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Sample records for lyoluminescence

  1. Lyoluminescence sensitisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galand, E.; Niezette, J.; Vanderschueren, J.

    1993-01-01

    Lyoluminescence (LL) of several carbohydrates and amino acids has been measured in water for a γ dose of respectively, 20 Gy and 50 Gy. It has been demonstrated that the LL yield depends markedly not only on the nature of the LL material but also on its commercial origin. By using solutions of organic dyes such as eosin B, rhodamine B or fluorescein, a substantial enhancement of LL has been observed with carbohydrates. Concentration effect has been investigated and maximum LL yields have been observed in the range 10 -5 -10 -4 mol. On the other hand, LL of amino acids has been increased by the use of rare earth ion solutions. Dysprosium, europium and terbium solutions have been used, but it has been proved that terbium nitrate is the most appropriate solution. Concentration effect has been studied for several amino acids and dosimetric response of glutamine has been investigated with different rare earth ions solutions. (Author)

  2. Lyoluminescence characteristics of lactose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oommen, I.K.; Sengupta, S.; Iyengar, T.S.

    1994-01-01

    The lyoluminescence (LL) of lactose shows a linear γ-ray dose response in the range 1-10 4 Gy. LL standardization measurement of lactose with a luminol sensitizer shows a sharp increase in light output in the pH range 10-11. Effects of radical scavengers and oxygen confirm that the radiation-induced free radicals take part in the LL process and oxygen is essential for initiating the LL mechanism. LL emission spectral measurements indicate an energy transfer from diffusing free radicals to sensitizer molecules to produce light. (author)

  3. Lyoluminescence characteristics of trehalose dihydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raman, Anand E-mail: anandr@apsara.barc.ernet.in; Oommen, Issac K.; Sharma, D.N

    2001-03-01

    Lyoluminescence (LL) of trehalose dihydrate showed a linear gamma ray sensitivity in the dose range 0.1-5x10{sup 2} Gy. At increased sample weight dissolved, the LL/mg showed a reduction when the microcontroller based integrated measurement system was used. The LL/mg was found to be independent of the sample weight when the instantaneous peak output observed by the electrometer amplifier on dissolution of the phosphor was taken as a measure of LL yield. The LL spectral measurement of trehalose dihydrate in luminol solution (LL sensitizer) confirms an energy transfer from the radiation induced free radicals to luminol molecule to produce light.

  4. Lyoluminescence characteristics of trehalose dihydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman, Anand; Oommen, Issac K.; Sharma, D.N.

    2001-01-01

    Lyoluminescence (LL) of trehalose dihydrate showed a linear gamma ray sensitivity in the dose range 0.1-5x10 2 Gy. At increased sample weight dissolved, the LL/mg showed a reduction when the microcontroller based integrated measurement system was used. The LL/mg was found to be independent of the sample weight when the instantaneous peak output observed by the electrometer amplifier on dissolution of the phosphor was taken as a measure of LL yield. The LL spectral measurement of trehalose dihydrate in luminol solution (LL sensitizer) confirms an energy transfer from the radiation induced free radicals to luminol molecule to produce light

  5. Lyoluminescence technique as an identification method for irradiated food stuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chazhoor, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents the studies made on the suitability of lyoluminescence technique as an analytical method for the identification of irradiated food stuffs. Powder milk, cinnamon, cardamom, clove, red chilly, cocoa, pepper, tea, coffee, turmeric and coriander showed lyoluminescence response when irradiated by a 10 kGy 60 Co and dissolved in luminol solution. Various dosimetric parameters such as effect of storage time, proportionality of the lyoluminescence response to dose etc were studied. (author). 1 tab., 3 figs

  6. Various aspects of lyoluminescence studies in radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundu, H.K.

    1992-01-01

    Lyoluminescence is the emission of light during the dissolution of irradiated organic and inorganic solids in suitable solvents. This phenomenon has attracted interdisciplinary research involving radiation physics, radiation chemistry and physical chemistry. This paper presents an overall view of the various aspects of lyoluminescence studies in the field of radiation research. (author). 14 refs

  7. Lyoluminescence in a non-aqueous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, S.M.; Ettinger, K.V.

    1990-01-01

    Lyoluminescence of mannose in water has been compared with that in water-methanol mixtures and in pure methanol. The light yield is larger in methanol by a factor, dependent upon the dose, which can reach 20 times. The yield in methanol increases with the temperature of the solvent. The nature of the dose response curve and the onset of saturation are the same. The fading on storage is faster for readout in methanol. (author)

  8. Structure and lyoluminescent reactions of free radicals of irradiated lactose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matyushkov, V.V.; Panasyuk, S.L.; Yudin, I.V.

    1983-01-01

    To determine mechanisms of processes, resulting in lyoluminescence the structure of fren radicals in γ-irradiated lactose was investigated by the method of electron paramagnetic resonance. Analysis of dependences of different radical content in irradiated crystals and lyoluminescent characteristics of these samples on the period of their storing enabled to confirm suggested earlier luminescence mechanism with lambdasub(max)=630 nm of irradiated carbon-hydrate in neutral and acid media. The possibility of controlling the content of different types of radicals in samples by lyoluminescent method was shown

  9. Lyoluminescence dosimetry of the radiation in industrial doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigna Filho, E. del.

    1984-01-01

    The γ-rays lyoluminescence (LL) dosimetry study is presented. The basic principles involved, both in the method and radiation dosimetry, the equivalence between water and lyoluminescent materials, apparatus, irradiation technique and calibration method are discussed. The LL response dependence with environmental conditions are presented. These were temperature, humidity, storage time and the dependence on dissolved mass. A pre-reading thermal treatment was developed to overcome previous difficulties. The developed technique was applied to dose intercomparisons. (M.A.C.) [pt

  10. Lyoluminescence studies using Eosin B as a sensitizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galand, E.; Niezette, J.; Vanderschueren, J.; Vanderschueren, H.W.

    1991-01-01

    Lyoluminescence of various saccharides and of glutamine has been investigated by using a home made read-out system allowing a better control of the dissolution rate. The device has been tested by measuring the weight and dose dependence of D(+) mannose and the influence of the origin of the sample. The use of eosin B solutions as a solvent shows a substantial enhancement of lyoluminescence for dextrose and xylose. (author)

  11. Lyoluminescence studies using Eosin B as a sensitizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galand, E.; Niezette, J.; Vanderschueren, J. (Inst. de Chimie, Sart Tilman, Liege (Belgium)); Vanderschueren, H.W. (Inst. d' Electrotechnique Montefiore, Sart Tilman, Liege (Belgium))

    1991-01-01

    Lyoluminescence of various saccharides and of glutamine has been investigated by using a home made read-out system allowing a better control of the dissolution rate. The device has been tested by measuring the weight and dose dependence of D(+) mannose and the influence of the origin of the sample. The use of eosin B solutions as a solvent shows a substantial enhancement of lyoluminescence for dextrose and xylose. (author).

  12. A review of lyoluminescence dosimetry and a new readout method using liquid scintillation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziemer, P.L.; Hanig, R.; Fayerman, L.K.

    1978-01-01

    Lyoluminescence dosimetry is useful as a personnel monitor and also as a neutron dosimeter. A review of lyoluminescence is given including readout systems, the machanisms of light emission, radiometric characteristics of lyoluminescence dosimeters, factor affecting response and liquid scintillation lyoluminscence readout

  13. Lyoluminescence of saccharides as a tool for large scale dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickel, Th; Pitt, E; Scharmann, A; Suprihadi, T [Giessen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). 1. Physikalisches Inst.

    1990-01-01

    Lyoluminescence, the radiation induced chemiluminescence of solids like saccharides and salts, has been proposed as a cheap dosemeter for high level dosimetry, i.e. for therapy, accident dosimetry and spice irradiation detection. The tissue-equivalence of materials, as well as the omission of pre- and post-reading handling of these low cost dosemeter materials, may be considered advantageous in comparison with other systems. Up till now one of the factors most inhibiting the introduction of lyoluminescence in routine dosimetry is the insufficiently known role of environmental influences during the solution process, leading to large standard deviations in dose readings. Investigations concerning the behaviour of two typical saccharides and the influence of oxygen on the mechanisms of lyoluminescence are reported. (author).

  14. A microcontroller based lyoluminescence recording system for high dose dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, Vaishali M.; Raman, Anand; Oommen, I.K.; Choithramani, S.J.; Sharma, D.N.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the features of a microcontroller based lyoluminescence (LL) measurement system which provides the peak yield versus time plot and the integrated light yield of the LL process. The peak yield is found to be a better measure of the LL process as compared to the integrated yield. (author)

  15. Dosimetric response of some biochemicals used as lyoluminescent dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ettinger, K.V.; Rowe, R.W.; Mallard, J.R.; Takavar, A.; Sephton, J.

    1977-01-01

    It has been found recently that a whole variety of biochemicals exhibit lyoluminescent response to ionizing and UV radiation, which can be used for the purpose of dosimetry. Among the amino acids, glutamine, glutamic acid and valine are showing good response and satisfactory stability of the stored energy i.e. stability of 'frozen' free radicals. Actually, all amino acids involved in naturally occuring proteins, which were investigated (20 compounds) show lyoluminescence to smaller or greater extent. The response is proportional to the dose in the region of 50 rad to 100 kilorad. The mechanism of lyoluminescence in amino acids is probably the same as in the saccharides; formation of free radicals in the solid, conversion to peroxy radicals and, finally generation of excited oxygen dimers on dissolution. Other categories of biochemicals which exhibit lyoluminescence (LL) are DNA, RNA and their salts, as well as some antibiotics like streptomycin, gentamycin and oxytetracycline. Those of proteins that are easily soluble in water, show a good LL response. The half-life of free radicals responsible for LL in albumins (egg, horse and human) is of an order of 24 h. However, in salmine (protamine sulphate) the decay is very slow, of an order of few month, so this material can be used as a 'protein equivalent' dosemeter. In all experiments a 60 Co source was used for irradiations. Proteins, RNA and DNA show a considerable response to UV. In experiments with UV radiation, mostly 2547 A wavelength, the response to radiation in terms of energy deposited in gramme of material was almost twice that for gamma rays of 1.33 and 1.17MeV

  16. Gamma dosimetry using lyoluminescence of Tris (hydroxymethyl) aminomethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, S.K.; Oommen, I.K.; Sengupta, S.; Soman, S.D.

    1983-01-01

    Lyoluminescence (LL) of Tris (hydroxymethyl) aminomethane has been studied and compared with the LL of glucose, mannose, valine and glutamine. Among these materials, Tris (hydroxymethyl) aminomethane on dissolution in luminol shows the highest LL sensitivity and stability. The linear dosimetric range of this system is 0.1-2x10 2 Gy which makes it useful in the fields of radiotherapy and radiation processing of food. (orig.)

  17. Variations of lyoluminescence with the commercial origin of the dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galand, E.; Niezette, J.; Vanderschueren, J.; Garsou, J.; Hoebeke, M.

    1994-01-01

    Lyoluminescence of glutamine, serine, arginine · HCl, lysine · HCl, inositol and mannose has been investigated. It has been demonstrated that the commercial origin of the sample plays an important role in the LL response. Recrystallization enhances the LL signal of the less sensitive mannose samples and reduces the dispersion of LL yields. Differences resulting from the nature and concentration of radiation-induced free radicals and from the grain size distribution cannot explain the LL variability and the change of LL yield after recrystallization. Supposed effects of water or solvent retention and traces of impurities are discussed. (author)

  18. Organic lyoluminescence dosimetry: its mechanism and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temperton, D.H.

    1983-01-01

    The lyoluminescence (LL) spectra emitted when irradiated carbohydrates were dissolved in pure water can be interpreted as the superposition of emission from singlet oxygen 'collisional pairs'. The amino acid spectra in pure water are consistent with excited carbonyl emissions. The results therefore provide further evidence that the self-reaction of peroxy radicals is the underlying mechanism of organic LL in pure water. In the presence of sensitisers, the spectra became characteristic of the sensitiser. The factors affecting the accuracy and precision of glutamine lyoluminescence dosimetry (LLD) were investigated. The dependence of the LL yield on the mass of glutamine dissolved, dosemeter irradiation temperature, solvent temperature, and on the storage time both before and after heat treatment (HT) was investigated. The participation of glutamine LLD in two IAEA intercomparisons of various high-dose measuring techniques is described and its performance assessed. The application of mannose LLD to clinical dosimetry and glutamine LLD to industrial radiation processing is discussed. Finally, a preliminary investigation was performed into the LL properties of halogenated nucleosides. (author)

  19. Studies of the properties of some saccharides for lyoluminescence dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazin, C.A.

    1983-03-01

    Alternative dosimetric methods for high doses are under investigation in a number of research centres. Dosemeters based on the phenomenon of lyoluminescence, i.e., emission of light following dissolution of irradiated organic and inorganic compounds were proposed in the 70's. In the present work, the response of several saccharides submitted to the radiation from a 60 Co source was studied. In order to carry out the study, a measuring system consisting of a light detection chamber and an electrometric unit was designed and built. Thereafter, studies concerning the change in light yield as a function of dose were carried out. Other investigated factors were the change in light yield with solvent pH and temperature and the stability of the response for long term storage. The results showed that maltose, lactose and glucose behaved properly as dosimetric materials for high dose measurements. Besides, no significant changes in the lyoluminescent response ocurred when the solvent pH and temperature varied around the usual values. These results show that the control of these parameters is not critica for the utilization of the saccharides under study for dosimetry. (Author) [pt

  20. Lyoluminescence and ESR correlation studies of trehalose dihydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raman, Anand E-mail: anandr@apsara.barc.ernet.in; Oommen, Issac K.; Gundu Rao, T.K.; Sharma, D.N

    2002-07-01

    ESR studies of irradiated lyoluminescence (LL) phosphor, trehalose dihydrate showed a linear free radical growth up to a dose of 11 kGy. The LL output measured under oxygen equilibrated conditions showed an extension of the dosimetric response from 0.6 to 6 kGy. ESR spectral analysis indicates the formation of two radical species viz., 'a' and 'b' and their involvement in the LL process. The estimated free radical concentrations of radicals 'a' and 'b' were found to be 6.81x10{sup 15} and 1.35x10{sup 16} g{sup -1}, respectively, for a gamma dose of 10.8 kGy.

  1. Lyoluminescence of tris (hydroxymethyl) aminomethane in gamma dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azorin, J.; Gutierrez, A.; Guadarrama, L.

    1986-01-01

    Gamma dosimetry using lyoluminescence (LL) has advantages over other conventional systems because of its low cost and simplicity of use. Results of the investigation of the LL properties of tris (hydroxymethyl) aminomethane irradiated with 60 Co gamma radiation are presented and compared with the results of the LL of mannose and sucrose. Tris on dissolution in luminol shows a higher LL response than that of mannose and lower than that of sucrose, and has the highest stability of the three systems. The LL response of tris was linear in the range 5 Gy to 1kGy and showed no fading during one week. A comparison with the results of other authors as well as with measurements by ESR techniques are also reported. From these results we conclude that tris (hydroxymethyl) aminomethane on dissolution in luminol provides a LL dosimetric system useful for gamma dosimetry in the radiation processing of foods. (author)

  2. Influence of electron acceptor on lyoluminescence of irradiated lithium and sodium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrts, D.P.; Dzelme, Yu.R.; Malin'sh, A.A.; Gasyavichus, I.G.; Tiliks, Yu.E.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of nitrate ions and the dissolution rate upon the stationary and non-stationary lyoluminescence has been studied for gamma-irradiated at 45 deg C and dose 10 4 Gy/h lithium and sodium fluorides when dissolving in a concentrated sulfuric acid under variuos disslution conditions. The lyoluminescence of both types is shown to depend on the acceptor concentration in the solvent and the dependence change is determined by reactions between chemically active defects at various depths of the crystal's surface layer affected by the solvent and the dissolution rate. The former reactions depend on the radiation defects' distibution in the crystal volume

  3. Accidental-radiation dosimetry by using the lyoluminescence of ordinary sugar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitt, E.; Scharmann, A.

    1987-01-01

    This investigation had the purpose to develop a simple and reliable method permitting, in the event of a nuclear catastrophe, to establish within short, for a large number of persons in representative places, doses of γ-radiation that might serve as decision aids for therapeutic measures to be taken. A suitable method seems to be by radiation-induced luminescence and subsequent solution (Lyoluminescence, LL) of sugar, a product available in any office, canteen, or household. Such lyoluminescence dosimetry was investigated. (orig./DG) [de

  4. Lactose and ''tris'' lyoluminescence dosimetry systems and ESR correlation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oommen, I.K.; Nambi, K.S.V.; Sengupta, S.; Rao, T.K.G.; Ravikumar, M.

    1989-01-01

    Lyoluminescence (LL) dosimeters have been developed using lactose monohydrate (disaccharide) and tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (''Tris'') systems and attempts have been made to understand the LL mechanism through ESR correlation studies. Tris LL dosimeter has a γ-ray sensitivity with a linear response in the absorbed-dose range 0.05-200 Gy (5-2 x 10 4 rad), while the lactose response extends to a higher range from 1 to 10 4 Gy (10 2 -10 6 rad). The LL output of lactose and Tris did not show any appreciable decay for a period of 6 months after irradiation. ESR measurements show that free-radical concentration in both the systems increases with γ-ray dose in the range 10 2 -10 5 Gy. The minimum dose required to measure the radiation-induced ESR signal for Tris is ∼ 500 Gy, the dose at which the LL output saturates, while lactose shows a radiation-induced ESR signal right at the minimum dose where LL could be detected. The estimated spin density on the radical carbon atom is 0.7. ESR signal stabilities of lactose and Tris were also studied. Lactose did not show any appreciable ESR decay for a period of 3 months after irradiation, while, for Tris, one of the radicals showed a decay of 45% for the same period. (author)

  5. Lyoluminescence of irradiated carbohydrates - the role of dissolution rate and oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baugh, P.J.; Laflin, P.

    1980-01-01

    The lyoluminescent emission from γ-irradiated carbohydrates is shown to be strictly controlled by the rate of dissolution of the solid and the availability of oxygen for reaction during dissolution. These effects are explained in terms of oxidation of trapped radicals diffusing from the dissolving carbohydrate which react in an 'active volume' set up at the onset of dissolution at the crystal-water interface. At irradiation doses greater than 82.5 krad for mannose there is a suppression of the emission which results from an incomplete oxidation of the diffusing radicals due to insufficient O 2 in the active volume leading to a reaction involving unoxidised radicals and peroxyl radicals which are believed to be the precursors of the emission. This reaction is suppressed when the oxygen supply to the 'active volume' is increased. This can be achieved by increasing the oxygen content of the injector gas and indirectly by decreasing the solubility of the carbohydrate. Under these conditions the linear dose range of the lyoluminescence response is extended to ca. 330 krad close to the dose at which trapped radicals saturate in the irradiated solid carbohydrate. Although lyoluminescence is a liquid surface-layer effect as expected the generation of the emission is greatly influenced by oxygen present in the injection atmosphere. Quenching of lyoluminescence by adding peroxyl radical quenchers Cu(II) ions and hydroquinone, suggests that the reaction involving these quenchers also occurs in the 'active volume'. The results generally can be interpreted in terms of a diffusion model. (author)

  6. Ce activated potassium bromide phosphor for lyoluminescence dosimetry of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhujbal, P.M.; Dhoble, S.J.

    2013-01-01

    The lyoluminescence (LL) properties of gamma irradiated KBr:Ce phosphor are reported in this paper. The samples were prepared by wet chemical route. The prepared material was characterized by lyoluminescence technique. LL in KBr:Ce have been recorded for different gamma doses. The nature of variation of peak LL intensity is found to be sublinear with gamma irradiation dose, and the peak LL intensity is found to be dependent on concentrations of added Ce in the samples. Negligible fading in the prepared KBr:Ce (0.5 mol%) sample is observed. -- Highlights: • The LL intensities are found to be dependent on concentrations of Ce ion. • The LL intensities are found to be dependent on gamma rays radiation dose. • Dose response of KBr:Ce (0.5 mol%) is observed linear between 0.08 and 1.00 kGy. • The prepared material may be useful for ionizing radiation dosimetry

  7. Lyoluminescence of calcium carbonate and possible applications in the dating of loess and soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copty-Wergles, K.; Nowotny, R.; Hille, P.

    1990-01-01

    Lyoluminescence (LL) during the dissolution in HCl of calcite and aragonite snail shells irradiated with 60 Co γ rays was investigated. In the dose range of 100 to 3000 Gy the LL response of analytical grade calcite powder samples is sub-linear but shows no saturation. The influence of solvent concentration, temperature and of dissolved nitrogen on LL yield was studied. The traps responsible for LL are not stable under illumination. Annealing experiments indicate the existence of several different traps and the possibility of electron transfer between them. (author)

  8. Theory, development and principal application trends of lyoluminescence in integral radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubicek, I.

    1984-01-01

    The mechanism of lyoluminescence (LL) of inorganic and organic compounds is described in detail and discussed are the basic characteristics of the LL process, the physico-chemical properties of the system, the principle of measurement and the possibility of increasing the LL yield. Attention is also devoted to the design of evaluation kits developed and used by different laboratories. A substantial part of the study is devoted to the response of LL dosemeters to different types of ionizing radiation (gamma radiation, fast and slow neutrons and heavy charged particles). The high level of tissue equivalence of some organic materials, their sensitivity to gamma radiation and fast neutrons and finally the possible use of human biological tissue as a dosemeter predestinates the LL method for uses mainly in clinical and accident dosimetry. (author)

  9. Development of a lyoluminescence dosimetry system for the radiation processing of food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ettinger, K.V.; Mallard, J.R.; Srirath, S.; Takavar, A.

    1978-01-01

    A new system of solid-state dosimetry is being developed aimed at the radiation processing of food. The system is based on the effect of lyoluminescence, i.e. emission of light when previously irradiated solids are dissolved in water or other solvents. The physical mechanism is based on the formation of free radicals in the solid, which are stable over periods ranging from days to years. These radicals are set free on dissolution and as a result of chemical reactions taking place in a solution light is produced. The dose response of lyoluminescent phosphors is monotonic, and often almost linear, over a very broad range of radiation doses. Amongst saccharides mannose can be used up to about 90krad, trehalose dihydrate up to 250krad and glucose to about 300krad. Amino acids exhibit a broader range: glutamine and glutamic acid can be used up to at least 4Mrad and threonine up to about 1Mrad. In addition, most of naturally occurring soluble amino acids are suitable in a range of doses below 200krad. Soluble starch (amylodextrin) has been successfully tried in a range up to 3Mrad. The intrinsic precision of the method is fairly high and the present uncertainty of the determination of dose, which is 2-4%, appears to be caused by the non-homogeneity of available phosphor and by insufficient reproducibility of the process of dissolution. The lower limit of doses is set by the sensitivity of the read-out equipment. For a simple arrangement with an uncooled PM tube and glutamine as a phosphor a reproducibility of 2-3% is reached for doses in excess of 600rads. The fading of irradiated phosphors is reproducible. A typical value for mannose is 10-15% during the first week and 20-30% during the first year for dosimeters stored at room temperature

  10. Comments on the reactions of carbohydrate peroxy radicals in relation to the lyoluminescent behaviour of irradiated carbohydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baugh, P.J.; Mahjani, M.G.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to recent work on lyoluminescence: the emission of visible light from irradiated tissue equivalent solids such as carbohydrates when dissolved in aqueous solutions (Atari et al., Radiat. Effects; 17:45(1973); and ibid.; 20: 135 (1973); and Baugh et al., Int.J.Radiat.Phys. Chem.(in press)). In the present communication the consequences of the fast elimination of the hydroperoxy radicals from carbohydrate peroxy radicals are considered in a further study of the chemical reactions involved. (U.K.)

  11. Correlation of ESR with lyoluminescence dosimetry using some sugars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azorin, Juan; Gutierrez, Alicia; Munoz, Eduardo; Gleason, Roberto

    1989-01-01

    Most applications involving ESR dosimetry currently center on aminoacids because of their relative tissue equivalence. Sugars, however, in addition to possessing high sensitivity and stability in their ESR and LL responses, are widely available as chemical reagents and as commercial sugar. In the present study, dosimetric characteristics of mannose, trehalose, sucrose and commercial sugar obtained by means of ESR and LL techniques are reported. Doses measured by both methods showed agreement within 5%. (author)

  12. Ruthenium(II) tris(2,2'-bipyridine) chelate as a chemiluminophore in extrinsic lyoluminescences of aluminium and magnesium in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Qinghong; Kotiranta, Miia; Langel, Kaarina; Suomi, Johanna; Hakansson, Markus; Spehar, Anna-Maria; Ala-Kleme, Timo; Eskola, Jarkko; Kulmala, Sakari

    2005-01-01

    Ruthenium(II) tris(2,2'-bipyridine) chelate shows chemiluminescence (CL) both during dissolution of metallic aluminium in alkaline conditions, and during dissolution of magnesium metal in acidic conditions. The presence of peroxodisulfate ions strongly enhances the CL. Magnesium system provides considerably better detectability of the present chelate giving linear calibration plot spanning over many orders of magnitude of concentration down to subnanomolar concentration levels. The possible primary species generated and luminescence mechanisms are shortly discussed

  13. A new sensitive technique for study of radiation effects in amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thwaites, D.I.; Buchan, G.; Ettinger, K.V.; Mallard, J.R.; Takavar, A.

    1976-01-01

    A new technique for the study of radiation induced free radicals in amino acids based on their reactions when untrapped by dissolution in water is reported. The light emission or lyoluminescence response of various amino acids to gamma radiation ( 60 Co) measured 4 hr after irradiation are shown. The sensitivities vary over three orders of magnitude, but there is little or no correlation between the lyoluminescent response and the structural type of amino acid. Dose-reponse curves indicate that the useful range extends from a few krad to a few hundred krad. Methods of extending the lower limits are discussed. Storage of irradiated material over a period of 4 months at 20 0 C showed changes of the order of 10%. Exposure to daylight has no effect on the light yield of amino acids. It is stated that the lyoluminescence technique is more sensitive than ESR in detecting radiation effects in amino acids. Lyoluminescence of irradiated proteins, RNA and DNA, has been observed. It appears that the new method may be particularly useful in providing information on the nature and magnitude of direct radiation damage in biologically important compounds and find applications in radiation dosimetry. (U.K.)

  14. Techniques of radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahesk, K.

    1985-01-01

    A text and reference with an interdisciplinary approach to physics, atomic energy, radiochemistry, and radiobiology. Chapters examine basic principles, experimental techniques, the methodology of dose experiments, and applications. Treats 14 different dosimetric techniques, including ionization chamber, thermoluminescence, and lyoluminescence. Considers the conceptual aspects and characteristic features of radiation

  15. Application of atomic energy in agriculture (Annual Report 1974)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Activities and results over the year 1974 are reviewed in the annual report for the entire research programme comprising: lyoluminescence, perspex dosemeters, primary radiation effects in biological materials, dose fractionation effect in Saintpaulia, adventitious bud technique in mutation breeding, mutation research in potatoes, protein improvement in peas, disease resistance in tomatoes, wheat, peas and barley, food preservation, genetic pest control, genetics of higher plants, soil-plant studies, element behaviour in soils and groundwater, heavy metals in plants, liquid waste reuse after irradiation, development of methods and instruments

  16. Dosimetry of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musilek, L.; Seda, J.; Trousil, J.

    1992-01-01

    The publication deals with a major field of ionizing radiation dosimetry, viz., integrating dosimetric methods, which are the basic means of operative dose determination. It is divided into the following sections: physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation; integrating dosimetric methods for low radiation doses (film dosimetry, nuclear emulsions, thermoluminescence, radiophotoluminescence, solid-state track detectors, integrating ionization dosemeters); dosimetry of high ionizing radiation doses (chemical dosimetric methods, dosemeters based on the coloring effect, activation detectors); additional methods applicable to integrating dosimetry (exoelectron emission, electron spin resonance, lyoluminescence, etc.); and calibration techniques for dosimetric instrumentation. (Z.S.). 422 refs

  17. Dissolution glow curve in LLD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haverkamp, U.; Wiezorek, C.; Poetter, R.

    1990-01-01

    Lyoluminescence dosimetry is based upon light emission during dissolution of previously irradiated dosimetric materials. The lyoluminescence signal is expressed in the dissolution glow curve. These curves begin, depending on the dissolution system, with a high peak followed by an exponentially decreasing intensity. System parameters that influence the graph of the dissolution glow curve, are, for example, injection speed, temperature and pH value of the solution and the design of the dissolution cell. The initial peak does not significantly correlate with the absorbed dose, it is mainly an effect of the injection. The decay of the curve consists of two exponential components: one fast and one slow. The components depend on the absorbed dose and the dosimetric materials used. In particular, the slow component correlates with the absorbed dose. In contrast to the fast component the argument of the exponential function of the slow component is independent of the dosimetric materials investigated: trehalose, glucose and mannitol. The maximum value, following the peak of the curve, and the integral light output are a measure of the absorbed dose. The reason for the different light outputs of various dosimetric materials after irradiation with the same dose is the differing solubility. The character of the dissolution glow curves is the same following irradiation with photons, electrons or neutrons. (author)

  18. Detection of food irradiation with luminescence methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderle, H.

    1997-06-01

    Food irradiation is applied as method for the preservation of foods, the prevention of food spoilage and the inhibition of food-borne pathogens. Doses exceeding 10 kGy (10 kJ/kg) are not recommended by the WHO. The different legislation requires methods for the detection and the closimetry of irradiated foods. Among the physical methods based on the radiation-induced changes in inorganic, nonhygroscopic crystalline solids are thermoluminescence (TL), photostimulated luminescence (PSL) and lyoluminescence (LL) measurement. The luminescence methods were tested on natural minerals. Pure quartz, feldspars, calcite, aragonite and dolomite of known origin were irradiated, read out and analyzed to determine the influence of luminescence-activators and deactivators. Carbonate minerals show an orange-red TL easily detectable by blue-sensitive photomultiplier tubes. TIL-inactive carbonate samples may be identified by a lyoluminescence method using the reaction of trapped irradiation-generated charge carriers with the solvent during crystal-lattice breakup. The fine-ground mineral is dissolved in an alkaline complexing agent/chemiluminescence sensitizer/chemiluminescence catalyst (EDTA/luminol/hemin) reagent mixture. The TL and PSL of quartz is too weak to contribute a significant part for the corresponding signals in polymineral dust. Alkali and soda feldspar show intense TL and PSL. The temperature maxima in the TL glow curves allow a clear distinction. PSL does not give this additional information, it suffers from bleaching by ambient light and requires light-protection. Grain disinfestated with low irradiation doses (500 Gy) may not identified by both TL and PSL measurement. The natural TL of feldspar particles may be overlap with the irradiation-induced TL of other minerals. As a routine method, irradiated spices are identified with TL measurement. The dust particles have to be enriched by heavy-liquid flotation and centrifugation. The PSL method allows a clear

  19. Application of atomic energy in agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    A state-of-the-art survey of current research is presented in the form of a series of short articles which includes X-ray dosimetry intercomparison (EULEP), testing of lyoluminescent materials for the 25-krad to 2.5-Mrad dose range, behaviour of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in soils and plants (also fallout), plant nutrition in relation to soils, Experimental Soil-Plant-Atmosphere System tests, nitrogen fixation, gene mutations and chromosome manipulation in both legumes and ornamental plants, incompatibility studies, radiation mutagenesis, crop protection by genetic control of insects, food sterilization and preservation by irradiation, and waste irradiation. An outline is given of the research plans for the coming four years and the international cooperation involved. A survey of the outward services, lectures, publications and conference participation is presented at the end. (Auth.)

  20. Dissolution rate effect upon lyolumenescence of irradiated potassium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leshchinskij, B.L.; Dzelme, Yu.R.; Tiliks, Yu.E.; Bugaenko, L.T.

    1985-01-01

    The paper is aimed at studying dissolution rate effect and concentration of electron acceptor upon lyoluminescence (LL) that occurs during dissolution of solids with radiation defects. For investigation gamma-irradiated potassium chloride monocrystalline disks were used. As a solvent 3x10sup(-6) M solution of C(RH) hodamine in 2.7 KCl aqueous solution is used. It is shown that LL occurs as a result of recombination of radiation defects with the solution and between themselves in two different regions of subsurface layer of the solid. Investigated dependences of LL intensty on dissolution rate are the efficient method of studying the structure of solids-aqueous solution interface and LL mechanism

  1. Progress in high-dose radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ettinger, K.V.; Nam, J.W.; McLaughlin, W.L.; Chadwick, K.H.

    1981-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a deluge of new high-dose dosimetry techniques and expanded applications of methods developed earlier. Many of the principal systems are calibrated by means of calorimetry, although production of heat is not always the final radiation effect of interest. Reference systems also include a number of chemical dose meters: ferrous sulphate, ferrous-cupric sulphate, and ceric sulphate acidic aqueous solutions. Requirements for stable and reliable transfer dose meters have led to further developments of several important high-dose systems: amino acids and saccharides analysed by ESR or lyoluminescence, thermoluminescent materials, radiochromic dyes and plastics, ceric-cerous solutions analysed by potentiometry, and ethanol-chlorobenzene solutions analysed by high-frequency oscillometry. A number of other prospective dose meters are also treated in this review. In addition, an IAEA programme of high-dose standardization and intercomparison for industrial radiation processing is described. (author)

  2. Neutron dosimetry in boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairchild, R.G.; Miola, U.J.; Ettinger, K.V.

    1981-01-01

    The recent development of various borated compounds and the utilization of one of these (Na 2 B 12 H 11 SH) to treat brain tumors in clinical studies in Japan has renewed interest in neutron capture therapy. In these procedures thermal neutrons interact with 10 B in boron containing cells through the 10 B(n,α) 7 Li reaction producing charged particles with a maximum range of approx. 10μm in tissue. Borated analogs of chlorpromazine, porphyrin, thiouracil and deoxyuridine promise improved tumor uptake and blood clearance. The therapy beam from the Medical Research Reactor in Brookhaven contains neutrons from a modified and filtered fission spectrum and dosimetric consequences of the use of the above mentioned compounds in conjunction with thermal and epithermal fluxes are discussed in the paper. One of the important problems of radiation dosimetry in capture therapy is determination of the flux profile and, hence, the dose profile in the brain. This has been achieved by constructing a brain phantom made of TE plastic. The lyoluminescence technique provides a convenient way of monitoring the neutron flux distributions; the detectors for this purpose utilize 6 Li and 10 B compounds. Such compounds have been synthesized specially for the purpose of dosimetry of thermal and epithermal beams. In addition, standard lyoluminescent phosphors, like glutamine, could be used to determine the collisional component of the dose as well as the contribution of the 14 N(n,p) 14 C reaction. Measurements of thermal flux were compared with calculations and with measurements done with activation foils

  3. Neutron personnel dosimetry considerations for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, T.P.; Easterly, C.E.

    1979-07-01

    The increasing development of fusion reactor technology warrants an evaluation of personnel neutron dosimetry systems to aid in the concurrent development of a radiation protection program. For this reason, current state of knowledge neutron dosimeters have been reviewed with emphasis placed on practical utilization and the problems inherent in each type of dosimetry system. Evaluations of salient parameters such as energy response, latent image instability, and minimum detectable dose equivalent are presented for nuclear emulsion films, track etch techniques, albedo and other thermoluminescent dosimetry techniques, electrical conductivity damage effects, lyoluminescence, thermocurrent, and thermally stimulated exoelectron emission. Brief summaries of dosimetry regulatory requirements and intercomparison study results help to establish compliance and recent trends, respectively. Spectrum modeling data generated by the Neutron Physics Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Princeton Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Facility have been analyzed by both International Commission on Radiological Protection fluence to dose conversion factors and an adjoint technique of radiation dosimetry, in an attempt to determine the applicability of current neutron dosimetry systems to deuterium and tritium fusion reactor leakage spectra. Based on the modeling data, a wide range of neutron energies will probably be present in the leakage spectra of the TFTR facility, and no appreciable risk of somatic injury to occupationally exposed workers is expected. The relative dose contributions due to high energy and thermal neutrons indicate that neutron dosimetry will probably not be a serious limitation in the development of fusion power

  4. Basic study of influence of radiation defects on tritium release processes from lithium silicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramenkovs, A.; Tiliks, J.; Kizane, G.; Supe, A. [Latvia Univ., Riga (Latvia). Dept. of Chem.; Grishmanovs, V. [Department of Quantum Engineering and System Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113 (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    The radiolysis of Li{sub 2}SiO{sub 3} and Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} was studied using the chemical scavengers method (CSM), thermoluminescence, lyoluminescence, electron spin resonance and spectrometric methods. The influence of the absorbed dose and many another parameters such as: irradiation conditions, sample preparation conditions and concentration of impurities on the accumulation rate of each type RD and RP were studied. Several possibilities for reducing the radiolysis of silicates were discussed. It has been found that tritium localization on the surface and in grains proceed by two different mechanisms. Tritium thermoextraction from the surface proceeds as chemidesorption of tritiated water, but from the bulk as diffusion. The tritium retention processes were studied. It has been found that tritium retention depends on irradiation conditions. Tritium retention is due to the formation of chemical bonds Li-T and thermal stable {identical_to}Si-T bonds. The accumulation of colloidal silicon and lithium can increase the tritium retention up to 25-35%. (orig.).

  5. Theory of RBE. Fifth triennial report, 1 January 1967-31 December 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, R.

    1981-07-01

    A single theme, that the response of a detector to gamma-rays (interpreted probabilistically through an extension of target theory) can be mapped into the region surrounding the path of an energetic heavy ion, through the local dose deposited by its delta-rays, has been the continuing basis of the present research. In order to systematize the understanding of RBE we have introduced new concepts to create a predictive theory of radiation response, of the structure of particle tracks, in a wide range of physical and biological systems. We have built a theory that is more generally applicable, to physical as well as to biological detectors, using the same basic concepts and operationally defined parameters. This procedure enables us to make quantitative experimental tests of the validity of our conceptual structure. We have created a systematic classification of detector properties, and have shown how their response varies with the numerical values of detector parameters within these classifications. Especially for 1-hit detection, our theory is universally accepted and applied. Originally created to explain the RBE of dry enzymes and viruses, it has been extended to scintillation counters, to particle tracks in nuclear emulsions, to thermoluminescent dosimeters, to lyo-luminescence, to single strand breaks in DNA, to the formation of color centers in crystals, and onwards. The extension of this conceptual system to biology required the many-hit detector, with its potential for the accumulation of sub-lethal damage. We have predicted the response of biological cells in high LET environments from this theory. It has served as the stimulus for discovering many hit physical systems (emulsions, photoresists) which respond preferentially to high LET radiations

  6. Dosimetry concepts and measurements in food irradiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadwick, K.H.; Oosterheert, W.F.

    1986-01-01

    The associations between the dosimetry concepts, Minimum absorbed dose (Dsub(min)), maximum absorbed dose (Dsub(max), and average dose and median dose are investigated for the case of a large cobalt-60 plaque source irradiating homogeneous bulk product in a two-pass, two-sided irradiation. It is assumed that to a first approximation the intensity of radiation decreases exponentially with the depth, t, in the product. A series of mathematical relationships is derived for the average dose, the maximum and minimum dose, the median dose [defined as (Dsub(maX) + Dsub(min)/2], and the uniformity ratio (defined U.R. = (Dsub(max)/Dsub(min). The relationships are derived in terms of a constant D 0 (the dose on the surface of the products in the pass close to the source) and the relaxation length (μt) of the radiation in the product. Since the uniformity ratio and other dose parameters can be calculated for certain chosen values of μt, the individual values Dsub(min) to Dsub(max) into 10 equal fractions, the amount of product irradiated to each of the fractions is calculated and it is shown that, independent of the value of U.R., about a third of the product receives a dose in the first fraction above Dsub(min). It is also shown that for a given median dose, the average dose decreases as U.R. increases. The calculated dose relationships are confirmed by measurement in homogeneous dummy product, using the lyoluminescence of glutamine to measure dose. The implications of these results for the regulation of the food irradiation process and for the design of irradiation facilities are discussed. (author)