technology was used to express a recombinant vaccine for shrimp. The highest percentage of relative survival in vaccinated shrimp (RPS = 44.99%) suggest that the recombinant phage can be used successfully to display and deliver VP28 for farmed marine crustaceans.

  15. Designer and natural peptide toxin blockers of the KcsA potassium channel identified by phage display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ruiming; Dai, Hui; Mendelman, Netanel; Cuello, Luis G.; Chill, Jordan H.; Goldstein, Steve A. N.

    2015-01-01

    Peptide neurotoxins are powerful tools for research, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. Limiting broader use, most receptors lack an identified toxin that binds with high affinity and specificity. This paper describes isolation of toxins for one such orphan target, KcsA, a potassium channel that has been fundamental to delineating the structural basis for ion channel function. A phage-display strategy is presented whereby ∼1.5 million novel and natural peptides are fabricated on the scaffold present in ShK, a sea anemone type I (SAK1) toxin stabilized by three disulfide bonds. We describe two toxins selected by sorting on purified KcsA, one novel (Hui1, 34 residues) and one natural (HmK, 35 residues). Hui1 is potent, blocking single KcsA channels in planar lipid bilayers half-maximally (Ki) at 1 nM. Hui1 is also specific, inhibiting KcsA-Shaker channels in Xenopus oocytes with a Ki of 0.5 nM whereas Shaker, Kv1.2, and Kv1.3 channels are blocked over 200-fold less well. HmK is potent but promiscuous, blocking KcsA-Shaker, Shaker, Kv1.2, and Kv1.3 channels with Ki of 1–4 nM. As anticipated, one Hui1 blocks the KcsA pore and two conserved toxin residues, Lys21 and Tyr22, are essential for high-affinity binding. Unexpectedly, potassium ions traversing the channel from the inside confer voltage sensitivity to the Hui1 off-rate via Arg23, indicating that Lys21 is not in the pore. The 3D structure of Hui1 reveals a SAK1 fold, rationalizes KcsA inhibition, and validates the scaffold-based approach for isolation of high-affinity toxins for orphan receptors. PMID:26627718

  16. Identification of a novel aFGF-binding peptide with anti-tumor effect on breast cancer from phage display library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Xiaoyong; Cai, Cuizan [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Xiao, Fei [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Xiong, Yaoling [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Huang, Yadong; Zhang, Qihao [Department of Biopharmaceutical Research and Development Centre, Institute of Biomedicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Xiang, Qi [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Lou, Guofeng [Department of Biopharmaceutical Research and Development Centre, Institute of Biomedicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Lian, Mengyang [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Su, Zhijian, E-mail: tjnuszj@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Biopharmaceutical Research and Development Centre, Institute of Biomedicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Zheng, Qing, E-mail: tzhengq@jnu.edu.cn [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China)

    2014-03-21

    Highlights: • A specific aFGF-binding peptide AP8 was identified from a phage display library. • AP8 could inhibit aFGF-stimulated cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. • AP8 arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase by suppressing Cyclin D1. • AP8 could block the activation of Erk1/2 and Akt kinase. • AP8 counteracted proliferation and cell cycle via influencing PA2G4 and PCNA. - Abstract: It has been reported that acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) is expressed in breast cancer and via interactions with fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) to promote the stage and grade of the disease. Thus, aFGF/FGFRs have been considered essential targets in breast cancer therapy. We identified a specific aFGF-binding peptide (AGNWTPI, named AP8) from a phage display heptapeptide library with aFGF after four rounds of biopanning. The peptide AP8 contained two (TP) amino acids identical and showed high homology to the peptides of the 182–188 (GTPNPTL) site of high-affinity aFGF receptor FGFR1. Functional analyses indicated that AP8 specifically competed with the corresponding phage clone A8 for binding to aFGF. In addition, AP8 could inhibit aFGF-stimulated cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase by increasing PA2G4 and suppressing Cyclin D1 and PCNA, and blocked the aFGF-induced activation of Erk1/2 and Akt kinase in both breast cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells. Therefore, these results indicate that peptide AP8, acting as an aFGF antagonist, is a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of breast cancer.

  17. From 'I' to 'L' and back again: the odyssey of membrane-bound M13 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Werner L; Nazarov, Petr V; Koehorst, Rob B M; Spruijt, Ruud B; Hemminga, Marcus A

    2009-05-01

    The major coat protein of the filamentous bacteriophage M13 is a surprising protein because it exists both as a membrane protein and as part of the M13 phage coat during its life cycle. Early studies showed that the phage-bound structure of the coat protein was a continuous I-shaped alpha-helix. However, throughout the years various structural models, both I-shaped and L-shaped, have been proposed for the membrane-bound state of the coat protein. Recently, site-directed labelling approaches have enabled the study of the coat protein under conditions that more closely mimic the in vivo membrane-bound state. Interestingly, the structure that has emerged from this work is I-shaped and similar to the structure in the phage-bound state.

  18. Antibody binding site mapping of SARS-CoV spike protein receptor-binding domain by a combination of yeast surface display and phage peptide library screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Wang, Jingxue; Wen, Kun; Mou, Zhirong; Zou, Liyun; Che, Xiaoyan; Ni, Bing; Wu, Yuzhang

    2009-12-01

    The receptor-binding domain (RBD) of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) spike (S) protein plays an important role in viral infection, and is a potential major neutralizing determinant. In this study, three hybridoma cell lines secreting specific monoclonal antibodies against the RBD of the S protein were generated and their exact binding sites were identified. Using yeast surface display, the binding sites of these antibodies were defined to two linear regions on the RBD: S(337-360) and S(380-399). Using these monoclonal antibodies in phage peptide library screening identified 10 distinct mimotopes 12 amino acids in length. Sequence comparison between native epitopes and these mimotopes further confirmed the binding sites, and revealed key amino acid residues involved in antibody binding. None of these antibodies could neutralize the murine leukemia virus pseudotyped expressing the SARS-CoV spike protein (MLV/SARS-CoV). However, these mAbs could be useful in the diagnosis of SARS-CoV due to their exclusive reactivity with SARS-CoV. Furthermore, this study established a feasible platform for epitope mapping. Yeast surface display combined with phage peptide library screening provides a convenient strategy for the identification of epitope peptides from certain antigenic proteins.

  19. Screening of Pro-Asp Sequences Exposed on Bacteriophage M13 as an Ideal Anchor for Gold Nanocubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwa Kyoung; Lee, Yujean; Kim, Hyori; Lee, Hye-Eun; Chang, Hyejin; Nam, Ki Tae; Jeong, Dae Hong; Chung, Junho

    2017-09-15

    Bacteriophages are thought to be ideal vehicles for linking antibodies to nanoparticles. Here, we define the sequence of peptides exposed as a fusion protein on M13 bacteriophages to yield optimal binding of gold nanocubes and efficient bacteriophage amplification. We generated five helper bacteriophage libraries using AE(X)2DP, AE(X)3DP, AE(X)4DP, AE(X)5DP, and AE(X)6DP as the exposed portion of pVIII, in which X was a randomized amino acid residue encoded by the nucleotide sequence NNK. Efficient phage amplification was achievable only in the AE(X)2DP, AE(X)3DP, and AE(X)4DP libraries. Through biopanning with gold nanocubes, we enriched the phage clones and selected the clone with the highest fold change after enrichment. This clone displayed Pro-Asp on the surface of the bacteriophage and had amplification yields similar to those of the wild-type helper bacteriophage (VCSM13). The clone displayed even binding of gold nanocubes along its length and minimal aggregation after binding. We conclude that, for efficient amplification, the exposed pVIII amino acid length should be limited to six residues and Ala-Glu-Pro-Asp-Asp-Pro (AEPDDP) is the ideal fusion protein sequence for guaranteeing the optimal formation of a complex with gold nanocubes.

  20. Screening a phage display library for a novel FGF8b-binding peptide with anti-tumor effect on prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wenhui; Chen, Xilei; Li, Tao; Li, Yanmei; Wang, Ruixue; He, Dan; Luo, Wu [Institute of Tissue Transplantation and Immunology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Li, Xiaokun [Institute of Tissue Transplantation and Immunology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); School of Pharmaceutical Science, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Wu, Xiaoping, E-mail: twxp@jnu.edu.cn [Institute of Tissue Transplantation and Immunology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); School of Pharmaceutical Science, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China)

    2013-05-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 8b (FGF8b) is the major isoform of FGF8 expressed in prostate cancer and it correlates with the stage and grade of the disease. FGF8b has been considered as a potential target for prostate cancer therapy. Here we isolated 12 specific FGF8b-binding phage clones by screening a phage display heptapeptide library with FGF8b. The peptide (HSQAAVP, named as P12) corresponding to one of these clones showed high homology to the immunoglobulin-like (Ig-like) domain II(D2) of high-affinity FGF8b receptor (FGFR3c), contained 3 identical amino acids (AVP) to the authentic FGFR3 D2 sequence aa 163–169 (LLAVPAA) directly participating in ligand binding, carried the same charges as its corresponding motif (aa163–169) in FGFR3c, suggesting that P12 may have a greater potential to interrupt FGF8b binding to its receptors than other identified heptapeptides do. Functional analysis indicated that synthetic P12 peptides mediate significant inhibition of FGF8b-induced cell proliferation, arrest cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase via suppression of Cyclin D1 and PCNA, and blockade of the activations of Erk1/2 and Akt cascades in both prostate cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells. The results demonstrated that the P12 peptide acting as an FGF8b antagonist may have therapeutic potential in prostate cancer. - Highlights: ► A novel FGF8b-binding peptide P12 was isolated from a phage display library. ► The mechanisms for P12 peptide inhibiting cell proliferation were proposed. ► P12 caused cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase via suppression of Cyclin D1 and PCNA. ► P12 suppressed FGF8b-induced activations of Akt and MAP kinases. ► P12 acting as an FGF8b antagonist may have therapeutic potential in prostate cancer.

  1. The comparison of BLyS-binding peptides from phage display library and computer-aided design on BLyS-TACI interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yacong; Hao, Xiafei; Feng, Jiannan; Shen, Beifen; Wei, Jing; Sun, Jian

    2015-02-01

    BLyS antagonists have become the therapeutic reagents in the treatment of autoimmune disorders. BLyS binding peptides and their Fc fusion proteins may be alternative BLyS antagonists in such application. In this study, the activity of BLyS binding peptide 814 obtained from phage display library and peptide TA designed by computer-aided modeling on the interaction of BLyS-TACI was compared. In addition, to maintain the spatial conformation and stability of the peptides, human IgG1 Fc fragment was fused to peptides 814 and TA to form peptide-Fc fusion proteins, steady and innovative peptibodies. The prokaryotic expression plasmids pET30a-814-Fc and pET30a-TA-Fc for these peptibodies were acquired by genetic engineering, and confirmed by DNA sequencing. After the right plasmids were transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), the fusion proteins were expressed and purified by protein A affinity column. As a result of competitive ELISA, peptides 814 and TA at 100μg/ml displayed 52.2% and 28.6% inhibition on the interaction of TACI-Fc with BLyS respectively. Moreover, 814-Fc and TA-Fc fusion proteins could bind to BLyS in a dosage-dependent manner as TACI-Fc did, and displayed 54.7% and 26.1% inhibition on the interaction of TACI-Fc-Myc with BLyS at 100μg/ml respectively. So 814-Fc and TA-Fc proteins had the similar bioactivity as the peptides did. Furthermore, compared with TA-Fc, 814-Fc showed two-fold inhibition effect on BLyS binding to TACI, suggesting that 814-Fc could inhibit BLyS bioactivity significantly and might serve as a potential antagonist to treat autoimmune diseases associated with BLyS overexpression.

  2. Screening of specific binding peptide targeting blood vessel of human esophageal cancer in vivo in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHI Min; WU Kai-chun; HAO Zhi-ming; GUO Chang-cun; YAO Jia-yin

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction remains a virulent malignancy with poor prognosis. Rapid progresses were made in chemotherapeutic agents and the development of molecular markers allowed better identification of candidates for targeted therapy. This study aimed to identify the candidate peptides used for anti-angiogenic therapy of esophageal cancer by in vivo screening C7C peptide library for peptides binding specifically to blood vessels of human esophageal cancer.Methods The phage displayed C7C peptide library was injected intravenously into mice bearing human esophageal tumor xenografts under renal capsule. After 5 rounds of screening, 13 clones were picked up individually and sequenced.During each round of screening, titers of phage recovery were calculated from tumor xenograft and control tissues.Homing of these 9 peptides to tumor vessel was detected by calculating phage titers in the tumor xenograft and control tissues (lung and spleen) after each phage was injected into mice model, and compared with the distribution of phage M13 and Ⅷ-related antigen in tumor xenograft by immunohistochemical staining. Comparisons among groups of data were made using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by the Bonferroni multiple comparisons test.Results The number of phage recovered from tumor tissue of each round increased gradually in tumor group while decreased in control groups (P <0.01 in tumor and spleen, P <0.05 in lung). Immunohistochemical staining showed similar staining pattern with M13 antibody or Ⅷ-related antigen antibody, suggesting that phages displaying the selected peptides could home to blood vessel of human esophageal cancer. According to their DNA, 9 corresponding peptide sequences were deduced. And the homing ability to blood vessel of phages displaying the selected peptides was confirmed by comparing with their recovery in tumor and control tissues. Two motifs, YSXNXW and PXNXXN, were also obtained by

  3. A Conserved Epitope Mapped with a Monoclonal Antibody against the VP3 Protein of Goose Parvovirus by Using Peptide Screening and Phage Display Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenxi; Liu, Hongyu; Li, Jinzhe; Liu, Dafei; Meng, Runze; Zhang, Qingshan; Shaozhou, Wulin; Bai, Xiaofei; Zhang, Tingting; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Waterfowl parvovirus (WPV) infection causes high mortality and morbidity in both geese (Anser anser) and Muscovy ducks (Cairina moschata), resulting in significant losses to the waterfowl industries. The VP3 protein of WPV is a major structural protein that induces neutralizing antibodies in the waterfowl. However, B-cell epitopes on the VP3 protein of WPV have not been characterized. To understand the antigenic determinants of the VP3 protein, we used the monoclonal antibody (mAb) 4A6 to screen a set of eight partially expressed overlapping peptides spanning VP3. Using western blotting and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we localized the VP3 epitope between amino acids (aa) 57 and 112. To identify the essential epitope residues, a phage library displaying 12-mer random peptides was screened with mAb 4A6. Phage clone peptides displayed a consensus sequence of YxRFHxH that mimicked the sequence 82Y/FNRFHCH88, which corresponded to amino acid residues 82 to 88 of VP3 protein of WPVs. mAb 4A6 binding to biotinylated fragments corresponding to amino acid residues 82 to 88 of the VP3 protein verified that the 82FxRFHxH88 was the VP3 epitope and that amino acids 82F is necessary to retain maximal binding to mAb 4A6. Parvovirus-positive goose and duck sera reacted with the epitope peptide by dot blotting assay, revealing the importance of these amino acids of the epitope in antibody-epitope binding reactivity. We identified the motif FxRFHxH as a VP3-specific B-cell epitope that is recognized by the neutralizing mAb 4A6. This finding might be valuable in understanding of the antigenic topology of VP3 of WPV.

  4. Identification of a conserved B-cell epitope on reticuloendotheliosis virus envelope protein by screening a phage-displayed random peptide library.

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    Mei Xue

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The gp90 protein of avian reticuloendotheliosis-associated virus (REV-A is an important envelope glycoprotein, which is responsible for inducing protective antibody immune responses in animals. B-cell epitopes on the gp90 protein of REV have not been well studied and reported. METHODS AND RESULTS: This study describes the identification of a linear B-cell epitope on the gp90 protein by screening a phage-displayed 12-mer random peptide library with the neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb A9E8 directed against the gp90. The mAb A9E8 recognized phages displaying peptides with the consensus motif SVQYHPL. Amino acid sequence of the motif exactly matched (213SVQYHPL(219 of the gp90. Further identification of the displayed B cell epitope was conducted using a set of truncated peptides expressed as GST fusion proteins and the Western blot results indicated that (213SVQYHPL(219 was the minimal determinant of the linear B cell epitope recognized by the mAb A9E8. Moreover, an eight amino acid peptide SVQYHPLA was proven to be the minimal unit of the epitope with the maximal binding activity to mAb A9E8. The REV-A-positive chicken serum reacted with the minimal linear epitopes in Western blot, revealing the importance of the eight amino acids of the epitope in antibody-epitope binding activity. Furthermore, we found that the epitope is a common motif shared among REV-A and other members of REV group. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: We identified (213SVQYHPL(219 as a gp90-specific linear B-cell epitope recognized by the neutralizing mAb A9E8. The results in this study may have potential applications in development of diagnostic techniques and epitope-based marker vaccines against REV-A and other viruses of the REV group.

  5. Heterogeneous catalysis on the phage surface: Display of active human enteropeptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparian, Marine E; Bobik, Tatyana V; Kim, Yana V; Ponomarenko, Natalia A; Dolgikh, Dmitry A; Gabibov, Alexander G; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P

    2013-11-01

    Enteropeptidase (EC 3.4.21.9) plays a key role in mammalian digestion as the enzyme that physiologically activates trypsinogen by highly specific cleavage of the trypsinogen activation peptide following the recognition sequence D4K. The high specificity of enteropeptidase makes it a powerful tool in modern biotechnology. Here we describe the application of phage display technology to express active human enteropeptidase catalytic subunits (L-HEP) on M13 filamentous bacteriophage. The L-HEP/C122S gene was cloned in the g3p-based phagemid vector pHEN2m upstream of the sequence encoding the phage g3p protein and downstream of the signal peptide-encoding sequence. Heterogeneous catalysis of the synthetic peptide substrate (GDDDDK-β-naphthylamide) cleavage by phage-bound L-HEP was shown to have kinetic parameters similar to those of soluble enzyme, with the respective Km values of 19 μM and 20 μM and kcat of 115 and 92 s(-1). Fusion proteins containing a D4K cleavage site were cleaved with phage-bound L-HEP/C122S as well as by soluble L-HEP/C122S, and proteolysis was inhibited by soybean trypsin inhibitor. Rapid large-scale phage production, one-step purification of phage-bound L-HEP, and easy removal of enzyme activity from reaction samples by PEG precipitation make our approach suitable for the efficient removal of various tag sequences fused to the target proteins. The functional phage display technology developed in this study can be instrumental in constructing libraries of mutants to analyze the effect of structural changes on the activity and specificity of the enzyme or generate its desired variants for biotechnological applications.

  6. Selection of Peptide Inhibitor to Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 Using Phage Display and Its Effects on Pancreatic Cancer Cell lines PANC-1 and CFPAC-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Lu, Maqing Zheng, Yunxia Zhu, Min Sha, Yue Wu, Xiao Han

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite tremendous advances in cancer treatment and survival rates, pancreatic cancer remains one of the most deadly afflictions and the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs are thought to be involved in cancer progression. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 is known to play a pivotal role in tumor invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis, and validated to be the anticancer target. Inhibition of MMP-2 activity is able to reduce the cancer cell invasion and suppress tumor growth in vivo. Two novel peptides, M204C4 and M205C4, which could specially inhibit MMP-2 activity, were identified by a phage display library screening. We showed that M204C4 and M205C4 inhibited the activity of MMP-2 in a dose dependent manner in vitro. Two peptides reduced MMP-2 mediated invasion of the pancreatic cancer cell lines PANC-1 and CFPAC-1, but not affected the expression and release of MMP-2. Furthermore, these two peptides could suppress tumor growth in vivo. Our results indicated that two peptides selected by phase display technology may be used as anticancer drugs in the future.

  7. A synthetic peptide corresponding to the C-terminal 25 residues of phage MS2 coded lysis protein dissipates the protonmotive force in Escherichia coli membrane vesicles by generating hydrophilic pores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goessens, Wil H.F.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Wilschut, Jan; Duin, Jan van

    1988-01-01

    The RNA phage MS2 encodes a protein, 75 amino acids long, that is necessary and sufficient for lysis of the host cell. DNA deletion analysis has shown that the lytic activity is confined to the C-terminal half of the protein. We have examined the effects of a synthetic peptide, covering the C-termin

  8. The C-terminal residue of phage Vp16 PDF, the smallest peptide deformylase, acts as an offset element locking the active conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzela, Renata; Nusbaum, Julien; Fieulaine, Sonia; Lavecchia, Francesco; Bienvenut, Willy V; Dian, Cyril; Meinnel, Thierry; Giglione, Carmela

    2017-09-08

    Prokaryotic proteins must be deformylated before the removal of their first methionine. Peptide deformylase (PDF) is indispensable and guarantees this mechanism. Recent metagenomics studies revealed new idiosyncratic PDF forms as the most abundant family of viral sequences. Little is known regarding these viral PDFs, including the capacity of the corresponding encoded proteins to ensure deformylase activity. We provide here the first evidence that viral PDFs, including the shortest PDF identified to date, Vp16 PDF, display deformylase activity in vivo, despite the absence of the key ribosome-interacting C-terminal region. Moreover, characterization of phage Vp16 PDF underscores unexpected structural and molecular features with the C-terminal Isoleucine residue significantly contributing to deformylase activity both in vitro and in vivo. This residue fully compensates for the absence of the usual long C-domain. Taken together, these data elucidate an unexpected mechanism of enzyme natural evolution and adaptation within viral sequences.

  9. Phage therapy pharmacology phage cocktails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Benjamin K; Abedon, Stephen T

    2012-01-01

    Phage therapy is the clinical or veterinary application of bacterial viruses (bacteriophages) as antibacterial "drugs." More generally, phages can be used as biocontrol agents against plant as well as foodborne pathogens. In this chapter, we consider the therapeutic use of phage cocktails, which is the combining of two or more phage types to produce more pharmacologically diverse formulations. The primary motivation for the use of cocktails is their broader spectra of activity in comparison to individual phage isolates: they can impact either more bacterial types or achieve effectiveness under a greater diversity of conditions. The combining of phages can also facilitate better targeting of multiple strains making up individual bacterial species or covering multiple species that might be responsible for similar disease states, in general providing, relative to individual phage isolates, a greater potential for presumptive or empirical treatment. Contrasting the use of phage banks, or even phage isolation against specific etiologies that have been obtained directly from patients under treatment, here we consider the utility as well as potential shortcomings associated with the use of phage cocktails as therapeutic antibacterial agents.

  10. Observation of the low frequency vibrational modes of bacteriophage M13 in water by Raman spectroscopy

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    Tsen Shaw-Wei D

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, a technique which departs radically from conventional approaches has been proposed. This novel technique utilizes biological objects such as viruses as nano-templates for the fabrication of nanostructure elements. For example, rod-shaped viruses such as the M13 phage and tobacco mosaic virus have been successfully used as biological templates for the synthesis of semiconductor and metallic nanowires. Results and discussion Low wave number (≤ 20 cm-1 acoustic vibrations of the M13 phage have been studied using Raman spectroscopy. The experimental results are compared with theoretical calculations based on an elastic continuum model and appropriate Raman selection rules derived from a bond polarizability model. The observed Raman mode has been shown to belong to one of the Raman-active axial torsion modes of the M13 phage protein coat. Conclusion It is expected that the detection and characterization of this low frequency vibrational mode can be used for applications in nanotechnology such as for monitoring the process of virus functionalization and self-assembly. For example, the differences in Raman spectra can be used to monitor the coating of virus with some other materials and nano-assembly process, such as attaching a carbon nanotube or quantum dots.

  11. Viable transmembrane region mutants of bacteriophage M13 coat protein prepared by site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z; Deber, C M

    1991-10-31

    Bacteriophage M13 coat protein - a 50-residue protein located at the E. coli host membrane during phage reproduction - is subjected to cytoplasmic, membrane-bound, and DNA-interactive environments during the phage life cycle. In research to examine the specific features of primary/secondary structure in the effective transmembrane (TM) region of the protein (residues 21-39: YIGYAWAMVVVIVGATIGI) which modulate its capacity to respond conformationally to the progressive influences of these varying environments, we have prepared over two dozen viable mutant phages with alterations in their coat protein TM regions. Mutants were obtained through use of site-directed mutagenesis techniques in combination with three "randomized" oligonucleotides which spanned the TM region. No subcloning was required. Among mutations observed were those in which each of the four TM Val residues was changed to Ala, and several with increased Ser or Thr content, including one double Ser mutant (G23S-A25S). Polar substitutions arising at Gly23 and Tyr24-including G23D, Y24H, Y24D and Y24N-suggested that this local segment resides external to the host membrane. Milligram quantities of mutant coat proteins are obtained by growing M13 mutant phages in liter preparations, with isotopic (e.g., 13C) labelling at desired sites, for subsequent characterization and conformational analysis in membrane-mimetic media.

  12. Identification of two linear B-cell epitopes from West Nile virus NS1 by screening a phage-displayed random peptide library

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    Qin Yong-Li

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The West Nile virus (WNV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1 is an important antigenic protein that elicits protective antibody responses in animals and can be used for the serological diagnosis of WNV infection. Although previous work has demonstrated the vital role of WNV NS1-specific antibody responses, the specific epitopes in the NS1 have not been identified. Results The present study describes the identification of two linear B-cell epitopes in WNV NS1 through screening a phage-displayed random 12-mer peptide library with two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs 3C7 and 4D1 that directed against the NS1. The mAbs 3C7 and 4D1 recognized phages displaying peptides with the consensus motifs LTATTEK and VVDGPETKEC, respectively. Exact sequences of both motifs were found in the NS1 (895LTATTEK901 and 925VVDGPETKEC934. Further identification of the displayed B cell epitopes were conducted using a set of truncated peptides expressed as MBP fusion proteins. The data indicated that 896TATTEK901 and925VVDGPETKEC934 are minimal determinants of the linear B cell epitopes recognized by the mAbs 3C7 and 4D1, respectively. Antibodies present in the serum of WNV-positive horses recognized the minimal linear epitopes in Western blot analysis, indicating that the two peptides are antigenic in horses during infection. Furthermore, we found that the epitope recognized by 3C7 is conserved only among WNV strains, whereas the epitope recognized by 4D1 is a common motif shared among WNV and other members of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV serocomplex. Conclusions We identified TATTEK and VVDGPETKEC as NS1-specific linear B-cell epitopes recognized by the mAbs 3C7 and 4D1, respectively. The knowledge and reagents generated in this study may have potential applications in differential diagnosis and the development of epitope-based marker vaccines against WNV and other viruses of JEV serocomplex.

  13. Phages targeting infected tissues: novel approach to phage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górski, Andrzej; Dąbrowska, Krystyna; Hodyra-Stefaniak, Katarzyna; Borysowski, Jan; Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata

    2015-01-01

    While the true efficacy of phage therapy still requires formal confirmation in clinical trials, it continues to offer realistic potential treatment in patients in whom antibiotics have failed. Novel developments and approaches are therefore needed to ascertain that future clinical trials would evaluate the therapy in its optimal form thus allowing for reliable conclusions regarding the true value of phage therapy. In this article, we present our vision to develop and establish a bank of phages specific to most threatening pathogens and armed with homing peptides enabling their localization in infected tissues in densities assuring efficient and stable eradication of infection.

  14. Nanoscale bacteriophage biosensors beyond phage display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee JW

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Jong-Wook Lee,1 Jangwon Song,1,2 Mintai P Hwang,1 Kwan Hyi Lee1,2 1Center for Biomaterials, Biomedical Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, Korea; 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Seoul, Korea Abstract: Bacteriophages are traditionally used for the development of phage display technology. Recently, their nanosized dimensions and ease with which genetic modifications can be made to their structure and function have put them in the spotlight towards their use in a variety of biosensors. In particular, the expression of any protein or peptide on the extraluminal surface of bacteriophages is possible by genetically engineering the genome. In addition, the relatively short replication time of bacteriophages offers researchers the ability to generate mass quantities of any given bacteriophage-based biosensor. Coupled with the emergence of various biomarkers in the clinic as a means to determine pathophysiological states, the development of current and novel technologies for their detection and quantification is imperative. In this review, we categorize bacteriophages by their morphology into M13-based filamentous bacteriophages and T4- or T7-based icosahedral bacteriophages, and examine how such advantages are utilized across a variety of biosensors. In essence, we take a comprehensive approach towards recent trends in bacteriophage-based biosensor applications and discuss their outlook with regards to the field of biotechnology. Keywords: biosensing, M13 bacteriophage, T4 bacteriophage, bacterial detection, Escherichia coli, SPR sensor

  15. Recombinant phage probes for Listeria monocytogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnazza, S; Gioffre, G; Felici, F; Guglielmino, S [Department of Microbiological, Genetic and Molecular Sciences, University of Messina, Messina (Italy)

    2007-10-03

    Monitoring of food and environmental samples for biological threats, such as Listeria monocytogenes, requires probes that specifically bind biological agents and ensure their immediate and efficient detection. There is a need for robust and inexpensive affinity probes as an alternative to antibodies. These probes may be recruited from random peptide libraries displayed on filamentous phage. In this study, we selected from two phage peptide libraries phage clones displaying peptides capable of specific and strong binding to the L. monocytogenes cell surface. The ability of isolated phage clones to interact specifically with L. monocytogenes was demonstrated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and confirmed by co-precipitation assay. We also assessed the sensitivity of phage-bacteria binding by PCR on phage-captured Listeria cells, which could be detected at a concentration of 10{sup 4} cells ml{sup -1}. In addition, as proof-of-concept, we tested the possibility of immobilizing the affinity-selected phages to a putative biosensor surface. The quality of phage deposition was monitored by ELISA and fluorescent microscopy. Phage-bacterial binding was confirmed by high power optical phase contrast microscopy. Overall, the results of this work validate the concept of affinity-selected recombinant filamentous phages as probes for detecting and monitoring bacterial agents under any conditions that warrant their recognition, including in food products.

  16. Recombinant phage probes for Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnazza, S.; Gioffrè, G.; Felici, F.; Guglielmino, S.

    2007-10-01

    Monitoring of food and environmental samples for biological threats, such as Listeria monocytogenes, requires probes that specifically bind biological agents and ensure their immediate and efficient detection. There is a need for robust and inexpensive affinity probes as an alternative to antibodies. These probes may be recruited from random peptide libraries displayed on filamentous phage. In this study, we selected from two phage peptide libraries phage clones displaying peptides capable of specific and strong binding to the L. monocytogenes cell surface. The ability of isolated phage clones to interact specifically with L. monocytogenes was demonstrated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and confirmed by co-precipitation assay. We also assessed the sensitivity of phage-bacteria binding by PCR on phage-captured Listeria cells, which could be detected at a concentration of 104 cells ml-1. In addition, as proof-of-concept, we tested the possibility of immobilizing the affinity-selected phages to a putative biosensor surface. The quality of phage deposition was monitored by ELISA and fluorescent microscopy. Phage-bacterial binding was confirmed by high power optical phase contrast microscopy. Overall, the results of this work validate the concept of affinity-selected recombinant filamentous phages as probes for detecting and monitoring bacterial agents under any conditions that warrant their recognition, including in food products.

  17. 肺癌特异性结合多肽的体外筛选和鉴定%Screening and identifying the peptide specifically binding to lung cancer by using phage display in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘雪刁; 何冰; 王桂香; 刘金泳; 曹成明; 臧林泉

    2013-01-01

    目的 应用噬菌体随机肽库技术筛选出与肺癌细胞特异性结合的多肽.方法 以人肺癌细胞NCI-H1299为靶细胞,人胚肺细胞MRC-5为吸附细胞,对噬菌体随机12肽库进行3轮全细胞减性筛选后,随机挑取噬菌体克隆进行ELISA鉴定;对亲和力较高的阳性克隆进行DNA测序并翻译为氨基酸序列;化学合成异硫氰酸荧光素标记的多肽(FITC-ZS-5),采用细胞和组织免疫荧光法鉴定FITC-ZS-5与肺癌细胞的亲和力及特异性.结果 通过3轮减性筛选后,与NCI-H1299细胞结合的噬菌体克隆得到有效的富集:ELISA结果显示5号克隆对CI-H1299细胞亲和力最高,将其命名为Phage ZS-5:测序结果显示Phage ZS-5所表达的多肽序列在国内外均未见报道,细胞及组织免疫荧光实验结果显示FITC-ZS-5 对肺癌细胞及组织具有较高的亲和力和特异性.结论 应用噬菌体随机肽库技术筛选到肺癌靶向性多肽ZS-5,为肺癌的靶向治疗和诊断奠定基础.%Aim In vitro phage display was used to screen and identify a polypeptide specifically targeting lung cancer cells. Methods The lung cancer NCI-HI 299 cell line and the normal lung MRC-5 cell line were used for the subtractive screening in vitro with a phage display-12 peptide library at 37℃. After three rounds of panning, a group of phage clones specifically binding to the NCI-H1299 cells were obtained, then the affinity of these clones binding to the targeted cells was studied by cell-based ELISA. The phage clones with high affinity was sequenced, thus the amino acid sequence was deduced and the peptide was synthesized and identified by immunofluorescence. Results After three rounds of panning, there was an obvious enrichment for the phage clones specifically binding to the NCI-H1299 cells. A phage clone named phage ZS-5 with high specificity and affinity to NCI-H1299 cells was identified by a cell-based ELISA. More importantly, the synthetic FITC-labeled peptide ZS-5, which

  18. 肝癌特异性噬菌体多肽的筛选和初步鉴定%Screening and preliminary identification of liver cancer specific peptide from a phage display peptide library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗时敏; 臧林泉

    2009-01-01

    目的 利用噬菌体展示肽库筛选与肝癌HepG2细胞特异性结合的多肽,为筛选及明确新的肝癌早期诊断和治疗标志物打下基础.方法 以肝癌细胞HepG2为靶细胞,LO-2为吸附细胞,在37℃条件下对噬菌体随机12肽库进行多轮减性筛选,挑取单克隆扩增并鉴定.利用ELISA初步鉴定克隆亲和力,测定阳性克隆DNA测序并进行同源性及氨基酸分析.结果 经过3轮减性筛选发现,随机挑选的30个单克隆中,其中ZS-9对HepG2具有较高亲和力,氨基酸测序结果表明,该序列与美国国立生物技术信息中心(NCBI)GenBankDNA序列数据库和Swiss-Prot蛋白数据库中的已知基因和蛋白无同源性,而且,国内外文献均未见报道,表明笔者筛选到一新的肝癌相关抗原的配体.结论 利用噬菌体随机12肽库成功筛选到与肝癌细胞HepG2具有较高亲和力的多肽,为筛选鉴定新的肝癌特异的标志物奠定工作基础,也为肝癌的早期诊断和靶向治疗进一步研发确定了靶标.%Objective To obtain short peptides which specifically binds to HepG2 cell line from 12 peptide libraries, and lay foundation for screening and identifying the new liver cancer markers for early diagnosis and treatment of liver cancer. Methods The liver cancer cell line HepG2 was used as the antigen and LO-2 as the absorber cells for subtraction biopanning from a phage display peptide library at 37℃. The positive phage clones were identified by cell enzyme-linked immunosorbentassay (EL1SA), and the identity of DNA sequence and amino acids were analyzed. Results After 3 rounds of screening, 30 phage clones were identified by EL1SA, ZS-9 of them bind to the HepG2 specifically. The amino acid sequence was blast in NCBI and Swiss-Prot, the results show that the sequence has not identity with the known genes and proteins in the database, and the sequence was not reported in literature. All these show that we had discovered several novel liver cancer

  19. Rapid enumeration of phage in monodisperse emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjhung, Katrina F; Burnham, Sean; Anany, Hany; Griffiths, Mansel W; Derda, Ratmir

    2014-06-17

    Phage-based detection assays have been developed for the detection of viable bacteria for applications in clinical diagnosis, monitoring of water quality, and food safety. The majority of these assays deliver a positive readout in the form of newly generated progeny phages by the bacterial host of interest. Progeny phages are often visualized as plaques, or holes, in a lawn of bacteria on an agar-filled Petri dish; however, this rate-limiting step requires up to 12 h of incubation time. We have previously described an amplification of bacteriophages M13 inside droplets of media suspended in perfluorinated oil; a single phage M13 in a droplet yields 10(7) copies in 3-4 h. Here, we describe that encapsulation of reporter phages, both lytic T4-LacZ and nonlytic M13, in monodisperse droplets can also be used for rapid enumeration of phage. Compartmentalization in droplets accelerated the development of the signal from the reporter enzyme; counting of "positive" droplets yields accurate enumeration of phage particles ranging from 10(2) to 10(6) pfu/mL. For enumeration of T4-LacZ phage, the fluorescent signal appeared in as little as 90 min. Unlike bulk assays, quantification in emulsion is robust and insensitive to fluctuations in environmental conditions (e.g., temperature). Power-free emulsification using gravity-driven flow in the absence of syringe pumps and portable fluorescence imaging solutions makes this technology promising for use at the point of care in low-resource environments. This droplet-based phage enumeration method could accelerate and simplify point-of-care detection of the pathogens for which reporter bacteriophages have been developed.

  20. Selection of peptide ligands for the antimucin core antibody C595 using phage display technology: definition of candidate epitopes for a cancer vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, P; Tighe, P; Kwiatkowski, E; Milligan, J; Price, M; Sewell, H

    1995-06-01

    Aims-To further define the specificity of the antimucin core antibody C595 by fitting it with a family of hexapeptide ligands by immunoselection of filamentous bacteriophage from a gene III display library of approximately 6.4 x 10(7) random hexapeptides.Methods-Three rounds of immuno-selection were used to enrich for C595 binding phage. DNA sequencing revealed the hexapeptides expressed. Bacteriophage and corresponding synthetic hexapeptides were used in ELISA assay to determine binding affinities.Results-Twenty nine clones from this selected population were analysed. Seven contained the natural epitope RPAP, encoded by two different DNA sequences; 17/29 contained the motif RLPP. In all, 28/29 clones contained the motif RXXP and one clone (RVRPAP) contained the motif RXXP in two peptidic registers; 24/28 clones (6/8 DNA sequences) contained a hydrophobic residue (V or I) at position 1 relative to the RXXP motif. In addition the proximity of RXXP to glycine (position 5) suggests that this contributes in the natural epitope to antibody/antigen binding, which was not detected by chemical synthetic methods. One clone, KSKAGV, bears no obvious relationship to the natural epitope and therefore qualifies as a weakly binding mimotope.Conclusions-This approach has rapidly defined the specificity of this antibody in unprecedented detail, and provides a more comprehensive molecular basis for exploring the immune recognition of the MUC1 mucin by the C595 antibody. Importantly, the novel but related epitopes seen provide peptide specificities and a strategy which may prove useful in generating cancer vaccine candidates.

  1. Identification of systemic lupus erythematosus infection-associated epitope by random 7 peptide libraries displayed on phage%SLE患者血清中病原体相关噬菌体7肽的检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王垚; 张凤民; 王亚贤; 颜培宇; 于晓红; 蔡文辉; 李玉军; 胡云龙; 翟爱霞; 陈杨

    2011-01-01

    目的用噬菌体7肽库筛选系统性红斑狼疮(SLE)患者血清特异性抗体,测序分析其实际意义。方法先用30例正常人混合血清与噬菌体7肽库反应,未与正常人白清结合的7肽再与30例SLE患者混合血清结合,获得SLE血清特异性结合的噬菌体克隆。用患者混合血清进行Dot-ELISA实验鉴定获得的噬菌体克隆,进一步用SLE患者及正常人血清各12例筛选阳性噬菌体的混合克隆,确定阳性噬菌体克隆与个体血清之间的结合情况,并对最终鉴定的噬菌体克隆进行测序与比对分析。结果混合的阳性噬菌体克隆与SLE患者个体血清反应阳性率明显高于其与正常人血清的反应率;序列分析显示阳性噬菌体克隆的抗原表位与杆菌、球菌、弧菌等微生物有同源性,与裂殖酵母属、链球菌属、立克次(氏)体属等有100%同源性,与人类抗原表位无关。结论SLE患者血清中存在与病原体抗原表位结合的抗体成分,提示SLE可能与病原体感染有关。%Objective To screen and identify the phage expressing random 7 amino acid peptide specific to the systemic lupus erythematosus(SLE)and analyze its practical significance. Methods Using the phage random 7 peptide library screening, the SLE specific phage clones were obtained by mixing with the sera from 30 SLE patients' and 30 normal controls respectively. Dot-ELISA was used to identify the SLE specific phage clones reacting to the sera of SLE patients and normal controls. Finally, the identified phages expressing random 7 amino acid peptides were sequenced and analyzed. Results Total 12 phages expressing random 7 amino acid peptides were obtained by phage peptide library screening and dot-ELISA identification. Sequence analysis showed that the no homology was found between the sequences of the deduced amino acid of the 7 antigen peptides and the sequence of human antigens. Peptides homology was found with coccus, coli, and

  2. 利用体内噬菌体展示技术筛选膀胱癌特异性结合肽%Selection of peptide specifically binding to bladder carcinoma by using phage display in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗俊茜; 张帆; 杨晓峰; 罗芳; 刘杰昊; 庞建智; 闫三华; 张小雷

    2015-01-01

    目的:利用体内噬菌体展示技术筛选与人膀胱移行细胞癌特异性结合的小分子多肽。方法:将人膀胱移行细胞癌细胞BIU87接种于裸鼠体内,制备膀胱癌荷瘤小鼠模型,尾静脉注射噬菌体展示环七肽库,然后筛选与膀胱移行细胞癌特异性结合的含外源多肽的噬菌体,经过3轮体内筛选后,免疫组织化学法及ELISA法鉴定单克隆噬菌体对BIU87的亲和力。提取阳性单克隆噬菌体单链DNA进行测序,并推导出外源多肽氨基酸序列,化学合成多肽、制备分子探针后采用激光扫描共聚焦显微镜术及流式细胞术鉴定多肽对膀胱癌细胞和组织的特异性。结果:3轮体内筛选后,噬菌体富集率达到4.334×102倍。免疫组化结果显示,肿瘤组织中噬菌体肽的含量随着每一轮筛选呈增长趋势,且结合逐渐增强,同时由于噬菌体经肝、肾代谢,可见肝脏结合大量非特异性的噬菌体。 ELISA结果显示,随机挑选的30个单克隆噬菌体斑中,有24个阳性噬菌体,其中10个噬菌体对BIU87有较强的亲和力,对其测序并推导出3种多肽序列,重复率最高的序列CSSPIGRHC(8/10)命名为NYZL1。化学合成FITC-C6-NYZL1,通过激光扫描共聚焦显微镜术、流式细胞术均证明多肽NYZL1可以特异性结合膀胱癌细胞。结论:利用体内噬菌体展示技术筛选出了与人膀胱移行细胞癌特异性结合的小分子多肽NYZL1,为膀胱癌早期诊断和靶向治疗提供一定的理论依据。%Objective:To screen the peptide binding to human bladder carcinoma cells specifically by using phage display technology in vivo.Methods: Nude mice were inoculated with bladder carcinoma cells BIU87 for establishing tumor-bearing mice model.The Ph.D.-C7CTM Peptide Library was injected intravenously via tail vein.Then we screened Phage containing exogenous peptides binding to bladder transitional carcinoma cells

  3. Screening of the phage-display random peptide specific to the sera of patients with lung cancer%应用噬菌体随机肽库筛选肺癌血清标志物的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李文辉; 苏丽菊; 杨桐树; 杨威; 钟志; 马玉杰; 孟晓燕; 徐宁

    2012-01-01

    Objective In order to screening the phage - display random 12 peptide specific to the lung cancer and explore early diagnosis, differential diagnosis and clinical treatment for lung cancer. Methods We sdected the serum of lung cancer patient,benign tumor and normal tumor,which was 35 case respectirely,Using the phage random 12 peptide library screening^ the lung cancer specific phage clones),we pooled these serum as a screening ligand. Then, the Dot - ELISA is used to identify the lung cancer specific phage clones reactive to sera of the lung cancer patients and normal controls individually. Results Total 12 of the phage - display random 12 peptide are obtained by phage peptide library screening and the Dot - ELISA identification. Mix of positive cloning respectively with the 12 cases of lung cancer patients and 12 cases of normal serum reaction and 12 cases of lung cancer patients serum all positive, normal serum all negative, sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 100%. Conclusion Lung cancer - specific peptides were screened by phage random peptide library maybe used to diagnosis the lung cancer,and implementing early detection and early intervention has important theoretical significance and application value of lung cancer.%目的 利用噬菌体随机12肽库筛选肺癌患者血清中标志物,对探索肺癌的早期诊断、鉴别诊断、临床治疗特别是实施针对肺癌的早期干预有重要的理论意义和应用价值.方法 分别选取正常人、良性肿瘤患者及肺癌患者血清各35例,先用肺癌患者、良性肿瘤患者、正常人混合血清作为筛选配基,对噬菌体随机12肽库进行减性淘筛,获得肺癌血清特异性结合的噬菌体克隆,并用患者混合血清进行Dot-ELISA实验鉴定获得的噬菌体克隆,进而分别用肺癌患者及正常人血清各12例进一步鉴定阳性噬菌体的混合克隆,确定阳性噬菌体克隆与个体血清之间的结合情况.结果 经减性筛选后,特异结

  4. Phage display peptide library technology's application in the diagnosis and therapy of tumor%噬菌体展示肽库技术在肿瘤诊治研究中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄斌; 俞杨; 王自正

    2011-01-01

    噬菌体展示肽库技术是将高度多样性的多肽与噬菌体衣壳蛋白融合表达,呈现于噬菌体表面的多肽具有相对独立的空间结构,能与配体结合,从而筛选特异性分子表位,其已成为肿瘤诊治研究的重要手段和有力工具.筛选与肿瘤细胞或血管表面细胞特异结合的多肽作为核素载体,制成探针,可以对肿瘤进行早期诊断和转移灶的定位,还可以进行核素治疗;以多肽为基础的靶向药物,可以弥补化学药物在杀伤肿瘤细胞的同时也损伤正常组织和器官的弊端,使得肿瘤治疗进入一个新时代.%Phage display peptide library technology facilitates displaying peptides of high diversity on the surface of phage coat proteins,which with their independent space structure bind with ligands to screen the specific molecule epitopes.With the development of this technology,it becomes an effective and powerful tool in tumor research.As nuclide carrier,peptides screened from phage display library binding specifically with tumor cells and tumor blood vessels,can be manufactured into a probe for prophase diagnosis of tumor,localization of metastasis and nuclide therapy.Targeting chemotherapy drugs on the basis of peptides greatly lower the risk of killing normal tissue and organs,which impulses entering a new therapy time.

  5. Probing Tumor Microenvironment With In Vivo Phage Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    technology. A, Peptides found in the “Phage pool alone” group are listed in a descending order of frequency. Note that CISQERGESC (CIS) and CIFSGEGESC ( CIF ...expressing CISQERGESC (CIS: 0.6% of the recovered phage clones) and 202 phages expressing a relevant peptide CIFSGEGESC ( CIF : 0.2%) (Table 1A). The...term ended showed that CIS and CIF , which have very similar amino acid sequences, bind to cultured hb6011 CAFs especially to filopodia and fibrous

  6. Identification of Fusarium virguliforme FvTox1-Interacting Synthetic Peptides for Enhancing Foliar Sudden Death Syndrome Resistance in Soybean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Wang

    Full Text Available Soybean is one of the most important crops grown across the globe. In the United States, approximately 15% of the soybean yield is suppressed due to various pathogen and pests attack. Sudden death syndrome (SDS is an emerging fungal disease caused by Fusarium virguliforme. Although growing SDS resistant soybean cultivars has been the main method of controlling this disease, SDS resistance is partial and controlled by a large number of quantitative trait loci (QTL. A proteinacious toxin, FvTox1, produced by the pathogen, causes foliar SDS. Earlier, we demonstrated that expression of an anti-FvTox1 single chain variable fragment antibody resulted in reduced foliar SDS development in transgenic soybean plants. Here, we investigated if synthetic FvTox1-interacting peptides, displayed on M13 phage particles, can be identified for enhancing foliar SDS resistance in soybean. We screened three phage-display peptide libraries and discovered four classes of M13 phage clones displaying FvTox1-interacting peptides. In vitro pull-down assays and in vivo interaction assays in yeast were conducted to confirm the interaction of FvTox1 with these four synthetic peptides and their fusion-combinations. One of these peptides was able to partially neutralize the toxic effect of FvTox1 in vitro. Possible application of the synthetic peptides in engineering SDS resistance soybean cultivars is discussed.

  7. Nanoscale bacteriophage biosensors beyond phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Wook; Song, Jangwon; Hwang, Mintai P; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophages are traditionally used for the development of phage display technology. Recently, their nanosized dimensions and ease with which genetic modifications can be made to their structure and function have put them in the spotlight towards their use in a variety of biosensors. In particular, the expression of any protein or peptide on the extraluminal surface of bacteriophages is possible by genetically engineering the genome. In addition, the relatively short replication time of bacteriophages offers researchers the ability to generate mass quantities of any given bacteriophage-based biosensor. Coupled with the emergence of various biomarkers in the clinic as a means to determine pathophysiological states, the development of current and novel technologies for their detection and quantification is imperative. In this review, we categorize bacteriophages by their morphology into M13-based filamentous bacteriophages and T4- or T7-based icosahedral bacteriophages, and examine how such advantages are utilized across a variety of biosensors. In essence, we take a comprehensive approach towards recent trends in bacteriophage-based biosensor applications and discuss their outlook with regards to the field of biotechnology.

  8. Nanoscale bacteriophage biosensors beyond phage display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Wook; Song, Jangwon; Hwang, Mintai P; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophages are traditionally used for the development of phage display technology. Recently, their nanosized dimensions and ease with which genetic modifications can be made to their structure and function have put them in the spotlight towards their use in a variety of biosensors. In particular, the expression of any protein or peptide on the extraluminal surface of bacteriophages is possible by genetically engineering the genome. In addition, the relatively short replication time of bacteriophages offers researchers the ability to generate mass quantities of any given bacteriophage-based biosensor. Coupled with the emergence of various biomarkers in the clinic as a means to determine pathophysiological states, the development of current and novel technologies for their detection and quantification is imperative. In this review, we categorize bacteriophages by their morphology into M13-based filamentous bacteriophages and T4- or T7-based icosahedral bacteriophages, and examine how such advantages are utilized across a variety of biosensors. In essence, we take a comprehensive approach towards recent trends in bacteriophage-based biosensor applications and discuss their outlook with regards to the field of biotechnology. PMID:24143096

  9. Development of a workflow for screening and identification of α-amylase inhibitory peptides from food source using an integrated Bioinformatics-phage display approach: Case study - Cumin seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siow, Hwee-Leng; Lim, Theam Soon; Gan, Chee-Yuen

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to develop an efficient workflow to discover α-amylase inhibitory peptides from cumin seed. A total of 56 unknown peptides was initially found in the cumin seed protein hydrolysate. They were subjected to 2 different in silico screenings and 6 peptides were shortlisted. The peptides were then subjected to in vitro selection using phage display technique and 3 clones (CSP3, CSP4 and CSP6) showed high affinity in binding α-amylase. These clones were subjected to the inhibitory test and only CSP4 and CSP6 exhibited high inhibitory activity. Therefore, these peptides were chemically synthesized for validation purposes. CSP4 exhibited inhibition of bacterial and human salivary α-amylases with IC50 values of 0.11 and 0.04μmol, respectively, whereas CSP6 was about 0.10 and 0.15μmol, respectively. Results showed that the strength of each protocol has been successfully combined as deemed fit to enhance the α-amylase inhibitor peptide discovery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Research on Screening Peptides Specifically Targeting Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma by Phage Display Technique%用噬菌体展示技术筛选喉癌细胞靶向肽的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯俊; 李丽; 杨洪斌; 刘世喜

    2011-01-01

    目的 筛选人源喉癌Hep-2细胞株特异结合的短肽,作为喉癌靶向治疗的载体.方法 体外培养Hep-2细胞株作为靶细胞,人正常喉黏膜上皮细胞为吸附细胞;用噬菌体展示十二肽库进行3轮差减筛选,随机挑取10个噬菌体克隆进行测序;采用酶联免疫吸附(enzyme linked immunosorbent assay,ELISA)法鉴定噬菌体与Hep-2细胞的结合活性;通过免疫荧光鉴定喉癌细胞特异性结合肽(F2)噬菌体阳性克隆与喉癌细胞结合的特异性.结果 经过3轮筛选后,噬菌体在靶细胞Hep-2上出现明显富集;ELISA分析鉴定显示5个阳性克隆能与Hep-2细胞特异结合,其中F2噬菌体克隆对喉癌细胞的结合靶向性明显高于对照细胞(P<0.05);免疫荧光显色显示,F2能特异性地与喉癌细胞结合.结论 利用噬菌体展示肽库技术,可以成功筛选到F2,其可能成为喉癌靶向治疗的载体.%Objective To obtain the polypeptides specifically bound to laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma line (Hep-2) and use it as a potential therapeutic vector targeting laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma patients. Methods With the Hep-2 cells as the target cells and human normal laryngeal squamous epithelial cells (HNLE cells) as the absorber cells, 3 rounds of panning from a Ph. D. -12TM phage-display peptide library were carried out. Ten randomly selected phage clones were sent for sequence detection. The affinity of phage clones was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The positive phage clones (F2) specifically bound to Hep-2 were identified by immunofluorescence detection. Results After 3 rounds of screening, 5 positive phage clones showed specific binding to Hep-2 cells and the affinity of positive phage clones (F2) was significantly higher than that of the control groups (P<0. 05). The results of immunofluorescence detection indicated that F2 could be specifically bound to Hep-2. Conclusion Phage display peptide libraries technique can

  11. Phage therapy pharmacology: calculating phage dosing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedon, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Phage therapy, which can be described as a phage-mediated biocontrol of bacteria (or, simply, biocontrol), is the application of bacterial viruses-also bacteriophages or phages-to reduce densities of nuisance or pathogenic bacteria. Predictive calculations for phage therapy dosing should be useful toward rational development of therapeutic as well as biocontrol products. Here, I consider the theoretical basis of a number of concepts relevant to phage dosing for phage therapy including minimum inhibitory concentration (but also "inundation threshold"), minimum bactericidal concentration (but also "clearance threshold"), decimal reduction time (D value), time until bacterial eradication, threshold bacterial density necessary to support phage population growth ("proliferation threshold"), and bacterial density supporting half-maximal phage population growth rates (K(B)). I also address the concepts of phage killing titers, multiplicity of infection, and phage peak densities. Though many of the presented ideas are not unique to this chapter, I nonetheless provide variations on derivations and resulting formulae, plus as appropriate discuss relative importance. The overriding goal is to present a variety of calculations that are useful toward phage therapy dosing so that they may be found in one location and presented in a manner that allows facile appreciation, comparison, and implementation. The importance of phage density as a key determinant of the phage potential to eradicate bacterial targets is stressed throughout the chapter.

  12. Piezoelectric nanogenerators based on ZnO and M13 Bacteriophage nanostructures (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong-Myeong; Kim, Kyujungg; Hong, Suck Won; Oh, Jin-Woo; Kim, Hyung Kook; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the portable and wearable electronic devices, operated in the power range of microwatt to miliwatt, become available thank to the nanotechnology development and become an essential element for a comfortable life. Our recent research interest mainly focuses on the fabrication of piezoelectric nanogenerators based on smart nanomaterials such as zinc oxide novel nanostructure, M13 bacteriophage. In this talk, we present a simple strategy for fabricating the freestanding ZnO nanorods/graphene/ZnO nanorods double sided heterostructures. The characterization of the double sided heterostructures by using SEM, and Raman scattering spectroscopy reveals the key process and working mechanism of a formation of the heterostructure. The mechanism is discussed in detail in term of the decomposed seed layer and the vacancy defect of graphene. The approach consists of a facile one-step fabrication process and could achieve ZnO coverage with a higher number density than that of the epitaxial single heterostructure. The resulting improvement in the number density of nanorods has a direct beneficial effect on the double side heterostructured nanogenerator performance. The total output voltage and current density are improved up to 2 times compared to those of a single heterostructure due to the coupling of the piezoelectric effects from both upward and downward grown nanorods. The facile one-step fabrication process suggests that double sided heterostructures would improve the performance of electrical and optoelectrical device, such as touch pad, pressure sensor, biosensor and dye-sensitized solar cells. Further, ioinspired nanogenerators based on vertically aligned phage nanopillars are inceptively demonstrated. Vertically aligned phage nanopillars enable not only a high piezoelectric response but also a tuneable piezoelectricity. Piezoelectricity is also modulated by tuning of the protein's dipoles in each phage. The sufficient electrical power from phage nanopillars thus

  13. Bioinformatic analysis of the neprilysin (M13 family of peptidases reveals complex evolutionary and functional relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinney John W

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The neprilysin (M13 family of endopeptidases are zinc-metalloenzymes, the majority of which are type II integral membrane proteins. The best characterised of this family is neprilysin, which has important roles in inactivating signalling peptides involved in modulating neuronal activity, blood pressure and the immune system. Other family members include the endothelin converting enzymes (ECE-1 and ECE-2, which are responsible for the final step in the synthesis of potent vasoconstrictor endothelins. The ECEs, as well as neprilysin, are considered valuable therapeutic targets for treating cardiovascular disease. Other members of the M13 family have not been functionally characterised, but are also likely to have biological roles regulating peptide signalling. The recent sequencing of animal genomes has greatly increased the number of M13 family members in protein databases, information which can be used to reveal evolutionary relationships and to gain insight into conserved biological roles. Results The phylogenetic analysis successfully resolved vertebrate M13 peptidases into seven classes, one of which appears to be specific to mammals, and insect genes into five functional classes and a series of expansions, which may include inactive peptidases. Nematode genes primarily resolved into groups containing no other taxa, bar the two nematode genes associated with Drosophila DmeNEP1 and DmeNEP4. This analysis reconstructed only one relationship between chordate and invertebrate clusters, that of the ECE sub-group and the DmeNEP3 related genes. Analysis of amino acid utilisation in the active site of M13 peptidases reveals a basis for their biochemical properties. A relatively invariant S1' subsite gives the majority of M13 peptidases their strong preference for hydrophobic residues in P1' position. The greater variation in the S2' subsite may be instrumental in determining the specificity of M13 peptidases for their substrates

  14. A Dwarf Nova in the Globular Cluster M13

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Servillat, M.; Webb, N.A.; Lewis, F.; Knigge, C.; van den Berg, M.C.; Dieball, A.; Grindlay, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Dwarf novae (DNe) in globular clusters (GCs) seem to be rare with only 13 detections in the 157 known Galactic GCs. We report the identification of a new DN in M13, the 14th DN identified in a GC to date. Using the 2 m Faulkes Telescope North, we conducted a search for stars in M13 that show variabi

  15. Designing phage therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodridge, Lawrence D

    2010-01-01

    Phage therapy is the application of phages to bodies, substances, or environments to effect the biocontrol of pathogenic or nuisance bacteria. To be effective, phages, minimally, must be capable of attaching to bacteria (adsorption), killing those bacteria (usually associated with phage infection), and otherwise surviving (resisting decay) until they achieve attachment and subsequent killing. While a strength of phage therapy is that phages that possess appropriate properties can be chosen from a large diversity of naturally occurring phages, a more rational approach to phage therapy also can include post-isolation manipulation of phages genetically, phenotypically, or in terms of combining different products into a single formulation. Genetic manipulation, especially in these modern times, can involve genetic engineering, though a more traditional approach involves the selection of spontaneously occurring phage mutants during serial transfer protocols. While genetic modification typically is done to give rise to phenotypic changes in phages, phage phenotype alone can also be modified in vitro, prior to phage application for therapeutic purposes, as for the sake of improving phage lethality (such as by linking phage virions to antibacterial chemicals such as chloramphenicol) or survival capabilities (e.g., via virion PEGylation). Finally, phages, both naturally occurring isolates or otherwise modified constructs, can be combined into cocktails which provide collectively enhanced capabilities such as expanded overall host range. Generally these strategies represent different routes towards improving phage therapy formulations and thereby efficacy through informed design.

  16. Mapping of epitopes for autoantibodies to the Type 1 diabetes autoantigen IA-2 by peptide phage display and molecular modelling: Overlap of antibody and T-cell determinants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A. Dromey, James; Weenink, Sarah M.; Peters, Günther H.J.

    2004-01-01

    phage display and homology modeling to characterize the epitope of a monoclonal IA-2 Ab (96/3) from a human type 1 diabetic patient. This Ab competes for IA-2 binding with Abs from the majority of patients with type 1 diabetes and therefore binds a region close to common autoantibody epitopes. Alignment...

  17. Hepatitis A virus mimotope mapping by phage display peptide library%用噬菌体展示肽库技术筛选甲肝病毒抗原模拟表位

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹经瑗; 李建东; 郑惠惠; 毕胜利; 李德新

    2012-01-01

    Objective A 12 mer phage display peptide library was used to identify hepatitis A virus mimotopes of antigenic determinants,to provide the feasibility of virus epitope mapping by using this approach.Methods Using purified anti-hepatitis A virus monoclonal antibody as affinity selective molecule,phage display peptide library was biopanned and positive clones were selected by ELISA,competition assay and DNA sequencing.Results 10 ELISA positive clones were chosen for DNA sequencing,and the displayed peptide sequences were deduced.9 of them showed identical nucleotide sequence,and similarity in their amino acid sequence with VP1 of HAV HM175 was found,but no sequence homology was found between the other phage clone and the capsid proteins of HAV.Those peptides may behave as mimotopes of HAV.Conclusion The mimotope of HAV was selected by using phage display peptide library screening.The results provide the potential of this method to search for the mimotopes of the virus.%目的 用噬菌体展示肽库技术筛选甲型肝炎(甲肝)病毒抗原模拟表位,为病毒抗原决定簇定位探索可行方法.方法 用纯化的抗甲肝病毒单克隆抗体,对噬菌体展示12肽库进行3轮“吸附-洗脱-扩增”筛选,随机挑取10个克隆,用酶联免疫吸附法(ELISA)对噬菌体克隆进行抗原性鉴定、竞争抑制鉴定及DNA序列测定分析,推导出展示肽氨基酸序列并与甲肝病毒(HAV)代表株结构蛋白氨基酸序列比较.结果 10个噬菌体克隆ELISA检测全为阳性,9个具有一致序列,与HAVHM175株结构蛋白中和活性表位之一:VP1 157-171区具有类似序列,另一株噬菌体克隆在HAVHM175中未发现类似序列,结果表明这些展示肽可能是HAV抗原模拟表位.结论 用噬菌体展示肽库技术筛选得到了HAV模拟表位,为开展病毒模拟表位研究打下了基础.

  18. Application of an M13 bacteriophage displaying tyrosine on the surface for detection of Fe(3+) and Fe(2+) ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaohua; Niu, Chuncheng; Wu, Yunhua; Liang, Xiaosheng

    2015-12-01

    Ferric and ferrous ion plays critical roles in bioprocesses, their influences in many fields have not been fully explored due to the lack of methods for quantification of ferric and ferrous ions in biological system or complex matrix. In this study, an M13 bacteriophage (phage) was engineered for use as a sensor for ferric and ferrous ions via the display of a tyrosine residue on the P8 coat protein. The interaction between the specific phenol group of tyrosine and Fe(3+) / Fe(2+) was used as the sensor. Transmission electron microscopy showed aggregation of the tyrosine-displaying phages after incubation with Fe(3+) and Fe(2+). The aggregated phages infected the host bacterium inefficiently. This phenomenon could be utilized for detection of ferric and ferrous ions. For ferric ions, a calibration curve ranging from 200 nmol/L to 8 μmol/L with a detection limit of 58 nmol/L was acquired. For ferrous ions, a calibration curve ranging from 800 nmol/L to 8 μmol/L with a detection limit of 641.7 nmol/L was acquired. The assay was specific for Fe(3+) and Fe(2+) when tested against Ni(2+), Pb(2+), Zn(2+), Mn(2+), Co(2+), Ca(2+), Cu(2+), Cr(3+), Ba(2+), and K(+). The tyrosine displaying phage to Fe(3+) and Fe(2+) interaction would have plenty of room in application to biomaterials and bionanotechnology.

  19. Gamma-phage lysin PlyG sequence-based synthetic peptides coupled with Qdot-nanocrystals are useful for developing detection methods for Bacillus anthracis by using its surrogates, B. anthracis-Sterne and B. cereus-4342

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atreya Chintamani

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous reports of site-directed deletion analysis on gamma (γ-phage lysin protein (PlyG have demonstrated that removal of a short amino acid sequence in the C-terminal region encompassing a 10-amino acid motif (190LKMTADFILQ199 abrogates its binding activity specific to the cell wall of Bacillus anthracis. Whether short synthetic peptides representing the10-amino acid PlyG putative binding motif flanked by surrounding N- and C-terminal residues also selectively bind to the bacterial cell wall has not been evaluated. If such peptides do demonstrate selective binding to the cell wall, they could serve as bio-probes towards developing detection technologies for B. anthracis. Furthermore, by using B. anthracis (Sterne, 34F2, an animal vaccine and B. cereus-4342, a γ-phage susceptible rare strain as surrogates of B. anthracis, development of proof-of-concepts for B. anthracis are feasible. Results Using four different methods, we evaluated six synthetic peptides representing the putative binding motif including flanking sequences (PlyG-P1 through P6 for the bacterial cell wall binding capacity. Our analysis identified PlyG-P1, PlyG-P3 and PlyG-P5 to have binding capability to both B. anthracis (Sterne, 34F2 and B. cereus-4342. The peptides however did not bind to B. cereus-11778, B. thuringiensis, and B. cereus-10876 suggesting their specificity for B. anthracis-Sterne and B. cereus-4342. PlyG-P3 in combination with fluorescent light microscopy detected even a single bacterium in plasma spiked with the bacteria. Conclusion Overall, these studies illustrate that the short 10-amino acid sequence 'LKMTADFILQ' in fact is a stand-alone bacterial cell wall-binding motif of PlyG. In principle, synthetic peptides PlyG-P1, PlyG-P3 and PlyG-P5, especially PlyG-P3 coupled with Qdot-nanocrystals are useful as high-sensitivity bio-probes in developing detection technologies for B. anthracis.

  20. Screening peptide mimotopes of blood group B carbohydrate antigen using phage display peptide library%随机十二肽噬菌体展示文库筛选血型B抗原模拟多肽的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李许锋; 罗敏; 邹建军; 岑东芝; 何克菲; 张积仁

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To screen peptide mimotopes of blood group B carbohydrate antigen with high affinity for blood group B monoclonal antibody which can replace carbohydrate antigen using a phage display peptide library, and find a new tool for application of blood group B carbohydrate antigen. METHODS: A 12-mer phage peptide library was screened for 3 rounds by using a blood group B monoclonal antibody as target protein according to such a procedure as “adsorbing,eluting and amplification”, and positive clones were selected randomly,confirmed by sandwich ELISA, single strand DNA was extracted from these positive clones and sequenced, and the mimic peptides were deduced by the DNA sequence. RESULTS: After 3 rounds of effective bio-panning, two major mimic peptides with high affinity for target protein were obtained, one peptide sequence was TKNMLSLPVGPG,the other one was HSLKHTQMSYSS. CONCLUSION: The resuits shows that the motif identified through a 12- mer phage display peptide library can be mimiced and may be a substitute for blood group B antigen.%目的:筛选出替代血型B抗原的模拟多肽,用多肽抗原替代糖类抗原.方法:抗血型B抗原的单克隆抗体作为固相筛选靶分子,对随机十二肽噬菌体展示文库进行生物淘选(bio-panning),经包被-结合-洗脱-扩增等循环3轮,对筛选的克隆ELISA鉴定,并通过剂量依赖实验验证其结合特异性.最后提取DNA测序,确定模拟肽氨基酸序列.结果:3轮筛选结束,得到2个亲和力较强的十二肽序列TKNMLSL-PVGPG和HSLKHTQMSYSS.结论:经过生物筛选得到模拟多肽序列,利用噬菌体展示技术筛选糖类抗原的模拟肽具有可行性,为糖类抗原的研究提供一种新思路.

  1. Amplified protein detection and identification through DNA-conjugated M13 bacteriophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Hun; Domaille, Dylan W; Cha, Jennifer N

    2012-06-26

    Sensitive protein detection and accurate identification continues to be in great demand for disease screening in clinical and laboratory settings. For these diagnostics to be of clinical value, it is necessary to develop sensors that have high sensitivity but favorable cost-to-benefit ratios. However, many of these sensing platforms are thermally unstable or require significant materials synthesis, engineering, or fabrication. Recently, we demonstrated that naturally occurring M13 bacteriophage can serve as biological scaffolds for engineering protein diagnostics. These viruses have five copies of the pIII protein, which can bind specifically to target antigens, and thousands of pVIII coat proteins, which can be genetically or chemically modified to react with signal-producing materials, such as plasmon-shifting gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). In this report, we show that DNA-conjugated M13 bacteriophage can act as inexpensive protein sensors that can rapidly induce a color change in the presence of a target protein yet also offer the ability to identify the detected antigen in a separate step. Many copies of a specific DNA oligonucleotide were appended to each virus to create phage-DNA conjugates that can hybridize with DNA-conjugated gold nanoparticles. In the case of a colorimetric positive result, the identity of the antigen can also be easily determined by using a DNA microarray. This saves precious resources by establishing a rapid, quantitative method to first screen for the presence of antigen followed by a highly specific typing assay if necessary.

  2. M13-templated magnetic nanoparticles for targeted in vivo imaging of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Debadyuti; Lee, Youjin; Thomas, Stephanie; Kohli, Aditya G.; Yun, Dong Soo; Belcher, Angela M.; Kelly, Kimberly A.

    2012-10-01

    Molecular imaging allows clinicians to visualize the progression of tumours and obtain relevant information for patient diagnosis and treatment. Owing to their intrinsic optical, electrical and magnetic properties, nanoparticles are promising contrast agents for imaging dynamic molecular and cellular processes such as protein-protein interactions, enzyme activity or gene expression. Until now, nanoparticles have been engineered with targeting ligands such as antibodies and peptides to improve tumour specificity and uptake. However, excessive loading of ligands can reduce the targeting capabilities of the ligand and reduce the ability of the nanoparticle to bind to a finite number of receptors on cells. Increasing the number of nanoparticles delivered to cells by each targeting molecule would lead to higher signal-to-noise ratios and would improve image contrast. Here, we show that M13 filamentous bacteriophage can be used as a scaffold to display targeting ligands and multiple nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging of cancer cells and tumours in mice. Monodisperse iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles assemble along the M13 coat, and its distal end is engineered to display a peptide that targets SPARC glycoprotein, which is overexpressed in various cancers. Compared with nanoparticles that are directly functionalized with targeting peptides, our approach improves contrast because each SPARC-targeting molecule delivers a large number of nanoparticles into the cells. Moreover, the targeting ligand and nanoparticles could be easily exchanged for others, making this platform attractive for in vivo high-throughput screening and molecular detection.

  3. M13-templated magnetic nanoparticles for targeted in vivo imaging of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Debadyuti; Lee, Youjin; Thomas, Stephanie; Kohli, Aditya G; Yun, Dong Soo; Belcher, Angela M; Kelly, Kimberly A

    2012-10-01

    Molecular imaging allows clinicians to visualize the progression of tumours and obtain relevant information for patient diagnosis and treatment. Owing to their intrinsic optical, electrical and magnetic properties, nanoparticles are promising contrast agents for imaging dynamic molecular and cellular processes such as protein-protein interactions, enzyme activity or gene expression. Until now, nanoparticles have been engineered with targeting ligands such as antibodies and peptides to improve tumour specificity and uptake. However, excessive loading of ligands can reduce the targeting capabilities of the ligand and reduce the ability of the nanoparticle to bind to a finite number of receptors on cells. Increasing the number of nanoparticles delivered to cells by each targeting molecule would lead to higher signal-to-noise ratios and would improve image contrast. Here, we show that M13 filamentous bacteriophage can be used as a scaffold to display targeting ligands and multiple nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging of cancer cells and tumours in mice. Monodisperse iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles assemble along the M13 coat, and its distal end is engineered to display a peptide that targets SPARC glycoprotein, which is overexpressed in various cancers. Compared with nanoparticles that are directly functionalized with targeting peptides, our approach improves contrast because each SPARC-targeting molecule delivers a large number of nanoparticles into the cells. Moreover, the targeting ligand and nanoparticles could be easily exchanged for others, making this platform attractive for in vivo high-throughput screening and molecular detection.

  4. Screening, identification and significance of the phage-display random 7 amino acid peptide specific to the sera of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus%系统性红斑狼疮患者血清特异性的噬菌体7肽的筛选、鉴定及其意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王垚; 钟照华; 张凤民; 苏丽菊; 李辉; 刘彦虹; 翟爱霞; 考文萍; 吴静; 李文辉; 胡云龙

    2010-01-01

    Objective To screen and identify the phage-display random 7 amino acid peptide specific to the systemic lupus erythematosus(SLE) and analyze its practical significance. Methods Using the phage random 7 peptide library screening, the SLE specific phage clones are obtained after binding with the mixture of sera from 30 SLE patients and 30 normal controls as ligand respectively. Then the Dot-ELISA is used to identify the SLE specific phage clones reactive to sera of the SLE patients and normal controls individually. Finally the identified phage-display random 7 amino acid peptides are sequenced and it's homology with the antigenic epitope of human being and other are also analyzed. Results Total 12 of the phage-display random 7 amino acid peptide are obtained by phage peptide library screening and the Dot-ELISA identification. Sequence analysis shows that the identified phage-display random 7 amino acid peptide epitope have homology with E. coli, Salmonella and human immunodeficiency virus, but not with that of human being. Conclusion SLE-specific peptides screened by phage random peptide library maybe used to diagnosis the SLE. Meanwhile, the antibodies in SLE patients which are combined with the Pathogen epitope, suggest that SLE maybe relate to pathogen infection.%目的 筛选和鉴定与系统性红斑狼疮(systemic lupus erythematosus,SLE)患者血清特异性结合的噬菌体7肽,并分析其实际意义.方法 分别选取正常人及SLE患者血清各30例,先后用正常人混合血清及SLE患者混合血清作为筛选配基,对噬菌体随机7肽库进行亲和筛选、扩增,获得SLE血清特异性结合的噬菌体克隆,并用患者混合血清进行Dot-ELISA实验鉴定获得的噬菌体克隆,进而分别用SLE患者及正常人血清各12例进一步鉴定阳性噬菌体的混合克隆,确定阳性噬菌体克隆与个体血清之间的结合情况;并对最终鉴定的噬菌体克隆进行测序与比对分析.结果 筛选到与SLE患者混合

  5. Bacteria, phages and septicemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ausra Gaidelyte

    Full Text Available The use of phages is an attractive option to battle antibiotic resistant bacteria in certain bacterial infections, but the role of phage ecology in bacterial infections is obscure. Here we surveyed the phage ecology in septicemia, the most severe type of bacterial infection. We observed that the majority of the bacterial isolates from septicemia patients spontaneously secreted phages active against other isolates of the same bacterial strain, but not to the strain causing the disease. Such phages were also detected in the initial blood cultures, indicating that phages are circulating in the blood at the onset of sepsis. The fact that most of the septicemic bacterial isolates carry functional prophages suggests an active role of phages in bacterial infections. Apparently, prophages present in sepsis-causing bacterial clones play a role in clonal selection during bacterial invasion.

  6. Two novel neutralizing antigenic epitopes of the s1 subunit protein of a QX-like avian infectious bronchitis virus strain Sczy3 as revealed using a phage display peptide library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Nianli; Xia, Jing; Wang, Fuyan; Duan, Zhenzhen; Miao, Dan; Yan, Qigui; Cao, Sanjie; Wen, Xintian; Liu, Ping; Huang, Yong

    2015-11-15

    The spike (S) protein of the infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) plays a central role in the pathogenicity, the immune antibody production, serotype and the tissue tropism. In this study, we generate 11 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against S1 subunit of IBV Sczy3 strain, and two mAbs 1D5 and 6A12 were positive in indirect ELISA against both His-S1 protein and the purified whole viral antigen. MAb 6A12 and 1D5 could recognized by other 10 IBV strains (IBVs) from five different genotypes, except that 1D5 had a relatively low reaction with two of the 10 tested IBVs. End-point neutralizing assay performed in chicken embro kidney (CEK) cells revealed that the neutralization titer of 6A12 and 1D5 against Sczy3 reached 1:44.7 and 1:40.6, respectively. After screening a phage display peptide library and peptide scanning, we identified two linear B-cell epitopes that were recognized by the mAbs 1D5 and 6A12, which corresponded to the amino acid sequences (87)PPQGMAW(93) and (412)IQTRTEP(418), respectively, in the IBV S1 subunit. Sequences comparison revealed that epitope (412)IQTRTEP(418) was conserved among IBVs, while the epitope (87)PPQGMAW(93) was relatively variable among IBVs. The novel mAbs and the epitopes identified will be useful for developing diagnostic assays for IBV infections.

  7. 噬菌体随机肽库技术在肿瘤靶向治疗中的应用%Application of phage random peptide library in tumour targeted therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢松丽; 刘杞

    2008-01-01

    肿瘤的保守治疗主要是化疗及放疗,化疗在作用于肿瘤的同时也损害了健康的组织和器官.靶向治疗只针对肿瘤组织,有较好的特异性和靶向性,将成为治疗肿瘤的主要方法.靶向治疗的关键是特异性载体的构建,利用噬菌体随机肽库技术筛选出的肽分子小、组织穿透性好,能成为理想的载体.此技术简便易行、分离纯化效率高,必将对肿瘤靶向治疗产生深远影响.%Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are main methods of tumor conservative treatments,but chemotherapy damages healthy tissues and organs while treats tumour.Targeted therapy which aims directly at the tumour owns better specificity and targeting,and it will be the major treatment of tumour.The primary problem of targeted therapy is construction of specific carrier.By phage random peptide library we can obtain peptide with smaller molecule and better penetrativity,which can be used as an ideal carrier.This technology is convenient and efficient.It will contribute greatly to the treatment of tumour.

  8. 68Ga-labelled phage-display selected peptides as tracers for positron emission tomography imaging of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm-associated infections: Selection, radiolabelling and preliminary biological evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karin M.; Kyneb, Majbritt H.; Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen

    2016-01-01

    stable in product formulation, whereas 68Ga-A8-K-DOTA was unstable. The S. aureus binding of 68Ga-A11-GSGK-DOTA and 68Ga-A9-K-DOTA was observed in vitro, though blocking of the binding was not possible by excess of cold peptide. The 68Ga-A9-K-DOTA was degraded slowly in vitro, while the combined in vivo......Introduction: In humans, Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of skin and deep-sited infections, often associated with the formation of biofilms. The purpose of the study was to identify and 68Ga-label phage-display peptides selected against S. aureus biofilm and evaluate their potential......-N,N′,N″,N‴-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) conjugated via a lysine linker (K), and for A11 also a glycine-serine-glycine spacer (GSG). The 68Ga-labelling of A8-K-DOTA, A9-K-DOTA, and A11-GSGK-DOTA were optimized in regards to: pre-purification methods of generator eluates, labelling solution, time, and temperature, as well...

  9. Packing of coat protein amphipathic and transmembrane helices in filamentous bacteriophage M13: role of small residues in protein oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, K A; Glibowicka, M; Li, Z; Li, H; Khan, A R; Chen, Y M; Wang, J; Marvin, D A; Deber, C M

    1995-09-08

    Filamentous bacteriophage M13, an important cloning and phage display vector, is encapsulated by ca 2700 copies of its 50-residue major coat protein (gene 8). This protein occurs as a membrane protein while stably inserted into its E. coli host inner membrane, and as a coat protein upon assembly and packing onto phage DNA in the lipid-free virion. To examine the specific protein-protein interactions underlying these processes, we used a combination of randomized and saturation mutagenesis of the entire gene 8 to assess the susceptibility of each position to mutation. In the resulting library of ca 100 viable M13 mutants, "small" residues (Ala,Gly,Ser), which constitute the non-polar face of the N-terminal amphipathic helical segment, and a face of the hydrophobic (effective transmembrane) helical segment, were found to be highly conserved. These results support a model in which coat protein packing is stabilized by the presence within each protein subunit of two "oligomerization segments", i.e. specific helical regions with faces rich in small residues which function to promote the close approach of alpha-helices.

  10. Ff-nano, Short Functionalized Nanorods Derived from Ff (f1, fd or M13 Filamentous Bacteriophage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia eSattar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available F-specific filamentous phage of Escherichia coli (Ff: f1, M13 or fd are long thin filaments (860 nm x 6 nm. They have been a major workhorse in display technologies and bionanotechnology; however, some applications are limited by the high length-to-diameter ratio of Ff. Furthermore, use of functionalized Ff outside of laboratory containment is in part hampered by the fact that they are genetically modified viruses. We have now developed a system for production and purification of very short functionalized Ff-phage-derived nanorods, named Ff-nano, that are only 50 nm in length. In contrast to standard Ff-derived vectors that replicate in E. coli and contain antibiotic-resistance genes, Ff-nano are protein DNA complexes that cannot replicate on their own and do not contain any coding sequences. These nanorods show an increased resistance to heating at 70 °C in 1 % SDS in comparison to the full-length Ff phage of the same coat composition. We demonstrate that functionalized Ff-nano particles are suitable for application as detection particles in sensitive and quantitative dipstick lateral flow diagnostic assay for human plasma fibronectin.

  11. Ff-nano, short functionalized nanorods derived from Ff (f1, fd, or M13) filamentous bacteriophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, Sadia; Bennett, Nicholas J; Wen, Wesley X; Guthrie, Jenness M; Blackwell, Len F; Conway, James F; Rakonjac, Jasna

    2015-01-01

    F-specific filamentous phage of Escherichia coli (Ff: f1, M13, or fd) are long thin filaments (860 nm × 6 nm). They have been a major workhorse in display technologies and bionanotechnology; however, some applications are limited by the high length-to-diameter ratio of Ff. Furthermore, use of functionalized Ff outside of laboratory containment is in part hampered by the fact that they are genetically modified viruses. We have now developed a system for production and purification of very short functionalized Ff-phage-derived nanorods, named Ff-nano, that are only 50 nm in length. In contrast to standard Ff-derived vectors that replicate in E. coli and contain antibiotic-resistance genes, Ff-nano are protein-DNA complexes that cannot replicate on their own and do not contain any coding sequences. These nanorods show an increased resistance to heating at 70(∘)C in 1% SDS in comparison to the full-length Ff phage of the same coat composition. We demonstrate that functionalized Ff-nano particles are suitable for application as detection particles in sensitive and quantitative "dipstick" lateral flow diagnostic assay for human plasma fibronectin.

  12. Globular cluster star classification: Application to M13

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caimmi R.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Starting from recent determination of Fe, O, Na abundances on a restricted sample (N = 67 of halo and thick disk stars, a natural and well motivated selection criterion is defined for the classification globular cluster stars. An application is performed to M13 using a sample (N = 113 for which Fe, O, Na abundances have been recently inferred from observations. A comparison is made between the current and earlier M13 star classifications. Both O and Na empirical differential abundance distributions are determined for each class and for the whole sample (with the addition of Fe in the last case and compared with their theoretical counterparts due to cosmic scatter obeying a Gaussian distribution whose parameters are inferred from related subsamples. The occurrence of an agreement between the empirical and theoretical distributions is interpreted as absence of significant chemical evolution and vice versa. The procedure is repeated with regard to four additional classes depending on whether oxygen and sodium abundance is above (stage CE or below (stage AF a selected threshold. Both O and Na empirical differential abundance distributions, related to the whole sample, exhibit a linear fit for the AF and CE stage. Within the errors, the oxygen slope for the CE stage is equal and of opposite sign with respect to the sodium slope for AF stage, while the contrary holds when dealing with the oxygen slope for the AF stage with respect to the sodium slope for the CE stage. In the light of simple models of chemical evolution applied to M13, oxygen depletion appears to be mainly turned into sodium enrichment for [O/H]≥ -1.35 and [Na/H]≤ -1.45, while one or more largely preferred channels occur for [O/H] -1.45. In addition, the primordial to the current M13 mass ratio can be inferred from the true sodium yield in units of the sodium solar abundance. Though the above results are mainly qualitative due to large (-+1.5 dex uncertainties in abundance

  13. Interaction Analysis through Proteomic Phage Display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustav N. Sundell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phage display is a powerful technique for profiling specificities of peptide binding domains. The method is suited for the identification of high-affinity ligands with inhibitor potential when using highly diverse combinatorial peptide phage libraries. Such experiments further provide consensus motifs for genome-wide scanning of ligands of potential biological relevance. A complementary but considerably less explored approach is to display expression products of genomic DNA, cDNA, open reading frames (ORFs, or oligonucleotide libraries designed to encode defined regions of a target proteome on phage particles. One of the main applications of such proteomic libraries has been the elucidation of antibody epitopes. This review is focused on the use of proteomic phage display to uncover protein-protein interactions of potential relevance for cellular function. The method is particularly suited for the discovery of interactions between peptide binding domains and their targets. We discuss the largely unexplored potential of this method in the discovery of domain-motif interactions of potential biological relevance.

  14. A novel method to identify and characterise peptide mimotopes of heat shock protein 70-associated antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaiz, Blanca; Madrigal-Estebas, Laura; Todryk, Stephen; James, Tharappel C; Doherty, Derek G; Bond, Ursula

    2006-04-08

    The heat shock protein, Hsp70, has been shown to play an important role in tumour immunity. Vaccination with Hsp70-peptide complexes (Hsp70-PCs), isolated from autologous tumour cells, can induce protective immune responses. We have developed a novel method to identify synthetic mimic peptides of Hsp70-PCs and to test their ability to activate T-cells. Peptides (referred to as "recognisers") that bind to Hsp70-PCs from the human breast carcinoma cell line, MDA-MB-231, were identified by bio-panning a random peptide M13 phage display library. Synthetic recogniser peptides were subsequently used as bait in a reverse bio-panning experiment to identify potential Hsp70-PC mimic peptides. The ability of the recogniser and mimic peptides to prime human lymphocyte responses against tumour cell antigens was tested by stimulating lymphocytes with autologous peptide-loaded monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). Priming and subsequent stimulation with either the recogniser or mimic peptide resulted in interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) secretion by the lymphocytes. Furthermore, DCs loaded with Hsp70, Hsp70-PC or the recogniser or the mimic peptide primed the lymphocytes to respond to soluble extracts from breast cells. These results highlight the potential application of synthetic peptide-mimics of Hsp70-PCs, as modulators of the immune response against tumours.

  15. Enrichment of an in vivo phage display repertoire by subtraction for easy identification of pathology biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    karina Vargas Sanchez

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion. This physical subtraction discarded from a complex repertoire the non-specific selected ligands. STRATEGY 1 Three rounds of in vivo phage peptide selection in EAE female Lewis rats ("EAE repertoire" vs controls ("HEALTHY repertoire". 2 DNA subtraction of the most common sequences between «HEALTHY» and «EAE» phage repertoires to obtain a third EAE specific «SUBTRACTION » phage repertoire. 3 Massive sequencing of the three repertoires and bioinformatic analysis to identify the peptides sequences with high EAE specificity. 4 Biological tests of potential EAE specific phage clones with CNS tissues from EAE and Healthy control rats. 5 Biological tests of the EAE specific peptide and phage clones on the BBB in vitro model (hCMEC/D3 cells under inflammatory conditions (IL-1β stimulation. 6 Target separation and identification by cross-link between the selected phage clones and hMEC/D3 endothelial cells targets under IL-1β stimulation vs controls.

  16. Inhibition of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 binding to endocytosis receptors of the low density lipoprotein receptor family by a peptide isolated from a phage displayed library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jan K.; Malmendal, Anders; Schiøtt, Birgit;

    2006-01-01

    (DVPCFGWCQDA) was determined by NMR. A binding site in the so-called flexible joint region of PAI-1 was suggested by molecular modelling and validated through binding studies with various competitors and site-directed mutagenesis of PAI-1. The peptide with an N-terminal biotin inhibited the binding of the u...

  17. Mimotopes for lupus-derived anti-DNA and nucleosome-specific autoantibodies selected from random peptide phage display libraries: facts and follies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieker, J.W.C.; Sun, Y.J.; Jacobs, C.W.M.; Putterman, C.; Monestier, M.; Muller, S.; Vlag, J. van der; Berden, J.H.M.

    2005-01-01

    Autoantibodies against chromatin are the most characteristic serological feature in SLE patients. Anti-dsDNA and nucleosome-specific antibodies are associated with glomerulonephritis, the most serious manifestation of SLE. Identification of peptides mimicking conformational epitopes (so-called mimot

  18. Panning and identification of antagonistic active peptides specifically bin-ding to the first and second extracellular membrane loops of rat CCR5 by technique of phage display peptide library%应用噬菌体展示肽库技术淘选大鼠 CCR5膜外第一、二胞外环特异性结合的活性拮抗肽与初步鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘思雪; 胡梅; 叶小研; 黄花荣; 钟英强

    2015-01-01

    [ ABSTRACT] AIM: To pan the active peptides which specifically bound to the first and second extracellular membrane loops of rat CC chemokine receptor 5 ( CCR5 ) .METHODS: The technique of phage display peptide library was used and binding ability of the peptides was identified.The amino acid sequences of the first and second extracellular loops of rat CCR5 were searched in the protein database and chemically synthesized corresponding linear peptides were used as targets in the biopanning.After 3 to 4 rounds of screening with Ph.D.TM-7 Phage Display Peptide Library were per-formed, the specific phages were collected and primarily identified by ELISA.RESULTS:The sequences of the peptides displayed on the selected phages were GHWKVWL and HYIDFRW, both of them exhibited positive in phage binding ELISA and the binding to phages and targets were concentration dependent and saturable.CONCLUSION:Two antagonis-tic active peptides specifically binding to CCR5 were successfully obtained by the technique of phage display peptide librar-y, and the binding ability to the first and second extracellular membrane loops of rat CCR5 were proved in vitro.%目的:利用噬菌体展示肽库技术淘选与大鼠CC趋化因子受体5( CCR5)膜外第一、二胞外环特异性结合的短肽,并鉴定其与CCR5的结合能力。方法:在蛋白质数据库中查得大鼠CCR5第一、二胞外环的氨基酸序列,合成相应的线性短肽作为淘选的靶分子,利用噬菌体展示7肽文库进行3~4轮淘选,用ELISA法鉴定所选肽与靶分子的结合,并测定其与浓度的关系。结果:与CCR5第一、二胞外环特异性结合的噬菌体展示的短肽序列分别为GHWKVWL和HYIDFRW,ELISA鉴定呈阳性反应,且短肽与靶分子的结合具有浓度依赖性和可饱和性。结论:利用噬菌体展示技术成功获得了2条CCR5特异性结合的短肽,并在体外证明其可与CCR5第一、二胞外环具有结合能力。

  19. Screening of peptides binding to HpaA of Helicobacter pylori from a random phage library%与幽门螺杆菌HpaA定植相关的功能性亲和肽的筛选

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱俊谕; 向一郎; 李琳; 杨厅; 潘剑珍; 王庆林; 吴翔

    2013-01-01

    目的 HpaA是幽门螺杆菌(Helicobacter pylori)的主要粘附因子,参与幽门螺杆菌在人胃黏膜上的定植过程.特异性阻断HpaA与人胃上皮细胞的粘附,可能成为阻断Hp感染的新方法,从而弥补常规治疗中出现的毒副作用大、耐药性等问题.方法 以人工合成的HpaA主要结构域KRTIQKKRTIQK多肽为靶标,应用噬菌体随机十二肽库进行筛选,经过3轮淘选,提取阳性噬菌体克隆ssDNA,测序并进行序列分析.通过相应的分析软件对亲和肽进行分析比对.结果 通过多次筛选与富集,获得了与HpaA相互作用的功能分子ASPH、EGR2.运用软件模拟发现ASPH、EGR2均能与HpaA分子高度吻合.结论 通过噬菌体肽库技术筛选出与幽门螺杆菌主要粘附分子HpaA相互作用的2个功能分子,可能参与幽门螺杆菌的定植与致病过程,为进一步研究幽门螺杆菌在人胃内致病的机制和多肽治疗方法提供了依据.%Objective Helicobacter pylori adhesin A (HpaA) is the main adhesion factor of H.pylori and is involved in the bacterial colonization of human gastric mucosa.Specifically inhibiting the adhesion of H.pylori to human epithelial cells may be a possible way to inhibit H.pylori infection.This treatment could also deal with other issues such as adverse reactions to conventional treatment and drug resistance.Methods Short synthetic peptides of HpaA's major domain KRTIQK were used as a target to screen for compatible short peptides from a phage display library.Positive phage clones were obtained by 3 rounds of biopanning,followed by single-stranded DNA extraction and sequencing.Results Repeated screening and enrichment yielded the functional molecules ASPH and EGR2,both of which interact with HpaA.A software simulation indicated that ASPH and EGR2 closely bind to HpaA molecules.Conclusion Two functional candidates that interact with HpaA were identified from a phage display library.This lays the theoretic foundation for

  20. Phage Particles as Vaccine Delivery Vehicles: Concepts, Applications and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Narjes; Abediankenari, Saeid

    2015-01-01

    The development of new strategies for vaccine delivery for generating protective and long-lasting immune responses has become an expanding field of research. In the last years, it has been recognized that bacteriophages have several potential applications in the biotechnology and medical fields because of their intrinsic advantages, such as ease of manipulation and large-scale production. Over the past two decades, bacteriophages have gained special attention as vehicles for protein/peptide or DNA vaccine delivery. In fact, whole phage particles are used as vaccine delivery vehicles to achieve the aim of enhanced immunization. In this strategy, the carried vaccine is protected from environmental damage by phage particles. In this review, phage-based vaccine categories and their development are presented in detail, with discussion of the potential of phage-based vaccines for protection against microbial diseases and cancer treatment. Also reviewed are some recent advances in the field of phage- based vaccines.

  1. High-throughput Identification of Phage-derived Imaging Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A. Kelly

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of phage-displayed peptide libraries is a powerful method for selecting peptides with desired binding properties. However, the validation and prioritization of “hits” obtained from this screening approach remains challenging. Here, we describe the development and testing of a new analysis method to identify and display hits from phage-display experiments and high-throughput enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay screens. We test the method using a phage screen against activated macrophages to develop imaging agents with higher specificity for active disease processes. The new methodology should be useful in identifying phage hits and is extendable to other library screening methods such as small-molecule and nanoparticle libraries.

  2. Is M 13 II-67 really oxygen poor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzes, Artie P.

    1987-05-01

    High-resolution (0.15 A) and high signal-to-noise data for two stars (II-67 and III-56) in M 13 taken with the Hamilton echelle spectrograph and the 3-m telescope at Lick Observatory are presented. Equivalent widths are determined for the O I 6300 A and 6363 A forbidden lines as well as for lines of other ions in this spectral region. Both the oxygen lines in II-67 are weaker than the respective ones in III-56. The equivalent widths suggest that the oxygen abundance in II-67 is deficient by a factor of 3-7 with respect to III-56. These observations confirm the results of a recent study of these objects by Leep, Wallerstein, and Oke (1986).

  3. Peptide arrays for screening cancer specific peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sahar; Mathews, Anu Stella; Byeon, Nara; Lavasanifar, Afsaneh; Kaur, Kamaljit

    2010-09-15

    In this paper, we describe a novel method to screen peptides for specific recognition by cancer cells. Seventy peptides were synthesized on a cellulose membrane in an array format, and a direct method to study the peptide-whole cell interaction was developed. The relative binding affinity of the cells for different peptides with respect to a lead 12-mer p160 peptide, identified by phage display, was evaluated using the CyQUANT fluorescence of the bound cells. Screening allowed identification of at least five new peptides that displayed higher affinity (up to 3-fold) for MDA-MB-435 and MCF-7 human cancer cells compared to the p160 peptide. These peptides showed very little binding to the control (noncancerous) human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Three of these peptides were synthesized separately and labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to study their uptake and interaction with the cancer and control cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry. The results confirmed the high and specific affinity of an 11-mer peptide 11 (RGDPAYQGRFL) and a 10-mer peptide 18 (WXEAAYQRFL) for the cancer cells versus HUVECs. Peptide 11 binds different receptors on target cancer cells as its sequence contains multiple recognition motifs, whereas peptide 18 binds mainly to the putative p160 receptor. The peptide array-whole cell binding assay reported here is a complementary method to phage display for further screening and optimization of cancer targeting peptides for cancer therapy and diagnosis.

  4. Inactivation of Escherichia coli phage by pulsed electric field treatment and analysis of inactivation mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanino, Takanori; Yoshida, Tomoki; Sakai, Kazuki; Ohshima, Takayuki

    2013-03-01

    Inactivation of bacteriophage by pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment, one of the effective procedures for bacteria nonthermal inactivation, was studied. Model phage particles Escherichia coli bacteriophages M13mp18 and λ phage, were successfully inactivated by PEF treatment. The survival ratios of both bacteriophages decreased depending on the PEF treatment time when applied peak voltage was 5 or 7 kV, and the survival ratios after 12 min PEF treatment were 10-4 - 10-5. Electrophoresis analyses of biological molecules of inactivated λ phage detected no degradation of total protein and genomic DNA. These results suggested that the factor of phage inactivation by PEF treatment was not based on the degradation of protein or DNA, but on the destruction of phage particle structure. Sensitivity of E. coli phage to PEF treatment was compared with that of E. coli cell. Phage and MV1184 cell were treated with same condition PEF at 5 kV, respectively. After 12 min treatment, the survival ration of λ phage and MV1184 were 4.0 × 10-5 and 1.7 × 10-3, respectively. The survival ratio of phage was lower than that of MV1184. E. coli cell is more tolerant to inactivation with PEF treatment than coli phage.

  5. Phage therapy: present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikova, S. G.; Tulyakova, E. N.; Moiseeva, I. Y.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, bacteriophages are known to have become an effective alternative to antibiotic drugs. The article describes the current and potential applications of bacteriophages and phage endolysins. Also of interest is the devastating effect of phages on biofilms. The development of phage resistance is touched upon as well. Furthermore, the authors discuss the issue of laying down the rules of rational phage therapy.

  6. Estimating richness from phage metagenomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacteriophages are important drivers of ecosystem functions, yet little is known about the vast majority of phages. Phage metagenomics, or the study of the collective genome of an assemblage of phages, enables the investigation of broad ecological questions in phage communities. One ecological cha...

  7. Phage choice, isolation, and preparation for phage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Jason J; Hyman, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Phage therapy is the use of bacteriophages--viruses that use bacteria as their host cells--as biocontrol agents of bacteria. Currently, phage therapy is garnering renewed interest as bacterial resistance to antibiotics becomes widespread. Historically, phage therapy was largely abandoned in the West in the 1940s due to the advent of chemical antibiotics, and the unreliability of phage-based treatments when compared to antibiotics. The choice of phage strain and the methods of phage preparation are now thought to have been critical to the success or failure of phage therapy trials. Insufficiently virulent phages, especially against actual target bacteria, allow bacteria to survive treatment while poorly prepared phage stocks, even if of sufficiently virulent phages, lack the numbers of viable phages required for adequate treatment. In this review we discuss the factors that determine the methods of isolation, analysis, and identification of phage species for phage therapy. We go on to discuss the various methods available for purifying phages as well as considerations of the degree of purification which is sufficient for various applications. Lastly, we review the current practices used to prepare commercial phage therapy products.

  8. 68Ga-labeled phage-display selected peptides as tracers for positron emission tomography imaging of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm-associated infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karin M; Kyneb, Majbritt H; Alstrup, Aage K O

    2016-01-01

    , while the in vivo plasma stability was analyzed in mice and pigs. Additionally, the whole-body distribution kinetics of (68)Ga-A9-K-DOTA was measured in vivo by PET imaging of pigs and ex vivo in excised mice tissues. RESULTS: The (68)Ga-A9-K-DOTA and (68)Ga-A11-GSGK-DOTA remained stable in product...... formulation, whereas (68)Ga-A8-K-DOTA was unstable. The S. aureus binding of (68)Ga-A11-GSGK-DOTA and (68)Ga-A9-K-DOTA was observed in vitro, though blocking of the binding was not possible by excess of cold peptide. The (68)Ga-A9-K-DOTA was degraded slowly in vitro, while the combined in vivo evaluation...

  9. Hybrid Nanomaterial Complexes for Advanced Phage-guided Gene Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teerapong Yata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing nanomaterials that are effective, safe, and selective for gene transfer applications is challenging. Bacteriophages (phage, viruses that infect bacteria only, have shown promise for targeted gene transfer applications. Unfortunately, limited progress has been achieved in improving their potential to overcome mammalian cellular barriers. We hypothesized that chemical modification of the bacteriophage capsid could be applied to improve targeted gene delivery by phage vectors into mammalian cells. Here, we introduce a novel hybrid system consisting of two classes of nanomaterial systems, cationic polymers and M13 bacteriophage virus particles genetically engineered to display a tumor-targeting ligand and carry a transgene cassette. We demonstrate that the phage complex with cationic polymers generates positively charged phage and large aggregates that show enhanced cell surface attachment, buffering capacity, and improved transgene expression while retaining cell type specificity. Moreover, phage/polymer complexes carrying a therapeutic gene achieve greater cancer cell killing than phage alone. This new class of hybrid nanomaterial platform can advance targeted gene delivery applications by bacteriophage.

  10. DNA Libraries for the Construction of Phage Libraries: Statistical and Structural Requirements and Synthetic Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lindner

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Peptide-based molecular probes identified by bacteriophage (phage display technology expand the peptide repertoire for in vivo diagnosis and therapy of cancer. Numerous peptides that bind cancer-associated antigens have been discovered by panning phage libraries. However, until now only few of the peptides selected by phage display have entered clinical applications. The success of phage derived peptides essentially depends on the quality of the library screened. This review summarizes the methods to achieve highly homogenous libraries that cover a maximal sequence space. Biochemical and chemical strategies for the synthesis of DNA libraries and the techniques for their integration into the viral genome are discussed in detail. A focus is set on the methods that enable the exclusion of disturbing sequences. In addition, the parameters that define the variability, the minimal numbers of copies per library and the use of alternating panning cycles to avoid the loss of selected hits are evaluated.

  11. DNA libraries for the construction of phage libraries: statistical and structural requirements and synthetic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Thomas; Kolmar, Harald; Haberkorn, Uwe; Mier, Walter

    2011-02-15

    Peptide-based molecular probes identified by bacteriophage (phage) display technology expand the peptide repertoire for in vivo diagnosis and therapy of cancer. Numerous peptides that bind cancer-associated antigens have been discovered by panning phage libraries. However, until now only few of the peptides selected by phage display have entered clinical applications. The success of phage derived peptides essentially depends on the quality of the library screened. This review summarizes the methods to achieve highly homogenous libraries that cover a maximal sequence space. Biochemical and chemical strategies for the synthesis of DNA libraries and the techniques for their integration into the viral genome are discussed in detail. A focus is set on the methods that enable the exclusion of disturbing sequences. In addition, the parameters that define the variability, the minimal numbers of copies per library and the use of alternating panning cycles to avoid the loss of selected hits are evaluated.

  12. Distribution of mating-type alleles and M13 PCR markers in the black leaf spot fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis of bananas in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, C B; Miranda, E C; Hanada, R E; Sousa, N R; Gasparotto, L; Soares, M A; Silva, G F

    2013-02-08

    The fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis is the causative agent of black sigatoka, which is one of the most destructive diseases of banana plants. Infection with this pathogen results in underdeveloped fruit, with no commercial value. We analyzed the distribution of the M. fijiensis mating-type system and its genetic variability using M13 phage DNA markers. We found a 1:1 distribution of mating-type alleles, indicating MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 idiomorphs. A polymorphism analysis using three different primers for M13 markers showed that only the M13 minisatellite primers generated polymorphic products. We then utilized this polymorphism to characterize 40 isolates from various Brazilian states. The largest genetic distances were found between isolates from the same location and between isolates from different parts of the country. Therefore, there was no correlation between the genetic similarity and the geographic origin of the isolates. The M13 marker was used to generate genetic fingerprints for five isolates; these fingerprints were compared with the band profiles obtained from inter-simple sequence repeat (UBC861) and inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism analyses. We found that the M13 marker was more effective than the other two markers for differentiating these isolates.

  13. Molecular detection via hybrid peptide-semiconductor photonic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estephan, E.; Saab, M.-b.; Martin, M.; Cloitre, T.; Larroque, C.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.; Malvezzi, A. M.; Gergely, C.

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the possibilities to support device functionality that includes strongly confined and localized light emission and detection processes within nano/micro-structured semiconductors for biosensing applications. The interface between biological molecules and semiconductor surfaces, yet still under-explored is a key issue for improving biomolecular recognition in devices. We report on the use of adhesion peptides, elaborated via combinatorial phage-display libraries for controlled placement of biomolecules, leading to user-tailored hybrid photonic systems for molecular detection. An M13 bacteriophage library has been used to screen 1010 different peptides against various semiconductors to finally isolate specific peptides presenting a high binding capacity for the target surfaces. When used to functionalize porous silicon microcavities (PSiM) and GaAs/AlGaAs photonic crystals, we observe the formation of extremely thin (detection was monitored via both linear and nonlinear optical measurements. Our linear reflectance spectra demonstrate an enhanced detection resolution via PSiM devices, when functionalized with the Si-specific peptide. Molecular capture at even lower concentrations (femtomols) is possible via the second harmonic generation of GaAs/AlGaAs photonic crystals when functionalized with GaAs-specific peptides. Our work demonstrates the outstanding value of adhesion peptides as interface linkers between semiconductors and biological molecules. They assure an enhanced molecular detection via both linear and nonlinear answers of photonic crystals.

  14. Peptide ligands specific to the oxidized form of escherichia coli thioredoxin.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholle, M. D.; Banach, B. S.; Hamdan, S. M.; Richardson, C. C.; Kay, B. K.; Biosciences Division; Amunix, Inc.; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago; Harvard Medical School

    2008-11-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a highly conserved redox protein involved in several essential cellular processes. In this study, our goal was to isolate peptide ligands to Escherichia coli Trx that mimic protein-protein interactions, specifically the T7 polymerase-Trx interaction. To do this, we subjected Trx to affinity selection against a panel of linear and cysteine-constrained peptides using M13 phage display. A novel cyclized conserved peptide sequence, with a motif of C(D/N/S/T/G)D(S/T)-hydrophobic-C-X-hydrophobic-P, was isolated to Trx. These peptides bound specifically to the E. coli Trx when compared to the human and spirulina homologs. An alanine substitution of the active site cysteines (CGPC) resulted in a significant loss of peptide binding affinity to the Cys-32 mutant. The peptides were also characterized in the context of Trx's role as a processivity factor of the T7 DNA polymerase (gp5). As the interaction between gp5 and Trx normally takes place under reducing conditions, which might interfere with the conformation of the disulfide-bridged peptides, we made use of a 22 residue deletion mutant of gp5 in the thioredoxin binding domain (gp5{Delta}22) that bypassed the requirements of reducing conditions to interact with Trx. A competition study revealed that the peptide selectively inhibits the interaction of gp5{Delta}22 with Trx, under oxidizing conditions, with an IC50 of {approx} 10 {micro}M.

  15. Genetically manipulated phages with improved pH resistance for oral administration in veterinary medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobrega, Franklin L.; Costa, Ana Rita; Santos, José F.; Siliakus, Melvin F.; van Lent, Jan W. M.; Kengen, Servé W. M.; Azeredo, Joana; Kluskens, Leon D.

    2016-01-01

    Orally administered phages to control zoonotic pathogens face important challenges, mainly related to the hostile conditions found in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). These include temperature, salinity and primarily pH, which is exceptionally low in certain compartments. Phage survival under these conditions can be jeopardized and undermine treatment. Strategies like encapsulation have been attempted with relative success, but are typically complex and require several optimization steps. Here we report a simple and efficient alternative, consisting in the genetic engineering of phages to display lipids on their surfaces. Escherichia coli phage T7 was used as a model and the E. coli PhoE signal peptide was genetically fused to its major capsid protein (10 A), enabling phospholipid attachment to the phage capsid. The presence of phospholipids on the mutant phages was confirmed by High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography, Dynamic Light Scattering and phospholipase assays. The stability of phages was analysed in simulated GIT conditions, demonstrating improved stability of the mutant phages with survival rates 102–107 pfu.mL−1 higher than wild-type phages. Our work demonstrates that phage engineering can be a good strategy to improve phage tolerance to GIT conditions, having promising application for oral administration in veterinary medicine. PMID:27976713

  16. Induction of immunity in sheep to Fasciola hepatica with mimotopes of cathepsin L selected from a phage display library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa-Mancera, A; Quiroz-Romero, H; Correa, D; Ibarra, F; Reyes-Pérez, M; Reyes-Vivas, H; López-Velázquez, G; Gazarian, K; Gazarian, T; Alonso, R A

    2008-10-01

    An M13 phage random 12-mers peptide library was used to screen cathepsin L mimotopes of Fasciola hepatica and to evaluate their immunogenicity in sheep. Seven clones showed positive reactivity to a rabbit anti-cathepsin L1/L2 antiserum in ELISA, and their amino acid sequences deduced by DNA sequencing were tentatively mapped on the protein. Twenty sheep were randomly allocated into 4 groups of 5 animals each, for immunization with 1x10(14) phage particles of clones 1, 20, a mixture of 7 clones and PBS, without adjuvant at the beginning, and 4 weeks later. All groups were challenged with 300 metacercariae at week 6 and slaughtered 16 weeks later. The mean worm burdens after challenge were reduced by 47.61% and 33.91% in sheep vaccinated with clones 1 and 20, respectively; no effect was observed in animals inoculated with the clone mixture. Also, a significant reduction in worm size and burden was observed for those sheep immunized with clone 1. Animals receiving clone 20, showed a significant reduction in egg output. Immunization induced a reduction of egg viability ranging from 58.92 to 82.11%. Furthermore, vaccinated animals produced clone-specific antibodies which were boosted after challenge with metacercariae of F. hepatica.

  17. Plasmids and packaging cell lines for use in phage display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2012-07-24

    The invention relates to a novel phagemid display system for packaging phagemid DNA into phagemid particles which completely avoids the use of helper phage. The system of the invention incorporates the use of bacterial packaging cell lines which have been transformed with helper plasmids containing all required phage proteins but not the packaging signals. The absence of packaging signals in these helper plasmids prevents their DNA from being packaged in the bacterial cell, which provides a number of significant advantages over the use of both standard and modified helper phage. Packaged phagemids expressing a protein or peptide of interest, in fusion with a phage coat protein such as g3p, are generated simply by transfecting phagemid into the packaging cell line.

  18. Phage as a Genetically Modifiable Supramacromolecule in Chemistry, Materials and Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Binrui; Yang, Mingying; Mao, Chuanbin

    2016-06-21

    Filamentous bacteriophage (phage) is a genetically modifiable supramacromolecule. It can be pictured as a semiflexible nanofiber (∼900 nm long and ∼8 nm wide) made of a DNA core and a protein shell with the former genetically encoding the latter. Although phage bioengineering and phage display techniques were developed before the 1990s, these techniques have not been widely used for chemistry, materials, and biomedical research from the perspective of supramolecular chemistry until recently. Powered by our expertise in displaying a foreign peptide on its surface through engineering phage DNA, we have employed phage to identify target-specific peptides, construct novel organic-inorganic nanohybrids, develop biomaterials for disease treatment, and generate bioanalytical methods for disease diagnosis. Compared with conventional biomimetic chemistry, phage-based supramolecular chemistry represents a new frontier in chemistry, materials science, and medicine. In this Account, we introduce our recent successful efforts in phage-based supramolecular chemistry, by integrating the unique nanofiber-like phage structure and powerful peptide display techniques into the fields of chemistry, materials science, and medicine: (1) successfully synthesized and assembled silica, hydroxyapatite, and gold nanoparticles using phage templates to form novel functional materials; (2) chemically introduced azo units onto the phage to form photoresponsive functional azo-phage nanofibers via a diazotization reaction between aromatic amino groups and the tyrosine residues genetically displayed on phage surfaces; (3) assembled phage into 2D films for studying the effects of both biochemical (the peptide sequences displayed on the phages) and biophysical (the topographies of the phage films) cues on the proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and identified peptides and topographies that can induce their osteogenic

  19. Ricin Detection Using Phage Displayed Single Domain Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen R. Goldman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Phage-displayed single domain antibodies (sdAb were compared to monomeric solubly expressed sdAb and llama polyclonal antibodies for the detection of ricin. SdAb are comprised of the variable domain derived from camelid heavy chain only antibodies (HcAb. Although HcAb lack variable light chains, they as well as their derivative sdAb are able to bind antigens with high affinity. The small size of sdAb (~16 kDa, while advantageous in many respects, limits the number of labels that can be incorporated. The ability to incorporate multiple labels is a beneficial attribute for reporter elements. Opportunely, sdAb are often selected using phage display methodology. Using sdAb displayed on bacteriophage M13 as the reporter element gives the potential for incorporating a very high number of labels. We have demonstrated the use of both sdAb and phage- displayed sdAb for the detection of ricin using both enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs and Luminex fluid array assays. The phage-displayed sdAb led to five to ten fold better detection of ricin in both the ELISA and Luminex assays, resulting in limits of detection of 1 ng/mL and 64 pg/mL respectively. The phage-displayed sdAb were also dramatically more effective for the visualization of binding to target in nitrocellulose dot blot assays, a method frequently used for epitope mapping.

  20. Purification of phage display-modified bacteriophage T4 by affinity chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figura Grzegorz

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Affinity chromatography is one of the most efficient protein purification strategies. This technique comprises a one-step procedure with a purification level in the order of several thousand-fold, adaptable for various proteins, differentiated in their size, shape, charge, and other properties. The aim of this work was to verify the possibility of applying affinity chromatography in bacteriophage purification, with the perspective of therapeutic purposes. T4 is a large, icosahedral phage that may serve as an efficient display platform for foreign peptides or proteins. Here we propose a new method of T4 phage purification by affinity chromatography after its modification with affinity tags (GST and Histag by in vivo phage display. As any permanent introduction of extraneous DNA into a phage genome is strongly unfavourable for medical purposes, integration of foreign motifs with the phage genome was not applied. The phage was propagated in bacteria expressing fusions of the phage protein Hoc with affinity tags from bacterial plasmids, independently from the phage expression system. Results Elution profiles of phages modified with the specific affinity motifs (compared to non-specific phages document their binding to the affinity resins and effective elution with standard competitive agents. Non-specific binding was also observed, but was 102-105 times weaker than the specific one. GST-modified bacteriophages were also effectively released from glutathione Sepharose by proteolytic cleavage. The possibility of proteolytic release was designed at the stage of expression vector construction. Decrease in LPS content in phage preparations was dependent on the washing intensity; intensive washing resulted in preparations of 11-40 EU/ml. Conclusions Affinity tags can be successfully incorporated into the T4 phage capsid by the in vivo phage display technique and they strongly elevate bacteriophage affinity to a specific resin. Affinity

  1. Different Characteristics of the Bright Branches of the Globular Clusters M3 and M13

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, D H; Jeon, Y B; Sim, K J; Cho, Dong-Hwan; Lee, Sang-Gak; Jeon, Young-Beom; Sim, Kyung Jin

    2005-01-01

    We carried out wide-field BVI CCD photometric observations of the GCs M3 and M13 using the BOAO 1.8 m telescope equipped with a 2K CCD. We present CMDs of M3 and M13. We have found AGB bumps at V = 14.85 for M3 at V = 14.25 for M13. It is found that AGB stars in M3 are more concentrated near the bump, while those in M13 are scattered along the AGB sequence. We identified the RGB bump of M3 at V = 15.50 and that of M13 at V = 14.80. We have estimated the ratios R and R2 for M3 and M13 and found that of R for M3 is larger than that for M13 while R2's for M3 and M13 are similar when only normal HB stars are used in R and R2 for M13. However, we found that R's for M3 and M13 are similar while R2 for M3 is larger than that for M13 when all the HB stars are included in R and R2 for M13. We have compared the observed RGB LFs of M3 and M13 with the theoretical RGB LF of Bergbusch & VandenBerg at the same radial distances from the cluster centers as used in R and R2 for M3 and M13. We found "extra stars" belonging...

  2. Peptides actively transported across the tympanic membrane: Functional and structural properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurabi, Arwa; Beasley, Kerry A.; Chang, Lisa; McCann, James; Pak, Kwang; Ryan, Allen F.

    2017-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) is the most common infectious disease of children under six, causing more antibiotic prescriptions and surgical procedures than any other pediatric condition. By screening a bacteriophage (phage) library genetically engineered to express random peptides on their surfaces, we discovered unique peptides that actively transport phage particles across the intact tympanic membrane (TM) and into the middle ear (ME). Herein our goals were to characterize the physiochemical peptide features that may underlie trans-TM phage transport; assess morphological and functional effects of phage peptides on the ME and inner ear (IE); and determine whether peptide-bearing phage transmigrate from the ME into the IE. Incubation of five peptide-bearing phage on the TM for over 4hrs resulted in demonstrably superior transport of one peptide, in level and in exponential increase over time. This suggests a preferred peptide motif for TM active transport. Functional and structural comparisons revealed unique features of this peptide: These include a central lysine residue, isoelectric point of 0.0 at physiological pH and a hydrophobic C-terminus. When the optimal peptide was applied to the TM independent of phage, similar transport was observed, indicating that integration into phage is not required. When 109 particles of the four different trans-TM phage were applied directly into the ME, no morphological effects were detected in the ME or IE when compared to saline or wild-type (WT) phage controls. Comparable, reversible hearing loss was observed for saline controls, WT phage and trans-TM peptide phage, suggesting a mild conductive hearing loss due to ME fluid. Perilymph titers after ME incubation established that few copies of trans-TM peptide phage crossed into the IE. The results suggest that, within the parameters tested, trans-TM peptides are safe and could be used as potential agents for noninvasive delivery of drugs, particles and gene therapy vectors to the ME

  3. Development of SERS substrate using phage-based magnetic template for triplex assay in sepsis diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Anh H; Shin, Yesol; Sim, Sang Jun

    2016-11-15

    Development of a new substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is one area of interest for the improvement of SERS performance. Herein, we introduce a new method for developing new mesoporous SERS substrates using M13 phages that display cysteine-rich peptides on the pVIII major units, which is an alternative for thiol donor using chemical modifications. Together with the SERS substrate development, and the use of the SERS technique for sepsis diagnostics is a new approach in clinical settings. The substrates were characterized and magnetized with magnetic immuno colloids made of gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles and specific antibodies. Conventionally, the SERS-tags are prepared by using gold nanoparticles and are modified with Raman dyes to immobilize specific antibodies to capture the biomarkers in the serum samples. However, in this method the SERS-tags are bound to the mesoporous substrate via antibody/antigen interactions to form clusters or layer-by-layer assemblies of SERS-tags for Raman signal enhancement. The SERS spectra showed distinct peaks for tags corresponding to three typical sepsis-specific biomarkers for diagnostics with the limit of detection values of 27 pM, 103 pM, and 78 pM for C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PCT), and soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1), respectively. With such an approach, SERS can be used for clinical purposes and can be improved by phage display modification rather than chemical alternatives. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Oriented and vectorial immobilization of linear M13 dsDNA between interdigitated electrodes--towards single molecule DNA nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzel, Ralph; Gajovic-Eichelmann, Nenad; Bier, Frank F

    2003-05-01

    The ability to control molecules at a resolution well below that offered by photolithography has gained much interest recently. DNA is a promising candidate for this task since it offers excellent specificity in base-pairing combined with addressability at the nanometer scale. New applications in biosensing, e.g. interaction analysis at the single molecule level, or nanobiotechnology, e.g. ultradense DNA microarrays, have been devised that rely on stretched DNA bridges. The basic technology required is the ability to deposit spatially defined, stretched DNA-bridges between anchoring structures on surfaces. In this paper we present two techniques for spanning 2 microm long dsDNA bridges between neighboring interdigitated electrodes (IDEs). The extended DNA used was linearized M13 dsDNA (M13mp18 7231 bp, ca. 2.5 microm length), either unmodified, or with chemical modifications at both ends. The first approach is based on the dielectrophoretic (DEP) concentration and alignment of linearized wild-type dsDNA. IDEs with 1.7 microm spacing are driven with an AC voltage around 1 MHz leading to field strengths in the order of 1 MV m(-1). The dsDNA is polarized and linearized by the force field and accumulates in the gap between two neighboring electrodes. This process is reversible and was visualized by fluorescence staining of M13 DNA using PicoGreen, as intercalating dye. The resulting dsDNA bridges and their orientation are discernible under the fluorescence microscope using fluorescent particles of different color. The particles are tagged with sequence specific peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes that bind to the DNA double strand at specific sites. The second approach is based on asymmetric electrochemical modification of a gold IDE with 2.0 microm spacings followed by spontaneous or stimulated deposition of a chemically modified M13-DNA. One side of the IDE was selectively coated with streptavidin by electropolymerization of a novel hydrophilic conductive polymer in

  5. Phage display of the Equine arteritis virus nsp1 ZF domain and examination of its metal interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleksiewicz, Martin B.; Snijder, E.J.; Normann, Preben

    2004-01-01

    A putative zinc finger (ZF) domain in the Equine arteritis virus (EAV) nsp 1 protein was described recently to be required for viral transcription. The nsp 1 ZF (50 aa) was expressed on the surface of M13KE gIII phage, fused to the N terminus of the phage pIII protein. To evaluate the functionality...... in the present study may have general applications in the study of other ZF domains....

  6. Clostridium difficile phages: still difficult?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Rose Hargreaves

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Phages that infect Clostridium difficile were first isolated for typing purposes in the 1980s, but their use was short lived. However, the rise of C. difficile epidemics over the last decade has triggered a resurgence of interest in using phages to combat this pathogen. Phage therapy is an attractive treatment option for C. difficile infection, however developing suitable phages is challenging. In this review we summarise the difficulties faced by researchers in this field, and we discuss the solutions and strategies used for the development of C. difficile phages for use as novel therapeutics.Epidemiological data has highlighted the diversity and distribution of C. difficile, and shown that novel strains continue to emerge in clinical settings. In parallel with epidemiological studies, advances in molecular biology have bolstered our understanding of C. difficile biology, and our knowledge of phage-host interactions in other bacterial species. These three fields of biology have therefore paved the way for future work on C. difficile phages to progress and develop. Benefits of using C. difficile phages as therapeutic agents include the fact that they have highly specific interactions with their bacterial hosts. Studies also show that they can reduce bacterial numbers in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Genetic analysis has revealed the genomic diversity among these phages and provided an insight into their taxonomy and evolution.No strictly virulent C. difficile phages have been reported and this contributes to the difficulties with their therapeutic exploitation. Although treatment approaches using the phage-encoded endolysin protein have been explored, the benefits of using whole-phages are such that they remain a major research focus. Whilst we don’t envisage working with C. difficile phages will be problem free, sufficient study should inform future strategies to facilitate their development to combat this problematic pathogen.

  7. Stimulating effect of graphene oxide on myogenesis of C2C12 myoblasts on RGD peptide-decorated PLGA nanofiber matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yong Cheol; Lee, Jong Ho; Kim, Min Jeong; Hong, Suck Won; Kim, Bongju; Hyun, Jung Keun; Choi, Yu Suk; Park, Jong-Chul; Han, Dong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    In the field of biomedical engineering, many studies have focused on the possible applications of graphene and related nanomaterials due to their potential for use as scaffolds, coating materials and delivery carriers. On the other hand, electrospun nanofiber matrices composed of diverse biocompatible polymers have attracted tremendous attention for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. However, their combination is intriguing and still challenging. In the present study, we fabricated nanofiber matrices composed of M13 bacteriophage with RGD peptide displayed on its surface (RGD-M13 phage) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, PLGA) and characterized their physicochemical properties. In addition, the effect of graphene oxide (GO) on the cellular behaviors of C2C12 myoblasts, which were cultured on PLGA decorated with RGD-M13 phage (RGD/PLGA) nanofiber matrices, was investigated. Our results revealed that the RGD/PLGA nanofiber matrices have suitable physicochemical properties as a tissue engineering scaffold and the growth of C2C12 myoblasts were significantly enhanced on the matrices. Moreover, the myogenic differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts was substantially stimulated when they were cultured on the RGD/PLGA matrices in the presence of GO. In conclusion, these findings propose that the combination of RGD/PLGA nanofiber matrices and GO can be used as a promising strategy for skeletal tissue engineering and regeneration.

  8. Phage neutralization by sera of patients receiving phage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łusiak-Szelachowska, Marzanna; Zaczek, Maciej; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Kłak, Marlena; Fortuna, Wojciech; Letkiewicz, Sławomir; Rogóż, Paweł; Szufnarowski, Krzysztof; Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Owczarek, Barbara; Górski, Andrzej

    2014-08-01

    The aim of our investigation was to verify whether phage therapy (PT) can induce antiphage antibodies. The antiphage activity was determined in sera from 122 patients from the Phage Therapy Unit in Wrocław with bacterial infections before and during PT, and in sera from 30 healthy volunteers using a neutralization test. Furthermore, levels of antiphage antibodies were investigated in sera of 19 patients receiving staphylococcal phages and sera of 20 healthy volunteers using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The phages were administered orally, locally, orally/locally, intrarectally, or orally/intrarectally. The rate of phage inactivation (K) estimated the level of phages' neutralization by human sera. Low K rates were found in sera of healthy volunteers (K ≤ 1.73). Low K rates were detected before PT (K ≤ 1.64). High antiphage activity of sera K > 18 was observed in 12.3% of examined patients (n = 15) treated with phages locally (n = 13) or locally/orally (n = 2) from 15 to 60 days of PT. High K rates were found in patients treated with some Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterococcus faecalis phages. Low K rates were observed during PT in sera of patients using phages orally (K ≤ 1.04). Increased inactivation of phages by sera of patients receiving PT decreased after therapy. These results suggest that the antiphage activity in patients' sera depends on the route of phage administration and phage type. The induction of antiphage activity of sera during or after PT does not exclude a favorable result of PT.

  9. Processing and functional display of the 86 kDa heterodimeric penicillin G acylase on the surface of phage fd

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaert, R.M D; van Duin, J; Quax, Wim

    1999-01-01

    The large heterodimeric penicillin G acylase from Alcaligenes faecalis was displayed on the surface of phage fd. We fused the coding sequence (alpha subunit-internal peptide-beta subunit) to the gene of a phage coat protein. A modified g3p signal sequence was used to direct the polypeptide to the pe

  10. Replication of M13 single—stranded DNA bearing a sitespecific ethenocytosine lesion by Escherichia coil cell extracts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGGE; PAULMDUNMAN; 等

    1997-01-01

    Previous investigation on the mutagenic effects of 3,N4-Ethenocytosine (εC),a nonpairing DNA lesion,revealed the existence of a novel SOS-independent inducible mutagenic mechanism in E.coli termed UVM for UV modulation of mutagenesis.To investigate whether UVM is mediated by an alteration of DNA replication,we have set up an in vitro replication system in which phage M13 viral single-stranded DNA bearing a single site-specific (εC) residue is replicated by soluble protein extracts from E.coli cells.Replication products were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis and the frequency of translesion synthesis was determined by restriction endonuclease analyses.Our data indicate that DNA replication is strongly inhibited by εC,but that translesion DNA synthesis does occur in about 14% of the replicated DNA molecules.These results are very similar to those observed previously in vivo,and suggest that this experimental system may be suitable for evaluating alterations in DNA replication in UVM-induced cells.

  11. Gold-Coated M13 Bacteriophage as a Template for Glucose Oxidase Biofuel Cells with Direct Electron Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaik, Rita A; Lan, Esther; Huang, Yu; Dunn, Bruce

    2016-01-26

    Glucose oxidase-based biofuel cells are a promising source of alternative energy for small device applications, but still face the challenge of achieving robust electrical contact between the redox enzymes and the current collector. This paper reports on the design of an electrode consisting of glucose oxidase covalently attached to gold nanoparticles that are assembled onto a genetically engineered M13 bacteriophage using EDC-NHS chemistry. The engineered phage is modified at the pIII protein to attach onto a gold substrate and serves as a high-surface-area template. The resulting "nanomesh" architecture exhibits direct electron transfer (DET) and achieves a higher peak current per unit area of 1.2 mA/cm(2) compared to most other DET attachment schemes. The final enzyme surface coverage on the electrode was calculated to be approximately 4.74 × 10(-8) mol/cm(2), which is a significant improvement over most current glucose oxidase (GOx) DET attachment methods.

  12. Characterization of a new M13 metallopeptidase from deep-sea Shewanella sp. E525-6 and mechanistic insight into its catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Yu eYang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial extracellular peptidases are important for bacterial nutrition and organic nitrogen degradation in the ocean. While many peptidases of the M13 family from terrestrial animals and bacteria are studied, there has been no report on M13 peptidases from marine bacteria. Here, we characterized an M13 peptidase, PepS, from the deep-sea sedimentary strain Shewanella sp. E525-6, and investigated its substrate specificity and catalytic mechanism. The gene pepS cloned from strain E525-6 contains 2085 bp and encodes an M13 metallopeptidase. PepS was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Among the characterized M13 peptidases, PepS shares the highest sequence identity (47% with Zmp1 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, indicating that PepS is a new member of the M13 family. PepS had the highest activity at 30°C and pH 8.0. It retained 15% activity at 0°C. Its half life at 40°C was only 4 min. These properties indicate that PepS is a cold-adapted enzyme. The smallest substrate for PepS is pentapeptide, and it is probably unable to cleave peptides of more than 30 residues. PepS prefers to hydrolyze peptide bonds with P1’ hydrophobic residues. Structural and mutational analyses suggested that His531, His535 and Glu592 coordinate the catalytic zinc ion in PepS, Glu532 acts as a nucleophile, and His654 is probably involved in the transition state stabilization. Asp538 and Asp596 can stablize the orientations of His531 and His535, and Arg660 can stablize the orientation of Asp596. These results help in understanding marine bacterial peptidases and organic nitrogen degradation.

  13. Phage cocktails and the future of phage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Benjamin K; Abedon, Stephen T; Loc-Carrillo, Catherine

    2013-06-01

    Viruses of bacteria, known as bacteriophages or phages, were discovered nearly 100 years ago. Their potential as antibacterial agents was appreciated almost immediately, with the first 'phage therapy' trials predating Fleming's discovery of penicillin by approximately a decade. In this review, we consider phage therapy that can be used for treating bacterial infections in humans, domestic animals and even biocontrol in foods. Following an overview of the topic, we explore the common practice - both experimental and, in certain regions of the world, clinical - of mixing therapeutic phages into cocktails consisting of multiple virus types. We conclude with a discussion of the commercial and medical context of phage cocktails as therapeutic agents. In comparing off-the-shelf versus custom approaches, we consider the merits of a middle ground, which we deem 'modifiable'. Finally, we explore a regulatory framework for such an approach based on an influenza vaccine model.

  14. No effect of femtosecond laser pulses on M13, E. coli, DNA, or protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigle, Jeffrey C.; Holwitt, Eric A.; Estlack, Larry E.; Noojin, Gary D.; Saunders, Katharine E.; Yakovlev, Valdislav V.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    Data showing what appears to be nonthermal inactivation of M13 bacteriophage (M13), Tobacco mosaic virus, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and Jurkatt T-cells following exposure to 80-fs pulses of laser radiation have been published. Interest in the mechanism led to attempts to reproduce the results for M13 and E. coli. Bacteriophage plaque-forming and bacteria colony-forming assays showed no inactivation of the microorganisms; therefore, model systems were used to see what, if any, damage might be occurring to biologically important molecules. Purified plasmid DNA (pUC19) and bovine serum albumin were exposed to and analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis (AGE) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), respectively, and no effect was found. DNA and coat proteins extracted from laser-exposed M13 and analyzed by AGE or PAGE found no effect. Raman scattering by M13 in phosphate buffered saline was measured to determine if there was any physical interaction between M13 and femtosecond laser pulses, and none was found. Positive controls for the endpoints measured produced the expected results with the relevant assays. Using the published methods, we were unable to reproduce the inactivation results or to show any interaction between ultrashort laser pulses and buffer/water, DNA, protein, M13 bacteriophage, or E. coli.

  15. The epic of phage therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Alain Dublanchet; Shawna Bourne

    2007-01-01

    The present report describes the presentation given by Dr Alain Dublanchet at the Stanier/Oxford Hygiene Symposium, held in Oxford, England, on November 10, 2004. Dr Dublanchet's lecture, entitled ‘The epic of phage therapy’, provided a sequential account of the use of phage as an antimicrobial from its discovery to its rise and fall and current rediscovery.

  16. Phage nanofibers induce vascularized osteogenesis in 3D printed bone scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianglin; Yang, Mingying; Zhu, Ye; Wang, Lin; Tomsia, Antoni P; Mao, Chuanbin

    2014-08-01

    A virus-activated matrix is developed to overcome the challenge of forming vascularized bone tissue. It is generated by filling a 3D printed bioceramic scaffold with phage nanofibers displaying high-density RGD peptide. After it is seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and implanted into a bone defect, the phage nanofibers induce osteogenesis and angiogenesis by activating endothelialization and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs.

  17. Application of phage display technology in targeted therapy of breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mian Kong; Junye Wang; Baojiang Li

    2013-01-01

    Phage display is a technology of gene expression and screening, it is widely used in the fields of defining antigenepitopes, signal transduction, genetic treatment, parasites research and tumor targeted therapy. Breast cancer is the mostcommon cancer in women, we can obtain peptides specially associated with breast cancer by using phage display technology,and this method has great potential in early diagnosis of breast cancer and development new targeted drugs.

  18. Directed synthesis of bio-inorganic vanadium oxide composites using genetically modified filamentous phage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Michael; Baik, Seungyun [Environmental Safety Group, Korea Institute of Science and Technology Europe (KIST-Europe) Forschungsgesellschaft mbH, Campus E 7 1, Saarbruecken (Germany); Jeon, Hojeong; Kim, Yuchan [Center for Biomaterials, Biomedical Research Institute Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jungtae [Environmental Safety Group, Korea Institute of Science and Technology Europe (KIST-Europe) Forschungsgesellschaft mbH, Campus E 7 1, Saarbruecken (Germany); Kim, Young Jun, E-mail: youngjunkim@kist-europe.de [Environmental Safety Group, Korea Institute of Science and Technology Europe (KIST-Europe) Forschungsgesellschaft mbH, Campus E 7 1, Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Phage is an excellent seeding for bio-templates for environmentally benign vanadium oxide nanocomposite synthesis. • The synthesized bio-inorganic vanadium oxide showed photodegradation activities. • The fabricated wt phage/vanadium oxide composite exhibited bundle-like structure. • The fabricated RSTB-phage/vanadium oxide composite exhibited a ball with a fiber-like nanostructure. • The virus/vanadium oxide composite could be applied in photocatalysts, sensors and nanoelectronic applications. - Abstract: The growth of crystalline vanadium oxide using a filamentous bacteriophage template was investigated using sequential incubation in a V{sub 2}O{sub 5} precursor. Using the genetic modification of the bacteriophage, we displayed two cysteines that constrained the RSTB-1 peptide on the major coat protein P8, resulting in vanadium oxide crystallization. The phage-driven vanadium oxide crystals with different topologies, microstructures, photodegradation and vanadium oxide composites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), quartz microbalance and dissipation (QCM-D) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Non-specific electrostatic attraction between a wild-type phage (wt-phage) and vanadium cations in the V{sub 2}O{sub 5} precursor caused phage agglomeration and fiber formation along the length of the viral scaffold. As a result, the addition of recombinant phage (re-phage) in V{sub 2}O{sub 5} precursors formed heterogeneous structures, which led to efficient condensation of vanadium oxide crystal formation in lines, shown by QCM-D analysis. Furthermore, re-phage/V{sub x}O{sub x} composites showed significantly enhanced photodegradation activities compared with the synthesized wt-phage-V{sub 2}O{sub 5} composite under illumination. This study demonstrates that peptide-mediated vanadium oxide mineralization is governed by a complicated interplay of peptide sequence, local structure

  19. Amyloid-β peptide binds to cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Hernandez-Zimbron

    Full Text Available Extracellular and intraneuronal accumulation of amyloid-beta aggregates has been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of macromolecules has deleterious effects on cellular functions. Mitochondria were found to be the target for amyloid-beta, and mitochondrial dysfunction is well documented in AD. In the present study we have shown for the first time that Aβ 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the amino-terminal region of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1. Phage clone, selected after screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage and bearing a 61 amino acid fragment of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, bound to Aβ 1-42 in ELISA as well as to Aβ aggregates present in AD brain. Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 co-immunoprecipitated from mitochondrial fraction of differentiated human neuroblastoma cells. Likewise, molecular dynamics simulation of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and the Aβ 1-42 peptide complex resulted in a reliable helix-helix interaction, supporting the experimental results. The interaction between Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 may explain, in part, the diminished enzymatic activity of respiratory chain complex IV and subsequent neuronal metabolic dysfunction observed in AD.

  20. Amyloid-β peptide binds to cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Zimbron, Luis Fernando; Luna-Muñoz, Jose; Mena, Raul; Vazquez-Ramirez, Ricardo; Kubli-Garfias, Carlos; Cribbs, David H; Manoutcharian, Karen; Gevorkian, Goar

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal accumulation of amyloid-beta aggregates has been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of macromolecules has deleterious effects on cellular functions. Mitochondria were found to be the target for amyloid-beta, and mitochondrial dysfunction is well documented in AD. In the present study we have shown for the first time that Aβ 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the amino-terminal region of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1. Phage clone, selected after screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage and bearing a 61 amino acid fragment of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, bound to Aβ 1-42 in ELISA as well as to Aβ aggregates present in AD brain. Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 co-immunoprecipitated from mitochondrial fraction of differentiated human neuroblastoma cells. Likewise, molecular dynamics simulation of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and the Aβ 1-42 peptide complex resulted in a reliable helix-helix interaction, supporting the experimental results. The interaction between Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 may explain, in part, the diminished enzymatic activity of respiratory chain complex IV and subsequent neuronal metabolic dysfunction observed in AD.

  1. Affinity-based release of polymer-binding peptides from hydrogels with the target segments of peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serizawa, Takeshi; Fukuta, Hiroki; Date, Takaaki; Sawada, Toshiki

    2016-02-01

    Peptides with affinities for the target segments of polymer hydrogels were identified by biological screening using phage-displayed peptide libraries, and these peptides exhibited an affinity-based release capability from hydrogels. The results from cell culture assays demonstrated the sustained anticancer effects of the drug-conjugated peptides that were released from the hydrogels.

  2. AMYLOID-β PEPTIDE BINDS TO MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN 1B (MAP1B)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevorkian, Goar; Gonzalez-Noriega, Alfonso; Acero, Gonzalo; Ordoñez, Jorge; Michalak, Colette; Munguia, Maria Elena; Govezensky, Tzipe; Cribbs, David H.; Manoutcharian, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal formation of amyloid-beta aggregates have been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of targets have deleterious effects on cellular functions. In the present study we have shown for the first time that amyloid-beta 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the microtubule binding domain of the heavy chain of microtubule-associated protein 1B by the screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage. This interaction may explain, in part, the loss of neuronal cytoskeletal integrity, impairment of microtubule-dependent transport and synaptic dysfunction observed previously in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:18079022

  3. Information Phage Therapy Research Should Report

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen T. Abedon

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriophages, or phages, are viruses which infect bacteria. A large subset of phages infect bactericidally and, consequently, for nearly one hundred years have been employed as antibacterial agents both within and outside of medicine. Clinically these applications are described as phage or bacteriophage therapy. Alternatively, and especially in the treatment of environments, this practice instead may be described as a phage-mediated biocontrol of bacteria. Though the history of phage therap...

  4. Corruption of phage display libraries by target-unrelated clones: diagnosis and countermeasures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, William D; Golomb, Miriam; Smith, George P

    2010-12-15

    Phage display is used to discover peptides or proteins with a desired target property-most often, affinity for a target selector molecule. Libraries of phage clones displaying diverse surface peptides are subject to a selection process designed to enrich for the target behavior and subsequently propagated to restore phage numbers. A recurrent problem is enrichment of clones, called target-unrelated phages or peptides (TUPs), that lack the target behavior. Many TUPs are propagation related; they have mutations conferring a growth advantage and are enriched during the propagations accompanying selection. Unlike other filamentous phage libraries, fd-tet-based libraries are relatively resistant to propagation-related TUP corruption. Their minus-strand origin is disrupted by a large cassette that simultaneously confers resistance to tetracycline and imposes a rate-limiting growth defect that cannot be bypassed with simple mutations. Nonetheless, a new type of propagation-related TUP emerged in the output of in vivo selections from an fd-tet library. The founding clone had a complex rearrangement that restored the minus-strand origin while retaining tetracycline resistance. The rearrangement involved two recombination events, one with a contaminant having a wild-type minus-strand origin. The founder's infectivity advantage spread by simple recombination to clones displaying different peptides. We propose measures for minimizing TUP corruption.

  5. HST UV Observations of the Cores of M3 and M13

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, F R; Pecci, F F; Cacciari, C; Dorman, B; Rood, R T; Ferraro, Francesco R.; Paltrinieri, Barbara; Pecci, Flavio Fusi; Cacciari, Carla; Dorman, Ben; Rood, Robert T.

    1997-01-01

    We present preliminary results from HST/WFPC2 observations of the central regions of the of the Galactic globular clusters M13 and M3. The clusters are almost identical in most respects including chemical composition, but there are dramatic differences in both the horizontal branch (HB) and blue straggler (BSS) populations. The M13 HB has a long blue tail extending 4.5 mag in V, reaching well below the level of the main sequence turn-off. M3 has no such feature. M3 and M13 are thus an extreme case of the ``second parameter problem'' in HB morphology. Also present in the M13 HB are two gaps similar to those seen in the clusters NGC 6752 and NGC 2808. M3 has a specific frequency of BSS three times larger than that of M13. Our results imply that neither age nor cluster density, two popular second parameter candidates, are likely to be responsible for the observed differences.

  6. Human Volunteers Receiving Escherichia coli Phage T4 Orally: a Safety Test of Phage Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Bruttin, Anne; Brüssow, Harald

    2005-01-01

    Fifteen healthy adult volunteers received in their drinking water a lower Escherichia coli phage T4 dose (103 PFU/ml), a higher phage dose (105 PFU/ml), and placebo. Fecal coliphage was detected in a dose-dependent way in volunteers orally exposed to phage. All volunteers receiving the higher phage dose showed fecal phage 1 day after exposure; this prevalence was only 50% in subjects receiving the lower phage dose. No fecal phage was detectable a week after a 2-day course of oral phage applic...

  7. Identification of one peptide which inhibited infectivity of avian infectious bronchitis virus in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Purified avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) was used to screen a random phage display peptide library. After the fourth panning, 10 positive phages were sequenced and characterized. The phages specifically inhibited IBV infectivity in HeLa cells and blocked IBV haemagglutination. One linear peptide "GSH HRH VHS PFV" from the positive phages with the highest neutralization titer was synthesized and this peptide inhibited IBV infection in HeLa as well. The results may contribute to development of antiviral therapeutics for IBV and studying the determinants for viral and cell interaction.

  8. Selective Deactivation of M13 Bacteriophage in E. Coli using Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Molukanele, P

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Deactivation of M13 Bacteriophage in E. Coli using Femtosecond Laser Pulses P. Molukanele 1, 3, A. Du Plessis 1, T. Roberts 1, L. Botha 1, M. Khati 2,3, W. Campos 2, 3 1CSIR National Laser Centre, Femtosecond Science group, Pretoria, South Africa 2CSIR... (host cells) using the cellular synthetic machinery, and cause the synthesis of specialized elements called virions, that can transfer the genome to other cells. M13 bacteriophage (virus which infects only bacteria) is a filamentous virus...

  9. Exploring the Secretomes of Microbes and Microbial Communities Using Filamentous Phage Display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana eGagic

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Microbial surface and secreted proteins (the secretome contain a large number of proteins that interact with other microbes, host and/or environment. These proteins are exported by the coordinated activities of the protein secretion machinery present in the cell. A group of phage, called filamentous phage, have the ability to hijack the cellular protein secretion machinery in order to amplify and assemble via a secretion-like process. This ability has been harnessed in the use of filamentous phage of Escherichia coli in biotechnology applications, including screening large libraries of variants for binding to bait of interest, from tissues in vivo to pure proteins or even inorganic substrates. In this review we discuss the roles of secretome proteins in pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria and corresponding secretion pathways. We describe the basics of phage display technology and its variants applied to discovery of bacterial proteins that have functions of interest for bacterial colonization and pathogenesis, through filamentous phage display library screening. Published literature also shows that phage display is suitable for secretome protein display as a tool for identification immunogenic peptides and can be used for discovery of vaccine candidates. Secretome selection aided by next-generation sequence analysis can also be used for selective display of the secretome at a microbial community scale, the latter revealing the richness of secretome functions of interest and surprising versatility in filamentous phage display of secretome proteins from large number of Gram-negative as well as Gram-positive bacteria and archaea.

  10. Phage Display Technology in Biomaterials Engineering: Progress and Opportunities for Applications in Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Ivone M; Reis, Rui L; Azevedo, Helena S

    2016-11-18

    The field of regenerative medicine has been gaining momentum steadily over the past few years. The emphasis in regenerative medicine is to use various in vitro and in vivo approaches that leverage the intrinsic healing mechanisms of the body to treat patients with disabling injuries and chronic diseases such as diabetes, osteoarthritis, and degenerative disorders of the cardiovascular and central nervous system. Phage display has been successfully employed to identify peptide ligands for a wide variety of targets, ranging from relatively small molecules (enzymes, cell receptors) to inorganic, organic, and biological (tissues) materials. Over the past two decades, phage display technology has advanced tremendously and has become a powerful tool in the most varied fields of research, including biotechnology, materials science, cell biology, pharmacology, and diagnostics. The growing interest in and success of phage display libraries is largely due to its incredible versatility and practical use. This review discusses the potential of phage display technology in biomaterials engineering for applications in regenerative medicine.

  11. The membrane-bound form of gene 9 minor coat protein of bacteriophage M13

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houbiers, M.C.

    2002-01-01

    Bacteriophage M13 is a virus that infects the bacteria Escherichia coli ( E. coli ), a single cell organism that resides in our intestines. It consists of the cytoplasm (contents) and a double membrane that keeps the contents together (the barrier to the outside world). The membra

  12. Anchoring mechanisms of membrane-associated M13 major coat protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stopar, D.; Spruijt, R.B.; Hemminga, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Bacteriophage M13 major coat protein is extensively used as a biophysical, biochemical, and molecular biology reference system for studying membrane proteins. The protein has several elements that control its position and orientation in a lipid bilayer. The N-terminus is dominated by the presence of

  13. Solid-state 31P NMR spectroscopy of bacteriophage M13 and tobacco mosaic virus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magusin, P.C.M.M.

    1995-01-01

    In this thesis, the results of various 31P NMR experiments observed for intact virus particles of bacteriophage M13 and Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV), are presented. To explain the results in a consistent way, models are developed and tested. 31

  14. Corruption of phage-display libraries by target-unrelated clones: Diagnosis and countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, William D.; Golomb, Miriam; Smith, George P.

    2010-01-01

    Phage display is used to discover peptides or proteins with a desired target property—most often, affinity for a target selector molecule. Libraries of phage clones displaying diverse surface peptides are subject to a selection process designed to enrich for the target behavior, and subsequently propagated to restore phage numbers. A recurrent problem is enrichment of clones, called target-unrelated phage (TUPs), that lack the target behavior. Many TUPs are propagation-related; they have mutations conferring a growth advantage, and are enriched during the propagations accompanying selection. Unlike other filamentous phage libraries, fd-tet-based libraries are relatively resistant to propagation-related TUP corruption. Their minus strand origin is disrupted by a large cassette that simultaneously confers resistance to tetracycline and imposes a rate-limiting growth defect that cannot be bypassed with simple mutations. Nonetheless, a new type of propagation-related TUP emerged in the output of in vivo selections from an fd-tet library. The founding clone had a complex rearrangement that restored the minus strand origin while retaining tetracycline resistance. The rearrangement involved two recombination events, one with a contaminant having a wild-type minus strand origin. The founder’s infectivity advantage spread by simple recombination to clones displaying different peptides. We propose measures for minimizing TUP corruption. PMID:20692225

  15. Clinical aspects of phage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Borysowski, Jan; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Fortuna, Wojciech; Letkiewicz, Sławomir; Szufnarowski, Krzysztof; Pawełczyk, Zdzisław; Rogóż, Paweł; Kłak, Marlena; Wojtasik, Elżbieta; Górski, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Phage therapy (PT) is a unique method of treatment of bacterial infections using bacteriophages (phages)-viruses that specifically kill bacteria, including their antibiotic-resistant strains. Over the last decade a marked increase in interest in the therapeutic use of phages has been observed, which has resulted from a substantial rise in the prevalence of antibiotic resistance of bacteria, coupled with an inadequate number of new antibiotics. The first, and so far the only, center of PT in the European Union is the Phage Therapy Unit (PTU) established at the Ludwik Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, Wrocław, Poland in 2005. This center continues the rich tradition of PT in Poland, which dates from the early 1920s. The main objective of this chapter is to present a detailed retrospective analysis of the results of PT of 153 patients with a wide range of infections resistant to antibiotic therapy admitted for treatment at the PTU between January 2008 and December 2010. Analysis includes the evaluation of both the efficacy and the safety of PT. In general, data suggest that PT can provide good clinical results in a significant cohort of patients with otherwise untreatable chronic bacterial infections and is essentially well tolerated. In addition, the whole complex procedure employed to obtain and characterize therapeutic phage preparations, as well as ethical aspects of PT, is discussed.

  16. Application of mimotope peptides of fumonisin b1 in Peptide ELISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing; Xu, Yang; He, Qing-hua; He, Zhen-yun; Xiong, Zheng-ping

    2013-05-22

    Anti-fumonisin B(1) (FB(1)) McAb 1D11 was used as the target for biopanning from a phage random loop-constrained heptapeptide library. After three cycles of panning, seven phages with three mimotope peptides were selected to mimic the binding of FB(1) to 1D11. After the identification of phage ELISA, the phage clone that showed the best linear range of detection was chosen for further research. One peptide with the inserted peptide sequence of the phage was synthetized, named CT-452. An indirect competitive ELISA (peptide ELISA) for detecting FB(1) was established using the CT-452-bovine serum albumin conjugate as coating antigen. The linear range of the inhibition curve was 1.77-20.73 ng/mL. The half inhibitory concentration (IC50) was 6.06 ng/mL, and the limit of detection was 1.18 ng/mL. This method was compared with conventional indirect ELISA (commercial ELISA kit) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and the results showed the reliability of the peptide ELISA for the determination of FB(1) in cereal samples. The relationship between the CT-452 and FB(1) standard concentrations in peptide ELISA was evaluated. The results indicated that synthetic peptide CT-452 can replace the FB(1) standard to establish an immunoassay free of FB(1).

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Vibrio anguillarum Phage CHOED Successfully Used for Phage Therapy in Aquaculture

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Jaime; Higuera, Gastón; Gajardo,Felipe; Castillo, Daniel; Middleboe, Mathias; García, Katherine; Ramírez, Carolina; Espejo, Romilio T.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio anguillarum phage CHOED was isolated from Chilean mussels. It is a virulent phage showing effective inhibition of V. anguillarum. CHOED has potential in phage therapy, because it can protect fish from vibriosis in fish farms. Here, we announce the completely sequenced genome of V. anguillarum phage CHOED.

  18. A cyclic peptidic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Baoyu; Xu, Peng; Jiang, Longguang;

    2014-01-01

    Peptides are attracting increasing interest as protease inhibitors. Here, we demonstrate a new inhibitory mechanism and a new type of exosite interactions for a phage-displayed peptide library-derived competitive inhibitor, mupain-1 (CPAYSRYLDC), of the serine protease murine urokinase...

  19. Information Phage Therapy Research Should Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stephen T Abedon

    2017-01-01

    .... Clinically these applications are described as phage or bacteriophage therapy. Alternatively, and especially in the treatment of environments, this practice instead may be described as a phage-mediated biocontrol of bacteria...

  20. Phage Therapy: Eco-Physiological Pharmacology

    OpenAIRE

    Abedon, Stephen T.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial virus use as antibacterial agents, in the guise of what is commonly known as phage therapy, is an inherently physiological, ecological, and also pharmacological process. Physiologically we can consider metabolic properties of phage infections of bacteria and variation in those properties as a function of preexisting bacterial states. In addition, there are patient responses to pathogenesis, patient responses to phage infections of pathogens, and also patient responses to phage virio...

  1. Construction of Human ScFv Phage Display Library against Ovarian Tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Jinsong; BI Hao; YAO Qin; QU Shen; ZONG Yiqiang

    2006-01-01

    In order to construct a single chain fragment variable (ScFv) phage display library against ovarian tumor, by using RT-PCR, the human heavy chain variable region genes (VH) and light chain variable region genes (VL) were amplified from lymphocytes of ovarian tumor patients and subsequently assembled into ScFv genes by SOE. The resulting ScFv genes were electrotransformed into E.coli TG1 and amplified with the co-infection of helper phage M13KO7 to obtain phage display library. The capacity and titer of the resulting library were detected. The phage antibody library with a capacity of approximately 3 × 109 cfu/μg was obtained. After amplification with helper phage, the titer of antibody library reached 5 × 1012 cfu/mL. Human ScFv library against ovarian tumor was constructed successfully, which laid a foundation for the screening of ovarian tumor specific ScFv for the radioimmunoimaging diagnosis of ovarian tumor.

  2. Phage therapy--constraints and possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Anders S

    2014-05-01

    The rise of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains, causing intractable infections, has resulted in an increased interest in phage therapy. Phage therapy preceded antibiotic treatment against bacterial infections and involves the use of bacteriophages, bacterial viruses, to fight bacteria. Virulent phages are abundant and have proven to be very effective in vitro, where they in most cases lyse any bacteria within the hour. Clinical trials on animals and humans show promising results but also that the treatments are not completely effective. This is partly due to the studies being carried out with few phages, and with limited experimental groups, but also the fact that phage therapy has limitations in vivo. Phages are large compared with small antibiotic molecules, and each phage can only infect one or a few bacterial strains. A very large number of different phages are needed to treat infections as these are caused by genetically different strains of bacteria. Phages are effective only if enough of them can reach the bacteria and increase in number in situ. Taken together, this entails high demands on resources for the construction of phage libraries and the testing of individual phages. The effectiveness and host range must be characterized, and immunological risks must be assessed for every single phage.

  3. Simulation of Structure and Energies of NinAlm Nanoclusters (n + m = 13) by Molecular Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Rojas T., Justo; Departamento de Física, Instituto Peruano de Energía Nuclear. Lima, Perú Facultad de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima, Perú; Rojas A., Chachi; Facultad de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima, Perú; Arroyo C., Juan; Facultad de Química e Ingeniería Química, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    By simulation with the Molecular Dynamics method and the thermal temper technique, the more stablegeometric structures and their respective energy were determined in the Nin Alm (n + m = 13)nanoclusters. The atomic interaction in the cluster was modelized with the Embeded Atom Method (EAM)(the Voter & Chen version). The most stable geometric structures of the cluster and their minimal energywere obtained from 200 generating spatial coordinates along the high energy path. The initial inter...

  4. Phage Display: Selecting Straws Instead of a Needle from a Haystack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojca Lunder

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of peptides with specific binding affinity to various protein and even non-protein targets are being discovered from phage display libraries. The power of this method lies in its ability to efficiently and rapidly identify ligands with a desired target property from a large population of phage clones displaying diverse surface peptides. However, the search for the needle in the haystack does not always end successfully. False positive results may appear. Thus instead of specific binders phage with no actual affinity toward the target are recovered due to their propagation advantages or binding to other components of the screening system, such as the solid phase, capturing reagents, contaminants in the target sample or blocking agents, rather than the target. Biopanning experiments on different targets performed in our laboratory revealed some previously identified and many new target-unrelated peptide sequences, which have already been frequently described and published, but not yet recognized as target-unrelated. Distinguishing true binders from false positives is an important step toward phage display selections of greater integrity. This article thoroughly reviews and discusses already identified and new target-unrelated peptides and suggests strategies to avoid their isolation.

  5. Identification of hepatitis A virus mimotopes by phage display, antigenicity and immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larralde, Osmany G; Martinez, Raiza; Camacho, Frank; Amin, Nevis; Aguilar, Alicia; Talavera, Arturo; Stott, David I; Perez, Ela M

    2007-03-01

    A phage-displayed peptide approach was used to identify ligands mimicking antigenic determinants of hepatitis A virus (HAV) for the first time. Bacteriophages displaying HAV mimotopes were isolated from a phage-display peptide library by affinity selection on serum antibodies from hepatitis A patients. Selected phage-peptides were screened for reactivity with sera from HAV infected patients and healthy controls. Four cloned peptides with different sequences were identified as mimotopes of HAV; three of them showed similarity in their amino acid sequences with at least one of the VP3 and VP1 antigenic proteins of HAV. One clone was recognised by 92% of the positive sera. The phagotopes competed effectively with HAV for absorption of anti-HAV-specific antibodies in human sera, as determined by ELISA. The four phage clones induced neutralising anti-HAV antibodies in immunised mice. These results demonstrate the potential of this method to elucidate the disease related epitopes of HAV and to use these mimotopes in diagnostic applications or in the development of a mimotope-based hepatitis A vaccine without the necessity of manipulation of the virus.

  6. Display technology on filamentous phage in the search for anti-infective biological agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Santiago Vispo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The causes of antibiotic resistance are complex. The phage display technology has been used mainly to produce monoclonal antibodies (MAbs and peptides directed against cancer or inflammatory disease targets. Today, this technology is recognized as a powerful tool for selecting novel peptides and antibodies that can bind to a wide range of antigens, ranging from whole cells to proteins and lipid targets. In this review, we highlight research that exploits the phage display technology to discover new drugs against infectious diseases, with a focus on antimicrobial peptides and antibodies. Methods: Basic and recent literature review was made, mainly focused on general aspects of phage display technology and the application in the search of new peptides or antibodies of pharmaceutical use to combat the infectious diseases transmitted by bacteria and virus. Results: Updated information on the selected topics is shown, with a guiding and practical approach aimed at researchers in the field of molecular biology to continue deepening the technology with special emphasis in the applications that have been developed in Cuba. Conclusions: Advances in methods of screening, manufacturing, and humanization technologies show that phage display technology can significantly contribute in the fight against clinically important pathogens.

  7. Phage typing of Staphylococcus saprophyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Pereira, A.; Melo Cristino, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    This study included 502 staphylococcus strains; Staphylococcus saprophyticus (297 strains) S. cohnii (47), S. xylosus (10), S. epidermidis (67) and S. aureus (81). Mitomycin C induction was performed on 100 isolates of S. saprophyticus and all induced strains were reacted with each other. Twenty-six strains proved to be lysogenic. Phages were propagated and titrated. With 12 of the phages there were three frequent associations, named lytic groups A, B and C, which included 75% of all typable strains. Typability of the system was 45% and reproducibility was between 94.2% and 100%. Phages did not lyse S. aureus and S. epidermidis strains, but they lysed S. saprophyticus and only rare strains of other novobiocin resistant species. Effective S. saprophyticus typing serves ecological purposes and tracing the origin of urinary strains from the skin or mucous membranes. Phage typing in association with plasmid profiling previously described, are anticipated as complementary methods with strong discriminatory power for differentiating among S. saprophyticus strains. PMID:1752305

  8. Phage lytic enzymes: a history

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David; Trudil

    2015-01-01

    There are many recent studies regarding the efficacy of bacteriophage-related lytic enzymes: the enzymes of ‘bacteria-eaters’ or viruses that infect bacteria. By degrading the cell wall of the targeted bacteria, these lytic enzymes have been shown to efficiently lyse Gram-positive bacteria without affecting normal flora and non-related bacteria. Recent studies have suggested approaches for lysing Gram-negative bacteria as well(Briersa Y, et al., 2014). These enzymes include: phage-lysozyme, endolysin, lysozyme, lysin, phage lysin, phage lytic enzymes, phageassociated enzymes, enzybiotics, muralysin, muramidase, virolysin and designations such as Ply, PAE and others. Bacteriophages are viruses that kill bacteria, do not contribute to antimicrobial resistance, are easy to develop, inexpensive to manufacture and safe for humans, animals and the environment. The current focus on lytic enzymes has been on their use as anti-infectives in humans and more recently in agricultural research models. The initial translational application of lytic enzymes, however, was not associated with treating or preventing a specifi c disease but rather as an extraction method to be incorporated in a rapid bacterial detection assay(Bernstein D, 1997).The current review traces the translational history of phage lytic enzymes–from their initial discovery in 1986 for the rapid detection of group A streptococcus in clinical specimens to evolving applications in the detection and prevention of disease in humans and in agriculture.

  9. Screening for the mimetic homologous oligopeptides of keratins 14 and 17 related with psoriasis from phage random peptide library%应用噬菌体肽库研究银屑病相关的角蛋白K14,K17模拟表位

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张亮; 刘玉峰; 杨乔欣; 任君萍; 黎志东

    2001-01-01

    目的获得与银屑病相关的角蛋白K14和K17同源序列的模拟表位,评估含有此基序的短肽与银屑病发病的关系. 方法将1株抗角蛋白K14和K17同源序列的单克隆抗体(mAb)5G5经亲和层析纯化后进行生物素标记,对噬菌体递呈的随机6肽库进行3轮淘洗并进行ELISA检测. 挑取10个阳性克隆进行DNA测序,分析所获数据,并进行竞争阻断实验. 结果氨基酸序列分析表明模拟短肽的基序为VL(x)AG,角蛋白K14、K17的同源序列及链球菌M蛋白均含有此基序. 携有这些短肽的噬菌体可与mAb 5G5特异结合,并可阻断单抗与角蛋白反应. 结论含有此基序的短肽可以模拟mAb 5G5识别的与银屑病相关的角蛋白K14和K17同源序列的抗原表位,为银屑病特异性短肽的研究提供了一个新途径,同时也为肽疫苗用于银屑病的治疗提供了崭新的思路.%AIM To acquire the mimetic homologous oligopeptides of human epidermal keratins 14 and 17 related with psoriasis and evaluate the effect of the oligopeptides on the pathogenesis of psoriasis. METHODS The mAb 5G5 recognizing the common epitope of human epidermal keratin K14 and K17 was purified by HiTrap Protein G affinity column, and was biotinylated by the biotin ester. A 6-mer phage random peptide library was biopanned for 3 cycles, then positive clones were identified by ELISA and DNA were extracted for sequencing. RESULTS Amino acid sequence analysis showed that 10 positive clones selected randomly had the consensus Amino acid sequence (motif) VL(x)AG. The motif VL(x)AG could be detected in the homologous amino acid sequence of keratins 14 and 17, and streptococcal M protein contained the motif too. The phages of positive clones reacted with mAb 5G5 specifically and prevented the interaction between mAb 5G5 and keratins with dose-dependent effects. CONCLUSION The motif could mimic the common epitope on human epidermal keratins 14,17 and streptococcal M protein, perhaps the

  10. New approaches to improve a peptide vaccine against porcine Taenia solium cysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis; Manoutcharian, Karen; Gevorkian, Goar; Rosas-Salgado, Gabriela; Hernández-Gonzalez, Marisela; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Cabrera-Ponce, José; López-Casillas, Fernando; González-Bonilla, César; Santiago-Machuca, Araceli; Ruíz-Pérez, Fernando; Sánchez, Joaquín; Goldbaum, Fernando; Aluja, Aline; Larralde, Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Cysticercosis caused by Taenia solium frequently affects human health and rustic porciculture. Cysticerci may localize in the central nervous system of humans causing neurocysticercosis, a major health problem in undeveloped countries. Prevalence and intensity of this disease in pigs and humans are related to social factors (poor personal hygiene, low sanitary conditions, rustic rearing of pigs, open fecalism) and possibly to biological factors such as immunity, genetic background, and gender. The indispensable role of pigs as an obligatory intermediate host in the life cycle offers the possibility of interfering with transmission through vaccination of pigs. An effective vaccine based on three synthetic peptides against pig cysticercosis has been successfully developed and proved effective in experimental and field conditions. The well-defined peptides that constitute the cysticercosis vaccine offer the possibility to explore alternative forms of antigen production and delivery systems that may improve the cost/benefit of this and other vaccines. Encouraging results were obtained in attempts to produce large amounts of these peptides and increased its immunogenicity by expression in recombinant filamentous phage (M13), in transgenic plants (carrots and papaya), and associated to bacterial immunogenic carrier proteins.

  11. Phage-Host Interactions in Flavobacterium psychrophilum and the Potential for Phage Therapy in Aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb

    , the increasing problem with antibiotic resistance has led to increased attention to the use of phages for controlling F. psychrophilum infections in aquaculture. In a synopsis and four scientific papers, this PhD project studies the potential and optimizes the use of phage therapy for treatment and prevention...... of F. psychrophilum infections in rainbow trout fry. In the first paper, studies of the controlling effect of different phages infecting F. psychrophilum in liquid cultures showed that a high initial phage concentration was crucial for fast and effective bacterial lysis in the cultures and sensitive...... cells could be maintained at a low level throughout the rest of the experiment. Surprisingly, no difference was observed between infection with single phages or phage cocktails. At the end of incubation phage-sensitive strains dominated in the cultures with low initial phage concentrations and phage...

  12. Targeting pancreatic islets with phage display assisted by laser pressure catapult microdissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Virginia J; Ozawa, Michael G; Trepel, Martin; Arap, Wadih; McDonald, Donald M; Pasqualini, Renata

    2005-02-01

    Heterogeneity of the microvasculature in different organs has been well documented by multiple methods including in vivo phage display. However, less is known about the diversity of blood vessels within functionally distinct regions of organs. Here, we combined in vivo phage display with laser pressure catapult microdissection to identify peptide ligands for vascular receptors in the islets of Langerhans in the murine pancreas. Protein database analyses of the peptides, CVSNPRWKC and CHVLWSTRC, showed sequence identity to two ephrin A-type ligand homologues, A2 and A4. Confocal microscopy confirmed that most immunoreactivity of CVSNPRWKC and CHVLWSTRC phage was associated with blood vessels in pancreatic islets. Antibodies recognizing EphA4, a receptor for ephrin-A ligands, were similarly associated with islet blood vessels. Importantly, binding of both islet-homing phage and anti-EphA4 antibody was strikingly increased in blood vessels of pancreatic islet tumors in RIP-Tag2 transgenic mice. These results indicate that endothelial cells of blood vessels in pancreatic islets preferentially express EphA4 receptors, and this expression is increased in tumors. Our findings show in vivo phage display and laser pressure catapult microdissection can be combined to reveal endothelial cell specialization within focal regions of the microvasculature.

  13. Phage Display Derived IgNAR V Region Binding Domains for Therapeutic Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubah, Obinna C; Barelle, Caroline J; Buschhaus, Magdalena J; Porter, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Phage display technology has revolutionized the science of drug discovery by transforming the generation and manipulation of ligands, such as antibody fragments, enzymes, and peptides. The basis of this technology is the expression of recombinant proteins or peptides fused to a phage coat protein, and subsequent isolation of ligands based on a variety of catalytic, physicochemical/binding kinetic and/or biological characteristics. An incredible number of diagnostic and therapeutic domains have been successfully isolated using phage display technology. The variable domain of the New Antigen Receptors (VNAR) found in cartilaginous fish, is also amenable to phage display selection. Whilst not an antibody, VNARs are unquestionable the oldest (450 million years), and smallest antigen binding, single-domains so far identified in the vertebrate kingdom. Their role as an integral part of the adaptive immune system of sharks has been well established, enhancing our understanding of the evolutionary origins of humoral immunity and the unusual but divergent ancestry of the VNARs themselves. VNARs exhibit remarkable physicochemical properties, such as small size, stability in extreme conditions, solubility, molecular flexibility, high affinity and selectivity for target. The purpose of this review is to illustrate the important role phage display has played in the isolation and characterization of potent therapeutic and diagnostic VNAR domains.

  14. Engineering human interferon α1c/86D with phage display technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马学军; 胡荣; 吕海; 魏开坤; 张丽兰; 薛水星; 侯云德

    1999-01-01

    Human interferon-α1c/86D (IFNα1c/86D) was functionally displayed on the surface of the filamentous bacteriophage using a phagemid vector system (pCANTAB5E). The key amino acid residues involved in the receptor binding were further defined with phage displayed 6-mer peptide library and two neutralizing antibodies against linear epitopes on the IFN-α1b, indicating that residues 30, 33, 34, (AB-loop) and residues 124, 126, 127 (D helix, DE-loop) were more critical than the adjacent residues for recognition of receptor. In addition, a cassette mutagenesis library was generated by fully randomizing the sequence of the four positions 29, 31, 32 and 35 in AB-loop, and used to select phage-IFN variants with WISH-hased panning method. Three phage-IFN variants were isolated to possess more antiviral activity in the range of 4—16-fold than parental phage-IFN after IPTG-induced soluble expression. The results suggest that phage displayed phage-IFN α1c/86D variants with increased specific activity might be obta

  15. The habits of highly effective phages: population dynamics as a framework for identifying therapeutic phages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Bull

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of bacteriophages as antibacterial agents is being actively researched on a global scale. Typically, the phages used are isolated from the wild by plating on the bacteria of interest, and a far larger set of candidate phages is often available than can be used in any application. When an excess of phages is available, how should the best phages be identified? Here we consider phage-bacterial population dynamics as a basis for evaluating and predicting phage success. A central question is whether the innate dynamical properties of phages are the determinants of success, or instead, whether extrinsic, indirect effects can be responsible. We address the dynamical perspective, motivated in part by the absence of dynamics in previously suggested principles of phage therapy. Current mathematical models of bacterial-phage dynamics do not capture the realities of in vivo dynamics, nor is this likely to change, but they do give insight to qualitative properties that may be generalizable. In particular, phage adsorption rate may be critical to treatment success, so understanding the effects of the in vivo environment on host availability may allow prediction of useful phages prior to in vivo experimentation. Principles for predicting efficacy may be derived by developing a greater understanding of the in vivo system, or such principles could be determined empirically by comparing phages with known differences in their dynamic properties. The comparative approach promises to be a powerful method of discovering the key to phage success. We offer five recommendations for future study: (i compare phages differing in treatment efficacy to identify the phage properties associated with success, (ii assay dynamics in vivo, (iii understand mechanisms of bacterial escape from phages, (iv test phages in model infections that are relevant to the intended clinical applications, and (v develop new classes of models for phage growth in spatially heterogeneous

  16. Trackable and Targeted Phage as Positron Emission Tomography (PET Agent for Cancer Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zibo Li, Qiaoling Jin, Chiunwei Huang, Siva Dasa, Liaohai Chen, Li-peng Yap, Shuanglong Liu, Hancheng Cai, Ryan Park, Peter S Conti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent advancement of nanotechnology has provided unprecedented opportunities for the development of nanoparticle enabled technologies for detecting and treating cancer. Here, we reported the construction of a PET trackable organic nanoplatform based on phage particle for targeted tumor imaging. Method: The integrin αvβ3 targeted phage nanoparticle was constructed by expressing RGD peptides on its surface. The target binding affinity of this engineered phage particle was evaluated in vitro. A bifunctional chelator (BFC 1,4,7,10-tetraazadodecane-N,N',N",N"'-tetraacetic acid (DOTA or 4-((8-amino-3,6,10,13,16,19-hexaazabicyclo [6.6.6] icosane-1-ylamino methyl benzoic acid (AmBaSar was then conjugated to the phage surface for 64Cu2+ chelation. After 64Cu radiolabeling, microPET imaging was performed in U87MG tumor model and the receptor specificity was confirmed by blocking experiments. Results: The phage-RGD demonstrated target specificity based on ELISA experiment. According to the TEM images, the morphology of the phage was unchanged after the modification with BFCs. The labeling yield was 25 ± 4% for 64Cu-DOTA-phage-RGD and 46 ± 5% for 64Cu-AmBaSar-phage-RGD, respectively. At 1 h time point, 64Cu-DOTA-phage-RGD and 64Cu-AmBaSar-phage-RGD have comparable tumor uptake (~ 8%ID/g. However, 64Cu-AmBaSar-phage-RGD showed significantly higher tumor uptake (13.2 ± 1.5 %ID/g, P<0.05 at late time points compared with 64Cu-DOTA-phage-RGD (10 ± 1.2 %ID/g. 64Cu-AmBaSar-phage-RGD also demonstrated significantly lower liver uptake, which could be attributed to the stability difference between these chelators. There is no significant difference between two tracers regarding the uptake in kidney and muscle at all time points tested. In order to confirm the receptor specificity, blocking experiment was performed. In the RGD blocking experiment, the cold RGD peptide was injected 2 min before the administration of 64Cu-AmBaSar-phage-RGD. Tumor uptake was

  17. Mg isotope ratios in giant stars of the globular clusters M 13 and M 71

    CERN Document Server

    Yong, D; Lambert, D L; Yong, David; Aoki, Wako; Lambert, David L.

    2006-01-01

    We present Mg isotope ratios in 4 red giants of the globular cluster M 13 and 1 red giant of the globular cluster M 71 based on spectra obtained with HDS on the Subaru Telescope. We confirm earlier results by Shetrone that for M 13, the ratio varies from (25+26)Mg/24Mg = 1 in stars with the highest Al abundance to (25+26)Mg/24Mg = 0.2 in stars with the lowest Al abundance. However, we separate the contributions of all three isotopes and find a spread in the ratio 24Mg:25Mg:26Mg with values ranging from 48:13:39 to 78:11:11. As in NGC 6752, we find a positive correlation between 26Mg and Al, an anticorrelation between 24Mg and Al, and no correlation between 25Mg and Al. In M 71, our one star has a ratio 70:13:17. For both clusters, the lowest ratios of 25Mg/24Mg and 26Mg/24Mg exceed those observed in field stars at the same metallicity, a result also found in NGC 6752. The contribution of 25Mg to the total Mg abundance is constant within a given cluster and between clusters with 25Mg/(24+25+26)Mg = 0.13. For M...

  18. Rubidium and lead abundances in giant stars of the globular clusters M 13 and NGC 6752

    CERN Document Server

    Yong, D; Lambert, D L; Paulson, D B; Yong, David; Aoki, Wako; Lambert, David L.; Paulson, Diane B.

    2006-01-01

    We present measurements of the neutron-capture elements Rb and Pb in five giant stars of the globular cluster NGC 6752 and Pb measurements in four giants of the globular cluster M 13. The abundances were derived by comparing synthetic spectra with high resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra obtained using HDS on the Subaru telescope and MIKE on the Magellan telescope. The program stars span the range of the O-Al abundance variation. In NGC 6752, the mean abundances are [Rb/Fe] = -0.17 +/- 0.06 (sigma = 0.14), [Rb/Zr] = -0.12 +/- 0.06 (sigma = 0.13), and [Pb/Fe] = -0.17 +/- 0.04 (sigma = 0.08). In M 13 the mean abundance is [Pb/Fe] = -0.28 +/- 0.03 (sigma = 0.06). Within the measurement uncertainties, we find no evidence for a star-to-star variation for either Rb or Pb within these clusters. None of the abundance ratios [Rb/Fe], [Rb/Zr], or [Pb/Fe] are correlated with the Al abundance. NGC 6752 may have slightly lower abundances of [Rb/Fe] and [Rb/Zr] compared to the small sample of field stars at the ...

  19. Preparation of single chain variable fragment of MG7 mAb by phage display technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-Cai Yu; Jie Ding; Yong-Zhan Nie; Dai-Ming Fan; Xue-Yong Zhang

    2001-01-01

    AIM To develop the single chain variable fragment of MG7 murine anti-human gastric cancer monoclonal antibody using the phage display technology for obtaining a tumor-targeting mediator. METHODS mRNA was isolated from MG7-producing murine hybridoma cell line and converted into cDNA. The variable fragments of heavy and light chain were amplified separately and assembled into ScFv with a specially constructed DNA linker by PCR. The ScFvs DNA was ligated into the phagmid vector pCANTAB5E and the ligated sample was transformed into competent E. Coli TG1. The transformed cells were infected with M13K07 helper phage to form MG7 recombinant phage antibody library. The volume and recombinant rate of the library were evaluated by means of bacterial colony count and restriction analysis. After two rounds of panning with gastric cancer cell line KATOⅢ of highly expressing MG7binding antigen, the phage clones displaying ScFv of the antibody were selected by ELISA from the enriched phage clones. The antigen-binding affinity of the positive clone was detected by competition ELISA. HB2151 E. Coli was transfected with the positive phage clone demonstrated by competition ELISA for production of a soluble form of the MG7 ScFv. ELISA assay was used to detect the antigenbinding affinity of the soluble MG7 ScFv. Finally, the relative molecular mass of soluble MG7 ScFv was measured by SDS-PAGE. RESULTS The VH, VL and ScFv DNAs were about 340bp,320bp and 750bp, respectively. The volume of the library was up to 2 × 106 and 8 of 11 random clones were recombinants. Two phage clones could strongly compete with the original MG7 antibody for binding to the antigen expressed on KATO Ⅲ cells. Within 2 strong positive phage clones, the soluble MG7 ScFv from one clone was found to have the binding activity with KATO Ⅲ cells.SDS-PAGE showed that the relative molecular weight of soluble MG7 ScFv was 32. CONCLUSION The MG7 ScFv was successfully produced by phage antibody technology, which may

  20. Last of the T Phages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studier, F. W.

    1978-01-01

    Results clearly show that it is possible to induce mutations in T7 DNA at a physically measurable rate in the laboratory, and to follow genetic divergence by restriction analysis. The rate of accumulation of changes in the presence of mutagen is high enough that it may be feasible to induce changes at least as great as those found among the T7-related phages isolated from nature.

  1. Bacteriophages with potential to inactivate Salmonella Typhimurium: Use of single phage suspensions and phage cocktails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Carla; Moreirinha, Catarina; Lewicka, Magdalena; Almeida, Paulo; Clemente, Carla; Cunha, Ângela; Delgadillo, Ivonne; Romalde, Jésus L; Nunes, Maria L; Almeida, Adelaide

    2016-07-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the dynamics of three previously isolated bacteriophages (or phages) individually (phSE-1, phSE-2 and phSE-5) or combined in cocktails of two or three phages (phSE-1/phSE-2, phSE-1/phSE-5, phSE-2/phSE-5 and phSE-1/phSE-2/phSE-5) to control Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (Salmonella Typhimurium) in order to evaluate their potential application during depuration. Phages were assigned to the family Siphoviridae and revealed identical restriction digest profiles, although they showed a different phage adsorption, host range, burst size, explosion time and survival in seawater. The three phages were effective against S. Typhimurium (reduction of ∼2.0 log CFU/mL after 4h treatment). The use of cocktails was not significantly more effective than the use of single phages. A big fraction of the remained bacteria are phage-resistant mutants (frequency of phage-resistant mutants 9.19×10(-5)-5.11×10(-4)) but phage- resistant bacterial mutants was lower for the cocktail phages than for the single phage suspensions and the phage phSE-1 presented the highest rate of resistance and phage phSE-5 the lowest one. The spectral changes of S. Typhimurium resistant and phage-sensitive cells were compared and revealed relevant differences for peaks associated to amide I (1620cm(-1)) and amide II (1515cm(-1)) from proteins and from carbohydrates and phosphates region (1080-1000cm(-1)). Despite the similar efficiency of individual phages, the development of lower resistance indicates that phage cocktails might be the most promising choice to be used during the bivalve depuration to control the transmission of salmonellosis.

  2. Antibody Production in Response to Staphylococcal MS-1 Phage Cocktail in Patients Undergoing Phage Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Maciej Żaczek; Marzanna Łusiak-Szelachowska; Ewa Jończyk-Matysiak; Beata Weber-Dąbrowska; Ryszard Międzybrodzki; Barbara Owczarek; Agnieszka Kopciuch; Wojciech Fortuna; Paweł Rogóż; Andrzej Górski

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the humoral immune response (through the release of IgG, IgA, and IgM antiphage antibodies) to a staphylococcal phage cocktail in patients undergoing experimental phage therapy at the Phage Therapy Unit, Medical Center of the Ludwik Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy in Wrocław, Poland. We also evaluated whether occurring antiphage antibodies had neutralizing properties towards applied phages (K rate). Among 20 examined patients receiving...

  3. Phage display:development of nanocarriers for targeted drug delivery to the brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Babak Bakhshinejad; Marzieh Karimi; Mohammad Khalaj-Kondori

    2015-01-01

    The blood brain barrier represents a formidable obstacle for the transport of most systemati-cally administered neurodiagnostics and neurotherapeutics to the brain. Phage display is a high throughput screening strategy that can be used for the construction of nanomaterial peptide libraries. These libraries can be screened for ifnding brain targeting peptide ligands. Surface func-tionalization of a variety of nanocarriers with these brain homing peptides is a sophisticated way to develop nanobiotechnology-based drug delivery platforms that are able to cross the blood brain barrier. These efifcient drug delivery systems raise our hopes for the diagnosis and treatment of various brain disorders in the future.

  4. Two flagellotropic phages and one pilus-specific phage active against Asticcacaulis biprosthecum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, J L; Petzold, S J; Umbreit, T H

    1979-04-15

    Three phages active against cells of Asticcacaulis biprosthecum attach to receptor sites located at the pole of the cell where pili, flagella, and holdfast are produced. Phage phiAcS2, a large phage with a prolate cylindrical head and flexible, noncontractile tail, attaches to flagella as well as to receptor sites at the pole of the cell. Attachment to flagella occurs at the region where head and tail of the phage are joined, leaving the distal end of the tail free for attachment to receptor sites at the cell surface. Phages phiAcM2 and phiAcM4, are identical in appearance to each other, possessing prolate cylindrical heads and flexible, noncontractile tails, and are smaller than phage phiAcS2. Phage phiAcM4, exhibits the same flagellotropic characteristic as described for phage phiAcS2, including the manner of attachment to flagella. Phage phiAcM2 has no affinity for flagella, but attaches by the distal end of the tail to pili and to receptor sites at the pole of the cell. Mechanical removal of flagella and pili protects against infection by all three phages. Studies with phage-resistant mutants and with KCN-treated cells suggest that pili are required for infection by both flagellotropic and pilus-specific phages.

  5. Use of phages to control Campylobacter spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janež, Nika; Loc-Carrillo, Catherine

    2013-10-01

    The use of phages to control pathogenic bacteria has been investigated since they were first discovered in the beginning of the 1900s. Over the last century we have slowly gained an in-depth understanding of phage biology including which phage properties are desirable when considering phage as biocontrol agents and which phage characteristics to potentially avoid. Campylobacter infections are amongst the most frequently encountered foodborne bacterial infections around the world. Handling and consumption of raw or undercooked poultry products have been determined to be the main route of transmission. The ability to use phages to target these bacteria has been studied for more than a decade and although we have made progress towards deciphering how best to use phages to control Campylobacter associated with poultry production, there is still much work to be done. This review outlines methods to improve the isolation of these elusive phages, as well as methods to identify desirable characteristics needed for a successful outcome. It also highlights the body of research undertaken so far and what criteria to consider when doing in-vivo studies, especially because some in-vitro studies have not been found to translate into to phage efficacy in-vivo.

  6. Information Phage Therapy Research Should Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedon, Stephen T

    2017-04-30

    Bacteriophages, or phages, are viruses which infect bacteria. A large subset of phages infect bactericidally and, consequently, for nearly one hundred years have been employed as antibacterial agents both within and outside of medicine. Clinically these applications are described as phage or bacteriophage therapy. Alternatively, and especially in the treatment of environments, this practice instead may be described as a phage-mediated biocontrol of bacteria. Though the history of phage therapy has involved substantial clinical experimentation, current standards along with drug regulations have placed a premium on preclinical approaches, i.e., animal experiments. As such, it is important for preclinical experiments not only to be held to high standards but also to be reported in a manner which improves translation to clinical utility. Here I address this latter issue, that of optimization of reporting of preclinical as well as clinical experiments. I do this by providing a list of pertinent information and data which, in my opinion, phage therapy experiments ought to present in publications, along with tips for best practices. The goal is to improve the ability of readers to gain relevant information from reports on phage therapy research, to allow other researchers greater potential to repeat or extend findings, to ease transitions from preclinical to clinical development, and otherwise simply to improve phage therapy experiments. Targeted are not just authors but also reviewers, other critical readers, writers of commentaries, and, perhaps, formulators of guidelines or policy. Though emphasizing therapy, many points are applicable to phage-mediated biocontrol of bacteria more generally.

  7. Peptides: A new class of anticancer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Smolarczyk

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Peptides are a novel class of anticancer agents embracing two distinct categories: natural antibacterial peptides, which are preferentially bound by cancer cells, and chemically synthesized peptides, which bind specifically to precise molecular targets located on the surface of tumor cells. Antibacterial peptides bind to both cell and mitochondrial membranes. Some of these peptides attach to the cell membrane, resulting in its disorganization. Other antibacterial peptides penetrate cancer cells without causing cell membrane damage, but they disrupt mitochondrial membranes. Thanks to phage and aptamer libraries, it has become possible to obtain synthetic peptides blocking or activating some target proteins found in cancer cells as well as in cells forming the tumor environment. These synthetic peptides can feature anti-angiogenic properties, block enzymes indispensable for sustained tumor growth, and reduce tumor ability to metastasize. In this review the properties of peptides belonging to both categories are discussed and attempts of their application for therapeutic purposes are outlined.

  8. SELECTION OF NEW EPITOPES FROM MONOVALENT DISPLAYED PHAGE OCTAPEPTIDE LIBRARY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李全喜; 王琰; 李竞; 王雅明; 徐建军; 王力民; 董志伟

    1998-01-01

    A library of 2×l07 random oetspaptides was constructed by use of phegemid-based monovaient phage display system. The randomly synthesized degenerated oilgodeoxyribonucleotides (oligos) were fused to the truncated gⅢ (p210-p408). Sequeraze analysis of 11 randomly chosen clones suggested that the degenerated inserts and its deduced amino acid (an) sequences are randomly distributed. The library was used to select binding paptides to the morroeloncl antlhody (mAb) 9E10, which recognizes a continuous decapaptide epitope of denatured human c-myc protein. After four to five rounds of panning, most of the eluted clones could bind to 9E10. Sequerlce analysis of the selected positive clones indlcated that the binding sequences could fall into two chsses, one class (clone 1) shares a consensus motif, ISE x x L, with c-mire decapeprider and the sequences of the other class are entirely different. The binding of both classes to 9E10 could be specifically lnhlhited by froe c-myc deeapeptide. The immunogenlcitF cff the phage peptide was further investigsted h5, construction of multivalent displayed phage peptides and immunization of animals with or without adjuvant. ELISA and competitive ELISA showed that anti-serum from both mice and rabbit immunized with either done could bind to the original antigen, c-myc decapeptide. These results denote that in spite of the dissimilarity of the selected psptides with c-myc decapeptide, they are capable of inducing similar immune respones in vivo, thus actually mimicking the antigen epitope.

  9. Whole genome phage display selects for proline-rich Boi polypeptides against Bem1p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertveldt, Kirsten; Robben, Johan; Volckaert, Guido

    2006-08-01

    Interaction selection by biopanning from a fragmented yeast proteome displayed on filamentous phage particles was successful in identifying proline-rich fragments of Boi1p and Boi2p. These proteins bind to the second "src homology region 3'' (SH3) domain of Bem1p, a protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae involved in bud formation. Target Bem1p was a doubly-tagged recombinant, Bem1([Asn142-Ile551]), which strongly interacts in ELISA with a C-terminal 75 amino acids polypeptide from Cdc24p exposed on phage. The whole yeast genomic display library contained approximately 7.7 x 10(7) independent clones of sheared S. cerevisiae genomic DNA fused to a truncated M13 gene III. This study corroborates the value of fragmented-proteome display to identify strong and direct interacting protein modules.

  10. Identification of small molecule binding sites within proteins using phage display technology.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodi, D. J.; Agoston, G. E.; Manon, R.; Lapcevich, R.; Green, S. J.; Makowski, L.; Biosciences Division; EntreMed Inc.; Florida State Univ.

    2001-11-01

    Affinity selection of peptides displayed on phage particles was used as the basis for mapping molecular contacts between small molecule ligands and their protein targets. Analysis of the crystal structures of complexes between proteins and small molecule ligands revealed that virtually all ligands of molecular weight 300 Da or greater have a continuous binding epitope of 5 residues or more. This observation led to the development of a technique for binding site identification which involves statistical analysis of an affinity-selected set of peptides obtained by screening of libraries of random, phage-displayed peptides against small molecules attached to solid surfaces. A random sample of the selected peptides is sequenced and used as input for a similarity scanning program which calculates cumulative similarity scores along the length of the putative receptor. Regions of the protein sequence exhibiting the highest similarity with the selected peptides proved to have a high probability of being involved in ligand binding. This technique has been employed successfully to map the contact residues in multiple known targets of the anticancer drugs paclitaxel (Taxol), docetaxel (Taxotere) and 2-methoxyestradiol and the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan, and to identify a novel paclitaxel receptor [1]. These data corroborate the observation that the binding properties of peptides displayed on the surface of phage particles can mimic the binding properties of peptides in naturally occurring proteins. It follows directly that structural context is relatively unimportant for determining the binding properties of these disordered peptides. This technique represents a novel, rapid, high resolution method for identifying potential ligand binding sites in the absence of three-dimensional information and has the potential to greatly enhance the speed of development of novel small molecule pharmaceuticals.

  11. Design of Ligands for Affinity Purification of G-CSF Based on Peptide Ligands Derived from a Peptide Library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Combinatorial peptide libraries have become powerful tools to screen functional ligands by the principle of affinity selection. We screened in a phage peptide library to investigate potential peptide affinity ligands for the purification of human granulocyte colony-stimulation factor(hG-CSF). Peptide ligands will be promising to replace monoclonal antibodies as they have advantages of high stability, efficiency, selectivity and low price.

  12. Selection of phages and conditions for the safe phage therapy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krylov, Victor; Shaburova, Olga; Pleteneva, Elena; Krylov, Sergey; Kaplan, Alla; Burkaltseva, Maria; Polygach, Olga; Chesnokova, Elena

    2015-02-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens forced us to consider the phage therapy as one of the possible alternative approaches to treatment. The purpose of this paper is to consider the conditions for the safe, long-term use of phage therapy against various infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We describe the selection of the most suitable phages, their most effective combinations and some approaches for the rapid recognition of phages unsuitable for use in therapy. The benefits and disadvantages of the various different approaches to the preparation of phage mixtures are considered, together with the specific conditions that are required for the safe application of phage therapy in general hospitals and the possibilities for the development of personalized phage therapy.

  13. Phage-Phagocyte Interactions and Their Implications for Phage Application as Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Jończyk-Matysiak

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Phagocytes are the main component of innate immunity. They remove pathogens and particles from organisms using their bactericidal tools in the form of both reactive oxygen species and degrading enzymes—contained in granules—that are potentially toxic proteins. Therefore, it is important to investigate the possible interactions between phages and immune cells and avoid any phage side effects on them. Recent progress in knowledge concerning the influence of phages on phagocytes is also important as such interactions may shape the immune response. In this review we have summarized the current knowledge on phage interactions with phagocytes described so far and their potential implications for phage therapy. The data suggesting that phage do not downregulate important phagocyte functions are especially relevant for the concept of phage therapy.

  14. Selection of phages and conditions for the safe phage therapy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Victor; Krylov; Olga; Shaburova; Elena; Pleteneva; Sergey; Krylov; Alla; Kaplan; Maria; Burkaltseva; Olga; Polygach; Elena; Chesnokova

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens forced us to consider the phage therapy as one of the possible alternative approaches to treatment. The purpose of this paper is to consider the conditions for the safe, long-term use of phage therapy against various infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We describe the selection of the most suitable phages, their most effective combinations and some approaches for the rapid recognition of phages unsuitable for use in therapy. The benefi ts and disadvantages of the various different approaches to the preparation of phage mixtures are considered, together with the specifi c conditions that are required for the safe application of phage therapy in general hospitals and the possibilities for the development of personalized phage therapy.

  15. Tumor penetrating peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tambet eTeesalu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC, contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular zip code of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is

  16. A shortcut in phage screening technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre de Andrade

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available A simple modification of the traditional Benton & Davis technique for phage screening is presented that avoids the tedious sample dilutions of putative spots/phages towards the second screening. With the use of a sole agar plate and nylon filter, the modification distinguishes a true positive recombinant from a false positive, with high probability of success.

  17. Methods for Selecting Phage Display Antibody Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara-Acevedo, Ricardo; Diez, Paula; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Maria; Degano, Rosa Maria; Ibarrola, Nieves; Gongora, Rafael; Orfao, Alberto; Fuentes, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The selection process aims sequential enrichment of phage antibody display library in clones that recognize the target of interest or antigen as the library undergoes successive rounds of selection. In this review, selection methods most commonly used for phage display antibody libraries have been comprehensively described.

  18. A Co-expression System Based on Phage and Phagemid to Select Cognate Antibody-antigen Pairs in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A modified selectively-infective phage (SIP) is developed to facilitate the selection of interacting antibody-antigen pairs from a large single-chain antibody (scFv) library in vivo. The system is constructed with a modified helper phage M13KO7 and phagemid pCANTAB 5 E. The antigen fused to the C-terminal of N1-N2 domain and the scFv to the N-terminal of CT domain of the gIIIp of filamentous phage are encoded on the phage and phagemid vectors respectively. The phages produced by co-transformants restore infectivity via interaction between antigen and antibody fusions in the cell periplasm. In a model system, the scFv fragment of the anti-hemagglutinin 17/9 antibody and its corresponding antigen are detected in the presence of a 105 fold excess of a non-interacting control pairs, which demonstrates this system to be very sensitive and facile to screen a large single-chain antibody library.

  19. Aeromonas phages encode tRNAs for their overused codons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, Ramanandan; Chithambaram, Shivapriya; Xia, Xuhua

    2014-01-01

    The GC-rich bacterial species, Aeromonas salmonicida, is parasitised by both GC-rich phages (Aeromonas phages - phiAS7 and vB_AsaM-56) and GC-poor phages (Aeromonas phages - 25, 31, 44RR2.8t, 65, Aes508, phiAS4 and phiAS5). Both the GC-rich Aeromonas phage phiAS7 and Aeromonas phage vB_AsaM-56 have nearly identical codon usage bias as their host. While all the remaining seven GC-poor Aeromonas phages differ dramatically in codon usage from their GC-rich host. Here, we investigated whether tRNA encoded in the genome of Aeromonas phages facilitate the translation of phage proteins. We found that tRNAs encoded in the phage genome correspond to synonymous codons overused in the phage genes but not in the host genes.

  20. A mimotope of Pre-S2 region of surface antigen of viral hepatitis Bscreened by phage display

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    To acquire the phage-displayed mimotopes which mimic the specificity of hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg), a random peptide library expressing linear peptide with 12 amino acids in length were used to screen with the serum from a hepatitis B virus infected patient in the recovery phase. After 3 rounds of biopanning, the positive phages were confirmed by competitive ELISA using HBsAg/P33. Two phagotopes were identified and one of them was confirmed as mimotope by competition experiment. Based on the mimotpe, a multiple antigenic peptide with four branches was synthesized by solid phase peptide synthesis. The antiginicity and specificity of the synthesized antigen was tested in BALB/c mice compared with the native epitope-based antigen. The results showed that the mimotope-based antigen could evoke higher titer of antibodies with the same specificity of the epitope-based antigen. Those findings indicate mimotopes can be used in antigen and vaccine design.

  1. High-resolution CCD spectra of stars in globular clusters. I - Oxygen in M13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leep, E. M.; Wallerstein, G.; Oke, J. B.

    1986-01-01

    High-resolution (0.3 A) CCD spectra obtained at the 200 in. coude spectrograph have been analyzed for the abundances of O, Sc, Fe, and La in four stars in the globular cluster M13. Fe/H abundance is found to be = -1.6, as found by many other observers of this cluster. For three stars O/Fe abundance is found to be = +0.3 + or - 0.1, which is similar to O/Fe ratios in other globular clusters and metal-poor field stars. For star II-67, no oxygen line is visible at 6300 A and O/Fe abundance is found to be not greater than -0.4 (for a high carbon content) and not greater than -0.7 (for a low carbon content). The latter is more likely to be correct. Two possible explanations of the oxygen deficiency in II-67 are discussed: primordial deficiency, and CNO cycling at or above a temperature of 25,000,000 K.

  2. 应用随机多肽文库分析BAC5单抗相关的抗原表位%Analysis of BAC5 mcAb-Related Epitope Using Random Peptide library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖锡宾; 张昌卿; 张颖; 张如华; 李经略; 冯凯涛; 孙韵; 叶永照

    2003-01-01

    Objective To identify epitope relating to BAC5 mcAb, a kind of monoclonal antibody (mcAb) located on the surface of nasopha-ryngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells.Methods Using BAC5 mcAb as a selected target, the 3 rounds of biopanning to a 12 mer random peptide library (RPL) presen-ted by M13 phages were carried out. The positive M13 phage clones were chosen and confirmed with sandwich ELISA for antibodycapture and competitive assay. The exogenous DNA fragments in the positive/negative M13 phages were sequenced to deduce andcompare the order of the amino acids of exogenous peptides among the phage clones.Results 77% (35/45) of the phages eluted from the 3rd round of biopnning could be captured by BAC5 mcAb. The 3 kinds ofthe peptides were displayed by M13 phages from the 8 positive clones identified with competitive assay. The same character of "-P-V-"structure existed near N-terminus of the 3 different peptides, i.e. -H-Q-S-H-Y-P-Y-P-V-V-S-L- (4/8) -Q-N-Q-A-W-F-S-Q-P-V-R-M- (3/8) and T-Q-A-Y-K-G-F-P-V-L-P-S- (1/8) in comparison with the peptide" -N-H-Q-S-T-F-W-Q-K-W-T-A-" dis-played by M13 phages from the negative clones (6/6).Conclusion BAC5 mcAb can recognize the 3 kinds of the peptides with-P-V-structure near N-terminus. These peptides mimic thestructure of the epitope on the surface of NPC cells recognized by BAC5 mcAb.%目的 鉴定能被BAC5单抗识别的定位于鼻咽癌细胞表面的抗原表位.方法 应用BAC5单抗作为靶抗体对噬菌体呈现的随机12肽文库进行3轮生物淘洗,用抗体捕获和竞争试验的夹心ELISA方法选择和鉴定阳性噬菌体克隆,对阳性和阴性噬菌体的外源性DNA片段进行序列分析,推导和比较由这些噬菌体所呈现的多肽氨基酸序列.结果 通过3轮生物淘洗能被抗体捕获的噬菌体克隆为77%(35/45).用竞争试验从所捕获的克隆中测得8个阳性克隆.来自这8个克隆的噬菌体呈现三种外源多肽,即-H-Q-S-H-Y-P-Y-P-V-V-S-L-(4/8)-Q-N-Q-A

  3. Enhanced Sensitive Immunoassay: Noncompetitive Phage Anti-Immune Complex Assay for the Determination of Malachite Green and Leucomalachite Green

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    To develop a more sensitive immunoassay for malachite green (MG) and leucomalachite green (LMG), we identified the immunocomplex binding phage-borne peptides for use in the noncompetitive phage anti-immunocomplex assay (PHAIA). An anti-LMG monoclonal antibody (mAb) was used to select immunocomplex binding peptides from a circular random eight-amino-acid phage-displayed library. After three rounds of panning-elution, five peptides that bound the LMG–mAb immunocomplex were obtained. One of the phage-borne peptide clones that resulted in an assay with the highest sensitivity was chosen for further research. The concentration of LMG producing 50% of the saturated signal and the limit of detection of the assay were 7.02 and 0.55 ng/mL, respectively, with a linear range of 1.35 to 21.56 ng/mL. The PHAIA based on the same antibody was 16 times more sensitive compared to the competitive immunoassay. PHAIA was used to analyze LMG, MG, and two mixtures of spiked fish samples, with validation by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detector. Results showed a good correlation (R2LMG = 0.9841; R2MG = 0.993; R2Mixture = 0.9903) between the data of PHAIA and HPLC, thus the assay was an efficient method for monitoring food safety. PMID:25077381

  4. High-throughput sequencing enhanced phage display enables the identification of patient-specific epitope motifs in serum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Anders; Kringelum, Jens Vindahl; Hansen, Christian Skjødt

    2015-01-01

    of the bioinformatic approach was demonstrated by identifying epitopes of a prominent peanut allergen, Ara h 1, in sera from patients with severe peanut allergy. The identified epitopes were confirmed by high-density peptide micro-arrays. The present study demonstrates that high-throughput sequencing can empower phage...

  5. ISOLATION OF ENDOTOXIN-SPECIFIC ANTIBODIES BY SELECTION OF AN SINGLE CHAIN PHAGE ANTIBODY LIBRARY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈鸣; 俞丽丽; 张雪; 府伟灵

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To isolate murine anti endotoxin single chain phage antibody from a constructed library. Methods: Total RNA was firstly extracted from murine splenic cells and mRNA was reverse-transcribed into cDNA. Then the designed primers were used to amplify the variable region genes of the heavy and light chain (VH, VL) with polymerase chain reaction. The linker was used to assemble the VH and VL into ScFv, and the NotI and SfiI restriction enzymes were used to digest the ScFv in order to ligate into the pCANTAB5E phagemid vector that was already digested with the same restriction enzymes. The ligated vector was then introduced into competent E.coli TG1 cells to construct a single-chain phage antibody library. After rescued with M13KO7 helper phage, recombinant phages displaying ScFv fragments were harvested from the supernatant and selected with endotoxin. The enriched positive clones were reinfected into TG1 cells. Finally, 190 clones were randomly selected to detect the anti endotoxin antibody with indirect ELISA. Results: The titer of anti endotoxin in murine sera was 1:12,800. The concentration of total RNA was 12.38 μg/ml. 1.9×107 clones were obtained after transformed into TG1. 3×104 colonies were gotten after one round panning. Two positive colonies were confirmed with indirect ELISA among 190 randomly selected colonies. Conclusion: A 1.9×107 murine anti endotoxin single chain phage antibody library was successfully constructed. Two anti endotoxin antibodies were obtained from the library.

  6. A cyclic peptidic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Baoyu; Xu, Peng; Jiang, Longguang;

    2014-01-01

    Peptides are attracting increasing interest as protease inhibitors. Here, we demonstrate a new inhibitory mechanism and a new type of exosite interactions for a phage-displayed peptide library-derived competitive inhibitor, mupain-1 (CPAYSRYLDC), of the serine protease murine urokinase...... pocket, its carbonyl group aligning improperly relative to Ser195 and the oxyanion hole, explaining why the peptide is an inhibitor rather than a substrate. Substitution of the P1 Arg with novel unnatural Arg analogues with aliphatic or aromatic ring structures led to an increased affinity, depending...... of this peptidic inhibitor, a concept different from conventional attempts at improving inhibitor affinity by reducing the entropic burden....

  7. PRODUCTION OF PHAGE-DISPLAYED ANTI-IDIOTYPIC ANTIBODY SINGLE CHAIN VARIABLE FRAGMENTS TO MG7 MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY DIRECTED AGAINST GASTRIC CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何凤田; 聂勇战; 陈宝军; 乔太东; 韩者艺; 樊代明

    2002-01-01

    Objective. To generate phage-displayed anti-idiotypic antibody single chain variable fragments (anti -Id ScFv) to MG7 monoclonal antibody (McAb) directed against gastric carcinoma so as to lay a foundation for developing anti-Id ScFv vaccine of the cancer.Methods. Balb/c mice were immunized i. p. with MG7 McAb conjugated with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), and mRNA was isolated from the spleens of the immunized mice. Heavy and light chain (VH and VL)genes of antibody were amplified separately and assembled into ScFv genes with a linker DNA by PCR. The ScFv genes were ligated into the phagemid vector pCANTAB5E and the ligated sample was transformed into competent E. coli TG1. The transformants were infected with M13KO7 helper phage to yield recombinant phages displaying ScFv on the tips of M13 phage. After 4 rounds of panning with MG7, the MG7-positive clones were selected by ELISA from the enriched phages. Thetypesoftheanti-IdScFvdisplayedontheselectedphagecloneswerepreliminarily identified by competition ELISA.Results. The VH, VL and ScFv DNAs were about 340 bp, 320 bp and 750 bp respectively. Twenty-four MG7-positive clones were selected from 60 enriched phage clones, among which 5 displayed β or γtype anti-Id ScFv.Conclsion. The anti-Id ScFv to MG7 McAb can be successfully selected by recombinant phage antibody technique, which paves a way for the study of prevention and cure of gastric carcinoma by using anti-Id ScFv.

  8. A phage-targeting strategy for the design of spatiotemporal drug delivery from grafted matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawada Ritsuko

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The natural response to injury is dynamic and normally consists of complex temporal and spatial cellular changes in gene expression, which, when acting in synchrony, result in patent tissue repair and, in some instances, regeneration. However, current therapeutic regiments are static and most rely on matrices, gels and engineered skin tissue. Accordingly, there is a need to design next-generation grafting materials to enable biotherapeutic spatiotemporal targeting from clinically approved matrices. To this end, rather then focus on developing completely new grafting materials, we investigated whether phage display could be deployed onto clinically approved synthetic grafts to identify peptide motifs capable of linking pharmaceutical drugs with differential affinities and eventually, control drug delivery from matrices over both space and time. Methods To test this hypothesis, we biopanned combinatorial peptide libraries onto different formulations of a wound-healing matrix (Integra® and eluted the bound peptides with 1 high salt, 2 collagen and glycosaminoglycan or 3 low pH. After three to six rounds of biopanning, phage recovery and phage amplification of the bound particles, any phage that had acquired a capacity to bind the matrix was sequenced. Results In this first report, we identify distinct classes of matrix-binding peptides which elute differently from the screened matrix and demonstrate that they can be applied in a spatially relevant manner. Conclusions We suggest that further applications of these combinatorial techniques to wound-healing matrices may offer a new way to improve the performance of clinically approved matrices so as to introduce temporal and spatial control over drug delivery.

  9. Information Phage Therapy Research Should Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen T. Abedon

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages, or phages, are viruses which infect bacteria. A large subset of phages infect bactericidally and, consequently, for nearly one hundred years have been employed as antibacterial agents both within and outside of medicine. Clinically these applications are described as phage or bacteriophage therapy. Alternatively, and especially in the treatment of environments, this practice instead may be described as a phage-mediated biocontrol of bacteria. Though the history of phage therapy has involved substantial clinical experimentation, current standards along with drug regulations have placed a premium on preclinical approaches, i.e., animal experiments. As such, it is important for preclinical experiments not only to be held to high standards but also to be reported in a manner which improves translation to clinical utility. Here I address this latter issue, that of optimization of reporting of preclinical as well as clinical experiments. I do this by providing a list of pertinent information and data which, in my opinion, phage therapy experiments ought to present in publications, along with tips for best practices. The goal is to improve the ability of readers to gain relevant information from reports on phage therapy research, to allow other researchers greater potential to repeat or extend findings, to ease transitions from preclinical to clinical development, and otherwise simply to improve phage therapy experiments. Targeted are not just authors but also reviewers, other critical readers, writers of commentaries, and, perhaps, formulators of guidelines or policy. Though emphasizing therapy, many points are applicable to phage-mediated biocontrol of bacteria more generally.

  10. Discovery of White Dwarfs in the Globular Clusters M13 and M22 Using HST ACS Photometric Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Dong-Hwan; Yoon, Tae Seog; Lee, Sang-Gak; Sung, Hyun-Il

    2015-12-01

    A search for hot and bright white dwarfs (WDs) in the Milky Way globular clusters M13 (NGC 6205) and M22 (NGC 6656) is carried out using the deep and homogeneous VI photometric catalog of Anderson et al. and and Sarajedini et al., based on data taken with the ACS/WFC aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). V versus V-I color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of M13 and M22 are constructed and numerous spurious detections are rejected according to their photometric quality parameters qfit(V) and qfit(I). In the case of M13, further radial restriction is applied to reject central stars with higher photometric errors due to central crowding. From each resultant V versus V-I CMD, sixteen and thirteen WD candidates are identified in M13 and M22, respectively. They are identified as stellar objects in the accompanying ACS/WFC images and are found to be randomly distributed across the central regions of M13 and M22. Their positions in the CMDs are in the bright part of the DA WD cooling sequences indicating that they are true WDs. In order to confirm their nature, follow-up spectroscopic observations are needed.

  11. Mammalian Host-Versus-Phage immune response determines phage fate in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna Hodyra-Stefaniak; Paulina Miernikiewicz; Jarosław Drapała; Marek Drab; Ewa Jończyk-Matysiak; Dorota Lecion; Zuzanna Kaźmierczak; Weronika Beta; Joanna Majewska; Marek Harhala; Barbara Bubak; Anna Kłopot; Andrzej Górski; Krystyna Dąbrowska

    2015-01-01

    Emerging bacterial antibiotic resistance draws attention to bacteriophages as a therapeutic alternative to treat bacterial infection. Examples of phage that combat bacteria abound. However, despite careful testing of antibacterial activity in vitro, failures nevertheless commonly occur. We investigated immunological response of phage antibacterial potency in vivo. Anti-phage activity of phagocytes, antibodies, and serum complement were identified by direct testing and by high-resolution fluor...

  12. Phage as a modulator of immune responses: practical implications for phage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górski, Andrzej; Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Borysowski, Jan; Dąbrowska, Krystyna; Wierzbicki, Piotr; Ohams, Monika; Korczak-Kowalska, Grażyna; Olszowska-Zaremba, Natasza; Łusiak-Szelachowska, Marzena; Kłak, Marlena; Jończyk, Ewa; Kaniuga, Ewelina; Gołaś, Aneta; Purchla, Sylwia; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Letkiewicz, Sławomir; Fortuna, Wojciech; Szufnarowski, Krzysztof; Pawełczyk, Zdzisław; Rogóż, Paweł; Kłosowska, Danuta

    2012-01-01

    Although the natural hosts for bacteriophages are bacteria, a growing body of data shows that phages can also interact with some populations of mammalian cells, especially with cells of the immune system. In general, these interactions include two main aspects. The first is the phage immunogenicity, that is, the capacity of phages to induce specific immune responses, in particular the generation of specific antibodies against phage antigens. The other aspect includes the immunomodulatory activity of phages, that is, the nonspecific effects of phages on different functions of major populations of immune cells involved in both innate and adaptive immune responses. These functions include, among others, phagocytosis and the respiratory burst of phagocytic cells, the production of cytokines, and the generation of antibodies against nonphage antigens. The aim of this chapter is to discuss the interactions between phages and cells of the immune system, along with their implications for phage therapy. These topics are presented based on the results of experimental studies and unique data on immunomodulatory effects found in patients with bacterial infections treated with phage preparations.

  13. Phage-Antibiotic Synergy (PAS): beta-lactam and quinolone antibiotics stimulate virulent phage growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeau, André M; Tétart, Françoise; Trojet, Sabrina N; Prère, Marie-Françoise; Krisch, H M

    2007-08-29

    Although the multiplication of bacteriophages (phages) has a substantial impact on the biosphere, comparatively little is known about how the external environment affects phage production. Here we report that sub-lethal concentrations of certain antibiotics can substantially stimulate the host bacterial cell's production of some virulent phage. For example, a low dosage of cefotaxime, a cephalosporin, increased an uropathogenic Escherichia coli strain's production of the phage PhiMFP by more than 7-fold. We name this phenomenon Phage-Antibiotic Synergy (PAS). A related effect was observed in diverse host-phage systems, including the T4-like phages, with beta-lactam and quinolone antibiotics, as well as mitomycin C. A common characteristic of these antibiotics is that they inhibit bacterial cell division and trigger the SOS system. We therefore examined the PAS effect within the context of the bacterial SOS and filamentation responses. We found that the PAS effect appears SOS-independent and is primarily a consequence of cellular filamentation; it is mimicked by cells that constitutively filament. The fact that completely unrelated phages manifest this phenomenon suggests that it confers an important and general advantage to the phages.

  14. Phage-Antibiotic Synergy (PAS: beta-lactam and quinolone antibiotics stimulate virulent phage growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André M Comeau

    Full Text Available Although the multiplication of bacteriophages (phages has a substantial impact on the biosphere, comparatively little is known about how the external environment affects phage production. Here we report that sub-lethal concentrations of certain antibiotics can substantially stimulate the host bacterial cell's production of some virulent phage. For example, a low dosage of cefotaxime, a cephalosporin, increased an uropathogenic Escherichia coli strain's production of the phage PhiMFP by more than 7-fold. We name this phenomenon Phage-Antibiotic Synergy (PAS. A related effect was observed in diverse host-phage systems, including the T4-like phages, with beta-lactam and quinolone antibiotics, as well as mitomycin C. A common characteristic of these antibiotics is that they inhibit bacterial cell division and trigger the SOS system. We therefore examined the PAS effect within the context of the bacterial SOS and filamentation responses. We found that the PAS effect appears SOS-independent and is primarily a consequence of cellular filamentation; it is mimicked by cells that constitutively filament. The fact that completely unrelated phages manifest this phenomenon suggests that it confers an important and general advantage to the phages.

  15. Phage display-derived binders able to distinguish Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine Morton

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to produce phage display-derived binders with the ability to distinguish Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria spp., which may have potential utility to enhance detection of Listeria monocytogenes. To obtain binders with the desired binding specificity a series of surface and solution phage-display biopannings were performed. Initially, three rounds of surface biopanning against gamma-irradiated L. monocytogenes serovar 4b cells were performed followed by an additional surface biopanning round against L. monocytogenes 4b which included prior subtraction biopanning against gamma-irradiated L. innocua cells. In an attempt to further enhance binder specificity for L. monocytogenes 4b two rounds of solution biopanning were performed, both rounds included initial subtraction solution biopanning against L. innocua. Subsequent evaluations were performed on the phage clones by phage binding ELISA. All phage clones tested from the second round of solution biopanning had higher specificity for L. monocytogenes 4b than for L. innocua and three other foodborne pathogens (Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli and Campylobacter jejuni. Further evaluation with five other Listeria spp. revealed that one phage clone in particular, expressing peptide GRIADLPPLKPN, was highly specific for L. monocytogenes with at least 43-fold more binding capability to L. monocytogenes 4b than to any other Listeria sp. This proof-of-principle study demonstrates how a combination of surface, solution and subtractive biopanning was used to maximise binder specificity. L. monocytogenes-specific binders were obtained which could have potential application in novel detection tests for L. monocytogenes, benefiting both the food and medical industries.

  16. Phage display-derived binders able to distinguish Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Josephine; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara; Charlermroj, Ratthaphol; Stewart, Linda D; Elliott, Christopher T; Grant, Irene R

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to produce phage display-derived binders with the ability to distinguish Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria spp., which may have potential utility to enhance detection of Listeria monocytogenes. To obtain binders with the desired binding specificity a series of surface and solution phage-display biopannings were performed. Initially, three rounds of surface biopanning against gamma-irradiated L. monocytogenes serovar 4b cells were performed followed by an additional surface biopanning round against L. monocytogenes 4b which included prior subtraction biopanning against gamma-irradiated L. innocua cells. In an attempt to further enhance binder specificity for L. monocytogenes 4b two rounds of solution biopanning were performed, both rounds included initial subtraction solution biopanning against L. innocua. Subsequent evaluations were performed on the phage clones by phage binding ELISA. All phage clones tested from the second round of solution biopanning had higher specificity for L. monocytogenes 4b than for L. innocua and three other foodborne pathogens (Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli and Campylobacter jejuni). Further evaluation with five other Listeria spp. revealed that one phage clone in particular, expressing peptide GRIADLPPLKPN, was highly specific for L. monocytogenes with at least 43-fold more binding capability to L. monocytogenes 4b than to any other Listeria sp. This proof-of-principle study demonstrates how a combination of surface, solution and subtractive biopanning was used to maximise binder specificity. L. monocytogenes-specific binders were obtained which could have potential application in novel detection tests for L. monocytogenes, benefiting both the food and medical industries.

  17. Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium Phage Waterfoul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Paige N.; Embry, Ella K.; Johnson, Christa O.; Watson, Tiara L.; Weast, Sayre K.; DeGraw, Caroline J.; Douglas, Jessica R.; Sellers, J. Michael; D’Angelo, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Waterfoul is a newly isolated temperate siphovirus of Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155. It was identified as a member of the K5 cluster of Mycobacterium phages and has a 61,248-bp genome with 95 predicted genes. PMID:27856585

  18. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  19. Effect of the dnaN mutation on the growth of small DNA phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taketo, A

    1981-01-01

    The effect of the dnaN mutation on the growth of single-stranded DNA phages was studied by burst experiments. In HC138 dnaN cells exposed to 42.5 degrees C at 5 min before infection, growth of spherical (microvirid or isometric) phages such as alpha 3, phi Kh-1 and phi X174 was partially reduced at the nonpermissive temperature. When infection was performed at 30 min after temperature shift-up, viral replication was completely inhibited at 42.5 degrees C in the dnaN strain but not in a dna+ revertant. At 41 degrees C, multiplication of filamentous (inovirid) phages M13 and fd was restricted specifically in HC138 F+ dnaN bacteria. When dnaN cells lysogenic for lambda i21 were grown at 42.5 degrees C for 60 min and then shifted down to 33 degrees C, a burst of lambda i21 occurred with concomitant cellular lysis, manifesting induction of the prophage development.

  20. Theory of the low frequency mechanical modes and Raman spectra of the M13 bacteriophage capsid with atomic detail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykeman, Eric C; Sankey, Otto F

    2009-01-21

    We present a theoretical study of the low frequency vibrational modes of the M13 bacteriophage using a fully atomistic model. Using ideas from electronic structure theory, the few lowest vibrational modes of the M13 bacteriophage are determined using classical harmonic analysis. The relative Raman intensity is estimated for each of the mechanical modes using a bond polarizability model. Comparison of the atomic mechanical modes calculated here with modes derived from elastic continuum theory shows that a much richer spectrum emerges from an atomistic picture.

  1. Supersize me: Cronobacter sakazakii phage GAP32

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasifar, Reza; Griffiths, Mansel W. [Canadian Research Institute for Food Safety, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada); Sabour, Parviz M. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Guelph Food Research Centre, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 5C9 (Canada); Ackermann, Hans-Wolfgang [Department of Microbiology-Infectiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Vandersteegen, Katrien; Lavigne, Rob [Laboratory of Gene Technology, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Noben, Jean-Paul [Biomedical Research Institute and Transnational University Limburg, School of Life Sciences, Hasselt University, Diepenbeek (Belgium); Alanis Villa, Argentina; Abbasifar, Arash [Canadian Research Institute for Food Safety, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada); Nash, John H.E. [Public Health Agency of Canada, Laboratory for Foodborne Zoonoses, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 3W4 (Canada); Kropinski, Andrew M., E-mail: akropins@uoguelph.ca [Public Health Agency of Canada, Laboratory for Foodborne Zoonoses, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 3W4 (Canada); Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Cronobacter sakazakii is a Gram-negative pathogen found in milk-based formulae that causes infant meningitis. Bacteriophages have been proposed to control bacterial pathogens; however, comprehensive knowledge about a phage is required to ensure its safety before clinical application. We have characterized C. sakazakii phage vB{sub C}saM{sub G}AP32 (GAP32), which possesses the second largest sequenced phage genome (358,663 bp). A total of 571 genes including 545 protein coding sequences and 26 tRNAs were identified, thus more genes than in the smallest bacterium, Mycoplasma genitalium G37. BLASTP and HHpred searches, together with proteomic analyses reveal that only 23.9% of the putative proteins have defined functions. Some of the unique features of this phage include: a chromosome condensation protein, two copies of the large subunit terminase, a predicted signal-arrest-release lysin; and an RpoD-like protein, which is possibly involved in the switch from immediate early to delayed early transcription. Its closest relatives are all extremely large myoviruses, namely coliphage PBECO4 and Klebsiella phage vB{sub K}leM-RaK2, with whom it shares approximately 44% homologous proteins. Since the homologs are not evenly distributed, we propose that these three phages belong to a new subfamily. - Highlights: • Cronobacter sakazakii phage vB{sub C}saM{sub G}AP32 has a genome of 358,663 bp. • It encodes 545 proteins which is more than Mycoplasma genitalium G37. • It is a member of the Myoviridae. • It is peripherally related to coliphage PBECO4 and Klebsiella phage vB{sub K}leM-RaK2. • GAP32 encodes a chromosome condensation protein.

  2. The Staphylococci Phages Family: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Van Melderen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to their crucial role in pathogenesis and virulence, phages of Staphylococcus aureus have been extensively studied. Most of them encode and disseminate potent staphylococcal virulence factors. In addition, their movements contribute to the extraordinary versatility and adaptability of this prominent pathogen by improving genome plasticity. In addition to S. aureus, phages from coagulase-negative Staphylococci (CoNS are gaining increasing interest. Some of these species, such as S. epidermidis, cause nosocomial infections and are therefore problematic for public health. This review provides an overview of the staphylococcal phages family extended to CoNS phages. At the morphological level, all these phages characterized so far belong to the Caudovirales order and are mainly temperate Siphoviridae. At the molecular level, comparative genomics revealed an extensive mosaicism, with genes organized into functional modules that are frequently exchanged between phages. Evolutionary relationships within this family, as well as with other families, have been highlighted. All these aspects are of crucial importance for our understanding of evolution and emergence of pathogens among bacterial species such as Staphylococci.

  3. Generation of Potent Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Neutralizing Antibodies from Mouse Phage Display Library for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Da Lai

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is an important stimulator for angiogenesis in solid tumors. Blocking VEGF activity is an effective therapeutic strategy to inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. Avastin, a humanized monoclonal antibody recognizes VEGF, has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. To generate potential VEGF-recognizing antibodies with better tumor regression ability than that of Avastin, we have designed a systematic antibody selection plan. From mice immunized with recombinant human VEGF, we generated three phage display libraries, scFv-M13KO7, Fab-M13KO7, and scFv-Hyperphage, in single-chain Fv (scFv or Fab format, displayed using either M13KO7 helper phage or Hyperphage. Solid-phase and solution-phase selection strategies were then applied to each library, generating six panning combinations. A total of sixty-four antibodies recognizing VEGF were obtained. Based on the results of epitope mapping, binding affinity, and biological functions in tumor inhibition, eight antibodies were chosen to examine their abilities in tumor regression in a mouse xenograft model using human COLO 205 cancer cells. Three of them showed improvement in the inhibition of tumor growth (328%–347% tumor growth ratio (% of Day 0 tumor volume on Day 21 vs. 435% with Avastin. This finding suggests a potential use of these three antibodies for VEGF-targeted therapy.

  4. Sequencing and Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage JG004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunk Boyke

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phages could be an important alternative to antibiotics, especially for treatment of multiresistant bacteria as e.g. Pseudomonas aeruginosa. For an effective use of bacteriophages as antimicrobial agents, it is important to understand phage biology but also genes of the bacterial host essential for phage infection. Results We isolated and characterized a lytic Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage, named JG004, and sequenced its genome. Phage JG004 is a lipopolysaccharide specific broad-host-range phage of the Myoviridae phage family. The genome of phage JG004 encodes twelve tRNAs and is highly related to the PAK-P1 phage genome. To investigate phage biology and phage-host interactions, we used transposon mutagenesis of the P. aeruginosa host and identified P. aeruginosa genes, which are essential for phage infection. Analysis of the respective P. aeruginosa mutants revealed several characteristics, such as host receptor and possible spermidine-dependance of phage JG004. Conclusions Whole genome sequencing of phage JG004 in combination with identification of P. aeruginosa host genes essential for infection, allowed insights into JG004 biology, revealed possible resistance mechanisms of the host bacterium such as mutations in LPS and spermidine biosynthesis and can also be used to characterize unknown gene products in P. aeruginosa.

  5. Identification of Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) medicae based on a specific genomic sequence unveiled by M13-PCR fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dourado, Ana Catarina; Alves, Paula I L; Tenreiro, Tania; Ferreira, Eugénio M; Tenreiro, Rogério; Fareleira, Paula; Crespo, M Teresa Barreto

    2009-12-01

    A collection of nodule isolates from Medicago polymorpha obtained from southern and central Portugal was evaluated by M13-PCR fingerprinting and hierarchical cluster analysis. Several genomic clusters were obtained which, by 16S rRNA gene sequencing of selected representatives, were shown to be associated with particular taxonomic groups of rhizobia and other soil bacteria. The method provided a clear separation between rhizobia and co-isolated non-symbiotic soil contaminants. Ten M13-PCR groups were assigned to Sinorhizobium (Ensifer) medicae and included all isolates responsible for the formation of nitrogen-fixing nodules upon re-inoculation of M. polymorpha test-plants. In addition, enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR fingerprinting indicated a high genomic heterogeneity within the major M13- PCR clusters of S. medicae isolates. Based on nucleotide sequence data of an M13-PCR amplicon of ca. 1500 bp, observed only in S. medicae isolates and spanning locus Smed_3707 to Smed_3709 from the pSMED01 plasmid sequence of S. medicae WSM419 genome's sequence, a pair of PCR primers was designed and used for direct PCR amplification of a 1399-bp sequence within this fragment. Additional in silico and in vitro experiments, as well as phylogenetic analysis, confirmed the specificity of this primer combination and therefore the reliability of this approach in the prompt identification of S. medicae isolates and their distinction from other soil bacteria.

  6. Colonisation of a phage susceptible Campylobacter jejuni population in two phage positive broiler flocks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Kittler

    Full Text Available The pathogens Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are commensals in the poultry intestine and campylobacteriosis is one of the most frequent foodborne diseases in developed and developing countries. Phages were identified to be effective in reducing intestinal Campylobacter load and this was evaluated, in the first field trials which were recently carried out. The aim of this study was to further investigate Campylobacter population dynamics during phage application on a commercial broiler farm. This study determines the superiority in colonisation of a Campylobacter type found in a field trial that was susceptible to phages in in vitro tests. The colonisation factors, i.e. motility and gamma glutamyl transferase activity, were increased in this type. The clustering in phylogenetic comparisons of MALDI-TOF spectra did not match the ST, biochemical phenotype and phage susceptibility. Occurrence of Campylobacter jejuni strains and phage susceptibility types with different colonisation potential seem to play a very important role in the success of phage therapy in commercial broiler houses. Thus, mechanisms of both, phage susceptibility and Campylobacter colonisation should be further investigated and considered when composing phage cocktails.

  7. Peptide array-based characterization and design of ZnO-high affinity peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okochi, Mina; Sugita, Tomoya; Furusawa, Seiji; Umetsu, Mitsuo; Adschiri, Tadafumi; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2010-08-15

    Peptides with both an affinity for ZnO and the ability to generate ZnO nanoparticles have attracted attention for the self-assembly and templating of nanoscale building blocks under ambient conditions with compositional uniformity. In this study, we have analyzed the specific binding sites of the ZnO-binding peptide, EAHVMHKVAPRP, which was identified using a phage display peptide library. The peptide binding assay against ZnO nanoparticles was performed using peptides synthesized on a cellulose membrane using the spot method. Using randomized rotation of amino acids in the ZnO-binding peptide, 125 spot-synthesized peptides were assayed. The peptide binding activity against ZnO nanoparticles varied greatly. This indicates that ZnO binding does not depend on total hydrophobicity or other physical parameters of these peptides, but rather that ZnO recognizes the specific amino acid alignment of these peptides. In addition, several peptides were found to show higher binding ability compared with that of the original peptides. Identification of important binding sites in the EAHVMHKVAPRP peptide was investigated by shortened, stepwise sequence from both termini. Interestingly, two ZnO-binding sites were found as 6-mer peptides: HVMHKV and HKVAPR. The peptides identified by amino acid substitution of HKVAPR were found to show high affinity and specificity for ZnO nanoparticles.

  8. Characterization and lytic activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens phages from sewage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananthi Radhakrishnan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens phages from sewage were tested against P. fluorescens isolates of soil and sewage. The phages were characterized as to host range, morphology, structural proteins and genome fingerprint. Of the seven phages isolated, one was found to be abundant in sewage (5.9×10(7 pfu/mL, having broad host range, and distinct protein and DNA profile when compared to the other six phages. DNA restriction and protein profiles of the phages and their morphology indicate the diversity in the sewage environment. None of the isolates from the rhizosphere regions of various cultivated soils were susceptible to phages isolated from sewage.

  9. Burkholderia cepacia complex Phage-Antibiotic Synergy (PAS): antibiotics stimulate lytic phage activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Fatima; Dennis, Jonathan J

    2015-02-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) is a group of at least 18 species of Gram-negative opportunistic pathogens that can cause chronic lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Bcc organisms possess high levels of innate antimicrobial resistance, and alternative therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. One proposed alternative treatment is phage therapy, the therapeutic application of bacterial viruses (or bacteriophages). Recently, some phages have been observed to form larger plaques in the presence of sublethal concentrations of certain antibiotics; this effect has been termed phage-antibiotic synergy (PAS). Those reports suggest that some antibiotics stimulate increased production of phages under certain conditions. The aim of this study is to examine PAS in phages that infect Burkholderia cenocepacia strains C6433 and K56-2. Bcc phages KS12 and KS14 were tested for PAS, using 6 antibiotics representing 4 different drug classes. Of the antibiotics tested, the most pronounced effects were observed for meropenem, ciprofloxacin, and tetracycline. When grown with subinhibitory concentrations of these three antibiotics, cells developed a chain-like arrangement, an elongated morphology, and a clustered arrangement, respectively. When treated with progressively higher antibiotic concentrations, both the sizes of plaques and phage titers increased, up to a maximum. B. cenocepacia K56-2-infected Galleria mellonella larvae treated with phage KS12 and low-dose meropenem demonstrated increased survival over controls treated with KS12 or antibiotic alone. These results suggest that antibiotics can be combined with phages to stimulate increased phage production and/or activity and thus improve the efficacy of bacterial killing.

  10. Identification and Characterization of Peptide Mimics of Blood Group A Antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaoming TANG; Lin WANG; Lihua HU; Yirong LI; Tianpen CUI; Juan XIONG; Lifang DOU

    2008-01-01

    In order to investigate peptide mimics of carbohydrate blood group A antigen, a phage display 12-met peptide library was screened with a monoclonal antibody against blood group A antigen, NaM87-1F6. The antibody-binding properties of the selected phage peptides were evaluated by phage ELISA and phage capture assay. The peptides were co-expressed as glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins. RBC agglutination inhibition assay was performed to assess the natural blood group A antigen-mimicking ability of the fusion proteins. The results showed that seven phage clones selected bound to NaM87-1F6 specifically, among which, 6 clones bore the same peptide sequence, EYWYCGMNRTGC and another harbored a different one QIWYERTLPFrF. The two peptides were successfully expressed at the N terminal of GST protein. Both of the fusion proteins inhibited the RBC agglutination mediated by anti-A serum in a concentration-dependent manner. These results suggested that the fusion proteins based on the selected peptides could mimic the blood group A an- tigen and might be used as anti-A antibody-adsorbing materials when immunoabsorption was applied in ABO incompatible transplantation.

  11. Use of Peptide Libraries for Identification and Optimization of Novel Antimicrobial Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Martin; Petkova, Asya; Gani, Jurnorain; Mikut, Ralf; Hilpert, Kai

    2017-01-01

    The increasing rates of resistance among bacteria and to a lesser extent fungi have resulted in an urgent need to find new molecules that hold therapeutic promise against multidrug-resistant strains. Antimicrobial peptides have proven very effective against a variety of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Additionally, the low levels of resistance reported towards these molecules are an attractive feature for antimicrobial drug development. Here we summarise information on diverse peptide libraries used to discover or to optimize antimicrobial peptides. Chemical synthesized peptide libraries, for example split and mix method, tea bag method, multi-pin method and cellulose spot method are discussed. In addition biological peptide library screening methods are summarized, like phage display, bacterial display, mRNA-display and ribosomal display. A few examples are given for small peptide libraries, which almost exclusively follow a rational design of peptides of interest rather than a combinatorial approach.

  12. Detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus using phage amplification combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Jon C; Barr, John R

    2017-02-01

    Antibiotic resistance continues to contribute significantly to morbidity and mortality across the world. Developing new tests for antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a core action to combat resistant infections. We describe a method that uses phage amplification detection (PAD) combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) to rapidly identify Staphylococcus aureus and determine phenotypic susceptibility to cefoxitin. Samples tested for S. aureus are incubated together with bacteriophage in the presence and absence of cefoxitin and subjected to rapid trypsin digestion followed by MALDI-MS analysis. Tryptic peptides derived from amplified phage proteins can be detected by MALDI-MS, as validated by time-of-flight (TOF)/TOF analysis of each peptide combined with database searching. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus show significant phage amplification in the presence of cefoxitin, while methicillin-sensitive S. aureus show no phage amplification relative to a no-antibiotic control. We also show that PAD methodology can be implemented on an FDA-approved commercial MALDI-MS bacterial identification system to identify S. aureus and determine antibiotic susceptibility. The novelty of this assay includes the use of phage-derived tryptic peptides as detected by MALDI-MS to monitor the results of PAD on an instrument common to many modern microbiology laboratories.

  13. In Vivo Imaging of Molecularly Targeted Phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A. Kelly

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid identification of in vivo affinity ligands would have far-reaching applications for imaging specific molecular targets, in vivo systems imaging, and medical use. We have developed a high-throughput method for identifying and optimizing ligands to map and image biologic targets of interest in vivo. We directly labeled viable phage clones with far-red fluorochromes and comparatively imaged them in vivo by multichannel fluorescence ratio imaging. Using Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine (osteonectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 as model targets, we show that: 1 fluorescently labeled phage retains target specificity on labeling; 2 in vivo distribution can be quantitated (detection thresholds of ~ 300 phage/mm3 tissue throughout the entire depth of the tumor using fluorescent tomographic imaging; and 3 fluorescently labeled phage itself can serve as a replenishable molecular imaging agent. The described method should find widespread application in the rapid in vivo discovery and validation of affinity ligands and, importantly, in the use of fluorochrome-labeled phage clones as in vivo imaging agents.

  14. Aerosol phage therapy efficacy in Burkholderia cepacia complex respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semler, Diana D; Goudie, Amanda D; Finlay, Warren H; Dennis, Jonathan J

    2014-07-01

    Phage therapy has been suggested as a potential treatment for highly antibiotic-resistant bacteria, such as the species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC). To address this hypothesis, experimental B. cenocepacia respiratory infections were established in mice using a nebulizer and a nose-only inhalation device. Following infection, the mice were treated with one of five B. cenocepacia-specific phages delivered as either an aerosol or intraperitoneal injection. The bacterial and phage titers within the lungs were assayed 2 days after treatment, and mice that received the aerosolized phage therapy demonstrated significant decreases in bacterial loads. Differences in phage activity were observed in vivo. Mice that received phage treatment by intraperitoneal injection did not demonstrate significantly reduced bacterial loads, although phage particles were isolated from their lung tissue. Based on these data, aerosol phage therapy appears to be an effective method for treating highly antibiotic-resistant bacterial respiratory infections, including those caused by BCC bacteria.

  15. Phages of Listeria offer novel tools for diagnostics and biocontrol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin J Loessner

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Historically, bacteriophages infecting their hosts have perhaps been best known and even notorious for being a nuisance in dairy-fermentation processes. However, with the rapid progress in molecular microbiology and microbial ecology, a new dawn has risen for phages. This review will provide an overview on possible uses and applications of Listeria phages, including phage-typing, reporter phage for bacterial diagnostics, and use of phage as biocontrol agents for food safety. The use of phage-encoded enzymes such as endolysins for the detection and as antimicrobial will also be addressed. Desirable properties of candidate phages for biocontrol will be discussed. While emphasizing the enormous future potential for applications, we will also consider some of the intrinsic limitations dictated by both phage and bacterial ecology.

  16. Current taxonomy of phages infecting lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer eMahony

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phages infecting lactic acid bacteria have been the focus of significant research attention over the past three decades. Through the isolation and characterization of hundreds of phage isolates, it has been possible to classify phages of the dairy starter and adjunct bacteria Lactococus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, Leuconostoc spp. and Lactobacillus spp. Among these, phages of L. lactis have been most thoroughly scrutinized and serve as an excellent model system to address issues that arise when attempting taxonomic classification of phages infecting other LAB species. Here, we present an overview of the current taxonomy of phages infecting LAB genera of industrial significance, the methods employed in these taxonomic efforts and how these may be employed for the taxonomy of phages of currently underrepresented and emerging phage species.

  17. HostPhinder: A Phage Host Prediction Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villarroel, Julia; Kleinheinz, Kortine Annina; Jurtz, Vanessa Isabell

    2016-01-01

    The current dramatic increase of antibiotic resistant bacteria has revitalised the interest in bacteriophages as alternative antibacterial treatment. Meanwhile, the development of bioinformatics methods for analysing genomic data places high-throughput approaches for phage characterization within...... reach. Here, we present HostPhinder, a tool aimed at predicting the bacterial host of phages by examining the phage genome sequence. Using a reference database of 2196 phages with known hosts, HostPhinder predicts the host species of a query phage as the host of the most genomically similar reference...... phages. As a measure of genomic similarity the number of co-occurring k-mers (DNA sequences of length k) is used. Using an independent evaluation set, HostPhinder was able to correctly predict host genus and species for 81% and 74% of the phages respectively, giving predictions for more phages than BLAST...

  18. In Vivo Selection of Phage for the Optical Imaging of PC-3 Human Prostate Carcinoma in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica R. Newton

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing medical need to detect and spatially localize early and aggressive forms of prostate cancer. Affinity ligands derived from bacteriophage (phage library screens can be developed to molecularly target prostate cancer with fluorochromes for optical imaging. Toward this goal, we used in vivo phage display and a newly described micropanning assay to select for phage that extravasate and bind human PC-3 prostate carcinoma xenografts in severe combined immune deficiency mice. One resulting phage clone (G1 displaying the peptide sequence IAGLATPGWSHWLAL was fluorescently labeled with the near-infrared fluorophore AlexaFluor 680 and was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo for its ability to bind and target PC-3 prostate carcinomas. The fluorescently labeled phage clone (G1 had a tumor-to-muscle ratio of ~30 in experiments. In addition, prostate tumors (PC-3 were readily detectable by optical-imaging methods. These results show proof of principle that diseasespecific library-derived fluorescent probes can be rapidly developed for use in the early detection of cancers by optical means.

  19. European regulatory conundrum of phage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeken, Gilbert; De Vos, Daniel; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Merabishvili, Maya; Zizi, Martin; Pirnay, Jean-Paul

    2007-10-01

    The treatment of infectious diseases with antibiotics is becoming increasingly challenging. Very few new antimicrobials are in the pharmaceutical industry pipeline. One of the potential alternatives for antibiotics is phage therapy. Major obstacles for the clinical application of bacteriophages are a false perception of viruses as 'enemies of life' and the lack of a specific frame for phage therapy in the current Medicinal Product Regulation. Short-term borderline solutions under the responsibility of a Medical Ethical Committee and/or under the umbrella of the Declaration of Helsinki are emerging. As a long-term solution, however, we suggest the creation of a specific section for phage therapy under the Advanced Therapy Medicinal Product Regulation.

  20. Phage therapy in the food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endersen, Lorraine; O'Mahony, Jim; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul; McAuliffe, Olivia; Coffey, Aidan

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in modern technologies, the food industry is continuously challenged with the threat of microbial contamination. The overuse of antibiotics has further escalated this problem, resulting in the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant foodborne pathogens. Efforts to develop new methods for controlling microbial contamination in food and the food processing environment are extremely important. Accordingly, bacteriophages (phages) and their derivatives have emerged as novel, viable, and safe options for the prevention, treatment, and/or eradication of these contaminants in a range of foods and food processing environments. Whole phages, modified phages, and their derivatives are discussed in terms of current uses and future potential as antimicrobials in the traditional farm-to-fork context, encompassing areas such as primary production, postharvest processing, biosanitation, and biodetection. The review also presents some safety concerns to ensure safe and effective exploitation of bacteriophages in the future.

  1. Identification of amino acids involved in the Flo11p-mediated adhesion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to a polystyrene surface using phage display with competitive elution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Henrik Dam; Dupont, Kitt; Jespersen, Lene;

    2007-01-01

    . cerevisiae FLO11 wild-type (TBR1) cells had a higher consensus than those from competitive panning with S. cerevisiae flo11¿ mutant (TBR5) cells, suggesting that the wild-type cells interact with the plastic surface in a stronger and more similar way than the mutant cells. Tryptophan and proline were more...... a phage with a hydrophobic peptide containing no tryptophan and only two proline residues. Conclusions: Our results suggest a key role of tryptophan and proline in the hydrophobic interactions between Flo11p on the S. cerevisiae cell surface and the PolySorp surface. Significance and Impact of the Study......Aims: To identify the main amino acids involved in the Flo11p-mediated adhesion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to the polystyrene surface PolySorp. Methods and Results: Using a combination of phage display and competitive elution revealed that 12-mer peptides of phages from competitive panning with S...

  2. Specific probe selection from landscape phage display library and its application in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of free prostate-specific antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Qiaolin; Wang, Fei; Yin, Long; Liu, Mingjun; Petrenko, Valery A; Liu, Aihua

    2014-03-01

    Probes against targets can be selected from the landscape phage library f8/8, displaying random octapeptides on the pVIII coat protein of the phage fd-tet and demonstrating many excellent features including multivalency, stability, and high structural homogeneity. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is usually determined by immunoassay, by which antibodies are frequently used as the specific probes. Herein we found that more advanced probes against free prostate-specific antigen (f-PSA) can be screened from the landscape phage library. Four phage monoclones were selected and identified by the specificity array. One phage clone displaying the fusion peptide ERNSVSPS showed good specificity and affinity to f-PSA and was used as a PSA capture probe in a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) array. An anti-human PSA monoclonal antibody (anti-PSA mAb) was used to recognize the captured antigen, followed by horseradish peroxidase-conjugated antibody (HRP-IgG) and o-phenylenediamine, which were successively added to develop plate color. The ELISA conditions such as effect of blocking agent, coating buffer pH, phage concentration, antigen incubation time, and anti-PSA mAb dilution for phage ELISA were optimized. On the basis of the optimal phage ELISA conditions, the absorbance taken at 492 nm on a microplate reader was linear with f-PSA concentration within 0.825-165 ng/mL with a low limit of detection of 0.16 ng/mL. Thus, the landscape phage is an attractive biomolecular probe in bioanalysis.

  3. Abundances of UV bright stars in globular clusters 1 ROA 5701 in $\\omega$ Centauri and Barnard 29 in M 13

    CERN Document Server

    Möhler, S; Lemke, M; Napiwotzki, R

    1998-01-01

    Two UV brights stars in globular clusters, ROA 5701 (omega Cen) and Barnard 29 (M 13) are analysed from high-resolution UV and optical spectra. The main aim is the measurement of iron abundances from UV spectra obtained with the HST-GHRS. In addition atmospheric parameters and abundances for He, C, N, O, and Si are derived from optical spectra (ESO CASPEC) for ROA 5701 or taken from literature for Barnard 29. Both stars are found to be post-asymptotic giant branch stars. Surprisingly, their iron abundances lie significantly below the cluster abundance in both cases. Barnard 29 lies 0.5 dex below the iron abundance derived for giant stars in M 13 and the iron abundance of ROA 5701 is the lowest of any star in omega Cen analysed so far. Barnard 29 shows the same abundance pattern as the red giant stars in M 13, except for its stronger iron deficiency. The iron depletion could be explained by gas-dust separation in the AGB progenitor's atmosphere, if iron condensed into dust grains which were then removed from t...

  4. The Caulobacter crescentus phage phiCbK: genomics of a canonical phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill Jason J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus is a popular model for the study of cell cycle regulation and senescence. The large prolate siphophage phiCbK has been an important tool in C. crescentus biology, and has been studied in its own right as a model for viral morphogenesis. Although a system of some interest, to date little genomic information is available on phiCbK or its relatives. Results Five novel phiCbK-like C. crescentus bacteriophages, CcrMagneto, CcrSwift, CcrKarma, CcrRogue and CcrColossus, were isolated from the environment. The genomes of phage phiCbK and these five environmental phage isolates were obtained by 454 pyrosequencing. The phiCbK-like phage genomes range in size from 205 kb encoding 318 proteins (phiCbK to 280 kb encoding 448 proteins (CcrColossus, and were found to contain nonpermuted terminal redundancies of 10 to 17 kb. A novel method of terminal ligation was developed to map genomic termini, which confirmed termini predicted by coverage analysis. This suggests that sequence coverage discontinuities may be useable as predictors of genomic termini in phage genomes. Genomic modules encoding virion morphogenesis, lysis and DNA replication proteins were identified. The phiCbK-like phages were also found to encode a number of intriguing proteins; all contain a clearly T7-like DNA polymerase, and five of the six encode a possible homolog of the C. crescentus cell cycle regulator GcrA, which may allow the phage to alter the host cell’s replicative state. The structural proteome of phage phiCbK was determined, identifying the portal, major and minor capsid proteins, the tail tape measure and possible tail fiber proteins. All six phage genomes are clearly related; phiCbK, CcrMagneto, CcrSwift, CcrKarma and CcrRogue form a group related at the DNA level, while CcrColossus is more diverged but retains significant similarity at the protein level. Conclusions Due to their lack of any apparent relationship to

  5. Vi I typing phage for generalized transduction of Salmonella typhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerquetti, M C; Hooke, A M

    1993-01-01

    Salmonella typhi Vi typing phages were used to transduce temperature-sensitive (Ts) mutants of Salmonella typhi. Antibiotic resistance and Ts+ markers were transduced at high frequency (> 10(-4) per virulent phage). Several markers were cotransduced by phage Vi I, suggesting that it may be useful for mapping studies of the S. typhi genome. PMID:8349572

  6. Phage therapy reduces Campylobacter jejuni colonization in broilers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, J.A.; Bergen, van M.A.P.; Mueller, M.A.; Wassenaar, T.M.; Carlton, R.M.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of phage therapy in the control of Campylobacter jejuni colonization in young broilers, either as a preventive or a therapeutic measure, was tested. A prevention group was infected with C. jejuni at day 4 of a 10-day phage treatment. A therapeutic group was phage treated for 6 days, start

  7. HostPhinder: A Phage Host Prediction Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Villarroel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The current dramatic increase of antibiotic resistant bacteria has revitalised the interest in bacteriophages as alternative antibacterial treatment. Meanwhile, the development of bioinformatics methods for analysing genomic data places high-throughput approaches for phage characterization within reach. Here, we present HostPhinder, a tool aimed at predicting the bacterial host of phages by examining the phage genome sequence. Using a reference database of 2196 phages with known hosts, HostPhinder predicts the host species of a query phage as the host of the most genomically similar reference phages. As a measure of genomic similarity the number of co-occurring k-mers (DNA sequences of length k is used. Using an independent evaluation set, HostPhinder was able to correctly predict host genus and species for 81% and 74% of the phages respectively, giving predictions for more phages than BLAST and significantly outperforming BLAST on phages for which both had predictions. HostPhinder predictions on phage draft genomes from the INTESTI phage cocktail corresponded well with the advertised targets of the cocktail. Our study indicates that for most phages genomic similarity correlates well with related bacterial hosts. HostPhinder is available as an interactive web service [1] and as a stand alone download from the Docker registry [2].

  8. Phage therapy reduces Campylobacter jejuni colonization in broilers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, J.A.; Bergen, van M.A.P.; Mueller, M.A.; Wassenaar, T.M.; Carlton, R.M.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of phage therapy in the control of Campylobacter jejuni colonization in young broilers, either as a preventive or a therapeutic measure, was tested. A prevention group was infected with C. jejuni at day 4 of a 10-day phage treatment. A therapeutic group was phage treated for 6 days,

  9. Vi I typing phage for generalized transduction of Salmonella typhi.

    OpenAIRE

    Cerquetti, M C; Hooke, A M

    1993-01-01

    Salmonella typhi Vi typing phages were used to transduce temperature-sensitive (Ts) mutants of Salmonella typhi. Antibiotic resistance and Ts+ markers were transduced at high frequency (> 10(-4) per virulent phage). Several markers were cotransduced by phage Vi I, suggesting that it may be useful for mapping studies of the S. typhi genome.

  10. Cell biology perspectives in phage biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansaldi, Mireille

    2012-01-01

    Cellular biology has long been restricted to large cellular organisms. However, as the resolution of microscopic methods increased, it became possible to study smaller cells, in particular bacterial cells. Bacteriophage biology is one aspect of bacterial cell biology that has recently gained insight from cell biology. Despite their small size, bacteriophages could be successfully labeled and their cycle studied in the host cells. This review aims to put together, although non-extensively, several cell biology studies that recently pushed the elucidation of key mechanisms in phage biology, such as the lysis-lysogeny decision in temperate phages or genome replication and transcription, one step further.

  11. Diversity and geographical distribution of Flavobacterium psychrophilum isolates and their phages: patterns of susceptibility to phage infection and phage host range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Daniel; Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb; Espejo, Romilio; Middelboe, Mathias

    2014-05-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is an important fish pathogen worldwide that causes cold water disease (CWD) or rainbow trout fry syndrome (RTFS). Phage therapy has been suggested as an alternative method for the control of this pathogen in aquaculture. However, effective use of bacteriophages in disease control requires detailed knowledge about the diversity and dynamics of host susceptibility to phage infection. For this reason, we examined the genetic diversity of 49 F. psychrophilum strains isolated in three different areas (Chile, Denmark, and USA) through direct genome restriction enzyme analysis (DGREA) and their susceptibility to 33 bacteriophages isolated in Chile and Denmark, thus covering large geographical (>12,000 km) and temporal (>60 years) scales of isolation. An additional 40 phage-resistant isolates obtained from culture experiments after exposure to specific phages were examined for changes in phage susceptibility against the 33 phages. The F. psychrophilum and phage populations isolated from Chile and Denmark clustered into geographically distinct groups with respect to DGREA profile and host range, respectively. However, cross infection between Chilean phage isolates and Danish host isolates and vice versa was observed. Development of resistance to certain bacteriophages led to susceptibility to other phages suggesting that "enhanced infection" is potentially an important cost of resistance in F. psychrophilum, possibly contributing to the observed co-existence of phage-sensitive F. psychrophilum strains and lytic phages across local and global scales. Overall, our results showed that despite the identification of local communities of phages and hosts, some key properties determining phage infection patterns seem to be globally distributed.

  12. MimoDB: a New Repository for Mimotope Data Derived from Phage Display Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianlong Wang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Peptides selected from phage-displayed random peptide libraries are valuable in two aspects. On one hand, these peptides are candidates for new diagnostics, therapeutics and vaccines. On the other hand, they can be used to predict the networks or sites of protein-protein interactions. MimoDB, a new repository for these peptides, was developed, in which 10,716 peptides collected from 571 publications were grouped into 1,229 sets. Besides peptide sequences, other important information, such as the target, template, library and complex structure, was also included. MimoDB can be browsed and searched through a user-friendly web interface. For computational biologists, MimoDB can be used to derive customized data sets and benchmarks, which are useful for new algorithm development and tool evaluation. For experimental biologists, their results can be searched against the MimoDB database to exclude possible target-unrelated peptides. The MimoDB database is freely accessible at http://immunet.cn/mimodb/.

  13. Structural characterization and optimization of antibody-selected phage library mimotopes of an antigen associated with autoimmune recurrent thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sem, D S; Baker, B L; Victoria, E J; Jones, D S; Marquis, D; Yu, L; Parks, J; Coutts, S M

    1998-11-17

    The presence of high titers of anti-cardiolipin antibodies (ACA's) of autoimmune origin, which are known to bind to plasma beta2-glycoprotein I (aka apolipoprotein H), correlates clinically with autoimmune recurrent thrombosis. Soluble beta2-glycoprotein I binds to solid-phase ACA (immobilized on a surface plasmon resonance chip) with a Kd of 1.4 microM, but if the reactants are reversed and beta2-glycoprotein I is on the solid-phase support, then the Kd is 52 nM. This 27-fold difference in affinity reflects the avidity/entropic advantage obtained for an antibody binding to an antigen that is made multivalent because it is attached to a solid phase. A mimotope of this antigen, selected from a phage display peptide library screen with an ACA, has been shown to bind to solid-phase ACA as a phage, using surface plasmon resonance. This peptide is representative of the motif from 37 peptides obtained in a previously reported phage library screen with this ACA (1). A synthetic version of this peptide, referred to as P4, has the sequence: A1G2P3C4I5L6L7A8R9D10R11C12P13G14, and binds to its selecting antibody with a Kd of 42 nM. NMR data indicate that proline-13 is present in both cis and trans configurations, and that these two geometries dramatically affect the overall tertiary structure of the molecule. The peptide lacking this proline binds severalfold better to the ACA, consistent with at least one of these structures having low affinity for binding ACA. Replacement of the arginine-9 position with a proline decreases binding affinity to ACA 10-fold. Another phage library-selected peptide has a proline in position 9, but also has a leucine in position 5, instead of isoleucine. Since its affinity for ACA is nearly as good as that for peptide P4, the phage library screening must have selected for a non-beta-branched amino acid in this position to compensate for the adverse effects of the arginine-9 to proline-9 substitution. The solution structure of a modified version

  14. Complete genome sequence of Vibrio anguillarum phage CHOED successfully used for phage therapy in aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romero, Jaime; Higuera, Gastón; Gajardo, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio anguillarum phage CHOED was isolated from Chilean mussels. It is a virulent phage showing effective inhibition of V. anguillarum. CHOED has potential in phage therapy, because it can protect fish from vibriosis in fish farms. Here, we announce the completely sequenced genome of V. anguilla...

  15. Selection of gonadotrophin surge attenuating factor phage antibodies by bioassay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mason Helen D

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to combine the generation of "artificial" antibodies with a rat pituitary bioassay as a new strategy to overcome 20 years of difficulties in the purification of gonadotrophin surge-attenuating factor (GnSAF. Methods A synthetic single-chain antibody (Tomlinson J phage display library was bio-panned with partially purified GnSAF produced by cultured human granulosa/luteal cells. The initial screening with a simple binding immunoassay resulted in 8 clones that were further screened using our in-vitro rat monolayer bioassay for GnSAF. Initially the antibodies were screened as pooled phage forms and subsequently as individual, soluble, single-chain antibody (scAbs forms. Then, in order to improve the stability of the scAbs for immunopurification purposes, and to widen the range of labelled secondary antibodies available, these were engineered into full-length human immunoglobulins. The immunoglobulin with the highest affinity for GnSAF and a previously described rat anti-GnSAF polyclonal antiserum was then used to immunopurify bioactive GnSAF protein. The two purified preparations were electrophoresed on 1-D gels and on 7 cm 2-D gels (pH 4–7. The candidate GnSAF protein bands and spots were then excised for peptide mass mapping. Results Three of the scAbs recognised GnSAF bioactivity and subsequently one clone of the purified scAb-derived immunoglobulin demonstrated high affinity for GnSAF bioactivity, also binding the molecule in such as way as to block its bioactivity. When used for repeated immunopurification cycles and then Western blot, this antibody enabled the isolation of a GnSAF-bioactive protein band at around 66 kDa. Similar results were achieved using the rat anti-GnSAF polyclonal antiserum. The main candidate molecules identified from the immunopurified material by excision of 2-D gel protein spots was human serum albumin precursor and variants. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the combination of

  16. Phage & phosphatase: a novel phage-based probe for rapid, multi-platform detection of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaine, S D; Pacitto, D; Sela, D A; Nugen, S R

    2015-11-21

    Genetic engineering of bacteriophages allows for the development of rapid, highly specific, and easily manufactured probes for the detection of bacterial pathogens. A challenge for novel probes is the ease of their adoption in real world laboratories. We have engineered the bacteriophage T7, which targets Escherichia coli, to carry the alkaline phosphatase gene, phoA. This inclusion results in phoA overexpression following phage infection of E. coli. Alkaline phosphatase is commonly used in a wide range of diagnostics, and thus a signal produced by our phage-based probe could be detected using common laboratory equipment. Our work demonstrates the successful: (i) modification of T7 phage to carry phoA; (ii) overexpression of alkaline phosphatase in E. coli; and (iii) detection of this T7-induced alkaline phosphatase activity using commercially available colorimetric and chemilumiscent methods. Furthermore, we demonstrate the application of our phage-based probe to rapidly detect low levels of bacteria and discern the antibiotic resistance of E. coli isolates. Using our bioengineered phage-based probe we were able to detect 10(3) CFU per mL of E. coli in 6 hours using a chemiluminescent substrate and 10(4) CFU per mL within 7.5 hours using a colorimetric substrate. We also show the application of this phage-based probe for antibiotic resistance testing. We were able to determine whether an E. coli isolate was resistant to ampicillin within 4.5 hours using chemiluminescent substrate and within 6 hours using a colorimetric substrate. This phage-based scheme could be readily adopted in labs without significant capital investments and can be translated to other phage-bacteria pairs for further detection.

  17. Phage-bacteria interaction network in human oral microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinfeng; Gao, Yuan; Zhao, Fangqing

    2016-07-01

    Although increasing knowledge suggests that bacteriophages play important roles in regulating microbial ecosystems, phage-bacteria interaction in human oral cavities remains less understood. Here we performed a metagenomic analysis to explore the composition and variation of oral dsDNA phage populations and potential phage-bacteria interaction. A total of 1,711 contigs assembled with more than 100 Gb shotgun sequencing data were annotated to 104 phages based on their best BLAST matches against the NR database. Bray-Curtis dissimilarities demonstrated that both phage and bacterial composition are highly diverse between periodontally healthy samples but show a trend towards homogenization in diseased gingivae samples. Significantly, according to the CRISPR arrays that record infection relationship between bacteria and phage, we found certain oral phages were able to invade other bacteria besides their putative bacterial hosts. These cross-infective phages were positively correlated with commensal bacteria while were negatively correlated with major periodontal pathogens, suggesting possible connection between these phages and microbial community structure in oral cavities. By characterizing phage-bacteria interaction as networks rather than exclusively pairwise predator-prey relationships, our study provides the first insight into the participation of cross-infective phages in forming human oral microbiota.

  18. How to Name and Classify Your Phage: An Informal Guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelien Adriaenssens

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available With this informal guide, we try to assist both new and experienced phage researchers through two important stages that follow phage discovery; that is, naming and classification. Providing an appropriate name for a bacteriophage is not as trivial as it sounds, and the effects might be long-lasting in databases and in official taxon names. Phage classification is the responsibility of the Bacterial and Archaeal Viruses Subcommittee (BAVS of the International Committee on the Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV. While the BAVS aims at providing a holistic approach to phage taxonomy, for individual researchers who have isolated and sequenced a new phage, this can be a little overwhelming. We are now providing these researchers with an informal guide to phage naming and classification, taking a “bottom-up” approach from the phage isolate level.

  19. Silent Encoding of Chemical Post-Translational Modifications in Phage-Displayed Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjhung, Katrina F; Kitov, Pavel I; Ng, Simon; Kitova, Elena N; Deng, Lu; Klassen, John S; Derda, Ratmir

    2016-01-13

    In vitro selection of chemically modified peptide libraries presented on phage, while a powerful technology, is limited to one chemical post-translational modification (cPTM) per library. We use unique combinations of redundant codons to encode cPTMs with "silent barcodes" to trace multiple modifications within a mixed modified library. As a proof of concept, we produced phage-displayed peptide libraries Ser-[X]4-Gly-Gly-Gly, with Gly and Ser encoded using unique combinations of codons (TCA-[X]4-GGAGGAGGA, AGT-[X]4-GGTGGTGGT, etc., where [X]4 denotes a random NNK library). After separate chemical modification and pooling, mixed-modified libraries can be panned and deep-sequenced to identify the enriched peptide sequence and the accompanying cPTM simultaneously. We panned libraries bearing combinations of modifications (sulfonamide, biotin, mannose) against matched targets (carbonic anhydrase, streptavidin, concanavalin A) to identify desired ligands. Synthesis and validation of sequences identified by deep sequencing revealed that specific cPTMs are significantly enriched in panning against the specific targets. Panning on carbonic anhydrase yielded a potent ligand, sulfonamide-WIVP, with Kd = 6.7 ± 2.1 nM, a 20-fold improvement compared with the control ligand sulfonamide-GGGG. Silent encoding of multiple cPTMs can be readily incorporated into other in vitro display technologies such as bacteriophage T7 or mRNA display.

  20. Next-generation phage display: integrating and comparing available molecular tools to enable cost-effective high-throughput analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Dias-Neto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Combinatorial phage display has been used in the last 20 years in the identification of protein-ligands and protein-protein interactions, uncovering relevant molecular recognition events. Rate-limiting steps of combinatorial phage display library selection are (i the counting of transducing units and (ii the sequencing of the encoded displayed ligands. Here, we adapted emerging genomic technologies to minimize such challenges. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We gained efficiency by applying in tandem real-time PCR for rapid quantification to enable bacteria-free phage display library screening, and added phage DNA next-generation sequencing for large-scale ligand analysis, reporting a fully integrated set of high-throughput quantitative and analytical tools. The approach is far less labor-intensive and allows rigorous quantification; for medical applications, including selections in patients, it also represents an advance for quantitative distribution analysis and ligand identification of hundreds of thousands of targeted particles from patient-derived biopsy or autopsy in a longer timeframe post library administration. Additional advantages over current methods include increased sensitivity, less variability, enhanced linearity, scalability, and accuracy at much lower cost. Sequences obtained by qPhage plus pyrosequencing were similar to a dataset produced from conventional Sanger-sequenced transducing-units (TU, with no biases due to GC content, codon usage, and amino acid or peptide frequency. These tools allow phage display selection and ligand analysis at >1,000-fold faster rate, and reduce costs approximately 250-fold for generating 10(6 ligand sequences. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our analyses demonstrates that whereas this approach correlates with the traditional colony-counting, it is also capable of a much larger sampling, allowing a faster, less expensive, more accurate and consistent analysis of phage enrichment. Overall

  1. Efficient Production of Single-Stranded Phage DNA as Scaffolds for DNA Origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kick, Benjamin; Praetorius, Florian; Dietz, Hendrik; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2015-07-08

    Scaffolded DNA origami enables the fabrication of a variety of complex nanostructures that promise utility in diverse fields of application, ranging from biosensing over advanced therapeutics to metamaterials. The broad applicability of DNA origami as a material beyond the level of proof-of-concept studies critically depends, among other factors, on the availability of large amounts of pure single-stranded scaffold DNA. Here, we present a method for the efficient production of M13 bacteriophage-derived genomic DNA using high-cell-density fermentation of Escherichia coli in stirred-tank bioreactors. We achieve phage titers of up to 1.6 × 10(14) plaque-forming units per mL. Downstream processing yields up to 410 mg of high-quality single-stranded DNA per one liter reaction volume, thus upgrading DNA origami-based nanotechnology from the milligram to the gram scale.

  2. Efficient Production of Single-Stranded Phage DNA as Scaffolds for DNA Origami

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Scaffolded DNA origami enables the fabrication of a variety of complex nanostructures that promise utility in diverse fields of application, ranging from biosensing over advanced therapeutics to metamaterials. The broad applicability of DNA origami as a material beyond the level of proof-of-concept studies critically depends, among other factors, on the availability of large amounts of pure single-stranded scaffold DNA. Here, we present a method for the efficient production of M13 bacteriophage-derived genomic DNA using high-cell-density fermentation of Escherichia coli in stirred-tank bioreactors. We achieve phage titers of up to 1.6 × 1014 plaque-forming units per mL. Downstream processing yields up to 410 mg of high-quality single-stranded DNA per one liter reaction volume, thus upgrading DNA origami-based nanotechnology from the milligram to the gram scale. PMID:26028443

  3. Twelve previously unknown phage genera are ubiquitous in global oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmfeldt, Karin; Solonenko, Natalie; Shah, Manesh; Corrier, Kristen; Riemann, Lasse; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2013-07-30

    Viruses are fundamental to ecosystems ranging from oceans to humans, yet our ability to study them is bottlenecked by the lack of ecologically relevant isolates, resulting in "unknowns" dominating culture-independent surveys. Here we present genomes from 31 phages infecting multiple strains of the aquatic bacterium Cellulophaga baltica (Bacteroidetes) to provide data for an underrepresented and environmentally abundant bacterial lineage. Comparative genomics delineated 12 phage groups that (i) each represent a new genus, and (ii) represent one novel and four well-known viral families. This diversity contrasts the few well-studied marine phage systems, but parallels the diversity of phages infecting human-associated bacteria. Although all 12 Cellulophaga phages represent new genera, the podoviruses and icosahedral, nontailed ssDNA phages were exceptional, with genomes up to twice as large as those previously observed for each phage type. Structural novelty was also substantial, requiring experimental phage proteomics to identify 83% of the structural proteins. The presence of uncommon nucleotide metabolism genes in four genera likely underscores the importance of scavenging nutrient-rich molecules as previously seen for phages in marine environments. Metagenomic recruitment analyses suggest that these particular Cellulophaga phages are rare and may represent a first glimpse into the phage side of the rare biosphere. However, these analyses also revealed that these phage genera are widespread, occurring in 94% of 137 investigated metagenomes. Together, this diverse and novel collection of phages identifies a small but ubiquitous fraction of unknown marine viral diversity and provides numerous environmentally relevant phage-host systems for experimental hypothesis testing.

  4. Biodiscovery of Aluminum Binding Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    for an additional 35-45 min. After induction, 5 µL cells were added to 25µL 250 nM YPet-Mona for 45 min. on ice. Cells were then pelleted and...binding mechanism of phage particles displaying a constrained heptapeptide with specific affinity to SiO2 and TiO2 ," Anal. Chem. 78(14), 4872-4879 (2006...hydroxyapatite crystals," Langmuir 27(12), 7620-7628 (2011). [15] Dickerson, M. B. A., et al., Peptide-induced room temperature formation of nanostructured TiO2

  5. Keck Observations of the UV-Bright Star Barnard 29 in the Globular Cluster M13 (NGC 6205)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, William Van Dyke; Chayer, Pierre; Reid, Iain N.

    2016-06-01

    In color-magnitude diagrams of globular clusters, stars brighter than the horizontal branch and bluer than the red-giant branch are known as UV-bright stars. Most are evolving from the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) to the tip of the white-dwarf cooling curve. To better understand this important phase of stellar evolution, we have analyzed a Keck HIRES echelle spectrum of the UV-bright star Barnard 29 in M13. We begin by fitting the star's H I (Hα, Hβ, and Hγ) and He I lines with a grid of synthetic spectra generated from non-LTE H-He models computed using the TLUSTY code. We find that the shape of the star's Hα profile is not well reproduced with these models. Upgrading from version 200 to version 204M of TLUSTY solves this problem: the Hα profile is now well reproduced. TLUSTY version 204 includes improved calculations for the Stark broadening of hydrogen line profiles. Using these models, we derive stellar parameters of Teff = 21,100 K, log g = 3.05, and log (He/H) = -0.87, values consistent with those of previous authors. The star's Keck spectrum shows photospheric absorption from N II, O II, Mg II, Al III, Si II, Si III, S II, Ar II, and Fe III. The abundances of these species are consistent with published values for the red-giant stars in M13, suggesting that the star's chemistry has changed little since it left the AGB.

  6. Faint Ultraviolet Objects in the Core of M13 Optical Counterparts of the Low Luminosity X-ray Source?

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, F R; Pecci, F F; Rood, R T; Dorman, B; Ferraro, Francesco R.; Paltrinieri, Barbara; Pecci, Flavio Fusi; Rood, Robert T.; Dorman, Ben

    1997-01-01

    The core of the galactic globular cluster M13 (NGC 6205) has been observed with WFPC2 on the Hubble Space Telescope through visual, blue and mid- and far-UV filters in a programme devoted to study the UV population in a sample of Galactic globular clusters. In the UV Color Magnitude Diagrams derived from the HST images we have discovered three faint objects with a strong UV excess, which lie significantly outside the main loci defined by more than 12,000 normal cluster stars. The positions of two of the UV stars are nearly coincident (7" & 1") to those of a low luminosity X-ray source recently found in the core of M13 and to a 3.5-sigma peak in the X-ray contour map. We suggest that the UV stars are physically connected to the X-ray emission. The UV stars are very similar to the quiescent nova in the globular cluster M80, and they might be a, perhaps new, subclass of cataclysmic variable.

  7. The Horizontal Branch in the UV Colour Magnitude Diagrams. II. The case of M3, M13 and M79

    CERN Document Server

    Dalessandro, Emanuele; Ferraro, Francesco R; Mucciarelli, Alessio; Cassisi, Santi

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed comparison between far-UV/optical colour Magnitude Diagrams obtained with high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope data and suitable theoretical models for three Galactic Globular Clusters: M3, M13 and M79. These systems represents a classical example of clusters in the intermediate metallicity regime that, even sharing similar metal content and age, show remarkably different Horizontal Branch morphologies. As a consequence, the observed differences in the colour distributions of Horizontal Branch stars cannot be interpreted in terms of either first (metallicity) or a second parameter such as age. We investigate here the possible role of variations of initial Helium abundance (Y). Thanks to the use of a proper setup of far-UV filters, we are able to put strong constraints on the maximum Y (Y_{max}) values compatible with the data. We find differences Delta Y_{max} ~ 0.02-0.04 between the clusters with M13 showing the largest value (Y_{max} ~ 0.30) and M3 the smallest (Y_{max} ~ 0.27). In g...

  8. High-resolution CCD spectra of stars in globular clusters. III - M4, M13, and M22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallerstein, George; Leep, E. Myckky; Oke, J. B.

    1987-01-01

    Spectra of 0.3 and 0.6 A resolution of stars in M4, M13 and M22 to derive abundances of various atomic species and the CN molecule. For M13, the usual Fe/H ratio and a surprisingly high aluminum abundance is found. The CN lines indicate a larger column density in the oxygen-rich star III-63 than in the oxygen-poor star II-67 by a factor of 10. It appears that II-67 is deficient in C, N, and O by about a factor 3 relative to iron for all three elements. For M4, Fe/H = -1.2 using solar f values derived via the Bell et al. (1976) model. This Fe abundance lies between earlier echelle values and photometric values. For two stars, CN data are obtained that can be understood if there was a slight excess of C/Fe and N/Fe prior to CN cycling and mixing. For M22, a large difference in CN is found between stars III-3 and IV-102. The origin of the CNO elements is discussed in terms of mass loss from an early generation of red giants and possibly Wolf-Rayet stars.

  9. Recent Advances Towards The Discovery Of Drug-Like Peptides De Novo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eGoldflam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Peptides are important natural molecules that possess functions as diverse as antibiotics, toxins, venoms and hormones, for example. However, whilst these peptides have useful properties, there are many targets and pathways that are not addressed through the activities of natural peptidic compounds. In these circumstances, directed evolution techniques, such as phage display, have been developed to sample the diverse chemical and structural repertoire of small peptides for useful means. In this review, we consider recent concepts that relate peptide structure to drug-like attributes and how these are incorporated within display technologies to deliver peptides de novo with valuable pharmaceutical properties.

  10. Recent Advances Towards The Discovery Of Drug-Like Peptides De Novo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldflam, Michael; Ullman, Christopher

    2015-12-01

    Peptides are important natural molecules that possess functions as diverse as antibiotics, toxins, venoms and hormones, for example. However, whilst these peptides have useful properties, there are many targets and pathways that are not addressed through the activities of natural peptidic compounds. In these circumstances, directed evolution techniques, such as phage display, have been developed to sample the diverse chemical and structural repertoire of small peptides for useful means. In this review, we consider recent concepts that relate peptide structure to drug-like attributes and how these are incorporated within display technologies to deliver peptides de novo with valuable pharmaceutical properties.

  11. Selection of binding targets in parasites using phage-display and aptamer libraries in vivo and in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Rosito Tonelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parasite infections are largely dependent on interactions between pathogen and different host cell populations to guarantee a successful infectious process. This is particularly true for obligatory intracellular parasites as Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, Leishmania, to name a few. Adhesion to and entry into the cell are essential steps requiring specific parasite and host cell molecules. The large amount of possible involved molecules poses additional difficulties for their identification by the classical biochemical approaches. In this respect, the search for alternative techniques should be pursued. Among them two powerful methodologies can be employed, both relying upon the construction of highly diverse combinatorial libraries of peptides or oligonucleotides that randomly bind with high affinity to targets on the cell surface and are selectively displaced by putative ligands. These are, respectively, the peptide-based phage display and the oligonucleotide-based aptamer techniques.The phage display technique has been extensively employed for the identification of novel ligands in vitro and in vivo in different areas such as cancer, vaccine development and epitope mapping. Particularly, phage display has been employed in the investigation of pathogen-host interactions. Although this methodology has been used for some parasites with encouraging results, in trypanosomatids its use is, as yet, scanty. RNA and DNA aptamers, developed by the SELEX process (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment, were described over two decades ago and since then contributed to a large number of structured nucleic acids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes or for the understanding of the cell biology. Similarly to the phage display technique scarce use of the SELEX process has been used in the probing of parasite-host interaction.In this review, an overall survey on the use of both phage display and aptamer technologies in different pathogenic

  12. Human IgA-binding peptides selected from random peptide libraries: affinity maturation and application in IgA purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Takaaki; Ohzono, Shinji; Park, Mirae; Sakamoto, Kotaro; Tsukamoto, Shogo; Sugita, Ryohei; Ishitobi, Hiroyuki; Mori, Toshiyuki; Ito, Osamu; Sorajo, Koichi; Sugimura, Kazuhisa; Ham, Sihyun; Ito, Yuji

    2012-12-14

    Phage display system is a powerful tool to design specific ligands for target molecules. Here, we used disulfide-constrained random peptide libraries constructed with the T7 phage display system to isolate peptides specific to human IgA. The binding clones (A1-A4) isolated by biopanning exhibited clear specificity to human IgA, but the synthetic peptide derived from the A2 clone exhibited a low specificity/affinity (K(d) = 1.3 μm). Therefore, we tried to improve the peptide using a partial randomized phage display library and mutational studies on the synthetic peptides. The designed Opt-1 peptide exhibited a 39-fold higher affinity (K(d) = 33 nm) than the A2 peptide. An Opt-1 peptide-conjugated column was used to purify IgA from human plasma. However, the recovered IgA fraction was contaminated with other proteins, indicating nonspecific binding. To design a peptide with increased binding specificity, we examined the structural features of Opt-1 and the Opt-1-IgA complex using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water. The simulation results revealed that the Opt-1 peptide displayed partial helicity in the N-terminal region and possessed a hydrophobic cluster that played a significant role in tight binding with IgA-Fc. However, these hydrophobic residues of Opt-1 may contribute to nonspecific binding with other proteins. To increase binding specificity, we introduced several mutations in the hydrophobic residues of Opt-1. The resultant Opt-3 peptide exhibited high specificity and high binding affinity for IgA, leading to successful isolation of IgA without contamination.

  13. Assembling filamentous phage occlude pIV channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciano, D K; Russel, M; Simon, S M

    2001-07-31

    Filamentous phage f1 is exported from its Escherichia coli host without killing the bacterial cell. Phage-encoded protein pIV, which is required for phage assembly and secretion, forms large highly conductive channels in the outer membrane of E. coli. It has been proposed that the phage are extruded across the bacterial outer membrane through pIV channels. To test this prediction, we developed an in vivo assay by using a mutant pIV that functions in phage export but whose channel opens in the absence of phage extrusion. In E. coli lacking its native maltooligosacharride transporter LamB, this pIV variant allowed oligosaccharide transport across the outer membrane. This entry of oligosaccharide was decreased by phage production and still further decreased by production of phage that cannot be released from the cell surface. Thus, exiting phage block the pIV-dependent entry of oligosaccharide, suggesting that phage occupy the lumen of pIV channels. This study provides the first evidence, to our knowledge, for viral exit through a large aqueous channel.

  14. Convergent evolution of pathogenicity islands in helper cos phage interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Keith A.; Dokland, Terje; Marina, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPIs) are phage satellites that exploit the life cycle of their helper phages for their own benefit. Most SaPIs are packaged by their helper phages using a headful (pac) packaging mechanism. These SaPIs interfere with pac phage reproduction through a variety of strategies, including the redirection of phage capsid assembly to form small capsids, a process that depends on the expression of the SaPI-encoded cpmA and cpmB genes. Another SaPI subfamily is induced and packaged by cos-type phages, and although these cos SaPIs also block the life cycle of their inducing phages, the basis for this mechanism of interference remains to be deciphered. Here we have identified and characterized one mechanism by which the SaPIs interfere with cos phage reproduction. This mechanism depends on a SaPI-encoded gene, ccm, which encodes a protein involved in the production of small isometric capsids, compared with the prolate helper phage capsids. As the Ccm and CpmAB proteins are completely unrelated in sequence, this strategy represents a fascinating example of convergent evolution. Moreover, this result also indicates that the production of SaPI-sized particles is a widespread strategy of phage interference conserved during SaPI evolution. This article is part of the themed issue ‘The new bacteriology’. PMID:27672154

  15. Convergent evolution of pathogenicity islands in helper cos phage interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpena, Nuria; Manning, Keith A; Dokland, Terje; Marina, Alberto; Penadés, José R

    2016-11-05

    Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPIs) are phage satellites that exploit the life cycle of their helper phages for their own benefit. Most SaPIs are packaged by their helper phages using a headful (pac) packaging mechanism. These SaPIs interfere with pac phage reproduction through a variety of strategies, including the redirection of phage capsid assembly to form small capsids, a process that depends on the expression of the SaPI-encoded cpmA and cpmB genes. Another SaPI subfamily is induced and packaged by cos-type phages, and although these cos SaPIs also block the life cycle of their inducing phages, the basis for this mechanism of interference remains to be deciphered. Here we have identified and characterized one mechanism by which the SaPIs interfere with cos phage reproduction. This mechanism depends on a SaPI-encoded gene, ccm, which encodes a protein involved in the production of small isometric capsids, compared with the prolate helper phage capsids. As the Ccm and CpmAB proteins are completely unrelated in sequence, this strategy represents a fascinating example of convergent evolution. Moreover, this result also indicates that the production of SaPI-sized particles is a widespread strategy of phage interference conserved during SaPI evolution.This article is part of the themed issue 'The new bacteriology'.

  16. Precisely modulated pathogenicity island interference with late phage gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Geeta; Chen, John; Ross, Hope F; Novick, Richard P

    2014-10-07

    Having gone to great evolutionary lengths to develop resistance to bacteriophages, bacteria have come up with resistance mechanisms directed at every aspect of the bacteriophage life cycle. Most genes involved in phage resistance are carried by plasmids and other mobile genetic elements, including bacteriophages and their relatives. A very special case of phage resistance is exhibited by the highly mobile phage satellites, staphylococcal pathogenicity islands (SaPIs), which carry and disseminate superantigen and other virulence genes. Unlike the usual phage-resistance mechanisms, the SaPI-encoded interference mechanisms are carefully crafted to ensure that a phage-infected, SaPI-containing cell will lyse, releasing the requisite crop of SaPI particles as well as a greatly diminished crop of phage particles. Previously described SaPI interference genes target phage functions that are not required for SaPI particle production and release. Here we describe a SaPI-mediated interference system that affects expression of late phage gene transcription and consequently is required for SaPI and phage. Although when cloned separately, a single SaPI gene totally blocks phage production, its activity in situ is modulated accurately by a second gene, achieving the required level of interference. The advantage for the host bacteria is that the SaPIs curb excessive phage growth while enhancing their gene transfer activity. This activity is in contrast to that of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs), which totally block phage growth at the cost of phage-mediated gene transfer. In staphylococci the SaPI strategy seems to have prevailed during evolution: The great majority of Staphylococcus aureus strains carry one or more SaPIs, whereas CRISPRs are extremely rare.

  17. Morphology, genome sequence, and structural proteome of type phage P335 from Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Labrie, Simon J.; Josephsen, Jytte; Neve, Horst;

    2008-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis phage P335 is a virulent type phage for the species that bears its name and belongs phage P335 is a virulent type phage for the species that bears its name and belongs to the Siphoviridae family. Morphologically, P335 resembled the L. lactis phages TP901-1 and Tuc2009, except...

  18. CTHRSSVVC Peptide as a Possible Early Molecular Imaging Target for Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rosemeire A.; Giordano, Ricardo J.; Gutierrez, Paulo S.; Rocha, Viviane Z.; Rudnicki, Martina; Kee, Patrick; Abdalla, Dulcinéia S. P.; Puech-Leão, Pedro; Caramelli, Bruno; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata; Meneghetti, José C.; Marques, Fabio L. N.; Khoobchandani, Menka; Katti, Kattesh V.; Lugão, Ademar B.; Kalil, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of our work was to select phages displaying peptides capable of binding to vascular markers present in human atheroma, and validate their capacity to target the vascular markers in vitro and in low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLr−/−) mouse model of atherosclerosis. By peptide fingerprinting on human atherosclerotic tissues, we selected and isolated four different peptides sequences, which bind to atherosclerotic lesions and share significant similarity to known human proteins with prominent roles in atherosclerosis. The CTHRSSVVC-phage peptide displayed the strongest reactivity with human carotid atherosclerotic lesions (p 95% yield as determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), to validate the binding of the peptide in atherosclerotic plaque specimens. The results supported our hypothesis that CTHRSSVVC peptide has a remarkable sequence for the development of theranostics approaches in the treatment of atherosclerosis and other diseases. PMID:27563889

  19. Targeting the Eph System with Peptides and Peptide Conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedl, Stefan J; Pasquale, Elena B

    2015-01-01

    Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and ephrin ligands constitute an important cell communication system that controls development, tissue homeostasis and many pathological processes. Various Eph receptors/ephrins are present in essentially all cell types and their expression is often dysregulated by injury and disease. Thus, the 14 Eph receptors are attracting increasing attention as a major class of potential drug targets. In particular, agents that bind to the extracellular ephrin-binding pocket of these receptors show promise for medical applications. This pocket comprises a broad and shallow groove surrounded by several flexible loops, which makes peptides particularly suitable to target it with high affinity and selectivity. Accordingly, a number of peptides that bind to Eph receptors with micromolar affinity have been identified using phage display and other approaches. These peptides are generally antagonists that inhibit ephrin binding and Eph receptor/ ephrin signaling, but some are agonists mimicking ephrin-induced Eph receptor activation. Importantly, some of the peptides are exquisitely selective for single Eph receptors. Most identified peptides are linear, but recently the considerable advantages of cyclic scaffolds have been recognized, particularly in light of potential optimization towards drug leads. To date, peptide improvements have yielded derivatives with low nanomolar Eph receptor binding affinity, high resistance to plasma proteases and/or long in vivo half-life, exemplifying the merits of peptides for Eph receptor targeting. Besides their modulation of Eph receptor/ephrin function, peptides can also serve to deliver conjugated imaging and therapeutic agents or various types of nanoparticles to tumors and other diseased tissues presenting target Eph receptors.

  20. Phage therapy: delivering on the promise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, D R; Anderson, J; Enright, M C

    2011-07-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect and, in many cases, destroy their bacterial targets. Within a few years of their initial discovery they were being investigated as therapeutic agents for infectious disease, an approach known as phage therapy. However, the nature of these exquisitely specific agents was not understood and much early use was both uninformed and unsuccessful. As a result they were replaced by chemical antibiotics once these became available. Although work on phage therapy continued (and continues) in Eastern Europe, this was not conducted to a standard allowing it to support clinical uses in areas regulated by the European Medicines Agency or the US FDA. To develop phage therapy for these areas requires work carried out in accordance with the requirements of these agencies, and, driven by the current crisis of antibiotic resistance, such clinical trials are now under way. The first Phase I clinical trial of safety was reported in 2005, and the results of the first Phase II clinical trial of efficacy of a bacteriophage therapeutic was published in 2009. While the delivery of these relatively large and complex agents to the site of disease can be more challenging than for conventional, small-molecule antibiotics, bacteriophages are then able to multiply locally even from an extremely low (picogram range) initial dose. This multiplication where and only where they are needed underlies the potential for bacteriophage therapeutics to become a much needed and powerful weapon against bacterial disease.

  1. Exploring the risks of phage application in the environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean eMeaden

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Interest in using bacteriophages to control the growth and spread of bacterial pathogens is being revived in the wake of widespread antibiotic resistance. However, little is known about the ecological effects that high concentrations of phages in the environment might have on natural microbial communities. We review the current evidence suggesting phage-mediated environmental perturbation, with a focus on agricultural examples, and describe the potential implications for human health and agriculture. Specifically, we examine the known and potential consequences of phage application in certain agricultural practices, discuss the risks of evolved bacterial resistance to phages, and question whether the future of phage therapy will emulate that of antibiotic treatment in terms of widespread resistance. Finally, we propose some basic precautions that could preclude such phenomena and highlight existing methods for tracking bacterial resistance to phage therapeutic agents.

  2. Pitfalls to avoid when using phage display for snake toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard; Lauridsen, Line Præst; Lomonte, Bruno; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Lohse, Brian

    2017-02-01

    Antivenoms against bites and stings from snakes, spiders, and scorpions are associated with immunological side effects and high cost of production, since these therapies are still derived from the serum of hyper-immunized production animals. Biotechnological innovations within envenoming therapies are thus warranted, and phage display technology may be a promising avenue for bringing antivenoms into the modern era of biologics. Although phage display technology represents a robust and high-throughput approach for the discovery of antibody-based antitoxins, several pitfalls may present themselves when animal toxins are used as targets for phage display selection. Here, we report selected critical challenges from our own phage display experiments associated with biotinylation of antigens, clone picking, and the presence of amber codons within antibody fragment structures in some phage display libraries. These challenges may be detrimental to the outcome of phage display experiments, and we aim to help other researchers avoiding these pitfalls by presenting their solutions.

  3. Development of lipopolysaccharide-mimicking peptides and their immunoprotectivity against Vibrio cholerae serogroup O1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad Pour Ghazi, Fatemeh; Gargari, Seyed Latif Mousavi

    2016-11-01

    Vibrio cholerae serogroup O1 is the main causative agent of cholera diseases defined by life threatening rice watery diarrhea. Cholera routine vaccination has failed in controlling epidemics in developing countries because of their hard and expensive production. In this study, our aim was to investigate phage displayed mimotopes that could mimic V. cholerae lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Although LPS of Vibrio, as an endotoxin, can stimulate the immune system, thereby making it a suitable candidate for cholera vaccine, its toxicity remains as a main problem. Phage particles displaying 12 amino acid peptides were selected from phage library mimicking the antigenic epitopes of LPS from vibrio. The screening was carried out using single-domain antibody fragment VHH against LPS as target through three rounds of selection. Three clones with highest affinity to VHH were selected. To find out a new and efficient vaccine against cholera, these three phage particles containing high-affinity peptides were administered to mice to investigate the active and passive immunity. Out of 20 particles, three showed the highest affinity toward VHH. ELISA was carried out with immunized mice sera using LPS and three selected phages particles individually. ETEC, Shigella sonnei, and clinical isolates were used as bacterial targets. These three selected phages (individually or in combination) could stimulate mice immune system producing active and passive immunity. The mice immunized with phage particles could protect about 14 LD50 of V. cholerae. In conclusion, these peptides are mimicking LPS and can potentially act as vaccine candidates against V. cholerae. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Lysogenic Conversion and Phage Resistance Development in Phage Exposed Escherichia coli Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abram Aertsen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, three-day old mature biofilms of Escherichia coli were exposed once to either a temperate Shiga-toxin encoding phage (H-19B or an obligatory lytic phage (T7, after which further dynamics in the biofilm were monitored. As such, it was found that a single dose of H-19B could rapidly lead to a near complete lysogenization of the biofilm, with a subsequent continuous release of infectious H-19B particles. On the other hand, a single dose of T7 rapidly led to resistance development in the biofilm population. Together, our data indicates a profound impact of phages on the dynamics within structured bacterial populations.

  5. Triosephosphate isomerase of Taenia solium (TTPI): phage display and antibodies as tools for finding target regions to inhibit catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria-Ayala, Víctor; Belmont, Iaraset; Abraham, Landa

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that antibodies against triosephosphate isomerase of Taenia solium (TTPI) can alter its enzymatic catalysis. In the present study, we used antibodies produced against the NH2-terminal region of TTPI (1/3NH2TTPI) and the phage display technology to find target regions to inhibit TTPI activity. As a first step, we obtained polyclonal antibodies against non-conserved regions from the 1/3NH2TTPI, which had an inhibitory effect of about 74 % on catalytic activity. Afterward, they were used to screen a library of phage-displayed dodecapeptides; as a result, 41 phage mimotope clones were isolated and grouped according to their amino acid sequence, finding the consensus A1 (VPTXPI), A2 (VPTXXI), B (LTPGQ), and D (DPLPR). Antibodies against selected phage mimotope clones were obtained by rabbit's immunization; these ones clearly recognized TTPI by both Western blot and ELISA. However, only the mimotope PDTS16 (DSVTPTSVMAVA) clone, which belongs to the VPTXXI consensus, raised antibodies capable of inhibiting the TTPI catalytic activity in 45 %. Anti-PDTS16 antibodies were confronted to several synthetic peptides that encompass the 1/3NH2TTPI, and they only recognized three, which share the motif FDTLQK belonging to the helix-α1 in TTPI. This suggests that this motif is the main part of the epitope recognized by anti-PDTS16 antibodies and revealed its importance for TTPI catalysis.

  6. Evolutionary Rationale for Phages as Complements of Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Barceló, Clara; Hochberg, Michael E

    2016-04-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections are a major concern to public health. Phage therapy has been proposed as a promising alternative to antibiotics, but an increasing number of studies suggest that both of these antimicrobial agents in combination are more effective in controlling pathogenic bacteria than either alone. We advocate the use of phages in combination with antibiotics and present the evolutionary basis for our claim. In addition, we identify compelling challenges for the realistic application of phage-antibiotic combined therapy.

  7. DISTRIBUTION OF PHAGE TYPES AND TRANSFERABLE DRUG RESISTANCE IN SHIGELLAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.Badalian

    1981-08-01

    Full Text Available A total of 610 strains of Shigellae isolated from cases of diarrhea in Iran during 1962-73 were studied with respect to their phage type, as well as antibiotic resistance and transferable drug resistance along with serotyping. It was shown that there was some relation between serotypes and phage types but no association could be found between phage types and resistance pattern.

  8. Identification of Target Ligands of CORYNE in Arabidopsis by Phage Display Library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heng Zhao; Shuzhen Li; Jiping Sheng; Lin Shen; Yuhui Yang; Bin Yao

    2011-01-01

    CORYNE (CRN) plays important roles in stem cell division and differentiation of shoot apical meristem (SAM) in Arabidopsis thaliana. The cytoplasmic kinase domain of CRN has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coil, and further purified by two consecutive steps of affinity chromatography. By using this purified CRN as a ligand, a 12-mer random-peptide library was used to determine the specific amino acid sequences binding with the recombinant CRN molecule. After four rounds of biopanning, positive phage clones were isolated and sequenced, and further tested by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for their binding ability and specificity. Two positive clones that specifically bind to the intracellular protein kinase domain of CRN have been identified. Alignment of these peptides and the kinase-associated protein phosphatase (KAPP) shows high similarity, indicating that KAPP might interact with the cytoplasmic kinase domain of CRN and negatively regulate the CLV signal. Our current study would be helpful to better understand the CLV3 signal pathway.

  9. Bacteriophages and Phage-Derived Proteins – Application Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Maciejewska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the bacterial resistance, especially to most commonly used antibiotics has proved to be a severe therapeutic problem. Nosocomial and community-acquired infections are usually caused by multidrug resistant strains. Therefore, we are forced to develop an alternative or supportive treatment for successful cure of life-threatening infections. The idea of using natural bacterial pathogens such as bacteriophages is already well known. Many papers have been published proving the high antibacterial efficacy of lytic phages tested in animal models as well as in the clinic. Researchers have also investigated the application of non-lytic phages and temperate phages, with promising results. Moreover, the development of molecular biology and novel generation methods of sequencing has opened up new possibilities in the design of engineered phages and recombinant phage-derived proteins. Encouraging performances were noted especially for phage enzymes involved in the first step of viral infection responsible for bacterial envelope degradation, named depolymerases. There are at least five major groups of such enzymes – peptidoglycan hydrolases, endosialidases, endorhamnosidases, alginate lyases and hyaluronate lyases – that have application potential. There is also much interest in proteins encoded by lysis cassette genes (holins, endolysins, spanins) responsible for progeny release during the phage lytic cycle. In this review, we discuss several issues of phage and phage-derived protein application approaches in therapy, diagnostics and biotechnology in general. PMID:25666799

  10. Quality and safety requirements for sustainable phage therapy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Blasdel, Bob G; Bretaudeau, Laurent; Buckling, Angus; Chanishvili, Nina; Clark, Jason R; Corte-Real, Sofia; Debarbieux, Laurent; Dublanchet, Alain; De Vos, Daniel; Gabard, Jérôme; Garcia, Miguel; Goderdzishvili, Marina; Górski, Andrzej; Hardcastle, John; Huys, Isabelle; Kutter, Elizabeth; Lavigne, Rob; Merabishvili, Maia; Olchawa, Ewa; Parikka, Kaarle J; Patey, Olivier; Pouilot, Flavie; Resch, Gregory; Rohde, Christine; Scheres, Jacques; Skurnik, Mikael; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Van Parys, Luc; Verbeken, Gilbert; Zizi, Martin; Van den Eede, Guy

    2015-07-01

    The worldwide antibiotic crisis has led to a renewed interest in phage therapy. Since time immemorial phages control bacterial populations on Earth. Potent lytic phages against bacterial pathogens can be isolated from the environment or selected from a collection in a matter of days. In addition, phages have the capacity to rapidly overcome bacterial resistances, which will inevitably emerge. To maximally exploit these advantage phages have over conventional drugs such as antibiotics, it is important that sustainable phage products are not submitted to the conventional long medicinal product development and licensing pathway. There is a need for an adapted framework, including realistic production and quality and safety requirements, that allows a timely supplying of phage therapy products for 'personalized therapy' or for public health or medical emergencies. This paper enumerates all phage therapy product related quality and safety risks known to the authors, as well as the tests that can be performed to minimize these risks, only to the extent needed to protect the patients and to allow and advance responsible phage therapy and research.

  11. Bacteriophages and phage-derived proteins--application approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Maciejewska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the bacterial resistance, especially to most commonly used antibiotics has proved to be a severe therapeutic problem. Nosocomial and community-acquired infections are usually caused by multidrug resistant strains. Therefore, we are forced to develop an alternative or supportive treatment for successful cure of life-threatening infections. The idea of using natural bacterial pathogens such as bacteriophages is already well known. Many papers have been published proving the high antibacterial efficacy of lytic phages tested in animal models as well as in the clinic. Researchers have also investigated the application of non-lytic phages and temperate phages, with promising results. Moreover, the development of molecular biology and novel generation methods of sequencing has opened up new possibilities in the design of engineered phages and recombinant phage-derived proteins. Encouraging performances were noted especially for phage enzymes involved in the first step of viral infection responsible for bacterial envelope degradation, named depolymerases. There are at least five major groups of such enzymes - peptidoglycan hydrolases, endosialidases, endorhamnosidases, alginate lyases and hyaluronate lyases - that have application potential. There is also much interest in proteins encoded by lysis cassette genes (holins, endolysins, spanins) responsible for progeny release during the phage lytic cycle. In this review, we discuss several issues of phage and phage-derived protein application approaches in therapy, diagnostics and biotechnology in general.

  12. Revisiting phage therapy: new applications for old resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobrega, Franklin L; Costa, Ana Rita; Kluskens, Leon D; Azeredo, Joana

    2015-04-01

    The success of phage therapy is dependent on the development of strategies able to overcome the limitations of bacteriophages as therapeutic agents, the creation of an adequate regulatory framework, the implementation of safety protocols, and acceptance by the general public. Many approaches have been proposed to circumvent phages' intrinsic limitations but none have proved to be completely satisfactory. In this review we present the major hurdles of phage therapy and the solutions proposed to circumvent them. A thorough discussion of the advantages and drawbacks of these solutions is provided and special attention is given to the genetic modification of phages as an achievable strategy to shape bacteriophages to exhibit desirable biological properties.

  13. Isolation and Characterization of Phages Infecting Bacillus subtilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Krasowska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages have been suggested as an alternative approach to reduce the amount of pathogens in various applications. Bacteriophages of various specificity and virulence were isolated as a means of controlling food-borne pathogens. We studied the interaction of bacteriophages with Bacillus species, which are very often persistent in industrial applications such as food production due to their antibiotic resistance and spore formation. A comparative study using electron microscopy, PFGE, and SDS-PAGE as well as determination of host range, pH and temperature resistance, adsorption rate, latent time, and phage burst size was performed on three phages of the Myoviridae family and one phage of the Siphoviridae family which infected Bacillus subtilis strains. The phages are morphologically different and characterized by icosahedral heads and contractile (SIOΦ, SUBω, and SPOσ phages or noncontractile (ARπ phage tails. The genomes of SIOΦ and SUBω are composed of 154 kb. The capsid of SIOΦ is composed of four proteins. Bacteriophages SPOσ and ARπ have genome sizes of 25 kbp and 40 kbp, respectively. Both phages as well as SUBω phage have 14 proteins in their capsids. Phages SIOΦ and SPOσ are resistant to high temperatures and to the acid (4.0 and alkaline (9.0 and 10.0 pH.

  14. Learning from Bacteriophages - Advantages and Limitations of Phage and Phage-Encoded Protein Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grażyna; Maciejewska, Barbara; Delattre, Anne-Sophie; Lavigne, Rob

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of bacteria resistance to most of the currently available antibiotics has become a critical therapeutic problem. The bacteria causing both hospital and community-acquired infections are most often multidrug resistant. In view of the alarming level of antibiotic resistance between bacterial species and difficulties with treatment, alternative or supportive antibacterial cure has to be developed. The presented review focuses on the major characteristics of bacteriophages and phage-encoded proteins affecting their usefulness as antimicrobial agents. We discuss several issues such as mode of action, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, resistance and manufacturing aspects of bacteriophages and phage-encoded proteins application. PMID:23305359

  15. Learning from bacteriophages - advantages and limitations of phage and phage-encoded protein applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Maciejewska, Barbara; Delattre, Anne-Sophie; Lavigne, Rob

    2012-12-01

    The emergence of bacteria resistance to most of the currently available antibiotics has become a critical therapeutic problem. The bacteria causing both hospital and community-acquired infections are most often multidrug resistant. In view of the alarming level of antibiotic resistance between bacterial species and difficulties with treatment, alternative or supportive antibacterial cure has to be developed. The presented review focuses on the major characteristics of bacteriophages and phage-encoded proteins affecting their usefulness as antimicrobial agents. We discuss several issues such as mode of action, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, resistance and manufacturing aspects of bacteriophages and phage-encoded proteins application.

  16. Interference with phage lambda development by the small subunit of the phage 21 terminase, gp1.

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    Bacteriophage lambda development is blocked in cells carrying a plasmid that expresses the terminase genes of phage 21. The interference is caused by the small subunit of phage 21 terminase, gp1. Mutants of lambda able to form plaques in the presence of gp1 include sti mutants. One such mutation, sti30, is an A. T-to-G.C transition mutation at base pair 184 on the lambda chromosome. The sti30 mutation extends the length of the ribosome-binding sequence of the Nul gene that is complementary to...

  17. Genome characteristics of a novel phage from Bacillus thuringiensis showing high similarity with phage from Bacillus cereus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yihui Yuan

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis is an important entomopathogenic bacterium belongs to the Bacillus cereus group, which also includes B. anthracis and B. cereus. Several genomes of phages originating from this group had been sequenced, but no genome of Siphoviridae phage from B. thuringiensis has been reported. We recently sequenced and analyzed the genome of a novel phage, BtCS33, from a B. thuringiensis strain, subsp. kurstaki CS33, and compared the gneome of this phage to other phages of the B. cereus group. BtCS33 was the first Siphoviridae phage among the sequenced B. thuringiensis phages. It produced small, turbid plaques on bacterial plates and had a narrow host range. BtCS33 possessed a linear, double-stranded DNA genome of 41,992 bp with 57 putative open reading frames (ORFs. It had a typical genome structure consisting of three modules: the "late" region, the "lysogeny-lysis" region and the "early" region. BtCS33 exhibited high similarity with several phages, B. cereus phage Wβ and some variants of Wβ, in genome organization and the amino acid sequences of structural proteins. There were two ORFs, ORF22 and ORF35, in the genome of BtCS33 that were also found in the genomes of B. cereus phage Wβ and may be involved in regulating sporulation of the host cell. Based on these observations and analysis of phylogenetic trees, we deduced that B. thuringiensis phage BtCS33 and B. cereus phage Wβ may have a common distant ancestor.

  18. Complete Genome Sequences of Four Novel Escherichia coli Bacteriophages Belonging to New Phage Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstens, Alexander B; Kot, Witold; Hansen, Lars H

    2015-01-01

    Here, we describe the sequencing and genome annotations of a set of four Escherichia coli bacteriophages (phages) belonging to newly discovered groups previously consisting of only a single phage and thus expand our knowledge of these phage groups.......Here, we describe the sequencing and genome annotations of a set of four Escherichia coli bacteriophages (phages) belonging to newly discovered groups previously consisting of only a single phage and thus expand our knowledge of these phage groups....

  19. Effects of short elastin-like peptides on filamentous particles and their transition behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathorne, Adam P; Bermudez, Harry

    2013-07-01

    While elastin-like polypeptides and peptides (ELPs) have been used for various stimulus-responsive applications, details of their switching remain unclear. We therefore constructed a novel series of filamentous phage particles displaying a high surface density of short ELPs. The surface display of ELPs did not disrupt either particle shape or dimensions, and the resulting ELP-phage particles were colloidally stable over several weeks. However, in spite of a saturating surface density, macroscopic aggregation of ELP-phages cannot be triggered in water. To investigate the underlying mechanisms we examined conformational changes in the secondary structure of the phage proteins by circular dichroism and tryptophan fluorescence, which indicate partial protein unfolding in ELP-phage particles. To gain further insight into the ELP itself, analogous "free" ELP peptides were synthesized and characterized. Circular dichroism of these peptides shows the onset of β-type conformations with increasing temperature, consistent with the accepted view of the microscopic transition that underlies the inverse phase behavior of ELPs. Increased guest residue hydrophobicity was found to depress the microscopic transition temperature of the peptides, also consistent with a previously proposed intramolecular hydrogen-bonding mechanism. Importantly, our results indicate that although the nanoscale presentation state can suppress macroscopic aggregation of ELPs, microscopic transitions of the ELP can still occur. Given the growing use of ELPs within supra-molecular scaffolds, such effects are important design considerations for future applications.

  20. Characterization of Five Podoviridae Phages Infecting Citrobacter freundii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Sana; Rousseau, Geneviève M; Labrie, Simon J; Kourda, Rim S; Tremblay, Denise M; Moineau, Sylvain; Slama, Karim B

    2016-01-01

    Citrobacter freundii causes opportunistic infections in humans and animals, which are becoming difficult to treat due to increased antibiotic resistance. The aim of this study was to explore phages as potential antimicrobial agents against this opportunistic pathogen. We isolated and characterized five new virulent phages, SH1, SH2, SH3, SH4, and SH5 from sewage samples in Tunisia. Morphological and genomic analyses revealed that the five C. freundii phages belong to the Caudovirales order, Podoviridae family, and Autographivirinae subfamily. Their linear double-stranded DNA genomes range from 39,158 to 39,832 bp and are terminally redundant with direct repeats between 183 and 242 bp. The five genomes share the same organization as coliphage T7. Based on genomic comparisons and on the phylogeny of the DNA polymerases, we assigned the five phages to the T7virus genus but separated them into two different groups. Phages SH1 and SH2 are very similar to previously characterized phages phiYeO3-12 and phiSG-JL2, infecting, respectively, Yersinia enterocolitica and Salmonella enterica, as well as sharing more than 80% identity with most genes of coliphage T7. Phages SH3, SH4, and SH5 are very similar to phages K1F and Dev2, infecting, respectively, Escherichia coli and Cronobacter turicensis. Several structural proteins of phages SH1, SH3, and SH4 were detected by mass spectrometry. The five phages were also stable from pH 5 to 10. No genes coding for known virulence factors or integrases were found, suggesting that the five isolated phages could be good candidates for therapeutic applications to prevent or treat C. freundii infections. In addition, this study increases our knowledge about the evolutionary relationships within the T7virus genus.

  1. Efficient purification of unique antibodies using peptide affinity-matrix columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Liselotte Brix; Riise, Erik; Nielsen, Leif Kofoed;

    2004-01-01

    Phage display technology was used to identify peptide ligands with unique specificity for a monoclonal model antibody, MK16, that recognises the human multiple sclerosis associated MHC class II molecule DR2 in complex with a myelin basic protein (MBP)-derived peptide corresponding to residue 85......-99. Several peptide epitopes were identified and all of them recognised specifically MK16. One peptide, ER6.1, was selected and linked to beaded agarose and demonstrated excellent performance as a peptide affinity chromatography matrix. This epitope matrix was efficient in the purification of MK16 Fab...

  2. Selection of peptide mimics of HIV-1 epitope recognized by neutralizing antibody VRC01.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton N Chikaev

    Full Text Available The ability to induce anti-HIV-1 antibodies that can neutralize a broad spectrum of viral isolates from different subtypes seems to be a key requirement for development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine. The epitopes recognized by the most potent broadly neutralizing antibodies that have been characterized are largely discontinuous. Mimetics of such conformational epitopes could be potentially used as components of a synthetic immunogen that can elicit neutralizing antibodies. Here we used phage display technology to identify peptide motifs that mimic the epitope recognized by monoclonal antibody VRC01, which is able to neutralize up to 91% of circulating primary isolates. Three rounds of biopanning were performed against 2 different phage peptide libraries for this purpose. The binding specificity of selected phage clones to monoclonal antibody VRC01 was estimated using dot blot analysis. The putative peptide mimics exposed on the surface of selected phages were analyzed for conformational and linear homology to the surface of HIV-1 gp120 fragment using computational analysis. Corresponding peptides were synthesized and checked for their ability to interfere with neutralization activity of VRC01 in a competitive inhibition assay. One of the most common peptides selected from 12-mer phage library was found to partially mimic a CD4-binding loop fragment, whereas none of the circular C7C-mer peptides was able to mimic any HIV-1 domains. However, peptides identified from both the 12-mer and C7C-mer peptide libraries showed rescue of HIV-1 infectivity in the competitive inhibition assay. The identification of epitope mimics may lead to novel immunogens capable of inducing broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies.

  3. Engineered Adhesion Peptides for Improved Silicon Adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Sathish Kumar; Jebors, Said; Martin, Marta; Cloitre, Thierry; Agarwal, Vivechana; Mehdi, Ahmad; Martinez, Jean; Subra, Gilles; Gergely, Csilla

    2015-11-01

    Engineering peptides that present selective recognition and high affinity for a material is a major challenge for assembly-driven elaboration of complex systems with wide applications in the field of biomaterials, hard-tissue regeneration, and functional materials for therapeutics. Peptide-material interactions are of vital importance in natural processes but less exploited for the design of novel systems for practical applications because of our poor understanding of mechanisms underlying these interactions. Here, we present an approach based on the synthesis of several truncated peptides issued from a silicon-specific peptide recovered via phage display technology. We use the photonic response provided by porous silicon microcavities to evaluate the binding efficiency of 14 different peptide derivatives. We identify and engineer a short peptide sequence (SLVSHMQT), revealing the highest affinity for p(+)-Si. The molecular recognition behavior of the obtained peptide fragment can be revealed through mutations allowing identification of the preferential affinity of certain amino acids toward silicon. These results constitute an advance in both the engineering of peptides that reveal recognition properties for silicon and the understanding of biomolecule-material interactions.

  4. Differences in the rotational properties of multiple stellar populations in M 13: a faster rotation for the "extreme" chemical subpopulation

    CERN Document Server

    Cordero, M J; Pilachowski, C A; Balbinot, E; Johnson, C I; Varri, A L

    2016-01-01

    We use radial velocities from spectra of giants obtained with the WIYN telescope, coupled with existing chemical abundance measurements of Na and O for the same stars, to probe the presence of kinematic differences among the multiple populations of the globular cluster (GC) M13. To characterise the kinematics of various chemical subsamples, we introduce a method using Bayesian inference along with an MCMC algorithm to fit a six-parameter kinematic model (including rotation) to these subsamples. We find that the so-called "extreme" population (Na-enhanced and extremely O-depleted) exhibits faster rotation around the centre of the cluster than the other cluster stars, in particular when compared to the dominant "intermediate" population (moderately Na-enhanced and O-depleted). The most likely difference between the rotational amplitude of this extreme population and that of the intermediate population is found to be $\\sim$4 km s$^{-1}$, with a 98.4% probability that the rotational amplitude of the extreme popul...

  5. Hydroxyapatite-binding peptides for bone growth and inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R. (Berkeley, CA); Song, Jie (Shrewsbury, MA); Lee, Seung-Wuk (Walnut Creek, CA)

    2011-09-20

    Hydroxyapatite (HA)-binding peptides are selected using combinatorial phage library display. Pseudo-repetitive consensus amino acid sequences possessing periodic hydroxyl side chains in every two or three amino acid sequences are obtained. These sequences resemble the (Gly-Pro-Hyp).sub.x repeat of human type I collagen, a major component of extracellular matrices of natural bone. A consistent presence of basic amino acid residues is also observed. The peptides are synthesized by the solid-phase synthetic method and then used for template-driven HA-mineralization. Microscopy reveal that the peptides template the growth of polycrystalline HA crystals .about.40 nm in size.

  6. Bio-mimetic Nanostructure Self-assembled from Au@Ag Heterogeneous Nanorods and Phage Fusion Proteins for Targeted Tumor Optical Detection and Photothermal Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Liu, Pei; Sun, Lin; Li, Cuncheng; Petrenko, Valery A.; Liu, Aihua

    2014-10-01

    Nanomaterials with near-infrared (NIR) absorption have been widely studied in cancer detection and photothermal therapy (PTT), while it remains a great challenge in targeting tumor efficiently with minimal side effects. Herein we report a novel multifunctional phage-mimetic nanostructure, which was prepared by layer-by-layer self-assembly of Au@Ag heterogenous nanorods (NRs) with rhodamine 6G, and specific pVIII fusion proteins. Au@Ag NRs, first being applied for PTT, exhibited excellent stability, cost-effectivity, biocompatibility and tunable NIR absorption. The fusion proteins were isolated from phage DDAGNRQP specifically selected from f8/8 landscape phage library against colorectal cancer cells in a high-throughput way. Considering the definite charge distribution and low molecular weight, phage fusion proteins were assembled on the negatively charged NR core by electrostatic interactions, exposing the N-terminus fused with DDAGNRQP peptide on the surface. The fluorescent images showed that assembled phage fusion proteins can direct the nanostructure into cancer cells. The nanostructure was more efficient than gold nanorods and silver nanotriangle-based photothermal agents and was capable of specifically ablating SW620 cells after 10 min illumination with an 808 nm laser in the light intensity of 4 W/cm2. The prepared nanostructure would become an ideal reagent for simutaneously targeted optical imaging and PTT of tumor.

  7. Bio-mimetic nanostructure self-assembled from Au@Ag heterogeneous nanorods and phage fusion proteins for targeted tumor optical detection and photothermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Liu, Pei; Sun, Lin; Li, Cuncheng; Petrenko, Valery A; Liu, Aihua

    2014-10-28

    Nanomaterials with near-infrared (NIR) absorption have been widely studied in cancer detection and photothermal therapy (PTT), while it remains a great challenge in targeting tumor efficiently with minimal side effects. Herein we report a novel multifunctional phage-mimetic nanostructure, which was prepared by layer-by-layer self-assembly of Au@Ag heterogenous nanorods (NRs) with rhodamine 6G, and specific pVIII fusion proteins. Au@Ag NRs, first being applied for PTT, exhibited excellent stability, cost-effectivity, biocompatibility and tunable NIR absorption. The fusion proteins were isolated from phage DDAGNRQP specifically selected from f8/8 landscape phage library against colorectal cancer cells in a high-throughput way. Considering the definite charge distribution and low molecular weight, phage fusion proteins were assembled on the negatively charged NR core by electrostatic interactions, exposing the N-terminus fused with DDAGNRQP peptide on the surface. The fluorescent images showed that assembled phage fusion proteins can direct the nanostructure into cancer cells. The nanostructure was more efficient than gold nanorods and silver nanotriangle-based photothermal agents and was capable of specifically ablating SW620 cells after 10 min illumination with an 808 nm laser in the light intensity of 4 W/cm(2). The prepared nanostructure would become an ideal reagent for simutaneously targeted optical imaging and PTT of tumor.

  8. Development of a rapid phage-based method for the detection of viable Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in blood within 48 h☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Benjamin M.C.; Denton, Emily J.; Mahendran, Sophie A.; Huxley, Jonathan N.; Rees, Catherine E.D.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a methodology to rapidly detect viable Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in clinical blood samples. MAP cells spiked into commercially available blood were recovered using optimised peptide-mediated magnetic separation (PMMS) and detected using a phage-based method, and the identity of the cells detected confirmed using nested-PCR amplification of MAP signature sequences (IS900). The limit of detection was determined to be 10 MAP cells per ml of blood and was used to detect MAP present in clinical bovine blood samples. Using the PMMS-phage method there was no difference when detecting MAP from whole blood or from isolated buffy coat. MAP was detected in animals that were milk-ELISA positive (15 animals) by PMMS-phage and no MAP was detected in blood samples from an accredited Johne's disease free herd (5 animals). In a set of samples from one herd (10 animals) that came from animals with variable milk ELISA status, the PMMS-phage results agreed with the positive milk-ELISA results in all but one case. These results show that the PMMS-phage method can detect MAP present in naturally infected blood. Total assay time is 48 h and, unlike PCR-based detection tests, only viable cells are detected. A rapid method for detecting MAP in blood could further the understanding of disseminated infection in animals with Johne's disease. PMID:23811207

  9. Peptides as targeting probes against tumor vasculature for diagnosis and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi Jie; Cho, Chi Hin

    2012-09-19

    Tumor vasculature expresses a distinct set of molecule signatures on the endothelial cell surface different from the resting blood vessels of other organs and tissues in the body. This makes them an attractive target for cancer therapy and molecular imaging. The current technology using the in vivo phage display biopanning allows us to quickly isolate and identify peptides potentially homing to various tumor blood vessels. Tumor-homing peptides in conjugation with chemotherapeutic drugs or imaging contrast have been extensively tested in various preclinical and clinical studies. These tumor-homing peptides have valuable potential as targeting probes for tumor molecular imaging and drug delivery. In this review, we summarize the recent advances about the applications of tumor-homing peptides selected by in vivo phage display library screening against tumor vasculature. We also introduce the characteristics of the latest discovered tumor-penetrating peptides in their potential clinical applications.

  10. Computational models of populations of bacteria and lytic phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak-Baltyn, Konrad; Martin, Gregory J O; Stickland, Anthony D; Scales, Peter J; Gras, Sally L

    2016-11-01

    The use of phages to control and reduce numbers of unwanted bacteria can be traced back to the early 1900s, when phages were explored as a tool to treat infections before the wide scale use of antibiotics. Recently, phage therapy has received renewed interest as a method to treat multiresistant bacteria. Phages are also widely used in the food industry to prevent the growth of certain bacteria in foods, and are currently being explored as a tool for use in bioremediation and wastewater treatment. Despite the large body of biological research on phages, relatively little attention has been given to computational modeling of the population dynamics of phage and bacterial interactions. The earliest model was described by Campbell in the 1960s. Subsequent modifications to this model include partial or complete resistance, multiple phage binding sites, and spatial heterogeneity. This review provides a general introduction to modeling of the population dynamics of bacteria and phage. The review introduces the basic model and relevant concepts and evaluates more complex variations of the basic model published to date, including a model of disease epidemics caused by infectious bacteria. Finally, the shortcomings and potential ways to improve the models are discussed.

  11. Heat tolerance of dairy lactococcal c2 phages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Cecilie Lykke Marvig; Basheer, Aideh; Neve, H.

    2011-01-01

    Nine Lactococcus lactis c2 phages propagated on different hosts were screened for thermal resistance in skimmed milk. Pronounced variations in thermal resistance were found. Three phages displayed high sensitivity towards heat resulting in >8 log reductions after 70 °C for 5 min, whereas the most...

  12. Fluorescent T7 display phages obtained by translational frameshift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slootweg, E.J.; Keller, H.J.H.G.; Hink, M.A.; Borst, J.W.; Bakker, J.; Schots, A.

    2006-01-01

    Lytic phages form a powerful platform for the display of large cDNA libraries and offer the possibility to screen for interactions with almost any substrate. To visualize these interactions directly by fluorescence microscopy, we constructed fluorescent T7 phages by exploiting the flexibility of pha

  13. Phages Preying on Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, and Bacillus thuringiensis: Past, Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Gillis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteriophages (phages have been widely studied due to their major role in virulence evolution of bacterial pathogens. However, less attention has been paid to phages preying on bacteria from the Bacillus cereus group and their contribution to the bacterial genetic pool has been disregarded. Therefore, this review brings together the main information for the B. cereus group phages, from their discovery to their modern biotechnological applications. A special focus is given to phages infecting Bacillus anthracis, B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis. These phages belong to the Myoviridae, Siphoviridae, Podoviridae and Tectiviridae families. For the sake of clarity, several phage categories have been made according to significant characteristics such as lifestyles and lysogenic states. The main categories comprise the transducing phages, phages with a chromosomal or plasmidial prophage state, γ-like phages and jumbo-phages. The current genomic characterization of some of these phages is also addressed throughout this work and some promising applications are discussed here.

  14. CTHRSSVVC Peptide as a Possible Early Molecular Imaging Target for Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemeire A. Silva

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our work was to select phages displaying peptides capable of binding to vascular markers present in human atheroma, and validate their capacity to target the vascular markers in vitro and in low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLr−/− mouse model of atherosclerosis. By peptide fingerprinting on human atherosclerotic tissues, we selected and isolated four different peptides sequences, which bind to atherosclerotic lesions and share significant similarity to known human proteins with prominent roles in atherosclerosis. The CTHRSSVVC-phage peptide displayed the strongest reactivity with human carotid atherosclerotic lesions (p < 0.05, when compared to tissues from normal carotid arteries. This peptide sequence shares similarity to a sequence present in the fifth scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR domain of CD163, which appeared to bind to CD163, and subsequently, was internalized by macrophages. Moreover, the CTHRSSVVC-phage targets atherosclerotic lesions of a low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLr−/− mouse model of atherosclerosis in vivo to High-Fat diet group versus Control group. Tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-CTHRSSVVC peptide (DOTA-CTHRSSVVC was synthesized and labeled with 111InCl3 in >95% yield as determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, to validate the binding of the peptide in atherosclerotic plaque specimens. The results supported our hypothesis that CTHRSSVVC peptide has a remarkable sequence for the development of theranostics approaches in the treatment of atherosclerosis and other diseases.

  15. Filamentous Phages As a Model System in Soft Matter Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogic, Zvonimir

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous phages have unique physical properties, such as uniform particle lengths, that are not found in other model systems of rod-like colloidal particles. Consequently, suspensions of such phages provided powerful model systems that have advanced our understanding of soft matter physics in general and liquid crystals in particular. We described some of these advances. In particular we briefly summarize how suspensions of filamentous phages have provided valuable insight into the field of colloidal liquid crystals. We also describe recent experiments on filamentous phages that have elucidated a robust pathway for assembly of 2D membrane-like materials. Finally, we outline unique structural properties of filamentous phages that have so far remained largely unexplored yet have the potential to further advance soft matter physics and material science.

  16. Phage abortive infection in lactococci: variations on a theme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopin, Marie-Christine; Chopin, Alain; Bidnenko, Elena

    2005-08-01

    Abortive infection (Abi) systems, also called phage exclusion, block phage multiplication and cause premature bacterial cell death upon phage infection. This decreases the number of progeny particles and limits their spread to other cells allowing the bacterial population to survive. Twenty Abi systems have been isolated in Lactococcus lactis, a bacterium used in cheese-making fermentation processes, where phage attacks are of economical importance. Recent insights in their expression and mode of action indicate that, behind diverse phenotypic and molecular effects, lactococcal Abis share common traits with the well-studied Escherichia coli systems Lit and Prr. Abis are widespread in bacteria, and recent analysis indicates that Abis might have additional roles other than conferring phage resistance.

  17. Staphylococcus aureus phage types and their correlation to antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehndiratta P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Context: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most devastating human pathogen. The organism has a differential ability to spread and cause outbreak of infections. Characterization of these strains is important to control the spread of infection in the hospitals as well as in the community. Aim: To identify the currently existing phage groups of Staphylococcus aureus, their prevalence and resistance to antibiotics. Materials and Methods: Study was undertaken on 252 Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from clinical samples. Strains were phage typed and their resistance to antibiotics was determined following standard microbiological procedures. Statistical Analysis: Chi square test was used to compare the antibiotic susceptibility between methicillin resistant Staph. aureus (MRSA and methicillin sensitive S. aureus (MSSA strains. Results: Prevalence of MRSA and MSSA strains was found to be 29.36% and 70.65% respectively. Of these 17.56% of MRSA and 40.44% of MSSA strains were community acquired. All the MSSA strains belonging to phage type 81 from the community were sensitive to all the antibiotics tested including clindamycin and were resistant to penicillin. Forty five percent strains of phage group III and 39% of non-typable MRSA strains from the hospital were resistant to multiple antibiotics. Conclusion: The study revealed that predominant phage group amongst MRSA strains was phage group III and amongst MSSA from the community was phage group NA (phage type 81. MSSA strains isolated from the community differed significantly from hospital strains in their phage type and antibiotic susceptibility. A good correlation was observed between community acquired strains of phage type 81 and sensitivity to gentamycin and clindamycin.

  18. Phage ΦPan70, a Putative Temperate Phage, Controls Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Planktonic, Biofilm and Burn Mouse Model Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holguín, Angela V.; Rangel, Guillermo; Clavijo, Viviana; Prada, Catalina; Mantilla, Marcela; Gomez, María Catalina; Kutter, Elizabeth; Taylor, Corinda; Fineran, Peter C.; Barrios, Andrés Fernando González; Vives, Martha J.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the Multi-Drug-Resistant organisms most frequently isolated worldwide and, because of a shortage of new antibiotics, bacteriophages are considered an alternative for its treatment. Previously, P. aeruginosa phages were isolated and best candidates were chosen based on their ability to form clear plaques and their host range. This work aimed to characterize one of those phages, ΦPan70, preliminarily identified as a good candidate for phage-therapy. We performed infection curves, biofilm removal assays, transmission-electron-microscopy, pulsed-field-gel-electrophoresis, and studied the in vivo ΦPan70 biological activity in the burned mouse model. ΦPan70 was classified as a member of the Myoviridae family and, in both planktonic cells and biofilms, was responsible for a significant reduction in the bacterial population. The burned mouse model showed an animal survival between 80% and 100%, significantly different from the control animals (0%). However, analysis of the ΦPan70 genome revealed that it was 64% identical to F10, a temperate P. aeruginosa phage. Gene annotation indicated ΦPan70 as a new, but possible temperate phage, therefore not ideal for phage-therapy. Based on this, we recommend genome sequence analysis as an early step to select candidate phages for potential application in phage-therapy, before entering into a more intensive characterization. PMID:26274971

  19. Isolation of recombinant phage antibodies targeting the hemagglutinin cleavage site of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhua Dong

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 viruses, which have emerged in poultry and other wildlife worldwide, contain a characteristic multi-basic cleavage site (CS in the hemagglutinin protein (HA. Because this arginine-rich CS is unique among influenza virus subtypes, antibodies against this site have the potential to specifically diagnose pathogenic H5N1. By immunizing mice with the CS peptide and screening a phage display library, we isolated four antibody Fab fragment clones that specifically bind the antigen peptide and several HPAI H5N1 HA proteins in different clades. The soluble Fab fragments expressed in Escherichia coli bound the CS peptide and the H5N1 HA protein with nanomolar affinity. In an immunofluorescence assay, these Fab fragments stained cells infected with HPAI H5N1 but not those infected with a less virulent strain. Lastly, all the Fab clones could detect the CS peptide and H5N1 HA protein by open sandwich ELISA. Thus, these recombinant Fab fragments will be useful novel reagents for the rapid and specific detection of HPAI H5N1 virus.

  20. The potential of phage therapy in cystic fibrosis: Essential human-bacterial-phage interactions and delivery considerations for use in Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trend, Stephanie; Fonceca, Angela M; Ditcham, William G; Kicic, Anthony; Cf, Arest

    2017-07-15

    As antimicrobial-resistant microbes become increasingly common and a significant global issue, novel approaches to treating these infections particularly in those at high risk are required. This is evident in people with cystic fibrosis (CF), who suffer from chronic airway infection caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria, typically Pseudomonas aeruginosa. One option is bacteriophage (phage) therapy, which utilises the natural predation of phage viruses upon their host bacteria. This review summarises the essential and unique aspects of the phage-microbe-human lung interactions in CF that must be addressed to successfully develop and deliver phage to CF airways. The current evidence regarding phage biology, phage-bacterial interactions, potential airway immune responses to phages, previous use of phages in humans and method of phage delivery to the lung are also summarised. Copyright © 2017 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Dispersal and Survival of Flavobacterium psychrophilum Phages In Vivo in Rainbow Trout and In Vitro under Laboratory Conditions: Implications for Their Use in Phage Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lone; Bertelsen, Sif K.; Dalsgaard, Inger

    2013-01-01

    Attention has been drawn to phage therapy as an alternative approach for controlling pathogenic bacteria such as Flavobacterium psychrophilum in salmonid aquaculture, which can give rise to high mortalities, especially in rainbow trout fry. Recently, phages have been isolated with a broad host...... range and a strong lytic potential against pathogenic F. psychrophilum under experimental conditions. However, little is known about the fate of phages at environmental conditions. Here, we quantified the dispersal and fate of F. psychrophilum phages and hosts in rainbow trout fry after intraperitoneal...... injection. Both phages and bacteria were isolated from the fish organs for up to 10 days after injection, and coinjection with both bacteria and phages resulted in a longer persistence of the phage in the fish organs, than when the fish had been injected with the phages only. The occurrence of both phage...

  2. Exploration of Phage-Host Interactions in Fish Pathogen Vibrio anguillarum and Anti-Phage Defense Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Demeng

    of V. anguillarum have been isolated, indicating that antibiotic use has to be restricted and alternatives have to be developed. Lytic phages have been demonstrated to play an essential role in preventing bacterial infection. However, phages are also known to play a critical role in the evolution......The disease vibriosis is caused by the bacterial pathogen Vibrio anguillarum and results in large losses in aquaculture both in Denmark and around the world. Antibiotics have been widely used in antimicrobial prophylaxis and treatment of vibriosis. Recently, numerous multidrug-resistant strains...... of bacterial pathogenicity development. Therefore, successful application of phage therapy in the treatment of vibriosis requires a detailed understanding of phage-host interactions, especially with regards to anti-phage defense mechanisms in the host. Part I. As a first approach, 24 V. anguillarum and 13...

  3. Structure and function of a cyanophage-encoded peptide deformylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Jeremy A; Lorimer, Don; Youle, Merry; Witte, Pam; Craig, Tim; Abendroth, Jan; Rohwer, Forest; Edwards, Robert A; Segall, Anca M; Burgin, Alex B

    2013-06-01

    Bacteriophages encode auxiliary metabolic genes that support more efficient phage replication. For example, cyanophages carry several genes to maintain host photosynthesis throughout infection, shuttling the energy and reducing power generated away from carbon fixation and into anabolic pathways. Photodamage to the D1/D2 proteins at the core of photosystem II necessitates their continual replacement. Synthesis of functional proteins in bacteria requires co-translational removal of the N-terminal formyl group by a peptide deformylase (PDF). Analysis of marine metagenomes to identify phage-encoded homologs of known metabolic genes found that marine phages carry PDF genes, suggesting that their expression during infection might benefit phage replication. We identified a PDF homolog in the genome of Synechococcus cyanophage S-SSM7. Sequence analysis confirmed that it possesses the three absolutely conserved motifs that form the active site in PDF metalloproteases. Phylogenetic analysis placed it within the Type 1B subclass, most closely related to the Arabidopsis chloroplast PDF, but lacking the C-terminal α-helix characteristic of that group. PDF proteins from this phage and from Synechococcus elongatus were expressed and characterized. The phage PDF is the more active enzyme and deformylates the N-terminal tetrapeptides from D1 proteins more efficiently than those from ribosomal proteins. Solution of the X-ray/crystal structures of those two PDFs to 1.95 Å resolution revealed active sites identical to that of the Type 1B Arabidopsis chloroplast PDF. Taken together, these findings show that many cyanophages encode a PDF with a D1 substrate preference that adds to the repertoire of genes used by phages to maintain photosynthetic activities.

  4. Vibrio vulnificus phage PV94 is closely related to temperate phages of V. cholerae and other Vibrio species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryshliak, Mark; Hammerl, Jens A; Reetz, Jochen; Strauch, Eckhard; Hertwig, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is an important pathogen which can cause serious infections in humans. Yet, there is limited knowledge on its virulence factors and the question whether temperate phages might be involved in pathogenicity, as is the case with V. cholerae. Thus far, only two phages (SSP002 and VvAW1) infecting V. vulnificus have been genetically characterized. These phages were isolated from the environment and are not related to Vibrio cholerae phages. The lack of information on temperate V. vulnificus phages prompted us to isolate those phages from lysogenic strains and to compare them with phages of other Vibrio species. In this study the temperate phage PV94 was isolated from a V. vulnificus biotype 1 strain by mitomycin C induction. PV94 is a myovirus whose genome is a linear double-stranded DNA of 33,828 bp with 5'-protruding ends. Sequence analysis of PV94 revealed a modular organization of the genome. The left half of the genome comprising the immunity region and genes for the integrase, terminase and replication proteins shows similarites to V. cholerae kappa phages whereas the right half containing genes for structural proteins is closely related to a prophage residing in V. furnissii NCTC 11218. We present the first genomic sequence of a temperate phage isolated from a human V. vulnificus isolate. The sequence analysis of the PV94 genome demonstrates the wide distribution of closely related prophages in various Vibrio species. Moreover, the mosaicism of the PV94 genome indicates a high degree of horizontal genetic exchange within the genus Vibrio, by which V. vulnificus might acquire virulence-associated genes from other species.

  5. Vibrio vulnificus phage PV94 is closely related to temperate phages of V. cholerae and other Vibrio species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Pryshliak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vibrio vulnificus is an important pathogen which can cause serious infections in humans. Yet, there is limited knowledge on its virulence factors and the question whether temperate phages might be involved in pathogenicity, as is the case with V. cholerae. Thus far, only two phages (SSP002 and VvAW1 infecting V. vulnificus have been genetically characterized. These phages were isolated from the environment and are not related to Vibrio cholerae phages. The lack of information on temperate V. vulnificus phages prompted us to isolate those phages from lysogenic strains and to compare them with phages of other Vibrio species. RESULTS: In this study the temperate phage PV94 was isolated from a V. vulnificus biotype 1 strain by mitomycin C induction. PV94 is a myovirus whose genome is a linear double-stranded DNA of 33,828 bp with 5'-protruding ends. Sequence analysis of PV94 revealed a modular organization of the genome. The left half of the genome comprising the immunity region and genes for the integrase, terminase and replication proteins shows similarites to V. cholerae kappa phages whereas the right half containing genes for structural proteins is closely related to a prophage residing in V. furnissii NCTC 11218. CONCLUSION: We present the first genomic sequence of a temperate phage isolated from a human V. vulnificus isolate. The sequence analysis of the PV94 genome demonstrates the wide distribution of closely related prophages in various Vibrio species. Moreover, the mosaicism of the PV94 genome indicates a high degree of horizontal genetic exchange within the genus Vibrio, by which V. vulnificus might acquire virulence-associated genes from other species.

  6. Evolution of Lactococcus lactis phages within a cheese factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Geneviève M; Moineau, Sylvain

    2009-08-01

    We have sequenced the double-stranded DNA genomes of six lactococcal phages (SL4, CB13, CB14, CB19, CB20, and GR7) from the 936 group that were isolated over a 9-year period from whey samples obtained from a Canadian cheese factory. These six phages infected the same two industrial Lactococcus lactis strains out of 30 tested. The CB14 and GR7 genomes were found to be 100% identical even though they were isolated 14 months apart, indicating that a phage can survive in a cheese plant for more than a year. The other four genomes were related but notably different. The length of the genomes varied from 28,144 to 32,182 bp, and they coded for 51 to 55 open reading frames. All five genomes possessed a 3' overhang cos site that was 11 nucleotides long. Several structural proteins were also identified by nano-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, confirming bioinformatic analyses. Comparative analyses suggested that the most recently isolated phages (CB19 and CB20) were derived, in part, from older phage isolates (CB13 and CB14/GR7). The organization of the five distinct genomes was similar to the previously sequenced lactococcal phage genomes of the 936 group, and from these sequences, a core genome was determined for lactococcal phages of the 936 group.

  7. Safety and efficacy of phage therapy via the intravenous route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck, Peter; Smithyman, Anthony

    2016-02-01

    Increasing development of antimicrobial resistance is driving a resurgence in interest in phage therapy: the use of bacteriophages to treat bacterial infections. As the lytic action of bacteriophages is unaffected by the antibiotic resistance status of their bacterial target, it is thought that phage therapy may have considerable potential in the treatment of a wide range of topical and localized infections. As yet this interest has not extended to intravenous (IV) use, which is surprising given that the historical record shows that phages are likely to be safe and effective when delivered by this route. Starting almost 100 years ago, phages were administered intravenously in treatment of systemic infections including typhoid, and Staphylococcal bacteremia. There was extensive IV use of phages in the 1940s to treat typhoid, reportedly with outstanding efficacy and safety. The safety of IV phage administration is also underpinned by the detailed work of Ochs and colleagues in Seattle who have over four decades' experience with IV injection into human subjects of large doses of highly purified coliphage PhiX174. Though these subjects included a large number of immune-deficient children, no serious side effects were observed over this extended time period. The large and continuing global health problems of typhoid and Staphylococcus aureus are exacerbated by the increasing antibiotic resistance of these pathogens. We contend that these infections are excellent candidates for use of IV phage therapy.

  8. A novel fluorescent probe: europium complex hybridized T7 phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chin-Mei; Jin, Qiaoling; Sutton, April; Chen, Liaohai

    2005-01-01

    We report on the creation of a novel fluorescent probe of europium-complex hybridized T7 phage. It was made by filling a ligand-displayed T7 ghost phage with a fluorescent europium complex particle. The structure of the hybridized phage, which contains a fluorescent inorganic core surrounded by a ligand-displayed capsid shell, was confirmed by electron microscope, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), bioassays, and fluorescence spectrometer. More importantly, as a benefit of the phage display technology, the hybridized phage has the capability to integrate an affinity reagent against virtually any target molecules. The approach provides an original method to fluorescently "tag" a bioligand and/or to "biofunctionalize" a fluorophore particle. By using other types of materials such as radioactive or magnetic particles to fill the ghost phage, we envision that the hybridized phages represent a new class of fluorescent, magnetic, or radioprobes for imaging and bioassays and could be used both in vitro and in vivo.

  9. Biofilm control with natural and genetically-modified phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motlagh, Amir Mohaghegh; Bhattacharjee, Ananda Shankar; Goel, Ramesh

    2016-04-01

    Bacteriophages, as the most dominant and diverse entities in the universe, have the potential to be one of the most promising therapeutic agents. The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria and the antibiotic crisis in the last few decades have resulted in a renewed interest in phage therapy. Furthermore, bacteriophages, with the capacity to rapidly infect and overcome bacterial resistance, have demonstrated a sustainable approach against bacterial pathogens-particularly in biofilm. Biofilm, as complex microbial communities located at interphases embedded in a matrix of bacterial extracellular polysaccharide substances (EPS), is involved in health issues such as infections associated with the use of biomaterials and chronic infections by multidrug resistant bacteria, as well as industrial issues such as biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces in food industry and membrane biofouling in water and wastewater treatment processes. In this paper, the most recent studies on the potential of phage therapy using natural and genetically-modified lytic phages and their associated enzymes in fighting biofilm development in various fields including engineering, industry, and medical applications are reviewed. Phage-mediated prevention approaches as an indirect phage therapy strategy are also explored in this review. In addition, the limitations of these approaches and suggestions to overcome these constraints are discussed to enhance the efficiency of phage therapy process. Finally, future perspectives and directions for further research towards a better understanding of phage therapy to control biofilm are recommended.

  10. Coevolution of CRISPR bacteria and phage in 2 dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Pu; Deem, Michael

    2014-03-01

    CRISPR (cluster regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) is a newly discovered adaptive, heritable immune system of prokaryotes. It can prevent infection of prokaryotes by phage. Most bacteria and almost all archae have CRISPR. The CRISPR system incorporates short nucleotide sequences from viruses. These incorporated sequences provide a historical record of the host and predator coevolution. We simulate the coevolution of bacteria and phage in 2 dimensions. Each phage has multiple proto-spacers that the bacteria can incorporate. Each bacterium can store multiple spacers in its CRISPR. Phages can escape recognition by the CRISPR system via point mutation or recombination. We will discuss the different evolutionary consequences of point mutation or recombination on the coevolution of bacteria and phage. We will also discuss an intriguing ``dynamic phase transition'' in the number of phage as a function of time and mutation rate. We will show that due to the arm race between phages and bacteria, the frequency of spacers and proto-spacers in a population can oscillate quite rapidly.

  11. Significance of phage-host interactions for biocontrol of Campylobacter jejuni in food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Athina, Zampara; Sørensen, Martine Camilla Holst; Elsser-Gravesen, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Poultry meat is the main source of Campylobacter jejuni foodborne disease. Currently, no effective control measures prevent C. jejuni from contaminating poultry meat. However, post-harvest phage treatment is a promising biocontrol strategy that has not yet been explored. Here we identified phages...... capable of reducing C. jejuni at chilled temperature by a systematic screening of unique phages of our collection consisting of flagellotropic phages and phages dependent on capsular polysaccharides (CPSs) for infection. Interestingly, CPS phages showed varied killing efficiencies at 5 °C in vitro......, ranging from insignificant reduction to 0.55 log reduction. In contrast, none of the flagellotropic phages significantly reduced C. jejuni counts at low temperature. Phage adsorption at 5 °C showed that flagellotropic phages bind reversibly and less efficiently to C. jejuni than CPS phages, which may...

  12. Portable self-contained cultures for phage and bacteria made of paper and tape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funes-Huacca, Maribel; Wu, Alyson; Szepesvari, Eszter; Rajendran, Pavithra; Kwan-Wong, Nicholas; Razgulin, Andrew; Shen, Yi; Kagira, John; Campbell, Robert; Derda, Ratmir

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that a functional, portable device for the growth of bacteria or amplification of bacteriophage can be created using simple materials. These devices are comprised of packing tape, sheets of paper patterned by hydrophobic printer ink, and a polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) membrane, which is selectively permeable to oxygen but non-permeable to water. These devices supply bacteria with oxygen and prevent the evaporation of media for a period over 48 h. The division time of E. coli and the amplification of the phage M13 in this device are similar to the rates measured on agar plates and in shaking cultures. The growth of bacteria with a fluorescent mCherry reporter can be quantified using a flatbed scanner or a cell phone camera. Permeating devices with commercial viability dye (PrestoBlue) can be used to detect low copy number of E. coli (1-10 CFU in 100 μL) and visualize microorganisms in environmental samples. The platform, equipped with bacteria that carry inducible mCherry reporter could also be used to quantify the concentration of the inducer (here, arabinose). Identical culture platforms can, potentially, be used to quantify the induction of gene expression by an engineered phage or by synthetic transcriptional regulators that respond to clinically relevant molecules. The majority of measurement and fabrication procedures presented in this report have been replicated by low-skilled personnel (high-school students) in a low-resource environment (high-school classroom). The fabrication and performance of the device have also been tested in a low-resource laboratory setting by researchers in Nairobi, Kenya. Accordingly, this platform can be used as both an educational tool and as a diagnostic tool in low-resource environments worldwide.

  13. Identification and Characterization of Peptides Mimicking the Epitopes of Metalloprotease of Schistosoma Japonicum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lianfei Tang; Yuxiao Chen; Linqian Wang; Shunke Zhang; Xianfang Zeng; Xinyuan Yi

    2005-01-01

    In an attempt to isolate and characterize peptides mimicking epitopes of metalloprotease and explore their immunological protection against Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum), polyclonal anti-metalloprotease sera was prepared to screen a 12-mer random peptide library to isolate phages binding specially to antisera IgG. Then,phage ELISA, animal immunization, DNA sequencing, Western blotting and enzymatic activity neutralizing analysis were used to characterize the selected phage clones. All of ten randomly picked clones were shown to be positive. Five peptides of different amino acid sequences deduced from DNA sequences were obtained and two of them (peptides 2 and 3) could induce significant reduction (31.0% and 31.8%, respectively) in worm burden and high reduction (52.6% and 54.9%, respectively) in liver eggs per gram (LEPG), while, unexpectedly, others (peptides 1, 4 and 5) could not elicit enough protection against infection of S. japonicum. Peptides 2 and 3 could be recognized by S. japonicum infected mouse sera (IMS) and could elicit neutralizing Abs. The results show that peptides 2 and 3 are antigenic and immunogenic. They are true mimics of epitopes of metalloprotease and useful as novel vaccine candidates against S. japonicum.

  14. Complete genome sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae phage JD001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zelin; Shen, Wenbin; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Haotian; Me, Rao; Wang, Yanchun; Zeng, Lingbin; Zhu, Yongzhang; Qin, Jinhong; He, Ping; Guo, Xiaokui

    2012-12-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae, opportunistic pathogens that are among the eight most prevalent infectious agents in hospitals. The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of K. pneumoniae has became a public health problem globally. To develop an effective antimicrobial agent, we isolated a bacteriophage, named JD001, from seawater and sequenced its genome. Comparative genome analysis of phage JD001 with other K. pneumoniae bacteriophages revealed that phage JD001 has little similarity to previously published K. pneumoniae phages KP15, KP32, KP34, and phiKO2. Here we announce the complete genome sequence of JD001 and report major findings from the genomic analysis.

  15. Phage approved in food, why not as a therapeutic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarhan, Wessam A; Azzazy, Hassan M E

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial resistance is not only restricted to human infections but is also a major problem in food. With the marked decrease in produced antimicrobials, the world is now reassessing bacteriophages. In 2006, ListShield™ received the US FDA approval for using phage in food. Nevertheless, regulatory approval of phage-based therapeutics is still facing many challenges. This review highlights the use of bacteriophages as biocontrol agents in the food industry. It also focuses on the challenges still facing the regulatory approval of phage-based therapeutics and the proposed approaches to overcome such challenges.

  16. Phage display library screening for identification of interacting protein partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addepalli, Balasubrahmanyam; Rao, Suryadevara; Hunt, Arthur G

    2015-01-01

    Phage display is a versatile high-throughput screening method employed to understand and improve the chemical biology, be it production of human monoclonal antibodies or identification of interacting protein partners. A majority of cell proteins operate in a concerted fashion either by stable or transient interactions. Such interactions can be mediated by recognition of small amino acid sequence motifs on the protein surface. Phage display can play a crucial role in identification of such motifs. This report describes the use of phage display for the identification of high affinity sequence motifs that could be responsible for interactions with a target (bait) protein.

  17. Review: phage therapy: a modern tool to control bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadir, Muhammad Imran

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of antibiotic-resistant in bacteria has aggravated curiosity in development of alternative therapy to conventional drugs. One of the emerging drugs that can be used alternative to antibiotics is bacteriophage therapy. The use of living phages in the cure of lethal infectious life threatening diseases caused by Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria has been reported. Another development in the field of bacteriophage therapy is the use of genetically modified and non replicating phages in the treatment of bacterial infection. Genetically engineered bacteriophages can be used as adjuvant along with antibiotic therapy. Phages encoded with lysosomal enzymes are also effectual in the treatment of infectious diseases.

  18. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated phage resistance is not impeded by the DNA modifications of phage T4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie J Yaung

    Full Text Available Bacteria rely on two known DNA-level defenses against their bacteriophage predators: restriction-modification and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR-CRISPR-associated (Cas systems. Certain phages have evolved countermeasures that are known to block endonucleases. For example, phage T4 not only adds hydroxymethyl groups to all of its cytosines, but also glucosylates them, a strategy that defeats almost all restriction enzymes. We sought to determine whether these DNA modifications can similarly impede CRISPR-based defenses. In a bioinformatics search, we found naturally occurring CRISPR spacers that potentially target phages known to modify their DNA. Experimentally, we show that the Cas9 nuclease from the Type II CRISPR system of Streptococcus pyogenes can overcome a variety of DNA modifications in Escherichia coli. The levels of Cas9-mediated phage resistance to bacteriophage T4 and the mutant phage T4 gt, which contains hydroxymethylated but not glucosylated cytosines, were comparable to phages with unmodified cytosines, T7 and the T4-like phage RB49. Our results demonstrate that Cas9 is not impeded by N6-methyladenine, 5-methylcytosine, 5-hydroxymethylated cytosine, or glucosylated 5-hydroxymethylated cytosine.

  19. The phage-related chromosomal islands of Gram-positive bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Novick, Richard P.; Christie, Gail E.; Penadés, Jose R.

    2010-01-01

    The phage-related chromosomal islands (PRCIs) were first identified in Staphylococcus aureus as highly mobile, superantigen-encoding genetic elements known as the S. aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPIs). These elements are characterized by a specific set of phage-related functions that enable them to use the phage reproduction cycle for their own transduction and inhibit phage reproduction in the process. SaPIs produce many phage-like infectious particles; their streptococcal counterparts hav...

  20. Lethal effects of /sup 32/P decay on transfecting activity of Bacillus subtillis phage phie DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loveday, K.S.

    1979-07-15

    Disintegration of /sup 32/P present in the DNA of Bacillus subtilis phage phie (a phage containing double-strand DNA) results in the loss of viability of intact phage as well as transfecting activity of isolated DNA. Only 1/12 of the /sup 32/P disintegrations per phage DNA equivalent inactivities the intact phage while nearly every disintegration inactivates the transfecting DNA. This result provides evidence for a single-strand intermediate in the transfection of B. subtilis by phie DNA.

  1. Synthesis of Bacteriophage M13-Specific Proteins in a DNA-Dependent Cell-Free System II. In Vitro Synthesis of Biologically Active Gene 5 Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konings, Ruud N. H.; Jansen, Josephine; Cuypers, Theo; Schoenmakers, John G. G.

    1973-01-01

    It is shown that gene 5 protein of bacteriophage M13 is one of the major proteins synthesized in vitro under the direction of M13 replicative-form DNA. By means of DNA-cellulose chromatography, this protein has been purified to homogeneity and its biological characteristics have been compared with those of its native counterpart. Like native gene 5 protein, the purified, in vitro-synthesized protein binds tightly and selectively to single-stranded, but not to double-stranded, DNAs. These results suggest that truly functional gene 5 protein is made in the cell-free system. Images PMID:4586780

  2. Selection of peptides for serological detection of equine infectious anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, E M; Cardoso, R; Souza, G R L; Goulart, L R; Heinemann, M B; Leite, R C; Reis, J K P

    2012-08-13

    Equine infectious anemia caused by equine infectious anemia virus is an important disease due to its high severity and incidence in animals. We used a phage display library to isolate peptides that can be considered potential markers for equine infectious anemia diagnosis. We selected peptides using IgG purified from a pool comprised of 20 sera from animals naturally infected with equine infectious anemia virus. The diagnostic potential of these peptides was investigated by ELISA, Western blot and dot blot with purified IgG and serum samples. Based on the results, we chose a peptide mimetic for glycoprotein gp45 epitopes of equine infectious anemia virus, with potential for use as an antigen in indirect diagnostic assays. Synthesis of this peptide has possible applications for the development of new diagnostic tools for this disease.

  3. A method for identification of the peptides that bind to a clone of thyroid-stimulating antibodies in the serum of Graves' disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Chan Hyun; Lee, Mi Hwa; Cho, Bo Youn; Chae, Chi-Bom

    2003-04-01

    A method was developed for identification of the peptide sequences that bind to thyroid-stimulating antibody (TSAb) clones from phage-displayed peptide library. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) was purified from the serum of a Graves' disease patient that stimulates the synthesis of cAMP in the cells that express TSH receptor (TSHR). The IgG that binds to TSHR was purified by an affinity column packed with the resin cross-linked with the extracellular domain of human TSHR. The receptor-binding IgG was then mixed with phages that display linear or cyclic peptides at the end of tail protein pIII. The bound phages were eluted with acidic glycine after extensive washing. From sequencing of the pIII gene of the bound phages, one can deduce the sequences of the peptides that bind to the receptor-binding IgG. Each peptide sequence was then tested for inhibition of the synthesis of cAMP from thyroid cells induced by the serum of a Graves' patient. In this way, one can obtain the peptides that bind to a clone of TSAb. We obtained a peptide sequence that inhibits the action of TSAb at an extremely low concentration (<10(-14) M). Such a peptide will be useful for various studies on TSAb.

  4. Isolation and Evaluation of Specific Human Recombinant Antibodies from a Phage Display Library against HER3 Cancer Signaling Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foroogh Nejatollahi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The human epidermal growth factor receptor family comprises four homologous members: EGFR (ErbB1, ErbB2 (HER2, ErbB3 (HER3 and ErbB4 (HER4.This family plays an important role in the signaling pathway and cell proliferation. The heterodimerization of HER2 with HER3 leads to tumor cell proliferation. Monoclonal antibody to the human HER3 receptor blocks HER3 heterodimerization and inhibits the growth of breast cancer cells. Due to their human origin, small size, rapid penetration and high affinity properties, recombinant single chain antibodies (scFv have been introduced as the most desired agents for cancer immunotherapy. In this study, we use a phage display system to select specific scFvs against HER3 for their use in cancer targeted therapy. Methods: A phage antibody display library of scFv was panned against an immunodominant epitope of HER3. Phage rescue was performed on the library. The supernatant that contained the appropriate scFv (109 PFU/ml was added to an immunotube which was coated with the peptide. Elution was done using log phase E. coli TG1. The clones were amplified by PCR and DNA fingerprinted to select the specific clones against the epitope. The specificity of the selected antibodies was tested in ELISA. Results: The results represented two predominant patterns with the frequency of 25%. The other patterns showed the frequencies of 5%-10%. scFv1 and scFv2 demonstrated positive ELISA with absorbances of 0.63 and 0.46, respectively while the absorbances of wells without peptide were 0.19 and 0.11, respectively. Conclusion: In this study two specific scFvs were selected against HER3 antigen in a successful panning process. Phage ELISA represented the specific binding of scFvs against HER3.The selected scFvs reacted only with the corresponding peptides. However, no reaction with the other peptides was detected. The selected anti-HER3 scFvs have suggested that these human high affinity and small antibodies that bind

  5. Refined multivalent display of bacterial spore-binding peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusvarghi, Sabrina; Kim, Jenny Morana; Creeger, Yehuda; Armitage, Bruce Alan

    2009-05-07

    A multiple antigen peptide display scaffold was used to create multivalent versions of a heptapeptide selected previously by phage display to bind to Bacillus subtilis spores. A simple flow cytometric assay was developed in which a biotinylated form of the peptide was first bound to fluorescent streptavidin, then the fluorescent streptavidin-peptide complex was bound to spores before introduction into the cytometer. This assay clearly demonstrated that the tetravalent scaffold enhanced the affinity for B. subtilis spores by greater than 1 and 2 orders of magnitude when compared to divalent and monovalent analogues, respectively. However, variations in the number and flexibility of spacer residues within the scaffold did not significantly affect the binding affinity of the tetravalent peptides. Similar to prior reports, these multivalent scaffolds are effective most likely because they mimic the multivalent display of the original peptide library on the phage coat. Moreover, the tetravalent peptides can be readily integrated into a variety of heterogeneous and homogeneous spore-detection assay formats.

  6. Expression of lysozymes from Erwinia amylovora phages and Erwinia genomes and inhibition by a bacterial protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Ina; Gernold, Marina; Schneider, Bernd; Geider, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Genes coding for lysozyme-inhibiting proteins (Ivy) were cloned from the chromosomes of the plant pathogens Erwinia amylovora and Erwinia pyrifoliae. The product interfered not only with activity of hen egg white lysozyme, but also with an enzyme from E. amylovora phage ΦEa1h. We have expressed lysozyme genes from the genomes of three Erwinia species in Escherichia coli. The lysozymes expressed from genes of the E. amylovora phages ΦEa104 and ΦEa116, Erwinia chromosomes and Arabidopsis thaliana were not affected by Ivy. The enzyme from bacteriophage ΦEa1h was fused at the N- or C-terminus to other peptides. Compared to the intact lysozyme, a His-tag reduced its lytic activity about 10-fold and larger fusion proteins abolished activity completely. Specific protease cleavage restored lysozyme activity of a GST-fusion. The bacteriophage-encoded lysozymes were more active than the enzymes from bacterial chromosomes. Viral lyz genes were inserted into a broad-host range vector, and transfer to E. amylovora inhibited cell growth. Inserted in the yeast Pichia pastoris, the ΦEa1h-lysozyme was secreted and also inhibited by Ivy. Here we describe expression of unrelated cloned 'silent' lyz genes from Erwinia chromosomes and a novel interference of bacterial Ivy proteins with a viral lysozyme.

  7. Application of phage display technique in molecular nuclear medicine%噬菌体展示技术在分子核医学中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘金剑; 刘鉴峰; 孟爱民

    2013-01-01

    噬菌体展示技术是研究分子间多种作用的技术,它能够在机理尚未明确的情况下研究蛋白质与蛋白质、蛋白质与多肽、蛋白质与核酸的相互作用,这种技术的一个关键优势是,它可以研究分子间的直接联系,得到不同亲和力的分子,一次性实现高效筛选多肽的目的.近年来随着噬菌体展示技术的成熟,该技术被广泛应用于生命科学研究的不同领域,如:单克隆抗体制备、多肽筛选、疫苗研制、基因治疗及细胞信号转导研究等.该文综述了噬菌体展示技术在分子核医学相关研究中的运用.%Phage display is a molecular diversity technology that allows the presentation of large peptide and protein libraries on the surface of filamentous phage.Phage display libraries permit the selection of peptides and proteins,including antibodies,with high affinity and specificity for almost any target.In recent years,along with phage display technology maturated,it has been widely used in screening tumor antibody library,the preparation of monoclonal antibody,polypeptide,drug design,gene therapy and cell signal transduction.This review serves as an introduction to phage display in molecular nuclear medicine,and recent application in display technology.

  8. [Inactivation of T4 phage in water environment using proteinase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Wen-zhou; Yang, Qing-xiang; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min; Zhu, Chun-fang

    2004-09-01

    The inactivation effectiveness of proteinase to viruses was investigated by using T4 phage as a model virus. The results showed that the inactivation effectiveness of proteinase to T4 phage was obvious. In the optimum conditions and 67.5 u/mL concentration, the inactivation rate of proteinase K to T4 phage in sterilized water and in sewage achieved 99.4% and 49.4% respectively in an hour, and achieved >99.9% and 81.1% in three hours. The inactivation rate of the industrial proteinase 1398 to T4 phage in sterilized water achieved 74.4% in an hour. The effects of pH and temperature on the inactivation effectiveness was not evident.

  9. Persistence of bacteria and phages in a chemostat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Hal L; Thieme, Horst R

    2012-05-01

    The model of bacteriophage predation on bacteria in a chemostat formulated by Levin et al. (Am Nat 111:3-24, 1977) is generalized to include a distributed latent period, distributed viral progeny release from infected bacteria, unproductive adsorption of phages to infected cells, and possible nutrient uptake by infected cells. Indeed, two formulations of the model are given: a system of delay differential equations with infinite delay, and a more general infection-age model that leads to a system of integro-differential equations. It is shown that the bacteria persist, and sharp conditions for persistence and extinction of phages are determined by the reproductive ratio for phage relative to the phage-free equilibrium. A novel feature of our analysis is the use of the Laplace transform.

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of the Streptomyces Phage Nanodon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Streptomyces phage Nanodon is a temperate double-stranded DNA Siphoviridae belonging to cluster BD1. It was isolated from soil collected in Kilauea, HI, using Streptomyces griseus subsp. griseus as a host.

  11. Inhibition of phage infection in capsule-producing Streptococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-10-04

    Oct 4, 2007 ... Acid production by capsule-producing Streptococcus thermophilus was inhibited less ... lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are of similar size to fat globules ..... Characterization of new virulent phage (MLC-A) of Lactobacillus paracasei.

  12. Biomathematical description of synthetic peptide libraries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Sieber

    Full Text Available Libraries of randomised peptides displayed on phages or viral particles are essential tools in a wide spectrum of applications. However, there is only limited understanding of a library's fundamental dynamics and the influences of encoding schemes and sizes on their quality. Numeric properties of libraries, such as the expected number of different peptides and the library's coverage, have long been in use as measures of a library's quality. Here, we present a graphical framework of these measures together with a library's relative efficiency to help to describe libraries in enough detail for researchers to plan new experiments in a more informed manner. In particular, these values allow us to answer-in a probabilistic fashion-the question of whether a specific library does indeed contain one of the "best" possible peptides. The framework is implemented in a web-interface based on two packages, discreteRV and peptider, to the statistical software environment R. We further provide a user-friendly web-interface called PeLiCa (Peptide Library Calculator, http://www.pelica.org, allowing scientists to plan and analyse their peptide libraries.

  13. Primary isolation strain determines both phage type and receptors recognised by Campylobacter jejuni bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Martine C Holst; Gencay, Yilmaz Emre; Birk, Tina; Baldvinsson, Signe Berg; Jäckel, Claudia; Hammerl, Jens A; Vegge, Christina S; Neve, Horst; Brøndsted, Lone

    2015-01-01

    In this study we isolated novel bacteriophages, infecting the zoonotic bacterium Campylobacter jejuni. These phages may be used in phage therapy of C. jejuni colonized poultry to prevent spreading of the bacteria to meat products causing disease in humans. Many C. jejuni phages have been isolated using NCTC12662 as the indicator strain, which may have biased the selection of phages. A large group of C. jejuni phages rely on the highly diverse capsular polysaccharide (CPS) for infection and recent work identified the O-methyl phosphoramidate modification (MeOPN) of CPS as a phage receptor. We therefore chose seven C. jejuni strains each expressing different CPS structures as indicator strains in a large screening for phages in samples collected from free-range poultry farms. Forty-three phages were isolated using C. jejuni NCTC12658, NCTC12662 and RM1221 as host strains and 20 distinct phages were identified based on host range analysis and genome restriction profiles. Most phages were isolated using C. jejuni strains NCTC12662 and RM1221 and interestingly phage genome size (140 kb vs. 190 kb), host range and morphological appearance correlated with the isolation strain. Thus, according to C. jejuni phage grouping, NCTC12662 and NCTC12658 selected for CP81-type phages, while RM1221 selected for CP220-type phages. Furthermore, using acapsular ∆kpsM mutants we demonstrated that phages isolated on NCTC12658 and NCTC12662 were dependent on the capsule for infection. In contrast, CP220-type phages isolated on RM1221 were unable to infect non-motile ∆motA mutants, hence requiring motility for successful infection. Hence, the primary phage isolation strain determines both phage type (CP81 or CP220) as well as receptors (CPS or flagella) recognised by the isolated phages.

  14. Primary isolation strain determines both phage type and receptors recognised by Campylobacter jejuni bacteriophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine C Holst Sørensen

    Full Text Available In this study we isolated novel bacteriophages, infecting the zoonotic bacterium Campylobacter jejuni. These phages may be used in phage therapy of C. jejuni colonized poultry to prevent spreading of the bacteria to meat products causing disease in humans. Many C. jejuni phages have been isolated using NCTC12662 as the indicator strain, which may have biased the selection of phages. A large group of C. jejuni phages rely on the highly diverse capsular polysaccharide (CPS for infection and recent work identified the O-methyl phosphoramidate modification (MeOPN of CPS as a phage receptor. We therefore chose seven C. jejuni strains each expressing different CPS structures as indicator strains in a large screening for phages in samples collected from free-range poultry farms. Forty-three phages were isolated using C. jejuni NCTC12658, NCTC12662 and RM1221 as host strains and 20 distinct phages were identified based on host range analysis and genome restriction profiles. Most phages were isolated using C. jejuni strains NCTC12662 and RM1221 and interestingly phage genome size (140 kb vs. 190 kb, host range and morphological appearance correlated with the isolation strain. Thus, according to C. jejuni phage grouping, NCTC12662 and NCTC12658 selected for CP81-type phages, while RM1221 selected for CP220-type phages. Furthermore, using acapsular ∆kpsM mutants we demonstrated that phages isolated on NCTC12658 and NCTC12662 were dependent on the capsule for infection. In contrast, CP220-type phages isolated on RM1221 were unable to infect non-motile ∆motA mutants, hence requiring motility for successful infection. Hence, the primary phage isolation strain determines both phage type (CP81 or CP220 as well as receptors (CPS or flagella recognised by the isolated phages.

  15. Properties of Klebsiella Phage P13 and Associated Exopolysaccharide Depolymerase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yang; LI Guiyang; MO Zhaolan; CHAI Zihan; SHANG Anqi; MOU Haijin

    2014-01-01

    The bacteriophage P13 that infects Klebsiella serotype K13 contains a heat-stable depolymerase capable of effective degradation of exopolysaccharide (EPS) produced by this microorganism. In this study, the titer of phage P13, initially 2.0 × 107 pfu mL-1, was found increasing 20 min after infection and reached 5.0 × 109 pfu mL-1 in 60 min. Accordingly, the enzyme activity of de-polymerase approached the maximum 60 min after infection. Treatment at 70℃for 30 min inactivated all the phage, but retained over 90%of the depolymerase activity. Addition of acetone into the crude phage lysate led to precipitation of the protein, with a marked increase in bacterial EPS degradation activity and a rapid drop in the titer of phage. After partial purification by acetone precipitation and ultrafiltration centrifugation, the enzyme was separated from the phage particles, showing two components with enzyme activity on Q-Sepharose Fast Flow. The soluble enzyme had an optimum degradation activity at 60℃and pH 6.5. Transmission electron mi-croscopy demonstrated that the phage P13 particles were spherical with a diameter of 50 nm and a short stumpy tail. It was a dou-ble-strand DNA virus consisting of a nucleic acid molecule of 45976 bp. This work provides an efficient purification operation in-cluding thermal treatment and ultrafiltration centrifugation, to dissociate depolymerase from phage particles. The characterization of phage P13 and associated EPS depolymerase is beneficial for further application of this enzyme.

  16. Killing cancer cells by targeted drug-carrying phage nanomedicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacoby Iftach

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic administration of chemotherapeutic agents, in addition to its anti-tumor benefits, results in indiscriminate drug distribution and severe toxicity. This shortcoming may be overcome by targeted drug-carrying platforms that ferry the drug to the tumor site while limiting exposure to non-target tissues and organs. Results We present a new form of targeted anti-cancer therapy in the form of targeted drug-carrying phage nanoparticles. Our approach is based on genetically-modified and chemically manipulated filamentous bacteriophages. The genetic manipulation endows the phages with the ability to display a host-specificity-conferring ligand. The phages are loaded with a large payload of a cytotoxic drug by chemical conjugation. In the presented examples we used anti ErbB2 and anti ERGR antibodies as targeting moieties, the drug hygromycin conjugated to the phages by a covalent amide bond, or the drug doxorubicin conjugated to genetically-engineered cathepsin-B sites on the phage coat. We show that targeting of phage nanomedicines via specific antibodies to receptors on cancer cell membranes results in endocytosis, intracellular degradation, and drug release, resulting in growth inhibition of the target cells in vitro with a potentiation factor of >1000 over the corresponding free drugs. Conclusion The results of the proof-of concept study presented here reveal important features regarding the potential of filamentous phages to serve as drug-delivery platform, on the affect of drug solubility or hydrophobicity on the target specificity of the platform and on the effect of drug release mechanism on the potency of the platform. These results define targeted drug-carrying filamentous phage nanoparticles as a unique type of antibody-drug conjugates.

  17. Antibody Phage Library Screening Efficiency Measured by KD Values

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hui-tang; SHAN Ya-ming; TANG Li-li; GAO Li-zeng; WANG Li-ping; LI Wei; LI Yu-xin

    2005-01-01

    An antibody phage library was screened with two target molecules, IFNα-2a and FGFR-GST, and the KD value of each round of panning was measured. It was found that the apparent KD values decreased along with each additional panning round, which indicates the increase of the binding affinity between the phage and the target molecules.This result shows that the KD value is a reliable intrinsic parameter and a new method for screening efficiency detection is thus provided.

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION: TEST REPORT OF CONTROL OF BIOAEROSOLS IN HLVAC SYSTEMS: AEOLUS CORPORATION SYNTHETIC MINIPLEAT V-CELL, SMV-M13-2424

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the Synthetic Minipleat V-Cell, SMV-M13-2424 air filter for dust and bioaerosol filtration manufactured by Aeolus Corporation. The pressure drop across the filter was 77 Pa clean and 348 ...

  19. Bioactive Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Banan-Mwine Daliri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The increased consumer awareness of the health promoting effects of functional foods and nutraceuticals is the driving force of the functional food and nutraceutical market. Bioactive peptides are known for their high tissue affinity, specificity and efficiency in promoting health. For this reason, the search for food-derived bioactive peptides has increased exponentially. Over the years, many potential bioactive peptides from food have been documented; yet, obstacles such as the need to establish optimal conditions for industrial scale production and the absence of well-designed clinical trials to provide robust evidence for proving health claims continue to exist. Other important factors such as the possibility of allergenicity, cytotoxicity and the stability of the peptides during gastrointestinal digestion would need to be addressed. This review discusses our current knowledge on the health effects of food-derived bioactive peptides, their processing methods and challenges in their development.

  20. Bioactive Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daliri, Eric Banan-Mwine; Oh, Deog H; Lee, Byong H

    2017-04-26

    The increased consumer awareness of the health promoting effects of functional foods and nutraceuticals is the driving force of the functional food and nutraceutical market. Bioactive peptides are known for their high tissue affinity, specificity and efficiency in promoting health. For this reason, the search for food-derived bioactive peptides has increased exponentially. Over the years, many potential bioactive peptides from food have been documented; yet, obstacles such as the need to establish optimal conditions for industrial scale production and the absence of well-designed clinical trials to provide robust evidence for proving health claims continue to exist. Other important factors such as the possibility of allergenicity, cytotoxicity and the stability of the peptides during gastrointestinal digestion would need to be addressed. This review discusses our current knowledge on the health effects of food-derived bioactive peptides, their processing methods and challenges in their development.

  1. Comparative genomic analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage PaMx25 reveals a novel siphovirus group related to phages infecting hosts of different taxonomic classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Víctor; Sepúlveda-Robles, Omar; Cazares, Adrián; Kameyama, Luis; Guarneros, Gabriel

    2017-08-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) are estimated to be the most abundant and diverse entities in the biosphere harboring vast amounts of novel genetic information. Despite the genetic diversity observed, many phages share common features, such as virion morphology, genome size and organization, and can readily be associated with clearly defined phage groups. However, other phages display unique genomes or, alternatively, mosaic genomes composed of regions that share homology with those of phages of diverse origins; thus, their relationships cannot be easily assessed. In this work, we present a functional and comparative genomic analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage PaMx25, a virulent member of the Siphoviridae family. The genomes of PaMx25 and a highly homologous phage NP1, bore sequence homology and synteny with the genomes of phages that infect hosts different than Pseudomonas. In order to understand the relationship of the PaMx25 genome with that of other phages, we employed several computational approaches. We found that PaMx25 and NP1 effectively bridged several phage groups. It is expected that as more phage genomes become available, more gaps will be filled, blurring the boundaries that currently separate phage groups.

  2. Paving a regulatory pathway for phage therapy: Europe should muster the resources to financially, technically and legally support the introduction of phage therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Huys, Isabelle; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Lavigne, Rob; Jennes, Serge; De Vos, Daniel; Casteels, Minne; Verbeken, Gilbert

    2013-01-01

    The growing problem of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has re-kindled interest in phage-based therapies. Yet, the use of phages to treat life-threatening bacterial infections is held back by the lack of an appropriate regulatory framework for phage therapy.

  3. The Legacy of 20th Century Phage Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Allan M

    2010-09-01

    The Golden Age of Phage Research, where phage was the favored material for attacking many basic questions in molecular biology, lasted from about 1940 to 1970. The era was initiated by Ellis and Delbrück, whose analysis defined the relevant parameters to measure in studying phage growth, and depended on the fact that the contents of a plaque can comprise descendants of a single infecting particle. It ended around 1970 because definitive methods had then become available for answering the same questions in other systems. Some of the accomplishments of phage research were the demonstration by Hershey and Chase that the genetic material of phage T2 is largely composed of DNA, the construction of linkage maps of T2 and T4 by Hershey and Rotman and their extension to very short molecular distances by Benzer, and the isolation of conditionally lethal mutants in T4 by Epstein et al. and in λ by Campbell. The dissection of the phage life cycle into causal chains was explored by Edgar and Wood for T4 assembly and later in the regulation of lysogeny by Kaiser, extended to the molecular level by Ptashne and others. Restriction/modification was discovered in λ by Bertani and Weigle, and the biochemical mechanism was elucidated by Arber and by Smith.

  4. Phage therapy against Enterococcus faecalis in dental root canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leron Khalifa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is an ever-growing problem faced by all major sectors of health care, including dentistry. Recurrent infections related to multidrug-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE in hospitals are untreatable and question the effectiveness of notable drugs. Two major reasons for these recurrent infections are acquired antibiotic resistance genes and biofilm formation. None of the traditionally known effective techniques have been able to efficiently resolve these issues. Hence, development of a highly effective antibacterial practice has become inevitable. One example of a hard-to-eradicate pathogen in dentistry is Enterococcus faecalis, which is one of the most common threats observed in recurrent root canal treatment failures, of which the most problematic to treat are its biofilm-forming VRE strains. An effective response against such infections could be the use of bacteriophages (phages. Phage therapy was found to be highly effective against biofilm and multidrug-resistant bacteria and has other advantages like ease of isolation and possibilities for genetic manipulations. The potential of phage therapy in dentistry, in particular against E. faecalis biofilms in root canals, is almost unexplored. Here we review the efforts to develop phage therapy against biofilms. We also focus on the phages isolated against E. faecalis and discuss the possibility of using phages against E. faecalis biofilm in root canals.

  5. Phage therapy against Enterococcus faecalis in dental root canals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, Leron; Shlezinger, Mor; Beyth, Shaul; Houri-Haddad, Yael; Coppenhagen-Glazer, Shunit; Beyth, Nurit; Hazan, Ronen

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is an ever-growing problem faced by all major sectors of health care, including dentistry. Recurrent infections related to multidrug-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in hospitals are untreatable and question the effectiveness of notable drugs. Two major reasons for these recurrent infections are acquired antibiotic resistance genes and biofilm formation. None of the traditionally known effective techniques have been able to efficiently resolve these issues. Hence, development of a highly effective antibacterial practice has become inevitable. One example of a hard-to-eradicate pathogen in dentistry is Enterococcus faecalis, which is one of the most common threats observed in recurrent root canal treatment failures, of which the most problematic to treat are its biofilm-forming VRE strains. An effective response against such infections could be the use of bacteriophages (phages). Phage therapy was found to be highly effective against biofilm and multidrug-resistant bacteria and has other advantages like ease of isolation and possibilities for genetic manipulations. The potential of phage therapy in dentistry, in particular against E. faecalis biofilms in root canals, is almost unexplored. Here we review the efforts to develop phage therapy against biofilms. We also focus on the phages isolated against E. faecalis and discuss the possibility of using phages against E. faecalis biofilm in root canals. PMID:27640530

  6. Conserved termini and adjacent variable region of Twortlikevirus Staphylococcus phages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianglilan Zhang; Huaixing Kang; Yuyuan Li; Xiaodong Liu; Yu Yang; Shasha Li; Guangqian Pei; Qiang Sun; Peng Shu; Zhiqiang Mi; Yong Huang; Zhiyi Zhang; Yannan Liu; Xiaoping An; Xiaolu Xu; Yigang Tong

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA) is an increasing cause of serious infection,both in the community and hospital settings. Despite sophisticated strategies and efforts, the antibiotic options for treating MRSA infection are narrowing because of the limited number of newly developed antimicrobials. Here, four newly-isolated MRSA-virulent phages, IME-SA1, IMESA2, IME-SA118 and IME-SA119, were sequenced and analyzed. Their genome termini were identified using our previously proposed "termini analysis theory". We provide evidence that remarkable conserved terminus sequences are found in IME-SA1/2/118/119, and, moreover, are widespread throughout Twortlikevirus Staphylococcus phage G1 and K species. Results also suggested that each phage of the two species has conserved 5′ terminus while the 3′ terminus is variable. More importantly, a variable region with a specific pattern was found to be present near the conserved terminus of Twortlikevirus S. phage G1 species. The clone with the longest variable region had variable terminus lengths in successive generations, while the clones with the shortest variable region and with the average length variable region maintained the same terminal length as themselves during successive generations. IME-SA1 bacterial infection experiments showed that the variation is not derived from adaptation of the phage to different host strains. This is the first study of the conserved terminus and variable region of Twortlikevirus S. phages.

  7. [Preparation and characterization of the recombinant protein containing immunomimetic peptide of benzo[a]pyrene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apal'ko, S V; Lunin, V G; Filipenko, M L; Matveeva, V A; Liashchuk, A M; Lavrova, N V; Sherina, E A; Aver'ianov, A V; Kostianko, M V; Glushkov, A N

    2011-01-01

    Two recombinant plasmids were constructed. The first plasmid contained the hybrid gene composed of immunomimetic peptide of benzo[a]pyrene, of the protein pIII of bacteriophage M13 and of cellulose binding domain encoding sequences. The second plasmid contained the hybrid gene composed of the signal peptide of the protein pIII of bacteriophage M13, of immunomimetic peptide of benzo[a]pyrene, of the protein pill of bacteriophage M13 and of cellulose binding domain sequences. The obtained recombinant plasmids were used in expression of chimeric protein containing immunomimetic peptide ofbenzo[a]pyrene based on strain E. coli M15. The lack of the recombinant protein expression using first plasmid was demonstrated. In the same time, it was shown that accumulation of recombinant protein contained immunomimetic peptide with signal peptide of the protein pIIIl of bacteriophage was present. This chimeric protein was produced in "mature" (without signal peptide) and "unprocessing" (with signal peptide) forms. Using the Western-blot analysis, it was shown that the "mature" form only specifically bound to the B2 monoclonal antibody against benzo[a]pyrene. Thus, we expressed, purified, and characterized the recombinant protein containing immunomimetic peptide of benzo[a]pyrene.

  8. Primary Isolation Strain Determines Both Phage Type and Receptors Recognised by Campylobacter jejuni Bacteriophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Martine C. Holst; Gencay, Yilmaz Emre; Birk, Tina

    2015-01-01

    In this study we isolated novel bacteriophages, infecting the zoonotic bacterium Campylobacter jejuni. These phages may be used in phage therapy of C. jejuni colonized poultry to prevent spreading of the bacteria to meat products causing disease in humans. Many C. jejuni phages have been isolated...... using NCTC12662 as the indicator strain, which may have biased the selection of phages. A large group of C. jejuni phages rely on the highly diverse capsular polysaccharide (CPS) for infection and recent work identified the O-methyl phosphoramidate modification (MeOPN) of CPS as a phage receptor. We...... therefore chose seven C. jejuni strains each expressing different CPS structures as indicator strains in a large screening for phages in samples collected from free-range poultry farms. Forty-three phages were isolated using C. jejuni NCTC12658, NCTC12662 and RM1221 as host strains and 20 distinct phages...

  9. Effects of surface functionalization on the surface phage coverage and the subsequent performance of phage-immobilized magnetoelastic biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikawa, Shin; Bedi, Deepa; Li, Suiqiong; Shen, Wen; Huang, Shichu; Chen, I-Hsuan; Chai, Yating; Auad, Maria L; Bozack, Michael J; Barbaree, James M; Petrenko, Valery A; Chin, Bryan A

    2011-01-15

    One of the important applications for which phage-immobilized magnetoelastic (ME) biosensors are being developed is the wireless, on-site detection of pathogenic bacteria for food safety and bio-security. Until now, such biosensors have been constructed by immobilizing a landscape phage probe on gold-coated ME resonators via physical adsorption. Although the physical adsorption method is simple, the immobilization stability and surface coverage of phage probes on differently functionalized sensor surfaces need to be evaluated as a potential way to enhance the detection capabilities of the biosensors. As a model study, a filamentous fd-tet phage that specifically binds streptavidin was adsorbed on either bare or surface-functionalized gold-coated ME resonators. The surface functionalization was performed through the formation of three self-assembled monolayers with a different terminator, based on the sulfur-gold chemistry: AC (activated carboxy-terminated), ALD (aldehyde-terminated), and MT (methyl-terminated). The results, obtained by atomic force microscopy, showed that surface functionalization has a large effect on the surface phage coverage (46.8%, 49.4%, 4.2%, and 5.2% for bare, AC-, ALD-, and MT-functionalized resonators, respectively). In addition, a direct correlation of the observed surface phage coverage with the quantity of subsequently captured streptavidin-coated microbeads was found by scanning electron microscopy and by resonance frequency measurements of the biosensors. The differences in surface phage coverage on the differently functionalized surfaces may then be used to pattern the phage probe layer onto desired parts of the sensor surface to enhance the detection capabilities of ME biosensors.

  10. Isolation of phages for phage therapy: a comparison of spot tests and efficiency of plating analyses for determination of host range and efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan Mirzaei, Mohammadali; Nilsson, Anders S

    2015-01-01

    Phage therapy, treating bacterial infections with bacteriophages, could be a future alternative to antibiotic treatment of bacterial infections. There are, however, several problems to be solved, mainly associated to the biology of phages, the interaction between phages and their bacterial hosts, but also to the vast variation of pathogenic bacteria which implies that large numbers of different phages are going to be needed. All of these phages must under present regulation of medical products undergo extensive clinical testing before they can be applied. It will consequently be of great economic importance that effective and versatile phages are selected and collected into phage libraries, i.e., the selection must be carried out in a way that it results in highly virulent phages with broad host ranges. We have isolated phages using the Escherichia coli reference (ECOR) collection and compared two methods, spot testing and efficiency of plating (EOP), which are frequently used to identify phages suitable for phage therapy. The analyses of the differences between the two methods show that spot tests often overestimate both the overall virulence and the host range and that the results are not correlated to the results of EOP assays. The conclusion is that single dilution spot tests cannot be used for identification and selection of phages to a phage library and should be replaced by EOP assays. The difference between the two methods can be caused by many factors. We have analysed if the differences and lack of correlation could be caused by lysis from without, bacteriocins in the phage lysate, or by the presence of prophages harbouring genes coding for phage resistance systems in the genomes of the bacteria in the ECOR collection.

  11. Comparative Omics and Trait Analyses of Marine Pseudoalteromonas Phages Advance the Phage OTU Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa B. Duhaime

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Viruses influence the ecology and evolutionary trajectory of microbial communities. Yet our understanding of their roles in ecosystems is limited by the paucity of model systems available for hypothesis generation and testing. Further, virology is limited by the lack of a broadly accepted conceptual framework to classify viral diversity into evolutionary and ecologically cohesive units. Here, we introduce genomes, structural proteomes, and quantitative host range data for eight Pseudoalteromonas phages isolated from Helgoland (North Sea, Germany and use these data to advance a genome-based viral operational taxonomic unit (OTU definition. These viruses represent five new genera and inform 498 unaffiliated or unannotated protein clusters (PCs from global virus metagenomes. In a comparison of previously sequenced Pseudoalteromonas phage isolates (n = 7 and predicted prophages (n = 31, the eight phages are unique. They share a genus with only one other isolate, Pseudoalteromonas podophage RIO-1 (East Sea, South Korea and two Pseudoalteromonas prophages. Mass-spectrometry of purified viral particles identified 12–20 structural proteins per phage. When combined with 3-D structural predictions, these data led to the functional characterization of five previously unidentified major capsid proteins. Protein functional predictions revealed mechanisms for hijacking host metabolism and resources. Further, they uncovered a hybrid sipho-myovirus that encodes genes for Mu-like infection rarely described in ocean systems. Finally, we used these data to evaluate a recently introduced definition for virus populations that requires members of the same population to have >95% average nucleotide identity across at least 80% of their genes. Using physiological traits and genomics, we proposed a conceptual model for a viral OTU definition that captures evolutionarily cohesive and ecologically distinct units. In this trait-based framework, sensitive hosts are

  12. Identification of antiviral mimetic peptides with interferon α-2b-like activity from a random peptide library using a novel functional biopanning method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi ZHANG; Gang BAI; Jia-qi CHEN; Wang TIAN; Yu CAO; Peng-wei PAN; Chao WANG

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To screen for interferon (IFN) α-2b mimetic peptides with antiviral activity. Methods: Selecting IFN receptor-binding peptides from a phage-display heptapeptide library using a novel functional biopanning method. This method was developed to identify peptides with activity against vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) inducing cytopathic effects on WISH cells. Results: Sixteen positive clones were obtained after 3 rounds of functional selection. Ten clones were picked from these positive clones according to the results of phage ELISA and were sequenced. The amino acid sequences homologous to IFNα-2b were defined by residues AB loop 31-37, BC loop 68-74, C helix 93-99, CD loop 106-112, D helix 115-121, DE loop 132-138, and E helix 143-161. Two of the peptides, designated clones T3 and T9, aligned with the IFNAR2-binding domains (AB loop and E helix), were synthe-sized and designated as IR-7 and KP-7, respectively. Both KP-7 and IR-7 were found to compete with GFP/IFNtα-2b for receptor binding and mimicked the antivi-ral activity of IFNα-2b cooperatively. Conclusion: Two IFNα-2b mimetic peptides with antiviral activity were derived from a phage-display heptapeptide library using a novel functional selection method.

  13. Phage display-derived inhibitor of the essential cell wall biosynthesis enzyme MurF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blewett Ann

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To develop antibacterial agents having novel modes of action against bacterial cell wall biosynthesis, we targeted the essential MurF enzyme of the antibiotic resistant pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. MurF catalyzes the formation of a peptide bond between D-Alanyl-D-Alanine (D-Ala-D-Ala and the cell wall precursor uridine 5'-diphosphoryl N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanyl-D-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelic acid (UDP-MurNAc-Ala-Glu-meso-A2pm with the concomitant hydrolysis of ATP to ADP and inorganic phosphate, yielding UDP-N-acetylmuramyl-pentapeptide. As MurF acts on a dipeptide, we exploited a phage display approach to identify peptide ligands having high binding affinities for the enzyme. Results Screening of a phage display 12-mer library using purified P. aeruginosa MurF yielded to the identification of the MurFp1 peptide. The MurF substrate UDP-MurNAc-Ala-Glumeso-A2pm was synthesized and used to develop a sensitive spectrophotometric assay to quantify MurF kinetics and inhibition. MurFp1 acted as a weak, time-dependent inhibitor of MurF activity but was a potent inhibitor when MurF was pre-incubated with UDP-MurNAc-Ala-Glu-meso-A2pm or ATP. In contrast, adding the substrate D-Ala-D-Ala during the pre-incubation nullified the inhibition. The IC50 value of MurFp1 was evaluated at 250 μM, and the Ki was established at 420 μM with respect to the mixed type of inhibition against D-Ala-D-Ala. Conclusion MurFp1 exerts its inhibitory action by interfering with the utilization of D-Ala-D-Ala by the MurF amide ligase enzyme. We propose that MurFp1 exploits UDP-MurNAc-Ala-Glu-meso-A2pm-induced structural changes for better interaction with the enzyme. We present the first peptide inhibitor of MurF, an enzyme that should be exploited as a target for antimicrobial drug development.

  14. Efficient purification of unique antibodies using peptide affinity-matrix columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Liselotte Brix; Riise, Erik; Nielsen, Leif Kofoed

    2004-01-01

    fragments and had no affinity for other antibodies. Using this peptide matrix MK16 IgG could be purified from cell culture supernatants thereby separating MK16 IgG from bovine IgG normally present in the enriched growth media used for such cells. Investigations of the fine specificity of the ER6.1 peptide......Phage display technology was used to identify peptide ligands with unique specificity for a monoclonal model antibody, MK16, that recognises the human multiple sclerosis associated MHC class II molecule DR2 in complex with a myelin basic protein (MBP)-derived peptide corresponding to residue 85......-99. Several peptide epitopes were identified and all of them recognised specifically MK16. One peptide, ER6.1, was selected and linked to beaded agarose and demonstrated excellent performance as a peptide affinity chromatography matrix. This epitope matrix was efficient in the purification of MK16 Fab...

  15. Peptide identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  16. Four Escherichia coli O157:H7 phages: a new bacteriophage genus and taxonomic classification of T1-like phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yan D; McAllister, Tim A; Nash, John H E; Kropinski, Andrew M; Stanford, Kim

    2014-01-01

    The T1-like bacteriophages vB_EcoS_AHP24, AHS24, AHP42 and AKS96 of the family Siphoviridae were shown to lyse common phage types of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 (STEC O157:H7), but not non-O157 E. coli. All contained circularly permuted genomes of 45.7-46.8 kb (43.8-44 mol% G+C) encoding 74-81 open reading frames and 1 arginyl-tRNA. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the structural proteins were identical among the four phages. Further proteomic analysis identified seven structural proteins responsible for tail fiber, tail tape measure protein, major capsid, portal protein as well as major and minor tail proteins. Bioinformatic analyses on the proteins revealed that genomes of AHP24, AHS24, AHP42 and AKS96 did not encode for bacterial virulence factors, integration-related proteins or antibiotic resistance determinants. All four phages were highly lytic to STEC O157:H7 with considerable potential as biocontrol agents. Comparative genomic, proteomic and phylogenetic analysis suggested that the four phages along with 17 T1-like phage genomes from database of National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) can be assigned into a proposed subfamily "Tunavirinae" with further classification into five genera, namely "Tlslikevirus" (TLS, FSL SP-126), "Kp36likevirus" (KP36, F20), Tunalikevirus (T1, ADB-2 and Shf1), "Rtplikevirus" (RTP, vB_EcoS_ACG-M12) and "Jk06likevirus" (JK06, vB_EcoS_Rogue1, AHP24, AHS24, AHP42, AKS96, phiJLA23, phiKP26, phiEB49). The fact that the viruses related to JK06 have been isolated independently in Israel (JK06) (GenBank Assession #, NC_007291), Canada (vB_EcoS_Rogue1, AHP24, AHS24, AHP42, AKS96) and Mexico (phiKP26, phiJLA23) (between 2005 and 2011) indicates that these similar phages are widely distributed, and that horizontal gene transfer does not always prevent the characterization of bacteriophage evolution. With this new scheme, any new discovered phages with same type can be

  17. Four Escherichia coli O157:H7 phages: a new bacteriophage genus and taxonomic classification of T1-like phages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan D Niu

    Full Text Available The T1-like bacteriophages vB_EcoS_AHP24, AHS24, AHP42 and AKS96 of the family Siphoviridae were shown to lyse common phage types of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 (STEC O157:H7, but not non-O157 E. coli. All contained circularly permuted genomes of 45.7-46.8 kb (43.8-44 mol% G+C encoding 74-81 open reading frames and 1 arginyl-tRNA. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the structural proteins were identical among the four phages. Further proteomic analysis identified seven structural proteins responsible for tail fiber, tail tape measure protein, major capsid, portal protein as well as major and minor tail proteins. Bioinformatic analyses on the proteins revealed that genomes of AHP24, AHS24, AHP42 and AKS96 did not encode for bacterial virulence factors, integration-related proteins or antibiotic resistance determinants. All four phages were highly lytic to STEC O157:H7 with considerable potential as biocontrol agents. Comparative genomic, proteomic and phylogenetic analysis suggested that the four phages along with 17 T1-like phage genomes from database of National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI can be assigned into a proposed subfamily "Tunavirinae" with further classification into five genera, namely "Tlslikevirus" (TLS, FSL SP-126, "Kp36likevirus" (KP36, F20, Tunalikevirus (T1, ADB-2 and Shf1, "Rtplikevirus" (RTP, vB_EcoS_ACG-M12 and "Jk06likevirus" (JK06, vB_EcoS_Rogue1, AHP24, AHS24, AHP42, AKS96, phiJLA23, phiKP26, phiEB49. The fact that the viruses related to JK06 have been isolated independently in Israel (JK06 (GenBank Assession #, NC_007291, Canada (vB_EcoS_Rogue1, AHP24, AHS24, AHP42, AKS96 and Mexico (phiKP26, phiJLA23 (between 2005 and 2011 indicates that these similar phages are widely distributed, and that horizontal gene transfer does not always prevent the characterization of bacteriophage evolution. With this new scheme, any new discovered phages with same type

  18. Bacteriophage exploitation of bacterial biofilms: phage preference for less mature targets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedon, Stephen T

    2016-02-01

    Robust evidence is somewhat lacking for biofilm susceptibility to bacteriophages in nature, contrasting often substantial laboratory biofilm vulnerability to phages. To help bridge this divide, I review a two-part scenario for 'heterogeneous' phage interaction even with phage-permissive single-species biofilms. First, through various mechanisms, those bacteria which are both more newly formed and located at biofilm surfaces may be particularly vulnerable to phage adsorption, rather than biofilm matrix being homogeneously resistant to phage penetration. Second, though phage infection of older, less metabolically active bacteria may still be virion productive, nevertheless the majority of phage population growth in association with biofilm bacteria could involve infection particularly of those bacteria which are more metabolically active and thereby better able to support larger phage bursts, versus clonally related biofilm bacteria equivalently supporting phage production. To the extent that biofilms are physiologically or structurally heterogeneous, with phages exploiting particularly relatively newly divided biofilm-surface bacteria, then even effective phage predation of natural biofilms could result in less than complete overall biofilm clearance. Phage tendencies toward only partial exploitation of even single-species biofilms could be consistent with observations that chronic bacterial infections in the clinic can require more aggressive or extensive phage therapy to eradicate.

  19. Affinity Purification of Insulin by Peptide-Ligand Affinity Chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The affinity heptapeptide (HWWWPAS) for insulin, selected from phage display library,was coupled to EAH Sepharose 4B gel and packed to a 1-mL column. The column was used for the affinity purification of insulin from protein mixture and commercial insulin preparation. It was observed that the minor impurity in the commercial insulin was removed by the affinity chromatography. Nearly 40 mg of insulin could be purified with the 1-mL affinity column. The results revealed the high specificity and capacity of the affinity column for insulin purification. Moreover, based on the analysis of the amino acids in the peptide sequence, shorter peptides were designed and synthesized for insulin chromatography. As a result, HWWPS was found to be a good alternative to HWWWPAS, while the other two peptides with three or four amino acids showed weak affinity for insulin. The results indicated that the peptide sequence of HWWWPAS was quite conservative for specific binding of insulin.

  20. Magnetic bead-based phage anti-immunocomplex assay (PHAIA) for the detection of the urinary biomarker 3-phenoxybenzoic acid to assess human exposure to pyrethroid insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Joo; Ahn, Ki Chang; González-Techera, Andrés; González-Sapienza, Gualberto G; Gee, Shirley J; Hammock, Bruce D

    2009-03-01

    Noncompetitive immunoassays are advantageous over competitive assays for the detection of small molecular weight compounds. We recently demonstrated that phage peptide libraries can be an excellent source of immunoreagents that facilitate the development of sandwich-type noncompetitive immunoassays for the detection of small analytes, avoiding the technical challenges of producing anti-immunocomplex antibody. In this work we explore a new format that may help to optimize the performance of the phage anti-immunocomplex assay (PHAIA) technology. As a model system we used a polyclonal antibody to 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA) and an anti-immunocomplex phage clone bearing the cyclic peptide CFNGKDWLYC. The assay setup with the biotinylated antibody immobilized onto streptavidin-coated magnetic beads significantly reduced the amount of coating antibody giving identical sensitivity (50% saturation of the signal (SC(50))=0.2-0.4ng/ml) to the best result obtained with direct coating of the antibody on ELISA plates. The bead-based assay tolerated up to 10 and 5% of methanol and urine matrix, respectively. This assay system accurately determined the level of spiked 3-PBA in different urine samples prepared by direct dilution or clean-up with solid-phase extraction after acidic hydrolysis with overall recovery of 80-120%.

  1. Exploiting Nanobodies in the Detection and Quantification of Human Growth Hormone via Phage-Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam Murad

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMonitoring blood levels of human growth hormone (hGH in most children with short stature deficiencies is crucial for taking a decision of treatment with extended course of daily and expensive doses of recombinant hGH (rhGH or Somatropin®. Besides, misusing of rhGH by sportsmen is banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency and thus sensitive GH-detecting methods are highly welcome in this field. Nanobodies are the tiniest antigen-binding entity derived from camel heavy chain antibodies. They were successfully generated against numerous antigens including hormones.MethodsA fully nanobody-based sandwich ELISA method was developed in this work for direct measurement of GH in biological samples.ResultsTwo major characteristics of nanobody were exploited for this goal: the robust and stable structure of the nanobody (NbGH04 used to capture hGH from tested samples, and the great ability of tailoring, enabling the display of the anti-GH detector nanobody (NbGH07 on the tip of M13-phage. Such huge, stable, and easy-to-prepare phage-Nb was used in ELISA to provide an amplified signal. Previously, NbGH04 was retrieved on immobilized hGH by phage display from a wide “immune” cDNA library prepared from a hGH-immunized camel. Here, and in order to assure epitope heterogeneity, NbGH07 was isolated from the same library using NbGH04-captured hGH as bait. Interaction of both nanobodies with hGH was characterized and compared with different anti-GH nanobodies and antibodies. The sensitivity (~0.5 ng/ml and stability of the nanobody-base sandwich ELISA were assessed using rhGH before testing in the quantification of hGH in blood sera and cell culture supernatants.ConclusionIn regard to all advantages of nanobodies; stability, solubility, production affordability in Escherichia coli, and gene tailoring, nanobody-based phage sandwich ELISA developed here would provide a valuable method for hGH detection and quantification.

  2. Exploiting Nanobodies in the Detection and Quantification of Human Growth Hormone via Phage-Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad, Hossam; Assaad, Jana Mir; Al-Shemali, Rasha; Abbady, Abdul Qader

    2017-01-01

    Monitoring blood levels of human growth hormone (hGH) in most children with short stature deficiencies is crucial for taking a decision of treatment with extended course of daily and expensive doses of recombinant hGH (rhGH or Somatropin(®)). Besides, misusing of rhGH by sportsmen is banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency and thus sensitive GH-detecting methods are highly welcome in this field. Nanobodies are the tiniest antigen-binding entity derived from camel heavy chain antibodies. They were successfully generated against numerous antigens including hormones. A fully nanobody-based sandwich ELISA method was developed in this work for direct measurement of GH in biological samples. Two major characteristics of nanobody were exploited for this goal: the robust and stable structure of the nanobody (NbGH04) used to capture hGH from tested samples, and the great ability of tailoring, enabling the display of the anti-GH detector nanobody (NbGH07) on the tip of M13-phage. Such huge, stable, and easy-to-prepare phage-Nb was used in ELISA to provide an amplified signal. Previously, NbGH04 was retrieved on immobilized hGH by phage display from a wide "immune" cDNA library prepared from a hGH-immunized camel. Here, and in order to assure epitope heterogeneity, NbGH07 was isolated from the same library using NbGH04-captured hGH as bait. Interaction of both nanobodies with hGH was characterized and compared with different anti-GH nanobodies and antibodies. The sensitivity (~0.5 ng/ml) and stability of the nanobody-base sandwich ELISA were assessed using rhGH before testing in the quantification of hGH in blood sera and cell culture supernatants. In regard to all advantages of nanobodies; stability, solubility, production affordability in Escherichia coli, and gene tailoring, nanobody-based phage sandwich ELISA developed here would provide a valuable method for hGH detection and quantification.

  3. Impact of a Single Phage and a Phage Cocktail Application in Broilers on Reduction of Campylobacter jejuni and Development of Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Samuel; Kittler, Sophie; Klein, Günter; Glünder, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacteriosis is currently the most frequent foodborne zoonosis in many countries. One main source is poultry. The aim of this study was to enhance the knowledge about the potential of bacteriophages in reducing colonization of broilers with Campylobacter , as there are only a few in vivo studies published. Commercial broilers were inoculated with 104 CFU/bird of a Campylobacter jejuni field strain. Groups of 88 birds each were subsequently treated with a single phage or a four-phage cocktail (107 PFU/bird in CaCO3 buffered SM-Buffer). Control birds received the solvent only. Afterwards, subgroups of eleven birds each were examined for their loads with phages and Campylobacter on day 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42 after phage application. The susceptibility of the Campylobacter population to phage infection was determined using ten isolates per bird. In total 4180 re-isolates were examined. The study demonstrated that the deployed phages persisted over the whole investigation period. The Campylobacter load was permanently reduced by the phage-cocktail as well as by the single phage. The reduction was significant between one and four weeks after treatment and reached a maximum of log10 2.8 CFU/g cecal contents. Phage resistance rates of initially up to 43% in the single phage treated group and 24% in the cocktail treated group later stabilized at low levels. The occurrence of phage resistance influenced but did not override the Campylobacter reducing effect. Regarding the reduction potential, the cocktail treatment had only a small advantage over the singe phage treatment directly after phage administration. However, the cocktail moderated and delayed the emergence of phage resistance. PMID:24205254

  4. Diversity and Geographical Distribution of Flavobacterium psychrophilum Isolates and Their Phages: Patterns of Susceptibility to Phage Infection and Phage Host Range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, Daniel; Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb; Espejo, Romilio

    2014-01-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is an important fish pathogen worldwide that causes cold water disease (CWD) or rainbow trout fry syndrome (RTFS). Phage therapy has been suggested as an alternative method for the control of this pathogen in aquaculture. However, effective use of bacteriophages in di...

  5. YMC-2011, a Temperate Phage of Streptococcus salivarius 57.I.