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Sample records for lutetium 161

  1. Lutetium pyrophosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhabishvili, N.A.; Davitashvili, E.G.; Orlovskij, V.P.; Kargareteli, L.N.

    1986-01-01

    Reaction between lutetium nitrate and pyrophosphates of sodium, potassium and ammonium in aqueous solution is studied, using the method of residual concentrations. New compounds are isolated, their composition and physicochemical properties are considered. Data on solubility in the systems at 25 deg C are given. All the hydrate pyrophosphates are roentgenoamorphous, they are crystallized only when heated. Thermal decomposition of lutetium pyrophosphate is investigated

  2. Anti-L1CAM radioimmunotherapy is more effective with the radiolanthanide terbium-161 compared to lutetium-177 in an ovarian cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenberg, Juergen; Lindenblatt, Dennis; Cohrs, Susan; Fischer, Eliane; Dorrer, Holger; Zhernosekov, Konstantin; Koester, Ulli; Tuerler, Andreas; Schibli, Roger

    2014-01-01

    The L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) is considered a valuable target for therapeutic intervention in different types of cancer. Recent studies have shown that anti-L1CAM radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with 67 Cu- and 177 Lu-labelled internalising monoclonal antibody (mAb) chCE7 was effective in the treatment of human ovarian cancer xenografts. In this study, we directly compared the therapeutic efficacy of anti-L1CAM RIT against human ovarian cancer under equitoxic conditions with the radiolanthanide 177 Lu and the potential alternative 161 Tb in an ovarian cancer therapy model. Tb was produced by neutron bombardment of enriched 160 Gd targets. 161 Tb and 177 Lu were used for radiolabelling of DOTA-conjugated antibodies. The in vivo behaviour of the radioimmunoconjugates (RICs) was assessed in IGROV1 tumour-bearing nude mice using biodistribution experiments and SPECT/CT imaging. After ascertaining the maximal tolerated doses (MTD) the therapeutic impact of 50 % MTD of 177 Lu- and 161 Tb-DOTA-chCE7 was evaluated in groups of ten mice by monitoring the tumour size of subcutaneous IGROV1 tumours. The average number of DOTA ligands per antibody was 2.5 and maximum specific activities of 600 MBq/mg were achieved under identical radiolabelling conditions. RICs were stable in human plasma for at least 48 h. 177 Lu- and 161 Tb-DOTA-chCE7 showed high tumour uptake (37.8-39.0 %IA/g, 144 h p.i.) with low levels in off-target organs. SPECT/CT images confirmed the biodistribution data. 161 Tb-labelled chCE7 revealed a higher radiotoxicity in nude mice (MTD: 10 MBq) than the 177 Lu-labelled counterpart (MTD: 12 MBq). In a comparative therapy study with equitoxic doses, tumour growth inhibition was better by 82.6 % for the 161 Tb-DOTA-chCE7 than the 177 Lu-DOTA-chCE7 RIT. Our study is the first to show that anti-L1CAM 161 Tb RIT is more effective compared to 177 Lu RIT in ovarian cancer xenografts. These results suggest that 161 Tb is a promising candidate for future clinical

  3. Anti-L1CAM radioimmunotherapy is more effective with the radiolanthanide terbium-161 compared to lutetium-177 in an ovarian cancer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenberg, Juergen; Lindenblatt, Dennis; Cohrs, Susan; Fischer, Eliane [Paul Scherrer Institute, Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences ETH-PSI-USZ, Villigen (Switzerland); Dorrer, Holger [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory of Radiochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, Villigen (Switzerland); Zhernosekov, Konstantin [ITG Isotope Technologies Garching GmbH, Garching (Germany); Koester, Ulli [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Tuerler, Andreas [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory of Radiochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, Villigen (Switzerland); University of Bern, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Berne (Switzerland); Schibli, Roger [Paul Scherrer Institute, Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences ETH-PSI-USZ, Villigen (Switzerland); ETH Zurich, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-10-15

    The L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) is considered a valuable target for therapeutic intervention in different types of cancer. Recent studies have shown that anti-L1CAM radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with {sup 67}Cu- and {sup 177}Lu-labelled internalising monoclonal antibody (mAb) chCE7 was effective in the treatment of human ovarian cancer xenografts. In this study, we directly compared the therapeutic efficacy of anti-L1CAM RIT against human ovarian cancer under equitoxic conditions with the radiolanthanide {sup 177}Lu and the potential alternative {sup 161}Tb in an ovarian cancer therapy model. Tb was produced by neutron bombardment of enriched {sup 160}Gd targets. {sup 161}Tb and {sup 177}Lu were used for radiolabelling of DOTA-conjugated antibodies. The in vivo behaviour of the radioimmunoconjugates (RICs) was assessed in IGROV1 tumour-bearing nude mice using biodistribution experiments and SPECT/CT imaging. After ascertaining the maximal tolerated doses (MTD) the therapeutic impact of 50 % MTD of {sup 177}Lu- and {sup 161}Tb-DOTA-chCE7 was evaluated in groups of ten mice by monitoring the tumour size of subcutaneous IGROV1 tumours. The average number of DOTA ligands per antibody was 2.5 and maximum specific activities of 600 MBq/mg were achieved under identical radiolabelling conditions. RICs were stable in human plasma for at least 48 h. {sup 177}Lu- and {sup 161}Tb-DOTA-chCE7 showed high tumour uptake (37.8-39.0 %IA/g, 144 h p.i.) with low levels in off-target organs. SPECT/CT images confirmed the biodistribution data. {sup 161}Tb-labelled chCE7 revealed a higher radiotoxicity in nude mice (MTD: 10 MBq) than the {sup 177}Lu-labelled counterpart (MTD: 12 MBq). In a comparative therapy study with equitoxic doses, tumour growth inhibition was better by 82.6 % for the {sup 161}Tb-DOTA-chCE7 than the {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-chCE7 RIT. Our study is the first to show that anti-L1CAM {sup 161}Tb RIT is more effective compared to {sup 177}Lu RIT in ovarian cancer xenografts

  4. Low temperature heat capacity of lutetium and lutetium hydrogen alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, D.K.

    1977-10-01

    The heat capacity of high purity electrotransport refined lutetium was measured between 1 and 20 0 K. Results for theta/sub D/ were in excellent agreement with theta values determined from elastic constant measurements. The heat capacity of a series of lutetium-hydrogen solid solution alloys was determined and results showed an increase in γ from 8.2 to about 11.3 mJ/g-atom-K 2 for hydrogen content increasing from zero to about one atomic percent. Above one percent hydrogen γ decreased with increasing hydrogen contents. The C/T data showed an increase with temperature decreasing below about 2.5 0 K for samples with 0.1 to 1.5 atomic percent hydrogen. This accounts for a large amount of scatter in theta/sub D/ versus hydrogen content in this range. The heat capacity of a bulk sample of lutetium dihydride was measured between 1 and 20 0 K and showed a large increase in theta/sub D/ and a large decrease in γ compared to pure lutetium

  5. Thermal decomposition of lutetium propionate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivel, Jean-Claude

    2010-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of lutetium(III) propionate monohydrate (Lu(C2H5CO2)3·H2O) in argon was studied by means of thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, IR-spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Dehydration takes place around 90 °C. It is followed by the decomposition of the anhydrous...... °C. Full conversion to Lu2O3 is achieved at about 1000 °C. Whereas the temperatures and solid reaction products of the first two decomposition steps are similar to those previously reported for the thermal decomposition of lanthanum(III) propionate monohydrate, the final decomposition...... of the oxycarbonate to the rare-earth oxide proceeds in a different way, which is here reminiscent of the thermal decomposition path of Lu(C3H5O2)·2CO(NH2)2·2H2O...

  6. Lutetium oxide-based transparent ceramic scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Zachary; Cherepy, Nerine; Kuntz, Joshua; Payne, Stephen A.

    2016-01-19

    In one embodiment, a transparent ceramic of sintered nanoparticles includes gadolinium lutetium oxide doped with europium having a chemical composition (Lu.sub.1-xGd.sub.x).sub.2-YEu.sub.YO.sub.3, where X is any value within a range from about 0.05 to about 0.45 and Y is any value within a range from about 0.01 to about 0.2, and where the transparent ceramic exhibits a transparency characterized by a scatter coefficient of less than about 10%/cm. In another embodiment, a transparent ceramic scintillator of sintered nanoparticles, includes a body of sintered nanoparticles including gadolinium lutetium oxide doped with a rare earth activator (RE) having a chemical composition (Lu.sub.1-xGd.sub.x).sub.2-YRE.sub.YO.sub.3, where RE is selected from the group consisting of: Sm, Eu, Tb, and Dy, where the transparent ceramic exhibits a transparency characterized by a scatter coefficient of less than about 10%/cm.

  7. Saturated vapor pressure of lutetium tris-acetylacetonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trembovetskij, G.V.; Berdonosov, S.S.; Murav' eva, I.A.; Martynenko, L.I. (Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR))

    1983-12-01

    By the statical method using /sup 177/Lu radioactive isotope the saturated vapor pressure of anhydrous lutetium acetylacetonate at 130 to 160 deg is determined. The calculations are carried out assuming the vapor to be monomolecular. The equation of lgP versus 1/T takes the form: lg Psub((mmHg))=(8.7+-1.6)-(4110+-690)/T. The thermodynamical characteristics of LuA/sub 3/ sublimation are calculated to be ..delta..Hsub(subl.)=79+-13 kJ/mol; ..delta..Ssub(subl.)=111+-20 J/kxmol.

  8. Separation of thulium, ytterbium and lutetium from uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, G.H.

    1987-01-01

    The behaviour at different temperatures, shaking times and hydrochloric acid concentrations on the solvent extraction system UO 2 2+ - (Tm 3+ , Yb 3+ , Lu 3+ ) - H 2 O - HCl - TBP was studied. Quantitative determinations of the elements were performed by visible spectrophotometry and X-ray fluorescence. The uranyl ion was efficiently extracted by TBP from an aqueous hydrochloric acid solution (4-7M) shaken during 10 minutes at room temperature. On these conditions the separation factors for uranium from thulium and ytterbium were found to be 3000 and from lutetium 140. (author)

  9. Laser resonance ionization spectroscopy on lutetium for the MEDICIS project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadelshin, V., E-mail: gadelshin@uni-mainz.de [University of Mainz, Institute of Physics (Germany); Cocolios, T. [KU Leuven, Institute for Nuclear and Radiation Physics (Belgium); Fedoseev, V. [CERN, EN Department (Switzerland); Heinke, R.; Kieck, T. [University of Mainz, Institute of Physics (Germany); Marsh, B. [CERN, EN Department (Switzerland); Naubereit, P. [University of Mainz, Institute of Physics (Germany); Rothe, S.; Stora, T. [CERN, EN Department (Switzerland); Studer, D. [University of Mainz, Institute of Physics (Germany); Duppen, P. Van [KU Leuven, Institute for Nuclear and Radiation Physics (Belgium); Wendt, K. [University of Mainz, Institute of Physics (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    The MEDICIS-PROMED Innovative Training Network under the Horizon 2020 EU program aims to establish a network of early stage researchers, involving scientific exchange and active cooperation between leading European research institutions, universities, hospitals, and industry. Primary scientific goal is the purpose of providing and testing novel radioisotopes for nuclear medical imaging and radionuclide therapy. Within a closely linked project at CERN, a dedicated electromagnetic mass separator system is presently under installation for production of innovative radiopharmaceutical isotopes at the new CERN-MEDICIS laboratory, directly adjacent to the existing CERN-ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility. It is planned to implement a resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) to ensure high efficiency and unrivaled purity in the production of radioactive ions. To provide a highly efficient ionization process, identification and characterization of a specific multi-step laser ionization scheme for each individual element with isotopes of interest is required. The element lutetium is of primary relevance, and therefore was considered as first candidate. Three two-step excitation schemes for lutetium atoms are presented in this work, and spectroscopic results are compared with data of other authors.

  10. Laser resonance ionization spectroscopy on lutetium for the MEDICIS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadelshin, V.; Cocolios, T.; Fedoseev, V.; Heinke, R.; Kieck, T.; Marsh, B.; Naubereit, P.; Rothe, S.; Stora, T.; Studer, D.; Van Duppen, P.; Wendt, K.

    2017-11-01

    The MEDICIS-PROMED Innovative Training Network under the Horizon 2020 EU program aims to establish a network of early stage researchers, involving scientific exchange and active cooperation between leading European research institutions, universities, hospitals, and industry. Primary scientific goal is the purpose of providing and testing novel radioisotopes for nuclear medical imaging and radionuclide therapy. Within a closely linked project at CERN, a dedicated electromagnetic mass separator system is presently under installation for production of innovative radiopharmaceutical isotopes at the new CERN-MEDICIS laboratory, directly adjacent to the existing CERN-ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility. It is planned to implement a resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) to ensure high efficiency and unrivaled purity in the production of radioactive ions. To provide a highly efficient ionization process, identification and characterization of a specific multi-step laser ionization scheme for each individual element with isotopes of interest is required. The element lutetium is of primary relevance, and therefore was considered as first candidate. Three two-step excitation schemes for lutetium atoms are presented in this work, and spectroscopic results are compared with data of other authors.

  11. Hyperfine interactions in 111Cd-doped lutetium sesquioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Errico, L.A.; Renteria, M.; Bibiloni, A.G.; Requejo, F.G.

    1999-01-01

    We report here first Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) results of the electric field gradient (EFG) characterisation at 111 Cd impurities located at both non-equivalent cation sites of the bixbyite structure of Lutetium sesquioxide, between room temperature (RT) and 1273 K. The comparison with results coming from a systematic 111 Cd PAC study in bixbyites and with point-charge model (PCM) predictions shows the presence of a trapped defect at RT in the neighbourhood of the asymmetric cation site, which is completely removed at T > 623 K. The anomalous EFG temperature dependence in Lu 2 O 3 can be described in the frame of a 'two-state' model with fluctuating interactions, which enables the experimental determination of the acceptor energy level introduced by the Cd impurity in the band-gap of the semiconductor and the estimation of the oxygen vacancy density in the sample

  12. Hyperfine interactions in {sup 111}Cd-doped lutetium sesquioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errico, L.A.; Renteria, M.; Bibiloni, A.G.; Requejo, F.G. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Programa TENAES (CONICET), Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas (Argentina)

    1999-09-15

    We report here first Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) results of the electric field gradient (EFG) characterisation at {sup 111}Cd impurities located at both non-equivalent cation sites of the bixbyite structure of Lutetium sesquioxide, between room temperature (RT) and 1273 K. The comparison with results coming from a systematic {sup 111}Cd PAC study in bixbyites and with point-charge model (PCM) predictions shows the presence of a trapped defect at RT in the neighbourhood of the asymmetric cation site, which is completely removed at T > 623 K. The anomalous EFG temperature dependence in Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} can be described in the frame of a 'two-state' model with fluctuating interactions, which enables the experimental determination of the acceptor energy level introduced by the Cd impurity in the band-gap of the semiconductor and the estimation of the oxygen vacancy density in the sample.

  13. DOTA-TATE peptides labelling with Lutetium 177: Preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliaga, Eleazar; Robles, Anita; Ramos, Bertha; Martinez, Flor

    2014-01-01

    he peptide DOTA-TATE was labeled with lutetium 177 according to the methodology provided under the regional project RLA/6/074, sponsored by the IAEA. The labeling was done in 0.26 M gentisic acid solution in 0.8 M sodium acetate buffer, pH 5, at 100 °C for 30 minutes in a dry heating block. The radiochemical purity was assessed by thin layer chromatography, using ITLC SG strips and a mixture of 0.15 M ammonium acetate - methanol (1:1) as solvent. The radiolabeled peptide 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE reached a radiochemical purity of 98 % with a specific activity of 2,8 mCi/µg of peptide. (authors).

  14. Effect of pressure on the bandstructure and superconductivity in lutetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asokamani, R.; Natarajan, S.; Rajagopalan, M.; Sundararajan, V.; Suvasini, M.B.; Iyakutti, K.

    1984-08-01

    The detailed bandstructure and superconducting behaviour of lutetium at 230 kbar pressure is reported here. The electronic contribution eta to the electron-phonon mass enhancement lambda is studied within the rigid muffin-tin (RMT) approximation. The pd and df matrix elements are expressed in terms of 'd' bandwidth, Fermi energy and muffin-tin zero. The variations of Grueneisen parameter and Debye temperature with pressure are studied and applied in the calculation of Tsub(c). The calculated Tsub(c) value agrees fairly well with the experimental value. The changes in the conduction bandwidth and the electronic specific heat coefficient with pressure are found to be in agreement with theoretical prediction. (author)

  15. Neutron capture cross section measurements: case of lutetium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roig, O.; Meot, V.; Belier, G.

    2011-01-01

    The neutron radiative capture is a nuclear reaction that occurs in the presence of neutrons on all isotopes and on a wide energy range. The neutron capture range on Lutetium isotopes, presented here, illustrates the variety of measurements leading to the determination of cross sections. These measurements provide valuable fundamental data needed for the stockpile stewardship program, as well as for nuclear astrophysics and nuclear structure. Measurements, made in France or in United-States, involving complex detectors associated with very rare targets have significantly improved the international databases and validated models of nuclear reactions. We present results concerning the measurement of neutron radiative capture on Lu 173 , Lu 175 , Lu 176 and Lu 177m , the measurement of the probability of gamma emission in the substitution reaction Yb 174 (He 3 ,pγ)Lu 176 . The measurement of neutron cross sections on Lu 177m have permitted to highlight the process of super-elastic scattering

  16. First principles study of electronic, elastic and thermal properties of lutetium intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagare, Gitanjali; Chouhan, Sunil Singh; Soni, Pooja; Sanyal, S.P.; Rajagopalan, M.

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, the electronic, elastic and thermal properties of lutetium intermetallics LuX have been studied theoretically by using first principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) with the generalized gradient approximation (GCA)

  17. Labelling of the peptide Dota-Octreotate with Lutetium 177

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez B, C.A.

    2004-01-01

    In this work is described the optimization of the reaction conditions to obtain the complex 177 Lu-Dota-TATE with a radiochemical purity > 95%, even so the studies of stability In vitro to the dilution in saline solution, stability in human serum and challenge to the cystein. The biodistribution studies are presented in mice Balb-C and the tests of biological recognition using one lines cellular of pancreatic adenoma (AR42-J). The obtained results show a high stability of the radio complex in vitro, since it doesn't suffer trans chelation from the Lutetium-177 to plasmatic proteins. The biodistribution tests in mice Balb-C demonstrated an appropriate lipophilly of the complex to be excreted in more proportion by the kidneys without significant accumulation in healthy tissues. It is necessary to mention that the drop activity specifies (3.54 μg / 37 MBq) obtained in the irradiation of 176 Lu 2 O 3 it allowed to verify the union of the 177 Lu-Dota-Tate to membrane receivers but without being able to obtain the saturation curves and competition required to characterize quantitatively the biological recognition. (Author)

  18. Low-temperature thermal properties and features of the phonon spectrum of lutetium tetraboride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novikov, V.V., E-mail: vvnovikov@mail.ru [Bryansk Petrovsky State University, 14 Bezhitskaya St., Bryansk 241037, Russia, (Russian Federation); Mitroshenkov, N.V., E-mail: weerm@yandex.ru [Bryansk Petrovsky State University, 14 Bezhitskaya St., Bryansk 241037, Russia, (Russian Federation); Matovnikov, A.V.; Avdashchenko, D.V. [Bryansk Petrovsky State University, 14 Bezhitskaya St., Bryansk 241037, Russia, (Russian Federation); Morozov, A.V. [Russian Timiryazev State Agrarian University, 49 Timiryazevskaya St., Moscow 127550 (Russian Federation); Pavlova, L.M.; Koltsov, V.B. [National Research University of Electronic Technology “MIET”, Moscow 124498 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • The coefficients of thermal expansion (α{sub ‖}, α{sub ⊥}) were measured for lutetium tetraboride. • The simplified Lutetium tetraboride phonon spectrum model is developed. • The Grüneisen parameters Γ, Γ{sub ‖}, Γ{sub ⊥} for lutetium tetraboride is calculated. • The anomalies of Γ{sub ‖}(T), Γ{sub ⊥}(T) at about 25 K are due to Einstein vibrations of boron sublattices. - Abstract: The coefficients of thermal expansion to the c axis (α{sub ‖}, α{sub ⊥}) were measured for lutetium tetraboride over the temperature range 4.2–300 K. The heat capacity data for lutetium tetraboride were used for the calculation of tetraboride phonon spectrum moments and also for the development of a simplified tetraboride spectrum model. The use of the heat capacity and thermal expansion data allowed the temperature changes of the Grüneisen parameters Γ, Γ{sub ‖}, Γ{sub ⊥} for tetraboride to be calculated. As a result of the approximation of Γ{sub ⊥}(T), Γ{sub ‖}(T) temperature dependencies in accordance with the chosen phonon spectrum model have been found: the anomalies of Γ{sub ⊥}(T), Γ{sub ‖}(T) are at about 25 K and then drop at lower temperatures due to the Einstein vibrations of boron sublattices.

  19. Lutetium-177 DOTATATE Production with an Automated Radiopharmaceutical Synthesis System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Alireza; Snowdon, Graeme M; Bailey, Dale L; Schembri, Geoffrey P; Bailey, Elizabeth A; Pavlakis, Nick; Roach, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy (PRRT) with yttrium-90 ((90)Y) and lutetium-177 ((177)Lu)-labelled SST analogues are now therapy option for patients who have failed to respond to conventional medical therapy. In-house production with automated PRRT synthesis systems have clear advantages over manual methods resulting in increasing use in hospital-based radiopharmacies. We report on our one year experience with an automated radiopharmaceutical synthesis system. All syntheses were carried out using the Eckert & Ziegler Eurotope's Modular-Lab Pharm Tracer® automated synthesis system. All materials and methods used were followed as instructed by the manufacturer of the system (Eckert & Ziegler Eurotope, Berlin, Germany). Sterile, GMP-certified, no-carrier added (NCA) (177)Lu was used with GMP-certified peptide. An audit trail was also produced and saved by the system. The quality of the final product was assessed after each synthesis by ITLC-SG and HPLC methods. A total of 17 [(177)Lu]-DOTATATE syntheses were performed between August 2013 and December 2014. The amount of radioactive [(177)Lu]-DOTATATE produced by each synthesis varied between 10-40 GBq and was dependant on the number of patients being treated on a given day. Thirteen individuals received a total of 37 individual treatment administrations in this period. There were no issues and failures with the system or the synthesis cassettes. The average radiochemical purity as determined by ITLC was above 99% (99.8 ± 0.05%) and the average radiochemical purity as determined by HPLC technique was above 97% (97.3 ± 1.5%) for this period. The automated synthesis of [(177)Lu]-DOTATATE using Eckert & Ziegler Eurotope's Modular-Lab Pharm Tracer® system is a robust, convenient and high yield approach to the radiolabelling of DOTATATE peptide benefiting from the use of NCA (177)Lu and almost negligible radiation exposure of the operators.

  20. Lutetium 177-Labeled Cetuximab Evaluation for Radioimmunotherapeutic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Yavari

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: The monoclonal antibody cetuximab binds to EGFR and thus provides an opportunity to create both imaging and therapeutic modalities that target this receptor. The potential of cetuximab as a radioimmunoconjugate was investigated and quality control tests (in vitro and in vivo were performed as a first step in the production of a new radiopharmaceutical.   Methods : Cetuximab solution was dialyzed and concentrated using an Amicon Ultra-15 filter. Purified antibody was labeled with lutetium-177 using the acyclic bifunctional chelator, DOTA-NHS, and radioimmunoconjugates were purified by PD10 columns. Radiochemical purity and stability in buffer and human blood serum were determined using thin layer chromatography. Integrity of the radiolabeled complex was checked by SDS-PAGE. Preliminary biodistribution studies in normal mice model performed to determine radioimmunoconjugates distribution up to 72h.   Results: The radiochemical purity of the complex was 98±1%. The stabilities in phosphate buffer and in human blood serum at 96 hours post-preparation were 96±2 % and 78±4%, respectively. All of the samples, controls and radiolabeled antibodies, showed a similar pattern of migration in the gel electrophoresis. Biodistribution of Lu177-cetuximab was evaluated in normal mice and the highest ID/g% was observed in the blood (13.2±1.3% at 24 hours and the liver (9.1±1.3% at 24 hours.   Conclusion: Our results show that DOTA-cituximab can be labeled with 177Lu. Lu177-cetuximab has sufficient stability and retains its integrity. The new complex could be considered for further evaluation in animals and possibly in humans as a new radiopharmaceutical for use in radioimmunotherapy of cancers.

  1. Structure and luminescence spectra of lutetium and yttrium borates synthesized from ammonium nitrate melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klassen, Nikolay V.; Shmurak, Semion Z.; Shmyt'ko, Ivan M.; Strukova, Galina K.; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Weber, Marvin J.

    2005-01-01

    Lutetium and yttrium borates doped with europium, terbium, gadolinium, etc. have been synthesized by dissolving initial oxides and nitrates in ammonium nitrate melt and thermal decomposition of the solvent. Annealings in the range of 500-1100 deg. C modified the dimensions of the grains from 2 to 3 nm to more than 100 nm. Significant dependence of the structure of lutetium borate on slight doping with rare earth ions has been found: terbium makes high-temperature vaterite phase preferential at room temperature, whereas europium stabilizes low-temperature calcite phase. Influence of the structure of the borates on the pattern of the luminescence spectra of europium dopant was observed. Possibilities for manufacturing of scintillating lutetium borate ceramics by means of this method of synthesis are discussed

  2. Structure and luminescence spectra of lutetium and yttrium borates synthesized from ammonium nitrate melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Nikolay V.; Shmurak, Semion Z.; Shmyt'ko, Ivan M.; Strukova, Galina K.; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Weber, Marvin J.

    2005-01-01

    Lutetium and yttrium borates doped with europium, terbium, gadolinium, etc. have been synthesized by dissolving initial oxides and nitrates in ammonium nitrate melt and thermal decomposition of the solvent. Annealings in the range of 500-1100°C modified the dimensions of the grains from 2 to 3 nm to more than 100 nm. Significant dependence of the structure of lutetium borate on slight doping with rare earth ions has been found: terbium makes high-temperature vaterite phase preferential at room temperature, whereas europium stabilizes low-temperature calcite phase. Influence of the structure of the borates on the pattern of the luminescence spectra of europium dopant was observed. Possibilities for manufacturing of scintillating lutetium borate ceramics by means of this method of synthesis are discussed.

  3. Determination of lutetium (III) hydrolysis constants in the middle of ion force 1M sodium chloride at 303 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez R, M.; Solache R, M.J.; Ramirez G, J.J.; Rojas H, A.

    1997-01-01

    With the purpose to complete information about the lutetium (III) hydrolysis constants here is used the potentiometric method to determine those in the middle of ion force 1M sodium chloride at 303 K. (Author)

  4. Apparent molar volumes and compressibilities of lanthanum, gadolinium and lutetium trifluoromethanesulfonates in dimethylsulfoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warmińska, Dorota; Wawer, Jarosław

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Sequence of volumes and compressibilities of Ln 3+ ions in DMSO is: La 3+ > Gd 3+ 3+ . ► Sequence of the partial molar volumes do not change with temperature. ► These results are the consequence of nature of the ion–solvent bonding. - Abstract: Temperature dependencies of the densities of dimethylsulfoxide solutions of lanthanum, gadolinium and lutetium trifluoromethanesulfonates have been determined over a wide range of concentrations. The apparent molar volumes and partial molar volumes of the salts at infinite dilution, as well as the expansibilities of the salts, have been calculated from density data. Additionally, the apparent molar isentropic compressibilities of lanthanum, gadolinium and lutetium trifluoromethanesulfonates have been calculated from sound velocity data at 298.15 K. The data obtained have been interpreted in terms of ion−solvent interactions.

  5. PMR investigation into complexes of lanthanum and lutetium with ethylenediaminediacetic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostromina, N.A.; Novikova, L.B.

    1975-01-01

    Proton resonance spectra of ethylendiaminediacetic acid (EDDA) and EDDA mixtures with La and Lu as function of pH of solution was studied. Sequence of EDDA (A 2- ) protonation was established; cations H 3 A + and H 4 A 2+ were found; dissociation constants of above mentioned cations were determined. Formation of H 2 LnA 3+ , HLnA 2+ and LnA + complexes in EDDA-Ln (1:1) system was found. Difference in the bonds mobility of lanthanum and lutetium complexes was determined: lanthanum forms complexes with labile, lutetium with non-labile bonds. Information on complexes structure is collected. Acid dissociation constants of protonated complexes of lanthanum with EDDA were determined

  6. Determination of Kps and β1,H in a wide interval of initial concentrations of lutetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-G, H.; Jimenez R, M.; Solache R, M.; Rojas H, A.

    2006-01-01

    The solubility product constants and the first of lutetium hydrolysis in the interval of initial concentration of 3.72 X 10 -5 to 2.09 X 10 -3 M of lutetium, in a 2M of NaCIO 4 media, at 303 K and under conditions free of CO 2 its were considered. The solubility diagrams (pLu (ac) -pC H ) by means of a radiochemical method were obtained, and starting from its the pC H values that limit the saturation and no-saturation zones of the solutions were settled down. Those diagrams allowed, also, to calculate the solubility product constants of Lu(OH) 3 . The experimental data to the polynomial solubility equation were adjusted, what allowed to calculate those values of the solubility product constants of Lu(OH) 3 and to determine the first hydrolysis constant. The value of precipitation pC H diminishes when the initial concentration of the lutetium increases, while the values of K ps and β 1,H its remain constant. (Author)

  7. Lutetium(III) aqua ion: On the dynamical structure of the heaviest lanthanoid hydration complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sessa, Francesco; D’Angelo, Paola, E-mail: p.dangelo@uniroma1.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università di Roma “La Sapienza,” P. le A. Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy); Spezia, Riccardo [CNRS, UMR 8587, Laboratoire Analyse et Modelisation Pour la Biologie et l’Environnement, Université d’Evry Val d’Essonne, Blvd. F. Mitterrand, 91025 Evry Cedex (France)

    2016-05-28

    The structure and dynamics of the lutetium(III) ion in aqueous solution have been investigated by means of a polarizable force field molecular dynamics (MD). An 8-fold square antiprism (SAP) geometry has been found to be the dominant configuration of the lutetium(III) aqua ion. Nevertheless, a low percentage of 9-fold complexes arranged in a tricapped trigonal prism (TTP) geometry has been also detected. Dynamic properties have been explored by carrying out six independent MD simulations for each of four different temperatures: 277 K, 298 K, 423 K, 632 K. The mean residence time of water molecules in the first hydration shell at room temperature has been found to increase as compared to the central elements of the lanthanoid series in agreement with previous experimental findings. Water exchange kinetic rate constants at each temperature and activation parameters of the process have been determined from the MD simulations. The obtained structural and dynamical results suggest that the water exchange process for the lutetium(III) aqua ion proceeds with an associative mechanism, in which the SAP hydration complex undergoes temporary structural changes passing through a 9-fold TTP intermediate. Such results are consistent with the water exchange mechanism proposed for heavy lanthanoid atoms.

  8. 28 CFR 16.1 - General provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General provisions. 16.1 Section 16.1 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PRODUCTION OR DISCLOSURE OF MATERIAL OR INFORMATION... administration of the Department of Justice. ...

  9. 7 CFR 1717.161 - Application process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Application process. 1717.161 Section 1717.161 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Consolidations of Electric Borrowers § 1717.161 Application process. (a) Borrowers are responsible for ensuring...

  10. 7 CFR 1427.161 - Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administration. 1427.161 Section 1427.161 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS COTTON Recourse Seed Cotton Loans § 1427.161 Administration...

  11. 21 CFR 161.136 - Olympia oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Olympia oysters. 161.136 Section 161.136 Food and... oysters. Olympia oysters, raw Olympia oysters, shucked Olympia oysters, are of the species Ostrea lurida and conform to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for oysters in § 161.130. ...

  12. 46 CFR 161.012-7 - Construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Construction. 161.012-7 Section 161.012-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Personal Flotation Device Lights § 161.012-7 Construction. (a...

  13. 46 CFR 161.012-9 - Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Performance. 161.012-9 Section 161.012-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Personal Flotation Device Lights § 161.012-9 Performance. (a) If...

  14. Synthesis of Lutetium Phosphate/Apoferritin Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Potential Applications in Radioimmunoimaging and Radioimmunotherapy of Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Hong; Engelhard, Mark H.; Wang, Jun; Fisher, Darrell R.; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-01-01

    We report a novel approach for synthesizing LuPO4/apoferritin core-shell nanoparticles based on an apoferritin template, conjugated to the protein biotin. To prepare the nanoparticle conjugates, we used non-radioactive lutetium as a model target or surrogate for radiolutetium (177Lu). The central cavity, multi-channel structure, and chemical properties of apoferritin are well-suited for sequentially diffusing lutetium and phosphate ions into the cavity--resulting in a stable core-shell composite. We characterized the synthesized LuPO4/apoferritin nanoparticle using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We tested the pre-targeting capability of biotin-modified lutetium/apoferritin nanoparticle using streptavidin-modified magnetic beads and streptavidin-modified fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) tracer. This paper presents a simple, fast, and efficient method for synthesizing LuPO4/apoferritin nanoparticle conjugates with biotin for potential applications in radioimmunotherapy and radioimmunoimaging of cancer

  15. Study of lutetium nitrate reaction with orthophosphates of alkali metals and ammonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davitashvili, E.G.; Dzhabishvili, N.A.; Orlovskij, V.P.; Kargareteli, L.N.

    1986-01-01

    The process of lutetium phosphate precipitation in systems Lu(NO 3 ) 3 - M 3 PO 4 -H 2 O, where M=K + , Na, NH 4 , at 25 deg was studied. Compounds LuPO 4 x2H 2 O, 5LuPO 4 xNa 3 PO 4 x16H 2 O, 2LuPO 4 xK 3 PO 4 x6H 2 O and 2LuPO 4 (NH 4 ) 3 PO 4 x6H 2 O were isolated. The compounds prepared are roentgenoamorphous. Results of thermal decomposition of the compounds are presented

  16. X-ray fluorescence analysis of lutetium oxide/oxalate for rare earth impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandola, L.C.; Khanna, P.P.

    1985-01-01

    An X-ray fluorescence spectrometric method for the analysis of lutetium oxide is described. The sample in the oxalate form is mixed with boric acid binding material and pressed into a pellet over supporting pellet of boric acid. A Philips PW 1220 wavelength dispersive semiautomatic X-ray fluorescence spectrometer is used for the analysis. The minimum determination limit is 0.002 percent for Y, Er and Yb and 0.005 percent for Tm. Calculations for theoretical minimum detection limits and percent standard deviations at each concentration of the standard are carried out. (author)

  17. Cerium-doped single crystal and transparent ceramic lutetium aluminum garnet scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherepy, Nerine J.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Speaks, Derrick T.; Payne, Stephen A.; Chai, B.H.T.; Porter-Chapman, Yetta; Derenzo, Stephen E.

    2007-01-01

    For rapid, unambiguous isotope identification, scintillator detectors providing high-resolution gamma ray spectra are required. We have fabricated Lutetium Aluminum Garnet (LuAG) using transparent ceramic processing, and report a 2-mm thick ceramic exhibiting 75% transmission and light yield comparable to single-crystal LuAG:Ce. The LuAG:Ce luminescence peaks at 550 nm, providing an excellent match for Silicon Photodiode readout. LuAG is dense (6.67 g/cm 3 ) and impervious to water, exhibits good proportionality and a fast decay (∼40 ns), and we measure light yields in excess of 20,000 photons/MeV

  18. Independent fissile inventory verification in a large tank employing lutetium double spikes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, J.A.; Walker, R.L.; May, M.P.; Smith, D.H.; Hebble, T.L.

    1987-01-01

    A 3000-liter feed adjustment tank containing over 2400 L of uranium solution was assayed for its contents using the double spiking technique of isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Lutetium was the double spike, with the natural element used as the initial spike and enriched 176-Lu as the second. The ability of a remote sampling system was evaluated for its ability to introduce the lutetium and also to produce homogeneous sample solutions. The system was found to be satisfactory. Volumes of the tank can be measured to a precision of about 0.2%. The concentration of uranium was measured as 154.5 g/L uranium, thus giving a total of 382.3 kg in the tank as compared to the plant's best estimate of 383 kg. Uranium measurements were subjected to internal calibration calculations, with 233-U and 236-U being used as the reference isotopes. A diversion of 5% of the tank contents was simulated to evaluate the method's sensitivity in this regard. The ability of this method to give timely results of good precision makes it a strong candidate for use in material balance and inventory accountability applications; it also has potential use in quality assurance areas

  19. Optical emission spectrographic analysis of lutetium oxide for rare earth impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandola, L.C.; Dixit, V.S.

    1986-01-01

    An optical emission spectrographic (OES) method has been developed for the analysis of high purity lutetium oxide to determine rare earths Er, Tm, Yb and Y. The spectra are excited by a d.c. arc run at 10 A current after mixing the sample with graphite buffer in the weight ratio 1:1. A 1200 grooves/mm grating blazed at 3300 A is used for dispersion and a Kodak SA-1 plate for recording the spectrum. The detection limit is 0.001 per cent for Tm, Yb and Y while it is 0.005 per cent for Er. The relative standard deviation of the method is ± 13.4 per cent. (author)

  20. Photoelectric conversion and electrochromic properties of lutetium tetrakis(tert-butyl)bisphthalocyaninate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Andrew Teh; Hu Tenyi; Liu Lungchang

    2003-01-01

    Both photoelectric and electrochromic effects on lutetium tetrakis(tert-butyl)bisphthalocyaninate (Lu(TBPc) 2 ) have been carried out in this study. Lu(TBPc) 2 is known for its electrochromic performance, but its photoelectric effect has not mentioned in the literature. The electrochromic properties of Lu(TBPc) 2 have been measured by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and UV-Vis spectrometer at the same time. It takes less than 1.5 s for the color to change from red to green under 0.9 V. Its cycle life is at least over 500 times. Furthermore, we also investigate its photoelectric conversion properties. Its photoelectric cell exhibits a positive photo-electricity conversion effect with a short-circuit photocurrent (46.4 μA/cm 2 ) under illumination of white light (1.201 mW/cm 2 )

  1. Electrochromism of solid films of blue form of lutetium phthalocyanine complexe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavrilov, V I; Konstantinov, A P; Luk' yanets, E A; Shelepin, I V

    1986-12-01

    Results of spectral-electrochemical study on electrochromic films of blue form of tret-butyl-substituted lutetium diphthalocyanine deposited on the surface of an electrode contacting with electrolyte aqueous solution are presented. In the 0.2-1.15 V potential range sweep of the electrode potential is followed by reversible change of the film colour in the following succession: blue reversible green reversible red. Electrochromic properties of the film confirm the corresponding spectral transitions from the initial state to monoelectron-oxidized and further on to the product of two-electron oxidation. Under potential sweeping towards the anode in the 1.4 V range and irreversible wave arises; potential achievement of this wave brings about complete change in the form of j, E-curves. The consequent electrode processes are followed by change in the film colour green - red that is associated witn mechanical fracture of the film.

  2. Formulation and characterization of lutetium-177-labeled stannous (tin) colloid for radiosynovectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Geetanjali; Singh, Manoranjan; Jha, Pragati; Tripathy, Sarthak; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Mukherjee, Anirban; Shamim, Shamim A

    2017-07-01

    Easy large-scale production, easy availability, cost-effectiveness, long half-life, and favorable radiation characteristics have made lutetium-177 (Lu) a preferred radionuclide for use in therapy. Lutetium-177-labeled stannous (Lu-Sn) colloid particles were formulated for application in radiosynovectomy, followed by in-vitro and in-vivo characterization. Stannous chloride (SnCl2) solution and Lu were heated together, the pH was adjusted, and the particles were recovered by centrifugation. The heating time and amount of SnCl2 were varied to optimize the labeling protocol. The labeling efficiency (LE) and radiochemical purity (RCP) of the product were determined. The size and shape of the particles were determined by means of electron microscopy. In-vitro stability was tested in PBS and synovial fluid, and in-vivo stability was tested in humans. LE and RCP were greater than 95% and ∼99% (Rf=0-0.1), respectively. Aggregated colloidal particles were spherical (mean size: 241±47 nm). The product was stable in vitro for up to 7 days in PBS as well as in synovial fluid. Injection of the product into the infected knee joint of a patient resulted in its homogenous distribution in the intra-articular space, as seen on the scan. No leakage of activity was seen outside the knee joint even 7 days after injection, indicating good tracer binding and in-vivo stability. Lu-Sn colloid was successfully prepared with a high LE (>95%) and high RCP (99%) under optimized reaction conditions. Because of the numerous benefits of Lu and the ease of preparation of tin colloid particles, Lu-Sn colloid particles are significantly superior to its currently available counterparts for use in radiosynovectomy.

  3. 40 CFR 161.153 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Definitions. 161.153 Section 161.153 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS..., destroy, repel or mitigate any pest, or that functions as a plant regulator, desiccant, or defoliant...

  4. 22 CFR 161.2 - Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Policy. 161.2 Section 161.2 Foreign Relations... environmental review procedures with the Department's decisionmaking process; (d) Invite and facilitate, when appropriate, Federal, State and local governmental authorities and public involvement in decisions which...

  5. 40 CFR 161.60 - Minor uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Minor uses. 161.60 Section 161.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS... until it is applied to the major use registrations. (3) EPA will accept extrapolations and regional data...

  6. 33 CFR 161.18 - Reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting requirements. 161.18 Section 161.18 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... call. H HOTEL Date, time and point of entry system Entry time expressed as in (B) and into the entry...

  7. 16 CFR 1.61 - Injunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Injunctions. 1.61 Section 1.61 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE GENERAL PROCEDURES... believe that it would be to the interest of the public, the Commission will apply to the courts for...

  8. 14 CFR 406.161 - Witness fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Witness fees. 406.161 Section 406.161 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... the same fees and mileage expenses as are paid to a witness in a court of the United States in...

  9. Electrochemistry and spectroelectrochemistry of tert-butylcalix[4]arene bridged bis double-decker lutetium(III) phthalocyanine, Lu2Pc4 and dimeric lutetium(III) phthalocyanine, Lu2Pc2(OAc)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koca, Atif; Ceyhan, Tanju; Erbil, Mehmet K.; Ozkaya, Ali Riza; Bekaroglu, Ozer

    2007-01-01

    In this study, electrochemical, electrochromic and spectroelectrochemical properties of a tert-butylcalix[4]arene bridged bis double-decker lutetium(III) phthalocyanine (Lu 2 Pc 4 2) were investigated explicitly as compared with a tert-butylcalix[4]arene bridged dimeric lutetium(III) phthalocyanine [Lu 2 Pc 2 (OAc) 2 1]. Distinctive differences between electrochemical and electrochromic properties of 1 and 2 were detected. Moreover, the properties of 1 and 2 were compared with previously reported S 4 (CH 2 ) 4 bridged Lu 2 Pc 2 (OAc) 2 and Lu 2 Pc 4 . The calixarene bridged phthalocyanine (Pc) compounds, 1 and 2 showed well-defined electrochromic behaviour with green-blue and blue-purple colour transitions. The enhanced electrochromic properties of 2, as compared to 1, were attributed to its double-decker structure, probably allowing the formation of suitable ion channels for the counter ion movement in the solid film

  10. 50 CFR 648.161 - Closures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Bluefish Fishery § 648.161 Closures. (a) EEZ closure. NMFS shall close the EEZ to fishing for bluefish by... dealer permit holders that no commercial quota is available for landing bluefish in that state. ...

  11. Photodynamic therapy with motexafin lutetium for rectal cancer: a preclinical model in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, H M; Smelstoys, J A; Davis, G J; Kapatkin, A S; Del Piero, F; Reineke, E; Wang, H; Zhu, T C; Busch, T M; Yodh, A G; Hahn, S M

    2006-10-01

    Local recurrence of rectal cancer remains a significant clinical problem despite multi-modality therapy. Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is a cancer treatment which generates tumor kill through the production of singlet oxygen in cells containing a photosensitizing drug when exposed to laser light of a specific wavelength. PDT is a promising modality for prevention of local recurrence of rectal cancer for several reasons: tumor cells may selectively retain photosensitizer at higher levels than normal tissues, the pelvis after mesorectal excision is a fixed space amenable to intra-operative illumination, and PDT can generate toxicity in tissues up to 1 cm thick. This study evaluated the safety, tissue penetration of 730 nm light, normal tissue toxicity and surgical outcome in a dog model of rectal resection after motexafin lutetium-mediated photodynamic therapy. Ten mixed breed dogs were used. Eight dogs underwent proctectomy and low rectal end to end stapled anastomosis. Six dogs received the photosensitizing agent motexafin lutetium (MLu, Pharmacyclics, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA) of 2 mg/kg preoperatively and underwent subsequent pelvic illumination of the transected distal rectum of 730 nm light with light doses ranging from 0.5 J/cm(2) to 10 J/cm(2) three hours after drug delivery. Two dogs received light, but no drug, and underwent proctectomy and low-rectal stapled anastomosis. Two dogs underwent midline laparotomy and pelvic illumination. Light penetration in tissues was determined for small bowel, rectum, pelvic sidewall, and skin. Clinical outcomes were recorded. Animals were sacrificed at 14 days and histological evaluation was performed. All dogs recovered uneventfully. No dog suffered an anastomotic leak. Severe tissue toxicity was not seen. Histological findings at necropsy revealed mild enteritis in all dogs. The excitation light penetration depths were 0.46 +/- 0.18, 0.46 +/- 0.15, and 0.69 +/- 0.39 cm, respectively, for rectum, small bowel, and peritoneum in

  12. Enthalpies of mixing in binary liquid alloys of lutetium with 3d metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Michael; Berezutski, Vadim [National Academy of Sciences, Kyiv (Ukraine). I. Frantsevich Institute for Problems of Materials Science; Usenko, Natalia; Kotova, Natalia [Taras Shevchenko National Univ., Kyiv (Ukraine). Dept. of Chemistry

    2017-01-15

    The enthalpies of mixing in binary liquid alloys of lutetium with chromium, cobalt, nickel and copper were determined at 1 773 - 1 947 K by isoperibolic calorimetry. The enthalpies of mixing in the Lu-Cr melts (measured up to 40 at.% Cr) demonstrate endothermic effects (ΔH = 6.88 ± 0.66 kJ . mol{sup -1} at x{sub Lu} = 0.60), whereas significant exothermic enthalpies of mixing have been established within a wide composition region for the Co-Lu, Ni-Lu and Cu-Lu liquid alloys. Minimum values of the integral enthalpy of mixing are as follows: ΔH{sub min} = -23.57 ± 1.41 kJ . mol{sup -1} at x{sub Lu} = 0.38 for the Co-Lu system; ΔH{sub min} = -48.65 ± 2.83 kJ . mol{sup -1} at x{sub Lu} = 0.40 for the Ni-Lu system; ΔH{sub min} = -24.63 ± 1.52 kJ . mol{sup -1} at x{sub Lu} = 0.37 for the Cu-Lu system.

  13. Optical Fibre NO2 Sensor Based on Lutetium Bisphthalocyanine in a Mesoporous Silica Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Debliquy

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we describe a NO2 sensor consisting of a coating based on lutetium bisphthalocyanine (LuPc2 in mesoporous silica. The sensor exploits the absorption spectrum change of this material which strongly and reversibly decreases in contact with NO2. NO2 is measured by following the amplitude change in the reflected spectrum of the coating deposited on the tip of a silica fibre. As diffusion of NO2 in LuPc2 is slow, the response time could be slow. To reduce it, the active molecules are dispersed in a mesoporous silica matrix deposited by a sol-gel process (Evaporation Induced Self Assembly avoiding the formation of large crystals. Doing so, the response is fairly fast. As the recovery is slow at room temperature, the recovery time is reduced by exposure to UV light at 365 nm. This UV light is directly introduced in the fibre yielding a practical sensor sensitive to NO2 in the ppm range suitable for pollution monitoring.

  14. Transition rates in {sup 161}Dy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, V; Malmskog, S G

    1969-06-15

    The decay of {sup 161}Tb has been studied using a high resolution Ge(Li)-detector. Five new transitions were observed and fitted into the earlier proposed decay scheme. The half-life of the 131.8 keV level in {sup 161}Dy was determined in a delayed coincidence measurement to be 145 {+-} 15 psec. The low level scheme in {sup 161}Dy is discussed within a quasi-particle model allowing for Coriolis mixing. Special attention is given to the strongly retarded, K-allowed 131.8 keV E1 transition with a retardation factor F{sub W} > 1.5 x 10{sup 8}.

  15. Lutetium-177 - Broad Production Capabilities are Expected to Stimulate Clinical Applications of this Important Therapeutic Radioisotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Lutetium-177 (Lu-177) is of broad interest for therapeutic applications where the deposition of localized radiation can benefit from the limited soft tissue penetration of the 0.497 MeV beta particle (max. = 2.76 mm). Examples of Lu-177 therapeutic strategies include treatment of small SS2/SS5-expressing tumors with targeted peptides and radiosynovectomy. Emission of a 208 keV gamma photon (11 %) allows imaging for evaluation of localization and biokinetics, and for targeting applications, correlation of uptake with therapeutic response. A broad spectrum of research reactors with even modest thermal neutron flux (e.g. > 1 x 10 14 ) can produce carrier-added Lu-177 with sufficient specific activity (SA) > 10 Ci/mg Lu by the 'direct' approach by irradiation of Lu-176. For low SA applications, thermal flux of > 10 13 in low-medium flux reactors provides sufficient SA (> 0.5 mCi Lu-177/mg) for preparation of Lu-EDTMP for synovectomy. Although relative Lu-177m/Lu-177 activity levels from 'direct' production can be very low (> 10 -5 ), the Lu-177m impurity levels can present an issue with radioactive waste storage requirements at some institutions. The alternative 'indirect' approach using decay of reactor produced ytterbium-177 available from by neutron irradiation of enriched Yb-176 targets provides no-carrier-added (nca) Lu-177 (theoretical SA = 109 Ci/mg Lu). Purification of the microscopic levels of nca Lu-177 from macroscopic Yb levels at the high multi Curie production level is a more challenging approach, since production yields are relatively low even at high thermal flux (e.g. 2 x 10 15 neutrons/cm 2 /sec). In addition, high mass Lu/Yb separation is especially time consuming, can generate significant waste, and the relatively expensive Yb-176 target material (> 97%, ∼ $ 20/mg) must be recovered, re-purified and used for subsequent target preparation. However, a number of effective methods for the Lu/Yb separation and Yb recovery have been reported, and even

  16. Displaying of formation of atomic clusters in radioactive lutetium oxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kartashov, V.M.; Troitskata, A.G.

    2002-01-01

    We earlier reported the results of our investigations of electron spectra of radioactive lutetium oxide films on the magnetic β-spectrometer π√2 with momentum resolution 0.04-0.1 %. The researches were conducted many times during ≅15 years, and a lot of the data has resulted us in the conclusion about possible formation of toroidal structures in these films. It is impossible to consider a radioactive oxide layer, deposited on metallic foil support having the electric potential of its foil support on all its depth because of its high dielectric properties. There is the potential gradient (≅10 6 -10 7 V/c) on its depth because of constant outflow of electrons from its surface. Our experiments included in itself also giving a potential, accelerating for electrons, to the metallic foil support. In this case we received a capability to watch the segments of auto emission and low energy Auger electrons. The analysis of the threshold relations and behavior (in time) of the M 4 NN and M 5 NN Auger electron intensities have resulted us in the conclusion that the greatest contribution to structure formations of these oxide films is introduced by electrons of M 4 -, M 5 - and N-sub-shell of ytterbium atoms (being formed as the result of radioactive decay of the lutetium fraction with half-times from 140 to 1200 days). The auto emission electron spectrum testifies to composite scission of M4 and M5 stationary states of the atom. It is possible to offer as the explanation a quantum flat rotator. If the particle orbit un-compresses the solenoid with a magnetic flux Φ, power condition of a rotator E m =h 2 (m-Φ/Φ 0 ) 2 /(8πm e R 0 2 ), where m e - electron mass, R 0 - an electron orbit radius; m - a magnetic quantum number, a Φ 0 =h c/e - a quantum of magnetic flux. At a quantum flow Φ=nΦ 0 (n - integer) and the power spectrum does not differ from a spectrum without the solenoid. The behavior (in time) of the experimental auto emission electron spectrum responds

  17. Determination of the stability constants of lanthanum, praseodymium, europium, erbium and lutetium complexes with chloride ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez R, E.

    2008-01-01

    The stability constants of La 3+ , Pr 3+ , Eu 3+ , Er 3+ and Lu 3+ chloride complexes were determined in perchloric acid media using a liquid-liquid extraction method. The dinonyl napthalene sulfonic acid in n-heptane was used as extractant. The lanthanide (Ln) concentrations were measured by a radiochemical (Eu and Lu) and a spectrophotometric (La, Pr, and Er) methods. In the last method, xylenol orange was used for the determinations at ph 6. The stability constants of lanthanum, praseodymium, erbium and lutetium chloride complexes were determined in 2, 3 and 4 M ionic strength and europium in 1, 2 and 3 M, at 303 K. The fitting of experimental data to the equations for the calculation of the stability constants, was carry out considering both one chemical species (LnCl 2+ ) or two chemical species (LnCl 2+ and LnCl 2 + ). The Specific Ion Interaction Theory was applied to the values of log β I Ln , Cl and the first stability constants at zero ionic strength were calculated by extrapolation. The same theory could not be applied to the log β I Ln , 2Cl , due to its low abundance and the values determined for the stability constants were similar. The distribution diagrams of the chemical species were obtained using the program MEDUSA and considering log β I Ln , CI , log β I Ln , 2CI values obtained in this work and the hydrolysis constants taken from the literature. The lanthanide chloride complexes are present in solution at specific conditions of ionic strength, concentration and in the absence of hydrolysis. The log β I Ln , Cl data were related to the charge density and the corresponding equations were obtained. These equations could be used to determine the stability constants along the lanthanide series. (Author)

  18. On the effect of ammonia and wet atmospheres on the conducting properties of different lutetium bisphthalocyanine thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parra, Vicente; Bouvet, Marcel; Brunet, Jerome; Rodriguez-Mendez, Maria Luz; Saja, Jose Antonio de

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we present new experimental data regarding the influence of ammonia (NH 3 ) and water (from wet atmospheres) in the conducting properties of lutetium bisphthalocyanine (LuPc 2 )-based films in two very different structural features, namely Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and vacuum evaporated (VE) films, deposited onto interdigitated electrodes. We pay particular attention to the effect of the mass flow rate ratios of the active gases, which certainly influence the mechanism of conduction of the chemiresistors. The particular trends observed are discussed on the basis of two main contributions: the electronic effects and the competition between gases in the adsorption process

  19. On the effect of ammonia and wet atmospheres on the conducting properties of different lutetium bisphthalocyanine thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, Vicente [Ecole Superieure de Physique et Chimie Industrielles (ESPCI) and Laboratoire de Chimie Inorganique et Materiaux Moleculaires-CNRS UMR 7071, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris 6) (France); Bouvet, Marcel [Ecole Superieure de Physique et Chimie Industrielles (ESPCI) and Laboratoire de Chimie Inorganique et Materiaux Moleculaires-CNRS UMR 7071, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris 6) (France)], E-mail: marcel.bouvet@espci.fr; Brunet, Jerome [Universite Blaise Pascal, LASMEA-CNRS UMR 6602, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Rodriguez-Mendez, Maria Luz [Dept. Quimica Fisica y Quimica Inorganica, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales (E.T.S.I.I), Universidad de Valladolid (Spain); Saja, Jose Antonio de [Dept. Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid (Spain)

    2008-10-31

    In this article, we present new experimental data regarding the influence of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) and water (from wet atmospheres) in the conducting properties of lutetium bisphthalocyanine (LuPc{sub 2})-based films in two very different structural features, namely Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and vacuum evaporated (VE) films, deposited onto interdigitated electrodes. We pay particular attention to the effect of the mass flow rate ratios of the active gases, which certainly influence the mechanism of conduction of the chemiresistors. The particular trends observed are discussed on the basis of two main contributions: the electronic effects and the competition between gases in the adsorption process.

  20. 36 CFR 13.161 - Permit application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 13.161 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... blueprint, sketch or photograph of the cabin or structure; (d) A map that shows the geographic location of... cabin or structure. All information may be provided orally except the cabin blueprint, sketch or...

  1. 21 CFR 161.130 - Oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... water. Before packing into the containers for shipment or other delivery for consumption the oysters are... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FISH AND SHELLFISH Requirements for Specific Standardized Fish and Shellfish § 161.130 Oysters. (a...

  2. 46 CFR 161.012-1 - Scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Personal Flotation Device Lights § 161.012-1 Scope. (a) This subpart... approving personal flotation device lights fitted on Coast Guard approved life preservers, bouyant vests...

  3. 46 CFR 161.012-3 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Personal Flotation Device Lights § 161.012-3 Definitions. (a) As used in this subpart, PFD means Coast Guard approved personal flotation device. (b) For the purpose of...

  4. 40 CFR 161.150 - General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... FOR REGISTRATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL PESTICIDES Product Chemistry Data Requirements § 161.150 General. (a) Applicability. This subpart describes the product chemistry data that are required to support the registration... characteristics must be considered. (iv) Certain data are needed as basic or supportive evidence in initiating or...

  5. 50 CFR 14.161 - Primary enclosures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Wild Mammals and Birds to the United States Specifications for Other Terrestrial Mammals § 14.161... primary enclosure shall provide adequate space for the animal to stand upright in a normal posture with... lie in a full prone position. Specifications for Birds ...

  6. 27 CFR 17.161 - General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....161 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE... organized to enable appropriate TTB officers to trace each operation or transaction, monitor compliance with... invoices and cost accounting records, are acceptable if they show the required information or are annotated...

  7. EC/β+ decay of 161Er

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinnikov, V.G.; Ibraheem, Y.S.; Stegailov, V.I.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The study of odd-proton nuclei in rare-earth region has been performed to get more information on the nuclear structure of these nuclei. In the framework of a program at the ISOL complex of YASNAPP-2 at JINR to study the decay of odd-nuclei, 161 Er has been investigated. The experiments have been focused on the 161 Ho level scheme populated in the EC/β + decay of 161 Er for which a few results have been previously reported [1,2]. Spectra of single γ-ray, γ-γ coincidence and internal conversion electrons were measured. There are appreciable disagreements between results of some γ-ray intensities obtained by us and in [2]. The greatest difference was for relative γ-ray intensity of the 11.28 keV, which has reported value I γ ∼ 10 (I γ 211 =1000) in [2], but this leads to an overpopulation of the 211 keV level by 14% of the decay [3]. The relative intensities of transitions with Eγ γ211 =1000). Inaccuracy of Iγ in [2] is probably due to a sudden change in the efficiency curve of their Ge(Li) detector in the low energy region while our HPGe detector feature a much smoother variation in the efficiency curve in this γ-ray energy region. Besides, the levels earlier introduced by us in [4], three new levels in 161 Ho were proposed from γ-γ coincidences at energies 693.2 keV, 859.6 keV, and 957.97 keV. Spins, parities and Nilsson quantum characteristics of some 161 Ho levels were established

  8. 7 CFR 1260.161 - Establishment and membership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....161 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BEEF PROMOTION AND RESEARCH Beef Promotion and Research Order Beef Promotion Operating Committee § 1260.161...

  9. The therapeutic threesome, Iodine 131, Lutetium-111 and Rhenium-188 Radionuclide Trifecta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    -limited and manageable. In a physician-sponsored Australian Phase II clinical study grade III/IV haematological toxicity occurred (4% platelets, 16% neutrophils). Objective response rate (ORR) was 76% and Complete Remission (CR) was achieved in 53% (3). The majority of our patients now qualify for outpatient radioimmuno-therapy with 131 Irituximab and monitoring of carer radiation exposure demonstrates that the IAEA and ICRP guidelines of less than 5 mSv per episode of treatment were satisfied in all carers, and visitors to the household were exposed to less than 1 mSv. First-line 131 I-rituximab is now given to patients presenting with newly diagnosed indolent stage IIB, III, IV follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma who do not wish to be exposed to the toxic effects of induction chemotherapy. In the INITIAL phase II clinical trial at Fremantle Hospital, after first-line 131 I-rituximab radioimmunotherapy, patients also undergo maintenance rituximab therapy to maintain remission. Clinical ORR is 100% with 80% CR in all patients, as evaluated by 18F-FDG PET imaging at 3 months. This is comparable with the reported ORR of first-line radioimmuno-therapy with 131 I-tositumomab (Bexxar) (4) and achieves the same ORR of standard R-CHOP chemotherapy regimens without the associated toxicity, or any requirement for hospital admission. 2. Lutetium-177 Octreotate Neuroendocrine malignancy is not amenable to chemotherapy and if unresectable due to metastases, usually in liver, the only effective treatment with intent-to cure is radiopeptide therapy. Lutetium-177 octreotate has been demonstrated to achieve ORR 45%, CR 2% (5) which is better than the results of the most effective but relatively more toxic chemotherapy regimen of Streptozotocin + 5FU + Doxorubicin. In an attempt to improve response rates we performed a pilot study of 177 Lu octreotate and capecitabine chemotherapy radiosensitizing therapy comprising 4 cycles of 7.4 GBq 177 Lu-octreotate with 2 weeks 1600 mg/m 2 capecitabine, at

  10. 36 CFR 406.161-406.169 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false [Reserved] 406.161-406.169 Section 406.161-406.169 Parks, Forests, and Public Property AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION... BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION §§ 406.161-406.169 [Reserved] ...

  11. 46 CFR 161.013-11 - Prototype test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prototype test. 161.013-11 Section 161.013-11 Shipping...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Electric Distress Light for Boats § 161.013-11 Prototype test. (a) Each manufacturer must test a prototype light identical to the lights to be certified prior to...

  12. 40 CFR 161.340 - Toxicology data requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Toxicology data requirements. 161.340... Toxicology data requirements. (a) Table. Sections 161.100 through 161.102 describe how to use this table to determine the toxicology data requirements and the substance to be tested. Kind of data required (b) Notes...

  13. 28 CFR 39.161-39.169 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false [Reserved] 39.161-39.169 Section 39.161-39.169 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE §§ 39.161-39.169 [Reserved] ...

  14. 21 CFR 161.170 - Canned Pacific salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned Pacific salmon. 161.170 Section 161.170... § 161.170 Canned Pacific salmon. (a) Identity. (1) Canned Pacific salmon is the food prepared from one... forms of canned Pacific salmon are processed from fish prepared by removing the head, gills, and tail...

  15. 45 CFR 2490.161-2490.169 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false [Reserved] 2490.161-2490.169 Section 2490.161-2490.169 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) JAMES MADISON MEMORIAL... CONDUCTED BY THE JAMES MADISON MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP FOUNDATION §§ 2490.161-2490.169 [Reserved] ...

  16. 7 CFR 1789.161 - Conflicts of interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conflicts of interest. 1789.161 Section 1789.161... Consultant Services Funded by Borrowers-General § 1789.161 Conflicts of interest. The standard for determining organizational conflicts of interest shall be as set forth in the FAR subpart 9.5 (48 CFR part 9...

  17. 49 CFR 28.161-28.169 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false [Reserved] 28.161-28.169 Section 28.161-28.169 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION §§ 28.161-28.169 [Reserved] ...

  18. On the use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to elucidate the structure of lutetium adenosine mono- and triphosphate complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostapha, S; Berthon, C; Fontaine-Vive, F; Gaysinski, M; Guérin, L; Guillaumont, D; Massi, L; Monfardini, I; Solari, P L; Thomas, O P; Charbonnel, M C; Den Auwer, C

    2014-02-01

    Although the physiological impact of the actinide elements as nuclear toxicants has been widely investigated for half a century, a description of their interactions with biological molecules remains limited. It is however of primary importance to better assess the determinants of actinide speciation in cells and more generally in living organisms to unravel the molecular processes underlying actinide transport and deposition in tissues. The biological pathways of this family of elements in case of accidental contamination or chronic natural exposure (in the case of uranium rich soils for instance) are therefore a crucial issue of public health and of societal impact. Because of the high chemical affinity of those actinide elements for phosphate groups and the ubiquity of such chemical functions in biochemistry, phosphate derivatives are considered as probable targets of these cations. Among them, nucleotides and in particular adenosine mono- (AMP) and triphosphate (ATP) nucleotides occur in more chemical reactions than any other compounds on the earth's surface, except water, and are therefore critical target molecules. In the present study, we are interested in trans-plutonium actinide elements, in particular americium and curium that are more rarely considered in environmental and bioaccumulation studies than early actinides like uranium, neptunium and plutonium. A first step in this strategy is to work with chemical analogues like lanthanides that are not radioactive and therefore allow extended physical chemical characterization to be conducted that are difficult to perform with radioactive materials. We describe herein the interaction of lutetium(III) with adenosine AMP and ATP. With AMP and ATP, insoluble amorphous compounds have been obtained with molar ratios of 1:2 and 1:1, respectively. With an excess of ATP, with 1:2 molar ratio, a soluble complex has been obtained. A combination of spectroscopic techniques (IR, NMR, ESI-MS, EXAFS) together with quantum

  19. Studies of the radiolabeling and biodistribution of substance P using lutetium-177 as a radiotracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Clarice Maria de

    2011-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are primary brain tumors, resistant to various treatments, as chemotherapy, radiotherapy, induction of apoptosis and surgery. An alternative for the treatment of malignant gliomas is the radionuclide therapy. This technique apply radiolabeled molecules that selectively bind to tumor cells producing cytotoxic effect by dose irradiation, and resulting in death of tumor cells. Most protocols for radionuclide therapy of malignant brain tumors involve the administration of peptides labeled with β - emitting radioisotopes. The Substance P (SP) is an 11- amino acid neuropeptide, characterized by the C-terminal sequence Phe-X-Gly-Leu-Met-NH 2 . The use of SP labeled with different radionuclides including 177 Lu, have been proposed for in vivo treatment of tumors. SP is the most important target of neurokinin 1 receptors, over expressed in malignant gliomas. The objective of this work was to study conditions of radiolabeling DOTA-SP with 177 Lu, the stability of labeled compound and in vivo and in vitro, to develop a protocol production and evaluate the potential of the radiopharmaceutical in the therapy of gliomas. The labeling conditions were optimized varying the temperature, reaction time, activity of lutetium-177 chloride and mass of DOTA-SP. The radiochemical purity of preparations were analyzed by chromatographic techniques. The stability of 17L u -DOTA- SP radiolabeled with low activity of 177 Lu was evaluated for different time at 2-8 degree C or incubated in human serum. The stability of the labeled with high activity of 177 Lu was also analyzed in the presence of gentisic acid (6 mg / mL) added after the labeling reaction. The labeled conditions in low and high activity were subjected to evaluation for the ability to cause oxidation of methionine residue, adding the D-L- methionine amino acid to the reaction medium (6 mg / mL) and subsequent chromatographic evaluation. In vitro study with 177 Lu-DOTA-SP, radiolabeled in the absence and presence

  20. Apparent molar volumes and compressibilities of lanthanum, gadolinium, lutetium and sodium trifluoromethanesulfonates in N,N-dimethylformamide and N,N-dimethylacetamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warmińska, Dorota; Fuchs, Anna; Lundberg, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► In DMF the sequence values of both volumes and compressibilities of Ln 3+ ions are: La 3+ ≈ Gd 3+ > Lu 3+ . ► In DMA the ionic volumes of lanthanoid(III) metal ions are, within error limits, identical. ► Obtained results are the consequence of an ion–solvent bonding nature. -- Abstract: The concentration and temperature dependencies of density of lanthanum, gadolinium, lutetium and sodium trifluoromethanesulfonates in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA) have been determined. From density data the apparent molar volumes and partial molar volumes of the salts at infinite dilution as well as the expansibilities have been evaluated. The apparent molar isentropic compressibilities of lanthanum, gadolinium, lutetium and sodium trifluoromethanesulfonates in DMF and DMA have been calculated from sound velocity data obtained at 298.15 K. The results have been discussed in terms of ion–solvent interactions

  1. 21 CFR 516.161 - Modifications to indexed drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Modifications to indexed drugs. 516.161 Section 516.161 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES Index...

  2. 40 CFR 161.35 - Flexibility of the data requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Flexibility of the data requirements. 161.35 Section 161.35 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE... periodically to reflect new scientific knowledge, new trends in pesticide development, and new Agency policies...

  3. 7 CFR 1150.161 - Promotion, research and nutrition education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Promotion, research and nutrition education. 1150.161... MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DAIRY PROMOTION PROGRAM Dairy Promotion and Research Order Promotion, Research and Nutrition Education § 1150.161 Promotion...

  4. 33 CFR 161.20 - Position Report (PR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Position Report (PR). 161.20 Section 161.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... Report (PR). A vessel must report its name and position: (a) Upon point of entry into a VMRS area; (b) At...

  5. 12 CFR 563.161 - Management and financial policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Management and financial policies. 563.161... ASSOCIATIONS-OPERATIONS Financial Management Policies § 563.161 Management and financial policies. (a)(1) For... corporation must be well managed and operate safely and soundly. Each also must pursue financial policies that...

  6. 21 CFR 161.175 - Frozen raw breaded shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... additives as defined in section 201(s) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act; or if they are food... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Frozen raw breaded shrimp. 161.175 Section 161.175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  7. 29 CFR 1910.161 - Fixed extinguishing systems, dry chemical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fixed extinguishing systems, dry chemical. 1910.161 Section... § 1910.161 Fixed extinguishing systems, dry chemical. (a) Scope and application. This section applies to all fixed extinguishing systems, using dry chemical as the extinguishing agent, installed to meet a...

  8. 24 CFR 982.161 - Conflict of interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Conflict of interest. 982.161... and PHA Administration of Program § 982.161 Conflict of interest. (a) Neither the PHA nor any of its... prospective interest to the PHA and HUD. (c) The conflict of interest prohibition under this section may be...

  9. 30 CFR 75.161 - Plans for training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Plans for training programs. 75.161 Section 75... Provision] § 75.161 Plans for training programs. Each operator must submit to the district manager, of the Coal Mine Safety and Health District in which the mine is located, a program or plan setting forth what...

  10. 12 CFR 410.161-410.169 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false [Reserved] 410.161-410.169 Section 410.161-410.169 Banks and Banking EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES §§ 410...

  11. 22 CFR 161.11 - Environmental review and consultation requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... requirements. 161.11 Section 161.11 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION REGULATIONS FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) Coordination of Other Requirements... comments. (d) Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act, 16 U.S.C. 661 et seq. (e) Section 309 of the Clean Air...

  12. 27 CFR 1.61 - Use of wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of wine. 1.61 Section..., NONINDUSTRIAL USE OF DISTILLED SPIRITS AND WINE, BULK SALES AND BOTTLING OF DISTILLED SPIRITS Nonindustrial Use of Distilled Spirits and Wine Uses Regarded As Industrial § 1.61 Use of wine. The following uses of...

  13. Labelling of the peptide Dota-Octreotate with Lutetium 177; Marcado del peptido Dota-Octreotate con Lutecio 177

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez B, C.A

    2004-07-01

    In this work is described the optimization of the reaction conditions to obtain the complex {sup 177} Lu-Dota-TATE with a radiochemical purity > 95%, even so the studies of stability In vitro to the dilution in saline solution, stability in human serum and challenge to the cystein. The biodistribution studies are presented in mice Balb-C and the tests of biological recognition using one lines cellular of pancreatic adenoma (AR42-J). The obtained results show a high stability of the radio complex in vitro, since it doesn't suffer trans chelation from the Lutetium-177 to plasmatic proteins. The biodistribution tests in mice Balb-C demonstrated an appropriate lipophilly of the complex to be excreted in more proportion by the kidneys without significant accumulation in healthy tissues. It is necessary to mention that the drop activity specifies (3.54 {mu}g / 37 MBq) obtained in the irradiation of {sup 176} Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} it allowed to verify the union of the {sup 177}Lu-Dota-Tate to membrane receivers but without being able to obtain the saturation curves and competition required to characterize quantitatively the biological recognition. (Author)

  14. Spectroscopic studies of lutetium pyro-silicates Lu2Si2O7 doped with bismuth and europium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretheau-Raynal, Francoise

    1981-01-01

    Single crystals of thortveitite structure pyro-silicates were grown by a floating zone technique associated with an arc image furnace. The samples were systematically characterized by X-Ray diffraction and microprobe analysis. Thanks to oriented single crystals of Lu 2 Si 2 O 7 , Yb 2 Si 2 O 7 and Sc 2 Si 2 O 7 , the recorded infrared and Raman spectra allow complete attribution of internal and external vibration modes, in good agreement with group theory predictions for C 2h factor group. Spectroscopic studies of Eu 3+ doping ion in Lu 2 Si 2 O 7 confirm C 2 point symmetry for the cationic site. Oscillator strengths and Judd-Ofelt parameters for Eu 3+ were calculated. A three level scheme ( 1 S 0 , 3 P 0 , 3 P 1 ) of Bi 3+ ion is used to explain radiative and non radiative mechanisms in Lu 2 Si 2 O 7 doped with bismuth. Finally, the mechanisms of low temperature (T =9 K) energy transfer between Bi 3+ and Eu 3+ in lutetium pyro-silicate was studied. The transfer occurs by non radiative process, without any diffusion of the excitation energy within the donor system and is due to dipole-dipole interactions between Bi 3+ and Eu 3+ ions. (author) [fr

  15. Radiolabeling of substance P with Lutetium-177 and biodistribution study in AR42J pancreatic tumor xenografted Nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Bortoleti de; Pujatti, Priscilla Brunelli; Barrio, Ofelia; Caldeira, Jose S.; Mengatti, Jair; Suzuki, Miriam F.

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic tumor (PT) is a neuroendocrine neoplasm that usually origin metastases in the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract. In recent years, new developments in targeted therapies have emerged and the presence of peptide receptors at the cell membrane of PT constitutes the basis of the clinical use of specific radiolabeled ligands. Substance P, an 11-amino acid peptide which has an important role in modulating pain transmission trough neurokinin 1 and 2 receptors (NKr), may play a role in the pathogenesis of PT, because approximately 10% of these tumors over express NKr. The aim of the present work was to produce a pure and stable SP analog (DOTA-SP) radiolabeled with Lutetium-177 ( 177 Lu), and to evaluate its in vivo target to AR42J pancreatic tumor cells in Nude mice in other to verify if SP can be used in this pancreatic tumor detection and treatment. 177 Lu (half-life 6.7 days) has both β and γ-emissions suitable for radiotherapy and imaging respectively. Substance P was successfully labeled with high yield (>99%) at optimized conditions and kept stable for more than 72 hours at 4 deg C and 24 hours in human plasma. Biodistribution studies showed that SP excretion was mainly performed by renal pathway. In addition, 177 Lu-DOTA-SP showed higher uptake by tumor than normal pancreas, indicating the presence of NK receptors in AR42J pancreatic tumor. (author)

  16. 46 CFR 161.006-1 - Applicable specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Nickel Plus Chromium and Nickel Plus Chromium—161.006-4 You may obtain these standards from The American...) Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc.: Standard for flexible cord and fixture wire, third edition, October, 1935. (b...

  17. 33 CFR 161.4 - Requirement to carry the rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY VESSEL TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT Vessel Traffic Services General Rules § 161... the Local Notice to Mariners. The VTS User's Manual and the World VTS Guide, an International Maritime...

  18. Eestist osaleb rahvusvahelisel reklaamifestivalil 161 reklaami / Sergo Selder

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Selder, Sergo

    2005-01-01

    Riias toimuvast kuuendast Baltimaade reklaamifestivalist "Kuldne haamer" ("Golden Hammer"). Eestist on esitatud 161 reklaami. Žüriisse kuulub eestlastest Jaanus Vahtra reklaamifirmast Saatchi & Saatchi, kelle Diseli õllereklaam võitis möödunud aastal telereklaamide Kuldhaamri

  19. {sup 177}Lutetium-DOTATATE peptide radio-receptor therapy for patients with endocrine neoplasm and the individualized semi-automatic dosimetry. A retrospective analysis; {sup 177}Lutetium-DOTATATE-Peptid-Radio-Rezeptor-Therapie bei Patienten mit neuroendokrinen Neoplasien und die individualisierte, semi-automatische-Dosimetrie. Eine retrospektive Analyse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeser, Anastassia

    2016-09-28

    The {sup 177}lutetium-DOTATATE peptide radio-receptor therapy is a promising approach for the palliative treatment of patients with inoperable endocrine neoplasm. The individually variable biological dispersion and the tumor uptake including the protection of critical organs require a precise and reliable organ and tumor dosimetry. The HERMES Hybrid dosimetry module has appeared as reliable and user-friendly tool for clinical application. The next step is supposed to by the complete integration of 3D SPECT imaging.

  20. Quantifying public radiation exposure related to lutetium-177 octreotate therapy for the development of a safe outpatient treatment protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmstead, Craig; Cruz, Kyle; Stodilka, Robert; Zabel, Pamela; Wolfson, Robert

    2015-02-01

    Radionuclide therapies, including treatment of neuroendocrine tumors with lutetium-177 (Lu-177) octreotate, often involve hospital admission to minimize radiation exposure to the public. Overnight admission due to Lu-177 octreotate therapy incurs additional cost for the hospital and is an inconvenience for the patient. This study endeavors to characterize the potential radiation risk to caregivers and the public should Lu-177 octreotate therapies be performed on an outpatient basis. Dose rate measurements of radiation emanating from 10 patients were taken 30 min, 4, and 20 h after initiation of Lu-177 octreotate therapy. Instadose radiation dose measurement monitors were also placed around the patients' rooms to assess the potential cumulative radiation exposure during the initial 30 min-4 h after treatment (simulating the hospital-based component of the outpatient model) as well as 4-20 h after treatment (simulating the discharged outpatient portion). The mean recorded dose rate at 30 min, 4, and 20 h after therapy was 20.4, 14.0, and 6.6 μSv/h, respectively. The majority of the cumulative dose readings were below the minimum recordable threshold of 0.03 mSv, with a maximum dose recorded of 0.18 mSv. Given the low dose rate and cumulative levels of radiation measured, the results support that an outpatient Lu-177 octreotate treatment protocol would not jeopardize public safety. Nevertheless, the concept of ALARA still requires that detailed radiation safety protocols be developed for Lu-177 octreotate outpatients to minimize radiation exposure to family members, caregivers, and the general public.

  1. Physico-chemical characterization of terbium-161-chloride (161TbCl3) radioisotope from irradiated natural gadolinium oxide target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azmairit Aziz; Nana Suherman

    2015-01-01

    Currently cancer patients are increasing every year in Indonesia and become the third leading cause of death after heart disease and high blood pressure. Terbium-161 ( 161 Tb) is a low β- emitter (E β - = 0.155 MeV, T 1/2 = 6.9 d) and very similar to 177 Lu in terms of half-life, E β - energy and chemical properties.However, 161 Tb also ejects internal conversion electrons and Auger electrons which can provide a greater therapeutic effect than 177 Lu. Radioisotope of 161 Tb can be produced as a carrier-free for use in labeling of biomolecules as a targeted radiopharmaceutical for cancer therapy. 161 Tb was obtained through 160 Gd(n,γ) 161 Tb nuclear reaction by thermal neutron bombardment on 100 mg of natural gadolinium oxide target in RSG-G.A. Siwabessy at a thermal neutron flux of ~10 14 n.cm -2 .s -1 and followed by radiochemical separation of 161 Tb from Gd isotopes using extraction chromatography method. The physico-chemical characterization of 161 TbCl 3 solution was studied by determination of its radionuclide purity by means of a γ-rays spectrometry with HP-Ge detector coupled to a multichannel analyzer (MCA). Radiochemical purity was determined using paper chromatography and paper electrophoresis methods. The results showed that 161 TbCl 3 radioisotope has a pH of 2, radiochemical purity of 99.64 ± 0.34%, radionuclide purity of 99.69 ± 0.20%, specific activity and radioactive concentration at the end of irradiation (EOI) of 2.26 – 5.31 Ci/mg and 3.84 – 9.03 mCi/mL, respectively. 161 TbCl 3 solution stable for 3 weeks at room temperature with a radiochemical purity of 98.41 ± 0.42%. 161 TbCl 3 solution from irradiated natural gadolinium oxide target has the physico-chemical characteristic that meets the requirements for use as a precursor in preparation of radiopharmaceuticals. (author)

  2. Hindered El Transitions in Eu155 and Tb161

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmskog, Sven G.

    1965-02-01

    The absolute E1 transition probabilities from the 3/2 + (411), 5/2 - (532) and 7/2 - (523) single particle levels in Eu 155 and Tb 161 have been measured by the method of delayed coincidences. This gave half lives of T 1/2 1/2 = (1.38 ± 0.06) ns for the 104.4 and 246 keV levels in Eu 155 . T 1/2 = (0.84 ± 0.04) ns and T 1/2 161 . The result has been compared with the calculations of a single particle in a deformed potential made by Nilsson

  3. 12 CFR 16.1 - Authority, purpose, and scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....1 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SECURITIES OFFERING DISCLOSURE RULES § 16.1 Authority, purpose, and scope. (a) Authority. This part is issued under the general... 12 U.S.C. 93a. (b) Purpose. This part sets forth rules governing the offer and sale of securities...

  4. 14 CFR 121.161 - Airplane limitations: Type of route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane limitations: Type of route. 121... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Aircraft Requirements § 121.161 Airplane... specifications, no certificate holder may operate a turbine-engine-powered airplane over a route that contains a...

  5. 33 CFR 161.12 - Vessel operating requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....0′ N. extending eastward through the Golden Gate, and the navigable waters of San Francisco Bay and... safety beyond that provided by other means. The bridge-to-bridge navigational frequency, 156.650 MHz (Ch... Measures, and Operating Requirements § 161.12 Vessel operating requirements. (a) Subject to the exigencies...

  6. Development of lutetium-labeled bombesin derivates: relationship between structure and diagnostic-therapeutic activity for prostate tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujatti, Priscilla Brunelli

    2009-01-01

    Bombesin (BBN) receptors - in particular, the gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptor peptide - have been shown to be massively over expressed in several human tumors types, including prostate cancer, and could be an alternative as target for its treatment by radionuclide therapy (RNT). A large number of BBN analogs had already been synthesized for this purpose and have shown to reduce tumor growth in mice. Nevertheless, most of the studied analogs exhibit high abdominal accumulation, especially in pancreas. This abdominal accumulation may represent a problem in clinical use of radiolabeled bombesin analogs probably due to serious side effects to patients. The goal of the present work was to radiolabel a novel series of bombesin derivatives with lutetium-177 and to evaluate the relationship between their structure and diagnostic-therapeutic activity for prostate tumor. The generic structure of studied peptides is DOTA-Phe-(Gly) n -BBN(6-14), where DOTA is the chelator, n is the number of glycine amino acids of Phe-(Gly) n spacer and BBN(6-14) is the bombesin sequence from the amino acid 6 to the amino acid 14. Preliminary studies were done to establish the ideal labeling conditions for obtaining the highest yield of labeled bombesin derivatives, determined by instant thin layer chromatography (ITLC-SG) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The stability of the preparations was evaluated either after storing at 2-8 degree C or incubation in human serum at 37 degree C and the partition coefficient was determined in n:octanol:water. In vivo studies were performed in both healthy Balb-c and Nude mice bearing PC-3 xenografts, in order to characterize the biological properties of labeled peptides. In vitro studies involved the evaluation of cold bombesin derivatives effect in PC-3 cells proliferation. Bombesin derivatives were successfully labeled with high yield at optimized conditions and exhibited high stability at 4 degree C. The analysis of the

  7. Study of the viability of the production of lutetium - 177 in the nuclear reactor IEA-R1 at IPEN/CNEN-SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Giovana Pasqualini da

    2008-01-01

    The - emitter 177 Lu is a promising therapeutic radioisotope for the curative treatment of cancer using labelled proteins. It has a half - life of 6.71 day and maximum and average (3 energies of 421 and 133 keV, respectively, resulting in a short range of irradiation of tissue. The decay is accompanied by the emission of low energy -radiation of 208.3 keV (11%) and 113 keV (6.4%), suitable for simultaneous imaging. Lu can be produced by two different routes, namely, by irradiation of natural Lu 2 O 3 target ( 176 Lu, 2.6%) or enriched (in 176 Lu) Lu 2 O 3 target, and also by irradiation of Yb target (Yb 2 O 3 ) followed by radiochemical separation of Lu from Yb isotopes. The objective of this work is the development of a method of the production of 177 Lu through of the (n, gamma) nuclear reaction, by the direct and indirect method of production. Targets of lutetium oxide and ytterbium oxide were irradiated for evaluation of the activity produced and the chemical separation of lutetium and ytterbium was studied using different ion exchange resins. For the direct method, the best results were obtained using the target Lu 2 O 3 enriched in 39.6%. The best results for the indirect method were achieved with the process of separation using 0.25M - HlBA as eluent. The results showed that it is possible to produce 177 Lu of low specific activity for labeling molecules used for bone pain relief and in radiosynoviortesy. (author)

  8. Electrochemistry and spectroelectrochemistry of tert-butylcalix[4]arene bridged bis double-decker lutetium(III) phthalocyanine, Lu{sub 2}Pc{sub 4} and dimeric lutetium(III) phthalocyanine, Lu{sub 2}Pc{sub 2}(OAc){sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koca, Atif [Chemical Engineering Department, Engineering Faculty, Marmara University, TR34722 Goeztepe, Istanbul (Turkey); Ceyhan, Tanju; Erbil, Mehmet K. [Department of Biochemistry, Division of Organic Chemistry, Guelhane Medical Academy (GATA), Ankara (Turkey); Ozkaya, Ali Riza [Department of Chemistry, Marmara University, TR34722 Goeztepe, Istanbul (Turkey)], E-mail: aliozkaya@marmara.edu.tr; Bekaroglu, Ozer [Department of Chemistry, Technical University of Istanbul, TR34469 Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey)], E-mail: obek@itu.edu.tr

    2007-11-09

    In this study, electrochemical, electrochromic and spectroelectrochemical properties of a tert-butylcalix[4]arene bridged bis double-decker lutetium(III) phthalocyanine (Lu{sub 2}Pc{sub 4}2) were investigated explicitly as compared with a tert-butylcalix[4]arene bridged dimeric lutetium(III) phthalocyanine [Lu{sub 2}Pc{sub 2}(OAc){sub 2}1]. Distinctive differences between electrochemical and electrochromic properties of 1 and 2 were detected. Moreover, the properties of 1 and 2 were compared with previously reported S{sub 4}(CH{sub 2}){sub 4} bridged Lu{sub 2}Pc{sub 2}(OAc){sub 2} and Lu{sub 2}Pc{sub 4}. The calixarene bridged phthalocyanine (Pc) compounds, 1 and 2 showed well-defined electrochromic behaviour with green-blue and blue-purple colour transitions. The enhanced electrochromic properties of 2, as compared to 1, were attributed to its double-decker structure, probably allowing the formation of suitable ion channels for the counter ion movement in the solid film.

  9. 38 CFR 3.161 - Expedited Claims Adjudication Initiative-Pilot Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Adjudication Initiative-Pilot Program. 3.161 Section 3.161 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... Claims § 3.161 Expedited Claims Adjudication Initiative—Pilot Program. Rules pertaining to the Expedited Claims Adjudication Initiative Pilot Program are set forth in part 20, subpart P, of this chapter...

  10. 33 CFR 161.60 - Vessel Traffic Service Prince William Sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... William Sound. 161.60 Section 161.60 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Movement Reporting System Areas and Reporting Points § 161.60 Vessel Traffic Service Prince William Sound... Cape Hinchinbrook Light to Schooner Rock Light, comprising that portion of Prince William Sound between...

  11. 40 CFR 161.490 - Wildlife and aquatic organisms data requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wildlife and aquatic organisms data... § 161.490 Wildlife and aquatic organisms data requirements. (a) Table. Sections 161.100 through 161.102 describe how to use this table to determine the wildlife and aquatic organisms data requirements and the...

  12. 40 CFR 161.55 - Agricultural vs. non-agricultural pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... pesticides. 161.55 Section 161.55 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR REGISTRATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL PESTICIDES General Provisions § 161.55 Agricultural vs. non-agricultural pesticides. Section 25(a)(1) of FIFRA instructs the...

  13. 43 CFR 16.1 - Agreements to dispose of helium in natural gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Agreements to dispose of helium in natural gas. 16.1 Section 16.1 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior CONSERVATION OF HELIUM § 16.1 Agreements to dispose of helium in natural gas. (a) Pursuant to his authority and...

  14. 22 CFR 161.10 - Non-Federal applicants for permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Non-Federal applicants for permits. 161.10 Section 161.10 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION REGULATIONS FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) Coordination of Other Requirements of NEPA § 161...

  15. Neutron capture cross section measurements: case of lutetium isotopes; Mesures de donnees de sections efficaces de capture radiative de neutrons: application au cas du lutecium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roig, O.; Meot, V.; Belier, G. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France)

    2011-07-15

    The neutron radiative capture is a nuclear reaction that occurs in the presence of neutrons on all isotopes and on a wide energy range. The neutron capture range on Lutetium isotopes, presented here, illustrates the variety of measurements leading to the determination of cross sections. These measurements provide valuable fundamental data needed for the stockpile stewardship program, as well as for nuclear astrophysics and nuclear structure. Measurements, made in France or in United-States, involving complex detectors associated with very rare targets have significantly improved the international databases and validated models of nuclear reactions. We present results concerning the measurement of neutron radiative capture on Lu{sup 173}, Lu{sup 175}, Lu{sup 176} and Lu{sup 177m}, the measurement of the probability of gamma emission in the substitution reaction Yb{sup 174}(He{sup 3},p{gamma})Lu{sup 176}. The measurement of neutron cross sections on Lu{sup 177m} have permitted to highlight the process of super-elastic scattering

  16. Preparation of extractive resins for producing terbium-161

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De la Cruz B, C. C.; Monroy G, F.

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents the development of a methodology for extractive resins preparation to base of HDEHP, which allows to separation of Tb from Gd generating an own technology of preparation of these resins. The study included the extractive resins preparation from 6 different supports: kieselguhr Dg, alumina, red volcanic rock, chiluca, quarry and fluorite; two treatment types of of supports and varied concentrations of HDEHP extractant (di(2-etil hexyl) orthophosphoric acid), in order to determine which resin has improved efficiency of Gd and Tb separation, and radionuclide purity of 161 Tb. Resins were prepared to base of kieselguhr to determine the most appropriate silicon deposition process. Two silicon deposition treatments were realized: treatment I , by contact with silicon deposition solution (dimethyldichlorosilane / heptane 1:30) and treatment II by contact with vapors of dimethyldichlorosilane in vacuum. The extractant retention was carried out to different concentrations of HDEHP / acetone: 1:4, 1:8, 1:15, 1:20, 1:30 and 1:40. According to the results, there is not direct relation of HDEHP concentration used in extractive resins preparation to base of kieselguhr over the efficiency of Gd and Tb separation and of radionuclide purity of 161 Tb. The effect of support in the efficiency of Gd and Tb separation was studied to prepare resins with the supports kieselguhr, alumina, quarry, chiluca, volcanic rock and fluorite, using the silicon deposition treatment II for the supports and a concentration of HDEHP / acetone 1:20, for extractant retention. Only resins based on kieselguhr could separate to Gd from Tb quantitatively, the resin at a concentration of HDEHP / Acetone 1:20 was the best results obtained in Gd and Tb separation, achieving a separation efficiency greater than 90% and a radionuclide purity higher than 99%. (Author)

  17. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(16)-1 - Corporations organized to finance crop operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Corporations organized to finance crop operations. 1.501(c)(16)-1 Section 1.501(c)(16)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Exempt Organizations § 1.501(c)(16)-1 Corporations organized to finance crop...

  18. Gpr161 anchoring of PKA consolidates GPCR and cAMP signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Verena A; Mayrhofer, Johanna E; Ilouz, Ronit; Tschaikner, Philipp; Raffeiner, Philipp; Röck, Ruth; Courcelles, Mathieu; Apelt, Federico; Lu, Tsan-Wen; Baillie, George S; Thibault, Pierre; Aanstad, Pia; Stelzl, Ulrich; Taylor, Susan S; Stefan, Eduard

    2016-07-12

    Scaffolding proteins organize the information flow from activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to intracellular effector cascades both spatially and temporally. By this means, signaling scaffolds, such as A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs), compartmentalize kinase activity and ensure substrate selectivity. Using a phosphoproteomics approach we identified a physical and functional connection between protein kinase A (PKA) and Gpr161 (an orphan GPCR) signaling. We show that Gpr161 functions as a selective high-affinity AKAP for type I PKA regulatory subunits (RI). Using cell-based reporters to map protein-protein interactions, we discovered that RI binds directly and selectively to a hydrophobic protein-protein interaction interface in the cytoplasmic carboxyl-terminal tail of Gpr161. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that a binary complex between Gpr161 and RI promotes the compartmentalization of Gpr161 to the plasma membrane. Moreover, we show that Gpr161, functioning as an AKAP, recruits PKA RI to primary cilia in zebrafish embryos. We also show that Gpr161 is a target of PKA phosphorylation, and that mutation of the PKA phosphorylation site affects ciliary receptor localization. Thus, we propose that Gpr161 is itself an AKAP and that the cAMP-sensing Gpr161:PKA complex acts as cilium-compartmentalized signalosome, a concept that now needs to be considered in the analyzing, interpreting, and pharmaceutical targeting of PKA-associated functions.

  19. Synthesis and up-conversion white light emission of RE{sup 3+}-doped lutetium oxide nanocubes as a single compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Shanshan [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Yang Jun, E-mail: jyang@swu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Li Chunxia [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Lin Jun, E-mail: jlin@ciac.jl.cn [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2012-04-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uniform and dispersive cubic precursor can be synthesized by sample hydrothermal process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrothermal precursor could transform to Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:RE{sup 3+} with its original cubic morphology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nearly equal intensities of blue, green, and red emissions under single 980 nm laser. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:RE{sup 3+} show bright white light emission, clearly visible to the naked eyes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chromaticity coordinate is very close to the standard equal energy white light illuminate. - Abstract: Uniform and dispersive Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+}/Tm{sup 3+} nanocubes have been successfully synthesized by hydrothermal process with subsequent calcination at 900 Degree-Sign C. The as-formed RE{sup 3+}-doped lutetium oxide precursor via the hydrothermal process, as a template, could transform to RE{sup 3+}-doped Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} with their original cubic morphology and slight shrinkage in the size after post-annealing process. The formation mechanism for the lutetium oxide precursor cubes has been proposed. Under single wavelength diode laser excitation of 980 nm, the as-obtained Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:3%Yb{sup 3+}/0.5%Er{sup 3+}/0.3%Tm{sup 3+} nanocubes show nearly equal intensities of blue (Tm{sup 3+}: {sup 1}G{sub 4} {yields} {sup 3}H{sub 6}), green (Er{sup 3+}: ({sup 2}H{sub 11/2}, {sup 4}S{sub 3/2}) {yields} {sup 4}I{sub 15/2}), and red (Er{sup 3+}: {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} {yields} {sup 4}I{sub 15/2}) emissions, which produces bright white light emission, clearly visible to the naked eyes. The main pathways to populate the upper emitting states come from the energy-transfer processes from Yb{sup 3+} to Tm{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+}, respectively. The chromaticity coordinate of the Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:3%Yb{sup 3+}/0.5%Er{sup 3+}/0.3%Tm{sup 3+} sample is calculated to be about x = 0.3403 and y = 0.3169, which falls exactly within the

  20. Development of a novel bombesin analog radiolabeled with Lutetium-177: in vivo evaluation of the biological properties in Balb-C mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujatti, Priscilla Brunelli; Barrio, Ofelia; Santos, Josefina da Silva; Mengatti, Jair; Araujo, Elaine Bortoleti de

    2008-01-01

    Bombesin (BBN), a 14-aminoacid amphibian peptide homologue of mammalian gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), has demonstrated the ability to bind with high affinity and specificity to GRP receptor, which are overexpressed on a variety of human cancers. A large number of BBN analogs were synthesized for this purpose and have shown to reduce tumor growth in mice. However, most of the studied analogs exhibit high abdominal accumulation, specially in pancreas. This abdominal accumulation may represent a problem in clinical use of radiolabeled bombesin analogs probably due to serious side effects to patients. In this study we describe the results of radiolabeling with lutetium-177 ( 177 Lu) and in vivo biodistribution and pharmacokinetics studies in normal Balb-C mice of a novel bombesin analog (BBNp4) - DOTA-X-BBN(6-14), where X is a spacer of four aminoacids. This spacer was inserted between the chelator and the binding sequence in order to improve bombesin in vivo properties. BBNp4 was successfully labeled with high yield and kept stable for more than 96 hours at 4 deg C and 4 hours in human plasma. Data analysis obtained from the in vivo studies showed that the amount of BBNp4 present in plasma decreased rapidly and became almost undetectable at 60 min p.i., indicating rapid peptide excretion, which is performed mainly by renal pathway. In addition, biodistribution and single photon emission tomography showed low abdominal accumulation of 177 Lu-DOTA-X-BBN(6-14), indicating that this analog is a potential candidate for tumors target therapy. (author)

  1. 25 CFR 1000.161 - What is a self-governance compact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is a self-governance compact? 1000.161 Section 1000... EDUCATION ACT Negotiation Process for Annual Funding Agreements Negotiating A Self-Governance Compact § 1000.161 What is a self-governance compact? A self-governance compact is an executed document that affirms...

  2. 14 CFR 61.161 - Aeronautical experience: Rotorcraft category and helicopter class rating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... category and helicopter class rating. 61.161 Section 61.161 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... helicopter class rating. (a) A person who is applying for an airline transport pilot certificate with a rotorcraft category and helicopter class rating, must have at least 1,200 hours of total time as a pilot that...

  3. 49 CFR 173.161 - Chemical kits and first aid kits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chemical kits and first aid kits. 173.161 Section... Class 7 § 173.161 Chemical kits and first aid kits. (a) Chemical kits and First aid kits must conform to... 10 kg. (b) Chemical kits and First aid kits are excepted from the specification packaging...

  4. 21 CFR 161.30 - Declaration of quantity of contents on labels for canned oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... canned oysters. 161.30 Section 161.30 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH....30 Declaration of quantity of contents on labels for canned oysters. (a) For many years packers of canned oysters in the Gulf area of the United States have labeled their output with a declaration of the...

  5. 46 CFR 161.002-15 - Sample extraction smoke detection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sample extraction smoke detection systems. 161.002-15..., CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Fire-Protective Systems § 161.002-15 Sample extraction smoke detection systems. The smoke detecting system must consist of a means for...

  6. 28 CFR 35.161 - Telecommunication devices for the deaf (TDD's).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Telecommunication devices for the deaf (TDD's). 35.161 Section 35.161 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE... devices for the deaf (TDD's). Where a public entity communicates by telephone with applicants and...

  7. 75 FR 61655 - Airworthiness Directives; Piper Aircraft, Inc. Model PA-28-161 Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-06

    ...-1006; Directorate Identifier 2009-CE-057-AD] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Piper Aircraft... airworthiness directive (AD) for all Piper Aircraft, Inc. (Piper) Model PA-28-161 airplanes equipped with.... Piper Model PA-28-161 airplanes modified by STC No. SA03303AT have a similar unsafe design feature that...

  8. 75 FR 81417 - Airworthiness Directives; Piper Aircraft, Inc. Model PA-28-161 Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Piper Aircraft, Inc. Model PA-28-161 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration... new airworthiness directive (AD): 2010-26-04 Piper Aircraft, Inc: Amendment 39-16543; Docket No. FAA... times may be Airplane approved for this part. Maintenance Manual Piper PA28-161 TAE 125-01, Doc. No...

  9. 21 CFR 150.161 - Artificially sweetened fruit preserves and jams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Artificially sweetened fruit preserves and jams. 150.161 Section 150.161 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... karaya, gum tragacanth, algin (sodium alginate), sodium carboxymethylcellulose (cellulose gum...

  10. 34 CFR 668.161 - Scope and purpose (cash management rules).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Scope and purpose (cash management rules). 668.161... POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Cash Management § 668.161 Scope and purpose (cash management rules). (a) General. (1) This subpart establishes the rules and...

  11. Measurement of 160Tb and 161Tb in nuclear forensics samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, J.; Davies, A.V.; Britton, R.E.

    2017-01-01

    160 Tb and 161 Tb are important radionuclides to measure when analysing a Nuclear Forensics sample. An analytical method for the measurement of both 160 Tb and 161 Tb was developed in this study. Terbium was separated and purified using exchange resin and TrisKem LN Resin. The purified fraction containing 160 Tb and 161 Tb was measured by gamma spectrometry and liquid scintillation counting. The counting efficiencies of 160 Tb and 161 Tb were determined using the CIEMAT/NIST efficiency tracing method. The LSC count rate ratio, R160 Tb /R161 Tb , on the reference date was determined by sequential counting and calculated using a custom script based on their half-lives. (author)

  12. Circulating Glucagon 1-61 Regulates Blood Glucose by Increasing Insulin Secretion and Hepatic Glucose Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J.; Kuhre, Rune E.; Hornburg, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    that PG 1-61 dose-dependently increases levels of cAMP, through the glucagon receptor, and increases insulin secretion and protein levels of enzymes regulating glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. In rats, PG 1-61 increases blood glucose and plasma insulin and decreases plasma levels of amino acids in......Glucagon is secreted from pancreatic α cells, and hypersecretion (hyperglucagonemia) contributes to diabetic hyperglycemia. Molecular heterogeneity in hyperglucagonemia is poorly investigated. By screening human plasma using high-resolution-proteomics, we identified several glucagon variants, among...... which proglucagon 1-61 (PG 1-61) appears to be the most abundant form. PG 1-61 is secreted in subjects with obesity, both before and after gastric bypass surgery, with protein and fat as the main drivers for secretion before surgery, but glucose after. Studies in hepatocytes and in β cells demonstrated...

  13. Solvent extraction of anionic chelate complexes of lanthanum(III), europium(III), lutetium(III), scandium(III), and indium(III) with 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone as ion-pairs with tetrabutylammonium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noro, Junji; Sekine, Tatsuya.

    1992-01-01

    The solvent extraction of lanthanum(III), europium(III), lutetium(III), scandium(III), and indium(III) in 0.1 mol dm -3 sodium nitrate solutions with 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone (Htta) in the absence and presence of tetrabutylammonium ions (tba + ) into carbon tetrachloride was measured. The extraction of lanthanum(III), europium(III), and lutetium(III) was greatly enhanced by the addition of tba + ; this could be explained in terms of the extraction of a ternary complex, M(tta) 4 - tba + . However, the extractions of scandium(III) and indium(III) were nearly the same when tba + was added. The data were treated on the basis of the formation equilibrium of the ternary complex from the neutral chelate, M(tta) 3 , with the extracted ion-pairs of the reagents, tta - tba + , in the organic phase. It was concluded that the degree of association of M(tta) 3 with the ion-pair, tta - tba + , is greater in the order La(tta) 3 ≅ Eu(tta) 3 > Lu(tta) 3 , or that the stability of the ternary complex in the organic phase is higher in the order La(tta) 4 - tba + ≅ Eu(tta) 4 - tba + > Lu(tta) 4 - tba + . This is similar to those of adduct metal chelates of Htta with tributylphosphate (TBP) in synergistic extraction systems. (author)

  14. 34 CFR 403.161 - How must funds be used under the Comprehensive Career Guidance and Counseling Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Guidance and Counseling Programs? 403.161 Section 403.161 Education Regulations of the Offices of the... the Special Programs? Comprehensive Career Guidance and Counseling Programs § 403.161 How must funds be used under the Comprehensive Career Guidance and Counseling Programs? (a) A State shall use not...

  15. 33 CFR 165.161 - Safety zones: Coast Guard Captain of the Port New York annual fireworks displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of the Port New York annual fireworks displays. 165.161 Section 165.161 Navigation and Navigable... Coast Guard District § 165.161 Safety zones: Coast Guard Captain of the Port New York annual fireworks displays. (a) Safety zones. The following areas are designated safety zones: (1) Bar Beach fireworks...

  16. The low-energy β(-) and electron emitter (161)Tb as an alternative to (177)Lu for targeted radionuclide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehenberger, Silvia; Barkhausen, Christoph; Cohrs, Susan; Fischer, Eliane; Grünberg, Jürgen; Hohn, Alexander; Köster, Ulli; Schibli, Roger; Türler, Andreas; Zhernosekov, Konstantin

    2011-08-01

    The low-energy β(-) emitter (161)Tb is very similar to (177)Lu with respect to half-life, beta energy and chemical properties. However, (161)Tb also emits a significant amount of conversion and Auger electrons. Greater therapeutic effect can therefore be expected in comparison to (177)Lu. It also emits low-energy photons that are useful for gamma camera imaging. The (160)Gd(n,γ)(161)Gd→(161)Tb production route was used to produce (161)Tb by neutron irradiation of massive (160)Gd targets (up to 40 mg) in nuclear reactors. A semiautomated procedure based on cation exchange chromatography was developed and applied to isolate no carrier added (n.c.a.) (161)Tb from the bulk of the (160)Gd target and from its stable decay product (161)Dy. (161)Tb was used for radiolabeling DOTA-Tyr3-octreotate; the radiolabeling profile was compared to the commercially available n.c.a. (177)Lu. A (161)Tb Derenzo phantom was imaged using a small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography camera. Up to 15 GBq of (161)Tb was produced by long-term irradiation of Gd targets. Using a cation exchange resin, we obtained 80%-90% of the available (161)Tb with high specific activity, radionuclide and chemical purity and in quantities sufficient for therapeutic applications. The (161)Tb obtained was of the quality required to prepare (161)Tb-DOTA-Tyr3-octreotate. We were able to produce (161)Tb in n.c.a. form by irradiating highly enriched (160)Gd targets; it can be obtained in the quantity and quality required for the preparation of (161)Tb-labeled therapeutic agents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Circulating Glucagon 1-61 Regulates Blood Glucose by Increasing Insulin Secretion and Hepatic Glucose Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolai J. Wewer Albrechtsen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Glucagon is secreted from pancreatic α cells, and hypersecretion (hyperglucagonemia contributes to diabetic hyperglycemia. Molecular heterogeneity in hyperglucagonemia is poorly investigated. By screening human plasma using high-resolution-proteomics, we identified several glucagon variants, among which proglucagon 1-61 (PG 1-61 appears to be the most abundant form. PG 1-61 is secreted in subjects with obesity, both before and after gastric bypass surgery, with protein and fat as the main drivers for secretion before surgery, but glucose after. Studies in hepatocytes and in β cells demonstrated that PG 1-61 dose-dependently increases levels of cAMP, through the glucagon receptor, and increases insulin secretion and protein levels of enzymes regulating glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. In rats, PG 1-61 increases blood glucose and plasma insulin and decreases plasma levels of amino acids in vivo. We conclude that glucagon variants, such as PG 1-61, may contribute to glucose regulation by stimulating hepatic glucose production and insulin secretion.

  18. Studies of the radiolabeling and biodistribution of substance P using lutetium-177 as a radiotracer; Estudo da marcacao e biodistribuicao da substancia P utilizando lutecio-177 como radiotracador

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Clarice Maria de

    2011-07-01

    Malignant gliomas are primary brain tumors, resistant to various treatments, as chemotherapy, radiotherapy, induction of apoptosis and surgery. An alternative for the treatment of malignant gliomas is the radionuclide therapy. This technique apply radiolabeled molecules that selectively bind to tumor cells producing cytotoxic effect by dose irradiation, and resulting in death of tumor cells. Most protocols for radionuclide therapy of malignant brain tumors involve the administration of peptides labeled with {beta}{sup -} emitting radioisotopes. The Substance P (SP) is an 11- amino acid neuropeptide, characterized by the C-terminal sequence Phe-X-Gly-Leu-Met-NH{sub 2}. The use of SP labeled with different radionuclides including {sup 177}Lu, have been proposed for in vivo treatment of tumors. SP is the most important target of neurokinin 1 receptors, over expressed in malignant gliomas. The objective of this work was to study conditions of radiolabeling DOTA-SP with {sup 177}Lu, the stability of labeled compound and in vivo and in vitro, to develop a protocol production and evaluate the potential of the radiopharmaceutical in the therapy of gliomas. The labeling conditions were optimized varying the temperature, reaction time, activity of lutetium-177 chloride and mass of DOTA-SP. The radiochemical purity of preparations were analyzed by chromatographic techniques. The stability of {sup 17L}u -DOTA- SP radiolabeled with low activity of {sup 177}Lu was evaluated for different time at 2-8 degree C or incubated in human serum. The stability of the labeled with high activity of {sup 177}Lu was also analyzed in the presence of gentisic acid (6 mg / mL) added after the labeling reaction. The labeled conditions in low and high activity were subjected to evaluation for the ability to cause oxidation of methionine residue, adding the D-L- methionine amino acid to the reaction medium (6 mg / mL) and subsequent chromatographic evaluation. In vitro study with {sup 177}Lu

  19. Percentages of CD4+CD161+ and CD4−CD8−CD161+ T Cells in the Synovial Fluid Are Correlated with Disease Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinlin Miao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. CD161 has been identified as a marker of human IL-17-producing T cells that are implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. This study aimed to investigate the potential link between the percentage of CD161+ T cells and disease activity in RA patients. Methods. Peripheral blood (PB from 54 RA patients and 21 healthy controls was evaluated. Paired synovial fluid (SF (n = 17 was analyzed. CD161 expression levels on CD4+, CD8+, and CD4−CD8− T cells were assessed by flow cytometry. Results. The percentage of CD4+CD161+ T cells in RA SF was higher than RA PB, and it was positively correlated with DAS28, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, and C-reactive protein (CRP. CD4−CD8−CD161+ T cell percentage was decreased in RA PB and was further reduced in RA SF, and its level in SF was inversely correlated with DAS28, ESR, and CRP. However, CD8+CD161+ T cell percentage was neither changed in RA PB and SF nor correlated with disease activity indices. Conclusion. An increased CD4+CD161+ T cell percentage and a decreased CD4−CD8−CD161+ T cell percentage are present in RA SF and are associated with disease activity, and the accumulation of CD4+CD161+ T cells in SF may contribute to the local inflammation of RA.

  20. Energy Storage Analysis of a Mixed R161/MOF-5 Nanoparticle Nanofluid Based on Molecular Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Tang, Shengli; Li, Leilei

    2018-05-20

    The thermal properties of refrigerants can be modified by adding porous nanoparticles into them. Here, molecular simulations, including molecular dynamics and grand canonical Monte Carlo, were employed to study the thermal energy storage properties of an R161/MOF-5 nanofluid. The results show that the thermodynamic energy change of MOF-5 nanoparticles is linear to the temperature. The adsorption heat calculated by grand canonical Monte Carlo is close to that calculated by the Clausius⁻Clapeyron equation. Additionally, a negative enhancement of the thermal energy storage capacity of the R161/MOF-5 nanofluid is found near the phase transition area.

  1. CD3+CD8+CD161high Tc17 cells are depleted in HIV-infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaardbo, Julie Christine; Hartling, Hans Jakob; Thorsteinsson, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    CD8+ Tc17 cells with pro-inflammatory properties have only recently been acknowledged, and Tc17 cells in HIV-infection are undescribed. CD3+CD8+CD161 Tc17 cells and the production of Interleukin-17 were examined in untreated and treated HIV-infected patients, HIV-HCV co-infected patients...... and healthy controls. Depletion of CD3+CD8+CD161 Tc17 cells and diminished production of Interleukin-17 in HIV-infected patients was found. The level of Tc17 cells was associated with the level of the CD4+ count in treated patients....

  2. Evaluation and application of the low energy electron emitter 161Tb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehenberger, Silvia M.

    2010-01-01

    The low energy electron emitter 161 Tb was produced n.c.a. in quantities sufficient for therapeutic applications and successfully used for labeling of peptides and antibodies. Furthermore, these compounds have been compared to n.c.a. 177 Lu labeled mAbs via cell experiments, a radionuclide that is already used in clinical nuclear oncology.

  3. 46 CFR 161.002-10 - Automatic fire detecting system control unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Automatic fire detecting system control unit. 161.002-10...-10 Automatic fire detecting system control unit. (a) General. The fire detecting system control unit... and the battery to be charged. (h) Automatic fire detecting system, battery charging and control—(1...

  4. 20 CFR 702.161 - Liens against assets of insurance carriers and employers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Liens against assets of insurance carriers... AND PROCEDURE General Provisions Liens on Compensation § 702.161 Liens against assets of insurance..., be subrogated to all the rights of the person receiving such payments. The Secretary may institute...

  5. African Journal of Drug & Alcohol Studies, 16(1), 2017 Copyright ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Drug & Alcohol Studies, 16(1), 2017. Copyright © 2017 ... Linear regression showed that males are more likely to abuse alcohol than females. (β= -.17; t = -3.47; ..... gerians through depression, suicide, road traffic accidents ...

  6. 10 CFR 63.161 - Emergency plan for the geologic repository operations area through permanent closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Planning Criteria § 63.161 Emergency plan for the geologic repository operations area through permanent... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Emergency plan for the geologic repository operations area... may occur at the geologic repository operations area, at any time before permanent closure and...

  7. 40 CFR 65.161 - Continuous records and monitoring system data handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... section. (D) Owners and operators shall retain the current description of the monitoring system as long as... Routing to a Fuel Gas System or a Process § 65.161 Continuous records and monitoring system data handling...) Monitoring system breakdowns, repairs, preventive maintenance, calibration checks, and zero (low-level) and...

  8. 22 CFR 161.12 - Environmental effects abroad of major departmental actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Environmental effects abroad of major... Requirements of NEPA § 161.12 Environmental effects abroad of major departmental actions. Departmental officials shall analyze actions under their cognizance with due regard for the environmental effects in the...

  9. 9 CFR 161.4 - Suspension or revocation of veterinary accreditation; criminal and civil penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suspension or revocation of veterinary... REVOCATION OF SUCH ACCREDITATION § 161.4 Suspension or revocation of veterinary accreditation; criminal and... to practice veterinary medicine in at least one State. (c) Accreditation shall be automatically...

  10. 27 CFR 31.161 - Conversion between metric and U.S. units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Wholesale Dealers' Records and Reports § 31.161 Conversion between metric and U.S. units. When liters are... number of cases to be converted, as follows: (a) If the conversion from liters to U.S. units is made... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Conversion between metric...

  11. An Amphiphysin-Like Domain in Fus2p Is Required for Rvs161p Interaction and Cortical Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Stein

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell–cell fusion fulfils essential roles in fertilization, development and tissue repair. In the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, fusion between two haploid cells of opposite mating type generates the diploid zygote. Fus2p is a pheromone-induced protein that regulates cell wall removal during mating. Fus2p shuttles from the nucleus to localize at the shmoo tip, bound to Rvs161p, an amphiphysin. However, Rvs161p independently binds a second amphiphysin, Rvs167p, playing an essential role in endocytosis. To understand the basis of the Fus2p–Rvs161p interaction, we analyzed Fus2p structural domains. A previously described N-terminal domain (NTD is necessary and sufficient to regulate nuclear/cytoplasmic trafficking of Fus2p. The Dbl homology domain (DBH binds GTP-bound Cdc42p; binding is required for cell fusion, but not localization. We identified an approximately 200 amino acid region of Fus2p that is both necessary and sufficient for Rvs161p binding. The Rvs161p binding domain (RBD contains three predicted alpha-helices; structural modeling suggests that the RBD adopts an amphiphysin-like structure. The RBD contains a 13-amino-acid region, conserved with Rvs161p and other amphiphysins, which is essential for binding. Mutations in the RBD, predicted to affect membrane binding, abolish cell fusion without affecting Rvs161p binding. We propose that Fus2p/Rvs161p form a novel heterodimeric amphiphysin required for cell fusion. Rvs161p binding is required but not sufficient for Fus2p localization. Mutations in the C-terminal domain (CTD of Fus2p block localization, but not Rvs161p binding, causing a significant defect in cell fusion. We conclude that the Fus2p CTD mediates an additional, Rvs161p-independent interaction at the shmoo tip.

  12. CD147-mediated chemotaxis of CD4+CD161+ T cells may contribute to local inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Minghua; Miao, Jinlin; Zhao, Peng; Luo, Xing; Han, Qing; Wu, Zhenbiao; Zhang, Kui; Zhu, Ping

    2018-01-01

    CD161 is used as a surrogate marker for Th17 cells, which are implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this study, we evaluated the percentage, clinical significance, and CD98 and CD147 expression of CD4 + CD161 + T cells. The potential role of CD147 and CD98 in cyclophilin A-induced chemotaxis of CD4 + CD161 + T cells was analyzed. Thirty-seven RA patients, 15 paired synovial fluid (SF) of RA, and 22 healthy controls were recruited. The cell populations and surface expression of CD98 and CD147 were analyzed by flow cytometry. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient and multiple linear regression were applied to calculate the correlations. Chemotaxis assay was used to investigate CD4 + CD161 + T cell migration. We found that the percentage of CD4 + CD161 + T cells and their expression of CD147 and CD98 in SF were higher than in the peripheral blood of RA patients. Percentage of SF CD4 + CD161 + T cells was positively correlated with 28-Joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28). CD147 monoclonal antibody (HAb18) attenuated the chemotactic ability of CD4 + CD161 + T cells. An increased CD4 + CD161 + T cell percentage and expression of CD147 and CD98 were shown in RA SF. Percentage of SF CD4 + CD161 + T cells can be used as a predictive marker of disease activity in RA. CD147 block significantly decreased the chemotactic index of CD4 + CD161 + cells induced by cyclophilin A (CypA). These results imply that the accumulation of CD4 + CD161 + T cells in SF and their high expression of CD147 may be associated with CypA-mediated chemotaxis and contribute to local inflammation in RA.

  13. Determination of K{sub ps} and {beta}{sub 1,H} in a wide interval of initial concentrations of lutetium; Determinacion de K{sub ps} y {beta}{sub 1,H} en un amplio intervalo de concentraciones iniciales del lutecio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-G, H.; Jimenez R, M.; Solache R, M. [ININ. Apdo. Postal 18-1027, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Rojas H, A. [UAM-I, A.P. 55-534, 09340, Mexico. D.F. (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    solubility product constants and the first of lutetium hydrolysis in the interval of initial concentration of 3.72 X 10{sup -5} to 2.09 X 10{sup -3} M of lutetium, in a 2M of NaCIO{sub 4} media, at 303 K and under conditions free of CO{sub 2} its were considered. The solubility diagrams (pLu{sub (ac)}-pC{sub H}) by means of a radiochemical method were obtained, and starting from its the pC{sub H} values that limit the saturation and no-saturation zones of the solutions were settled down. Those diagrams allowed, also, to calculate the solubility product constants of Lu(OH){sub 3}. The experimental data to the polynomial solubility equation were adjusted, what allowed to calculate those values of the solubility product constants of Lu(OH){sub 3} and to determine the first hydrolysis constant. The value of precipitation pC{sub H} diminishes when the initial concentration of the lutetium increases, while the values of K{sub ps} and {beta}{sub 1,H} its remain constant. (Author)

  14. 28 CFR 0.161 - Acceptance of certain offers by the Deputy Attorney General or Associate Attorney General, as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Deputy Attorney General or Associate Attorney General, as appropriate. 0.161 Section 0.161 Judicial... certain offers by the Deputy Attorney General or Associate Attorney General, as appropriate. (a) In all... § 0.160, the Assistant Attorney General concerned shall, when he is of the opinion that the proposed...

  15. 77 FR 28406 - 161st Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration 161st Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to the authority... 161st open meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans (also known as...

  16. 42 CFR 84.161 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type B and Type BE respirators; test requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Man test for gases and vapors; Type B and Type BE respirators; test requirements. 84.161 Section 84.161 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air...

  17. Peripheral blood CD161+ T cells from asthmatic patients are activated during asthma attack and predominantly produce IFN-gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Hernández, Y; Pedraza-Sánchez, S; Blandón-Vijil, V; del Río-Navarro, B E; Vaughan, G; Moreno-Lafont, M; Escobar-Gutiérrez, A

    2007-04-01

    In humans, T cells expressing the CD161 molecule NKR-P1A constitute around 20% of the circulating CD3(+) cells and are potentially immunoregulatory in several diseases. Their role in asthma is not well known, but they could participate in asthma attacks. To determinate whether activation of CD161(+) T cells and their cytokine production correlate with clinical status of asthma, we analysed blood samples from asthma attack patients (AAP) and stable asthma patients (SAP) in comparison with healthy non-atopic controls (HC). There was a significant higher baseline expression of CD69 on T cells from AAP and the difference was more notorious on CD161(+) T cells; upregulation of CD69 was observed on both CD161(-) and CD161(+) T cells driven by Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus crude extract, whereas polyclonal stimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus ionomycin predominantly induced IFN-gamma but no IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 by CD161(+) T cells in all groups; upon polyclonal stimulation, there were more CD161(+) T cells producing IFN-gamma and less CD161(-) T cells producing this cytokine, contrasting with the opposite results observed in SAP and HC groups. Our results indicate that, during asthma attack, CD161(+) T cells are activated and are able to produce predominantly IFN-gamma but no Th2 cytokines. We hypothesize that during an asthma attack, IFN-gamma produced by CD161(+) T cells could help to reestablish the Th1/Th2 equilibrium. These observations may contribute to the understanding of the immune mechanisms involved in asthma attacks.

  18. 161 | Page

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fr. Ikenga

    the definition limits the understanding of a region to a country and does not in any way ..... in Nigeria under the Presidential Constitution (London: Sweet & Maxwell, 1983) pp. .... Sani Abacha & 3 Ors. v Chief Gani Fawehinmi.78 In that case, the.

  19. Solvent extraction of lanthanum (III), europium (III), and lutetium (III) with 5,7-dichloro-8-quinolinol into chloroform in the absence and presence of tetrabutylammonium ions or trioctylphosphine oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noro, Junji; Sekine, Tatsuya.

    1993-01-01

    The solvent extractions of lanthanum(III), europium(III), and lutetium(III) (M 3+ ) in 0.1 moldm -3 sodium nitrate solutions with 5,7-dichloro-8-quinolinol (HA) into chloroform were studied in both the absence and presence of tetrabutylammonium ions (tba + ) or trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO). In the absence of tba + or TOPO, the extracted species were the MA 3 and MA H A (self-adduct), though MA 4 - tba + was found when tba + was added; MA 3 TOPO and MA 3 (TOPO) 2 were found when TOPO was added in addition to the above mentioned two species. The anionic complex or TOPO adducts greatly enhanced the extraction. The data were statistically analyzed and the equilibrium constants for the extraction of these species, as well as the constants for the association of the HA, the A - tba + , or the TOPO on the MA 3 in the organic phase, were determined. The extraction of the MA 3 is better in the order LaA 3 3 3 . Although the values of the association constant of the HA or the TOPO on the MA 3 are rather similar for the three metal chelates, the constants for A - tba + are larger in the same order as mentioned above. Thus, the separation of these three metal ions by solvent extraction with this chelating extractant is not much affected by the addition of TOPO, but is greatly improved by the addition of tba + . (author)

  20. The unpaired spectroscopy of sup 161,162 Er at spins up to 50 Dirac h

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, M.A.; Roberts, J.W.; Alderson, A.; Ali, I.; Cullen, D.M.; Fallon, P.; Forsyth, P.D.; Sharpey-Schafer, J.F. (Liverpool Univ. (UK). Oliver Lodge Lab.); Simpson, J.; Bentley, M.A.; Bruce, A.M. (Science and Engineering Research Council, Daresbury (UK). Daresbury Lab.); Chapman, R.; Lisle, J.C.; Mo, J.N. (Manchester Univ. (UK). Schuster Lab.)

    1990-12-24

    High spin states in {sup 161}Er and {sup 162}Er have been populated using the {sup 130}Te+{sup 36}S reaction at a bombarding energy of 170 MeV. In {sup 161}Er, three rotational bands were extended from I {approx equal} 35{Dirac h} to I {approx equal} 50{Dirac h}. In {sup 162}Er the positive parity yrast band was observed to I=44{Dirac h}. These rotational sequences are compared to a simple unpaired model which was successful in predicting the behaviour of similar high spin data on {sup 159,160}Er. These studies of the light Er isotopes constitute the highest spins observed in normal deformed nuclei and yield direct and specific information on the single-neutron spectrum of states. (orig.).

  1. Hindered El Transitions in Eu{sup 155} and Tb{sup 161}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malmskog, Sven G

    1965-02-15

    The absolute E1 transition probabilities from the 3/2{sup +} (411), 5/2{sup -} (532) and 7/2{sup -} (523) single particle levels in Eu{sup 155} and Tb{sup 161} have been measured by the method of delayed coincidences. This gave half lives of T{sub 1/2} < 0.2 ns and T{sub 1/2} = (1.38 {+-} 0.06) ns for the 104.4 and 246 keV levels in Eu{sup 155}. T{sub 1/2} = (0.84 {+-} 0.04) ns and T{sub 1/2} < 0. 2 ns for the 417.6 and 480.6 keV levels in Tb{sup 161}. The result has been compared with the calculations of a single particle in a deformed potential made by Nilsson.

  2. Competitor presence reduces internal attentional focus and improves 16.1km cycling time trial performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Emily L; Jones, Hollie S; Andy Sparks, S; Marchant, David C; Midgley, Adrian W; Mc Naughton, Lars R

    2015-07-01

    Whilst the presence of a competitor has been found to improve performance, the mechanisms influencing the change in selected work rates during direct competition have been suggested but not specifically assessed. The aim was to investigate the physiological and psychological influences of a visual avatar competitor during a 16.1-km cycling time trial performance, using trained, competitive cyclists. Randomised cross-over design. Fifteen male cyclists completed four 16.1km cycling time trials on a cycle ergometer, performing two with a visual display of themselves as a simulated avatar (FAM and SELF), one with no visual display (DO), and one with themselves and an opponent as simulated avatars (COMP). Participants were informed the competitive avatar was a similar ability cyclist but it was actually a representation of their fastest previous performance. Increased performance times were evident during COMP (27.8±2.0min) compared to SELF (28.7±1.9min) and DO (28.4±2.3min). Greater power output, speed and heart rate were apparent during COMP trial than SELF (pperformance. Competitive cyclists performed significantly faster during a 16.1-km competitive trial than when performing maximally, without a competitor. The improvement in performance was elicited due to a greater external distraction, deterring perceived exertion. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Expression of LLT1 and its receptor CD161 in lung cancer is associated with better clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braud, Véronique M; Biton, Jérôme; Becht, Etienne; Knockaert, Samantha; Mansuet-Lupo, Audrey; Cosson, Estelle; Damotte, Diane; Alifano, Marco; Validire, Pierre; Anjuère, Fabienne; Cremer, Isabelle; Girard, Nicolas; Gossot, Dominique; Seguin-Givelet, Agathe; Dieu-Nosjean, Marie-Caroline; Germain, Claire

    2018-01-01

    Co-stimulatory and inhibitory receptors expressed by immune cells in the tumor microenvironment modulate the immune response and cancer progression. Their expression and regulation are still not fully characterized and a better understanding of these mechanisms is needed to improve current immunotherapies. Our previous work has identified a novel ligand/receptor pair, LLT1/CD161, that modulates immune responses. Here, we extensively characterize its expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We show that LLT1 expression is restricted to germinal center (GC) B cells within tertiary lymphoid structures (TLS), representing a new hallmark of the presence of active TLS in the tumor microenvironment. CD161-expressing immune cells are found at the vicinity of these structures, with a global enrichment of NSCLC tumors in CD161 + CD4 + and CD8 + T cells as compared to normal distant lung and peripheral blood. CD161 + CD4 + T cells are more activated and produce Th1-cytokines at a higher frequency than their matched CD161-negative counterparts. Interestingly, CD161 + CD4 + T cells highly express OX40 co-stimulatory receptor, less frequently 4-1BB, and display an activated but not completely exhausted PD-1-positive Tim-3-negative phenotype. Finally, a meta-analysis revealed a positive association of CLEC2D (coding for LLT1) and KLRB1 (coding for CD161) gene expression with favorable outcome in NSCLC, independently of the size of T and B cell infiltrates. These data are consistent with a positive impact of LLT1/CD161 on NSCLC patient survival, and make CD161-expressing CD4 + T cells ideal candidates for efficient anti-tumor recall responses.

  4. Participation of CD161(+) and invariant natural killer T cells in pediatric asthma exacerbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpio-Pedroza, Juan C; Vaughan, Gilberto; del Rio-Navarro, Blanca E; del Río-Chivardí, Jaime M; Vergara-Castañeda, Arely; Jiménez-Zamudio, Luis A; Morales-Flores, Amelia; Rodríguez-Moreno, Guadalupe; Ruiz-Tovar, Karina; Fonseca-Coronado, Salvador; Gonçalves Rossi, Livia M; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Asthma has been defined as a disease of chronic airway inflammation in which many cells and cellular products participate with variable degrees of airflow obstruction and hyperresponsiveness that lead to recurrent episodes of wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness, and coughing. Prominent among these cellular elements are two cell types referred to as the invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and a subpopulation of T cells expressing the molecule CD161, which are both thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of asthma. Although the presence of iNKT and other CD161(+) cells in murine models has been associated with asthma, relatively few studies have been performed in the adult patient with asthma that have been often conflicting and even fewer studies are available in children. The present study was performed to investigate the peripheral blood frequencies of iNKT and CD161(+) T cells in children with asthma. A total of 35 children, 19 stable asthmatic patients, 6 who had experienced an asthmatic attack within 24 hours and had not received any treatment, and 10 healthy controls, aged 6-12 years, were enrolled in the study. iNKT and CD161(+) T-cell frequencies in blood were measured together with quantitative levels of IL-4 and interferon (IFN) γ using a cytofluorimetric approach. The results show that iNKT cells are increased in pediatric asthmatic patients undergoing exacerbations of asthma. These cells also produced less IFN-γ and more IL-4 than children with stable asthma and in healthy control children. These results suggest that iNKT cells might participate in the development of the asthmatic exacerbations. The increased production of IL-4 in conjunction with the decrease of IFN-γ may be mechanistically responsible, at least partially, for the heightening of the immunologic response leading to the asthmatic attack in children. Knowledge of these interactive mechanisms involving the iNKT cell and our understanding of its role in the exacerbation of

  5. A 16:1 Serializer ASIC for Data Transmission at 5 Gbps

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    A high speed, low power 16:1 serializer has been developed with a commercial 0.25 μm silicon-on-sapphire CMOS technology. The serializer operates from 4.0 to 5.7 Gbps. Total jitter is 62 ps and the eye openning of the bathtub curve is 122 ps at bit rate error of 10-12 at 5 Gbps. Power consumption is 463 mW at 5 Gbps. A proton beam test indicates the serializer is suitable for applications in high energy physics experiments.

  6. A 16:1 Serializer ASIC for Data Transmission at 5 Gbps

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    A high speed, low power 16:1 serializer is developed using a commercial 0.25 μm silicon-on-sapphire CMOS technology. It operates from 4.0 to 5.8 Gbps in the lab test. Its total jitter is measured to be 62 ps and the bathtub scan demonstrates a 122 ps opening at BER of less than 10-12 level at 5 Gbps. The measured power consumption is 507 mW at this data rate. A proton test of this chip is scheduled in June and test results will be discussed when available.

  7. Thermodynamic analysis and experimental investigation of a Solo V161 Stirling cogeneration unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogdakis, E.D.; Antonakos, G.D.; Koronaki, I.P.

    2012-01-01

    In order to investigate the Stirling engine implementation technology, a Solo Stirling Engine V161 cogeneration module has been installed at the Laboratory of Applied Thermodynamics of National Technical University of Athens. A special thermodynamic analysis of the engine's performance has been conducted introducing and utilizing specially designed computing codes along with the thermal balance study of the unit. Measurements were conducted under different operational conditions concerning various heat load stages of the engine, working pressure, as well as electric power production. Analysis of the experimental results has shown that the overall performance of the Stirling unit proved very promising and quite adequate for various areal applications, equally competing with other CHP systems. The performance of the unit experienced significant stability all over the operating range. The power stand ratio 0.35 differentiates Stirling cogeneration units from others that use diverging technologies significantly. The energy savings using a Stirling CHP unit, in respect to the concurrent use of a thermal and an electrical system at the same equivalent power has revealed 36.8%. -- Highlights: ► Thermodynamic analysis of an a-type Stirling engine. ► Development of generated electrical and thermal power of the m-CHP Solo Stirling Unit to engine's load comparison. ► Stirling m-CHP until heat balance analysis. ► Evaluation of the Solo Stirling V161 unit efficiency.

  8. β-decay spectroscopy of neutron-rich 160,161,162Sm isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Z.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutron-rich 160,161,162Sm isotopes have been populated at the RIBF, RIKEN via β first time. β-coincident γ rays were observed in all three isotopes including γ rays from the isomeric decay of 160Sm and 162Sm. The isomers in 160Sm and 162Sm have previously been observed but have been populated via β decay for the first time. The isomeric state in 162Sm is assigned a 4−v72+[ 633 ]⊗v12−[ 521 ]${4^ - }v{{7 \\over 2}^ + }\\left[ {633} \\right] \\otimes v{{1 \\over 2}^ - }\\left[ {521} \\right]$ configuration based on the decay pattern. The level schemes of 160Sm and 162Sm are presented. The ground states in the parent nuclei 160Pm and 162Pm are both assigned a 6−v72+[633]⊗π52−[532]${6^ - }v{{7 \\over 2}^ + }\\left[ {633} \\right] \\otimes \\pi {{5 \\over 2}^ - }\\left[ {532} \\right]$ configuration based on the population of states in the daughter nuclei. Blocked BCS calculations were performed to further investigate the spin-parities of the ground states in 160Pm, 161Pm, and 162Pm, and the isomeric state in 162Sm

  9. A de-novo interstitial microduplication involving 2p16.1-p15 and mirroring 2p16.1-p15 microdeletion syndrome: Clinical and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimouni-Bloch, Aviva; Yeshaya, Josepha; Kahana, Sarit; Maya, Idit; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina

    2015-11-01

    Microdeletions of various sizes in the 2p16.1-p15 chromosomal region have been grouped together under the 2p16.1-p15 microdeletion syndrome. Children with this syndrome generally share certain features including microcephaly, developmental delay, facial dysmorphism, urogenital and skeletal abnormalities. We present a child with a de-novo interstitial 1665 kb duplication of 2p16.1-p15. Clinical features of this child are distinct from those of children with the 2p16.1-p15 microdeletion syndrome, specifically the head circumference which is within the normal range and mild intellectual disability with absence of autistic behaviors. Microduplications many times bear milder clinical phenotypes in comparison with corresponding microdeletion syndromes. Indeed, as compared to the microdeletion syndrome patients, the 2p16.1-p15 microduplication seems to have a milder cognitive effect and no effect on other body systems. Limited information available in genetic databases about cases with overlapping duplications indicates that they all have abnormal developmental phenotypes. The involvement of genes in this location including BCL11A, USP34 and PEX13, affecting fundamental developmental processes both within and outside the nervous system may explain the clinical features of the individual described in this report. Copyright © 2015 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Innate signals overcome acquired TCR signaling pathway regulation and govern the fate of human CD161(hi) CD8α⁺ semi-invariant T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtle, Cameron J; Delrow, Jeff; Joslyn, Rochelle C; Swanson, Hillary M; Basom, Ryan; Tabellini, Laura; Delaney, Colleen; Heimfeld, Shelly; Hansen, John A; Riddell, Stanley R

    2011-09-08

    Type 17 programmed CD161(hi)CD8α(+) T cells contribute to mucosal immunity to bacteria and yeast. In early life, microbial colonization induces proliferation of CD161(hi) cells that is dependent on their expression of a semi-invariant Vα7.2(+) TCR. Although prevalent in adults, CD161(hi)CD8α(+) cells exhibit weak proliferative and cytokine responses to TCR ligation. The mechanisms responsible for the dichotomous response of neonatal and adult CD161(hi) cells, and the signals that enable their effector function, have not been established. We describe acquired regulation of TCR signaling in adult memory CD161(hi)CD8α(+) T cells that is absent in cord CD161(hi) cells and adult CD161(lo) cells. Regulated TCR signaling in CD161(hi) cells was due to profound alterations in TCR signaling pathway gene expression and could be overcome by costimulation through CD28 or innate cytokine receptors, which dictated the fate of their progeny. Costimulation with IL-1β during TCR ligation markedly increased proinflammatory IL-17 production, while IL-12-induced Tc1-like function and restored the response to TCR ligation without costimulation. CD161(hi) cells from umbilical cord blood and granulocyte colony stimulating factor-mobilized leukaphereses differed in frequency and function, suggesting future evaluation of the contribution of CD161(hi) cells in hematopoietic stem cell grafts to transplant outcomes is warranted.

  11. Determination of the constants of the solubility product of Ln(OH)3 and the effect of the chloride ions on the lanthanum hydrolysis, praseodymium and lutetium in aqueous solutions of ion force 2 Molar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez G, H.D.

    2005-01-01

    The behavior of lanthanum (III), praseodymium (III), and lutetium (III) was studied in 2 M NaClO 4 (aq) and 2 M NaCl (aq) at 303 K and free -CO 2 conditions. Solubility diagrams (p Ln(aq)-pC H ) were obtained by means of a radiochemical method. The pC H borderlines of saturation and unsaturation zones of the solutions and solubility product constants for Ln(OH) 3 were determined from these diagrams. The fitting of the solubility equation to the experimental values of p Ln(aq)-pC H diagrams allowed the calculation of the first hydrolysis and solubility product constants. Independently, the stability constants for the first species of hydrolysis were determined by means of pH titrations, the data were treated with the program SUPERQUAD and fitted to the mean ligand number equation. The stability constants for the species LnCl 2+ were as well calculated in 2M ionic strength and 303 K from the hydrolysis constant values obtained in both perchlorate and chloride media. The values obtained for La, Pr and Lu were: logK ps : 21.11 ± 0.09, 19.81 ± 0.11 and 18.10 ± 0.13 in 2M NaClO 4 ; logK ps : 22.22 ± 0.09, 21.45 ± 0.14 and 18.52 ± 0.29 in 2M NaCl; log β 1 : - 8.64 ± 0.02, - 8.37 ± 0.01 and - 7.95 ± 0.11 in 2M NaClO 4 ; log β 1 / : - 9.02 ± 0.11, - 8.75 ± 0.01 and - 8.12 ± 0.03 in 2M NaCl and the values for log β 1,Cl were - 0.0255, - 0.155 and - 0.758, respectively. (Author)

  12. Determination of the stability constants of lanthanum, praseodymium, europium, erbium and lutetium complexes with chloride ions; Determinacion de las constantes de estabilidad de los complejos de lantano, praseodimio, europio, erbio y lutecio con iones cloruro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez R, E [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    The stability constants of La{sup 3+}, Pr{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+} and Lu{sup 3+} chloride complexes were determined in perchloric acid media using a liquid-liquid extraction method. The dinonyl napthalene sulfonic acid in n-heptane was used as extractant. The lanthanide (Ln) concentrations were measured by a radiochemical (Eu and Lu) and a spectrophotometric (La, Pr, and Er) methods. In the last method, xylenol orange was used for the determinations at ph 6. The stability constants of lanthanum, praseodymium, erbium and lutetium chloride complexes were determined in 2, 3 and 4 M ionic strength and europium in 1, 2 and 3 M, at 303 K. The fitting of experimental data to the equations for the calculation of the stability constants, was carry out considering both one chemical species (LnCl{sup 2+}) or two chemical species (LnCl{sup 2+} and LnCl{sub 2}{sup +}). The Specific Ion Interaction Theory was applied to the values of log {beta}{sup I}{sub Ln},{sub Cl} and the first stability constants at zero ionic strength were calculated by extrapolation. The same theory could not be applied to the log {beta}{sup I}{sub Ln},{sub 2Cl}, due to its low abundance and the values determined for the stability constants were similar. The distribution diagrams of the chemical species were obtained using the program MEDUSA and considering log {beta}{sup I}{sub Ln},{sub CI}, log {beta}{sup I}{sub Ln},{sub 2CI} values obtained in this work and the hydrolysis constants taken from the literature. The lanthanide chloride complexes are present in solution at specific conditions of ionic strength, concentration and in the absence of hydrolysis. The log {beta}{sup I}{sub Ln},{sub Cl} data were related to the charge density and the corresponding equations were obtained. These equations could be used to determine the stability constants along the lanthanide series. (Author)

  13. Hard-photon production at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 and 172 GeV at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    We have studied the process $e^+e^-{\\rightarrow}\\rm n {\\gamma}$ $(\\rm n{\\ge}2)$ at centre-of-mass energies of 161.3 GeV and 172.1 GeV. The analysis is based on a sample of events collected by the L3 detector in 1996 corresponding to total integrated luminosities of 10.7 ${\\rm pb^{-1}}$ and 10.1 ${\\rm pb^{-1}}$ respectively. The observed rates of events with two and more photons and the characteristic distributions are in good agreement with the Standard Model expectations. This is used to set lower limits on contact interaction energy scale parameters, on the QED cut-off parameters and on the mass of excited electrons.

  14. Differential Effect of Cytomegalovirus Infection with Age on the Expression of CD57, CD300a, and CD161 on T-Cell Subpopulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhri Hassouneh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Immunosenescence is a progressive deterioration of the immune system with aging. It affects both innate and adaptive immunity limiting the response to pathogens and to vaccines. As chronic cytomegalovirus (CMV infection is probably one of the major driving forces of immunosenescence, and its persistent infection results in functional and phenotypic changes to the T-cell repertoire, the aim of this study was to analyze the effect of CMV-seropositivity and aging on the expression of CD300a and CD161 inhibitory receptors, along with the expression of CD57 marker on CD4+, CD8+, CD8+CD56+ (NKT-Like and CD4−CD8− (DN T-cell subsets. Our results showed that, regardless of the T-cell subset, CD57−CD161−CD300a+ T-cells expand with age in CMV-seropositive individuals, whereas CD57−CD161+CD300a+ T-cells decrease. Similarly, CD57+CD161−CD300a+ T-cells expand with age in CMV-seropositive individuals in all subsets except in DN cells and CD57−CD161+CD300a− T-cells decrease in all T-cell subsets except in CD4+ T-cells. Besides, in young individuals, CMV latent infection associates with the expansion of CD57+CD161−CD300a+CD4+, CD57−CD161−CD300a+CD4+, CD57+CD161−CD300a+CD8+, CD57−CD161−CD300a+CD8+, CD57+CD161−CD300a+NKT-like, and CD57+CD161−CD300a+DN T-cells. Moreover, in young individuals, CD161 expression on T-cells is not affected by CMV infection. Changes of CD161 expression were only associated with age in the context of CMV latent infection. Besides, CD300a+CD57+CD161+ and CD300a−CD57+CD161+ phenotypes were not found in any of the T-cell subsets studied except in the DN subpopulation, indicating that in the majority of T-cells, CD161 and CD57 do not co-express. Thus, our results show that CMV latent infection impact on the immune system depends on the age of the individual, highlighting the importance of including CMV serology in any study regarding immunosenescence.

  15. CNV-association meta-analysis in 191,161 European adults reveals new loci associated with anthropometric traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macé, Aurélien; Tuke, Marcus A; Deelen, Patrick; Kristiansson, Kati; Mattsson, Hannele; Nõukas, Margit; Sapkota, Yadav; Schick, Ursula; Porcu, Eleonora; Rüeger, Sina; McDaid, Aaron F; Porteous, David; Winkler, Thomas W; Salvi, Erika; Shrine, Nick; Liu, Xueping; Ang, Wei Q; Zhang, Weihua; Feitosa, Mary F; Venturini, Cristina; van der Most, Peter J; Rosengren, Anders; Wood, Andrew R; Beaumont, Robin N; Jones, Samuel E; Ruth, Katherine S; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Tyrrell, Jessica; Havulinna, Aki S; Boers, Harmen; Mägi, Reedik; Kriebel, Jennifer; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Perola, Markus; Nieminen, Markku; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma S; Geller, Frank; Lahti, Jari; Palotie, Aarno; Koponen, Päivikki; Lundqvist, Annamari; Rissanen, Harri; Bottinger, Erwin P; Afaq, Saima; Wojczynski, Mary K; Lenzini, Petra; Nolte, Ilja M; Sparsø, Thomas; Schupf, Nicole; Christensen, Kaare; Perls, Thomas T; Newman, Anne B; Werge, Thomas; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Timothy D; Chambers, John C; Koskinen, Seppo; Melbye, Mads; Raitakari, Olli T; Lehtimäki, Terho; Tobin, Martin D; Wain, Louise V; Sinisalo, Juha; Peters, Annette; Meitinger, Thomas; Martin, Nicholas G; Wray, Naomi R; Montgomery, Grant W; Medland, Sarah E; Swertz, Morris A; Vartiainen, Erkki; Borodulin, Katja; Männistö, Satu; Murray, Anna; Bochud, Murielle; Jacquemont, Sébastien; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hansen, Thomas F; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Mangino, Massimo; Province, Michael A; Deloukas, Panos; Kooner, Jaspal S; Freathy, Rachel M; Pennell, Craig; Feenstra, Bjarke; Strachan, David P; Lettre, Guillaume; Hirschhorn, Joel; Cusi, Daniele; Heid, Iris M; Hayward, Caroline; Männik, Katrin; Beckmann, Jacques S; Loos, Ruth J F; Nyholt, Dale R; Metspalu, Andres; Eriksson, Johan G; Weedon, Michael N; Salomaa, Veikko; Franke, Lude; Reymond, Alexandre; Frayling, Timothy M; Kutalik, Zoltán

    2017-01-01

    There are few examples of robust associations between rare copy number variants (CNVs) and complex continuous human traits. Here we present a large-scale CNV association meta-analysis on anthropometric traits in up to 191,161 adult samples from 26 cohorts. The study reveals five CNV associations at

  16. 25 CFR 161.603 - Can mediation be used in the event of a permit violation or dispute?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can mediation be used in the event of a permit violation... AND WATER NAVAJO PARTITIONED LANDS GRAZING PERMITS Permit Violations § 161.603 Can mediation be used... to be resolved with the District Grazing Committee through mediation. (a) The District Grazing...

  17. Kui naine tahab olla kangelane : kestvus-perfomance "Äng - 161 km palja rindkerega" / Fideelia-Signe Roots

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Roots, Fideelia-Signe, 1976-

    2014-01-01

    Fideelia-Signe Roots oma aktsioonist tegevuskunstiürituse "Äng" raames, mille käigus kunstnik kõndis jalgsi alasti ülakehaga 161 kilomeetrit Tartust Karepale eesmärgiga testida naise kehakuvandi piire. Kangelase ja superkangelase mõistest

  18. 77 FR 34935 - Foreign-Trade Zone 161; Temporary/Interim Manufacturing Authority; Siemens Energy, Inc., (Wind...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board [Docket T-4-2012] Foreign-Trade Zone 161; Temporary/Interim Manufacturing Authority; Siemens Energy, Inc., (Wind Turbine Nacelles and Hubs); Notice of... temporary/interim manufacturing (T/IM) authority, on behalf of Siemens Energy, Inc., to manufacture wind...

  19. 25 CFR 161.610 - What will BIA do if livestock is not removed when a permit expires or is cancelled?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What will BIA do if livestock is not removed when a permit expires or is cancelled? 161.610 Section 161.610 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF... will BIA do if livestock is not removed when a permit expires or is cancelled? If the livestock is not...

  20. A Nonsense Mutation in FAM161A Is a Recurrent Founder Allele in Dutch and Belgian Individuals With Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Schil, Kristof; Klevering, B. Jeroen; Leroy, Bart P.; Pott, Jan Willem R.; Bandah-Rozenfeld, Dikla; Zonneveld-Vrieling, Marijke N.; Sharon, Dror; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Cremers, Frans P. M.; De Baere, Elfride; Collin, Rob W. J.; van den Born, L. Ingeborgh

    PURPOSE. To identify mutations in FAM161A underlying autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) in the Dutch and Belgian populations and to investigate whether common FAM161A-associated phenotypic features could be identified. METHODS. Homozygosity mapping, amplification-refractory mutation

  1. Precursory activity of the 161 ka Kos Plateau Tuff eruption, Aegean Sea (Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, David J. W.; Pe-Piper, Georgia; Lefort, Darren

    2010-08-01

    The Kos Plateau Tuff (KPT) eruption of 161 ka was the largest explosive Quaternary eruption in the eastern Mediterranean. We have discovered an uplifted beach deposit of abraded pumice cobbles, directly overlain by the KPT. The pumice cobbles resemble pumice from the KPT in petrography and composition and differ from Plio-Pleistocene rhyolites on the nearby Kefalos Peninsula. The pumice contains enclaves of basaltic andesite showing chilled lobate margins, suggesting co-existence of two magmas. The deposit provides evidence that the precursory phase of the KPT eruption produced pumice rafts, and defines the paleoshoreline for the KPT, which elsewhere was deposited on land. The beach deposit has been uplifted about 120 m since the KPT eruption, whereas the present marine area south of Kos has subsided several hundred metres, as a result of regional neotectonics. The basaltic andesite is more primitive than other mafic rocks known from the Kos-Nisyros volcanic centre and contains phenocrysts of Fo89 olivine, bytownite, enstatite and diopside. Groundmass amphibole suggests availability of water in the final stages of magma evolution. Geochemical and mineralogical variation in the mafic products of the KPT eruption indicate that fractionation of basaltic magma in a base-of-crust magma chamber was followed by mixing with rhyolitic magma during eruption. Low eruption rates during the precursory activity may have minimised the extent of mixing and preserved the end-member magma types.

  2. Development of lutetium-labeled bombesin derivates: relationship between structure and diagnostic-therapeutic activity for prostate tumor; Desenvolvimento de derivados da bombesina radiomarcados com lutecio-177: relacao estrutura e potencial diagnostico-terapeutico para tumor de prostata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujatti, Priscilla Brunelli

    2009-07-01

    Bombesin (BBN) receptors - in particular, the gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptor peptide - have been shown to be massively over expressed in several human tumors types, including prostate cancer, and could be an alternative as target for its treatment by radionuclide therapy (RNT). A large number of BBN analogs had already been synthesized for this purpose and have shown to reduce tumor growth in mice. Nevertheless, most of the studied analogs exhibit high abdominal accumulation, especially in pancreas. This abdominal accumulation may represent a problem in clinical use of radiolabeled bombesin analogs probably due to serious side effects to patients. The goal of the present work was to radiolabel a novel series of bombesin derivatives with lutetium-177 and to evaluate the relationship between their structure and diagnostic-therapeutic activity for prostate tumor. The generic structure of studied peptides is DOTA-Phe-(Gly){sub n}-BBN(6-14), where DOTA is the chelator, n is the number of glycine amino acids of Phe-(Gly){sub n} spacer and BBN(6-14) is the bombesin sequence from the amino acid 6 to the amino acid 14. Preliminary studies were done to establish the ideal labeling conditions for obtaining the highest yield of labeled bombesin derivatives, determined by instant thin layer chromatography (ITLC-SG) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The stability of the preparations was evaluated either after storing at 2-8 degree C or incubation in human serum at 37 degree C and the partition coefficient was determined in n:octanol:water. In vivo studies were performed in both healthy Balb-c and Nude mice bearing PC-3 xenografts, in order to characterize the biological properties of labeled peptides. In vitro studies involved the evaluation of cold bombesin derivatives effect in PC-3 cells proliferation. Bombesin derivatives were successfully labeled with high yield at optimized conditions and exhibited high stability at 4 degree C. The analysis of

  3. Study of the viability of the production of lutetium - 177 in the nuclear reactor IEA-R1 at IPEN/CNEN-SP; Estudo da viabilidade de producao do lutecio - 177 no reator nuclear IEA-R1 do IPEN/CNEN-SP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Giovana Pasqualini da

    2008-07-01

    The {sup -} emitter {sup 177} Lu is a promising therapeutic radioisotope for the curative treatment of cancer using labelled proteins. It has a half - life of 6.71 day and maximum and average (3 energies of 421 and 133 keV, respectively, resulting in a short range of irradiation of tissue. The decay is accompanied by the emission of low energy -radiation of 208.3 keV (11%) and 113 keV (6.4%), suitable for simultaneous imaging. Lu can be produced by two different routes, namely, by irradiation of natural Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} target ({sup 176}Lu, 2.6%) or enriched (in {sup 176}Lu) Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} target, and also by irradiation of Yb target (Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}) followed by radiochemical separation of Lu from Yb isotopes. The objective of this work is the development of a method of the production of {sup 177} Lu through of the (n, gamma) nuclear reaction, by the direct and indirect method of production. Targets of lutetium oxide and ytterbium oxide were irradiated for evaluation of the activity produced and the chemical separation of lutetium and ytterbium was studied using different ion exchange resins. For the direct method, the best results were obtained using the target Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} enriched in 39.6%. The best results for the indirect method were achieved with the process of separation using 0.25M - HlBA as eluent. The results showed that it is possible to produce {sup 177} Lu of low specific activity for labeling molecules used for bone pain relief and in radiosynoviortesy. (author)

  4. Isolation and characterization of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME)-producing Streptomyces sp. S161 from sheep (Ovis aries) faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y; Wang, J; Deng, Z; Wu, H; Deng, Q; Tan, H; Cao, L

    2013-09-01

    An actinomycete producing oil-like mixtures was isolated and characterized. The strain was isolated from sheep faeces and identified as Streptomyces sp. S161 based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The strain showed cellulase and xylanase activities. The (1) H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of the mixtures showed that the mixtures were composed of fatty acid methyl esters (52·5), triglycerides (13·7) and monoglycerides (9·1) (mol.%). Based on the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis, the fatty acid methyl esters were mainly composed of C14-C16 long-chain fatty acids. The results indicated that Streptomyces sp. S161 could produce fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) directly from starch. To our knowledge, this is the first isolated strain that can produce biodiesel (FAME) directly from starch. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Disruption of δ-opioid receptor phosphorylation at threonine 161 attenuates morphine tolerance in rats with CFA-induced inflammatory hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hai-Jing; Xie, Wei-Yan; Hu, Fang; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Jun; Wang, Yun

    2012-04-01

    Our previous study identified Threonine 161 (Thr-161), located in the second intracellular loop of the δ-opioid receptor (DOR), as the only consensus phosphorylation site for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5). The aim of this study was to assess the function of DOR phosphorylation by Cdk5 in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain and morphine tolerance. Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons of rats with CFA-induced inflammatory pain were acutely dissociated and the biotinylation method was used to explore the membrane localization of phosphorylated DOR at Thr-161 (pThr-161-DOR), and paw withdrawal latency was measured after intrathecal delivery of drugs or Tat-peptide, using a radiant heat stimulator in rats with CFA-induced inflammatory pain. Both the total amount and the surface localization of pThr-161-DOR were significantly enhanced in the ipsilateral DRG following CFA injection. Intrathecal delivery of the engineered Tat fusion-interefering peptide corresponding to the second intracellular loop of DOR (Tat-DOR-2L) increased inflammatory hypersensitivity, and inhibited DOR- but not µ-opioid receptor-mediated spinal analgesia in CFA-treated rats. However, intrathecal delivery of Tat-DOR-2L postponed morphine antinociceptive tolerance in rats with CFA-induced inflammatory pain. Phosphorylation of DOR at Thr-161 by Cdk5 attenuates hypersensitivity and potentiates morphine tolerance in rats with CFA-induced inflammatory pain, while disruption of the phosphorylation of DOR at Thr-161 attenuates morphine tolerance.

  6. CD161+ MAIT cells are severely reduced in peripheral blood and lymph nodes of HIV-infected individuals independently of disease progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Maria Eberhard

    Full Text Available Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT cells are characterized by the combined expression of the semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR Vα7.2, the lectin receptor CD161, as well as IL-18R, and play an important role in antibacterial host defense of the gut. The current study characterized CD161(+ MAIT and CD161-TCRVα7.2(+ T cell subsets within a large cohort of HIV patients with emphasis on patients with slow disease progression and elite controllers. Mononuclear cells from blood and lymph node samples as well as plasma from 63 patients and 26 healthy donors were analyzed by multicolor flow cytometry and ELISA for IL-18, sCD14 and sCD163. Additionally, MAIT cells were analyzed after in vitro stimulation with different cytokines and/or fixed E.coli. Reduced numbers of CD161(+ MAIT cells during HIV infection were detectable in the blood and lymph nodes of all patient groups, including elite controllers. CD161+ MAIT cell numbers did not recover even after successful antiretroviral treatment. The loss of CD161(+ MAIT cells was correlated with higher levels of MAIT cell activation; an increased frequency of the CD161-TCRVα7.2(+T cell subset in HIV infection was observed. In vitro stimulation of MAIT cells with IL-18 and IL-12, IL-7 and fixed E.coli also resulted in a rapid and additive reduction of the MAIT cell frequency defined by CD161, IL-18R and CCR6. In summary, the irreversible reduction of the CD161(+ MAIT cell subset seems to be an early event in HIV infection that is independent of later stages of the disease. This loss appears to be at least partially due to the distinctive vulnerability of MAIT cells to the pronounced stimulation by microbial products and cytokines during HIV-infection.

  7. Design and commissioning of a 16.1 MHz multiharmonic buncher for the reaccelerator at NSCL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Daniel Maloney

    The ReAccelerator (ReA) linear accelerator facility at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory is a unique resource for the nuclear physics community. The particle fragmentation beam production technique, combined with the ability to stop and then reaccelerate the beam to energies of astrophysical interest, give experimenters an unprecedented range of rare isotopes at energies of nuclear and astrophysical interest. The ReAccelerator also functions as a testbed for technology to be incorporated in the upcoming Facility for Rare Isotope Beams linear accelerator, which will eventually in turn become the beam source for ReA. This prototype nature of the ReAccelerator, however, dictated some design choices which have resulted in a final beam with a time structure that is less than ideal for certain classes of experiments. The cavities and RFQ used in ReA have an operating frequency of 80.5 MHz, which corresponds to a separation between particle bunches at the detectors of 12.4 ns. While this separation is acceptable for many experiments, sensitive time of flight measurements require a greater separation between pulses. As nuclear physics experiments rely on statistics, a solution to increasing bunch separation without simply discarding a large fraction of the beam particles was desired. This document describes the design and construction of such a device, a 16.1 MHz multiharmonic buncher. The first chapter provides backgound information on the NSCL and ReA, and some basic concepts in accelerator physics to lay the groundwork for the project.Next, more specifics are provided on the time structure of accelerated beams, and the experimental motivation for greater separation. The third chapter outlines the basic principles of multiharmonic bunching. In order to evaluate the feasibility of any buncher design, the exact acceptance of the Radiofrequency Quadrupole (RFQ) of the ReAccelerator needed to be empirically measured. Chapter 4 describes the results of that

  8. Completion Report for Well ER-16-1 Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa - Shoshone Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2006-12-01

    Well ER-16-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in June and July 2005 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Rainier Mesa-Shoshone Mountain Corrective Action Unit, Number 99. The overall purpose of the well was to gather subsurface data to better characterize the hydrogeology of the Shoshone Mountain area, especially in the older Tertiary and pre-Tertiary strata. The main 46.99-centimeter hole was drilled to a depth of 702.9 meters and cased with 33.97-centimeter casing to 663.7 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters, and the well was drilled to total depth of 1,220.7 meters. A completion string set at the depth of 1,162.4 meters consisted of 13.97-centimeter stainless-steel casing, with one continuous slotted interval open to the lower carbonate aquifer. The fluid level in the borehole soon dropped, so the borehole was deepened in July 2006. To deepen the borehole, the slotted section was cemented and a 12.1-centimeter hole was drilled through the bottom of the completion string to the new total depth of 1,391.7 meters, which is 171.0 meters deeper than the original borehole. A string of 6.03-centimeter carbon-steel tubing with one continuous slotted interval at 1,361.8 to 1,381.4 meters, and open to the lower carbonate aquifer, was installed in the well with no gravel packing or cement, to serve as a monitoring string. Data gathered during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters (extra cuttings samples were collected from the Paleozoic rocks for paleontological analyses), sidewall core samples from 37 depths, various geophysical logs, and water level measurements. These data indicate that the well penetrated 646.8 meters of Tertiary volcanic rocks and 744.9 meters

  9. Similarities and Differences in Pacing Patterns in a 161-km and 101-km Ultra-Distance Road Race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Philip L S; Tan, Frankie H Y; Bosch, Andrew N

    2016-08-01

    Tan, PLS, Tan, FHY, and Bosch, AN. Similarities and differences in pacing patterns in a 161-km and 101-km ultra-distance road race. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2145-2155, 2016-The purpose of this study was to establish and compare the pacing patterns of fast and slow finishers in a tropical ultra-marathon. Data were collected from the Craze Ultra-marathon held on the 22nd and 21st of September in 2012 and 2013, respectively. Finishers of the 161-km (N = 47) and 101-km (N = 120) categories of the race were divided into thirds (groups A-C) by merit of finishing time. Altogether, 17 and 11 split times were recorded for the 161-km and 101-km finishers, respectively, and used to calculate the mean running speed for each distance segment. Running speed for the first segment was normalized to 100, with all subsequent splits adjusted accordingly. Running speed during the last 5 km was calculated against the mean race pace to establish the existence of an end spurt. A reverse J-shaped pacing profile was demonstrated in all groups for both distance categories and only 38% of the finishers executed an end spurt. In the 101-km category, in comparison with groups B and C, group A maintained a significantly more even pace (p = 0.013 and 0.001, respectively) and completed the race at a significantly higher percent of initial starting speed (p = 0.001 and 0.001, respectively). Descriptive data also revealed that the top 5 finishers displayed a "herd-behavior" by staying close to the lead runner in the initial portion of the race. These findings demonstrate that to achieve a more even pace, recreational ultra-runners should adopt a patient sustainable starting speed, with less competitive runners setting realistic performance goals whereas competitive runners with a specific time goal to consider running in packs of similar pace.

  10. Elevated Ratio of Th17 Cell-Derived Th1 Cells (CD161(+)Th1 Cells) to CD161(+)Th17 Cells in Peripheral Blood of Early-Onset Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotake, Shigeru; Nanke, Yuki; Yago, Toru; Kawamoto, Manabu; Kobashigawa, Tsuyoshi; Yamanaka, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the destruction of articular cartilage and bone with elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines. It has been reported that IL-17 and Th17 cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of RA. Recently, plasticity in helper T cells has been demonstrated; Th17 cells can convert to Th1 cells. It remains to be elucidated whether this conversion occurs in the early phase of RA. Here, we tried to identify Th17 cells, Th1 cells, and Th17 cell-derived Th1 cells (CD161(+)Th1 cells) in the peripheral blood of early-onset RA patients. We also evaluated the effect of methotrexate on the ratio of Th17 cells in early-onset RA patients. The ratio of Th17 cell-derived Th1 cells to CD161(+)Th17 cells was elevated in the peripheral blood of early-onset RA patients. In addition, MTX reduced the ratio of Th17 cells but not Th1 cells. These findings suggest that IL-17 and Th17 play important roles in the early phase of RA; thus, anti-IL-17 antibodies should be administered to patients with RA in the early phase.

  11. Alterations of in vivo CA1 network activity in Dp(16)1Yey Down syndrome model mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveau, Matthieu; Polygalov, Denis; Boehringer, Roman; Amano, Kenji; Yamakawa, Kazuhiro; McHugh, Thomas J

    2018-02-27

    Down syndrome, the leading genetic cause of intellectual disability, results from an extra-copy of chromosome 21. Mice engineered to model this aneuploidy exhibit Down syndrome-like memory deficits in spatial and contextual tasks. While abnormal neuronal function has been identified in these models, most studies have relied on in vitro measures. Here, using in vivo recording in the Dp(16)1Yey model, we find alterations in the organization of spiking of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, including deficits in the generation of complex spikes. These changes lead to poorer spatial coding during exploration and less coordinated activity during sharp-wave ripples, events involved in memory consolidation. Further, the density of CA1 inhibitory neurons expressing neuropeptide Y, a population key for the generation of pyramidal cell bursts, were significantly increased in Dp(16)1Yey mice. Our data refine the 'over-suppression' theory of Down syndrome pathophysiology and suggest specific neuronal subtypes involved in hippocampal dysfunction in these model mice. © 2018, Raveau et al.

  12. Overlapping trisomies for human chromosome 21 orthologs produce similar effects on skull and brain morphology of Dp(16)1Yey and Ts65Dn mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starbuck, John M; Dutka, Tara; Ratliff, Tabetha S; Reeves, Roger H; Richtsmeier, Joan T

    2014-08-01

    Trisomy 21 results in gene-dosage imbalance during embryogenesis and throughout life, ultimately causing multiple anomalies that contribute to the clinical manifestations of Down syndrome. Down syndrome is associated with manifestations of variable severity (e.g., heart anomalies, reduced growth, dental anomalies, shortened life-span). Craniofacial dysmorphology and cognitive dysfunction are consistently observed in all people with Down syndrome. Mouse models are useful for studying the effects of gene-dosage imbalance on development. We investigated quantitative changes in the skull and brain of the Dp(16)1Yey Down syndrome mouse model and compared these mice to Ts65Dn and Ts1Cje mouse models. Three-dimensional micro-computed tomography images of Dp(16)1Yey and euploid mouse crania were morphometrically evaluated. Cerebellar cross-sectional area, Purkinje cell linear density, and granule cell density were evaluated relative to euploid littermates. Skulls of Dp(16)1Yey and Ts65Dn mice displayed similar changes in craniofacial morphology relative to their respective euploid littermates. Trisomy-based differences in brain morphology were also similar in Dp(16)1Yey and Ts65Dn mice. These results validate examination of the genetic basis for craniofacial and brain phenotypes in Dp(16)1Yey mice and suggest that they, like Ts65Dn mice, are valuable tools for modeling the effects of trisomy 21 on development. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Novel Neurovascular Protective Agents: Effects of INV-155, INV-157, INV-159, and INV-161 versus Lipoic Acid and Captopril in a Rat Stroke Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry J. Connell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lipoic acid (LA, which has significant antioxidant properties, may also function as a potent neuroprotectant. The synthetic compounds INV-155, INV-157, INV-159, and INV-161 are physiochemical combinations of lipoic acid and captopril. We sought to determine if these compounds have neuroprotective potential following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO in rats. Methods. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intravenously with captopril (1–50 mg/kg 30 minutes prior to MCAO. Blood pressure, heart rate, baroreceptor reflex sensitivity, and infarct size were measured. In addition, dose response effect on infarct size and cardiovascular parameters was determined using INV-155, INV-157, INV-159, and INV-161 and compared to captopril and LA. Results. Pretreatment with captopril and LA at all doses tested was neuroprotective. The compounds INV-159 (0.5–10 mg/kg and INV-161 (1–10 mg/kg produced a significant,dose-dependent decrease in infarct size. In contrast, INV-155 and INV-157 had no effect on infarct size. Conclusions. Combined pretreatment with captopril potentiated the neuroprotective benefit observed following LA alone. Both INV-159 and INV-161 were also neuroprotective. These results suggest that patients taking combinations of captopril and LA, either as combination therapy or in the form of INV-159 or INV-161, may also benefit from significant protection against cerebral infarction.

  14. Pair-Production of W Bosons in $e^+ e^-$ Interactions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alpat, B; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Antreasyan, D; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Caria, M; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chan, A; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Choi, M T; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Drago, E; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Fernández, D; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee Jae Sik; Lee, K Y; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lieb, E H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nagy, E; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Ro, S; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Rodríguez-Calonge, F J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Santocchia, A; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    We report on the measurement of W-boson pair-production with the L3 detector at LEP at a centre-of-mass energy of 161.34~\\GeV. In a data sample corresponding to a total luminosity of 11~pb$^{-1}$, we select four-fermion events with high invariant masses of pairs of hadronic jets or leptons. Combining all final states, the measured total cross section for W-pair production is: $\\SWW = 2.89^{+0.81}_{-0.70}~(stat.)\\pm0.14~(syst.)$~pb. Within the Standard Model, this corresponds to a mass of the W boson of: $\\MW = 80.80^{+0.48}_{-0.42}~(exp.)\\pm 0.03$~(LEP)~\\GeV. Limits on anomalous triple-vector-boson couplings are derived. \\end{abstract}

  15. Measurements of 161 Double Stars With a High-Speed CCD: The Winter/Spring 2017 Observing Program at Brilliant Sky Observatory, Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harshaw, Richard

    2018-04-01

    In the winter and spring of 2017, an aggressive observing program of measuring close double stars with speckle interferometry and CCD imaging was undertaken at Brilliant Sky Observatory, my observing site in Cave Creek, Arizona. A total of 596 stars were observed, 8 of which were rejected for various reasons, leaving 588 pairs. Of these, 427 were observed and measured with speckle interferometry, while the remaining 161 were measured with a CCD. This paper reports the results of the observations of the 161 CCD cases. A separate paper in this issue will report the speckle measurements of the 427 other pairs.

  16. On the use of polarization modulation in combined interferometry and polarimetry. Corrigendum. 1998 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion, v. 40 p. 153-161

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segre, S.E.

    1998-01-01

    Errors in the main text, the appendix and two curves are corrected in this corrigendum to the paper entitled ''On the use of polarization modulation in combined interferometry and polarimetry'', written by S.E. Segre and published in 1998 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion, v. 40 p. 153-161

  17. CD161+CD4+ T cells are enriched in the liver during chronic hepatitis and associated with co-secretion of IL-22 and Interferon-gamma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hoi eKang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease. CD4+ T cells play a key role in disease outcome. However, the critical functions and associated phenotypes of intrahepatic CD4+ T cells are not well defined. We have previously shown that CD8+ T cells expressing the C type lectin CD161 are highly enriched in the human liver, especially during chronic hepatitis. These cells are associated with a type 17 differentiation pattern and express cytokines including IL-17A, IL-22 and IFNγ. We therefore analysed expression of CD161 on CD4+ T cells in blood and liver and addressed the relevant phenotype and functional capacity of these populations. We observed marked enrichment of CD161+CD4+ T cells in the liver during chronic hepatitis such that they are the dominant subtype (mean 55% of CD4+ T cells. IL-22 and IL-17 secreting CD4+ cells were readily found in the livers of HCV+ and NASH donors, although not enriched compared to blood. There was, however, specific enrichment of a novel subset of IL-22/IFN-γ dual secretors (p=0.02 compared to blood, a result reconfirmed with direct ex vivo analyses. These data indicate the dominance of CD161+ expressing lymphocyte populations within the hepatic infiltrate, associated with a distinct cytokine profile. Given their documented roles as antiviral and hepatoprotective cytokines respectively, the impact of co-secretion of IFNγ and IL-22 in the liver may be particularly significant.

  18. Single and multi-photon events with missing energy in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at 161 GeV < $\\sqrt{s}$ < 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    A search for single and multi-photon events with missing energy is performed using data collected at centre-of-mass energies between 161 GeV and 172 GeV for a total of 20.9 pb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity. The results obtained are used to derive the value for the $\

  19. Direct in vitro and in vivo comparison of {sup 161}Tb and {sup 177}Lu using a tumour-targeting folate conjugate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Cristina; Reber, Josefine; Haller, Stephanie [Paul Scherrer Institute, Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences ETH-PSI-USZ, Villigen (Switzerland); Dorrer, Holger; Tuerler, Andreas [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory of Radiochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, Villigen (Switzerland); University of Bern, Laboratory of Radiochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Bern (Switzerland); Bernhardt, Peter [The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Department of Radiation Physics, Gothenburg (Sweden); Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Medical Physics and Medical Bioengeneering, Gothenburg (Sweden); Zhernosekov, Konstantin [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory of Radiochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, Villigen (Switzerland); Schibli, Roger [Paul Scherrer Institute, Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences ETH-PSI-USZ, Villigen (Switzerland); ETH Zurich, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-03-15

    The radiolanthanide {sup 161}Tb (T{sub 1/2} = 6.90 days, Eβ{sup -}{sub av} = 154 keV) was recently proposed as a potential alternative to {sup 177}Lu (T{sub 1/2} = 6.71 days, Eβ{sup -}{sub av} = 134 keV) due to similar physical decay characteristics but additional conversion and Auger electrons that may enhance the therapeutic efficacy. The goal of this study was to compare {sup 161}Tb and {sup 177}Lu in vitro and in vivo using a tumour-targeted DOTA-folate conjugate (cm09). {sup 161}Tb-cm09 and {sup 177}Lu-cm09 were tested in vitro on folate receptor (FR)-positive KB and IGROV-1 cancer cells using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) viability assay. In vivo {sup 161}Tb-cm09 and {sup 177}Lu-cm09 (10 MBq, 0.5 nmol) were investigated in two different tumour mouse models with regard to the biodistribution, the possibility for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging and the antitumour efficacy. Potentially undesired side effects were monitored over 6 months by determination of plasma parameters and examination of kidney function with quantitative SPECT using {sup 99m}Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). To obtain half-maximal inhibition of tumour cell viability a 4.5-fold (KB) and 1.7-fold (IGROV-1) lower radioactivity concentration was required for {sup 161}Tb-cm09 (IC{sub 50} ∝0.014 MBq/ml and ∝2.53 MBq/ml) compared to {sup 177}Lu-cm09 (IC{sub 50} ∝0.063 MBq/ml and ∝4.52 MBq/ml). SPECT imaging visualized tumours of mice with both radioconjugates. However, in therapy studies {sup 161}Tb-cm09 reduced tumour growth more efficiently than {sup 177}Lu-cm09. These findings were in line with the higher absorbed tumour dose for {sup 161}Tb-cm09 (3.3 Gy/MBq) compared to {sup 177}Lu-cm09 (2.4 Gy/MBq). None of the monitored parameters indicated signs of impaired kidney function over the whole time period of investigation after injection of the radiofolates. Compared to {sup 177}Lu-cm09 we demonstrated equal imaging

  20. How Are Substrate Binding and Catalysis Affected by Mutating Glu127 and Arg161 in Prolyl-4-hydroxylase? A QM/MM and MD Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, Amy; de Visser, Sam P.

    2017-01-01

    Prolyl-4-hydroxylase is a vital enzyme for human physiology involved in the biosynthesis of 4-hydroxyproline, an essential component for collagen formation. The enzyme performs a unique stereo- and regioselective hydroxylation at the C4 position of proline despite the fact that the C5 hydrogen atoms should be thermodynamically easier to abstract. To gain insight into the mechanism and find the origin of this regioselectivity, we have done a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) study on wildtype and mutant structures. In a previous study (Timmins et al., 2017) we identified several active site residues critical for substrate binding and positioning. In particular, the Glu127 and Arg161 were shown to form multiple hydrogen bonding and ion-dipole interactions with substrate and could thereby affect the regio- and stereoselectivity of the reaction. In this work, we decided to test that hypothesis and report a QM/MM and molecular dynamics (MD) study on prolyl-4-hydroxylase and several active site mutants where Glu127 or Arg161 are mutated for Asp, Gln, or Lys. Thus, the R161D and R161Q mutants give very high barriers for hydrogen atom abstraction from any proline C–H bond and therefore will be inactive. The R161K mutant, by contrast, sees the regio- and stereoselectivity of the reaction change but still is expected to hydroxylate proline at room temperature. By contrast, the Glu127 mutants E127D and E127Q show possible changes in regioselectivity with the former being more probable to react compared to the latter. PMID:29170737

  1. The Association of PPARγ Pro12Ala and C161T Polymorphisms with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and Their Influence on Lipid and Lipoprotein Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Rahimi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background The aim of present study was to clarify the role of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR γ Pro12Ala and C161T polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS and their influence on lipid and lipoprotein profiles of patients. Materials and Methods The present cross-sectional study consisted of 50 women with PCOS, who referred to the Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences Clinic between April and October 2015, and 233 unrelated age-matched healthy women from the same region (West Iran. The PPARγ Pro12Ala and PPARγ C161T polymorphisms were gen- otyped using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Fasting blood sugar (FBS, serum triglycerides (TG, cholesterol, low density lipoprotein- cholesterol (LDL-C, high density lipoprotein- cholesterol (HDL-C and estradiol levels were measured. Results The serum level of estradiol was significantly lower in PCOS patients compared to healthy women. The PPARγ Pro12Ala (CG genotype increased the risk of PCOS 2.96-fold. The frequency of the PPARγ T allele (at C161T was 21% in patients and 17.2% in controls with no significant difference (P=0.52. In all studied individuals, the PPARγ CG geno- type was associated with significantly higher levels of TG. However, significantly lower levels of total cholesterol and LDL-C were observed in PPARγ TT individuals compared with those with the CC genotype. Within the PCOS group, the PPARγ CG genotype was significantly associated with lower levels of estradiol compared with the CC genotype. Also, the CG genotype was significantly associated with higher levels of TG when compared with the CC genotype. Conclusion Our study shows that, unlike PPARγ C161T, PPARγ Pro12Ala is associated with the risk of PCOS. Also, we found that the lipid and lipoprotein profiles significantly vary based on PPARγ Pro12Ala and C161T genotypes.

  2. How Are Substrate Binding and Catalysis Affected by Mutating Glu127 and Arg161 in Prolyl-4-hydroxylase? A QM/MM and MD Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Timmins

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Prolyl-4-hydroxylase is a vital enzyme for human physiology involved in the biosynthesis of 4-hydroxyproline, an essential component for collagen formation. The enzyme performs a unique stereo- and regioselective hydroxylation at the C4 position of proline despite the fact that the C5 hydrogen atoms should be thermodynamically easier to abstract. To gain insight into the mechanism and find the origin of this regioselectivity, we have done a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM study on wildtype and mutant structures. In a previous study (Timmins et al., 2017 we identified several active site residues critical for substrate binding and positioning. In particular, the Glu127 and Arg161 were shown to form multiple hydrogen bonding and ion-dipole interactions with substrate and could thereby affect the regio- and stereoselectivity of the reaction. In this work, we decided to test that hypothesis and report a QM/MM and molecular dynamics (MD study on prolyl-4-hydroxylase and several active site mutants where Glu127 or Arg161 are mutated for Asp, Gln, or Lys. Thus, the R161D and R161Q mutants give very high barriers for hydrogen atom abstraction from any proline C–H bond and therefore will be inactive. The R161K mutant, by contrast, sees the regio- and stereoselectivity of the reaction change but still is expected to hydroxylate proline at room temperature. By contrast, the Glu127 mutants E127D and E127Q show possible changes in regioselectivity with the former being more probable to react compared to the latter.

  3. Post-irradiation examination of A1-61 wt % U3Si fuel rods from the NRU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, D.F.; Wang, N.

    1997-09-01

    This paper describes the post-irradiation examination of 4 intact low-enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel rods from the national research universal (NRU) reactor at the Chalk River Laboratories of AECL. The rods were irradiated during the period 1993 through 1995, under typical driver fuel operating conditions in NRU, i.e., nominal D 2 0 coolant inlet temperature 37 degrees C, inlet pressure 654 kPa and mass flow 12.4 L/s. Irradiation exposures ranged from 147 to 251 full-power days, corresponding to 40 to 84 atom % 235 U burnup. The maximum rod power was ∼2 MW, with element linear power ratings up to 68 kW/m. Post-irradiation examinations, conducted in 1997, focused on optical metallography to measure cladding oxide thickness and fuel core and cladding microstructural examinations. The cladding oxide was approximately 24 μm thick at the mid-plane of fuel rods irradiated to 251 full-power days, with small areas up to 34 μm thick on the fins. The cladding retained significant ductility after irradiation, and its microstructure appeared unchanged. Fuel core diametral increases were small (up to 4%) and within the range previously observed on A1-61 wt % U 3 Si fuel irradiated in the NRU reactor. (author)

  4. Central and Eastern European countries between the 16+1 platform and Chinese OBOR - One Belt, One Road - Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Cornel Dumitrescu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at analysing the projects and the initiatives of the Central and Eastern European countries that have been finalised, are in progress or will be developed in the near future with the help of the existing or future financial instruments specific to the 16+1 platform and the One Belt, One Road complex program. For our research we selected four countries, namely: Poland, Romania, Serbia and Hungary, the group being relevant from the perspective of the transportation corridors connected to the ”One Belt, One Road” initiative: (1 - Piraeus, Skopje, Belgrade, Budapest, Western Europe; (2 - Suez Canal, Constanta and then Danube, Western Europe, or through Moldova towards Ukraine and Poland; (3 – Constanta, through the Black Sea and Caspian Sea and then the corridors mentioned at the previous point. We based our analysis on the data provided by the National Bureau of Statistics of China, China-CEEC think-tank network and the literature in the field.

  5. CNV-association meta-analysis in 191,161 European adults reveals new loci associated with anthropometric traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macé, Aurélien; Tuke, Marcus A; Deelen, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    There are few examples of robust associations between rare copy number variants (CNVs) and complex continuous human traits. Here we present a large-scale CNV association meta-analysis on anthropometric traits in up to 191,161 adult samples from 26 cohorts. The study reveals five CNV associations......-scale genome-wide meta-analysis of structural variation and find rare CNVs associated with height, weight and BMI with large effect sizes.......)). Burden analysis shows a 0.41 cm decrease in height, a 0.003 increase in waist-to-hip ratio and increase in BMI by 0.14 kg/m(2) for each Mb of total deletion burden (P = 2.5 × 10(-10), 6.0 × 10(-5), and 2.9 × 10(-3)). Our study provides evidence that the same genes (e.g., MC4R, FIBIN, and FMO5) harbor...

  6. Di-Jet Production in Photon-Photon Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}_{ee}$ = 161 and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.G.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1999-01-01

    Di-jet production is studied in collisions of quasi-real photons radiated by the LEP beams at e+e- centre-of-mass energies 161 and 172 GeV. The jets are reconstructed using a cone jet finding algorithm. The angular distributions of direct and double-resolved processes are measured and compared to the predictions of leading order and next-to-leading order perturbative QCD. The jet energy profiles are also studied. The inclusive two-jet cross-section is measured as a function of transverse energy and rapidity and compared to next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations. The inclusive two-jet cross-section as a function of rapidity is compared to the prediction of the leading order Monte Carlo generators PYTHIA and PHOJET. The Monte Carlo predictions are calculated with different parametrisations of the parton distributions of the photon. The influence of the `underlying event' has been studied to reduce the model dependence of the predicted jet cross-sections from the Monte Carlo generators.

  7. 16.1% Efficient Hysteresis-Free Mesostructured Perovskite Solar Cells Based on Synergistically Improved ZnO Nanorod Arrays

    KAUST Repository

    Mahmood, Khalid

    2015-06-01

    Significant efficiency improvements are reported in mesoscopic perovskite solar cells based on the development of a low-temperature solution-processed ZnO nanorod (NR) array exhibiting higher NR aspect ratio, enhanced electron density, and substantially reduced work function than conventional ZnO NRs. These features synergistically result in hysteresis-free, scan-independent, and stabilized devices with an efficiency of 16.1%. Electron-rich, nitrogen-doped ZnO (N:ZnO) NR-based electron transporting materials (ETMs) with enhanced electron mobility produced using ammonium acetate show consistently higher efficiencies by one to three power points than undoped ZnO NRs. Additionally, the preferential electrostatic interaction between the -nonpolar facets of N:ZnO and the conjugated polyelectrolyte polyethylenimine (PEI) has been relied on to promote the hydrothermal growth of high aspect ratio NR arrays and substantially improve the infiltration of the perovskite light absorber into the ETM. Using the same interactions, a conformal PEI coating on the electron-rich high aspect ratio N:ZnO NR arrays is -successfully applied, resulting in a favorable work function shift and altogether leading to the significant boost in efficiency from <10% up to >16%. These results largely surpass the state-of-the-art PCE of ZnO-based perovskite solar cells and highlight the benefits of synergistically combining mesoscale control with doping and surface modification. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Searches for charginos and neutralinos in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Gianotti, F; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Lehraus, Ivan; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Boccali, T; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Hühn, T; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Turnbull, R M; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Morawitz, P; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Giehl, I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Diaconu, C A; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Konstantinidis, N P; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Marumi, M; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Sguazzoni, G; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1998-01-01

    The data recorded by the ALEPH detector at centre-of-mass energies of 161, 170, and 172 GeV are analysed for signals of chargino and neutralino production. No evidence of a signal is found, although candidate events consistent with the expectations from Standard Model processes are observed. Limits at 95% C.L. on the production cross sections are derived and bounds on the parameters of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model are set. The lower limit on the mass of the lightest chargino is 85.5 GeV/c^2 for gaugino-like charginos (mu = -500 GeV/c^2), and 85.0 GeV/c^2 for Higgsino-like charginos (M_2 = 500 GeV/c^2), for heavy sneutrinos (M(snu) > 200 GeV/c^2) and tanb = sqrt(2). The effect of light sleptons on chargino and neutralino limits is investigated. The assumptions of a universal slepton mass and a universal gaugino mass are relaxed, allowing less model-dependent limits to be obtained.

  9. Experimental system description for air-water CCFL tests of the 161-rod FLECHT-SEASET test vessel upper plenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogdall, S.P.; Anderson, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    A series of countercurrent flow limiting (CCFL) experiments has been performed by EG and G Idaho, Inc. in the Steam-Air-Water (SAW) test facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory on behalf of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Tests were performed in a mockup of the vessel for the 161-Rod Systems Effects Test (SET) facility of the FLECHT-SEASET program, conducted by the Westinghouse Electric Corporation. Westinghouse and the NRC will use the test results to provide a CCFL correlation to predict the flooding behavior in the upper plenum of the SET vessel. This paper presents a description of the experimental system and the test conduct, including data validation and uncertainty analysis. The test objectives centered on experimentally obtaining coefficients in the Wallis correlation for flooding with the specific vessel geometry. The test conditions and vessel configuration are described and the design of the test loop, instrumentation, and data acquisition are discussed. The establishment of a test point and the resultant data are described

  10. Measurement and interpretation of the W-pair cross-section in $e^+ e^-$ interactions at 161 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Adzic, P; Ajinenko, I; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbi, M S; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Diodato, A; Djannati, A; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Durand, J D; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Falk, E; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Ferrari, P; Ferrer, A; Fichet, S; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gerdyukov, L N; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gonçalves, P; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grefrath, A; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Knoblauch, D; Kokkinias, P; Konoplyannikov, A K; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leisos, A; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Mahon, J R; Maio, A; Malmgren, T G M; Malychev, V; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Masik, J; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Merk, M; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Orazi, G; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Pain, R; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Podobnik, T; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sahr, O; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Serbelloni, L; Shellard, R C; Siegrist, P; Silvestre, R; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sokolov, A; Solovyanov, O; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stampfer, D; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Terranova, F; Thomas, J; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Todorova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Waldner, F; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wlodek, T; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1997-01-01

    In 1996 LEP ran at a centre-of-mass energy of 161~GeV, just above the threshold of W-pair production. DELPHI accumulated data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $9.93 {\\mathrm{~pb^{-1}}}$, and observed 29 events that are considered as candidates for W-pair production. From these, a cross-section for the doubly resonant $e^+e^-\\to\\mathrm{WW}$ process of $3.67~^{+0.97}_{-0.85} \\pm 0.19{\\mathrm{~pb}}$ has been measured. Within the Standard Model, this cross-section corresponds to a mass of the W-boson of ${\\mathrm{80.40~\\pm~0.44~(stat.)~\\pm~0.09~(syst.) ~\\pm 0.03~(LEP)~GeV}}/c^2$. Alternatively, if $m_{\\mathrm{W}}$ is held fixed at its current value determined by other experiments, the observed cross-section is used to obtain limits on trilinear ${\\mathrm{WWV (V \\equiv \\gamma, Z)}}$ couplings.

  11. Is there a gender equity for women farmers? Reflections on public policy and social CONPES 161/2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximena Marin Hermann

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Domestic roles ( reproductive and productive Colombian rural women are different and are marked by the dynamics of their own territories , but also developed in the areas of public and private unevenly and unfairly compared to men rural sector. Considering the above, raises feminist economics "care economy" as an effort to validate and make visible the contribution of women to the economy. But this trend can go further, can contribute to the transformation of reproductive and productive roles, encouraging participation and democracy for women. Considering this, the equitable use of the time in the private ( family enters debate. Women no longer want and seek only equality in public but do not want to share your time at home on an unequal footing . Public policies are needed to contribute to these disparities disappear. To this extent it is possible to ask yourself the current Public Policy Of Gender Equity for Women ( SOCIAL CONPES 161/2013 , can guarantee the full enjoyment of the rights of Colombian women applying the principles of equality and non-discrimination? This reflection tries to do, from a gender perspective, an analytical reading of the impact of public policy on the transformation of the reality of the Colombian rural women.

  12. DLEU2, frequently deleted in malignancy, functions as a critical host gene of the cell cycle inhibitory microRNAs miR-15a and miR-16-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerner, Mikael; Harada, Masako; Loven, Jakob; Castro, Juan; Davis, Zadie; Oscier, David; Henriksson, Marie; Sangfelt, Olle; Grander, Dan; Corcoran, Martin M.

    2009-01-01

    The microRNAs miR-15a and miR-16-1 are downregulated in multiple tumor types and are frequently deleted in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma. Despite their abundance in most cells the transcriptional regulation of miR-15a/16-1 remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that the putative tumor suppressor DLEU2 acts as a host gene of these microRNAs. Mature miR-15a/miR-16-1 are produced in a Drosha-dependent process from DLEU2 and binding of the Myc oncoprotein to two alterative DLEU2 promoters represses both the host gene transcript and levels of mature miR-15a/miR-16-1. In line with a functional role for DLEU2 in the expression of the microRNAs, the miR-15a/miR-16-1 locus is retained in four CLL cases that delete both promoters of this gene and expression analysis indicates that this leads to functional loss of mature miR-15a/16-1. We additionally show that DLEU2 negatively regulates the G1 Cyclins E1 and D1 through miR-15a/miR-16-1 and provide evidence that these oncoproteins are subject to miR-15a/miR-16-1-mediated repression under normal conditions. We also demonstrate that DLEU2 overexpression blocks cellular proliferation and inhibits the colony-forming ability of tumor cell lines in a miR-15a/miR-16-1-dependent way. Together the data illuminate how inactivation of DLEU2 promotes cell proliferation and tumor progression through functional loss of miR-15a/miR-16-1.

  13. An intermediate level of CD161 expression defines a novel activated, inflammatory, and pathogenic subset of CD8+ T cells involved in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Bryan; Salou, Marion; Vogel, Isabel; Garcia, Alexandra; Dugast, Emilie; Morille, Jeremy; Kilens, Stéphanie; Charpentier, Eric; Donnart, Audrey; Nedellec, Steven; Jacq-Foucher, Marylène; Le Frère, Fabienne; Wiertlewski, Sandrine; Bourreille, Arnaud; Brouard, Sophie; Michel, Laure; David, Laurent; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Degauque, Nicolas; Nicot, Arnaud B; Berthelot, Laureline; Laplaud, David-Axel

    2018-03-01

    Several lines of evidence support a key role for CD8 + T cells in central nervous system tissue damage of patients with multiple sclerosis. However, the precise phenotype of the circulating CD8 + T cells that may be recruited from the peripheral blood to invade the CNS remains largely undefined to date. It has been suggested that IL-17 secreting CD8 (Tc17) T cells may be involved, and in humans these cells are characterized by the expression of CD161. We focused our study on a unique and recently described subset of CD8 T cells characterized by an intermediate expression of CD161 as its role in neuroinflammation has not been investigated to date. The frequency, phenotype, and function of CD8 + T cells with an intermediate CD161 expression level were characterized ex-vivo, in vitro, and in situ using RNAseq, RT-PCR, flow cytometry, TCR sequencing, and immunohistofluorescence of cells derived from healthy volunteers (n = 61), MS subjects (n = 90), as well as inflammatory (n = 15) and non-inflammatory controls (n = 6). We report here that CD8 + CD161 int T cells present characteristics of effector cells, up-regulate cell-adhesion molecules and have an increased ability to cross the blood-brain barrier and to secrete IL-17, IFNγ, GM-CSF, and IL-22. We further demonstrate that these cells are recruited and enriched in the CNS of MS subjects where they produce IL-17. In the peripheral blood, RNAseq, RT-PCR, high-throughput TCR repertoire analyses, and flow cytometry confirmed an increased effector and transmigration pattern of these cells in MS patients, with the presence of supernumerary clones compared to healthy controls. Our data demonstrate that intermediate levels of CD161 expression identifies activated and effector CD8 + T cells with pathogenic properties that are recruited to MS lesions. This suggests that CD161 may represent a biomarker and a valid target for the treatment of neuroinflammation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd

  14. Rates of intraoperative complications and conversion to laparotomy during laparoscopic ovariectomy performed by veterinary students: 161 cases (2010-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylund, Adam M; Drury, Adam; Weir, Heather; Monnet, Eric

    2017-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess rates of intraoperative complications and conversion to laparotomy associated with supervised veterinary students performing laparoscopic ovariectomy in dogs. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 161 female shelter dogs for which elective laparoscopic ovariectomy had been performed by supervised senior (fourth-year) veterinary students from 2010 through 2014. PROCEDURES Medical records of all dogs were reviewed and data collected regarding duration of surgery, surgical complications and other characteristics, and whether conversion to laparotomy was required. RESULTS Laparoscopic ovariectomy was performed with a 2-cannula technique and a 10-mm vessel-sealing device for hemostasis in all dogs. A Veress needle was used for initial insufflation in 144 (89.4%) dogs; method of insufflation was not reported for the remaining 17 (10.6%) dogs. Mean ± SD duration of surgery was 114.90 ± 33.40 minutes. Surgical complications, all classified as minor blood loss, occurred in 24 (14.9%) dogs. These included splenic puncture during insertion of the Veress needle (n = 20 [12.4%]) and minor bleeding from the ovarian pedicle (4 [2.5%]). Splenic puncture required no intervention, and ovarian pedicle bleeding required application of the vessel-sealing device an additional time to control the bleeding. Two ovaries were dropped in the abdominal cavity at the time of removal. Both were retrieved without complication. Conversion to laparotomy was not required for any dog. All dogs were discharged from the hospital within 24 hours after surgery. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Laparoscopic ovariectomy in dogs was performed safely by closely supervised novice surgeons, with only minor intraoperative complications encountered and no need for conversion to laparotomy.

  15. Epidemiologia e distribuição de lesões extrarrenais de uremia em 161 cães

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isadora P. Silveira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: Com o objetivo de determinar a epidemiologia e as características morfológicas, incluindo a localização anatômica, das lesões extrarrenais de uremia, bem como determinar as principais lesões do sistema urinário associadas à ocorrência de uremia, foram revisados os protocolos de necropsias de cães realizadas no Laboratório de Patologia Veterinária da Universidade Federal de Santa Maria de janeiro de 1996 a dezembro de 2012 (17 anos. Nesse período foram necropsiados 4.201 cães, sendo que 161 (3,8% apresentaram lesões extrarrenais de uremia. Em 134 cães (83,2% foram descritos sinais clínicos associados à uremia. As lesões extrarrenais mais frequentes, em ordem decrescente, foram: gastrite ulcerativa e hemorrágica (56,5%, mineralização de tecidos moles (55,9%, edema pulmonar (47,2%, estomatite e/ou glossite ulcerativa (30,4%, endocardite/trombose atrial e aórtica (28,6%, hiperplasia das paratireoides (9,3%, osteodistrofia fibrosa (8,1%, anemia (6,2%, laringite ulcerativa (5%, enterite ulcerativa/hemorrágica (3,7%, esofagite fibrinonecrótica (1,9% e pericardite fibrinosa (1.9%. Na maioria dos casos as lesões extrarrenais de uremia foram decorrentes de azotemia prolongada por lesões renais graves, sendo as mais prevalentes a nefrite intersticial e a glomerulonefrite.

  16. Towards a Balanced Synergy of Visions and Interests: Latvia’s Perspectives in 16+1 and Belt and Road Initiatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spruds Andris

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses China’s 16+1 and Belt and Road initiatives from Latvia’s perspective. Although the initiatives provide engagement on a large scale, it is challenging to achieve the task of achieving a synergy between a variety of stakeholders and interests in the context of a diversity of visions and agendas. The strategic dimension of transcontinental initiatives complicates further the building of synergy. Connectivity is an important and promising principle of both initiatives and transcontinental infrastructural linkages are especially high on the agenda. Mutually beneficial progress, however, must yet be achieved. In times of uncertainty, Central and Eastern European countries, including Latvia, are engaged in a balancing process of potential economic benefits and strategic implications of the 16+1 and Belt and Road initiatives.

  17. Search for anomalous production of dilepton events with missing transverse momentum in $e^{+} e^{-}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Beeston, C.; Behnke, T.; Bell, A.N.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bloomer, J.E.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Bouwens, B.T.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Doucet, M.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Edwards, J.E.G.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Evans, H.G.; Evans, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fischer, H.M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Fong, D.G.; Foucher, M.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Geddes, N.I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hart, P.A.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ingram, M.R.; Ishii, K.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P.W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, C.R.; Jones, G.; Jones, M.; Jost, U.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kirk, J.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W.P.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markus, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mincer, A.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Muller, U.; Mihara, S.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oh, A.; Oldershaw, N.J.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Pearce, M.J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Rees, D.L.; Rigby, D.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rooke, A.; Ros, E.; Rossi, A.M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Ruppel, U.; Rust, D.R.; Rylko, R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schenk, P.; Schieck, J.; Schleper, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, Robert Wayne; Sproston, M.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Utzat, P.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Verzocchi, M.; Vikas, P.; Vokurka, E.H.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilkens, B.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1998-01-01

    Events containing a pair of charged leptons and significant missing transverse momentum are selected from a data sample corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 20.6 pb^-1 at centre-of-mass energies of 161 GeV and 172 GeV. The observed number of events, four at 161 GeV and nine at 172 GeV, is consistent with the number expected from Standard Model processes, predominantly arising from W+W- production with each W decaying leptonically. This topology is also an experimental signature for the pair production of new particles that decay to a charged lepton accompanied by one or more invisible particles. Further event selection criteria are described that optimise the sensitivity to particular new physics channels. No evidence for new phenomena is observed and limits on the production of scalar charged lepton pairs and other new particles are presented.

  18. Magnetic properties of the ternary carbide DyCoC2 studied by magnetization measurements, neutron diffraction and 161Dy Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amanai, H.; Onodera, H.; Ohashi, M.; Matsuo, S.; Yamauchi, H.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic properties of DyCoC 2 have been investigated by means of magnetization measurements, powder neutron diffraction and 161 Dy Moessbauer spectroscopy. The magnetization versus temperature curves of a single-crystalline sample reveal that the magnetic structure of DyCoC 2 is a simple collinear ferromagnetic one below T C =10.0 K. At 4.2 K, the magnitude of the Dy moment is 8.7(1)μ B , whose direction is defined by an angle of 38.0(5) from the a-axis toward the c-axis. The magnetic structure and the magnitude of the moment are also confirmed by the results of powder neutron diffraction experiments and 161 Dy Moessbauer spectroscopy, respectively. ((orig.))

  19. Search for sleptons in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 161 GeV and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Hühn, T; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Turnbull, R M; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Morawitz, P; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Diaconu, C A; Konstantinidis, N P; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Simion, S; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1997-01-01

    The data recorded by the ALEPH experiment at LEP at centre-of-mass energies of 161 GeV and 172 GeV were analysed to search for sleptons, the supersymmetric partners of leptons. No evidence for the production of these particles was found. The number of candidates observed is consistent with the background expected from four-fermion processes and gammagamma-interactions. Improved mass limits at 95% C.L. are reported.

  20. Search for sleptons in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 161 GeV and 172 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Orteu, S.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R. M.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Schune, M.-H.; Serin, L.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Sau, Lan Wu; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1997-02-01

    The data recorded by the ALEPH experiment at LEP at centre-of-mass energies of 161 GeV and 172 GeV were analysed to search for sleptons, the supersymmetric partners of leptons. No evidence for the production of these particles was found. The number of candidates observed is consistent with the background expected from four-fermion processes and yy-interactions. Improved mass limits at 95% C.L. are reported.

  1. T-cell receptor repertoire of human peripheral CD161hiTRAV1-2+ MAIT cells revealed by next generation sequencing and single cell analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Kathrin; Beltrán, Eduardo; Moser, Markus; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Dornmair, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are a T-cell subset that expresses a conserved TRAV1-2 (Vα7.2) T-cell receptor (TCR) chain and the surface marker CD161. They are involved in the defence against microbes as they recognise small organic molecules of microbial origin that are presented by the non-classical MHC molecule 1 (MR1). MAIT cells express a semi-restricted TCR α chain with TRAV1-2 preferentially linked to TRAJ33, TRAJ12, or TRAJ20 which pairs with a limited set of β chains. To investigate the TCR repertoire of human CD161(hi)TRAV1-2(+) T cells in depth we analysed the α and β chains of this T-cell subset by next generation sequencing. Concomitantly we analysed 132 paired α and β chains from single cells to assess the αβ pairing preferences. We found that the CD161(hi)TRAV1-2(+) TCR repertoire in addition to the typical MAIT TCRs further contains polyclonal elements reminiscent of classical αβ T cells. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Measurement of hadron and lepton pair production at 161 GeV < $\\sqrt{s}$ < 172 GeV at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Sauvage, G; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schultze, K; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    We report on measurements of $\\mathrm{e^+e^-}$ annihilation into hadrons and lepton pairs. The data have been taken with the L3 detector at LEP at centre--of--mass energies between 161~$\\mathrm{Ge\\kern -0.12em V}$ and 172~$\\mathrm{Ge\\kern -0.12em V}$. In a data sample corresponding to 21.2~pb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity 2728 hadronic and 868 lepton--pair events are selected. The measured cross sections and leptonic forward--backward asymmetries agree well with the Standard Model predictions. \\end{abstract}

  3. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in $e^+ e^-$ Interactions at $161 \\leq \\sqrt{s} \\leq 172$ GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Schneegans, M; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson has been performed with the L3 detector at LEP. The data sample was collected at three centre-of-mass energies, 161.3, 170.3 and 172.3 GeV with integrated luminosities of 10.8, 1.0 and 9.2 $pb^-1$, respectively. No Higgs signal is observed. In combination with previous data taken at the Z resonance, a lower Higgs mass limit, $M_H > 69.5$ GeV, is obtained at 95\\% confidence level.

  4. Gulf of Mexico Sales 157 and 161: Central and western planning areas final environmental impact statement, Volume I: Sections I through IV.C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    This Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) covers the proposed 1996 Gulf of Mexico OCS oil and gas lease sales [Central Gulf of Mexico Sale 157 (March 1996) and Western Gulf of Mexico Sale 161 (August 1996)]. This document includes the purpose and background of the proposed actions, the alternatives, the descriptions of the affected environment, and the potential environmental impacts of the proposed actions and alternatives. Proposed mitigating measures and their potential effects are analyzed, in addition to potential cumulative impacts resulting from proposed activities

  5. MicroRNA-15a and -16-1 act via MYB to elevate fetal hemoglobin expression in human trisomy 13

    OpenAIRE

    Sankaran, Vijay G.; Menne, Tobias F.; Šćepanović, Danilo; Vergilio, Jo-Anne; Ji, Peng; Kim, Jinkuk; Thiru, Prathapan; Orkin, Stuart H.; Lander, Eric S.; Lodish, Harvey F.

    2011-01-01

    Many human aneuploidy syndromes have unique phenotypic consequences, but in most instances it is unclear whether these phenotypes are attributable to alterations in the dosage of specific genes. In human trisomy 13, there is delayed switching and persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) and elevation of embryonic hemoglobin in newborns. Using partial trisomy cases, we mapped this trait to chromosomal band 13q14; by examining the genes in this region, two microRNAs, miR-15a and -16-1, appear as t...

  6. Low-temperature thermal properties of yttrium and lutetium dodecaborides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czopnik, A; Shitsevalova, N; Pluzhnikov, V; Krivchikov, A; Paderno, Yu; Onuki, Y

    2005-01-01

    The heat capacity (C p ) and dilatation (α) of YB 12 and LuB 12 are studied. C p of the zone-melted YB 12 tricrystal is measured in the range 2.5-70 K, of the zone-melted LuB 12 single crystal in the range 0.6-70 K, and of the LuB 12 powder sample in the range 4.3-300 K; α of the zone-melted YB 12 tricrystal and LuB 12 single crystals is measured in the range 5-200 K. At low temperatures a negative thermal expansion (NTE) is revealed for both compounds: for YB 12 at 50-70 K, for LuB 12 at 10-20 K and 60-130 K. Their high-temperature NTE is a consequence of nearly non-interacting freely oscillating metal ions (Einstein oscillators) in cavities of a simple cubic rigid Debye lattice formed by B 12 cage units. The Einstein temperatures are ∼254 and ∼164 K, and the Debye temperatures are ∼1040 K and ∼1190 K for YB 12 and LuB 12 respectively. The LuB 12 low-temperature NTE is connected with an induced low-energy defect mode. The YB 12 superconducting transition has not been detected up to 2.5 K

  7. Magnetic structures of holmium-lutetium alloys and superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swaddling, P.P.; Cowley, R.A.; Ward, R.C.C.

    1996-01-01

    Alloys and superlattices of Ho and Lu have been grown using molecular beam epitaxy and their magnetic structures determined using neutron-scattering techniques. The 4f moments in the alloys form a helix at all compositions with the moments aligned in the basal plane perpendicular to the wave vector...... of the helix remaining coherent through the nonmagnetic Lu blocks. The neutron scattering from the superlattices is consistent with a model in which there are different phase advances of the helix turn angle through the Ho and Lu blocks, but with a localized moment on the Ho sites only. A comparison...... of Ho and Lu. At low temperatures, for superlattices with fewer than approximately twenty atomic planes of Ho, the Ho moments within a block undergo a phase transition from helical to ferromagnetic order, with the coupling between successive blocks dependent on the thickness of the Lu spacer....

  8. Lutetium-177-EDTMP for pain palliation in bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutty Sola, Gisela A.; Arguelles, Maria G.; Bottazzini, Debora L.; Furnari, Juan C.; Vera Ruiz, H.

    1999-01-01

    Experiences with the new palliative agent Lu-177 EDTMP are summarized. The production of primary 177 Lu by the 176 Lu(n,γ) 177 Lu reaction and the synthesis of the radioactive complex are described as well as the procedures used for the control of the radionuclidic and the radiochemical purity. The stability of the compound has been also studied. The in vivo essays with rats and the use of the radiopharmaceutical, after a careful dose evaluation, in a patient with bone metastases from a breast cancer, show that the behaviour of Lu-177 EDTMP is similar to that of the analogue Sm-153 EDTMP. (author)

  9. Identification of a recombinant inulin fructotransferase (difructose dianhydride III forming) from Arthrobacter sp. 161MFSha2.1 with high specific activity and remarkable thermostability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Yu, Shuhuai; Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Bo; Mu, Wanmeng

    2015-04-08

    Difructose dianhydride III (DFA III) is a functional carbohydrate produced from inulin by inulin fructotransferase (IFTase, EC 4.2.2.18). In this work, an IFTase gene from Arthrobacter sp. 161MFSha2.1 was cloned and expressed in Escherachia coli. The recombinant enzyme was purified by metal affinity chromatography. It showed significant inulin hydrolysis activity, and the produced main product from inulin was determined as DFA III by nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. The molecular mass of the purified protein was calculated to be 43 and 125 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel filtration, respectively, suggesting the native enzyme might be a homotrimer. The recombinant enzyme showed maximal activity as 2391 units/mg at pH 6.5 and 55 °C. It displayed the highest thermostability among previously reported IFTases (DFA III forming) and was stable up to 80 °C for 4 h of incubation. The smallest substrate was determined as nystose. The conversion ratio of inulin to DFA III reached 81% when 100 g/L inulin was catalyzed by 80 nM recombinant enzyme for 20 min at pH 6.5 and 55 °C. All of these data indicated that the IFTase (DFA III forming) from Arthrobacter sp. 161MFSha2.1 had great potential for industrial DFA III production.

  10. Search for Acoplanar Lepton Pair Events in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161, 172 and 183 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.G.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    2000-01-01

    A selection of di-lepton events with significant missing transverse momentum has been performed using a total data sample of 77.0 pb-1 at e+e- centre-of-mass energies of 161 GeV, 172 GeV and 183 GeV. The observed numbers of events: four at 161 GeV, nine at 172 GeV, and 78 at 183 GeV, are consistent with the numbers expected from Standard Model processes, which arise predominantly from W+W- production with each W decaying leptonically. This topology is an experimental signature also for the pair production of new particles that decay to a charged lepton accompanied by one or more invisible particles. Further event selection criteria are described that optimise the sensitivity to particular new physics channels. No evidence for new phenomena is apparent and model independent limits on the production cross-section times branching ratio squared for various new physics processes are presented. Assuming a 100% branching ratio for the decay of a right-handed charged slepton to a charged lepton and the lightest neutr...

  11. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in $e^+ e^-$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161-172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Beeston, C; Behnke, T; Bell, A N; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bloomer, J E; Bobinski, M; Bock, P; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Bouwens, B T; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Burgard, C; Bürgin, R; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Clarke, P E L; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallapiccola, C; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; del Pozo, L A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; do Couto e Silva, E; Doucet, M; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Edwards, J E G; Estabrooks, P G; Evans, H G; Evans, M; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fischer, H M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fong, D G; Foucher, M; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Geddes, N I; Geich-Gimbel, C; Geralis, T; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giacomelli, R; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Goodrick, M J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hajdu, C; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Hargrove, C K; Hart, P A; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hillier, S J; Hobson, P R; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Hutchcroft, D E; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ingram, M R; Ishii, K; Jawahery, A; Jeffreys, P W; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Joly, A; Jones, C R; Jones, G; Jones, M; Jost, U; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kirk, J; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lahmann, R; Lai, W P; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markus, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mincer, A; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Morii, M; Müller, U; Mihara, S; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oh, A; Oldershaw, N J; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pearce, M J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Posthaus, A; Rees, D L; Rigby, D; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Rooke, A M; Ros, E; Rossi, A M; Routenburg, P; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Ruppel, U; Rust, D R; Rylko, R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schenk, P; Schieck, J; Schleper, P; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skillman, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Springer, R W; Sproston, M; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stockhausen, B; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Szymanski, P; Tafirout, R; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Utzat, P; Van Kooten, R; Verzocchi, M; Vikas, P; Vokurka, E H; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilkens, B; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a search for the Standard Model Higgs boson using data from e^+e^- collisions collected at center-of-mass energies of 161, 170 and 172 GeV by the OPAL detector at LEP. The data collected at these energies correspond to integrated luminosities of 10.0, 1.0 and 9.4 pb^-1, respectively. The search is sensitive to the main final states from the process in which the Higgs boson is produced in association with a fermion anti-fermion pair, namely four jets, two jets with missing energy, and two jets produced together with a pair of electron, muon or tau leptons. One candidate event is observed, in agreement with the Standard Model background expectation. In combination with previous OPAL searches at center-of-mass energies close to the Z^0 resonance and the revised previous OPAL searches at 161 GeV, we derive a lower limit of 69.4 GeV for the mass of the Standard Model Higgs boson at the 95% confidence level.

  12. Monoclonal antibody 1.6.1 against human MPL receptor allows HSC enrichment of CB and BM CD34(+)CD38(-) populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit Cocault, Laurence; Fleury, Maud; Clay, Denis; Larghero, Jérôme; Vanneaux, Valérie; Souyri, Michèle

    2016-04-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) and its receptor Mpl (CD110) play a crucial role in the regulation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Functional study of Mpl-expressing HSCs has, however, been hampered by the lack of efficient monoclonal antibodies, explaining the very few data available on Mpl(+) HSCs during human embryonic development and after birth. Investigating the main monoclonal antibodies used so far to sort CD110(+) cells from cord blood (CB) and adult bone marrow (BM), we found that only the recent monoclonal antibody 1.6.1 engineered by Immunex Corporation was specific. Using in vitro functional assays, we found that this antibody can be used to sort a CD34(+)CD38(-)CD110(+) population enriched in hematopoietic progenitor stem cells, both in CB and in adult BM. In vivo injection into NSG mice further indicated that the CB CD34(+)CD38(-)CD110(+) population is highly enriched in HSCs compared with both CD34(+)CD38(-)CD110(-) and CD34(+)CD38(-) populations. Together our results validate MAb1.6.1 as an important tool, which has so far been lacking, in the HSC field. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. 161Dy Moessbauer spectroscopy of the intermetallic compounds DyNi2Si2, DyNi2Ge2 and DyAg2Si2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onodera, Hideya; Murata, Akifumi; Koizuka, Masaaki; Ohashi, Masayoshi; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    1994-01-01

    161 Dy Moessbauer spectroscopic study has been performed on DyNi 2 Si 2 , DyNi 2 Ge 2 and DyAg 2 Si 2 in order to clarify microscopic properties of antiferromagnets with incommensurate and sinusoidally moment-modulated structure. The experiments were done using the standard 161 Tb Moessbauer sources prepared by neutron irradiation at the Japan Material Testing Reactor. The Moessbauer spectra of DyNi 2 Si 2 are analyzed satisfactorily by a single set of hyperfine parameters, and hence the sinusoidal moment-modulation is considered to be realized through a distribution of spin relaxation rate. The broadened spectra of DyNi 2 Ge 2 are fitted tentatively by three subspectra. It seems for DyNi 2 Ge 2 that the incommensurate arrangement of Dy moments differed in magnitude as well as the distribution of spin relaxation rate originates the moment modulation. The fact that the spectrum of DyAg 2 Si 2 at 3 K consists of two distinct subspectra ensures the complicated antiferromagnetic structure where two kinds of Dy moments differed in magnitude are arranged noncollinearly. (author)

  14. Geophysical Multiphase Flow With Interphase Exchanges - Hydrodynamic and Thermodynamic Models, and Numerical Techniques, Version GMFIX-1.61, Design Document Attachment 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dartevelle, S.

    2006-01-01

    Since the multiphase system is made up of a large number of particles, it is impractical to solve the motion of each individual particle; hence GMFIX v1.61 is based upon the Implicit Multi-Field formalism (IMF) which treats all phases in the system as interpenetrating continua. Each instantaneous local point variable (mass, velocity, temperature, pressure, so forth) must be treated to acknowledge the fact that any given arbitrary volume can be shared by different phases at the same time. This treatment may involve, for instance, an averaging or a smoothing process. GMFIX is the geophysical version of MFIX codes developed by NETL and ORNL. MFIX comes after 30 years of continuous developments and improvements from K-FIX codes from LANL. At the time this manuscript was ready for publication (March 2005), some differences exist between the current versions of GMFIX (v. 1.61) and MFIX (v: 1.60) regarding the exact formulation of the energy and momentum equations, the interfacial closures, and the turbulence formulation. Yet both GMFIX and MFIX are being improved, and developed tightly sides by sides

  15. Homozygosity mapping reveals new nonsense mutation in the FAM161A gene causing autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in a Palestinian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobor, Ditta; Balousha, Ghassan; Baumann, Britta; Wissinger, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogenous group of inherited retinal degenerations caused by mutations in at least 45 genes. Recently, the FAM161A gene was identified as the causative gene for RP28, an autosomal recessive form of RP. We performed a clinical and molecular genetic study of a consanguineous Palestinian family with two three siblings affected with retinitis pigmentosa. DNA samples were collected from the index patient, his father, his affected sister, and two non-affected brothers. DNA sample from the index was subjected to high resolution genome-wide SNP array. Assuming identity-by-descent in this consanguineous family we applied homozygosity mapping to identify disease causing genes. The index patient reported night blindness since the age of 20 years, followed by moderate disease progression with decrease of peripheral vision, the development of photophobia and later on reduced central vision. At the age of 40 his visual acuity was counting fingers (CF) for both eyes, color discrimination was not possible and his visual fields were severely constricted. Funduscopic examination revealed a typical appearance of advanced RP with optic disc pallor, narrowed retinal vessels, bone-spicule like pigmentary changes in the mid-periphery and atrophic changes in the macula. His younger affected brother (37 years) was reported with overall milder symptoms, while the youngest sister (21 years) reported problems only with night vision. Applying high-density SNP arrays we identified several homozygous genomic regions one of which included the recently identified FAM161A gene mutated in RP28-linked autosomal recessive RP. Sequencing analysis revealed the presence of a novel homozygous nonsense mutation, c.1003C>T/p.R335X in the index patient and the affected sister. We identified an RP28-linked RP family in the Palestinian population caused by a novel nonsense mutation in FAM161A. RP in this family shows a typical disease onset with moderate to rapid progression

  16. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=161, 170 and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Hühn, T; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Turnbull, R M; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Morawitz, P; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Diaconu, C A; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Konstantinidis, N P; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kado, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Simion, S; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1997-01-01

    The reaction e+e- -> HZ is used to search for the Standard Model Higgs boson. The data sample consists of integrated luminosities of 10.9pb-1 1.1pb-1 and 9.5pb-1 collected by the ALEPH experiment at LEP during 1996, at centre-of-mass energies of 161, 170 and 172GeV, respectively. No candidate events were found, in agreement with the expected background of 0.84 events from all Standard Model processes. This search results in a 95%C.L. lower limit on the Higgs boson mass of 69.4GeV. When combined with earlier ALEPH searches performed at energies at and around the Z peak, this limit increases to 70.7GeV

  17. Searches for supersymmetry in the photon(s) plus missing energy channels at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 GeV and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, Philippe; Goy, C.; Lees, J.P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.N.; Nief, J.Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J.M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Padilla, C.; Park, I.C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J.A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A.O.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, John; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, Gigi; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I.R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barres, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Rensch, B.; Waananen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Boccali, T.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D.E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S.J.; Halley, A.W.; Knowles, I.G.; Lynch, J.G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J.M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A.S.; Thomson, Evelyn J.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R.M.; Buchmuller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E.B.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A.M.; Williams, M.D.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A.P.; Bowdery, C.K.; Buck, P.G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E.P.; Williams, M.I.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J.J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Buescher, Volker; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lutjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Richter, Robert, 1; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, Richard Dante; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, Ph.; Hocker, Andreas; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D.W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrancois, J.; Lutz, A.M.; Nikolic, Irina; Schune, M.H.; Serin, L.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Blair, G.A.; Bryant, L.M.; Chambers, J.T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M.G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J.A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Botterill, D.R.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P.R.; Thompson, J.C.; Wright, A.E.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Kozanecki, W.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S.N.; Dann, J.H.; Kim, H.Y.; Litke, A.M.; McNeil, M.A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C.A.J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M.S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W.M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R.W.; Armstrong, S.R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gonzalez, S.; Greening, T.C.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nachtman, J.M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y.B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I.J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J.M.; Zobernig, G.

    1998-01-01

    Searches for supersymmetric particles in channels with one or more photons and missing energy have been performed with data collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP. The data consist of 11.1 \\pb\\ at $\\sqrt{s} = 161 ~\\, \\rm GeV$, 1.1 \\pb\\ at 170 \\gev\\ and 9.5 \\pb\\ at 172 GeV. The \\eenunu\\ cross se ction is measured. The data are in good agreement with predictions based on the Standard Model, and are used to set upper limits on the cross sections for anomalous photon production. These limits are compared to two different SUSY models and used to set limits on the neutralino mass. A limit of 71 \\gevsq\\ at 95\\% C.L. is set on the mass of the lightest neutralin o ($\\tau_{\\chi_{1}^{0}} \\leq $ 3 ns) for the gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking and LNZ models.

  18. Missing mass spectra in hadronic events from $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=161-172 GeV and limits on invisible Higgs decays

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; Alessandro, R D; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Mil, A J W; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1998-01-01

    Events characterised by large hadronic energy and transverse momentum are selected from the data collected by the L3 detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies between 161 and 172 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 21 $\\rm pb^{-1}$. The visible mass and the missing mass distributions of the selected events are consistent with those expected from Standard Model processes. This result is combined with that from data taken at the Z resonance to set an upper limit on the production rate and decay into invisible final states of a non-minimal Higgs boson, as a function of the Higgs mass. Assuming the non-minimal Higgs production cross section to be the same as for the Standard Model Higgs boson and the decay branching fraction into invisible final states to be 100\\%, a Higgs mass lower limit of 69.6 GeV is derived at 95\\% confidence level.

  19. QCD Studies and Determination of $\\alpha_s$ in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 GeV and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    We present a study of the structure of hadronic events recorded by the L3 detector at LEP at the center of mass energies of 161 and 172 GeV. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 21.25 pb-1 collected during the high energy runs of 1996. The distributions of event shape variables and the energy dependence of their mean values are well reproduced by QCD models. From a comparison of the data with resummed second order QCD calculations, we determine the strong coupling constant at the two energies. Combining with our earlier measurements we find that the strong coupling constant decreases with increasing energy as expected in QCD.

  20. Search for the Higgs boson at center-of-mass energies between 161 and 184 GeV in the 4-jet channel with OPAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toerne, E. von

    1998-07-01

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson using data from e + e - collisions collected at center-of-mass energies from 161 to 184 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP is presented. The search is applied to events in the four-jet-channel, in which the Higgs boson decays into a bb pair and the associated Z 0 decays into quark and anti-quark. The data analyzed corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 75.0 pb -1 . Five candidate events are observed, in agreement with the Standard Model background expectation of 6.61±0.42 (stat.) ±1.72 (syst.) events. A lower limit of 74.0 GeV is derived for the mass of the Standard Model Higgs boson at the 95% confidence level. In combination with OPAL searches in other channels a limit of 86.9 GeV is obtained. (orig.)

  1. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in e+e- collisions at sqrt(s)=161, 170 and 172GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino,, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R. M.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kado, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Schune, M.-H.; Serin, L.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1997-10-01

    The reaction e+e--->HZ is used to search for the Standard Model Higgs boson. The data sample consists of integrated luminosities of 10.9pb-1, 1.1pb-1, and 9.5pb-1 collected by the ALEPH experiment at LEP during 1996, at centre-of-mass energies of 161, 170 and 172GeV, respectively. No candidate events were found, in agreement with the expected background of 0.84 events from all Standard Model processes. This search results in a 95% C.L. lower limit on the Higgs boson mass of 69.4GeV/c2. When combined with earlier ALEPH searches performed at energies at and around the Z peak, this limit increases to 70.7GeV/c2.

  2. Wind-tunnel calibration of a combined pitot-static tube and vane-type flow-angularity indicator at Mach numbers of 1.61 and 2.01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Archibald R; Mace, William D

    1956-01-01

    A limited calibration of a combined pitot-static tube and vane-type flow-angularity indicator has been made in the Langley 4- by 4-foot supersonic pressure tunnel at Mach numbers of 1.61 and 2.01. The results indicated that the angle-of-yaw indications were affected by unsymmetric shock effects at low angles of attack.

  3. Interpretation of bathymetric and magnetic data from the easternmost segment of Australian-Antarctic Ridge, 156°-161°E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, H.; Kim, S.; Park, S.

    2013-12-01

    From 2011 to 2013, Korea Polar Research Institute (KOPRI) conducted a series of geophysical and geochemical expeditions on the longest and easternmost segment of Australian-Antarctic Ridge, located at 61°-63°S, and 156°-161°E. This ridge segment plays an important role in constraining the tectonics of the Antarctic plate. Using IBRV ARAON, the detailed bathymetric data and eleven total magnetic profiles were collected. The studied ridge has spread NNW-SSE direction and tends to be shallower to the west and deeper to the east. The western side of the ridge (156°-157.50°E) shows a broad axial high and a plenty of seamounts as an indicative of massive volcanism. Near the center of the ridge (158°-159°E), a seamount chain is formed stretching toward the south from the ridge. Also, the symmetric seafloor fabric is clearly observed at the eastern portion (158.50°-160°E) of the seamount chain. From the topographic change along the ridge axis, the western part of the ridge appears to have a sufficient magma supply. On the contrary, the eastern side of the ridge (160°-161°E) is characterized by axial valley and relatively deeper depth. Nevertheless, the observed total magnetic field anomalies exhibit symmetric patterns across the ridge axis. Although there have not been enough magnetic survey lines, the spreading rates of the ridge are estimated as the half-spreading rate of 37.7 mm/y and 35.3 mm/y for the western portion of the ridge and 42.3 mm/y for the eastern portion. The studied ridge can be categorized as an intermediate spreading ridge, confirming previous studies based on the spreading rate of global ridge system. Here we will present the preliminary results on bathymetric changes along the ridge axis and its relationship with melt supply distribution, and detailed magnetic properties of the ridge constrained by the observed total field anomalies.

  4. Milder clinical and biochemical phenotypes associated with the c.482G>A (p.Arg161Gln) pathogenic variant in cobalamin C disease: Implications for management and screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almannai, Mohammed; Marom, Ronit; Divin, Kristian; Scaglia, Fernando; Sutton, V Reid; Craigen, William J; Lee, Brendan; Burrage, Lindsay C; Graham, Brett H

    2017-09-01

    Cobalamin C disease is a multisystemic disease with variable manifestations and age of onset. Genotype-phenotype correlations are well-recognized in this disorder. Here, we present a large cohort of individuals with cobalamin C disease, several of whom are heterozygous for the c.482G>A pathogenic variant (p.Arg161Gln). We compared clinical characteristics of individuals with this pathogenic variant to those who do not have this variant. To our knowledge, this study represents the largest single cohort of individuals with the c.482G>A (p.Arg161Gln) pathogenic variant. A retrospective chart review of 27 individuals from 21 families with cobalamin C disease who are followed at our facility was conducted. 13 individuals (48%) are compound heterozygous with the c.482G>A (p.Arg161Gln) on one allele and a second pathogenic variant on the other allele. Individuals with the c.482G>A (p.Arg161Gln) pathogenic variant had later onset of symptoms and easier metabolic control. Moreover, they had milder biochemical abnormalities at presentation which likely contributed to the observation that 4 individuals (31%) in this group were missed by newborn screening. The c.482G>A (p.Arg161Gln) pathogenic variant is associated with milder disease. These individuals may not receive a timely diagnosis as they may not be identified on newborn screening or because of unrecognized, late onset symptoms. Despite the milder presentation, significant complications can occur, especially if treatment is delayed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Determination of the constants of the solubility product of Ln(OH){sub 3} and the effect of the chloride ions on the lanthanum hydrolysis, praseodymium and lutetium in aqueous solutions of ion force 2 Molar; Determinacion de las constantes del producto de solubilidad de Ln(OH){sub 3} y el efecto de los iones cloruro sobre la hidrolisis de lantano, praseodimio y lutecio en soluciones acuosas de fuerza ionica 2 Molar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez G, H.D

    2005-07-01

    The behavior of lanthanum (III), praseodymium (III), and lutetium (III) was studied in 2 M NaClO{sub 4} (aq) and 2 M NaCl (aq) at 303 K and free -CO{sub 2} conditions. Solubility diagrams (p Ln(aq)-pC{sub H}) were obtained by means of a radiochemical method. The pC{sub H} borderlines of saturation and unsaturation zones of the solutions and solubility product constants for Ln(OH){sub 3} were determined from these diagrams. The fitting of the solubility equation to the experimental values of p Ln(aq)-pC{sub H} diagrams allowed the calculation of the first hydrolysis and solubility product constants. Independently, the stability constants for the first species of hydrolysis were determined by means of pH titrations, the data were treated with the program SUPERQUAD and fitted to the mean ligand number equation. The stability constants for the species LnCl{sup 2+} were as well calculated in 2M ionic strength and 303 K from the hydrolysis constant values obtained in both perchlorate and chloride media. The values obtained for La, Pr and Lu were: logK{sub ps}: 21.11 {+-} 0.09, 19.81 {+-} 0.11 and 18.10 {+-} 0.13 in 2M NaClO{sub 4}; logK{sub ps}: 22.22 {+-} 0.09, 21.45 {+-} 0.14 and 18.52 {+-} 0.29 in 2M NaCl; log {beta}{sub 1}: - 8.64 {+-} 0.02, - 8.37 {+-} 0.01 and - 7.95 {+-} 0.11 in 2M NaClO{sub 4}; log {beta}{sub 1}{sup /} : - 9.02 {+-} 0.11, - 8.75 {+-} 0.01 and - 8.12 {+-} 0.03 in 2M NaCl and the values for log {beta}{sub 1,Cl} were - 0.0255, - 0.155 and - 0.758, respectively. (Author)

  6. Search for heavy neutral and charged leptons in $e^+ e^-$ annihilation at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 GeV and $\\sqrt{s}$ = 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    A search for unstable neutral and charged heavy leptons as well as for stable charged heavy leptons has been made at center-of-mass energies $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 GeV and $\\sqrt{s}$ = 172 GeV with the L3 detector at LEP. No evidence for their existence was found. We exclude unstable neutral leptons of Dirac (Majorana) type for masses below 78.0 (66.7), 78.0 (66.7) and 72.2 (58.2) GeV, if the heavy neutrino couples to the electron, muon or tau family, respectively. We exclude unstable charged heavy leptons for masses below 81.0 GeV for a wide mass range of the associated neutral heavy lepton. The production of stable charged heavy leptons with a mass less than 84.2 GeV is also excluded. If the unstable charged heavy lepton decays via mixing into a massless neutrino, we exclude masses below 78.7 GeV.

  7. Search for supersymmetry in the photon(s) plus missing energy channels at sqrt(s)=161 GeV and 172 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Boccali, T.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R. M.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Buck, P. G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Schune, M.-H.; Serin, L.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1998-02-01

    Searches for supersymmetric particles in channels with one or more photons and missing energy have been performed with data collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP. The data consist of 11.1 pb-1 at sqrt(s)=161 GeV, 1.1 pb-1 at 170 GeV and 9.5 pb-1 at 172 GeV. The e+e--->νν¯γ(γ) cross section is measured. The data are in good agreement with predictions based on the Standard Model, and are used to set upper limits on the cross sections for anomalous photon production. These limits are compared to two different SUSY models and used to set limits on the neutralino mass. A limit of 71 GeV/c2 at 95% C.L. is set on the mass of the lightest neutralino (τχ10<= 3 ns) for the gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking and LNZ models. © 1998

  8. Prognostic value of CT findings to predict survival outcomes in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: a single institutional study of 161 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Kim, Kyung Won; Byun, Jae Ho; Kim, So Yeon; Song, Ki Byung; Ramaiya, Nikhil H.; Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Hong, Seung-Mo

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic value of CT to predict recurrence-free and overall survival in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PanNENs). Between January 2004 and December 2012, 161 consecutive patients who underwent preoperative triphasic CT and surgical resection with curative intent for PanNENs were identified. The tumour consistency, margin, presence of calcification, pancreatic duct dilatation, bile duct dilatation, vascular invasion, and hepatic metastases were evaluated. The tumour size, arterial enhancement ratio, and portal enhancement ratio were measured. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to determine the association between CT features and recurrence-free survival and overall survival. By multivariate analysis, tumour size (>3 cm) (hazard ratio, 3.314; p = 0.006), portal enhancement ratio (≤1.1) (hazard ratio, 2.718; p = 0.006), and hepatic metastases (hazard ratio, 4.374; p = 0.003) were independent significant variables for worse recurrence-free survival. Portal enhancement ratio (≤1.1) (hazard ratio, 5.951; p = 0.001) and hepatic metastases (hazard ratio, 4.122; p = 0.021) were independent significant variables for worse overall survival. Portal enhancement ratio (≤1.1) and hepatic metastases assessed on CT were common independent prognostic factors for worse recurrence-free survival and overall survival in patients with PanNENs. (orig.)

  9. Prognostic value of CT findings to predict survival outcomes in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: a single institutional study of 161 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Kim, Kyung Won; Byun, Jae Ho; Kim, So Yeon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Ki Byung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ramaiya, Nikhil H.; Tirumani, Sree Harsha [Harvard Medical School, Department of Imaging, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Hong, Seung-Mo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    To evaluate the prognostic value of CT to predict recurrence-free and overall survival in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PanNENs). Between January 2004 and December 2012, 161 consecutive patients who underwent preoperative triphasic CT and surgical resection with curative intent for PanNENs were identified. The tumour consistency, margin, presence of calcification, pancreatic duct dilatation, bile duct dilatation, vascular invasion, and hepatic metastases were evaluated. The tumour size, arterial enhancement ratio, and portal enhancement ratio were measured. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to determine the association between CT features and recurrence-free survival and overall survival. By multivariate analysis, tumour size (>3 cm) (hazard ratio, 3.314; p = 0.006), portal enhancement ratio (≤1.1) (hazard ratio, 2.718; p = 0.006), and hepatic metastases (hazard ratio, 4.374; p = 0.003) were independent significant variables for worse recurrence-free survival. Portal enhancement ratio (≤1.1) (hazard ratio, 5.951; p = 0.001) and hepatic metastases (hazard ratio, 4.122; p = 0.021) were independent significant variables for worse overall survival. Portal enhancement ratio (≤1.1) and hepatic metastases assessed on CT were common independent prognostic factors for worse recurrence-free survival and overall survival in patients with PanNENs. (orig.)

  10. Measurement of the Mass and Width of the W Boson in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 - 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P.P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, Sandra F.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, Sofia; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, Pierre; Apel, W-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, Jean-Eudes; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G.J.; Baroncelli, Antonio; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, Eli; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, Mikael; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, Marc; Besson, N.; Bloch, Daniel; Blom, M.; Bluj, Michal; Bonesini, Maurizio; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, PSL; Borisov, G.; Botner, Olga; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, Marko; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J.M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, Tiziano; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, Paolo; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, Roberto; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, Fabio; Costa, M.J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, Javier; D'Hondt, J.; da Silva, T.; Da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; De Angelis, Alessandro; De Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, Barbara; De Maria, N.; De Min, A.; de Paula, L.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Duperrin, A.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, Tord; Ellert, Mattias; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, Maria Catarina; Fanourakis, George K.; Feindt, Michael; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, Miriam; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Philippe; Gazis, Evangelos; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, Vincent; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S-O.; Holt, P.J.; Houlden, M.A.; Jackson, John Neil; Jarlskog, Goran; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, Erik Karl; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, Frederic; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, Gabrijel; Kerzel, U.; King, B.T.; Kjaer, N.J.; Kluit, Peter; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, Jacques; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez, J.M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, Pierre; Lyons, Louis; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Nulty, R.Mc; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Muller, Ulrich; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim Filho, Luiz Martins; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J.P.; Palka, Henryk; Papadopoulou, Th.D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, Andrea; Petrolini, Alessandro; Piedra, Jonatan; Pieri, L.; Pierre, Francois; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M.E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Rames, J.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, Peter; Richard, F.; Ridky, Jan; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, Paolo; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann, Vanina; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Segar, A.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, Martin; Simard, L.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, Andrei Valerevich; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Taffard, A.C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Thomas, J.; Timmermans, Jan; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, Petr; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, Clara; Turluer, M-L.; Tyapkin, I.A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, Giovanni; Van Dam, P.; Van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, Filipe; Venus, W.; Verdier, Patrice; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, Lorenzo; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A.J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, Danilo; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimine, N.I.; Zintchenko, Alexandre

    2008-01-01

    A measurement of the W boson mass and width has been performed by the DELPHI collaboration using the data collected during the full LEP2 programme (1996-2000). The data sample has an integrated luminosity of 660 pb^-1 and was collected over a range of centre-of-mass energies from 161 to 209 GeV. Results are obtained by applying the method of direct reconstruction of the mass of the W from its decay products in both the W+W- -> lvqq and W+W- -> qqqq channels. The W mass result for the combined data set is M_W = 80.336 +/- 0.055 (Stat.) +/- 0.028 (Syst.) +/- 0.025 (FSI) +/- 0.009 (LEP) GeV/c^2, where FSI represents the uncertainty due to final state interaction effects in the qqqq channel, and LEP represents that arising from the knowledge of the collision energy of the accelerator. The combined value for the W width is Gamma_W = 2.404 +/- 0.140 (Stat.) +/- 0.077 (Syst.) +/- 0.065 (FSI) GeV/c^2. These results supersede all values previously published by the DELPHI collaboration. This paper is dedicated to the m...

  11. Cell growth and resistance of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis TOMSC161 following freezing, drying and freeze-dried storage are differentially affected by fermentation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velly, H; Fonseca, F; Passot, S; Delacroix-Buchet, A; Bouix, M

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the effects of fermentation parameters on the cell growth and on the resistance to each step of the freeze-drying process of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis TOMSC161, a natural cheese isolate, using a response surface methodology. Cells were cultivated at different temperatures (22, 30 and 38°C) and pH (5·6, 6·2 and 6·8) and were harvested at different growth phases (0, 3 and 6 h of stationary phase). Cultivability and acidification activity losses of Lc. lactis were quantified after freezing, drying, 1 and 3 months of storage at 4 and 25°C. Lactococcus lactis was not damaged by freezing but was sensitive to drying and to ambient temperature storage. Moreover, the fermentation temperature and the harvesting time influenced the drying resistance of Lc. lactis. Lactococcus lactis cells grown in a whey-based medium at 32°C, pH 6·2 and harvested at late stationary phase exhibited both an optimal growth and the highest resistance to freeze-drying and storage. A better insight on the individual and interaction effects of fermentation parameters made it possible the freeze-drying and storage preservation of a sensitive strain of technological interest. Evidence on the particularly damaging effect of the drying step and the high-temperature storage is presented. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Search for Stable Heavy Charged Particles in $e^+ e^-$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130-136, 161 and 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Ajinenko, I; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbi, M S; Barbiellini, Guido; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Diodato, A; Djama, F; Djannati, A; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Durand, J D; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrer, A; Fichet, S; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gerdyukov, L N; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grefrath, A; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Kokkinias, P; Konoplyannikov, A K; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Mahon, J R; Malmgren, T G M; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Merk, M; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Novák, M; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Pain, R; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Podobnik, T; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sahr, O; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schimmelpfennig, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Serbelloni, L; Shellard, R C; Siegrist, P; Silvestre, R; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Solovyanov, O; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stampfer, D; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chernyaev, E; Thomas, J; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Todorova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wlodek, T; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1997-01-01

    A search for stable or long-lived heavy charged particles in $e^+e^-$ interactions at energies of 130-136, 161 and 172 GeV has been performed using the data taken by the DELPHI experiment at LEP. The search is based on particle identification provided by the Time Projection Chamber and the Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector. Upper limits at 95\\% confidence level are derived on the cross-section for heavy long-lived pair-produced charge $\\pm e$ and $\\pm 2/3e$ particles in the range of 0.4-2.3 pb for masses from 45 to 84 GeV/$c^2$. Within supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, long-lived charginos with masses from 45 to 84 (80)~GeV/$c^2$ for high (low) sneutrino masses can be excluded at 95\\% confidence level. %Mass limits for long-lived sleptons are obtained. %For selectrons no general mass limits can be given. Left-handed (right-handed) long-lived or stable smuons and staus with masses between 45 and 68 (65)~GeV/$c^2$ can be excluded at 95\\% confidence level.

  13. Common variants on 2p16.1, 6p22.1 and 10q24.32 are associated with schizophrenia in Han Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, H; Yan, H; Li, J; Li, Z; Zhang, X; Ma, Y; Mei, L; Liu, C; Cai, L; Wang, Q; Zhang, F; Iwata, N; Ikeda, M; Wang, L; Lu, T; Li, M; Xu, H; Wu, X; Liu, B; Yang, J; Li, K; Lv, L; Ma, X; Wang, C; Li, L; Yang, F; Jiang, T; Shi, Y; Li, T; Zhang, D; Yue, W

    2017-07-01

    Many schizophrenia susceptibility loci have been identified through genome-wide association studies (GWASs) in European populations. However, until recently, schizophrenia GWASs in non-European populations were limited to small sample sizes and have yielded few loci associated with schizophrenia. To identify genetic risk variations for schizophrenia in the Han Chinese population, we performed a two-stage GWAS of schizophrenia comprising 4384 cases and 5770 controls, followed by independent replications of 13 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in an additional 4339 schizophrenia cases and 7043 controls of Han Chinese ancestry. Furthermore, we conducted additional analyses based on the results in the discovery stage. The combined analysis confirmed evidence of genome-wide significant associations in the Han Chinese population for three loci, at 2p16.1 (rs1051061, in an exon of VRK2, P=1.14 × 10 -12 , odds ratio (OR)=1.17), 6p22.1 (rs115070292 in an intron of GABBR1, P=4.96 × 10 -10 , OR=0.77) and 10q24.32 (rs10883795 in an intron of AS3MT, P=7.94 × 10 -10 , OR=0.87; rs10883765 at an intron of ARL3, P=3.06 × 10 -9 , OR=0.87). The polygenic risk score based on Psychiatric Genomics Consortium schizophrenia GWAS data modestly predicted case-control status in the Chinese population (Nagelkerke R 2 : 1.7% ~5.7%). Our pathway analysis suggested that neurological biological pathways such as GABAergic signaling, dopaminergic signaling, cell adhesion molecules and myelination pathways are involved in schizophrenia. These findings provide new insights into the pathogenesis of schizophrenia in the Han Chinese population. Further studies are needed to establish the biological context and potential clinical utility of these findings.

  14. The EP4 receptor antagonist, L-161,982, blocks prostaglandin E2-induced signal transduction and cell proliferation in HCA-7 colon cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherukuri, Durga Prasad; Chen, Xiao B.O.; Goulet, Anne-Christine; Young, Robert N.; Han, Yongxin; Heimark, Ronald L.; Regan, John W.; Meuillet, Emmanuelle; Nelson, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that elevated levels of prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ) can increase intestinal epithelial cell proliferation, and thus play a role in colorectal tumorigenesis. PGE 2 exerts its effects through four G-protein-coupled PGE receptor (EP) subtypes, named the EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4. Increased phosphorylation of extracellular regulated kinases (ERK1/2) is required for PGE 2 to stimulate cell proliferation of human colon cancer cells. However, the EP receptor(s) that are involved in this process remain unknown. We provide evidence that L-161,982, a selective EP4 receptor antagonist, completely blocks PGE 2 -induced ERK phosphorylation and cell proliferation of HCA-7 cells. In order to identify downstream target genes of ERK1/2 signaling, we found that PGE 2 induces expression of early growth response gene-1 (EGR-1) downstream of ERK1/2 and regulates its expression at the level of transcription. PGE 2 treatment induces phosphorylation of cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) at Ser133 residue and CRE-mediated luciferase activity in HCA-7 cells. Studies with dominant-negative CREB mutant (ACREB) provide clear evidence for the involvement of CREB in PGE 2 driven egr-1 transcription in HCA-7 cells. In conclusion, this study reveals that egr-1 is a target gene of PGE 2 in HCA-7 cells and is regulated via the newly identified EP4/ERK/CREB pathway. Finally our results support the notion that antagonizing EP4 receptors may provide a novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of colon cancer

  15. Decreased frequency of peripheral CD4(+) CD161(+) Th(17) -precursor cells in kidney transplant recipients on long-term therapy with Belatacept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondran, Florian Wolfgang Rudolf; Timrott, Kai; Kollrich, Sonja; Klempnauer, Juergen; Schwinzer, Reinhard; Becker, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    Clinical trials have pointed out the promising role of co-stimulation blocker Belatacept for improvement of graft function and avoidance of undesired side-effects associated with calcineurin-inhibitors (CNI). However, due to the worldwide limited availability of appropriate patients, almost no data exist to assess the effects of sustained application of this immunomodulator on the recipient's immune system. The aim of this study was to reveal specific alterations in the composition of immunologic subpopulations potentially involved in development of tolerance or chronic graft rejection following long-term Belatacept therapy. For this, peripheral lymphocyte subsets of kidney recipients treated with Belatacept (n=5; average 7.8years) were determined by flow-cytometry and compared with cells from matched patients on CNI (n=9) and healthy controls (n=10). T cells capable of producing IL-17 and serum levels of soluble CD30 were quantified. Patients on CNI showed a higher frequency of CD4(+) CD161(+) Th(17) -precursors and IL-17-producing CD4(+) T cells than Belatacept patients and controls. Significantly higher serum levels of soluble CD30 were observed in CNI patients, indicating a possible involvement of the CD30/CD30L-system in Th(17) -differentiation. No differences were found concerning CD4(+) CD25(+) CD127(low) FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells. In conclusion, patients on therapy with Belatacept did not show a comparable Th(17) -profile to that seen in individuals with chronic intake of CNI. The distinct effects of Belatacept on Th(17) -immunity might prove beneficial for the long-term outcome following kidney transplantation. © 2012 The Authors. Transplant International © 2012 European Society for Organ Transplantation.

  16. Meat, milk, saturated fatty acids, the Pro12Ala and C161T polymorphisms of the PPARgamma gene and colorectal cancer risk in Japanese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriki, Kiyonori; Hirose, Kaoru; Matsuo, Keitaro; Wakai, Kenji; Ito, Hidemi; Kanemitsu, Yukihide; Hirai, Takashi; Kato, Tomoyuki; Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Takezaki, Toshiro; Suzuki, Takeshi; Saito, Toshiko; Tanaka, Rie; Tajima, Kazuo

    2006-11-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) gene plays important roles in energy homeostasis. To examine interactions between consumption of foods and fatty acids and the Pro12Ala and C161T (His447His) polymorphisms for colorectal cancer, we performed two case-control studies in Japanese. In study 1, there were 128 colorectal cancer cases and 238 non-cancer controls, and in study 2 there were 257 cases and 771 (age- and sex-matched) non-cancer controls. Assessment of food and nutrients consumption in study 1 was via a nine-item questionnaire, while in study 2 assessment of consumption was according to a more detailed semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Consumption of foods and fatty acids was divided into low, moderate and high groups. The overall frequency of the Ala allele was frequencies of the Pro/Pro + C/C and Pro/Pro + (C/T + T/T) genotypes were 70-73% and 20-26%, respectively. Compared with subjects with low meat intake and the Pro/Pro + C/C genotype, those with high meat consumption and the same genotype had a stronger increased risk in study 1 [OR, 2.88; 95% CI, 1.14-7.30; P for trend = 0.02], but a positive association with processed meat consumption was greatest in those with the Pro/Pro + (C/T + T/T) genotype (P for trend = 0.05) in study 2. Likewise, high consumption of saturated fatty acids and milk appeared to confer marginal increased risk and stronger decreased risk, respectively, in those with the Pro/Pro and Pro/Pro + C/C genotypes (OR, 1.35 and 0.65; 95% CI, 0.93-1.96 and 0.43-1.00; P for trend = 0.10 and 0.06). Further large-scale studies are needed to determine colorectal cancer risk according to relationships between the PPARgamma gene polymorphisms and dietary intakes of meat, processed meat, milk and saturated fatty acids in Japanese with very low frequency of the Ala allele.

  17. Hyper-Expression of PD-1 Is Associated with the Levels of Exhausted and Dysfunctional Phenotypes of Circulating CD161++TCR iVα7.2+ Mucosal-Associated Invariant T Cells in Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yean K. Yong

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT cells, defined as CD161++TCR iVα7.2+ T cells, play an important role in the innate defense against bacterial infections, and their functionality is impaired in chronic viral infections. Here, we investigated the frequency and functional role of MAIT cells in chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection. The peripheral CD3+CD161++TCR iVα7.2+ MAIT cells in chronic HBV-infected patients and healthy controls were phenotypically characterized based on CD57, PD-1, TIM-3, and CTLA-4, as well as HLA-DR and CD38 expression. The frequency of MAIT cells was significantly decreased among chronic HBV-infected individuals as compared to controls. Expression of CD57, PD-1, CTLA-4, as well as HLA-DR and CD38 on MAIT cells was significantly elevated in chronic HBV-infected individuals relative to controls. The percentage of T cell receptor (TCR iVα7.2+ CD161+ MAIT cells did not correlate with HBV viral load but inversely with HLA-DR on CD4+ T cells and MAIT cells and with CD57 on CD8+ T cells suggesting that decrease of MAIT cells may not be attributed to direct infection by HBV but driven by HBV-induced chronic immune activation. The percentage and expression levels of PD-1 as well as CTLA-4 on MAIT cells inversely correlated with plasma HBV-DNA levels, which may suggest either a role for MAIT cells in the control of HBV infection or the effect of HBV replication in the liver on MAIT cell phenotype. We report that decrease of TCR iVα7.2+ MAIT cells in the peripheral blood and their functions were seemingly impaired in chronic HBV-infected patients likely because of the increased expression of PD-1.

  18. The Aerodynamic Characteristics in Pitch of a 1/15-Scale Model of the Grumman F11F-1 Airplane at Mach Numbers of 1.41, 1.61, and 2.01, TED No. NACA DE 390

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, Cornelius

    1956-01-01

    Tests have been made in the Langley 4- by 4-foot supersonic pressure tunnel at Mach numbers of 1.41, 1.61, and 2.01 to determine the static longitudinal stability and control characteristics of various arrangements of the Grumman F11F-1 airplane. Tests were made of the complete model and various combinations of its component parts and, in addition, the effects of various body modifications, a revised vertical tail, and wing fences on the longitudinal characteristics were determined. The results indicate that for a horizontal-tail incidence of -10 deg the trim lift coefficient varied from 0.29 at a Mach number of 1.61 to 0.23 at a Mach number of 2.01 with a corresponding decrease in lift-drag trim from 3.72 to 3.15. Stick-position instability was indicated in the low-supersonic-speed range. A photographic-type nose modification resulted in slightly higher values of minimum drag coefficient but did not significantly affect the static stability or lift-curve slope. The minimum drag coefficient for the complete model with the production nose remained essentially constant at 0.047 throughout the Mach number range investigated.

  19. China’s foreign policy towards Central and Eastern Europe: The “16+1” format in the South–South cooperation perspective. Cases of the Czech Republic and Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartosz Kowalski

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the “16+1” format initiated in 2012 as a platform for economic, trade, and cultural cooperation between Central and Eastern Europe (CEE and China. As Chinese authorities claim, the “16+1” initiative is complementary to the “New Silk Road” strategy, being a pragmatic formula without political goals, whose main rationale is to bring mutual benefits to all of its participants (win–win. However, despite the Chinese narratives concerning cooperation with the CEE countries as an economic bridgehead of the “One Road, One Belt” (OBOR initiative, some signs of the political dimension of the project can be noticed. Since at least the 1950s, active participation and promotion of the South–South cooperation has become an important component of China’s foreign relations. Although for Chinese policy makers Sino–South relations have been traditionally defined within the frame of, mostly postcolonial, developing countries of Southeast Asia, Central Asia, Africa, and Latin America, this article tries to examine the “South–South” pattern of China’s diplomacy towards Central and Eastern European states with a focus on the Czech Republic and Hungary.

  20. Meiotic and pedigree segregation analyses in carriers of t(4;8)(p16;p23.1) differing in localization of breakpoint positions at 4p subband 4p16.3 and 4p16.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midro, Alina T; Zollino, Marcella; Wiland, Ewa; Panasiuk, Barbara; Iwanowski, Piotr S; Murdolo, Marina; Śmigiel, Robert; Sąsiadek, Maria; Pilch, Jacek; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare meiotic segregation in sperm cells from two carriers with t(4;8)(p16;p23.1) reciprocal chromosome translocations (RCTs), differing in localization of the breakpoint positions at the 4p subband-namely, 4p16.3 (carrier 1) and 4p16.1 (carrier 2)-and to compare data of the pedigree analyses performed by direct method. Three-color fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) on sperm cells and FISH mapping for the evaluation of the breakpoint positions, data from pedigrees, and direct segregation analysis of the pedigrees were performed. Similar proportions of normal/balanced and unbalanced sperm cells were found in both carriers. The most common was an alternate type of segregation (about 52 % and about 48 %, respectively). Unbalanced adjacent I and adjacent II karyotypes were found in similar proportions about 15 %. The direct segregation analysis (following Stengel-Rutkowski) of the pedigree of carriers of t(4;8)(p16.1;p23.1) was performed and results were compared with the data of the pedigree segregation analysis obtained earlier through the indirect method. The probability of live-born progeny with unbalanced karyotype for carriers of t(4;8)(p16.1;p23.1) was moderately high at 18.8 %-comparable to the value obtained using the indirect method for the same carriership, which was 12 %. This was, however, markedly lower than the value of 41.2 % obtained through the pedigree segregation indirect analysis estimated for carriers of t(4;8)(p16.3;p23.1), perhaps due to the unique composition of genes present within the 4p16.1-4p 16.3 region. Revealed differences in pedigree segregation analysis did not correspond to the very similar profile of meiotic segregation patterns presented by carrier 1 and carrier 2. Most probably, such discordances may be due to differences in embryo survival rates arising from different genetic backgrounds.

  1. Effects of the C161T polymorphism in the gene of peroxisome proliferators activated receptor γ on changes of plasma lipid and apolipoprotein ratios induced by a high carbohydrate diet in a healthy Chinese Han young population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Mei; Gong, Ren Rong; Lin, Jia; Jiang, Zhe; Li, Yuan Hao; Zhang, Rong Rong; Fang, Ding Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the ratios of plasma lipids and apolipoproteins may be associated with diets and the C161T polymorphism in the gene of peroxisome proliferators activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma). As a result, this study was to investigate the effects of this polymorphism on changes of the ratios induced by a high-carbohydrate (high-CHO) diet. After a washout diet of 54% carbohydrate for 7 days, 56 healthy young adults (22.89 +/- 1.80 years old) were given the high-CHO diet of 70% carbohydrate for 6 days. Height, weight, waist circumference (WC), glucose, triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), apolipoprotein (apo) AI, and apoB100 at baseline and before and after the high-CHO diet were measured. Body mass index (BMI), TG/HDL-C, log (TG/HDL-C), TC/HDL-C, LDL-C/HDL-C, and apoB100/apoAI were calculated. PPARgamma C161T was detected by a PCR-RFLP method. The relationship between the polymorphism and the ratios were analyzed. The female T carriers had higher BMI and WC than the female CC homozygotes at baseline and before and after the diet, higher glucose, TG/HDL-C and log (TG/HDL-C) before the diet. In males, when compared to the T carriers, the CC homozygotes had higher TG/HDL-C, log (TG/HDL-C) and apoB100/apoAI at baseline and before and after the diet, higher glucose at baseline, higher LDL-C/HDL-C and TC/HDL-C before and after the diet. Compared with those before the high-CHO diet, TC/HDL-C and LDL-C/HDL-C decreased after the diet regardless of gender and the genotypes. Decreased BMI and WC were observed in the male CC homozygotes but only decreased BMI in the female T carriers. Notably, decreased apoB100/apoAI was observed in the male T carriers, while elevated TG/HDL-C and log (TG/HDL-C) in the female CC homozygotes, and reduced glucose in the female T carriers. The results suggest that the interplay of gender, the PPARgamma C161T polymorphism and the high-CHO diet can

  2. DOE responses to the State of New Mexico's comments on ''summary of the results of the evaluation of the WIPP site and preliminary design validation program'' (WIPP-DOE-161)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    During the 60-day period provided for comments on the ''Summary of the Results of the Evaluation of the WIPP Site and Preliminary Design Validation Program'' (WIPP-DOE-161), written submittals and hearing testimony from about 133 individuals, 7 citizens groups and 6 state agencies were received by the Department of Energy (DOE). Approximately 25% of the public comment submittals were positive statements supporting the WIPP, with the remaining 75% reflecting concern with one or more aspects of the project. A portion of the state's comment package (submitted by the Governor of New Mexico) contained concerns relevant to WIPP which were unrelated to site suitability. Supportive comments formed the majority of the submittals from the New Mexico Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) which ''...is charged with the responsibility of evaluating the suitability of the site for carrying out the mission of WIPP by analyzing all the reports and other information which form the background to the DOE evaluation of the site''

  3. Photoemission and muon spin relaxation spectroscopy of the iron-based Rb0.77Fe1.61Se2 superconductor: Crucial role of the cigar-shaped Fermi surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maletz, J.; Zabolotnyy, V. B.; Evtushinsky, D. V.; Yaresko, A. N.; Kordyuk, A. A.; Shermadini, Z.; Luetkens, H.; Sedlak, K.; Khasanov, R.; Amato, A.; Krzton-Maziopa, A.; Conder, K.; Pomjakushina, E.; Klauss, H.-H.; Rienks, E. D. L.; Büchner, B.; Borisenko, S. V.

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we investigate the electronic and magnetic properties of Rb0.77Fe1.61Se2 (Tc = 32.6 K) in normal and superconducting states by means of photoemission and μSR spectroscopies as well as band-structure calculations. We demonstrate that the unusual behavior of these materials is the result of separation into metallic (˜12%) and insulating (˜88%) phases. Only the former becomes superconducting and has a usual electronic structure of electron-doped FeSe slabs. Our results thus imply that the antiferromagnetic insulating phase is just a by-product of Rb intercalation and its magnetic properties have no direct relation to the superconductivity. Instead, we find that also in this class of iron-based compounds, the key ingredient for superconductivity is a certain proximity of a Van Hove singularity to the Fermi level.

  4. Delitos que Vulneran la Intimidad de las Personas: Análisis crítico del artículo 161-A del Código Penal Chileno

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Ingrid Díaz Tolosa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available El artículo 161-A del Código Penal chileno es una muestra de los resultados que se obtienen al legislar materias tan importantes, como lo es la protección penal de la intimidad de las personas, de forma acelerada. La norma en análisis resiste innumerables críticas; su redacción es confusa e imprecisa, lo que conlleva arduas tareas de interpretación. Este trabajo pretende contribuir en esta labor, reflexionando acerca de puntuales problemas asociados a la tipificación de los delitos recogidos en la citada disposición, así respecto al inciso primero se analiza, especialmente, si se penaliza la indiscreción o deslealtad en las comunicaciones y actuaciones privadas, mientras que en cuanto al inciso segundo se medita acerca de si se exige el conocimiento de la obtención subrepticia del material por parte de quien lo difunde. Además, se destaca la necesaria interpretación restrictiva de estos tipos, se analiza el interés público como fundamento de la autorización legal o judicial para ejecutar las conductas tipificadas, y de ¡egeferendae, se indican las ventajas que tendría introducir un elemento subjetivo del tipo distinto del dolo como la finalidad de vulnerar ¡a intimidad de otro, a fin de salvar las incertidumbres que existen en la actual legislaciónThe article 161-A of the Chilean Penal Code is a sample of the results that are obtained when so important matters, like the penal protection of the privacy, are legislated precipitately. The norm in analysis resists innumerable critiques; its draft is confused and vague, giving us an arduous interpretation work. This paper tries to contribute in this analysis, thinking over punctual problems, for example, regarding to the first clause we studied, specially, if the indiscretion or disloyalty is penalized in the communications and private performances, while as for the second clause it is pondered if who diffuse the information must to know about that it was obtained illegally

  5. Analysis of the spectrum of four-times-ionized lutetium (Lu V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufman, V.; Sugar, J.

    1978-01-01

    Spectra of Lu obtained with a sliding spark discharge at peak currents of 50--500 A were recorded with a 10.7 m normal incidence spectrograph in the range of 500--2100 A. Intercomparison of spectra revealed a distinct separation of Lu III, IV, and V, the first two of which have already been anlayzed. The present work contains an interpretation of Lu V in which 419 lines are classified as transitions among 136 energy levels of the 4f 13 , 4f 12 5d, 4f 12 6s, and 4f 12 6p configurations. Calculated energy levels and eigenvectors, obtained with fitted values for the radial integrals, are given

  6. Lutetium-177 complexation of DOTA and DTPA in the presence of competing metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Ishioka, Noriko S.; Hashimoto, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    177 Lu complexation of DOTA and DTPA is investigated by the addition of Ca(II), Fe(II) and Zn(II). The 177 Lu complexation yield of DTPA was higher than that of DOTA in the presence of Ca(II), Fe(II) and Zn(II). Therefore, it was found that the 177 Lu complexation of DTPA was more advantageous compared with DOTA in the presence of competing metals, Ca, Fe and Zn. (author)

  7. Lutetium-177 and iodine-131 loaded chelating polymer microparticles intended for radioembolization of liver malignancies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrubý, Martin; Škodová, Michaela; Macková, Hana; Skopal, Jan; Tomeš, Marek; Kropáček, Martin; Zimová, Jana; Kučka, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 12 (2011), s. 1155-1159 ISSN 1381-5148 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP207/10/P054; GA MŠk 1M0505 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505; CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : macroporous chelating beads * radioembolization * quinoline-8-ol Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.479, year: 2011

  8. Production and evaluation of Lutetium-177 maltolate as a possible therapeutic agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakimi, A.; Jalilian, A. R.; Bahrami Samani, A.; Ghannadi Maragheh, M.

    2012-01-01

    Development of oral therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals is a new concept in radiopharmacy. Due to the interesting therapeutic properties of 177 Lu and oral bioavailability of maltolate (MAL) metal complexes, 177 Lu-maltolate ( 177 Lu-MAL) was developed as a possible therapeutic compound for ultimate oral administration. The specific activity of 2.6-3 GBq/mg was obtained by irradiation of natural Lu 2 O 3 sample with thermal neutron flux of 4x10 13 n.cm -2 .s -1 for Lu-177. The product was converted into chloride form which was further used for labeling maltol (MAL). At optimized conditions a radiochemical purity of about >99% was obtained for 177 Lu-MAL shown by ITLC (specific activity, 970-1000 Mbq/mmole). The stability of the labeled compound as well as the partition coefficient was determined in the final solution up to 24h. Biodistribution studies of Lu-177 chloride and 177 Lu-MAL were carried out in wild-type rats for post-oral distribution phase data. Lu-MAL is a possible therapeutic agent in human malignancies for the bone palliation therapy so the efficacy of the compound should be tested in various animal models.

  9. Thermodynamic characteristics of dehydration of hexahydrates of erbium, thulium and lutetium chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukraintseva, Eh.A.; Sokolova, N.P.; Logvinenko, V.A.

    1991-01-01

    Temperature dependence of water vapour equilibrium pressure over the compounds of ErCl 3 ·6H-2O, TmCl 3 ·6H 2 O and LuCl 3 ·6H 2 O is studied by membrane method within the temperature range of 309-403 K. Dehydration process stoichiometry is determined thermogravimetrically under quasi-equilibrium conditions. All three compounds split off three molecules at the first stage of dehydration. ErCl 3 ·6H 2 O and TmCl 2 ·6H 2 O are very similar to terbium and disprosium chloride hexahydrates by vapour pressure value and dehydration enthalpy; enthalpy of the first dehydration stage is of the same character as those of nedymium, gadolinium and holmium chloride haxahydrates

  10. Luminescence and defects creation in Ce3+-doped aluminium and lutetium perovskites and garnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnikov, A.; Savikhina, T.; Zazubovich, S.; Nikl, M.; Mares, J.A.; Blazek, K.; Nejezchleb, K.

    2005-01-01

    Luminescence, scintillation response, energy transfer and defect creation processes were studied at 4.2-300K for Ce 3+ -doped YAlO 3 , Lu x Y 1-x AlO 3 (x=0.3) and Lu 3 Al 5 O 12 crystals under excitation in the 2.5-11.5eV energy range. Influence of the charge and ionic radius of co-doping ions on the efficiency of these processes, the origin of the defects created and possible mechanisms of their formation were discussed

  11. Physico-chemical study of erbium, thulium ytterbium and lutetium butyrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loginova, V.E.; Dvornikova, L.M.; Khazov, L.A.; Rubinshtejn, A.S.

    1975-01-01

    Er-Lu butyrates have been obtained. The crystals of the obtained salts had an identical shape of combinations of hexagonal prisms and pyramids. The values of the refraction index, measured by the method of circular screening and use of immersion liquids, were found to be close to each other in all the salts considered. The densities of the crystallohydrates of rare earth element butyrates, measured by the pycnometric method in isooctane, increases in the order of Er, Tm, Lu: 1.73; 1.74; 1.79 g/cm 3 , respectively. Infrared spectra of rare earth element butyrates were studied, and the main ware frequencies of maximum absorption were determined with a view of finding the character of the bond between the metal and the anion. A thermo-differential and a thermo-gravimetric investigation of rare earth element butyrates was carried out

  12. Crystal growth and scintillation properties of Ce-doped sodium calcium lutetium complex fluoride

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wakahara, S.; Furuya, Y.; Yanagida, T.; Yokota, Y.; Pejchal, Jan; Sugiyama, M.; Kawaguchi, N.; Totsuka, D.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 4 (2012), s. 729-732 ISSN 0925-3467 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : scintillator * micro-pulling-down method * single crystal * gamma-ray stopping power Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.918, year: 2012

  13. The beta strength function structure in β+ decay of lutetium, thulium and cesium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkhazov, G.D.; Bykov, A.A.; Vitman, V.D.; Naumov, Yu.V.; Orlov, S.Yu.

    1981-01-01

    The spectra of total γ-absorption in the decays of some Lutecium, Thulium and Cesium isotopes have been measured. The probabilities for level population in the decay of the isotopes have been determined. The deduced beta strength functions reveal pronounced structure. Calculations of the strength functions using the Saxon-Woods potential and the residual Gamow-Teller interaction are presented. It is shown that in β + decay of light Thulium and Cesium isotopes the strength function comprises more than 70% of the Gamow-Teller excitations with μsub(tau) = +1. This result is the first direct observation of the Gamow-Teller resonance in β + decay of nuclei with Tsub(z) > O. (orig.)

  14. High pressure and temperature induced structural and elastic properties of lutetium chalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriya, S.; Kinge, R.; Khenata, R.; Varshney, Dinesh

    2018-04-01

    The high-pressure structural phase transition and pressure as well temperature induced elastic properties of rock salt to CsCl structures in semiconducting LuX (X = S, Se, and Te) chalcogenides compound have been performed using effective interionic interaction potential with emphasis on charge transfer interactions and covalent contribution. Estimated values of phase transition pressure and the volume discontinuity in pressure-volume phase diagram indicate the structural phase transition from ZnS to NaCl structure. From the investigations of elastic constants the pressure (temperature) dependent volume collapse/expansion, melting temperature TM, Hardness (HV), and young modulus (E) the LuX lattice infers mechanical stiffening, and thermal softening.

  15. The isolation of lutetium from gadolinium contained in Purex process solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostick, D.T.; Vick, D.O.; May, M.P.; Walker, R.L.

    1992-09-01

    A chemical separation procedure has been devised to isolate Lu from Purex dissolver solutions containing the neutron poison, Gd. The isolation procedure involves the removal of U and >Pu from a dissolver solution using tributylphosphate solvent extraction. If required, solvent extraction using di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid can be employed to further purify the sample be removing alkali and alkali earth elements. Finally, Lu is chromatographically separated from Gd and rare earth fission products on a Dowex 50W-X8 resin column using an alpha-hydroxyisobutyrate eluant. The success of the chemical separation procedure has been demonstrated in the quantitative recovery of as little as 1.4 ng Lu from solutions containing a 5000-fold excess of Gd. Additionally, Lu has been isolated from synthetic dissolver samples containing U, Ba, Cs, and Gd. Thermal emission MS data indicated that the Lu fraction of the synthetic sample was free of Gd interference

  16. Moessbauer effect study of hyperfine interaction of /sup 161/Dy and /sup 151/Eu in tungsten bronzes Dysub(0. 18) WO/sub 3/ and Eusub(0. 18) WO/sub 3/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kisynska, K

    1979-01-01

    The Moessbauer technique was used to investigate the hyperfine interaction of /sup 161/Dy and /sup 151/Eu in cubic rare earth tungsten bronzes: Dysub(0.18)WO/sub 3/ and Eusub(0.18)WO/sub 3/. Well resolved hfs spectrum was obtained at 4.2 K for Dysub(0.18)WO/sub 3/. The effective hf field approximation sufficed to interpret the spectrum. The obtained hyperfine interaction parameters were: -g/sub 0/..beta..sub(N)Hsub(eff)=(805+-19) Mc/s and e/sup 2/qQ/sub 0//4 = (506+-56) Mc/s. These results imply that ground doublet of Dy/sup +3/ ion in bronze is a Kramers doublet Vertical Bar+-15/2> with asymmetrical hyperfine tensor Asub(z) non equal to 0, Asub(x) = Asub(y) = 0 and that local crystalline field at RE metal in tungsten bronze at 4.2 K cannot be cubic. From ME absorption spectra of Eusub(0.18)WO/sub 3/ taken at 4.2 K, 78 K and 300 K the values of quadrupole interaction constants for bronze lattice and its temperature dependence were obtained. These data indicate that a phase transition from the high temperature ideal perovskite structure to a distorted one occurs in RE bronzes and that the distortion concerns the nearest tungsten-oxygen environment of RE ion.

  17. 4p16.1-p15.31 duplication and 4p terminal deletion in a 3-years old Chinese girl: Array-CGH, genotype-phenotype and neurological characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccione, Maria; Salzano, Emanuela; Vecchio, Davide; Ferrara, Dante; Malacarne, Michela; Pierluigi, Mauro; Ferrara, Ines; Corsello, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    Microscopically chromosome rearrangements of the short arm of chromosome 4 include the two known clinical entities: partial trisomy 4p and deletions of the Wolf-Hirschhorn critical regions 1 and 2 (WHSCR-1 and WHSCR-2, respectively), which cause cranio-facial anomalies, congenital malformations and developmental delay/intellectual disability. We report on clinical findings detected in a Chinese patient with a de novo 4p16.1-p15.32 duplication in association with a subtle 4p terminal deletion of 6 Mb in size. This unusual chromosome imbalance resulted in WHS classical phenotype, while clinical manifestations of 4p trisomy were practically absent. This observation suggests the hypothesis that haploinsufficiency of sensitive dosage genes with regulatory function placed in WHS critical region, is more pathogenic than concomitant 4p duplicated segment. Additionally clinical findings in our patient confirm a variable penetrance of major malformations and neurological features in Chinese children despite of WHS critical region's deletion. Copyright © 2015 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Practice Bulletin No. 161: External Cephalic Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    In the United States, there is a widespread belief that the overall cesarean delivery rate is higher than necessary. Efforts are being directed toward decreasing the number of these procedures, in part by encouraging physicians to make changes in their management practices. Because breech presentations are associated with a high rate of cesarean delivery, there is renewed interest in techniques such as external cephalic version (ECV) and vaginal breech delivery. The purpose of this document is to provide information about ECV by summarizing the relevant evidence presented in published studies and to make recommendations regarding its use in obstetric practice.

  19. 21 CFR 16.1 - Scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....440(e) relating to the retention, recall, and destruction of human cells, tissues, and cellular and... a determination that a device is subject to a repair, replacement, or refund order or that a... standard or has a defect. § 1004.6, relating to plan for repurchase, repair, or replacement of an...

  20. 29 CFR 1952.161 - Developmental schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... standards—July 1973. (e) Development of training program for employers and employees—October 1974. (f) Complete hiring of additional staff—April 1975. (g) Basic training of staff—May 1975. (h) Development of approved Manual MIS—July 1972. (i) Commencement of compliance activities—July 1972. (j) Development of...

  1. 40 CFR 82.161 - Technician certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... shall address the subject areas listed in appendix D. (c) Program Approval. Persons may seek approval of... the closed-book certification exam, within 30 days. Programs providing Type I certification using the... percent or higher on the certification exam, no later than 30 days after the program has received the exam...

  2. 7 CFR 932.161 - Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... a form provided by the committee, for each week (Sunday through Saturday, or such other 7-day period...; (5) acidified; (6) Spanish olives; (7) Sicilian style olives; (8) Greek style olives; (9) olive oil...

  3. 40 CFR 417.161 - Specialized definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... line to maintain minimal product quality. (f) The term BOD7 shall mean the biochemical oxygen demand as... apply to this subpart. (b) The term anhydrous product shall mean the theoretical product that would result if all water were removed from the actual product. (c) The term surfactant shall mean those...

  4. Reference: 161 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ids, based on thin layer chromatography. The identity of the Ala, Asp, Phe, and T...rp conjugates was verified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Insertional mutations in GH3.1, GH3.2, G

  5. Publications | Page 161 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The direction of healthcare service development, particularly at the. ... distance education : sub-project 6; quality assurance models, standards and key performance ... disaster response flood management and recovery, and whether the flood.

  6. 7 CFR 400.161 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) Annual Statutory Financial Statement means the annual financial statement of an insurer prepared in accordance with Statutory Accounting Principles and submitted to the state insurance department if required... statement of an insurer prepared in accordance with Statutory Accounting Principles and submitted to the...

  7. 40 CFR 63.161 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... process; and/or transformed by chemical reaction into materials that are not organic hazardous air... good engineering judgement and standards, such as ANSI B31-3. In food/medical service means that a... meet written specifications, (2) An exothermic reaction which is a safety hazard, (3) The intended...

  8. Search Results | Page 161 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... Apply Morocco filter · Thailand 35 Apply Thailand filter · Guatemala 33 Apply Guatemala filter .... ICTs for Micro, Small and Medium Enterprise Development in Egypt ... to craft policies for fruitful integration into the global economy and inclusive growth. ... However, poverty is still widespread and the government admits that ...

  9. 40 CFR 61.161 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... conditioned to produce molten glass. The unit includes foundations, superstructure and retaining walls, raw... aerosols. Malfunction means any sudden failure of air pollution control equipment or process equipment or... melted by indirect heating. The openings of the vessels are in the outside wall of the furnace and are...

  10. 32_155 - 161_BIO 083 Magashi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    userpc

    the constituents of volatile matter, long cha branched chain ... drugs have been isolated from natural sourc notably from plant ... retention time (RT), molecular formular, molecular weight .... Agilent. Technology) at Chemistry Department, Bayero.

  11. 21 CFR 161.190 - Canned tuna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... (a) Identity. (1) Canned tuna is the food consisting of processed flesh of fish of the species... deemed to be safe if it is not a food additive as defined in section 201(s) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act), or if it is a food additive as so defined, it is used in conformity with...

  12. 21 CFR 161.145 - Canned oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... evenly over the meshes of a circular sieve which has been previously weighed. The diameter of the sieve... such quantity is 3 pounds or more. The bottom of the sieve is woven-wire cloth that complies with the specifications for such cloth set forth under “2.38 mm (No. 8)” in “Official Methods of Analysis of the...

  13. 40 CFR 161.20 - Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... (1) The primary purpose of this part is to specify the types and minimum amounts of data and...)(7). (2) This part also specifies the types and minimum amounts of data and information the Agency...) Finally, this part specifies the types and minimum amounts of data and information that an applicant for...

  14. Vegetation - Suisun Marsh 2000 [ds161

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — This vegetation mapping project of Suisun Marsh blends ground-based classification, aerial photo interpretation, and GIS editing and processing. The method is based...

  15. 161 Teachers' Continuing Professional Development as Correlates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    development on universal basic education in Bayelsa State, Nigeria. Using descriptive ... constitutes an enduring career development process which is very crucial in the overall .... affect their roles and their student's production. Accordingly ...

  16. Clean Cities Now Vol. 16.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-05-01

    Biannual newsletter for the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities initiative. The newsletter includes feature stories on advanced vehicle deployment, idle reduction, and articles on Clean Cities coalition successes across the country.

  17. El procedimiento de impugnación de disposiciones y resoluciones autonómicas sin rango de ley previsto en el artículo 161.2 CE y en el Título V de la LOTC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Lluís Pérez Francesch

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available El objeto del presente trabajo es estudiar el procedimiento de impugnación de disposiciones y resoluciones autonómicas, regulado en el Título V de la LOTC, en desarrollo del art. 161.2 CE. En dicho proceso, el Gobierno goza de la legitimación activa para impugnar cualquier actividad infralegal, normativa o no, de una Comunidad Autónoma, por motivo de una inconstitucionalidad no competencial. Se trata de una impugnación residual de otros procedimientos, como el recurso de inconstitucionalidad o los conflictos positivos de competencia, todos en manos del Gobierno para activarlos. Este ostenta, así, importantes instrumentos para frenar la actividad de las Comunidades Autónomas en su integridad, en una asimetría procesal que dota a los órganos centrales de unos poderes «preventivos» no imprescindibles. De esta manera, se manifiesta una concepción de la organización territorial del Estado español, no deferente con las Comunidades Autónomas. El desarrollo extensivo que se ha realizado del art. 161.2 CE, asignándose al Gobierno central un papel prepotente y asimétrico respecto de los órgano autonómicos, se estudia desde la perspectiva técnico-jurídica del procedimiento jurisdiccional concretado en el Título V de la LOTC y desde el trasfondo político del mismo, que tiene su máxima expresión en el auto que inadmite la impugnación contra el «Plan Ibarretxe » (Auto 135/2004, de 20 de abril. Se estudian todos los casos—realmente variados—en los que se ha realizado una impugnación al amparo del Título V de la LOTC, en los que, sin embargo, destaca la capacidad para suspender la disposición o resolución autonómica por el sólo hecho de iniciarse el procedimiento. Este efecto suspensivo inmediato le aleja de la figura de la medida cautelar. Por otro lado, la impugnación de disposiciones sin rango de ley y de resoluciones, disposiciones o actos autonómicos tiene su campo de acción en el seno de la jurisdicci

  18. Propuesta de acciones que incrementen la incorporación de los adultos mayores al Club de Abuelos del Consultorio Médico161 del Policlínico Raúl Sánchez

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Labrador Labrador

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available La realización de este trabajo tiene como propósito lograr un acercamiento a un grupo poblacional que en estos momentos constituye uno de los más numerosos en nuestro país, el adulto mayor. En el trabajo se analizó la situación de salud de la población del consultorio médico161 perteneciente al área de salud del Policlínico Docente Comunitario Raúl Sánchez en Pinar Del Río..Nos posibilitó acercarnos a la realidad social de nuestro entorno, aportando un enriquecimiento espiritual al profundizar en el estudio de las conductas y de poder cooperar para erradicarlas y así modificar estilos de vida y hacer de nuestro medio social un espacio seguro. A través de métodos empíricos se realizó el acercamiento a la población, identificando las causas de uno de los principales problemas de la comunidad (la falta de incorporación de los adultos mayores al círculo de abuelos a través de lluvia de ideas se elaboró un plan de acción con participación intersectorial y comunitaria con el objetivo de que este problema dejara de ser uno de los principales de esta comunidad en el no solo se realizarán actividades físicas también otras donde estarán involucrados en su desarrollo médico, enfermera, representantes comunitarios apoyando al técnico de cultura física que se desempeña en ese consultorio.

  19. Quantitative imaging by pixel-based contrast-enhanced ultrasound reveals a linear relationship between synovial vascular perfusion and the recruitment of pathogenic IL-17A-F+IL-23+ CD161+ CD4+ T helper cells in psoriatic arthritis joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocco, Ugo; Stramare, Roberto; Martini, Veronica; Coran, Alessandro; Caso, Francesco; Costa, Luisa; Felicetti, Mara; Rizzo, Gaia; Tonietto, Matteo; Scanu, Anna; Oliviero, Francesca; Raffeiner, Bernd; Vezzù, Maristella; Lunardi, Francesca; Scarpa, Raffaele; Sacerdoti, David; Rubaltelli, Leopoldo; Punzi, Leonardo; Doria, Andrea; Grisan, Enrico

    2017-02-01

    To develop quantitative imaging biomarkers of synovial tissue perfusion by pixel-based contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), we studied the relationship between CEUS synovial vascular perfusion and the frequencies of pathogenic T helper (Th)-17 cells in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) joints. Eight consecutive patients with PsA were enrolled in this study. Gray scale CEUS evaluation was performed on the same joint immediately after joint aspiration, by automatic assessment perfusion data, using a new quantification approach of pixel-based analysis and the gamma-variate model. The set of perfusional parameters considered by the time intensity curve includes the maximum value (peak) of the signal intensity curve, the blood volume index or area under the curve, (BVI, AUC) and the contrast mean transit time (MTT). The direct ex vivo analysis of the frequencies of SF IL17A-F + CD161 + IL23 + CD4 + T cells subsets were quantified by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). In cross-sectional analyses, when tested for multiple comparison setting, a false discovery rate at 10%, a common pattern of correlations between CEUS Peak, AUC (BVI) and MTT parameters with the IL17A-F + IL23 + - IL17A-F + CD161 + - and IL17A-F + CD161 + IL23 + CD4 + T cells subsets, as well as lack of correlation between both peak and AUC values and both CD4 + T and CD4 + IL23 + T cells, was observed. The pixel-based CEUS assessment is a truly measure synovial inflammation, as a useful tool to develop quantitative imaging biomarker for monitoring target therapeutics in PsA.

  20. Short communication an interferon-γ ELISPOT assay with two cytotoxic T cell epitopes derived from HTLV-1 tax region 161-233 discriminates HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis patients from asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers in a Peruvian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Ivan; López, Giovanni; Talledo, Michael; MacNamara, Aidan; Verdonck, Kristien; González, Elsa; Tipismana, Martín; Asquith, Becca; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Vanham, Guido; Clark, Daniel

    2011-11-01

    HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) is a chronic and progressive disorder caused by the human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). In HTLV-1 infection, a strong cytotoxic T cell (CTL) response is mounted against the immunodominant protein Tax. Previous studies carried out by our group reported that increased IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) responses against the region spanning amino acids 161 to 233 of the Tax protein were associated with HAM/TSP and increased HTLV-1 proviral load (PVL). An exploratory study was conducted on 16 subjects with HAM/TSP, 13 asymptomatic carriers (AC), and 10 HTLV-1-seronegative controls (SC) to map the HAM/TSP-associated CTL epitopes within Tax region 161-233. The PVL of the infected subjects was determined and the specific CTL response was evaluated with a 6-h incubation IFN-γ ELISPOT assay using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated with 16 individual overlapping peptides covering the Tax region 161-233. Other proinflammatory and Th1/Th2 cytokines were also quantified in the supernatants by a flow cytometry multiplex assay. In addition, a set of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I alleles that bind with high affinity to the CTL epitopes of interest was determined using computational tools. Univariate analyses identified an association between ELISPOT responses to two new CTL epitopes, Tax 173-185 and Tax 181-193, and the presence of HAM/TSP as well as an increased PVL. The HLA-A*6801 allele, which is predicted to bind to the Tax 181-193 peptide, was overpresented in the HAM/TSP patients tested.

  1. Results of an investigation to determine local flow characteristics at the air data probe locations using an 0.030-scale model (45-0) of the space shuttle vehicle orbiter configuration 140A/B (modified) in the NASA Ames Research Center unitary plan wind tunnel (OA161, A, B, C), volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, M. E.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented of wind tunnel test 0A161 of a 0.030-scale model 45-0 of the configuration 140A/B (modified) space shuttle vehicle orbiter in the NASA Ames Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel facilities. The purpose of this test was to determine local total and static pressure environments for the air data probe locations and relative effectiveness of alternate flight-test probe configurations. Testing was done in the Mach number range from 0.30 to 3.5. Angle of attack was varied from -8 to 25 degrees while sideslip varied between -8 and 8 degrees.

  2. Electron-phonon interaction in the binary superconductor lutetium carbide LuC2 via first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilmi, S.; Saib, S.; Bouarissa, N.

    2018-06-01

    Structural, electronic, electron-phonon coupling and superconducting properties of the intermetallic compound LuC2 are investigated by means of ab initio pseudopotential plane wave method within the generalized gradient approximation. The calculated equilibrium lattice parameters yielded a very good accord with experiment. There is no imaginary phonon frequency in the whole Brillouin zone supporting thus the dynamical stability in the material of interest. The average electron-phonon coupling parameter is found to be 0.59 indicating thus a weak-coupling BCS superconductor. Using a reasonable value of μ* = 0.12 for the effective Coulomb repulsion parameter, the superconducting critical temperature Tc is found to be 3.324 which is in excellent agreement with the experimental value of 3.33 K. The effect of the spin-orbit coupling on the superconducting properties of the material of interest has been examined and found to be weak.

  3. Lanthanum(III) and Lutetium(III) in Nitrate-Based Ionic Liquids: A Theoretical Study of Their Coordination Shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodo, Enrico

    2015-09-03

    By using ab initio molecular dynamics, we investigate the solvent shell structure of La(3+) and Lu(3+) ions immersed in two ionic liquids, ethylammonium nitrate (EAN) and its hydroxy derivative (2-ethanolammonium nitrate, HOEAN). We provide the first study of the coordination properties of these heavy metal ions in such a highly charged nonacqueous environment. We find, as expected, that the coordination in the liquid is mainly due to nitrate anions and that, due to the bidentate nature of the ligand, the complexation shell of the central ion has a nontrivial geometry and a coordination number in terms of nitrate molecules that apparently violates the decrease of ionic radii along the lanthanides series, since the smaller Lu(3+) ion seems to coordinate six nitrate molecules and the La(3+) ion only five. A closer inspection of the structural features obtained from our calculations shows, instead, that the first shell of oxygen atoms is more compact for Lu(3+) than for La(3+) and that the former coordinates 8 oxygen atoms while the latter 10 in accord with the typical lanthanide's trend along the series and that their first solvation shells have a slight irregular and complex geometrical pattern. When moving to the HOEAN solutions, we have found that the solvation of the central ion is possibly also due to the cation itself through the oxygen atom on the side chain. Also, in this liquid, the coordination numbers in terms of oxygen atoms in both solvents is 10 for La(3+) and 8 for Lu(3+).

  4. Magnetic susceptibility of scandium-hydrogen and lutetium-hydrogen solid-solution alloys from 2 to 3000K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stierman, R.J.

    1982-12-01

    Results for pure Sc show that the maximum and minimum in the susceptibility discovered earlier are enhanced as the impurity level of iron in scandium decreases. The Stoner enhancement factor, calculated from low-temperature heat capacity data, susceptibility data, and band-structure calculations show Sc to be a strongly enhanced paramagnet. Below 2 0 K, the magnetic anisotropy between the hard and easy directions of scandium decreases linearly with decreasing temperature, tending toward zero at 0 K. The large increase in the susceptibility of Sc at lower temperatures indicates magnetic ordering. Pure Lu and Lu-H alloys showed an anisotropy in susceptibility vs orientation; thus the samples were not random polycrystalline samples. Pure Lu shows the shallow maximum and minimum, but the increase in susceptibility at low temperatures is larger than previously observed. The susceptibility-composition dependence of the Lu-H alloys also did not match other data. The susceptibility-composition dependence does not match the composition dependence of the electronic specific heat constant below 150 K, showing the electronic specific heat is being affected by terms other than phonon-electron and pure electron-electron interactions

  5. Rare-earth antisites in lutetium aluminum garnets: influence on lattice parameter and Ce.sup.3+./sup. multicenter structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Przybylińska, H.; Wittlin, A.; Ma, C.G.; Brik, M.G.; Kamińska, A.; Sybilski, P.; Zorenko, Yu.; Nikl, Martin; Gorbenko, V.; Fedorov, A.; Kučera, M.; Suchocki, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 9 (2014), s. 1515-1519 ISSN 0925-3467 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/12/0805 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : garnets * scintillators * laser materials * phosphors Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.981, year: 2014

  6. Controllable synthesis of Eu{sup 3+}/Tb{sup 3+} activated lutetium fluorides nanocrystals and their photophysical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jintai; Huo, Jiansheng [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Cai, Yuepeng [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang, Qianming, E-mail: qmwang@scnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Guangdong Technology Research Center for Ecological Management and Remediation of Urban Water System, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2013-12-15

    In this paper, phosphors of LuF{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+}/Tb{sup 3+} have been successfully synthesized with small chelator ethylenediaminetetra acetic acid (EDTA) or amphiphilic polymer (polyethylene glycol, PEG-1000) as templates via a hydrothermal method. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electronic microscope (SEM), and photo-luminescent spectra techniques (PL) were used to characterize the as-prepared samples. XRD patterns showed that well crystallized lanthanide fluorides with hexagonal phase were achieved. SEM images revealed that different regular microstructures were achieved. The photo-luminescent properties of LuF{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} demonstrated that there are significant energy transfers from fluorides to Eu{sup 3+}. The results presented that EDTA as the template will lead to the highest emission intensities. -- Highlights: • Various templates were used to synthesize LuF{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+}/Tb{sup 3+}. • All the phosphors were red or green emissive. • Different morphologies were acquired and controllable.

  7. Combining results of two GC separations partly achieves determination of all cis and trans 16:1, 18:1, 18:2 and 18:3 except CLA isomers of milk fat as demonstrated using Ag-ion SPE fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, John K G; Hernandez, Marta; Cruz-Hernandez, Cristina; Kraft, Jana; Dugan, Michael E R

    2008-03-01

    Milk fat is a complex mixture of geometric and positional isomers of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated, including short-, long- and branch-chain fatty acids (FAs). There has been partial success to resolve this mixture of FAs using different GC temperature programs, or a combination of GC isothermal and temperature programs. To overcome the problem associated with overlapping isomers prior silver-ion separation was recommended. However, this procedure is time consuming and not practical for routine analysis. In addition, previous methods focused mainly on the trans and cis isomers of 18:1. The present method takes advantage of differences in the relative elution times between different types of FAs. The method involved analyzing each milk fat using the same highly polar 100-m capillary column and GC instrument, and conducting two separations using temperature programs that plateau at 175 and 150 degrees C. The relative shift among the geometric and positional isomers at these two temperature settings was enough to permit identification of most of the trans and cis 16:1, 18:1 and 20:1, the c/t-18:2 and the c/c/t-18:3 isomers found in milk fat. The identity of these FAs was confirmed by prior separation of the total fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) of milk fat using Ag(+)-SPE columns, and comparing the fractions to the total milk fat. The Ag(+)-SPE technique was modified to obtain pure saturated, trans- and cis-monounsaturated and diunsaturated FAMEs. By combining the results from these two separate GC analyses, knowing the elution order, it was possible to determine most of the geometric and positional isomers of 16:1, 18:1, 20:1, 18:2 and 18:3 without a prior silver-ion separation. Only few minor FAs could not be resolved, notable the conjugated linoleic acid isomers that still required the complimentary Ag(+)-HPLC separation. The two GC temperature programs have been successfully used to routinely analyze most FA isomers in total milk and beef fats in about 200

  8. 161 EVALUATION OF ON-SHORE OIL SPILL REMEDIATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EVALUATION OF ON-SHORE OIL SPILL REMEDIATION OPERATIONS IN. PORT HARCOURT ... study is an attempt to unravel the effectiveness of clean-up exercises undertaken by oil .... Research Design. The study ..... remediation as well as tilling and evacuation of affected soils would certainly be more productive.

  9. 40 CFR 161.640 - Product performance data requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... or indirectly transmit diseases to humans. However, each registrant must ensure through testing that... microbial pests associated with human and animal wastes (1) CR EP* 91-7 Products for treating water systems...

  10. Practice Bulletin No. 161 Summary: External Cephalic Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    In the United States, there is a widespread belief that the overall cesarean delivery rate is higher than necessary. Efforts are being directed toward decreasing the number of these procedures, in part by encouraging physicians to make changes in their management practices. Because breech presentations are associated with a high rate of cesarean delivery, there is renewed interest in techniques such as external cephalic version (ECV) and vaginal breech delivery. The purpose of this document is to provide information about ECV by summarizing the relevant evidence presented in published studies and to make recommendations regarding its use in obstetric practice.

  11. 7 CFR 966.161 - Reapportionment of Committee Membership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... alternates. (c) District 3—four members and their alternates. (d) District 4—four members and their...

  12. 40 CFR 161.590 - Nontarget insect data requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... pollinators (4) CR CR CR CR CR CR TEP TEP 141-5 Nontarget insect testing—aquatic insects Acute toxicity to aquatic insects (5) 142-1 Aquatic insect life-cycle study (5) 142-1 Simulated or actual field testing for aquatic insects (5) 142-3 Nontarget insect testing—predators and parasites (5) 143-1thru 143-3 Key: CR...

  13. People’s Republic of China Scientific Abstracts No. 161.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-21

    campanumaea pilosula 0.5 oz., polygonatum canaliculatum 0.5 oz., soutellaria indica 1 oz., curcumin 0.5 oz., paeonia ruba 0.5 oz. Additional...congregation, increase fibrinogen solubility , prevention of platelet congregation in the small vessels of the myocardium and injury to the myocardium. 17

  14. Publications | Page 161 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    African Youth on the Information Highway : Participation and Leadership in ... le marché : Réflexions à la croisée de la science, de la religion et du développement ... Modern and Traditional Irrigation Technologies in the Eastern Mediterranean.

  15. 40 CFR 161.167 - Discussion of formation of impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... present in his product at any time before use at a level equal to or greater than 0.1 percent (1000 ppm... at any time before use at a level equal to or greater than 0.1 percent (1000 ppm) by weight of the...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR REGISTRATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL PESTICIDES Product Chemistry Data...

  16. Modular forms and special cycles on Shimura curves (AM-161)

    CERN Document Server

    Kudla, Stephen S; Yang, Tonghai

    2006-01-01

    Modular Forms and Special Cycles on Shimura Curves is a thorough study of the generating functions constructed from special cycles, both divisors and zero-cycles, on the arithmetic surface ""M"" attached to a Shimura curve ""M"" over the field of rational numbers. These generating functions are shown to be the q-expansions of modular forms and Siegel modular forms of genus two respectively, valued in the Gillet-Soulé arithmetic Chow groups of ""M"". The two types of generating functions are related via an arithmetic inner product formula. In addition, an analogue of the classical Siegel-Weil

  17. 40 CFR 161.240 - Residue chemistry data requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .../feed (5), (14) [CR] [CR] [CR] [CR] EP EP 171-4 Meat/milk/poultry/eggs (6), (14) [CR] [CR] [CR] [CR... food/feed are required when detectable residues could concentrate on processing and thus require establishment of a food additive tolerance. (6) Livestock feeding studies are required whenever a pesticide...

  18. 40 CFR 51.161 - Public availability of information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Review of New Sources and... advertisement in the area affected of the location of the source information and analysis specified in paragraph... would conflict with existing requirements for acting on requests for permission to construct or modify...

  19. What we do | Page 161 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The burden of disease caused by smoking, and the medical and social costs ... health, social, environmental and economic consequences of tobacco consumption and ... Eastern Africa has experienced more than its fair share of violent conflict ...

  20. Dicty_cDB: CHJ161 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available *tttxrslfikmptkt*m*i** sw*kmlckdsl**sl*frlw*rf*m*n*t*wfkmlcpfrkttpxxt*km**emptrp*m* s*stwkrmlrccp*tttkmifkmsx...kt*m*sqplw*rmlc*sspr*mfiemstrp*m*s* stwkrmlrccp*tttkmiikmsxkt*m*nqslw*rmlc*k*k*lfnl*rlkl*kkrftlc henctx** F

  1. 161---8 Dec 2009.indd [final version].indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-12-08

    Dec 8, 2009 ... United Kingdom population norms, preachers within this sample were ... University of Warwick, .... hand, feeling types make judgements based on subjective, personal values. ... and female Bible College students (Francis, Penson & Jones. 2001) .... link between psychological type preference and choice of.

  2. 40 CFR 161.440 - Spray drift data requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Nonfood Forestry Domestic outdoor Indoor Test substance Data to support MP Data to support EP Guidelines... organisms expected to be present would be exceeded. The nontarget organisms include humans, domestic animals...

  3. 50 CFR 300.161 - Alternatives and exceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., must reflect that number or label. (4) A conveyance (truck, plane, boat, etc.) is not considered a... shipping documents; (2) Fish or shellfish contained in retail consumer packages labeled pursuant to the...

  4. 40 CFR 161.390 - Reentry protection data requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... could cause adverse effects on persons entering treated sites. In the last situation, reentry intervals... crop Nonfood Greenhouse Food crop Nonfood Forestry Domestic outdoor Indoor Test substance Data to... oncogenic effects or other adverse effects as evidenced by subchronic, chronic, and reproduction studies...

  5. 7 CFR 4279.161 - Filing preapplications and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... preapplications nor applications will be accepted or processed unless a lender has agreed to finance the proposal... description of collateral, with estimated values, to be offered as security for the loan. (vii) If a corporate...) Current personal and corporate financial statements of any guarantors. (11) A proposed Loan Agreement or a...

  6. 161---8 Dec 2009.indd [final version].indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-12-08

    Dec 8, 2009 ... The theory is attractive to practical theologians for two reasons. ... They consider conforming to principles to be of more importance than cultivating harmony. ...... Francis, L.J. & Atkins, P., 2000, Exploring Luke's Gospel: A guide.

  7. 40 CFR 161.540 - Plant protection data requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... phytotoxicity Tier I: Seed germination/seedling emergence (2) R R R TGAI TGAI 122-1 Vegetative vigor (2) R R R TGAI TGAI 122-1 Aquatic plant growth (2) R R R TGAI TGAI 122-2 Tier II: Seed germination/seedling... Nonfood Greenhouse Food crop Nonfood Forestry Domestic outdoor Indoor Test substance Data to support MP...

  8. 161 ETHICAL PROBLEMS OF RAPE AS A SOCIAL CANKERWORM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    violence that involves intercourse without consent or against someone being willing ... Rape is a global problem with women and children being mostly vulnerable .... allows their wards to spend too much time watching television where sex is ...

  9. A Formal Theory of Perception. Technical Report No. 161.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottmayer, William Arthur

    An attempt to build a mathematical model of a device that could learn geometry is discussed. The report discusses the background and motivation of the study, the coding problem, the derivation of Suppes "Stimulus-Response Theory of Finite Automata" used in the work in learning theory, and a summary of the technical work. (DB)

  10. 22 CFR 161.7 - Categories of actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... individuals, and facilitating trade opportunities abroad and U.S. business expansion in foreign markets; (2... documents and delivering retirement checks, social security payments and veterans benefits; (3) Conduct of... international bridges and pipeline (see Executive Order 11423 and the International Bridge Act of 1972 (Pub. L...

  11. Travel Policies in ARL Libraries. SPEC Kit 161.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Michael D.

    This kit examines the methods and policies currently used to provide travel funding for academic librarians. The results of a survey of Association of Research Libraries (ARL) libraries (n=73) conducted in Fall 1989 are presented as well as examples of travel policies and guidelines submitted by the following respondents: the Universities of…

  12. All projects related to | Page 161 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Ecohealth Chair on Human and Animal Health in Protected Ecosystems of Central and Eastern Africa. Project ... Topic: AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION, ZOONOSES, GENDER ANALYSIS, Disease control, ANTIBIOTICS, ANIMAL DISEASES.

  13. 9 CFR 161.3 - Standards for accredited veterinarian duties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... legally able to practice veterinary medicine. An accredited veterinarian shall perform the functions of an... examine such an animal showing abnormalities, in order to determine whether or not there is clinical... accredited work, an accredited veterinarian shall take such measures of sanitation as are necessary to...

  14. 40 CFR 161.190 - Physical and chemical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR REGISTRATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL PESTICIDES Product Chemistry Data...) Basic manufacturers are required to provide the Agency with a sample of each TGAI used to formulate a...

  15. What we do | Page 161 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    We collaborate with governments, research institutions, and global funders to develop .... Region(s): Americas, Canada, North And Central America, Asia, South And ... This project builds on previous investment in three rounds of a small grants ...

  16. Structural and optical properties of Vernier phase lutetium oxyfluorides doped with lanthanide ions: interesting candidates as scintillators and X-Ray phosphors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Passuello, T.; Piccinelli, M.; Trevisani, M.; Giarola, M.; Mariotto, G.; Marciniak, L.; Hreniak, D.; Guzik, M.; Fasoli, M.; Vedda, A.; Jarý, Vítězslav; Nikl, Martin; Causin, V.; Bettinelli, M.; Speghini, A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 21 (2012), s. 10639-10649 ISSN 0959-9428 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN300100802 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : oxyfluoride * luminescence * scintillator * phosphor * Eu3+ * Ce3+ * Pr3+ Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 5.968, year: 2011

  17. Investigations of structural, elastic, electronic and thermodynamic properties of lutetium filled skutterudite LuFe4P12 under pressure effect: FP-LMTO method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boudia Keltouma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Structural, elastic, electronic and thermodynamic properties of ternary cubic filled skutterudite compound were calculated. We have computed the elastic modulus and its pressure dependence. From the elastic parameter behavior, it is inferred that this compound is elastically stable and ductile in nature. Through the quasi-harmonic Debye model, in which phononic effects are considered, the effect of pressure P (0 to 50 GPa and temperature T (0 to 3000 °C on the lattice constant, elastic parameters, bulk modulus B, heat capacity, thermal expansion coefficient α, internal energy U, entropy S, Debye temperature θD, Helmholtz free energy A, and Gibbs free energy G are investigated.

  18. Aluminum and gallium substitution in yttrium and lutetium aluminum−gallium garnets: investigation by single-crystal NMR and TSL methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Laguta, Valentyn; Zorenko, Y.; Gorbenko, V.; Iskalieva, A.; Zagorodniy, Y.; Sidletskiy, O.; Bilski, P.; Twardak, A.; Nikl, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 42 (2016), s. 24400-24408 ISSN 1932-7447 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-15569S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : garnets * Ga and Al site occupation * nuclear magnetic resonance * thermoluminescence Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.536, year: 2016

  19. Etudes optiques de nouveaux materiaux laser: Des orthosilicates dopes a l'ytterbium: Le yttrium (lutetium,scandium) pentoxide de silicium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denoyer, Aurelie

    La decouverte et l'elaboration de nouveaux materiaux laser solides suscitent beaucoup d'interet parmi la communaute scientifique. En particulier les lasers dans la gamme de frequence du micron debouchent sur beaucoup d'applications, en telecommunication, en medecine, dans le domaine militaire, pour la, decoupe des metaux (lasers de puissance), en optique non lineaire (doublage de frequence, bistabilite optique). Le plus couramment utilise actuellement est le Nd:YAG dans cette famille de laser, mais des remplacants plus performants sont toujours recherches. Les lasers a base d'Yb3+ possedent beaucoup d'avantages compares aux lasers Nd3+ du fait de leur structure electronique simple et de leur deterioration moins rapide. Parmi les matrices cristallines pouvant accueillir l'ytterbium, les orthosilicates Yb:Y 2SiO5, Yb:Lu2SiO5 et Yb:Sc2SiO 5 se positionnent tres bien, du fait de leur bonne conductivite thermique et du fort eclatement de leur champ cristallin necessaire a l'elaboration de lasers quasi-3 niveaux. De plus l'etude fine et systematique des proprietes microscopiques de nouveaux materiaux s'avere toujours tres interessante du point de vue de la recherche fondamentale, c'est ainsi que de nouveaux modeles sont concus (par exemple pour le champ cristallin) ou que de nouvelles proprietes inhabituelles sont decouvertes, menant a de nouvelles applications. Ainsi d'autres materiaux dopes a l'ytterbium sont connus pour leurs proprietes de couplage electron-phonon, de couplage magnetique, d'emission cooperative ou encore de bistabilite optique, mais ces proprietes n'ont encore jamais ete mises en evidence dans Yb:Y 2SiO5, Yb:Lu2SiO5 et Yb:Sc2SiO 5. Ainsi, cette these a pour but l'etude des proprietes optiques et des interactions microscopiques dans Yb:Y2SiO 5, Yb:Lu2SiO5 et Yb:Sc2SiO5. Nous utilisons principalement les techniques d'absorption IR et de spectroscopie Raman pour determiner les excitations du champ cristallin et les modes de vibration dans le materiau. Des mesures optiques sous champ magnetique ont egalement ete effectuees dans le but de caracteriser le comportement de ces excitations lorsqu'elles sont soumises a l'effet Zeeman. La resonance paramagnetique electronique a permis de completer cette etude de l'eclatement Zeeman suivant toutes les orientations du cristal. Enfin la fluorescence par excitation selective et la fluorescence induite par Raman FT, completent la description des niveaux d'energie et revelent l'existence d'emission cooperative de deux ions Yb3+ et de transferts d'energie. Les resultats de cette these apportent une contribution originale dans le domaine des nouveaux materiaux lasers par l'etude et la comprehension des interactions fines et des proprietes microscopiques d'un materiau en particulier. Ils debouchent a la fois sur des applications possibles dans le domaine de l'optique et des lasers, et sur la comprehension d'aspects fondamentaux. Cette these a prouve l'interet de ces matrices pour leur utilisation comme lasers solides: un fort eclatement du champ cristallin favorable a l'elaboration de laser quasi-3 niveaux, et de larges bandes d'absorption (dues a un fort couplage electron-phonon et a des raies satellites causees par une interaction d'echange entre deux ions Yb3+) qui permettent la generation d'impulsions laser ultra-courtes, l'accordabilite du laser, etc. De plus la miniaturisation des lasers est possible pour l'optique integree grace a des couches minces synthetisees par epitaxie en phase liquide dont nous avons demontre la tres bonne qualite structurale et l'ajustement possible de certains parametres. Nous avons reconstruit le tenseur g du niveau fondamental (qui donne des informations precieuses sur les fonctions d'onde), ceci dans le but d'aider les theoriciens a concevoir un modele de champ cristallin valide. Plusieurs mecanismes de transferts d'energie ont ete mis en evidence: un mecanisme de relaxation d'un site vers l'autre, un mecanisme d'emission cooperative, et un mecanisme d'excitation de l'Yb3+ par le Tm3+ (impurete presente dans le materiau). Ces transferts sont plutot nefastes pour la fabrication d'un laser mais sont interessants pour l'optique non lineaire (doublage de frequence, memoires optiques). Enfin, plusieurs elements (le couplage magnetique de paire, le couplage electron-phonon et l'emission cooperative) nous ont permis de conclure sur le caractere covalent de la matrice. Nous avons d'ailleurs demontre ici le role de la covalence dans l'emission cooperative, transition habituellement attribuee aux interactions multipolaires electriques.

  20. Synthesis, Radiolabelling and In Vitro Characterization of the Gallium-68-, Yttrium-90- and Lutetium-177-Labelled PSMA Ligand, CHX-A''-DTPA-DUPA-Pep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, Benjamin; Solbach, Christoph; Andreolli, Elena; Winter, Gordon; Machulla, Hans-Jürgen; Reske, Sven N

    2014-04-29

    Since prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) has been identified as a diagnostic target for prostate cancer, many urea-based small PSMA-targeting molecules were developed. First, the clinical application of these Ga-68 labelled compounds in positron emission tomography (PET) showed their diagnostic potential. Besides, the therapy of prostate cancer is a demanding field, and the use of radiometals with PSMA bearing ligands is a valid approach. In this work, we describe the synthesis of a new PSMA ligand, CHX-A''-DTPA-DUPA-Pep, the subsequent labelling with Ga-68, Lu-177 and Y-90 and the first in vitro characterization. In cell investigations with PSMA-positive LNCaP C4-2 cells, KD values of ≤14.67 ± 1.95 nM were determined, indicating high biological activities towards PSMA. Radiosyntheses with Ga-68, Lu-177 and Y-90 were developed under mild reaction conditions (room temperature, moderate pH of 5.5 and 7.4, respectively) and resulted in nearly quantitative radiochemical yields within 5 min.

  1. Synthesis, Radiolabelling and In Vitro Characterization of the Gallium-68-, Yttrium-90- and Lutetium-177-Labelled PSMA Ligand, CHX-A''-DTPA-DUPA-Pep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Baur

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Since prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA has been identified as a diagnostic target for prostate cancer, many urea-based small PSMA-targeting molecules were developed. First, the clinical application of these Ga-68 labelled compounds in positron emission tomography (PET showed their diagnostic potential. Besides, the therapy of prostate cancer is a demanding field, and the use of radiometals with PSMA bearing ligands is a valid approach. In this work, we describe the synthesis of a new PSMA ligand, CHX-A''-DTPA-DUPA-Pep, the subsequent labelling with Ga-68, Lu-177 and Y-90 and the first in vitro characterization. In cell investigations with PSMA-positive LNCaP C4-2 cells, KD values of ≤14.67 ± 1.95 nM were determined, indicating high biological activities towards PSMA. Radiosyntheses with Ga-68, Lu-177 and Y-90 were developed under mild reaction conditions (room temperature, moderate pH of 5.5 and 7.4, respectively and resulted in nearly quantitative radiochemical yields within 5 min.

  2. Modeled Neutron Induced Nuclear Reaction Cross Sections for Radiochemsitry in the region of Thulium, Lutetium, and Tantalum I. Results of Built in Spherical Symmetry in a Deformed Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, R. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-09-06

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron induced nuclear reaction cross sections for targets ranging from Terbium (Z = 65) to Rhenium (Z = 75). Of particular interest are the cross sections on Tm, Lu, and Ta including reactions on isomeric targets.

  3. Manual on the proper use of lutetium-177-labeled somatostatin analogue (Lu-177-DOTA-TATE) injectable in radionuclide therapy (2nd ed.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosono, Makoto; Ikebuchi, Hideharu; Nakamura, Yoshihide; Nakamura, Nobutaka; Yamada, Takahiro; Yanagida, Sachiko; Kitaoka, Asami; Kojima, Kiyotaka; Sugano, Hiroyasu; Kinuya, Seigo; Inoue, Tomio; Hatazawa, Jun

    2018-04-01

    Here we present the guideline for the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors using Lu-177-DOTA-TATE on the basis of radiation safety aspects in Japan. This guideline was prepared by a study supported by Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare, and approved by Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine. Lu-177-DOTA-TATE treatment in Japan should be carried out according to this guideline. Although this guideline is applied in Japan, the issues for radiation protection shown in this guideline are considered internationally useful as well. Only the original Japanese version is the formal document.

  4. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of Merkel cell carcinoma using 177lutetium-labeled somatostatin analogs in combination with radiosensitizing chemotherapy. A potential novel treatment based on molecular pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salavati, A.; Prasad, V.; Baum, R.P.; Schneider, C.P.; Herbst, R.

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have been published on the safety and feasibility of synchronous use of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRNT), as source of internal radiation therapy, in combination with chemotherapy. In this study we reported a 53-year-old man with stage IV Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), who underwent synchronous internal radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Based on presumable poor prognosis with chemotherapy only, functional similarities of MCC with other neuroendocrine tumors and available evidence of effectiveness and safety of synchronous use of external beam radiation therapy and chemotherapy in treatment of high-risk MCC patients, our interdisciplinary neuroendocrine tumor board recommended him to add PRRNT to his ongoing chemotherapy. He received 2 courses of 177 Lu-DOTATATE(1, 4, 7, 10-Tetraazacyclododecane-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraacetic acid-1-D-Phe1-Tyr3-Thr8-octreotide) in combination with ongoing 8 cycles of liposomal doxorubicin based on standard protocols. Response to therapy was evaluated by 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) and 68 gallium-somatostatin-receptor PET/CT. There was an impressive improvement of the clinical symptoms. However, follow-up positron emission tomography (PET)/CT studies showed mixed pattern of response. Synchronous use of PRRNT and radiosensitizing chemotherapy seems safe and feasible in high risk MCC patients, however, further prospective studies and clinical trials are warranted to provide reliable evidence of possible pitfalls and effectiveness of PRRNT and 68 Ga-somatostatin-receptor PET/CT in the management of MCC. (author)

  5. Effect of the ion force on the stability constants of the complexes LnCl2+ and LnCl2+ of Europium and Lutetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez R, E.; Jimenez R, M.; Solache R, M.

    2004-01-01

    A study is presented on the determination of the constants of stability of those complex LnCI 3-n n (where Ln = Eu 3+ and Lu 3+ and n = 1 and 2), by means of a method of extraction with solvent, to constant temperature (303 K) and in means of high ionic force (1- 3M H CI/HCIO 4 ). It is also presented the application of the theory of the specific interaction of ions (SIT) of Bronsted-Guggenheim-Scatchard for the extrapolation of the values to infinite dilution. (Author)

  6. Study of the radiolabeling of substance P with Lutetium-177 and analysis of the stability in vitro: development of new radiopharmaceutical for tumor treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Clarice Maria de; Pujatti, Priscilla Brunelli; Mengatti, Jair Mengatti; Araujo, Elaine Bortoleti de

    2009-01-01

    Substance P (SP) is an 11- amino acid neuropeptide, which is known as an important member of the family of the tachykinins, characterized by the C-terminal sequence Phe-X-Gly-Leu-Met-NH2. Radiolabeled SP has been described and proposal for detection and treatment of diseases such as arthritis and tumors. SP is the most important target of neurokinin 1 (NK-1) receptors, over expressed in malignant gliomas. 177 Lu is commonly used in the production of radiopharmaceuticals for treatment of neuroendocrine tumors and is a radionuclide with favorable properties for endo radiotherapy. The half-life of 177 Lu is 6.75 days and it emits b- particles of 497 keV average energy. Moreover, 177 Lu also emits g radiation of 208 keV average energy, which makes imaging diagnosis possible. There are few studies describing radiolabeled SP analogs in literature and the objective of this work was to study the radiolabeling conditions and the stability of SP complexed to DOTA chelator, using 177 Lu as radionuclide, in order to determine the best radiolabeling methodology. A high radiochemical purity (> 95%) and high specific activity of DOTA-SP was achieved when the reaction time was 30 minutes, the temperature was 90 deg C, the mass of DOTA-SP was 10 mg and 177 Lu activity was 185 MBq. These conditions extrapolate will be used in future experiments with high activity and also in in vitro and in vivo studies involving glioma models. (author)

  7. Separation device of radio lanthanides (DISER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vera T, A.L.; Monroy G, F.; Vazquez M, J.C.; Jimenez B, F.

    2008-01-01

    At the present time the cancer is one of the main causes of mortality in our country, therefore, its prevention, diagnostic and treatment is of vital importance for those health systems. The treatment of the cancer and other illnesses, starting from monoclonal antibodies, peptides, macro aggregates or marked aminoacids with beta particles emitting radioisotopes, it is an extremely promising field. The radioactive lanthanides: Promethium 149, Terbium 161, Holmium 166 and Lutetium 177 are beta emitting (β), which possess nuclear and chemical properties that have shown their feasibility like radioisotopes of radiotherapeutic use. However, these radioisotopes are not commercially available; to this respect, the Radioactive Materials Research Laboratory (LIMR) of the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ), it has developed the methodology of production of these radioisotopes and based on these works, there is designed, built and mounted the Radio lanthanides Separation Device (DISER) able to carry out the radioisotopes production in a routine way. This device is content in a cell that has an auxiliary air service, an extraction system and it is protected with a lead armor-plating of 10 cm. The DISER it is manual and easy of managing. The main function of this equipment is the radio lanthanides separation starting from the extractive chromatography by means of packed columns with a commercial resin (LnSPS) and recovered in the superior and inferior part by fiber glass. The DISER is composed by a main carrousel where the separation columns and the elution recipients are mounted. Also counts with an opening system of irradiation vials, port samples for columns and glass material. The present work presents a detailed description of the DISER, as well as its handling that allows to produce the radioisotopes Promethium-149, Terbium-161, Holmium-166 and Lutetium-177 starting from the separation of its parent elements Neodymium-149, Gadolinium-161, Dysprosium-166 and

  8. Separation device of radio lanthanides (DISER); Dispositivo de separacion de radiolantanidos (DISER)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vera T, A.L. [FES-Zaragoza, UNAM, 09000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Monroy G, F.; Vazquez M, J.C.; Jimenez B, F. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: veratrevino@hotmail.com

    2008-07-01

    At the present time the cancer is one of the main causes of mortality in our country, therefore, its prevention, diagnostic and treatment is of vital importance for those health systems. The treatment of the cancer and other illnesses, starting from monoclonal antibodies, peptides, macro aggregates or marked aminoacids with beta particles emitting radioisotopes, it is an extremely promising field. The radioactive lanthanides: Promethium 149, Terbium 161, Holmium 166 and Lutetium 177 are beta emitting ({beta}), which possess nuclear and chemical properties that have shown their feasibility like radioisotopes of radiotherapeutic use. However, these radioisotopes are not commercially available; to this respect, the Radioactive Materials Research Laboratory (LIMR) of the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ), it has developed the methodology of production of these radioisotopes and based on these works, there is designed, built and mounted the Radio lanthanides Separation Device (DISER) able to carry out the radioisotopes production in a routine way. This device is content in a cell that has an auxiliary air service, an extraction system and it is protected with a lead armor-plating of 10 cm. The DISER it is manual and easy of managing. The main function of this equipment is the radio lanthanides separation starting from the extractive chromatography by means of packed columns with a commercial resin (LnSPS) and recovered in the superior and inferior part by fiber glass. The DISER is composed by a main carrousel where the separation columns and the elution recipients are mounted. Also counts with an opening system of irradiation vials, port samples for columns and glass material. The present work presents a detailed description of the DISER, as well as its handling that allows to produce the radioisotopes Promethium-149, Terbium-161, Holmium-166 and Lutetium-177 starting from the separation of its parent elements Neodymium-149, Gadolinium-161, Dysprosium-166

  9. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 161 - Data Requirements for Registration: Use Pattern Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... juices Fermentation beverages (wine, beer, whiskey, vinegar) Processed or manufactured nonfood plant and... Seafood processing Vegetable oil processing Spice mills Vinegar processing Farinaceous processing (noodles...

  10. 9 CFR 161.1 - Statement of purpose; performance of accredited duties in different States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... appropriate laboratory for testing with complete and accurate paperwork. (ix) Develop appropriate biosecurity... REVOCATION OF SUCH ACCREDITATION REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS FOR ACCREDITED VETERINARIANS AND SUSPENSION OR... eradication and control programs; (v) Laboratory support in confirming disease diagnoses; (vi) Ethical and...

  11. 25 CFR 161.204 - How are carrying capacities and stocking rates established?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... be based on forage production, range utilization, the application of land management practices, and range improvements in place to achieve uniformity of grazing under sustained yield management principles... agricultural resource management plan and range unit management plan. (b) BIA, with the concurrence of the...

  12. Adesina et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. (2013) 10(3):161 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJTCAM

    macerated in 5L of local beer and one glassful is taken twice a day for two weeks to cure ... mistletoes harvested on particular hosts in the management or treatment of ..... (2009) investigated the safety of Globimetula braunii leaf extracts in rats.

  13. 40 CFR 161.34 - Flagging of studies for potential adverse effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... a type listed in paragraph (b) of this section to support an application for new or amended... feeding study or combined chronic feeding/oncogenicity study 83-1 Cholinesterase inhibition NOEL less than... ADI 9 Subchronic feeding study 82-1 Cholinesterase inhibition NOEL less than 100 times the current...

  14. 25 CFR 161.3 - What is the purpose of this part?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... consistent with integrated resource management plans in order to protect and maintain other values such as... and economics of agribusiness, sources and use of credit and marketing of agricultural products, and...

  15. 78 FR 56692 - Colorado River Storage Project-Rate Order No. WAPA-161

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    ... existing Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) Firm Power Rate and the Colorado River Storage...-6372, email [email protected] , or Mr. Rodney Bailey, Power Marketing Manager, CRSP Management Center...: Western Area Power Administration Temporary Extension for Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Firm...

  16. 33 CFR 161.25 - Vessel Traffic Service New York Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Raritan Bay to the Raritan River Rail Road Bridge; and then north including the waters of the Arthur Kill... waters of the Kill Van Kull and Upper New York Bay north to a line drawn east-west from the Holland...

  17. 9 CFR 161.2 - Requirements and application procedures for accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ACCREDITATION OF VETERINARIANS AND SUSPENSION OR REVOCATION OF... addressing the subject areas which led to loss of accreditation for the applicant, and subject areas which...

  18. Résultats de recherche | Page 161 | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Du 7 au 10 février 2005, les représentants de cinq pays d'Afrique francophone (le Cameroun, le Maroc, le Niger, le Sénégal et la République démocratique du Congo - RDC) se sont réunis pour s'interroger sur les voies et moyens de dynamiser l'approp. Projet ...

  19. African Journal of Drug & Alcohol Studies, 16(1), 2017 Copyright ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The early age at initiation begs for more comprehensive drug prevention programmes especially in ... in terms of prevention, treatment and care of drug ... drug treatment unit in a Federal Neuropsy- .... sonal income or from family and friends,.

  20. Adesina et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. (2013) 10(3):161 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJTCAM

    extracts, infusions, tinctures, fluid extracts or tea bags are widely used in various cultures in ... etc. effects and were non-toxic in experimental animals at the doses used. ... lead to poor growth and productivity and eventual death of such host plants, ... that occur in India, has about 401 plant hosts and possesses remarkable ...

  1. 21 CFR 161.173 - Canned wet pack shrimp in transparent or nontransparent containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FISH AND SHELLFISH Requirements for...; prepared in one of the styles specified in paragraph (a)(3) of this section, in sufficient water or other...) Acceptable quality level (AQL). The maximum percent of defective sample units permitted in a lot that will be...

  2. African Journal of Drug & Alcohol Studies, 16(1), 2017 Copyright ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (β = .13; p<.05) and parents' educational level (β = .16; p<.05) independently predicted alcohol use; and .... demographical profile of the respondents ... High score indicates higher familial drinking habit. The researcher obtained alpha co- ... us with teachers who led the researcher ..... lo, Brazil: The Role of Neighborhood.

  3. Microstrip silicon detectors of the monitoring and triggering systems in the E-161 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogolyubskij, M.Yu.; Kurchaninov, L.L.; Moiseev, A.M.; Semenov, P.A.; Leflat, A.K.; Sekhniaidze, G.G.

    1991-01-01

    A monitoring and triggering system based on microstrip silicon detectors (MSD) and fast-response low-noise electronics with the number of the readout channels equal to 896, is described. The PMS noise is ENC=25x10 3 e - with the signal integration time of 50 ns. The probability of registering a noise pulse by one channel during data readout cycle is not more than 2.5x10 -6 . The time resolution (FWHM) is (16±3) ns. 17 refs.; 7 figs

  4. 26 CFR 31.3306(c)(16)-1 - Services in employ of international organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Services in employ of international... OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Federal Unemployment Tax Act (Chapter 23, Internal Revenue Code...

  5. Shahat et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. (2017) 14(2):161 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sayed

    extracts, Serratia marcescens displayed inhibition zone ranged between 10-17 mm. The antimicrobial activity of plant extracts against bacteria was more effective than against fungi, which is similar to the results reported by Avato and Ertürk (Avato et al.,. 1997; Ertürk et al., 2003). Acknowledgments. The authors extend their ...

  6. 22 CFR 161.9 - Specific steps in the Department's NEPA process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... environmental impact statement or a “Finding of no significant impact”. The assessment shall include a brief... accordance with the CEQ Regulations (§ 1508.9). If the assessment demonstrates that there will be no... agencies and persons consulted in preparing the assessment. (3) Notice of intent to prepare an EIS. As soon...

  7. 14 CFR 161.305 - Required analysis and conditions for approval of proposed restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... improved work force and/or educational productivity, if any; valuation of positive safety effects, if any; and/or other qualitative benefits, including improvements in quality of life. (B) At the applicant's... used. (iv) Condition 4: The proposed restriction does not conflict with any existing Federal statute or...

  8. 78 FR 20888 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 161-Sedgwick County, Kansas; Notification of Proposed Production...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-08

    ...- corrosion coatings; plastic tubes/washers/hoses/seals/sheets/tape/bags/ containers; bushings; funnels...; covers; gaskets; labels; fasteners; bolt extenders; springs; rings; bushings; flanges; hatches; supports...; filters; copper pipes/adapters/fasteners/reducers; aluminum plates/ flanges/covers; locks and locksets...

  9. Shahat et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. (2017) 14(2):161 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sayed

    The obtained dry extract was weighed and the percentage yield was expressed in terms of air dried weight of plant materials. Material for Antimicrobials. The bacterial, fungal and yeast strains were personally obtained from the microbiology Lab, Botany Dept.,. Fac. of Sci. (Al- Azhar Univ. Assiut, Assiut Univ. and Minia Univ.).

  10. 25 CFR 161.604 - What happens if a permit violation occurs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... initiate an appropriate investigation within 5 business days of that notification. (b) Unless otherwise provided under tribal law, when BIA has reason to believe that a permit violation has occurred, BIA or the authorized tribal representative will provide written notice to the permittee within 5 business days. ...

  11. 25 CFR 161.1 - What definitions do I need to know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... following: (1) One adult sheep or goat is equivalent to one-fifth (0.20) of an AU; (2) One adult horse, mule..., cattle, sheep, goats, mules, burros, donkeys, and llamas. Management Unit is a subdivision of a... management plan is a statement of management objectives for grazing, farming, or other agriculture management...

  12. 25 CFR 161.301 - What will a grazing permit contain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... permits will contain the following provisions: (1) Name of permit holder; (2) Range management plan...) Animal identification requirements (i.e., brand, microchip, freeze brand, earmark, tattoo, etc.); (6...

  13. Yang et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. (2015) 12(4):161 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proff.Adewunmi

    in mice treated with Coptidis Rhizoma extract as compared with the control mice. ... Therefore, there is need for development of novel antifungal drugs. Chinese ... onto Sabouraud dextrose agar (Zhaorui Bio Technologies, Shanghai) plates for.

  14. 33 CFR 161.35 - Vessel Traffic Service Houston/Galveston.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...; Gulf ICW and Galveston-Freeport Cut-Off from Mile 346 to Mile 352; Texas City Channel; Texas City...′ N 94°47.0′ W Red Fish Bar 4000 29°29.8′ N 94°51.9′ W Bayport Channel 4000 29°36.7′ N 94°57.2′ W... Galveston Bay Entrance Channel LB 11 and 12 29° 20.6′ N; 94° 44.6′ W E Bolivar Land Cut Mile 349...

  15. 40 CFR 161.202 - Purposes of the registration data requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... other abnormalities to the fetus as the result of exposure of the mother during pregnancy. Two... tests are required to assess potential to affect the mammalian cell's genetic components. The objectives... assay methods, the capacity of a chemical to alter genetic material in cells. (ii) To determine the...

  16. 76 FR 161 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ..., Division of Workplace Programs, SAMHSA/CSAP, Room 2-1042, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, Maryland 20857... certification maintenance program. MedTox Laboratories, Inc., 402 W. County Road D,St. Paul, MN 55112. 651-636...

  17. 7 CFR 457.161 - Canola and rapeseed crop insurance provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...: Canola and Rapeseed Crop Provisions If a conflict exists among the policy provisions, the order of... application of disease control measures; (e) Wildlife; (f) Earthquake; (g) Volcanic eruption; or (h) Failure... injurious to human or animal health. (3) Quality will be a factor in determining your loss in canola...

  18. : tous les projets | Page 161 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Malgré la très forte croissance économique observée au Pérou, le marché du travail ne permet pas d'offrir de meilleurs emplois à tout le monde. Date de début : 4 septembre 2012. End Date: 4 octobre 2014. Sujet: OCCUPATIONAL STRUCTURE, LABOUR MARKET, ACCESS TO MARKETS, DISADVANTAGED GROUPS, ...

  19. SU-E-J-161: Inverse Problems for Optical Parameters in Laser Induced Thermal Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahrenholtz, SJ; Stafford, RJ; Fuentes, DT

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance-guided laser-induced thermal therapy (MRgLITT) is investigated as a neurosurgical intervention for oncological applications throughout the body by active post market studies. Real-time MR temperature imaging is used to monitor ablative thermal delivery in the clinic. Additionally, brain MRgLITT could improve through effective planning for laser fiber's placement. Mathematical bioheat models have been extensively investigated but require reliable patient specific physical parameter data, e.g. optical parameters. This abstract applies an inverse problem algorithm to characterize optical parameter data obtained from previous MRgLITT interventions. Methods: The implemented inverse problem has three primary components: a parameter-space search algorithm, a physics model, and training data. First, the parameter-space search algorithm uses a gradient-based quasi-Newton method to optimize the effective optical attenuation coefficient, μ-eff. A parameter reduction reduces the amount of optical parameter-space the algorithm must search. Second, the physics model is a simplified bioheat model for homogeneous tissue where closed-form Green's functions represent the exact solution. Third, the training data was temperature imaging data from 23 MRgLITT oncological brain ablations (980 nm wavelength) from seven different patients. Results: To three significant figures, the descriptive statistics for μ-eff were 1470 m −1 mean, 1360 m −1 median, 369 m −1 standard deviation, 933 m −1 minimum and 2260 m −1 maximum. The standard deviation normalized by the mean was 25.0%. The inverse problem took <30 minutes to optimize all 23 datasets. Conclusion: As expected, the inferred average is biased by underlying physics model. However, the standard deviation normalized by the mean is smaller than literature values and indicates an increased precision in the characterization of the optical parameters needed to plan MRgLITT procedures. This investigation demonstrates the potential for the optimization and validation of more sophisticated bioheat models that incorporate the uncertainty of the data into the predictions, e.g. stochastic finite element methods

  20. 161 Hydrologie et morphologie de l'estuaire du fleuve Sassandra ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP 2000

    Résumé. Les études physico-chimiques des eaux de surface et de sub-surface et les levés bathymétriques effectués dans l'estuaire du fleuve Sassandra, ont permis de caractériser l'hydrologie et la morphologie du fond de cet embouchure. Sur toute la surface d'eau le pH est proche de la neutralité, la conductivité est ...

  1. 40 CFR 93.161 - Conformity evaluation for Federal installations with facility-wide emission budgets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conformity evaluation for Federal... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DETERMINING CONFORMITY OF FEDERAL ACTIONS TO STATE OR FEDERAL IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Determining Conformity of General Federal Actions to State or Federal...

  2. African Journal of Drug & Alcohol Studies, 16(1), 2017 Copyright ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relevance of the influence of familial drinking habits was emphasized in ... Department of Psychology, Faculty of Social Sciences, Federal University ... toward alcohol use and actual consump- ... life. Also, Chassin, et al. (2004) reported that familial alcoholism partly raised risk ..... Friendship Networks and Family Fac-.

  3. Using Chronic Absence in a Multi-Metric Accountability System. Policy Memo 16-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, Heather

    2016-01-01

    With the passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) of 2015, California must integrate additional measures of student and school performance into the state-wide accountability system. To support the conversation as policymakers consider if/how to include chronic absenteeism data in the state's accountability system, PACE has conducted an…

  4. Study of the joining particle rotation in nuclei of 161-167 Er and 235 U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez L, M.

    1996-01-01

    The residual quadrupole pairing and spin-spin interactions among the nucleons, in presence of the rotational motion, lead to additional terms in the particle-rotation coupling which attenuate the effects of the Coriolis interaction. These couplings are determined by using the density matrix formalism, under the consideration of the exact conservation of the nuclear angular moment. Finally the energy levels of the rotational bands and the mixing amplitudes of the BE2 transition probabilities are calculated for some odd deformed nuclei. A very good agreement between the theoretical and experimental energies is obtained. The Coriolis attenuation produced by these interactions shows itself as relevant for explaining the experimental results. (Author)

  5. SU-E-T-161: Evaluation of Dose Calculation Based On Cone-Beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, T; Nakazawa, T; Saitou, Y; Nakata, A; Yano, M; Tateoka, K; Fujimoto, K; Sakata, K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to convert pixel values in cone-beam CT (CBCT) using histograms of pixel values in the simulation CT (sim-CT) and the CBCT images and to evaluate the accuracy of dose calculation based on the CBCT. Methods: The sim-CT and CBCT images immediately before the treatment of 10 prostate cancer patients were acquired. Because of insufficient calibration of the pixel values in the CBCT, it is difficult to be directly used for dose calculation. The pixel values in the CBCT images were converted using an in-house program. A 7 fields treatment plans (original plan) created on the sim-CT images were applied to the CBCT images and the dose distributions were re-calculated with same monitor units (MUs). These prescription doses were compared with those of original plans. Results: In the results of the pixel values conversion in the CBCT images,the mean differences of pixel values for the prostate,subcutaneous adipose, muscle and right-femur were −10.78±34.60, 11.78±41.06, 29.49±36.99 and 0.14±31.15 respectively. In the results of the calculated doses, the mean differences of prescription doses for 7 fields were 4.13±0.95%, 0.34±0.86%, −0.05±0.55%, 1.35±0.98%, 1.77±0.56%, 0.89±0.69% and 1.69±0.71% respectively and as a whole, the difference of prescription dose was 1.54±0.4%. Conclusion: The dose calculation on the CBCT images achieve an accuracy of <2% by using this pixel values conversion program. This may enable implementation of efficient adaptive radiotherapy

  6. Solvent extraction of lanthanide ions with 1-Phenyl-3-Methyl-4-Benzoyl-Pyrazolone-5 (HPMBP), 2. Extraction of Erbium(III), Ytterbium(III) and Lutetium(III) by HPMBP from aqueous-methanol solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czakis-Sulikowska, D.M.; Kuznik, B.; Malinowska, A.

    1990-01-01

    The solvent extraction of lanthanides(III)(Ln = Er, Yb, Lu) by 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-pyrazolone-5 (HL) in carbon tetrachloride from aqueous-methanol phase was investigated. The equilibrium constants for the extraction from aqueous-50 % (ν/ν) methanol phase (K ex ), two-phase stability constants of the complexes LnL 3 (β 3 * ) and stability constants of complexes LnL 2+ , LnL 2 + , LnL 3 (β n )(Ln = Yb, Lu) were calculated. It was confirmed that the addition of methanol to the aqueous phase causes a synergistic effect. The influence of methanol on the dissociation constant of HPMBP (K a ) and the distribution constant of HPMBP (p HL ) between carbon tetrachloride and water-methanol solutions was investigated. (Authors)

  7. Measurement of high energy neutrons via Lu(n,xn) reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, E.A.; Becker, J.A.; Archer, D.E.; Younes, W.; Stoyer, M.A.; Slaughter, D.

    1997-07-01

    High energy neutrons can be assayed by the use of the nuclear diagnostic material lutetium. We are measuring the (n,xn) cross sections for natural lutetium in order to develop it as a detector material. We are applying lutetium to diagnose the high energy neutrons produced in test target/blanket systems appropriate for the Accelerator Production of Tritium Project. 3 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  8. Smoking reduces circulating CD26hi CD161hi MAIT cells in healthy individuals and patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammitzbøll, Cecilie; Börnsen, Lars; Romme Christensen, Jeppe

    2017-01-01

    Upon chronic cigarette smoke exposure, inhaled antigens and irritants cause altered lung immune homeostasis. Circulating immune cells are affected, and smoking is associated with an increased risk of developing various disorders, including multiple sclerosis (MS). This study was conducted......-induced proliferation and cytokine secretion in smokers and nonsmokers in a cohort of 100 healthy individuals (HI). In addition, we analyzed immune cell subsets associated with smoking in 2 independent cohorts of patients with MS. In HI smokers compared with nonsmokers, we found increased blood cell counts...... to determine the impact of smoking on circulating immune cell subsets. Furthermore, we determined whether any smoking-associated changes were related to MS. With the use of flow cytometry, CFSE assays, and ELISpot assays, we analyzed circulating immune cell phenotypes and quantified antigen...

  9. 25 CFR 161.308 - Must a permittee comply with standards of conduct if granted a permit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... grazing operations in accordance with the principles of sustained yield management, agricultural resource management planning, sound conservation practices, and other community goals as expressed in Navajo Nation laws, agricultural resource management plans, and similar sources. (b) Comply with all applicable laws...

  10. FCJ-161 Productive Provocations: Vitriolic Media, Spaces of Protest and Agonistic Outrage in the 2011 England Riots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony McCosker

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The intense social upheaval that spread through a number of UK cities in the riots and protests of August, 2011 signalled the terrifying speed with which passionate disaffection can turn to uncontained violence. At stake in the dense and volatile debate that ensued, and in the acts of violence themselves, were contests over spaces as well as competing models of democracy, publics and citizenship, including the appropriate use of social media. Within these debates, almost universally, rational deliberative discourse and action is assumed to be the only route to legitimate “civil” society. So what is to be made of the violent physical contest over city squares, streets and property, as well as contests over acts of participation and demonstration played out online through the hundreds of eyewitness videos posted to sites like YouTube and the endless flow of often vitriolic words in blogs, comments spaces and social network sites? This paper uses a video posted to YouTube titled ‘Clapham Junction Speaker (London Riots 2011’ to examine the passion and provocation that flowed beyond the city streets to enliven, intensify and sustain forms of protest and civic engagement. We argue that the aggressive and antagonistic tenor of the Speaker’s twenty minute monologue, the bitter vitriol that flowed through the comments space, and even the act of posting it constitute significant elements of a generative, ‘agonistic’ public, to use Chantal Mouffe’s term, that operates in multiple spaces and outside of the rationalising discourse demanded by mainstream media and government. This paper develops a richer understanding of these spaces of protest, and the concept of provocation central to these events.

  11. Experiment data report for Loft anticipated transient experiments 16-1, 16-2, and 16-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batt, D.L.; Carpenter, J.M.

    1980-12-01

    This report presents uninterpreted experimental data from the second, third, and fourth anticipated transient experiments (Experiments L6-2, L6-1, and L6-3), conducted in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility. Experiment L6-2 simulated a loss of forced primary coolant flow in a large PWR by tripping power to primary coolant pump motor generator sets, allowing the pumps to coast down under the influence of the flywheel system. Reactor scram initiated on indication of low flow in the primary coolant system (PCS). Experiment L6-1 simulated a loss of steam load in a large PWR by closing the steam flow control valve which reduced heat removal from the secondary coolant system and caused the PCS temperature and pressure to increase until reactor scram initiated on indication on high PCS pressure. Experiment L6-3 simulated an excessive load increase in a large PWR by opening the steam flow control valve at its maximum rate. PCS temperature and pressure decreased, causing the reactor to scram on indication of low PCS pressure. All experiments were complete when the plant was returned to a hot-standby condition

  12. 16.1% Efficient Hysteresis-Free Mesostructured Perovskite Solar Cells Based on Synergistically Improved ZnO Nanorod Arrays

    KAUST Repository

    Mahmood, Khalid; Swain, Bhabani Sankar; Amassian, Aram

    2015-01-01

    Significant efficiency improvements are reported in mesoscopic perovskite solar cells based on the development of a low-temperature solution-processed ZnO nanorod (NR) array exhibiting higher NR aspect ratio, enhanced electron density

  13. 25 CFR 161.713 - How will BIA determine the amount of damages to Navajo Partitioned Lands?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... per month for comparable property or grazing privileges, or the estimated commercial value or replacement costs of the products or property. (c) BIA will determine the value of the products or property illegally used or removed based upon a valuation of similar products or property. ...

  14. 75 FR 32357 - Gallatin National Forest; Montana; Jack Rabbit to Big Sky Meadow Village 161 kV Transmission Line...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... prior to the close of the comment period and should clearly articulate the reviewer's concerns and... during the scoping of the proposed action and the comment period. The decision maker will take into... near Cascade Creek homes/Lava Lake Trailhead area, Greek Creek homes and the Deer Creek Trailhead areas...

  15. 77 FR 20782 - Foreign-Trade Zone 161-Sedgwick County, KS; Application for Temporary/Interim Manufacturing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... Turbine Nacelles and Hubs); Hutchinson, KS An application has been submitted to the Executive Secretary of... County), Kansas. Under T/IM procedures, Siemens has requested authority to produce wind turbine nacelles... (4008.11), hydraulic hoses (4009.21, 4009.42), rubber gaskets and o-rings (4016.93), vibration dampeners...

  16. 161. Necrosis por presión del septo de salida ventricular causado por dos implantes adyacentes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. González Calle

    2012-04-01

    Conclusiones: Esta complicación ilustra que los tejidos entre dos dispositivos duros y con movimiento uno conrespecto al otro pueden desarrollar necrosis por presión y fricción y, consecuentemente, perforación. Probablemente, hubiera sido preferible sustituir el homoinjerto pulmonar con stent en el momento de la sustitución valvular aórtica.

  17. 161 Etude du pouvoir germinatif de quatre variétés de riz que sont ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Par contre, le taux de Grains Germés Avec Champignon (GGAC) est très ..... 9 Août fixant les modalités d'application de la loi relative aux semences d'origine végétale ... GASTEL, Manuel de production de semences pour le secteur informel.

  18. CNV-association meta-analysis in 191,161 European adults reveals new loci associated with anthropometric traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macé, Aurélien; Tuke, Marcus A; Deelen, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    at 1q21.1, 3q29, 7q11.23, 11p14.2, and 18q21.32 and confirms two known loci at 16p11.2 and 22q11.21, implicating at least one anthropometric trait. The discovered CNVs are recurrent and rare (0.01-0.2%), with large effects on height (>2.4 cm), weight (>5 kg), and body mass index (BMI) (>3.5 kg/m(2...

  19. 40 CFR 429.161 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best practicable control technology... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS TIMBER PRODUCTS PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Wood Furniture... application of the best practicable control technology currently available (BPT). Except as provided in 40 CFR...

  20. Students Who Study Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) in Postsecondary Education. Stats in Brief. NCES 2009-161

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianglei

    2009-01-01

    Rising concern about America's ability to maintain its competitive position in the global economy has renewed interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education. To understand who enters into and completes undergraduate programs in STEM fields, this report examined data from three major national studies: the 1995-96…

  1. 161: BRIDGING BETWEEN PATIENTS PREFERENCE AND EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE ACCORDING TO GUIDELINES IN OSTEOARTHRITIS MANAGEMENT: A QUALITATIVE STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behshid, Mozhgan; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Irajpoor, Alireza

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims Osteoarthritis is the major cause of disability worldwide that causes significant problems in activities of daily living and deeply affects the quality of life. Osteoarthritis is predicted to become one of the major causes of disability in future that necessitates comprehensive global plans for resolving this health issue in accordance with patients' local culture, beliefs and attitudes. This study was a part of PhD dissertation that was conducted to carry out an in-depth examination of the experiences of patients with OA about their use of strategies for the OA self-management and compare them with scientific evidences. Methods The present qualitative study was conducted using a conventional content analysis approach on 33participantincluding patients with OA, their family members and healthcare personnel who were selected by purposive sampling. Data were collected through unstructured and semi-structured interviews and continued until data saturation occurred. Data analysis was carried out simultaneously. Guba and Lincoln's standards of rigor and trustworthiness were respected including the credibility, transferability, dependability and conformability of the data. A narrative systematic review was conducted on osteoarthritis care guidelines and algorithms in order to compare patients' preference with scientific evidences. Results The analysis of the data revealed four main categories, including: Conservative approach in selecting treatment modalities, trend toward traditional treatment, Preferring complementary and alternative medicine, and concerns and barriers treatment modalities. The review of literature demonstrated little attention by professionals to the patients' values or priorities. Comparing of the modalities that were preferred by patients with scientific guidelines indicated some inconsistencies. Conclusion Patient's perceptions, preference, and adherence to treatment, play an essential role in relieving nagging symptoms and treatments outcomes. Although guidelines are used to define best practices in osteoarthritis care, patient preference that derived from their local culture, beliefs and attitudes should be considered to operationalization. Participating the patients on the therapeutic goal setting as well as clinical decision-making, and supervising the use of complementary treatments are recommended. Patients should be involved in the development of clinical practice guidelines.

  2. Evaluation of the topoisomerase II-inactive bisdioxopiperazine ICRF-161 as a protectant against doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, E.; Thougaard, A.V.; Grauslund, M.

    2009-01-01

    of topoisomerase II, resulting in the risk of additional myelosuppression in patients receiving ICRF-187 as a cardioprotectant in combination with doxorubicin. The development of a topoisomerase II-inactive iron chelating compound thus appeared attractive. In the present paper we evaluate the topoisomerase II...... chelation alone does not appear to be sufficient for protection against anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy Udgivelsesdato: 2009/1/8...

  3. A Unit-Problem Investigation of Blunt Leading-Edge Separation Motivated by AVT-161 SACCON Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckring, James M.; Boelens, Okko J.

    2011-01-01

    A research effort has been initiated to examine in more detail some of the challenging flow fields discovered from analysis of the SACCON configuration aerodynamics. This particular effort is oriented toward a diamond wing investigation specifically designed to isolate blunt leading-edge separation phenomena relevant to the SACCON investigations of the present workshop. The approach taken to design this new effort is reviewed along with the current status of the program.

  4. A Simulation Based Methodology to Examine the B-1B’s AN/ALQ-161 Maintenance Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    2001). “The Air Force does not think of, or advertise , bombers as interchangeable. The B-1, B-2 and B-52 all have a specific mission area and 2...Modeling ( CPM ), Goal Programming, EOQ, Nonlinear Programming Predictive Models unknown, ill-defined known or under the decision-maker’s control

  5. 161 Effets de la remontée des eaux de la nappe phréatique sur l ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boualem

    les coliformes thermotolérants (Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Salmonella, Yersinia enterocolitica, etc.), streptocoques fécaux (genres Enterococcus et Streptococcus) et bactéries aérobies, ce qu'ils rendre inaptes à la consommation. Ses microorganismes proviennent de fosses septiques et des fuites dans le ...

  6. Employment and Training Policy in the United States during the Economic Crisis. Upjohn Institute Working Paper No. 10-161

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Christopher J.; Eberts, Randall W.

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines labor market conditions and public employment policies in the United States during what some are calling the Great Recession. We document the dramatic labor market changes that rapidly unfolded when the rate of gross domestic product growth turned negative, from the end of 2007 through early 2009. The paper reviews the…

  7. Incidence, Predictive Factors, and Prognosis of Chondrosarcoma in Patients with Ollier Disease and Maffucci Syndrome : An International Multicenter Study of 161 Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdegaal, Suzan H. M.; Bovee, Judith V. M. G.; Pansuriya, Twinkal C.; Grimer, Robert J.; Ozger, Harzem; Jutte, Paul C.; San Julian, Mikel; Biau, David J.; van der Geest, Ingrid C. M.; Leithner, Andreas; Streitbuerger, Arne; Klenke, Frank M.; Gouin, Francois G.; Campanacci, Domenico A.; Marec-Berard, Perrine; Hogendoorn, Pancras C. W.; Brand, Ronald; Taminiau, Antonie H. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Enchondromatosis is characterized by the presence of multiple benign cartilage lesions in bone. While Ollier disease is typified by multiple enchondromas, in Maffucci syndrome these are associated with hemangiomas. Studies evaluating the predictive value of clinical symptoms for

  8. Site Investigation Report. 161st Air Refueling Group, Arizona National Guard, Sky Harbor International Airport and Papago Military Reservation, Phoenix, Arizona. Volume 1. Report, Tables and Figures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-01

    channel, floodplain, and alluvial fan environments derived from drainage areas of the Salt, Gila, Agua Fria, and Verde Rivers. Thickness of upper unit...groundwater media under consideration should be demonstrated to be potable and utilized as drinldng water, either currently or at some planncA future

  9. Federal uranium-enrichment program and the criteria and full-cost-recovery requirements of Section 161 of the Atomic Energy Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montange, C.H.

    1987-01-01

    DOE operates the US uranium enrichment business, which makes it responsible for the reliable supply of nuclear fuel to most US nuclear utilities as well as to many in other countries. Questions have arisen about DOE's compliance with key legal provisions and DOE's future as a reliable and competitive supplier of enrichment services. An overview of the implications of the loss of the US monopoly and the declining market also shows how demand forecasts erred. The author traces the historical development of DOE's monopoly and the shift toward policies encouraging private ownership. The three pricing options available to DOE are to price above cost (i.e., for profit), below (i.e., subsidize), or at cost. Current law requires pricing at cost. The other options will require political and economic policy changes

  10. Multibeam collection for KN161L06: Multibeam data collected aboard Knorr from 2000-04-07 to 2000-05-16, Recife, Brazil to Recife, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  11. Multibeam collection for KN161L07: Multibeam data collected aboard Knorr from 2000-05-21 to 2000-06-04, Recife, Brazil to Norfolk, VA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  12. Properties of II-VI Semiconductors: Bulk Crystals, Epitaxial Films, Quantum Well Structures, and Dilute Magnetic Systems. Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings. Volume 161

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-11-21

    These might be due to the formation of oxides of Se/Te; Cd/Zn and selenates and tellurates of Cd/Zn. But the oxides of Se/Te and selenates and... tellurates of Zn/Cd have low melting/dissociation temperatures and hence can not account for the increase in mass. Oxides of Zn and Cd are stable even at high...applying a voltage. This involves a large movement of Ag ions to or from the silver sulphide layer and is therefore determined by the maximum current

  13. Multibeam collection for KN161L04: Multibeam data collected aboard Knorr from 2000-02-23 to 2000-03-19, Barbados to Ponta Delgada, Azores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  14. Gulf of Mexico sales 157 and 161: Central and Western Planning areas. Final environmental impact statement: Volume 2, Sections IV.D through IX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This volume of the environmental impact statement for sales in the Gulf of Mexico presents information dealing with impacts on the costal regions due to planned operations of the petroleum industry. Topics discussed include: impacts on sensitive coastal environments; coastal barrier beaches and associated dunes; wetlands; offshore resources; water quality; air quality; impacts to aquatic environments; impacts on marine birds; impacts on archaeological resources; impacts on socioeconomic conditions; topography; and analysis of a large oil spill

  15. SU-E-T-161: Characterization and Validation of CT Simulator Hounsfield Units to Relative Stopping Power Values for Proton Treatment Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnell, E; Ahmad, S; De La Fuente Herman, T

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a calibration curve that includes and minimizes the variations of Hounsfield Unit (HU) from a CT scanner to Relative Stopping Power (RSP) of tissues along the proton beam path. The variations are due to scanner and proton energy, technique, phantom size and placement, and tissue arrangement. Methods: A CIRS 062 M phantom with 10 plugs of known relative electron density (RED) was scanned through a 16 slice GE Discovery CT Simulator scanner. Three setup combinations of plug distributions and techniques clinically implemented for five treatment regions were scanned with energies of 100, 120, and 140 kV. Volumetric HU values were measured for each plug and scan. The RSP values derived through the Bethe-Bloch formula are currently being verified with parallel-plate ionization chamber measurements in water using 80, 150, and 225 MeV proton beam. Typical treatment plans for treatment regions of brain, head-&-neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis are being planned and dose delivered will be compared with film and Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) measurements. Results: Percentage variations were determined for each variable. For tissues close to water, variations were <1% from any given parameter. Tissues far from water equivalence (lung and bone) showed the greatest sensitivity to change (7.4% maximum) with scanner energy and up to 5.3% with positioning of the phantom. No major variations were observed for proton energies within the treatment range. Conclusion: When deriving a calibration curve, attention should be placed to low and high HU values. A thorough verification process of calculated vs. water-phantom measured RSP values at different proton energies, followed by dose validation of planned vs. measured doses in phantom with film and OSL detectors are currently being undertaken

  16. Reversal of Human Papillomavirus-Specific T Cell Immune Suppression through TLR Agonist Treatment of Langerhans Cells Exposed to Human Papillomavirus Type 161

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Laura M.; Raff, Adam B.; Da Silva, Diane M.; Kast, W. Martin

    2009-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 infects the epithelial layer of cervical mucosa and is causally associated with the generation of cervical cancer. Langerhans cells (LC) are the resident antigen-presenting cells at the site of infection and therefore are responsible for initiating an immune response against HPV16. On the contrary, LC exposed to HPV16 do not induce a specific T cell immune response, which leads to the immune evasion of HPV16. Demonstrating that Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and TLR8 are expressed on human LC, we hypothesized that imidazoquinolines would activate LC exposed to HPV16, leading to the induction of an HPV16-specific cell-mediated immune response. Surprisingly both phenotypic and functional hallmarks of activation are not observed when LC are exposed to HPV16 virus-like particles (VLP) and treated with imiquimod (TLR7 agonist). However, we found that LC are activated by 3M-002 (TLR8 agonist) and resiquimod (TLR8/7 agonist). LC exposed to HPV16 VLP and subsequently treated with 3M-002 or resiquimod highly up-regulate surface activation markers, secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, induce CCL21-directed migration, and initiate an HPV16-specific CD8+ T cell response. These data strongly indicate that 3M-002 and resiquimod are promising therapeutics for treatment of HPV-infections and HPV-induced cervical lesions. This is an author-produced version of a manuscript accepted for publication in The Journal of Immunology (The JI). The American Association of Immunologists, Inc. (AAI), publisher of The JI, holds the copyright to this manuscript. This version of the manuscript has not yet been copyedited or subjected to editorial proofreading by The JI; hence, it may differ from the final version published in The JI (online and in print). AAI (The JI) is not liable for errors or omissions in this author-produced version of the manuscript or in any version derived from it by the U.S. National Institutes of Health or any other third party. The final, citable version of record can be found at www.jimmunol.org.” PMID:19234187

  17. General complex rotated finite-element method for predissociation studies of diatomic molecules: An application on the (1-6)1Σg+ states of H2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Stefan; Elander, Nils

    2004-01-01

    An exterior complex rotated finite element method was applied on the diabatic multichannel Schroedinger equation in order to compute and compare rovibronic energy structures, predissociation widths, and nonradiative lifetimes for levels in the (1-4) (1-5), and (1-6) 1 Σ g + manifolds of H 2 . The rotationless (v,J=0) levels are found to be more or less shifted relative to each other when comparing the results for these three manifolds. The existence of homogeneous spectroscopic perturbations was investigated by studying the rovibronic (v,J=0-10) sequences for energies and level widths. Known experimental and theoretical radiative lifetimes were used to estimate present levels that might be spectroscopically measurable. The computed level widths for the EF, GK, and H electronic levels were generally found to be about two orders of magnitude larger than previously reported [P. Quadrelli, K. Pressler, and L. Woiniewicz, J. Chem. Phys. 93, 4958 (1990)], indicating a somewhat stronger predissociation

  18. SU-F-J-161: Prostate Contouring in Patients with Bilateral Hip Prostheses: Impact of Using Artifact-Reduced CT Images and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elzibak, A; Loblaw, A; Morton, G; Vesprini, D; Liu, S; Chung, H; Davidson, M [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the usefulness of metal artifact reduction in CT images of patients with bilateral hip prostheses (BHP) for contouring the prostate and determine if the inclusion of MR images provides additional benefits. Methods: Five patients with BHP were CT scanned using our clinical protocol (140kV, 300mAs, 3mm slices, 1.5mm increment, Philips Medical Systems, OH). Images were reconstructed with the orthopaedic metal artifact reduction (O-MAR) algorithm. MRI scanning was then performed (1.5T, GE Healthcare, WI) with a flat table-top (T{sub 2}-weighted, inherent body coil, FRFSE, 3mm slices with 0mm gap). All images were transferred to Pinnacle (Version 9.2, Philips Medical Systems). For each patient, two data sets were produced: one containing the O-MAR-corrected CT images and another containing fused MRI and O-MAR-corrected CT images. Four genito-urinary radiation oncologists contoured the prostate of each patient on the O-MAR-corrected CT data. Two weeks later, they contoured the prostate on the fused data set, blinded to all other contours. During each contouring session, the oncologists reported their confidence in the contours (1=very confident, 3=not confident) and the contouring difficulty that they experienced (1=really easy, 4=very challenging). Prostate volumes were computed from the contours and the conformity index was used to evaluate inter-observer variability. Results: Larger prostate volumes were found on the O-MAR-corrected CT set than on the fused set (p< 0.05, median=36.9cm{sup 3} vs. 26.63 cm{sup 3}). No significant differences were noted in the inter-observer variability between the two data sets (p=0.3). Contouring difficulty decreased with the addition of MRI (p<0.05) while the radiation oncologists reported more confidence in their contours when MRI was fused with the O-MAR-corrected CT data (p<0.05). Conclusion: This preliminary work demonstrated that, while O-MAR correction to CT images improves visualization of anatomy, the addition of MRI enhanced the oncologists’ confidence in contouring the prostate in patients with BHP.

  19. Scintillation properties and X-ray irradiation hardness of Ce3+-doped Gd2O3-based scintillation glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Liwan; Shao, Chongyun; Zhang, Yu; Liao, Xili; Yang, Qiuhong; Hu, Lili; Chen, Danping

    2016-01-01

    Ce 3+ -doped Gd 2 O 3 -based scintillation glasses are prepared within an air or CO atmosphere. The effects of fluorine, lutetium, barium, and the melting atmosphere on the optical properties, scintillation properties and irradiation hardness are studied. Absorption spectra, luminescence spectra under UV and X-ray excitation, and the X-ray radiation-induced spectra are presented. The results show that the density can be increased by doping with fluorine, lutetium and barium. The luminescence intensity decreases after X-ray irradiation. Because of charge transfer quenching, fluorine and lutetium enhance the UV-excited and X-ray excited luminescence intensity, but barium decreases. Moreover, fluorine and lutetium are advantageous to irradiation hardness while barium is not. In addition, a non-reducing atmosphere provides a higher irradiation hardness than a reducing atmosphere. Fluorine-doped glass is promising to enhance luminescence intensity, promote irradiation hardness, and increase the density.

  20. Luminescence and scintillation properties of rare-earth-doped LuF.sub.3./sub. scintillation crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pejchal, Jan; Fukuda, K.; Kurosawa, S.; Yokota, Y.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 41, Mar SI (2015), s. 58-62 ISSN 0925-3467 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : lutetium fluoride * scintillator * scintillator * VUV luminescence Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.183, year: 2015

  1. Structural investigations of Lu.sub.2./sub.O.sub.3./sub. as single crystal and polycrystalline transparent ceramic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Guzik, M.; Pejchal, Jan; Yoshikawa, A.; Ito, A.; Goto, T.; Siczek, M.; Lis, T.; Boulon, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 7 (2014), 3327 -3334 ISSN 1528-7483 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : lutetium oxide * structure * crystal growth * ceramics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.891, year: 2014

  2. Labeling of peptides and antibodies against different receptor human epidermal growth factors with different radionuclides and chemical and biological evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calzada, V.

    2011-01-01

    This Master thesis presented at the University of the Oriental Republic of Uruguay, School of Chemistry studies the following topics: quality control in nuclear medicine, radiopharmaceuticals such as technetium and lutetium

  3. High-Performance Low-Cost Portable Radiological and Nuclear Detectors Based on Colloidal Nanocrystals (TOPIC 07-B)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    The synthesized CNCs were optically very active and demonstrated very bright luminescence even under UV lamp excitation at room...temperature (Fig. 8.15). Fig. 8.16 shows absorption, Fig. 8.15. Visible luminescence from Pb3O2I2 under UV lamp excitation. M. Osiński, High-Performance Low...QCS - low-dimensional quantum confinement system LEDs – light-emitting diodes LuAG – lutetium aluminum garnet LYSO – lutetium yttrium

  4. Safety, Pharmacokinetics and Dosimetry of a Long-Acting Radiolabeled Somatostatin Analogue 177Lu-DOTA-EB-TATE in Patients with Advanced Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Wang, Hao; Jacobson Weiss, Orit; Cheng, Yuejuan; Niu, Gang; Li, Fang; Bai, Chunmei; Zhu, Zhaohui; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2018-04-13

    Radiolabeled somatostatin analogue therapy has become an established treatment method for patients with well to moderately differentiated unresectable or metastatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). The most frequently used somatostatin analogues in clinical practice are octreotide and octreotate. However, both peptides showed suboptimal retention within tumors. The aim of this first-in-human study is to explore the safety and dosimetry of a long-acting radiolabeled somatostatin analogue, lutetium-177-1, 4, 7, 10-tetra-azacyclododecane-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraacetic acid-Evans blue-octreotate ( 177 Lu-DOTA-EB-TATE). Methods: Eight patients (6 males and 2 females; age range, 27-61 y) with advanced metastatic neuroendocrine tumors were recruited. Five patients received a single dose 0.35-0.70 GBq (9.5-18.9 mCi) of 177 Lu-DOTA-EB-TATE and underwent serial whole body planar and single-photon emission computed tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT) scans at 2, 24, 72, 120 and 168 h after injection. The other 3 patients received intravenous injection of 0.28-0.41 GBq (7.5-11.1 mCi) of 177 Lu-DOTATATE for the same imaging acquisition procedures at 1, 3, 4, 24 and 72 h after injection. The dosimetry was calculated using the OLINDA/EXM 1.1 software. Results: Administration of 177 Lu-DOTA-EB-TATE was well tolerated, with no adverse symptoms being noticed or reported in any of the patients. Compared with 177 Lu-DOTATATE, 177 Lu-DOTA-EB-TATE showed extended circulation in the blood and achieved 7.9-fold increase of tumor dose delivery. The total body effective doses were 0.205 ± 0.161 mSv/MBq for 177 Lu-DOTA-EB-TATE and 0.174 ± 0.072 mSv/MBq for 177 Lu-DOTATATE. Significant dose delivery increases to the kidneys and bone marrow were also observed in patients receiving 177 Lu-DOTA-EB-TATE than those receiving 177 Lu-DOTATATE (3.2 and 18.2-fold, respectively). Conclusion: By introducing an albumin binding moiety, 177 Lu-DOTA-EB-TATE showed remarkably higher uptake and retention in NET

  5. As faces e funções da tradução em sala de aula de LE.DOI: 10.5007/2175-7968.2011v1n27p161

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinara de Oliveira Branco

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo tem o objetivo de discutir e demonstrar como a tradução pode ser aplicada em sala de aula de línguas estrangeiras (LE de forma eficaz, sem interferir negativamente na aquisição da língua estrangeira e utilizando, em casos específicos, a língua materna (LM ou a própria LE como recurso tradutório. Para tanto, a Abordagem Funcionalista da Tradução de Nord (1997 será utilizada como base teórica, bem como as categorias de tradução de Jakobson (2000. A partir da discussão da teoria, serão apresentados exercícios de tradução que descrevam o uso e eficácia tradutórios no contexto de aprendizagem de LE. Os resultados demonstram que há uma desmistificação quanto ao uso da tradução nesse contexto e que a LM passa a ter sua importância e valor novamente reconhecidos no aprendizado de LE.

  6. As faces e funções da tradução em sala de aula de LE.DOI: 10.5007/2175-7968.2011v1n27p161

    OpenAIRE

    Branco, Sinara de Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Este artigo tem o objetivo de discutir e demonstrar como a tradução pode ser aplicada em sala de aula de línguas estrangeiras (LE) de forma eficaz, sem interferir negativamente na aquisição da língua estrangeira e utilizando, em casos específicos, a língua materna (LM) ou a própria LE como recurso tradutório. Para tanto, a Abordagem Funcionalista da Tradução de Nord (1997) será utilizada como base teórica, bem como as categorias de tradução de Jakobson (2000). A partir da discussão da teoria,...

  7. Comment on "Atomic structure calculations and identification of EUV and SXR spectral lines in Sr XXX" by A. Goyal, I. Khatri, S. Aggarwal, A.K. Singh, M. Mohan [J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transf 2015;161:157

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Kanti M.

    2015-11-01

    Recently, Goyal et al. [1] reported energies and lifetimes (τ) for the lowest 113 levels of the 2s22p5, 2s2p6, 2s22p43ℓ, 2s2p53ℓ and 2p63ℓ configurations of F-like Sr XXX. For the calculations they adopted the multi-configuration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) and the flexible atomic code (FAC). Additionally, they also listed radiative rates (A- values), oscillator strengths (f- values) and line strengths (S- values) for four types of transitions, namely electric dipole (E1), electric quadrupole (E2), magnetic dipole (M1) and magnetic quadrupole (M2), but only from the ground to the higher excited levels. However, there are two clear anomalies in their reported data. Firstly, the f-values listed from FAC in their Tables 3-6 are larger than from MCDF by a factor of two, for all transitions. This is because they have blindly listed the output from FAC without realising that, unlike MCDF, FAC lists ωf where ω is the statistical weight, and happens to be exactly 2 in the present case. Secondly, their lifetime for level 2 (2s22p51/2 o 2P) is incorrect. This is because the dominant contributing transition for this level is 1-2 M1 for which A=3.25×106 s-1, listed (correctly) in their Table 5, and this leads to τ=3.08×10-7 s, and not 1.54×10-7 s, as listed in their Table 1.

  8. Sabbatical Options for Academic Librarians in the U.S. Vary Widely. A Review of: Flaspohler, M. R. (2009. Librarian sabbatical leaves: Do we need to get out more? Journal of Academic Librarianship, 35(2, 152‐161.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Ganshorn

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives – To gather data on what proportion of U.S. academic libraries provide sabbatical opportunities to librarians, and to explore library directors’ perceptions of the effectiveness of sabbaticals and barriers to sabbatical‐taking among librarians at their institutions.Design – Online questionnaire.Setting – Academic libraries in the U.S..Subjects – Directors of 403 academic libraries.Methods – The author reviewed the literature on sabbatical leaves in the library profession. She then developed an online survey using the University of Washington’s Catalyst system (a tool similar to SurveyMonkey. The survey contained both closed and open‐ended questions, in order to generate quantitative data as well as to gather more in‐depth information on respondents’ views.A sample of American academic library directors was generated by choosing every eighth entry on a list of 3037 academic libraries generated by lib‐web‐cats, an online directory of libraries (http://www.librarytechnology.org/libwebcats/. The survey was sent to 403 academic library directors based on this selection method. The author received 101 successfully completed surveys for a response rate of 25%.Main Results – The author found that just over half of respondents (53 libraries, or 52% indicated their institutions offered sabbatical leaves to librarians. Thirty‐six per cent indicated they did not, while 12% indicated “other” (many of these respondents commented with clarifications about what other leave programs were available to librarians. Of the 53 institutions that reported offering leave programs, only half (27 respondents indicated that library staff members had taken a sabbatical leave.Open‐ended questions generated some insight into the barriers to sabbatical leaves at academic libraries. Differences between institutions in terms of availability of sabbatical leaves appear to be due to a combination of librarian status (whether or not librarians have full faculty status; funding issues (in some institutions, the library, and not the college administration, has to cover the costs of a sabbatical; and availability of other staff to cover the duties of the individual taking the leave.Respondents also noted a discrepancy between the length and timing of librarian sabbaticals compared to other faculty (i.e., the professoriate, with librarians more often required to begin their leaves in the summer. Librarian sabbaticals were also sometimes shorter than those of other faculty; in some institutions a summer‐length sabbatical was available, but not a six‐month or year‐long sabbatical, even though these options were available to other faculty.In terms of impacts of sabbaticals, most respondents who had experienced a staff member taking sabbatical felt that the sabbatical benefited the staff member and the institution; positive results include improved morale, publications that raised the profile of the library, and learning that was applied in the workplace. Some respondents, however, had negative experiences to report, the most common being that the sabbatical had had no effect. Some respondents noted staff who had taken sabbaticals had failed to meet the goals that had been set for the sabbatical. When asked what could be done to enhance sabbatical programs, respondents at institutions with these programs had some interesting suggestions, such as aligning sabbatical programs more closely with institutional goals, or promoting the pursuit of more collaborative research while on sabbatical.Conclusion – The author notes that while it’s dangerous to over‐generalize from such a brief survey, many of the issues raised in the responses, such as faculty status, funding shortfalls, and staff shortages echo themes raised elsewhere in the library literature. These issues probably need to be addressed if we are to see any increase in the number of librarians taking sabbatical leaves.The author’s other conclusion is that librarians must be more accountable for demonstrating how a sabbatical could add institutional value, and for meeting the goals set in their sabbatical plans. The author conducted this study while on sabbatical herself, and concludes it “provides one example of how a librarian might create a manageable, research‐based project that more closely marries academic rigor to personal experience” (p. 160.

  9. Monitoreo de la protección catódica a línea submarina No. 161 de 36"ø Rebombeo/Dos Bocas de la Región Marina Suroeste en la sonda de Campeche

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández Márquez, Joaquín Salvador

    2002-01-01

    Uno de los retos que existen en la actualidad dentro del ámbito de Pemex Exploración y Producción es la construcción de líneas submarinas dentro de la Sonda de Campeche en el Golfo de México, para el transporte de los hidrocarburos desde ese sitio hasta las instalaciones de Almacenamiento y Bombeo a los diferentes puntos de la Republica Mexicana. Así mismo, el mayor problema que se cuenta es cuando una vez hecha la construcción del ducto submarino que se debe de hacer pa...

  10. CCDC 849283: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : bis(N-(1-(6-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl)pyridin-2-yl)ethylidene)aniline)-cobalt tetrachloro-cobalt

    KAUST Repository

    Gong, Dirong

    2013-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  11. CCDC 849284: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : Dichloro-(2,6-diisopropyl-N-(1-(6-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl)pyridin-2-yl)ethylidene)aniline)-cobalt(ii)

    KAUST Repository

    Gong, Dirong

    2013-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  12. Sabbatical Options for Academic Librarians in the U.S. Vary Widely. A Review of: Flaspohler, M. R. (2009). Librarian sabbatical leaves: Do we need to get out more? Journal of Academic Librarianship, 35(2), 152‐161.

    OpenAIRE

    Heather Ganshorn

    2010-01-01

    Objectives – To gather data on what proportion of U.S. academic libraries provide sabbatical opportunities to librarians, and to explore library directors’ perceptions of the effectiveness of sabbaticals and barriers to sabbatical‐taking among librarians at their institutions.Design – Online questionnaire.Setting – Academic libraries in the U.S..Subjects – Directors of 403 academic libraries.Methods – The author reviewed the literature on sabbatical leaves in the library profession. She then ...

  13. A narrativa estilhaçada em Assim na terra, de Luiz Sérgio Metz DOI - 10.5752/P.2358-3428.2012v16n31p161

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Lorena Vouto da Fonseca

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo analisa como se dá a relação entre textos, o jogo intertextual em Assim na terra, do sulriograndense Luiz Sérgio Metz, e como as relações que se estabelecem entre diferentes textos estruturam essa narrativa, a qual se constitui a partir do fragmento, da referência e da citação, em suma, da Biblioteca. Inserindo o autor na linhagem dos autores-críticos, explicitamos as relações estabelecidas pelo autor com seus modelos: em especial Jorge Luis Borges, Vicente Huidobro, Octávio Paz e Aureliano de Figueiredo Pinto. Referimo-nos, aqui, ao diálogo que se estabelece entre autores latinoamericanos, especialmente aqueles que, ao mesmo tempo em que produziram literatura, pensaram o fazer literário e, consequentemente, seu próprio lugar no mundo. Próximos, além de uma determinada atividade criadora, esses autores compartilham uma história, uma cultura e um determinado espaço – o mesmo locus de enunciação, o qual não considera, necessariamente, limites políticos, ou, fronteiras. Palavras-chave: Luiz Sérgio Metz.Assim na terra. Jogo intertextual. Biblioteca. Literatura latinoamericana.  

  14. Baseline Cardiopulmonary Function as an Independent Prognostic Factor for Survival of Inoperable Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer After Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy: A Single-Center Analysis of 161 Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semrau, Sabine; Klautke, Gunther; Fietkau, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Little is known about the effects of cardiopulmonary function on the prognosis of concurrent chemoradiotherapy in patients with inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of the effects of tumor- and patient-related factors and parameters of cardiopulmonary function and heart morphology on the feasibility, toxicity, and prognosis was performed. Results: Cardiopulmonary function had no effect on the toxicity or feasibility of treatment; effects on survival were observed in the univariate analysis. Median survival varied as follows: cardiac function: 13.0 ± 1.6 months for left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) > 50% vs. 10.0 ± 1.9 months for LVEF ≤ 50% (p = 0.003); pulmonary function: 16.0 ± 0.6 months for no lung function deficits (vital capacity [VC] ≥ 60%, forced expiratory volume in 1 s ≥ 80%, and diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) ≥60%) vs. 14.0 ± 1.5 months for one or two function deficits vs. 8.0 ± 1.5 months for three lung function deficits (p = 0.001); T stage: 19.0 ± 3.1 months for rcT0/cT1/cT2 vs. 12.0 ± 0.8 months for cT3/cT4 (p = 0.039); and age: 11.0 ± 1.5 months for <60 years vs. 18.0 ± 2.5 months for 60-69 years vs. 12.0 ± 1.2 months for ≥70 years (p = 0.008). Prognostic factors identified in the multivariate analysis were LVEF ≤50% (p = 0.043; hazard ratio [HR], 1.74), reduced pulmonary function (p = 0.001; HR, 1.71 or 5.05) and T stage (p = 0.026; HR: 1.71). Conclusions: In addition to T-stage, cardiac and pulmonary function variables affected the survival of non-small-cell lung cancer patients after chemoradiotherapy.

  15. The KMOS Cluster Survey (KCS). II. The Effect of Environment on the Structural Properties of Massive Cluster Galaxies at Redshift 1.39 < z < 1.61

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jeffrey C. C.; Beifiori, Alessandra; Saglia, Roberto P.; Mendel, J. Trevor; Stott, John P.; Bender, Ralf; Galametz, Audrey; Wilman, David J.; Cappellari, Michele; Davies, Roger L.; Houghton, Ryan C. W.; Prichard, Laura J.; Lewis, Ian J.; Sharples, Ray; Wegner, Michael

    2018-03-01

    We present results on the structural properties of massive passive galaxies in three clusters at 1.39 R-band sizes of these galaxies are a factor of ∼2–3 smaller than their local counterparts. The slopes of the relation between the stellar mass and the light-weighted size are consistent with recent studies in clusters and the field. Their mass-weighted sizes are smaller than the rest-frame R-band sizes, with an average mass-weighted to light-weighted size ratio that varies between ∼0.45 and 0.8 among the clusters. We find that the median light-weighted size of the passive galaxies in the two more evolved clusters is ∼24% larger than that for field galaxies, independent of the use of circularized effective radii or semimajor axes. These two clusters also show a smaller size ratio than the less evolved cluster, which we investigate using color gradients to probe the underlying {M}* /{L}{{{H}}160} gradients. The median color gradients are ∇z ‑ H ∼ ‑0.4 mag dex‑1, twice the local value. Using stellar populations models, these gradients are best reproduced by a combination of age and metallicity gradients. Our results favor the minor merger scenario as the dominant process responsible for the observed galaxy properties and the environmental differences at this redshift. The environmental differences support that clusters experience accelerated structural evolution compared to the field, likely via an epoch of enhanced minor merger activity during cluster assembly. Based on observations obtained at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) of the European Southern Observatory (ESO; program IDs: 092.A-0210; 093.A-0051; 094.A-0578; 095.A-0137(A); 096.A-0189(A); 097.A-0332(A)). This work is based on observations made with the NASA/ESA HST, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program GO 13687, as well as with the CANDELS Multi-Cycle Treasury Program and the 3D-HST Treasury Program (GO 12177 and 12328).

  16. Antonio Sánchez-Bayón, Sistema de Derecho Comparado y global: de las familias jurídicas mundiales al nuevo Derecho común, Tirant lo Blanch, Valencia, 2012, 161 págs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia del Barrio

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Dr. Sánchez-Bayón untersucht in dieser Studie die Notwendigkeit, das Konzept des Vergleichenden Rechts in Zeiten der Globalisierung neu zu überdenken. Die kulturellen, politischen und soziologischen Wechsel müssen an die neue Weltlage angepasst werden. Die juristischen Lösungen müssen verglichen werden, so dass die Spielregeln und der professionelle technische Sprachgebrauch angeglichen werden können; nur so können die Antworten auf die Konsolidierung des gemeinschaftlichen Rechts gefunden werden. Der Autor stellt den formalistischen Positivismus des Staates in Frage.

  17. A genome-wide association study of Hodgkin's lymphoma identifies new susceptibility loci at 2p16.1 (REL), 8q24.21 and 10p14 (GATA3)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enciso-Mora, Victor; Broderick, Peter; Ma, Yussanne

    2010-01-01

    To identify susceptibility loci for classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (cHL), we conducted a genome-wide association study of 589 individuals with cHL (cases) and 5,199 controls with validation in four independent samples totaling 2,057 cases and 3,416 controls. We identified three new susceptibility...... etiology by revealing a strong human leukocyte antigen (HLA) association (rs6903608, OR = 1.70, combined P = 2.84 × 10 -50). These data provide new insight into the pathogenesis of cHL....

  18. Uses of cancer registries for public health and clinical research in Europe: Results of the European Network of Cancer Registries survey among 161 population-based cancer registries during 2010–2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; Louwman, W.J.; Kwast, A.; van den Hurk, C.J.G.; O'Callaghan, M.; Rosso, S.; Zanetti, R.; Storm, H.; Comber, H.; Steliarova-Foucher, E.; Coebergh, J.W.W.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To provide insight into cancer registration coverage, data access and use in Europe. This contributes to data and infrastructure harmonisation and will foster a more prominent role of cancer registries (CRs) within public health, clinical policy and cancer research, whether within or outside the

  19. CCDC 849283: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : bis(N-(1-(6-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl)pyridin-2-yl)ethylidene)aniline)-cobalt tetrachloro-cobalt

    KAUST Repository

    Gong, Dirong; Jia, Weiguo; Chen, Tao; Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2013-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from

  20. CCDC 849284: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : Dichloro-(2,6-diisopropyl-N-(1-(6-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl)pyridin-2-yl)ethylidene)aniline)-cobalt(ii)

    KAUST Repository

    Gong, Dirong; Jia, Weiguo; Chen, Tao; Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2013-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from

  1. Lifespan analysis of brain development, gene expression and behavioral phenotypes in the Ts1Cje, Ts65Dn and Dp(16)1/Yey mouse models of Down syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aziz, Nadine M; Guedj, Faycal; Pennings, Jeroen L A; Olmos-Serrano, Jose Luis; Siegel, Ashley; Haydar, Tarik F; Bianchi, Diana W

    2018-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) results from triplication of human chromosome 21. Neuropathological hallmarks of DS include atypical central nervous system development that manifests prenatally and extends throughout life. As a result, individuals with DS exhibit cognitive and motor deficits and have delays in

  2. Genome-wide association analysis of genetic generalized epilepsies implicates susceptibility loci at 1q43, 2p16.1, 2q22.3 and 17q21.32

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffens, M.; Leu, C.; Ruppert, A. K.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic generalized epilepsies (GGEs) have a lifetime prevalence of 0.3 and account for 2030 of all epilepsies. Despite their high heritability of 80, the genetic factors predisposing to GGEs remain elusive. To identify susceptibility variants shared across common GGE syndromes, we carried out a ...

  3. Method of isolation of traces of americium by using the +6 oxidation state properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwinta, Jean; Michel, Jean-Jacques

    1969-05-01

    The authors present a method to separate traces of americium from a solution containing fission products and actinides. This method comprises the following steps: firstly, the oxidation of americium at the +6 state by ammonium persulfate and carrying over of actinides and III and IV lanthanides by lanthanum fluoride; secondly, the reduction by hydrazine of the oxidized americium and carrying over of the reduced americium by lutetium fluoride; and thirdly, the americium-lutetium separation by selective extractions either with di 2 ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid, or by fractionated elution on an anionic resin column by a mixture of nitric acid and methanol [fr

  4. Extraction of nitrates of lanthanoids (3) of the yttrium group and yttrium (3) by trialkylbenzylammonium nitrate in toluene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyartman, A.K.; Kovalev, S.V.; Keskinov, V.A.; Kopyrin, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    A study was made on extraction of nitrates of lanthanoids (3) of the yttrium group (terbium-lutetium) and yttrium (3) by trialkylbensylammonium nitrate in toluene at T=298.15 K pH 2. Extraction isotherms are described with account of formation of compound of (R 4 N) 2 [Ln(NO 3 ) 5 ] composition in organic phase. Values of extraction constants decreasing in terbium (3)-lutetium (3) series, were calculated. Value of extraction constant for yttrium (3) is close to the value of extraction constant for ytterbium (3). 13 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Luminescence characteristics of the Ce.sup.3+./sup.-doped pyrosilicates: the case of La-admixed Gd.sub.2./sub.Si.sub.2./sub.O.sub.7./sub. single crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jarý, Vítězslav; Nikl, Martin; Kurosawa, S.; Shoji, Y.; Mihóková, Eva; Beitlerová, Alena; Pazzi, G.P.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 118, č. 46 (2014), s. 26521-26529 ISSN 1932-7447 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH14266 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : lutetium silicate sci ntillators * floating-zone growth * electronic-structure * yttrium content * lyso crystals Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.772, year: 2014

  6. Para-ter-butyl of calix(4)arene with acetamide-ether as inorganic-organic receiver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, F.M. de; Scopelliti, R.; Muller, G.; Buenzli J, C.G.; Charbonniere, L.

    2001-01-01

    A new functionalized calix(4)arene was designed and constructed with predetrmined properties to form lanthanides complexes and to sensibilize its luminescent properties. This, in addition to sensibilize that photophysical property and once formed the complex resulted a good receiver of organic molecules as it is demonstrated the crystal structure of the lutetium complex. (Author)

  7. Ce(III) and Lu(III) metal-organic frameworks with Lewis acid metal sites: Preparation, sorption properties and catalytic activity in Knoevenagel condensation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Almáši, M.; Zeleňák, V.; Opanasenko, Maksym; Císařová, I.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 243, APR 2015 (2015), s. 184-194 ISSN 0920-5861 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-07101S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : cerium(III) * lutetium(III) * Benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.312, year: 2015

  8. Effective atomic number, electron density and kerma of gamma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    rare element optical glass with oxides of tungsten, tantalum and thorium. ... Similarly, gadolinium and lutetium exhibit only +3 oxidation state because .... (σa) and effective molecular cross-section (σm) are related by the following equation: σa =.

  9. Application of the pM'-pCH diagrams in the determination of hydrolysis constants of the lanthanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez G, H.; Jimenez R, M.; Solache R, M.; Rojas H, A.

    2001-01-01

    The pM ' -pC H diagrams allowed to determine the saturation and non-saturation zones of Lu(OH) 3 in solid phase and those were applied for determining the hydrolysis and lutetium solubility constants, using the radioactive isotope Lu-177. The first constant of hydrolysis was also determined by the potentiometric method in absence of solid phase. (Author)

  10. Thermoluminescent coactivated rare earth oxyhalide phosphors and x-ray image converters utilizing said phosphors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabatin, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    Oxyhalides of lanthanum, gadolinium and lutetium coactivated with a first activator selected from bismuth and samarium to provide the color of light emission and a second coactivator (e.g. terbium or praseodymium) which increases the amount of stored energy in a stored radiographic latent image are found to be superior in their conversion efficiency of x-rays to visible light. (author)

  11. Character of changes in the thermodynamic properties of alloyed melts of rare-earth metals with low-melting-point p- and d-metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamshchikov, L.F.; Zyapaev, A.A.; Raspopin, S.P.

    2003-01-01

    Published data on thermodynamic characteristics of lanthanides in liquid-metal melts of gallium, indium and zinc were systematized. The monotonous change from lanthanum to lutetium was ascertained for activity values and activity coefficients of trivalent lanthanides in the melts, which permits calculating the values for the systems of fusible metals, where no experimental data are available [ru

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_005823 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available KYSLVAGGKRLRPVLALAAFGGLQNETQNVLLLGASLECI 100 ... NSQTLSILSKQSAPELFEAMKYSLVAGGKRLRPVLALAAFGGLQNETQNVLLLGASLEC...I Sbjct: 1 ... NSQTLSILSKQSAPELFEAMKYSLVAGGKRLRPVLALAAFGGLQNETQNVLLLGASLECI 60 ... Query: 161 LHRNLLEILHAG

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_002678 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 9] ... Length = 161 ... Query: 1 ... MFVRTAGERDLVAIRALLVETWHATYDAIYGAAKVTEITDAWHSIASLKARLIKPNSEFL 60 ... MFVRTAGERD...LVAIRALLVETWHATYDAIYGAAKVTEITDAWHSIASLKARLIKPNSEFL Sbjct: 1 ... MFVRTAGERD

  14. ORF Alignment: NT_033778 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MFAYDILVVTVRLGEYNTKTKVDCDNHLCQE 60 ... Query: 161 FTTTVWRETAANATSKVLRTMNIDRQPKETCSEIYGWNMTFEQICAGNTLSQLCSTDSGA ...220 ... FTTTVWRETAANATSKVLRTMNIDRQPKETCSEIYGWNMTFEQICAGNTLSQLCSTDSGA Sbjct: 121 FTTTVWRETAANATSKVLRTMNIDRQPKETCSEIYGWNMTFEQICAGNTLSQLCSTDSGA 180 ...

  15. ORF Alignment: NC_004567 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... Length = 161 ... Query: 2 ... QVLFHDQALDLVGEPLQDGDQLPKFKVFTTHDEKIKTKDLLGKPVLLSVMPDIDTRVCSI 61 ... ... ... QVLFHDQALDLVGEPLQDGDQLPKFKVFTTHDEKIKTKDLLGKPVLLSVMPDIDTRVCSI Sbjct: 1 ... QVLFHDQALDLVGEPLQDGDQLPKFKVFTTH

  16. Validation of GEANT3 simulation studies with a dual-head PMT ClearPET TM prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Ziemons, K; Streun, M; Pietrzyk, U

    2004-01-01

    The ClearPET TM project is proposed by working groups of the Crystal Clear Collaboration (CCC) to develop a 2/sup nd/ generation high performance small animal positron emission tomograph (PET). High sensitivity and high spatial resolution is foreseen for the ClearPET TM camera by using a phoswich arrangement combining mixed lutetium yttrium aluminum perovskite (LuYAP:Ce) and lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) scintillating crystals. Design optimizations for the first photomultiplier tube (PMT) based ClearPET camera are done with a Monte-Carlo simulation package implemented on GEANT3 (CERN, Geneva, Switzerland). A dual-head prototype has been built to test the frontend electronics and was used to validate the implementation of the GEANT3 simulation tool. Multiple simulations were performed following the experimental protocols to measure the intrinsic resolution and the sensitivity profile in axial and radial direction. Including a mean energy resolution of about 27.0% the simulated intrinsic resolution is about (...

  17. The joint PNC-ORNL tank calibration experiment of 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.H.; Bostick, D.A.; McBay, E.H.; Carter, J.A.; Ehinger, M.H.

    1991-11-01

    A tank calibration experiment was carried out using the lutetium double spike technique as part of the joint PNC-DOE effort to establish nuclear safeguards at reprocessing plants. The experiment used a 3000 liter tank containing about 100g/L depleted uranium. Results were less than ideal, but the reasons for this are understood. The discussions between the two organizations were highly beneficial. The experiment served to identify two problems in the procedure that must be solved before anything else is tried: 1. Quantitative mixing of tracer of tank contents has not been achieved at PNC. This must be corrected. 2. A chemical procedure to isolate lutetium in a form compatible with good mass spectrometric analysis must be developed. It must be amenable to use in a hot cell. 6 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Luminescent determination of trace amounts of terbium using diantipyrylmethane and salicylic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tishchenko, M A; Gerasimenko, G I; Poluehktov, N S [AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Odessa. Inst. Obshchej i Neorganicheskoj Khimii

    1978-01-01

    To elucidate the possibility of using pyrazolone-5-diantipyril-methane (DAM) derivative for determination of terbium microimpurities, the conditions have been studied of luminescent determination of terbium in complex compounds containing an ion of rare-earth element, diantipyrilmethane, and salicylic acid (Sal.). The ratio between the components in the complex REE-DAM-Sal is 1:1:3. La, Y, Gd do not affect the luminescence intensity of terbium complex. A luminescent method of determining terbium traces in highly pure oxides of lanthanum, gadolinium, lutetium, and yttrium has been developed in which suspensions of complex precipitation are used. The amount of terbium determined in oxide of lanthanum, gadolinium, and lutetium is (1-5)x10/sup -6/% and (2-3)x10/sup -5/% in yttrium oxide.

  19. Luminescence and energy transfer processes in (Lu,Tb).sub.3./sub.Al.sub.5./sub.O.sub.12./sub. single crystalline films doped with Ce.sup.3+./sup.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartosiewicz, Karol; Babin, Vladimir; Nikl, Martin; Mareš, Jiří A.; Zorenko, Yu.; Gorbenko, V.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 173, May (2016), s. 141-148 ISSN 0022-2313 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-15569S; GA ČR GAP204/12/0805 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 316906 - LUMINET Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : lutetium terbium aluminum garnets * Ce 3+ * energy transfer * luminescence * single crystalline films Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.686, year: 2016

  20. Luminescence and scintillation properties of Lu.sub.3./sub.Al.sub.5./sub.O.sub.12./sub. nanoceramics sintered by SPS method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pejchal, Jan; Babin, Vladimir; Beitlerová, Alena; Kučerková, Romana; Pánek, D.; Barta, J.; Čuba, V.; Yamaji, A.; Kurosawa, S.; Mihóková, Eva; Ito, A.; Goto, T.; Nikl, Martin; Yoshikawa, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 53, Mar (2016), s. 54-63 ISSN 0925-3467 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-09876S; GA MŠk(CZ) LH14266 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : lutetium-aluminium-garnet * spark-plasma-sintering * nanoceramics * scintillator * Ce-doping Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.238, year: 2016

  1. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of exchange coupled Ce.sup.3+./sup. ions in Lu.sub.2./sub.SiO.sub.5./sub. single crystal scintillator

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buryi, Maksym; Laguta, Valentyn; Rosa, Jan; Nikl, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 90, Jul (2016), s. 23-26 ISSN 1350-4487 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/12/0805; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029; GA MŠk LO1409 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : electron paramagnetic resonance * scintillators * lutetium oxyorthosilicate * exchange coupled ions * cerium ions Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.442, year: 2016

  2. Thermophysical Properties of Matter - The TPRC Data Series. Volume 4. Specific Heat - Metallic Elements and Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-01-01

    Indium—Indium alloys—Iron—iron alloys— lanthanum — load—lead alloys—lithium—lithium alloya—«agnaslum—magnaalum alloys—manganas^ —naoganasa alloys—marcury...Germanium 21 Gold 22 Hafnium 23 Holmium 24 Indium 25 Iridium 26 Iron 27 Lanthanum 28 Lead 29 Lithium 30 Lutetium 31 Magnesium 32 Manganese 33...hexahydrate (ErC^-eHjO Erbium gallate (see Trierbium pentagallium 1 dodecaoxide) 4 5 65 822 Freon 10 (see Carbon tetrachloride) Freon 11

  3. Laser Spectroscopy Characterization of Materials for Frequency Agile Solid State Laser Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-15

    Received 30 November 1987; revised manuscript received 29 January 1988) Single crystals of lanthanum lutetium gallium garnet (LaLuGaG) were grown by...group may be realized it gar- dleternte itf other materials can be found with spectral nets formed with lanthanum occupying tile dodecaliedrial ,1nl...array-pumped Nd: YAG and Nd: Lu: YAG lasers," Opt. inates and gallates with the malilite structure," in Tunable Lett. 14, 116-118 (1989). Solid State

  4. USSR and Eastern Europe Scientific Abstracts, Physics. Number 46.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-11-02

    magnetic field in the area of large fields, the harmonics are due to the resonances of the standing magnetic -plasma waves in the plate; in the area...parameters of cerium, gadolinium and lutetium orthovanadite. Polytherms of heat capacity, magnetization and magnetic susceptibility of these rare...of lasing in mixed ZnxCd^_xS single crystals, and it was found that the model of a simple " Fabry -Perot resonator ," i.e., an inverse layer on the

  5. Addition compounds between lanthanide trifluoromethane sulphonates and N,N,N',N' - tetrametilmalonamida (TMMA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellis, V.M. de.

    1984-01-01

    The preparation and characterization of the addiction compounds between lanthanide trifluoromethanesulphonates with the N,N,N',N' - tetramethylmodomamide (TMMA) are reported. The characterization of the compounds obtained by microanalytical procedures, infrared spectra, conductance measurements, X-ray powder patterns, absorption spectra of the praseodymium, neodymium, holmium and erbium and the emission spectra of the europium and the europium-doped lanthanum and lutetium adducts were made. (M.J.C.) [pt

  6. First principle calculation of structure and lattice dynamics of Lu2Si2O7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazipov D.V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ab initio calculations of crystal structure and Raman spectra has been performed for single crystal of lutetium pyrosilicate Lu2Si2O7. The types of fundamental vibrations, their frequencies and intensities in the Raman spectrum has been obtained for two polarizations. Calculations were made in the framework of density functional theory (DFT with hybrid functionals. The isotopic substitution was calculated for all inequivalent ions in cell. The results in a good agreement with experimental data.

  7. Abstracts of the 36. Brazilian congress of chemistry; 3. National meeting on thermal analysis and calorimetry; 9. Brazilian journey of chemistry scientific initiation; 2. National meeting on industrial chemistry; 4. Scientific marathon on chemistry; EXPOQUIMICA 96; 1. Workshop on in flow analysis; 1. Workshop on the environment: opportunities for the interdisciplinary research; 1. Workshop on chemical sensors and biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The use of ceramic solid electrolytes for chemical sensors and the characterization of lanthanide III p-toluene-sulphonates as well as the chemical preparation of lutetium compounds are discussed. A Brazilian station for monitoring global atmospheric and the impacts on pollutants dispersion in Brazil are analysed. The catalytic liquefaction of sugar cane bagasse is considered as well as the study of higher alcohols reaction on zeolites is presented

  8. Assignment of 4f-5d absorption bands in Ce-doped RAlO.sub.3./sub. (R=La, Gd, Y, Lu) perovskites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mihóková, Eva; Nikl, Martin; Bacci, M.; Dušek, Michal; Petříček, Václav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 19 (2009), 1951309/1-1951309/7 ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 903; GA AV ČR IAA100100810 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : cerium * EHT calculations * gadolinium compounds * lanthanum compounds * lutetium compounds * ultraviolet spectra * yttrium compounds Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.475, year: 2009

  9. Crystal growth and scintillation properties of selected fluoride crystals for VUV scintillators

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pejchal, Jan; Fukuda, K.; Yamaji, A.; Yokota, Y.; Kurosawa, S.; Král, Robert; Nikl, Martin; Yoshikawa, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 401, Sep (2014), s. 833-838 ISSN 0022-0248. [International Conference on Crystal Growth and Epitaxy /17./. Warsaw, 11.08.2013-16..08.2013] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12150 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : vacuum-ultra-violet emission * micro-pulling-down method * barium -lutetium fluoride * erbium fluoride Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.698, year: 2014

  10. Luminescence mechanism in doubly Gd, Nd-codoped fluoride crystals for VUV scintillators

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pejchal, Jan; Fukuda, K.; Babin, Vladimir; Kurosawa, S.; Yokota, Y.; Yoshikawa, A.; Nikl, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 169, Jan (2016), s. 682-689 ISSN 0022-2313. [International Conference on Luminescence and Optical Spectroscopy of Condensed Matter /17./. Wroclaw, 13.07.2014-18.07.2014] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH14266 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : barium –lutetium–yttrium fluoride * lutetium fluoride * scintillator * VUV luminescence Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.686, year: 2016

  11. Modifications of micro-pulling-down method for the growth of selected Li-containing crystals for neutron scintillator and VUV scintillation crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pejchal, Jan; Fujimoto, Y.; Chani, V.; Yanagida, T.; Yokota, Y.; Yoshikawa, A.; Nikl, Martin; Beitlerová, Alena

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 360, SI (2012), 127–130 ISSN 0022-0248 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002 Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100100910 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : Ti-doping * micro-pulling-down * barium lutetium fluoride * lithium aluminate * neutron scintillator Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.552, year: 2012

  12. Yttrium and rare earths separation by ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinatti, D.G.; Ayres, M.J.G.; Ribeiro, S.; Silva, G.L.J.P.; Silva, M.L.C.P.; Martins, A.H.

    1988-01-01

    The experimental results of yttrium and rare earths separation from Brazilian xenotime are presented. The research consist in five stage: 1) Preparation of yttrium, erbium and lutetium standard solutions, from solubilization of pure oxides 2) yttrium and rare earths separation by ion exchange chromatrography 3) Separation and recovery of EDTA 4) Precipitation and calcination and 4) Analytical control of process. (C.G.C.) [pt

  13. Dicty_cDB: [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VF (Link to library) VFC161 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U15456-1 VFC161P (Link... to Original site) VFC161F 564 VFC161Z 562 VFC161P 1126 - - Show VFC161 Library VF (Link to library) Clone ID VFC161 (Link to dict...yBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID - dictyBase ID - Link to Contig Contig-U15456-1 Original site URL http://dict...Value N Y16962 |Y16962.1 Dictyostelium discoideum mRNA for cathepsin D. 1025 0.0 5 AJ243946 |AJ243946.1 Dict...plasma membrane 4.0 %: vesicles of secretory system >> prediction for VFC161 is nuc 5' end seq. ID VFC161F 5

  14. Structure-Based Discovery of 4-(6-Methoxy-2-methyl-4-(quinolin-4-yl)-9 H -pyrimido[4,5- b ]indol-7-yl)-3,5-dimethylisoxazole (CD161) as a Potent and Orally Bioavailable BET Bromodomain Inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yujun; Bai, Longchuan; Liu, Liu; McEachern, Donna; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Meagher, Jennifer L.; Yang, Chao-Yie; Ran, Xu; Zhou, Bing; Hu, Yang; Li, Xiaoqin; Wen, Bo; Zhao, Ting; Li, Siwei; Sun, Duxin; Wang, Shaomeng (Michigan)

    2017-03-24

    We have designed and synthesized 9H-pyrimido[4,5-b]indole-containing compounds to obtain potent and orally bioavailable BET inhibitors. By incorporation of an indole or a quinoline moiety to the 9H-pyrimido[4,5-b]indole core, we identified a series of small molecules showing high binding affinities to BET proteins and low nanomolar potencies in inhibition of cell growth in acute leukemia cell lines. One such compound, 4-(6-methoxy-2-methyl-4-(quinolin-4-yl)-9H-pyrimido[4,5-b]indol-7-yl)-3,5-dimethylisoxazole (31) has excellent microsomal stability and good oral pharmacokinetics in rats and mice. Orally administered, 31 achieves significant antitumor activity in the MV4;11 leukemia and MDA-MB-231 triple-negative breast cancer xenograft models in mice. Determination of the cocrystal structure of 31 with BRD4 BD2 provides a structural basis for its high binding affinity to BET proteins. Testing its binding affinities against other bromodomain-containing proteins shows that 31 is a highly selective inhibitor of BET proteins. Our data show that 31 is a potent, selective, and orally active BET inhibitor.

  15. ISSN 2073 ISSN 2073 9990 East Cent. Afr. J. s 9990 East Cent. Afr.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hp 630 Dual Core

    Most of these complications can be prevented by patientss education on self footcare .... 161(60.1%), smoking of cigarette causes poor circulation affecting the feet 161 .... This can be explained by the fact that higher level of education might.

  16. ORF Alignment: NC_002950 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available APLRAVYGNIDGQDIR Sbjct: 1 ... KIGLLSDTHGYIDEKYRIHFADCDEIWHAGDIGSVTVADYLSGLAPLRAVYGNIDGQDIR 60 ... Query: 147 DMLHLNPGAAGKYGFHAVRTLMRFV...IDGRDIRDLQVIELAD 187 ... DMLHLNPGAAGKYGFHAVRTLMRFVIDGRDIRDLQVIELAD Sbjct: 121 DMLHLNPGAAGKYGFHAVRTLMRFVIDGRDIRDLQVIELAD 161

  17. ORF Alignment: NC_002678 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 099] ... Length = 146 ... Query: 41 ... IFAANEPVPREMLARVVGKNCNLDLVIDDIRTELAGRPYELVSVAGGWQHRTKKVFGDVI 100 ... ... ... IFAANEPVPREMLARVVGKNCNLDLVIDDIRTELAGRPYELVSVAGGWQHRTKKVFGDVI Sbjct: 1 ... ...IFAANEPVPREMLARVVGKNCNLDLVIDDIRTELAGRPYELVSVAGGWQHRTKKVFGDVI 60 ... Query: 161 SGPRSPRPGAPYTYVTTKNFLSQFGL 186 ...

  18. High resolution Holocene paleomagnetic secular variation records from Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Usapkar, A.; Dewangan, P.; Badesab, F.K.; Mazumdar, A.; Ramprasad, T.; Krishna, K.S.; Basavaiah, N.

    /8 probably due to local effects. Paleoinclination records of MD161/8, MD161/11 and MD161/13 show a low between ~2.4 and 2.0 cal. kyr BP, an increase between 2.0 and 1.4 cal. kyr BP and a decrease towards the present. To varying degrees these trends can...

  19. Supplementary data:

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Plant Pathology

    Supplementary data: Table 1. Identification of various virulence factors in R. solanacearum: Rs-09-161, Rs-10-244, GMI1000. Gene name Rs-09-161 locus tag*. Accession no. Rs-10-244 locus tag*. Accesion no. GMI1000 locus tag. Location. Gene description. Exopolysacharide. epsA. RALSO161_m00209880 KY661391 ...

  20. 24th Annual Canadian Conference on HIV/AIDS Research/24e Congr?s Annuel Canadien de Recherche sur le VIH/sida CAHR Committees / Comit?s de l?ACRV

    OpenAIRE

    Hogg, Robert; Hogg, Robert; Hart, Trevor; Tan, Darrell; Hart, Trevor; Tan, Darrell; Boily-Larouche, Genevi?ve; Lajoie, Julie; Omollo, Kenneth O; Cheruiyot, Julianna; Njoki, Jane; Kimani, Makubo; Oyugi, Julius; Kimani, Joshua; Fowke, Keith R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The C-type lectin CD161 is expressed by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells sharing conserved transcriptional and functional signature. CD4+ T cells with type-17 profiles derived from CD161+ precursors and CD161-expressing CD8+ T cells share the same differentiation profile and include the unique anti-bacterial CD161++ mucosal-associated invariant T cells (MAIT) expressing invariant TCR V?7.2. During HIV infection, circulating cells harbouring the signature of CD161+ cells are impaired in blood...

  1. Single-shot positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy with LYSO scintillators

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso, A. M.; Cooper, B. S.; Deller, A.; Cassidy, D. B.

    2016-01-01

    We have evaluated the application of a lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) based detector to single-shot positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. We compare this detector directly with a similarly configured PbWO4 scintillator, which is the usual choice for such measurements. We find that the signal to noise ratio obtained using LYSO is around three times higher than that obtained using PbWO4 for measurements of Ps excited to longer-lived (Rydberg) levels, or when they are ionized so...

  2. The migrant 152Eu as europium humate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotz, D.

    2001-01-01

    Europium was used as a representative of the lanthanide group in the migration experiments in underground water. These 14 elements, with the atomic numbers of 58 (cerium) through 71 (lutetium) are quite similar in their chemical characteristics, and all of them will form metal-humate complexes with humic acids via proton exchange groups. Apart from the concentration, chemical composition and structure, also the particle size of these metal humates will vary strongly as it is dependent on the geochemistry and geophysics of the underground systems [de

  3. Measurement of the half-life of sup 1 sup 7 sup 6 Lu

    CERN Document Server

    Nir-El, Y

    1998-01-01

    The half-life of sup 1 sup 7 sup 6 Lu was determined by measuring the disintegration rate of a solution of lutetium oxide, using a calibrated HPGe detector, and found to be (3.69+-0.02)x10 sup 1 sup 0 y. It is recommended that the current adopted value be calculated from the grouping of three published values since 1983, including our value, the weighted mean of which is (3.73+-0.01)x10 sup 1 sup 0 y.

  4. Phase extraction equilibria in systems rare earth (3) nitrates-ammonium nitrate-water-trialkylmethylammonium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyartman, A.K.; Kopyrin, A.A.; Puzikov, E.A.

    1995-01-01

    The distribution of rare earth metals (3) between aqueous and organic phases in the systems rare earth metal (3) (praseodymium-lutetium (3), yttrium (3)) nitrate-ammonium nitrate-water-trialkylmethylammonium (kerosene diluent nitrate has been studied. It is shown that in organic phase di- and trisolvates of metals (3) with tralkylmethylammonium nitrate are formed. The influence of concentration of rare earth metal (3) nitrate and ammonium nitrate on the values of extraction concentrational constants has been ascertained: they decrease with increase in the ordinal number of lanthanide (3). 11 refs., 4 figs. 1 tab

  5. Indigenous development of TBq levels of "1"7"7Lu radioisotope production at RPhD for nuclear medicine applications - a successful venture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Sudipta; Vimalnath, K.V.; Dash, Ashutosh

    2017-01-01

    Lutetium-177 ("1"7"7Lu) has emerged as a potential radionuclide during last decade for the development of radionuclide therapy owing to its favorable nuclear decay characteristics (T_1_/_2=6.65 d, E_β_(_m_a_x) = 0.497 MeV, E_γ = 113 keV (6.4%) and 208 keV (11%)). The long half-life of this promising radioisotope offering distinct logistical advantage and feasibility of its large-scale production in medium flux Dhruva research reactor contributed to its success story

  6. Mutual solubility between hexane and three-n-butyl phosphate solvates of lanthanide(III) and thorium(IV) nitrates at various temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keskinov, V.A.; Lishuk, V.V.; Pyartman, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    Phase diagrams of binary liquid systems of hexane-rare earth(III) nitrates solvates (rare earth - neodymium, gadolinium, yttrium, ytterbium, lutetium) and thorium(IV) with tri-n-butylphosphate are studied at different temperatures. Phase diagrams of binary systems consist of fields of homogeneous solutions and field of stratification into two liquid phases (I, II): phase I is enriched by hexane, and phase II - [Ln(NO 3 ) 3 (TBP) 3 ] (Ln=Nd, Gd, Y, Yb and Lu) or [Th(NO 3 ) 4 (TBP) 2 ]. Field of stratification into two liquid phases are decreased with growing temperature in binary systems [ru

  7. Kinetic properties of solid yttrium at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivliev, A.D.

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of results of experimental investigation into temperature-diffusivity, specific electroresistance and heat conductivity of yttrium is carried out. Peculiarities of variation of its kinetic characteristics under high temperatures are shown to result from two-band character of energy spectrum of collectivized electrons. In particular, growth of heat conductivity results from reduction of density of heavy electron states under heating. The suggested model describes kinetic characteristics of lutetium, as well. Usage of this model for the rest heavy rare-earth metals enables to make conclusion about reduction of magnetic scattering effcieincy in the rare-earth metals in proportion to approximation to melting temperature

  8. Development of Scintillators in Nuclear Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Khoshakhlagh, Mohammad; Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh; Abedi, Seyed Mohammad; Mahmoudian, Babak

    2015-01-01

    High-quality image is necessary for accurate diagnosis in nuclear medicine. There are many factors in creating a good image and detector is the most important one. In recent years, several detectors are studied to get a better picture. The aim of this paper is comparison of some type of these detectors such as thallium activated sodium iodide bismuth germinate cesium activated yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG: Ce) YAP: Ce “lutetium aluminum garnet activated by cerium” CRY018 “CRY019” lanthanum br...

  9. Development of Scintillators in Nuclear Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshakhlagh, Mohammad; Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh; Abedi, Seyed Mohammad; Mahmoudian, Babak

    2015-01-01

    High-quality image is necessary for accurate diagnosis in nuclear medicine. There are many factors in creating a good image and detector is the most important one. In recent years, several detectors are studied to get a better picture. The aim of this paper is comparison of some type of these detectors such as thallium activated sodium iodide bismuth germinate cesium activated yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG: Ce) YAP: Ce "lutetium aluminum garnet activated by cerium" CRY018 "CRY019" lanthanum bromide and cadmium zinc telluride. We studied different properties of these crystals including density, energy resolution and decay times that are more important factors affecting the image quality.

  10. Neutron activation analysis of the rare earth elements in Nasu hot springs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Nagao; Takahashi, Naruto.

    1978-01-01

    Eleven rare earth elements (lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, holmium, thulium, ytterbium and lutetium) in hot spring waters and sinter deposits in the Nasu area were determined by the neutron activation method. The rare earth elements in hot spring water were preconcentrated in ferric hydroxide precipitate and neutron-irradiated. The rare earth elements were chemically separated into lighter and heavier groups and the activity of each group was measured with a Ge(Li) detector. Distribution of the rare earth elements between the hot spring water and the sinter deposit was also discussed. (auth.)

  11. Status of the lanthanides and actinides in the periodic table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, N.E.

    1985-01-01

    In extended discussions and correspondence with Ekkehard Fluck, the author was made aware of a problem with the Periodic Table, i.e., which element should be shown in the main table as the representative of the lanthanide series and the actinide series. In earlier discussion, he came to the conclusion that lanthanum and actinium are not the elements which should appear, but rather lutetium and lawrencium are more appropriate for inclusion in their place. This paper will attempt to justify the reasons for the above conclusions. 4 refs

  12. Scintillator Evaluation for High-Energy X-Ray Diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, S. S.; Baker, S. A.

    2001-01-01

    This report presents results derived from a digital radiography study performed using x-rays from a 2.3 MeV, rod-pinch diode. Detailed is a parameter study of cerium-doped lutetium ortho-silicate (LSO) scintillator thickness, as it relates to system resolution and detection quantum efficiency (DQE). Additionally, the detection statistics of LSO were compared with that of CsI(Tl). As a result of this study we found the LSO scintillator with a thickness of 3 mm to yield the highest system DQE over the range of spatial frequencies from 0.75 to 2.5 mm -1

  13. 4d--4f emission resonances in laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Sullivan, G.; Carroll, P.K.

    1981-01-01

    Using targets containing compounds of the elements cesium through lutetium, we studied the spectra of laser-produced plasmas in the grazing-incidence region from 40 to 200 A. The spectra are characterized by strong regions of resonancelike emission extending typically over 9--18 eV. With increasing Z, the spectra show certain systematic variations in character and move monotonically toward shorter wavelengths. From a collisional-radiative plasma model, the ion stages responsible for the emision are identified as VIII through XVI. The resonances are attributed to 4-4f transitions that, because Dn = 0, tend to overlap for different ion stages of the same element

  14. Progress report for the Office of Safeguards and Security for FY 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.H.; McKown, H.S.; Walker, R.L.; Sherman, R.L.; Pritchard, C.A.; Carter, J.A.

    1982-12-01

    Progress in various areas funded by, or of interest to, the Office of Safeguards and Security during FY 1982 is reported. The quadrupole mass spectrometer and its mobile laboratory visited several sites; results were uniformly excellent. We designed, built, and evaluated a new ion source for this instrument; as a result, performance is considerably enhanced. We have completed initial evaluation of lutetium for use as a double spike in calibrating holding tanks or other vessels of indeterminate volume. Precisions and accuracies of about 0.1% were obtained. Two uranium standards have been evaluated using NBS isotopic standards and SALE samples

  15. Successful neoadjuvant peptide receptor radionuclide therapy for an inoperable pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Nunes da Silva

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-functional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs can present with advanced local or distant (metastatic disease limiting the possibility of surgical cure. Several treatment options have been used in experimental neoadjuvant settings to improve the outcomes in such cases. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PPRT using beta emitting radiolabelled somatostatin analogues has been used in progressive pancreatic NETs. We report a 55-year-old female patient with a 12.8 cm pancreatic NET with significant local stomach and superior mesenteric vein compression and liver metastases. The patient underwent treatment with [177Lutetium-DOTA0,Tyr3]octreotate (177Lu-octreotate for the treatment of local and metastatic symptomatic disease. Six months after 4 cycles of 177lutetium-octreotate, resolution of the abdominal complaints was associated with a significant reduction in tumour size and the tumour was rendered operable. Histology of the tumour showed a 90% necrotic tumour with abundant hyalinized fibrosis and haemorrhage compatible with PPRT-induced radiation effects on tumour cells. This report supports that PPRT has a role in unresectable and metastatic pancreatic NET.

  16. An inelastic neutron scattering study of the spin dynamics of Yb1-xLuxAl3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, R.

    1998-01-01

    We present the results of a systematic inelastic neutron scattering study of the spin dynamics of the mixed valent compound YbAl 3 doped with nonmagnetic lutetium. The aim of the investigation is to clarify the origin of the unusual gap-like magnetic response observed in YbAl 3 , which can be modeled by two inelastic peaks: a narrow peak at 34 meV with HWHM, r = 6.4 ± 0.8 meV and a broad peak at 44 meV with Λ = 30 ± 1 meV. Lutetium substitution leads to a substantial increase in the linewidth (Λ = 9 ± 1 meV at x = 0.1) and a decrease in the intensity (down by 60% at x = 0.1) of the narrow component, with a negligible effect on the broad inelastic peak. This trend is confirmed with higher doping resulting in the complete suppression of the narrow peak at x ≥ 0.35. The results indicate that the narrow component arises from coherent excitation processes within the hybridized 4f-band, which are destroyed by disorder, while the broad component is not so sensitive to the loss of coherence

  17. Novel Electro-Optical Coupling Technique for Magnetic Resonance-Compatible Positron Emission Tomography Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter D. Olcott

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-compatible positron emission tomography (PET detector design is being developed that uses electro-optical coupling to bring the amplitude and arrival time information of high-speed PET detector scintillation pulses out of an MRI system. The electro-optical coupling technology consists of a magnetically insensitive photodetector output signal connected to a nonmagnetic vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL diode that is coupled to a multimode optical fiber. This scheme essentially acts as an optical wire with no influence on the MRI system. To test the feasibility of this approach, a lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate crystal coupled to a single pixel of a solid-state photomultiplier array was placed in coincidence with a lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystal coupled to a fast photomultiplier tube with both the new nonmagnetic VCSEL coupling and the standard coaxial cable signal transmission scheme. No significant change was observed in 511 keV photopeak energy resolution and coincidence time resolution. This electro-optical coupling technology enables an MRI-compatible PET block detector to have a reduced electromagnetic footprint compared with the signal transmission schemes deployed in the current MRI/PET designs.

  18. Novel electro-optical coupling technique for magnetic resonance-compatible positron emission tomography detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olcott, Peter D; Peng, Hao; Levin, Craig S

    2009-01-01

    A new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-compatible positron emission tomography (PET) detector design is being developed that uses electro-optical coupling to bring the amplitude and arrival time information of high-speed PET detector scintillation pulses out of an MRI system. The electro-optical coupling technology consists of a magnetically insensitive photodetector output signal connected to a nonmagnetic vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) diode that is coupled to a multimode optical fiber. This scheme essentially acts as an optical wire with no influence on the MRI system. To test the feasibility of this approach, a lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate crystal coupled to a single pixel of a solid-state photomultiplier array was placed in coincidence with a lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystal coupled to a fast photomultiplier tube with both the new nonmagnetic VCSEL coupling and the standard coaxial cable signal transmission scheme. No significant change was observed in 511 keV photopeak energy resolution and coincidence time resolution. This electro-optical coupling technology enables an MRI-compatible PET block detector to have a reduced electromagnetic footprint compared with the signal transmission schemes deployed in the current MRI/PET designs.

  19. Neutron temperature measurements in a cryogenic hydrogenous moderator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.M.; Hoovler, G.S.; Lewis, R.H.

    1995-01-01

    Benchmarkings of neutronic calculations are most successful when there is a direct correlation between a measurement and an analytic result. In the thermal neutron energy region, the fluence rate as a function of moderator temperature and position within the moderator is an area of potential correlation. The measurement can be done by activating natural lutetium. The two isotopes of the element lutetium have widely different cross sections and permit the discrimination of flux shape and energy distributions at different reactor conditions. The 175 Lu has a 1/v dependence in the thermal energy region, and 176 Lu has a resonance structure that approximates a constant cross section in the same region. The saturation activation of the two isotopes has been measured in an insulated moderator container at the center of a thermal heterogeneous reactor designed for space nuclear propulsion. The measurements were made in a hydrogenous (polyethylene) moderator at three temperatures (83, 184, and 297 K) and five locations within the moderator. Simultaneously, the reactivity effect of the change in the moderator temperature was determined to be positive with an increase in temperature. The plot of activation shows the variation in neutron fluence rate and current with temperature and explains the positive reactivity coefficient. A neutron temperature can be inferred from a postulated Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution and compared with Monte Carlo or other calculations

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of simultaneous radiation detection in the hybrid tomography system ClearPET-XPAD3/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dávila, H. Olaya, E-mail: hernan.olaya@uptc.edu.co; Martínez, S. A. [Physics Department, Universidad Pedagógica y Tecnológica de Colombia, Tunja-Colombia (Colombia); Sevilla, A. C., E-mail: acsevillam@unal.edu.co; Castro, H. F. [Physics Department, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá D.C - Colombia (Colombia)

    2016-07-07

    Using the Geant4 based simulation framework SciFW1, a detailed simulation was performed for a detector array in the hybrid tomography prototype for small animals called ClearPET / XPAD, which was built in the Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille. The detector system consists of an array of phoswich scintillation detectors: LSO (Lutetium Oxy-ortosilicate doped with cerium Lu{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce) and LuYAP (Lutetium Ortoaluminate of Yttrium doped with cerium Lu{sub 0.7}Y{sub 0.3}AlO{sub 3}:Ce) for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and hybrid pixel detector XPAD for Computed Tomography (CT). Simultaneous acquisition of deposited energy and the corresponding time - position for each recorded event were analyzed, independently, for both detectors. interference between detection modules for PET and CT. Information about amount of radiation reaching each phoswich crystal and XPAD detector using a phantom in order to study the effectiveness by radiation attenuation and influence the positioning of the radioactive source {sup 22}Na was obtained. The simulation proposed will improve distribution of detectors rings and interference values will be taken into account in the new versions of detectors.