WorldWideScience

Sample records for lysine desoxycholate agar

  1. Lysine-iron agar in the detection of Arizona cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    EDWARDS, P R; FIFE, M A

    1961-11-01

    A lysine-iron agar is described and recommended for the detection of Arizona strains which ferment lactose rapidly. Black colonies which appear on bismuth sulfite agar should be transferred to the medium. Salmonellae and Arizona cultures produce a distinctive reaction since they are the only recognized groups of enteric bacteria which regularly produce lysine decarboxylase rapidly and form large amounts of hydrogen sulfide. Use of the medium is particularly recommended in the examination of specimens from enteric infections in which shigellae and salmonellae are not detected.

  2. [Modification of the lysine-iron agar (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauters, G

    1975-12-01

    The addition of L-phenylalanine to the lysine-iron agar described by Edwards and Fife ]1] allows a more valuable screening of the Proteus group based on its deamination properties. Some minor modifications of the indicator and thiosulfate content lead to improve and earlier recording of the results.

  3. Biochemical differentiation of the Enterobacteriaceae with the aid of lysine-iron-agar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J G; Kunz, L J; Barron, W; Ewing, W H

    1966-03-01

    A procedure is described for identifying members of the family Enterobacteriaceae isolated from clinical specimens. The methods are based on primary differentiation of the various groups of bacteria by the use of Kligler Iron Agar and lysine-iron-agar. For identification of Salmonella, Shigella, and Arizona group organisms from stools, Triple Sugar Iron Agar and lysine-iron-agar are employed. The usefulness of this schema for diagnostic bacteriology laboratories is discussed. It is not intended to replace methods used in reference or research laboratories.

  4. Improvement of mannitol lysine crystal violet brilliant green agar for the selective isolation of H2S-positive Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodaka, H; Mizuochi, S; Honda, T; Yamaguchi, K

    2000-12-01

    Mannitol lysine crystal violet brilliant green agar (MLCB) is widely used in Japan for Salmonella isolation because the medium has been commercially available. Colonies of Salmonella on MLCB appear colorless with black centers due to H2S gas production; however, most Citrobacter freundii also produce H2S gas. In order to distinguish H2S-positive Salmonella from C. freundii we have improved MLCB. To MLCB was added 1% lactose (L-MLCB). The relation for pH and black center colony formation was examined. The pH of MLCB and L-MLCB inoculated with Salmonella species was slightly acid after 7 h, but the pH of L-MLCB inoculated with C. freundii did not become acid for 24 h. The colony of C. freundii did not have a black center because the production of acid from lactose lowers the pH below 10 where it is needed for H2S to react with iron to produce black pigments. Of 99 Salmonella strains including 13 serotypes tested, all strains had the same colony morphologies on MLCB and L-MLCB. When MLCB and L-MLCB were evaluated with 36 C. freundii strains isolated from foods, only colonies on MLCB had black centers. We conclude that L-MLCB is useful for detection of nonlactose-fermenting, H2S-positive Salmonella in food samples.

  5. Plating in Top Agar

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    1. Warm plates to room temperature before use. Cold plates causes the top agar to solidify irregularly. DO not warm plates to 37° as the top agar will take forever to solidify. - Prepare top agar as the appropriate liquid medium with 0.7% agar. Keeping 100 mL bottles is convenient. For phages, use λ top agar, which is less rich and yields bigger plaques. - Melt top agar in the microwave completely. Allow the agar to boil after liquification; incompletely melted agar looks liquid, but is...

  6. Effect of bacteriophage lysin on lysogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Balaji Subramanyam; Vanaja Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of phage lysin on the growth of lysogens. Methods: Sputum specimens processed by modified Petroff's method were respectively treated with phagebiotics in combination with lysin and lysin alone. The specimens were incubated at 37℃ for 4 days. At the end of day 1, 2, 3 and day 4, the specimens were streaked on blood agar plates and incubated at 37℃ for 18-24 hours. The growth of normal flora observed after day 1 was considered as lysogens.Results:When specimens treated with lysin alone, lysogen formation was avoided and normal flora was controlled. Conclusions: Lysin may have no effect on the growth of lysogens. Sputum specimens treated with phagebiotics-lysin showed the growth of lysogens.

  7. 21 CFR 582.7115 - Agar-agar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Agar-agar. 582.7115 Section 582.7115 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Stabilizers § 582.7115 Agar-agar. (a) Product. Agar-agar. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used...

  8. Operation, Maintenance and Performance Evaluation of the Potomac Estuary Experimental Water Treatment Plant. Appendix. Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    media were utilized for Salmonella isolates. These were triple sugar iron (TSI) agar , urea agar (Christensen) and lysine iron agar (LIA). TSI slants...solid medium used for isolating Salmonella sp. from the enrichment broth cultures was xylose lysine desoxycholate (XLD) agar . Salmonella and Arizona... agar was inoculated by heavily streaking the slant. The tubes were incubated for 18 to 24 hours at 350C. Cultures of Salmonella are urease negative

  9. Syneresis in agar hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boral, Shilpi; Saxena, Anita; Bohidar, H B

    2010-03-01

    Agar hydrogels exhibit syneresis which creates internal osmotic stress on the physical network. It was observed that such a stress gives rise to characteristic pulsating modes (breathing modes). Experiments carried over a period of 60-day revealed that the network deformations grew monotonously when the solvent released by syneresis was removed periodically from gel surface. However, when the solvent was not withdrawn, the gel exhibited very slowly relaxing breathing modes. The swelling-deswelling dynamics has been discussed in the generalized framework of a dissipative damped oscillator.

  10. Probing China's Lysine Market

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The lysine sector in China developed further in 2006. Both the capacity and the output hit new highs and China had a major impact on the global lysine market. The import amount of lysine satisfied only a very small portion of the domestic market's demand.

  11. Rapid Method for Detection, Identification, and Susceptibility Testing of Enteric Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Stager, Charles E.; Erikson, Eric; Davis, James R.

    1983-01-01

    Three hundred and seven colonies believed to be enteric pathogens were selected from primary plates of MacConkey, xylose desoxycholate, or salmonella-shigella agar for inoculation to lactose-sucrose broth, urea-41 motility medium, modified Andrade glucose broth with inverted Durham tube, pregrowth broth, triple sugar iron agar, lysine iron agar (LIA), and Christensen urea agar. The rapid screen consisted of interpreting the lactose-sucrose, urea-41 motility, and modified Andrade glucose broth...

  12. Automatic agar tray inoculation device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, J. R.; Mills, S. M.

    1972-01-01

    Automatic agar tray inoculation device is simple in design and foolproof in operation. It employs either conventional inoculating loop or cotton swab for uniform inoculation of agar media, and it allows technician to carry on with other activities while tray is being inoculated.

  13. Motility-indole-lysine medium for presumptive identification of enteric pathogens of Enterobacteriaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reller, L B; Mirrett, S

    1975-09-01

    Detection of lysine decarboxylase activity is a useful supplement to reactions on triple sugar-iron (TSI) and urea agars in the initial examination of suspected pathogenic isolates from fecal cultures. Owing to the added value of motility and indole production in the differentiation of enteric pathogens, we prepared and evaluated a motility-indole-lysine (MIL) medium. The following 890 organisms were tested: 264 Shigella, 2 Edwardsiella, 182 Salmonella enteritidis, 235 S. typhi, 3 Arizona, 32 Yersinia enterocolitica, and 172 other members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. With few exceptions the MIL medium gave the same results as the standard motility, indole, and lysine decarboxylase (Moeller) test media. All discrepancies were with the indole reaction, which was weak in 2 of 67 strains of Escherichia coli and falsely negative in 6 of 32 strains of Y. enterocolitica. When both TSI agar and lysine-iron agar (LIA) slants are used in the evaluation isolates from fecal cultures, detection of H2S is duplicated. Both LIA and MIL medium detect lysine decarboxylase and deaminase activity equally well. Because of its ability to detect motility and indole production, the MIL medium is more useful than LIA when used with TSI agar. The combination of TSI agar, MIL medium, and urea agar enables reliable initial recognition of enteric pathogens of the Enterobacteriaceae.

  14. Release Control of Dye from Agar Ball

    OpenAIRE

    板屋, 智之; 山村, 俊貴; 唐澤, 有太朗

    2013-01-01

    Agar is a special product of Nagano prefecture. To utilize agar gel as adsorbing or releasing material of dyes or drugs, spherical agar gel “agar ball” was prepared by dropping aqueous agar solution into salad oil. And releasing behavior of a dye (rhodamine B) from agar ball was studied. The dye is released easily from agar ball, but the release can be controlled by hybiridazation of agar and galatin. In addition, it was found that agar ball could extract the dye from oil phase containing the...

  15. Fastidious anaerobe agar compared with Wilkins-Chalgren agar, brain heart infusion agar, and brucella agar for susceptibility testing of Fusobacterium species.

    OpenAIRE

    Brazier, J. S.; Goldstein, E J; Citron, D M; Ostovari, M I

    1990-01-01

    Fastidious anaerobe agar supported the growth of 82 strains of fusobacteria better than brain heart infusion agar, brucella agar, and Wilkins-Chalgren agar. Fastidious anaerobe agar showed less hazing and fewer tailing endpoints with beta-lactam antibiotics. Whole-blood supplementation improved the performance of all media. Wilkins-Chalgren agar without blood failed to support the growth of 17% of the strains. All Fusobacterium ulcerans strains were resistant to clindamycin.

  16. Effect of dietary lysine on hepatic lysine catabolism in broilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysine is frequently a first- or second-limiting amino acid in poultry diets. Improving the efficiency of lysine use for protein synthesis would effectively lower the lysine requirement and decrease feed costs. Understanding how lysine is degraded and how the degradation is regulated would identif...

  17. 48 CFR 401.371 - AGAR Advisories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false AGAR Advisories. 401.371... ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Agency Acquisition Regulations 401.371 AGAR Advisories. The SPE may issue AGAR Advisories, consistent with the policies of the FAR and the AGAR, for the following purposes: (a)...

  18. Sodium desoxycholate-assisted capillary electrochromatography with methacrylate ester-based monolithic column on fast separation and determination of coumarin analogs in Angelica dahurica extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhao; Wang, Jiajing; Chen, Danxia; Fan, Guorong; Wu, Yutian

    2012-09-01

    A rapid and sensitive CEC method with methacrylate ester-based monolithic column has been developed for separation and determination of five coumarins (byakangelicin, oxypeucedanin hydrate, xanthotoxol, 5-hydroxy-8-methoxypsoralen and bergapten) in Angelica dahurica extract. Surfactant sodium desoxycholate (SDC) was introduced into the mobile phase as the pseudostationary to dynamically increase the selectivity of analytes instead of increasing the hydrophobicity of stationary phase. In addition, other factors, pH of phosphate buffer, ACN content and applied voltage, for instance, have also an obvious effect on the resolution but little on the retention time. Satisfactory separation of these five coumarins was achieved within 6 min under a 30:70 v/v ACN-buffer containing 20 mM sodium dihydrogen phosphate (NaH(2) PO(4) ) and 0.25 mM SDC at pH 2.51. The RSDs of intraday and interday for relative peak areas were less than 3.0% and 4.7%, respectively; and the recoveries were between 87.5% and 95.0%. The LODs were lower than 0.15 μg/mL and the LOQs were lower than 0.30 μg/mL, respectively, while calibration curves showed a good linearity (r(2) > 0.9979). Finally, five target coumarins from the crude extracts of A. dahurica were separated, purified, and concentrated by D-101 macroporous resin, and were successfully separated and quantitatively determined within 6 min.

  19. Lysine methylation: beyond histones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Zhang; Hong Wen; Xiaobing Shi

    2012-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of histone proteins,such as acetylation,methylation,phosphorylation,and ubiquitylation,play essential roles in regulating chromatin dynamics.Combinations of different modifications on the histone proteins,termed 'histone code' in many cases,extend the information potential of the genetic code by regulating DNA at the epigenetic level.Many PTMs occur on non-histone proteins as well as histones,regulating protein-protein interactions,stability,localization,and/or enzymatic activities of proteins involved in diverse cellular processes.Although protein phosphorylation,ubiquitylation,and acetylation have been extensively studied,only a few proteins other than histones have been reported that can be modified by lysine methylation.This review summarizes the current progress on lysine methylation of nonhistone proteins,and we propose that lysine methylation,like phosphorylation and acetylation,is a common PTM that regulates proteins in diverse cellular processes.

  20. Crystal formation in furunculosis agar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, G.L.; Ross, A.J.

    1964-01-01

    SINCE ITS INTRODUCTION SOME MONTHS AGO, FURUNCULOSIS AGAR has been employed in the diagnosis of suspect furunculosis and also as a general purpose medium. During our work with this medium we have noticed discrete "colonies," of crystalline material, which very closely resemble microbial colonies. These crystal colonies are compact and appear on both the surface and subsurface; they occur in inoculated slants and plates incubated for long periods (2 to 3 weeks), as well as in uninoculated stored medium. As the crystal colonies could be confusing to workers using this medium, we decided to attempt to identify them and also to determine whether storage conditions and different lots of medium affect crystal formation.

  1. Biocompatible cationic pullulan-g-desoxycholic acid-g-PEI micelles used to co-deliver drug and gene for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lili; Ji, Fangling; Bao, Yongming; Xia, Jing; Guo, Lianying; Wang, Jingyun; Li, Yachen

    2017-01-01

    The greatest crux in the combination of chemotherapy and gene therapy is the construction of a feasible and biocompatible carrier for loading the therapeutic drug and gene simultaneously. Here, a new amphiphilic bifunctional pullulan derivative (named as PDP) synthesized by grafting lipophilic desoxycholic acid and low-molecular weight (1kDa) branched polyethylenimine onto the backbone of pullulan was evaluated as a nano-carrier for the co-delivery of drug and gene for potential cancer therapy. PDP exhibited good blood compatibility and low cytotoxicity in the hemolysis and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays, respectively. By self-assembly process, the amphiphilic PDP polymer formed cationic core-shell nanomicelles in aqueous solution with an average diameter of 160.8nm and a zeta potential of approximate 28mV. The PDP micelles had relative higher drug encapsulation efficiency (84.05%) and loading capacity (7.64%) for doxorubicin (DOX), an effective anti-tumor drug, demonstrating sustained drug release profile and good DNA-binding ability. The flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that PDP/DOX micelles could be successfully internalized by MCF-7 cells, and presenting higher cytotoxicity against MCF-7 cells than that of free DOX. Furthermore, PDP micelles could efficiently transport tumor suppressor gene p53 into MCF-7 cells, and the expressed exogenous p53 protein induced MCF-7 cells to die. More excitedly, in comparison with single DOX or p53 delivery, the co-delivery of DOX and gene p53 using PDP micelles displayed higher cytotoxicity, induced higher apoptosis rate of tumor cells and blocked more effectively the migration of cancer cells in vitro. In tumor-bearing mice, co-delivery of DOX and p53 also exhibited enhanced antitumor efficacy as compared with single delivery of DOX or p53 alone. In summary, these results demonstrated that it is highly promising to use cationic PDP micelles for effectively

  2. Agar agar-stabilized milled zerovalent iron particles for in situ groundwater remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velimirovic, Milica; Schmid, Doris; Wagner, Stephan; Micić, Vesna; Kammer, Frank von der; Hofmann, Thilo, E-mail: thilo.hofmann@univie.ac.at

    2016-09-01

    Submicron-scale milled zerovalent iron (milled ZVI) particles produced by grinding macroscopic raw materials could provide a cost-effective alternative to nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) particles for in situ degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons in groundwater. However, the aggregation and settling of bare milled ZVI particles from suspension presents a significant obstacle to their in situ application for groundwater remediation. In our investigations we reduced the rapid aggregation and settling rate of bare milled ZVI particles from suspension by stabilization with a “green” agar agar polymer. The transport potential of stabilized milled ZVI particle suspensions in a diverse array of natural heterogeneous porous media was evaluated in a series of well-controlled laboratory column experiments. The impact of agar agar on trichloroethene (TCE) removal by milled ZVI particles was assessed in laboratory-scale batch reactors. The use of agar agar significantly enhanced the transport of milled ZVI particles in all of the investigated porous media. Reactivity tests showed that the agar agar-stabilized milled ZVI particles were reactive towards TCE, but that their reactivity was an order of magnitude less than that of bare, non-stabilized milled ZVI particles. Our results suggest that milled ZVI particles could be used as an alternative to nZVI particles as their potential for emplacement into contaminated zone, their reactivity, and expected longevity are beneficial for in situ groundwater remediation. - Highlights: • Rapid aggregation and sedimentation were observed in bare milled ZVI particles. • Agar agar improved the stability of milled ZVI particle suspensions. • Agar agar enhanced the transport of milled ZVI particles in heterogeneous sands. • Agar agar reduced the reactivity of milled ZVI particles towards TCE.

  3. Differentiation of Candida dubliniensis on chrom agar and Pal′s agar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raut S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Difference in expression of putative virulence factors and in antifungal susceptibility among different Candida species has raised the need for species-level identification. The close relationship of Candida dubliniensis with C. albicans has led to misidentification of C. dubliniensis isolates as C. albicans . Phenotypic tests include ability to produce chlamydospore on casein agar, colony colour development on differential media CHROM agar Candida medium and ability to form hyphal fringe on Pal′s agar, have been used to differentiate these two Candida species. Fifty isolates of Candida species were recovered from various specimens (blood, urine, tissue and respiratory secretions from diabetic and cancer patients between April and July 2007. The isolates were tested for chlamydospore production on casein agar. These were also streaked simultaneously on CHROM agar, Pal′s agar and a combination of CHROM agar supplemented with Pal′s agar for identification and differentiation of C. dubliniensis from C. albicans . On CHROM agar, 19 isolates were identified as C. dubliniensis , nine as C. albicans , 10 as C. krusei , nine as C. tropicalis and two as C. glabrata . One was indeterminate and later identified as C. dubliniensis . Out of the 20 C. dubliniensis isolates, 19 isolates exhibited hyphal fringe on Pal′s agar. On CHROM agar supplemented with Pal′s agar, 16 out of the 19 fringe-positive isolates exhibited fringe surrounding the bluish green-coloured colonies of C. dubliniensis . Additional identification tests like growth at 45oC and ability to reduce 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride were time efficient, inexpensive and easy-to-use methods for differentiation of C. dubliniensis and C. albicans isolates. CHROM agar when supplemented with Pal′s agar gave definitive identification between C. dubliniensis and C. albicans .

  4. Menu Proposal to Use Powdered Agar

    OpenAIRE

    土屋, ひろ子; 嶋村, 桃子; 小松, 沙霧

    2015-01-01

    The author was involved in the development of the menu items that might be sold at “Taisho Village”, a theme park. Requirements in the menu development were that cooking should be simple as it starts cooking after receiving orders and it should have attractive appearances. Powdered agar has advantages over rod-shaped or string-shaped agar, with easiness of handling such as its ready solubility in water and no need to wash, rehydrate or strain. Because powdered agar is easy to use in cooking,...

  5. Isolation of a Bacterium Strain Degraded Agar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    One in 58 strains of bacteria isolated from the compost showed clear colonies after a few days of growth on the plates containing medium made of only agar and water.Water suspension contained only agar (2 and 8g·L -1 ) with two controls (normal saline,LB medium) was inoculated with the bacterium BR5-1 to see whether there was an increasement of the alive bacteria concentration after 48 h of the growth.The results showed that there was a significant rising of the alive bacteria concentration in the agar susp...

  6. Agar from some Hawaiian red algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, G.A.; Doty, M.S.

    1983-08-01

    From describing the agars of Gelidiella acerosa Forskk., Gelidium pluma Loomis, G. pusillum (Stackh.) Lejolis, Gracilaria abbotiana Hoyle, G. bursapastoris (Gmelin) Silva, G. canaliculata (Kutzing) Sonder, G. coronopifolia J.Ag., G. epihippisora Hoyle, Pterocladia caerulescens (Kutzing) Santelices and P. capillacea (Gmelin) Born. and Thur. as found in Hawaiian samples of these species, it is concluded that the species of Gelidium and especially Pterocladia and Gelidiella may merit more consideration for usage due to their agar gel strengths. The nature of the gel from Gracilaria abbottiana suggests the generic status might well be reexamined. The agars from the Gelidiella and the other Gracilaria species should be studied further for their prospective values to the food industry other than gel strength. Mixtures of the agars from G. bursapastoris and G. coronopifolia would merit attention for the taste texture of their mixtures. (Refs. 18).

  7. Characterization of physicochemical properties of carboxymethyl agar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Mingzhao; Liu, Xin; Luan, Jimei; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2014-10-13

    A series of carboxymethyl agars (CMAs) with different degree of substitution (DS) were prepared, and their properties were determined and analyzed. The results showed that with the increase of DS, the dissolving temperature, the gelling temperature, the gel melting temperature, the gel strength, the gel hardness, the gel fracturability, and the solution apparent viscosity of CMA all decreased, except that its gel cohesiveness and gel springiness increased. The variation process of agar molecules in solution from coil to helix could be observed by measuring the optical rotation of the solution at such a low concentration, at which even the solution could not form a gel. The gel skeleton microstructures of both agar and CMA were of porous network structure, and the pore size of CMA became smaller and denser with the increase of its DS. After carboxymethylation, the agar hygroscopicity was improved, but its thermal stability was lowered.

  8. Natural porous agar materials from macroalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francavilla, Matteo; Pineda, Antonio; Lin, Carol S K; Franchi, Massimo; Trotta, Pasquale; Romero, Antonio A; Luque, Rafael

    2013-02-15

    Porous agar materials have been prepared from marine macroalgae species using a simple microwave-assisted extraction/drying methodology, providing a new family of polysaccharide derived porous solids. The microwave-assisted extraction allows a more efficient and less time-consuming extraction of the polysaccharide compared to conventional extraction protocols based on conventional heating. DRIFT and (13)C NMR results indicated that the internal agar structure (based on d-galactose and 3,6-anhydro-l-galactose linked units) was preserved after the extraction methodology, which opens a wide range of future possibilities and applications for this new family of porous polysaccharides. The extracted agar materials, which have already applications per se due to their high purities, could be subsequently transformed into a novel family of attractive mesoporous agar materials that could be used as natural templates for the production of nanocrystals of metal oxides.

  9. Some Experiments With Agar-Grown Seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeland, P. W.

    1973-01-01

    Two percent agar gel is reported as a better medium for germination and growth studies. Students can be encouraged to undertake many simple experiments and make precise observations by using this medium. (PS)

  10. Supplementary notes on Basidiocarp ontogeny in Agarics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnders, A.F.M.

    1983-01-01

    Basidiocarp ontogeny is described and illustrated of eight species of agarics, viz. Hygrophoropsis aurantiaca, Hygrophorus pudorinus, Tricholoma populinum, T. ustaloides, T. vaccinum, Marasmiellus candidus, Marasmius wynnei, and Panellus mitis

  11. Use of bile-esculin agar for rapid differentiation of Enterobacteriaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindell, S S; Quinn, P

    1975-05-01

    Bile-esculin agar has been used for several years for the presumptive identification of group D streptococci. All members of the Enterobacteriaceae family will also grow on this medium, but only certain ones can hydrolyze esculin to 6,7-dihydroxycoumarin, which reacts with iron to produce a characteristic blackening of the medium. One thousand and six cultures from clinical specimens representing 20 genera were isolated and identified. Heavy inocula from fresh pure culture isolates on heart infusion agar were placed on bile-esculin agar slants and incubated at 35 C. The slants were examined at 4 h and again at 18 h for esculin hydrolysis. Shigella, Salmonella, Arizona, Proteus mirabilis, Proteus morganii, Providencia alcalifaciens, and Providencia stuartii all produced negative results. Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Serratia marcescens, and Serratia rubidaea produced a positive reaction in 4 h. The other remaining eight genera exhibited varying results. The use of this medium in conjunction with triple sugar iron-lysine iron agar has been of great value in differentiating the Klebsiella-Enterobacter-Serratia group from other Enterobacteriaceae.

  12. STABILITAS ANTOSIANIN JANTUNG PISANG KEPOK (Musa paradisiaca L TERHADAP CAHAYA SEBAGAI PEWARNA AGAR-AGAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Ninan Lestario

    2015-02-01

    jantung pisang kepok yang disinari dengan intensitas 780-2.214 lux selama 10 jam masih disukai panelis, sedangkan yang disinari dengan intensitas 10.340 sudah tidak disukai panelis. Kata kunci: Antosianin, jantung pisang, agar-agar, intensitas cahaya, laju degradasi warna

  13. Pigments of fly agaric (Amanita muscaria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stintzing, Florian; Schliemann, Willibald

    2007-01-01

    The complex pigment pattern of fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) cap skins has been studied by LC-DAD and mass spectrometry. Among the betaxanthins the corresponding derivatives of serine, threonine, ethanolamine, alanine, Dopa, phenylalanine and tryptophan are reported for the first time to contribute to the pigment pattern of fly agarics. Betalamic acid, the chromophoric precursor of betaxanthins and betacyanins, muscaflavin and seco-dopas were also detected. Furthermore, the red-purple muscapurpurin and the red muscarubrin were tentatively assigned while further six betacyanin-like components could not be structurally allocated. Stability studies indicated a high susceptibility of pigment extracts to degradation which led to rapid colour loss thus rendering a complete characterization of betacyanin-like compounds impossible at present. Taking into account these difficulties the presented results may be a starting point for a comprehensive characterization of the pigment composition of fly agarics.

  14. Extraction of agar from Gelidium sesquipedale (Rhodopyta) and surface characterization of agar based films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, P; Etxabide, A; Leceta, I; Peñalba, M; de la Caba, K

    2014-01-01

    The chemical structure of the agar obtained from Gelidium sesquipedale (Rhodophyta) has been determined by (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C NMR) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Agar (AG) films with different amounts of soy protein isolate (SPI) were prepared using a thermo-moulding method, and transparent and hydrophobic films were obtained and characterized. FTIR analysis provided a detailed description of the binding groups present in the films, such as carboxylic, hydroxyl and sulfonate groups, while the surface composition was examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The changes observed by FTIR and XPS spectra suggested interactions between functional groups of agar and SPI. This is a novel approach to the characterization of agar-based films and provides knowledge about the compatibility of agar and soy protein for further investigation of the functional properties of biodegradable films based on these biopolymers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Standard operating procedure to prepare agar phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, R. M.; Santos, T. Q.; Oliveira, D. P.; Souza, R. M.; Alvarenga, A. V.; Costa-Felix, R. P. B.

    2016-07-01

    Agar phantoms are widely used as soft tissue mimics and some preparation techniques are described in the literature. There are also standards that describe the recipe of a soft tissue mimicking material (TMM). However some details of manufacture process are not clearly defined. The standardization of the phantom's preparation can produce a metrological impact on the results of the acoustic properties measured. In this direction, this paper presents a standard operating procedure (SOP) to prepare the agar TMM described on the IEC 60601-237.

  16. Digestible lysine requirements of broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEP Bernal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Modern broilers have been submitted to continuous genetic improvement, and therefore, their nutritional requirements must be constantly updated to ensure their performance. Two experiments were carried out to evaluate different digestible lysine levels for starter (1021 days and grower (22-35 days phases. The experiments were carried out with male and female Cobb 500 broilers, distributed according to a randomized block experimental design in a 5x2 factorial arrangement (5 increasing digestible lysine levels x 2 sexes, totaling 10 treatments, with 8 replicates of 22 and 20 birds during the starter and grower phase, respectively. Digestible lysine levels of 1.06, 1.12, 1.18, 1.24, and 1.30 were used in the starter diets (10-21 days and 0.9, 0.98, 1.04, 1.10, and 1.16% in the grower diets (22-35 days. Based on the statistical analyses of the evaluated performance parameters, digestible lysine requirements for maximum performance were determined as 1.22% for males and 1.24% for females in the starter phase, and 1.16% for both sexes in the grower phase. Carcass and performance results indicate that digestible lysine requirements vary with sex and evaluated production parameter. Considering the most relevant broiler production parameters, in 22- to 35-d-old males, digestible lysine requirement for breast meat yield (1.16% was higher than those for feed conversion ratio (1.07% and weight gain (1.05%.

  17. Luminescent DNA- and agar-based membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leones, R; Fernandes, M; Ferreira, R A S; Cesarino, I; Lima, J F; Carlos, L D; Bermudez, V de Zea; Magon, C J; Donoso, J P; Silva, M M; Pawlicka, A

    2014-09-01

    Luminescent materials containing europium ions are investigated for different optical applications. They can be obtained using bio-macromolecules, which are promising alternatives to synthetic polymers based on the decreasing oil resources. This paper describes studies of the DNA- and Agar-europium triflate luminescent membranes and its potential technological applications are expanded to electroluminescent devices. Polarized optical microscopy demonstrated that the samples are birefringent with submicrometer anisotropy. The X-ray diffraction analysis revealed predominantly amorphous nature of the samples and the atomic force microscopy images showed a roughness of the membranes of 409.0 and 136.1 nm for the samples of DNA10Eu and Agar1.11Eu, respectively. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of the DNA(n)Eu membranes with the principal lines at g ≈ 2.0 and g ≈ 4.8 confirmed uniform distribution of rare earth ions in a disordered matrix. Moreover, these strong and narrow resonance lines for the samples of DNA(n)Eu when compared to the Agar(n)Eu suggested a presence of paramagnetic radicals arising from the DNA matrix. The emission spectra suggested that the Eu3+ ions occupy a single local environment in both matrices and the excitation spectra monitored around the Eu emission lines pointed out that the Eu3+ ions in the Agar host were mainly excited via the broad band component rather than by direct intra-4f(6) excitation, whereas the opposite case occurred for the DNA-based sample.

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of Nano Hydroxyapatite with Agar-Agar Bio-Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Senthilarasan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyapatite used for bone replacement is one of the most active areas of ceramic biomaterials research currently. It is a desirable implant material due to its biocompatibility and osteoconductive properties. Agar agar is a biological polymer frequently used in tissue engineering and pharmaceutical for potential use in bone replacement. Nano hydroxyapatite was successfully synthesized by wet chemical precipitation method . In this work nHAp/agar composite were synthesized and characterization of the compound were done by using characterization Fourier transform infrared(FTIR, X-ray diffract ration (XRD, Transmission electron microscope(TEM and Energy dispersive analysis of X-ray spectrum(EDAX.

  19. Expansion of the Lysine Acylation Landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Christian A.

    2012-01-01

    Leaving marks: The number of known posttranslational modifications for lysine has been expanded considerably. In addition to acetylation of side-chain amino functionalities of lysine residues in proteins, crotonylation, succinylation, and malonylation have now been identified as posttranslational...

  20. Automatic surface inoculation of agar trays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, J. R.; Mills, S. M.; Boykin, E. H.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a machine and technique for the automatic inoculation of a plastic tray containing agar media with a culture, using either a conventional inoculation loop or a cotton swab. The design of the machine is simple, it is easy to use, and it relieves the operator from the manual task of streaking cultures. The described technique makes possible the visualization of the overall qualitative and, to some extent, quantitative relationships of various bacterial types in a sample tested.

  1. Available lysine in canned fish

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, D. Ramananda; Gadre, Ujjwala V.

    1984-01-01

    Otolithus argenteus was canned in brine by heat processing at two different steam pressures either at 0.70 kg/cm super(2) or 1.05 kg/cm super(2) for 25 minutes. The nutritive value of canned fish as evaluated by the total nitrogen and available lysine did not alter much either during heat processing or during storage over a period of nine months at 28 degree plus or minus 5 degree C.

  2. 21 CFR 866.4600 - Ouchterlony agar plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ouchterlony agar plate. 866.4600 Section 866.4600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....4600 Ouchterlony agar plate. (a) Identification. An ouchterlony agar plate for clinical use is a device...

  3. Evaluation of the chromogenic agar chromID C. difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Catherine; Burghoffer, Béatrice; Lalande, Valérie; Barbut, Frederic

    2013-03-01

    Three selective media (chromID C. difficile agar, taurocholate cycloserine cefoxitin agar [TCCA; homemade], and CLO medium) were compared from 406 stool samples of patients suspected of having Clostridium difficile infection. The sensitivities of chromID C. difficile agar at 24 h and 48 h, CLO medium, and TCCA were 74.1%, 87%, 85.2%, and 70.4%, respectively.

  4. Evaluation of the Chromogenic Agar chromID C. difficile

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Three selective media (chromID C. difficile agar, taurocholate cycloserine cefoxitin agar [TCCA; homemade], and CLO medium) were compared from 406 stool samples of patients suspected of having Clostridium difficile infection. The sensitivities of chromID C. difficile agar at 24 h and 48 h, CLO medium, and TCCA were 74.1%, 87%, 85.2%, and 70.4%, respectively.

  5. Syneresis and delayed detachment in agar plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divoux, Thibaut; Mao, Bosi; Snabre, Patrick

    Biogels made of crosslinked polymers such as proteins or polysaccharides behave as porous soft solids and store large amount of solvent. These gels undergo spontaneous aging, called syneresis that consists in the shrinkage of the gel matrix and the progressive expulsion of the solvent. As a result, a biogel originally casted in a container often lose contact with the container sidewalls, and the detachment time is a priori difficult to anticipate since it may occur over variable time spans (from hours to days). Here we report on the syneresis phenomena in agar plates that consist in Petri dishes filled with a gel mainly composed of agar. Direct observations and speckle pattern correlation analysis allow us to rationalize the delayed detachment of the gel from the sidewall of the Petri dish. The detachment time $t^*$ is surprisingly not controlled by the mass loss as one would intuitively expect. Instead, $t^*$ is strongly correlated to the gel minimum thickness $e_{min}$ measured along the sidewall of the plate, and increases as a robust function of $e_{min}$ independently of the prior mass-loss history. Time-resolved correlation spectroscopy atypically applied to such weakly diffusive media gives access to the local thinning rate of the gel. This technique also allows us to detect the gel micro-displacements that are triggered by the water evaporation prior to the detachment, and even to anticipate the latter from a few hours. Our work provides observables to predict the detachment time of agar gels in dishes, and highlights the relevance of speckle pattern correlation analysis for the quantitative investigation of the syneresis dynamics in biopolymer gels.

  6. Syneresis and delayed detachment in agar plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divoux, Thibaut; Mao, Bosi; Snabre, Patrick

    2015-05-14

    Biogels made of crosslinked polymers such as proteins or polysaccharides behave as porous soft solids and store large amounts of solvent. These gels undergo spontaneous aging, called syneresis, which consists of the shrinkage of the gel matrix and the progressive expulsion of solvent. As a result, a biogel originally casted in a container often loses contact with the container sidewalls, and the detachment time is difficult to anticipate a priori, since it may occur over variable time spans (from hours to days). Here we report on syneresis phenomena in agar plates, which consist of Petri dishes filled with a gel mainly composed of agar. Direct observations and speckle pattern correlation analysis allow us to rationalize the delayed detachment of the gel from the sidewall of the Petri dish. The detachment time t* is surprisingly not controlled by the mass loss as one would intuitively expect. Instead, t* is strongly correlated to the gel minimum thickness emin measured along the sidewall of the plate, and increases as a robust function of emin, independently of the prior mass-loss history. Time-resolved correlation spectroscopy atypically applied to such weakly diffusive media gives access to the local thinning rate of the gel. This technique also allows us to detect the gel micro-displacements that are triggered by water evaporation prior to the detachment, and even to anticipate the latter from a few hours. Our work provides observables to predict the detachment time of agar gels in dishes, and highlights the relevance of speckle pattern correlation analysis for the quantitative investigation of the syneresis dynamics in biopolymer gels.

  7. Back to the kitchen: food-grade agar is a low-cost alternative to bacteriological agar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovski, Steve; Tillett, Daniel

    2012-10-15

    Food-grade agar can be used as a low-cost substitute for bacteriological agar in the preparation of solid microbial media. No difference was observed in the colony morphology, growth rate, or viability of bacteria grown on solid media prepared using food-grade agar as compared with using bacteriological-grade agar. This simple tip can reduce the cost of the most common solid media by 80% or more.

  8. Characteristic features and dye degrading capability of agar-agar gel immobilized manganese peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Muhammad; Asgher, Muhammad; Shahid, Muhammad; Bhatti, Haq Nawaz

    2016-05-01

    Immobilization of enzymes has been regarded as an efficient approach to develop biocatalyst with improved activity and stability characteristics under reaction conditions. In the present study, purified manganese peroxidase (MnP) from Ganoderma lucidum IBL-05 was immobilized in agar-agar support using entrapment technique. Maximum immobilization yield was accomplished at 4.0% agar-agar gel. The immobilized MnP exhibited better resistance to changes in pH and temperature than the free enzyme, with optimal conditions being pH 6.0 and 50 °C. The kinetic parameters Km and Kcat/Km for free and entrapped MnP were calculated to be 65.6 mM and 6.99 M(-1) s(-1), and 82 mM and 8.15 M(-1) s(-1), respectively. Thermo-stability was significantly improved after immobilization. After 120 h, the insolubilized MnP retained its activity up to 71.9% and 60.3% at 30 °C and 40 °C, respectively. It showed activity until 10th cycle and retained 74.3% residual activity after 3th cycle. The effects of H2O2, ionic strength and potential inhibitors on activity of free and immobilized enzyme were investigated. Moreover, the decolorization of three structurally different dyes was monitored in order to assess the degrading capability of the entrapped MnP. The decolorization efficiencies for all the tested dyes were 78.6-84.7% after 12h. The studies concluded that the toxicity of dyes aqueous solutions was significantly reduced after treatment. The remarkable catalytic, thermo-stability and re-cycling features of the agar-agar immobilized MnP display a high potential for biotechnological applications.

  9. [Studies on growth of Pasteurella multocida on BTB agar].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arashima, Y; Iguthi, K; Kawabata, M; Kumasaka, K; Okuyama, K; Kawano, K

    1989-02-01

    It has been reported that the Pasteurella multocida does not grow on the BTB agar. Therefore, this medium has been used as selective and differential medium for Pasteurella multocida. However, we have experienced that some of the Pasteurella multocida from the patient's materials grew on the BTB agar. Here, we will report on the studies of the growth of the Pasteurella multocida strain on the BTB agar. Ten strains of Pasteurella multocida from humans and animals were used as the test strains. Those were adjusted to McFarland No. 5 by the sterilized physiological saline and inoculated on the agars. We compared commercially prepared BTB agars from 3 companies and BTB agars prepared by our-self from dehydrated culture medium. Blood, Chocolate, Nutrient and MacConkey agar were also used in this study. As for the growth of the Pasteurella multocida, we checked the pH of each agar and the temperature during the cultivation. The results are as follows: 1) Pasteurella multocida was confirmed to grow on all of the BTB agar. 2) Pasteurella multocida grew most heavily at 37 degrees C and pH of 7.4 to 8.2. 3) The difference of the growth on each agar was considered to be the difference of the pH and nutritional condition of the agar.

  10. Biological treatment of textile dyes by agar-agar immobilized consortium in a packed bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Yogesh; Gupte, Akshaya

    2015-03-01

    The decolorization of Acid Maroon V was investigated using bacterial consortium EDPA containing Enterobacter dissolvens AGYP1 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa AGYP2 immobilized in different entrapment matrices. The consortium displayed 96% removal of dye (100 mg/l) within 6 h when immobilized in agar-agar. Under optimum concentrations of agar-agar (3.0% w/v) and cell biomass (0.9 g% w/v), the consortium displayed decolorization for 18 successive batches of Acid Maroon V and also decolorized 14 other different textile dyes. A packed bed reactor under batch mode showed 89% decolorization of dye after 56 repetitive cycles. Under continuous flow mode, maximum color removal was achieved with bed length of 36 cm, hydraulic retention time of 2.66 h, and dye concentration of 100 mg/l. Additionally, the reactor decolorized relatively higher concentrations (100-2000 mg/l) of dye. The synthetic dye wastewater containing five textile dyes was decolorized 92% with 62% COD reduction using an immobilized consortium.

  11. Screening fungicides for use in fish culture: Evaluation of the agar plug transfer, cellophane transfer, and agar dilution methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Tom A.

    1983-01-01

    The reliability, reproducibility, and usefulness of three screening methods -- the cellophane transfer, the agar plug transfer, and the agar dilution -- to screen aquatic fungicides were evaluated. Achlya flagellata and Saprolegnia hypogyna were exposed to 1, 10, and 100 mg/L of malachite green to test each method. The cellophane transfer and agar plug transfer techniques had similar reliability and reproducibility in rating fungicidal activity, and were both superior to the agar dilution technique. The agar plug transfer and agar dilution techniques adequately projected in vivo activity of malachite green, but the cellophane transfer technique overestimated its activity. Overall, the agar plug transfer technique most accurately rated the activity of malachite green and was the easiest test to perform. It therefore appears to be the method of choice for testing aquatic fungicides.

  12. Hemoglobin Labeled by Radioactive Lysine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, W. F.; Yuile, C. L.; DeLaVergne, L.; Miller, L. L.; Whipple, G. H.

    1949-12-08

    This paper reports on the utilization of tagged epsilon carbon of DL-lysine by a dog both anemic and hypoproteinemic due to repeated bleeding plus a diet low in protein. The experiment extended over period of 234 days, a time sufficient to indicate an erythrocyte life span of at least 115 days based upon the rate of replacement of labeled red cell proteins. The proteins of broken down red cells seem not to be used with any great preference for the synthesis of new hemoglobin.

  13. Cleaning plaster surfaces with agar-agar gels: evaluation of the technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Tortajada Hernando

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Cleaning plaster surfaces represent a challenge for conservators It should only be performed following fully tested methods that guarantee the conservation of such fragile material. The goal of this work is to establishing a suitable cleaning method for this type of artworks from the tested concentrations and time of applications, using agar gels on plaster supports. Morphological, porosity and weight variations have been studied. Confocal and stereomicroscopy have been used as analytical techniques, as well as the measurement of water vapor permeability and weight have been taken on the samples. La limpieza de superficies de yeso-escayola con geles de agar-agar: evaluación de la técnica Resumen: La limpieza segura y eficiente de las superficies de yeso constituye un reto y una responsabilidad para el conservador-restaurador, y debe llevarse a cabo siguiendo métodos testados que garanticen su correcta conservación. La intención de este trabajo es determinar, a partir de las concentraciones y tiempos de aplicación ensayados, cuáles serían los parámetros óptimos para la ejecución de una limpieza eficaz e inocua empleando geles de agar-agar sobre soportes de yeso. Se han comprobado las posibles variaciones morfológicas de la superficie, las variaciones de la porosidad y del peso, así como la presencia de residuos, para lo cual se ha empleado la microscopía confocal, microscopía binocular, la medida de la permeabilidad al vapor de agua y la medida del peso de las muestras.

  14. Improving agar electrospinnability with choline-based deep eutectic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ana M M; Souza, Hiléia K S; Uknalis, Joseph; Liu, Shih-Chuan; Gonçalves, Maria P; Liu, LinShu

    2015-09-01

    Very recently our group has produced novel agar-based fibers by an electrospinning technique using water as solvent and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as co-blending polymer. Here, we tested the deep eutectic solvent (DES), (2-hydroxyethyl)trimethylammonium chloride/urea prepared at 1:2 molar ratio, as an alternative solvent medium for agar electrospinning. The electrospun materials were collected with an ethanol bath adapted to a previous electrospinning set-up. One weight percent agar-in-DES showed improved viscoelasticity and hence, spinnability, when compared to 1 wt% agar-in-water and pure agar nanofibers were successfully electrospun if working above the temperature of sol-gel transition (∼80 °C). By changing the solvent medium we decreased the PVA concentration (5 wt% starting solution) and successfully produced composite fibers with high agar contents (50/50 agar/PVA). Best composite fibers were formed with the 50/50 and 30/70 agar/PVA solutions. These fibers were mechanically resistant, showed tailorable surface roughness and diverse size distributions, with most of the diameters falling in the sub-micron range. Both nano and micro forms of agar fibers (used separately or combined) may have potential for the design of new and highly functional agar-based materials.

  15. [Utilization of LIN (lysine-indole-motility) medium for the preliminary identification of enteropathogenic bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockemühl, J; Bednarek, I

    1975-07-01

    A multiple-test medium for the routine laboratory identification of enteropathogenic bacteria is described. The medium has the following formula: Bacto-peptone (Difco) 5 g; yeast extract (Difco) 3 g; casein tryptic digest peptone (Merek) 15 g; glucose 1 g; L-lysine-monohydrochloride (Merck, No. 5700) 5 g; NaCl 5 g; bromcresol purple 0.016 g; agar 2 g; distilled water 1000 ml; final pH 6.6. The medium is dispensed in amounts of 5 ml into tubes of 14 X 85 mm and autoclaved at 120 degrees C for 10 min. The tubes are tightly closed with rubber stoppers. - The medium is inoculated by stabbing to the bottom of the tube. Readings are made after over-night incubation at 37 degrees C. A scheme for the preliminary identification of enteropathogenic bacteria is given, based on LIM medium in conjunction with Kligler's iron agar, and the oxidase reaction.

  16. PENILAIAN PENGARUH PENAMBAHAN LYSINE PADA NASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignatius Tarwotjo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Pengaruh penambahan lysine pada mutu protein nasi dilakukan pada tikus putih dengan mengukur Protein Efficiency Ratio. Nasi dan Nasi dengan sayur beserta laukpauk, seperti dikonsumsi oleh kebanyakan keluarga di Indonesia, yang berasnya lebih dulu ditambahi butiran premix berisi lysine, thiamine dan riboflavin ternaya menghasilkan Protein Efficiency Ratio lebih tinggi dari pada yang tidak ditambahi.

  17. Engineering a Lysine-ON Riboswitch for Metabolic Control of Lysine Production in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li-Bang; Zeng, An-Ping

    2015-12-18

    Riboswitches are natural RNA elements that regulate gene expression by binding a ligand. Here, we demonstrate the possibility of altering a natural lysine-OFF riboswitch from Eschericia coli (ECRS) to a synthetic lysine-ON riboswitch and using it for metabolic control. To this end, a lysine-ON riboswitch library was constructed using tetA-based dual genetic selection. After screening the library, the functionality of the selected lysine-ON riboswitches was examined using a report gene, lacZ. Selected lysine-ON riboswitches were introduced into the lysE gene (encoding a lysine transport protein) of Corynebacterium glutamicum and used to achieve dynamic control of lysine transport in a recombinant lysine-producing strain, C. glutamicum LPECRS, which bears a deregulated aspartokinase and a lysine-OFF riboswitch for dynamic control of the enzyme citrate synthase. Batch fermentation results of the strains showed that the C. glutamicum LPECRS strain with an additional lysine-ON riboswitch for the control of lysE achieved a 21% increase in the yield of lysine compared to that of the C. glutamicum LPECRS strain and even a 89% increase in yield compared to that of the strain with deregulated aspartokinase. This work provides a useful approach to generate lysine-ON riboswitches for C. glutamicum metabolic engineering and demonstrates for the first time a synergetic effect of lysine-ON and -OFF riboswitches for improving lysine production in this industrially important microorganism. The approach can be used to dynamically control other genes and can be applied to other microorganisms.

  18. Methods for identifying lipoxygenase producing microorganisms on agar plates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyyssola, A.; Heshof, R.; Haarmann, T.; Eidner, J.; Westerholm-Parvinen, A.; Langfelder, K.; Kruus, K.; Graaff, de L.H.; Buchert, J.

    2012-01-01

    Plate assays for lipoxygenase producing microorganisms on agar plates have been developed. Both potassium iodide-starch and indamine dye formation methods were effective for detecting soybean lipoxygenase activity on agar plates. A positive result was also achieved using the beta-carotene bleaching

  19. Deregulation of histone lysine methyltransferases contributes to oncogenic transformation of human bronchoepithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoda Satoshi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alterations in the processing of the genetic information in carcinogenesis result from stable genetic mutations or epigenetic modifications. It is becoming clear that nucleosomal histones are central to proper gene expression and that aberrant DNA methylation of genes and histone methylation plays important roles in tumor progression. To date, several histone lysine methyltransferases (HKMTs have been identified and histone lysine methylation is now considered to be a critical regulator of transcription. However, still relatively little is known about the role of HKMTs in tumorigenesis. Results We observed differential HKMT expression in a lung cancer model in which normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE cells expressing telomerase, SV40 large T antigen, and Ras were immortal, formed colonies in soft agar, and expressed specific HKMTs for H3 lysine 9 and 27 residues but not for H3 lysine 4 residue. Modifications in the H3 tails affect the binding of proteins to the histone tails and regulate protein function and the position of lysine methylation marks a gene to be either activated or repressed. In the present study, suppression by siRNA of HKMTs (EZH2, G9A, SETDB1 and SUV39H1 that are over-expressed in immortalized and transformed cells lead to reduced cell proliferation and much less anchorage-independent colony growth. We also found that the suppression of H3-K9, G9A and SUV39H1 induced apoptosis and the suppression of H3-K27, EZH2 caused G1 arrest. Conclusion Our results indicate the potential of these HKMTs in addition to the other targets for epigenetics such as DNMTs and HDACs to be interesting therapeutic targets.

  20. Selected elements in fly agaric Amanita muscaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falandysz, J; Kunito, T; Kubota, R; Lipka, K; Mazur, A; Falandysz, Justyna J; Tanabe, S

    2007-09-01

    Concentrations of Ag, Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cu, Cr, Cs, Fe, Ga, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Pb, Rb, Se, Sb, Sr, V, Tl and Zn have been determined in the whole fruiting bodies, as well as separately in caps and stalks, of fly agaric collected from three geographically distant sites in northern part of Poland. The elements were determined using ICP-MS, ICP-OES, HG-AAS and CV-AAS, respectively. For elements such as Al, Ba, Cr, Fe, Ga, Mo, Mn, Pb, Sb, Sr, Tl, and V concentrations were similar in the caps and stalks, respectively, and for K, Zn, Ag, Ca, Cd, Cu, Hg, Mg, Rb and Se were greater in the caps, while for Co, Cs and Na in the stalks. For Ag, Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, Ga, Hg, Mn, Mo, Pb, Rb, Sb, Sr, Tl and V concentration in the caps showed spatial variations (P<0.05), while for Cu, K, Mg, Na, Se and Zn was independent of the site. The elements such as K with median or mean in the caps between 37,000 and 43,000 microg/g.dm and Mg with 920 and 1,100 microg/g dm were most abundant. Next, within median values range from approximately 100 to 500 microg/g dm were such as Ca, Fe and Al, and in descending order they followed by Rb (100-400 microg/g dm); V, Na, Zn (50-200 microg/g dm); Cu, Mn (10-50 microg/g dm); Cd (10-20 microg/g dm); Se (5 microg/g dm); Ba (<1-3); Cr, Ag, Pb, Sr (<1-2 microg/g dm); Cs, Co, Hg (<1-1 microg/g dm); Ga (<0.5), Sb, Mo and Tl (<0.1 microg/g dm).

  1. Reactive lysine content in commercially available pet foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooijen, van C.; Bosch, G.; Poel, van der A.F.B.; Wierenga, P.A.; Alexander, L.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2014-01-01

    The Maillard reaction can occur during processing of pet foods. During this reaction, the e-amino group of lysine reacts with reducing sugars to become unavailable for metabolism. The aim of the present study was to determine the reactive lysine (RL; the remaining available lysine) to total lysine (

  2. SPOTing Acetyl-Lysine Dependent Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Picaud

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Post translational modifications have been recognized as chemical signals that create docking sites for evolutionary conserved effector modules, allowing for signal integration within large networks of interactions. Lysine acetylation in particular has attracted attention as a regulatory modification, affecting chromatin structure and linking to transcriptional activation. Advances in peptide array technologies have facilitated the study of acetyl-lysine-containing linear motifs interacting with the evolutionary conserved bromodomain module, which specifically recognizes and binds to acetylated sequences in histones and other proteins. Here we summarize recent work employing SPOT peptide technology to identify acetyl-lysine dependent interactions and document the protocols adapted in our lab, as well as our efforts to characterize such bromodomain-histone interactions. Our results highlight the versatility of SPOT methods and establish an affordable tool for rapid access to potential protein/modified-peptide interactions involving lysine acetylation.

  3. Oligo(L-lysine)-induced titanium dioxide: Effects of consecutive lysine on precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sungjun; Park, Sangwoo; Lee, Sang-Yup

    2011-11-01

    Biomineralization of metal oxide utilizes biomolecular substances, such as peptides and proteins, to induce mineralization of metal precursors in a mild aqueous solution. In this study, we investigated biomineralization of an abiological substance, titanium dioxide (TiO 2), by oligo(L-lysine). Specifically, we systemically studied the influence of the number of consecutive lysine on TiO 2 precipitation. Oligo(L-lysine) was chosen as a homopeptide lysine source whose lysine quantity was adjusted. When oligo(L-lysine) contains more than three consecutive lysine, it induces notably fast precipitation, while single and dilysine do not readily form TiO 2 precipitates. Precipitation of TiO 2 was promoted with the length of oligo(L-lysine). The oligo(L-lysine) was associated with TiO 2 precipitate, which was confirmed by spectroscopic and thermogravitational analyses. The outcomes of this research provide a plausible rationale for explaining precipitation of the Ti precursor that is highly dependent on peptide sequences.

  4. Lysine requirement of growing male Pekin ducks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bons, A; Timmler, R; Jeroch, H

    2002-12-01

    1. One growth experiment and one balance test were conducted to study the response to increasing levels of dietary lysine supplementation in male Pekin ducks with special reference to the growth periods from 1 to 3 weeks and 4 to 7 weeks of age. 2. Two different low-lysine diets were used as basal diets in both periods. The basal lysine levels were 7.6 g/kg (d 1 to 21) and 6.2 g/kg (d 22 to 49) and the ranges in lysine concentration were 7.6 to 12.6 g/kg (d 1 to 21) and 6.2 to 11.2 g/kg (d 22 to 49). 3. Growth performance, feed conversion efficiency and meat yield increased (P < 0.05) with increasing lysine concentration (requirement defined as 95% of the asymptote). 4. It is concluded that the dietary lysine concentration should be 0.93 g/MJ nitrogen corrected apparent metabolisable energy (AMEN) (11.7 g/kg) for the starter period (until d 21) and 0.75 g/MJ AMEN (10.0 g/kg) for the grower period (from d 22 onwards).

  5. Direct Protocol for Ambient Mass Spectrometry Imaging on Agar Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angolini, Célio Fernando F; Vendramini, Pedro Henrique; Araújo, Francisca D S; Araújo, Welington L; Augusti, Rodinei; Eberlin, Marcos N; de Oliveira, Luciana Gonzaga

    2015-07-07

    Herein we describe a new protocol that allows direct mass spectrometry imaging (IMS) of agar cultures. A simple sample dehydration leads to a thin solid agar, which enables the direct use of spray-based ambient mass spectrometry techniques. To demonstrate its applicability, metal scavengers siderophores were imaged directly from agar culture of S. wadayamensis, and well resolved and intense images were obtained using both desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) and easy ambient sonic-spray ionization (EASI) with well-defined selective spatial distributions for the free and the metal-bound molecules, providing clues for their roles in cellular metabolism.

  6. Bioavailability of free lysine and protein-bound lysine from casein and fishmeal in juvenile turbot (Psetta maxima).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeckel, Saskia; Dietz, Carsten; Schulz, Carsten; Susenbeth, Andreas

    2015-03-14

    In the present study, a linear regression analysis between lysine intake and lysine retention was conducted to investigate the efficiency of lysine utilisation (k(Lys)) at marginal lysine intake of either protein-bound or free lysine sources in juvenile turbot (Psetta maxima). For this purpose, nine isonitrogenous and isoenergetic diets were formulated to contain 2·25-4·12 g lysine/100 g crude protein (CP) to ensure that lysine was the first-limiting amino acid in all diets. The basal diet contained 2·25 g lysine/100 g CP. Graded levels of casein (Cas), fishmeal (FM) and L-lysine HCl (Lys) were added to the experimental diets to achieve stepwise lysine increments. A total of 240 fish (initial weight 50·1 g) were hand-fed all the experimental diets once daily until apparent satiation over a period of 56 d. Feed intake was significantly affected by dietary lysine concentration rather than by dietary lysine source. Specific growth rate increased significantly at higher lysine concentrations (PCas, Lys or FM were 0·833, 0·857 and 0·684, respectively. The bioavailability of lysine from the respective lysine sources was determined by a slope-ratio approach. The bioavailability of lysine (relative to the reference lysine source Cas) from FM and Lys was 82·1 and 103 %, respectively. Nutrient requirement for maintenance was in the range of 16·7-23·4 mg/kg(0·8) per d, and did not differ between the treatments. There were no significant differences in lysine utilisation efficiency or bioavailability of protein-bound or crystalline lysine from the respective sources observed when lysine was confirmed to be the first-limiting nutrient.

  7. Effect of water structure on gelation of agar in glycerol solutions and phase diagram of agar organogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boral, Shilpi; Bohidar, H B

    2012-06-21

    A comprehensive study of hydration of polyanionic agar molecules in its solution and gel phase in glycerol-water binary solvent is reported. Raman spectroscopy results predict differential water structure arrangement for glycerol-water binary solvent, 0.02% (w/v) agar in glycerol solution and 0.3% (w/v) agar organogel. The 3200 cm(-1) Raman band pertaining to ice-like structure of water was found to increase in gel phase alike in glycerol-water solvent while it decreased in agar solutions with increase in glycerol concentration. In contrast, the partially structured water corresponding to the component 3310 cm(-1) of Raman spectra increased in agar solution, and decreased in gel phase similar to glycerol-water solvent case. We have explained these observations based on a simple model where the available oxygen to hydrogen atom ratio in a given solvent-polymer system uniquely defines hydration in solution and gel phases. The gelation concentration was found to increase from 0.18 (for water) to 0.22% (w/v) (50% v/v glycerol solution) as the glycerol concentration was raised. Correspondingly, the gelation temperature, T(g), showed a decline from 40 to 20 °C, and the gel melting temperature, T(m), revealed a reduction from 81 to 65 °C in the same glycerol concentration regime. Two distinctive features are evident here: (i) presence of glycerol as a cosolvent does not favor the gelation of agar as compared to water and (ii) agar organogels are softer than their hydrogels. A unique 3D phase diagram for the agar organogel is proposed. Circular dichroism data confirmed that the agar molecules retained their biological activity in these solvents. Thus, it is shown that thermo-mechanical properties of these organogels could be systematically tuned and adapted as per application requirement.

  8. AGAR PENULISAN RESEP TETAP UP TO DATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmatini Rahmatini

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakResep adalah suatu permintaan tertulis dari dokter, dokter gigi atau dokter hewan kepada apoteker untuk membuatkan obat dalam bentuk sediaan tertentu dan menyerahkannya kepada pasien. Resep merupakan perwujudan akhir dari kompetensi, pengetahuan dan keahlian dokter dalam menerapkan pengetahuannya dalam bidang farmakologi dan terapi.Penulisan resep harus ditulis dengan jelas sehingga dapat dibaca oleh petugas di apotek. Resep yang ditulis dengan tidak jelas akan menimbulkan terjadinya kesalahan saat peracikan / penyiapan obat dan penggunaan obat yang diresepkan.Ilmu pengetahuan tentang obat selalu berubah, obat – obat baru selalu muncul di pasaran.Secara umum, seorang dokter harus mengikuti perkembangan dalam terapi obat. Bila muncul efek samping akibat obat yang seharusnya diketahui dan dapat dicegah oleh dokter, maka dokter akan berhadapan dengan hukum.Agar penulisan resep tetap up to date, seorang dokter harus mengumpulkan berbagai informasi yang tersedia. Sumber informasi yang dapat digunakan adalah : Buku acuan, Kompendium obat, Daftar Obat Esensial Nasional (DOEN dan Pedoman terapi, Buletin obat, Jurnal Kedokteran, Pusat informasi obat,Informasi melalui komputer, Sumber informasi dari industri farmasi, dan informasi lisan.Bandingkan kelebihan dan kekurangan berbagai sumber informasi. Tugas seorang dokter adalah melakukan cara terbaik untuk tetap up to date dengan mendaftar sumber informasi yang dapat dimanfaatkan. Carilah sedikitnya satu dari yang berikut ini : (1 jurnal kedokteran: (2 buletin obat; (3 buku acuan farmakologi atau acuan klinis; (4 komisi terapi maupun konsultan, atau lulusan pasca sarjana farmakologi. Dengan bekal pengetahuan dan kemampuan untuk melakukan penilaian secara kritis setiap bentuk informasi, diharapkan dokter tetap up to date dalam menulis resepKata kunci : Resep – up to- date.Abstract Prescription is a written request from a doctor, dentist or veterinarian to the pharmacist to make a particular drug

  9. Lysine-Rich Proteins in High-Lysine Hordeum Vulgare Grain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingversen, J.; Køie, B.

    1973-01-01

    The salt-soluble proteins in barley grain selected for high-lysine content (Hiproly, CI 7115 and the mutants 29 and 86) and of a control (Carlsberg II) with normal lysine content, contain identical major proteins as determined by MW and electrophoretic mobility. The concentration of a protein group...

  10. Suitability of various plant derived gelling agents as agar substitute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2012-06-05

    Jun 5, 2012 ... of three test fungi (Trichoderma harzianum, Alternaria alternata and Alternaria solani) as good as agar. Guar gum .... validate the available data and to look for additional cheap and .... A revised medium for rapid growth and.

  11. Rheological properties of agar and carrageenan from Ghanaian red seaweeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rhein-Knudsen, Nanna; Ale, Marcel Tutor; Ajalloueian, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    . The ι-carrageenan and agar samples had gelling temperatures of 70–74 °C and 38–52 °C, respectively. Gel strengths, G’ at 25 °C, of carrageenan samples extracted via alkali-treatment were 4000–6500 Pa. The agar gel strength was 287 Pa. The rheological properties of the H. musciformis κ-carrageenans were...

  12. Detection of extracellular proteases from microorganisms on agar plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alane Beatriz Vermelho

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available We present herein an improved assay for detecting the presence of extracellular proteases from microorganisms on agar plates. Using different substrates (gelatin, BSA, hemoglobin incorporated into the agar and varying the culture medium composition, we were able to detect proteolytic activities from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Micrococcus luteus and Serratia marcescens as well as the influence that these components displayed in the expression of these enzymes. For all microorganisms tested we found that in agar-BHI or yeast extract medium containing gelatin the sensitivity of proteinase detection was considerably greater than in BSA-agar or hemoglobin-agar. However, when BSA or hemoglobin were added to the culture medium, there was an increase in growth along with a marked reduction in the amount of proteinase production. In the case of M. luteus the incorporation of glycerol in BHI or yeast extract gelatin-agar induced protease liberation. Our results indicate that the technique described here is of value for detecting extracellular proteases directly in the culture medium, by means of a qualitative assay, simple, inexpensive, straight forward method to assess the presence of the proteolytic activity of a given microorganism colony with great freedom in substrate selection.

  13. Thermal characterization of magnetically aligned carbonyl iron/agar composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Bleis, D; Vales-Pinzón, C; Freile-Pelegrín, Y; Alvarado-Gil, J J

    2014-01-01

    Composites of magnetic particles into polymeric matrices have received increasing research interest due to their capacity to respond to external magnetic or electromagnetic fields. In this study, agar from Gelidium robustum has been chosen as natural biocompatible polymer to build the matrix of the magnetic carbonyl iron particles (CIP) for their uses in biomedical fields. Heat transfer behavior of the CIP-agar composites containing different concentrations (5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30% w/w) of magnetically aligned and non-aligned CIP in the agar matrix was studied using photothermal radiometry (PTR) in the back-propagation emission configuration. The morphology of the CIP-agar composites with aligned and non-aligned CIP under magnetic field was also evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results revealed a dominant effect of CIP concentration over the alignment patterns induced by the magnetic field, which agrees with the behavior of the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity. Agar served as a perfect matrix to be used with CIP, and CIP-agar composites magnetically aligned at 20% CIP concentration can be considered as promising 'smart' material for hyperthermia treatments in the biomedical field.

  14. Characterization of agar/soy protein biocomposite films: Effect of agar on the extruded pellets and compression moulded films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, T; Etxabide, A; Guerrero, P; de la Caba, K

    2016-10-20

    Agar/soy protein biocomposite films were successfully processed by extrusion and compression moulding, obtaining transparent and homogeneous films. The conformational changes occurred during the extrusion process and the effect of agar on the final properties were analyzed. As shown by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and specific mechanical energy (SME) values, during the extrusion process protein denatured and unfolded protein chains could interact with agar. These interactions were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and the secondary structure was determined from the amide I band. Those interactions were supported by the decrease of film solubility. Furthermore, the good compatibility between agar and soy protein was confirmed by the images from scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Immobilization of pectin degrading enzyme from Bacillus licheniformis KIBGE IB-21 using agar-agar as a support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Haneef Ur; Aman, Afsheen; Zohra, Raheela Rahmat; Qader, Shah Ali Ul

    2014-02-15

    Pectinase from Bacillus licheniformis KIBGE IB-21 was immobilized in agar-agar matrix using entrapment technique. Effect of different concentrations of agar-agar on pectinase immobilization was investigated and it was found that maximum immobilization was achieved at 3.0% agar-agar with 80% enzyme activity. After immobilization, the optimum temperature of enzyme increased from 45 to 50 °C and reaction time from 5 to 10 minutes as compared to free enzyme. Due to the limited diffusion of high molecular weight substrate, K(m) of immobilized enzyme slightly increased from 1.017 to 1.055 mg ml(-1), while Vmax decreased from 23,800 to 19,392 μM min(-1) as compared to free enzyme. After 120 h entrapped pectinase retained their activity up to 82% and 71% at 30 °C and 40 °C, respectively. The entrapped pectinase showed activity until 10th cycle and maintain 69.21% activity even after third cycle.

  16. Egg yolk emulsion agar, a new medium for the cultivation of Helicobacter pylori.

    OpenAIRE

    Westblom, T U; Madan, E; Midkiff, B R

    1991-01-01

    We developed a new agar, egg yolk emulsion (EYE) agar, for cultivation of Helicobacter pylori. EYE agar contains Columbia agar base (Oxoid), 10% EYE (Oxoid), 1% IsoVitaleX (BBL), and 40 mg of Triphenyleteraxolium chloride (Sigma) per liter. We compared EYE agar with the following agars: (i) brain heart infusion agar-7% horse blood-1% IsoVitaleX (GDW agar; C. S. Goodwin, E. D. Blincow, J. R. Warren, T. E. Waters, C. R. Sanderson, and L. Easton, J. Clin. Pathol. 38:1127-1131, 1985), (ii) brain ...

  17. Agar/collagen membrane as skin dressing for wounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao Lei; Yang Wei; Mao Xuan; Mou Shansong; Tang Shunqing [Biomedical Engineering Institute, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China)], E-mail: tshunqt@jnu.edu.cn, E-mail: tmuss@jnu.edu.cn

    2008-12-15

    Agar, a highly hydrophilic polymer, has a special gel property and favorable biocompatibility, but moderate intension strength in an aqueous condition and a low degradation rate. In order to tailor both properties of mechanical intension and degradation, type I collagen was composited with agar in a certain ratio by drying at 50 {sup 0}C or by a freeze-dry process. Glutaraldehyde was chosen as a crosslinking agent, and the most favorable condition for crosslinking was that the weight ratio of agar to glutaraldehyde was 66.7 and the pH value about 5. Dynamic mechanical analysis results showed that the single agar membrane had a modulus value between 640 MPa and 1064 MPa, but it was between 340 MPa and 819 MPa after being composited with type I collagen. It was discovered under an optical microscope that the pores were interconnected in the composite scaffolds instead of the honeycomb-like pores in a single type I collagen scaffold or the laminated gaps in a single agar scaffold. The results of an acute toxicity test disclosed that the composites were not toxic to mice although the composites were crosslinked with a certain concentration of glutaraldehyde. The results of gross examinations showed that when the composite membranes or scaffolds were applied to a repair rabbit skin lesion, the composites had a good repair effect without infection, liquid exudation or visible scar in the lesion covered with them. But in the control group, the autologous skin showed necrosis and there were a lot of scar tissues in the lesion site. H and E staining results showed that the repair tissue was similar to the normal one and very few scaffolds or membranes were left without degradation after 2 or 3 weeks. In conclusion, it is proved that type I collagen increases the toughness of the agar membrane, and the agar/type I collagen composites are promising biomaterials as wound dressings for healing burns or ulcers.

  18. Light transfer in agar immobilized microalgae cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandilian, Razmig; Jesus, Bruno; Legrand, Jack; Pilon, Laurent; Pruvost, Jérémy

    2017-09-01

    This paper experimentally and theoretically investigates light transfer in agar-immobilized cell cultures. Certain biotechnological applications such as production of metabolites secreted by photosynthetic microorganisms require cells to be immobilized in biopolymers to minimize contamination and to facilitate metabolite recovery. In such applications, light absorption by cells is one of the most important parameters affecting cell growth or metabolite productivity. Modeling light transfer therein can aid design and optimize immobilized-cell reactors. In this study, Parachlorella kessleri cells with areal biomass concentrations ranging from 0.36 to 16.9 g/m2 were immobilized in 2.6 mm thick agar gels. The average absorption and scattering cross-sections as well as the scattering phase function of P. kessleri cells were measured. Then, the absorption and transport scattering coefficients of the agar gel were determined using an inverse method based on the modified two-flux approximation. The forward model was used to predict the normal-hemispherical transmittance and reflectance of the immobilized-cell films accounting for absorption and scattering by both microalgae and the agar gel. Good agreement was found between the measured and predicted normal-hemispherical transmittance and reflectance provided absorption and scattering by agar were taken into account. Moreover, good agreement was found between experimentally measured and predicted mean rate of photon absorption. Finally, optimal areal biomass concentration was determined to achieve complete absorption of the incident radiation.

  19. Efficient Production of Enantiopure d-Lysine from l-Lysine by a Two-Enzyme Cascade System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The microbial production of d-lysine has been of great interest as a medicinal raw material. Here, a two-step process for d-lysine production from l-lysine by the successive microbial racemization and asymmetric degradation with lysine racemase and decarboxylase was developed. The whole-cell activities of engineered Escherichia coli expressing racemases from the strains Proteus mirabilis (LYR and Lactobacillus paracasei (AAR were first investigated comparatively. When the strain BL21-LYR with higher racemization activity was employed, l-lysine was rapidly racemized to give dl-lysine, and the d-lysine yield was approximately 48% after 0.5 h. Next, l-lysine was selectively catabolized to generate cadaverine by lysine decarboxylase. The comparative analysis of the decarboxylation activities of resting whole cells, permeabilized cells, and crude enzyme revealed that the crude enzyme was the best biocatalyst for enantiopure d-lysine production. The reaction temperature, pH, metal ion additive, and pyridoxal 5′-phosphate content of this two-step production process were subsequently optimized. Under optimal conditions, 750.7 mmol/L d-lysine was finally obtained from 1710 mmol/L l-lysine after 1 h of racemization reaction and 0.5 h of decarboxylation reaction. d-lysine yield could reach 48.8% with enantiomeric excess (ee ≥ 99%.

  20. Radioactive Lysine in Protein Metabolism Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L. L.; Bale, W. F.; Yuile, C. L.; Masters, R. E.; Tishkoff, G. H.; Whipple,, G. H.

    1950-01-09

    Studies of incorporation of DL-lysine in various body proteins of the dog; the time course of labeled blood proteins; and apparent rate of disappearance of labeled plasma proteins for comparison of behavior of the plasma albumin and globulin fractions; shows more rapid turn over of globulin fraction.

  1. Lysine and arginine requirements of Salminus brasiliensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jony Koji Dairiki

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to determine the dietary lysine (DL and dietary arginine (DA requirements of dourado (Salminus brasiliensis, through dose-response trials using the amino acid profiles of whole carcasses as a reference. Two experiments were carried out in a completely randomized design (n=4. In the first experiment, groups of 12 feed-conditioned dourado juveniles (11.4±0.2 g were stocked in 60 L cages placed in 300 L plastic indoor tanks in a closed circulation system. Fish were fed for 60 days on diets containing 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, or 3.5 % dietary lysine. In the second experiment, dourado juveniles (27.0±0.8 g were fed for 60 days on semipurified diets containing arginine at 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 or 3.0%, in similar conditions to those of the first experiment. Optimal DL requirements, as determined by broken-line analysis method for final weight, weight gain and specific growth rate, were 2.15% DL or 5% lysine in dietary protein, and 1.48% DA or 3.43% arginine in dietary protein. The best feed conversion ratio is attained with 2.5% DL or 5.8% lysine in dietary protein and 1.4% DA or 3.25% arginine in dietary protein.

  2. Photothermal characterization of the gelation process in Gelidium robustum Agar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freile-Pelegrín, Y.; Bante, J.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Yánez-Limón, J. M.

    2005-06-01

    Agar is a hydrophilic colloid formed by polysaccharides, whose ability to form reversible gels simply by cooling hot aqueous solutions is the most important property and can be regarded as the prototype and model for all gelling systems. In this paper the evolution of the gelation process of agar obtained from algae of the species Gelidium robustum, using the photopyroelectric technique is reported. It is shown that thermal effusivity increase when the agar is cooled, reaching a maximum value around 37°C. The increase in thermal effusivity can be related to the increasing of the bondings in the gel as temperature decreases, reaching the maximum at the gelation point. The decrease of the thermal effusivity at lower temperature could be due to the syneresis process involving a gradual release of water after gelation.

  3. Fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) poisoning, case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satora, Leszek; Pach, Dorota; Butryn, Beata; Hydzik, Piotr; Balicka-Slusarczyk, Barbara

    2005-06-01

    Gathering and eating mushrooms and other plants containing psychoactive substances has become increasingly popular among young people experimenting with drugs. Dried fly agaric Amanita muscaria fruiting bodies were eaten by five young persons (18-21 years of age) at a party in order to evoke hallucinations. Visual and auditory hallucinations occurred in four of them, whereas a 18-year-old girl lost consciousness. The following morning, she went to the Clinic of Toxicology. Due to the fact that not all the active substances present in the fly agaric have been identified, and some of them have an effect after a period of latency, the patient was admitted for several days of observation during which check-up examinations were performed. After four days without any problems, she was discharged. The poisoning regressed with no organ complications. The remaining persons who had eaten the fly agaric were free from any complaints.

  4. Hichrom candida agar for identification of candida species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baradkar V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromogenic media are frequently used in direct and rapid identification of yeasts because different Candida species produce unique colors on these media. We used 60 isolates of Candida species including 30 C. albicans, 10 C. parapsilosis, 11 C. glabrata, five C. tropicalis, and four C. dubliniensis, isolated from various clinical specimens, to evaluate the performance of HiChrome Candida agar. These strains had been identified by germ tube test, morphology on cornmeal agar, chlamydospore formation on tobacco agar and sugar assimilation tests. The sensitivity and specificity results were: C. albicans (96.55 and 96.42%; C. parapsilosis (80 and 98.03%, C. glabrata (90.90 and 88.23%, C. tropicalis (100 and 100% and C. dubliniensis (60 and 96.55% respectively. HiChrom Candida agaris medium has been useful and capable of presumptive, rapid identification of Candida species within 48 hours.

  5. Lysine kinetics in preterm infants: the importance of enteral feeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.R.D. van der Schoor (Sophie); P.J. Reeds; F. Stellaard; J.L.D. Wattimena (Josias); P.J.J. Sauer (Pieter); H.A. Büller (Hans); J.B. van Goudoever (Hans)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractINTRODUCTION: Lysine is the first limiting essential amino acid in the diet of newborns. First pass metabolism by the intestine of dietary lysine has a direct effect on systemic availability. We investigated whether first pass lysine metabolism in the intestine is high

  6. Lysine kinetics in preterm infants : the importance of enteral feeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schoor, SRD; Reeds, PJ; Stellaard, F; Wattimena, JDL; Sauer, PJJ; Buller, HA; van Goudoever, JB

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Lysine is the first limiting essential amino acid in the diet of newborns. First pass metabolism by the intestine of dietary lysine has a direct effect on systemic availability. We investigated whether first pass lysine metabolism in the intestine is high in preterm infants, particular

  7. Effect of BiTek agar on lysostaphin susceptibility of staphylococci.

    OpenAIRE

    Langlois, B E; Dawson, K.; Akers, K

    1990-01-01

    Staphylococci which were considered to be lysostaphin susceptible on P agar containing Bacto-Agar showed different degrees of resistance to lysostaphin when tested on P agar made with BiTek agar. As a result, lysostaphin-susceptible strains were misidentified as lysostaphin-resistant strains.

  8. Improved isolation of Vibro vulnificus from seawater and sediment with cellobiose-colistin agar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høi, L.; Dalsgaard, Inger; Dalsgaard, A.

    1998-01-01

    An improved selective medium, cellobiose-colistin (CC) agar, gave a significantly higher (P cellobiose-polymyxin B-colistin (mCPC) agar, In a total of 446 alkaline peptone water preenrichments amended...... with polymyxin B, V. vulnificus was isolated from 154 preenrichments (35%) with mCPC agar and from 179 preenrichments (40%) with CC agar. CC agar gave a higher plating efficiency of V. vulnificus cells than did cellobiose-polymyxin B-colistin (CPC) agar, mCPC agar, or thiosulfate-citrate-bile salts-sucrose (TCBS...

  9. Is blood agar an alternative to sabouraud dextrose agar for the isolation of fungi in patients with mycotic keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Ashok Kumar; Brahmaiah, Upputuri; Narayen, Nitesh; Reddy, Ravi Kumar; Reddy, Rupak Kumar; Chitta, Meghraj; Prasad, Srinivas; Swarup, Rishi; Mohiuddin, Syed Maaz; Reddy, Madhukar; Aasuri, Murali K; Murthy, B S R; Bhide, Milind; Ahmed, Sajid

    2013-06-01

    To compare the blood agar (BA), sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) and chocolate agar (CA) for the isolation of fungi in patients with mycotic keratitis. Corneal Scrapings of 229 patients with clinically diagnosed microbial keratitis were inoculated on BA, SDA, CA. The culture media were evaluated for the rate and time taken for the fungal growth. Seventy six of 229 patients had fungal keratitis. Fungus grew on BA in 60/76(78.9 %), on SDA in 76/76 (100 %), on CA in 40/76(52.6 %) patients. The fungi which grew on BA (60/76) also grown on SDA at the same time. The colony morphologies of different fungi were better on SDA than BA/CA. Among the different culture media, SDA is essential for the isolation fungi in patients with mycotic keratitis.

  10. Recovery of Sublethally Injured Bacteria Using Selective Agar Overlays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKillip, John L.

    2001-01-01

    This experiment subjects bacteria in a food sample and an environmental sample to conditions of sublethal stress in order to assess the effectiveness of the agar overlay method to recover sublethally injured cells compared to direct plating onto the appropriate selective medium. (SAH)

  11. Internal structure and thermo-viscoelastic properties of agar ionogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anshu; Rawat, Kamla; Solanki, Pratima R; Aswal, V K; Kohlbrecher, J; Bohidar, H B

    2015-12-10

    Ionic liquids (IL) can alter the physical properties of agar hydrogels. Rheology studies show that gels with wide range of storage moduli (gel strength) G0 values ranging from 1 to 20 KPa could be made in imidazolium based IL solutions where the IL concentration may not exceed 5% (w/v). Gelation and gel melting temperatures (tgel and Tm) could be altered by as much as ≈ 10 °C. Small angle neutron scattering studies revealed the presence of fibre bundles of agar double helices having typical length of 120 nm that increased to ≈ 180 nm under favorable conditions. These structures gain flexibility from the cladding of the agar bundles by IL molecules which in turn caused partial charge neutralization of its surface. Raman spectroscopy revealed differential hydration of these bundles. It was found that IL molecules with longer alkyl chain (more hydrophobic) altered the gel homogeneity, and changed its thermal and mechanical properties significantly. Therefore, customization of agar hydrogels in green solvent medium (IL solutions) widens the scope of its application potential that may include sensing.

  12. An improved agar medium for growth of Geobacillus thermoglucosidarius strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, M; Baghaei-Yazdi, N; Qin, W; Amartey, S

    2017-01-01

    Geobacillus species have potential applications in many biotechnological processes. They are fastidious in their vitamin and amino acid requirements. A new semi-defined agar medium (SDM) was developed which gave consistently high viable cell counts of various G. thermoglucosidasius strains (5×10(8)-6×10(8)cfu/ml) under aerobic conditions at 70°C.

  13. Development of a selective agar plate for the detection of Campylobacter spp. in fresh produce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jin-Hee; Choi, Na-Young; Bae, Young-Min; Lee, Jung-Su; Lee, Sun-Young

    2014-10-17

    This study was conducted to develop a selective medium for the detection of Campylobacter spp. in fresh produce. Campylobacter spp. (n=4), non-Campylobacter (showing positive results on Campylobacter selective agar) strains (n=49) isolated from fresh produce, indicator bacteria (n=13), and spoilage bacteria isolated from fresh produce (n=15) were plated on four Campylobacter selective media. Bolton agar and modified charcoal cefoperazone deoxycholate agar (mCCDA) exhibited higher sensitivity for Campylobacter spp. than did Preston agar and Hunt agar, although certain non-Campylobacter strains isolated from fresh produce by using a selective agar isolation method, were still able to grow on Bolton agar and mCCDA. To inhibit the growth of non-Campylobacter strains, Bolton agar and mCCDA were supplemented with 5 antibiotics (rifampicin, polymyxin B, sodium metabisulfite, sodium pyruvate, ferrous sulfate) and the growth of Campylobacter spp. (n=7) and non-Campylobacter strains (n=44) was evaluated. Although Bolton agar supplemented with rifampicin (BR agar) exhibited a higher selectivity for Campylobacter spp. than did mCCDA supplemented with antibiotics, certain non-Campylobacter strains were still able to grow on BR agar (18.8%). When BR agar with various concentrations of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim were tested with Campylobacter spp. (n=8) and non-Campylobacter (n=7), sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim was inhibitory against 3 of 7 non-Campylobacter strains. Finally, we validated the use of BR agar containing 50mg/L sulfamethoxazole (BRS agar) or 0.5mg/L ciprofloxacin (BRCS agar) and other selective agars for the detection of Campylobacter spp. in chicken and fresh produce. All chicken samples were positive for Campylobacter spp. when tested on mCCDA, BR agar, and BRS agar. In fresh produce samples, BRS agar exhibited the highest selectivity for Campylobacter spp., demonstrating its suitability for the detection of Campylobacter spp. in fresh produce.

  14. Agar-agar entrapment increases the stability of endo-β-1,4-xylanase for repeated biodegradation of xylan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi, Zainab; Shahid, Faiza; Ul Qader, Shah Ali; Aman, Afsheen

    2015-04-01

    Microbial xylanases, specially endo-β-1,4-xylanase catalyzes the hydrolysis of xylan, is considered one of the most significant hydrolases. It has numerous applications but most extensively is utilized in paper and pulp industry as a bio-bleaching agent. Immobilization technique is comprehensively studied with the expectation of modifying and improving enzyme stability and characteristics for commercial purposes. Currently, matrix entrapment technique is applied to immobilize endo-β-1,4-xylanase within agar-agar gel beads produced by Geobacillus stearothermophilus KIBGE-IB29. Maximal enzyme immobilization yield was achieved at 2.5% of agar-agar concentration. Optimized conditions demonstrated an increase in the optimal reaction time from 05 min to 30 min and incubation temperature from 50 °C to 60 °C with reference to free enzyme whereas; no effect was observed for optimum pH. Entrapment technique uniquely changed the kinetic parameters of immobilized endo-β-1,4-xylanase (Km: 0.5074 mg min(-1) to 0.5230 mg min(-1) and Vmax: 4773 U min(-1) to 968 U min(-1)) as compared to free enzyme. However, immobilized enzyme displayed broad thermal stability and retained 79.0% of its initial activity at 80 °C up to 30 min whereas; free enzyme completely lost its activity at this temperature. With respect to economic feasibility, the immobilized enzyme showed impressive recycling efficiency up to six reaction cycles.

  15. Comparison of Paraffin Bait, Humic Acid Vitamin B Agar and Paraffin Agar Methods to Isolate Nocardia from Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasoulinasab, M. (MSc

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: The Isolation of Nocardia species is complex and time-consuming, which is due to rapid growth of adjacent bacteria. Because of the importance of a specific medium with the ability of controlling intrusive microorganisms, this study aimed at comparing three laboratory methods to introduce the reliable isolation technique for Nocardia species. Material and Methods: The soil samples were collected from different regions of Tehran province, Iran, and carefully transferred to the laboratory. The samples were cultured in three different media including Paraffin Baiting,Humic acid vitamin B agar and Paraffin agar, and incubated for 3-4 weeks at 35 °C. Results: Of 110 soil samples, 31 Nocardia isolates (28.18% were obtained from the media including Paraffin Baiting, (19; 17.27%, Humic acid and vitamin B agar (4; 3.63%, and Paraffin agar, (8; 7.27%. Conclusion: because of high rate of isolation, low cost and the clearance of colonies suspected nocardia, Paraffin Bait technique is more reliable and efficient compared to the other methods. Key words: Nocardia; Soil; Paraffin Baiting; Humic Acid Vitamin B

  16. Combination cellulose plate (non-agar solid support) and agar plate method improves isolation of fungi from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Kenichi; Todaka, Nemuri; Ōmura, Satoshi; Masuma, Rokuro

    2014-11-01

    This is the first report describing the improved isolation of common filamentous fungi via a method combining cellulose plate and agar plate system. A cellulose plate is a porous plate made of nanofibrous crystaline cellulose. Isolating fungi from soils using these types of media separately resulted in the number of fungal colonies appearing on cellulose plates being lower than that on agar plates. However, the number of actual fungal species isolated using cellulose plates alone was more or less the same as that found using agar plates. Significantly, the diversity of isolates using a combination of the two media was greater than using each media individually. As a result, numerous new or rare fungal species with potential, including previously proposed new species, were isolated successfully in this way. All fungal colonies, including the Penicillium species, that appeared on the cellulose plate penetrated in potato dextrose were either white or yellow. Cultivation on cellulose plates with added copper ion overcomes the change in coloration, the colonies appearing as they do following cultivation on potato dextrose agar.

  17. Lysine fortification: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellett, Peter L; Ghosh, Shibani

    2004-06-01

    Fortification with lysine to improve the protein value of human diets that are heavily based on cereals has received support from the results of these recent studies [1,2]. Support also comes from examination of average food and nutrient availability data derived from food balance sheets. Whereas nutritional status is influenced by the nutrient content of foods consumed in relation to need, the requirements for protein and amino acids are influenced by many additional factors [10, 12, 14, 28, 29]. These include age, sex, body size, physical activity, growth, pregnancy and lactation, infection, and the efficiency of nutrient utilization. Even if the immune response was influenced by the added lysine, adequate water and basic sanitation would remain essential. Acute and chronic undernutrition and most micronutrient deficiencies primarily affect poor and deprived people who do not have access to food of adequate nutritional value, live in unsanitary environments without access to clean water and basic services, and lack access to appropriate education and information [30]. A further variable is the possible interaction between protein and food energy availability [31]. This could affect the protein value of diets when food energy is limiting to a significant degree. Thus, the additional effects of food energy deficiency on protein utilization could well be superimposed on the very poorest. The improvement of dietary diversity must be the long-term aim, with dietary fortification considered only a short-term solution. The former should take place as wealth improves and the gaps between rich and poor diminish. Although such changes are taking place, they are highly uneven. Over the last several decades, increases have occurred in the availability of food energy, total protein, and animal protein for both developed and developing countries. However, for the very poorest developing countries over the same period, changes have been almost nonexistent, and the values for

  18. Growth and Characterization of Agar Gel Grown Brushite Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Suryawanshi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brushite [CaHPO4·2H2O] or calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate (CHPD also known as urinary crystal is a stable form of calcium phosphate. The brushite crystals were grown by single and double diffusion techniques in agar-agar gel at room temperature. Effects of different growth parameters were discussed in single diffusion and double diffusion techniques. Good quality star, needle, platy, rectangular, and prismatic shaped crystals in single diffusion and nuclei with dendritic growth were obtained in double diffusion. These grown nuclei were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. SEM has shown the different morphologies of crystals; FTIR has confirmed the presence of functional groups; crystalline nature was supported by XRD, whereas the TGA indicates total 24.68% loss in weight and formation of stable calcium pyrophosphate (Ca2P2O7 at 500°C.

  19. Periodic growth of Bacillus subtilis colonies on agar plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi

    1992-10-01

    Bacillus subtilis colonies show periodic growth on agar plates. The organism has been observed to show several colony morphologies including diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) type, dense branching morphology (DBM), Eden type, and spreading without producing openings. The agar concentration for the periodic growth is higher than that of DBM and lower than that of DLA or Eden type. The nutrient (peptone) concentration for the periodic growth is higher than that of DLA and DBM and lower than that of Eden type. The colony grows towards a place with higher peptone concentration. These findings suggest that the diffusion of nutrient particles, i.e. the concentration gradient of peptone particles at the growing perimeter of a colony, would be essentially involved in the periodic growth. The distance between concentric rings of a colony is constant and intervention between two colonies is not observed, unlike the Liesegang ring.

  20. Comparison of dosimetry gels prepared by agar and bovine gelatine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sağsöz, M. E.; Korkut, Ö.; Alemdar, N.; Aktaş, S.; Çalı, E. B.; Kantarcı, M.

    2016-04-01

    Gel dosimeters are unique materials capable of showing three dimensional (3D) dose distributions of therapeutic or diagnostic exposures. Fricke gel dosimeters can be considered as chemical dosimeters that rely on a radiation-induced chemical reaction. Dose distribution of Fricke solutions containing Fe+2 ions determines the transformation of acidic, oxygen saturated Fe+2 ions to Fe+3 ions by the ionizing radiation in aqueous solutions. In this study we produced two different types of gel dosimeters using agar and bovine gelatin with similar fabrication methods. We compared the magnetic resonance (MR) T1 imaging responses of these two gel dosimeters to acquire a dose dependency of MR intensities. In conclusion agar gel dosimeters found to be produced easily and more consistent.

  1. Exploring lysine riboswitch for metabolic flux control and improvement of L-lysine synthesis in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li-Bang; Zeng, An-Ping

    2015-06-19

    Riboswitch, a regulatory part of an mRNA molecule that can specifically bind a metabolite and regulate gene expression, is attractive for engineering biological systems, especially for the control of metabolic fluxes in industrial microorganisms. Here, we demonstrate the use of lysine riboswitch and intracellular l-lysine as a signal to control the competing but essential metabolic by-pathways of lysine biosynthesis. To this end, we first examined the natural lysine riboswitches of Eschericia coli (ECRS) and Bacillus subtilis (BSRS) to control the expression of citrate synthase (gltA) and thus the metabolic flux in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in E. coli. ECRS and BSRS were then successfully used to control the gltA gene and TCA cycle activity in a lysine producing strain Corynebacterium glutamicum LP917, respectively. Compared with the strain LP917, the growth of both lysine riboswitch-gltA mutants was slower, suggesting a reduced TCA cycle activity. The lysine production was 63% higher in the mutant ECRS-gltA and 38% higher in the mutant BSRS-gltA, indicating a higher metabolic flux into the lysine synthesis pathway. This is the first report on using an amino acid riboswitch for improvement of lysine biosynthesis. The lysine riboswitches can be easily adapted to dynamically control other essential but competing metabolic pathways or even be engineered as an "on-switch" to enhance the metabolic fluxes of desired metabolic pathways.

  2. Elucidating the effects of arginine and lysine on a monoclonal antibody C-terminal lysine variation in CHO cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xintao; Tang, Hongping; Sun, Ya-Ting; Liu, Xuping; Tan, Wen-Song; Fan, Li

    2015-08-01

    C-terminal lysine variants are commonly observed in monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and found sensitive to process conditions, especially specific components in culture medium. The potential roles of media arginine (Arg) and lysine (Lys) in mAb heavy chain C-terminal lysine processing were investigated by monitoring the lysine variant levels under various Arg and Lys concentrations. Both Arg and Lys were found to significantly affect lysine variant level. Specifically, lysine variant level increased from 18.7 to 31.8 % when Arg and Lys concentrations were increased from 2 to 10 mM. Since heterogeneity of C-terminal lysine residues is due to the varying degree of proteolysis by basic carboxypeptidases (Cps), enzyme (basic Cps) level, pH conditions, and product (Arg and Lys) inhibition, which potentially affect the enzymatic reaction, were investigated under various Arg and Lys conditions. Enzyme level and pH conditions were found not to account for the different lysine variant levels, which was evident from the minimal variation in transcription level and intracellular pH. On the other hand, product inhibition effect of Arg and Lys on basic Cps was evident from the notable intracellular and extracellular Arg and Lys concentrations comparable with Ki values (inhibition constant) of basic Cps and further confirmed by cell-free assays. Additionally, a kinetic study of lysine variant level during the cell culture process enabled further characterization of the C-terminal lysine processing.

  3. Normal force controlled rheology applied to agar gelation

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Bosi; Divoux, Thibaut; Snabre, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    A wide range of thermoreversible gels are prepared by cooling down to ambient temperature hot aqueous polymer solutions. During the sol-gel transition, such materials may experience a volume contraction which is traditionally overlooked as rheological measurements are usually performed in geometries of constant volume. In this article, we revisit the formation of 1.5\\% wt. agar gels through a series of benchmark rheological experiments performed with a plate-plate geometry. We demonstrate on ...

  4. Use of electron beam on aflatoxins degradation in coconut agar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogovschi, Vladimir D.; Nunes, Thaise C.F.; Villavicencio, Anna L.C.H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: vrogovschi@ipen.br; Aquino, Simone; Goncalez, Edlayne [Instituto Biologico (IB-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Correa, Benedito [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biomedicas

    2009-07-01

    The fungi Aspergillus flavus are capable of producing toxic metabolites, such as aflatoxin, that is one of the most important human carcinogens, according to the 'International Agency for Research on Cancer'. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of electron beam irradiation on degradation of aflatoxin B1 present in laboratorial residues with a dose of 0 kGy and 5.0 kGy. The fungi were cultivated in potato dextrose agar (PDA) for 7 days and transferred to a coconut agar medium, incubated at a temperature of 25 deg C for 14 days to produce the laboratorial wastes (coconut agar) containing aflatoxins. The samples were conditioned in petri dish for radiation treatment of contaminated material and processed in the Electron Accelerator with 0 kGy and 5.0 kGy. Aflatoxin B{sub 1} was extracted with chloroform and separated on a thin layer chromatography plate (TLC) with chloroform: acetone (9:1). All the control and irradiated samples were analyzed in a Shimadzu Densitometer. The detection limit of this methodology is 0.1{mu}g kg{sup -1}. The results indicate that the irradiated samples had a reduction of 75.49 % in the analyzed dose. (author)

  5. Methods for identifying lipoxygenase producing microorganisms on agar plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyyssölä, Antti; Heshof, Ruud; Haarmann, Thomas; Eidner, Jasmin; Westerholm-Parvinen, Ann; Langfelder, Kim; Kruus, Kristiina; de Graaff, Leo; Buchert, Johanna

    2012-03-26

    Plate assays for lipoxygenase producing microorganisms on agar plates have been developed. Both potassium iodide-starch and indamine dye formation methods were effective for detecting soybean lipoxygenase activity on agar plates. A positive result was also achieved using the β-carotene bleaching method, but the sensitivity of this method was lower than the other two methods. The potassium iodide-starch and indamine dye formation methods were also applied for detecting lipoxygenase production by Trichoderma reesei and Pichia pastoris transformants expressing the lipoxygenase gene of the fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis. In both cases lipoxygenase production in the transformants could be identified. For detection of the G. graminis lipoxygenase produced by Aspergillus nidulans the potassium iodide-starch method was successful. When Escherichia coli was grown on agar and soybean lipoxygenase was applied on the culture lipoxygenase activity could clearly be detected by the indamine dye formation method. This suggests that the method has potential for screening of metagenomic libraries in E. coli for lipoxygenase activity.

  6. Individual based simulations of bacterial growth on agar plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginovart, M.; López, D.; Valls, J.; Silbert, M.

    2002-03-01

    The individual based simulator, INDividual DIScrete SIMulations (INDISIM) has been used to study the behaviour of the growth of bacterial colonies on a finite dish. The simulations reproduce the qualitative trends of pattern formation that appear during the growth of Bacillus subtilis on an agar plate under different initial conditions of nutrient peptone concentration, the amount of agar on the plate, and the temperature. The simulations are carried out by imposing closed boundary conditions on a square lattice divided into square spatial cells. The simulator studies the temporal evolution of the bacterial population possible by setting rules of behaviour for each bacterium, such as its uptake, metabolism and reproduction, as well as rules for the medium in which the bacterial cells grow, such as concentration of nutrient particles and their diffusion. The determining factors that characterize the structure of the bacterial colony patterns in the presents simulations, are the initial concentrations of nutrient particles, that mimic the amount of peptone in the experiments, and the set of values for the microscopic diffusion parameter related, in the experiments, to the amount of the agar medium.

  7. Mupirocin-mucin agar for selective enumeration of Bifidobacterium bifidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechar, Radko; Rada, Vojtech; Parafati, Lucia; Musilova, Sarka; Bunesova, Vera; Vlkova, Eva; Killer, Jiri; Mrazek, Jakub; Kmet, Vladimir; Svejstil, Roman

    2014-11-17

    Bifidobacterium bifidum is a bacterial species exclusively found in the human intestinal tract. This species is becoming increasingly popular as a probiotic organism added to lyophilized products. In this study, porcine mucin was used as the sole carbon source for the selective enumeration of B. bifidum in probiotic food additives. Thirty-six bifidobacterial strains were cultivated in broth with mucin. Only 13 strains of B. bifidum utilized the mucin to produce acids. B. bifidum was selectively enumerated in eight probiotic food supplements using agar (MM agar) containing mupirocin (100 mg/L) and mucin (20 g/L) as the sole carbon source. MM agar was fully selective if the B. bifidum species was presented together with Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, Bifidobacterium breve, and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum species and with lactic acid bacteria (lactobacilli, streptococci). Isolated strains of B. bifidum were identified using biochemical, PCR, MALDI-TOF procedures and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The novel selective medium was also suitable for the isolation of B. bifidum strains from human fecal samples.

  8. Antimicrobial activity of chicken NK-lysin against Eimeria sporozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yeong H; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Siragusa, Gregory R; Bannerman, Douglas D; Lillehoj, Erik P

    2008-06-01

    NK-lysin is an antimicrobial and antitumor polypeptide that is considered to play an important role in innate immunity. Chicken NK-lysin is a member of the saposin-like protein family and exhibits potent antitumor cell activity. To evaluate the antimicrobial properties of chicken NK-lysin, we examined its ability to reduce the viability of various bacterial strains and two species of Eimeria parasites. Culture supernatants from COS7 cells transfected with a chicken NK-lysin cDNA and His-tagged purified NK-lysin from the transfected cells both showed high cytotoxic activity against Eimeria acervulina and Eimeria maxima sporozoites. In contrast, no bactericidal activity was observed. Further studies using synthetic peptides derived from NK-lysin may be useful for pharmaceutical and agricultural uses in the food animal industry.

  9. An update on histone lysine methylation in plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Yu; Zhongyuan Bu; Wen-Hui Shen; Aiwu Dong

    2009-01-01

    Histone methylation plays crucial roles in epigenetic regulation.The SET domain proteins are now recognized as generally having methyltransferase activity targeted to specific lysine residues of histones.The enzymes and their specific histone lysine methylation have enormous impacts on the regulation of chromatin structure and function.In this review,we discuss recent advances made on histone lysine methylations and their diverse functions in plant growth and development.

  10. Global analysis of lysine acetylation in strawberry leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianping eFang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Protein lysine acetylation is a reversible and dynamic post-translational modification. It plays an important role in regulating diverse cellular processes including chromatin dynamic, metabolic pathways and transcription in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Although studies of lysine acetylome in plants have been reported, the throughput was not high enough, hindering the deep understanding of lysine acetylation in plant physiology and pathology. In this study, taking advantages of anti-acetyllysine-based enrichment and high-sensitive-mass spectrometer, we applied an integrated proteomic approach to comprehensively investigate lysine acetylome in strawberry. In total, we identified 1392 acetylation sites in 684 proteins, representing the largest dataset of acetylome in plants to date. To reveal the functional impacts of lysine acetylation in strawberry, intensive bioinformatic analysis was performed. The results significantly expanded our current understanding of plant acetylome and demonstrated that lysine acetylation is involved in multiple cellular metabolism and cellular processes. More interestingly, nearly 50% of all acetylated proteins identified in this work were localized in chloroplast and the vital role of lysine acetylation in photosynthesis was also revealed. Taken together, this study not only established the most extensive lysine acetylome in plants to date, but also systematically suggests the significant and unique roles of lysine acetylation in plants.

  11. Histone H4 Lysine 20 methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Stine; Schotta, Gunnar; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2013-01-01

    of histones have emerged as key regulators of genomic integrity. Intense research during the past few years has revealed histone H4 lysine 20 methylation (H4K20me) as critically important for the biological processes that ensure genome integrity, such as DNA damage repair, DNA replication and chromatin...... instability, demonstrating the important functions of H4K20 methylation in genome maintenance. In this review, we explain molecular mechanisms underlying these defects and discuss novel ideas for furthering our understanding of genome maintenance in higher eukaryotes....

  12. Optimization of lysine metabolism in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rytter, Jakob Vang

    the project intends to eliminate. PGI catalyzes the conversion of alpha-D-glucose-6-phosphate to fructose-6-phosphate just downstream of the branch in the glycolysis, but it also catalyzes the reverse reaction. It is unknown whether up- or down-regulation of the pgi is required to increase the flux through......, and increased NADPH availability is therefore a potential way to enhance lysine production. The generation of NADPH is mainly located in the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Using the genome scale model the phosphoglucoisomerase enzyme (PGI) has been identified as a possible bottleneck in the metabolism, which...

  13. Improved toluidine blue-DNA agar for detection of DNA hydrolysis by campylobacters.

    OpenAIRE

    Lior, H.; Patel, A.

    1987-01-01

    Our improved toluidine blue-DNA agar was compared with methyl green DNase test agar for the detection of DNA hydrolysis by campylobacters. The toluidine blue-DNA agar gave clear-cut positive and negative reactions with campylobacter strains belonging to several species.

  14. Development of an eco-friendly agar extraction technique from the red seaweed Gracilaria lemaneiformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiyan; Yu, Xingju; Jin, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Yuanling

    2008-05-01

    The red seaweed, Gracilaria lemaneiformis growing as an aquaculture bioremediator along the coasts of Liaodong Peninsula, China, was investigated for the agar production. An eco-friendly method called agar photobleaching extraction process was developed for the benefit of workers' health and safety of the environment. The native agar (NA), alkali-modified agar (AA), chemical-bleached agar (CA) and photobleached agar (PA), which were extracted using different processes, were evaluated for their physical and chemical properties. The PA showed most desirable performances in terms of gel strength, gelling temperature, sulfate content and 3,6-anhydro-l-galactose content. Among the different processed agars, PA gel strength was 1913 g/cm2, the highest among the different processed agars, which increased 8.6% on the basis of the AA. Further we applied this new technique to extract agars from Gracilaria asiatica, and similar results were obtained with that of G. lemaneiformis. This indicates that the agar photobleaching extraction process is a feasible method for Gracilaria species and has a potential application. During the whole agar photobleaching extraction process the pigment content of G. lemaneiformis declined gradually and the TOC concentration in photobleaching solution increased along with the increase in the irradiation time. The mechanism of agar photobleaching could be elucidated by the photolysis theory.

  15. NMR spectroscopy study of agar-based polymers electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattos, R.I.; Tambelli, C.E. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Pirassununga, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Zootecnia e Engenharia de Alimentos; Raphael, E. [Universidade Federal de Sao Joao del-Rey (UFSJ), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Naturais; Silva, I.D.A.; Magon, C.J.; Donoso, J.P. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IFSC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2012-07-01

    Full text: This communication presents the results of preparation and characterization of transparent films obtained from agar and acetic acid. The films were characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The film formed by agar (Sigma Aldrich) was dispersed in water and kept under stirring and heating at 100 deg C. Next, glycerol, formaldehyde and different quantities of acetic acid (25 and 50 wt%) were added to this solution. The obtained solution was placed on a glass plate and left to dry for 48 hours in oven at 50 deg C to obtain the films, which were kept under vacuum before characterization. The ionic conductivity of the films display an Arrhenius behavior with activation energy E{sub a} = 78 (25 wt% of acetic acid) and E{sub a} = 87 kJ/mol (50 wt% of acetic acid). The conductivity values were 3:0 X 10{sup -6} and 1:2 X 10{sup -4} S/cm at room temperature and 4:4 X 10{sup -4} and 1:5 X 10{sup -3}S/cm at 70 deg C, for the 25 and 50 wt% of acetic acid respectively. To investigate the mechanism of protonic conduction in the polymer proton conductor proton NMR measurements were performed in the temperature range 200-370 K. The {sup 1}H-NMR results exhibit the qualitative feature associated with the proton mobility, namely the presence of well defined {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation maxima at 300 K. Activation energy of the order of 40 kJ/mol was obtained from the {sup 1}H-NMR line narrowing data. The ionic conductivity of the film combined with their transparency, flexibility, homogeneity and good adhesion to the glasses or metals indicate that agar-based SPEs are promising materials for used on optoelectronic applications. (author)

  16. File list: Oth.Unc.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Unc.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Unclassified ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Unc.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.Pan.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Pan.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Pancreas http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Pan.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.Plc.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Plc.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Placenta http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Plc.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.Unc.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Unc.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Unclassified ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Unc.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.Unc.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Unc.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Unclassified ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Unc.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Oth.Pan.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Pan.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Pancreas http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Pan.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.Plc.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Plc.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Placenta http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Plc.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.Prs.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Prs.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Prostate http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Prs.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.Prs.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Prs.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Prostate http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Prs.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Oth.Prs.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Prs.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Prostate http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Prs.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.Plc.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Plc.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Placenta http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Plc.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Oth.Pan.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Pan.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Pancreas http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Pan.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Oth.Plc.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Plc.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Placenta http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Plc.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.Prs.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Prs.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Prostate http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Prs.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.Unc.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Unc.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Unclassified ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Unc.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  11. Modelling Fractal Growth of Bacillus subtilis on Agar Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogedby, Hans C.

    1991-02-01

    The observed fractal growth of a bacterial colony of Bacillus subtilis on agar plates is simulated by a simple computer model in two dimensions. Growth morphologies are shown and the fractal dimension is computed. The concentration of nutrients and the time scale ratio of bacterial multiplication and nutrient diffusion are the variable parameters in the model. Fractal growth is observed in the simulations for moderate concentrations and time scale ratios. The simulated morphologies are similar to the ones grown in the biological experiment. The phenomenon is analogous to the fractal morphologies of lipid layers grown on a water surface.

  12. Modeling Surface Growth of Escherichia coli on Agar Plates

    OpenAIRE

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Morozumi, Satoshi

    2005-01-01

    Surface growth of Escherichia coli cells on a membrane filter placed on a nutrient agar plate under various conditions was studied with a mathematical model. The surface growth of bacterial cells showed a sigmoidal curve with time on a semilogarithmic plot. To describe it, a new logistic model that we presented earlier (H. Fujikawa et al., Food Microbiol. 21:501-509, 2004) was modified. Growth curves at various constant temperatures (10 to 34°C) were successfully described with the modified m...

  13. Quantification of Nε-(2-Furoylmethyl)-L-lysine (furosine), Nε-(Carboxymethyl)-L-lysine (CML), Nε-(Carboxyethyl)-L-lysine (CEL) and total lysine through stable isotope dilution assay and tandem mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troise, A.D.; Fiore, A.; Wiltafsky, M.; Fogliano, V.

    2015-01-01

    The control of Maillard reaction (MR) is a key point to ensure processed foods quality. Due to the presence of a primary amino group on its side chain, lysine is particularly prone to chemical modifications with the formation of Amadori products (AP), Nε-(Carboxymethyl)-L-lysine (CML),

  14. STUDY OF LYSINE AND ALANINE DELIVERANCE THROUGH POLYPYRROLE MEMBRANE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhitasari Suratman

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Electropolymerization processes of pyrrole and the usage of polypyrrole membrane as lysine and alanine deliverance have been studied by cyclic voltammetry technique. Polypyrrole membrane was prepared by electropolymerization processes of pyrrole in water based solvent containing sodium perchlorate as supporting electrolyte. Electropolymerization processes were carried out within potential range of 0-1100 mV vs Ag/AgCl reference electrode and at the scanning rate of 100 mV/s. In this study, lysine and alanine have been used as molecules which could easily be loaded on and released from polypyrrole membrane. The presence of lysine or alanine during electropolymerization process reduced the rate of electropolymerization of polypyrrole. In lysine or alanine transfer processes into polypyrrole membrane, the interaction between polypyrrole and lysine or alanine showed by the curve of E½ oxidation in respect of - log C. It proved that the E½ oxidation shifted to more positive potential showed by the increasing of concentration of lysine or alanine. Beside that, voltammetric responses of lysine and alanine transfered into polypyrrole membrane were found to be Nernstian. The results indicated that polypyrrole could be used as a sensor of lysine and alanine.   Keywords: Electropolymerization, polypyrrole membrane, voltammetry technique

  15. Digestible lysine levels in diets supplemented with ractopamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelar de Oliveira Souza

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In order evaluate digestible lysine levels in diets supplemented with 20 ppm of ractopamine on the performance and carcass traits, 64 barrows with high genetic potential at finishing phase were allotted in a completely randomized block design with four digestible lysine levels (0.80, 0.90, 1.00, and 1.10%, eight replicates and two pigs per experimental unit. Initial body weight and pigs' kinship were used as criteria in the blocks formation. Diets were mainly composed of corn and soybean meal supplemented with minerals, vitamins and amino acids to meet pigs' nutritional requirements at the finishing phase, except for digestible lysine. No effect of digestible lysine levels was observed in animal performance. The digestible lysine intake increased linearly by increasing the levels of digestible lysine in the diets. Carcass traits were not influenced by the dietary levels of digestible lysine. The level of 0.80% of digestible lysine in diets supplemented with 20 ppm ractopamine meets the nutritional requirements of castrated male pigs during the finishing phase.

  16. The Tale of Protein Lysine Acetylation in the Cytoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Sadoul

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Reversible posttranslational modification of internal lysines in many cellular or viral proteins is now emerging as part of critical signalling processes controlling a variety of cellular functions beyond chromatin and transcription. This paper aims at demonstrating the role of lysine acetylation in the cytoplasm driving and coordinating key events such as cytoskeleton dynamics, intracellular trafficking, vesicle fusion, metabolism, and stress response.

  17. Bioavailability of lysine in heat-treated foods and feedstuffs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McArtney Rutherfurd, S.

    2010-01-01

    During the processing of foodstuffs, lysine can react with other compounds present to form nutritionally unavailable derivatives, the most common example of which are Maillard products. Maillard products can cause serious problems when determining the available lysine content of processed foods or f

  18. Bioavailability of lysine in heat-treated foods and feedstuffs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McArtney Rutherfurd, S.

    2010-01-01

    During the processing of foodstuffs, lysine can react with other compounds present to form nutritionally unavailable derivatives, the most common example of which are Maillard products. Maillard products can cause serious problems when determining the available lysine content of processed foods or

  19. Creative lysins: Listeria and the engineering of antimicrobial enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tassell, Maxwell L; Angela Daum, M; Kim, Jun-Seob; Miller, Michael J

    2016-02-01

    Cell wall lytic enzymes have been of increasing interest as antimicrobials for targeting Gram-positive spoilage and pathogenic bacteria, largely due to the development of strains resistant to antibiotics and bacteriophage therapy. Such lysins show considerable promise against Listeria monocytogenes, a primary concern in food-processing environments, but there is room for improvement via protein engineering. Advances in antilisterial applications could benefit from recent developments in lysin biotechnology that have largely targeted other organisms. Herein we present various considerations for the future development of lysins, including environmental factors, cell physiology concerns, and dynamics of protein architecture. Our goal is to review key developments in lysin biotechnology to provide a contextual framework for the current models of lysin-cell interactions and highlight key considerations for the characterization and design of novel lytic enzymes.

  20. Karakterisasi Enzim Selulase PMP 0126Y dari Limbah Pengolahan Agar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekowati Chasanah

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hasil penapisan bakteri penghasil enzim selulase terdahulu mendapatkan isolat PMP 0126 sebagai isolat yang berpotensi yang diisolasi dari limbah pengolahan agar skala UKM di Pamengpeuk, Garut. Isolat tersebut ternyata belum merupakan koloni tunggal, terdiri dari 2 isolat bakteri yaitu PMP 0126Y dan PMP 0126W. Isolat PMP 0126Y memiliki kemampuan mendegradasi selulosa yang lebih besar dibanding PMP 0126W. Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah untuk memproduksi dan mengkarakterisasi enzim selulase dari isolat PMP 0126Y, serta mengidentifikasi isolat tersebut. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa enzim selulase diproduksi optimum pada hari ke-3 kultivasi menggunakan medium cair berisi  CMC 1%. Enzim kasar yang diperoleh dapat bekerja optimal pada suhu 30 °C dan pH 5, dapat ditingkatkan aktivitasnya dengan ion logam dalam bentuk garam CaCl2 dan ZnCl2 5 mM.. Pemurnian dengan sistem penukar anion dapat meningkatkan aktivitas enzim 15x dengan perolehan 20%. Dari hasil SDS-PAGE terlihat bahwa ada 3 selulase dengan perkiraan berat molekul 39, 30, dan 14 kDa. Enzim kasar ini memiliki kemampuan menghidrolisis limbah pengolahan agar sebaik ketika memecah substrat CMC,  yang mengindikasikan bahwa enzim dari isolat ini berpotensi sebagai kandidat agen sakarifikasi pada produksi bioetanol. Identifikasi bakteri dengan 16S-rDNA menunjukkan bahwa isolat ini memiliki kemiripan 96% dengan bakteri Chryseobacterium indologenes McR-1.

  1. [Clinical utility of Pourmedia GBS agar on screening for vaginal colonization of Group B Streptococcus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, Mitsunori; Nagasaki, Hiromi; Tasaki, Megumi; Kamiyama, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) are normal flora of the vagina and intestinal, but if the pregnant woman was infected with GBS in the vagina, miscarriage or premature would occur or the newborn would be developed to severe GBS infection. It is recommended that the inspection of GBS on all pregnant women by Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology (JSOG) and Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). We examined the comparison of detection rate between Pourmedia GBS agar (Eiken Chemical Co., Ltd.) and Nissui Separated Plate Sheep Blood Agar/BTB Lactose Agar medium (Nissui Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd.) on 112 sample. The positive rate of Pourmedia GBS agar was 21.4% (24/112 samples), Whereas Nissui Separated Plate Sheep Blood Agar/BTB Lactose Agar medium was 17.8% (20/112 samples). It was found that the detection rate was improved by using Pourmedia GBS agar on GBS screening test of vaginal swab.

  2. Application of agar liquid-gel transition in cultivation and harvesting of microalgae for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinod; Nanda, Manisha; Verma, Monu

    2017-06-17

    In order to increase microalgal biomass productivity efficient cultivation and harvesting methods are needed against the available traditional methods. The present study focuses on the same by harvesting microalgae using agar gel. Agar medium containing bold's basal medium (BBM) undergoes a thermoreversible gel transition. As compared to the traditional protocols, this gel is used to cultivate microalgae without even affecting the total productivity. To develop the gel for microalgae cultivation, agar was boiled in BBM. Then the agar was cooled to 35°C and microalgae culture was added to it. After seeding the microalgae the temperature of the agar was further decreased by 10°C to induce gelation. Instead of isolated cells microalgae were grown in clusters within the agar gel. Microalgal clusters gravimetrically settle at the bottom within 2h. In this method agar can be reused. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Candida spp. morphotype differentiation on Sabouraud-Triphenyltetrazolium-Agar (STTZ-Agar) under three different experimental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, G; Marinelli, A; Galdiero, E; Arnese, A; Di Onofrio, V; Lucariello, A; Marinelli, P

    2004-04-01

    One hundred and thirty-two strains of Candida spp. were cultured on STTZ-Agar at 37 degrees C for 6 days and at 25 degrees C for 6 and 21 days to determine the culture conditions that would ensure maximum reproducibility in the discrimination of the strains of the same species. Standardization is of utmost importance, as varying experimental conditions can alter the results of the tests. Further studies are needed also implementing molecular tests to establish possible relationships between morphotype, genotype and virulence.

  4. Comparative study of bio-ethanol production from mahula (Madhuca latifolia L.) flowers by Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells immobilized in agar agar and Ca-alginate matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behera, Shuvashish; Mohanty, Rama Chandra [Department of Botany, Utkal University, Vani Vihar, Bhubaneswar 751004, Orissa (India); Kar, Shaktimay; Ray, Ramesh Chandra [Microbiology Laboratory, Central Tuber Crops Research Institute (Regional Centre), Bhubaneswar 751019, Orissa (India)

    2010-01-15

    Batch fermentation of mahula (Madhuca latifolia L., a tree commonly found in tropical rain forest) flowers was carried out using immobilized cells (in agar agar and calcium alginate) and free cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The ethanol yields were 151.2, 154.5 and 149.1 g kg{sup -1} flowers using immobilized (in agar agar and calcium alginate) and free cells, respectively. Cell entrapment in calcium alginate was found to be marginally superior to those in agar agar (2.2% more) as well as over free cell (3.5% more) as regard to ethanol yield from mahula flowers is concerned. Further, the immobilized cells were physiologically active at least for three cycles [150.6, 148.5 and 146.5 g kg{sup -1} (agar agar) and 152.8, 151.5 and 149.5 g kg{sup -1} flowers (calcium alginate) for first, second and third cycle, respectively] of ethanol fermentation without apparently lowering the productivity. Mahula flowers, a renewable, non-food-grade cheap carbohydrate substrate from non-agricultural environment such as forest can serve as an alternative to food grade sugar/starchy crops such as maize, sugarcane for bio-ethanol production. (author)

  5. Lysine Acetylation and Deacetylation in Brain Development and Neuropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Tapias

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic development is critical for the final functionality and maintenance of the adult brain. Brain development is tightly regulated by intracellular and extracellular signaling. Lysine acetylation and deacetylation are posttranslational modifications that are able to link extracellular signals to intracellular responses. A wealth of evidence indicates that lysine acetylation and deacetylation are critical for brain development and functionality. Indeed, mutations of the enzymes and cofactors responsible for these processes are often associated with neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Lysine acetylation and deacetylation are involved in all levels of brain development, starting from neuroprogenitor survival and proliferation, cell fate decisions, neuronal maturation, migration, and synaptogenesis, as well as differentiation and maturation of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, to the establishment of neuronal circuits. Hence, fluctuations in the balance between lysine acetylation and deacetylation contribute to the final shape and performance of the brain. In this review, we summarize the current basic knowledge on the specific roles of lysine acetyltransferase (KAT and lysine deacetylase (KDAC complexes in brain development and the different neurodevelopmental disorders that are associated with dysfunctional lysine (deacetylation machineries.

  6. Molecular and structural insight into lysine selection on substrate and ubiquitin lysine 48 by the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suryadinata, Randy; Holien, Jessica K; Yang, George

    2013-01-01

    The attachment of ubiquitin (Ub) to lysines on substrates or itself by ubiquitin-conjugating (E2) and ubiquitin ligase (E3) enzymes results in protein ubiquitination. Lysine selection is important for generating diverse substrate-Ub structures and targeting proteins to different fates; however......, the mechanisms of lysine selection are not clearly understood. The positioning of lysine(s) toward the E2/E3 active site and residues proximal to lysines are critical in their selection. We investigated determinants of lysine specificity of the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34, toward substrate and Ub lysines....... Evaluation of the relative importance of different residues positioned -2, -1, +1 and +2 toward ubiquitination of its substrate, Sic1, on lysine 50 showed that charged residues in the -1 and -2 positions negatively impact on ubiquitination. Modeling suggests that charged residues at these positions alter...

  7. Evaluation of eight agar media for the isolation of shiga toxin-Producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Alexander; Huszczynski, George; Gauthier, Martine; Blais, Burton

    2014-01-01

    The growth characteristics of 96 shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains representing 36 different O-types (including priority O types O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145 and O157) on commercial and in-house agar media were studied. The ability of the strains to grow on agar media with varying selective supplement formulations was evaluated using MacConkey Agar (MAC); Rainbow® Agar O157 (RBA); Rainbow® Agar O157 with manufacturer-recommended selective supplements (RBA-NT); Rainbow® Agar O157 with USDA-recommended selective supplements (RBA-USDA); CHROMagar STEC™ (CH STEC); Tryptone Bile agar containing cefixime and tellurite (TBA-CT); Tryptone Bile agar containing cefixime, tellurite, eosin and methylene blue (TBA-EM); and VTEC agar. All of the strains were able to grow on MAC, RBA and VTEC agar, whereas a number of strains (including some non-O157 priority O types) were unable to grow on the highly selective media CH STEC, RBA-NT, RBA-USDA, TBA-EM and TBA-CT. Only RBA-NT and CH STEC exhibited significant inhibition of background flora from ground beef enrichment. Significant inhibition of background flora from beef trim enrichment was observed with RBA-NT, RBA-USDA, CH STEC, TBA-EM and VTEC agar. With exception of E. coli O157, several different colony morphologies were observed on the differential plating media among strains of the same O type, indicating that this colony morphology is not a reliable means of identifying target STEC. These results suggest that an approach to maximize the recovery of target STEC from beef enrichment cultures is dual plating on lesser (RBA, MAC, VTEC agar) and more highly (RBA-NT, CH STEC) selective agars.

  8. Surface migration of Staphylococcus xylosus on low-agar media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dordet-Frisoni, Emilie; Gaillard-Martinie, Brigitte; Talon, Régine; Leroy, Sabine

    2008-05-01

    Staphylococcus xylosus is a commensal species commonly found on the skin of mammals, but also currently used as starter culture for meat fermentation. Most strains of this species colonize by forming a biofilm on abiotic surfaces. We show here that the majority of S. xylosus strains also exhibit extensive colony spreading on the surface of soft agar media. This phenomenon seemed to be independent of biofilm-forming ability. It occurred in different culture media and was dependent on temperature. Formation of a giant S. xylosus colony did not involve a biosurfactant. Microscopic observation showed that the front of the giant colony comprised a single layer of spacing cells with more packed cells in the median area. Supplementation of the soft media with DNase I increased S. xylosus colony spreading, indicating that extracellular DNA may be involved in limiting the phenomenon. The ability of S. xylosus to spread on semi-solid surfaces may constitute an advantage for surface colonization.

  9. Growth of strontium oxalate crystals in agar–agar gel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P V Dalal; K B Saraf

    2011-04-01

    Single crystals of strontium oxalate have been grown by using strontium chloride and oxalic acid in agar–agar gel media at ambient temperature. Different methods for growing crystals were adopted. The optimum conditions were employed in each method by varying concentration of gel and reactants, and gel setting time etc. Transparent prismatic bi-pyramidal platy-shaped and spherulite crystals were obtained in various methods. The grown crystals were characterized with the help of FT–IR studies and monoclinic system of crystals were supported with lattice parameters = 9.67628 Å, = 6.7175 Å, = 8.6812 Å, = 113.566°, and = 521.84 Å3 calculated from X-ray diffractogram.

  10. Normal force controlled rheology applied to agar gelation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Bosi; Divoux, Thibaut; Snabre, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    A wide range of thermoreversible gels are prepared by cooling down to ambient temperature hot aqueous polymer solutions. During the sol-gel transition, such materials may experience a volume contraction which is traditionally overlooked as rheological measurements are usually performed in geometries of constant volume. In this article, we revisit the formation of 1.5\\% wt. agar gels through a series of benchmark rheological experiments performed with a plate-plate geometry. We demonstrate on that particular gel of polysaccharides that the contraction associated with the sol/gel transition cannot be neglected. Indeed, imposing a constant gap width during the gelation results in the strain hardening of the sample, as evidenced by the large negative normal force that develops. Such hardening leads to the slow drift in time of the gel elastic modulus $G'$ towards ever larger values, and thus to an erroneous estimate of $G'$. As an alternative, we show that imposing a constant normal force equals to zero during the gelation, instead of a constant gap width, suppresses the hardening as the decrease of the gap compensates for the sample contraction. Using normal force controlled rheology, we then investigate the impact of thermal history on 1.5\\% wt. agar gels. We show that neither the value of the cooling rate, nor the introduction of a constant temperature stage during the cooling process influence the gel elastic properties. Instead, $G'$ only depends on the terminal temperature reached at the end of the cooling ramp, as confirmed by direct imaging of the gel microstructure by cryoelectron microscopy. The present work offers an extensive review of the technical difficulties associated with the rheology of hydrogels and paves the way for a systematic use of normal force controlled rheology to monitor non-isochoric processes.

  11. HDAC inhibitors induce global changes in histone lysine and arginine methylation and alter expression of lysine demethylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillico, Ryan; Sobral, Marina Gomez; Stesco, Nicholas; Lakowski, Ted M

    2016-02-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are cancer treatments that inhibit the removal of the epigenetic modification acetyllysine on histones, resulting in altered gene expression. Such changes in expression may influence other histone epigenetic modifications. We describe a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method to quantify lysine acetylation and methylation and arginine methylation on histones extracted from cultured cells treated with HDAC inhibitors. The HDAC inhibitors vorinostat, mocetinostat and entinostat induced 400-600% hyperacetylation in HEK 293 and K562 cells. All HDAC inhibitors decreased histone methylarginines in HEK 293 cells but entinostat produced dose dependent reductions in asymmetric dimethylarginine, not observed in K562 cells. Vorinostat produced increases in histone lysine methylation and decreased expression of some lysine demethylases (KDM), measured by quantitative PCR. Entinostat had variable effects on lysine methylation and decreased expression of some KDM while increasing expression of others. Mocetinostat produced dose dependent increases in histone lysine methylation by LC-MS/MS. This was corroborated with a multiplex colorimetric assay showing increases in histone H3 lysine 4, 9, 27, 36 and 79 methylation. Increases in lysine methylation were correlated with dose dependent decreases in the expression of seven KDM. Mocetinostat functions as an HDAC inhibitor and a de facto KDM inhibitor.

  12. Physicochemical properties of biodegradable polyvinyl alcohol-agar films from the red algae Hydropuntia cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madera-Santana, Tomás J; Robledo, Daniel; Freile-Pelegrín, Yolanda

    2011-08-01

    Agar obtained from the red alga Hydropuntia cornea was blended with polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) in order to produce biodegradable films. In this study, we compare the properties of biopolymeric films formulated with agars extracted from H. cornea collected at different seasons (rainy and dry) in the Gulf of Mexico coast and PVOH as synthetic matrix. The films were prepared at different agar contents (0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100%) and their optical, mechanical, thermal, and morphological properties analyzed. The tensile strength of PVOH-agar films increased when agar content was augmented. The formulation with 50% agar from rainy season (RS) had a significant higher tensile strength when compared to those from dry season (DS; p biodegradable packaging industry.

  13. Preparation and Characterization of Chitosan/Agar Blended Films: Part 2. Thermal, Mechanical, and Surface Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esam A. Elhefian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan/agar (CS/AG films were prepared by blending different proportions of chitosan and agar (considering chitosan as the major component in solution forms. The thermal stability of the blended films was studied using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA. It was revealed that chitosan and agar form a compatible blend. Studying the mechanical properties of the films showed a decrease in the tensile strength and elongation at break with increasing agar content. Blending of agar with chitosan at all proportions was found to form hydrogel films with enhanced swelling compared to the pure chitosan one. Static water contact angle measurements confirmed the increasing affinity of the blended films towards water suggesting that blending of agar with chitosan improves the wettability of the obtained films.

  14. EVALUACIÓN POR MÉTODO ECOMÉTRICO DE AGAR OBTENIDO DE ALGAS ROJAS COLOMBIANAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Villalobos

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the productivity on agar-agar of two species of red algae of thegenera Gracilaria belonging from the Colombiam Caribean coast (G. cylindrica and G. mammillarisobtained in laboratory. Productivity of culture media elaborated with base agar - agar was determinedusing the ecometric method with 20 different bacterial species. Results obtained from ICA and ICRshowed that agar extracted from Gracilaria cylindrica and Gracillaria mammillaris are equally productive,this shows that both species can be used for agar production. For better results, it is still necessary tooptimize extraction processes and purification of agar in both species of algae.

  15. protein, tryptophan and lysine contents in quality protien maize ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    for human nutrition recommended by Food and Agriculture Organization in ... METHODS: The protein, tryptophan and lysine contents of improved ... This study revealed the fact that genetic factor influences the protein, ... Ethiop J Health Sci.

  16. A modified pork plasma agar for the enumeration of Staphylococcus aureus in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauschild, A H; Park, C E; Hilsheimer, R

    1979-09-01

    The coagulase reaction of Staphylococcus aureus on the PPSA (pork plasma for S. aureus) agar of Devoyod et al. was found to be fibrinogen-deficient. By including bovine fibrinogen (BFG) in the medium, the fibrin halos around S. aureus colonies became more distinct, preparations of pork plasma previously unacceptable for inclusion in the original PPSA agar were performing well, and the amount of pork plasma required in PPSA agar could be reduced by nearly 90%. In the modified medium, designated PPF (pork plasma fibrinogen) agar, the agar base (Baird-Parker agar without egg yolk) was unchanged. After surface plating, the base was covered with 8 mL of a modified overpour agar: 2.5% pork plasma, 0.38% BFG, and 0.0015% soy trypsin inhibitor in 0.7% Bacto agar. Most S. aureus strains could be enumerated after 24 h of incubation at 35 degrees C; the others required 44 h. Without soy trypsin inhibitor, a number of strains showed considerable fibrinolysis between 24 and 44 h of growth; this activity was neutralized by the inhibitor. The S. aureus counts of 27 food samples on PPF agar were essentially the same as the confirmed S. aureus counts obtained by the Baird-Parker method.

  17. Residual Agar Determination in Bacterial Spores by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, Karen L.; Colburn, Heather A.; Wunschel, David S.; Petersen, Catherine E.; Jarman, Kristin H.; Valentine, Nancy B.

    2010-02-15

    Presented here is an analytical method to detect residual agar from a bacterial spore sample as an indication of culturing on an agar plate. This method is based on the resolubilization of agar polysaccharide from a bacterial spore sample, enzymatic digestion, followed by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MSn) analysis for detection of a specific agar fragment ion. A range of Bacillus species and strains were selected to demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach. The characteristic agar fragment ion was detected in the spores grown on agar that were washed from 1 to 5 times, irradiated or non-irradiated and not in the spores grown in broth. A sample containing approximately 108 spores is currently needed for confident detection of residual agar from culture on agar plates in the presence of bacterial spores with a limit of detection of approximately 1 ppm agar spiked into a broth-grown spore sample. The results of a proficiency test with 42 blinded samples are presented demonstrating the utility of this method with no false positives and only 3 false negatives for samples that were below the detection level of the method as documented.

  18. Residual agar determination in bacterial spores by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Karen L; Colburn, Heather A; Wunschel, David S; Petersen, Catherine E; Jarman, Kristin H; Valentine, Nancy B

    2010-02-15

    Presented here is an analytical method to detect residual agar from a bacterial spore sample as an indication of culturing on an agar plate. This method is based on the resolubilization of agar polysaccharide from a bacterial spore sample, enzymatic digestion, followed by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS(n)) analysis for detection of a specific agar fragment ion. A range of Bacillus species and strains were selected to demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach. The characteristic agar fragment ion was detected in the spores grown on agar that were washed from 1 to 5 times, irradiated or nonirradiated, and not in the spores grown in broth. A sample containing approximately 10(8) spores is currently needed for confident detection of residual agar from culture on agar plates in the presence of bacterial spores with a limit of detection of approximately 1 ppm agar spiked into a broth-grown spore sample. The results of a proficiency test with 42 blinded samples are presented demonstrating the utility of this method with no false positives and only three false negatives for samples that were below the detection level of the method as documented.

  19. Digestible lysine levels in diets for laying Japanese quails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleverson Luís Nascimento Ribeiro

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to estimate the digestible lysine requirement of Japanese quails in the egg-laying phase. A total of 336 female Japanese quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica of average initial age of 207 days were distributed in a completely randomized experimental design, composed of 6 treatments (lysine levels with 7 replicates and 8 birds per experimental unit, with duration of 84 days. Experimental diets were formulated from a basal diet, with corn and soybean meal, with 2.800 kcal ME/kg and 203.70 g/kg crude protein, showing levels of 9.50; 10.00; 10.50; 11.00; 11.50; and 12.00 g/kg digestible lysine; diets remained isoprotein and isocaloric. The following variables were studied: feed intake (FI; lysine intake (LI; egg production per bird per day (EPBD; egg production per bird housed (EPBH; production of marketable eggs (PME; egg weight (EW; egg mass (EM; utilization efficiency of lysine for egg mass production (UELEM; feed conversion per mass (FCEM; feed conversion per dozen eggs (FCDZ; bird availability (BA; percentages of yolk (Y, albumen (A and shell (S; specific egg weight (SW; nitrogen ingested (NI; nitrogen excreted (NE; and nitrogen balance (NB. Significant effect was only observed for LI, EW, EM, UELEM, FCEM, Y, A and SW. The digestible lysine level estimated in diets for laying Japanese quails is 11.20 g digestible lysine/kg diet, corresponding to an average daily intake of 272.23 mg lysine.

  20. ß-Lysine discrimination by lysyl-tRNA synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilreath, Marla S; Roy, Hervé; Bullwinkle, Tammy J

    2011-01-01

    guided by the PoxA structure. A233S LysRS behaved as wild type with a-lysine, while the G469A and A233S/G469A variants decreased stable a-lysyl-adenylate formation. A233S LysRS recognized ß-lysine better than wildtype, suggesting a role for this residue in discriminating a- and ß-amino acids. Both...

  1. Maintenance requirement and deposition efficiency of lysine in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Speroni Ceron

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to determine the maintenance requirement and the deposition efficiency of lysine in growing pigs. It was used the incomplete changeover experimental design, with replicates over time. Twelve castrated pigs with average body weight (BW of 52±2 kg were kept in metabolism crates with a controlled temperature of 22ºC. The diets were formulated to supply 30, 50, 60, and 70% of the expected requirements of standardized lysine, and provided at 2.6 times the energy requirements for maintenance. The trial lasted 24 days and was divided into two periods of 12 days: seven days for animal adaptation to the diet and five days for sample collection. The increasing content of lysine in the diet did not affect dry matter intake of the pigs. The amount of nitrogen excreted was 47% of the nitrogen intake, of which 35% was excreted through feces and 65% through urine. The estimated endogenous losses of lysine were 36.4 mg kg-1 BW0.75. The maintenance requirement of lysine for pigs weighing around 50 kg is 40.4 mg kg-1 BW0.75, and the deposition efficiency of lysine is 90%.

  2. Targeting protein lysine methylation and demethylation in cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunlong He; Ilia Korboukh; Jian Jin; Jing Huang

    2012-01-01

    During the last decade,we saw an explosion of studies investigating the role of lysine methylation/demethylation of histones and non-histone proteins,such as p53,NF-kappaB,and E2F1.These ‘Ying-Yang' post-translational modifications are important to fine-tuning the activity of these proteins. Lysine methylation and demethylation are catalyzed by protein lysine methyltransferases (PKMTs) and protein lysine demethylases (PKDMs).PKMTs,PKDMs,and their substrates have been shown to play important roles in cancers.Although the underlying mechanisms of tumorigenesis are still largely unknown,growing evidence is starting to link aberrant regulation of methylation to tumorigenesis.This review focuses on summarizing the recent progress in understanding of the function of protein lysine methylation,and in the discovery of small molecule inhibitors for PKMTs and PKDMs.We also discuss the potential and the caveats of targeting protein lysine methylation for the treatment of cancer.

  3. Enzymic and chemical synthesis of epilson-N-(L-propionyl-2)-L-lysine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, M; Tanaka, M

    1978-10-01

    Pyruvate was shown to act as an oxo acid substrate in the reverse direction of saccharopine dehydrogenase [epsilon N-(L-glutaryl-2)-L-lysine: NAD oxidoreductase (L-lysine-forming)] reaction. The enzymic condensation product of lysine and pyruvate was isolated and identified as epsilon-N-(L-propionyl-2)-L-lysine by comparison with the synthetic compound. A method for the chemical preparation of diastereoisomers of epsilon-N-(propionyl-2)-L-lysine is also described.

  4. l-lysine production by Bacillus methanolicus: Genome-based mutational analysis and l-lysine secretion engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nærdal, Ingemar; Netzer, Roman; Irla, Marta; Krog, Anne; Heggeset, Tonje Marita Bjerkan; Wendisch, Volker F; Brautaset, Trygve

    2017-02-20

    Bacillus methanolicus is a methylotrophic bacterium with an increasing interest in academic research and for biotechnological applications. This bacterium was previously applied for methanol-based production of l-glutamate, l-lysine and the five-carbon diamine cadaverine by wild type, classical mutant and recombinant strains. The genomes of two different l-lysine secreting B. methanolicus classical mutant strains, NOA2#13A52-8A66 and M168-20, were sequenced. We focused on mutational mapping in genes present in l-lysine and other relevant amino acid biosynthetic pathways, as well as in the primary cell metabolism important for precursor supply. In addition to mutations in the aspartate pathway genes dapG, lysA and hom-1, new mutational target genes like alr, proA, proB1, leuC, odhA and pdhD were identified. Surprisingly, no mutations were found in the putative l-lysine transporter gene lysE(MGA3). Inspection of the wild type B. methanolicus strain PB1 genome sequence identified two homologous putative l-lysine transporter genes, lysE(PB1) and lysE2(PB1). The biological role of these putative l-lysine transporter genes, together with the heterologous l-lysine exporter gene lysE(Cg) from Corynebacterium glutamicum, were therefore investigated. Our results demonstrated that the titer of secreted l-lysine in B. methanolicus was significantly increased by overexpression of lysE(Cg) while overexpression of lysE(MGA3), lysE(PB1) and lysE2(PB1) had no measurable effect.

  5. NAS agar is more suitable than McKay agar for primary culture of Streptococcus milleri group (SMG) fastidious bacteria, S. intermedius in particular.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raclavsky, Vladislav; Novotny, Radko; Stary, Lubomir; Navratilova, Lucie; Zatloukal, Jaromir; Jakubec, Petr; Zapalka, Martin; Kopriva, Frantisek; Kolek, Vitezslav

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus milleri group (SMG) is a group of three streptococcal species (S. anginosus, intermedius and constellatus) that act as opportunist pathogens, among others in cystic fibrosis. Due to their fastidious character, they are both difficult to cultivate and to differentiate from less pathogenic streptococcal species, therefore being most probably underdiagnosed. Semi-selective McKay agar and NAS agar were developed to facilitate SMG recovery from clinical samples; however, direct comparison of recovery rates has not been published yet. We tested the performance of both media on 123 patient samples and demonstrated general superiority of NAS agar for SMG recovery during primary cultivation convincingly. This observation was also confirmed by quantitative drop tests during subculture. Despite the undisputed overall superiority of NAS agar over McKay agar, a smaller fraction of strains grew better on McKay agar. Inter-strain differences were the most probable explanation. Therefore, when economic conditions are not limiting and maximum recovery rate is desirable, both plates are advised to be used in parallel for primary cultivation of clinical samples.

  6. Metformin HCl loaded mucoadhesive agar microspheres for sustained release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khokan Bera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent past, a major interest in the control of blood sugar had been targeted to develop plenty of new formulations. The present work aims at the development of a low cost sustained release system of metformin hydrochloride embedded in microspheres of agar (Gelidium cartilagineum to overcome the frequent dosing of the drug. Models were developed with respect to controlling variables (X 1 , drug: Polymer, X 2 , surfactant concentration, and X 3 , pH of phosphate buffer. The most effective levels of parameters were found as X 1 (1 : 2, X 2 (1.25%, X 3 (phosphate buffer pH 7.4. Instrumental analysis (Fourier transforms infra-red spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, mucoadhesion study, toxicity test and in vivo study were performed with the optimized product. The best batch (A2 exhibited a high drug entrapment efficiency of 84.82 ± 1.23%, swelling index of 3.84 ± 0.38 and 86% of mucoadhesion after 12 h. The in vitro release was also sustained for more than 12 h.

  7. Heavy metal accumulation by carrageenan and agar producing algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdin, K.S. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Faculty of Biology; Bird, K.T. [North Carolina Univ., Wilmington, NC (United States). Center for Marine Science Research

    1994-09-01

    The accumulation of six heavy metals Cu, Cd, Ni, Zn, Mn and Pb was measured in living and lzophilized algal thalli. The agar producing algae were Gracilaria tikvahiae and Gelidium pusillum. The carrageenan producing macroalgae were Agardhiella subulata and the gametophyte and tetrasporophyte phases of Chondrus crispus. These produce primarily iota, kappa and lambda carrageenans, respectively. At heavy metal concentrations of 0.5 mg L{sup -1}, living thalli of Gracilaria tikvahiae generally showed the greatest amount of accumulation of the 6 heavy metals tested. The accumulation of Pb was greater in the living thalli of all four species than in the lyophilized thalli. Except for Agardhiella subulata, lyophilized thalli showed greater accumulation of Ni, Cu and Zn. There was no difference in heavy metal accumulation between living and lyophilized thalli in the accumulation of Cd. Manganese showed no accumulation at the tested concentration. There did not appear to be a relationship between algal hydrocolloid characteristics and the amounts of heavy metals accumulated. (orig.)

  8. Agar dilution method for susceptibility testing of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta C de Castillo

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available The antibiotic susceptibilities of Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates obtained from patients attending a clinic for sexually transmitted diseases in Tucumán, Argentina, were determined by the agar dilution method (MIC. 3.5% of the isolates produced ²-lactamase. A total of 96.5% of ²-lactamase negative isolates tested were susceptible to penicillin (MIC < 2 µgml-1; 14.03% of the tested isolates were resistant to tetracycline (MIC < 2 µgml-1, and 98% of the tested isolates were susceptible to spectinomycin (MIC < 64 µgml-1. The MICs for 95% of the isolates, tested for other drugs were: < 2 µgml-1 for cefoxitin, < 0.06 µgml-1 for cefotaxime, < 0.25 µgml-1 for norfloxacin, < 10 µgml-1 for cephaloridine, < 10 µgml-1 for cephalexin, and < 50 µgml-1 for kanamycin. Antibiotic resistance among N. gonorrhoeae isolates from Tucumán, Argentina, appeared to be primarily limited to penicillin and tetracycline, which has been a general use against gonorrhoeae in Tucumán since 1960. Periodic monitoring of the underlying susceptibility profiles of the N. gonorrhoeae strains prevalent in areas of frequent transmission may provide clues regarding treatment options and emerging of drug resistance.

  9. Modeling surface growth of Escherichia coli on agar plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Morozumi, Satoshi

    2005-12-01

    Surface growth of Escherichia coli cells on a membrane filter placed on a nutrient agar plate under various conditions was studied with a mathematical model. The surface growth of bacterial cells showed a sigmoidal curve with time on a semilogarithmic plot. To describe it, a new logistic model that we presented earlier (H. Fujikawa et al., Food Microbiol. 21:501-509, 2004) was modified. Growth curves at various constant temperatures (10 to 34 degrees C) were successfully described with the modified model (model III). Model III gave better predictions of the rate constant of growth and the lag period than a modified Gompertz model and the Baranyi model. Using the parameter values of model III at the constant temperatures, surface growth at various temperatures was successfully predicted. Surface growth curves at various initial cell numbers were also sigmoidal and converged to the same maximum cell numbers at the stationary phase. Surface growth curves at various nutrient levels were also sigmoidal. The maximum cell number and the rate of growth were lower as the nutrient level decreased. The surface growth curve was the same as that in a liquid, except for the large curvature at the deceleration period. These curves were also well described with model III. The pattern of increase in the ATP content of cells grown on a surface was sigmoidal, similar to that for cell growth. We discovered several characteristics of the surface growth of bacterial cells under various growth conditions and examined the applicability of our model to describe these growth curves.

  10. Electrospinning of agar/PVA aqueous solutions and its relation with rheological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ana M M; Souza, Hiléia K S; Uknalis, Joseph; Liu, Shih-Chuan; Gonçalves, Maria P; Liu, LinShu

    2015-01-22

    In this work, we report the successful fabrication of agar-based nanofibers by electrospinning technique, using water as solvent media. A tubeless spinneret was attached inside the electrospinning chamber, operating at 50°C, to avoid agar gelation. Agar pure solution (1 wt%) showed inadequate spinnability regardless of the used electrospinning conditions. The addition of a co-blending polymer such as PVA (10 wt% starting solution) improved the solutions viscoelasticity and hence, the solutions spinnability. Agar/PVA solutions were prepared with different mass ratios (100/0, 50/50, 40/60, 30/70, 20/80 and 0/100) and electrospun at various sets of electrospinning conditions. Best nanofibers were obtained with 30/70 and 20/80 agar/PVA blends while samples with higher agar contents (50/50 and 40/60 agar/PVA) were harder to process and led to discontinuous fibrous mats. This first set of encouraging results can open a new window of opportunities for agar-based biomaterials in the form of nanofibers.

  11. A modified agar pad method for mycobacterial live-cell imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson Brian D

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two general approaches to prokaryotic live-cell imaging have been employed to date, growing bacteria on thin agar pads or growing bacteria in micro-channels. The methods using agar pads 'sandwich' the cells between the agar pad on the bottom and a glass cover slip on top, before sealing the cover slip. The advantages of this technique are that it is simple and relatively inexpensive to set up. However, once the cover slip is sealed, the environmental conditions cannot be manipulated. Furthermore, desiccation of the agar pad, and the growth of cells in a sealed environment where the oxygen concentration will be in gradual decline, may not permit longer term studies such as those required for the slower growing mycobacteria. Findings We report here a modified agar pad method where the cells are sandwiched between a cover slip on the bottom and an agar pad on top of the cover slip (rather than the reverse and the cells viewed from below using an inverted microscope. This critical modification overcomes some of the current limitations with agar pad methods and was used to produce time-lapse images and movies of cell growth for Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Conclusions This method offers improvement on the current agar pad methods in that long term live cell imaging studies can be performed and modification of the media during the experiment is permitted.

  12. Characteristics of thermoplastic sugar palm Starch/Agar blend: Thermal, tensile, and physical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumaidin, R; Sapuan, S M; Jawaid, M; Ishak, M R; Sahari, J

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work is to study the behavior of biodegradable sugar palm starch (SPS) based thermoplastic containing agar in the range of 10-40wt%. The thermoplastics were melt-mixed and then hot pressed at 140°C for 10min. SEM investigation showed good miscibility between SPS and agar. FT-IR analysis confirmed that SPS and agar were compatible and inter-molecular hydrogen bonds existed between them. Incorporation of agar increased the thermoplastic starch tensile properties (Young's modulus and tensile strength). The thermal stability and moisture uptake increased with increasing agar content. The present work shows that starch-based thermoplastics with 30wt% agar content have the highest tensile strength. Higher content of agar (40wt%) resulted to more rough cleavage fracture and slight decrease in the tensile strength. In conclusion, the addition of agar improved the thermal and tensile properties of thermoplastic SPS which widened the potential application of this eco-friendly material. The most promising applications for this eco-friendly material are short-life products such as packaging, container, tray, etc. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Agar composition affects in vitro screening of biocontrol activity of antagonistic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosmans, L; De Bruijn, I; De Mot, R; Rediers, H; Lievens, B

    2016-08-01

    Agar-based screening assays are the method of choice when evaluating antagonistic potential of bacterial biocontrol-candidates against pathogens. We showed that when using the same medium, but different agar compositions, the activity of a bacterial antagonist against Agrobacterium was strongly affected. Consequently, results from in vitro screenings should be interpreted cautiously.

  14. Detection of agar, by analysis of sugar markers, associated with Bacillus anthracis spores, after culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunschel, David S; Colburn, Heather A; Fox, Alvin; Fox, Karen F; Harley, William M; Wahl, Jon H; Wahl, Karen L

    2008-08-01

    Detection of small quantities of agar associated with spores of Bacillus anthracis could provide key information regarding its source or growth characteristics. Agar, widely used in growth of bacteria on solid surfaces, consists primarily of repeating polysaccharide units of 3,6-anhydro-l-galactose (AGal) and galactose (Gal) with sulfated and O-methylated galactoses present as minor constituents. Two variants of the alditol acetate procedure were evaluated for detection of potential agar markers associated with spores. The first method employed a reductive hydrolysis step, to stabilize labile anhydrogalactose, by converting to anhydrogalactitol. The second eliminated the reductive hydrolysis step simplifying the procedure. Anhydrogalactitol, derived from agar, was detected using both derivatization methods followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. However, challenges with artifactual background (reductive hydrolysis) or marker destruction (hydrolysis) respectively lead to the use of an alternative agar marker. A minor agar component, 6-O-methyl galactose (6-O-M gal), was readily detected in agar-grown but not broth-grown bacteria. Detection was optimized by the use of gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS-MS). With appropriate choice of sugar marker and analytical procedure, detection of sugar markers for agar has considerable potential in microbial forensics.

  15. Agar composition affects in vitro screening of biocontrol activity of antagonistic microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosmans, Lien; De Bruijn, I.; de Mot, Rene; Readers, Hans; Lievens, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Agar-based screening assays are the method of choice when evaluating antagonistic potential of bacterial biocontrol-candidates against pathogens.Weshowed thatwhen using the samemedium, but different agar compositions, the activity of a bacterial antagonist against Agrobacteriumwas strongly affected.

  16. Development of novel agar media for isolating guaiacol producing Alicyclobacillus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, S S; Park, S H; Kang, D H

    2013-06-03

    The purpose of this study is to develop a selective and differential medium (SK2 agar) for isolating guaiacol producing Alicyclobacillus. Forty-one selected dyes and vanillic acid were incorporated in SK agar for screening selective and differential agents. Two guaiacol producing (1016, 1101) and two non-guaiacol producing (19220, C-GD 1-1) Alicyclobacillus isolates were streaked onto media and color differentiation of the isolates was assessed. Among 41 tested dyes, Chrome Azurol S (CAS) allowed color differentiation of the two types of Alicyclobacillus. Colonies of guaiacol producing Alicyclobacillus isolates appeared as dark purple to royal blue color with yellow background, whereas non-guaiacol producing Alicyclobacillus isolates produced cream colored colonies with yellow background. Vanillic acid not only served as a precursor for guaiacol formation but also inhibited non-guaiacol producing Alicyclobacillus. Non-guaiacol producing isolates did not grow on SK agar containing more than 70 ppm vanillic acid, whereas the recovery of guaiacol producing isolates was unaffected. When compared with other Alicyclobacillus isolation media, not only was SK2 agar capable of selectively recovering guaiacol-producing Alicyclobacillus, the degree of growth was also approximately equal if not better than orange serum agar, potato dextrose agar, and K agar. The development of SK2 agar provides the fruit juice industry with an inexpensive, simple to use alternative for the detection of guaiacol producing Alicyclobacillus.

  17. Physicochemical and morphological properties of plasticized poly(vinyl alcohol)-agar biodegradable films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madera-Santana, T J; Freile-Pelegrín, Y; Azamar-Barrios, J A

    2014-08-01

    The effects of the addition of glycerol (GLY) on the physicochemical and morphological properties of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)-agar films were reported. PVA-agar films were prepared by solution cast method, and the addition of GLY in PVA-agar films altered the optical properties, resulting in a decrease in opacity values and in the color difference (ΔE) of the films. Structural characterization using Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicated that the presence of GLY altered the intensity of the bands (from 1200 to 800cm(-1)) and crystallinity. The characterization of the thermal properties indicated that an increase in the agar content produces a decrease in the melting temperature and augments the heat of fusion. Similar tendencies were observed in plasticized films, but at different magnification. The formulation that demonstrated the lowest mechanical properties contained 25wt.% agar, whereas the formulation that contained 75wt.% agar demonstrated a significant improvement. The water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) and surface morphology analysis demonstrated that the structure of PVA-agar films is reorganized upon GLY addition. The physicochemical properties of PVA-agar films using GLY as a plasticizer provide information for the application of this formulation as packaging material for specific food applications.

  18. Ceftibuten-containing agar plate for detecting group B streptococci with reduced penicillin susceptibility (PRGBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Chitose; Kimura, Kouji; Doyama, Yo; Miyazaki, Akira; Morimoto, Makiko; Banno, Hirotsugu; Nagano, Noriyuki; Jin, Wanchun; Wachino, Jun-ichi; Yamada, Keiko; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2015-08-01

    Penicillins remain first-line agents for treatment of group B Streptococcus (Streptococcus agalactiae; GBS) infections; however, several reports have confirmed the existence of GBS with reduced penicillin susceptibility (PRGBS). Because no selective agar plates for detection of PRGBS are available to date, in this investigation, we developed the selective agar plate for detection of PRGBS. We used 19 genetically well-confirmed PRGBS isolates and 38 penicillin-susceptible GBS isolates identified in Japan. For preparation of trial PRGBS-selective agar plates, we added 1 of antimicrobial agents (among oxacillin, ceftizoxime, and ceftibuten) to a well-established GBS-selective agar plate. Among 12 trial PRGBS-selective agar plates, Muller-Hinton agar containing 128 μg/mL ceftibuten with 5% sheep blood, 8 μg/mL gentamicin, and 12 μg/mL nalidixic acid was the most appropriate selective agar for PRGBS, showing 100% sensitivity and 81.6% specificity. In cases of potential nosocomial spread of PRGBS, the selective agar plate could be useful and reliable.

  19. Agar composition affects in vitro screening of biocontrol activity of antagonistic microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosmans, Lien; De Bruijn, I.; de Mot, Rene; Readers, Hans; Lievens, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Agar-based screening assays are the method of choice when evaluating antagonistic potential of bacterial biocontrol-candidates against pathogens.Weshowed thatwhen using the samemedium, but different agar compositions, the activity of a bacterial antagonist against Agrobacteriumwas strongly affected.

  20. [Evaluation of a new medium, eggplant (Solanum melongena) agar as a screening medium for Cryptococcus neoformans in environmental samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengul, Mustafa; Ergin, Cağrı; Kartal, Tuğba

    2014-04-01

    Cryptococcus neofomans is an encapsulated yeast-like fungus that causes life-threatening infections, especially in immunosuppresive patients. C.neoformans infection is believed to be acquired via inhalation of aerosolized particles from the environment. Avian guano, decaying tree hollows and soil are the related known environmental niches. Brown pigmented yeast growth from the precursors in growth media is an important step for the identification and isolation of C.neoformans. Seeds of plants in nature are preferred owing to easy accessibility and low costs for the preparation of such media. Guizotia abysinicca (Niger seed) as Staib agar, Helianthus annus (Sunflower) as Pal's medium, Brassica nigra (Mustard) agar, tobacco agar, Mucuna pruriens (Velvet bean) seed agar, Perilla frutescens (Beefsteak plant) seed agar, Rubus fruticosus (Blackberry) agar and ground red hot pepper agar are pigment-based selective media for the differentiation of C.neoformans. The aim of this study was to observe the pigment production of C.neoformans in a new medium based on eggplant (Solanum melongena) and also to compare its performance with the simplified Staib, Pal's and tobacco agar for isolation from the environment. Three different eggplant-based medium (S.melongena Melanzaza viserba, S.melongena Pinstripe F1 and S.ovigerum Ivory F1) were included in the study. Pigment-forming eggplant medium, simplified Staib agar, Pal's agar and tobacco agar were used for the cultivation of the environmental swabbed samples from 19 Eucalyptus camaldulensis trunk hollows in continuous colonization region. While pigment formation were observed with S.melongena Melanzaza viserba and S.melongena Pinstripe F1 containing media, S.ovigerum Ivory F1 medium was found to be non-reactive. In colonization area (Gökova-Akyaka, Turkey), 11 (57.9%) out of 19 E.camaldulensis samples were positive with simplified Staib agar, Pal's agar and eggplant agar while 10 (52.6%) of them are positive with tobacco agar. C

  1. An extension of the Coconut Cream Agar method to screen Penicillium citrinum isolates for citrinin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, S; Flint, S; Palmer, J; Fletcher, G C; Pitt, J I

    2013-09-01

    A simple and rapid screening method was developed for the detection of citrinin in fungal cultures using Coconut Cream Agar (CCA) described previously for detecting aflatoxin and ochratoxin A. Fifteen isolates of Penicillium citrinum were inoculated onto CCA and incubated at 25 and 30°C for 10 days. All isolates produced a distinct yellow green fluorescence on CCA when the reverse side of the agar plates were viewed under long wavelength UV light. Detection was optimal at 25°C after four to 5 days of incubation. Isolates positive by the CCA method also tested positive for citrinin production by the TLC agar plug method after growth on CCA, Czapek yeast extract agar and yeast extract sucrose agar. Control cultures were negative by both methods, indicating that the CCA Petri dish method was suitable for screening cultures for citrinin production.

  2. Rheological and structural characterization of agar/whey proteins insoluble complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Cristina M R; Souza, Hiléia K S; Magalhães, Natália F; Andrade, Cristina T; Gonçalves, Maria Pilar

    2014-09-22

    Complex coacervation between whey proteins and carboxylated or highly sulphated polysaccharides has been widely studied. The aim of this work was to characterise a slightly sulphated polysaccharide (agar) and whey protein insoluble complexes in terms of yield, composition and physicochemical properties as well as to study their rheological behaviour for better understanding their structure. Unlike other sulphated polysaccharides, complexation of agar and whey protein at pH 3 in the absence of a buffering agent resulted in a coacervate that was a gel at 20°C with rheological properties and structure similar to those of simple agar gels, reinforced by proteins electrostatically aggregated to the agar network. The behaviour towards heat treatment was similar to that of agar alone, with a high thermal hysteresis and almost full reversibility. In the presence of citrate buffer, the result was a "flocculated solid", with low water content (75-81%), whose properties were governed by protein behaviour.

  3. Crystal Structure of the Lysine Riboswitch Regulatory mRNA Element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garst, A.; Heroux, A; Rambo, R; Batey, R

    2008-01-01

    Riboswitches are metabolite-sensitive elements found in mRNAs that control gene expression through a regulatory secondary structural switch. Along with regulation of lysine biosynthetic genes, mutations within the lysine-responsive riboswitch (L-box) play a role in the acquisition of resistance to antimicrobial lysine analogs. To understand the structural basis for lysine binding, we have determined the 2.8{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of lysine bound to the Thermotoga maritima asd lysine riboswitch ligand-binding domain. The structure reveals a complex architecture scaffolding a binding pocket completely enveloping lysine. Mutations conferring antimicrobial resistance cluster around this site as well as highly conserved long range interactions, indicating that they disrupt lysine binding or proper folding of the RNA. Comparison of the free and bound forms by x-ray crystallography, small angle x-ray scattering, and chemical probing reveals almost identical structures, indicating that lysine induces only limited and local conformational changes upon binding.

  4. Universal growth of microdomains and gelation transition in agar hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boral, Shilpi; Saxena, Anita; Bohidar, H B

    2008-03-27

    Investigations were carried out on aqueous sols and gels of agar (extracted from red seaweed Gelidiella acerosa) to explore the growth of microdomains en route to gelation. Isothermal frequency sweep studies on gel samples revealed master plots showing power-law dependence of gel elastic modulus, |G*|, on oscillation frequency, omega as |G*| approximately omegan, independent of temperature, with 0.5universally fitted to RS approximately epsilon(-3/5) and RL approximately epsilon-1/3 (epsilon=(T/Tg-1), T>Tg). The S(q,t) behavior close to the gel transition point (Tg approximately (38+/-3 degrees C determined from rheology) followed a stretched exponential function: S(t)=A exp(-t/ts)beta. The beta factor increased from 0.25 to 1 as the gel temperature approached 25 degrees C from Tg, and relaxation time, ts, showed a peak at T approximately 30 degrees C. The SLS data (in the sol state) suggested the scaling of scattered intensity, Is(q) approximately epsilon(-gamma) (epsilon=(T/Tg-1), T>Tg) with gamma=0.13+/-0.03, and the presence of two distinct domains characterized by a Guinier regime (low q) and a power-law regime (high q). Close to and above Tg (+2 degrees C), IS(q) scaled with q as Is(q) approximately q(-alpha) with alpha=2.2+/-0.2, which decreased to 1.4+/-1 just below Tg (-2 degrees C), implying a coil-helix transition for 0.2% (w/v) and 0.3% (w/v) samples. For a 0.01% sample, alpha=3.5+/-0.5 which indicated the presence of spherical microgels.

  5. Effects of lysine-induced acute renal failure in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asanuma, Kentaro; Adachi, Kenji; Sugimoto, Tetsuro; Chiba, Shuichi

    2006-05-01

    This study investigates the effects of lysine-induced acute renal failure. Female dogs received a lysine hydrochloride (lysine) of 4500 mg/kg/day (3.75 ml/kg/hr) for 3 consecutive days. The dogs were observed for clinical signs. Body weights were recorded, food consumption and water consumption calculated, and urinalysis and blood biochemistry were performed daily. Plasma samples for amino acid determinations were obtained from all dogs, which were necropsied on Day 3. Histopathological examinations were done on all test animals. Compound-related findings include the following. Blood biochemistry results showed increases in ammonia, blood urea nitrogen, blood urea nitrogen/creatinine ratio, and creatinine. Urinary changes consisted of increases in urine volume, total protein, albumin, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase. In addition, macroscopic findings consisted of pale, congested capsule; microscopic findings consisted of hypertrophy of proximal convoluted tubule (mainly S1 segment), and degeneration/desquamation of urinary tubule (mainly S3 segment with hyaline casts) in the kidney. From these findings, it can be concluded that lysine is nephrotoxic in dogs. Nephrotoxicity of lysine may relate to direct tubular toxicity and to tubular obstruction.

  6. Antioxidant activity of carbocysteine lysine salt monohydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinamonti, S; Venturoli, L; Leis, M; Chicca, M; Barbieri, A; Sostero, S; Ravenna, F; Daffonchio, L; Novellini, R; Ciaccia, A

    2001-09-01

    Reactive oxygen radicals are involved in many respiratory diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Carbocysteine lysine salt monohydrate (CLS) is a mucoactive drug effective in the treatment of bronchopulmonary diseases characterized by mucus alterations, including COPD. In the present study, the antioxidant activity of CLS was studied in vitro in three different oxygen radical producing systems, i.e. bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) from patients affected by COPD, ultrasound treated human serum and cultured human lung endothelial cells challenged with elastase. BAL, exposed or not to different concentrations of CLS (1.5-30 mM), was assayed for free radical content by fluorometric analysis of DNA unwinding (FADU) or by cytochrome c reduction kinetics. Human serum was treated with ultrasound in the presence or absence of CLS (1.5, 2.5 mM) or N-acetyl cysteine (NAC; 4, 5 mM) and assayed for free radical content by FADU. Human endothelial cells cultured in vitro from pulmonary artery were incubated with elastase (0.3 IU/mL), in the presence or absence of glutathione (GSH; 0.65 mM) or CLS (0.16 mM). The supernatant was tested for cytochrome c reduction kinetics whereas cell homogenates were assessed for xanthine oxidase (XO) content by SDS-PAGE. Results showed that CLS is more effective as an in vitro scavenger in comparison to GSH and NAC. CLS reduced the damage of DNA from healthy donors exposed to COPD-BAL and was able to quench clastogenic activity induced in human serum by exposure to ultrasound at concentrations as low as 2.5 mM. NAC protect DNA from radical damage, starting from 5 mM. In human lung endothelial cells cultured in presence of elastase, CLS (0.16 mM) decreased xanthine oxidase activity. These results suggest that CLS could act by interfering with the conversion of xanthine dehydrogenase into superoxide-producing xanthine oxidase. The antioxidant activity of CLS could contribute to its therapeutic activity by reducing radical

  7. Oligo-lysine Induced Formation of Silica Particles in Neutral Silicate Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Oligo-(lysine)n (n = 1-4) containing different numbers of lysine residues was used to induce the condensation of silicic acid to form silica particles in neutral silicate solution. It was found that the condensation rate and the formation of silica particles are dependent on the number of lysine residues in an oligo-lysine. Oligo-lysine with more lysine residues can link more silicic acid together to form a matrix that promotes the effective aggregation of the condensed silica pieces to form large silica particles.

  8. Continuous degradation of maltose: improvement in stability and catalytic properties of maltase (α-glucosidase) through immobilization using agar-agar gel as a support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Muhammad Asif; Karim, Asad; Aman, Afsheen; Marchetti, Roberta; Qader, Shah Ali Ul; Molinaro, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Maltose degrading enzyme was immobilized within agar-agar support via entrapment method due to its industrial utilization. The maximum immobilization efficiency (82.77%) was achieved using 4.0% agar-agar keeping the diameter of bead up to 3.0 mm. The matrix entrapment showed maximum catalytic activity at pH 7.0 and temperature 65 °C. Substrate saturation kinetics showed that the K m of immobilized enzyme increased from 1.717 to 2.117 mM ml(-1) where as Vmax decreased from 8,411 to 7,450 U ml(-1 )min(-1) as compared to free enzyme. The immobilization significantly increased the stability of maltase against various temperatures and immobilized maltase retain 100% of its original activity after 2 h at 50 °C, whereas the free maltase only showed 60% residual activity under same condition. The reusability of entrapped maltase showed activity up to 12 cycles and retained 50% of activity even after 5th cycle. Storage stability of agar entrapped maltase retain 73% of its initial activity even after 2 months when stored at 30 °C while free enzyme showed only 37% activity at same storage conditions.

  9. Seed-Specific Expression of a Lysine-Rich Protein Gene, GhLRP, from Cotton Significantly Increases the Lysine Content in Maize Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yue

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Maize seed storage proteins are a major source of human and livestock consumption. However, these proteins have poor nutritional value, because they are deficient in lysine and tryptophan. Much research has been done to elevate the lysine content by reducing zein content or regulating the activities of key enzymes in lysine metabolism. Using the naturally lysine-rich protein genes, sb401 and SBgLR, from potato, we previously increased the lysine and protein contents of maize seeds. Here, we examined another natural lysine-rich protein gene, GhLRP, from cotton, which increased the lysine content of transgenic maize seeds at levels varying from 16.2% to 65.0% relative to the wild-type. The total protein content was not distinctly different, except in the six transgenic lines. The lipid and starch levels did not differ substantially in Gossypium hirsutum L. lysine-rich protein (GhLRP transgenic kernels when compared to wild-type. The agronomic characteristics of all the transgenic maize were also normal. GhLRP is a high-lysine protein candidate gene for increasing the lysine content of maize. This study provided a valuable model system for improving maize lysine content.

  10. Seed-specific expression of a lysine-rich protein gene, GhLRP, from cotton significantly increases the lysine content in maize seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Jing; Li, Cong; Zhao, Qian; Zhu, Dengyun; Yu, Jingjuan

    2014-03-27

    Maize seed storage proteins are a major source of human and livestock consumption. However, these proteins have poor nutritional value, because they are deficient in lysine and tryptophan. Much research has been done to elevate the lysine content by reducing zein content or regulating the activities of key enzymes in lysine metabolism. Using the naturally lysine-rich protein genes, sb401 and SBgLR, from potato, we previously increased the lysine and protein contents of maize seeds. Here, we examined another natural lysine-rich protein gene, GhLRP, from cotton, which increased the lysine content of transgenic maize seeds at levels varying from 16.2% to 65.0% relative to the wild-type. The total protein content was not distinctly different, except in the six transgenic lines. The lipid and starch levels did not differ substantially in Gossypium hirsutum L. lysine-rich protein (GhLRP) transgenic kernels when compared to wild-type. The agronomic characteristics of all the transgenic maize were also normal. GhLRP is a high-lysine protein candidate gene for increasing the lysine content of maize. This study provided a valuable model system for improving maize lysine content.

  11. A Hidden Pitfall in the Preparation of Agar Media Undermines Microorganism Cultivability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Tomohiro; Kawasaki, Kosei; Daimon, Serina; Kitagawa, Wataru; Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Michiko; Nakatsu, Cindy H.

    2014-01-01

    Microbiologists have been using agar growth medium for over 120 years. It revolutionized microbiology in the 1890s when microbiologists were seeking effective methods to isolate microorganisms, which led to the successful cultivation of microorganisms as single clones. But there has been a disparity between total cell counts and cultivable cell counts on plates, often referred to as the “great plate count anomaly,” that has long been a phenomenon that still remains unsolved. Here, we report that a common practice microbiologists have employed to prepare agar medium has a hidden pitfall: when phosphate was autoclaved together with agar to prepare solid growth media (PT medium), total colony counts were remarkably lower than those grown on agar plates in which phosphate and agar were separately autoclaved and mixed right before solidification (PS medium). We used a pure culture of Gemmatimonas aurantiaca T-27T and three representative sources of environmental samples, soil, sediment, and water, as inocula and compared colony counts between PT and PS agar plates. There were higher numbers of CFU on PS medium than on PT medium using G. aurantiaca or any of the environmental samples. Chemical analysis of PT agar plates suggested that hydrogen peroxide was contributing to growth inhibition. Comparison of 454 pyrosequences of the environmental samples to the isolates revealed that taxa grown on PS medium were more reflective of the original community structure than those grown on PT medium. Moreover, more hitherto-uncultivated microbes grew on PS than on PT medium. PMID:25281372

  12. A hidden pitfall in the preparation of agar media undermines microorganism cultivability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Tomohiro; Kawasaki, Kosei; Daimon, Serina; Kitagawa, Wataru; Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Michiko; Nakatsu, Cindy H; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2014-12-01

    Microbiologists have been using agar growth medium for over 120 years. It revolutionized microbiology in the 1890s when microbiologists were seeking effective methods to isolate microorganisms, which led to the successful cultivation of microorganisms as single clones. But there has been a disparity between total cell counts and cultivable cell counts on plates, often referred to as the "great plate count anomaly," that has long been a phenomenon that still remains unsolved. Here, we report that a common practice microbiologists have employed to prepare agar medium has a hidden pitfall: when phosphate was autoclaved together with agar to prepare solid growth media (PT medium), total colony counts were remarkably lower than those grown on agar plates in which phosphate and agar were separately autoclaved and mixed right before solidification (PS medium). We used a pure culture of Gemmatimonas aurantiaca T-27(T) and three representative sources of environmental samples, soil, sediment, and water, as inocula and compared colony counts between PT and PS agar plates. There were higher numbers of CFU on PS medium than on PT medium using G. aurantiaca or any of the environmental samples. Chemical analysis of PT agar plates suggested that hydrogen peroxide was contributing to growth inhibition. Comparison of 454 pyrosequences of the environmental samples to the isolates revealed that taxa grown on PS medium were more reflective of the original community structure than those grown on PT medium. Moreover, more hitherto-uncultivated microbes grew on PS than on PT medium.

  13. Detection of Agar, by Analysis of Sugar Markers, Associated with Bacillus Anthracis Spores, After Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunschel, David S.; Colburn, Heather A.; Fox, Alvin; Fox, Karen F.; Harley, William M.; Wahl, Jon H.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2008-08-01

    Detection of small quantities of agar associated with spores of Bacillus anthracis could provide key information regarding its source or growth characteristics. Agar, widely used in growth of bacteria on solid surfaces, consists primarily of repeating polysaccharide units of 3,6-anhydro-L-galactose (AGal) and galactose (Gal) with sulfated and O-methylated galactoses present as minor constituents. Two variants of the alditol acetate procedure were evaluated for detection of potential agar markers associated with spores. The first method employed a reductive hydrolysis step, to stabilize labile anhydrogalactose, by converting to anhydrogalactitol. The second eliminated the reductive hydrolysis step simplifying the procedure. Anhydrogalactitol, derived from agar, was detected using both derivatization methods followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. However, challenges with artefactual background (reductive hydrolysis) or marker destruction (hydrolysis) lead to the search for alternative sugar markers. A minor agar component, 6-O-methyl galactose (6-O-M gal), was readily detected in agar-grown but not broth-grown bacteria. Detection was optimized by the use of gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS-MS). With appropriate choice of sugar marker and analytical procedure, detection of sugar markers for agar has considerable potential in microbial forensics.

  14. Sugar Substrates for l-Lysine Fermentation by Ustilago maydis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Marroquín, A.; Ledezma, M.; Carreño, R.

    1970-01-01

    The extracellular production of l-lysine in media with cane sugar, blackstrap molasses, or clarified sugar-cane juice by a previously obtained mutant of Ustilago maydis was studied. Enzymatically inverted clarified juice (medium J-3) gave 2.9 g of lysine per liter under the following conditions: inoculum, 5%; pH 5.8; temperature, 30 C; KLa in the fermentors, 0.41 mmoles of O2 per liter per min; fermentation time, 72 hr. The concentrate, obtained by direct evaporation and drying of the fermentation broth, could be used as a possible feed supplement because of its amino-acid and vitamin content. PMID:5485081

  15. Development of agar diffusion method for dosage of gramicidin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Gabriela Reis Solano

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Gramicidin, an antimicrobial peptide active against Gram positive bacteria, is commonly used in pharmaceutical preparations for topical use. Considering that only the turbidimetric method has been described in the literature, the present study sought to develop and validate an agar diffusion method for the dosage of gramicidin. The method was developed and validated using the Kocuria rhizophila ATCC 9341 as a test microorganism. Two designs were used: a 3x3 parallel-line model, and a 5x1 standard curve. The validation demonstrated that the method follows the linear model (r²= 0.994, presenting a significant regression between the zone diameter of growth inhibition and the logarithm of the concentration within the range of 5 to 25.3 µg/mL. The results obtained for both designs were precise, having a relative standard deviation (R.S.D. for intra-day precision of 0.81 for the 3x3 assay and 1.90 for the 5x1 assay. For the inter-day precision, the R.S.D. was 1.35 for the 3x3 and 2.64 for the 5x1. The accuracy was verified and results confirmed to be accurate, having a tolerance interval of 95%, which lay within permitted limits and appropriate trueness. In addition, the method was considered selective, with limit of detection and upper and lower limits of quantification of 2.00, 5.00 and 25.3 µg/mL, respectively. No difference in precision between the designs used in the agar diffusion method was evident (p>0.05. The method proved to be appropriate for the microbiological dosage of the raw material gramicidin.A gramicidina, um peptídeo antimicrobiano ativo contra bactérias Gram positivo, é utilizada em preparações farmacêuticas de uso tópico. Neste trabalho procurou-se desenvolver e validar outro método para o doseamento de gramicidina tendo em vista que somente o método turbidimétrico é descrito. O método de difusão em ágar foi desenvolvido e validado utilizando como microrganismo teste Kocuria rhizophila ATCC 9341. Foram utilizados

  16. Membrane-assisted culture of fungal mycelium on agar plates for RNA extraction and pharmacological analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Mario; Müller, Carolin; Peiter, Edgar

    2014-05-15

    Fungal mycelium grown in liquid culture is easy to harvest for RNA extraction and gene expression analyses, but liquid cultures often develop rather heterogeneously. In contrast, growth of fungal mycelium on agar plates is highly reproducible. However, this biological material cannot be harvested easily for downstream analyses. This article describes a PVDF (polyvinylidene difluoride) membrane-assisted agar plate culture method that enables the harvest of mycelium grown on agar plates. This culture method leads to a strongly reduced variation in gene expression between biological replicates and requires less growth space as compared with liquid cultures.

  17. Agar media that indicate acid production from sorbitol by oral microorganisms.

    OpenAIRE

    Kalfas, S.; Edwardsson, S

    1985-01-01

    Two varieties of agar medium (Trypticase [BBL Microbiology Systems]-serum-sorbitol-bromcresol purple agar [TSSB] and Trypticase-blood-sorbitol-CaCO3 agar [TBSCa]) indicating microbial acid production from sorbitol were tested. The media were devised for use in studies on the prevalence of sorbitol-fermenting human oral microorganisms incubated in an anaerobic or microaerophilic atmosphere containing 5 to 6% CO2. TSSB contains bromcresol purple as the pH indicator and NaHCO3 as the main buffer...

  18. Growth characteristics of Bacillus anthracis compared to other Bacillus spp. on the selective nutrient media Anthrax Blood Agar and Cereus Ident Agar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaso, Herbert; Bartling, Carsten; Al Dahouk, Sascha; Hagen, Ralf M; Scholz, Holger C; Beyer, Wolfgang; Neubauer, Heinrich

    2006-01-01

    Anthrax Blood Agar (ABA) and Cereus Ident Agar (CEI) were evaluated as selective growth media for the isolation of Bacillus anthracis using 92 B. anthracis and 132 other Bacillus strains from 30 species. The positive predictive values for the identification of B. anthracis on ABA, CEI, and the combination of both were 72%, 71%, and 90%, respectively. Thus, less than 10% of all species were misidentified using both nutrient media. Species which might be misidentified as B. anthracis were B. cereus, B. mycoides, and B. thuringiensis. Particularly, 30% of B. weihenstephanensis strains were misidentified as B. anthracis.

  19. Rendimiento diagnóstico del agar sangre con filtro versus agar karmali para el diagnóstico de Campylobacter en coprocultivo

    OpenAIRE

    Moya-Salazar, Jeel; 1. MSc(c), M.T., Facultad de Ciencias y Filosofía, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Perú.; Pio-Dávila, Liz; 2. MLT., Hospital Nacional Dos de Mayo, Lima, Perú.; Terán-Vásquez, Alfonso; 3. M.Ed., MLT., Área de Microbiología, Hospital Nacional Docente Madre-Niño San Bartolomé, Lima, Perú.; Olivo-López, José; 4. M.T., Servicio de Microbiología. Instituto Nacional de Salud del Niño, Lima, Perú.

    2016-01-01

    Objetivo: Evaluar el rendimiento diagnóstico del agar sangre con filtro (ASF) en comparación con el agar Karmali (AK) para el diagnóstico de Campylobacter spp en coprocultivo.Material y métodos: Se realizó una investigación de tipo experimental prospectiva de corte transversal en el Hospital Nacional Docente Madre-Niño “San Bartolomé” se evaluaron muestra de heces con examen coprolóico funcional reactivo para inflamación. Las muestras fueron sembradas en ASF y en AK e incubadas hasta 72 horas...

  20. Effect of Selected Plant Extracts and D- and L-Lysine on the Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lurling, M; Van Oosterhout, F

    2014-01-01

    We tested extracts from Fructus mume, Salvia miltiorrhiza and Moringa oleifera as well as L-lysine and D-Lysine as curative measures to rapidly suppress the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa NIVA-CYA 43...

  1. Installation of site-specific methylation into histones using methyl lysine analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Matthew D

    2010-04-01

    Chromatin structure is influenced by post-translational modifications on histones, the principal basic protein component of chromatin. In order to study one of these modifications, lysine methylation, in the context of reconstituted chromatin, this unit describes the installation of analogs of methyl lysine residues into recombinant histones. The modification site is specified by mutating the lysine of interest to cysteine. The mutant histones are expressed and purified, and the cysteine residue alkylated to produce N-methyl aminoethylcysteine, an isosteric analog of methyl lysine. Using different alkylating reagents, it is possible to install analogs of mono-, di-, or trimethyl lysine. While these analogs are not identical to methyl lysine residues, they show similar biochemical properties to their natural counterparts. The ease of synthesis of methyl lysine analog (MLA) histones, especially on a large scale, makes them particularly useful reagents for studying the effects of histone lysine methylation on chromatin structure, biophysics and biochemistry. (c) 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. Ultrastructure of Nocardia cell growth and development on defined and complex agar media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaman, B L; Shankel, D M

    1969-09-01

    The cell growth of Nocardia strain 721-A on Brain Heart Infusion Agar (BHIA), nutrient agar, and chemically defined agar media was studied by light and electron microscopy. Light microscopy revealed a change in cell morphology induced by growth on BHIA. Electron microscopy demonstrated a concurrent change in intracellular complexity. On BHIA, the cells became bulbous and developed irregularly branched filaments which fragmented by multiple and random septation. These fragments appeared to undergo a secondary stage of development similar to that described for Arthrobacter. Cells grown on defined or nutrient agar did not become bulbous and lacked the unusual complexity found in cells grown on BHIA. Intracytoplasmic membranes were altered by the nutritional state of the cell and changed during cell development.

  3. A fresh liver agar substrate for rearing small numbers of forensically important blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruner, Susan V.; Slone, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Forensically important calliphorids can be reared on a mixture of beef liver and agar. Small pieces of meat, especially fresh or frozen beef liver, will desiccate in 2–6 h, but this simple-to-make feeding substrate remains moist for at least 12 h at 25 and 30°C without desiccation, even in small (5 g) amounts. We determined the survivorship of small numbers of Chrysomya megacephala (F.) (first-instar larvae to adult eclosion) raised on 5 g of liver agar and fresh beef liver. We found that all larvae raised on 5 g of liver died due to desiccation, but survivorship on 5 g of liver agar was equivalent to that on larger (50 g) pieces of either liver agar or beef liver.

  4. A fresh liver agar substrate for rearing small numbers of forensically important blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruner, Susan V; Slone, Daniel H

    2014-05-01

    Forensically important calliphorids can be reared on a mixture of beef liver and agar. Small pieces of meat, especially fresh or frozen beef liver, will desiccate in 2-6 h, but this simple-to-make feeding substrate remains moist for at least 12 h at 25 and 30 degrees C without desiccation, even in small (5 g) amounts. We determined the survivorship of small numbers of Chrysomya megacephala (F.) (first-instar larvae to adult eclosion) raised on 5 g of liver agar and fresh beef liver. We found that all larvae raised on 5 g of liver died due to desiccation, but survivorship on 5 g of liver agar was equivalent to that on larger (50 g) pieces of either liver agar or beef liver.

  5. Green fabrication of agar-conjugated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, S; Huang, B Y; Lin, P Y; Chang, C W [Department of Chemistry and Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, S L [Department of Seafood Science, National Kaohsiung Marine University, Kaohsiung 81157, Taiwan (China); Wu, C C [Department of Nutrition and Health Sciences, Chang Jung Christian University, Tainan 71101, Taiwan (China); Wu, C H [Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung 80811, Taiwan (China); Huang, Y S, E-mail: shsieh@facmail.NSYSU.edu.tw [Department of Food Science and Technology, Tajen University, Pingtung 90741, Taiwan (China)

    2010-11-05

    Magnetic nanoparticles are of great interest both for fundamental research and emerging applications. In the biomedical field, magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) has shown promise as a hyperthermia-based tumor therapeutic. However, preparing suitable solubilized magnetite nanoparticles is challenging, primarily due to aggregation and poor biocompatibility. Thus methods for coating Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs with biocompatible stabilizers are required. We report a new method for preparing Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles by co-precipitation within the pores of agar gel samples. Permeated agar gels were then dried and ground into a powder, yielding agar-conjugated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. Samples were characterized using XRD, FTIR, TGA, TEM and SQUID. This method for preparing agar-coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles is environmentally friendly, inexpensive and scalable.

  6. Proton beam writing of microstructures in Agar gel for patterned cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larisch, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.larisch@studserv.uni-leipzig.de [Nukleare Festkoerperphysik, Universitaet Leipzig, Linnestr. 5, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Koal, Torsten; Werner, Ronald; Hohlweg, Marcus; Reinert, Tilo; Butz, Tilman [Nukleare Festkoerperphysik, Universitaet Leipzig, Linnestr. 5, 04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    A rather useful prerequisite for many biological and biophysical studies, e.g., for cell-cell communication or neuronal networks, is confined cell growth on micro-structured surfaces. Solidified Agar layers have smooth surfaces which are electrically neutral and thus inhibit receptor binding and cell adhesion. For the first time, Agar microstructures have been manufactured using proton beam writing (PBW). In the irradiated Agar material the polysaccharides are split into oligosaccharides which can easily be washed off leaving Agar-free areas for cell adhesion. The beam diameter of 1 {mu}m allows the fabrication of compartments accommodating single cells which are connected by micrometer-sized channels. Using the external beam the production process is very fast. Up to 50 Petri dishes can be produced per day which makes this technique very suitable for biological investigations which require large throughputs.

  7. [THE APPLICATION OF SELECTIVE CHROMOGENIC AGAR FOR DETECTING ENTEROBACTERIA WITH PRODUCTION OF BETA-LACTAMASES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobova, A G; Frolova, L N; Kliasova, G A

    2015-11-01

    The detection of enterobacteria with production of beta-lactamases of extended spectrum in selective chromogenic agar was analyzed The results ofdetection of beta-lactamases of extended spectrum was compared with "double disc" technique. The smears from mucous membrane of guttur and rectum from patients were analyzed in parallel on solid growth agar (Endo or Mac Conkey) and on selective agar CHROMagartm ESBL (CHROMagar France). The production of beta-lactamases of extended spectrum was confirmed using "double discs" technique. To exclude hyper-production of ampC beta-lactamases E-test was applied containing cefotetan and cefotetan with cloxacillin. The sampling consisted of 1552 samples from patients. The study permitted to isolate 1243 strains of enterobacteria on agar Endo or Mac Conkey and 409 strains of enterobacteria on selective agar CHROMagartm ESBL (Escherichia coli n = 226, Klebsiella pneumoniae n = 105, enterobacter spp. n = 35, Citrobacter spp. n = 21, others n = 22). The application of "double discs" technique confirmed production of beta-lactamases of extended spectrum in 386 (94%) out of 409 strains isolated on agar CHROMagartm ESBL. In 23 (6%) of strains no confirmation was established and hyper-production of ampC of beta-lactamases was established 15 out of total. Additionally, 8 were sensitive to cephalosporin of third generation. All enterobacteria isolated on agar Endo or Mac Conkey also were tested by "double discs" technique. Overall, 394 strains of enterobacteria with production of beta-lactamases of extended spectrum were obtained. On all agars (agar Endo or Mac Conkey and CHROMagartm ESBL)--263 (67%) strains; only on CHROMagartm ESBL--123 (31%) and only on agar Endo or Mac Conkey--8 (2%) (p agar CHROMagartm ESBL made up to 98% and specificity--97%. The resolution about detection of enterobacteria producing beta-lactamases of extended spectrum were submitted to clinic in 18-24 hours after arrival ofsamplesfrom patients in laboratory. The CHR

  8. Lysine-Grafted MCM-41 Silica as an Antibacterial Biomaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María F. Villegas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a facile strategy for the zwitterionization of bioceramics that is based on the direct incorporation of l-lysine amino acid via the ε-amino group onto mesoporous MCM-41 materials. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR studies of lysine-grafted MCM-41 (MCM-LYS simultaneously showed bands at 3080 and 1540 cm−1 and bands at 1625 and 1415 cm−1 corresponding to -NH3+/COO− pairs, which demonstrate the incorporation of the amino acid on the material surface keeping its zwitterionic character. Both elemental and thermogravimetric analyses showed that the amount of grafted lysine was 8 wt. % based on the bioceramic total weight. Moreover, MCM-LYS exhibited a reduction of adhesion of S. aureus and E. coli bacteria in 33% and 50%, respectively at physiological pH, as compared with pristine MCM-41. Biofilm studies onto surfaces showed that lysine functionalization elicited a reduction of the area covered by S. aureus biofilm from 42% to only 5% (88%. This research shows a simple and effective approach to chemically modify bioceramics using single amino acids that provides zwitterionic functionality, which is useful to develop new biomaterials that are able to resist bacterial adhesion.

  9. The structural feature surrounding glycated lysine residues in human hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shigenori; Nakahari, Takashi; Yamamoto, Daisuke

    2011-06-01

    Complications derived from diabetes mellitus are caused by nonenzymatic protein glycation at the specific sites. LC/MS/MS was performed for the identification of the tryptic peptides of glycated hemoglobins using glyceraldehyde. After the identification of the glycation or non-glycation site, computer analysis of the structure surrounding the sites was carried out using PDB data (1BZ0). Five glycated lysine residues (Lys-16(α), -56(α), -8(β), -82(β), and -144(β)) and four non-glycated lysine residues (Lys-7(α), -40(α), -99(α), and -132(β)) were identified. The non-glycated lysine residues, Lys-7(α), -40(α), and -132(β), are most likely to form electrostatic interactions with the β carboxyl group of Asp-74(α), C-terminal His-146(β), and Glu-7(β) by virtue of their proximity, which is 2.67-2.91 Å (N-O). Additionally, there are histidine residues within 4.55-7.38 Å (N-N) around eight sites except for Lys-7(α). We conclude that the following factors seem to be necessary for glycation of lysine residues: (i) the apparent absence of aspartate or glutamate residues to inhibit the glycation reaction by forming an electrostatic interaction, (ii) the presence of histidine residues for acid-base catalysis of the Amadori rearrangement, and (iii) the presence of an amino acid residue capable of stabilizing a phosphate during proton transfer.

  10. Detection of salt bridges to lysines in solution in barnase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Williamson, Michael P.; Hounslow, Andrea M.

    2013-01-01

    We show that salt bridges involving lysines can be detected by deuterium isotope effects on NMR chemical shifts of the sidechain amine. Lys27 in the ribonuclease barnase is salt bridged, and mutation of Arg69 to Lys retains a partially buried salt bridge. The salt bridges are functionally important....

  11. Requirement of the laying hen for apparent fecal digestible lysine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutte, J.B.; Smink, W.

    1998-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the requirement for lysine of a White Leghorn strain of hens with a body weight of approximately 1,600 g. Before starting the experiment, apparent fecal digestibility of amino acids of the basal diet was determined in an in vivo digestibility trial with six individ

  12. Predicting post-translational lysine acetylation using support vector machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gnad, Florian; Ren, Shubin; Choudhary, Chunaram

    2010-01-01

    spectrometry to identify 3600 lysine acetylation sites on 1750 human proteins covering most of the previously annotated sites and providing the most comprehensive acetylome so far. This dataset should provide an excellent source to train support vector machines (SVMs) allowing the high accuracy in silico...

  13. effects of dietary chromium tripicolinate and lysine on growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AISA

    Six traitements ont été répétés quatre fois, avec quatre porcs par répétition. Au cours de cette ... The potential capability of lysine to improve ... (chromium picolinate) on animal productivity has ... cholesterol (Sigma, 1989a), and total proteins.

  14. Amino acid nutrition beyond methionine and lysine for milk protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amino acids are involved in many important physiological processes affecting the production, health, and reproduction of high-producing dairy cows. Most research and recommendations for lactating dairy cows has focused on methionine and lysine for increasing milk protein yield. This is because these...

  15. Low density, microcellular, dopable, agar/gelatin foams for pulsed power experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNamara, W.F. [Orion International Technologies, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Aubert, J.H. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Low-density, microcellular foams prepared from the natural polymers agar and gelatin have been developed for pulsed-power physics experiments. Numerous experiments were supported with foams having densities at or below 10 mg/cm{sup 3}. For some of the experiments, the agar/gelatin foam was uniformly doped with metallic elements using soluble salts. Depending on the method of preparation, cell sizes were typically below 10 microns and for one process were below 1.0 micron.

  16. Isolation of Asticcacaulis sp. SA7, a novel agar-degrading alphaproteobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoda, Akifumi; Sakai, Masao

    2006-03-01

    An agar-degrading bacterium, strain SA7, was isolated from plant roots cultivated in soil. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence showed that strain SA7 is affiliated with the genus Asticcacaulis. Strain SA7 produced extracellular agarase, and grew utilizing agar in the culture medium as sole carbon source. Zymogram analysis showed that strain SA7 extracellularly secreted single agarase protein (about 70 kDa).

  17. Immediate differentiation of salmonella-resembling colonies on brilliant green agar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annette Nygaard; Hoorfar, Jeffrey

    2000-01-01

    A rapid biochemical system (OBIS) based on immediate enzymatic differentiation of Citrobacter, Proteus, Providencia, Hafnia and Morganella spp. from Salmonella on brilliant green agar was evaluated A total of 96 field isolates from various Salmonella serotypes, 18 Citrobacter freundii and 25...... isolates of other Enterobacteriaceae were tested All Salmonella isolates were identified correctly by the kit, and none of the Enterobacteriaceae isolates were identified as Salmonella. The results indicate complete specificity for Salmonella colonies on brilliant green agar....

  18. File list: Oth.Gon.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Gonad SRX1060...566,SRX1060567,SRX1060557 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Bon.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bon.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Bo...ne http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bon.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Bl...ood http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Utr.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Utr.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ut...erus http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Utr.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Emb.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Em...bryo http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Emb.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Pl...uripotent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Al...l cell types SRX099897,SRX099894 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Epd.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation E...pidermis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Plc.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Plc.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...lacenta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Plc.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Bo...ne http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Neu.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation N...eural http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Bl...ood http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.CDV.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ca...rdiovascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.CDV.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ot...hers http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation A...dipocyte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation D...igestive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Gon.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Gon.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation G...onad http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Gon.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Dig.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Di...gestive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Dig.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.Dig.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Dig.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Digestive tra...ct http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Dig.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Liv.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Li...ver http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Liv.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Kid.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Kid.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation K...idney http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Kid.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Pan.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...ancreas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Pan.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Un...classified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Kid.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Kid.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ki...dney http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Kid.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Lng.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation L...ung SRX099891 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Lng.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation L...iver http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...luripotent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.CDV.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ca...rdiovascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.CDV.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Lu...ng http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation A...ll cell types SRX099891 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ne...ural http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Bl...ood http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Li...ver http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Utr.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Utr.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ut...erus http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Utr.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.Gon.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Gonad SRX1060...566,SRX1060567,SRX1060557 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Myo.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Myo.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation M...uscle http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Myo.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Plc.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Plc.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...lacenta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Plc.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Unc.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation U...nclassified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Unc.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Brs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Br...east http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.NoD.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.NoD.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine No descriptio...n http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.NoD.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Pan.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Pa...ncreas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Pan.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation L...iver http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...reast http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Gon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Gon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation G...onad http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Gon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.Adp.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Adipocyte htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Adp.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Al...l cell types SRX099894,SRX099897 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Bon.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bon.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...one http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bon.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Myo.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Myo.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Mu...scle http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Myo.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...lood http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Li...ver http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ep...idermis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Kid.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Kid.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation K...idney http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Kid.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Lng.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Lu...ng http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Lng.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation L...ung SRX099891 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.PSC.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...luripotent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.PSC.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Emb.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Em...bryo http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Emb.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation K...idney http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Unc.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Un...classified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Unc.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation U...nclassified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ki...dney http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...ancreas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation A...dipocyte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...rostate http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Utr.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Utr.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation U...terus http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Utr.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...lood http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.Dig.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Dig.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Digestive tra...ct http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Dig.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Kid.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Kid.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation K...idney http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Kid.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Oth.NoD.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.NoD.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine No descriptio...n http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.NoD.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.EmF.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.EmF.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Embryonic fib...roblast http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.EmF.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.CDV.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ca...rdiovascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.CDV.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Pan.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Pa...ncreas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Pan.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Pl...uripotent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Dig.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Di...gestive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Dig.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Brs.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...reast http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Brs.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Bld.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...lood http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Oth.Dig.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Dig.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Digestive tra...ct http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Dig.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Myo.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Myo.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation M...uscle http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Myo.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ad...ipocyte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Emb.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Em...bryo http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Emb.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Oth.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation O...thers http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Oth.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Plc.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Plc.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...lacenta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Plc.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Myo.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Myo.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation M...uscle http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Myo.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.CDV.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Cardiovascula...r http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.CDV.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Bon.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bon.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...one http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bon.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Dig.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Diges...tive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Dig.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Pancre...as http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Unc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Uncla...ssified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Unc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Pan.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Pancr...eas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Pan.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Neural... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Epide...rmis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Breast... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Diges...tive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Prosta...te http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Liv.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Liver ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Liv.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Myo.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Myo.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Muscle... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Myo.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation All ce...ll types SRX099893,SRX099896 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Emb.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Embryo... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Emb.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Pan.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Pancr...eas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Pan.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Unclas...sified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Adipo...cyte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Neura...l http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Utr.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Utr.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Uterus... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Utr.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.ALL.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation All ce...ll types SRX099893,SRX099896 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.ALL.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Blood... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.CDV.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Cardi...ovascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Blood ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Bld.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Blood ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Dig.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Diges...tive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Dig.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Others... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Prost...ate http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Epider...mis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Neural... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Uncla...ssified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Breas...t http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Lung h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Kidney... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Adp.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Adipo...cyte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Oth.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Others... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Oth.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Bon.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bon.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Bone h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bon.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Blood ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Adipo...cyte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Adipoc...yte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.CDV.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Cardio...vascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.CDV.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Neu.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Neural... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Lng.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Lung h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Lng.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.PSC.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Plurip...otent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Plc.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Plc.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Placen...ta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Plc.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Oth.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Others... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Oth.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Oth.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Others... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Oth.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Lng.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Lung h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Lng.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Prs.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Prost...ate http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Prs.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Myo.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Myo.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Muscl...e http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Myo.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Unclas...sified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Epide...rmis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Prosta...te http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Blood... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.ALL.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation All ce...ll types SRX099893,SRX099896 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.ALL.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Neura...l http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Plurip...otent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Pancr...eas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation All c...ell types SRX099890 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Liver ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Gon.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Gon.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Gonad... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Gon.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation All c...ell types SRX099890 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Pluri...potent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Prs.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Prosta...te http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Prs.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.CDV.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Cardi...ovascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Gon.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Gon.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Gonad ...SRX099893,SRX099896 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Gon.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Bone ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Dig.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Digest...ive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Dig.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Blood... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Uncla...ssified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Utr.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Utr.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Uteru...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Utr.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Liver ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Lung h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Liv.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Liver ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Liv.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Blood ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Epider...mis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Pan.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Pancr...eas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Pan.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Plurip...otent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Placen...ta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Place...nta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Prs.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Prost...ate http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Prs.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Bon.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bon.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Bone h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bon.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Lung ...SRX099890 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Unc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Unclas...sified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Unc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Utr.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Utr.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Uteru...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Utr.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Adp.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Adipoc...yte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Adp.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Gon.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Gon.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Gonad ...SRX099893,SRX099896 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Gon.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Digest...ive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Dig.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Diges...tive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Dig.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Brs.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Breast... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Myo.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Myo.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Muscle... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Myo.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.CDV.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Cardio...vascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.CDV.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Bone h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Epider...mis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Other...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.Adp.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Adipocyte htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Adp.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.NoD.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.NoD.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine No descriptio...n http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.NoD.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.PSC.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Pluripotent s...tem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.PSC.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Pluripotent s...tem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Myo.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Myo.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Mu...scle http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Myo.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Prs.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Pr...ostate http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Prs.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation A...ll cell types SRX099891 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Gon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Gon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Go...nad SRX099894,SRX099897 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Gon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation O...thers http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.EmF.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.EmF.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Embryonic fib...roblast http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.EmF.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.PSC.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...luripotent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.PSC.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Lu...ng http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Emb.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Em...bryo http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Emb.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Oth.CDV.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Cardiovascula...r http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.CDV.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ep...idermis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Bon.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bon.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Bo...ne http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bon.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...lood http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Spl.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Spl.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Sp...leen http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Spl.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Liv.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Li...ver http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Liv.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Pa...ncreas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Un...classified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. Optimization of lysine production in Corynebacteriumglutamicum ATCC15032 by Response surface methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnaz Haghi

    2017-03-01

    Discussion and conclusion: According to the results, the proposed culture media by response surface methodology causes 1400 times increase in the lysine production compared with M9 culture media and methionine had an important role in the production of lysine, probably by inhibiting the other metabolic pathway which has common metabolic precursor with lysine production metabolic pathway.

  17. File list: Oth.Gon.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Gonad SRX1060...567,SRX1060566,SRX1060557 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.Adp.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Adipocyte htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Adp.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.ALL.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine All cell type...s SRX1060566,SRX1060567,SRX1060557 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.Epd.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Epidermis htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Epd.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Oth.Epd.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Epidermis htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Epd.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.ALL.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine All cell type...s SRX1060567,SRX1060566,SRX1060557 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.Adp.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Adipocyte htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Adp.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.Dig.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Dig.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Digestive tra...ct http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Dig.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Oth.EmF.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.EmF.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Embryonic fib...roblast http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.EmF.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.CDV.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Cardiovascula...r http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.CDV.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Oth.Gon.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Gonad SRX1060...566,SRX1060567,SRX1060557 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Oth.NoD.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.NoD.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine No descriptio...n http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.NoD.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.PSC.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Pluripotent s...tem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.Epd.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Epidermis htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Epd.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Oth.ALL.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine All cell type...s SRX1060566,SRX1060567,SRX1060557 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.PSC.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Pluripotent s...tem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Oth.Epd.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Epidermis htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Epd.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Oth.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation O...thers http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Oth.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...one http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Pl...acenta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Pr...ostate http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ep...idermis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...luripotent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...lacenta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Pan.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Pa...ncreas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Pan.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation N...eural http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Utr.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Utr.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation U...terus http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Utr.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Spl.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Spl.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Sp...leen http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Spl.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Utr.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Utr.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ut...erus http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Utr.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation E...pidermis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Oth.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ot...hers http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Oth.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Dig.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation D...igestive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Dig.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Pr...ostate http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Spl.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Spl.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Sp...leen http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Spl.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Gon.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Gon.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Go...nad SRX099894,SRX099897 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Gon.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation N...eural http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. Complex impedance and conductivity of agar-based ion-conducting polymer electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwanya, A. C.; Amaechi, C. I.; Udounwa, A. E.; Osuji, R. U.; Maaza, M.; Ezema, F. I.

    2015-04-01

    Agar-based electrolyte standing films with different salts and weak acids as ion and proton conductors were prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction, UV-visible spectrophotometry, photoluminescence emission spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The salts used are lithium perchlorate (LiClO4) and potassium perchlorate (KClO4), while the weak acids used are acetic acid (CH3COOH) and lactic acid (C3H6O3). The values of the ion conductivity obtained for the agar-based polymer films are 6.54 × 10-8, 9.12 × 10-8, 3.53 × 10-8, 2.24 × 10-8 S/cm for the agar/acetic acid, agar/lactic acid, agar/LiClO4 and agar/KClO4 polymer films, respectively. As a function of temperature, the ion conductivity exhibits an Arrhenius behavior and the estimated activation energy is ≈0.1 eV for all the samples. The samples depicted high values of dielectric permittivity toward low frequencies which is due mostly to electrode polarization effect. The samples showed very high transparency (85-98 %) in the visible region, and this high transparency is one of the major requirements for application in electrochromic devices (ECD). The values of conductivity and activation energy obtained indicate that the electrolytes are good materials for application in ECD.

  14. Invitro Antidiabetic Activities of Agar, Agarosa, and Agaropectin from Gracilaria gigas Seaweed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardoko

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Some types of seaweed are reported to have antidiabet activity in vivo or in vitro, but the activity antidiabet fractions of polysaccharides from seaweed has not been widely reported. Gracilaria gigas is one type of red seaweed that can produce agar and it has two factions, namely agarose and agaropectin. The aim of this study was to obtain an agar extract, agarose fraction, agaropektin fraction of Gracilaria gigas and to determine the α-glucosidase inhibitory activity of extracts and the fractions. Extraction of agar that used an ethanol solution, and to fractionate agarose and agaropektin used dimetilsulfoxide solution. The results showed that the fraction of the agarose having lower sulfate content (0.28% compared with agar (5.91% and agaropektin (6.07%. Types of samples (agar, agarose, and agaropektin and sample doses significantly in inhibiting α-glucosidase enzyme activity. Agarose fraction has IC50 value against α-glucosidase lowest (96.86 ± 4.61 ppm, followed by the extract agar (116.63 ± 5.61 ppm, then the fraction agaropektin (158.34 ± 1.77 ppm.

  15. Preparation, characterization, and in vitro gastrointestinal digestibility of oil-in-water emulsion-agar gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Neves, Marcos A; Kobayashi, Isao; Uemura, Kunihiko; Nakajima, Mitsutoshi

    2013-01-01

    Soybean oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion-agar gel samples were prepared and their digestibility evaluated by using an in vitro gastrointestinal digestion model. Emulsion-agar sols were obtained by mixing the prepared O/W emulsions with a 1.5 wt % agar solution at 60 °C, and their subsequent cooling at 5 °C for 1 h formed emulsion-agar gels. Their gel strength values increased with increasing degree of polymerization of the emulsifiers, and the relative gel strength increased in the case of droplets with an average diameter smaller than 700 nm. Flocculation and coalescence of the released emulsion droplets depended strongly on the emulsifier type; however, the emulsifier type hardly affected the ζ-potential of emulsion droplets released from the emulsion-agar gels during in vitro digestion. The total FFA content released from each emulsion towards the end of the digestion period was nearly twice that released from the emulsion-agar gel, indicating that gelation of the O/W emulsion may have delayed lipid hydrolysis.

  16. [GROWTH OF MICROMYCETES FROM DIFFERENT ECOLOGICAL NICHES ON AGAR NUTRIENT MEDIA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurchenko, I M; Yurieva, E M; Voychuk, S I

    2015-01-01

    Radial growth rate of (K(r)) 153 strains 6 species of micromycetes from different ecological niches was studied on 7 agar media: three standard (malt extract agar, potato-dextrose agar, Czapek's agar), and on agar media with plant polymers (carboxymethylcellulose, xylan, soluble starch and apple pectin). Endophytic and plant pathogenic strains (biotrophs) of all studied species did not differ significantly in their ability to grow on nutrient media of different composition--average values of K(r) for these two groups were the same (0,200 and 0,199 mm/h, respectively). Soil micromycetes (saprophytes) characterized by the lowest average growth rate (0,169 mm/h) and significantly differed from the endophytic and plant pathogenic ones. Average of the radial growth rates of studied microscopic fungi were higher on standard nutrient media than with plant polymers ones. Growth parameters of endophytes and plant pathogens of all studied species on various agar media differed from the soil strains. High growth rate of endophytic and plant pathogenic strains of Fusarium poae, Alternaria alternata and Ceratocystis sp. provides them the rapid colonization of plants. Penicillium funiculosum strains equally can exist as saprophytes in soil and as endophytic plant symbionts. A wide range of K(r) variation of endophytic dark pigmented Mycelia sterilia indicates the presence in this group of different species of micromycetes, which have no sporulation.

  17. Broth versus solid agar culture of swab samples of cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varettas, Kerry

    2013-12-01

    As part of the donor assessment protocol, bioburden assessment must be performed on allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples collected at the time of tissue retrieval. Swab samples of musculoskeletal tissue allografts from cadaveric donors are received at the microbiology department of the South Eastern Area Laboratory Services (Australia) to determine the presence of bacteria and fungi. This study will review the isolation rate of organisms from solid agar and broth culture of swab samples of cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue over a 6-year period, 2006-2011. Swabs were inoculated onto horse blood agar (anaerobic, 35 °C) and chocolate agar (CO2, 35 °C) and then placed into a cooked meat broth (aerobic, 35 °C). A total of 1,912 swabs from 389 donors were received during the study period. 557 (29.1 %) swabs were culture positive with the isolation of 713 organisms, 249 (34.9 %) from solid agar culture and an additional 464 (65.1 %) from broth culture only. This study has shown that the broth culture of cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal swab samples recovered a greater amount of organisms than solid agar culture. Isolates such as Clostridium species and Staphylococcus aureus would not have been isolated from solid agar culture alone. Broth culture is an essential part of the bioburden assessment protocol of swab samples of cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue in this laboratory.

  18. The biology of lysine acetylation integrates transcriptional programming and metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujtaba Shiraz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The biochemical landscape of lysine acetylation has expanded from a small number of proteins in the nucleus to a multitude of proteins in the cytoplasm. Since the first report confirming acetylation of the tumor suppressor protein p53 by a lysine acetyltransferase (KAT, there has been a surge in the identification of new, non-histone targets of KATs. Added to the known substrates of KATs are metabolic enzymes, cytoskeletal proteins, molecular chaperones, ribosomal proteins and nuclear import factors. Emerging studies demonstrate that no fewer than 2000 proteins in any particular cell type may undergo lysine acetylation. As described in this review, our analyses of cellular acetylated proteins using DAVID 6.7 bioinformatics resources have facilitated organization of acetylated proteins into functional clusters integral to cell signaling, the stress response, proteolysis, apoptosis, metabolism, and neuronal development. In addition, these clusters also depict association of acetylated proteins with human diseases. These findings not only support lysine acetylation as a widespread cellular phenomenon, but also impel questions to clarify the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms governing target selectivity by KATs. Present challenges are to understand the molecular basis for the overlapping roles of KAT-containing co-activators, to differentiate between global versus dynamic acetylation marks, and to elucidate the physiological roles of acetylated proteins in biochemical pathways. In addition to discussing the cellular 'acetylome', a focus of this work is to present the widespread and dynamic nature of lysine acetylation and highlight the nexus that exists between epigenetic-directed transcriptional regulation and metabolism.

  19. Severe dietary lysine restriction affects growth and body composition and hepatic gene expression for nitrogen metabolism in growing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J; Lee, K S; Kwon, D-H; Bong, J J; Jeong, J Y; Nam, Y S; Lee, M S; Liu, X; Baik, M

    2014-02-01

    Dietary lysine restriction may differentially affect body growth and lipid and nitrogen metabolism, depending on the degree of lysine restriction. This study was conducted to examine the effect of dietary lysine restriction on growth and lipid and nitrogen metabolism with two different degree of lysine restriction. Isocaloric amino acid-defined diets containing 1.4% lysine (adequate), 0.70% lysine (50% moderate lysine restriction) and 0.35% lysine (75% severe lysine restriction) were fed from the age of 52 to 77 days for 25 days in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The 75% severe lysine restriction increased (p muscle lipid contents and abdominal fat accumulation, increased (p  0.05) affect body growth and lipid and nitrogen metabolism. Our results demonstrate that severe 75% lysine restriction has detrimental effects on body growth and deregulate lipid and nitrogen metabolism.

  20. Improved enrichment for recovery of Shigella sonnei from foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlman, I J; Romero, A; Wentz, B A

    1985-01-01

    Shigella species were recovered from foods by the procedure described in the Bacteriological Analytical Manual, 5th Ed. The method is effective if Shigella species are present at about 10(6) cells/g. A 25 g food portion was incubated in Gram-negative (GN) and selenite cystine broths for 16 h at 35 degrees C and streaked onto MacConkey, Levine's eosin methylene blue, desoxycholate citrate, and xylose lysine desoxycholate agars. S. sonnei cells were recovered quantitatively at 44.5 degrees C, and along with other Shigella species, were grown with Escherichia coli in a tryptone broth under anaerobic conditions. Shigella species were also grown in a mixed microflora from foods. S. sonnei cells were inoculated into an enrichment broth containing 20 g tryptone, 2 g K2HPO4, 2 g KH2PO4, 1 g glucose, 5 g NaCl, 1.5 mL Tween 80, and 0.5 mg novobiocin/L (pH 7.0) and incubated for 20 h at 44 degrees C. Enrichments were streaked onto MacConkey agar and the plates were incubated 20 h at 35 degrees C. Suspect Shigella colonies were screened in glucose, tryptone, and lysine broths and in triple sugar iron and motility agars. The sensitivity varied from 0.3 to 1000 bacteria/g. The method has been examined with artificially inoculated lettuce, celery, brussels sprouts, mushrooms, and hamburger. It is also applicable to S. flexneri if incubation is conducted at 42 degrees C.

  1. Cytotoxic effect of desoxycholic acid on pancreatic acinar cells and its influence on the activity of nuclear transcription factors%脱氧胆酸对胰腺腺泡细胞的损伤及核转录因子活性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张桂信; 陈海龙; 曹传海; 林小洋; 张利; 纪军; 王永鹏

    2011-01-01

    目的 观察脱氧胆酸(DCA)对AR42J胰腺腺泡细胞的损伤作用并探讨其对核转录因子(TF)活性的影响。方法 应用噻唑蓝(MTT)比色法检测DCA作用下细胞存活率改变,流式细胞术AV/PI双染法检测细胞的凋亡/坏死率。细胞经0.4mmoL/L DCA分别作用15 min、30 min、4h后收集培液上清,收集细胞并提取细胞质和细胞核蛋白,分别检测培液上清和胞质淀粉酶的活性,利用Luminex检测细胞核TF的DNA结合活性。结果 DCA对AR42J胰腺腺泡细胞的损伤作用呈浓度和时间依赖性,对细胞质内和培液中的淀粉酶水平无明显影响。在检测的40种TF活性变化中,DCA诱导ATF2、AR33、STAT5、NFAT、FKHR和NKX-2.5这6种TF活性明显升高,而RUNX/AML、NF-Y、MEF2和E2F1这4种TF活性则明显下降,其余30种TF活性无明显变化。结论 DCA对腺泡细胞的损伤作用主要表现为凋亡和坏死,对细胞内酶的合成和分泌功能没有明显影响。DCA诱导细胞核TF活性的变化,可能是其诱导细胞损伤的分子生物学基础。%Objective To study the cytotoxic effect of desoxycholic acid (DCA) on pancreatic acinar cells AR42J, its impact on the synthesis and secretion function of amylase, and the influence on the activity of nuclear transcription factor (TF). MethodsThe cytotoxic effect of DCS was detected in rat AR42J cells by using methyl thiazol tetrazolium (MTT) assay. The rate of apoptosis or necrosis was determined by flow cytometry. After the cells were incubated with DCA (0. 4 mmol/L) for 15 min, 30 min, or 4 h, the medium was collected to detect the activity of amylase. The cytoplamic protein was extracted to detect the activity of amylase, and nuclear protein was extracted to detect the DNA binding activity of 40 TFs by Luminex. Results DCA exerted cytotoxic effects on AR42J cells in a time-and dose-dependent manner, and induced cell apoptosis and necrosis. DCA had no significant influence on the amylase synthesis and secretion

  2. Impact of dry heating on physicochemical properties of corn starch and lysine mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ying; Yu, Jicheng; Xu, Yongbin; Zhang, Yinghui

    2016-10-01

    Corn starch was modified with lysine by dry heat treatment and to investigate how they can affect the pasting and structural properties of the treated starches. Dry heating with lysine reduced the pasting temperature and resulting in viscosity increase. The particle size of heated starch-lysine mixture increased, suggesting that starch granules were cross-linked to lysine. After dry heating, the onset temperature, peak temperature and conclusion temperature of corn starch-lysine mixture were lower than those of other starches. The degree of crystallinity decreased for the starch after dry heat treatment while these heated starch samples still have the same X-ray diffraction types as the original starch.

  3. Evaluation of several modifications of an ecometric technique for assessment of media performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornacki, Jeffrey L; Gurtler, Joshua B; Yan, Zhinong; Cooper, Chad M

    2003-09-01

    Recovery of Listeria monocytogenes 101M, Jonesia denitrificans, salmonellae, and Pediococcus sp. NRRL B-2354 across nine media was evaluated with three modified versions of an ecometric method. Two approaches involved the use of broth cultures (10(8) to 10(9) CFU/ml) of individual strains and either large (10-microl) or small (1-microl) presterilized plastic loops. The third approach involved precultured slants and the inoculation of media with presterilized plastic inoculating needles (10(4) CFU per needle). Absolute growth indices (AGIs) were compared. No significant differences (P agar supplemented with 0.6% yeast extract (TSAYE) was used for the recovery of L. monocytogenes, J. denitrificans, Pediococcus sp. NRRL B-2354, and Salmonella spp. However, the small loop-broth technique recovered significantly fewer Salmonella enterica Typhimurium DT104 and Salmonella Senftenberg 775W cells than the other two techniques did. The performance of each individual bacterial strain on each of nine media was assayed. The recovery of L. monocytogenes was excellent (AGI > 4.8) with TSAYE, PALCAM, modified Oxford medium (MOX), and Baird-Parker agar and slight with modified PRAB (AGI = 0.4) and deMan Rogosa Sharpe (MRS) agar (lysine iron agar [MLIA], xylose lysine desoxycholate [XLD] agar, and xylose lysine tergitol 4 [XLT4] agar). The recovery of J. denitrificans with TSAYE and MOX was excellent, significantly better than that achieved with PALCAM (AGI = 3.0), but the organism was not recovered with Baird-Parker agar or with the other media tested. The recovery of Pediococcus sp. NRRL B-2354 was excellent with TSAYE and modified PRAB medium > Baird-Parker agar > acidified MRS agar, but the organism was not recovered with any of the other media tested. The best recovery of S. enterica Typhimurium DT104 was achieved with TSAYE > MLIA > or = XLD agar > or = XLT4 agar > Baird-Parker > PALCAM, MOX, acidified MRS agar, modified PRAB, and MRS agar. The best recovery of Salmonella

  4. Evaluation of modified dichloran 18% glycerol (DG18) agar for enumerating fungi in wheat flour: a collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuchat, L R; Hwang, C A

    1996-04-01

    Dichloran 18% glycerol agar base supplemented with 100 micrograms of chloramphenicol ml-1 (DG18 agar) was compared to DG18 agar supplemented with 100 micrograms of Triton X-301 ml-1 (DG18T) and DG18 agar supplemented with 1 microgram of iprodione [3-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-N-(1-methyl-ethyl)-2,4-dioxo-1-imidazolidine- carboxamide] ml-1 (DG18I agar) for enumeration of fungi in ten brands of wheat flour. As the flours contained low fungal populations, all were inoculated with two to four strains of xerophilic fungi (Aspergillus candidus, A. penicillioides, Eurotium amstelodami, E. intermedium, E. repens, E. rubrum, E. tonophilum, E. umbrosum and Wallemia sebi), after which counts ranged from 3.87 to 6.37 log10 CFU g-1. Significantly higher populations (p < 0.05) were detected in four flours: three were on DG18T compared to DG18 and DG18I agar. A. candidus had been inoculated into all three flours. E. amstelodami, E. intermedium, E. repens or E. tonophilum had also been inoculated into at least one of the three flours showing significantly higher numbers of CFU on DG18T agar. Analysis of collapsed data from all samples showed that DG18T agar was significantly better than DG18 or DG18I agars at p < 0.10 but not at p < 0.05. Coefficients of variation for reproducibility (among-laboratory variation) were 8.4%, 7.5% and 8.6%, respectively, for DG18, DG18T and DG18I agars. DG18I agar restricted colony development most, especially for Eurotium species. Naturally occurring Penicillium species grew equally well on DG18 and DG18T agars, whereas W. sebi grew well on all three media. DG18T agar was judged to be superior to DG18 and DG18I agars for enumerating fungi in wheat flours.

  5. Mass production of spores of lactic acid-producing Rhizopus oryzae NBRC 5384 on agar plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Ryosuke

    2013-01-01

    Mass production of sporangiospores (spores) of Rhizopus oryzae NBRC 5384 (identical to NRRL 395 and ATCC 9363) on potato-dextrose-agar medium was studied aiming at starting its L(+)-lactic acid fermentation directly from spore inoculation. Various parameters including harvest time, sowed spore density, size of agar plate, height of air space, and incubation mode of plate (agar-on-bottom or agar-on-top) were studied. Ordinarily used shallow Petri dishes were found out to be unsuitable for the full growth of R. oryzae sporangiophores. In a very wide range of the sowed spore density, the smaller it was, the greater the number of the harvested spores was. It was also interesting to find out that R. oryzae grown downward vertically with a deep air space in an agar-on-top mode gave larger amount of spores than in an agar-on-bottom mode at 30°C for 7-day cultivation. Scale-up of the agar plate culture from 26.4 to 292 cm(2) was studied, resulting in the proportional relationship between the number of the harvested spores/plate and the plate area in the deep Petri dishes. The number of plates of 50 cm in diameter needed for 100 m(3) industrial submerged fermentation started directly from 2 × 10(5) spores/mL inoculum size was estimated as about 6, from which it was inferred that such a fermentation would be feasible. Designing a 50 cm plate and a method of spreading and collecting the spores were suggested. Bioprocess technological significance of the "full-scale industrial submerged fermentation started directly from spore inoculation omitting pre-culture" has been discussed.

  6. Evaluation of CP Chromo Select Agar for the enumeration of Clostridium perfringens from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manafi, Mammad; Waldherr, Kerstin; Kundi, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The European Directive on drinking water quality has included mCP agar as the reference method for recovering Clostridium perfringens from drinking waters. In the present study, three media (mCP, TSCF and CP Chromo Select Agar) were evaluated for recovery of C. perfringens in different surface water samples. Out of 139 water samples, using a membrane filtration technique, 131 samples (94.2%) were found to be presumptively positive for C. perfringens in at least one of the culture media. Green colored colonies on CP Chromo Select Agar (CCP agar) were counted as presumptive C. perfringens isolates. Out of 483 green colonies on CCP agar, 96.3% (465 strains, indole negative) were identified as C. perfringens, and 15 strains (3.1%) were indole positive and were identified as Clostridium sordellii, Clostridium bifermentans or Clostridium tetani. Only 3 strains (0.6%) gave false positive results and were identified as Clostridium fallax, Clostridium botulinum, and Clostridium tertium. Variance analysis of the data obtained shows statistically no significant differences in the counts obtained between media employed in this work. The mCP method is very onerous for routine screening and bacterial colonies could not be used for further biochemical testing. The colonies on CCP and TSCF were easy to count and subculture for confirmation tests. TSCF detects sulfite-reducing clostridia, including species other than C. perfringens, and in some cases excessive blackening of the agar frustrated counting of the colonies. If the contamination was too high, TSCF did not consistently produce black colonies and as a consequence, the colonies were white and gave false negative results. On the other hand, the identification of typical and atypical colonies isolated from all media demonstrated that CCP agar was the most useful medium for C. perfringens recovery in water samples.

  7. McKay agar enables routine quantification of the 'Streptococcus milleri' group in cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Christopher D; Grinwis, Margot E; Field, Tyler R; Parkins, Michael D; Norgaard, Jens C; Gregson, Daniel B; Rabin, Harvey R; Surette, Michael G

    2010-05-01

    The 'Streptococcus milleri' group (SMG) has recently been recognized as a contributor to bronchopulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis (CF). Routine detection and quantification is limited by current CF microbiology protocols. McKay agar was developed previously for the semi-selective isolation of this group. Here, McKay agar was validated against a panel of clinical SMG isolates, which revealed improved SMG recovery compared with Columbia blood agar. The effectiveness of this medium was evaluated by appending it to the standard CF sputum microbiology protocols in a clinical laboratory for a 6-month period. All unique colony types were isolated and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Whilst a wide variety of organisms were isolated, members of the SMG were the most prevalent bacteria cultured, and McKay agar allowed routine quantification of the SMG from 10(3) to >10(8) c.f.u. ml(-1) directly from sputum. All members of the SMG were detected [Streptococcus anginosus (40.7 %), Streptococcus intermedius (34.3 %) and Streptococcus constellatus (25 %)] with an overall prevalence rate of 40.6 % in our adult CF population. Without exception, samples where SMG isolates were cultured at 10(7) c.f.u. ml(-1) or greater were associated with pulmonary exacerbations. This study demonstrates that McKay agar can be used routinely to quantify the SMG from complex clinical samples.

  8. Long-term biological hydrogen production by agar immobilized Rhodobacter capsulatus in a sequential batch photobioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkahlout, Kamal; Alipour, Siamak; Eroglu, Inci; Gunduz, Ufuk; Yucel, Meral

    2017-04-01

    In this study, agar immobilization technique was employed for biological hydrogen production using Rhodobacter capsulatus DSM 1710 (wild type) and YO3 (hup-mutant) strains in sequential batch process. Different agar and glutamate concentrations were tested with defined nutrient medium. Agar concentration 4% (w/v) and 4 mM glutamate were selected for bacterial immobilization in terms of rate and longevity of hydrogen production. Acetate concentration was increased from 40 to 60-100 and 60 mM gave best results with both bacterial strains immobilized in 4% (w/v) agar. Cell concentration was increased from 2.5 to 5 mg dcw mL(-1) agar and it was found that increasing cell concentration of wild-type strain caused decrease in yield and productivity while these parameters improved by increasing cell concentration of mutant strain. Also, the hydrogen production time has extended from 17 days up to 60 days according to the process conditions and parameters. Hydrogen production by immobilized photosynthetic bacteria is a convenient technology for hydrogen production as it enables to produce hydrogen with high organic acid concentrations comparing to suspended cultures. Besides, immobilization increases the stability of the system and allowed sequential batch operation for long-term application.

  9. Preparation and characterization of bio-nanocomposite films of agar and silver nanoparticles: laser ablation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, Jong-Whan; Wang, Long-Feng; Lee, Yonghoon; Hong, Seok-In

    2014-03-15

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were prepared by a laser ablation method and composite films with the AgNPs and agar were prepared by solvent casting method. UV-vis absorbance test and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis results revealed that non-agglomerated spherical AgNPs were formed by the laser ablation method. The surface color of the resulting agar/AgNPs films exhibited the characteristic plasmonic effect of the AgNPs with the maximum absorption peaks of 400-407 nm. X-ray diffraction (XRD) test results also exhibited characteristic AgNPs crystals with diffraction peaks observed at 2θ values of 38.39°, 44.49°, and 64.45°, which were corresponding to (111), (200), and (220) crystallographic planes of face-centered cubic (fcc) silver crystals, respectively. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) results showed that thermal stability of the agar/AgNPs composite films was increased by the inclusion of metallic silver. Water vapor barrier properties and surface hydrophobicity of the agar/AgNPs films increased slightly with the increase in AgNPs content but they were not statistically significant (p>0.05), while mechanical strength and stiffness of the composite films decreased slightly (p<0.05). The agar/AgNPs films exhibited distinctive antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive (Listeria monocytogenes) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli O157:H7) bacterial pathogens.

  10. Antimicrobial and physical-mechanical properties of agar-based films incorporated with grapefruit seed extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanmani, Paulraj; Rhim, Jong-Whan

    2014-02-15

    The use of synthetic petroleum based packaging films caused serious environmental problems due to their difficulty in recycling and poor biodegradability. Therefore, present study was aimed to develop natural biopolymer-based antimicrobial packaging films as an alternative for the synthetic packaging films. As a natural antimicrobial agent, grapefruit seed extract (GSE) has been incorporated into agar to prepare antimicrobial packaging film. The films with different concentrations of GSE were prepared by a solvent casting method and the resulting composite films were examined physically and mechanically. In addition, the films were characterized by FE-SEM, XRD, FT-IR and TGA. The incorporation of GSE caused increase in color, UV barrier, moisture content, water solubility and water vapor permeability, while decrease in surface hydrophobicity, tensile strength and elastic modulus of the films. As the concentration of GSE increased from 0.6 to 13.3 μg/mL, the physical and mechanical properties of the films were affected significantly. The addition of GSE changed film microstructure of the film, but did not influence the crystallinity of agar and thermal stability of the agar-based films. The agar/GSE films exhibited distinctive antimicrobial activity against three test food pathogens, such as Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli. These results suggest that agar/GSE films have potential to be used in an active food packaging systems for maintaining food safety and extending the shelf-life of the packaged food.

  11. Effects of shape and size of agar gels on heating uniformity during pulsed microwave treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Reyes, Nohemí; Temis-Pérez, Ana L; López-Malo, Aurelio; Rojas-Laguna, Roberto; Sosa-Morales, María Elena

    2015-05-01

    Model gel systems with different shape (sphere, cylinder, and slab) and size (180 and 290 g) were prepared with agar (5%) and sucrose (5%). Dielectric constant (ε'), loss factor (ε"), thermophysical properties, and temperature distribution of the model system were measured. Each agar model system was immersed and suspended in water, and then, heated in a microwave oven with intermittent heating until the core temperature reached 50 °C. The ε' and ε" of agar gels decreased when frequency increased. The density and thermal conductivity values of the agar gels were 1033 kg/m(3) and 0.55 W/m °C, respectively. The temperature distribution of sphere, cylinder, and slab was different when similar power doses were applied. The slab reached 50 °C in less time (10 min) and showed a more uniform heating than spheres and cylinders in both sizes. Agar model systems of 180 g heated faster than those of 290 g. The coldest point was the center of the model systems in all studied cases. Shape and size are critical food factors that affect the heating uniformity during microwave heating processes.

  12. Novel grafted agar disks for the covalent immobilization of β-D-galactosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahba, Marwa I; Hassan, Mohamed E

    2015-12-01

    Novel grafted agar disks were prepared for the covalent immobilization of β-D-galactosidase (β-gal). The agar disks were activated through reacting with ethylenediamine or different molecular weights of Polyethyleneimine (PEI), followed by glutaraldehyde (GA). The modification of the agar gel and the binding of the enzyme were verified by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and elemental analysis. Moreover, the agar's activation process was optimized, and the amount of immobilized enzyme increased 3.44 folds, from 38.1 to 131.2 U/g gel, during the course of the optimization process. The immobilization of β-gal onto the activated agar disks caused its optimum temperature to increase from 45°C to 45-55°C. The optimum pH of the enzyme was also shifted towards the acidic side (3.6-4.6) after its immobilization. Additionally, the Michaelis-Menten constant (Km ) increased for the immobilized β-gal as compared to its free counterpart whereas the maximum reaction rate (Vmax ) decreased. The immobilized enzyme was also shown to retain 92.99% of its initial activity after being used for 15 consecutive times.

  13. Strategies to improve the mechanical strength and water resistance of agar films for food packaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ana M M; Gonçalves, Maria P

    2015-11-05

    Agar films possess several properties adequate for food packaging applications. However, their high cost-production and quality variations caused by physiological and environmental factors affecting wild seaweeds make them less attractive for industries. In this work, native (NA) and alkali-modified (AA) agars obtained from sustainably grown seaweeds (integrated multi-trophic aquaculture) were mixed with locust bean gum (LBG) to make 'knife-coated' films with fixed final concentration (1 wt%) and variable agar/LBG ratios. Agar films were easier to process upon LBG addition (viscosity increase and gelling character decrease of the film-forming solutions observed by dynamic oscillatory and steady shear measurements). The mechanical properties and water resistance were optimal for films with 50 and/or 75% LBG contents and best in the case of NA (cheaper to extract). These findings can help reduce the cost-production of agar packaging films. Moreover, the controlled cultivation of seaweeds can provide continuous and reliable feedstock for transformation industries.

  14. Characterization of bionanocomposite films prepared with agar and paper-mulberry pulp nanocellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Jeevan Prasad; Rhim, Jong-Whan

    2014-09-22

    Crystallized nanocellulose (CNC) was separated from paper-mulberry (Broussonetia kazinoki Siebold) bast pulp by sulfuric acid hydrolysis method and they were blended with agar to prepare bionanocomposite films. The effect of CNC content (1, 3, 5 and 10 wt% based on agar) on the mechanical, water vapor permeability (WVP), and thermal properties of the nanocomposites were studied. Changes of the cellulose fibers in structure, morphology, crystallinity, and thermal properties of the films were evaluated using FT-IR, TEM, SEM, XRD, and TGA analysis methods. The CNC was composed of fibrous and spherical or elliptic granules of nano-cellulose with sizes of 50-60 nm. Properties of agar film such as mechanical and water vapor barrier properties were improved significantly (p<0.05) by blending with the CNC. The tensile modulus and tensile strength of agar film increased by 40% and 25%, respectively, in the composite film with 5 wt% of CNC, and the WVP of agar film decreased by 25% after formation of nanocomposite with 3 wt% of CNC. The CNC obtained from the paper-mulberry bast pulp can be used as a reinforcing agent for the preparation of bio-nanocomposites, and they have a high potential for the development of completely biodegradable food packaging materials.

  15. Lysine metabolism in antisense C-hordein barley grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Daiana; Rizzi, Vanessa; Gaziola, Salete A

    2015-01-01

    ) and five antisense C-hordein transgenic barley lines. Considering the amounts of soluble and protein-bound aspartate-derived amino acids together with the analysis of key enzymes of aspartate metabolic pathway, we suggest that the C-hordein suppression did not only alter the metabolism of at least one......The grain proteins of barley are deficient in lysine and threonine due to their low concentrations in the major storage protein class, the hordeins, especially in the C-hordein subgroup. Previously produced antisense C-hordein transgenic barley lines have an improved amino acid composition......, with increased lysine, methionine and threonine contents. The objective of the study was to investigate the possible changes in the regulation of key enzymes of the aspartate metabolic pathway and the contents of aspartate-derived amino acids in the nontransgenic line (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Golden Promise...

  16. Coacervate-like microspheres from lysine-rich proteinoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlfing, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    Microspheres form isothermally from lysine-rich proteinoid when the ionic strength of the solution is increased with NaCl or other salts. Studies with different monovalent anions and with polymers of different amino acid composition indicate that charge neutralization and hydrophobic bonding contribute to microsphere formation. The particles also form in sea water, especially if heated or made slightly alkaline. The microspheres differ from those made from acidic proteinoid but resemble coacervate droplets in some ways (isothermal formation, limited stability, stabilization by quinone, uptake of dyes). Because the constituent lysine-rich proteinoid is of simulated prebiotic origin, the study is interpreted to add emphasis to and suggest an evolutionary continuity for coacervation phenomena.

  17. Improvement of Karmali agar by addition of polymyxin B for the detection of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli in whole-chicken carcass rinse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Jung-Whan; Kim, Hyunsook; Yim, Jin-Hyeok; Song, Kwang-Young; Moon, Jin-San; Kim, Young-Jo; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2013-05-01

    The Karmali agar was modified by supplementation with a high concentration of polymyxin B. The goal of the study was to evaluate the effect of a high concentration of polymyxin B on the ability and selectivity of the modified Karmali agar to isolate Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli from whole chicken carcass rinse. A total of 80 whole chickens were rinsed with 400 mL of buffer peptone water. The rinsed samples were incubated with 2× blood-free modified Bolton enrichment broth for 48 h, and then streaked onto unmodified Karmali agar and modified Karmali agar supplemented with 100000 IU/L polymixin B (P-Karmali agar). The suspected colonies were finally confirmed by colony PCR. The P-Karmali agar exhibited a significantly better (P agar (P-Karmali agar, 73.8%; unmodified Karmali agar, 33.8%). Moreover, the selectivity of the P-Karmali agar was also better (P agar when comparing the number of contaminated plates (P-Karmali agar, 68.8%; unmodified Karmali agar, 87.5%) and growth index of competing flora (P-Karmali agar, 1.4; unmodified Karmali agar, 2.7). The improved selective agar excluded competing flora resistant to antibiotic agents in unmodified Karmali agar, increasing isolation rate and selectivity for C. jejuni and C. coli.

  18. Cost-effective nanoporous Agar-Agar polymer/Nickel powder composite particle for effective bio-products adsorption by expanded bed chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, Setareh; Jahanshahi, Mohsen; Rahimpour, Ahmad

    2014-09-26

    In the present work a novel kind of dense nanoporous composite matrix for expanded bed application has been successfully first prepared with Nickel powder as a densifier and was covered with Agar-Agar layer as a skeleton, through the method of water-in-oil emulsification. Agar-Agar is a porous and inexpensive polymer. In order to fabricate cost-effective adsorbent with favorable qualities Agar-Agar polymer was used. Thereafter, the customized composite particle was modified by pseudo-affinity dye-ligand, Reactive Blue 4 (RB4), aimed at preparing a pseudo-affinity adsorbent (RB4-Agar-Ni) for bioprodut adsorption from aqueous solution. Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) was selected as a model protein to investigate the adsorption behavior in batchwise and expanded bed chromatography, and the obtained results were evaluated with that of Streamline™ (Amersham-Pharmacia Biotech, Sweden). Spherical appearance and porous structure of composite particles were observed by the optical microscope (OM) and scanning electronic microscope (SEM). The results suggested that the matrices followed the logarithmic normal size distribution with the range of 65-300 μm and average diameter of 126.81-151.47 μm, proper wet density of 1.64-2.78 g/ml, water content of 62.74-34%, porosity of 98-90% and pore size of about 38-130 nm. For better comprehension of the impact of solid phase properties on the performance of the expanded bed, the expansion and hydrodynamic properties of a composite matrix with a series of densities was evaluated and estimated by the retention time distribution method (RTD) in an expanded bed and was compared with that of other matrices. According to obtained results the expansion factors under the same fluid velocity decreased by increasing the matrix density. Moreover, the axial dispersion coefficient (Dax) is the most appropriate parameter for evaluating the stability of expanded bed, on various operating conditions, such as different flow velocity, bed expansion

  19. Time domain NMR study of Agar-gelatin blends; Estudo por RMN no dominio do tempo de blendas de Agar- gelatina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattos, Ritamara; Pericini, H.A.; Tambelli, Caio E., E-mail: tambelli@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Pirassununga, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Zootecnia e Engenharia de Alimentos; Raphael, Ellen [Universidade Federal de Sao Joao del Rei (UFSJ), MG (Brazil). Departamento de Ciencias Naturais; Magon, Claudio J.; Donoso, P. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2015-07-01

    This communication presents results of {sup 1}H time domain nuclear magnetic resonance of Agar-Gelatin blends plasticised with glycerol, cross-linked with formaldehyde and containing acetic acid. The spin-spin relaxation decay curves of samples obtained from CPMG experiments were inverted into corresponding distributions of relaxation times using NNLS (Non Negative Least Square) algorithm. The continuous distributions reveals up to four components of spin-spin relaxation times (T{sub 2}). The two components at short T{sub 2} were associated with protons in different environments of Agar and gelatin polymer chain. The two components at longer T{sub 2} can be associated with the glycerol that is the responsible to promote the proton conduction in the blend. (author)

  20. Modification of Karmali agar by supplementation with potassium clavulanate for the isolation of Campylobacter from chicken carcass rinses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Jung-Whan; Kim, Hong-Seok; Kim, Dong-Hyeon; Kim, Hyunsook; Choi, In-Soo; Oh, Deog-Hwan; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2014-07-01

    The detection ability and selectivity of Karmali agar was improved by supplementation of an extended-spectrum β-lactamase inhibitor, potassium clavulanate. The optimum concentration of potassium clavulanate (0.5 μg/ml) in Karmali agar was determined by inoculation of 50 Campylobacter and 30 extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing E. coli strains onto normal and modified Karmali agar containing various concentrations of the agent. Eighty retail carcasses were rinsed with 400 ml of buffered peptone water. The rinse samples were enriched in 2 × blood-free Bolton enrichment broth at 42°C for 48 h and then were streaked onto normal and modified Karmali agar containing 0.5 μg/ml potassium clavulanate. The suspicious colonies were subcultured on Columbia blood agar and confirmed by colony PCR. In chicken carcass samples, the modified Karmali agar showed a significantly greater isolation rate than normal Karmali agar (42.5 versus 21.3%; P agar was also significantly higher (P agar, as seen by comparison of the number of contaminated agar plates (83.8 versus 97.5%) and the growth index (1.67 versus 2.91) of the non-Campylobacter colonies.

  1. PLMD: An updated data resource of protein lysine modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haodong; Zhou, Jiaqi; Lin, Shaofeng; Deng, Wankun; Zhang, Ying; Xue, Yu

    2017-05-20

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) occurring at protein lysine residues, or protein lysine modifications (PLMs), play critical roles in regulating biological processes. Due to the explosive expansion of the amount of PLM substrates and the discovery of novel PLM types, here we greatly updated our previous studies, and presented a much more integrative resource of protein lysine modification database (PLMD). In PLMD, we totally collected and integrated 284,780 modification events in 53,501 proteins across 176 eukaryotes and prokaryotes for up to 20 types of PLMs, including ubiquitination, acetylation, sumoylation, methylation, succinylation, malonylation, glutarylation, glycation, formylation, hydroxylation, butyrylation, propionylation, crotonylation, pupylation, neddylation, 2-hydroxyisobutyrylation, phosphoglycerylation, carboxylation, lipoylation and biotinylation. Using the data set, a motif-based analysis was performed for each PLM type, and the results demonstrated that different PLM types preferentially recognize distinct sequence motifs for the modifications. Moreover, various PLMs synergistically orchestrate specific cellular biological processes by mutual crosstalks with each other, and we totally found 65,297 PLM events involved in 90 types of PLM co-occurrences on the same lysine residues. Finally, various options were provided for accessing the data, while original references and other annotations were also present for each PLM substrate. Taken together, we anticipated the PLMD database can serve as a useful resource for further researches of PLMs. PLMD 3.0 was implemented in PHP + MySQL and freely available at http://plmd.biocuckoo.org. Copyright © 2017 Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Genetics Society of China. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Antimicrobial activity of honey from the stingless bee Trigona carbonaria determined by agar diffusion, agar dilution, broth microdilution and time-kill methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boorn, K L; Khor, Y-Y; Sweetman, E; Tan, F; Heard, T A; Hammer, K A

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the spectrum of antimicrobial activity of 11 samples of stingless bee honey compared to medicinal, table and artificial honeys. Activity was assessed by agar diffusion, agar dilution, broth microdilution and time-kill viability assays. By agar dilution, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ranges were 4% to >10% (w/v) for Gram-positive bacteria, 6% to >16% (w/v) for Gram-negative bacteria and 6% to >10% (w/v) for Candida spp. By broth microdilution, all organisms with the exception of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata were inhibited at bee honeys ranged from 7.1% to 16.0% and were 11.7% for medicinal honey and 26.5% for table honey. Treatment of organisms with 20% (w/v) stingless bee honey for 60 min resulted in decreases of 1-3 log for Staphylococcus aureus, >3 log for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and honey resulted in decreases of bee honey has broad-spectrum antibacterial activity although activity against Candida was limited. Stingless bee honey samples varied in activity and the basis for this remains to be determined. Stingless bee honey had similar activity to medicinal honey and may therefore have a role as a medicinal agent.

  3. Synthesis and Phase Behavior of Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-b-Poly(L-Lysine Hydrochloride) and Poly(N-Isopropylacrylamide-co-Acrylamide)-b-Poly(L-Lysine Hydrochloride)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spasojevic, Milica; Vorenkamp, Eltjo; Jansen, Mark R. P. A. C. S.; de Vos, Paul; Schouten, Arend Jan

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-b-poly(L-lysine) and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide- co-acrylamide)-b-poly(L-lysine) copolymers was accomplished by combining atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and ring opening polymerization (ROP). For this purpose, a di-functional initiator with p

  4. Glass bead cultivation of fungi: combining the best of liquid and agar media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droce, Aida; Sørensen, Jens Laurids; Giese, Henriette; Sondergaard, Teis Esben

    2013-09-01

    Production of bioactive compounds and enzymes from filamentous fungi is highly dependent on cultivation conditions. Here we present an easy way to cultivate filamentous fungi on glass beads that allow complete control of nutrient supply. Secondary metabolite production in Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium solani cultivated on agar plates, in shaking liquid culture or on glass beads was compared. Agar plate culture and glass bead cultivation yielded comparable results while liquid culture had lower production of secondary metabolites. RNA extraction from glass beads and liquid cultures was easier than from agar plates and the quality was superior. The system allows simple control of nutrient availability throughout fungal cultivation. This combined with the ease of extraction of nucleic acids and metabolites makes the system highly suitable for the study of gene regulation in response to specific nutrient factors. © 2013.

  5. Expression of an accessory cell phenotype by hairy cells during lymphocyte colony formation in agar culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farcet, J P; Gourdin, M F; Testa, U; Andre, C; Jouault, H; Reyes, F

    1983-01-01

    Human T lymphocytes require the cooperation of accessory cells to generate lymphocyte colonies in agar culture under PHA stimulation. Various hairy cell enriched fractions, as well as normal monocytes, have been found to be able to initiate colony formation by normal lymphocytes. Leukemic monocytes from CMML patients were also effective, but not the leukemic lymphocytes from CLL patients. The phenotype expressed by HC in agar colonies was further studied using cell surface and enzymatic markers. We have concluded that HC in agar culture in the presence of both normal T lymphocytes and PHA lose the B phenotype that they express in vivo and function like an accessory cell in contrast to normal or leukemic B lymphocytes.

  6. Homogeneous matrix deposition on dried agar for MALDI imaging mass spectrometry of microbial cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Thomas; Dorrestein, Pieter C

    2015-11-01

    Matrix deposition on agar-based microbial colonies for MALDI imaging mass spectrometry is often complicated by the complex media on which microbes are grown. This Application Note demonstrates how consecutive short spray pulses of a matrix solution can form an evenly closed matrix layer on dried agar. Compared with sieving dry matrix onto wet agar, this method supports analyte cocrystallization, which results in significantly more signals, higher signal-to-noise ratios, and improved ionization efficiency. The even matrix layer improves spot-to-spot precision of measured m/z values when using TOF mass spectrometers. With this technique, we established reproducible imaging mass spectrometry of myxobacterial cultures on nutrient-rich cultivation media, which was not possible with the sieving technique. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  7. Possible influence of surfactants and proteins on the efficiency of contact agar microbiological surface sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckers, Sylvie M; Sindic, Marianne; Anceau, Christine; Brostaux, Yves; Detry, Jean G

    2010-11-01

    Agar contact microbiological sampling techniques, based on a transfer of the microorganisms present on a surface to a culture medium, are widely used to assess and control surface cleanliness and to evaluate microbial contamination levels. The effectiveness of these techniques depends on many environmental parameters that influence the strength of attachment of the bacteria to the surface. In the present study, stainless steel and high density polyethylene surfaces were inoculated with known concentrations of Staphylococcus epidermidis. Following an experimental design, the surfaces were sampled with different types of replicate organism direct agar contact plates and Petrifilm; results indicated that recovery rates were influenced by the presence of egg white albumin or Tween 80 in the inoculum solutions or by the introduction of surfactants into the contact agar of the microbiological sampling techniques. The techniques yielded significantly different results, depending on sampling conditions, underlining the need for a standardization of laboratory experiments to allow relevant comparisons of such techniques.

  8. [Presumptive identification of Candida spp. and other clinically important yeasts: usefulness of Brilliance Candida Agar].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, Claudia; López, Mónica; Arechavala, Alicia; Perrone, María Del Carmen; Guelfand, Liliana; Bianchi, Mario

    2010-06-30

    Fungal infections caused by yeasts have increased during the last decades and invasive forms represent a serious problem for human health. Candida albicans is the species most frequently isolated from clinical samples. However, other emerging yeast pathogens are increasingly responsible for mycotic infections, and some of them are resistant to some antifungal drugs. Consequently, it is necessary to have methods that can provide a rapid presumptive identification at species level. Numerous chromogenic agar media have been shown to be of value as diagnostic tools. We have compared a chromogenic medium, Brilliance Candida Agar, with CHROMagar Candida, the chromogenic medium most used in our country. A multicentre study was conducted in 16 Hospitals belonging to the Mycology Net of Buenos Aires City Government. A total of 240 yeast isolates were included in this research. The new chromogenic agar showed results very similar to those obtained with CHROMagar Candida. Copyright 2009 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Modeling of the Bacillus subtilis Bacterial Biofilm Growing on an Agar Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial biofilms are organized communities composed of millions of microorganisms that accumulate on almost any kinds of surfaces. In this paper, a biofilm growth model on an agar substrate is developed based on mass conservation principles, Fick’s first law, and Monod’s kinetic reaction, by considering nutrient diffusion between biofilm and agar substrate. Our results show biofilm growth evolution characteristics such as biofilm thickness, active biomass, and nutrient concentration in the agar substrate. We quantitatively obtain biofilm growth dependence on different parameters. We provide an alternative mathematical method to describe other kinds of biofilm growth such as multiple bacterial species biofilm and also biofilm growth on various complex substrates.

  10. Homogeneous Matrix Deposition on Dried Agar for MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Microbial Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Thomas; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2015-11-01

    Matrix deposition on agar-based microbial colonies for MALDI imaging mass spectrometry is often complicated by the complex media on which microbes are grown. This Application Note demonstrates how consecutive short spray pulses of a matrix solution can form an evenly closed matrix layer on dried agar. Compared with sieving dry matrix onto wet agar, this method supports analyte cocrystallization, which results in significantly more signals, higher signal-to-noise ratios, and improved ionization efficiency. The even matrix layer improves spot-to-spot precision of measured m/z values when using TOF mass spectrometers. With this technique, we established reproducible imaging mass spectrometry of myxobacterial cultures on nutrient-rich cultivation media, which was not possible with the sieving technique.

  11. Digestible Lysine on Live Performance of Chicken Type Naked Neck During the Starter Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RG de Oliveira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The poultry market has changed due to a higher consumer interest on products with differentiated organoleptic characteristics, making of free-range broiler production a promising activity. This experiment was conducted to determine the digestible lysine requirements of Redbro Cou Nu male and female chickens during the starter phase (one to 21 days of age. Six hundred and thirty Redbro Cou Nu broilers were distributed into 30 pens (21 chickens/pen according to a randomized complete design in a 5 x 2 factorial arrangement, consisting of five levels of digestible lysine and two sexes, with three replicates (pens per treatments. Diets with increasing digestible lysine levels (8.1, 9.5, 10.9, 12.3 and 13.7 g of digestible lysine per kg of diet were offered ad libitum. The following performance traits were evaluated at the end of the experiment (d 21: feed intake, lysine intake, body weight gain, and feed conversion ratio. No interaction between dietary lysine level and sex was observed for the evaluated traits. The effect of sex was only detected on body weight gain, while effects of dietary lysine level were only detected on the feed intake. Males presented higher body weight gain than females. Lysine intake and body weight gain increased, and feed conversion ratio decreased as the level of dietary lysine increased. The best feed conversion ratio was obtained when birds were fed 12.95 g of digestible lysine per kg of diet.

  12. Assessment of Etest as an alternative to agar dilution for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsi; Taylor, Thomas H; Pettus, Kevin; Trees, David

    2014-05-01

    We studied whether the Etest can be used as an alternative to agar dilution to determine antimicrobial susceptibilities of ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime in Neisseria gonorrhoeae surveillance. One hundred fifteen clinical and laboratory isolates of N. gonorrhoeae were tested following the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-approved CLSI standard agar dilution method and, separately, by the Etest according to the manufacturer's recommendations. The MICs were determined and compared. Ten laboratory-generated mutants were used to simulate substantially nonsusceptible specimens. The Etest and agar dilution methods were well correlated. Statistical tests produced regression R2 values of 88%, 82%, and 85% and Pearson correlation coefficients of 92%, 91%, and 92% for ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime, respectively. When paired comparisons were made, the two tests were 88.7%, 80%, and 87% within 1 log2 dilution from each other for ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime, respectively. The within-2-log2 agreements were 99.1%, 98.3%, and 94.8% for ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime, respectively. Notwithstanding the good correlations and the within-2-log2 general agreement, the Etest results produced slightly lower MICs than the agar dilution results. In conclusion, we found that the Etest can be effectively used as an alternative to agar dilution testing to determine the susceptibility of N. gonorrhoeae to ceftriaxone, cefixime, and cefpodoxime, although we recommend further research into extremely resistant isolates. For isolates within the typical range of clinical MICs, reexamination of the Etest interpretation of susceptible and nonsusceptible categories would likely allow for successful transition from agar dilution to the Etest.

  13. Radiation effects on agar, alginates and carrageenan to be used as food additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliste, A. J. A. J.; Vieira, F. F. F. F.; Del Mastro, N. L. N. L.

    2000-03-01

    Agar, alginates and carrageenan are hydrocolloids that induce stabilization of physical properties of the food product during shelf life and prevention of undesirable changes such as moisture migration, gas cell coalescence or textural profile changes. In this work, agar, alginates and carrageenan was irradiated as powder with different doses (0-10 kGy) of Co-60 and the rheological functional performance of water solutions of these irradiated additives was studied. The results are analyzed taking in account the future applications of those additives in irradiated foods.

  14. Immobilization of lysine oxidase on a gold-platinum nanoparticles modified Au electrode for detection of lysine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, N; Narang, J; Sunny; Pundir, C S

    2013-04-10

    A commercial lysine oxidase (LyOx) from Trichoderma viride was immobilized covalently onto gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) electrodeposited onto Au electrode using 3-aminopropyltriethoxy silane (3-APTES) and glutaraldehyde cross linking chemistry. A lysine biosensor was fabricated using LyOx/3-APTES/AuNPs-PtNPs/Au electrode as a working electrode, Ag/AgCl (3M KCl) as standard electrode and Pt wire as auxiliary electrode connected through a potentiostat. The enzyme electrode was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The cumulative effect of AuNPs and PtNPs showed excellent electrocatalytic activity at low applied potential for detection of H2O2, a product of LyOx reaction. The sensor showed its optimum response within 4s, when polarized at 0.2V vs. Ag/AgCl in 0.1M phosphate buffer, pH 7.5 at 30°C. The linear range and detection limit of the sensor were 1.0-600μM and 1.0μM (S/N=3), respectively. Biosensor measured lysine level in sera, milk and amino acid tablet, which correlated well with those by standard HPLC method. The enzyme electrode lost 50% of its initial activity after 200 uses over a period of 4 months.

  15. The Sulfolobus solfataricus Lrp-like protein LysM regulates lysine biosynthesis in response to lysine availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Arie B; Bell, Stephen D; Lebbink, Robert Jan; de Vos, Willem M; van der Oost, John

    2002-08-16

    Although the archaeal transcription apparatus resembles the eukaryal RNA polymerase II system, many bacterial-like regulators can be found in archaea. Particularly, all archaeal genomes sequenced to date contain genes encoding homologues of Lrp (leucine-responsive regulatory protein). Whereas Lrp-like proteins in bacteria are involved in regulation of amino acid metabolism, their physiological role in archaea is unknown. Although several archaeal Lrp-like proteins have been characterized recently, no target genes apart from their own coding genes have been discovered yet, and no ligands for these regulators have been identified so far. In this study, we show that the Lrp-like protein LysM from Sulfolobus solfataricus is involved in the regulation of lysine and possibly also arginine biosynthesis, encoded by the lys gene cluster. Exogenous lysine is the regulatory signal for lys gene expression and specifically serves as a ligand for LysM by altering its DNA binding affinity. LysM binds directly upstream of the TFB-responsive element of the intrinsically weak lysW promoter, and DNA binding is favored in the absence of lysine, when lysWXJK transcription is maximal. The combined in vivo and in vitro data are most compatible with a model in which the bacterial-like LysM activates the eukarya-like transcriptional machinery. As with transcriptional activation by Escherichia coli Lrp, activation by LysM is apparently dependent on a co-activator, which remains to be identified.

  16. Characterization and crystal structure of lysine insensitive Corynebacterium glutamicum dihydrodipicolinate synthase (cDHDPS) protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Elena A; Bannon, Gary A; Glenn, Kevin C; Jeong, Soon Seog; Sturman, Eric J; Rydel, Timothy J

    2008-12-15

    The lysine insensitive Corynebacterium glutamicum dihydrodipicolinate synthase enzyme (cDHDPS) was recently successfully introduced into maize plants to enhance the level of lysine in the grain. To better understand lysine insensitivity of the cDHDPS, we expressed, purified, kinetically characterized the protein, and solved its X-ray crystal structure. The cDHDPS enzyme has a fold and overall structure that is highly similar to other DHDPS proteins. A noteworthy feature of the active site is the evidence that the catalytic lysine residue forms a Schiff base adduct with pyruvate. Analyses of the cDHDPS structure in the vicinity of the putative binding site for S-lysine revealed that the allosteric binding site in the Escherichia coli DHDPS protein does not exist in cDHDPS due to three non-conservative amino acids substitutions, and this is likely why cDHDPS is not feedback inhibited by lysine.

  17. Conformational Studies of ε- CBz- L- Lysine and L- Valine Block Copolypeptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Conformational studies of ε-CBz-L-lysine and L-valine block copoylpeptides using x- ray diffraction and CD spectra are described. The block copolypeptides contain valine block in the center and on both side of the valine are ε-CBz-L-lysine blocks. The conformation of the copolypeptides changes with increases in the chain length of ε- CBz-L- lysine blocks. When length of ε- CBZ- L- lysine blocks is 9, the block copolypeptide has exclusive beta sheet structure. With the increase in chain length of ε-CBz-L-lysine blocks from 9 to 14, the block copolypeptide shows presence of both alpha helix and beta sheet components. With further increase in chain length of ε- CBz- L- lysine blocks, the beta sheet component disappears and block copolypeptides exhibits exclusive α -helix conformation.

  18. Using a bacteriocin structure to engineer a phage lysin that targets Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukacik, Petra; Barnard, Travis J; Buchanan, Susan K

    2012-12-01

    Purified phage lysins present an alternative to traditional antibiotics and work by hydrolysing peptidoglycan. Phage lysins have been developed against Gram-positive pathogens such as Bacillus anthracis and Streptococcus pneumoniae, where the peptidoglycan layer is exposed on the cell surface. Addition of the lysin to a bacterial culture results in rapid death of the organism. Gram-negative bacteria are resistant to phage lysins because they contain an outer membrane that protects the peptidoglycan from degradation. We solved crystal structures of a Yersinia pestis outer-membrane protein and the bacteriocin that targets it, which informed engineering of a bacterial-phage hybrid lysin that can be transported across the outer membrane to kill specific Gram-negative bacteria. This work provides a template for engineering phage lysins against a wide variety of bacterial pathogens.

  19. Extensive lysine methylation in hyperthermophilic crenarchaea : potential implications for protein stability and recombinant enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Botting, Catherine H.; Paul Talbot; Sonia Paytubi; White, Malcolm F

    2010-01-01

    In eukarya and bacteria, lysine methylation is relatively rare and is catalysed by sequence-specific lysine methyltransferases that typically have only a single-protein target. Using RNA polymerase purified from the thermophilic crenarchaeum Sulfolobus solfataricus, we identified 21 methyllysines distributed across 9 subunits of the enzyme. The modified lysines were predominantly in alpha-helices and showed no conserved sequence context. A limited survey of the Thermoproteus tenax proteome re...

  20. [Simultaneous isolation of MRSA and Pseudomonas aeruginosa using a novel selective and differential PMAC agar].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, F; Okuda, S; Uchino, U; Muraoka, H; Hasegawa, M; Kobayashi, I

    1996-09-01

    PMAC agar, a novel, selective and differential medium has been developed and was subjected for evaluation of its selective and differential capability of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa from other bacteria such as Bacillus, Micrococcus, Gram-negative bacteria and drug resistant ones. Growth of MRSA and P. aeruginosa on PMAC agar was facilitated and their colonies were easily differentiated. Colonies of MRSA after 24 approximately 48 h incubation at 35 degrees C were small (2 to 4 mm in diameter), smooth and egg-yolk reaction positive. On the other hand, P. aeruginosa with pigment production (pyocianin, fluorescin or pyomelanin) formed large (2.5 to 7.0 mm in diameter), brownish black or brown colonies with a creamy edge. PMAC agar did not allow to grow unwanted bacteria tested except certain species formerly classified to Pseudomonas such as Burkholderia and Stenotrophomonas. However multi-drug resistant strains such as Enterobacter cloacae, Serratia marcescens and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus formed extremely small colonies. PMAC agar is recommended as a novel, useful medium for isolation, differentiation and presumptive identification of MRSA and P. aeruginosa from clinical and environmental sources.