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Sample records for ltr dna recognition

  1. Accurate episomal HIV 2-LTR circles quantification using optimized DNA isolation and droplet digital PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malatinkova, Eva; Kiselinova, Maja; Bonczkowski, Pawel; Trypsteen, Wim; Messiaen, Peter; Vermeire, Jolien; Verhasselt, Bruno; Vervisch, Karen; Vandekerckhove, Linos; De Spiegelaere, Ward

    2014-01-01

    In HIV-infected patients on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), the detection of episomal HIV 2-LTR circles is a potential marker for ongoing viral replication. Quantification of 2-LTR circles is based on quantitative PCR or more recently on digital PCR assessment, but is hampered due to its low abundance. Sample pre-PCR processing is a critical step for 2-LTR circles quantification, which has not yet been sufficiently evaluated in patient derived samples. We compared two sample processing procedures to more accurately quantify 2-LTR circles using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). Episomal HIV 2-LTR circles were either isolated by genomic DNA isolation or by a modified plasmid DNA isolation, to separate the small episomal circular DNA from chromosomal DNA. This was performed in a dilution series of HIV-infected cells and HIV-1 infected patient derived samples (n=59). Samples for the plasmid DNA isolation method were spiked with an internal control plasmid. Genomic DNA isolation enables robust 2-LTR circles quantification. However, in the lower ranges of detection, PCR inhibition caused by high genomic DNA load substantially limits the amount of sample input and this impacts sensitivity and accuracy. Moreover, total genomic DNA isolation resulted in a lower recovery of 2-LTR templates per isolate, further reducing its sensitivity. The modified plasmid DNA isolation with a spiked reference for normalization was more accurate in these low ranges compared to genomic DNA isolation. A linear correlation of both methods was observed in the dilution series (R2=0.974) and in the patient derived samples with 2-LTR numbers above 10 copies per million peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), (R2=0.671). Furthermore, Bland-Altman analysis revealed an average agreement between the methods within the 27 samples in which 2-LTR circles were detectable with both methods (bias: 0.3875±1.2657 log10). 2-LTR circles quantification in HIV-infected patients proved to be more

  2. Rapid turnover of 2-LTR HIV-1 DNA during early stage of highly active antiretroviral therapy.

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    Weijun Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite prolonged treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, the infectious HIV-1 continues to replicate and resides latently in the resting memory CD4+ T lymphocytes, which blocks the eradication of HIV-1. The viral persistence of HIV-1 is mainly caused by its proviral DNA being either linear nonintegrated, circular nonintegrated, or integrated. Previous reports have largely focused on the dynamics of HIV-1 DNA from the samples collected with relatively long time intervals during the process of disease and HAART treatment, which may have missed the intricate changes during the intervals in early treatment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we investigated the dynamics of HIV-1 DNA in patients during the early phase of HARRT treatment. Using optimized real time PCR, we observed significant changes in 2-LTR during the first 12-week of treatment, while total and integrated HIV-1 DNA remained stable. The doubling time and half-life of 2-LTR were not correlated with the baseline and the rate of changes in plasma viral load and various CD4+ T-cell populations. Longitudinal analyses on 2-LTR sequences and plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS levels did not reveal any significant changes in the same treatment period. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study revealed the rapid changes in 2-LTR concentration in a relatively large number of patients during the early HAART treatment. The rapid changes indicate the rapid infusion and clearance of cells bearing 2-LTR in the peripheral blood. Those changes are not expected to be caused by the blocking of viral integration, as our study did not include the integrase inhibitor raltegravir. Our study helps better understand the dynamics of HIV-DNA and its potential role as a biomarker for the diseases and for the treatment efficacy of HAART.

  3. Effects of As2O3 on DNA methylation, genomic instability, and LTR retrotransposon polymorphism in Zea mays.

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    Erturk, Filiz Aygun; Aydin, Murat; Sigmaz, Burcu; Taspinar, M Sinan; Arslan, Esra; Agar, Guleray; Yagci, Semra

    2015-12-01

    Arsenic is a well-known toxic substance on the living organisms. However, limited efforts have been made to study its DNA methylation, genomic instability, and long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposon polymorphism causing properties in different crops. In the present study, effects of As2O3 (arsenic trioxide) on LTR retrotransposon polymorphism and DNA methylation as well as DNA damage in Zea mays seedlings were investigated. The results showed that all of arsenic doses caused a decreasing genomic template stability (GTS) and an increasing Random Amplified Polymorphic DNAs (RAPDs) profile changes (DNA damage). In addition, increasing DNA methylation and LTR retrotransposon polymorphism characterized a model to explain the epigenetically changes in the gene expression were also found. The results of this experiment have clearly shown that arsenic has epigenetic effect as well as its genotoxic effect. Especially, the increasing of polymorphism of some LTR retrotransposon under arsenic stress may be a part of the defense system against the stress.

  4. Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Type 1 LTR DNA contains an intrinsic gene producing antisense RNA and protein products

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    Hsiao Chiu-Bin

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While viruses have long been shown to capitalize on their limited genomic size by utilizing both strands of DNA or complementary DNA/RNA intermediates to code for viral proteins, it has been assumed that human retroviruses have all their major proteins translated only from the plus or sense strand of RNA, despite their requirement for a dsDNA proviral intermediate. Several studies, however, have suggested the presence of antisense transcription for both HIV-1 and HTLV-1. More recently an antisense transcript responsible for the HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ protein has been described. In this study we investigated the possibility of an antisense gene contained within the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR. Results Inspection of published sequences revealed a potential transcription initiator element (INR situated downstream of, and in reverse orientation to, the usual HIV-1 promoter and transcription start site. This antisense initiator (HIVaINR suggested the possibility of an antisense gene responsible for RNA and protein production. We show that antisense transcripts are generated, in vitro and in vivo, originating from the TAR DNA of the HIV-1 LTR. To test the possibility that protein(s could be translated from this novel HIV-1 antisense RNA, recombinant HIV antisense gene-FLAG vectors were designed. Recombinant protein(s were produced and isolated utilizing carboxy-terminal FLAG epitope (DYKDDDDK sequences. In addition, affinity-purified antisera to an internal peptide derived from the HIV antisense protein (HAP sequences identified HAPs from HIV+ human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Conclusion HIV-1 contains an antisense gene in the U3-R regions of the LTR responsible for both an antisense RNA transcript and proteins. This antisense transcript has tremendous potential for intrinsic RNA regulation because of its overlap with the beginning of all HIV-1 sense RNA transcripts by 25 nucleotides. The

  5. DNA recognition by synthetic constructs.

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    Pazos, Elena; Mosquera, Jesús; Vázquez, M Eugenio; Mascareñas, José L

    2011-09-05

    The interaction of transcription factors with specific DNA sites is key for the regulation of gene expression. Despite the availability of a large body of structural data on protein-DNA complexes, we are still far from fully understanding the molecular and biophysical bases underlying such interactions. Therefore, the development of non-natural agents that can reproduce the DNA-recognition properties of natural transcription factors remains a major and challenging goal in chemical biology. In this review we summarize the basics of double-stranded DNA recognition by transcription factors, and describe recent developments in the design and preparation of synthetic DNA binders. We mainly focus on synthetic peptides that have been designed by following the DNA interaction of natural proteins, and we discuss how the tools of organic synthesis can be used to make artificial constructs equipped with functionalities that introduce additional properties to the recognition process, such as sensing and controllability. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Marcadores virológicos no convencionales en pacientes infectados con el virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana: ADN HIV-T, ADN HIV- 2LTR y ARN de HIV Non conventional virological markers in HIV-infected patients: T-HIV DNA, 2LTR-HIV DNA and HIV RNA

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    Rosana Gariglio

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available La terapia antirretroviral de alta eficacia (TAAE induce una reducción marcada y persistente de la viremia plasmática, contribuyendo a disminuir la mortalidad y morbilidad de los pacientes HIV-positivos. Así, la carga viral (CV es el método de referencia para evaluar la eficacia terapéutica. Sin embargo, aun en presencia de una TAAE eficiente no se ha logrado la erradicación viral. En este estudio analizamos la presencia del ADN total de HIV (ADN HIV-T, del ADN no integrado con 2LTR (ADN HIV-2LTR y del ARN de HIV, en un grupo de 55 pacientes HIV-positivos en distintos estadios clínicos, con y sin TAAE, mediante ensayos de PCR con revelado colorimétrico en microplaca, optimizados en nuestro laboratorio. La sensibilidad clínica del ARN del HIV fue evaluada con el bDNA, resultando del 74% y del 64%, respectivamente, con una concordancia del 85%. Este ensayo podría ser utilizado en el seguimiento de pacientes bajo TAAE. El ADN HIV-2LTR resultó positivo en el 54% aunque estuvo ausente en pacientes con elevada CV. Este marcador se consideraba un producto lábil y su presencia se asociaba a infección reciente. Sin embargo, actuales evidencias ponen en discusión su estabilidad por lo que su significado clínico debe ser reconsiderado. La ausencia del ADN HIV-2LTR en pacientes con CV detectable puede relacionarse con la heterogeneidad de la secuencia utilizada para su detección. El ADN HIV-T estuvo presente en el 100% de las muestras y resultaría relevante como marcador de remisión cuando se dispongan de terapias que efectivamente erradiquen la infección.Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART induces a persistent reduction of the plasmatic viremia, contributing to decrease mortality and morbidity of infected people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Thus, viral load (VL is the reference method to evaluate therapy effectiveness. However, even in the presence of efficient HAART viral eradication was yet not achieved. In this

  7. Enzymatic recognition of DNA replication origins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stayton, M.M.; Bertsch, L.; Biswas, S.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the process of recognition of the complementary-strand origin with emphasis on RNA polymerase action in priming M13 DNA replication, the role of primase in G4 DNA replication, and the function of protein n, a priming protein, during primosome assembly. These phage systems do not require several of the bacterial DNA replication enzymes, particularly those involved in the regulation of chromosome copy number of the initiatiion of replication of duplex DNA. 51 references, 13 figures, 1 table

  8. Antibody recognition of Z-DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafer, E.M.; Moeller, A.; Valle, R.P.C.; Nordheim, V.A.; Rich, A.; Stollar, B.D.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge)

    1983-01-01

    To measure serological reactions under physiological ionic strength, we prepared a brominated (Bl) poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC), which forms a stable Z helix in solutions of low salt concentration. Mice and rabbits were immunized with this polymer complexed with the basic protein methylated bovine serum albumin (MBSA), and it was discovered that the Z-DNA helix is a strong immunogen. Various antibody populations were purified from the rabbit serum by quantitative immunoprecipitation. Spleen cells from the mice were used for the preparation of hybridoma cell lines secreting monoclonal antibodies. Anti-Z-DNA antibodies were also raised by immunizing animals with poly(dG-dm 5 C).poly(dG-dm 5 C) under conditions where it was reported to be in the left-handed Z conformation as well as unmodified poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC) that was in the right-handed B conformation: both were complexed with MBSA. Z-DNA reactive antibodies were found in both murine and human SLE. A Z-DNA-specific as well as a dDNA and Z-DNA cross-reactive antibody population were distinguished by affinity chromatography of the SLE sera. The specificities of the various anti-Z-DNA antibody populations were measured by direct-binding and competitive radioimmunoassays, using synthetic polymers of defined structure under various ionic strengths. These studies allow us to map the possible antigenic sites for these antibodies, which serve as a model for DNA-protein recognition. The findings also established the usefulness of the antibodies as biochemical probes for Z-DNA. 29 references, 6 figures, 1 table

  9. LTR retrotransposons in fungi.

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    Anna Muszewska

    Full Text Available Transposable elements with long terminal direct repeats (LTR TEs are one of the best studied groups of mobile elements. They are ubiquitous elements present in almost all eukaryotic genomes. Their number and state of conservation can be a highlight of genome dynamics. We searched all published fungal genomes for LTR-containing retrotransposons, including both complete, functional elements and remnant copies. We identified a total of over 66,000 elements, all of which belong to the Ty1/Copia or Ty3/Gypsy superfamilies. Most of the detected Gypsy elements represent Chromoviridae, i.e. they carry a chromodomain in the pol ORF. We analyzed our data from a genome-ecology perspective, looking at the abundance of various types of LTR TEs in individual genomes and at the highest-copy element from each genome. The TE content is very variable among the analyzed genomes. Some genomes are very scarce in LTR TEs (8000 elements. The data shows that transposon expansions in fungi usually involve an increase both in the copy number of individual elements and in the number of element types. The majority of the highest-copy TEs from all genomes are Ty3/Gypsy transposons. Phylogenetic analysis of these elements suggests that TE expansions have appeared independently of each other, in distant genomes and at different taxonomical levels. We also analyzed the evolutionary relationships between protein domains encoded by the transposon pol ORF and we found that the protease is the fastest evolving domain whereas reverse transcriptase and RNase H evolve much slower and in correlation with each other.

  10. Physical signals for protein–DNA recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Xiao-Qin; Zeng, Jia; Yan, Hong

    2009-01-01

    This paper discovers consensus physical signals around eukaryotic splice sites, transcription start sites, and replication origin start and end sites on a genome-wide scale based on their DNA flexibility profiles calculated by three different flexibility models. These salient physical signals are localized highly rigid and flexible DNAs, which may play important roles in protein–DNA recognition by the sliding search mechanism. The found physical signals lead us to a detailed hypothetical view of the search process in which a DNA-binding protein first finds a genomic region close to the target site from an arbitrary starting location by three-dimensional (3D) hopping and intersegment transfer mechanisms for long distances, and subsequently uses the one-dimensional (1D) sliding mechanism facilitated by the localized highly rigid DNAs to accurately locate the target flexible binding site within 30 bp (base pair) short distances. Guided by these physical signals, DNA-binding proteins rapidly search the entire genome to recognize a specific target site from the 3D to 1D pathway. Our findings also show that current promoter prediction programs (PPPs) based on DNA physical properties may suffer from lots of false positives because other functional sites such as splice sites and replication origins have similar physical signals as promoters do

  11. DNA pattern recognition using canonical correlation algorithm.

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    Sarkar, B K; Chakraborty, Chiranjib

    2015-10-01

    We performed canonical correlation analysis as an unsupervised statistical tool to describe related views of the same semantic object for identifying patterns. A pattern recognition technique based on canonical correlation analysis (CCA) was proposed for finding required genetic code in the DNA sequence. Two related but different objects were considered: one was a particular pattern, and other was test DNA sequence. CCA found correlations between two observations of the same semantic pattern and test sequence. It is concluded that the relationship possesses maximum value in the position where the pattern exists. As a case study, the potential of CCA was demonstrated on the sequence found from HIV-1 preferred integration sites. The subsequences on the left and right flanking from the integration site were considered as the two views, and statistically significant relationships were established between these two views to elucidate the viral preference as an important factor for the correlation.

  12. Dynamic constitutional frameworks for DNA biomimetic recognition.

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    Catana, Romina; Barboiu, Mihail; Moleavin, Ioana; Clima, Lilia; Rotaru, Alexandru; Ursu, Elena-Laura; Pinteala, Mariana

    2015-02-07

    Linear and cross-linked dynamic constitutional frameworks generated from reversibly interacting linear PEG/core constituents and cationic sites shed light on the dominant coiling versus linear DNA binding behaviours, closer to the histone DNA binding wrapping mechanism.

  13. [Non-LTR retrotransposons: LINEs and SINEs in plant genome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xu-Dong; Ling, Hong-Qing

    2006-06-01

    Retrotransposons are one of the drivers of genome evolution. They include LTR (long terminal repeat) retrotransposons, which widespread in Eukaryotagenomes, show structural similarity to retroviruses. Non-LTR retrotransposons were first discovered in animal genomes and then identified as ubiquitous components of nuclear genomes in many species across the plant kingdom. They constitute a large fraction of the repetitive DNA. Non-LTR retrotransposons are divided into LINEs (long interspersed nuclear elements) and SINEs (short interspersed nuclear elements). Transposition of non-LTR retrotransposons is rarely observed in plants indicating that most of them are inactive and/or under regulation of the host genome. Transposition is poorly understood, but experimental evidence from other genetic systems shows that LINEs are able to transpose autonomously while non-autonomous SINEs depend on the reverse transcription machinery of other retrotransposons. Phylogenic analysis shows LINEs are probably the most ancient class of retrotransposons in plant genomes, while the origin of SINEs is unknown. This review sums up the above data and wants to show readers a clear picture of non-LTR retrotransposons.

  14. LTR real-time PCR for HIV-1 DNA quantitation in blood cells for early diagnosis in infants born to seropositive mothers treated in HAART area (ANRS CO 01).

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    Avettand-Fènoël, Véronique; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Blanche, Stéphane; Burgard, Marianne; Floch, Corinne; Toure, Kadidia; Allemon, Marie-Christine; Warszawski, Josiane; Rouzioux, Christine

    2009-02-01

    HIV-1 diagnosis in babies born to seropositive mothers is one of the challenges of HIV epidemics in children. A simple, rapid protocol was developed for quantifying HIV-1 DNA in whole blood samples and was used in the ANRS French pediatric cohort in conditions of prevention of mother-to-child transmission. A quantitative HIV-1 DNA protocol (LTR real-time PCR) requiring small blood volumes was developed. First, analytical reproducibility was evaluated on 172 samples. Results obtained on blood cell pellets and Ficoll-Hypaque separated mononuclear cells were compared in 48 adult HIV-1 samples. Second, the protocol was applied to HIV-1 diagnosis in infants in parallel with plasma HIV-RNA quantitation. This prospective study was performed in children born between May 2005 and April 2007 included in the ANRS cohort. The assay showed good reproducibility. The 95% detection cut-off value was 6 copies/PCR, that is, 40 copies/10(6) leukocytes. HIV-DNA levels in whole blood were highly correlated with those obtained after Ficoll-Hypaque separation (r = 0.900, P mothers have received HAART. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Programmable molecular recognition based on the geometry of DNA nanostructures.

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    Woo, Sungwook; Rothemund, Paul W K

    2011-07-10

    From ligand-receptor binding to DNA hybridization, molecular recognition plays a central role in biology. Over the past several decades, chemists have successfully reproduced the exquisite specificity of biomolecular interactions. However, engineering multiple specific interactions in synthetic systems remains difficult. DNA retains its position as the best medium with which to create orthogonal, isoenergetic interactions, based on the complementarity of Watson-Crick binding. Here we show that DNA can be used to create diverse bonds using an entirely different principle: the geometric arrangement of blunt-end stacking interactions. We show that both binary codes and shape complementarity can serve as a basis for such stacking bonds, and explore their specificity, thermodynamics and binding rules. Orthogonal stacking bonds were used to connect five distinct DNA origami. This work, which demonstrates how a single attractive interaction can be developed to create diverse bonds, may guide strategies for molecular recognition in systems beyond DNA nanostructures.

  16. DNAzyme Feedback Amplification: Relaying Molecular Recognition to Exponential DNA Amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng; Yin, Qingxin; McConnell, Erin M; Chang, Yangyang; Brennan, John D; Li, Yingfu

    2018-03-26

    Technologies capable of linking DNA amplification to molecular recognition are very desirable for ultrasensitive biosensing applications. We have developed a simple but powerful isothermal DNA amplification method, termed DNAzyme feedback amplification (DFA), that is capable of relaying molecular recognition to exponential DNA amplification. The method incorporates both an RNA-cleaving DNAzyme (RCD) and rolling circle amplification (RCA) carried out by a special DNA polymerase using a circular DNA template. DFA begins with a stimulus-dependent RCA reaction, producing tandemly linked RCDs in long-chain DNA products. These RCDs cleave an RNA-containing DNA sequence to form additional primers that hybridize to the circular DNA molecule, giving rise to DNA assemblies that act as the new inputs for RCA. The RCA reaction and the cleavage event keep on feeding each other autonomously, resulting in exponential growth of repetitive DNA sequences that can be easily detected. This method can be used for the detection of both nucleic acid based targets and non-nucleic acid analytes. In this article, we discuss the conceptual framework of the feedback amplification approach, the essential features of this method as well as remaining challenges and possible solutions. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. DMPD: All is not Toll: new pathways in DNA recognition. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16446382 All is not Toll: new pathways in DNA recognition. Wagner H, Bauer S. J Exp... Med. 2006 Feb 20;203(2):265-8. Epub 2006 Jan 30. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show All is not Toll: new pathways in DNA recognition.... PubmedID 16446382 Title All is not Toll: new pathways in DNA recognition. Authors

  18. Development of 5' LTR DNA methylation of latent HIV-1 provirus in cell line models and in long-term-infected individuals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trejbalová, K.; Kovářová, D.; Blažková, J.; Machala, L.; Jilich, D.; Weber, Jan; Kučerová, D.; Vencálek, O.; Hirsch, Ivan; Hejnar, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 8, Feb 19 (2016), č. článku 19. ISSN 1868-7083 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : HIV-1 * latent reservoir * DNA methylation * chromatin conformation * latent HIV-1 provirus reactivation * HIV-1-infected individuals Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.987, year: 2016 http://clinicalepigeneticsjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13148-016-0185-6

  19. Development of 5 ' LTR DNA methylation of latent HIV-1 provirus in cell line models and in long-term-infected individuals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trejbalová, Kateřina; Kovářová, Denisa; Blažková, Jana; Machala, L.; Jilich, D.; Weber, J.; Kučerová, Dana; Vencálek, O.; Hirsch, Ivan; Hejnar, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 8, zima (2016), č. článku 19. ISSN 1868-7083 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/12/1736 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : HIV-1 * latent reservoir * DNA methylation * chromatin conformation * latent HIV-1 provirus reactivation * HIV-1-infected individuals Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.987, year: 2016

  20. DMPD: Innate immune recognition of, and regulation by, DNA. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16979939 Innate immune recognition of, and regulation by, DNA. Ishii KJ, Akira S. T...rends Immunol. 2006 Nov;27(11):525-32. Epub 2006 Sep 18. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Innate immune recognition... of, and regulation by, DNA. PubmedID 16979939 Title Innate immune recognition of, and regulation b

  1. Bio-recognitive photonics of a DNA-guided organic semiconductor

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    Back, Seung Hyuk; Park, Jin Hyuk; Cui, Chunzhi; Ahn, Dong June

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of duplex DNA with higher molecular weights has attracted attention for a new opportunity towards a better organic light-emitting diode (OLED) capability. However, biological recognition by OLED materials is yet to be addressed. In this study, specific oligomeric DNA-DNA recognition is successfully achieved by tri (8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminium (Alq3), an organic semiconductor. Alq3 rods crystallized with guidance from single-strand DNA molecules show, strikingly, a unique distribution of the DNA molecules with a shape of an `inverted' hourglass. The crystal's luminescent intensity is enhanced by 1.6-fold upon recognition of the perfect-matched target DNA sequence, but not in the case of a single-base mismatched one. The DNA-DNA recognition forming double-helix structure is identified to occur only in the rod's outer periphery. This study opens up new opportunities of Alq3, one of the most widely used OLED materials, enabling biological recognition.

  2. Bio-recognitive photonics of a DNA-guided organic semiconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, Seung Hyuk; Park, Jin Hyuk; Cui, Chunzhi; Ahn, Dong June

    2016-01-04

    Incorporation of duplex DNA with higher molecular weights has attracted attention for a new opportunity towards a better organic light-emitting diode (OLED) capability. However, biological recognition by OLED materials is yet to be addressed. In this study, specific oligomeric DNA-DNA recognition is successfully achieved by tri (8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminium (Alq3), an organic semiconductor. Alq3 rods crystallized with guidance from single-strand DNA molecules show, strikingly, a unique distribution of the DNA molecules with a shape of an 'inverted' hourglass. The crystal's luminescent intensity is enhanced by 1.6-fold upon recognition of the perfect-matched target DNA sequence, but not in the case of a single-base mismatched one. The DNA-DNA recognition forming double-helix structure is identified to occur only in the rod's outer periphery. This study opens up new opportunities of Alq3, one of the most widely used OLED materials, enabling biological recognition.

  3. Molecular recognition in complexes of TRF proteins with telomeric DNA.

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    Miłosz Wieczór

    Full Text Available Telomeres are specialized nucleoprotein assemblies that protect the ends of linear chromosomes. In humans and many other species, telomeres consist of tandem TTAGGG repeats bound by a protein complex known as shelterin that remodels telomeric DNA into a protective loop structure and regulates telomere homeostasis. Shelterin recognizes telomeric repeats through its two major components known as Telomere Repeat-Binding Factors, TRF1 and TRF2. These two homologous proteins are therefore essential for the formation and normal function of telomeres. Indeed, TRF1 and TRF2 are implicated in a plethora of different cellular functions and their depletion leads to telomere dysfunction with chromosomal fusions, followed by apoptotic cell death. More specifically, it was found that TRF1 acts as a negative regulator of telomere length, and TRF2 is involved in stabilizing the loop structure. Consequently, these proteins are of great interest, not only because of their key role in telomere maintenance and stability, but also as potential drug targets. In the current study, we investigated the molecular basis of telomeric sequence recognition by TRF1 and TRF2 and their DNA binding mechanism. We used molecular dynamics (MD to calculate the free energy profiles for binding of TRFs to telomeric DNA. We found that the predicted binding free energies were in good agreement with experimental data. Further, different molecular determinants of binding, such as binding enthalpies and entropies, the hydrogen bonding pattern and changes in surface area, were analyzed to decompose and examine the overall binding free energies at the structural level. With this approach, we were able to draw conclusions regarding the consecutive stages of sequence-specific association, and propose a novel aspartate-dependent mechanism of sequence recognition. Finally, our work demonstrates the applicability of computational MD-based methods to studying protein-DNA interactions.

  4. DNA sensor cGAS-mediated immune recognition

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    Pengyan Xia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The host takes use of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs to defend against pathogen invasion or cellular damage. Among microorganism-associated molecular patterns detected by host PRRs, nucleic acids derived from bacteria or viruses are tightly supervised, providing a fundamental mechanism of host defense. Pathogenic DNAs are supposed to be detected by DNA sensors that induce the activation of NFκB or TBK1-IRF3 pathway. DNA sensor cGAS is widely expressed in innate immune cells and is a key sensor of invading DNAs in several cell types. cGAS binds to DNA, followed by a conformational change that allows the synthesis of cyclic guanosine monophosphate–adenosine monophosphate (cGAMP from adenosine triphosphate and guanosine triphosphate. cGAMP is a strong activator of STING that can activate IRF3 and subsequent type I interferon production. Here we describe recent progresses in DNA sensors especially cGAS in the innate immune responses against pathogenic DNAs.

  5. Novel DNA packaging recognition in the unusual bacteriophage N15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feiss, Michael [Department of Microbiology, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Geyer, Henriette, E-mail: henriettegeyer@gmail.com [Division of Viral Infections, Robert Koch Institute, Berlin (Germany); Division of Viral Infections, Robert Koch Institute, Berlin (Germany); Klingberg, Franco, E-mail: franco.klingberg@thermofisher.com [Flow Cytometry, Imaging & Microscopy, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Frankfurter Strasse 129B 64293 Darmstadt (Germany); Flow Cytometry, Imaging & Microscopy, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Frankfurter Strasse 129B 64293 Darmstadt (Germany); Moreno, Norma, E-mail: nmoreno@islander.tamucc.edu [Texas A& M University – Corpus Christi, 6300 Ocean Drive, Corpus Christi, TX 78412, United States. (United States); Texas A& M University – Corpus Christi, 6300 Ocean Drive, Corpus Christi, TX 78412, United States. (United States); Forystek, Amanda, E-mail: eamanda-forystek@uiowa.edu [Flow Cytometry, Imaging & Microscopy, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Frankfurter Strasse 129B 64293 Darmstadt (Germany); Room # 2911 JPP, Dept. of Psychiatry, The University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa, 52242 (United States); Maluf, Nasib Karl, E-mail: fKarl.Maluf@ap-lab.com [Flow Cytometry, Imaging & Microscopy, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Frankfurter Strasse 129B 64293 Darmstadt (Germany); Alliance Protein Laboratories, Inc. 6042 Cornerstone Court West, Suite ASan Diego, CA 92121, USA. (United States); Sippy, Jean [Department of Microbiology, Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Phage lambda's cosB packaging recognition site is tripartite, consisting of 3 TerS binding sites, called R sequences. TerS binding to the critical R3 site positions the TerL endonuclease for nicking cosN to generate cohesive ends. The N15 cos (cos{sup N15}) is closely related to cos{sup λ}, but whereas the cosB{sup N15} subsite has R3, it lacks the R2 and R1 sites and the IHF binding site of cosB{sup λ}. A bioinformatic study of N15-like phages indicates that cosB{sup N15} also has an accessory, remote rR2 site, which is proposed to increase packaging efficiency, like R2 and R1 of lambda. N15 plus five prophages all have the rR2 sequence, which is located in the TerS-encoding 1 gene, approximately 200 bp distal to R3. An additional set of four highly related prophages, exemplified by Monarch, has R3 sequence, but also has R2 and R1 sequences characteristic of cosB–λ. The DNA binding domain of TerS-N15 is a dimer. - Highlights: • There are two classes of DNA packaging signals in N15-related phages. • Phage N15's TerS binding site: a critical site and a possible remote accessory site. • Viral DNA recognition signals by the λ-like bacteriophages: the odd case of N15.

  6. DMPD: Cytosolic DNA recognition for triggering innate immune responses. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18280611 Cytosolic DNA recognition for triggering innate immune responses. Takaoka ...A, Taniguchi T. Adv Drug Deliv Rev. 2008 Apr 29;60(7):847-57. Epub 2007 Dec 31. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Cytosol...ic DNA recognition for triggering innate immune responses. PubmedID 18280611 Title Cytosolic D

  7. Insertion of a solo LTR retrotransposon associates with spur mutations in 'Red Delicious' apple (Malus × domestica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mengxue; Sun, Qibao; Zhou, Junyong; Qiu, Huarong; Guo, Jing; Lu, Lijuan; Mu, Wenlei; Sun, Jun

    2017-09-01

    Insertion of a solo LTR, which possesses strong bidirectional, stem-specific promoter activities, is associated with the evolution of a dwarfing apple spur mutation. Spur mutations in apple scions revolutionized global apple production. Since long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons are tightly related to natural mutations, inter-retrotransposon-amplified polymorphism technique and genome walking were used to find sequences in the apple genome based on these LTRs. In 'Red Delicious' spur mutants, a novel, 2190-bp insertion was identified as a spur-specific, solo LTR (sLTR) located at the 1038th nucleotide of another sLTR, which was 1536 bp in length. This insertion-within-an-insertion was localized within a preexisting Gypsy-50 retrotransposon at position 3,762,767 on chromosome 4. The analysis of transcriptional activity of the two sLTRs (the 2190- and 1536-bp inserts) indicated that the 2190-bp sLTR is a promoter, capable of bidirectional transcription. GUS expression in the 2190-bp-sense and 2190-bp-antisense transgenic lines was prominent in stems. In contrast, no promoter activity from either the sense or the antisense strand of the 1536-bp sLTR was detected. From ~150 kb of DNA on each side of the 2190 bp, sLTR insertion site, corresponding to 300 kb of the 'Golden Delicious' genome, 23 genes were predicted. Ten genes had predicted functions that could affect shoot development. This first report, of a sLTR insertion associated with the evolution of apple spur mutation, will facilitate apple breeding, cloning of spur-related genes, and discovery of mechanisms behind dwarf habit.

  8. Low levels of LTR retrotransposon deletion by ectopic recombination in the gigantic genomes of salamanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frahry, Matthew Blake; Sun, Cheng; Chong, Rebecca A; Mueller, Rachel Lockridge

    2015-02-01

    Across the tree of life, species vary dramatically in nuclear genome size. Mutations that add or remove sequences from genomes-insertions or deletions, or indels-are the ultimate source of this variation. Differences in the tempo and mode of insertion and deletion across taxa have been proposed to contribute to evolutionary diversity in genome size. Among vertebrates, most of the largest genomes are found within the salamanders, an amphibian clade with genome sizes ranging from ~14 to ~120 Gb. Salamander genomes have been shown to experience slower rates of DNA loss through small (i.e., genomes. However, no studies have addressed DNA loss from salamander genomes resulting from larger deletions. Here, we focus on one type of large deletion-ectopic-recombination-mediated removal of LTR retrotransposon sequences. In ectopic recombination, double-strand breaks are repaired using a "wrong" (i.e., ectopic, or non-allelic) template sequence-typically another locus of similar sequence. When breaks occur within the LTR portions of LTR retrotransposons, ectopic-recombination-mediated repair can produce deletions that remove the internal transposon sequence and the equivalent of one of the two LTR sequences. These deletions leave a signature in the genome-a solo LTR sequence. We compared levels of solo LTRs in the genomes of four salamander species with levels present in five vertebrates with smaller genomes. Our results demonstrate that salamanders have low levels of solo LTRs, suggesting that ectopic-recombination-mediated deletion of LTR retrotransposons occurs more slowly than in other vertebrates with smaller genomes.

  9. Conformational Selection and Induced Fit for RNA Polymerase and RNA/DNA Hybrid Backtracked Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng eChen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available RNA polymerase catalyzes transcription with a high fidelity. If DNA/RNA mismatch or DNA damage occurs downstream, a backtracked RNA polymerase can proofread this situation. However, the backtracked mechanism is still poorly understood. Here we have performed multiple explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD simulations on bound and apo DNA/RNA hybrid to study backtracked recognition. MD simulations at room temperature suggest that specific electrostatic interactions play key roles in the backtracked recognition between the polymerase and DNA/RNA hybrid. Kinetics analysis at high temperature shows that bound and apo DNA/RNA hybrid unfold via a two-state process. Both kinetics and free energy landscape analyses indicate that bound DNA/RNA hybrid folds in the order of DNA/RNA contracting, the tertiary folding and polymerase binding. The predicted Φ-values suggest that C7, G9, dC12, dC15 and dT16 are key bases for the backtracked recognition of DNA/RNA hybrid. The average RMSD values between the bound structures and the corresponding apo ones and Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS P test analyses indicate that the recognition between DNA/RNA hybrid and polymerase might follow an induced fit mechanism for DNA/RNA hybrid and conformation selection for polymerase. Furthermore, this method could be used to relative studies of specific recognition between nucleic acid and protein.

  10. The Fanconi anemia associated protein FAAP24 uses two substrate specific binding surfaces for DNA recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wienk, H.L.J.; Slootweg, J.C.; Speerstra, S.; Kaptein, R.; Boelens, R.; Folkers, G.E.

    2013-01-01

    To maintain the integrity of the genome, multiple DNA repair systems exist to repair damaged DNA. Recognition of altered DNA, including bulky adducts, pyrimidine dimers and interstrand crosslinks (ICL), partially depends on proteins containing helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) domains. To understand how ICL

  11. Two-step interrogation then recognition of DNA binding site by Integration Host Factor: an architectural DNA-bending protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Vivas, Paula; Connolly, Mitchell; Kuznetsov, Serguei V; Rice, Phoebe A; Ansari, Anjum

    2018-02-28

    The dynamics and mechanism of how site-specific DNA-bending proteins initially interrogate potential binding sites prior to recognition have remained elusive for most systems. Here we present these dynamics for Integration Host factor (IHF), a nucleoid-associated architectural protein, using a μs-resolved T-jump approach. Our studies show two distinct DNA-bending steps during site recognition by IHF. While the faster (∼100 μs) step is unaffected by changes in DNA or protein sequence that alter affinity by >100-fold, the slower (1-10 ms) step is accelerated ∼5-fold when mismatches are introduced at DNA sites that are sharply kinked in the specific complex. The amplitudes of the fast phase increase when the specific complex is destabilized and decrease with increasing [salt], which increases specificity. Taken together, these results indicate that the fast phase is non-specific DNA bending while the slow phase, which responds only to changes in DNA flexibility at the kink sites, is specific DNA kinking during site recognition. Notably, the timescales for the fast phase overlap with one-dimensional diffusion times measured for several proteins on DNA, suggesting that these dynamics reflect partial DNA bending during interrogation of potential binding sites by IHF as it scans DNA.

  12. Cooperative DNA Recognition Modulated by an Interplay between Protein-Protein Interactions and DNA-Mediated Allostery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Merino

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Highly specific transcriptional regulation depends on the cooperative association of transcription factors into enhanceosomes. Usually, their DNA-binding cooperativity originates from either direct interactions or DNA-mediated allostery. Here, we performed unbiased molecular simulations followed by simulations of protein-DNA unbinding and free energy profiling to study the cooperative DNA recognition by OCT4 and SOX2, key components of enhanceosomes in pluripotent cells. We found that SOX2 influences the orientation and dynamics of the DNA-bound configuration of OCT4. In addition SOX2 modifies the unbinding free energy profiles of both DNA-binding domains of OCT4, the POU specific and POU homeodomain, despite interacting directly only with the first. Thus, we demonstrate that the OCT4-SOX2 cooperativity is modulated by an interplay between protein-protein interactions and DNA-mediated allostery. Further, we estimated the change in OCT4-DNA binding free energy due to the cooperativity with SOX2, observed a good agreement with experimental measurements, and found that SOX2 affects the relative DNA-binding strength of the two OCT4 domains. Based on these findings, we propose that available interaction partners in different biological contexts modulate the DNA exploration routes of multi-domain transcription factors such as OCT4. We consider the OCT4-SOX2 cooperativity as a paradigm of how specificity of transcriptional regulation is achieved through concerted modulation of protein-DNA recognition by different types of interactions.

  13. A novel function for spumaretrovirus integrase: an early requirement for integrase-mediated cleavage of 2 LTR circles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouscadet Jean-François

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Retroviral integration is central to viral persistence and pathogenesis, cancer as well as host genome evolution. However, it is unclear why integration appears essential for retrovirus production, especially given the abundance and transcriptional potential of non-integrated viral genomes. The involvement of retroviral endonuclease, also called integrase (IN, in replication steps apart from integration has been proposed, but is usually considered to be accessory. We observe here that integration of a retrovirus from the spumavirus family depends mainly on the quantity of viral DNA produced. Moreover, we found that IN directly participates to linear DNA production from 2-LTR circles by specifically cleaving the conserved palindromic sequence found at LTR-LTR junctions. These results challenge the prevailing view that integrase essential function is to catalyze retroviral DNA integration. Integrase activity upstream of this step, by controlling linear DNA production, is sufficient to explain the absolute requirement for this enzyme. The novel role of IN over 2-LTR circle junctions accounts for the pleiotropic effects observed in cells infected with IN mutants. It may explain why 1 2-LTR circles accumulate in vivo in mutants carrying a defective IN while their linear and integrated DNA pools decrease; 2 why both LTRs are processed in a concerted manner. It also resolves the original puzzle concerning the integration of spumaretroviruses. More generally, it suggests to reassess 2-LTR circles as functional intermediates in the retrovirus cycle and to reconsider the idea that formation of the integrated provirus is an essential step of retrovirus production.

  14. DMPD: TLR9 as a key receptor for the recognition of DNA. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18262306 TLR9 as a key receptor for the recognition of DNA. Kumagai Y, Takeuchi O, ...TLR9 as a key receptor for the recognition of DNA. PubmedID 18262306 Title TLR9 as a key receptor for the recognition

  15. Recognition of methylated DNA through methyl-CpG binding domain proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, Xueqing; Ma, Wen; Solov'yov, Ilia

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation is a key regulatory control route in epigenetics, involving gene silencing and chromosome inactivation. It has been recognized that methyl-CpG binding domain (MBD) proteins play an important role in interpreting the genetic information encoded by methylated DNA (mDNA). Although...... the function of MBD proteins has attracted considerable attention and is well characterized, the mechanism underlying mDNA recognition by MBD proteins is still poorly understood. In this article, we demonstrate that the methyl-CpG dinucleotides are recognized at the MBD-mDNA interface by two MBD arginines...

  16. Sensitive Fluorescent Sensor for Recognition of HIV-1 dsDNA by Using Glucose Oxidase and Triplex DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubin Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A sensitive fluorescent sensor for sequence-specific recognition of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA was developed on the surface of silver-coated glass slide (SCGS. Oligonucleotide-1 (Oligo-1 was designed to assemble on the surface of SCGS and act as capture DNA, and oligonucleotide-2 (Oligo-2 was designed as signal DNA. Upon addition of target HIV-1 dsDNA (Oligo-3•Oligo-4, signal DNA could bind on the surface of silver-coated glass because of the formation of C•GoC in parallel triplex DNA structure. Biotin-labeled glucose oxidase (biotin-GOx could bind to signal DNA through the specific interaction of biotin-streptavidin, thereby GOx was attached to the surface of SCGS, which was dependent on the concentration of target HIV-1 dsDNA. GOx could catalyze the oxidation of glucose and yield H2O2, and the HPPA can be oxidized into a fluorescent product in the presence of HRP. Therefore, the concentration of target HIV-1 dsDNA could be estimated with fluorescence intensity. Under the optimum conditions, the fluorescence intensity was proportional to the concentration of target HIV-1 dsDNA over the range of 10 pM to 1000 pM, the detection limit was 3 pM. Moreover, the sensor had good sequence selectivity and practicability and might be applied for the diagnosis of HIV disease in the future.

  17. Molecular threading and tunable molecular recognition on DNA origami nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Na; Czajkowsky, Daniel M; Zhang, Jinjin; Qu, Jianxun; Ye, Ming; Zeng, Dongdong; Zhou, Xingfei; Hu, Jun; Shao, Zhifeng; Li, Bin; Fan, Chunhai

    2013-08-21

    The DNA origami technology holds great promise for the assembly of nanoscopic technological devices and studies of biochemical reactions at the single-molecule level. For these, it is essential to establish well controlled attachment of functional materials to predefined sites on the DNA origami nanostructures for reliable measurements and versatile applications. However, the two-sided nature of the origami scaffold has shown limitations in this regard. We hypothesized that holes of the commonly used two-dimensional DNA origami designs are large enough for the passage of single-stranded (ss)-DNA. Sufficiently long ssDNA initially located on one side of the origami should thus be able to "thread" to the other side through the holes in the origami sheet. By using an origami sheet attached with patterned biotinylated ssDNA spacers and monitoring streptavidin binding with atomic force microscopic (AFM) imaging, we provide unambiguous evidence that the biotin ligands positioned on one side have indeed threaded through to the other side. Our finding reveals a previously overlooked critical design feature that should provide new interpretations to previous experiments and new opportunities for the construction of origami structures with new functional capabilities.

  18. Computational studies of radiation and oxidative damage to DNA and its recognition by repair enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinak, M. [Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering, Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is used to study the time evolution of the recognition processes and to construct a model of the specific DNA-repair enzyme' complexes. MD simulations of the following molecules were performed: DNA dodecamer with thymine dimer (TD), DNA 30-mer with thymine glycol (TG), and respective specific repair enzymes T4 Endonuclease V and Endonuclease III. Both DNA lesions are experimentally suggested to be mutagenic and carcinogenic unless properly recognized and repaired by repair enzymes. In the case of TD, there is detected a strong kink around the TD site, that is not observed in native DNA. In addition there is observed a different value of electrostatic energy at the TD site - negative '-9 kcal/mol', in contrast to the nearly neutral value of the native thymine site. These two factors - structural changes and specific electrostatic energy - seem to be important for proper recognition of a TD damaged site and for formation of DNA-enzyme complex. Formation of this complex is the onset of the repair of DNA. In the case of TG damaged DNA the structural characteristics of the TG were calculated (charges, bond lengths, bond angles, etc.). The formed TG was used to replace the native thymine and then submitted to the simulation in the system with a repair enzyme with Endonuclease III for the purpose of the study of the formation of the DNA-enzyme complex. (author)

  19. LTR-retrotransposons-based molecular markers in cultivated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRACE

    2006-07-03

    Jul 3, 2006 ... LTR-retrotransposons represent a standard component of the Gossypium Genome (Zaki and Abdel Ghany,. 2003). The analysis of the molecular existence and distribution of ancient and active LTR-retrotransposons, therefore, provides a comprehensive evaluation of the evolutionary history of Gossypium.

  20. Recognition of thymine in DNA bulges by a Zn(II) macrocyclic complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Mundo, Imee Marie A; Fountain, Matthew A; Morrow, Janet R

    2011-08-14

    A Zn(II) macrocyclic complex with appended quinoline is a bifunctional recognition agent that uses both the Zn(II) center and the pendent aromatic group to bind to thymine in bulges with good selectivity over DNA containing G, C or A bulges. Spectroscopic studies show that the stem containing the bulge stays largely intact in a DNA hairpin with the Zn(II) complex bound to the thymine bulge. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  1. Conformational elasticity can facilitate TALE-DNA recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Hongxing; Sun, Jiya; Baldwin, Enoch P; Segal, David J; Duan, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Sequence-programmable transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins have emerged as a highly efficient tool for genome engineering. Recent crystal structures depict a transition between an open unbound solenoid and more compact DNA-bound solenoid formed by the 34 amino acid repeats. How TALEs switch conformation between these two forms without substantial energetic compensation, and how the repeat-variable di-residues (RVDs) discriminate between the cognate base and other bases still remain unclear. Computational analysis on these two aspects of TALE-DNA interaction mechanism has been conducted in order to achieve a better understanding of the energetics. High elasticity was observed in the molecular dynamics simulations of DNA-free TALE structure that started from the bound conformation where it sampled a wide range of conformations including the experimentally determined apo and bound conformations. This elastic feature was also observed in the simulations starting from the apo form which suggests low free energy barrier between the two conformations and small compensation required upon binding. To analyze binding specificity, we performed free energy calculations of various combinations of RVDs and bases using Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (PBSA) and other approaches. The PBSA calculations indicated that the native RVD-base structures had lower binding free energy than mismatched structures for most of the RVDs examined. Our theoretical analyses provided new insight on the dynamics and energetics of TALE-DNA binding mechanism. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Structural basis for sequence-specific recognition of DNA by TAL effectors

    KAUST Repository

    Deng, Dong

    2012-01-05

    TAL (transcription activator-like) effectors, secreted by phytopathogenic bacteria, recognize host DNA sequences through a central domain of tandem repeats. Each repeat comprises 33 to 35 conserved amino acids and targets a specific base pair by using two hypervariable residues [known as repeat variable diresidues (RVDs)] at positions 12 and 13. Here, we report the crystal structures of an 11.5-repeat TAL effector in both DNA-free and DNA-bound states. Each TAL repeat comprises two helices connected by a short RVD-containing loop. The 11.5 repeats form a right-handed, superhelical structure that tracks along the sense strand of DNA duplex, with RVDs contacting the major groove. The 12th residue stabilizes the RVD loop, whereas the 13th residue makes a base-specific contact. Understanding DNA recognition by TAL effectors may facilitate rational design of DNA-binding proteins with biotechnological applications.

  3. Recognition of Local DNA Structures by p53 Protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brázda, Václav; Coufal, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 2 (2017), č. článku 375. E-ISSN 1422-0067 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-21855S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : tumor-suppressor protein * c-terminal domain * non-b dna Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 3.226, year: 2016

  4. Dynamic conformational change regulates the protein-DNA recognition: an investigation on binding of a Y-family polymerase to its target DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiakun Chu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Protein-DNA recognition is a central biological process that governs the life of cells. A protein will often undergo a conformational transition to form the functional complex with its target DNA. The protein conformational dynamics are expected to contribute to the stability and specificity of DNA recognition and therefore may control the functional activity of the protein-DNA complex. Understanding how the conformational dynamics influences the protein-DNA recognition is still challenging. Here, we developed a two-basin structure-based model to explore functional dynamics in Sulfolobus solfataricus DNA Y-family polymerase IV (DPO4 during its binding to DNA. With explicit consideration of non-specific and specific interactions between DPO4 and DNA, we found that DPO4-DNA recognition is comprised of first 3D diffusion, then a short-range adjustment sliding on DNA and finally specific binding. Interestingly, we found that DPO4 is under a conformational equilibrium between multiple states during the binding process and the distributions of the conformations vary at different binding stages. By modulating the strength of the electrostatic interactions, the flexibility of the linker, and the conformational dynamics in DPO4, we drew a clear picture on how DPO4 dynamically regulates the DNA recognition. We argue that the unique features of flexibility and conformational dynamics in DPO4-DNA recognition have direct implications for low-fidelity translesion DNA synthesis, most of which is found to be accomplished by the Y-family DNA polymerases. Our results help complete the description of the DNA synthesis process for the Y-family polymerases. Furthermore, the methods developed here can be widely applied for future investigations on how various proteins recognize and bind specific DNA substrates.

  5. Imidazopyridine/Pyrrole and hydroxybenzimidazole/pyrrole pairs for DNA minor groove recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renneberg, Dorte; Dervan, Peter B

    2003-05-14

    The DNA binding properties of fused heterocycles imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (Ip) and hydroxybenzimidazole (Hz) paired with pyrrole (Py) in eight-ring hairpin polyamides are reported. The recognition profile of Ip/Py and Hz/Py pairs were compared to the five-membered ring pairs Im/Py and Hp/Py on a DNA restriction fragment at four 6-base pair recognition sites which vary at a single position 5'-TGTNTA-3', where N = G, C, T, A. The Ip/Py pair distinguishes G.C from C.G, T.A, and A.T, and the Hz/Py pair distinguishes T.A from A.T, G.C, and C.G, affording a new set of heterocycle pairs to target the four Watson-Crick base pairs in the minor groove of DNA.

  6. The herpes viral transcription factor ICP4 forms a novel DNA recognition complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnicliffe, Richard B.; Lockhart-Cairns, Michael P.; Levy, Colin; Mould, A. Paul; Jowitt, Thomas A.; Sito, Hilary; Baldock, Clair; Sandri-Goldin, Rozanne M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The transcription factor ICP4 from herpes simplex virus has a central role in regulating the gene expression cascade which controls viral infection. Here we present the crystal structure of the functionally essential ICP4 DNA binding domain in complex with a segment from its own promoter, revealing a novel homo-dimeric fold. We also studied the complex in solution by small angle X-Ray scattering, nuclear magnetic resonance and surface-plasmon resonance which indicated that, in addition to the globular domain, a flanking intrinsically disordered region also recognizes DNA. Together the data provides a rationale for the bi-partite nature of the ICP4 DNA recognition consensus sequence as the globular and disordered regions bind synergistically to adjacent DNA motifs. Therefore in common with its eukaryotic host, the viral transcription factor ICP4 utilizes disordered regions to enhance the affinity and tune the specificity of DNA interactions in tandem with a globular domain. PMID:28505309

  7. Caulobacter crescentus Cell Cycle-Regulated DNA Methyltransferase Uses a Novel Mechanism for Substrate Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, Clayton B; Yakubov, Aziz B; Reich, Norbert O

    2017-08-01

    Caulobacter crescentus relies on DNA methylation by the cell cycle-regulated methyltransferase (CcrM) in addition to key transcription factors to control the cell cycle and direct cellular differentiation. CcrM is shown here to efficiently methylate its cognate recognition site 5'-GANTC-3' in single-stranded and hemimethylated double-stranded DNA. We report the K m , k cat , k methylation , and K d for single-stranded and hemimethylated substrates, revealing discrimination of 10 7 -fold for noncognate sequences. The enzyme also shows a similar discrimination against single-stranded RNA. Two independent assays clearly show that CcrM is highly processive with single-stranded and hemimethylated DNA. Collectively, the data provide evidence that CcrM and other DNA-modifying enzymes may use a new mechanism to recognize DNA in a key epigenetic process.

  8. Protein Recognition in Drug-Induced DNA Alkylation: When the Moonlight Protein GAPDH Meets S23906-1/DNA Minor Groove Adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savreux-Lenglet, Gaëlle; Depauw, Sabine; David-Cordonnier, Marie-Hélène

    2015-11-05

    DNA alkylating drugs have been used in clinics for more than seventy years. The diversity of their mechanism of action (major/minor groove; mono-/bis-alkylation; intra-/inter-strand crosslinks; DNA stabilization/destabilization, etc.) has undoubtedly major consequences on the cellular response to treatment. The aim of this review is to highlight the variety of established protein recognition of DNA adducts to then particularly focus on glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) function in DNA adduct interaction with illustration using original experiments performed with S23906-1/DNA adduct. The introduction of this review is a state of the art of protein/DNA adducts recognition, depending on the major or minor groove orientation of the DNA bonding as well as on the molecular consequences in terms of double-stranded DNA maintenance. It reviews the implication of proteins from both DNA repair, transcription, replication and chromatin maintenance in selective DNA adduct recognition. The main section of the manuscript is focusing on the implication of the moonlighting protein GAPDH in DNA adduct recognition with the model of the peculiar DNA minor groove alkylating and destabilizing drug S23906-1. The mechanism of action of S23906-1 alkylating drug and the large variety of GAPDH cellular functions are presented prior to focus on GAPDH direct binding to S23906-1 adducts.

  9. An application of LTR design in fault detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik

    1998-01-01

    The fault detection and isolation (FDI) problem is considered in this paper. The FDI problem is formulated as a filter design problem, where the faults in the system is estimated and the disturbance acting on the system is rejected. It turns out that the filter design problem can be considered...... as a standard Loop Transfer Recovery (LTR) design problem. As a consequence of the connection between LTR and FDI design, it is shown in an example how the LQG/LTR design method for full order and a proportional-integral observer can be applied with advantages in connection with FDI....

  10. A parametric LTR solution for discrete-time systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Jannerup, Ole Erik

    1989-01-01

    A parametric LTR (loop transfer recovery) solution for discrete-time compensators incorporating filtering observers which achieve exact recovery is presented for both minimum- and non-minimum-phase systems. First the recovery error, which defines the difference between the target loop transfer...... and the full loop transfer function, is manipulated into a general form involving the target loop transfer matrix and the fundamental recovery matrix. A parametric LTR solution based on the recovery matrix is developed. It is shown that the LQR/LTR (linear quadratic Gaussian/loop transfer recovery) solution...

  11. DNA Recognition by the DNA Primase of Bacteriophage T7: A Structure Function Study of the Zinc-Binding Domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akabayov, B.; Lee, S.; Akabayov, S.; Rekhi, S.; Zhu, B.; Richardson, C.

    2009-01-01

    Synthesis of oligoribonucleotide primers for lagging-strand DNA synthesis in the DNA replication system of bacteriophage T7 is catalyzed by the primase domain of the gene 4 helicase-primase. The primase consists of a zinc-binding domain (ZBD) and an RNA polymerase (RPD) domain. The ZBD is responsible for recognition of a specific sequence in the ssDNA template whereas catalytic activity resides in the RPD. The ZBD contains a zinc ion coordinated with four cysteine residues. We have examined the ligation state of the zinc ion by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and biochemical analysis of genetically altered primases. The ZBD of primase engaged in catalysis exhibits considerable asymmetry in coordination to zinc, as evidenced by a gradual increase in electron density of the zinc together with elongation of the zinc-sulfur bonds. Both wild-type primase and primase reconstituted from purified ZBD and RPD have a similar electronic change in the level of the zinc ion as well as the configuration of the ZBD. Single amino acid replacements in the ZBD (H33A and C36S) result in the loss of both zinc binding and its structural integrity. Thus the zinc in the ZBD may act as a charge modulation indicator for the surrounding sulfur atoms necessary for recognition of specific DNA sequences.

  12. Contrasting roles for DNA methyltransferases and histone deacetylases in single-item and associative recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Hannah; Smith, Anna E; Barker, Gareth R; Uney, James B; Warburton, E Clea

    2017-03-01

    Recognition memory enables us to judge whether we have encountered a stimulus before and to recall associated information, including where the stimulus was encountered. The perirhinal cortex (PRh) is required for judgment of stimulus familiarity, while hippocampus (HPC) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) are additionally involved when spatial information associated with a stimulus needs to be remembered. While gene expression is known to be essential for the consolidation of long-term recognition memory, the underlying regulatory mechanisms are not fully understood. Here we investigated the roles of two epigenetic mechanisms, DNA methylation and histone deacetylation, in recognition memory. Infusion of DNA methyltransferase inhibitors into PRh impaired performance in novel object recognition and object-in-place tasks while infusions into HPC or mPFC impaired object-in-place performance only. In contrast, inhibition of histone deacetylases in PRh, but not mPFC, enhanced recognition memory. These results support the emerging role of epigenetic processes in learning and memory.

  13. Contrasting roles for DNA methyltransferases and histone deacetylases in single-item and associative recognition memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Scott

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Recognition memory enables us to judge whether we have encountered a stimulus before and to recall associated information, including where the stimulus was encountered. The perirhinal cortex (PRh is required for judgment of stimulus familiarity, while hippocampus (HPC and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC are additionally involved when spatial information associated with a stimulus needs to be remembered. While gene expression is known to be essential for the consolidation of long-term recognition memory, the underlying regulatory mechanisms are not fully understood. Here we investigated the roles of two epigenetic mechanisms, DNA methylation and histone deacetylation, in recognition memory. Infusion of DNA methyltransferase inhibitors into PRh impaired performance in novel object recognition and object-in-place tasks while infusions into HPC or mPFC impaired object-in-place performance only. In contrast, inhibition of histone deacetylases in PRh, but not mPFC, enhanced recognition memory. These results support the emerging role of epigenetic processes in learning and memory.

  14. Dynamic two-stage mechanism of versatile DNA damage recognition by xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clement, Flurina C.; Camenisch, Ulrike; Fei, Jia; Kaczmarek, Nina; Mathieu, Nadine [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Zuerich-Vetsuisse, Winterthurerstrasse 260, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Naegeli, Hanspeter, E-mail: naegelih@vetpharm.uzh.ch [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Zuerich-Vetsuisse, Winterthurerstrasse 260, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2010-03-01

    The recognition and subsequent repair of DNA damage are essential reactions for the maintenance of genome stability. A key general sensor of DNA lesions is xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) protein, which recognizes a wide variety of helix-distorting DNA adducts arising from ultraviolet (UV) radiation, genotoxic chemicals and reactive metabolic byproducts. By detecting damaged DNA sites, this unique molecular sensor initiates the global genome repair (GGR) pathway, which allows for the removal of all the aforementioned lesions by a limited repertoire of excision factors. A faulty GGR activity causes the accumulation of DNA adducts leading to mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, neurological degeneration and other traits of premature aging. Recent findings indicate that XPC protein achieves its extraordinary substrate versatility by an entirely indirect readout strategy implemented in two clearly discernible stages. First, the XPC subunit uses a dynamic sensor interface to monitor the double helix for the presence of non-hydrogen-bonded bases. This initial screening generates a transient nucleoprotein intermediate that subsequently matures into the ultimate recognition complex by trapping undamaged nucleotides in the abnormally oscillating native strand, in a way that no direct contacts are made between XPC protein and the offending lesion itself. It remains to be elucidated how accessory factors like Rad23B, centrin-2 or the UV-damaged DNA-binding complex contribute to this dynamic two-stage quality control process.

  15. FoxA1 binding to the MMTV LTR modulates chromatin structure and transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmqvist, Per-Henrik; Belikov, Sergey; Zaret, Kenneth S.; Wrange, Oerjan

    2005-01-01

    Novel binding sites for the forkhead transcription factor family member Forkhead box A (FoxA), previously referred to as Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 3 (HNF3), were found within the mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat (MMTV LTR). The effect of FoxA1 on MMTV LTR chromatin structure, and expression was evaluated in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Mutagenesis of either of the two main FoxA binding sites showed that the distal site, -232/-221, conferred FoxA1-dependent partial inhibition of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) driven MMTV transcription. The proximal FoxA binding segment consisted of two individual FoxA sites at -57/-46 and -45/-34, respectively, that mediated an increased basal MMTV transcription. FoxA1 binding altered the chromatin structure of both the inactive- and the hormone-activated MMTV LTR. Hydroxyl radical foot printing revealed FoxA1-mediated changes in the nucleosome arrangement. Micrococcal nuclease digestion showed the hormone-dependent sub-nucleosome complex, containing ∼120 bp of DNA, to be expanded by FoxA1 binding to the proximal segment into a larger complex containing ∼200 bp. The potential function of the FoxA1-mediated expression of the MMTV provirus for maintenance of expression in different tissues is discussed

  16. Recognition and processing of a new repertoire of DNA substrates by human 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chun-Yue I; Delaney, James C; Kartalou, Maria; Lingaraju, Gondichatnahalli M; Maor-Shoshani, Ayelet; Essigmann, John M; Samson, Leona D

    2009-03-10

    The human 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) recognizes and excises a broad range of purines damaged by alkylation and oxidative damage, including 3-methyladenine, 7-methylguanine, hypoxanthine (Hx), and 1,N(6)-ethenoadenine (epsilonA). The crystal structures of AAG bound to epsilonA have provided insights into the structural basis for substrate recognition, base excision, and exclusion of normal purines and pyrimidines from its substrate recognition pocket. In this study, we explore the substrate specificity of full-length and truncated Delta80AAG on a library of oligonucleotides containing structurally diverse base modifications. Substrate binding and base excision kinetics of AAG with 13 damaged oligonucleotides were examined. We found that AAG bound to a wide variety of purine and pyrimidine lesions but excised only a few of them. Single-turnover excision kinetics showed that in addition to the well-known epsilonA and Hx substrates, 1-methylguanine (m1G) was also excised efficiently by AAG. Thus, along with epsilonA and ethanoadenine (EA), m1G is another substrate that is shared between AAG and the direct repair protein AlkB. In addition, we found that both the full-length and truncated AAG excised 1,N(2)-ethenoguanine (1,N(2)-epsilonG), albeit weakly, from duplex DNA. Uracil was excised from both single- and double-stranded DNA, but only by full-length AAG, indicating that the N-terminus of AAG may influence glycosylase activity for some substrates. Although AAG has been primarily shown to act on double-stranded DNA, AAG excised both epsilonA and Hx from single-stranded DNA, suggesting the possible significance of repair of these frequent lesions in single-stranded DNA transiently generated during replication and transcription.

  17. Structural basis for the cooperative DNA recognition by Smad4 MH1 dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baburajendran, Nithya; Jauch, Ralf; Tan, Clara Yueh Zhen; Narasimhan, Kamesh; Kolatkar, Prasanna R.

    2011-01-01

    Smad proteins form multimeric complexes consisting of the ‘common partner’ Smad4 and receptor regulated R-Smads on clustered DNA binding sites. Deciphering how pathway specific Smad complexes multimerize on DNA to regulate gene expression is critical for a better understanding of the cis-regulatory logic of TGF-β and BMP signaling. To this end, we solved the crystal structure of the dimeric Smad4 MH1 domain bound to a palindromic Smad binding element. Surprisingly, the Smad4 MH1 forms a constitutive dimer on the SBE DNA without exhibiting any direct protein–protein interactions suggesting a DNA mediated indirect readout mechanism. However, the R-Smads Smad1, Smad2 and Smad3 homodimerize with substantially decreased efficiency despite pronounced structural similarities to Smad4. Therefore, intricate variations in the DNA structure induced by different Smads and/or variant energetic profiles likely contribute to their propensity to dimerize on DNA. Indeed, competitive binding assays revealed that the Smad4/R-Smad heterodimers predominate under equilibrium conditions while R-Smad homodimers are least favored. Together, we present the structural basis for DNA recognition by Smad4 and demonstrate that Smad4 constitutively homo- and heterodimerizes on DNA in contrast to its R-Smad partner proteins by a mechanism independent of direct protein contacts. PMID:21724602

  18. Structural basis of PAM-dependent target DNA recognition by the Cas9 endonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Carolin; Niewoehner, Ole; Duerst, Alessia; Jinek, Martin

    2014-09-25

    The CRISPR-associated protein Cas9 is an RNA-guided endonuclease that cleaves double-stranded DNA bearing sequences complementary to a 20-nucleotide segment in the guide RNA. Cas9 has emerged as a versatile molecular tool for genome editing and gene expression control. RNA-guided DNA recognition and cleavage strictly require the presence of a protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) in the target DNA. Here we report a crystal structure of Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 in complex with a single-molecule guide RNA and a target DNA containing a canonical 5'-NGG-3' PAM. The structure reveals that the PAM motif resides in a base-paired DNA duplex. The non-complementary strand GG dinucleotide is read out via major-groove interactions with conserved arginine residues from the carboxy-terminal domain of Cas9. Interactions with the minor groove of the PAM duplex and the phosphodiester group at the +1 position in the target DNA strand contribute to local strand separation immediately upstream of the PAM. These observations suggest a mechanism for PAM-dependent target DNA melting and RNA-DNA hybrid formation. Furthermore, this study establishes a framework for the rational engineering of Cas9 enzymes with novel PAM specificities.

  19. A Theory of LTR Junk-food Consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Levy, Amnon

    2003-01-01

    LTR junk-food consumption balances the marginal satisfaction with the marginal deterioration of health. An LTR person discounts the instantaneous marginal satisfaction from junk-food consumption by its implications for his survival probability. His change rate of health evaluation is increased (decreased) by junk-food consumption when health is better (worse) than a critical level. The moderating direct effects of age and relative price on junk-food consumption may be amplified, or dimmed, by...

  20. Biochemical and Structural Insights into the Mechanism of DNA Recognition by Arabidopsis ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinghui Song

    Full Text Available Gaseous hormone ethylene regulates numerous stress responses and developmental adaptations in plants by controlling gene expression via transcription factors ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE3 (EIN3 and EIN3-Like1 (EIL1. However, our knowledge regarding to the accurate definition of DNA-binding domains (DBDs within EIN3 and also the mechanism of specific DNA recognition by EIN3 is limited. Here, we identify EIN3 82-352 and 174-306 as the optimal and core DBDs, respectively. Results from systematic biochemical analyses reveal that both the number of EIN3-binding sites (EBSs and the spacing length between two EBSs affect the binding affinity of EIN3; accordingly, a new DNA probe which has higher affinity with EIN3 than ERF1 is also designed. Furthermore, we show that palindromic repeat sequences in ERF1 promoter are not necessary for EIN3 binding. Finally, we provide, to our knowledge, the first crystal structure of EIN3 core DBD, which contains amino acid residues essential for DNA binding and signaling. Collectively, these data suggest the detailed mechanism of DNA recognition by EIN3 and provide an in-depth view at molecular level for the transcriptional regulation mediated by EIN3.

  1. In Vitro Selection of a Single-Stranded DNA Molecular Recognition Element Specific for Bromacil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M. Williams

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bromacil is a widely used herbicide that is known to contaminate environmental systems. Due to the hazards it presents and inefficient detection methods, it is necessary to create a rapid and efficient sensing device. Towards this end, we have utilized a stringent in vitro selection method to identify single-stranded DNA molecular recognition elements (MRE specific for bromacil. We have identified one MRE with high affinity (Kd=9.6 nM and specificity for bromacil compared to negative targets of selection and other pesticides. The selected ssDNA MRE will be useful as the sensing element in a field-deployable bromacil detection device.

  2. Convergent evolution of ribonuclease h in LTR retrotransposons and retroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustyantsev, Kirill; Novikova, Olga; Blinov, Alexander; Smyshlyaev, Georgy

    2015-05-01

    Ty3/Gypsy long terminals repeat (LTR) retrotransposons are structurally and phylogenetically close to retroviruses. Two notable structural differences between these groups of genetic elements are 1) the presence in retroviruses of an additional envelope gene, env, which mediates infection, and 2) a specific dual ribonuclease H (RNH) domain encoded by the retroviral pol gene. However, similar to retroviruses, many Ty3/Gypsy LTR retrotransposons harbor additional env-like genes, promoting concepts of the infective mode of these retrotransposons. Here, we provide a further line of evidence of similarity between retroviruses and some Ty3/Gypsy LTR retrotransposons. We identify that, together with their additional genes, plant Ty3/Gypsy LTR retrotransposons of the Tat group have a second RNH, as do retroviruses. Most importantly, we show that the resulting dual RNHs of Tat LTR retrotransposons and retroviruses emerged independently, providing strong evidence for their convergent evolution. The convergent resemblance of Tat LTR retrotransposons and retroviruses may indicate similar selection pressures acting on these diverse groups of elements and reveal potential evolutionary constraints on their structure. We speculate that dual RNH is required to accelerate retrotransposon evolution through increased rates of strand transfer events and subsequent recombination events. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  3. MD study of pyrimidine base damage on DNA and its recognition by repair enzyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinak, M.

    2000-01-01

    The molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was used on the study of two specific damages of pyrimidine bases of DNA. Pyrimidine bases are major targets either of free radicals induced by ionizing radiation in DNA surrounding environment or UV radiation. Thymine dimer (TD) is UV induced damage, in which two neighboring thymines in one strand are joined by covalent bonds of C(5)-C(5) and C(6)-C(6) atoms of thymines. Thymine glycol (TG) is ionizing radiation induced damage in which the free water radical adds to unsaturated bond C(5)-C(6) of thymine. Both damages are experimentally suggested to be mutagenetic and carcinogenic unless properly repaired by repair enzymes. In the case of MD of TD, there is detected strong kink around the TD site that is not observed in native DNA. In addition there is observed the different value of electrostatic energy at the TD site - negative '-10 kcal/mol', in contrary to nearly neutral value of native thymine site. Structural changes and specific electrostatic energy - seems to be important for proper recognition of TD damaged site, formation of DNA-enzyme complex and thus for subsequent repair of DNA. In the case of TG damaged DNA there is major structural distortion at the TG site, mainly the increased distance between TG and the C5' of adjacent nucleotide. This enlarged gap between the neighboring nucleotides may prevent the insertion of complementary base during replication causing the replication process to stop. In which extend this structural feature together with energy properties of TG contributes to the proper recognition of TG by repair enzyme Endonuclease III is subject of further computational MD study. (author)

  4. DNA modifications by platinum antitumor drugs and its recognition by DNA-binding proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brabec, Viktor

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 271, Suppl. 1 (2004), s. 90 ISSN 0014-2956. [Meeting of the Federation of the European Biochemical Societies /29./. 26.06.2004-01.07.2004, Warsaw] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/02/1552 Keywords : platinum drugs * DNA-protein interaction * NF-kappaB Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  5. Molecular recognition of AT-DNA sequences by the induced CD pattern of dibenzotetraaza[14]annulene (DBTAA)-adenine derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojković, Marijana Radić; Skugor, Marko; Dudek, Lukasz; Grolik, Jarosław; Eilmes, Julita; Piantanida, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    An investigation of the interactions of two novel and several known DBTAA-adenine conjugates with double-stranded DNA and RNA has revealed the DNA/RNA groove as the dominant binding site, which is in contrast to the majority of previously studied DBTAA analogues (DNA/RNA intercalators). Only DBTAA-propyladenine conjugates revealed the molecular recognition of AT-DNA by an ICD band pattern > 300 nm, whereas significant ICD bands did not appear for other ds-DNA/RNA. A structure-activity relation for the studied series of compounds showed that the essential structural features for the ICD recognition are a) the presence of DNA-binding appendages (adenine side chain and positively charged side chain) on both DBTAA side chains, and b) the presence of a short propyl linker, which does not support intramolecular aromatic stacking between DBTAA and adenine. The observed AT-DNA-ICD pattern differs from previously reported ss-DNA (poly dT) ICD recognition by a strong negative ICD band at 350 nm, which allows for the dynamic differentiation between ss-DNA (poly dT) and coupled ds-AT-DNA.

  6. Alterations in HIV-1 LTR promoter activity during AIDS progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiebenthal-Millow, Kirsten; Greenough, Thomas C.; Bretttler, Doreen B.; Schindler, Michael; Wildum, Steffen; Sullivan, John L.; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2003-01-01

    HIV-1 variants evolving in AIDS patients frequently show increased replicative capacity compared to those present during early asymptomatic infection. It is known that late stage HIV-1 variants often show an expanded coreceptor tropism and altered Nef function. In the present study we investigated whether enhanced HIV-1 LTR promoter activity might also evolve during disease progression. Our results demonstrate increased LTR promoter activity after AIDS progression in 3 of 12 HIV-1-infected individuals studied. Further analysis revealed that multiple alterations in the U3 core-enhancer and in the transactivation-response (TAR) region seem to be responsible for the enhanced functional activity. Our findings show that in a subset of HIV-1-infected individuals enhanced LTR transcription contributes to the increased replicative potential of late stage virus isolates and might accelerate disease progression

  7. Genome-wide analysis of LTR-retrotransposon diversity and its impact on the evolution of the genus Helianthus (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascagni, Flavia; Giordani, Tommaso; Ceccarelli, Marilena; Cavallini, Andrea; Natali, Lucia

    2017-08-18

    Genome divergence by mobile elements activity and recombination is a continuous process that plays a key role in the evolution of species. Nevertheless, knowledge on retrotransposon-related variability among species belonging to the same genus is still limited. Considering the importance of the genus Helianthus, a model system for studying the ecological genetics of speciation and adaptation, we performed a comparative analysis of the repetitive genome fraction across ten species and one subspecies of sunflower, focusing on long terminal repeat retrotransposons at superfamily, lineage and sublineage levels. After determining the relative genome size of each species, genomic DNA was isolated and subjected to Illumina sequencing. Then, different assembling and clustering approaches allowed exploring the repetitive component of all genomes. On average, repetitive DNA in Helianthus species represented more than 75% of the genome, being composed mostly by long terminal repeat retrotransposons. Also, the prevalence of Gypsy over Copia superfamily was observed and, among lineages, Chromovirus was by far the most represented. Although nearly all the same sublineages are present in all species, we found considerable variability in the abundance of diverse retrotransposon lineages and sublineages, especially between annual and perennial species. This large variability should indicate that different events of amplification or loss related to these elements occurred following species separation and should have been involved in species differentiation. Our data allowed us inferring on the extent of interspecific repetitive DNA variation related to LTR-RE abundance, investigating the relationship between changes of LTR-RE abundance and the evolution of the genus, and determining the degree of coevolution of different LTR-RE lineages or sublineages between and within species. Moreover, the data suggested that LTR-RE abundance in a species was affected by the annual or perennial

  8. Role of DNA conformation & energetic insights in Msx-1-DNA recognition as revealed by molecular dynamics studies on specific and nonspecific complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachhap, Sangita; Singh, Balvinder

    2015-01-01

    In most of homeodomain-DNA complexes, glutamine or lysine is present at 50th position and interacts with 5th and 6th nucleotide of core recognition region. Molecular dynamics simulations of Msx-1-DNA complex (Q50-TG) and its variant complexes, that is specific (Q50K-CC), nonspecific (Q50-CC) having mutation in DNA and (Q50K-TG) in protein, have been carried out. Analysis of protein-DNA interactions and structure of DNA in specific and nonspecific complexes show that amino acid residues use sequence-dependent shape of DNA to interact. The binding free energies of all four complexes were analysed to define role of amino acid residue at 50th position in terms of binding strength considering the variation in DNA on stability of protein-DNA complexes. The order of stability of protein-DNA complexes shows that specific complexes are more stable than nonspecific ones. Decomposition analysis shows that N-terminal amino acid residues have been found to contribute maximally in binding free energy of protein-DNA complexes. Among specific protein-DNA complexes, K50 contributes more as compared to Q50 towards binding free energy in respective complexes. The sequence dependence of local conformation of DNA enables Q50/Q50K to make hydrogen bond with nucleotide(s) of DNA. The changes in amino acid sequence of protein are accommodated and stabilized around TAAT core region of DNA having variation in nucleotides.

  9. Two dimensional molecular electronics spectroscopy for molecular fingerprinting, DNA sequencing, and cancerous DNA recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Arunkumar Chitteth; Rezapour, Mohammad Reza; Yun, Jeonghun; Cho, Yeonchoo; Cho, Woo Jong; Min, Seung Kyu; Lee, Geunsik; Kim, Kwang S

    2014-02-25

    Laser-driven molecular spectroscopy of low spatial resolution is widely used, while electronic current-driven molecular spectroscopy of atomic scale resolution has been limited because currents provide only minimal information. However, electron transmission of a graphene nanoribbon on which a molecule is adsorbed shows molecular fingerprints of Fano resonances, i.e., characteristic features of frontier orbitals and conformations of physisorbed molecules. Utilizing these resonance profiles, here we demonstrate two-dimensional molecular electronics spectroscopy (2D MES). The differential conductance with respect to bias and gate voltages not only distinguishes different types of nucleobases for DNA sequencing but also recognizes methylated nucleobases which could be related to cancerous cell growth. This 2D MES could open an exciting field to recognize single molecule signatures at atomic resolution. The advantages of the 2D MES over the one-dimensional (1D) current analysis can be comparable to those of 2D NMR over 1D NMR analysis.

  10. Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimmler, Antje

    2017-01-01

    In this article, I shall examine the cognitive, heuristic and theoretical functions of the concept of recognition. To evaluate both the explanatory power and the limitations of a sociological concept, the theory construction must be analysed and its actual productivity for sociological theory mus...

  11. Full Length Research Paper LTR-retrotransposons-based molecular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LTR-retrotransposons possess unique properties that make them appropriate for investigating relationships between closely related species and populations. The aim of the current study was to employ Ty1-copia group retrotransposons as molecular markers in cultivated Egyptian cottons, G. barbadense L. Restriction site ...

  12. Recognition and repair of 2-aminofluorene- and 2-(acetylamino)fluorene-DNA adducts by UVRABC nuclease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, J.R.; Case, R.; Tang, Moonshong

    1989-01-01

    Recognition of damage induced by N-hydroxy-2-aminofluorene (N-OH-AF) and N-acetoxy-2-(acetylamino)fluorene (NAAAF) in both φX174 RFI supercoiled DNA and a linear DNA fragment by purified UVRA, UVRB, and UVRC proteins was investigated. The authors have previously demonstrated that N-OH-AF and NAAAF treatments produce N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-aminofluorene (dG-C8-AF) and N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-(acetylamino)fluorene (dG-C8-AAF), respectively, in DNA. Using a piperidine cleavage method and DNA sequence analysis, they have found that all guanine residues can be modified by N-OH-AF and NAAAF. These two kinds of adducts have different impacts on the DNA helix structure; while dG-C8-AF maintains the anti configuration, dG-C8-AAF is in the syn form. φX174 RF DNA-Escherichia coli transfection results indicate that while the uvrA, uvrB, and uvrC gene products are needed to repair dG-C8-AAF, the uvrC, but not the uvrA or uvrB gene products, is needed for repair of dG-C8-Af. However, they have found that in vitro the UVRA, UVRB, and UVRC proteins must work in concert to nick both dG-C8-AF and dG-C8-AAF. In general, the reactions of UVRABC nuclease toward dG-C8-AF are similar to those toward dG-C8-AAF; it incises seven to eight nucleotides from the 5' side and three to four nucleotides from the 3' side of the DNA adduct. Evidence is presented to suggest that hydrolysis on the 3' and 5' sides of the damaged base by UVRABC nuclease is not simultaneous and that at least occasionally hydrolysis occurs only on the 3' side or on the 5' side of the damage site. The possible mechanisms of UVRABC nuclease incision for AF-DNA are discussed

  13. Structural factors involved in the recognition of helix distortions in uv-damaged DNA by model peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, H; Zimmer, C [Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Jena. Forschungszentrum fuer Molekularbiologie und Medizin

    1977-02-28

    On the basis of our previous and present results concerning conformational changes of DNA after uv-irradiation some conclusions on the structure of DNA double helix in uv-damaged regions were drawn. From the results it appears that local distortions like denaturation or premelting should be excluded. Furthermore it was shown that the thymine dimerization strongly depends on the adjacent nucleic acid bases. By means of a strong binding effect of the oligopeptide netropsin to DNA irradiated at low uv-doses it is concluded that such local distortions in DNA together with a specific sequence-dependent variation of the conformation could act as recognition sites for endonucleases.

  14. Damage-recognition proteins as a potential indicator of DNA-damage-mediated sensitivity or resistance of human cells to ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, C.C.-K.

    1992-01-01

    The authors compared damage-recognition proteins in cells expressing different sensitivities to DNA damage. An increase in damage-recognition proteins and an enhancement of plasmid re-activation were detected in HeLa cells resistant to cisplatin and u.v. However, repair-defective cells derived from xeroderma-pigmentosum (a rare skin disease) patients did not express less cisplatin damage-recognition proteins than repair-competent cells, suggesting that damage-recognition-protein expression may not be related to DNA repair. By contrast, cells resistant to DNA damage consistently expressed high levels of u.v.-modified-DNA damage-recognition proteins. The results support the notion that u.v. damage-recognition proteins are different from those that bind to cisplatin. Findings also suggest that the damage-recognition proteins identified could be used as potential indicators of the sensitivity or resistance of cells to u.v. (author)

  15. Evolution of divergent DNA recognition specificities in VDE homing endonucleases from two yeast species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posey, Karen L; Koufopanou, Vassiliki; Burt, Austin; Gimble, Frederick S

    2004-01-01

    Homing endonuclease genes (HEGs) are mobile DNA elements that are thought to confer no benefit to their host. They encode site-specific DNA endonucleases that perpetuate the element within a species population by homing and disseminate it between species by horizontal transfer. Several yeast species contain the VMA1 HEG that encodes the intein-associated VMA1-derived endonuclease (VDE). The evolutionary state of VDEs from 12 species was assessed by assaying their endonuclease activities. Only two enzymes are active, PI-ZbaI from Zygosaccharomyces bailii and PI-ScaI from Saccharomyces cariocanus. PI-ZbaI cleaves the Z.bailii recognition sequence significantly faster than the Saccharomyces cerevisiae site, which differs at six nucleotide positions. A mutational analysis indicates that PI-ZbaI cleaves the S.cerevisiae substrate poorly due to the absence of a contact that is analogous to one made in PI-SceI between Gln-55 and nucleotides +9/+10. PI-ZbaI cleaves the Z.bailii substrate primarily due to a single base-pair substitution (A/T+5 --> T/A+5). Structural modeling of the PI-ZbaI/DNA complex suggests that Arg-331, which is absent in PI-SceI, contacts T/A+5, and the reduced activity observed in a PI-ZbaI R331A mutant provides evidence for this interaction. These data illustrate that homing endonucleases evolve altered specificity as they adapt to recognize alternative target sites.

  16. Evolutionary characterization of Ty3/gypsy-like LTR retrotransposons in the parasitic cestode Echinococcus granulosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Young-An

    2016-11-01

    Cyclophyllidean cestodes including Echinococcus granulosus have a smaller genome and show characteristics such as loss of the gut, a segmented body plan, and accelerated growth rate in hosts compared with other tissue-invading helminths. In an effort to address the molecular mechanism relevant to genome shrinkage, the evolutionary status of long-terminal-repeat (LTR) retrotransposons, which are known as the most potent genomic modulators, was investigated in the E. granulosus draft genome. A majority of the E. granulosus LTR retrotransposons were classified into a novel characteristic clade, named Saci-2, of the Ty3/gypsy family, while the remaining elements belonged to the CsRn1 clade of identical family. Their nucleotide sequences were heavily corrupted by frequent base substitutions and segmental losses. The ceased mobile activity of the major retrotransposons and the following intrinsic DNA loss in their inactive progenies might have contributed to decrease in genome size. Apart from the degenerate copies, a gag gene originating from a CsRn1-like element exhibited substantial evidences suggesting its domestication including a preserved coding profile and transcriptional activity, the presence of syntenic orthologues in cestodes, and selective pressure acting on the gene. To my knowledge, the endogenized gag gene is reported for the first time in invertebrates, though its biological function remains elusive.

  17. Probing the role of interfacial waters in protein-DNA recognition using a hybrid implicit/explicit solvation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shen; Bradley, Philip

    2013-01-01

    When proteins bind to their DNA target sites, ordered water molecules are often present at the protein-DNA interface bridging protein and DNA through hydrogen bonds. What is the role of these ordered interfacial waters? Are they important determinants of the specificity of DNA sequence recognition, or do they act in binding in a primarily non-specific manner, by improving packing of the interface, shielding unfavorable electrostatic interactions, and solvating unsatisfied polar groups that are inaccessible to bulk solvent? When modeling details of structure and binding preferences, can fully implicit solvent models be fruitfully applied to protein-DNA interfaces, or must the individualistic properties of these interfacial waters be accounted for? To address these questions, we have developed a hybrid implicit/explicit solvation model that specifically accounts for the locations and orientations of small numbers of DNA-bound water molecules while treating the majority of the solvent implicitly. Comparing the performance of this model to its fully implicit counterpart, we find that explicit treatment of interfacial waters results in a modest but significant improvement in protein sidechain placement and DNA sequence recovery. Base-by-base comparison of the performance of the two models highlights DNA sequence positions whose recognition may be dependent on interfacial water. Our study offers large-scale statistical evidence for the role of ordered water for protein DNA recognition, together with detailed examination of several well-characterized systems. In addition, our approach provides a template for modeling explicit water molecules at interfaces that should be extensible to other systems. PMID:23444044

  18. Proceedings of the workshop. Recognition of DNA damage as onset of successful repair. Computational and experimental approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinak, Miroslav

    2002-03-01

    This was held at The Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, on the 18th and 19th of December 2001. The Laboratory of Radiation Risk Analysis of JAERI organized the workshop. The main subject of the workshop was the DNA damage and its repair. Presented works described the leading experimental as well computational approaches, focusing mainly on the formation of DNA damage, its proliferation, enzymatic recognition and repair, and finally imaging and detection of lesions on a DNA molecule. The 19 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  19. DNA barcoding of Arctic Ocean holozooplankton for species identification and recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucklin, Ann; Hopcroft, Russell R.; Kosobokova, Ksenia N.; Nigro, Lisa M.; Ortman, Brian D.; Jennings, Robert M.; Sweetman, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    Zooplankton species diversity and distribution are important measures of environmental change in the Arctic Ocean, and may serve as 'rapid-responders' of climate-induced changes in this fragile ecosystem. The scarcity of taxonomists hampers detailed and up-to-date monitoring of these patterns for the rarer and more problematic species. DNA barcodes (short DNA sequences for species recognition and discovery) provide an alternative approach to accurate identification of known species, and can speed routine analysis of zooplankton samples. During 2004-2008, zooplankton samples were collected during cruises to the central Arctic Ocean and Chukchi Sea. A ˜700 base-pair region of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (mtCOI) gene was amplified and sequenced for 82 identified specimens of 41 species, including cnidarians (six hydrozoans, one scyphozoan), arthropod crustaceans (five amphipods, 24 copepods, one decapod, and one euphausiid); two chaetognaths; and one nemertean. Phylogenetic analysis used the Neighbor-Joining algorithm with Kimura-2-Parameter (K-2-P) distances, with 1000-fold bootstrapping. K-2-P genetic distances between individuals of the same species ranged from 0.0 to 0.2; genetic distances between species ranged widely from 0.1 to 0.7. The mtCOI gene tree showed monophyly (at 100% bootstrap value) for each of the 26 species for which more than one individual was analyzed. Of seven genera for which more than one species was analyzed, four were shown to be monophyletic; three genera were not resolved. At higher taxonomic levels, only the crustacean order Copepoda was resolved, with bootstrap value of 83%. The mtCOI barcodes accurately discriminated and identified known species of 10 taxonomic groups of Arctic Ocean holozooplankton. A comprehensive DNA barcode database for the estimated 300 described species of Arctic holozooplankton will allow rapid assessment of species diversity and distribution in this climate-vulnerable ocean ecosystem.

  20. Evolution of divergent DNA recognition specificities in VDE homing endonucleases from two yeast species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posey, Karen L.; Koufopanou, Vassiliki; Burt, Austin; Gimble, Frederick S.

    2004-01-01

    Homing endonuclease genes (HEGs) are mobile DNA elements that are thought to confer no benefit to their host. They encode site-specific DNA endonucleases that perpetuate the element within a species population by homing and disseminate it between species by horizontal transfer. Several yeast species contain the VMA1 HEG that encodes the intein-associated VMA1-derived endonuclease (VDE). The evolutionary state of VDEs from 12 species was assessed by assaying their endonuclease activities. Only two enzymes are active, PI-ZbaI from Zygosaccharomyces bailii and PI-ScaI from Saccharomyces cariocanus. PI-ZbaI cleaves the Z.bailii recognition sequence significantly faster than the Saccharomyces cerevisiae site, which differs at six nucleotide positions. A mutational analysis indicates that PI-ZbaI cleaves the S.cerevisiae substrate poorly due to the absence of a contact that is analogous to one made in PI-SceI between Gln-55 and nucleotides +9/+10. PI-ZbaI cleaves the Z.bailii substrate primarily due to a single base-pair substitution (A/T+5 → T/A+5). Structural modeling of the PI-ZbaI/DNA complex suggests that Arg-331, which is absent in PI-SceI, contacts T/A+5, and the reduced activity observed in a PI-ZbaI R331A mutant provides evidence for this interaction. These data illustrate that homing endonucleases evolve altered specificity as they adapt to recognize alternative target sites. PMID:15280510

  1. Analysis of the substrate recognition state of TDP-43 to single-stranded DNA using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Kitamura

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal function and abnormal aggregation of transactivation response (TAR DNA/RNA-binding protein 43 kDa (TDP-43 are directly associated with the lethal genetic diseases: cystic fibrosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD. The binding of TDP-43 to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA or RNA is involved in transcriptional repression, regulation of RNA splicing, and RNA stabilization. Equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd of TDP-43 and ssDNA or RNA have been determined using various methods; however, methods that can measure Kd with high sensitivity in a short time using a small amount of TDP-43 in solution would be advantageous. Here, in order to determine the Kd of TDP-43 and fluorescence-labeled ssDNA as well as the binding stoichiometry, we use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS, which detects the slowed diffusion of molecular interactions in solution with single-molecule sensitivity, in addition to electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA. Using tandem affinity chromatography of TDP-43 dually tagged with glutathione-S-transferase and poly-histidine tags, highly purified protein was obtained. FCS successfully detected specific interaction between purified TDP-43 and TG ssDNA repeats, with a Kd in the nanomolar range. The Kd of the TDP-43 mutant was not different from the wild type, although mutant oligomers, which did not bind ssDNA, were observed. Analysis of the fluorescence brightness per dimerized TDP-43/ssDNA complex was used to evaluate their binding stoichiometry. The results suggest that an assay combining FCS and EMSA can precisely analyze ssDNA recognition mechanisms, and that FCS may be applied for the rapid and quantitative determination of the interaction strength between TDP-43 and ssDNA or RNA. These methods will aid in the elucidation of the substrate recognition mechanism of ALS- and FTLD-associated variants of TDP-43.

  2. Nuclear Matrix protein SMAR1 represses HIV-1 LTR mediated transcription through chromatin remodeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreenath, Kadreppa; Pavithra, Lakshminarasimhan; Singh, Sandeep; Sinha, Surajit; Dash, Prasanta K.; Siddappa, Nagadenahalli B.; Ranga, Udaykumar; Mitra, Debashis; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear Matrix and MARs have been implicated in the transcriptional regulation of host as well as viral genes but their precise role in HIV-1 transcription remains unclear. Here, we show that > 98% of HIV sequences contain consensus MAR element in their promoter. We show that SMAR1 binds to the LTR MAR and reinforces transcriptional silencing by tethering the LTR MAR to nuclear matrix. SMAR1 associated HDAC1-mSin3 corepressor complex is dislodged from the LTR upon cellular activation by PMA/TNFα leading to an increase in the acetylation and a reduction in the trimethylation of histones, associated with the recruitment of RNA Polymerase II on the LTR. Overexpression of SMAR1 lead to reduction in LTR mediated transcription, both in a Tat dependent and independent manner, resulting in a decreased virion production. These results demonstrate the role of SMAR1 in regulating viral transcription by alternative compartmentalization of LTR between the nuclear matrix and chromatin.

  3. Recognition and repair of the CC-1065-(N3-Adenine)-DNA adduct by the UVRABC nuclease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, M.; Lee, C.S.; Doisy, R.; Ross, L.; Needham-VanDevanter, D.R.; Hurley, L.H.

    1988-01-01

    The recognition and repair of the helix-stabilizing and relatively nondistortive CC-1065-(N3-adenine)-DNA adduct by UVRABC nuclease has been investigated both in vivo with phi X174RFI DNA by a transfection assay and in vitro by a site-directed adduct in a 117 base pair fragment from M13mp1. CC-1065 is a potent antitumor antibiotic produced by Streptomyces zelensis which binds within the minor groove of DNA through N3 of adenine. In contrast to the helix-destabilizing and distortive modifications of DNA caused by ultraviolet light or N-acetoxy-2-(acetylamino)fluorene, CC-1065 increases the melting point of DNA and decreases the S1 nuclease activity. Using a viral DNA-Escherichia coli transfection system, the authors have found that the uvrA, uvrB, and uvrC genes, which code for the major excision repair proteins for UV- and NAAAF-induced DNA damage, are also involved in the repair of CC-1065-DNA adducts. In contrast, the uvrD gene product, which has been found to be involved in the repair of UV damage, has no effect in repairing CC-1065-DNA adducts. Purified UVRA, UVRB, and UVRC proteins must work in concert to incise the drug-modified phi X174RFI DNA. Using a site-directed and multiple CC-1065 modified (MspI-BstNI) 117 base pair fragment from M13mp1, they have found that UVRABC nuclease incises at the eight phosphodiester bond on the 5' side of the CC-1065-DNA adduct on the drug-modified strand. The enzymes do not cut the noncovalently modified strand. The DNA sequence and/or helix-stabilizing effect of multiple adducts may determine the recognition and/or incision of the drug-DNA adduct by UVRABC nuclease. These results are discussed in relation to the structure of the CC-1065-DNA adduct and the effect of drug binding on local DNA structure

  4. Helicase Dependent Isothermal Amplification of DNA and RNA using Self-Avoiding Molecular Recognition Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zunyi; McLendon, Chris; Hutter, Daniel; Bradley, Kevin M.; Hoshika, Shuichi; Frye, Carole; Benner, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Assays that target DNA or RNA (xNA) are highly sensitive, as small amounts of xNA can be amplified by PCR. Unfortunately, PCR is inconvenient in low resource environments, requiring equipment and power that may not be available in these environments. However, isothermal procedures that avoid thermal cycling are often confounded by primer dimers, off-target priming, and other artifacts. Here, we show how a “self avoiding molecular recognition system” (SAMRS) eliminates these artifacts to give clean amplicons in a helicase-dependent isothermal amplification (SAMRS-HDA). We also show that incorporating SAMRS into the 3′-ends of primers facilitates the design and screening of primers for HDA assays. Finally, we show that SAMRS-HDA can be twofold multiplexed, something difficult to achieve with HDA using standard primers. This shows that SAMRS-HDA is a more versatile approach than standard HDA with a broader applicability for xNA-targeted diagnostics and research. PMID:25953623

  5. Recognition of AT-Rich DNA Binding Sites by the MogR Repressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Aimee; Higgins, Darren E.; Panne, Daniel; (Harvard-Med); (EMBL)

    2009-07-22

    The MogR transcriptional repressor of the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes recognizes AT-rich binding sites in promoters of flagellar genes to downregulate flagellar gene expression during infection. We describe here the 1.8 A resolution crystal structure of MogR bound to the recognition sequence 5' ATTTTTTAAAAAAAT 3' present within the flaA promoter region. Our structure shows that MogR binds as a dimer. Each half-site is recognized in the major groove by a helix-turn-helix motif and in the minor groove by a loop from the symmetry-related molecule, resulting in a 'crossover' binding mode. This oversampling through minor groove interactions is important for specificity. The MogR binding site has structural features of A-tract DNA and is bent by approximately 52 degrees away from the dimer. The structure explains how MogR achieves binding specificity in the AT-rich genome of L. monocytogenes and explains the evolutionary conservation of A-tract sequence elements within promoter regions of MogR-regulated flagellar genes.

  6. Structural hierarchy controlling dimerization and target DNA recognition in the AHR transcriptional complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seok, Seung-Hyeon; Lee, Woojong; Jiang, Li; Molugu, Kaivalya; Zheng, Aiping; Li, Yitong; Park, Sanghyun; Bradfield, Christopher A.; Xing, Yongna (UW)

    2017-04-10

    he aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) belongs to the PAS (PER-ARNT-SIM) family transcription factors and mediates broad responses to numerous environmental pollutants and cellular metabolites, modulating diverse biological processes from adaptive metabolism, acute toxicity, to normal physiology of vascular and immune systems. The AHR forms a transcriptionally active heterodimer with ARNT (AHR nuclear translocator), which recognizes the dioxin response element (DRE) in the promoter of downstream genes. We determined the crystal structure of the mammalian AHR–ARNT heterodimer in complex with the DRE, in which ARNT curls around AHR into a highly intertwined asymmetric architecture, with extensive heterodimerization interfaces and AHR interdomain interactions. Specific recognition of the DRE is determined locally by the DNA-binding residues, which discriminates it from the closely related hypoxia response element (HRE), and is globally affected by the dimerization interfaces and interdomain interactions. Changes at the interdomain interactions caused either AHR constitutive nuclear localization or failure to translocate to nucleus, underlying an allosteric structural pathway for mediating ligand-induced exposure of nuclear localization signal. These observations, together with the global higher flexibility of the AHR PAS-A and its loosely packed structural elements, suggest a dynamic structural hierarchy for complex scenarios of AHR activation induced by its diverse ligands.

  7. Molecular recognition of live methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus cells using DNA aptamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turek, Diane; Van Simaeys, Dimitri; Johnson, Judith; Ocsoy, Ismail; Tan, Weihong

    2013-01-01

    To generate DNA-aptamers binding to Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) . The Cell-Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) technology was used to run the selection against MRSA bacteria and develop target-specific aptamers. MRSA bacteria were targeted while Enterococcus faecalis bacteria were used for counter selection during that process. Binding assays to determine the right aptamer candidates as well as binding assays on clinical samples were performed through flow cytometry and analyzed using the FlowJo software. The characterization of the aptamers was done by determination of their K d values and determined by analysis of flow data at different aptamer concentration using SigmaPlot. Finally, the recognition of the complex Gold-nanoparticle-aptamer to the bacteria cells was observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). During the cell-SELEX selection process, 17 rounds were necessary to generate enrichment of the pool. While the selection was run using fixed cells, it was shown that the binding of the pools with live cells was giving similar results. After sequencing and analysis of the two last pools, four sequences were identified to be aptamer candidates. The characterization of those aptamers showed that based on their K d values, DTMRSA4 presented the best binding with a K d value of 94.61 ± 18.82 nmol/L. A total of ten clinical samples of MRSA , S. aureus and Enterococcus faecalis were obtained to test those aptamers and determine their binding on a panel of samples. DTMRSA1 and DTMRSA3 showed the best results regarding their specificity to MRSA , DTMRSA1 being the most specific of all. Finally, those aptamers were coupled with gold-nanoparticle and their binding to MRSA cells was visualized through TEM showing that adduction of nanoparticles on the aptamers did not change their binding property. A total of four aptamers that bind to MRSA were obtained with K d values ranking from 94 to 200 nmol/L.

  8. Binding to the DNA Minor Groove by Heterocyclic Dications: From AT Specific Monomers to GC Recognition with Dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanjunda, Rupesh; Wilson, W. David

    2012-01-01

    Compounds that bind in the DNA minor groove have provided critical information on DNA molecular recognition, they have found extensive uses in biotechnology and they are providing clinically useful drugs against diseases as diverse as cancer and sleeping sickness. This review focuses on the development of clinically useful heterocyclic diamidine minor groove binders. These compounds have shown us that the classical model for minor groove binding in AT DNA sequences must be expanded in several ways: compounds with nonstandard shapes can bind strongly to the groove, water can be directly incorporated into the minor groove complex in an interfacial interaction, and the compounds can form cooperative stacked dimers to recognize GC and mixed AT/GC base pair sequences. PMID:23255206

  9. Omni-PolyA: a method and tool for accurate recognition of Poly(A) signals in human genomic DNA

    KAUST Repository

    Magana-Mora, Arturo

    2017-08-15

    BackgroundPolyadenylation is a critical stage of RNA processing during the formation of mature mRNA, and is present in most of the known eukaryote protein-coding transcripts and many long non-coding RNAs. The correct identification of poly(A) signals (PAS) not only helps to elucidate the 3′-end genomic boundaries of a transcribed DNA region and gene regulatory mechanisms but also gives insight into the multiple transcript isoforms resulting from alternative PAS. Although progress has been made in the in-silico prediction of genomic signals, the recognition of PAS in DNA genomic sequences remains a challenge.ResultsIn this study, we analyzed human genomic DNA sequences for the 12 most common PAS variants. Our analysis has identified a set of features that helps in the recognition of true PAS, which may be involved in the regulation of the polyadenylation process. The proposed features, in combination with a recognition model, resulted in a novel method and tool, Omni-PolyA. Omni-PolyA combines several machine learning techniques such as different classifiers in a tree-like decision structure and genetic algorithms for deriving a robust classification model. We performed a comparison between results obtained by state-of-the-art methods, deep neural networks, and Omni-PolyA. Results show that Omni-PolyA significantly reduced the average classification error rate by 35.37% in the prediction of the 12 considered PAS variants relative to the state-of-the-art results.ConclusionsThe results of our study demonstrate that Omni-PolyA is currently the most accurate model for the prediction of PAS in human and can serve as a useful complement to other PAS recognition methods. Omni-PolyA is publicly available as an online tool accessible at www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/omnipolya/.

  10. Transfer of molecular recognition information from DNA nanostructures to gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwardson, Thomas G. W.; Lau, Kai Lin; Bousmail, Danny; Serpell, Christopher J.; Sleiman, Hanadi F.

    2016-02-01

    DNA nanotechnology offers unparalleled precision and programmability for the bottom-up organization of materials. This approach relies on pre-assembling a DNA scaffold, typically containing hundreds of different strands, and using it to position functional components. A particularly attractive strategy is to employ DNA nanostructures not as permanent scaffolds, but as transient, reusable templates to transfer essential information to other materials. To our knowledge, this approach, akin to top-down lithography, has not been examined. Here we report a molecular printing strategy that chemically transfers a discrete pattern of DNA strands from a three-dimensional DNA structure to a gold nanoparticle. We show that the particles inherit the DNA sequence configuration encoded in the parent template with high fidelity. This provides control over the number of DNA strands and their relative placement, directionality and sequence asymmetry. Importantly, the nanoparticles produced exhibit the site-specific addressability of DNA nanostructures, and are promising components for energy, information and biomedical applications.

  11. Preferential recognition of auto-antibodies against 4-hydroxynonenal modified DNA in the cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, Mohammad; Shahab, Uzma; Alatar, Abdulrahman A; Ahmad, Saheem

    2017-11-01

    The structural perturbations in DNA molecule may be caused by a break in a strand, a missing base from the backbone, or a chemically changed base. These alterations in DNA that occurs naturally can result from metabolic or hydrolytic processes. DNA damage plays a major role in the mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, aging and various other patho-physiological conditions. DNA damage can be induced through hydrolysis, exposure to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other reactive carbonyl metabolites including 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE). 4-HNE is an important lipid peroxidation product which has been implicated in the mutagenesis and carcinogenesis processes. The present study examines to probe the presence of auto-antibodies against 4-hydroxynonenal damaged DNA (HNE-DNA) in various cancer subjects. In this study, the purified calf thymus DNA was damaged by the action of 4-HNE. The DNA was incubated with 4-HNE for 24 h at 37°C temperature. The binding characteristics of cancer auto-antibodies were assessed by direct binding and competitive inhibition ELISA. DNA modifications produced hyperchromicity in UV spectrum and decreased fluorescence intensity. Cancer sera exhibited enhanced binding with the 4-HNE modified calf thymus DNA as compared to its native conformer. The 4-HNE modified DNA presents unique epitopes which may be one of the factors for the auto-antibody induction in cancer patients. The HNE modified DNA presents unique epitopes which may be one of the factors for the autoantibody induction in cancer patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Dual chromatin recognition by the histone deacetylase complex HCHC is required for proper DNA methylation in Neurospora crassa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Shinji; Bicocca, Vincent T.; Gessaman, Jordan D.; Rountree, Michael R.; Yokoyama, Ayumi; Yu, Eun Y.; Selker, Jeanne M. L.; Selker, Eric U.

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation, heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1), histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) methylation, histone deacetylation, and highly repeated sequences are prototypical heterochromatic features, but their interrelationships are not fully understood. Prior work showed that H3K9 methylation directs DNA methylation and histone deacetylation via HP1 in Neurospora crassa and that the histone deacetylase complex HCHC is required for proper DNA methylation. The complex consists of the chromodomain proteins HP1 and chromodomain protein 2 (CDP-2), the histone deacetylase HDA-1, and the AT-hook motif protein CDP-2/HDA-1–associated protein (CHAP). We show that the complex is required for proper chromosome segregation, dissect its function, and characterize interactions among its components. Our analyses revealed the existence of an HP1-based DNA methylation pathway independent of its chromodomain. The pathway partially depends on CHAP but not on the CDP-2 chromodomain. CDP-2 serves as a bridge between the recognition of H3K9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) by HP1 and the histone deacetylase activity of HDA-1. CHAP is also critical for HDA-1 localization to heterochromatin. Specifically, the CHAP zinc finger interacts directly with the HDA-1 argonaute-binding protein 2 (Arb2) domain, and the CHAP AT-hook motifs recognize heterochromatic regions by binding to AT-rich DNA. Our data shed light on the interrelationships among the prototypical heterochromatic features and support a model in which dual recognition by the HP1 chromodomain and the CHAP AT-hooks are required for proper heterochromatin formation. PMID:27681634

  13. Recognition of double-stranded DNA using energetically activated duplexes with interstrand zippers of 1-, 2-or 4-pyrenyl-functionalized O2 '-alkylated RNA monomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karmakar, Saswata; Madsen, Andreas Stahl; Guenther, Dale C.

    2014-01-01

    '-alkylated uridine monomers X-Z by means of thermal denaturation experiments, optical spectroscopy, force-field simulations and recognition experiments using DNA hairpins as model targets. We demonstrate that Invaders with +1 interstrand zippers of X or Y monomers efficiently recognize mixed-sequence DNA...

  14. Molecular recognition of AT-DNA sequences by the induced CD pattern of dibenzotetraaza[14]annulene (DBTAA)–adenine derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojković, Marijana Radić; Škugor, Marko; Dudek, Łukasz; Grolik, Jarosław; Eilmes, Julita

    2014-01-01

    Summary An investigation of the interactions of two novel and several known DBTAA–adenine conjugates with double-stranded DNA and RNA has revealed the DNA/RNA groove as the dominant binding site, which is in contrast to the majority of previously studied DBTAA analogues (DNA/RNA intercalators). Only DBTAA–propyladenine conjugates revealed the molecular recognition of AT-DNA by an ICD band pattern > 300 nm, whereas significant ICD bands did not appear for other ds-DNA/RNA. A structure–activity relation for the studied series of compounds showed that the essential structural features for the ICD recognition are a) the presence of DNA-binding appendages (adenine side chain and positively charged side chain) on both DBTAA side chains, and b) the presence of a short propyl linker, which does not support intramolecular aromatic stacking between DBTAA and adenine. The observed AT-DNA-ICD pattern differs from previously reported ss-DNA (poly dT) ICD recognition by a strong negative ICD band at 350 nm, which allows for the dynamic differentiation between ss-DNA (poly dT) and coupled ds-AT-DNA. PMID:25246976

  15. Structural basis of hAT transposon end recognition by Hermes, an octameric DNA transposase from Musca domestica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Alison B; Ewis, Hosam E; Li, Xianghong; Knapp, Joshua A; Laver, Thomas; Doss, Anna-Louise; Tolun, Gökhan; Steven, Alasdair C; Grishaev, Alexander; Bax, Ad; Atkinson, Peter W; Craig, Nancy L; Dyda, Fred

    2014-07-17

    Hermes is a member of the hAT transposon superfamily that has active representatives, including McClintock's archetypal Ac mobile genetic element, in many eukaryotic species. The crystal structure of the Hermes transposase-DNA complex reveals that Hermes forms an octameric ring organized as a tetramer of dimers. Although isolated dimers are active in vitro for all the chemical steps of transposition, only octamers are active in vivo. The octamer can provide not only multiple specific DNA-binding domains to recognize repeated subterminal sequences within the transposon ends, which are important for activity, but also multiple nonspecific DNA binding surfaces for target capture. The unusual assembly explains the basis of bipartite DNA recognition at hAT transposon ends, provides a rationale for transposon end asymmetry, and suggests how the avidity provided by multiple sites of interaction could allow a transposase to locate its transposon ends amidst a sea of chromosomal DNA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Involvement of DNA-PK and ATM in radiation- and heat-induced DNA damage recognition and apoptotic cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Masanori

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation and hyperthermia results in important biological consequences, e.g. cell death, chromosomal aberrations, mutations, and DNA strand breaks. There is good evidence that the nucleus, specifically cellular DNA, is the principal target for radiation-induced cell lethality. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are considered to be the most serious type of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation. On the other hand, verifiable mechanisms which can lead to heat-induced cell death are damage to the plasma membrane and/or inactivation of heat-labile proteins caused by protein denaturation and subsequent aggregation. Recently, several reports have suggested that DSBs can be induced after hyperthermia because heat-induced phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) foci formation can be observed in several mammalian cell lines. In mammalian cells, DSBs are repaired primarily through two distinct and complementary mechanisms: non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), and homologous recombination (HR) or homology-directed repair (HDR). DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) are key players in the initiation of DSB repair and phosphorylate and/or activate many substrates, including themselves. These phosphorylated substrates have important roles in the functioning of cell cycle checkpoints and in cell death, as well as in DSB repair. Apoptotic cell death is a crucial cell suicide mechanism during development and in the defense of homeostasis. If DSBs are unrepaired or misrepaired, apoptosis is a very important system which can protect an organism against carcinogenesis. This paper reviews recently obtained results and current topics concerning the role of DNA-PK and ATM in heat- or radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. (author)

  17. Assembling of G-strands into novel tetra-molecular parallel G4-DNA nanostructures using avidin-biotin recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovok, Natalia; Iram, Natalie; Zikich, Dragoslav; Ghabboun, Jamal; Livshits, Gideon I; Porath, Danny; Kotlyar, Alexander B

    2008-09-01

    We describe a method for the preparation of novel long (hundreds of nanometers), uniform, inter-molecular G4-DNA molecules composed of four parallel G-strands. The only long continuous G4-DNA reported so far are intra-molecular structures made of a single G-strand. To enable a tetra-molecular assembly of the G-strands we developed a novel approach based on avidin-biotin biological recognition. The steps of the G4-DNA production include: (i) Enzymatic synthesis of long poly(dG)-poly(dC) molecules with biotinylated poly(dG)-strand; (ii) Formation of a complex between avidin-tetramer and four biotinylated poly(dG)-poly(dC) molecules; (iii) Separation of the poly(dC) strands from the poly(dG)-strands, which are connected to the avidin; (iv) Assembly of the four G-strands attached to the avidin into tetra-molecular G4-DNA. The average contour length of the formed structures, as measured by AFM, is equal to that of the initial poly(dG)-poly(dC) molecules, suggesting a tetra-molecular mechanism of the G-strands assembly. The height of tetra-molecular G4-nanostructures is larger than that of mono-molecular G4-DNA molecules having similar contour length. The CD spectra of the tetra- and mono-molecular G4-DNA are markedly different, suggesting different structural organization of these two types of molecules. The tetra-molecular G4-DNA nanostructures showed clear electrical polarizability. This suggests that they may be useful for molecular electronics.

  18. The crystal structure of the Sox4 HMG domain-DNA complex suggests a mechanism for positional interdependence in DNA recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Ralf; Ng, Calista K L; Narasimhan, Kamesh; Kolatkar, Prasanna R

    2012-04-01

    It has recently been proposed that the sequence preferences of DNA-binding TFs (transcription factors) can be well described by models that include the positional interdependence of the nucleotides of the target sites. Such binding models allow for multiple motifs to be invoked, such as principal and secondary motifs differing at two or more nucleotide positions. However, the structural mechanisms underlying the accommodation of such variant motifs by TFs remain elusive. In the present study we examine the crystal structure of the HMG (high-mobility group) domain of Sox4 [Sry (sex-determining region on the Y chromosome)-related HMG box 4] bound to DNA. By comparing this structure with previously solved structures of Sox17 and Sox2, we observed subtle conformational differences at the DNA-binding interface. Furthermore, using quantitative electrophoretic mobility-shift assays we validated the positional interdependence of two nucleotides and the presence of a secondary Sox motif in the affinity landscape of Sox4. These results suggest that a concerted rearrangement of two interface amino acids enables Sox4 to accommodate primary and secondary motifs. The structural adaptations lead to altered dinucleotide preferences that mutually reinforce each other. These analyses underline the complexity of the DNA recognition by TFs and provide an experimental validation for the conceptual framework of positional interdependence and secondary binding motifs.

  19. Molecular recognition of AT-DNA sequences by the induced CD pattern of dibenzotetraaza[14]annulene (DBTAA)–adenine derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Stojković, Marijana Radić; Škugor, Marko; Dudek, Łukasz; Grolik, Jarosław; Eilmes, Julita; Piantanida, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    Summary An investigation of the interactions of two novel and several known DBTAA–adenine conjugates with double-stranded DNA and RNA has revealed the DNA/RNA groove as the dominant binding site, which is in contrast to the majority of previously studied DBTAA analogues (DNA/RNA intercalators). Only DBTAA–propyladenine conjugates revealed the molecular recognition of AT-DNA by an ICD band pattern > 300 nm, whereas significant ICD bands did not appear for other ds-DNA/RNA. A structure–activity...

  20. Tet1 Oxidase Regulates Neuronal Gene Transcription, Active DNA Hydroxy-methylation, Object Location Memory, and Threat Recognition Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Aggarwal, Milan; Kaas, Garrett A; Lewis, John; Wang, Jing; Ross, Daniel L; Zhong, Chun; Kennedy, Andrew; Song, Hongjun; Sweatt, J David

    2015-10-01

    A dynamic equilibrium between DNA methylation and demethylation of neuronal activity-regulated genes is crucial for memory processes. However, the mechanisms underlying this equilibrium remain elusive. Tet1 oxidase has been shown to play a key role in the active DNA demethylation in the CNS. In this study, we used Tet1 gene knockout (Tet1KO) mice to examine the involvement of Tet1 in memory consolidation and storage in the adult brain. We found that Tet1 ablation leads to: altered expression of numerous neuronal activity-regulated genes, compensatory upregulation of active demethylation pathway genes, and upregulation of various epigenetic modifiers. Moreover, Tet1KO mice showed an enhancement in the consolidation and storage of threat recognition (cued and contextual fear conditioning) and object location memories. We conclude that Tet1 plays a critical role in regulating neuronal transcription and in maintaining the epigenetic state of the brain associated with memory consolidation and storage.

  1. Tet1 oxidase regulates neuronal gene transcription, active DNA hydroxymethylation, object location memory, and threat recognition memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic equilibrium between DNA methylation and demethylation of neuronal activity-regulated genes is crucial for memory processes. However, the mechanisms underlying this equilibrium remain elusive. Tet1 oxidase has been shown to play a key role in the active DNA demethylation in the central nervous system. In this study, we used Tet1 gene knockout (Tet1KO mice to examine the involvement of Tet1 in memory consolidation and storage in the adult brain. We found that Tet1 ablation leads to altered expression of numerous neuronal activity-regulated genes, compensatory upregulation of active demethylation pathway genes, and upregulation of various epigenetic modifiers. Moreover, Tet1KO mice showed an enhancement in the consolidation and storage of threat recognition (cued and contextual fear conditioning and object location memories. We conclude that Tet1 plays a critical role in regulating neuronal transcription and in maintaining the epigenetic state of the brain associated with memory consolidation and storage.

  2. An Analysis Of Pole/zero Cancellation In LTR-based Feedback Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Jannerup, Ole Erik

    1990-01-01

    The pole/zero cancellation in LTR-based feedback design will be analyzed for both full-order as well as minimal-order observers. The asymptotic behaviour of the sensitivity function from the LTR-procedure are given in explicit expressions in the case when a zero is not cancelled by an equivalent...... pole. It will be shown that the non-minimum phase case is included as a special case. The results are not based on any specific LTR-method....

  3. Lune/eye gone, a Pax-like protein, uses a partial paired domain and a homeodomain for DNA recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, S; Wallen, R V; Goriely, A; Kalionis, B; Desplan, C

    1998-11-10

    Pax proteins, characterized by the presence of a paired domain, play key regulatory roles during development. The paired domain is a bipartite DNA-binding domain that contains two helix-turn-helix domains joined by a linker region. Each of the subdomains, the PAI and RED domains, has been shown to be a distinct DNA-binding domain. The PAI domain is the most critical, but in specific circumstances, the RED domain is involved in DNA recognition. We describe a Pax protein, originally called Lune, that is the product of the Drosophila eye gone gene (eyg). It is unique among Pax proteins, because it contains only the RED domain. eyg seems to play a role both in the organogenesis of the salivary gland during embryogenesis and in the development of the eye. A high-affinity binding site for the Eyg RED domain was identified by using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment techniques. This binding site is related to a binding site previously identified for the RED domain of the Pax-6 5a isoform. Eyg also contains another DNA-binding domain, a Prd-class homeodomain (HD), whose palindromic binding site is similar to other Prd-class HDs. The ability of Pax proteins to use the PAI, RED, and HD, or combinations thereof, may be one mechanism that allows them to be used at different stages of development to regulate various developmental processes through the activation of specific target genes.

  4. Molecular Recognition of DNA Damage Sites by Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonucleases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, W. A.

    2005-07-28

    The DNA repair/redox factor AP endonuclease 1 (APE1) is a multifunctional protein which is known to to be essential for DNA repair activity in human cells. Structural/functional analyses of the APE activity is thus been an important research field to assess cellular defense mechanisms against ionizing radiation.

  5. Recognition of base J in duplex DNA by J-binding protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabatini, Robert; Meeuwenoord, Nico; van Boom, Jacques H.; Borst, Piet

    2002-01-01

    beta-d-Glucosylhydroxymethyluracil, also called base J, is an unusual modified DNA base conserved among Kinetoplastida. Base J is found predominantly in repetitive DNA and correlates with epigenetic silencing of telomeric variant surface glycoprotein genes. We have previously found a J-binding

  6. A Novel AT-Rich DNA Recognition Mechanism for Bacterial Xenogeneic Silencer MvaT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Ding

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial xenogeneic silencing proteins selectively bind to and silence expression from many AT rich regions of the chromosome. They serve as master regulators of horizontally acquired DNA, including a large number of virulence genes. To date, three distinct families of xenogeneic silencers have been identified: H-NS of Proteobacteria, Lsr2 of the Actinomycetes, and MvaT of Pseudomonas sp. Although H-NS and Lsr2 family proteins are structurally different, they all recognize the AT-rich DNA minor groove through a common AT-hook-like motif, which is absent in the MvaT family. Thus, the DNA binding mechanism of MvaT has not been determined. Here, we report the characteristics of DNA sequences targeted by MvaT with protein binding microarrays, which indicates that MvaT prefers binding flexible DNA sequences with multiple TpA steps. We demonstrate that there are clear differences in sequence preferences between MvaT and the other two xenogeneic silencer families. We also determined the structure of the DNA-binding domain of MvaT in complex with a high affinity DNA dodecamer using solution NMR. This is the first experimental structure of a xenogeneic silencer in complex with DNA, which reveals that MvaT recognizes the AT-rich DNA both through base readout by an "AT-pincer" motif inserted into the minor groove and through shape readout by multiple lysine side chains interacting with the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone. Mutations of key MvaT residues for DNA binding confirm their importance with both in vitro and in vivo assays. This novel DNA binding mode enables MvaT to better tolerate GC-base pair interruptions in the binding site and less prefer A tract DNA when compared to H-NS and Lsr2. Comparison of MvaT with other bacterial xenogeneic silencers provides a clear picture that nature has evolved unique solutions for different bacterial genera to distinguish foreign from self DNA.

  7. Influence of the complexity of radiation-induced DNA damage on enzyme recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, Philip

    2002-01-01

    Ionising radiation is unique in inducing DNA clustered damage together with the simple isolated lesions. Understanding how these complex lesions are recognised and repaired by the cell is key to understanding the health risks associated with radiation exposure. This study focuses on whether ionising radiation-induced complex single-strand breaks (SSB) are recognised by DNA-PK and PARP, and whether the complexity of DSB influence their ligation by either DNA ligase lV/XRCC4 (LX) complex or T4 DNA ligase. Plasmid DNA, irradiated in aqueous solution using sparsely ionising γ-rays and densely ionising α-particles produce different yields of complex DNA damages, used as substrates for in vitro DNA-PK and PARP activity assays. The activity of DNA-PK to phosphorylate a peptide was determined using HF19 cell nuclear extracts as a source of DNA-PK. PARP ADP-ribosylation activity was determined using purified PARP enzyme. The activation of DNA-PK and PARP by irradiated DNA is due to SSB and not the low yield of DSB (linear plasmid DNA <10%). A ∼2 fold increase in DNA-PK activation and a ∼3-fold reduction in PARP activity seen on increasing the ionising density of the radiation (proportion of complex damage) are proposed to reflect changes in the complexity of SSB and may relate to damage signalling. Complex DSB synthesised as double-stranded oligonucleotides, with a 2 bp 5'-overhang, and containing modified lesions, 8-oxoguanine and abasic sites, at known positions relative to the termini were used as substrates for in vitro ligation by DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 or T4 ligase. The presence of a modified lesion 2 or 3 bp but not 4 bp from the 3'-termini and 2 or 6 bp from the 5'-termini caused a drastic reduction in the extent of ligation. Therefore, the presence of modified lesions near to the termini of a DSB may compromise their rejoining by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) involving the LX complex. (author)

  8. Recognition of damaged DNA by Escherichia coli Fpg protein: insights from structural and kinetic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zharkov, Dmitry O.; Ishchenko, Alexander A.; Douglas, Kenneth T.; Nevinsky, Georgy A.

    2003-01-01

    Formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg) excises oxidized purines from damaged DNA. The recent determination of the three-dimensional structure of the covalent complex of DNA with Escherichia coli Fpg, obtained by reducing the Schiff base intermediate formed during the reaction [Gilboa et al., J. Biol. Chem. 277 (2002) 19811] has revealed a number of potential specific and non-specific interactions between Fpg and DNA. We analyze the structural data for Fpg in the light of the kinetic and thermodynamic data obtained by the method of stepwise increase in ligand complexity to estimate relative contributions of individual nucleotide units of lesion-containing DNA to its total affinity for this enzyme [Ishchenko et al., Biochemistry 41 (2002) 7540]. Stopped-flow kinetic analysis that has allowed the dissection of Fpg catalysis in time [Fedorova et al., Biochemistry 41 (2002) 1520] is also correlated with the structural data

  9. Importance of the Sequence-Directed DNA Shape for Specific Binding Site Recognition by the Estrogen-Related Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kareem Mohideen-Abdul

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Most nuclear receptors (NRs bind DNA as dimers, either as hetero- or as homodimers on DNA sequences organized as two half-sites with specific orientation and spacing. The dimerization of NRs on their cognate response elements (REs involves specific protein–DNA and protein–protein interactions. The estrogen-related receptor (ERR belongs to the steroid hormone nuclear receptor (SHR family and shares strong similarity in its DNA-binding domain (DBD with that of the estrogen receptor (ER. In vitro, ERR binds with high affinity inverted repeat REs with a 3-bps spacing (IR3, but in vivo, it preferentially binds to single half-site REs extended at the 5′-end by 3 bp [estrogen-related response element (ERREs], thus explaining why ERR was often inferred as a purely monomeric receptor. Since its C-terminal ligand-binding domain is known to homodimerize with a strong dimer interface, we investigated the binding behavior of the isolated DBDs to different REs using electrophoretic migration, multi-angle static laser light scattering (MALLS, non-denaturing mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance. In contrast to ER DBD, ERR DBD binds as a monomer to EREs (IR3, such as the tff1 ERE-IR3, but we identified a DNA sequence composed of an extended half-site embedded within an IR3 element (embedded ERRE/IR3, where stable dimer binding is observed. Using a series of chimera and mutant DNA sequences of ERREs and IR3 REs, we have found the key determinants for the binding of ERR DBD as a dimer. Our results suggest that the sequence-directed DNA shape is more important than the exact nucleotide sequence for the binding of ERR DBD to DNA as a dimer. Our work underlines the importance of the shape-driven DNA readout mechanisms based on minor groove recognition and electrostatic potential. These conclusions may apply not only to ERR but also to other members of the SHR family, such as androgen or glucocorticoid, for which a strong well-conserved half

  10. LTR retrotransposon landscape in Medicago truncatula: more rapid removal than in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jin-Song

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long terminal repeat retrotransposons (LTR elements are ubiquitous Eukaryotic TEs that transpose through RNA intermediates. Accounting for significant proportion of many plant genomes, LTR elements have been well established as one of the major forces underlying the evolution of plant genome size, structure and function. The accessibility of more than 40% of genomic sequences of the model legume Medicago truncatula (Mt has made the comprehensive study of its LTR elements possible. Results We use a newly developed tool LTR_FINDER to identify LTR retrotransposons in the Mt genome and detect 526 full-length elements as well as a great number of copies related to them. These elements constitute about 9.6% of currently available genomic sequences. They are classified into 85 families of which 64 are reported for the first time. The majority of the LTR retrotransposons belong to either Copia or Gypsy superfamily and the others are categorized as TRIMs or LARDs by their length. We find that the copy-number of Copia-like families is 3 times more than that of Gypsy-like ones but the latter contribute more to the genome. The analysis of PBS and protein-coding domain structure of the LTR families reveals that they tend to use only 4–5 types of tRNAs and many families have quite conservative ORFs besides known TE domains. For several important families, we describe in detail their abundance, conservation, insertion time and structure. We investigate the amplification-deletion pattern of the elements and find that the detectable full-length elements are relatively young and most of them were inserted within the last 0.52 MY. We also estimate that more than ten million bp of the Mt genomic sequences have been removed by the deletion of LTR elements and the removal of the full-length structures in Mt has been more rapid than in rice. Conclusion This report is the first comprehensive description and analysis of LTR retrotransposons in the

  11. Structural basis for sequence-specific recognition of DNA by TAL effectors

    KAUST Repository

    Deng, Dong; Yan, Chuangye; Pan, Xiaojing; Mahfouz, Magdy M.; Wang, Jiawei; Zhu, Jiankang; Shi, Yi Gong; Yan, Nieng

    2012-01-01

    TAL (transcription activator-like) effectors, secreted by phytopathogenic bacteria, recognize host DNA sequences through a central domain of tandem repeats. Each repeat comprises 33 to 35 conserved amino acids and targets a specific base pair

  12. Atomistic details of the molecular recognition of DNA-RNA hybrid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    conformations corresponding to typical A- and B-type nucleic acids and the .... protein chains and five base pairs in DNA-RNA hybrid ... employed to treat the long range electrostatic interac- .... The solvent accessible surface areas (SASA) of.

  13. Foundations for a syntatic pattern recognition system for genomic DNA sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Searles, D.B.

    1993-03-01

    The goal of the proposed work is the creation of a software system that will perform sophisticated pattern recognition and related functions at a level of abstraction and with expressive power beyond current general-purpose pattern-matching systems for biological sequences; and with a more uniform language, environment, and graphical user interface, and with greater flexibility, extensibility, embeddability, and ability to incorporate other algorithms, than current special-purpose analytic software.

  14. Formation of (DNA)2-LNA triplet with recombinant base recognition: A quantum mechanical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, Vijaya Shri; Tiwari, Rakesh Kumar

    2018-05-01

    The formation of DNA triple helix offers the verity of new possibilities in molecular biology. However its applications are limited to purine and pyrimidine rich sequences recognized by forming Hoogsteen/Reverse Hoogsteen triplets in major groove sites of DNA duplex. To overcome this drawback modification in bases backbone and glucose of nucleotide unit of DNA have been proposed so that the third strand base recognized by both the bases of DNA duplex by forming Recombinant type(R-type) of bonding in mixed sequences. Here we performed Quanrum Mechanical (Hartree-Fock and DFT) methodology on natural DNA and Locked Nucleic Acids(LNA) triplets using 6-31G and some other new advance basis sets. Study suggests energetically stable conformation has been observed for recombinant triplets in order of G-C*G > A-T*A > G-C*C > T-A*T for both type of triplets. Interestingly LNA leads to more stable conformation in all set of triplets, clearly suggests an important biological tool to overcome above mentioned drawbacks.

  15. Efficient representation of DNA data for pattern recognition using failure factor oracles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleophas, Loek; Kourie, Derrick G.; Watson, Bruce W.

    2013-01-01

    In indexing of and pattern matching on DNA sequences, representing all factors of a sequence is important. One efficient, compact representation is the factor oracle (FO). At the same time, any classical deterministic finite automata (DFA) can be transformed to a so-called failure one (FDFA), which

  16. Active Site Sharing and Subterminal Hairpin Recognition in a New Class of DNA Transposases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronning, Donald R.; Guynet, Catherine; Ton-Hoang, Bao; Perez, Zhanita N.; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Chandler, Michael; Dyda, Fred (Centre Nat); (NIH)

    2010-07-20

    Many bacteria harbor simple transposable elements termed insertion sequences (IS). In Helicobacter pylori, the chimeric IS605 family elements are particularly interesting due to their proximity to genes encoding gastric epithelial invasion factors. Protein sequences of IS605 transposases do not bear the hallmarks of other well-characterized transposases. We have solved the crystal structure of full-length transposase (TnpA) of a representative member, ISHp608. Structurally, TnpA does not resemble any characterized transposase; rather, it is related to rolling circle replication (RCR) proteins. Consistent with RCR, Mg{sup 2+} and a conserved tyrosine, Tyr127, are essential for DNA nicking and the formation of a covalent intermediate between TnpA and DNA. TnpA is dimeric, contains two shared active sites, and binds two DNA stem loops representing the conserved inverted repeats near each end of ISHp608. The cocrystal structure with stem-loop DNA illustrates how this family of transposases specifically recognizes and pairs ends, necessary steps during transposition.

  17. Ternary monolayers as DNA recognition interfaces for direct and sensitive electrochemical detection in untreated clinical samples

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Campuzano, S.; Kuralay, F.; Lobo-Castanón, M.J.; Bartošík, Martin; Vyavahare, K.; Paleček, Emil; Haake, D.A.; Wang, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 8 (2011), s. 3577-3583 ISSN 0956-5663 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME09038 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : electrochemical detection * DNA hybridization * self-assembled monolayer Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 5.602, year: 2011

  18. DNA modifications by antitumor platinum and ruthenium compounds: Their recognition and repair

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brabec, Viktor

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 71, - (2002), s. 1-68 ISSN 0079-6603 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5004101 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : interstrand cross-link * cisplatin -demaged DNA * anticancer drug cisplatin Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.839, year: 2002

  19. Recognition and cleavage of 5-methylcytosine DNA by bacterial SRA-HNH proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Tiesheng; Yamada-Mabuchi, Megumu; Zhao, Gong; Li, Li; liu, Guang; Ou, Hong-Yu; Deng, Zixin; Zheng, Yu; He, Xinyi

    2015-01-01

    SET and RING-finger-associated (SRA) domain is involved in establishment and maintenance of DNA methylation in eukaryotes. Proteins containing SRA domains exist in mammals, plants, even microorganisms. It has been established that mammalian SRA domain recognizes 5-methylcytosine (5mC) through a base-flipping mechanism. Here, we identified and characterized two SRA domain-containing proteins with the common domain architecture of N-terminal SRA domain and C-terminal HNH nuclease domain, Sco533...

  20. Diamond-coated field-effect sensor for DNA recognition - influence of material and morphology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ižák, Tibor; Sakata, T.; Miyazawa, Y.; Kajisa, T.; Kromka, Alexander; Rezek, Bohuslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 60, Nov (2015), 87-93 ISSN 0925-9635 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100101209 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : diamond * field effect device * DNA * C-V characteristics * fluorescence Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.125, year: 2015

  1. Induced-fit recognition of DNA by organometallic complexes with dynamic stereogenic centers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chen, H.; Parkinson, J. A.; Nováková, Olga; Bella, J.; Wang, F.; Dawson, A.; Gould, R.; Parsons, S.; Brabec, Viktor; Sadler, P. J.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 25 (2003), s. 14623-14628 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/02/1552; GA ČR GA305/01/0418; GA AV ČR IAA5004101 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : organometallic complexes * platinum * DNA Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 10.272, year: 2003

  2. The effects of multiple UV exposures on HIV-LTR (long terminal repeat) expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreck, S.; Milton, J.; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.; Woloschak, G.E.; Loyola Univ., Maywood, IL

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that cellular stress agents such as UV radiation induce transcription from the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Using HeLa cells stably transfected with the HIV-LTR sequence, which transcriptionally drives the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) reporter gene, we examined the effects of multiple exposures to UVC (254 nm) on HIV-LTR-CAT expression. Low doses (≤ 5 J m -2 ) had no effect on CAT expression, but up to 29-fold induction was observed with 10 J m -2 when cells were harvested 48 h after completion of the exposure. Little difference was noted in induction levels when cells were exposed to one 25 J m -2 dose, viable cells were harvested at 24 h, 48 h or 72 h, and cell lysates were assayed for CAT expression. Two sequential 12.5 J m -2 exposures, given 24 h apart, resulted in an additive effect on CAT expression; these two exposures produced CAT activity equivalent to that induced following a single 25 J m -2 dose. Our data suggest that HIV-LTR requires a specific threshold UV dose in order to elicit induction; a maximal induction dose is also evident; exposures higher than this maximal dose contribute no more to HIV-LTR induction in viable cells. (author)

  3. A rhodium(III) complex for high-affinity DNA base-pair mismatch recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junicke, Henrik; Hart, Jonathan R.; Kisko, Jennifer; Glebov, Oleg; Kirsch, Ilan R.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2003-01-01

    A rhodium(III) complex, rac-[Rh(bpy)2phzi]3+ (bpy, 2,2′-bipyridine; phzi, benzo[a]phenazine-5,6-quinone diimine) has been designed as a sterically demanding intercalator targeted to destabilized mismatched sites in double-helical DNA. The complex is readily synthesized by condensation of the phenazine quinone with the corresponding diammine complex. Upon photoactivation, the complex promotes direct strand scission at single-base mismatch sites within the DNA duplex. As with the parent mismatch-specific reagent, [Rh(bpy)2(chrysi)]3+ [chrysene-5,6-quinone diimine (chrysi)], mismatch selectivity depends on the helix destabilization associated with mispairing. Unlike the parent chrysi complex, the phzi analogue binds and cleaves with high affinity and efficiency. The specific binding constants for CA, CC, and CT mismatches within a 31-mer oligonucleotide duplex are 0.3, 1, and 6 × 107 M−1, respectively; site-specific photocleavage is evident at nanomolar concentrations. Moreover, the specificity, defined as the ratio in binding affinities for mispaired vs. well paired sites, is maintained. The increase in affinity is attributed to greater stability in the mismatched site associated with stacking by the heterocyclic aromatic ligand. The high-affinity complex is also applied in the differential cleavage of DNA obtained from cell lines deficient in mismatch repair vs. those proficient in mismatch repair. Agreement is found between photocleavage by the mismatch-specific probes and deficiency in mismatch repair. This mismatch-specific targeting, therefore, offers a potential strategy for new chemotherapeutic design. PMID:12610209

  4. Structural Basis for DNA Recognition by the Two-Component Response Regulator RcsB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippova, Ekaterina V; Zemaitaitis, Bozena; Aung, Theint; Wolfe, Alan J; Anderson, Wayne F

    2018-02-27

    RcsB is a highly conserved transcription regulator of the Rcs phosphorelay system, a complex two-component signal transduction system (N. Majdalani and S. Gottesman, Annu Rev Microbiol 59:379-405, 2005; A. J. Wolfe, Curr Opin Microbiol 13:204-209, 2010, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mib.2010.01.002; D. J. Clarke, Future Microbiol 5:1173-1184, 2010, https://doi.org/10.2217/fmb.10.83). RcsB plays an important role in virulence and pathogenicity in human hosts by regulating biofilm formation. RcsB can regulate transcription alone or together with its auxiliary transcription regulators by forming heterodimers. This complexity allows RcsB to regulate transcription of more than 600 bacterial genes in response to different stresses (D. Wang et al., Mol Plant Microbe Interact 25:6-17, 2012, https://doi.org/10.1094/MPMI-08-11-0207). Despite increasing knowledge of RcsB importance, molecular mechanisms that drive the ability of RcsB to control transcription of a large number of genes remain unclear. Here, we present crystal structures of unphosphorylated RcsB in complex with the consensus DNA-binding sequence of 22-mer (DNA22) and 18-mer (DNA18) of the flhDC operon from Escherichia coli determined at 3.15- and 3.37-Å resolution, respectively. The results of our structural analysis combined with the results of in vitro binding assays provide valuable insights to the protein regulatory mechanism, demonstrate how RcsB recognizes target DNA sequences, and reveal a unique oligomeric state that allows RcsB to form homo- and heterodimers. This information will help us understand the complex mechanisms of transcriptional regulation by RcsB in bacteria. IMPORTANCE RcsB is a well-studied two-component response regulator of the Rcs phosphorelay system, conserved within the family Enterobacteriaceae , which includes many pathogens. It is a global regulator, controlling more than 5% of bacterial genes associated with capsule biosynthesis, flagellar biogenesis, cell wall biosynthesis

  5. Helicase-Dependent Isothermal Amplification of DNA and RNA by Using Self-Avoiding Molecular Recognition Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zunyi; McLendon, Chris; Hutter, Daniel; Bradley, Kevin M; Hoshika, Shuichi; Frye, Carole B; Benner, Steven A

    2015-06-15

    Assays that detect DNA or RNA (xNA) are highly sensitive, as small amounts of xNA can be amplified by PCR. Unfortunately, PCR is inconvenient in low-resource environments, and requires equipment and power that might not be available in these environments. Isothermal procedures, which avoid thermal cycling, are often confounded by primer dimers, off-target priming, and other artifacts. Here, we show how a "self avoiding molecular recognition system" (SAMRS) eliminates these artifacts and gives clean amplicons in a helicase-dependent isothermal amplification (SAMRS-HDA). We also show that incorporating SAMRS into the 3'-ends of primers facilitates the design and screening of primers for HDA assays. Finally, we show that SAMRS-HDA can be twofold multiplexed, difficult to achieve with HDA using standard primers. Thus, SAMRS-HDA is a more versatile approach than standard HDA, with a broader applicability for xNA-targeted diagnostics and research. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. DNA aptamer functionalized gold nanostructures for molecular recognition and photothermal inactivation of methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocsoy, Ismail; Yusufbeyoglu, Sadi; Yılmaz, Vedat; McLamore, Eric S; Ildız, Nilay; Ülgen, Ahmet

    2017-11-01

    In this work, we report the development of DNA aptamer-functionalized gold nanoparticles (Apt@Au NPs) and gold nanorods (Apt@Au NRs) for inactivation of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with targeted photothermal therapy (PTT). Although both Apt@Au NPs and Apt@Au NRs specifically bind to MRSA cells, Apt@Au NPs and Apt@Au NRs inactivated ∼5% and over 95% of the cells,respectively through PTT. This difference in inactivation was based on the relatively high longitudinal absorption of near-infrared (NIR) radiation and strong photothermal conversion capability for the Apt@Au NRs compared to the Apt@Au NPs. The Au NRs served as a nanoplatform for the loading of thiolated aptamer and also provided multivalent effects for increasing binding strength and affinity to MRSA. Our results indicate that the type of aptamer and the degree of multivalent effect(s) are important factors for MRSA inactivation efficiency in PTT. We show that the Apt@Au NRs are a very effective and promising nanosystem for specific cell recognition and in vitro PTT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification of a non-LTR retrotransposon from the gypsy moth

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.J. Garner; J.M. Slavicek

    1999-01-01

    A family of highly repetitive elements, named LDT1, has been identified in the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar. The complete element is 5.4 kb in length and lacks long-terminal repeats, The element contains two open reading frames with a significant amino acid sequence similarity to several non-LTR retrotransposons. The first open reading frame contains...

  8. Large-scale transcriptome data reveals transcriptional activity of fission yeast LTR retrotransposons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourier, Tobias; Willerslev, Eske

    2010-01-01

    of transcriptional activity are observed from both strands of solitary LTR sequences. Transcriptome data collected during meiosis suggests that transcription of solitary LTRs is correlated with the transcription of nearby protein-coding genes. CONCLUSIONS: Presumably, the host organism negatively regulates...

  9. Akv murine leukemia virus enhances bone tumorigenesis in hMT-c-fos-LTR transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Jörg; Krump-Konvalinkova, Vera; Luz, Arne

    1995-01-01

    hMt-c-fos-LTR transgenic mice (U. Rüther, D. Komitowski, F. R. Schubert, and E. F. Wagner. Oncogene 4, 861–865, 1989) developed bone sarcomas in 20% (3/15) of females at 448 ± 25 days and in 8% (1/12) of males at 523 days. After infection of newborns with Akv, an infectious retrovirus derived from...

  10. LTR retrotransposon dynamics in the evolution of the olive (Olea europaea) genome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Barghini, E.; Natali, L.; Giordani, T.; Cossu, R.M.; Scalabrin, S.; Cattonaro, F.; Šimková, Hana; Vrána, Jan; Doležel, Jaroslav; Morgante, M.; Cavallini, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2015), s. 91-100 ISSN 1340-2838 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : LTR retrotransposons * next-generation sequencing * olive Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.267, year: 2015

  11. Cellular specificity of HIV-1 replication can be controlled by LTR sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed-Inderbitzin, Edward; Maury, Wendy

    2003-01-01

    Two well-established determinants of retroviral tropism are envelope sequences that regulate entry and LTR sequences that can regulate viral expression in a cell-specific manner. Studies with human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) have demonstrated that tropism of this virus maps primarily to variable envelope sequences. Studies have demonstrated that T cell and macrophage-specific transcription factor binding motifs exist in the upstream region of the LTR U3; however, the ability of the core enhancer/promoter proximal elements (two NF-κB and three Sp1 sites) to function well in macrophages and T cells have led many to conclude that HIV LTR sequences are not primary determinants of HIV tropism. To determine if cellular specificity could be imparted to HIV by the core enhancer elements, the enhancer/promoter proximal region of the HIV LTR was substituted with motifs that control gene expression in a myeloid-specific manner. The enhancer region from equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) when substituted for the HIV enhancer/promoter proximal region was found to drive expression in a macrophage-specific manner and was responsive to HIV Tat. The addition of a 5' methylation-dependent binding site (MDBP) and a promoter proximal Sp1 motif increased expression without altering cellular specificity. Spacing between the promoter proximal region and the TATA box was also found to influence LTR activity. Infectivity studies using chimeric LTRs within the context of a dual-tropic infectious molecular clone established that these LTRs directed HIV replication and production of infectious virions in macrophages but not primary T cells or T cell lines. This investigation demonstrates that cellular specificity can be imparted onto HIV-1 replication at the level of viral transcription and not entry

  12. Characterization of EIAV LTR variability and compartmentalization in various reservoir tissues of long-term inapparent carrier ponies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, Jenner K.P.; Craigo, Jodi K.; Cook, Sheila J.; Issel, Charles J.; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2003-01-01

    Dynamic genomic variation resulting in changes in envelope antigenicity has been established as a fundamental mechanism of persistence by equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), as observed with other lentiviruses, including HIV-1. In addition to the reported changes in envelope sequences, however, certain studies indicate the viral LTR as a second variable EIAV gene, with the enhancer region being designated as hypervariable. These observations have lead to the suggestion that LTR variation may alter viral replication properties to optimize to the microenvironment of particular tissue reservoirs. To test this hypothesis directly, we examined the population of LTR quasispecies contained in various tissues of two inapparent carrier ponies experimentally infected with a reference EIAV biological clone for 18 months. The results of these studies demonstrated that the EIAV LTR is in fact highly conserved with respect to the infecting LTR species after 1.5 years of persistent infection and regardless of the tissue reservoir. Thus, these comprehensive analyses demonstrate for the first time that the EIAV LTR is highly conserved during long-term persistent infection and that the observed variations in viral LTR are associated more with in vitro adaptation to replication in cultured cells rather than in vivo replication in natural target cells

  13. DNA binding and cleavage studies of new sulfasalazine-derived dipeptide Zn(II) complex: Validation for specific recognition with 5 Prime -TMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabassum, Sartaj [Department of Chemistry, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, UP 202002 (India); Al-Asbahy, Waddhaah M.; Afzal, Mohd.; Shamsi, Manal; Arjmand, Farukh [Department of Chemistry, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, UP 202002 (India)

    2012-11-15

    A new water soluble complex [Zn(glygly)(ssz)(H{sub 2}O)]{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O, 1 derived from dipeptide (glycyl glycine) and sulfasalazine was synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic (IR, UV-vis, NMR, ESI-MS) and analytical methods. The in vitro DNA binding studies of complex 1 with calf-thymus DNA were carried out by employing various biophysical methods and molecular docking technique which reveals strong electrostatic binding via phosphate backbone of DNA helix, in addition to partial intercalation. To gain further insight into the molecular recognition at the target site, interaction studies of complex 1 with 5 Prime -TMP and 5 Prime -GMP were carried out by UV-vis titration which was validated by {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P NMR with 5 Prime -TMP, which implicate the preferential selectivity of 1 towards N3 of thymine. Complex 1 is accessible to minor groove of DNA and cleaved pBR322 DNA via hydrolytic pathway (validated by T4 ligase assay). - Graphical abstract: Synthesis, characterization, DNA binding and cleavage studies of [Zn(glygly)(ssz)(H{sub 2}O)]{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O (1) containing glycyl glycine and sulfasalazine ligand. Complex 1 recognize minor groove of DNA and show hydrolytic DNA cleavage. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Novel Zn(II) complex 1 bearing bioactive glycyl glycine and sulfasalazine ligand scaffold. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cleavage activity of 1 was enhanced in presence of activators: H{sub 2}O{sub 2}>MPA>GSH>Asc. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Complex 1 recognize minor groove as depicted in the cleavage pattern and molecular docking. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Complex 1 cleaves pBR322 DNA via hydrolytic mechanism and validated by T4 DNA ligase experiments.

  14. DNA binding and cleavage studies of new sulfasalazine-derived dipeptide Zn(II) complex: Validation for specific recognition with 5′–TMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabassum, Sartaj; Al–Asbahy, Waddhaah M.; Afzal, Mohd.; Shamsi, Manal; Arjmand, Farukh

    2012-01-01

    A new water soluble complex [Zn(glygly)(ssz)(H 2 O)]·6H 2 O, 1 derived from dipeptide (glycyl glycine) and sulfasalazine was synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic (IR, UV–vis, NMR, ESI–MS) and analytical methods. The in vitro DNA binding studies of complex 1 with calf–thymus DNA were carried out by employing various biophysical methods and molecular docking technique which reveals strong electrostatic binding via phosphate backbone of DNA helix, in addition to partial intercalation. To gain further insight into the molecular recognition at the target site, interaction studies of complex 1 with 5′-TMP and 5′-GMP were carried out by UV–vis titration which was validated by 1 H and 31 P NMR with 5′-TMP, which implicate the preferential selectivity of 1 towards N3 of thymine. Complex 1 is accessible to minor groove of DNA and cleaved pBR322 DNA via hydrolytic pathway (validated by T4 ligase assay). - Graphical abstract: Synthesis, characterization, DNA binding and cleavage studies of [Zn(glygly)(ssz)(H 2 O)]·6H 2 O (1) containing glycyl glycine and sulfasalazine ligand. Complex 1 recognize minor groove of DNA and show hydrolytic DNA cleavage. Highlights: ► Novel Zn(II) complex 1 bearing bioactive glycyl glycine and sulfasalazine ligand scaffold. ► Cleavage activity of 1 was enhanced in presence of activators: H 2 O 2 >MPA>GSH>Asc. ► Complex 1 recognize minor groove as depicted in the cleavage pattern and molecular docking. ► Complex 1 cleaves pBR322 DNA via hydrolytic mechanism and validated by T4 DNA ligase experiments.

  15. Evolutionary genomics revealed interkingdom distribution of Tcn1-like chromodomain-containing Gypsy LTR retrotransposons among fungi and plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blinov Alexander

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromodomain-containing Gypsy LTR retrotransposons or chromoviruses are widely distributed among eukaryotes and have been found in plants, fungi and vertebrates. The previous comprehensive survey of chromoviruses from mosses (Bryophyta suggested that genomes of non-seed plants contain the clade which is closely related to the retrotransposons from fungi. The origin, distribution and evolutionary history of this clade remained unclear mainly due to the absence of information concerning the diversity and distribution of LTR retrotransposons in other groups of non-seed plants as well as in fungal genomes. Results In present study we preformed in silico analysis of chromodomain-containing LTR retrotransposons in 25 diverse fungi and a number of plant species including spikemoss Selaginella moellendorffii (Lycopodiophyta coupled with an experimental survey of chromodomain-containing Gypsy LTR retrotransposons from diverse non-seed vascular plants (lycophytes, ferns, and horsetails. Our mining of Gypsy LTR retrotransposons in genomic sequences allowed identification of numerous families which have not been described previously in fungi. Two new well-supported clades, Galahad and Mordred, as well as several other previously unknown lineages of chromodomain-containing Gypsy LTR retrotransposons were described based on the results of PCR-mediated survey of LTR retrotransposon fragments from ferns, horsetails and lycophytes. It appeared that one of the clades, namely Tcn1 clade, was present in basidiomycetes and non-seed plants including mosses (Bryophyta and lycophytes (genus Selaginella. Conclusions The interkingdom distribution is not typical for chromodomain-containing LTR retrotransposons clades which are usually very specific for a particular taxonomic group. Tcn1-like LTR retrotransposons from fungi and non-seed plants demonstrated high similarity to each other which can be explained by strong selective constraints and the

  16. Human XPC-hHR23B interacts with XPA-RPA in the recognition of triplex-directed psoralen DNA interstrand crosslinks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoma, Brian S; Wakasugi, Mitsuo; Christensen, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    (NER), XPA-RPA, recognizes DNA ICLs. We now report the use of triplex technology to direct a site-specific psoralen ICL to a target DNA substrate to determine whether the human global genome NER damage recognition complex, XPC-hHR23B, recognizes this lesion. Our results demonstrate that XPC-hHR23B...... recognizes psoralen ICLs, which have a structure fundamentally different from other lesions that XPC-hHR23B is known to bind, with high affinity and specificity. XPC-hHR23B and XPA-RPA protein complexes were also observed to bind psoralen ICLs simultaneously, demonstrating not only that psoralen ICLs...... are recognized by XPC-hHR23B alone, but also that XPA-RPA may interact cooperatively with XPC-hHR23B on damaged DNA, forming a multimeric complex. Since XPC-hHR23B and XPA-RPA participate in the recognition and verification of DNA damage, these results support the hypothesis that interplay between components...

  17. Type I-E CRISPR-Cas Systems Discriminate Target from Non-Target DNA through Base Pairing-Independent PAM Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datsenko, Kirill A.; Jackson, Ryan N.; Wiedenheft, Blake; Severinov, Konstantin; Brouns, Stan J. J.

    2013-01-01

    Discriminating self and non-self is a universal requirement of immune systems. Adaptive immune systems in prokaryotes are centered around repetitive loci called CRISPRs (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat), into which invader DNA fragments are incorporated. CRISPR transcripts are processed into small RNAs that guide CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins to invading nucleic acids by complementary base pairing. However, to avoid autoimmunity it is essential that these RNA-guides exclusively target invading DNA and not complementary DNA sequences (i.e., self-sequences) located in the host's own CRISPR locus. Previous work on the Type III-A CRISPR system from Staphylococcus epidermidis has demonstrated that a portion of the CRISPR RNA-guide sequence is involved in self versus non-self discrimination. This self-avoidance mechanism relies on sensing base pairing between the RNA-guide and sequences flanking the target DNA. To determine if the RNA-guide participates in self versus non-self discrimination in the Type I-E system from Escherichia coli we altered base pairing potential between the RNA-guide and the flanks of DNA targets. Here we demonstrate that Type I-E systems discriminate self from non-self through a base pairing-independent mechanism that strictly relies on the recognition of four unchangeable PAM sequences. In addition, this work reveals that the first base pair between the guide RNA and the PAM nucleotide immediately flanking the target sequence can be disrupted without affecting the interference phenotype. Remarkably, this indicates that base pairing at this position is not involved in foreign DNA recognition. Results in this paper reveal that the Type I-E mechanism of avoiding self sequences and preventing autoimmunity is fundamentally different from that employed by Type III-A systems. We propose the exclusive targeting of PAM-flanked sequences to be termed a target versus non-target discrimination mechanism. PMID:24039596

  18. (CAG)(n)-hairpin DNA binds to Msh2-Msh3 and changes properties of mismatch recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Barbara A L; Yang, Zungyoon; Lai, Maoyi; Gajec, Maciej; Gajek, Maciez; Badger, John D; Hayes, Jeffrey J; Edelmann, Winfried; Kucherlapati, Raju; Wilson, Teresa M; McMurray, Cynthia T

    2005-08-01

    Cells have evolved sophisticated DNA repair systems to correct damaged DNA. However, the human DNA mismatch repair protein Msh2-Msh3 is involved in the process of trinucleotide (CNG) DNA expansion rather than repair. Using purified protein and synthetic DNA substrates, we show that Msh2-Msh3 binds to CAG-hairpin DNA, a prime candidate for an expansion intermediate. CAG-hairpin binding inhibits the ATPase activity of Msh2-Msh3 and alters both nucleotide (ADP and ATP) affinity and binding interfaces between protein and DNA. These changes in Msh2-Msh3 function depend on the presence of A.A mispaired bases in the stem of the hairpin and on the hairpin DNA structure per se. These studies identify critical functional defects in the Msh2-Msh3-CAG hairpin complex that could misdirect the DNA repair process.

  19. Expression of protein-coding genes embedded in ribosomal DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Steinar D; Haugen, Peik; Nielsen, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) is a specialised chromosomal location that is dedicated to high-level transcription of ribosomal RNA genes. Interestingly, rDNAs are frequently interrupted by parasitic elements, some of which carry protein genes. These are non-LTR retrotransposons and group II introns that e...... in the nucleolus....

  20. Molecular recognition of naphthalene diimide ligands by telomeric quadruplex-DNA: the importance of the protonation state and mediated hydrogen bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinello, A; Barone, G; Grunenberg, J

    2016-01-28

    In depth Monte Carlo conformational scans in combination with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and electronic structure calculations were applied in order to study the molecular recognition process between tetrasubstituted naphthalene diimide (ND) guests and G-quadruplex (G4) DNA receptors. ND guests are a promising class of telomere stabilizers due to which they are used in novel anticancer therapeutics. Though several ND guests have been studied experimentally in the past, the protonation state under physiological conditions is still unclear. Based on chemical intuition, in the case of N-methyl-piperazine substitution, different protonation states are possible and might play a crucial role in the molecular recognition process by G4-DNA. Depending on the proton concentration, different nitrogen atoms of the N-methyl-piperazine might (or might not) be protonated. This fact was considered in our simulation in terms of a case by case analysis, since the process of molecular recognition is determined by possible donor or acceptor positions. The results of our simulations show that the electrostatic interactions between the ND ligands and the G4 receptor are maximized in the case of the protonation of the terminal nitrogen atoms, forming compact ND G4 complexes inside the grooves. The influence of different protonation states in terms of the ability to form hydrogen bonds with the sugar-phosphate backbone, as well as the importance of mediated vs. direct hydrogen bonding, was analyzed in detail by MD and relaxed force constant (compliance constant) simulations.

  1. Enhancement of Intranasal Vaccination in Mice with Deglycosylated Chain A Ricin by LTR72, a Novel Mucosal Adjuvant

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kende, Meir; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Rivera, Noelia; Hewetson, John

    2006-01-01

    .... However, in the presence of 4, 2, or 1 microg of the mucosal adjuvant LTR72, a mutant of the heat-labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli, the low antibody response and protection were substantially enhanced...

  2. Enhancement of Intranasal Vaccination in Mice with Deglycosylated Chain A Ricin by LTR72, a Novel Mucosal Adjuvant

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kende, Meir; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Rivera, Noelia; Hewetson, John

    2006-01-01

    .... However, in the presence of 4, 2, or 1 micro-gram of the mucosal adjuvant LTR72, a mutant of the heat-labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli, the low antibody response and protection were substantially enhanced...

  3. Regulatory elements involved in tax-mediated transactivation of the HTLV-I LTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeler, J S; Muchardt, C; Podar, M; Gaynor, R B

    1993-10-01

    HTLV-I is the etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia. In this study, we investigated the regulatory elements and cellular transcription factors which function in modulating HTLV-I gene expression in response to the viral transactivator protein, tax. Transfection experiments into Jurkat cells of a variety of site-directed mutants in the HTLV-1 LTR indicated that each of the three motifs A, B, and C within the 21-bp repeats, the binding sites for the Ets family of proteins, and the TATA box all influenced the degree of tax-mediated activation. Tax is also able to activate gene expression of other viral and cellular promoters. Tax activation of the IL-2 receptor and the HIV-1 LTR is mediated through NF-kappa B motifs. Interestingly, sequences in the 21-bp repeat B and C motifs contain significant homology with NF-kappa B regulatory elements. We demonstrated that an NF-kappa B binding protein, PRDII-BF1, but not the rel protein, bound to the B and C motifs in the 21-bp repeat. PRDII-BF1 was also able to stimulate activation of HTLV-I gene expression by tax. The role of the Ets proteins on modulating tax activation was also studied. Ets 1 but not Ets 2 was capable of increasing the degree of tax activation of the HTLV-I LTR. These results suggest that tax activates gene expression by either direct or indirect interaction with several cellular transcription factors that bind to the HTLV-I LTR.

  4. Role of protein structure and the role of individual fingers in zinc finger protein-DNA recognition: a molecular dynamics simulation study and free energy calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Mazen Y.

    2018-05-01

    Molecular dynamics and MM_GBSA energy calculations on various zinc finger proteins containing three and four fingers bound to their target DNA gave insights into the role of each finger in the DNA binding process as part of the protein structure. The wild type Zif 268 (PDB code: 1AAY) gave a ΔG value of - 76.1 (14) kcal/mol. Zinc fingers ZF1, ZF2 and ZF3 were mutated in one experiment and in another experiment one finger was cut and the rest of the protein was studied for binding. The ΔΔG values for the Zinc Finger protein with both ZF1 and ZF2 mutated was + 80 kcal/mol, while mutating only ZF1 the ΔΔG value was + 52 kcal/mol (relative to the wild type). Cutting ZF3 and studying the protein consisting only of ZF1 linked to ZF2 gave a ΔΔG value of + 68 kcal/mol. Upon cutting ZF1, the resulting ZF2 linked to ZF3 protein gave a ΔΔG value of + 41 kcal/mol. The above results shed light on the importance of each finger in the binding process, especially the role of ZF1 as the anchoring finger followed in importance by ZF2 and ZF3. The energy difference between the binding of the wild type protein Zif268 (1AAY) and that for individual finger binding to DNA according to the formula: ΔΔGlinkers, otherstructuralfactors = ΔGzif268 - (ΔGF1+F2+F3) gave a value = - 44.5 kcal/mol. This stabilization can be attributed to the contribution of linkers and other structural factors in the intact protein in the DNA binding process. DNA binding energies of variant proteins of the wild type Zif268 which differ in their ZF1 amino acid sequence gave evidence of a good relationship between binding energy and recognition and specificity, this finding confirms the reported vital role of ZF1 in the ZF protein scanning and anchoring to the target DNA sequence. The role of hydrogen bonds in both specific and nonspecific amino acid-DNA contacts is discussed in relation to mutations. The binding energies of variant Zinc Finger proteins confirmed the role of ZF1 in the recognition

  5. Long Terminal Repeat Circular DNA as Markers of Active Viral Replication of Human T Lymphotropic Virus-1 in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M Fox

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Clonal expansion of human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1 infected cells in vivo is well documented. Unlike human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1, HTLV-1 plasma RNA is sparse. The contribution of the “mitotic” spread of HTLV-1 compared with infectious spread of the virus to HTLV-1 viral burden in established infection is uncertain. Since extrachromosomal long terminal repeat (LTR DNA circles are indicators of viral replication in HIV-1 carriers with undetectable plasma HIV RNA, we hypothesised that HTLV-1 LTR circles could indicate reverse transcriptase (RT usage and infectious activity. 1LTR and 2LTR DNA circles were measured in HTLV-1 cell lines and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of asymptomatic carriers (ACs and patients with HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP or adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL. 1LTR DNA circles were detected in 14/20 patients at a mean of 1.38/100 PBMC but did not differentiate disease status nor correlate with HTLV-1 DNA copies. 2LTR DNA circles were detected in 30/31 patients and at higher concentrations in patients with HTLV-1-associated diseases, independent of HTLV-1 DNA load. In an incident case the 2LTR DNA circle concentration increased 2.1 fold at the onset of HAM/TSP compared to baseline. Detectable and fluctuating levels of HTLV-1 DNA circles in patients indicate viral RT usage and virus replication. Our results indicate HTLV-1 viral replication capacity is maintained in chronic infection and may be associated with disease onset.

  6. Simultaneous fluorescence light-up and selective multicolor nucleobase recognition based on sequence-dependent strong binding of berberine to DNA abasic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fei; Shao, Yong; Ma, Kun; Cui, Qinghua; Liu, Guiying; Xu, Shujuan

    2012-04-28

    Label-free DNA nucleobase recognition by fluorescent small molecules has received much attention due to its simplicity in mutation identification and drug screening. However, sequence-dependent fluorescence light-up nucleobase recognition and multicolor emission with individual emission energy for individual nucleobases have been seldom realized. Herein, an abasic site (AP site) in a DNA duplex was employed as a binding field for berberine, one of isoquinoline alkaloids. Unlike weak binding of berberine to the fully matched DNAs without the AP site, strong binding of berberine to the AP site occurs and the berberine's fluorescence light-up behaviors are highly dependent on the target nucleobases opposite the AP site in which the targets thymine and cytosine produce dual emission bands, while the targets guanine and adenine only give a single emission band. Furthermore, more intense emissions are observed for the target pyrimidines than purines. The flanking bases of the AP site also produce some modifications of the berberine's emission behavior. The binding selectivity of berberine at the AP site is also confirmed by measurements of fluorescence resonance energy transfer, excited-state lifetime, DNA melting and fluorescence quenching by ferrocyanide and sodium chloride. It is expected that the target pyrimidines cause berberine to be stacked well within DNA base pairs near the AP site, which results in a strong resonance coupling of the electronic transitions to the particular vibration mode to produce the dual emissions. The fluorescent signal-on and emission energy-modulated sensing for nucleobases based on this fluorophore is substantially advantageous over the previously used fluorophores. We expect that this approach will be developed as a practical device for differentiating pyrimidines from purines by positioning an AP site toward a target that is available for readout by this alkaloid probe. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  7. Toward an integrated model of protein-DNA recognition as inferred from NMR studies on the Lac repressor system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalodimos, Ch.; Boelens, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070151407; Kaptein, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074334603

    2004-01-01

    Sequence-specific protein-DNA interactions are responsible for the regulation of key biological functions such as replication of the genome, initiation of transcription, and repair of damaged DNA. All of these regulatory pathways are built on the foundation that proteins are able to bind selectively

  8. Analysis of plant LTR-retrotransposons at the fine-scale family level reveals individual molecular patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingues Douglas S

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sugarcane is an important crop worldwide for sugar production and increasingly, as a renewable energy source. Modern cultivars have polyploid, large complex genomes, with highly unequal contributions from ancestral genomes. Long Terminal Repeat retrotransposons (LTR-RTs are the single largest components of most plant genomes and can substantially impact the genome in many ways. It is therefore crucial to understand their contribution to the genome and transcriptome, however a detailed study of LTR-RTs in sugarcane has not been previously carried out. Results Sixty complete LTR-RT elements were classified into 35 families within four Copia and three Gypsy lineages. Structurally, within lineages elements were similar, between lineages there were large size differences. FISH analysis resulted in the expected pattern of Gypsy/heterochromatin, Copia/euchromatin, but in two lineages there was localized clustering on some chromosomes. Analysis of related ESTs and RT-PCR showed transcriptional variation between tissues and families. Four distinct patterns were observed in sRNA mapping, the most unusual of which was that of Ale1, with very large numbers of 24nt sRNAs in the coding region. The results presented support the conclusion that distinct small RNA-regulated pathways in sugarcane target the lineages of LTR-RT elements. Conclusions Individual LTR-RT sugarcane families have distinct structures, and transcriptional and regulatory signatures. Our results indicate that in sugarcane individual LTR-RT families have distinct behaviors and can potentially impact the genome in diverse ways. For instance, these transposable elements may affect nearby genes by generating a diverse set of small RNA's that trigger gene silencing mechanisms. There is also some evidence that ancestral genomes contribute significantly different element numbers from particular LTR-RT lineages to the modern sugarcane cultivar genome.

  9. A complex array of Hpr consensus DNA recognition sequences proximal to the enterotoxin gene in Clostridium perfringens type A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brynestad, S; Iwanejko, L A; Stewart, G S; Granum, P E

    1994-01-01

    Enterotoxin production in Clostridium perfringens is both strain dependent and sporulation associated. Underlying these phenotypic observations must lie a genetic and molecular explanation and the principal keys will be held within the DNA sequence both upstream and downstream of the structural gene cpe. In accordance with the above we have sequenced 4.1 kbp of DNA upstream of cpe in the type strain NCTC 8239. A region of DNA extending up to 1.5 kb 5' to cpe is conserved in all enterotoxin-positive strains. This region contains a putative ORF with substantial homology to an ORF in the Salmonella typhimurium IS200 insertion element and, in addition, contains multiple perfect consensus DNA-binding sequences for the Bacillus subtilis transition state regulator Hpr. The detailed structural elements revealed by the sequence analysis are presented and used to develop a new perspective on the molecular basis of enterotoxin production in this important food-poisoning bacterium.

  10. Genome-wide analysis of LTR-retrotransposons in oil palm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beulé, Thierry; Agbessi, Mawussé Dt; Dussert, Stephane; Jaligot, Estelle; Guyot, Romain

    2015-10-15

    The oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) is a major cultivated crop and the world's largest source of edible vegetable oil. The genus Elaeis comprises two species E. guineensis, the commercial African oil palm and E. oleifera, which is used in oil palm genetic breeding. The recent publication of both the African oil palm genome assembly and the first draft sequence of its Latin American relative now allows us to tackle the challenge of understanding the genome composition, structure and evolution of these palm genomes through the annotation of their repeated sequences. In this study, we identified, annotated and compared Transposable Elements (TE) from the African and Latin American oil palms. In a first step, Transposable Element databases were built through de novo detection in both genome sequences then the TE content of both genomes was estimated. Then putative full-length retrotransposons with Long Terminal Repeats (LTRs) were further identified in the E. guineensis genome for characterization of their structural diversity, copy number and chromosomal distribution. Finally, their relative expression in several tissues was determined through in silico analysis of publicly available transcriptome data. Our results reveal a congruence in the transpositional history of LTR retrotransposons between E. oleifera and E. guineensis, especially the Sto-4 family. Also, we have identified and described 583 full-length LTR-retrotransposons in the Elaeis guineensis genome. Our work shows that these elements are most likely no longer mobile and that no recent insertion event has occurred. Moreover, the analysis of chromosomal distribution suggests a preferential insertion of Copia elements in gene-rich regions, whereas Gypsy elements appear to be evenly distributed throughout the genome. Considering the high proportion of LTR retrotransposon in the oil palm genome, our work will contribute to a greater understanding of their impact on genome organization and evolution

  11. Recognition of RNA by amide modified backbone nucleic acids: molecular dynamics simulations of DNA-RNA hybrids in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nina, Mafalda; Fonné-Pfister, Raymonde; Beaudegnies, Renaud; Chekatt, Habiba; Jung, Pierre M J; Murphy-Kessabi, Fiona; De Mesmaeker, Alain; Wendeborn, Sebastian

    2005-04-27

    Thermodynamic and structural properties of a chemically modified DNA-RNA hybrid in which a phosphodiester linkage is replaced by a neutral amide-3 linkage (3'-CH(2)-CONH-5') were investigated using UV melting experiments, molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water, and continuum solvent models. van't Hoff analysis of the experimental UV melting curves suggests that the significant increase of the thermodynamic stability of a 15-mer DNA-RNA with seven alternated amide-3 modifications (+11 degrees C) is mainly due to an increased binding enthalpy. To further evaluate the origin in the observed affinities differences, the electrostatic contribution to the binding free energy was calculated by solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equation numerically. The nonelectrostatic contribution was estimated as the product of a hydrophobic surface tension coefficient and the surface area that is buried upon double strand formation. Structures were taken from 10 ns molecular dynamics simulations computed in a consistent fashion using explicit solvent, counterions, and the particle-mesh Ewald procedure. The present preliminary thermodynamic study suggests that the favorable binding free energy of the amide-3 DNA single strand to the complementary RNA is equally driven by electrostatic and nonpolar contributions to the binding compared to their natural analogues. In addition, molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water were performed on an amide-3 DNA single strand and the corresponding natural DNA. Results from the conformations cluster analysis of the simulated amide-3 DNA single strand ensembles suggest that the 25% of the population sampled within 10 ns has a pre-organized conformation where the sugar C3' endo pucker is favored at the 3'-flanking nucleotides. These structural and thermodynamic features contribute to the understanding of the observed increased affinities of the amide-3 DNA-RNA hybrids at the microscopic level.

  12. Replacement of a thiourea with an amidine group in a monofunctional platinum-acridine antitumor agent. Effect on DNA interactions, DNA adduct recognition and repair

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kostrhunová, Hana; Malina, Jaroslav; Pickard, A.J.; Štěpánková, Jana; Vojtíšková, Marie; Kašpárková, Jana; Muchová, T.; Rohlfing, M.L.; Bierbach, U.; Brabec, Viktor

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 5 (2011), s. 1941-1954 ISSN 1543-8384 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/11/0856 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : platinum * DNA binding * anticancer effects Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.782, year: 2011

  13. Foundations for a syntatic pattern recognition system for genomic DNA sequences. [Annual] report, 1 December 1991--31 March 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Searles, D.B.

    1993-03-01

    The goal of the proposed work is the creation of a software system that will perform sophisticated pattern recognition and related functions at a level of abstraction and with expressive power beyond current general-purpose pattern-matching systems for biological sequences; and with a more uniform language, environment, and graphical user interface, and with greater flexibility, extensibility, embeddability, and ability to incorporate other algorithms, than current special-purpose analytic software.

  14. Recognition by nonaromatic and stereochemical subunit-containing polyamides of the four Watson-Crick base pairs in the DNA minor groove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Fei; Wu, Yan-Ling; Jiang, Shi-Kun; Wang, Pu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Chen, Xing-Lai; Zhang, Wen; Ji, Yan-Juan; Guo, Chuan-Xin

    2012-06-18

    In order to develop an optimal subunit as a T-recognition element in hairpin polyamides, 15 novel chirality-modified polyamides containing (R)-α,β-diaminopropionic acid ((R) β α-NH 2), (S)-α,β-diaminopropionic acid ((S) β α-NH 2), (1R,3S)-3-aminocyclopentanecarboxylic acid ((RS) Cp), (1S,3R)-3-amino-cyclopentanecarboxylic acid ((RS) Cp), (1R,3R)-3-aminocyclopentanecarboxylic acid ((RR) Cp) and (1S,3S)-3-amino-cyclopentanecarboxylic acid ((SS) Cp) residues were synthesized. Their binding characteristics to DNA sequences 5'-TGCNCAT-3'/3'-ACGN'GTA-5' (N⋅N'=A⋅T, T⋅A, G⋅C and C⋅G) were systemically studied by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and molecular simulation (MSim) techniques. SPR showed that polyamide 4, AcIm-(S) β α-NH 2-ImPy-γ-ImPy-β-Py-βDp (β/(S) β α-NH 2 pair), bound to a DNA sequence containing a core binding site of 5'-TGCACAT-3' with a dissociation equilibrium constant (K(D) ) of 4.5×10(-8)  m. This was a tenfold improvement in specificity over 5'-TGCTCAT-3' (K(D) =4.5×10(-7)  M). MSim studies supported the SPR results. More importantly, for the first time, we found that chiral 3-aminocyclopentanecarboxylic acids in polyamides can be employed as base readers with only a small decrease in binding affinity to DNA. In particular, SPR showed that polyamide 9 ((RR) Cp/β pair) had a 15-fold binding preference for 5'-TGCTCAT-3' over 5'-TGCACAT-3'. A large difference in standard free energy change for A⋅T over T⋅A was determined (ΔΔG(o) =5.9 kJ mol(-1) ), as was a twofold decrease in interaction energy by MSim. Moreover, a 1:1 stoichiometry (9 to 5'-TGCTCAT-3'/3'-ACGAGTA-5') was shown by MSim to be optimal for the chiral five-membered cycle to fit the minor groove. Collectively, the study suggests that the (S)-α-amino-β-aminopropionic acid and (1R,3R)-3-aminocyclopentanecarboxylic acid can serve as a T-recognition element, and the stereochemistry and the nature of these subunits significantly influence

  15. Selective recognition of DNA from olive leaves and olive oil by PNA and modified-PNA microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Stefano; Calabretta, Alessandro; Tedeschi, Tullia; Sforza, Stefano; Arcioni, Sergio; Baldoni, Luciana; Corradini, Roberto; Marchelli, Rosangela

    2012-01-01

    PNA probes for the specific detection of DNA from olive oil samples by microarray technology were developed. The presence of as low as 5% refined hazelnut (Corylus avellana) oil in extra-virgin olive oil (Olea europaea L.) could be detected by using a PNA microarray. A set of two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the Actin gene of Olive was chosen as a model for evaluating the ability of PNA probes for discriminating olive cultivars. Both unmodified and C2-modified PNAs bearing an arginine side-chain were used, the latter showing higher sequence specificity. DNA extracted from leaves of three different cultivars (Ogliarola leccese, Canino and Frantoio) could be easily discriminated using a microarray with unmodified PNA probes, whereas discrimination of DNA from oil samples was more challenging, and could be obtained only by using chiral PNA probes. PMID:22772038

  16. Enzymatic recognition of DNA damage induced by UVB-photosensitized titanium dioxide and biological consequences in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: evidence for oxidatively DNA damage generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, A Viviana; Deodato, Elder L; Cardoso, Janine S; Oliveira, Eliza F; Machado, Sérgio L; Toma, Helena K; Leitão, Alvaro C; de Pádula, Marcelo

    2010-06-01

    Although titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) has been considered to be biologically inert, finding use in cosmetics, paints and food colorants, recent reports have demonstrated that when TiO(2) is attained by UVA radiation oxidative genotoxic and cytotoxic effects are observed in living cells. However, data concerning TiO(2)-UVB association is poor, even if UVB radiation represents a major environmental carcinogen. Herein, we investigated DNA damage, repair and mutagenesis induced by TiO(2) associated with UVB irradiation in vitro and in vivo using Saccharomyces cerevisiae model. It was found that TiO(2) plus UVB treatment in plasmid pUC18 generated, in addition to cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), specific damage to guanine residues, such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) and 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyG), which are characteristic oxidatively generated lesions. In vivo experiments showed that, although the presence of TiO(2) protects yeast cells from UVB cytotoxicity, high mutation frequencies are observed in the wild-type (WT) and in an ogg1 strain (deficient in 8-oxoG and FapyG repair). Indeed, after TiO(2) plus UVB treatment, induced mutagenesis was drastically enhanced in ogg1 cells, indicating that mutagenic DNA lesions are repaired by the Ogg1 protein. This effect could be attenuated by the presence of metallic ion chelators: neocuproine or dipyridyl, which partially block oxidatively generated damage occurring via Fenton reactions. Altogether, the results indicate that TiO(2) plus UVB potentates UVB oxidatively generated damage to DNA, possibly via Fenton reactions involving the production of DNA base damage, such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Enzymatic recognition of DNA damage induced by UVB-photosensitized titanium dioxide and biological consequences in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Evidence for oxidatively DNA damage generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, A. Viviana, E-mail: alicia.pinto@incqs.fiocruz.br [Laboratorio de Diagnostico Molecular e Hematologia, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Ciencias da Saude - Ilha do Fundao, CEP 21941-540, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Laboratorio de Radiobiologia Molecular, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Ciencias da Saude - Ilha do Fundao, CEP 21949-900, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Deodato, Elder L. [Laboratorio de Diagnostico Molecular e Hematologia, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Ciencias da Saude - Ilha do Fundao, CEP 21941-540, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Laboratorio de Radiobiologia Molecular, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Ciencias da Saude - Ilha do Fundao, CEP 21949-900, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Cardoso, Janine S. [Laboratorio de Radiobiologia Molecular, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Ciencias da Saude - Ilha do Fundao, CEP 21949-900, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Oliveira, Eliza F.; Machado, Sergio L.; Toma, Helena K. [Laboratorio de Diagnostico Molecular e Hematologia, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Ciencias da Saude - Ilha do Fundao, CEP 21941-540, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Leitao, Alvaro C. [Laboratorio de Radiobiologia Molecular, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Ciencias da Saude - Ilha do Fundao, CEP 21949-900, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Padula, Marcelo de [Laboratorio de Diagnostico Molecular e Hematologia, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Ciencias da Saude - Ilha do Fundao, CEP 21941-540, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2010-06-01

    Although titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) has been considered to be biologically inert, finding use in cosmetics, paints and food colorants, recent reports have demonstrated that when TiO{sub 2} is attained by UVA radiation oxidative genotoxic and cytotoxic effects are observed in living cells. However, data concerning TiO{sub 2}-UVB association is poor, even if UVB radiation represents a major environmental carcinogen. Herein, we investigated DNA damage, repair and mutagenesis induced by TiO{sub 2} associated with UVB irradiation in vitro and in vivo using Saccharomyces cerevisiae model. It was found that TiO{sub 2} plus UVB treatment in plasmid pUC18 generated, in addition to cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), specific damage to guanine residues, such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) and 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyG), which are characteristic oxidatively generated lesions. In vivo experiments showed that, although the presence of TiO{sub 2} protects yeast cells from UVB cytotoxicity, high mutation frequencies are observed in the wild-type (WT) and in an ogg1 strain (deficient in 8-oxoG and FapyG repair). Indeed, after TiO{sub 2} plus UVB treatment, induced mutagenesis was drastically enhanced in ogg1 cells, indicating that mutagenic DNA lesions are repaired by the Ogg1 protein. This effect could be attenuated by the presence of metallic ion chelators: neocuproine or dipyridyl, which partially block oxidatively generated damage occurring via Fenton reactions. Altogether, the results indicate that TiO{sub 2} plus UVB potentates UVB oxidatively generated damage to DNA, possibly via Fenton reactions involving the production of DNA base damage, such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine.

  18. Enzymatic recognition of DNA damage induced by UVB-photosensitized titanium dioxide and biological consequences in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Evidence for oxidatively DNA damage generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, A. Viviana; Deodato, Elder L.; Cardoso, Janine S.; Oliveira, Eliza F.; Machado, Sergio L.; Toma, Helena K.; Leitao, Alvaro C.; Padula, Marcelo de

    2010-01-01

    Although titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) has been considered to be biologically inert, finding use in cosmetics, paints and food colorants, recent reports have demonstrated that when TiO 2 is attained by UVA radiation oxidative genotoxic and cytotoxic effects are observed in living cells. However, data concerning TiO 2 -UVB association is poor, even if UVB radiation represents a major environmental carcinogen. Herein, we investigated DNA damage, repair and mutagenesis induced by TiO 2 associated with UVB irradiation in vitro and in vivo using Saccharomyces cerevisiae model. It was found that TiO 2 plus UVB treatment in plasmid pUC18 generated, in addition to cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), specific damage to guanine residues, such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) and 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyG), which are characteristic oxidatively generated lesions. In vivo experiments showed that, although the presence of TiO 2 protects yeast cells from UVB cytotoxicity, high mutation frequencies are observed in the wild-type (WT) and in an ogg1 strain (deficient in 8-oxoG and FapyG repair). Indeed, after TiO 2 plus UVB treatment, induced mutagenesis was drastically enhanced in ogg1 cells, indicating that mutagenic DNA lesions are repaired by the Ogg1 protein. This effect could be attenuated by the presence of metallic ion chelators: neocuproine or dipyridyl, which partially block oxidatively generated damage occurring via Fenton reactions. Altogether, the results indicate that TiO 2 plus UVB potentates UVB oxidatively generated damage to DNA, possibly via Fenton reactions involving the production of DNA base damage, such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine.

  19. Epigenetic variants of a transgenic petunia line show hypermethylation in transgene DNA: an indication for specific recognition of foreign DNA in transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, P; Heidmann, I

    1994-05-25

    We analysed de novo DNA methylation occurring in plants obtained from the transgenic petunia line R101-17. This line contains one copy of the maize A1 gene that leads to the production of brick-red pelargonidin pigment in the flowers. Due to its integration into an unmethylated genomic region the A1 transgene is hypomethylated and transcriptionally active. Several epigenetic variants of line 17 were selected that exhibit characteristic and somatically stable pigmentation patterns, displaying fully coloured, marbled or colourless flowers. Analysis of the DNA methylation patterns revealed that the decrease in pigmentation among the epigenetic variants was correlated with an increase in methylation, specifically of the transgene DNA. No change in methylation of the hypomethylated integration region could be detected. A similar increase in methylation, specifically in the transgene region, was also observed among progeny of R101-17del, a deletion derivative of R101-17 that no longer produces pelargonidin pigments due to a deletion in the A1 coding region. Again de novo methylation is specifically directed to the transgene, while the hypomethylated character of neighbouring regions is not affected. Possible mechanisms for transgene-specific methylation and its consequences for long-term use of transgenic material are discussed.

  20. An effective HIV-1 integrase inhibitor screening platform: Rationality validation of drug screening, conformational mobility and molecular recognition analysis for PFV integrase complex with viral DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wenyi; Zuo, Ke; Sun, Xin; Liu, Wei; Yan, Xiao; Liang, Li; Wan, Hua; Chen, Fengzheng; Hu, Jianping

    2017-11-01

    As an important target for the development of novel anti-AIDS drugs, HIV-1 integrase (IN) has been widely concerned. However, the lack of a complete accurate crystal structure of HIV-1 IN greatly blocks the discovery of novel inhibitors. In this work, an effective HIV-1 IN inhibitor screening platform, namely PFV IN, was filtered from all species of INs. Next, the 40.8% similarity with HIV-1 IN, as well as the high efficiency of virtual screening and the good agreement between calculated binding free energies and experimental ones all proved PFV IN is a promising screening platform for HIV-1 IN inhibitors. Then, the molecular recognition mechanism of PFV IN by its substrate viral DNA and six naphthyridine derivatives (NRDs) inhibitors was investigated through molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations and water-mediated interactions analyses. The functional partition of NRDs IN inhibitors could be divided into hydrophobic and hydrophilic ones, and the Mg 2+ ions, water molecules and conserved DDE motif residues all interacted with the hydrophilic partition, while the bases in viral DNA and residues like Tyr212, Pro214 interacted with the hydrophobic one. Finally, the free energy landscape (FEL) and cluster analyses were performed to explore the molecular motion of PFV IN-DNA system. It is found that the association with NRDs inhibitors would obviously decrease the motion amplitude of PFV IN-DNA, which may be one of the most potential mechanisms of IN inhibitors. This work will provide a theoretical basis for the inhibitor design based on the structure of HIV-1 IN. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Diversity, distribution and dynamics of full-length Copia and Gypsy LTR retroelements in Solanum lycopersicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Rosalía Cristina; Kozaczek, Melisa Eliana; Rosli, Hernán Guillermo; Andino, Natalia Pilar; Sanchez-Puerta, Maria Virginia

    2017-10-01

    Transposable elements are the most abundant components of plant genomes and can dramatically induce genetic changes and impact genome evolution. In the recently sequenced genome of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), the estimated fraction of elements corresponding to retrotransposons is nearly 62%. Given that tomato is one of the most important vegetable crop cultivated and consumed worldwide, understanding retrotransposon dynamics can provide insight into its evolution and domestication processes. In this study, we performed a genome-wide in silico search of full-length LTR retroelements in the tomato nuclear genome and annotated 736 full-length Gypsy and Copia retroelements. The dispersion level across the 12 chromosomes, the diversity and tissue-specific expression of those elements were estimated. Phylogenetic analysis based on the retrotranscriptase region revealed the presence of 12 major lineages of LTR retroelements in the tomato genome. We identified 97 families, of which 77 and 20 belong to the superfamilies Copia and Gypsy, respectively. Each retroelement family was characterized according to their element size, relative frequencies and insertion time. These analyses represent a valuable resource for comparative genomics within the Solanaceae, transposon-tagging and for the design of cultivar-specific molecular markers in tomato.

  2. X-ray crystal structure of the N-terminal region of Moloney murine leukemia virus integrase and its implications for viral DNA recognition: N-Terminal Region of M-MuLV Integrase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, Rongjin [Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Aiyer, Sriram [Department of Pharmacology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Cote, Marie L. [Department of Biochemistry, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, UMDNJ, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Xiao, Rong [Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Jiang, Mei [Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Acton, Thomas B. [Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Roth, Monica J. [Department of Pharmacology, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Montelione, Gaetano T. [Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey 08854; Department of Biochemistry, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, UMDNJ, Piscataway New Jersey 08854

    2017-02-03

    The retroviral integrase (IN) carries out the integration of a dsDNA copy of the viral genome into the host DNA, an essential step for viral replication. All IN proteins have three general domains, the N-terminal domain (NTD), the catalytic core domain, and the C-terminal domain. The NTD includes an HHCC zinc finger-like motif, which is conserved in all retroviral IN proteins. Two crystal structures of Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) IN N-terminal region (NTR) constructs that both include an N-terminal extension domain (NED, residues 1–44) and an HHCC zinc-finger NTD (residues 45–105), in two crystal forms are reported. The structures of IN NTR constructs encoding residues 1–105 (NTR1–105) and 8–105 (NTR8–105) were determined at 2.7 and 2.15 Å resolution, respectively and belong to different space groups. While both crystal forms have similar protomer structures, NTR1–105 packs as a dimer and NTR8–105 packs as a tetramer in the asymmetric unit. The structure of the NED consists of three anti-parallel β-strands and an α-helix, similar to the NED of prototype foamy virus (PFV) IN. These three β-strands form an extended β-sheet with another β-strand in the HHCC Zn2+ binding domain, which is a unique structural feature for the M-MuLV IN. The HHCC Zn2+ binding domain structure is similar to that in HIV and PFV INs, with variations within the loop regions. Differences between the PFV and MLV IN NEDs localize at regions identified to interact with the PFV LTR and are compared with established biochemical and virological data for M-MuLV. Proteins 2017; 85:647–656.

  3. The thermodynamic effects of ligand structure on the molecular recognition of mononuclear ruthenium polypyridyl complexes with B-DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes (RPCs), [(phen)2Ru(tatpp)]Cl2 (3Cl2) and [(phen)2Ru (tatpp)Ru(phen)2]Cl4 (4Cl4), containing the large planar and redox-active tetraazatetrapyrido- pentacene (tatpp) ligand, cleave DNA in the presence of reducing agents in cell-free assays and show significant...

  4. PAM-Dependent Target DNA Recognition and Cleavage by C2c1 CRISPR-Cas Endonuclease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hui; Gao, Pu; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Patel, Dinshaw J. (MSKCC); (Cornell); (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

    2016-12-01

    C2c1 is a newly identified guide RNA-mediated type V-B CRISPR-Cas endonuclease that site-specifically targets and cleaves both strands of target DNA. We have determined crystal structures of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris C2c1 (AacC2c1) bound to sgRNA as a binary complex and to target DNAs as ternary complexes, thereby capturing catalytically competent conformations of AacC2c1 with both target and non-target DNA strands independently positioned within a single RuvC catalytic pocket. Moreover, C2c1-mediated cleavage results in a staggered seven-nucleotide break of target DNA. crRNA adopts a pre-ordered five-nucleotide A-form seed sequence in the binary complex, with release of an inserted tryptophan, facilitating zippering up of 20-bp guide RNA:target DNA heteroduplex on ternary complex formation. Notably, the PAM-interacting cleft adopts a “locked” conformation on ternary complex formation. Structural comparison of C2c1 ternary complexes with their Cas9 and Cpf1 counterparts highlights the diverse mechanisms adopted by these distinct CRISPR-Cas systems, thereby broadening and enhancing their applicability as genome editing tools.

  5. Conformation and recognition of DNA damaged by antitumor cis-dichlorido platinum(II) complex of CDK inhibitor bohemine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováková, Olga; Lišková, Barbora; Vystrčilová, Jana; Suchánková, Tereza; Vrána, Oldřich; Starha, P.; Trávníček, Z.; Brabec, Viktor

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 78, MAY2014 (2014), s. 54-64 ISSN 0223-5234 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-08273S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Antitumor * Platinum * DNA Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.447, year: 2014

  6. The foci of DNA double strand break-recognition proteins localize with γH2AX after heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Mori, Eiichiro; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2010-01-01

    Recently, there have been many reports concerning proteins which can recognize DNA double strand break (DSBs), and such proteins include histone H2AX phosphorylated at serine 139 (γH2AX), ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) phospho-serine 1981, DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) phospho-threonine 2609, Nijmegen breakage syndrome 1 (NBS1) phospho-serine 343, checkpoint kinase 2 (CHK2), phospho-threonine 68, and structural maintenance of chromosomes 1 (SMC1) phospho-serine 966. Thus, it should be possible to follow the formation of DSBs and their repair using immunohistochemical methods with multiple antibodies to detect these proteins. When normal human fibroblasts (AG1522 cells) were exposed to 3 Gy of X-rays as a control, clearly discernable foci for these proteins were detected, and these foci localized with γH2AX foci. After heat treatment at 45.5 deg C for 20 min, these proteins are partially localized with γH2AX foci. Here we show that there were slight differences in the localization pattern among these proteins, such as a disappearance from the nucleus (phospho-ATM) and translocation to the cytoplasm (phospho-NBS1) at 30 min after heat treatment, and some foci (phospho-DNA-PKcs and phospho-CHK2) appeared at 8 h after heat treatment. These results are discussed from perspectives of heat-induced denaturation of proteins and formation of DSBs. (author)

  7. A unique dual recognition hairpin probe mediated fluorescence amplification method for sensitive detection of uracil-DNA glycosylase and endonuclease IV activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yushu; Yan, Ping; Xu, Xiaowen; Jiang, Wei

    2016-03-07

    Uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG) and endonuclease IV (Endo IV) play cooperative roles in uracil base-excision repair (UBER) and inactivity of either will interrupt the UBER to cause disease. Detection of UDG and Endo IV activities is crucial to evaluate the UBER process in fundamental research and diagnostic application. Here, a unique dual recognition hairpin probe mediated fluorescence amplification method was developed for sensitively and selectively detecting UDG and Endo IV activities. For detecting UDG activity, the uracil base in the probe was excised by the target enzyme to generate an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site, achieving the UDG recognition. Then, the AP site was cleaved by a tool enzyme Endo IV, releasing a primer to trigger rolling circle amplification (RCA) reaction. Finally, the RCA reaction produced numerous repeated G-quadruplex sequences, which interacted with N-methyl-mesoporphyrin IX to generate an enhanced fluorescence signal. Alternatively, for detecting Endo IV activity, the uracil base in the probe was first converted into an AP site by a tool enzyme UDG. Next, the AP site was cleaved by the target enzyme, achieving the Endo IV recognition. The signal was then generated and amplified in the same way as those in the UDG activity assay. The detection limits were as low as 0.00017 U mL(-1) for UDG and 0.11 U mL(-1) for Endo IV, respectively. Moreover, UDG and Endo IV can be well distinguished from their analogs. This method is beneficial for properly evaluating the UBER process in function studies and disease prognoses.

  8. Retroviral DNA Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The integration of a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome into host chromatin is the defining step of retroviral replication. This enzymatic process is catalyzed by the virus-encoded integrase protein, which is conserved among retroviruses and LTR-retrotransposons. Retroviral integration proceeds via two integrase activities: 3′-processing of the viral DNA ends, followed by the strand transfer of the processed ends into host cell chromosomal DNA. Herein we review the molecular mechanism of retroviral DNA integration, with an emphasis on reaction chemistries and architectures of the nucleoprotein complexes involved. We additionally discuss the latest advances on anti-integrase drug development for the treatment of AIDS and the utility of integrating retroviral vectors in gene therapy applications. PMID:27198982

  9. Coop-Seq Analysis Demonstrates that Sox2 Evokes Latent Specificities in the DNA Recognition by Pax6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Caizhen; Malik, Vikas; Chang, Yiming Kenny; Veerapandian, Veeramohan; Srivastava, Yogesh; Huang, Yong-Heng; Hou, Linlin; Cojocaru, Vlad; Stormo, Gary D; Jauch, Ralf

    2017-11-24

    Sox2 and Pax6 co-regulate genes in neural lineages and the lens by forming a ternary complex likely facilitated allosterically through DNA. We used the quantitative and scalable cooperativity-by-sequencing (Coop-seq) approach to interrogate Sox2/Pax6 dimerization on a DNA library where five positions of the Pax6 half-site were randomized yielding 1024 cooperativity factors. Consensus positions normally required for the high-affinity DNA binding by Pax6 need to be mutated for effective dimerization with Sox2. Out of the five randomized bases, a 5' thymidine is present in most of the top ranking elements. However, this thymidine maps to a region outside of the Pax half site and is not expected to directly interact with Pax6 in known binding modes suggesting structural reconfigurations. Re-analysis of ChIP-seq data identified several genomic regions where the cooperativity promoting sequence pattern is co-bound by Sox2 and Pax6. A highly conserved Sox2/Pax6 bound site near the Sprouty2 locus was verified to promote cooperative dimerization designating Sprouty2 as a potential target reliant on Sox2/Pax6 cooperativity in several neural cell types. Collectively, the functional interplay of Sox2 and Pax6 demands the relaxation of high-affinity binding sites and is enabled by alternative DNA sequences. We conclude that this binding mode evolved to warrant that a subset of target genes is only regulated in the presence of suitable partner factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Origin of the diversity in DNA recognition domains in phasevarion associated modA genes of pathogenic Neisseria and Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawthorne, Jayde A; Beatson, Scott A; Srikhanta, Yogitha N; Fox, Kate L; Jennings, Michael P

    2012-01-01

    Phase variable restriction-modification (R-M) systems have been identified in a range of pathogenic bacteria. In some it has been demonstrated that the random switching of the mod (DNA methyltransferase) gene mediates the coordinated expression of multiple genes and constitutes a phasevarion (phase variable regulon). ModA of Neisseria and Haemophilus influenzae contain a highly variable, DNA recognition domain (DRD) that defines the target sequence that is modified by methylation and is used to define modA alleles. 18 distinct modA alleles have been identified in H. influenzae and the pathogenic Neisseria. To determine the origin of DRD variability, the 18 modA DRDs were used to search the available databases for similar sequences. Significant matches were identified between several modA alleles and mod gene from distinct bacterial species, indicating one source of the DRD variability was via horizontal gene transfer. Comparison of DRD sequences revealed significant mosaicism, indicating exchange between the Neisseria and H. influenzae modA alleles. Regions of high inter- and intra-allele similarity indicate that some modA alleles had undergone recombination more frequently than others, generating further diversity. Furthermore, the DRD from some modA alleles, such as modA12, have been transferred en bloc to replace the DRD from different modA alleles.

  11. In Vitro Selection of Single-Stranded DNA Molecular Recognition Elements against S. aureus Alpha Toxin and Sensitive Detection in Human Serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ka L. Hong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha toxin is one of the major virulence factors secreted by Staphylococcus aureus, a bacterium that is responsible for a wide variety of infections in both community and hospital settings. Due to the prevalence of S. aureus related infections and the emergence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus, rapid and accurate diagnosis of S. aureus infections is crucial in benefiting patient health outcomes. In this study, a rigorous Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX variant previously developed by our laboratory was utilized to select a single-stranded DNA molecular recognition element (MRE targeting alpha toxin with high affinity and specificity. At the end of the 12-round selection, the selected MRE had an equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd of 93.7 ± 7.0 nM. Additionally, a modified sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was developed by using the selected ssDNA MRE as the toxin-capturing element and a sensitive detection of 200 nM alpha toxin in undiluted human serum samples was achieved.

  12. A conserved motif in the linker domain of STAT1 transcription factor is required for both recognition and release from high-affinity DNA-binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüntelmann, Bettina; Staab, Julia; Herrmann-Lingen, Christoph; Meyer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Binding to specific palindromic sequences termed gamma-activated sites (GAS) is a hallmark of gene activation by members of the STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) family of cytokine-inducible transcription factors. However, the precise molecular mechanisms involved in the signal-dependent finding of target genes by STAT dimers have not yet been very well studied. In this study, we have characterized a sequence motif in the STAT1 linker domain which is highly conserved among the seven human STAT proteins and includes surface-exposed residues in close proximity to the bound DNA. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we have demonstrated that a lysine residue in position 567 of the full-length molecule is required for GAS recognition. The substitution of alanine for this residue completely abolished both binding to high-affinity GAS elements and transcriptional activation of endogenous target genes in cells stimulated with interferon-γ (IFNγ), while the time course of transient nuclear accumulation and tyrosine phosphorylation were virtually unchanged. In contrast, two glutamic acid residues (E559 and E563) on each monomer are important for the dissociation of dimeric STAT1 from DNA and, when mutated to alanine, result in elevated levels of tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT1 as well as prolonged IFNγ-stimulated nuclear accumulation. In conclusion, our data indicate that the kinetics of signal-dependent GAS binding is determined by an array of glutamic acid residues located at the interior surface of the STAT1 dimer. These negatively charged residues appear to align the long axis of the STAT1 dimer in a position perpendicular to the DNA, thereby facilitating the interaction between lysine 567 and the phosphodiester backbone of a bound GAS element, which is a prerequisite for transient gene induction.

  13. Recognition, signaling, and repair of DNA double-strand breaks produced by ionizing radiation in mammalian cells: the molecular choreography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Larry H

    2012-01-01

    The faithful maintenance of chromosome continuity in human cells during DNA replication and repair is critical for preventing the conversion of normal diploid cells to an oncogenic state. The evolution of higher eukaryotic cells endowed them with a large genetic investment in the molecular machinery that ensures chromosome stability. In mammalian and other vertebrate cells, the elimination of double-strand breaks with minimal nucleotide sequence change involves the spatiotemporal orchestration of a seemingly endless number of proteins ranging in their action from the nucleotide level to nucleosome organization and chromosome architecture. DNA DSBs trigger a myriad of post-translational modifications that alter catalytic activities and the specificity of protein interactions: phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation, ubiquitylation, and SUMOylation, followed by the reversal of these changes as repair is completed. "Superfluous" protein recruitment to damage sites, functional redundancy, and alternative pathways ensure that DSB repair is extremely efficient, both quantitatively and qualitatively. This review strives to integrate the information about the molecular mechanisms of DSB repair that has emerged over the last two decades with a focus on DSBs produced by the prototype agent ionizing radiation (IR). The exponential growth of molecular studies, heavily driven by RNA knockdown technology, now reveals an outline of how many key protein players in genome stability and cancer biology perform their interwoven tasks, e.g. ATM, ATR, DNA-PK, Chk1, Chk2, PARP1/2/3, 53BP1, BRCA1, BRCA2, BLM, RAD51, and the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 complex. Thus, the nature of the intricate coordination of repair processes with cell cycle progression is becoming apparent. This review also links molecular abnormalities to cellular pathology as much a possible and provides a framework of temporal relationships. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Recovery of avian metapneumovirus subgroup C from cDNA: cross-recognition of avian and human metapneumovirus support proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Dhanasekaran; Buchholz, Ursula J; Samal, Siba K

    2006-06-01

    Avian metapneumovirus (AMPV) causes an acute respiratory disease in turkeys and is associated with "swollen head syndrome" in chickens, contributing to significant economic losses for the U.S. poultry industry. With a long-term goal of developing a better vaccine for controlling AMPV in the United States, we established a reverse genetics system to produce infectious AMPV of subgroup C entirely from cDNA. A cDNA clone encoding the entire 14,150-nucleotide genome of AMPV subgroup C strain Colorado (AMPV/CO) was generated by assembling five cDNA fragments between the T7 RNA polymerase promoter and the autocatalytic hepatitis delta virus ribozyme of a transcription plasmid, pBR 322. Transfection of this plasmid, along with the expression plasmids encoding the N, P, M2-1, and L proteins of AMPV/CO, into cells stably expressing T7 RNA polymerase resulted in the recovery of infectious AMPV/CO. Characterization of the recombinant AMPV/CO showed that its growth properties in tissue culture were similar to those of the parental virus. The potential of AMPV/CO to serve as a viral vector was also assessed by generating another recombinant virus, rAMPV/CO-GFP, that expressed the enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a foreign protein. Interestingly, GFP-expressing AMPV and GFP-expressing human metapneumovirus (HMPV) could be recovered using the support plasmids of either virus, denoting that the genome promoters are conserved between the two metapneumoviruses and can be cross-recognized by the polymerase complex proteins of either virus. These results indicate a close functional relationship between AMPV/CO and HMPV.

  15. Different Recognition of DNA Modified by Antitumor Cisplatin and Its Clinically Ineffective trans Isomer by Tumor Suppressor Protein p53

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kašpárková, Jana; Pospíšilová, Š.; Brabec, Viktor

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 276, č. 19 (2001), s. 16064-16069 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/99/0695; GA ČR GA305/01/0418; GA ČR GA301/00/P094; GA AV ČR IAA5004101; GA MZd NL6058 Grant - others:HHMI(US) 55000313; Wellcome Trust(GB) 062366/Z/00/Z Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : Interstrand cross-links * platinum complexes * supercoiled DNA Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 7.258, year: 2001

  16. LTRsift: a graphical user interface for semi-automatic classification and postprocessing of de novo detected LTR retrotransposons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinbiss Sascha

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long terminal repeat (LTR retrotransposons are a class of eukaryotic mobile elements characterized by a distinctive sequence similarity-based structure. Hence they are well suited for computational identification. Current software allows for a comprehensive genome-wide de novo detection of such elements. The obvious next step is the classification of newly detected candidates resulting in (super-families. Such a de novo classification approach based on sequence-based clustering of transposon features has been proposed before, resulting in a preliminary assignment of candidates to families as a basis for subsequent manual refinement. However, such a classification workflow is typically split across a heterogeneous set of glue scripts and generic software (for example, spreadsheets, making it tedious for a human expert to inspect, curate and export the putative families produced by the workflow. Results We have developed LTRsift, an interactive graphical software tool for semi-automatic postprocessing of de novo predicted LTR retrotransposon annotations. Its user-friendly interface offers customizable filtering and classification functionality, displaying the putative candidate groups, their members and their internal structure in a hierarchical fashion. To ease manual work, it also supports graphical user interface-driven reassignment, splitting and further annotation of candidates. Export of grouped candidate sets in standard formats is possible. In two case studies, we demonstrate how LTRsift can be employed in the context of a genome-wide LTR retrotransposon survey effort. Conclusions LTRsift is a useful and convenient tool for semi-automated classification of newly detected LTR retrotransposons based on their internal features. Its efficient implementation allows for convenient and seamless filtering and classification in an integrated environment. Developed for life scientists, it is helpful in postprocessing and refining

  17. LTRsift: a graphical user interface for semi-automatic classification and postprocessing of de novo detected LTR retrotransposons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbiss, Sascha; Kastens, Sascha; Kurtz, Stefan

    2012-11-07

    Long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons are a class of eukaryotic mobile elements characterized by a distinctive sequence similarity-based structure. Hence they are well suited for computational identification. Current software allows for a comprehensive genome-wide de novo detection of such elements. The obvious next step is the classification of newly detected candidates resulting in (super-)families. Such a de novo classification approach based on sequence-based clustering of transposon features has been proposed before, resulting in a preliminary assignment of candidates to families as a basis for subsequent manual refinement. However, such a classification workflow is typically split across a heterogeneous set of glue scripts and generic software (for example, spreadsheets), making it tedious for a human expert to inspect, curate and export the putative families produced by the workflow. We have developed LTRsift, an interactive graphical software tool for semi-automatic postprocessing of de novo predicted LTR retrotransposon annotations. Its user-friendly interface offers customizable filtering and classification functionality, displaying the putative candidate groups, their members and their internal structure in a hierarchical fashion. To ease manual work, it also supports graphical user interface-driven reassignment, splitting and further annotation of candidates. Export of grouped candidate sets in standard formats is possible. In two case studies, we demonstrate how LTRsift can be employed in the context of a genome-wide LTR retrotransposon survey effort. LTRsift is a useful and convenient tool for semi-automated classification of newly detected LTR retrotransposons based on their internal features. Its efficient implementation allows for convenient and seamless filtering and classification in an integrated environment. Developed for life scientists, it is helpful in postprocessing and refining the output of software for predicting LTR

  18. Bond graph modeling and LQG/LTR controller design of magnetically levitation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Shik; Park, Jeon Soo [Busan National Univ. (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-09-01

    A logical and systematic procedure to derive a mathematical model for magnetically levitation (MAGLEV) systems with a combined lift and guidance is developed by using bond graph modeling techniques. First, bond graph is contructed for the 1{sup st}-dimensional MAGLEV system in which three subsystems (energy feeding, track and vehicle) are considered. And, the 2{sup nd}-dimensional MAGLEV system in which lift and guidance dynamics are coupled is modeled by using the concept of multi-port field in bond graph languages. Finally, the LQG/LTR control system is designed for a multivariable MAGLEV system with stagger configuration type. In this paper, it has been shown that the bond graph is an excellent effective method for modeling multi-energy domain systems such as MAGLEV systems with uncertainties such as mass variations, track irregularities and wind gusts. (Author).

  19. Bond graph modeling and LQG/LTR controller design of magnetically levitation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Shik; Park, Jeon Soo

    1991-01-01

    A logical and systematic procedure to derive a mathematical model for magnetically levitation (MAGLEV) systems with a combined lift and guidance is developed by using bond graph modeling techniques. First, bond graph is contructed for the 1 st -dimensional MAGLEV system in which three subsystems (energy feeding, track and vehicle) are considered. And, the 2 nd -dimensional MAGLEV system in which lift and guidance dynamics are coupled is modeled by using the concept of multi-port field in bond graph languages. Finally, the LQG/LTR control system is designed for a multivariable MAGLEV system with stagger configuration type. In this paper, it has been shown that the bond graph is an excellent effective method for modeling multi-energy domain systems such as MAGLEV systems with uncertainties such as mass variations, track irregularities and wind gusts. (Author)

  20. Structural basis for IL-1α recognition by a modified DNA aptamer that specifically inhibits IL-1α signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gelinas, Amy D.; von Carlowitz, Ira; Janjic, Nebojsa; Pyle, Anna Marie (Yale); (SomaLogic)

    2017-10-09

    IL-1α is an essential cytokine that contributes to inflammatory responses and is implicated in various forms of pathogenesis and cancer. Here we report a naphthyl modified DNA aptamer that specifically binds IL-1α and inhibits its signaling pathway. By solving the crystal structure of the IL-1α/aptamer, we provide a high-resolution structure of this critical cytokine and we reveal its functional interaction interface with high-affinity ligands. The non-helical aptamer, which represents a highly compact nucleic acid structure, contains a wealth of new conformational features, including an unknown form of G-quadruplex. The IL-1α/aptamer interface is composed of unusual polar and hydrophobic elements, along with an elaborate hydrogen bonding network that is mediated by sodium ion. IL-1α uses the same interface to interact with both the aptamer and its cognate receptor IL-1RI, thereby suggesting a novel route to immunomodulatory therapeutics.

  1. Host-Guest Recognition-Assisted Electrochemical Release: Its Reusable Sensing Application Based on DNA Cross Configuration-Fueled Target Cycling and Strand Displacement Reaction Amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yuanyuan; Zhuo, Ying; Chai, Yaqin; Yuan, Ruo

    2017-08-15

    In this work, an elegantly designed host-guest recognition-assisted electrochemical release was established and applied in a reusable electrochemical biosensor for the detection of microRNA-182-5p (miRNA-182-5p), a prostate cancer biomarker in prostate cancer, based on the DNA cross configuration-fueled target cycling and strand displacement reaction (SDR) amplification. With such a design, the single target miRNA input could be converted to large numbers of single-stranded DNA (S1-Trp and S2-Trp) output, which could be trapped by cucurbit[8]uril methyl viologen (CB-8-MV 2+ ) based on the host-guest recognition, significantly enhancing the sensitivity for miRNA detection. Moreover, the nucleic acids products obtained from the process of cycling amplification could be utilized sufficiently, avoiding the waste and saving the experiment cost. Impressively, by resetting a settled voltage, the proposed biosensor could release S1-Trp and S2-Trp from the electrode surface, attributing that the guest ion methyl viologen (MV 2+ ) was reduced to MV +· under this settled voltage and formed a more-stable CB-8-MV +· -MV +· complex. Once O 2 was introduced in this system, MV +· could be oxidized to MV 2+ , generating the complex of CB-8-MV 2+ for capturing S1-Trp and S2-Trp again in only 5 min. As a result, the simple and fast regeneration of biosensor for target detection was realized on the base of electrochemical redox-driven assembly and release, overcoming the challenges of time-consuming, burdensome operations and expensive experimental cost in traditional reusable biosensors and updating the construction method for a reusable bisensor. Furthermore, the biosensor could be reused for more than 10 times with a regeneration rate of 93.20%-102.24%. After all, the conception of this work provides a novel thought for the construction of effective reusable biosensor to detect miRNA and other biomarkers and has great potential application in the area requiring the release of

  2. Isolation of Retroelement from Plant Genomic DNA

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Author: Pat Heslop-Harrison ### Abstract: Retroelements and their derivatives are an ubiquitous and abundant component of plant genomes. From the 1990s, PCR based techniques have been developed to isolate the elements from genomic DNA of different plants, and the methods and primers used are presented here. Major classes of retroelements include the Ty1-copia, the Ty3-gypsy and the LINE (non-LTR) groups. Mixed PCR products representing the full heterogeneous pool of retrotransposo...

  3. The Enzyme-Like Domain of Arabidopsis Nuclear β-Amylases Is Critical for DNA Sequence Recognition and Transcriptional Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyk, Sebastian; Simková, Klára; Zürcher, Evelyne; Luginbühl, Leonie; Brand, Luise H; Vaughan, Cara K; Wanke, Dierk; Zeeman, Samuel C

    2014-04-01

    Plant BZR1-BAM transcription factors contain a β-amylase (BAM)-like domain, characteristic of proteins involved in starch breakdown. The enzyme-derived domains appear to be noncatalytic, but they determine the function of the two Arabidopsis thaliana BZR1-BAM isoforms (BAM7 and BAM8) during transcriptional initiation. Removal or swapping of the BAM domains demonstrates that the BAM7 BAM domain restricts DNA binding and transcriptional activation, while the BAM8 BAM domain allows both activities. Furthermore, we demonstrate that BAM7 and BAM8 interact on the protein level and cooperate during transcriptional regulation. Site-directed mutagenesis of residues in the BAM domain of BAM8 shows that its function as a transcriptional activator is independent of catalysis but requires an intact substrate binding site, suggesting it may bind a ligand. Microarray experiments with plants overexpressing truncated versions lacking the BAM domain indicate that the pseudo-enzymatic domain increases selectivity for the preferred cis-regulatory element BBRE (BZR1-BAM Responsive Element). Side specificity toward the G-box may allow crosstalk to other signaling networks. This work highlights the importance of the enzyme-derived domain of BZR1-BAMs, supporting their potential role as metabolic sensors. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  4. Ancient Origin of the U2 Small Nuclear RNA Gene-Targeting Non-LTR Retrotransposons Utopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Kenji K; Jurka, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Most non-long terminal repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposons encoding a restriction-like endonuclease show target-specific integration into repetitive sequences such as ribosomal RNA genes and microsatellites. However, only a few target-specific lineages of non-LTR retrotransposons are distributed widely and no lineage is found across the eukaryotic kingdoms. Here we report the most widely distributed lineage of target sequence-specific non-LTR retrotransposons, designated Utopia. Utopia is found in three supergroups of eukaryotes: Amoebozoa, SAR, and Opisthokonta. Utopia is inserted into a specific site of U2 small nuclear RNA genes with different strength of specificity for each family. Utopia families from oomycetes and wasps show strong target specificity while only a small number of Utopia copies from reptiles are flanked with U2 snRNA genes. Oomycete Utopia families contain an "archaeal" RNase H domain upstream of reverse transcriptase (RT), which likely originated from a plant RNase H gene. Analysis of Utopia from oomycetes indicates that multiple lineages of Utopia have been maintained inside of U2 genes with few copy numbers. Phylogenetic analysis of RT suggests the monophyly of Utopia, and it likely dates back to the early evolution of eukaryotes.

  5. Mammalian-specific genomic functions: Newly acquired traits generated by genomic imprinting and LTR retrotransposon-derived genes in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko; Ishino, Fumitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Mammals, including human beings, have evolved a unique viviparous reproductive system and a highly developed central nervous system. How did these unique characteristics emerge in mammalian evolution, and what kinds of changes did occur in the mammalian genomes as evolution proceeded? A key conceptual term in approaching these issues is "mammalian-specific genomic functions", a concept covering both mammalian-specific epigenetics and genetics. Genomic imprinting and LTR retrotransposon-derived genes are reviewed as the representative, mammalian-specific genomic functions that are essential not only for the current mammalian developmental system, but also mammalian evolution itself. First, the essential roles of genomic imprinting in mammalian development, especially related to viviparous reproduction via placental function, as well as the emergence of genomic imprinting in mammalian evolution, are discussed. Second, we introduce the novel concept of "mammalian-specific traits generated by mammalian-specific genes from LTR retrotransposons", based on the finding that LTR retrotransposons served as a critical driving force in the mammalian evolution via generating mammalian-specific genes.

  6. Repair of DNA treated with lambda-irradiation and chemical carcinogens. Progress report, 1984-1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldthwait, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    Research progress is reported in the following areas: (1) DNA repair in HeLa cells; (2) a search for human transposable elements; (3) the effect of radiation and carcinogens on the activation of LTR sequences; and (4) studies on oncogenes of central nervous system tumors

  7. A yeast model for target-primed (non-LTR retrotransposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busby Jason N

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Target-primed (non-LTR retrotransposons, such as the human L1 element, are mobile genetic elements found in many eukaryotic genomes. They are often present in large numbers and their retrotransposition can cause mutations and genomic rearrangements. Despite their importance, many aspects of their replication are not well understood. Results We have developed a yeast model system for studying target-primed retrotransposons. This system uses the Zorro3 element from Candida albicans. A cloned copy of Zorro3, tagged with a retrotransposition indicator gene, retrotransposes at a high frequency when introduced into an appropriate C. albicans host strain. Retrotransposed copies of the tagged element exhibit similar features to the native copies, indicating that the natural retrotransposition pathway is being used. Retrotransposition is dependent on the products of the tagged element's own genes and is highly temperature-regulated. The new assay permits the analysis of the effects of specific mutations introduced into the cloned element. Conclusion This Zorro3 retrotransposition assay system complements previously available target-primed retrotransposition assays. Due to the relative simplicity of the growth, manipulation and analysis of yeast cells, the system should advance our understanding of target-primed retrotransposition.

  8. LQG/LTR optimal attitude control of small flexible spacecraft using free-free boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Joseph M.

    Due to the volume and power limitations of a small satellite, careful consideration must be taken while designing an attitude control system for 3-axis stabilization. Placing redundancy in the system proves difficult and utilizing power hungry, high accuracy, active actuators is not a viable option. Thus, it is customary to find dependable, passive actuators used in conjunction with small scale active control components. This document describes the application of Elastic Memory Composite materials in the construction of a flexible spacecraft appendage, such as a gravity gradient boom. Assumed modes methods are used with Finite Element Modeling information to obtain the equations of motion for the system while assuming free-free boundary conditions. A discussion is provided to illustrate how cantilever mode shapes are not always the best assumption when modeling small flexible spacecraft. A key point of interest is first resonant modes may be needed in the system design plant in spite of these modes being greater than one order of magnitude in frequency when compared to the crossover frequency of the controller. LQG/LTR optimal control techniques are implemented to compute attitude control gains while controller robustness considerations determine appropriate reduced order controllers and which flexible modes to include in the design model. Key satellite designer concerns in the areas of computer processor sizing, material uncertainty impacts on the system model, and system performance variations resulting from appendage length modifications are addressed.

  9. Transcriptionally active LTR retrotransposons in Eucalyptus genus are differentially expressed and insertionally polymorphic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, Helena Sanches; Domingues, Douglas Silva; Silva, Juliana Costa; Borges, Rafael Junqueira; Matioli, Fábio Filippi; Fontes, Marcos Roberto de Mattos; Marino, Celso Luis

    2015-08-14

    In Eucalyptus genus, studies on genome composition and transposable elements (TEs) are particularly scarce. Nearly half of the recently released Eucalyptus grandis genome is composed by retrotransposons and this data provides an important opportunity to understand TE dynamics in Eucalyptus genome and transcriptome. We characterized nine families of transcriptionally active LTR retrotransposons from Copia and Gypsy superfamilies in Eucalyptus grandis genome and we depicted genomic distribution and copy number in two Eucalyptus species. We also evaluated genomic polymorphism and transcriptional profile in three organs of five Eucalyptus species. We observed contrasting genomic and transcriptional behavior in the same family among different species. RLC_egMax_1 was the most prevalent family and RLC_egAngela_1 was the family with the lowest copy number. Most families of both superfamilies have their insertions occurring Eucalyptus species. Using EST analysis and qRT-PCRs, we observed transcriptional activity in several tissues and in all evaluated species. In some families, osmotic stress increases transcript values. Our strategy was successful in isolating transcriptionally active retrotransposons in Eucalyptus, and each family has a particular genomic and transcriptional pattern. Overall, our results show that retrotransposon activity have differentially affected genome and transcriptome among Eucalyptus species.

  10. AN ILLUMINATION INVARIANT TEXTURE BASED FACE RECOGNITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Meena

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Automatic face recognition remains an interesting but challenging computer vision open problem. Poor illumination is considered as one of the major issue, since illumination changes cause large variation in the facial features. To resolve this, illumination normalization preprocessing techniques are employed in this paper to enhance the face recognition rate. The methods such as Histogram Equalization (HE, Gamma Intensity Correction (GIC, Normalization chain and Modified Homomorphic Filtering (MHF are used for preprocessing. Owing to great success, the texture features are commonly used for face recognition. But these features are severely affected by lighting changes. Hence texture based models Local Binary Pattern (LBP, Local Derivative Pattern (LDP, Local Texture Pattern (LTP and Local Tetra Patterns (LTrPs are experimented under different lighting conditions. In this paper, illumination invariant face recognition technique is developed based on the fusion of illumination preprocessing with local texture descriptors. The performance has been evaluated using YALE B and CMU-PIE databases containing more than 1500 images. The results demonstrate that MHF based normalization gives significant improvement in recognition rate for the face images with large illumination conditions.

  11. Regulation of FeLV-945 by c-Myb binding and CBP recruitment to the LTR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finstad Samantha L

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Feline leukemia virus (FeLV induces degenerative, proliferative and malignant hematologic disorders in its natural host, the domestic cat. FeLV-945 is a viral variant identified as predominant in a cohort of naturally infected animals. FeLV-945 contains a unique sequence motif in the long terminal repeat (LTR comprised of a single copy of transcriptional enhancer followed by a 21-bp sequence triplicated in tandem. The LTR is precisely conserved among independent cases of multicentric lymphoma, myeloproliferative disease and anemia in animals from the cohort. The 21-bp triplication was previously shown to act as a transcriptional enhancer preferentially in hematopoietic cells and to confer a replicative advantage. The objective of the present study was to examine the molecular mechanism by which the 21-bp triplication exerts its influence and the selective advantage responsible for its precise conservation. Results Potential binding sites for the transcription factor, c-Myb, were identified across the repeat junctions of the 21-bp triplication. Such sites would not occur in the absence of the repeat; thus, a requirement for c-Myb binding to the repeat junctions of the triplication would exert a selective pressure to conserve its sequence precisely. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated specific binding of c-Myb to the 21-bp triplication. Reporter gene assays showed that the triplication-containing LTR is responsive to c-Myb, and that responsiveness requires the presence of both c-Myb binding sites. Results further indicated that c-Myb in complex with the 21-bp triplication recruits the transcriptional co-activator, CBP, a regulator of normal hematopoiesis. FeLV-945 replication was shown to be positively regulated by CBP in a manner dependent on the presence of the 21-bp triplication. Conclusion Binding sites for c-Myb across the repeat junctions of the 21-bp triplication may account for its precise conservation in

  12. Determination of the recognition site for adenine-specific methylase of Shigella sonnei 47 by hydazinolysis of DNA, followed by separation of the purine oligonucleotides by thin-layer chromatography on DEAE-cellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopatina, N.G.; Kirnos, M.D.; Suchkov, S.V.; Vanyushin, B.F.; Nikol'skaya, I.I.; Debov, S.S.

    1985-01-01

    A method has been developed for the separation of oligopurine units according to length and composition by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography on plates with DEAE-cellulose, permitting a comparative analysis of the content of various purine isopliths in DNA of different origin. In the case of the analysis of methylated DNA, the method permits a comparison of the substrate specificity of various enzymes of methylation of the adenine residues in DNA. In conjunction with enzymatic treatment of labeled methylated isopliths, the method permits determination of the methylatable sequence and in a number of cases an ascertainment of the recognition site for adenine-specific methylase as a whole. The proposed method was used to establish the fact that the methylase Ssol recognizes the sequence 5'...G-A-A-T-T-C...3' and methylates the adenine residue closest to its 5'-end

  13. The dual action of poly(ADP-ribose polymerase -1 (PARP-1 inhibition in HIV-1 infection: HIV-1 LTR inhibition and diminution in Rho GTPase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slava eRom

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The transcription of HIV-1 (HIV is regulated by complex mechanisms involving various cellular factors and virus-encoded transactivators. Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1 inhibition has emerged recently as a potent anti-inflammatory tool, since PARP-1 is involved in the regulation of some genes through its interaction with various transcription factors. We propose a novel approach to diminish HIV replication via PARP-1 inhibition using human primary monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM as an in vitro model system. PARP-1 inhibitors were able to reduce HIV replication in MDM by 60-80% after 7 days infection. Long Terminal Repeat (LTR acts as a switch in virus replication and can be triggered by several agents such as: Tat, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα, and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA. Overexpression of Tat in MDM transfected with an LTR reporter plasmid led to a 4.2-fold increase in LTR activation; PARP inhibition resulted in 70% reduction of LTR activity. LTR activity, which increased 3-fold after PMA or TNFα treatment, was reduced by PARP inhibition (by 85-95%. MDM treated with PARP inhibitors showed 90% reduction in NFκB activity (known to mediate PMA- and TNFα-induced HIV LTR activation. Cytoskeleton rearrangements are important in effective HIV-1 infection. PARP inactivation reduced actin cytoskeleton rearrangements by affecting Rho GTPase machinery. These findings suggest that HIV replication in MDM could be suppressed by PARP inhibition via NFκB suppression, diminution of LTR activation and its effects on the cytoskeleton. PARP appears to be essential for HIV replication and its inhibition may provide a potent approach to treatment of HIV infection.

  14. Pattern recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Theodoridis, Sergios

    2003-01-01

    Pattern recognition is a scientific discipline that is becoming increasingly important in the age of automation and information handling and retrieval. Patter Recognition, 2e covers the entire spectrum of pattern recognition applications, from image analysis to speech recognition and communications. This book presents cutting-edge material on neural networks, - a set of linked microprocessors that can form associations and uses pattern recognition to ""learn"" -and enhances student motivation by approaching pattern recognition from the designer's point of view. A direct result of more than 10

  15. A new activity of anti-HIV and anti-tumor protein GAP31: DNA adenosine glycosidase - Structural and modeling insight into its functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hui-Guang [Department of Biochemistry, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Huang, Philip L. [American Biosciences, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Zhang, Dawei; Sun, Yongtao [Department of Biochemistry, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Chen, Hao-Chia [Endocrinology and Reproduction Research Branch, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Zhang, John [Department of Chemistry, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Huang, Paul L. [Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Kong, Xiang-Peng, E-mail: xiangpeng.kong@med.nyu.edu [Department of Biochemistry, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Lee-Huang, Sylvia, E-mail: sylvia.lee-huang@med.nyu.edu [Department of Biochemistry, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 (United States)

    2010-01-01

    We report here the high-resolution atomic structures of GAP31 crystallized in the presence of HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotides systematically designed to examine the adenosine glycosidase activity of this anti-HIV and anti-tumor plant protein. Structural analysis and molecular modeling lead to several novel findings. First, adenine is bound at the active site in the crystal structures of GAP31 to HIV-LTR duplex DNA with 5' overhanging adenosine ends, such as the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA but not to DNA duplex with blunt ends. Second, the active site pocket of GAP31 is ideally suited to accommodate the 5' overhanging adenosine of the 3'-processed HIV-LTR DNA and the active site residues are positioned to perform the adenosine glycosidase activity. Third, GAP31 also removes the 5'-end adenine from single-stranded HIV-LTR DNA oligonucleotide as well as any exposed adenosine, including that of single nucleotide dAMP but not from AMP. Fourth, GAP31 does not de-purinate guanosine from di-nucleotide GT. These results suggest that GAP31 has DNA adenosine glycosidase activity against accessible adenosine. This activity is distinct from the generally known RNA N-glycosidase activity toward the 28S rRNA. It may be an alternative function that contributes to the antiviral and anti-tumor activities of GAP31. These results provide molecular insights consistent with the anti-HIV mechanisms of GAP31 in its inhibition on the integration of viral DNA into the host genome by HIV-integrase as well as irreversible topological relaxation of the supercoiled viral DNA.

  16. Nucleotide Excision Repair Lesion-Recognition Protein Rad4 Captures a Pre-Flipped Partner Base in a Benzo[a]pyrene-Derived DNA Lesion: How Structure Impacts the Binding Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Hong; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Min, Jung-Hyun; Zhang, Yingkai; Broyde, Suse

    2017-06-19

    The xeroderma pigmentosum C protein complex (XPC) recognizes a variety of environmentally induced DNA lesions and is the key in initiating their repair by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. When bound to a lesion, XPC flips two nucleotide pairs that include the lesion out of the DNA duplex, yielding a productively bound complex that can lead to successful lesion excision. Interestingly, the efficiencies of NER vary greatly among different lesions, influencing their toxicity and mutagenicity in cells. Though differences in XPC binding may influence NER efficiency, it is not understood whether XPC utilizes different mechanisms to achieve productive binding with different lesions. Here, we investigated the well-repaired 10R-(+)-cis-anti-benzo[a]pyrene-N 2 -dG (cis-B[a]P-dG) DNA adduct in a duplex containing normal partner C opposite the lesion. This adduct is derived from the environmental pro-carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene and is likely to be encountered by NER in the cell. We have extensively investigated its binding to the yeast XPC orthologue, Rad4, using umbrella sampling with restrained molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations. The NMR solution structure of this lesion in duplex DNA has shown that the dC complementary to the adducted dG is flipped out of the DNA duplex in the absence of XPC. However, it is not known whether the "pre-flipped" base would play a role in its recognition by XPC. Our results show that Rad4 first captures the displaced dC, which is followed by a tightly coupled lesion-extruding pathway for productive binding. This binding path differs significantly from the one deduced for the small cis-syn cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer lesion opposite mismatched thymines [ Mu , H. , ( 2015 ) Biochemistry , 54 ( 34 ), 5263 - 7 ]. The possibility of multiple paths that lead to productive binding to XPC is consistent with the versatile lesion recognition by XPC that is required for successful NER.

  17. A specific insertion of a solo-LTR characterizes the Y-chromosome of Bryonia dioica (Cucurbitaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Ryan K; Silber, Martina V; Renner, Susanne S

    2010-06-14

    Relatively few species of flowering plants are dioecious and even fewer are known to have sex chromosomes. Current theory posits that homomorphic sex chromosomes, such as found in Bryonia dioica (Cucurbitaceae), offer insight into the early stages in the evolution of sex chromosomes from autosomes. Little is known about these early steps, but an accumulation of transposable element sequences has been observed on the Y-chromosomes of some species with heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Recombination, by which transposable elements are removed, is suppressed on at least part of the emerging Y-chromosome, and this may explain the correlation between the emergence of sex chromosomes and transposable element enrichment. We sequenced 2321 bp of the Y-chromosome in Bryonia dioica that flank a male-linked marker, BdY1, reported previously. Within this region, which should be suppressed for recombination, we observed a solo-LTR nested in a Copia-like transposable element. We also found other, presumably paralogous, solo-LTRs in a consensus sequence of the underlying Copia-like transposable element. Given that solo-LTRs arise via recombination events, it is noteworthy that we find one in a genomic region where recombination should be suppressed. Although the solo-LTR could have arisen before recombination was suppressed, creating the male-linked marker BdY1, our previous study on B. dioica suggested that BdY1 may not lie in the recombination-suppressed region of the Y-chromosome in all populations. Presence of a solo-LTR near BdY1 therefore fits with the observed correlation between retrotransposon accumulation and the suppression of recombination early in the evolution of sex chromosomes. These findings further suggest that the homomorphic sex chromosomes of B. dioica, the first organism for which genetic XY sex-determination was inferred, are evolutionarily young and offer reference information for comparative studies of other plant sex chromosomes.

  18. Cloning and heterologous expression of a hydrophobin gene Ltr.hyd from the tiger milk mushroom Lentinus tuber-regium in yeast-like cells of Tremella fuciformis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongmei Liu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hydrophobins are small proteins secreted by filamentous fungi, which show a highly surface activity. Because of the signally self-assembling abilities and surface activities, hydrophobins were considered as candidates in many aspects, for example, stabilizing foams and emulsions in food products. Lentinus tuber-regium, known as tiger milk mushroom, is both an edible and medicinal sclerotium-producing mushroom. Up to now, the hydrophobins of L. tuber-regium have not been identified. Results: In this paper, a Class I hydrophobin gene, Ltr.hyd, was cloned from L. tuber-regium and expressed in the yeast-like cells of Tremella fuciformis mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The expression vector pGEH-GH was under the control of T. fuciformis glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (gpd promoter. The integration of Ltr.hyd into the genome of T. fuciformis was confirmed by PCR, Southern blot, fluorescence observation and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE demonstrated that recombinant hydrophobin rLtr.HYD with an expected molecular mass of 13 kDa was extracted. The yield of rLtr.HYD was 0.66 mg/g dry weight. The emulsifying activity of rLtr.HYD was better than the typical food emulsifiers sodium caseinate and Tween 20. Conclusions: We evaluated the emulsifying property of hydrophobin Ltr.HYD, which can be potentially used as a food emulsifier. Keywords: Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Emulsifier, Expression vector, Filamentous fungi, Gel electrophoresis, Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, Heterogenous expression, Hydrophobin, Quantitative real-time PCR, Southern blot, Surface activity

  19. Unexpected Modulation of Recall B and T Cell Responses after Immunization with Rotavirus-like Particles in the Presence of LT-R192G

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Basset

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available LT-R192G, a mutant of the thermolabile enterotoxin of E. coli, is a potent adjuvant of immunization. Immune responses are generally analyzed at the end of protocols including at least 2 administrations, but rarely after a prime. To investigate this point, we compared B and T cell responses in mice after one and two intrarectal immunizations with 2/6 rotavirus-like particles (2/6-VLP and LT-R192G. After a boost, we found, an unexpected lower B cell expansion measured by flow cytometry, despite a secondary antibody response. We then analyzed CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs and CD4+CD25+Foxp3− helper T cells after in vitro (restimulation of mesenteric lymph node cells with the antigen (2/6-VLP, the adjuvant (LT-R192G or both. 2/6-VLP did not activate CD4+CD25+Foxp3− nor Foxp3+ T cells from non-immunized and 2/6-VLP immunized mice, whereas they did activate both subsets from mice immunized with 2/6-VLP in the presence of adjuvant. LT-R192G dramatically decreased CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells from non-immunized and 2/6-VLP immunized mice but not from mice immunized with 2/6-VLP and adjuvant. Moreover, in this case, LT-R192G increased Foxp3 expression on CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cells, suggesting specific Treg activation during the recall. Finally, when both 2/6-VLP and LT-R192G were used for restimulation, LT-R192G clearly suppressed both 2/6-VLP-specific CD4+CD25+Foxp3− and Foxp3+ T cells. All together, these results suggest that LT-R192G exerts different effects on CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells, depending on a first or a second contact. The unexpected immunomodulation observed during the recall should be considered in designing vaccination protocols.

  20. Selection of reliable reference genes for gene expression studies in Trichoderma afroharzianum LTR-2 under oxalic acid stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Yuping; Wu, Xiaoqing; Ren, He; Zhou, Fangyuan; Zhou, Hongzi; Zhang, Xinjian; Yang, Hetong

    2017-10-01

    An appropriate reference gene is required to get reliable results from gene expression analysis by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). In order to identify stable and reliable reference genes in Trichoderma afroharzianum under oxalic acid (OA) stress, six commonly used housekeeping genes, i.e., elongation factor 1, ubiquitin, ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, α-tubulin, actin, from the effective biocontrol isolate T. afroharzianum strain LTR-2 were tested for their expression during growth in liquid culture amended with OA. Four in silico programs (comparative ΔCt, NormFinder, geNorm and BestKeeper) were used to evaluate the expression stabilities of six candidate reference genes. The elongation factor 1 gene EF-1 was identified as the most stably expressed reference gene, and was used as the normalizer to quantify the expression level of the oxalate decarboxylase coding gene OXDC in T. afroharzianum strain LTR-2 under OA stress. The result showed that the expression of OXDC was significantly up-regulated as expected. This study provides an effective method to quantify expression changes of target genes in T. afroharzianum under OA stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Speech Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Morariu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method of speech recognition by pattern recognition techniques. Learning consists in determining the unique characteristics of a word (cepstral coefficients by eliminating those characteristics that are different from one word to another. For learning and recognition, the system will build a dictionary of words by determining the characteristics of each word to be used in the recognition. Determining the characteristics of an audio signal consists in the following steps: noise removal, sampling it, applying Hamming window, switching to frequency domain through Fourier transform, calculating the magnitude spectrum, filtering data, determining cepstral coefficients.

  2. Type I-E CRISPR-cas systems discriminate target from non-target DNA through base pairing-independent PAM recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, E.R.; Semenova, E.; Datsenko, K.A.; Jackson, R.N.; Wiedenheft, B.; Severinov, K.; Brouns, S.J.J.

    2013-01-01

    Discriminating self and non-self is a universal requirement of immune systems. Adaptive immune systems in prokaryotes are centered around repetitive loci called CRISPRs (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat), into which invader DNA fragments are incorporated. CRISPR transcripts

  3. The DNA-recognition mode shared by archaeal feast/famine-regulatory proteins revealed by the DNA-binding specificities of TvFL3, FL10, FL11 and Ss-LrpB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Katsushi; Nogami, Hideki; Kabasawa, Mamiko; Ebihara, Sonomi; Shimowasa, Ai; Hashimoto, Keiko; Kawashima, Tsuyoshi; Ishijima, Sanae A.; Suzuki, Masashi

    2009-01-01

    The DNA-binding mode of archaeal feast/famine-regulatory proteins (FFRPs), i.e. paralogs of the Esherichia coli leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp), was studied. Using the method of systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), optimal DNA duplexes for interacting with TvFL3, FL10, FL11 and Ss-LrpB were identified as TACGA[AAT/ATT]TCGTA, GTTCGA[AAT/ATT]TCGAAC, CCGAAA[AAT/ATT]TTTCGG and TTGCAA[AAT/ATT]TTGCAA, respectively, all fitting into the form abcdeWWWedcba. Here W is A or T, and e.g. a and a are bases complementary to each other. Apparent equilibrium binding constants of the FFRPs and various DNA duplexes were determined, thereby confirming the DNA-binding specificities of the FFRPs. It is likely that these FFRPs recognize DNA in essentially the same way, since their DNA-binding specificities were all explained by the same pattern of relationship between amino-acid positions and base positions to form chemical interactions. As predicted from this relationship, when Gly36 of TvFL3 was replaced by Thr, the b base in the optimal DNA duplex changed from A to T, and, when Thr36 of FL10 was replaced by Ser, the b base changed from T to G/A. DNA-binding characteristics of other archaeal FFRPs, Ptr1, Ptr2, Ss-Lrp and LysM, are also consistent with the relationship. PMID:19468044

  4. The application of strand invasion phenomenon, directed by peptide nucleic acid (PNA) and single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) for the recognition of specific sequences of human endogenous retroviral HERV-W family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machnik, Grzegorz; Bułdak, Łukasz; Ruczyński, Jarosław; Gąsior, Tomasz; Huzarska, Małgorzata; Belowski, Dariusz; Alenowicz, Magdalena; Mucha, Piotr; Rekowski, Piotr; Okopień, Bogusław

    2017-05-01

    The HERV-W family of human endogenous retroviruses represents a group of numerous sequences that show close similarity in genetic composition. It has been documented that some members of HERV-W-derived expression products are supposed to play significant role in humans' pathology, such as multiple sclerosis or schizophrenia. Other members of the family are necessary to orchestrate physiological processes (eg, ERVWE1 coding syncytin-1 that is engaged in syncytiotrophoblast formation). Therefore, an assay that would allow the recognition of particular form of HERV-W members is highly desirable. A peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-mediated technique for the discrimination between multiple sclerosis-associated retrovirus and ERVWE1 sequence has been developed. The assay uses a PNA probe that, being fully complementary to the ERVWE1 but not to multiple sclerosis-associated retrovirus (MSRV) template, shows high selective potential. Single-stranded DNA binding protein facilitates the PNA-mediated, sequence-specific formation of strand invasion complex and, consequently, local DNA unwinding. The target DNA may be then excluded from further analysis in any downstream process such as single-stranded DNA-specific exonuclease action. Finally, the reaction conditions have been optimized, and several PNA probes that are targeted toward distinct loci along whole HERV-W env sequences have been evaluated. We believe that PNA/single-stranded DNA binding protein-based application has the potential to selectively discriminate particular HERV-W molecules as they are at least suspected to play pathogenic role in a broad range of medical conditions, from psycho-neurologic disorders (multiple sclerosis and schizophrenia) and cancers (breast cancer) to that of an auto-immunologic background (psoriasis and lupus erythematosus). Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. GABBR1 has a HERV-W LTR in its regulatory region – a possible implication for schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hegyi Hedi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Schizophrenia is a complex disease with uncertain aetiology. We suggest GABBR1, GABA receptor B1 implicated in schizophrenia based on a HERV-W LTR in the regulatory region of GABBR1. Our hypothesis is supported by: (i GABBR1 is in the 6p22 genomic region most often implicated in schizophrenia; (ii microarray studies found that only presynaptic pathway-related genes, including GABA receptors, have altered expression in schizophrenic patients and (iii it explains how HERV-W elements, expressed in schizophrenia, play a role in the disease: by altering the expression of GABBR1 via a long terminal repeat that is also a regulatory element to GABBR1. Reviewers This paper was reviewed by Sandor Pongor and Martijn Huynen.

  6. Human serum albumin supported lipid patterns for the targeted recognition of microspheres coated by membrane based on ss-DNA hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiaoming; He Qiang; Cui Yue; Duan Li; Li Junbai

    2006-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) patterns have been successfully fabricated for the deposition of lipid bilayer, 1,2-dimyristoyl-sglycerophosphate (DMPA), by making use of the micro-contact printing (μCP) technique and liposome fusion. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) results indicate that lipid bilayer has been assembled in HSA patterns with a good stability. Such well-defined lipid patterns formed on HSA surface create possibility to incorporate specific components like channels or receptors for specific recognition. In view of this, microspheres coated with lipid membranes were immobilized in HSA-supported lipid patterns via the hybridization of complementary ss-DNAs. This procedure enables to transfer solid materials to a soft surface through a specific recognition

  7. Mutations in the Lactococcus lactis Ll.LtrB group II intron that retain mobility in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Souza Lisa M

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Group II introns are mobile genetic elements that form conserved secondary and tertiary structures. In order to determine which of the conserved structural elements are required for mobility, a series of domain and sub-domain deletions were made in the Lactococcus lactis group II intron (Ll.LtrB and tested for mobility in a genetic assay. Point mutations in domains V and VI were also tested. Results The largest deletion that could be made without severely compromising mobility was 158 nucleotides in DIVb(1–2. This mutant had a mobility frequency comparable to the wild-type Ll.LtrB intron (ΔORF construct. Hence, all subsequent mutations were done in this mutant background. Deletion of DIIb reduced mobility to approximately 18% of wild-type, while another deletion in domain II (nts 404–459 was mobile to a minor extent. Only two deletions in DI and none in DIII were tolerated. Some mobility was also observed for a DIVa deletion mutant. Of the three point mutants at position G3 in DV, only G3A retained mobility. In DVI, deletion of the branch-point nucleotide abolished mobility, but the presence of any nucleotide at the branch-point position restored mobility to some extent. Conclusions The smallest intron capable of efficient retrohoming was 725 nucleotides, comprising the DIVb(1–2 and DII(iia,b deletions. The tertiary elements found to be nonessential for mobility were alpha, kappa and eta. In DV, only the G3A mutant was mobile. A branch-point residue is required for intron mobility.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations shed light on the enthalpic and entropic driving forces that govern the sequence specific recognition between netropsin and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenc, Jozica; Gerster, Sarah; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2010-09-02

    With the aim to gain a better understanding of the various driving forces that govern sequence specific DNA minor groove binding, we performed a thermodynamic analysis of netropsin binding to an AT-containing and to a set of six mixed AT/GC-containing binding sequences in the DNA minor groove. The relative binding free energies obtained using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations show significant variations with the binding sequence. While the introduction of a GC base pair in the middle or close to the middle of the binding site is unfavorable for netropsin binding, a GC base pair at the end of the binding site appears to have no negative influence on the binding. The results of the structural and energetic analyses of the netropsin-DNA complexes reveal that the differences in the calculated binding affinities cannot be explained solely in terms of netropsin-DNA hydrogen-bonding or interaction energies. In addition, solvation effects and entropic contributions to the relative binding free energy provide a more complete picture of the various factors determining binding. Analysis of the relative binding entropy indicates that its magnitude is highly sequence-dependent, with the ratio |TDeltaDeltaS|/|DeltaDeltaH| ranging from 0.07 for the AAAGA to 1.7 for the AAGAG binding sequence, respectively.

  9. Dynamic DNA binding, junction recognition and G4 melting activity underlie the telomeric and genome-wide roles of human CST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Anukana; Wang, Yongyao; Diao, Jiajie; Price, Carolyn M

    2017-12-01

    Human CST (CTC1-STN1-TEN1) is a ssDNA-binding complex that helps resolve replication problems both at telomeres and genome-wide. CST resembles Replication Protein A (RPA) in that the two complexes harbor comparable arrays of OB-folds and have structurally similar small subunits. However, the overall architecture and functions of CST and RPA are distinct. Currently, the mechanism underlying CST action at diverse replication issues remains unclear. To clarify CST mechanism, we examined the capacity of CST to bind and resolve DNA structures found at sites of CST activity. We show that CST binds preferentially to ss-dsDNA junctions, an activity that can explain the incremental nature of telomeric C-strand synthesis following telomerase action. We also show that CST unfolds G-quadruplex structures, thus providing a mechanism for CST to facilitate replication through telomeres and other GC-rich regions. Finally, smFRET analysis indicates that CST binding to ssDNA is dynamic with CST complexes undergoing concentration-dependent self-displacement. These findings support an RPA-based model where dissociation and re-association of individual OB-folds allow CST to mediate loading and unloading of partner proteins to facilitate various aspects of telomere replication and genome-wide resolution of replication stress. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Quadruplex-forming sequences occupy discrete regions inside plant LTR retrotransposons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lexa, M.; Kejnovský, Eduard; Šteflová, Pavlína; Konvalinová, H.; Vorlíčková, Michaela; Vyskot, Boris

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 2 (2014), s. 968-978 ISSN 0305-1048 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/12/0466; GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/10/0930; GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/10/0102; GA ČR(CZ) GA522/09/0083; GA ČR GPP501/10/P483 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : INTRAMOLECULAR DNA QUADRUPLEXES * VIRUS TYPE-1 RNA * CIRCULAR-DICHROISM Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 9.112, year: 2014

  11. Mutations of amino acids in the DNA-recognition domain of Epstein-Barr virus ZEBRA protein alter its sub-nuclear localization and affect formation of replication compartments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Richard; Heston, Lee; Shedd, Duane; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Miller, George

    2008-01-01

    ZEBRA, a transcription factor and DNA replication protein encoded by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BZLF1 gene, plays indispensable roles in the EBV lytic cycle. We recently described the phenotypes of 46 single amino acid substitutions introduced into the DNA-recognition region of ZEBRA [Heston, L., El-Guindy, A., Countryman, J., Dela Cruz, C., Delecluse, H.J., and Miller, G. 2006]. The 27 DNA-binding-proficient mutants exhibited distinct defects in their ability to activate expression of the kinetic classes of viral genes. Four phenotypic variants could be discerned: wild-type, defective at activating Rta, defective at activating early genes, and defective at activating late genes. Here we analyze the distribution of ZEBRA within the nucleus and the localization of EA-D (the viral DNA polymerase processivity factor), an indicator of the development of replication compartments, in representatives of each phenotypic group. Plasmids encoding wild-type (WT) and mutant ZEBRA were transfected into 293 cells containing EBV-bacmids. WT ZEBRA protein was diffusely and smoothly distributed throughout the nucleus, sparing nucleoli, and partially recruited to globular replication compartments. EA-D induced by WT ZEBRA was present diffusely in some cells and concentrated in globular replication compartments in other cells. The distribution of ZEBRA and EA-D proteins was identical to WT following transfection of K188R, a mutant with a conservative change. The distribution of S186A mutant ZEBRA protein, defective for activation of Rta and EA-D, was identical to WT, except that the mutant ZEBRA was never found in globular compartments. Co-expression of Rta with S186A mutant rescued diffuse EA-D but not globular replication compartments. The most striking observation was that several mutant ZEBRA proteins defective in activating EA-D (R179A, K181A and A185V) and defective in activating lytic viral DNA replication and late genes (Y180E and K188A) were localized to numerous punctate

  12. Bipartite recognition of DNA by TCF/Pangolin is remarkably flexible and contributes to transcriptional responsiveness and tissue specificity of wingless signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary C Archbold

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The T-cell factor (TCF family of transcription factors are major mediators of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in metazoans. All TCFs contain a High Mobility Group (HMG domain that possesses specific DNA binding activity. In addition, many TCFs contain a second DNA binding domain, the C-clamp, which binds to DNA motifs referred to as Helper sites. While HMG and Helper sites are both important for the activation of several Wnt dependent cis-regulatory modules (W-CRMs, the rules of what constitutes a functional HMG-Helper site pair are unknown. In this report, we employed a combination of in vitro binding, reporter gene analysis and bioinformatics to address this question, using the Drosophila family member TCF/Pangolin (TCF/Pan as a model. We found that while there were constraints for the orientation and spacing of HMG-Helper pairs, the presence of a Helper site near a HMG site in any orientation increased binding and transcriptional response, with some orientations displaying tissue-specific patterns. We found that altering an HMG-Helper site pair from a sub-optimal to optimal orientation/spacing dramatically increased the responsiveness of a W-CRM in several fly tissues. In addition, we used the knowledge gained to bioinformatically identify two novel W-CRMs, one that was activated by Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the prothoracic gland, a tissue not previously connected to this pathway. In sum, this work extends the importance of Helper sites in fly W-CRMs and suggests that the type of HMG-Helper pair is a major factor in setting the threshold for Wnt activation and tissue-responsiveness.

  13. Potent Inhibition of HhaI DNA Methylase by the Aglycon of 2-(1H)-Pyrimidinone Riboside (Zebularine) at the GCGC Recognition Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Márquez, Víctor E.; Kelley, James A.; Eritja Casadellà, Ramón; Vanbemmel, Dana; Christman, Judith K.

    2003-01-01

    A short oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) with 2-(1H)-pyrimidinone at the HhaI DNA methyltransferase target site (GCGC) is shown to induce a level of inhibition of methyl transfer and thermal stability of the complex with the enzyme identical to that achieved with a similar ODN substituted with 5-azacytosine. The drugs responsible for these effects - zebularine and 5-azacytidine/2′-deoxy-5-azacytidine - are contrasted in terms of chemical stability and possible metabolic activation by a brief struct...

  14. Recognition of hypoxyloid and xylarioid Entonaema species and allied Xylaria species from a comparison of holomorphic morphology, HPLC profiles, andribosomal DNA sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stadler, M.; Fournier, J.; Læssøe, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    pallidum is thus regarded as a later synonym of E. mesentericum. Therefore, the latter name is transferred to Xylaria. A key to entonaemoid Xylariaceae is provided. Colour reactions (NH3, KOH) of the ectostroma were applied to a limited number of Xylaria spp., but metabolite profiles of cultures appear......The genus Entonaema comprises Xylariaceae with hollow, gelatinous stromata that accumulate liquid. Some of its species, including the type species, appear related to Daldinia from a polyphasic approach, comprising morphological studies, comparisons of ribosomal DNA sequences, and high performance...

  15. Histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity of p300 modulates human T lymphotropic virus type 1 p30II-mediated repression of LTR transcriptional activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael, Bindhu; Nair, Amrithraj M.; Datta, Antara; Hiraragi, Hajime; Ratner, Lee; Lairmore, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is a deltaretrovirus that causes adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma, and is implicated in a variety of lymphocyte-mediated inflammatory disorders. HTLV-1 provirus has regulatory and accessory genes in four pX open reading frames. HTLV-1 pX ORF-II encodes two proteins, p13 II and p30 II , which are incompletely defined in virus replication or pathogenesis. We have demonstrated that pX ORF-II mutations block virus replication in vivo and that ORF-II encoded p30 II , a nuclear-localizing protein that binds with CREB-binding protein (CBP)/p300, represses CREB and Tax responsive element (TRE)-mediated transcription. Herein, we have identified p30 II motifs important for p300 binding and in regulating TRE-mediated transcription in the absence and presence of HTLV-1 provirus. Within amino acids 100-179 of p30 II , a region important for repression of LTR-mediated transcription, we identified a single lysine residue at amino acid 106 (K3) that significantly modulates the ability of p30 II to repress TRE-mediated transcription. Exogenous p300, in a dose-responsive manner, reverses p30 II -dependent repression of TRE-mediated transcription, in the absence or presence of the provirus, In contrast to wild type p300, p300 HAT mutants (defective in histone acetyltransferase activity) only partially rescued p30 II -mediated LTR repression. Deacetylation by histone deacetylase-1 (HDAC-1) enhanced p30 II -mediated LTR repression, while inhibition of deacetylation by trichostatin A decreases p30 II -mediated LTR repression. Collectively, our data indicate that HTLV-1 p30 II modulates viral gene expression in a cooperative manner with p300-mediated acetylation

  16. LQG/LTR [linear quadratic Gaussian with loop transfer recovery] robust control system design for a low-pressure feedwater heater train

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, G.V.; Bailey, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper uses the linear quadratic Gaussian with loop transfer recovery (LQG/LTR) control system design method to obtain a level control system for a low-pressure feedwater heater train. The control system performance and stability robustness are evaluated for a given set of system design specifications. The tools for analysis are the return ratio, return difference, and inverse return difference singular-valve plots for a loop break at the plant output. 3 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  17. DNA in a Tunnel: A Comfy Spot for Recognition - or -The Structure of BsoBI Complexed with DNA. What can we Learn about Function via Structure Determination and how can this be Applied to Bone or Muscle Biology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanderWoerd, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The structure and function of a biologically active molecule are related. To understand its function, it is necessary (but not always sufficient) to know the structure of the molecule. There are many ways of relating the molecular function with the structure. Mutation analysis can identify pertinent amino acids of an enzyme, or alternatively structure comparison of the of two similar molecules with different function may lead to understanding which parts are responsible for a functional aspect, or a series of "structural cartoons" - enzyme structure, enzyme plus substrate, enzyme with transition state analog, and enzyme with product - may give insight in the function of a molecule. As an example we will discuss the structure and function of the restriction enzyme BsoBI from Bacillus stearothemzophilus in complex with its cognate DNA. The enzyme forms a unique complex with DNA in that it completely encircles the DNA. The structure reveals the enzyme-DNA contacts, how the DNA is distorted compared with the canonical forms, and elegantly shows how two distinct DNA sequences can be recognized with the same efficiency. Based on the structure we may also propose a hypothesis how the enzymatic mechanism works. The knowledge gained thru studies such as this one can be used to alter the function by changing the molecular structure. Usually this is done by design of inhibitors specifically active against and fitting into an active site of the enzyme of choice. In the case of BsoBI one of the objectives of the study was to alter the enzyme specificity. In bone biology there are many candidates available for molecular study in order to explain, alter, or (temporarily) suspend activity. For example, the understanding of a pathway that negatively regulates bone formation may be a good target for drug design to stimulate bone formation and have good potential as the basis for new countermeasures against bone loss. In principle the same approach may aid muscle atrophy, radiation

  18. Biosensors for DNA sequence detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercoutere, Wenonah; Akeson, Mark

    2002-01-01

    DNA biosensors are being developed as alternatives to conventional DNA microarrays. These devices couple signal transduction directly to sequence recognition. Some of the most sensitive and functional technologies use fibre optics or electrochemical sensors in combination with DNA hybridization. In a shift from sequence recognition by hybridization, two emerging single-molecule techniques read sequence composition using zero-mode waveguides or electrical impedance in nanoscale pores.

  19. Intracellular high mobility group B1 protein (HMGB1) represses HIV-1 LTR-directed transcription in a promoter- and cell-specific manner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naghavi, Mojgan H.; Nowak, Piotr; Andersson, Jan; Soennerborg, Anders; Yang Huan; Tracey, Kevin J.; Vahlne, Anders

    2003-01-01

    We investigated whether the high mobility group B 1 (HMGB1), an abundant nuclear protein in all mammalian cells, affects HIV-1 transcription. Intracellular expression of human HMGB1 repressed HIV-1 gene expression in epithelial cells. This inhibitory effect of HMGB1 was caused by repression of long terminal repeat (LTR)-mediated transcription. Other viral promoters/enhancers, including simian virus 40 or cytomegalovirus, were not inhibited by HMGB1. In addition, HMGB1 inhibition of HIV-1 subtype C expression was dependent on the number of NFκB sites in the LTR region. The inhibitory effect of HMGB1 on viral gene expression observed in HeLa cells was confirmed by an upregulation of viral replication in the presence of antisense HMGB1 in monocytic cells. In contrast to what was found in HeLa cells and monocytic cells, endogenous HMGB1 expression did not affect HIV-1 replication in unstimulated Jurkat cells. Thus, intracellular HMGB1 affects HIV-1 LTR-directed transcription in a promoter- and cell-specific manner

  20. Hybridogenesis and a potential case of R2 non-LTR retrotransposon horizontal transmission in Bacillus stick insects (Insecta Phasmida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavariello, Claudia; Luchetti, Andrea; Martoni, Francesco; Bonandin, Livia; Mantovani, Barbara

    2017-02-06

    Horizontal transfer (HT) is an event in which the genetic material is transferred from one species to another, even if distantly related, and it has been demonstrated as a possible essential part of the lifecycle of transposable elements (TEs). However, previous studies on the non-LTR R2 retrotransposon, a metazoan-wide distributed element, indicated its vertical transmission since the Radiata-Bilateria split. Here we present the first possible instances of R2 HT in stick insects of the genus Bacillus (Phasmida). Six R2 elements were characterized in the strictly bisexual subspecies B. grandii grandii, B. grandii benazzii and B. grandii maretimi and in the obligatory parthenogenetic taxon B. atticus. These elements were compared with those previously retrieved in the facultative parthenogenetic species B. rossius. Phylogenetic inconsistencies between element and host taxa, and age versus divergence analyses agree and support at least two HT events. These HT events can be explained by taking into consideration the complex Bacillus reproductive biology, which includes also hybridogenesis, gynogenesis and androgenesis. Through these non-canonical reproductive modes, R2 elements may have been transferred between Bacillus genomes. Our data suggest, therefore, a possible role of hybridization for TEs survival and the consequent reshaping of involved genomes.

  1. Speaker Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Lasse Lohilahti; Jørgensen, Kasper Winther

    2005-01-01

    Speaker recognition is basically divided into speaker identification and speaker verification. Verification is the task of automatically determining if a person really is the person he or she claims to be. This technology can be used as a biometric feature for verifying the identity of a person...

  2. “One Ring to Bind Them All”—Part I: The Efficiency of the Macrocyclic Scaffold for G-Quadruplex DNA Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Monchaud

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrocyclic scaffolds are particularly attractive for designing selective G-quadruplex ligands essentially because, on one hand, they show a poor affinity for the “standard” B-DNA conformation and, on the other hand, they fit nicely with the external G-quartets of quadruplexes. Stimulated by the pioneering studies on the cationic porphyrin TMPyP4 and the natural product telomestatin, follow-up studies have developed, rapidly leading to a large diversity of macrocyclic structures with remarkable-quadruplex binding properties and biological activities. In this review we summarize the current state of the art in detailing the three main categories of quadruplex-binding macrocycles described so far (telomestatin-like polyheteroarenes, porphyrins and derivatives, polyammonium cyclophanes, and in addressing both synthetic issues and biological aspects.

  3. Human macrophages support persistent transcription from unintegrated HIV-1 DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, Jeremy; Beddall, Margaret H.; Yu Dongyang; Iyer, Subashini R.; Marsh, Jon W.; Wu Yuntao

    2008-01-01

    Retroviruses require integration of their RNA genomes for both stability and productive viral replication. In HIV infection of non-dividing, resting CD4 T cells, where integration is greatly impeded, the reverse transcribed HIV DNA has limited biological activity and a short half-life. In metabolically active and proliferating T cells, unintegrated DNA rapidly diminishes with cell division. HIV also infects the non-dividing but metabolically active macrophage population. In an in vitro examination of HIV infection of macrophages, we find that unintegrated viral DNA not only has an unusual stability, but also maintains biological activity. The unintegrated linear DNA, 1-LTR, and 2-LTR circles are stable for at least 30 days. Additionally, there is persistent viral gene transcription, which is selective and skewed towards viral early genes such as nef and tat with highly diminished rev and vif. One viral early gene product Nef was measurably synthesized. We also find that independent of integration, the HIV infection process in macrophages leads to generation of numerous chemokines

  4. HPV18 Persistence Impairs Basal and DNA Ligand-Mediated IFN-β and IFN-λ1 Production through Transcriptional Repression of Multiple Downstream Effectors of Pattern Recognition Receptor Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertini, Silvia; Lo Cigno, Irene; Calati, Federica; De Andrea, Marco; Borgogna, Cinzia; Dell'Oste, Valentina; Landolfo, Santo; Gariglio, Marisa

    2018-03-15

    Although it is clear that high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) can selectively infect keratinocytes and persist in the host, it still remains to be unequivocally determined whether they can escape antiviral innate immunity by interfering with pattern recognition receptor (PRR) signaling. In this study, we have assessed the innate immune response in monolayer and organotypic raft cultures of NIKS cells harboring multiple copies of episomal HPV18 (NIKSmcHPV18), which fully recapitulates the persistent state of infection. We show for the first time, to our knowledge, that NIKSmcHPV18, as well as HeLa cells (a cervical carcinoma-derived cell line harboring integrated HPV18 DNA), display marked downregulation of several PRRs, as well as other PRR downstream effectors, such as the adaptor protein stimulator of IFN genes and the transcription factors IRF1 and 7. Importantly, we provide evidence that downregulation of stimulator of IFN genes, cyclic GMP-AMP synthase, and retinoic acid-inducible gene I mRNA levels occurs at the transcriptional level through a novel epigenetic silencing mechanism, as documented by the accumulation of repressive heterochromatin markers seen at the promoter region of these genes. Furthermore, stimulation of NIKSmcHPV18 cells with salmon sperm DNA or poly(deoxyadenylic-deoxythymidylic) acid, two potent inducers of PRR signaling, only partially restored PRR protein expression. Accordingly, the production of IFN-β and IFN-λ 1 was significantly reduced in comparison with the parental NIKS cells, indicating that HPV18 exerts its immunosuppressive activity through downregulation of PRR signaling. Altogether, our findings indicate that high-risk human papillomaviruses have evolved broad-spectrum mechanisms that allow simultaneous depletion of multiple effectors of the innate immunity network, thereby creating an unreactive cellular milieu suitable for viral persistence. Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  5. A DNA-Encoded Library of Chemical Compounds Based on Common Scaffolding Structures Reveals the Impact of Ligand Geometry on Protein Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favalli, Nicholas; Biendl, Stefan; Hartmann, Marco; Piazzi, Jacopo; Sladojevich, Filippo; Gräslund, Susanne; Brown, Peter J; Näreoja, Katja; Schüler, Herwig; Scheuermann, Jörg; Franzini, Raphael; Neri, Dario

    2018-06-01

    A DNA-encoded chemical library (DECL) with 1.2 million compounds was synthesized by combinatorial reaction of seven central scaffolds with two sets of 343×492 building blocks. Library screening by affinity capture revealed that for some target proteins, the chemical nature of building blocks dominated the selection results, whereas for other proteins, the central scaffold also crucially contributed to ligand affinity. Molecules based on a 3,5-bis(aminomethyl)benzoic acid core structure were found to bind human serum albumin with a K d value of 6 nm, while compounds with the same substituents on an equidistant but flexible l-lysine scaffold showed 140-fold lower affinity. A 18 nm tankyrase-1 binder featured l-lysine as linking moiety, while molecules based on d-Lysine or (2S,4S)-amino-l-proline showed no detectable binding to the target. This work suggests that central scaffolds which predispose the orientation of chemical building blocks toward the protein target may enhance the screening productivity of encoded libraries. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Biochip microsystem for bioinformatics recognition and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lue, Jaw-Chyng (Inventor); Fang, Wai-Chi (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A system with applications in pattern recognition, or classification, of DNA assay samples. Because DNA reference and sample material in wells of an assay may be caused to fluoresce depending upon dye added to the material, the resulting light may be imaged onto an embodiment comprising an array of photodetectors and an adaptive neural network, with applications to DNA analysis. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  7. Application of biomolecular recognition via magnetic nanoparticle in nanobiotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wei-Zheng; Cetinel, Sibel; Montemagno, Carlo

    2018-05-01

    The marriage of biomolecular recognition and magnetic nanoparticle creates tremendous opportunities in the development of advanced technology both in academic research and in industrial sectors. In this paper, we review current progress on the magnetic nanoparticle-biomolecule hybrid systems, particularly employing the recognition pairs of DNA-DNA, DNA-protein, protein-protein, and protein-inorganics in several nanobiotechnology application areas, including molecular biology, diagnostics, medical treatment, industrial biocatalysts, and environmental separations.

  8. Ex vivo response to histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors of the HIV long terminal repeat (LTR derived from HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao K Lu

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi can induce human immunodeficiency virus (HIV transcription from the HIV long terminal repeat (LTR. However, ex vivo and in vivo responses to HDACi are variable and the activity of HDACi in cells other than T-cells have not been well characterised. Here, we developed a novel assay to determine the activity of HDACi on patient-derived HIV LTRs in different cell types. HIV LTRs from integrated virus were amplified using triple-nested Alu-PCR from total memory CD4+ T-cells (CD45RO+ isolated from HIV-infected patients prior to and following suppressive antiretroviral therapy. NL4-3 or patient-derived HIV LTRs were cloned into the chromatin forming episomal vector pCEP4, and the effect of HDACi investigated in the astrocyte and epithelial cell lines SVG and HeLa, respectively. There were no significant differences in the sequence of the HIV LTRs isolated from CD4+ T-cells prior to and after 18 months of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART. We found that in both cell lines, the HDACi panobinostat, trichostatin A, vorinostat and entinostat activated patient-derived HIV LTRs to similar levels seen with NL4-3 and all patient derived isolates had similar sensitivity to maximum HDACi stimulation. We observed a marked difference in the maximum fold induction of luciferase by HDACi in HeLa and SVG, suggesting that the effect of HDACi may be influenced by the cellular environment. Finally, we observed significant synergy in activation of the LTR with vorinostat and the viral protein Tat. Together, our results suggest that the LTR sequence of integrated virus is not a major determinant of a functional response to an HDACi.

  9. Alterations of ultraviolet irradiated DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davila, C.; Garces, F.

    1980-01-01

    Thymine dimers production has been studied in several DNA- 3 H irradiated at various wave lenght of U.V. Light. The influence of dimers on the hydrodynamic and optic properties, thermal structural stability and transformant capacity of DNA have been studied too. At last the recognition and excision of dimers by the DNA-UV-Endonuclease and DNA-Polimerase-I was also studied. (author)

  10. Rotavirus 2/6 Viruslike Particles Administered Intranasally with Cholera Toxin, Escherichia coli Heat-Labile Toxin (LT), and LT-R192G Induce Protection from Rotavirus Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    O’Neal, Christine M.; Clements, John D.; Estes, Mary K.; Conner, Margaret E.

    1998-01-01

    We have shown that rotavirus 2/6 viruslike particles composed of proteins VP2 and VP6 (2/6-VLPs) administered to mice intranasally with cholera toxin (CT) induced protection from rotavirus challenge, as measured by virus shedding. Since it is unclear if CT will be approved for human use, we evaluated the adjuvanticity of Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin (LT) and LT-R192G. Mice were inoculated intranasally with 10 μg of 2/6-VLPs combined with CT, LT, or LT-R192G. All three adjuvants induced ...

  11. Deletion of the LTR enhancer/promoter has no impact on the integration profile of MLV vectors in human hematopoietic progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna Moiani

    Full Text Available Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV-derived gamma-retroviral vectors integrate preferentially near transcriptional regulatory regions in the human genome, and are associated with a significant risk of insertional gene deregulation. Self-inactivating (SIN vectors carry a deletion of the U3 enhancer and promoter in the long terminal repeat (LTR, and show reduced genotoxicity in pre-clinical assays. We report a high-definition analysis of the integration preferences of a SIN MLV vector compared to a wild-type-LTR MLV vector in the genome of CD34(+ human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs. We sequenced 13,011 unique SIN-MLV integration sites and compared them to 32,574 previously generated MLV sites in human HSPCs. The SIN-MLV vector recapitulates the integration pattern observed for MLV, with the characteristic clustering of integrations around enhancer and promoter regions associated to H3K4me3 and H3K4me1 histone modifications, specialized chromatin configurations (presence of the H2A.Z histone variant and binding of RNA Pol II. SIN-MLV and MLV integration clusters and hot spots overlap in most cases and are generated at a comparable frequency, indicating that the reduced genotoxicity of SIN-MLV vectors in hematopoietic cells is not due to a modified integration profile.

  12. DNA pattern recognition using canonical correlation algorithm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-09-28

    Sep 28, 2015 ... were considered as the two views, and statistically significant relationships were established between these two ... Canonical correlation analysis is to find two sets of basis ..... Jing XY, Li S, Lan C, Zhang D, Yang JY and Liu Q 2011 Color ... Yu S, Yu K, Tresp V and Kriegel HP 2006 Multi-output regularized.

  13. Pattern Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Procházka

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Multimodal signal analysis based on sophisticated sensors, efficient communicationsystems and fast parallel processing methods has a rapidly increasing range of multidisciplinaryapplications. The present paper is devoted to pattern recognition, machine learning, and the analysisof sleep stages in the detection of sleep disorders using polysomnography (PSG data, includingelectroencephalography (EEG, breathing (Flow, and electro-oculogram (EOG signals. The proposedmethod is based on the classification of selected features by a neural network system with sigmoidaland softmax transfer functions using Bayesian methods for the evaluation of the probabilities of theseparate classes. The application is devoted to the analysis of the sleep stages of 184 individualswith different diagnoses, using EEG and further PSG signals. Data analysis points to an averageincrease of the length of the Wake stage by 2.7% per 10 years and a decrease of the length of theRapid Eye Movement (REM stages by 0.8% per 10 years. The mean classification accuracy for givensets of records and single EEG and multimodal features is 88.7% ( standard deviation, STD: 2.1 and89.6% (STD:1.9, respectively. The proposed methods enable the use of adaptive learning processesfor the detection and classification of health disorders based on prior specialist experience andman–machine interaction.

  14. Ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair......ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair...

  15. LOCAL TEXTURE DESCRIPTION FRAMEWORK FOR TEXTURE BASED FACE RECOGNITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Reena Rose

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Texture descriptors have an important role in recognizing face images. However, almost all the existing local texture descriptors use nearest neighbors to encode a texture pattern around a pixel. But in face images, most of the pixels have similar characteristics with that of its nearest neighbors because the skin covers large area in a face and the skin tone at neighboring regions are same. Therefore this paper presents a general framework called Local Texture Description Framework that uses only eight pixels which are at certain distance apart either circular or elliptical from the referenced pixel. Local texture description can be done using the foundation of any existing local texture descriptors. In this paper, the performance of the proposed framework is verified with three existing local texture descriptors Local Binary Pattern (LBP, Local Texture Pattern (LTP and Local Tetra Patterns (LTrPs for the five issues viz. facial expression, partial occlusion, illumination variation, pose variation and general recognition. Five benchmark databases JAFFE, Essex, Indian faces, AT&T and Georgia Tech are used for the experiments. Experimental results demonstrate that even with less number of patterns, the proposed framework could achieve higher recognition accuracy than that of their base models.

  16. Rotavirus 2/6 Viruslike Particles Administered Intranasally with Cholera Toxin, Escherichia coli Heat-Labile Toxin (LT), and LT-R192G Induce Protection from Rotavirus Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Neal, Christine M.; Clements, John D.; Estes, Mary K.; Conner, Margaret E.

    1998-01-01

    We have shown that rotavirus 2/6 viruslike particles composed of proteins VP2 and VP6 (2/6-VLPs) administered to mice intranasally with cholera toxin (CT) induced protection from rotavirus challenge, as measured by virus shedding. Since it is unclear if CT will be approved for human use, we evaluated the adjuvanticity of Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin (LT) and LT-R192G. Mice were inoculated intranasally with 10 μg of 2/6-VLPs combined with CT, LT, or LT-R192G. All three adjuvants induced equivalent geometric mean titers of rotavirus-specific serum antibody and intestinal immunoglobulin G (IgG). Mice inoculated with 2/6-VLPs with LT produced significantly higher titers of intestinal IgA than mice given CT as the adjuvant. All mice inoculated with 2/6-VLPs mixed with LT and LT-R192G were totally protected (100%) from rotavirus challenge, while mice inoculated with 2/6-VLPs mixed with CT showed a mean 91% protection from challenge. The availability of a safe, effective mucosal adjuvant such as LT-R192G will increase the practicality of administering recombinant vaccines mucosally. PMID:9525668

  17. DNA nanotechnology and fluorescence applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichthaerle, Thomas; Strauss, Maximilian T; Schueder, Florian; Woehrstein, Johannes B; Jungmann, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    Structural DNA nanotechnology allow researchers to use the unique molecular recognition properties of DNA strands to construct nanoscale objects with almost arbitrary complexity in two and three dimensions. Abstracted as molecular breadboards, DNA nanostructures enable nanometer-precise placement of guest molecules such as proteins, fluorophores, or nanoparticles. These assemblies can be used to study biological phenomena with unprecedented control over number, spacing, and molecular identity. Here, we give a general introduction to structural DNA nanotechnology and more specifically discuss applications of DNA nanostructures in the field of fluorescence and plasmonics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Repetitive DNA and Plant Domestication: Variation in Copy Number and Proximity to Genes of LTR-Retrotransposons among Wild and Cultivated Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) Genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascagni, Flavia; Barghini, Elena; Giordani, Tommaso; Rieseberg, Loren H; Cavallini, Andrea; Natali, Lucia

    2015-11-24

    The sunflower (Helianthus annuus) genome contains a very large proportion of transposable elements, especially long terminal repeat retrotransposons. However, knowledge on the retrotransposon-related variability within this species is still limited. We used next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to perform a quantitative and qualitative survey of intraspecific variation of the retrotransposon fraction of the genome across 15 genotypes--7 wild accessions and 8 cultivars--of H. annuus. By mapping the Illumina reads of the 15 genotypes onto a library of sunflower long terminal repeat retrotransposons, we observed considerable variability in redundancy among genotypes, at both superfamily and family levels. In another analysis, we mapped Illumina paired reads to two sets of sequences, that is, long terminal repeat retrotransposons and protein-encoding sequences, and evaluated the extent of retrotransposon proximity to genes in the sunflower genome by counting the number of paired reads in which one read mapped to a retrotransposon and the other to a gene. Large variability among genotypes was also ascertained for retrotransposon proximity to genes. Both long terminal repeat retrotransposon redundancy and proximity to genes varied among retrotransposon families and also between cultivated and wild genotypes. Such differences are discussed in relation to the possible role of long terminal repeat retrotransposons in the domestication of sunflower. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  19. Face Detection and Recognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jain, Anil K

    2004-01-01

    This report describes research efforts towards developing algorithms for a robust face recognition system to overcome many of the limitations found in existing two-dimensional facial recognition systems...

  20. Graphical symbol recognition

    OpenAIRE

    K.C. , Santosh; Wendling , Laurent

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The chapter focuses on one of the key issues in document image processing i.e., graphical symbol recognition. Graphical symbol recognition is a sub-field of a larger research domain: pattern recognition. The chapter covers several approaches (i.e., statistical, structural and syntactic) and specially designed symbol recognition techniques inspired by real-world industrial problems. It, in general, contains research problems, state-of-the-art methods that convey basic s...

  1. DNA-Destabilizing Agents as an Alternative Approach for Targeting DNA: Mechanisms of Action and Cellular Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëlle Lenglet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA targeting drugs represent a large proportion of the actual anticancer drug pharmacopeia, both in terms of drug brands and prescription volumes. Small DNA-interacting molecules share the ability of certain proteins to change the DNA helix's overall organization and geometrical orientation via tilt, roll, twist, slip, and flip effects. In this ocean of DNA-interacting compounds, most stabilize both DNA strands and very few display helix-destabilizing properties. These types of DNA-destabilizing effect are observed with certain mono- or bis-intercalators and DNA alkylating agents (some of which have been or are being developed as cancer drugs. The formation of locally destabilized DNA portions could interfere with protein/DNA recognition and potentially affect several crucial cellular processes, such as DNA repair, replication, and transcription. The present paper describes the molecular basis of DNA destabilization, the cellular impact on protein recognition, and DNA repair processes and the latter's relationships with antitumour efficacy.

  2. Synergy of Two Highly Specific Biomolecular Recognition Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejlersen, Maria; Christensen, Niels Johan; Sørensen, Kasper K

    2018-01-01

    Two highly specific biomolecular recognition events, nucleic acid duplex hybridization and DNA-peptide recognition in the minor groove, were coalesced in a miniature ensemble for the first time by covalently attaching a natural AT-hook peptide motif to nucleic acid duplexes via a 2'-amino......-LNA scaffold. A combination of molecular dynamics simulations and ultraviolet thermal denaturation studies revealed high sequence-specific affinity of the peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates (POCs) when binding to complementary DNA strands, leveraging the bioinformation encrypted in the minor groove of DNA...

  3. Recognition and Toleration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2010-01-01

    Recognition and toleration are ways of relating to the diversity characteristic of multicultural societies. The article concerns the possible meanings of toleration and recognition, and the conflict that is often claimed to exist between these two approaches to diversity. Different forms...... or interpretations of recognition and toleration are considered, confusing and problematic uses of the terms are noted, and the compatibility of toleration and recognition is discussed. The article argues that there is a range of legitimate and importantly different conceptions of both toleration and recognition...

  4. 8 CFR 1292.2 - Organizations qualified for recognition; requests for recognition; withdrawal of recognition...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...; requests for recognition; withdrawal of recognition; accreditation of representatives; roster. 1292.2...; requests for recognition; withdrawal of recognition; accreditation of representatives; roster. (a) Qualifications of organizations. A non-profit religious, charitable, social service, or similar organization...

  5. DNA nanotechnology-enabled biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Jie; Zhu, Dan; Zhang, Yinan; Wang, Lianhui; Fan, Chunhai

    2016-02-15

    Biosensors employ biological molecules to recognize the target and utilize output elements which can translate the biorecognition event into electrical, optical or mass-sensitive signals to determine the quantities of the target. DNA-based biosensors, as a sub-field to biosensor, utilize DNA strands with short oligonucleotides as probes for target recognition. Although DNA-based biosensors have offered a promising alternative for fast, simple and cheap detection of target molecules, there still exist key challenges including poor stability and reproducibility that hinder their competition with the current gold standard for DNA assays. By exploiting the self-recognition properties of DNA molecules, researchers have dedicated to make versatile DNA nanostructures in a highly rigid, controllable and functionalized manner, which offers unprecedented opportunities for developing DNA-based biosensors. In this review, we will briefly introduce the recent advances on design and fabrication of static and dynamic DNA nanostructures, and summarize their applications for fabrication and functionalization of DNA-based biosensors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Studying DNA Looping by Single-Molecule FRET

    OpenAIRE

    Le, Tung T.; Kim, Harold D.

    2014-01-01

    Bending of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) is associated with many important biological processes such as DNA-protein recognition and DNA packaging into nucleosomes. Thermodynamics of dsDNA bending has been studied by a method called cyclization which relies on DNA ligase to covalently join short sticky ends of a dsDNA. However, ligation efficiency can be affected by many factors that are not related to dsDNA looping such as the DNA structure surrounding the joined sticky ends, and ligase can als...

  7. 3D DNA Crystals and Nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J. Paukstelis

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available DNA’s molecular recognition properties have made it one of the most widely used biomacromolecular construction materials. The programmed assembly of DNA oligonucleotides has been used to create complex 2D and 3D self-assembled architectures and to guide the assembly of other molecules. The origins of DNA nanotechnology are rooted in the goal of assembling DNA molecules into designed periodic arrays, i.e., crystals. Here, we highlight several DNA crystal structures, the progress made in designing DNA crystals, and look at the current prospects and future directions of DNA crystals in nanotechnology.

  8. Optical Pattern Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Francis T. S.; Jutamulia, Suganda

    2008-10-01

    Contributors; Preface; 1. Pattern recognition with optics Francis T. S. Yu and Don A. Gregory; 2. Hybrid neural networks for nonlinear pattern recognition Taiwei Lu; 3. Wavelets, optics, and pattern recognition Yao Li and Yunglong Sheng; 4. Applications of the fractional Fourier transform to optical pattern recognition David Mendlovic, Zeev Zalesky and Haldum M. Oxaktas; 5. Optical implementation of mathematical morphology Tien-Hsin Chao; 6. Nonlinear optical correlators with improved discrimination capability for object location and recognition Leonid P. Yaroslavsky; 7. Distortion-invariant quadratic filters Gregory Gheen; 8. Composite filter synthesis as applied to pattern recognition Shizhou Yin and Guowen Lu; 9. Iterative procedures in electro-optical pattern recognition Joseph Shamir; 10. Optoelectronic hybrid system for three-dimensional object pattern recognition Guoguang Mu, Mingzhe Lu and Ying Sun; 11. Applications of photrefractive devices in optical pattern recognition Ziangyang Yang; 12. Optical pattern recognition with microlasers Eung-Gi Paek; 13. Optical properties and applications of bacteriorhodopsin Q. Wang Song and Yu-He Zhang; 14. Liquid-crystal spatial light modulators Aris Tanone and Suganda Jutamulia; 15. Representations of fully complex functions on real-time spatial light modulators Robert W. Cohn and Laurence G. Hassbrook; Index.

  9. Linking maternal and somatic 5S rRNA types with different sequence-specific non-LTR retrotransposons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locati, Mauro D; Pagano, Johanna F B; Ensink, Wim A; van Olst, Marina; van Leeuwen, Selina; Nehrdich, Ulrike; Zhu, Kongju; Spaink, Herman P; Girard, Geneviève; Rauwerda, Han; Jonker, Martijs J; Dekker, Rob J; Breit, Timo M

    2017-04-01

    5S rRNA is a ribosomal core component, transcribed from many gene copies organized in genomic repeats. Some eukaryotic species have two 5S rRNA types defined by their predominant expression in oogenesis or adult tissue. Our next-generation sequencing study on zebrafish egg, embryo, and adult tissue identified maternal-type 5S rRNA that is exclusively accumulated during oogenesis, replaced throughout the embryogenesis by a somatic-type, and thus virtually absent in adult somatic tissue. The maternal-type 5S rDNA contains several thousands of gene copies on chromosome 4 in tandem repeats with small intergenic regions, whereas the somatic-type is present in only 12 gene copies on chromosome 18 with large intergenic regions. The nine-nucleotide variation between the two 5S rRNA types likely affects TFIII binding and riboprotein L5 binding, probably leading to storage of maternal-type rRNA. Remarkably, these sequence differences are located exactly at the sequence-specific target site for genome integration by the 5S rRNA-specific Mutsu retrotransposon family. Thus, we could define maternal- and somatic-type MutsuDr subfamilies. Furthermore, we identified four additional maternal-type and two new somatic-type MutsuDr subfamilies, each with their own target sequence. This target-site specificity, frequently intact maternal-type retrotransposon elements, plus specific presence of Mutsu retrotransposon RNA and piRNA in egg and adult tissue, suggest an involvement of retrotransposons in achieving the differential copy number of the two types of 5S rDNA loci. © 2017 Locati et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  10. Pattern recognition & machine learning

    CERN Document Server

    Anzai, Y

    1992-01-01

    This is the first text to provide a unified and self-contained introduction to visual pattern recognition and machine learning. It is useful as a general introduction to artifical intelligence and knowledge engineering, and no previous knowledge of pattern recognition or machine learning is necessary. Basic for various pattern recognition and machine learning methods. Translated from Japanese, the book also features chapter exercises, keywords, and summaries.

  11. DNA cytosine methylation in the bovine leukemia virus promoter is associated with latency in a lymphoma-derived B-cell line: potential involvement of direct inhibition of cAMP-responsive element (CRE)-binding protein/CRE modulator/activation transcription factor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierard, Valérie; Guiguen, Allan; Colin, Laurence; Wijmeersch, Gaëlle; Vanhulle, Caroline; Van Driessche, Benoît; Dekoninck, Ann; Blazkova, Jana; Cardona, Christelle; Merimi, Makram; Vierendeel, Valérie; Calomme, Claire; Nguyên, Thi Liên-Anh; Nuttinck, Michèle; Twizere, Jean-Claude; Kettmann, Richard; Portetelle, Daniel; Burny, Arsène; Hirsch, Ivan; Rohr, Olivier; Van Lint, Carine

    2010-06-18

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) proviral latency represents a viral strategy to escape the host immune system and allow tumor development. Besides the previously demonstrated role of histone deacetylation in the epigenetic repression of BLV expression, we showed here that BLV promoter activity was induced by several DNA methylation inhibitors (such as 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine) and that overexpressed DNMT1 and DNMT3A, but not DNMT3B, down-regulated BLV promoter activity. Importantly, cytosine hypermethylation in the 5'-long terminal repeat (LTR) U3 and R regions was associated with true latency in the lymphoma-derived B-cell line L267 but not with defective latency in YR2 cells. Moreover, the virus-encoded transactivator Tax(BLV) decreased DNA methyltransferase expression levels, which could explain the lower level of cytosine methylation observed in the L267(LTaxSN) 5'-LTR compared with the L267 5'-LTR. Interestingly, DNA methylation inhibitors and Tax(BLV) synergistically activated BLV promoter transcriptional activity in a cAMP-responsive element (CRE)-dependent manner. Mechanistically, methylation at the -154 or -129 CpG position (relative to the transcription start site) impaired in vitro binding of CRE-binding protein (CREB) transcription factors to their respective CRE sites. Methylation at -129 CpG alone was sufficient to decrease BLV promoter-driven reporter gene expression by 2-fold. We demonstrated in vivo the recruitment of CREB/CRE modulator (CREM) and to a lesser extent activating transcription factor-1 (ATF-1) to the hypomethylated CRE region of the YR2 5'-LTR, whereas we detected no CREB/CREM/ATF recruitment to the hypermethylated corresponding region in the L267 cells. Altogether, these findings suggest that site-specific DNA methylation of the BLV promoter represses viral transcription by directly inhibiting transcription factor binding, thereby contributing to true proviral latency.

  12. DNA-tension dependence of restriction enzyme activity reveals mechanochemical properties of the reaction pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, B.; Noom, M.C.; Wuite, G.J.L.

    2005-01-01

    Type II restriction endonucleases protect bacteria against phage infections by cleaving recognition sites on foreign double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with extraordinary specificity. This capability arises primarily from large conformational changes in enzyme and/or DNA upon target sequence recognition.

  13. Statistical Pattern Recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Andrew R

    2011-01-01

    Statistical pattern recognition relates to the use of statistical techniques for analysing data measurements in order to extract information and make justified decisions.  It is a very active area of study and research, which has seen many advances in recent years. Applications such as data mining, web searching, multimedia data retrieval, face recognition, and cursive handwriting recognition, all require robust and efficient pattern recognition techniques. This third edition provides an introduction to statistical pattern theory and techniques, with material drawn from a wide range of fields,

  14. DNA Topology and the Initiation of Virus DNA Packaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choon Seok Oh

    Full Text Available During progeny assembly, viruses selectively package virion genomes from a nucleic acid pool that includes host nucleic acids. For large dsDNA viruses, including tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses, immature viral DNA is recognized and translocated into a preformed icosahedral shell, the prohead. Recognition involves specific interactions between the viral packaging enzyme, terminase, and viral DNA recognition sites. Generally, viral DNA is recognized by terminase's small subunit (TerS. The large terminase subunit (TerL contains translocation ATPase and endonuclease domains. In phage lambda, TerS binds a sequence repeated three times in cosB, the recognition site. TerS binding to cosB positions TerL to cut the concatemeric DNA at the adjacent nicking site, cosN. TerL introduces staggered nicks in cosN, generating twelve bp cohesive ends. Terminase separates the cohesive ends and remains bound to the cosB-containing end, in a nucleoprotein structure called Complex I. Complex I docks on the prohead's portal vertex and translocation ensues. DNA topology plays a role in the TerSλ-cosBλ interaction. Here we show that a site, I2, located between cosN and cosB, is critically important for an early DNA packaging step. I2 contains a complex static bend. I2 mutations block DNA packaging. I2 mutant DNA is cut by terminase at cosN in vitro, but in vivo, no cos cleavage is detected, nor is there evidence for Complex I. Models for what packaging step might be blocked by I2 mutations are presented.

  15. Paradigms in object recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutihac, R.; Mutihac, R.C.

    1999-09-01

    A broad range of approaches has been proposed and applied for the complex and rather difficult task of object recognition that involves the determination of object characteristics and object classification into one of many a priori object types. Our paper revises briefly the three main different paradigms in pattern recognition, namely Bayesian statistics, neural networks, and expert systems. (author)

  16. Infant Visual Recognition Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Susan A.; Feldman, Judith F.; Jankowski, Jeffery J.

    2004-01-01

    Visual recognition memory is a robust form of memory that is evident from early infancy, shows pronounced developmental change, and is influenced by many of the same factors that affect adult memory; it is surprisingly resistant to decay and interference. Infant visual recognition memory shows (a) modest reliability, (b) good discriminant…

  17. Recognition and Toleration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2010-01-01

    Recognition and toleration are ways of relating to the diversity characteristic of multicultural societies. The article concerns the possible meanings of toleration and recognition, and the conflict that is often claimed to exist between these two approaches to diversity. Different forms or inter...

  18. Challenging ocular image recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauca, V. Paúl; Forkin, Michael; Xu, Xiao; Plemmons, Robert; Ross, Arun A.

    2011-06-01

    Ocular recognition is a new area of biometric investigation targeted at overcoming the limitations of iris recognition performance in the presence of non-ideal data. There are several advantages for increasing the area beyond the iris, yet there are also key issues that must be addressed such as size of the ocular region, factors affecting performance, and appropriate corpora to study these factors in isolation. In this paper, we explore and identify some of these issues with the goal of better defining parameters for ocular recognition. An empirical study is performed where iris recognition methods are contrasted with texture and point operators on existing iris and face datasets. The experimental results show a dramatic recognition performance gain when additional features are considered in the presence of poor quality iris data, offering strong evidence for extending interest beyond the iris. The experiments also highlight the need for the direct collection of additional ocular imagery.

  19. iPBS: a universal method for DNA fingerprinting and retrotransposon isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalendar, Ruslan; Antonius, Kristiina; Smýkal, Petr; Schulman, Alan H

    2010-11-01

    Molecular markers are essential in plant and animal breeding and biodiversity applications, in human forensics, and for map-based cloning of genes. The long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons are well suited as molecular markers. As dispersed and ubiquitous transposable elements, their "copy and paste" life cycle of replicative transposition leads to new genome insertions without excision of the original element. Both the overall structure of retrotransposons and the domains responsible for the various phases of their replication are highly conserved in all eukaryotes. Nevertheless, up to a year has been required to develop a retrotransposon marker system in a new species, involving cloning and sequencing steps as well as the development of custom primers. Here, we describe a novel PCR-based method useful both as a marker system in its own right and for the rapid isolation of retrotransposon termini and full-length elements, making it ideal for "orphan crops" and other species with underdeveloped marker systems. The method, iPBS amplification, is based on the virtually universal presence of a tRNA complement as a reverse transcriptase primer binding site (PBS) in LTR retrotransposons. The method differs from earlier retrotransposon isolation methods because it is applicable not only to endogenous retroviruses and retroviruses, but also to both Gypsy and Copia LTR retrotransposons, as well as to non-autonomous LARD and TRIM elements, throughout the plant kingdom and to animals. Furthermore, the inter-PBS amplification technique as such has proved to be a powerful DNA fingerprinting technology without the need for prior sequence knowledge.

  20. NF90 una proteína celular que se une a RNAds inhibe la transactivación del LTR del HIV-1 mediada por TAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Urcuqui Inchima

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available

    La transactivación del LTR de HIV-1 requiere la interacción de la proteína Tat ( trans-activation transcription con la estructura TAR ( trans-activation response, que se encuentra localizada en el extremo 5’ de todos los transcriptos virales. La interacción de la proteína Tat con TAR forma un precomplejo transcripcional indispensable para la eficiente transcripción del genoma viral.
    La interacción de diferentes factores celulares (cdk9 y ciclina T, entre otros con el precomplejo Tat-TAR, constituye un complejo estable que facilita la fosforilación de la subunidad mayor de la RNA polimerasa II, asegurando una eficiente elongación de los transcriptos virales. No se han descripto proteínas capaces de regular negativamente la función de Tat con resultados nefastos para la replicación viral. También se ha descrito otro tipo de proteínas celulares con capacidad de interactuar con TAR. El ejemplo mejor caracterizado es la proteína-kinasa dependiente de RNA (PKR, se autofosforila y mediante fosforilación del factor eIF2, inhibe la síntesis de proteínas. Con el presente trabajo se
    pretendió aislar y caracterizar otras proteínas celulares capaces de interactuar con la estructura TAR y estudiar su efecto en la función de Tat.

     

  1. Improved understanding of protein complex offers insight into DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summer Science Writing Internship Improved understanding of protein complex offers insight into DNA clearer understanding of the origin recognition complex (ORC) - a protein complex that directs DNA replication - through its crystal structure offers new insight into fundamental mechanisms of DNA replication

  2. 8 CFR 292.2 - Organizations qualified for recognition; requests for recognition; withdrawal of recognition...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...; requests for recognition; withdrawal of recognition; accreditation of representatives; roster. 292.2...; withdrawal of recognition; accreditation of representatives; roster. (a) Qualifications of organizations. A non-profit religious, charitable, social service, or similar organization established in the United...

  3. Cadmium(Cd)-induced oxidative stress down-regulates the gene expression of DNA mismatch recognition proteins MutS homolog 2 (MSH2) and MSH6 in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Todd, E-mail: toddhsu@mail.ntou.edu.tw [Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology and Center of Excellence for Marine Bioenvironment and Biotechnology, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung 20224, Taiwan (China); Huang, Kuan-Ming; Tsai, Huei-Ting; Sung, Shih-Tsung; Ho, Tsung-Nan [Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology and Center of Excellence for Marine Bioenvironment and Biotechnology, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung 20224, Taiwan (China)

    2013-01-15

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) of simple base mismatches and small insertion-deletion loops in eukaryotes is initiated by the binding of the MutS homolog 2 (MSH2)-MSH6 heterodimer to mismatched DNA. Cadmium (Cd) is a genotoxic heavy metal that has been recognized as a human carcinogen. Oxidant stress and inhibition of DNA repair have been proposed as major factors underlying Cd genotoxicity. Our previous studies indicated the ability of Cd to disturb the gene expression of MSH6 in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. This study was undertaken to explore if Cd-induced oxidative stress down-regulated MSH gene activities. Following the exposure of zebrafish embryos at 1 h post fertilization (hpf) to sublethal concentrations of Cd at 3-5 {mu}M for 4 or 9 h, a parallel down-regulation of MSH2, MSH6 and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD) gene expression was detected by real-time RT-PCR and the expression levels were 40-50% of control after a 9-h exposure. Cd exposure also induced oxidative stress, yet no inhibition of catalase gene activity was observed. Whole mount in situ hybridization revealed a wide distribution of msh6 mRNA in the head regions of 10 hpf embryos and pretreatment of embryos with antioxidants butylhydroxytoluene (BHT), D-mannitol or N-acetylcysteine (NAC) at 1-10 {mu}M restored Cd-suppressed msh6 expression. QPCR confirmed the protective effects of antioxidants on Cd-suppressed msh2/msh6 mRNA production. Down-regulated MSH gene activities reaching about 50% of control were also induced in embryos exposed to paraquat, a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generating herbicide, or hydrogen peroxide at 200 {mu}M. Hence, Cd at sublethal levels down-regulates msh2/msh6 expression primarily via ROS as signaling molecules. The transcriptional activation of human msh6 is known to be fully dependent on the specificity factor 1 (Sp1). Cd failed to inhibit the DNA binding activity of zebrafish Sp1 unless at lethal concentrations based on band shift assay, therefore

  4. Harmonization versus Mutual Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jan Guldager; Schröder, Philipp

    The present paper examines trade liberalization driven by the coordination of product standards. For oligopolistic firms situated in separate markets that are initially sheltered by national standards, mutual recognition of standards implies entry and reduced profits at home paired with the oppor......The present paper examines trade liberalization driven by the coordination of product standards. For oligopolistic firms situated in separate markets that are initially sheltered by national standards, mutual recognition of standards implies entry and reduced profits at home paired...... countries and three firms, where firms first lobby for the policy coordination regime (harmonization versus mutual recognition), and subsequently, in case of harmonization, the global standard is auctioned among the firms. We discuss welfare effects and conclude with policy implications. In particular......, harmonized standards may fail to harvest the full pro-competitive effects from trade liberalization compared to mutual recognition; moreover, the issue is most pronounced in markets featuring price competition....

  5. CASE Recognition Awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currents, 1985

    1985-01-01

    A total of 294 schools, colleges, and universities received prizes in this year's CASE Recognition program. Awards were given in: public relations programs, student recruitment, marketing, program pulications, news writing, fund raising, radio programming, school periodicals, etc. (MLW)

  6. Forensic speaker recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuwly, Didier

    2013-01-01

    The aim of forensic speaker recognition is to establish links between individuals and criminal activities, through audio speech recordings. This field is multidisciplinary, combining predominantly phonetics, linguistics, speech signal processing, and forensic statistics. On these bases, expert-based

  7. The Recognition Of Fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsass, Peter; Jensen, Bodil; Mørup, Rikke

    2007-01-01

    Elsass P., Jensen B., Morup R., Thogersen M.H. (2007). The Recognition Of Fatigue: A qualitative study of life-stories from rehabilitation clients. International Journal of Psychosocial Rehabilitation. 11 (2), 75-87......Elsass P., Jensen B., Morup R., Thogersen M.H. (2007). The Recognition Of Fatigue: A qualitative study of life-stories from rehabilitation clients. International Journal of Psychosocial Rehabilitation. 11 (2), 75-87...

  8. Evaluating music emotion recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturm, Bob L.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental problem with nearly all work in music genre recognition (MGR)is that evaluation lacks validity with respect to the principal goals of MGR. This problem also occurs in the evaluation of music emotion recognition (MER). Standard approaches to evaluation, though easy to implement, do...... not reliably differentiate between recognizing genre or emotion from music, or by virtue of confounding factors in signals (e.g., equalization). We demonstrate such problems for evaluating an MER system, and conclude with recommendations....

  9. Why recognition is rational

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clintin P. Davis-Stober

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The Recognition Heuristic (Gigerenzer and Goldstein, 1996; Goldstein and Gigerenzer, 2002 makes the counter-intuitive prediction that a decision maker utilizing less information may do as well as, or outperform, an idealized decision maker utilizing more information. We lay a theoretical foundation for the use of single-variable heuristics such as the Recognition Heuristic as an optimal decision strategy within a linear modeling framework. We identify conditions under which over-weighting a single predictor is a mini-max strategy among a class of a priori chosen weights based on decision heuristics with respect to a measure of statistical lack of fit we call ``risk''. These strategies, in turn, outperform standard multiple regression as long as the amount of data available is limited. We also show that, under related conditions, weighting only one variable and ignoring all others produces the same risk as ignoring the single variable and weighting all others. This approach has the advantage of generalizing beyond the original environment of the Recognition Heuristic to situations with more than two choice options, binary or continuous representations of recognition, and to other single variable heuristics. We analyze the structure of data used in some prior recognition tasks and find that it matches the sufficient conditions for optimality in our results. Rather than being a poor or adequate substitute for a compensatory model, the Recognition Heuristic closely approximates an optimal strategy when a decision maker has finite data about the world.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of DNA-free and DNA-bound TAL effectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Wan

    Full Text Available TAL (transcriptional activator-like effectors (TALEs are DNA-binding proteins, containing a modular central domain that recognizes specific DNA sequences. Recently, the crystallographic studies of TALEs revealed the structure of DNA-recognition domain. In this article, molecular dynamics (MD simulations are employed to study two crystal structures of an 11.5-repeat TALE, in the presence and absence of DNA, respectively. The simulated results indicate that the specific binding of RVDs (repeat-variable diresidues with DNA leads to the markedly reduced fluctuations of tandem repeats, especially at the two ends. In the DNA-bound TALE system, the base-specific interaction is formed mainly by the residue at position 13 within a TAL repeat. Tandem repeats with weak RVDs are unfavorable for the TALE-DNA binding. These observations are consistent with experimental studies. By using principal component analysis (PCA, the dominant motions are open-close movements between the two ends of the superhelical structure in both DNA-free and DNA-bound TALE systems. The open-close movements are found to be critical for the recognition and binding of TALE-DNA based on the analysis of free energy landscape (FEL. The conformational analysis of DNA indicates that the 5' end of DNA target sequence has more remarkable structural deformability than the other sites. Meanwhile, the conformational change of DNA is likely associated with the specific interaction of TALE-DNA. We further suggest that the arrangement of N-terminal repeats with strong RVDs may help in the design of efficient TALEs. This study provides some new insights into the understanding of the TALE-DNA recognition mechanism.

  11. Page Recognition: Quantum Leap In Recognition Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Larry

    1989-07-01

    No milestone has proven as elusive as the always-approaching "year of the LAN," but the "year of the scanner" might claim the silver medal. Desktop scanners have been around almost as long as personal computers. And everyone thinks they are used for obvious desktop-publishing and business tasks like scanning business documents, magazine articles and other pages, and translating those words into files your computer understands. But, until now, the reality fell far short of the promise. Because it's true that scanners deliver an accurate image of the page to your computer, but the software to recognize this text has been woefully disappointing. Old optical-character recognition (OCR) software recognized such a limited range of pages as to be virtually useless to real users. (For example, one OCR vendor specified 12-point Courier font from an IBM Selectric typewriter: the same font in 10-point, or from a Diablo printer, was unrecognizable!) Computer dealers have told me the chasm between OCR expectations and reality is so broad and deep that nine out of ten prospects leave their stores in disgust when they learn the limitations. And this is a very important, very unfortunate gap. Because the promise of recognition -- what people want it to do -- carries with it tremendous improvements in our productivity and ability to get tons of written documents into our computers where we can do real work with it. The good news is that a revolutionary new development effort has led to the new technology of "page recognition," which actually does deliver the promise we've always wanted from OCR. I'm sure every reader appreciates the breakthrough represented by the laser printer and page-makeup software, a combination so powerful it created new reasons for buying a computer. A similar breakthrough is happening right now in page recognition: the Macintosh (and, I must admit, other personal computers) equipped with a moderately priced scanner and OmniPage software (from Caere

  12. LEDGF/p75 Deficiency Increases Deletions at the HIV-1 cDNA Ends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Murilo T D; Reyes, Daniel; Llano, Manuel

    2017-09-15

    Processing of unintegrated linear HIV-1 cDNA by the host DNA repair system results in its degradation and/or circularization. As a consequence, deficient viral cDNA integration generally leads to an increase in the levels of HIV-1 cDNA circles containing one or two long terminal repeats (LTRs). Intriguingly, impaired HIV-1 integration in LEDGF/p75-deficient cells does not result in a correspondent increase in viral cDNA circles. We postulate that increased degradation of unintegrated linear viral cDNA in cells lacking the lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) account for this inconsistency. To evaluate this hypothesis, we characterized the nucleotide sequence spanning 2-LTR junctions isolated from LEDGF/p75-deficient and control cells. LEDGF/p75 deficiency resulted in a significant increase in the frequency of 2-LTRs harboring large deletions. Of note, these deletions were dependent on the 3' processing activity of integrase and were not originated by aberrant reverse transcription. Our findings suggest a novel role of LEDGF/p75 in protecting the unintegrated 3' processed linear HIV-1 cDNA from exonucleolytic degradation.

  13. Modeling DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is life's most amazing molecule. It carries the genetic instructions that almost every organism needs to develop and reproduce. In the human genome alone, there are some three billion DNA base pairs. The most difficult part of teaching DNA structure, however, may be getting students to visualize something as small as a…

  14. Proteopedia: 3D Visualization and Annotation of Transcription Factor-DNA Readout Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas Machado, Ana Carolina; Saleebyan, Skyler B.; Holmes, Bailey T.; Karelina, Maria; Tam, Julia; Kim, Sharon Y.; Kim, Keziah H.; Dror, Iris; Hodis, Eran; Martz, Eric; Compeau, Patricia A.; Rohs, Remo

    2012-01-01

    3D visualization assists in identifying diverse mechanisms of protein-DNA recognition that can be observed for transcription factors and other DNA binding proteins. We used Proteopedia to illustrate transcription factor-DNA readout modes with a focus on DNA shape, which can be a function of either nucleotide sequence (Hox proteins) or base pairing…

  15. LTR Control Methodologies for Microvibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aglietti, G.S.; Stoustrup, Jakob; Rogers, E.

    1998-01-01

    Microvibrations at frequencies between 1 and 1000 Hz generated by on-board equipment can propagate through a satellite's structure and hence significantly reduce the performance of sensitive payloads. This paper describes a Lagrange-Rayleigh-Ritz method for developing models suitable for the desi...... of active control schemes. Here Loop Transfer Recovery based controller design methods are employed with this modeling strategy...

  16. Probabilistic Open Set Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Lalit Prithviraj

    Real-world tasks in computer vision, pattern recognition and machine learning often touch upon the open set recognition problem: multi-class recognition with incomplete knowledge of the world and many unknown inputs. An obvious way to approach such problems is to develop a recognition system that thresholds probabilities to reject unknown classes. Traditional rejection techniques are not about the unknown; they are about the uncertain boundary and rejection around that boundary. Thus traditional techniques only represent the "known unknowns". However, a proper open set recognition algorithm is needed to reduce the risk from the "unknown unknowns". This dissertation examines this concept and finds existing probabilistic multi-class recognition approaches are ineffective for true open set recognition. We hypothesize the cause is due to weak adhoc assumptions combined with closed-world assumptions made by existing calibration techniques. Intuitively, if we could accurately model just the positive data for any known class without overfitting, we could reject the large set of unknown classes even under this assumption of incomplete class knowledge. For this, we formulate the problem as one of modeling positive training data by invoking statistical extreme value theory (EVT) near the decision boundary of positive data with respect to negative data. We provide a new algorithm called the PI-SVM for estimating the unnormalized posterior probability of class inclusion. This dissertation also introduces a new open set recognition model called Compact Abating Probability (CAP), where the probability of class membership decreases in value (abates) as points move from known data toward open space. We show that CAP models improve open set recognition for multiple algorithms. Leveraging the CAP formulation, we go on to describe the novel Weibull-calibrated SVM (W-SVM) algorithm, which combines the useful properties of statistical EVT for score calibration with one-class and binary

  17. Touchless palmprint recognition systems

    CERN Document Server

    Genovese, Angelo; Scotti, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    This book examines the context, motivation and current status of biometric systems based on the palmprint, with a specific focus on touchless and less-constrained systems. It covers new technologies in this rapidly evolving field and is one of the first comprehensive books on palmprint recognition systems.It discusses the research literature and the most relevant industrial applications of palmprint biometrics, including the low-cost solutions based on webcams. The steps of biometric recognition are described in detail, including acquisition setups, algorithms, and evaluation procedures. Const

  18. Mechanisms of bacterial DNA replication restart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windgassen, Tricia A; Wessel, Sarah R; Bhattacharyya, Basudeb

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Multi-protein DNA replication complexes called replisomes perform the essential process of copying cellular genetic information prior to cell division. Under ideal conditions, replisomes dissociate only after the entire genome has been duplicated. However, DNA replication rarely occurs without interruptions that can dislodge replisomes from DNA. Such events produce incompletely replicated chromosomes that, if left unrepaired, prevent the segregation of full genomes to daughter cells. To mitigate this threat, cells have evolved ‘DNA replication restart’ pathways that have been best defined in bacteria. Replication restart requires recognition and remodeling of abandoned replication forks by DNA replication restart proteins followed by reloading of the replicative DNA helicase, which subsequently directs assembly of the remaining replisome subunits. This review summarizes our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying replication restart and the proteins that drive the process in Escherichia coli (PriA, PriB, PriC and DnaT). PMID:29202195

  19. Robust Bioinformatics Recognition with VLSI Biochip Microsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lue, Jaw-Chyng L.; Fang, Wai-Chi

    2006-01-01

    A microsystem architecture for real-time, on-site, robust bioinformatic patterns recognition and analysis has been proposed. This system is compatible with on-chip DNA analysis means such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR)amplification. A corresponding novel artificial neural network (ANN) learning algorithm using new sigmoid-logarithmic transfer function based on error backpropagation (EBP) algorithm is invented. Our results show the trained new ANN can recognize low fluorescence patterns better than the conventional sigmoidal ANN does. A differential logarithmic imaging chip is designed for calculating logarithm of relative intensities of fluorescence signals. The single-rail logarithmic circuit and a prototype ANN chip are designed, fabricated and characterized.

  20. [Prosopagnosia and facial expression recognition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Shinichi

    2014-04-01

    This paper reviews clinical neuropsychological studies that have indicated that the recognition of a person's identity and the recognition of facial expressions are processed by different cortical and subcortical areas of the brain. The fusiform gyrus, especially the right fusiform gyrus, plays an important role in the recognition of identity. The superior temporal sulcus, amygdala, and medial frontal cortex play important roles in facial-expression recognition. Both facial recognition and facial-expression recognition are highly intellectual processes that involve several regions of the brain.

  1. A DNA minor groove electronegative potential genome map based on photo-chemical probing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemose, Søren; Nielsen, Peter Eigil; Hansen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    The double-stranded DNA of the genome contains both sequence information directly relating to the protein and RNA coding as well as functional and structural information relating to protein recognition. Only recently is the importance of DNA shape in this recognition process being fully appreciat...

  2. Optical Character Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Converso, L.; Hocek, S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes computer-based optical character recognition (OCR) systems, focusing on their components (the computer, the scanner, the OCR, and the output device); how the systems work; and features to consider in selecting a system. A list of 26 questions to ask to evaluate systems for potential purchase is included. (JDD)

  3. Recognition of fractal graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perepelitsa, VA; Sergienko, [No Value; Kochkarov, AM

    1999-01-01

    Definitions of prefractal and fractal graphs are introduced, and they are used to formulate mathematical models in different fields of knowledge. The topicality of fractal-graph recognition from the point of view, of fundamental improvement in the efficiency of the solution of algorithmic problems

  4. Facial Expression Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pantic, Maja; Li, S.; Jain, A.

    2009-01-01

    Facial expression recognition is a process performed by humans or computers, which consists of: 1. Locating faces in the scene (e.g., in an image; this step is also referred to as face detection), 2. Extracting facial features from the detected face region (e.g., detecting the shape of facial

  5. Transcription of highly repetitive tandemly organized DNA in amphibians and birds: A historical overview and modern concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimova, Irina; Krasikova, Alla

    2016-12-01

    Tandemly organized highly repetitive DNA sequences are crucial structural and functional elements of eukaryotic genomes. Despite extensive evidence, satellite DNA remains an enigmatic part of the eukaryotic genome, with biological role and significance of tandem repeat transcripts remaining rather obscure. Data on tandem repeats transcription in amphibian and avian model organisms is fragmentary despite their genomes being thoroughly characterized. Review systematically covers historical and modern data on transcription of amphibian and avian satellite DNA in somatic cells and during meiosis when chromosomes acquire special lampbrush form. We highlight how transcription of tandemly repetitive DNA sequences is organized in interphase nucleus and on lampbrush chromosomes. We offer LTR-activation hypotheses of widespread satellite DNA transcription initiation during oogenesis. Recent explanations are provided for the significance of high-yield production of non-coding RNA derived from tandemly organized highly repetitive DNA. In many cases the data on the transcription of satellite DNA can be extrapolated from lampbrush chromosomes to interphase chromosomes. Lampbrush chromosomes with applied novel technical approaches such as superresolution imaging, chromosome microdissection followed by high-throughput sequencing, dynamic observation in life-like conditions provide amazing opportunities for investigation mechanisms of the satellite DNA transcription.

  6. Galeotti on recognition as inclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2008-01-01

    Anna Elisabetta Galeotti's theory of 'toleration as recognition' has been criticised by Peter Jones for being conceptually incoherent, since liberal toleration presupposes a negative attitude to differences, whereas multicultural recognition requires positive affirmation hereof. The paper spells ...

  7. School IPM Recognition and Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schools and school districts can get support and recognition for implementation of school IPM. EPA is developing a program to provide recognition for school districts that are working towards or have achieved a level of success with school IPM programs.

  8. Stereotype Associations and Emotion Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlstra, Gijsbert; Holland, Rob W.; Dotsch, Ron; Hugenberg, Kurt; Wigboldus, Daniel H. J.

    We investigated whether stereotype associations between specific emotional expressions and social categories underlie stereotypic emotion recognition biases. Across two studies, we replicated previously documented stereotype biases in emotion recognition using both dynamic (Study 1) and static

  9. From nonspecific DNA-protein encounter complexes to the prediction of DNA-protein interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu Gao

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA-protein interactions are involved in many essential biological activities. Because there is no simple mapping code between DNA base pairs and protein amino acids, the prediction of DNA-protein interactions is a challenging problem. Here, we present a novel computational approach for predicting DNA-binding protein residues and DNA-protein interaction modes without knowing its specific DNA target sequence. Given the structure of a DNA-binding protein, the method first generates an ensemble of complex structures obtained by rigid-body docking with a nonspecific canonical B-DNA. Representative models are subsequently selected through clustering and ranking by their DNA-protein interfacial energy. Analysis of these encounter complex models suggests that the recognition sites for specific DNA binding are usually favorable interaction sites for the nonspecific DNA probe and that nonspecific DNA-protein interaction modes exhibit some similarity to specific DNA-protein binding modes. Although the method requires as input the knowledge that the protein binds DNA, in benchmark tests, it achieves better performance in identifying DNA-binding sites than three previously established methods, which are based on sophisticated machine-learning techniques. We further apply our method to protein structures predicted through modeling and demonstrate that our method performs satisfactorily on protein models whose root-mean-square Calpha deviation from native is up to 5 A from their native structures. This study provides valuable structural insights into how a specific DNA-binding protein interacts with a nonspecific DNA sequence. The similarity between the specific DNA-protein interaction mode and nonspecific interaction modes may reflect an important sampling step in search of its specific DNA targets by a DNA-binding protein.

  10. Programmable RNA recognition and cleavage by CRISPR/Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Mitchell R; Oakes, Benjamin L; Sternberg, Samuel H; East-Seletsky, Alexandra; Kaplan, Matias; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2014-12-11

    The CRISPR-associated protein Cas9 is an RNA-guided DNA endonuclease that uses RNA-DNA complementarity to identify target sites for sequence-specific double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) cleavage. In its native context, Cas9 acts on DNA substrates exclusively because both binding and catalysis require recognition of a short DNA sequence, known as the protospacer adjacent motif (PAM), next to and on the strand opposite the twenty-nucleotide target site in dsDNA. Cas9 has proven to be a versatile tool for genome engineering and gene regulation in a large range of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell types, and in whole organisms, but it has been thought to be incapable of targeting RNA. Here we show that Cas9 binds with high affinity to single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) targets matching the Cas9-associated guide RNA sequence when the PAM is presented in trans as a separate DNA oligonucleotide. Furthermore, PAM-presenting oligonucleotides (PAMmers) stimulate site-specific endonucleolytic cleavage of ssRNA targets, similar to PAM-mediated stimulation of Cas9-catalysed DNA cleavage. Using specially designed PAMmers, Cas9 can be specifically directed to bind or cut RNA targets while avoiding corresponding DNA sequences, and we demonstrate that this strategy enables the isolation of a specific endogenous messenger RNA from cells. These results reveal a fundamental connection between PAM binding and substrate selection by Cas9, and highlight the utility of Cas9 for programmable transcript recognition without the need for tags.

  11. A REVIEW: OPTICAL CHARACTER RECOGNITION

    OpenAIRE

    Swati Tomar*1 & Amit Kishore2

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents detailed review in the field of Optical Character Recognition. Various techniques are determine that have been proposed to realize the center of character recognition in an optical character recognition system. Even though, sufficient studies and papers are describes the techniques for converting textual content from a paper document into machine readable form. Optical character recognition is a process where the computer understands automatically the image of handwritten ...

  12. DNA Camouflage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-08

    1 DNA Camouflage Supplementary Information Bijan Zakeri1,2*, Timothy K. Lu1,2*, Peter A. Carr2,3* 1Department of Electrical Engineering and...ll.mit.edu). Distribution A: Public Release   2 Supplementary Figure 1 DNA camouflage with the 2-state device. (a) In the presence of Cre, DSD-2[α...10 1 + Cre 1 500 1,000 length (bp) chromatogram alignment template − Cre   4 Supplementary Figure 3 DNA camouflage with a switchable

  13. Novel DNA materials and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dayong; Campolongo, Michael J; Nhi Tran, Thua Nguyen; Ruiz, Roanna C H; Kahn, Jason S; Luo, Dan

    2010-01-01

    The last two decades have witnessed the exponential development of DNA as a generic material instead of just a genetic material. The biological function, nanoscale geometry, biocompatibility, biodegradability, and molecular recognition capacity of DNA make it a promising candidate for the construction of novel functional nanomaterials. As a result, DNA has been recognized as one of the most appealing and versatile nanomaterial building blocks. Scientists have used DNA in this way to construct various amazing nanostructures, such as ordered lattices, origami, supramolecular assemblies, and even three-dimensional objects. In addition, DNA has been utilized as a guide and template to direct the assembly of other nanomaterials including nanowires, free-standing membranes, and crystals. Furthermore, DNA can also be used as structural components to construct bulk materials such as DNA hydrogels, demonstrating its ability to behave as a unique polymer. Overall, these novel DNA materials have found applications in various areas in the biomedical field in general, and nanomedicine in particular. In this review, we summarize the development of DNA assemblies, describe the innovative progress of multifunctional and bulk DNA materials, and highlight some real-world nanomedical applications of these DNA materials. We also show our insights throughout this article for the future direction of DNA materials. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  14. Repair of DNA-polypeptide crosslinks by human excision nuclease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Joyce T.; Sancar, Aziz

    2006-03-01

    DNA-protein crosslinks are relatively common DNA lesions that form during the physiological processing of DNA by replication and recombination proteins, by side reactions of base excision repair enzymes, and by cellular exposure to bifunctional DNA-damaging agents such as platinum compounds. The mechanism by which pathological DNA-protein crosslinks are repaired in humans is not known. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of recognition and repair of protein-DNA and oligopeptide-DNA crosslinks by the human excision nuclease. Under our assay conditions, the human nucleotide excision repair system did not remove a 16-kDa protein crosslinked to DNA at a detectable level. However, 4- and 12-aa-long oligopeptides crosslinked to the DNA backbone were recognized by some of the damage recognition factors of the human excision nuclease with moderate selectivity and were excised from DNA at relatively efficient rates. Our data suggest that, if coupled with proteolytic degradation of the crosslinked protein, the human excision nuclease may be the major enzyme system for eliminating protein-DNA crosslinks from the genome. damage recognition | nucleotide excision repair

  15. Superficial Priming in Episodic Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopkins, Stephen; Sargent, Jesse; Ngo, Catherine T.

    2010-01-01

    We explored the effect of superficial priming in episodic recognition and found it to be different from the effect of semantic priming in episodic recognition. Participants made recognition judgments to pairs of items, with each pair consisting of a prime item and a test item. Correct positive responses to the test item were impeded if the prime…

  16. Word Recognition in Auditory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Iain D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Although spoken word recognition is more fundamental to human communication than text recognition, knowledge of word-processing in auditory cortex is comparatively impoverished. This dissertation synthesizes current models of auditory cortex, models of cortical pattern recognition, models of single-word reading, results in phonetics and results in…

  17. Visual Recognition Memory across Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Emily J. H.; Pascalis, Olivier; Eacott, Madeline J.; Herbert, Jane S.

    2011-01-01

    In two experiments, we investigated the development of representational flexibility in visual recognition memory during infancy using the Visual Paired Comparison (VPC) task. In Experiment 1, 6- and 9-month-old infants exhibited recognition when familiarization and test occurred in the same room, but showed no evidence of recognition when…

  18. Forensic Face Recognition: A Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, Tauseef; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; Quaglia, Adamo; Epifano, Calogera M.

    2012-01-01

    The improvements of automatic face recognition during the last 2 decades have disclosed new applications like border control and camera surveillance. A new application field is forensic face recognition. Traditionally, face recognition by human experts has been used in forensics, but now there is a

  19. Semantic Activity Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Thonnat , Monique

    2008-01-01

    International audience; Extracting automatically the semantics from visual data is a real challenge. We describe in this paper how recent work in cognitive vision leads to significative results in activity recognition for visualsurveillance and video monitoring. In particular we present work performed in the domain of video understanding in our PULSAR team at INRIA in Sophia Antipolis. Our main objective is to analyse in real-time video streams captured by static video cameras and to recogniz...

  20. DNA-Based Applications in Nanobiotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid M. Abu-Salah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological molecules such as deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA have shown great potential in fabrication and construction of nanostructures and devices. The very properties that make DNA so effective as genetic material also make it a very suitable molecule for programmed self-assembly. The use of DNA to assemble metals or semiconducting particles has been extended to construct metallic nanowires and functionalized nanotubes. This paper highlights some important aspects of conjugating the unique physical properties of dots or wires with the remarkable recognition capabilities of DNA which could lead to miniaturizing biological electronics and optical devices, including biosensors and probes. Attempts to use DNA-based nanocarriers for gene delivery are discussed. In addition, the ecological advantages and risks of nanotechnology including DNA-based nanobiotechnology are evaluated.

  1. Pattern Recognition Control Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambone, Elisabeth A.

    2018-01-01

    Spacecraft control algorithms must know the expected vehicle response to any command to the available control effectors, such as reaction thrusters or torque devices. Spacecraft control system design approaches have traditionally relied on the estimated vehicle mass properties to determine the desired force and moment, as well as knowledge of the effector performance to efficiently control the spacecraft. A pattern recognition approach was used to investigate the relationship between the control effector commands and spacecraft responses. Instead of supplying the approximated vehicle properties and the thruster performance characteristics, a database of information relating the thruster ring commands and the desired vehicle response was used for closed-loop control. A Monte Carlo simulation data set of the spacecraft dynamic response to effector commands was analyzed to establish the influence a command has on the behavior of the spacecraft. A tool developed at NASA Johnson Space Center to analyze flight dynamics Monte Carlo data sets through pattern recognition methods was used to perform this analysis. Once a comprehensive data set relating spacecraft responses with commands was established, it was used in place of traditional control methods and gains set. This pattern recognition approach was compared with traditional control algorithms to determine the potential benefits and uses.

  2. DNA glue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filichev, Vyacheslav V; Astakhova, Irina V.; Malakhov, Andrei D.

    2008-01-01

    Significant alterations in thermal stability of parallel DNA triplexes and antiparallel duplexes were observed upon changing the attachment of ethynylpyrenes from para to ortho in the structure of phenylmethylglycerol inserted as a bulge into DNA (TINA). Insertions of two ortho-TINAs as a pseudo...

  3. Hyperstretching DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schakenraad, Koen; Biebricher, Andreas S.; Sebregts, Maarten; Ten Bensel, Brian; Peterman, Erwin J.G.; Wuite, Gijs J L; Heller, Iddo; Storm, Cornelis; Van Der Schoot, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of DNA is highly susceptible to changes by mechanical and biochemical cues in vivo and in vitro. In particular, large increases in base pair spacing compared to regular B-DNA are effected by mechanical (over)stretching and by intercalation of compounds that are widely

  4. Cocaine promotes both initiation and elongation phase of HIV-1 transcription by activating NF-κB and MSK1 and inducing selective epigenetic modifications at HIV-1 LTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahu, Geetaram; Farley, Kalamo; El-Hage, Nazira; Aiamkitsumrit, Benjamas; Fassnacht, Ryan; Kashanchi, Fatah; Ochem, Alex; Simon, Gary L.; Karn, Jonathan; Hauser, Kurt F.; Tyagi, Mudit

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine accelerates human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) replication by altering specific cell-signaling and epigenetic pathways. We have elucidated the underlying molecular mechanisms through which cocaine exerts its effect in myeloid cells, a major target of HIV-1 in central nervous system (CNS). We demonstrate that cocaine treatment promotes HIV-1 gene expression by activating both nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-ĸB) and mitogen- and stress-activated kinase 1 (MSK1). MSK1 subsequently catalyzes the phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10, and p65 subunit of NF-ĸB at 276th serine residue. These modifications enhance the interaction of NF-ĸB with P300 and promote the recruitment of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) to the HIV-1 LTR, supporting the development of an open/relaxed chromatin configuration, and facilitating the initiation and elongation phases of HIV-1 transcription. Results are also confirmed in primary monocyte derived macrophages (MDM). Overall, our study provides detailed insights into cocaine-driven HIV-1 transcription and replication. - Highlights: • Cocaine induces the initiation phase of HIV transcription by activating NF-ĸB. • Cocaine induced NF-ĸB phosphorylation promotes its interaction with P300. • Cocaine enhances the elongation phase of HIV transcription by stimulating MSK1. • Cocaine activated MSK1 catalyzes the phosphorylation of histone H3 at its Ser10. • Cocaine induced H3S10 phosphorylation facilitates the recruitment of P-TEFb at LTR

  5. Cocaine promotes both initiation and elongation phase of HIV-1 transcription by activating NF-κB and MSK1 and inducing selective epigenetic modifications at HIV-1 LTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahu, Geetaram; Farley, Kalamo [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States); El-Hage, Nazira [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Aiamkitsumrit, Benjamas; Fassnacht, Ryan [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States); Kashanchi, Fatah [George Mason University, Manassas, VA (United States); Ochem, Alex [ICGEB, Wernher and Beit Building, Anzio Road, Observatory, 7925 Cape Town (South Africa); Simon, Gary L. [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States); Karn, Jonathan [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Hauser, Kurt F. [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Tyagi, Mudit, E-mail: tmudit@email.gwu.edu [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States); Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Tropical Medicine, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Cocaine accelerates human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) replication by altering specific cell-signaling and epigenetic pathways. We have elucidated the underlying molecular mechanisms through which cocaine exerts its effect in myeloid cells, a major target of HIV-1 in central nervous system (CNS). We demonstrate that cocaine treatment promotes HIV-1 gene expression by activating both nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-ĸB) and mitogen- and stress-activated kinase 1 (MSK1). MSK1 subsequently catalyzes the phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10, and p65 subunit of NF-ĸB at 276th serine residue. These modifications enhance the interaction of NF-ĸB with P300 and promote the recruitment of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) to the HIV-1 LTR, supporting the development of an open/relaxed chromatin configuration, and facilitating the initiation and elongation phases of HIV-1 transcription. Results are also confirmed in primary monocyte derived macrophages (MDM). Overall, our study provides detailed insights into cocaine-driven HIV-1 transcription and replication. - Highlights: • Cocaine induces the initiation phase of HIV transcription by activating NF-ĸB. • Cocaine induced NF-ĸB phosphorylation promotes its interaction with P300. • Cocaine enhances the elongation phase of HIV transcription by stimulating MSK1. • Cocaine activated MSK1 catalyzes the phosphorylation of histone H3 at its Ser10. • Cocaine induced H3S10 phosphorylation facilitates the recruitment of P-TEFb at LTR.

  6. Threshold models of recognition and the recognition heuristic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Erdfelder

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available According to the recognition heuristic (RH theory, decisions follow the recognition principle: Given a high validity of the recognition cue, people should prefer recognized choice options compared to unrecognized ones. Assuming that the memory strength of choice options is strongly correlated with both the choice criterion and recognition judgments, the RH is a reasonable strategy that approximates optimal decisions with a minimum of cognitive effort (Davis-Stober, Dana, and Budescu, 2010. However, theories of recognition memory are not generally compatible with this assumption. For example, some threshold models of recognition presume that recognition judgments can arise from two types of cognitive states: (1 certainty states in which judgments are almost perfectly correlated with memory strength and (2 uncertainty states in which recognition judgments reflect guessing rather than differences in memory strength. We report an experiment designed to test the prediction that the RH applies to certainty states only. Our results show that memory states rather than recognition judgments affect use of recognition information in binary decisions.

  7. B chromosome in the beetle Coprophanaeus cyanescens (Scarabaeidae: emphasis in the organization of repetitive DNA sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes de Oliveira Sarah

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To contribute to the knowledge of coleopteran cytogenetics, especially with respect to the genomic content of B chromosomes, we analyzed the composition and organization of repetitive DNA sequences in the Coprophanaeus cyanescens karyotype. We used conventional staining and the application of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH mapping using as probes C0t-1 DNA fraction, the 18S and 5S rRNA genes, and the LOA-like non-LTR transposable element (TE. Results The conventional analysis detected 3 individuals (among 50 analyzed carrying one small metacentric and mitotically unstable B chromosome. The FISH analysis revealed a pericentromeric block of C0t-1 DNA in the B chromosome but no 18S or 5S rDNA clusters in this extra element. Using the LOA-like TE probe, the FISH analysis revealed large pericentromeric blocks in eight autosomal bivalents and in the B chromosome, and a pericentromeric block extending to the short arm in one autosomal pair. No positive hybridization signal was observed for the LOA-like element in the sex chromosomes. Conclusions The results indicate that the origin of the B chromosome is associated with the autosomal elements, as demonstrated by the hybridization with C0t-1 DNA and the LOA-like TE. The present study is the first report on the cytogenetic mapping of a TE in coleopteran chromosomes. These TEs could have been involved in the origin and evolution of the B chromosome in C. cyanescens.

  8. Solvated protein-DNA docking using HADDOCK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Marc; Visscher, Koen M; Bonvin, Alexandre M.J.J; Kastritis, Panagiotis L.

    2013-01-01

    Interfacial water molecules play an important role in many aspects of protein-DNA specificity and recognition. Yet they have been mostly neglected in the computational modeling of these complexes. We present here a solvated docking protocol that allows explicit inclusion of water molecules in the

  9. DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelino, J.

    1992-01-01

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with 32 P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism's genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens

  10. DNA probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castelino, J

    1993-12-31

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with {sup 32}P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism`s genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens 10 figs, 2 tabs

  11. Excision of HIV-1 proviral DNA by recombinant cell permeable tre-recombinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmikanth Mariyanna

    Full Text Available Over the previous years, comprehensive studies on antiretroviral drugs resulted in the successful introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART into clinical practice for treatment of HIV/AIDS. However, there is still need for new therapeutic approaches, since HAART cannot eradicate HIV-1 from the infected organism and, unfortunately, can be associated with long-term toxicity and the development of drug resistance. In contrast, novel gene therapy strategies may have the potential to reverse the infection by eradicating HIV-1. For example, expression of long terminal repeat (LTR-specific recombinase (Tre-recombinase has been shown to result in chromosomal excision of proviral DNA and, in consequence, in the eradication of HIV-1 from infected cell cultures. However, the delivery of Tre-recombinase currently depends on the genetic manipulation of target cells, a process that is complicating such therapeutic approaches and, thus, might be undesirable in a clinical setting. In this report we demonstrate that E.coli expressed Tre-recombinases, tagged either with the protein transduction domain (PTD from the HIV-1 Tat trans-activator or the translocation motif (TLM of the Hepatitis B virus PreS2 protein, were able to translocate efficiently into cells and showed significant recombination activity on HIV-1 LTR sequences. Tre activity was observed using episomal and stable integrated reporter constructs in transfected HeLa cells. Furthermore, the TLM-tagged enzyme was able to excise the full-length proviral DNA from chromosomal integration sites of HIV-1-infected HeLa and CEM-SS cells. The presented data confirm Tre-recombinase activity on integrated HIV-1 and provide the basis for the non-genetic transient application of engineered recombinases, which may be a valuable component of future HIV eradication strategies.

  12. Re-thinking employee recognition: understanding employee experiences of recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Despite widespread acceptance of the importance of employee recognition for both individuals and organisations and evidence of its increasing use in organisations, employee recognition has received relatively little focused attention from academic researchers. Particularly lacking is research exploring the lived experience of employee recognition and the interpretations and meanings which individuals give to these experiences. Drawing on qualitative interviews conducted as part of my PhD rese...

  13. Sequence-specific activation of the DNA sensor cGAS by Y-form DNA structures as found in primary HIV-1 cDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzner, Anna-Maria; Hagmann, Cristina Amparo; Goldeck, Marion; Wolter, Steven; Kübler, Kirsten; Wittmann, Sabine; Gramberg, Thomas; Andreeva, Liudmila; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Mertens, Christina; Zillinger, Thomas; Jin, Tengchuan; Xiao, Tsan Sam; Bartok, Eva; Coch, Christoph; Ackermann, Damian; Hornung, Veit; Ludwig, Janos; Barchet, Winfried; Hartmann, Gunther; Schlee, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Cytosolic DNA that emerges during infection with a retrovirus or DNA virus triggers antiviral type I interferon responses. So far, only double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) over 40 base pairs (bp) in length has been considered immunostimulatory. Here we found that unpaired DNA nucleotides flanking short base-paired DNA stretches, as in stem-loop structures of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) derived from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), activated the type I interferon-inducing DNA sensor cGAS in a sequence-dependent manner. DNA structures containing unpaired guanosines flanking short (12- to 20-bp) dsDNA (Y-form DNA) were highly stimulatory and specifically enhanced the enzymatic activity of cGAS. Furthermore, we found that primary HIV-1 reverse transcripts represented the predominant viral cytosolic DNA species during early infection of macrophages and that these ssDNAs were highly immunostimulatory. Collectively, our study identifies unpaired guanosines in Y-form DNA as a highly active, minimal cGAS recognition motif that enables detection of HIV-1 ssDNA.

  14. Molecular Recognition in the Colloidal World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elacqua, Elizabeth; Zheng, Xiaolong; Shillingford, Cicely; Liu, Mingzhu; Weck, Marcus

    2017-11-21

    Colloidal self-assembly is a bottom-up technique to fabricate functional nanomaterials, with paramount interest stemming from programmable assembly of smaller building blocks into dynamic crystalline domains and photonic materials. Multiple established colloidal platforms feature diverse shapes and bonding interactions, while achieving specific orientations along with short- and long-range order. A major impediment to their universal use as building blocks for predesigned architectures is the inability to precisely dictate and control particle functionalization and concomitant reversible self-assembly. Progress in colloidal self-assembly necessitates the development of strategies that endow bonding specificity and directionality within assemblies. Methodologies that emulate molecular and polymeric three-dimensional (3D) architectures feature elements of covalent bonding, while high-fidelity molecular recognition events have been installed to realize responsive reconfigurable assemblies. The emergence of anisotropic 'colloidal molecules', coupled with the ability to site-specifically decorate particle surfaces with supramolecular recognition motifs, has facilitated the formation of superstructures via directional interactions and shape recognition. In this Account, we describe supramolecular assembly routes to drive colloidal particles into precisely assembled architectures or crystalline lattices via directional noncovalent molecular interactions. The design principles are based upon the fabrication of colloidal particles bearing surface-exposed functional groups that can undergo programmable conjugation to install recognition motifs with high fidelity. Modular and versatile by design, our strategy allows for the introduction and integration of molecular recognition principles into the colloidal world. We define noncovalent molecular interactions as site-specific forces that are predictable (i.e., feature selective and controllable complementary bonding partners

  15. DNA methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Kristine; Christensen, Jesper; Helin, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation is involved in key cellular processes, including X-chromosome inactivation, imprinting and transcriptional silencing of specific genes and repetitive elements. DNA methylation patterns are frequently perturbed in human diseases such as imprinting disorders and cancer. The recent...... discovery that the three members of the TET protein family can convert 5-methylcytosine (5mC) into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) has provided a potential mechanism leading to DNA demethylation. Moreover, the demonstration that TET2 is frequently mutated in haematopoietic tumours suggests that the TET...... proteins are important regulators of cellular identity. Here, we review the current knowledge regarding the function of the TET proteins, and discuss various mechanisms by which they contribute to transcriptional control. We propose that the TET proteins have an important role in regulating DNA methylation...

  16. DNA data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Raw DNA chromatogram data produced by the ABI 373, 377, 3130 and 3730 automated sequencing machines in ABI format. These are from fish (primarily Sebastes spp.,...

  17. DNA nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Nadrian C.; Sleiman, Hanadi F.

    2018-01-01

    DNA is the molecule that stores and transmits genetic information in biological systems. The field of DNA nanotechnology takes this molecule out of its biological context and uses its information to assemble structural motifs and then to connect them together. This field has had a remarkable impact on nanoscience and nanotechnology, and has been revolutionary in our ability to control molecular self-assembly. In this Review, we summarize the approaches used to assemble DNA nanostructures and examine their emerging applications in areas such as biophysics, diagnostics, nanoparticle and protein assembly, biomolecule structure determination, drug delivery and synthetic biology. The introduction of orthogonal interactions into DNA nanostructures is discussed, and finally, a perspective on the future directions of this field is presented.

  18. Human activity recognition and prediction

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a unique view of human activity recognition, especially fine-grained human activity structure learning, human-interaction recognition, RGB-D data based action recognition, temporal decomposition, and causality learning in unconstrained human activity videos. The techniques discussed give readers tools that provide a significant improvement over existing methodologies of video content understanding by taking advantage of activity recognition. It links multiple popular research fields in computer vision, machine learning, human-centered computing, human-computer interaction, image classification, and pattern recognition. In addition, the book includes several key chapters covering multiple emerging topics in the field. Contributed by top experts and practitioners, the chapters present key topics from different angles and blend both methodology and application, composing a solid overview of the human activity recognition techniques. .

  19. [Comparative studies of face recognition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2012-07-01

    Every human being is proficient in face recognition. However, the reason for and the manner in which humans have attained such an ability remain unknown. These questions can be best answered-through comparative studies of face recognition in non-human animals. Studies in both primates and non-primates show that not only primates, but also non-primates possess the ability to extract information from their conspecifics and from human experimenters. Neural specialization for face recognition is shared with mammals in distant taxa, suggesting that face recognition evolved earlier than the emergence of mammals. A recent study indicated that a social insect, the golden paper wasp, can distinguish their conspecific faces, whereas a closely related species, which has a less complex social lifestyle with just one queen ruling a nest of underlings, did not show strong face recognition for their conspecifics. Social complexity and the need to differentiate between one another likely led humans to evolve their face recognition abilities.

  20. Genetic specificity of face recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeshaft, Nicholas G; Plomin, Robert

    2015-10-13

    Specific cognitive abilities in diverse domains are typically found to be highly heritable and substantially correlated with general cognitive ability (g), both phenotypically and genetically. Recent twin studies have found the ability to memorize and recognize faces to be an exception, being similarly heritable but phenotypically substantially uncorrelated both with g and with general object recognition. However, the genetic relationships between face recognition and other abilities (the extent to which they share a common genetic etiology) cannot be determined from phenotypic associations. In this, to our knowledge, first study of the genetic associations between face recognition and other domains, 2,000 18- and 19-year-old United Kingdom twins completed tests assessing their face recognition, object recognition, and general cognitive abilities. Results confirmed the substantial heritability of face recognition (61%), and multivariate genetic analyses found that most of this genetic influence is unique and not shared with other cognitive abilities.

  1. Radically enhanced molecular recognition

    KAUST Repository

    Trabolsi, Ali; Khashab, Niveen M.; Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Friedman, Douglas C.; Colvin, Michael T.; Coti, Karla K.; Bení tez, Diego S.; Tkatchouk, Ekaterina; Olsen, John Carl; Belowich, Matthew E.; Carmieli, Raanan; Khatib, Hussam A.; Goddard, William Andrew III; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Stoddart, Fraser Fraser Raser

    2009-01-01

    The tendency for viologen radical cations to dimerize has been harnessed to establish a recognition motif based on their ability to form extremely strong inclusion complexes with cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) in its diradical dicationic redox state. This previously unreported complex involving three bipyridinium cation radicals increases the versatility of host-guest chemistry, extending its practice beyond the traditional reliance on neutral and charged guests and hosts. In particular, transporting the concept of radical dimerization into the field of mechanically interlocked molecules introduces a higher level of control within molecular switches and machines. Herein, we report that bistable and tristable [2]rotaxanes can be switched by altering electrochemical potentials. In a tristable [2]rotaxane composed of a cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) ring and a dumbbell with tetrathiafulvalene, dioxynaphthalene and bipyridinium recognition sites, the position of the ring can be switched. On oxidation, it moves from the tetrathiafulvalene to the dioxynaphthalene, and on reduction, to the bipyridinium radical cation, provided the ring is also reduced simultaneously to the diradical dication. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  2. Radically enhanced molecular recognition

    KAUST Repository

    Trabolsi, Ali

    2009-12-17

    The tendency for viologen radical cations to dimerize has been harnessed to establish a recognition motif based on their ability to form extremely strong inclusion complexes with cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) in its diradical dicationic redox state. This previously unreported complex involving three bipyridinium cation radicals increases the versatility of host-guest chemistry, extending its practice beyond the traditional reliance on neutral and charged guests and hosts. In particular, transporting the concept of radical dimerization into the field of mechanically interlocked molecules introduces a higher level of control within molecular switches and machines. Herein, we report that bistable and tristable [2]rotaxanes can be switched by altering electrochemical potentials. In a tristable [2]rotaxane composed of a cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) ring and a dumbbell with tetrathiafulvalene, dioxynaphthalene and bipyridinium recognition sites, the position of the ring can be switched. On oxidation, it moves from the tetrathiafulvalene to the dioxynaphthalene, and on reduction, to the bipyridinium radical cation, provided the ring is also reduced simultaneously to the diradical dication. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  3. DNA expressions - A formal notation for DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, Rudy van

    2015-01-01

    We describe a formal notation for DNA molecules that may contain nicks and gaps. The resulting DNA expressions denote formal DNA molecules. Different DNA expressions may denote the same molecule. Such DNA expressions are called equivalent. We examine which DNA expressions are minimal, which

  4. Functional oligonucleotide recognition nanomodules for electrochemical DNA biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Campàs i Homs, Mònica

    2002-01-01

    El objetivo de esta tesis ha sido diseñar, caracterizar y optimizar un array de sensores de ADN electroquímico. Para el estudio de la inmovilización de las sondas de oligonucleótidos y la detección de la hibridación se realizaron experimentos preliminares con un sistema simplificado. Dicho sistema demostró que las monocapas auto-ensambladas (SAMs) en superficies de oro eran apropiadas como método de inmovilización. Debido al rápido desarrollo de los sensores de ADN hacia los arrays de ADN, se...

  5. Speech Recognition on Mobile Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Zheng-Hua; Lindberg, Børge

    2010-01-01

    in the mobile context covering motivations, challenges, fundamental techniques and applications. Three ASR architectures are introduced: embedded speech recognition, distributed speech recognition and network speech recognition. Their pros and cons and implementation issues are discussed. Applications within......The enthusiasm of deploying automatic speech recognition (ASR) on mobile devices is driven both by remarkable advances in ASR technology and by the demand for efficient user interfaces on such devices as mobile phones and personal digital assistants (PDAs). This chapter presents an overview of ASR...

  6. Molecular Mechanisms of Odor Recognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anholt, Robert

    2000-01-01

    .... We characterized the transduction pathway for the recognition of pheromones in the vomeronasal organ and also characterized subpopulations of olfactory neurons expressing different axonal G proteins...

  7. Markov Models for Handwriting Recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Plotz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Since their first inception, automatic reading systems have evolved substantially, yet the recognition of handwriting remains an open research problem due to its substantial variation in appearance. With the introduction of Markovian models to the field, a promising modeling and recognition paradigm was established for automatic handwriting recognition. However, no standard procedures for building Markov model-based recognizers have yet been established. This text provides a comprehensive overview of the application of Markov models in the field of handwriting recognition, covering both hidden

  8. Sudden Event Recognition: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Asyraf Zulkifley

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Event recognition is one of the most active research areas in video surveillance fields. Advancement in event recognition systems mainly aims to provide convenience, safety and an efficient lifestyle for humanity. A precise, accurate and robust approach is necessary to enable event recognition systems to respond to sudden changes in various uncontrolled environments, such as the case of an emergency, physical threat and a fire or bomb alert. The performance of sudden event recognition systems depends heavily on the accuracy of low level processing, like detection, recognition, tracking and machine learning algorithms. This survey aims to detect and characterize a sudden event, which is a subset of an abnormal event in several video surveillance applications. This paper discusses the following in detail: (1 the importance of a sudden event over a general anomalous event; (2 frameworks used in sudden event recognition; (3 the requirements and comparative studies of a sudden event recognition system and (4 various decision-making approaches for sudden event recognition. The advantages and drawbacks of using 3D images from multiple cameras for real-time application are also discussed. The paper concludes with suggestions for future research directions in sudden event recognition.

  9. DNA-nanoparticle assemblies go organic : Macroscopic polymeric materials with nanosized features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mentovich, Elad D.; Livanov, Konstantin; Prusty, Deepak K.; Sowwan, Mukules; Richter, Shachar

    2012-01-01

    Background: One of the goals in the field of structural DNA nanotechnology is the use of DNA to build up 2- and 3-D nanostructures. The research in this field is motivated by the remarkable structural features of DNA as well as by its unique and reversible recognition properties. Nucleic acids can

  10. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  11. DNA-imprinted polymer nanoparticles with monodispersity and prescribed DNA-strand patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Tuan; Liao, Chenyi; Toader, Violeta; Barłóg, Maciej; Bazzi, Hassan S.; Li, Jianing; Sleiman, Hanadi F.

    2018-02-01

    As colloidal self-assembly increasingly approaches the complexity of natural systems, an ongoing challenge is to generate non-centrosymmetric structures. For example, patchy, Janus or living crystallization particles have significantly advanced the area of polymer assembly. It has remained difficult, however, to devise polymer particles that associate in a directional manner, with controlled valency and recognition motifs. Here, we present a method to transfer DNA patterns from a DNA cage to a polymeric nanoparticle encapsulated inside the cage in three dimensions. The resulting DNA-imprinted particles (DIPs), which are 'moulded' on the inside of the DNA cage, consist of a monodisperse crosslinked polymer core with a predetermined pattern of different DNA strands covalently 'printed' on their exterior, and further assemble with programmability and directionality. The number, orientation and sequence of DNA strands grafted onto the polymeric core can be controlled during the process, and the strands are addressable independently of each other.

  12. In vivo control of CpG and non-CpG DNA methylation by DNA methyltransferases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Arand

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The enzymatic control of the setting and maintenance of symmetric and non-symmetric DNA methylation patterns in a particular genome context is not well understood. Here, we describe a comprehensive analysis of DNA methylation patterns generated by high resolution sequencing of hairpin-bisulfite amplicons of selected single copy genes and repetitive elements (LINE1, B1, IAP-LTR-retrotransposons, and major satellites. The analysis unambiguously identifies a substantial amount of regional incomplete methylation maintenance, i.e. hemimethylated CpG positions, with variant degrees among cell types. Moreover, non-CpG cytosine methylation is confined to ESCs and exclusively catalysed by Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b. This sequence position-, cell type-, and region-dependent non-CpG methylation is strongly linked to neighboring CpG methylation and requires the presence of Dnmt3L. The generation of a comprehensive data set of 146,000 CpG dyads was used to apply and develop parameter estimated hidden Markov models (HMM to calculate the relative contribution of DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts for de novo and maintenance DNA methylation. The comparative modelling included wild-type ESCs and mutant ESCs deficient for Dnmt1, Dnmt3a, Dnmt3b, or Dnmt3a/3b, respectively. The HMM analysis identifies a considerable de novo methylation activity for Dnmt1 at certain repetitive elements and single copy sequences. Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b contribute de novo function. However, both enzymes are also essential to maintain symmetrical CpG methylation at distinct repetitive and single copy sequences in ESCs.

  13. SAR: Stroke Authorship Recognition

    KAUST Repository

    Shaheen, Sara; Rockwood, Alyn; Ghanem, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Are simple strokes unique to the artist or designer who renders them? If so, can this idea be used to identify authorship or to classify artistic drawings? Also, could training methods be devised to develop particular styles? To answer these questions, we propose the Stroke Authorship Recognition (SAR) approach, a novel method that distinguishes the authorship of 2D digitized drawings. SAR converts a drawing into a histogram of stroke attributes that is discriminative of authorship. We provide extensive classification experiments on a large variety of data sets, which validate SAR's ability to distinguish unique authorship of artists and designers. We also demonstrate the usefulness of SAR in several applications including the detection of fraudulent sketches, the training and monitoring of artists in learning a particular new style and the first quantitative way to measure the quality of automatic sketch synthesis tools. © 2015 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Iris Recognition Using Wavelet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaliq Masood

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Biometric systems are getting more attention in the present era. Iris recognition is one of the most secure and authentic among the other biometrics and this field demands more authentic, reliable and fast algorithms to implement these biometric systems in real time. In this paper, an efficient localization technique is presented to identify pupil and iris boundaries using histogram of the iris image. Two small portions of iris have been used for polar transformation to reduce computational time and to increase the efficiency of the system. Wavelet transform is used for feature vector generation. Rotation of iris is compensated without shifts in the iris code. System is tested on Multimedia University Iris Database and results show that proposed system has encouraging performance.

  15. SAR: Stroke Authorship Recognition

    KAUST Repository

    Shaheen, Sara

    2015-10-15

    Are simple strokes unique to the artist or designer who renders them? If so, can this idea be used to identify authorship or to classify artistic drawings? Also, could training methods be devised to develop particular styles? To answer these questions, we propose the Stroke Authorship Recognition (SAR) approach, a novel method that distinguishes the authorship of 2D digitized drawings. SAR converts a drawing into a histogram of stroke attributes that is discriminative of authorship. We provide extensive classification experiments on a large variety of data sets, which validate SAR\\'s ability to distinguish unique authorship of artists and designers. We also demonstrate the usefulness of SAR in several applications including the detection of fraudulent sketches, the training and monitoring of artists in learning a particular new style and the first quantitative way to measure the quality of automatic sketch synthesis tools. © 2015 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Control of DNA hybridization by photoswitchable molecular glue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohno, Chikara; Nakatani, Kazuhiko

    2011-12-01

    Hybridization of DNA is one of the most intriguing events in molecular recognition and is essential for living matter to inherit life beyond generations. In addition to the function of DNA as genetic material, DNA hybridization is a key to control the function of DNA-based materials in nanoscience. Since the hybridization of two single stranded DNAs is a thermodynamically favorable process, dissociation of the once formed DNA duplex is normally unattainable under isothermal conditions. As the progress of DNA-based nanoscience, methodology to control the DNA hybridization process has become increasingly important. Besides many reports using the chemically modified DNA for the regulation of hybridization, we focused our attention on the use of a small ligand as the molecular glue for the DNA. In 2001, we reported the first designed molecule that strongly and specifically bound to the mismatched base pairs in double stranded DNA. Further studies on the mismatch binding molecules provided us a key discovery of a novel mode of the binding of a mismatch binding ligand that induced the base flipping. With these findings we proposed the concept of molecular glue for DNA for the unidirectional control of DNA hybridization and, eventually photoswitchable molecular glue for DNA, which enabled the bidirectional control of hybridization under photoirradiation. In this tutorial review, we describe in detail how we integrated the mismatch binding ligand into photoswitchable molecular glue for DNA, and the application and perspective in DNA-based nanoscience.

  17. The Legal Recognition of Sign Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meulder, Maartje

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an analytical overview of the different types of explicit legal recognition of sign languages. Five categories are distinguished: constitutional recognition, recognition by means of general language legislation, recognition by means of a sign language law or act, recognition by means of a sign language law or act including…

  18. DNA based radiological dosimetry technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Quijada, Gerardo A.; Roy, Emmanuel; Veres, Teodor; Dumoulin, Michel M.; Vachon, Caroline; Blagoeva, Rosita; Pierre, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The purpose of this project is to develop a personal and wearable dosimeter using a highly-innovative approach based on the specific recognition of DNA damage with a polymer hybrid. Our biosensor will be sensitive to breaks in nucleic acid macromolecules and relevant to mixed-field radiation. The dosimeter proposed will be small, field deployable and will sense damages for all radiation types at the DNA level. The generalized concept for the novel-based radiological dosimeter: 1) Single or double stranded oligonucleotide is immobilized on surface; 2) Single stranded has higher cross-section for fragmentation; 3) Double stranded is more biological relevant; 4) Radiation induces fragmentation; 5) Ultra-sensitive detection of fragments provides radiation dose. Successful efforts have been made towards a proof-of-concept personal wearable DNA-based dosimeter that is appropriate for mixed-field radiation. The covalent immobilization of oligonucleotides on large areas of plastic surfaces has been demonstrated and corroborated spectroscopically. The surface concentration of DNA was determined to be 8 x 1010 molecules/cm 2 from a Ce(IV) catalyzed hydrolysis study of a fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide. Current efforts are being directed at studying radiation induced fragmentation of DNA followed by its ultra-sensitive detection via a novel method. In addition, proof-of-concept wearable personal devices and a detection platform are presently being fabricated. (author)

  19. Unequal recognition, misrecognition and injustice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2012-01-01

    by the state of religious minorities. It argues that state–religion relations can be analysed as relations of recognition, which are not only unequal but also multi-dimensional, and that it is difficult to answer the question whether multi-dimensional recognitive inequalities are unjust or wrong if one...

  20. Side-View Face Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santemiz, P.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; van den Biggelaar, Olivier

    As a widely used biometrics, face recognition has many advantages such as being non-intrusive, natural and passive. On the other hand, in real-life scenarios with uncontrolled environment, pose variation up to side-view positions makes face recognition a challenging work. In this paper we discuss

  1. Infants' Recognition Memory for Hue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Marc H.

    1976-01-01

    Fifty 4-month-old infants were habituated to one wavelength of light and then tested for recognition with the original and two new spectral lights. After short- and long-term delays with different types of retroactive interference, the results indicated that the infants' recognition memory for hue was quite resilient to interference or delay. (JMB)

  2. Forensic Face Recognition: A Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, Tauseef; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan

    2010-01-01

    Beside a few papers which focus on the forensic aspects of automatic face recognition, there is not much published about it in contrast to the literature on developing new techniques and methodologies for biometric face recognition. In this report, we review forensic facial identification which is

  3. Side-View Face Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santemiz, P.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    2010-01-01

    Side-view face recognition is a challenging problem with many applications. Especially in real-life scenarios where the environment is uncontrolled, coping with pose variations up to side-view positions is an important task for face recognition. In this paper we discuss the use of side view face

  4. FILTWAM and Voice Emotion Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bahreini, Kiavash; Nadolski, Rob; Westera, Wim

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces the voice emotion recognition part of our framework for improving learning through webcams and microphones (FILTWAM). This framework enables multimodal emotion recognition of learners during game-based learning. The main goal of this study is to validate the use of microphone

  5. enDNA-Prot: Identification of DNA-Binding Proteins by Applying Ensemble Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruifeng Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA-binding proteins are crucial for various cellular processes, such as recognition of specific nucleotide, regulation of transcription, and regulation of gene expression. Developing an effective model for identifying DNA-binding proteins is an urgent research problem. Up to now, many methods have been proposed, but most of them focus on only one classifier and cannot make full use of the large number of negative samples to improve predicting performance. This study proposed a predictor called enDNA-Prot for DNA-binding protein identification by employing the ensemble learning technique. Experiential results showed that enDNA-Prot was comparable with DNA-Prot and outperformed DNAbinder and iDNA-Prot with performance improvement in the range of 3.97–9.52% in ACC and 0.08–0.19 in MCC. Furthermore, when the benchmark dataset was expanded with negative samples, the performance of enDNA-Prot outperformed the three existing methods by 2.83–16.63% in terms of ACC and 0.02–0.16 in terms of MCC. It indicated that enDNA-Prot is an effective method for DNA-binding protein identification and expanding training dataset with negative samples can improve its performance. For the convenience of the vast majority of experimental scientists, we developed a user-friendly web-server for enDNA-Prot which is freely accessible to the public.

  6. Cytosolic DNA Sensor Upregulation Accompanies DNA Electrotransfer in B16.F10 Melanoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Znidar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In several preclinical tumor models, antitumor effects occur after intratumoral electroporation, also known as electrotransfer, of plasmid DNA devoid of a therapeutic gene. In mouse melanomas, these effects are preceded by significant elevation of several proinflammatory cytokines. These observations implicate the binding and activation of intracellular DNA-specific pattern recognition receptors or DNA sensors in response to DNA electrotransfer. In tumors, IFNβ mRNA and protein levels significantly increased. The mRNAs of several DNA sensors were detected, and DAI, DDX60, and p204 tended to be upregulated. These effects were accompanied with reduced tumor growth and increased tumor necrosis. In B16.F10 cells in culture, IFNβ mRNA and protein levels were significantly upregulated. The mRNAs for several DNA sensors were present in these cells; DNA-dependent activator of interferon regulatory factor (DAI, DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp box polypeptide 60 (DDX60, and p204 were significantly upregulated while DDX60 protein levels were coordinately upregulated. Upregulation of DNA sensors in tumors could be masked by the lower transfection efficiency compared to in vitro or to dilution by other tumor cell types. Mirroring the observation of tumor necrosis, cells underwent a significant DNA concentration-dependent decrease in proliferation and survival. Taken together, these results indicate that DNA electrotransfer may cause the upregulation of several intracellular DNA sensors in B16.F10 cells, inducing effects in vitro and potentially in vivo.

  7. Residues R199H200 of prototype foamy virus transactivator Bel1 contribute to its binding with LTR and IP promoters but not its nuclear localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Qinglin; Tan, Juan; Cui, Xiaoxu; Luo, Di; Yu, Miao; Liang, Chen; Qiao, Wentao

    2014-01-01

    Prototype foamy virus encodes a transactivator called Bel1 that enhances viral gene transcription and is essential for PFV replication. Nuclear localization of Bel1 has been reported to rely on two proximal basic motifs R 199 H 200 and R 221 R 222 R 223 that likely function together as a bipartite nuclear localization signal. In this study, we report that mutating R 221 R 222 R 223 , but not R 199 H 200 , relocates Bel1 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, suggesting an essential role for R 221 R 222 R 223 in the nuclear localization of Bel1. Although not affecting the nuclear localization of Bel1, mutating R 199 H 200 disables Bel1 from transactivating PFV promoters. Results of EMSA reveal that the R 199 H 200 residues are vital for the binding of Bel1 to viral promoter DNA. Moreover, mutating R 199 H 200 in Bel1 impairs PFV replication to a much greater extent than mutating R 221 R 222 R 223 . Collectively, our findings suggest that R 199 H 200 directly participate in Bel1 binding to viral promoter DNA and are indispensible for Bel1 transactivation activity. - Highlights: • The R 221 R 222 R 223 residues are essential for the nuclear localization of Bel1. • Although not affecting the nuclear localization of Bel1, mutating R 199 H 200 disables Bel1 from transactivating PFV promoters. • The R 199 H 200 residues directly participate in Bel1 binding to viral promoter DNA. • Mutating R 199 H 200 in Bel1 impairs PFV replication to a much greater extent than mutating R 221 R 222 R 223

  8. T cell recognition of breast cancer antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nadia Viborg; Andersen, Sofie Ramskov; Andersen, Rikke Sick

    Recent studies are encouraging research of breast cancer immunogenicity to evaluate the applicability ofimmunotherapy as a treatment strategy. The epitope landscape in breast cancer is minimally described, thus it is necessary to identify T cell targets to develop immune mediated therapies.......This project investigates four proteins commonly upregulated in breast cancer and thus probable tumor associated antigens (TAAs). Aromatase, prolactin, NEK3, and PIAS3 contribute to increase growth, survival, and motility of malignant cells. Aspiring to uncover novel epitopes for cytotoxic T cells, a reverse...... recognition utilizing DNA barcode labeled MHC multimers to screen peripheral blood lymphocytes from breast cancer patients and healthy donor samples. Signif-icantly more TAA specific T cell responses were detected in breast cancer patients than healthy donors for both HLA-A*0201 (P

  9. [Molecular dynamics of immune complex of photoadduct-containing DNA with Fab-Anti-DNA antibody fragment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akberova, N I; Zhmurov, A A; Nevzorova, T A; Litvinov, R I

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies to DNA play an important role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. The elucidation of structural mechanisms of both the antigen recognition and the interaction of anti-DNA antibodies with DNA will help to understand the role of DNA-containing immune complexes in various pathologies and can provide a basis for new treatment modalities. Moreover, the DNA-antibody complex is an analog of specific intracellular DNA-protein interactions. In this work, we used in silico molecular dynamic simulations of bimolecular complexes of the dsDNA segment containing the Fab fragment of an anti-DNA antibody to obtain the detailed thermodynamic and structural characteristics of dynamic intermolecular interactions. Using computationally modified crystal structure of the Fab-DNA complex (PDB ID: 3VW3), we studied the equilibrium molecular dynamics of the 64M-5 antibody Fab fragment associated with the dsDNA fragment containing the thymine dimer, the product of DNA photodamage. Amino acid residues that constitute paratopes and the complementary nucleotide epitopes for the Fab-DNA construct were identified. Stacking and electrostatic interactions were found to play the main role in mediating the most specific antibody-dsDNA contacts, while hydrogen bonds were less significant. These findings may shed light on the formation and properties of pathogenic anti-DNA antibodies in autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus associated with skin photosensitivity and DNA photodamage.

  10. Online handwritten mathematical expression recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyükbayrak, Hakan; Yanikoglu, Berrin; Erçil, Aytül

    2007-01-01

    We describe a system for recognizing online, handwritten mathematical expressions. The system is designed with a user-interface for writing scientific articles, supporting the recognition of basic mathematical expressions as well as integrals, summations, matrices etc. A feed-forward neural network recognizes symbols which are assumed to be single-stroke and a recursive algorithm parses the expression by combining neural network output and the structure of the expression. Preliminary results show that writer-dependent recognition rates are very high (99.8%) while writer-independent symbol recognition rates are lower (75%). The interface associated with the proposed system integrates the built-in recognition capabilities of the Microsoft's Tablet PC API for recognizing textual input and supports conversion of hand-drawn figures into PNG format. This enables the user to enter text, mathematics and draw figures in a single interface. After recognition, all output is combined into one LATEX code and compiled into a PDF file.

  11. Viewpoint Manifolds for Action Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souvenir Richard

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Action recognition from video is a problem that has many important applications to human motion analysis. In real-world settings, the viewpoint of the camera cannot always be fixed relative to the subject, so view-invariant action recognition methods are needed. Previous view-invariant methods use multiple cameras in both the training and testing phases of action recognition or require storing many examples of a single action from multiple viewpoints. In this paper, we present a framework for learning a compact representation of primitive actions (e.g., walk, punch, kick, sit that can be used for video obtained from a single camera for simultaneous action recognition and viewpoint estimation. Using our method, which models the low-dimensional structure of these actions relative to viewpoint, we show recognition rates on a publicly available dataset previously only achieved using multiple simultaneous views.

  12. The Coding of Biological Information: From Nucleotide Sequence to Protein Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štambuk, Nikola

    The paper reviews the classic results of Swanson, Dayhoff, Grantham, Blalock and Root-Bernstein, which link genetic code nucleotide patterns to the protein structure, evolution and molecular recognition. Symbolic representation of the binary addresses defining particular nucleotide and amino acid properties is discussed, with consideration of: structure and metric of the code, direct correspondence between amino acid and nucleotide information, and molecular recognition of the interacting protein motifs coded by the complementary DNA and RNA strands.

  13. Large branched self-assembled DNA complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosch, Paul; Waelti, Christoph; Middelberg, Anton P J; Davies, A Giles

    2007-01-01

    Many biological molecules have been demonstrated to self-assemble into complex structures and networks by using their very efficient and selective molecular recognition processes. The use of biological molecules as scaffolds for the construction of functional devices by self-assembling nanoscale complexes onto the scaffolds has recently attracted significant attention and many different applications in this field have emerged. In particular DNA, owing to its inherent sophisticated self-organization and molecular recognition properties, has served widely as a scaffold for various nanotechnological self-assembly applications, with metallic and semiconducting nanoparticles, proteins, macromolecular complexes, inter alia, being assembled onto designed DNA scaffolds. Such scaffolds may typically contain multiple branch-points and comprise a number of DNA molecules selfassembled into the desired configuration. Previously, several studies have used synthetic methods to produce the constituent DNA of the scaffolds, but this typically constrains the size of the complexes. For applications that require larger self-assembling DNA complexes, several tens of nanometers or more, other techniques need to be employed. In this article, we discuss a generic technique to generate large branched DNA macromolecular complexes

  14. Specification for projects of radiogeologic recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This instruction is a guidance to achievement of radiogeologic recognition projects. The radiogeologic recognition is a prospecting method that join the classic geologic recognition with measures of rock radioactivity. (C.M.)

  15. DNA Vaccines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    diseases. Keywords. DNA vaccine, immune response, antibodies, infectious diseases. GENERAL .... tein vaccines require expensive virus/protein purification tech- niques as ... sphere continue to remain major health hazards in developing nations. ... significance since it can be produced at a very low cost and can be stored ...

  16. DNA Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Ellen S.; Bertino, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a simulation activity that allow students to work through the exercise of DNA profiling and to grapple with some analytical and ethical questions involving a couple arranging with a surrogate mother to have a baby. Can be used to teach the principles of restriction enzyme digestion, gel electrophoresis, and probe hybridization. (MDH)

  17. Circular viral DNA detection and junction sequence analysis from PBMC of SHIV-infected cynomolgus monkeys with undetectable virus plasma RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cara, Andrea; Maggiorella, Maria Teresa; Bona, Roberta; Sernicola, Leonardo; Baroncelli, Silvia; Negri, Donatella R.M.; Leone, Pasqualina; Fagrouch, Zahra; Heeney, Jonathan; Titti, Fausto; Cafaro, Aurelio; Ensoli, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Extrachromosomal forms of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 can be detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) from HIV-infected patients in the absence of detectable viral replication and are thought to be a sign of active but cryptic virus replication. No information, however, are available on whether these forms are also present in animal models for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and on their relation with other methods of detection of virus replication. To this aim, a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach was used to detect and analyze unintegrated circular 2-LTR-containing forms in PBMC of simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)89.6P infected cynomolgus monkeys with RNA levels ranging between 1.8x10 6 and less than 50 copies/ml of plasma. 2-LTR forms were detected in 96.5% of monkeys' samples above 50 copies/ml of plasma, whereas they were present in 75.8% of monkeys' samples below 50 copies/ml of plasma. Persistence of unintegrated viral DNA in monkeys with undetectable plasma RNA could indicate either stability in non-dividing cells or ongoing low levels of viral replication in dividing cells

  18. Dual Recognition of Human Telomeric G-quadruplex by Neomycin-anthraquinone Conjugate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Nihar; Davis, Erik; Xue, Liang

    2013-01-01

    The authors report the recognition of a G-quadruplex formed by four repeat human telomeric DNA with aminosugar intercalator conjugates. The recognition of G-quadruplex through dual binding mode ligands significantly increased the affinity of ligands for G-quadruplex. One such example is a neomycin-anthraquinone 2 which exhibited nanomolar affinity for the quadruplex, and the affinity of 2 is nearly 1000 fold higher for human telomeric G-quadruplex DNA than its constituent units, neomycin and anthraquinone. PMID:23698792

  19. Autonomy, recognition and education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Vitório Cenci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses Honneth’s concept of autonomy from two dimensions of his work, distinct, though inseparable. The first one is suggested through the subject’s positive practical self-relation linked to the patterns of reciprocal recognition of love, right and social esteem; the second is formulated as non-centered autonomy opposed to the present-day criticism of the modern autonomous subject encompassing three levels, namely: the capacity of linguistic articulation, the narrative coherence of life and the complementation of being guided by principles with some criteria of moral sensitivity to the context. We defend the position that, by metaphysically anchoring the concept of autonomy onto the intersubjective assumptions of his/her theory of the subject, and exploring it linked to the subject’s positive practical self-relation and to a non-centered meaning, Honneth has managed to renew it, which allows drawing important consequences of such effort to the field of education.

  20. Pattern recognition in spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebran, M; Paletou, F

    2017-01-01

    We present a new automated procedure that simultaneously derives the effective temperature T eff , surface gravity log g , metallicity [ Fe/H ], and equatorial projected rotational velocity v e sin i for stars. The procedure is inspired by the well-known PCA-based inversion of spectropolarimetric full-Stokes solar data, which was used both for Zeeman and Hanle effects. The efficiency and accuracy of this procedure have been proven for FGK, A, and late type dwarf stars of K and M spectral types. Learning databases are generated from the Elodie stellar spectra library using observed spectra for which fundamental parameters were already evaluated or with synthetic data. The synthetic spectra are calculated using ATLAS9 model atmospheres. This technique helped us to detect many peculiar stars such as Am, Ap, HgMn, SiEuCr and binaries. This fast and efficient technique could be used every time a pattern recognition is needed. One important application is the understanding of the physical properties of planetary surfaces by comparing aboard instrument data to synthetic ones. (paper)

  1. Vision-Based Navigation and Recognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosenfeld, Azriel

    1998-01-01

    .... (4) Invariants: both geometric and other types. (5) Human faces: Analysis of images of human faces, including feature extraction, face recognition, compression, and recognition of facial expressions...

  2. Vision-Based Navigation and Recognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosenfeld, Azriel

    1996-01-01

    .... (4) Invariants -- both geometric and other types. (5) Human faces: Analysis of images of human faces, including feature extraction, face recognition, compression, and recognition of facial expressions...

  3. Recognition Using Classification and Segmentation Scoring

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kimball, Owen; Ostendorf, Mari; Rohlicek, Robin

    1992-01-01

    .... We describe an approach to connected word recognition that allows the use of segmental information through an explicit decomposition of the recognition criterion into classification and segmentation scoring...

  4. Auditory Modeling for Noisy Speech Recognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    ... digital filtering for noise cancellation which interfaces to speech recognition software. It uses auditory features in speech recognition training, and provides applications to multilingual spoken language translation...

  5. Kernel learning algorithms for face recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jun-Bao; Pan, Jeng-Shyang

    2013-01-01

    Kernel Learning Algorithms for Face Recognition covers the framework of kernel based face recognition. This book discusses the advanced kernel learning algorithms and its application on face recognition. This book also focuses on the theoretical deviation, the system framework and experiments involving kernel based face recognition. Included within are algorithms of kernel based face recognition, and also the feasibility of the kernel based face recognition method. This book provides researchers in pattern recognition and machine learning area with advanced face recognition methods and its new

  6. The strategies of DNA immobilization and hybridization detection mechanism in the construction of electrochemical DNA sensor: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahwarhar Izuan Abdul Rashid

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, electrochemical deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA sensor has recently emerged as promising alternative clinical diagnostic devices especially for infectious disease by exploiting DNA recognition events and converting them into an electrochemical signal. This is because the existing DNA diagnostic method possesses certain drawbacks such as time-consuming, expensive, laborious, low selectivity and sensitivity. DNA immobilization strategies and mechanism of electrochemical detection are two the most important aspects that should be considered before developing highly selective and sensitive electrochemical DNA sensor. Here, we focus on some recent strategies for DNA probes immobilization on the surface of electrochemical transducer such as adsorption, covalent bonding and Avidin/Streptavidin-Biotin interaction on the electrode surface for specific interaction with its complementary DNA target. A numerous approach for DNA hybridization detection based electrochemical technique that frequently used including direct DNA electrochemical detection and label based electrochemical (redox-active indicator, enzyme label and nanoparticles were also discussed in aiming to provide general guide for the design of electrochemical DNA sensor. We also discussed the challenges and suggestions to improve the application of electrochemical DNA sensor at point-care setting. Keywords: Electrochemical DNA sensor, DNA immobilization, DNA hybridization, Electrochemical mechanism

  7. Facial recognition in education system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krithika, L. B.; Venkatesh, K.; Rathore, S.; Kumar, M. Harish

    2017-11-01

    Human beings exploit emotions comprehensively for conveying messages and their resolution. Emotion detection and face recognition can provide an interface between the individuals and technologies. The most successful applications of recognition analysis are recognition of faces. Many different techniques have been used to recognize the facial expressions and emotion detection handle varying poses. In this paper, we approach an efficient method to recognize the facial expressions to track face points and distances. This can automatically identify observer face movements and face expression in image. This can capture different aspects of emotion and facial expressions.

  8. Iris recognition via plenoptic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J.; Boehnen, Chris Bensing; Bolme, David S.

    2017-11-07

    Iris recognition can be accomplished for a wide variety of eye images by using plenoptic imaging. Using plenoptic technology, it is possible to correct focus after image acquisition. One example technology reconstructs images having different focus depths and stitches them together, resulting in a fully focused image, even in an off-angle gaze scenario. Another example technology determines three-dimensional data for an eye and incorporates it into an eye model used for iris recognition processing. Another example technology detects contact lenses. Application of the technologies can result in improved iris recognition under a wide variety of scenarios.

  9. Face Recognition using Approximate Arithmetic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marso, Karol

    Face recognition is image processing technique which aims to identify human faces and found its use in various different fields for example in security. Throughout the years this field evolved and there are many approaches and many different algorithms which aim to make the face recognition as effective...... processing applications the results do not need to be completely precise and use of the approximate arithmetic can lead to reduction in terms of delay, space and power consumption. In this paper we examine possible use of approximate arithmetic in face recognition using Eigenfaces algorithm....

  10. Two large-scale analyses of Ty1 LTR-retrotransposon de novo insertion events indicate that Ty1 targets nucleosomal DNA near the H2A/H2B interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridier-Nahmias Antoine

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the years, a number of reports have revealed that Ty1 integration occurs in a 1-kb window upstream of Pol III-transcribed genes with an approximate 80-bp periodicity between each integration hotspot and that this targeting requires active Pol III transcription at the site of integration. However, the molecular bases of Ty1 targeting are still not understood. Findings The publications by Baller et al. and Mularoni et al. in the April issue of Genome Res. report the first high-throughput sequencing analysis of Ty1 de novo insertion events. Their observations converge to the same conclusion, that Ty1 targets a specific surface of the nucleosome at he H2A/H2B interface. Conclusion This discovery is important, and should help identifying factor(s involved in Ty1 targeting. Recent data on transposable elements and retroviruses integration site choice obtained by large-scale analyses indicate that transcription and chromatin structure play an important role in this process. The studies reported in this commentary add a new evidence of the importance of chromatin in integration selectivity that should be of interest for everyone interested in transposable elements integration.

  11. Evaluating music emotion recognition:Lessons from music genre recognition?

    OpenAIRE

    Sturm, Bob L.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental problem with nearly all work in music genre recognition (MGR)is that evaluation lacks validity with respect to the principal goals of MGR. This problem also occurs in the evaluation of music emotion recognition (MER). Standard approaches to evaluation, though easy to implement, do not reliably differentiate between recognizing genre or emotion from music, or by virtue of confounding factors in signals (e.g., equalization). We demonstrate such problems for evaluating an MER syste...

  12. DNA barcode goes two-dimensions: DNA QR code web server.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Shi, Linchun; Xu, Xiaolan; Li, Huan; Xing, Hang; Liang, Dong; Jiang, Kun; Pang, Xiaohui; Song, Jingyuan; Chen, Shilin

    2012-01-01

    The DNA barcoding technology uses a standard region of DNA sequence for species identification and discovery. At present, "DNA barcode" actually refers to DNA sequences, which are not amenable to information storage, recognition, and retrieval. Our aim is to identify the best symbology that can represent DNA barcode sequences in practical applications. A comprehensive set of sequences for five DNA barcode markers ITS2, rbcL, matK, psbA-trnH, and CO1 was used as the test data. Fifty-three different types of one-dimensional and ten two-dimensional barcode symbologies were compared based on different criteria, such as coding capacity, compression efficiency, and error detection ability. The quick response (QR) code was found to have the largest coding capacity and relatively high compression ratio. To facilitate the further usage of QR code-based DNA barcodes, a web server was developed and is accessible at http://qrfordna.dnsalias.org. The web server allows users to retrieve the QR code for a species of interests, convert a DNA sequence to and from a QR code, and perform species identification based on local and global sequence similarities. In summary, the first comprehensive evaluation of various barcode symbologies has been carried out. The QR code has been found to be the most appropriate symbology for DNA barcode sequences. A web server has also been constructed to allow biologists to utilize QR codes in practical DNA barcoding applications.

  13. DNA barcode goes two-dimensions: DNA QR code web server.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Liu

    Full Text Available The DNA barcoding technology uses a standard region of DNA sequence for species identification and discovery. At present, "DNA barcode" actually refers to DNA sequences, which are not amenable to information storage, recognition, and retrieval. Our aim is to identify the best symbology that can represent DNA barcode sequences in practical applications. A comprehensive set of sequences for five DNA barcode markers ITS2, rbcL, matK, psbA-trnH, and CO1 was used as the test data. Fifty-three different types of one-dimensional and ten two-dimensional barcode symbologies were compared based on different criteria, such as coding capacity, compression efficiency, and error detection ability. The quick response (QR code was found to have the largest coding capacity and relatively high compression ratio. To facilitate the further usage of QR code-based DNA barcodes, a web server was developed and is accessible at http://qrfordna.dnsalias.org. The web server allows users to retrieve the QR code for a species of interests, convert a DNA sequence to and from a QR code, and perform species identification based on local and global sequence similarities. In summary, the first comprehensive evaluation of various barcode symbologies has been carried out. The QR code has been found to be the most appropriate symbology for DNA barcode sequences. A web server has also been constructed to allow biologists to utilize QR codes in practical DNA barcoding applications.

  14. Cocaine promotes both initiation and elongation phase of HIV-1 transcription by activating NF-κB and MSK1 and inducing selective epigenetic modifications at HIV-1 LTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Geetaram; Farley, Kalamo; El-Hage, Nazira; Aiamkitsumrit, Benjamas; Fassnacht, Ryan; Kashanchi, Fatah; Ochem, Alex; Simon, Gary L.; Karn, Jonathan; Hauser, Kurt F.; Tyagi, Mudit

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine accelerates human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) replication by altering specific cell-signaling and epigenetic pathways. We have elucidated the underlying molecular mechanisms through which cocaine exerts its effect in myeloid cells, a major target of HIV-1 in central nervous system (CNS). We demonstrate that cocaine treatment promotes HIV-1 gene expression by activating both nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen- and stress-activated kinase 1 (MSK1). MSK1 subsequently catalyzes the phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10, and p65 subunit of NF-κB at 276th serine residue. These modifications enhance the interaction of NF-κB with P300 and promote the recruitment of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) to the HIV-1 LTR, supporting the development of an open/relaxed chromatin configuration, and facilitating the initiation and elongation phases of HIV-1 transcription. Results are also confirmed in primary monocyte derived macrophages (MDM). Overall, our study provides detailed insights into cocaine-driven HIV-1 transcription and replication. PMID:25980739

  15. Success with voice recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sferrella, Sheila M

    2003-01-01

    You need a compelling reason to implement voice recognition technology. At my institution, the compelling reason was a turnaround time for Radiology results of more than two days. Only 41 percent of our reports were transcribed and signed within 24 hours. In November 1998, a team from Lehigh Valley Hospital went to RSNA and reviewed every voice system on the market. The evaluation was done with the radiologist workflow in mind, and we came back from the meeting with the vendor selection completed. The next steps included developing a business plan, approval of funds, reference calls to more than 15 sites and contract negotiation, all of which took about six months. The department of Radiology at Lehigh Valley Hospital and Health Network (LVHHN) is a multi-site center that performs over 360,000 procedures annually. The department handles all modalities of radiology: general diagnosis, neuroradiology, ultrasound, CT Scan, MRI, interventional radiology, arthography, myelography, bone densitometry, nuclear medicine, PET imaging, vascular lab and other advanced procedures. The department consists of 200 FTEs and a medical staff of more than 40 radiologists. The budget is in the $10.3 million range. There are three hospital sites and four outpatient imaging center sites where services are provided. At Lehigh Valley Hospital, radiologists are not dedicated to one subspecialty, so implementing a voice system by modality was not an option. Because transcription was so far behind, we needed to eliminate that part of the process. As a result, we decided to deploy the system all at once and with the radiologists as editors. The planning and testing phase took about four months, and the implementation took two weeks. We deployed over 40 workstations and trained close to 50 physicians. The radiologists brought in an extra radiologist from our group for the two weeks of training. That allowed us to train without taking a radiologist out of the department. We trained three to six

  16. Site-specific DNA transesterification catalyzed by a restriction enzyme

    OpenAIRE

    Sasnauskas, Giedrius; Connolly, Bernard A.; Halford, Stephen E.; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2007-01-01

    Most restriction endonucleases use Mg2+ to hydrolyze phosphodiester bonds at specific DNA sites. We show here that BfiI, a metal-independent restriction enzyme from the phospholipase D superfamily, catalyzes both DNA hydrolysis and transesterification reactions at its recognition site. In the presence of alcohols such as ethanol or glycerol, it attaches the alcohol covalently to the 5′ terminus of the cleaved DNA. Under certain conditions, the terminal 3′-OH of one DNA strand can attack the t...

  17. Indoor navigation by image recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Io Teng; Leong, Chi Chong; Hong, Ka Wo; Pun, Chi-Man

    2017-07-01

    With the progress of smartphones hardware, it is simple on smartphone using image recognition technique such as face detection. In addition, indoor navigation system development is much slower than outdoor navigation system. Hence, this research proves a usage of image recognition technique for navigation in indoor environment. In this paper, we introduced an indoor navigation application that uses the indoor environment features to locate user's location and a route calculating algorithm to generate an appropriate path for user. The application is implemented on Android smartphone rather than iPhone. Yet, the application design can also be applied on iOS because the design is implemented without using special features only for Android. We found that digital navigation system provides better and clearer location information than paper map. Also, the indoor environment is ideal for Image recognition processing. Hence, the results motivate us to design an indoor navigation system using image recognition.

  18. Pattern recognition and string matching

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Xiuzhen

    2002-01-01

    The research and development of pattern recognition have proven to be of importance in science, technology, and human activity. Many useful concepts and tools from different disciplines have been employed in pattern recognition. Among them is string matching, which receives much theoretical and practical attention. String matching is also an important topic in combinatorial optimization. This book is devoted to recent advances in pattern recognition and string matching. It consists of twenty eight chapters written by different authors, addressing a broad range of topics such as those from classifica­ tion, matching, mining, feature selection, and applications. Each chapter is self-contained, and presents either novel methodological approaches or applications of existing theories and techniques. The aim, intent, and motivation for publishing this book is to pro­ vide a reference tool for the increasing number of readers who depend upon pattern recognition or string matching in some way. This includes student...

  19. License plate recognition (phase B).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    License Plate Recognition (LPR) technology has been used for off-line automobile enforcement purposes. The technology has seen mixed success with correct reading rate as high as 60 to 80% depending on the specific application and environment. This li...

  20. Similarity measures for face recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Vezzetti, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Face recognition has several applications, including security, such as (authentication and identification of device users and criminal suspects), and in medicine (corrective surgery and diagnosis). Facial recognition programs rely on algorithms that can compare and compute the similarity between two sets of images. This eBook explains some of the similarity measures used in facial recognition systems in a single volume. Readers will learn about various measures including Minkowski distances, Mahalanobis distances, Hansdorff distances, cosine-based distances, among other methods. The book also summarizes errors that may occur in face recognition methods. Computer scientists "facing face" and looking to select and test different methods of computing similarities will benefit from this book. The book is also useful tool for students undertaking computer vision courses.

  1. DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlow, R.

    1978-01-01

    Some topics discussed are as follows: difficulty in extrapolating data from E. coli to mammalian systems; mutations caused by UV-induced changes in DNA; mutants deficient in excision repair; other postreplication mechanisms; kinds of excision repair systems; detection of repair by biochemical or biophysical means; human mutants deficient in repair; mutagenic effects of UV on XP cells; and detection of UV-repair defects among XP individuals

  2. RNF111/Arkadia is a SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase that facilitates the DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Sara L; Hansen, Rebecca K; Wagner, Sebastian A

    2013-01-01

    nonproteolytic, K63-linked ubiquitylation of SUMOylated target proteins. We demonstrate that RNF111 promoted ubiquitylation of SUMOylated XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum C) protein, a central DNA damage recognition factor in nucleotide excision repair (NER) extensively regulated by ultraviolet (UV...

  3. Poxvirus uracil-DNA glycosylase-An unusual member of the family I uracil-DNA glycosylases: Poxvirus Uracil-DNA Glycosylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schormann, Norbert [Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham Alabama 35294; Zhukovskaya, Natalia [Department of Microbiology, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia Pennsylvania 19104; Bedwell, Gregory [Department of Microbiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham Alabama 35294; Nuth, Manunya [Department of Microbiology, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia Pennsylvania 19104; Gillilan, Richard [MacCHESS (Macromolecular Diffraction Facility at CHESS) Cornell University, Ithaca New York 14853; Prevelige, Peter E. [Department of Microbiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham Alabama 35294; Ricciardi, Robert P. [Department of Microbiology, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia Pennsylvania 19104; Abramson Cancer Center, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia Pennsylvania 19104; Banerjee, Surajit [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, and NE-CAT Argonne Illinois 60439; Chattopadhyay, Debasish [Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham Alabama 35294

    2016-11-02

    We report that uracil-DNA glycosylases are ubiquitous enzymes, which play a key role repairing damages in DNA and in maintaining genomic integrity by catalyzing the first step in the base excision repair pathway. Within the superfamily of uracil-DNA glycosylases family I enzymes or UNGs are specific for recognizing and removing uracil from DNA. These enzymes feature conserved structural folds, active site residues and use common motifs for DNA binding, uracil recognition and catalysis. Within this family the enzymes of poxviruses are unique and most remarkable in terms of amino acid sequences, characteristic motifs and more importantly for their novel non-enzymatic function in DNA replication. UNG of vaccinia virus, also known as D4, is the most extensively characterized UNG of the poxvirus family. D4 forms an unusual heterodimeric processivity factor by attaching to a poxvirus-specific protein A20, which also binds to the DNA polymerase E9 and recruits other proteins necessary for replication. D4 is thus integrated in the DNA polymerase complex, and its DNA-binding and DNA scanning abilities couple DNA processivity and DNA base excision repair at the replication fork. In conclusion, the adaptations necessary for taking on the new function are reflected in the amino acid sequence and the three-dimensional structure of D4. We provide an overview of the current state of the knowledge on the structure-function relationship of D4.

  4. [Neurological disease and facial recognition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Mitsuru; Sugimoto, Azusa; Kobayakawa, Mutsutaka; Tsuruya, Natsuko

    2012-07-01

    To discuss the neurological basis of facial recognition, we present our case reports of impaired recognition and a review of previous literature. First, we present a case of infarction and discuss prosopagnosia, which has had a large impact on face recognition research. From a study of patient symptoms, we assume that prosopagnosia may be caused by unilateral right occipitotemporal lesion and right cerebral dominance of facial recognition. Further, circumscribed lesion and degenerative disease may also cause progressive prosopagnosia. Apperceptive prosopagnosia is observed in patients with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), pathologically considered as Alzheimer's disease, and associative prosopagnosia in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Second, we discuss face recognition as part of communication. Patients with Parkinson disease show social cognitive impairments, such as difficulty in facial expression recognition and deficits in theory of mind as detected by the reading the mind in the eyes test. Pathological and functional imaging studies indicate that social cognitive impairment in Parkinson disease is possibly related to damages in the amygdalae and surrounding limbic system. The social cognitive deficits can be observed in the early stages of Parkinson disease, and even in the prodromal stage, for example, patients with rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) show impairment in facial expression recognition. Further, patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM 1), which is a multisystem disease that mainly affects the muscles, show social cognitive impairment similar to that of Parkinson disease. Our previous study showed that facial expression recognition impairment of DM 1 patients is associated with lesion in the amygdalae and insulae. Our study results indicate that behaviors and personality traits in DM 1 patients, which are revealed by social cognitive impairment, are attributable to dysfunction of the limbic system.

  5. Studying DNA looping by single-molecule FRET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tung T; Kim, Harold D

    2014-06-28

    Bending of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) is associated with many important biological processes such as DNA-protein recognition and DNA packaging into nucleosomes. Thermodynamics of dsDNA bending has been studied by a method called cyclization which relies on DNA ligase to covalently join short sticky ends of a dsDNA. However, ligation efficiency can be affected by many factors that are not related to dsDNA looping such as the DNA structure surrounding the joined sticky ends, and ligase can also affect the apparent looping rate through mechanisms such as nonspecific binding. Here, we show how to measure dsDNA looping kinetics without ligase by detecting transient DNA loop formation by FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer). dsDNA molecules are constructed using a simple PCR-based protocol with a FRET pair and a biotin linker. The looping probability density known as the J factor is extracted from the looping rate and the annealing rate between two disconnected sticky ends. By testing two dsDNAs with different intrinsic curvatures, we show that the J factor is sensitive to the intrinsic shape of the dsDNA.

  6. Voice congruency facilitates word recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Campeanu

    Full Text Available Behavioral studies of spoken word memory have shown that context congruency facilitates both word and source recognition, though the level at which context exerts its influence remains equivocal. We measured event-related potentials (ERPs while participants performed both types of recognition task with words spoken in four voices. Two voice parameters (i.e., gender and accent varied between speakers, with the possibility that none, one or two of these parameters was congruent between study and test. Results indicated that reinstating the study voice at test facilitated both word and source recognition, compared to similar or no context congruency at test. Behavioral effects were paralleled by two ERP modulations. First, in the word recognition test, the left parietal old/new effect showed a positive deflection reflective of context congruency between study and test words. Namely, the same speaker condition provided the most positive deflection of all correctly identified old words. In the source recognition test, a right frontal positivity was found for the same speaker condition compared to the different speaker conditions, regardless of response success. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that the benefit of context congruency is reflected behaviorally and in ERP modulations traditionally associated with recognition memory.

  7. Voice congruency facilitates word recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campeanu, Sandra; Craik, Fergus I M; Alain, Claude

    2013-01-01

    Behavioral studies of spoken word memory have shown that context congruency facilitates both word and source recognition, though the level at which context exerts its influence remains equivocal. We measured event-related potentials (ERPs) while participants performed both types of recognition task with words spoken in four voices. Two voice parameters (i.e., gender and accent) varied between speakers, with the possibility that none, one or two of these parameters was congruent between study and test. Results indicated that reinstating the study voice at test facilitated both word and source recognition, compared to similar or no context congruency at test. Behavioral effects were paralleled by two ERP modulations. First, in the word recognition test, the left parietal old/new effect showed a positive deflection reflective of context congruency between study and test words. Namely, the same speaker condition provided the most positive deflection of all correctly identified old words. In the source recognition test, a right frontal positivity was found for the same speaker condition compared to the different speaker conditions, regardless of response success. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that the benefit of context congruency is reflected behaviorally and in ERP modulations traditionally associated with recognition memory.

  8. Nucleic Acid Sensors Involved in the Recognition of HBV in the Liver–Specific in vivo Transfection Mouse Models—Pattern Recognition Receptors and Sensors for HBV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chean Ring Leong

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cellular innate immune system recognizing pathogen infection is critical for the host defense against viruses. Hepatitis B virus (HBV is a DNA virus with a unique life cycle whereby the DNA and RNA intermediates present at different phases. However, it is still unclear whether the viral DNA or RNA templates are recognized by the pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs to trigger host antiviral immune response. Here in this article, we review the recent advances in the progress of the HBV studies, focusing on the nucleic acid sensors and the pathways involved in the recognition of HBV in the liver–specific in vivo transfection mouse models. Hydrodynamic injection transfecting the hepatocytes in the gene-disrupted mouse model with the HBV replicative genome DNA has revealed that IFNAR and IRF3/7 are indispensable in HBV eradication in the mice liver but not the RNA sensing pathways. Interestingly, accumulating evidence of the recent studies has demonstrated that HBV markedly interfered with IFN-β induction and antiviral immunity mediated by the Stimulator of interferon genes (STING, which has been identified as a central factor in foreign DNA recognition and antiviral innate immunity. This review will present the current understanding of innate immunity in HBV infection and of the challenges for clearing of the HBV infection.

  9. DNA Packaging by λ-Like Bacteriophages: Mutations Broadening the Packaging Specificity of Terminase, the λ-Packaging Enzyme

    OpenAIRE

    Feiss, Michael; Reynolds, Erin; Schrock, Morgan; Sippy, Jean

    2010-01-01

    The DNA-packaging specificities of phages λ and 21 depend on the specific DNA interactions of the small terminase subunits, which have support helix-turn-recognition helix-wing DNA-binding motifs. λ-Terminase with the recognition helix of 21 preferentially packages 21 DNA. This chimeric terminase's ability to package λDNA is reduced ∼20-fold. Phage λ with the chimeric terminase is unable to form plaques, but pseudorevertants are readily obtained. Some pseudorevertants have trans-acting suppre...

  10. Chirality as a tool in nucleic acid recognition: principles and relevance in biotechnology and in medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradini, Roberto; Sforza, Stefano; Tedeschi, Tullia; Marchelli, Rosangela

    2007-05-05

    The understanding of the interaction of chiral species with DNA or RNA is very important for the development of new tools in biology and of new drugs. Several cases in which chirality is a crucial point in determining the DNA binding mode are reviewed and discussed, with the aim of illustrating how chirality can be considered as a tool for improving the understanding of mechanisms and the effectiveness of nucleic acid recognition. The review is divided into two parts: the former describes examples of chiral species interacting with DNA: intercalators, metal complexes, and groove binders; the latter part is dedicated to chirality in DNA analogs, with discussion of phosphate stereochemistry and chirality of ribose substitutes, in particular of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) for which a number of works have been published recently dealing with the effect of chirality in DNA recognition. The discussion is intended to show how enantiomeric recognition originates at the molecular level, by exploiting the enormous progresses recently achieved in the field of structural characterization of complexes formed by nucleic acid with their ligands by crystallographic and spectroscopic methods. Examples of application of the DNA binding molecules described and the role of chirality in DNA recognition relevant for biotechnology or medicinal chemistry are reported. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Hemi-methylated DNA regulates DNA methylation inheritance through allosteric activation of H3 ubiquitylation by UHRF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Joseph S; Cornett, Evan M; Goldfarb, Dennis; DaRosa, Paul A; Li, Zimeng M; Yan, Feng; Dickson, Bradley M; Guo, Angela H; Cantu, Daniel V; Kaustov, Lilia; Brown, Peter J; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Erie, Dorothy A; Major, Michael B; Klevit, Rachel E; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Kuhlman, Brian; Strahl, Brian D; Rothbart, Scott B

    2016-09-06

    The epigenetic inheritance of DNA methylation requires UHRF1, a histone- and DNA-binding RING E3 ubiquitin ligase that recruits DNMT1 to sites of newly replicated DNA through ubiquitylation of histone H3. UHRF1 binds DNA with selectivity towards hemi-methylated CpGs (HeDNA); however, the contribution of HeDNA sensing to UHRF1 function remains elusive. Here, we reveal that the interaction of UHRF1 with HeDNA is required for DNA methylation but is dispensable for chromatin interaction, which is governed by reciprocal positive cooperativity between the UHRF1 histone- and DNA-binding domains. HeDNA recognition activates UHRF1 ubiquitylation towards multiple lysines on the H3 tail adjacent to the UHRF1 histone-binding site. Collectively, our studies are the first demonstrations of a DNA-protein interaction and an epigenetic modification directly regulating E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. They also define an orchestrated epigenetic control mechanism involving modifications both to histones and DNA that facilitate UHRF1 chromatin targeting, H3 ubiquitylation, and DNA methylation inheritance.

  12. Comparing Face Detection and Recognition Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Korra, Jyothi

    2016-01-01

    This paper implements and compares different techniques for face detection and recognition. One is find where the face is located in the images that is face detection and second is face recognition that is identifying the person. We study three techniques in this paper: Face detection using self organizing map (SOM), Face recognition by projection and nearest neighbor and Face recognition using SVM.

  13. In Depth Characterization of Repetitive DNA in 23 Plant Genomes Reveals Sources of Genome Size Variation in the Legume Tribe Fabeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macas, Jiří; Novák, Petr; Pellicer, Jaume; Čížková, Jana; Koblížková, Andrea; Neumann, Pavel; Fuková, Iva; Doležel, Jaroslav; Kelly, Laura J; Leitch, Ilia J

    2015-01-01

    The differential accumulation and elimination of repetitive DNA are key drivers of genome size variation in flowering plants, yet there have been few studies which have analysed how different types of repeats in related species contribute to genome size evolution within a phylogenetic context. This question is addressed here by conducting large-scale comparative analysis of repeats in 23 species from four genera of the monophyletic legume tribe Fabeae, representing a 7.6-fold variation in genome size. Phylogenetic analysis and genome size reconstruction revealed that this diversity arose from genome size expansions and contractions in different lineages during the evolution of Fabeae. Employing a combination of low-pass genome sequencing with novel bioinformatic approaches resulted in identification and quantification of repeats making up 55-83% of the investigated genomes. In turn, this enabled an analysis of how each major repeat type contributed to the genome size variation encountered. Differential accumulation of repetitive DNA was found to account for 85% of the genome size differences between the species, and most (57%) of this variation was found to be driven by a single lineage of Ty3/gypsy LTR-retrotransposons, the Ogre elements. Although the amounts of several other lineages of LTR-retrotransposons and the total amount of satellite DNA were also positively correlated with genome size, their contributions to genome size variation were much smaller (up to 6%). Repeat analysis within a phylogenetic framework also revealed profound differences in the extent of sequence conservation between different repeat types across Fabeae. In addition to these findings, the study has provided a proof of concept for the approach combining recent developments in sequencing and bioinformatics to perform comparative analyses of repetitive DNAs in a large number of non-model species without the need to assemble their genomes.

  14. Protection of hematopoietic cells from O(6)-alkylation damage by O(6)-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase gene transfer: studies with different O(6)-alkylating agents and retroviral backbones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, M; Bardenheuer, W; Sorg, U R; Seeber, S; Flasshove, M; Moritz, T

    2001-07-01

    Overexpression of O(6)-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) can protect hematopoietic cells from O(6)-alkylation damage. To identify possible clinical applications of this technology we compared the effect of MGMT gene transfer on the hematotoxicity induced by different O(6)-alkylating agents in clinical use: the chloroethylnitrosoureas ACNU, BCNU, CCNU and the tetrazine derivative temozolomide. In addition, various retroviral vectors expressing the MGMT-cDNA were investigated to identify optimal viral backbones for hematoprotection by MGMT expression. Protection from ACNU, BCNU, CCNU or temozolomide toxicity was evaluated utilizing a Moloney murine leukemia virus-based retroviral vector (N2/Zip-PGK-MGMT) to transduce primary murine bone marrow cells. Increased resistance in murine colony-forming units (CFU) was demonstrated for all four drugs. In comparison to mock-transduced controls, after transduction with N2/Zip-PGK-MGMT the IC50 for CFU increased on average 4.7-fold for ACNU, 2.5-fold for BCNU, 6.3-fold for CCNU and 1.5-fold for temozolomide. To study the effect of the retroviral backbone on hematoprotection various vectors expressing the human MGMT-cDNA from a murine embryonic sarcoma virus LTR (MSCV-MGMT) or a hybrid spleen focus-forming/murine embryonic sarcoma virus LTR (SF1-MGMT) were compared with the N2/Zip-PGK-MGMT vector. While all vectors increased resistance of transduced human CFU to ACNU, the SF1-MGMT construct was most efficient especially at high ACNU concentrations (8-12 microg/ml). Similar results were obtained for protection of murine high-proliferative-potential colony-forming cells. These data may help to optimize treatment design and retroviral constructs in future clinical studies aiming at hematoprotection by MGMT gene transfer.

  15. In Depth Characterization of Repetitive DNA in 23 Plant Genomes Reveals Sources of Genome Size Variation in the Legume Tribe Fabeae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Macas

    Full Text Available The differential accumulation and elimination of repetitive DNA are key drivers of genome size variation in flowering plants, yet there have been few studies which have analysed how different types of repeats in related species contribute to genome size evolution within a phylogenetic context. This question is addressed here by conducting large-scale comparative analysis of repeats in 23 species from four genera of the monophyletic legume tribe Fabeae, representing a 7.6-fold variation in genome size. Phylogenetic analysis and genome size reconstruction revealed that this diversity arose from genome size expansions and contractions in different lineages during the evolution of Fabeae. Employing a combination of low-pass genome sequencing with novel bioinformatic approaches resulted in identification and quantification of repeats making up 55-83% of the investigated genomes. In turn, this enabled an analysis of how each major repeat type contributed to the genome size variation encountered. Differential accumulation of repetitive DNA was found to account for 85% of the genome size differences between the species, and most (57% of this variation was found to be driven by a single lineage of Ty3/gypsy LTR-retrotransposons, the Ogre elements. Although the amounts of several other lineages of LTR-retrotransposons and the total amount of satellite DNA were also positively correlated with genome size, their contributions to genome size variation were much smaller (up to 6%. Repeat analysis within a phylogenetic framework also revealed profound differences in the extent of sequence conservation between different repeat types across Fabeae. In addition to these findings, the study has provided a proof of concept for the approach combining recent developments in sequencing and bioinformatics to perform comparative analyses of repetitive DNAs in a large number of non-model species without the need to assemble their genomes.

  16. Genetic determinants of mate recognition in Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Terry W; Shearer, Tonya L; Smith, Hilary A; Kubanek, Julia; Gribble, Kristin E; Welch, David B Mark

    2009-09-09

    Mate choice is of central importance to most animals, influencing population structure, speciation, and ultimately the survival of a species. Mating behavior of male brachionid rotifers is triggered by the product of a chemosensory gene, a glycoprotein on the body surface of females called the mate recognition pheromone. The mate recognition pheromone has been biochemically characterized, but little was known about the gene(s). We describe the isolation and characterization of the mate recognition pheromone gene through protein purification, N-terminal amino acid sequence determination, identification of the mate recognition pheromone gene from a cDNA library, sequencing, and RNAi knockdown to confirm the functional role of the mate recognition pheromone gene in rotifer mating. A 29 kD protein capable of eliciting rotifer male circling was isolated by high-performance liquid chromatography. Two transcript types containing the N-terminal sequence were identified in a cDNA library; further characterization by screening a genomic library and by polymerase chain reaction revealed two genes belonging to each type. Each gene begins with a signal peptide region followed by nearly perfect repeats of an 87 to 92 codon motif with no codons between repeats and the final motif prematurely terminated by the stop codon. The two Type A genes contain four and seven repeats and the two Type B genes contain three and five repeats, respectively. Only the Type B gene with three repeats encodes a peptide with a molecular weight of 29 kD. Each repeat of the Type B gene products contains three asparagines as potential sites for N-glycosylation; there are no asparagines in the Type A genes. RNAi with Type A double-stranded RNA did not result in less circling than in the phosphate-buffered saline control, but transfection with Type B double-stranded RNA significantly reduced male circling by 17%. The very low divergence between repeat units, even at synonymous positions, suggests that the

  17. DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Zeeland, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    In this chapter a series of DNA repair pathways are discussed which are available to the cell to cope with the problem of DNA damaged by chemical or physical agents. In the case of microorganisms our knowledge about the precise mechanism of each DNA repair pathway and the regulation of it has been improved considerably when mutants deficient in these repair mechanisms became available. In the case of mammalian cells in culture, until recently there were very little repair deficient mutants available, because in almost all mammalian cells in culture at least the diploid number of chromosomes is present. Therefore the frequency of repair deficient mutants in such populations is very low. Nevertheless because replica plating techniques are improving some mutants from Chinese hamsters ovary cells and L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells are now available. In the case of human cells, cultures obtained from patients with certain genetic diseases are available. A number of cells appear to be sensitive to some chemical or physical mutagens. These include cells from patients suffering from xeroderma pigmentosum, Ataxia telangiectasia, Fanconi's anemia, Cockayne's syndrome. However, only in the case of xeroderma pigmentosum cells, has the sensitivity to ultraviolet light been clearly correlated with a deficiency in excision repair of pyrimidine dimers. Furthermore the work with strains obtained from biopsies from man is difficult because these cells generally have low cloning efficiencies and also have a limited lifespan in vitro. It is therefore very important that more repair deficient mutants will become available from established cell lines from human or animal origin

  18. Bidirectional Modulation of Recognition Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Jonathan W; Poeta, Devon L; Jacobson, Tara K; Zolnik, Timothy A; Neske, Garrett T; Connors, Barry W; Burwell, Rebecca D

    2015-09-30

    Perirhinal cortex (PER) has a well established role in the familiarity-based recognition of individual items and objects. For example, animals and humans with perirhinal damage are unable to distinguish familiar from novel objects in recognition memory tasks. In the normal brain, perirhinal neurons respond to novelty and familiarity by increasing or decreasing firing rates. Recent work also implicates oscillatory activity in the low-beta and low-gamma frequency bands in sensory detection, perception, and recognition. Using optogenetic methods in a spontaneous object exploration (SOR) task, we altered recognition memory performance in rats. In the SOR task, normal rats preferentially explore novel images over familiar ones. We modulated exploratory behavior in this task by optically stimulating channelrhodopsin-expressing perirhinal neurons at various frequencies while rats looked at novel or familiar 2D images. Stimulation at 30-40 Hz during looking caused rats to treat a familiar image as if it were novel by increasing time looking at the image. Stimulation at 30-40 Hz was not effective in increasing exploration of novel images. Stimulation at 10-15 Hz caused animals to treat a novel image as familiar by decreasing time looking at the image, but did not affect looking times for images that were already familiar. We conclude that optical stimulation of PER at different frequencies can alter visual recognition memory bidirectionally. Significance statement: Recognition of novelty and familiarity are important for learning, memory, and decision making. Perirhinal cortex (PER) has a well established role in the familiarity-based recognition of individual items and objects, but how novelty and familiarity are encoded and transmitted in the brain is not known. Perirhinal neurons respond to novelty and familiarity by changing firing rates, but recent work suggests that brain oscillations may also be important for recognition. In this study, we showed that stimulation of

  19. Cognitive object recognition system (CORS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Chaitanya; Varadarajan, Karthik Mahesh; Krishnamurthi, Niyant; Xu, Shuli; Biederman, Irving; Kelley, Troy

    2010-04-01

    We have developed a framework, Cognitive Object Recognition System (CORS), inspired by current neurocomputational models and psychophysical research in which multiple recognition algorithms (shape based geometric primitives, 'geons,' and non-geometric feature-based algorithms) are integrated to provide a comprehensive solution to object recognition and landmarking. Objects are defined as a combination of geons, corresponding to their simple parts, and the relations among the parts. However, those objects that are not easily decomposable into geons, such as bushes and trees, are recognized by CORS using "feature-based" algorithms. The unique interaction between these algorithms is a novel approach that combines the effectiveness of both algorithms and takes us closer to a generalized approach to object recognition. CORS allows recognition of objects through a larger range of poses using geometric primitives and performs well under heavy occlusion - about 35% of object surface is sufficient. Furthermore, geon composition of an object allows image understanding and reasoning even with novel objects. With reliable landmarking capability, the system improves vision-based robot navigation in GPS-denied environments. Feasibility of the CORS system was demonstrated with real stereo images captured from a Pioneer robot. The system can currently identify doors, door handles, staircases, trashcans and other relevant landmarks in the indoor environment.

  20. An audiovisual emotion recognition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yi; Wang, Guoyin; Yang, Yong; He, Kun

    2007-12-01

    Human emotions could be expressed by many bio-symbols. Speech and facial expression are two of them. They are both regarded as emotional information which is playing an important role in human-computer interaction. Based on our previous studies on emotion recognition, an audiovisual emotion recognition system is developed and represented in this paper. The system is designed for real-time practice, and is guaranteed by some integrated modules. These modules include speech enhancement for eliminating noises, rapid face detection for locating face from background image, example based shape learning for facial feature alignment, and optical flow based tracking algorithm for facial feature tracking. It is known that irrelevant features and high dimensionality of the data can hurt the performance of classifier. Rough set-based feature selection is a good method for dimension reduction. So 13 speech features out of 37 ones and 10 facial features out of 33 ones are selected to represent emotional information, and 52 audiovisual features are selected due to the synchronization when speech and video fused together. The experiment results have demonstrated that this system performs well in real-time practice and has high recognition rate. Our results also show that the work in multimodules fused recognition will become the trend of emotion recognition in the future.

  1. Kazakh Traditional Dance Gesture Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussipbekov, A. K.; Amirgaliyev, E. N.; Hahn, Minsoo

    2014-04-01

    Full body gesture recognition is an important and interdisciplinary research field which is widely used in many application spheres including dance gesture recognition. The rapid growth of technology in recent years brought a lot of contribution in this domain. However it is still challenging task. In this paper we implement Kazakh traditional dance gesture recognition. We use Microsoft Kinect camera to obtain human skeleton and depth information. Then we apply tree-structured Bayesian network and Expectation Maximization algorithm with K-means clustering to calculate conditional linear Gaussians for classifying poses. And finally we use Hidden Markov Model to detect dance gestures. Our main contribution is that we extend Kinect skeleton by adding headwear as a new skeleton joint which is calculated from depth image. This novelty allows us to significantly improve the accuracy of head gesture recognition of a dancer which in turn plays considerable role in whole body gesture recognition. Experimental results show the efficiency of the proposed method and that its performance is comparable to the state-of-the-art system performances.

  2. Strip biosensor for amplified detection of nerve growth factor-beta based on a molecular translator and catalytic DNA circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Lai, Ting; Mu, Kejie; Zhou, Zheng

    2014-10-07

    We have demonstrated a new visual detection approach based on a molecular translator and a catalytic DNA circuit for the detection of nerve growth factor-beta (NGF-β). In this assay, a molecular translator based on the binding-induced DNA strand-displacement reaction was employed to convert the input protein to an output DNA signal. The molecular translator is composed of a target recognition element and a signal output element. Target recognition is achieved by the binding of the anti-NGF-β antibody to the target protein. Polyclonal anti-NGF-β antibody is conjugated to DNA1 and DNA2. The antibody conjugated DNA1 is initially hybridized to DNA3 to form a stable DNA1/DNA3 duplex. In the presence of NGF-β, the binding of the same target protein brings DNA1 and DNA2 into close proximity, resulting in an increase in their local effective concentration. This process triggers the strand-displacement reaction between DNA2 and DNA3 and releases the output DNA3. The released DNA3 is further amplified by a catalytic DNA circuit. The product of the catalytic DNA circuit is detected by a strip biosensor. This proposed assay has high sensitivity and selectivity with a dynamic response ranging from 10 fM to 10 pM, and its detection limit is 10 fM of NGF-β. This work provides a sensitive, enzyme-free, and universal strategy for the detection of other proteins.

  3. An impedimetric study of DNA hybridization on paper-supported inkjet-printed gold electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihalainen, Petri; Määttänen, Anni; Peltonen, Jouko; Pettersson, Fredrik; Pesonen, Markus; Österbacka, Ronald; Viitala, Tapani

    2014-01-01

    In this study, two different supramolecular recognition architectures for impedimetric detection of DNA hybridization have been formed on disposable paper-supported inkjet-printed gold electrodes. The gold electrodes were fabricated using a gold nanoparticle based ink. The first recognition architecture consists of subsequent layers of biotinylated self-assembly monolayer (SAM), streptavidin and biotinylated DNA probe. The other recognition architecture is constructed by immobilization of thiol-functionalized DNA probe (HS-DNA) and subsequent backfill with 11-mercapto-1-undecanol (MUOH) SAM. The binding capacity and selectivity of the recognition architectures were examined by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements. SPR results showed that the HS-DNA/MUOH system had a higher binding capacity for the complementary DNA target. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements showed that the hybridization can be detected with impedimetric spectroscopy in picomol range for both systems. EIS signal indicated a good selectivity for both recognition architectures, whereas SPR showed very high unspecific binding for the HS-DNA/MUOH system. The factors affecting the impedance signal were interpreted in terms of the complexity of the supramolecular architecture. The more complex architecture acts as a less ideal capacitive sensor and the impedance signal is dominated by the resistive elements. (paper)

  4. On speech recognition during anaesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alapetite, Alexandre

    2007-01-01

    This PhD thesis in human-computer interfaces (informatics) studies the case of the anaesthesia record used during medical operations and the possibility to supplement it with speech recognition facilities. Problems and limitations have been identified with the traditional paper-based anaesthesia...... and inaccuracies in the anaesthesia record. Supplementing the electronic anaesthesia record interface with speech input facilities is proposed as one possible solution to a part of the problem. The testing of the various hypotheses has involved the development of a prototype of an electronic anaesthesia record...... interface with speech input facilities in Danish. The evaluation of the new interface was carried out in a full-scale anaesthesia simulator. This has been complemented by laboratory experiments on several aspects of speech recognition for this type of use, e.g. the effects of noise on speech recognition...

  5. The nucleosome: orchestrating DNA damage signaling and repair within chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Poonam; Miller, Kyle M

    2016-10-01

    DNA damage occurs within the chromatin environment, which ultimately participates in regulating DNA damage response (DDR) pathways and repair of the lesion. DNA damage activates a cascade of signaling events that extensively modulates chromatin structure and organization to coordinate DDR factor recruitment to the break and repair, whilst also promoting the maintenance of normal chromatin functions within the damaged region. For example, DDR pathways must avoid conflicts between other DNA-based processes that function within the context of chromatin, including transcription and replication. The molecular mechanisms governing the recognition, target specificity, and recruitment of DDR factors and enzymes to the fundamental repeating unit of chromatin, i.e., the nucleosome, are poorly understood. Here we present our current view of how chromatin recognition by DDR factors is achieved at the level of the nucleosome. Emerging evidence suggests that the nucleosome surface, including the nucleosome acidic patch, promotes the binding and activity of several DNA damage factors on chromatin. Thus, in addition to interactions with damaged DNA and histone modifications, nucleosome recognition by DDR factors plays a key role in orchestrating the requisite chromatin response to maintain both genome and epigenome integrity.

  6. Discriminative learning for speech recognition

    CERN Document Server

    He, Xiadong

    2008-01-01

    In this book, we introduce the background and mainstream methods of probabilistic modeling and discriminative parameter optimization for speech recognition. The specific models treated in depth include the widely used exponential-family distributions and the hidden Markov model. A detailed study is presented on unifying the common objective functions for discriminative learning in speech recognition, namely maximum mutual information (MMI), minimum classification error, and minimum phone/word error. The unification is presented, with rigorous mathematical analysis, in a common rational-functio

  7. Acoustic modeling for emotion recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Anne, Koteswara Rao; Vankayalapati, Hima Deepthi

    2015-01-01

     This book presents state of art research in speech emotion recognition. Readers are first presented with basic research and applications – gradually more advance information is provided, giving readers comprehensive guidance for classify emotions through speech. Simulated databases are used and results extensively compared, with the features and the algorithms implemented using MATLAB. Various emotion recognition models like Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), Regularized Discriminant Analysis (RDA), Support Vector Machines (SVM) and K-Nearest neighbor (KNN) and are explored in detail using prosody and spectral features, and feature fusion techniques.

  8. Simultaneous tracking and activity recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manfredotti, Cristina Elena; Fleet, David J.; Hamilton, Howard J.

    2011-01-01

    be used to improve the prediction step of the tracking, while, at the same time, tracking information can be used for online activity recognition. Experimental results in two different settings show that our approach 1) decreases the error rate and improves the identity maintenance of the positional......Many tracking problems involve several distinct objects interacting with each other. We develop a framework that takes into account interactions between objects allowing the recognition of complex activities. In contrast to classic approaches that consider distinct phases of tracking and activity...... tracking and 2) identifies the correct activity with higher accuracy than standard approaches....

  9. Human ear recognition by computer

    CERN Document Server

    Bhanu, Bir; Chen, Hui

    2010-01-01

    Biometrics deals with recognition of individuals based on their physiological or behavioral characteristics. The human ear is a new feature in biometrics that has several merits over the more common face, fingerprint and iris biometrics. Unlike the fingerprint and iris, it can be easily captured from a distance without a fully cooperative subject, although sometimes it may be hidden with hair, scarf and jewellery. Also, unlike a face, the ear is a relatively stable structure that does not change much with the age and facial expressions. ""Human Ear Recognition by Computer"" is the first book o

  10. Familiar Person Recognition: Is Autonoetic Consciousness More Likely to Accompany Face Recognition Than Voice Recognition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsics, Catherine; Brédart, Serge

    2010-11-01

    Autonoetic consciousness is a fundamental property of human memory, enabling us to experience mental time travel, to recollect past events with a feeling of self-involvement, and to project ourselves in the future. Autonoetic consciousness is a characteristic of episodic memory. By contrast, awareness of the past associated with a mere feeling of familiarity or knowing relies on noetic consciousness, depending on semantic memory integrity. Present research was aimed at evaluating whether conscious recollection of episodic memories is more likely to occur following the recognition of a familiar face than following the recognition of a familiar voice. Recall of semantic information (biographical information) was also assessed. Previous studies that investigated the recall of biographical information following person recognition used faces and voices of famous people as stimuli. In this study, the participants were presented with personally familiar people's voices and faces, thus avoiding the presence of identity cues in the spoken extracts and allowing a stricter control of frequency exposure with both types of stimuli (voices and faces). In the present study, the rate of retrieved episodic memories, associated with autonoetic awareness, was significantly higher from familiar faces than familiar voices even though the level of overall recognition was similar for both these stimuli domains. The same pattern was observed regarding semantic information retrieval. These results and their implications for current Interactive Activation and Competition person recognition models are discussed.

  11. Micro-Recognition - Erving Goffman as Recognition Thinker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Michael Hviid; Kristiansen, Søren

    2009-01-01

    and civil inattention guide the conduct of people in many of their face-to-face encounters with each other. This article therefore shows how Goffman may in fact supplement many of the most fashionable and celebrated contemporary recognition theories as advanced by e.g. Nancy Fraser, Charles Taylor or Axel...

  12. Face recognition : implementation of face recognition on AMIGO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geelen, M.J.A.J.; Molengraft, van de M.J.G.; Elfring, J.

    2011-01-01

    In this (traineeship)report two possible methods of face recognition were presented. The first method describes how to detect and recognize faces by using the SURF algorithm. This algorithm finally was not used for recognizing faces, with the reason that the Eigenface algorithm was an already tested

  13. Mapping DNA cleavage by the Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes following long-range communication between DNA sites in different orientations

    OpenAIRE

    van Aelst, Kara; Saikrishnan, Kayarat; Szczelkun, Mark D

    2015-01-01

    The prokaryotic Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes are single-chain proteins comprising an Mrr-family nuclease, a superfamily 2 helicase-like ATPase, a coupler domain, a methyltransferase, and a DNA-recognition domain. Upon recognising an unmodified DNA target site, the helicase-like domain hydrolyzes ATP to cause site release (remodeling activity) and to then drive downstream translocation consuming 1-2 ATP per base pair (motor activity). On an invading foreign DNA, double-strand brea...

  14. Molecular design of sequence specific DNA alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoshima, Masafumi; Bando, Toshikazu; Shinohara, Ken-ichi; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Sequence-specific DNA alkylating agents have great interest for novel approach to cancer chemotherapy. We designed the conjugates between pyrrole (Py)-imidazole (Im) polyamides and DNA alkylating chlorambucil moiety possessing at different positions. The sequence-specific DNA alkylation by conjugates was investigated by using high-resolution denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The results showed that polyamide chlorambucil conjugates alkylate DNA at flanking adenines in recognition sequences of Py-Im polyamides, however, the reactivities and alkylation sites were influenced by the positions of conjugation. In addition, we synthesized conjugate between Py-Im polyamide and another alkylating agent, 1-(chloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-1,2-dihydro-3H-benz[e]indole (seco-CBI). DNA alkylation reactivies by both alkylating polyamides were almost comparable. In contrast, cytotoxicities against cell lines differed greatly. These comparative studies would promote development of appropriate sequence-specific DNA alkylating polyamides against specific cancer cells.

  15. Intrinsic flexibility of B-DNA: the experimental TRX scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heddi, Brahim; Oguey, Christophe; Lavelle, Christophe; Foloppe, Nicolas; Hartmann, Brigitte

    2010-01-01

    B-DNA flexibility, crucial for DNA-protein recognition, is sequence dependent. Free DNA in solution would in principle be the best reference state to uncover the relation between base sequences and their intrinsic flexibility; however, this has long been hampered by a lack of suitable experimental data. We investigated this relationship by compiling and analyzing a large dataset of NMR (31)P chemical shifts in solution. These measurements reflect the BI BII equilibrium in DNA, intimately correlated to helicoidal descriptors of the curvature, winding and groove dimensions. Comparing the ten complementary DNA dinucleotide steps indicates that some steps are much more flexible than others. This malleability is primarily controlled at the dinucleotide level, modulated by the tetranucleotide environment. Our analyses provide an experimental scale called TRX that quantifies the intrinsic flexibility of the ten dinucleotide steps in terms of Twist, Roll, and X-disp (base pair displacement). Applying the TRX scale to DNA sequences optimized for nucleosome formation reveals a 10 base-pair periodic alternation of stiff and flexible regions. Thus, DNA flexibility captured by the TRX scale is relevant to nucleosome formation, suggesting that this scale may be of general interest to better understand protein-DNA recognition.

  16. Kinetics and Thermodynamics of DNA Processing by Wild Type DNA-Glycosylase Endo III and Its Catalytically Inactive Mutant Forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga A. Kladova

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Endonuclease III (Endo III or Nth is one of the key enzymes responsible for initiating the base excision repair of oxidized or reduced pyrimidine bases in DNA. In this study, a thermodynamic analysis of structural rearrangements of the specific and nonspecific DNA-duplexes during their interaction with Endo III is performed based on stopped-flow kinetic data. 1,3-diaza-2-oxophenoxazine (tCO, a fluorescent analog of the natural nucleobase cytosine, is used to record multistep DNA binding and lesion recognition within a temperature range (5–37 °C. Standard Gibbs energy, enthalpy, and entropy of the specific steps are derived from kinetic data using Van’t Hoff plots. The data suggest that enthalpy-driven exothermic 5,6-dihydrouracil (DHU recognition and desolvation-accompanied entropy-driven adjustment of the enzyme–substrate complex into a catalytically active state play equally important parts in the overall process. The roles of catalytically significant amino acids Lys120 and Asp138 in the DNA lesion recognition and catalysis are identified. Lys120 participates not only in the catalytic steps but also in the processes of local duplex distortion, whereas substitution Asp138Ala leads to a complete loss of the ability of Endo III to distort a DNA double chain during enzyme–DNA complex formation.

  17. Two high-mobility group box domains act together to underwind and kink DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez-Giraldo, R.; Acosta-Reyes, F. J. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Malarkey, C. S. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Saperas, N. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Churchill, M. E. A., E-mail: mair.churchill@ucdenver.edu [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Campos, J. L., E-mail: mair.churchill@ucdenver.edu [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-06-30

    The crystal structure of HMGB1 box A bound to an unmodified AT-rich DNA fragment is reported at a resolution of 2 Å. A new mode of DNA recognition for HMG box proteins is found in which two box A domains bind in an unusual configuration generating a highly kinked DNA structure. High-mobility group protein 1 (HMGB1) is an essential and ubiquitous DNA architectural factor that influences a myriad of cellular processes. HMGB1 contains two DNA-binding domains, box A and box B, which have little sequence specificity but have remarkable abilities to underwind and bend DNA. Although HMGB1 box A is thought to be responsible for the majority of HMGB1–DNA interactions with pre-bent or kinked DNA, little is known about how it recognizes unmodified DNA. Here, the crystal structure of HMGB1 box A bound to an AT-rich DNA fragment is reported at a resolution of 2 Å. Two box A domains of HMGB1 collaborate in an unusual configuration in which the Phe37 residues of both domains stack together and intercalate the same CG base pair, generating highly kinked DNA. This represents a novel mode of DNA recognition for HMGB proteins and reveals a mechanism by which structure-specific HMG boxes kink linear DNA.

  18. Two high-mobility group box domains act together to underwind and kink DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sánchez-Giraldo, R.; Acosta-Reyes, F. J.; Malarkey, C. S.; Saperas, N.; Churchill, M. E. A.; Campos, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structure of HMGB1 box A bound to an unmodified AT-rich DNA fragment is reported at a resolution of 2 Å. A new mode of DNA recognition for HMG box proteins is found in which two box A domains bind in an unusual configuration generating a highly kinked DNA structure. High-mobility group protein 1 (HMGB1) is an essential and ubiquitous DNA architectural factor that influences a myriad of cellular processes. HMGB1 contains two DNA-binding domains, box A and box B, which have little sequence specificity but have remarkable abilities to underwind and bend DNA. Although HMGB1 box A is thought to be responsible for the majority of HMGB1–DNA interactions with pre-bent or kinked DNA, little is known about how it recognizes unmodified DNA. Here, the crystal structure of HMGB1 box A bound to an AT-rich DNA fragment is reported at a resolution of 2 Å. Two box A domains of HMGB1 collaborate in an unusual configuration in which the Phe37 residues of both domains stack together and intercalate the same CG base pair, generating highly kinked DNA. This represents a novel mode of DNA recognition for HMGB proteins and reveals a mechanism by which structure-specific HMG boxes kink linear DNA

  19. Target recognition by wavelet transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhengdong; He Wuliang; Zheng Xiaodong; Cheng Jiayuan; Peng Wen; Pei Chunlan; Song Chen

    2002-01-01

    Wavelet transform has an important character of multi-resolution power, which presents pyramid structure, and this character coincides the way by which people distinguish object from coarse to fineness and from large to tiny. In addition to it, wavelet transform benefits to reducing image noise, simplifying calculation, and embodying target image characteristic point. A method of target recognition by wavelet transform is provided

  20. Face recognition, a landmarks tale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Face recognition is a technology that appeals to the imagination of many people. This is particularly reflected in the popularity of science-fiction films and forensic detective series such as CSI, CSI New York, CSI Miami, Bones and NCIS. Although these series tend to be set in the present, their

  1. Mobile Visual Recognition on Smartphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenwen Gui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the recognition of large-scale outdoor scenes on smartphones by fusing outputs of inertial sensors and computer vision techniques. The main contributions can be summarized as follows. Firstly, we propose an ORD (overlap region divide method to plot image position area, which is fast enough to find the nearest visiting area and can also reduce the search range compared with the traditional approaches. Secondly, the vocabulary tree-based approach is improved by introducing GAGCC (gravity-aligned geometric consistency constraint. Our method involves no operation in the high-dimensional feature space and does not assume a global transform between a pair of images. Thus, it substantially reduces the computational complexity and memory usage, which makes the city scale image recognition feasible on the smartphone. Experiments on a collected database including 0.16 million images show that the proposed method demonstrates excellent recognition performance, while maintaining the average recognition time about 1 s.

  2. Data complexity in pattern recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Kam Ho Tin

    2006-01-01

    Machines capable of automatic pattern recognition have many fascinating uses. Algorithms for supervised classification, where one infers a decision boundary from a set of training examples, are at the core of this capability. This book looks at data complexity and its role in shaping the theories and techniques in different disciplines

  3. The Army word recognition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, David R.; Haratz, David

    1977-01-01

    The application of speech recognition technology in the Army command and control area is presented. The problems associated with this program are described as well as as its relevance in terms of the man/machine interactions, voice inflexions, and the amount of training needed to interact with and utilize the automated system.

  4. Speech recognition from spectral dynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Some of the history of gradual infusion of the modulation spectrum concept into Automatic recognition of speech (ASR) comes next, pointing to the relationship of modulation spectrum processing to wellaccepted ASR techniques such as dynamic speech features or RelAtive SpecTrAl (RASTA) filtering. Next, the frequency ...

  5. Speech recognition implementation in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Keith S.

    2005-01-01

    Continuous speech recognition (SR) is an emerging technology that allows direct digital transcription of dictated radiology reports. The SR systems are being widely deployed in the radiology community. This is a review of technical and practical issues that should be considered when implementing an SR system. (orig.)

  6. Color Textons for Texture Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burghouts, G.J.; Geusebroek, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Texton models have proven to be very discriminative for the recognition of grayvalue images taken from rough textures. To further improve the discriminative power of the distinctive texton models of Varma and Zisserman (VZ model) (IJCV, vol. 62(1), pp. 61-81, 2005), we propose two schemes to exploit

  7. Output Interference in Recognition Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criss, Amy H.; Malmberg, Kenneth J.; Shiffrin, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Dennis and Humphreys (2001) proposed that interference in recognition memory arises solely from the prior contexts of the test word: Interference does not arise from memory traces of other words (from events prior to the study list or on the study list, and regardless of similarity to the test item). We evaluate this model using output…

  8. License plate recognition using DTCNNs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Brugge, M.H; Stevens, J.H; Nijhuis, J.A G; Spaanenburg, L; Tavsanonoglu, V

    1998-01-01

    Automatic license plate recognition requires a series of complex image processing steps. For practical use, the amount of data to he processed must be minimized early on. This paper shows that the computationally most intensive steps can be realized by DTCNNs. Moreover; high-level operations like

  9. Matching score based face recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, B.J.; Beumer, G.M.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    2006-01-01

    Accurate face registration is of vital importance to the performance of a face recognition algorithm. We propose a new method: matching score based face registration, which searches for optimal alignment by maximizing the matching score output of a classifier as a function of the different

  10. Towards automatic forensic face recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, Tauseef; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a methodology and experimental results for evidence evaluation in the context of forensic face recognition. In forensic applications, the matching score (hereafter referred to as similarity score) from a biometric system must be represented as a Likelihood Ratio (LR). In our

  11. Regulation of DNA double-strand break repair by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwertman, Petra; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic DNA lesions. The swift recognition and faithful repair of such damage is crucial for the maintenance of genomic stability, as well as for cell and organismal fitness. Signalling by ubiquitin, SUMO and other ubiquitin-like modifiers (UBLs...

  12. The Variation Analysis of DNA Methylation in Wheat Carrying Gametocidal Chromosome 3C from Aegilops triuncialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Zhao, Jieyu; Bai, Yan; Ao, You; Guo, Changhong

    2017-08-10

    Gametocidal (Gc) chromosomes can ensure their preferential transmission by killing the gametes without themselves through causing chromosome breakage and therefore have been exploited as an effective tool for genetic breeding. However, to date very little is known about the molecular mechanism of Gc action. In this study, we used methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) technique to assess the extent and pattern of cytosine methylation alterations at the whole genome level between two lines of wheat Gc addition line and their common wheat parent. The results indicated that the overall levels of cytosine methylation of two studied Gc addition lines (CS-3C and CS-3C3C, 48.68% and 48.65%, respectively) were significantly increased when compared to common wheat CS (41.31%) and no matter fully methylated or hemimethylated rates enhanced in Gc addition lines. A set of 30 isolated fragments that showed different DNA methylation or demethylation patterns between the three lines were sequenced and the results indicated that 8 fragments showed significant homology to known sequences, of which three were homologous to MITE transposon (Miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements), LTR-retrotransposon WIS-1p and retrotransposon Gypsy , respectively. Overall, our results showed that DNA methylation could play a role in the Gc action.

  13. The Variation Analysis of DNA Methylation in Wheat Carrying Gametocidal Chromosome 3C from Aegilops triuncialis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Gametocidal (Gc chromosomes can ensure their preferential transmission by killing the gametes without themselves through causing chromosome breakage and therefore have been exploited as an effective tool for genetic breeding. However, to date very little is known about the molecular mechanism of Gc action. In this study, we used methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP technique to assess the extent and pattern of cytosine methylation alterations at the whole genome level between two lines of wheat Gc addition line and their common wheat parent. The results indicated that the overall levels of cytosine methylation of two studied Gc addition lines (CS–3C and CS–3C3C, 48.68% and 48.65%, respectively were significantly increased when compared to common wheat CS (41.31% and no matter fully methylated or hemimethylated rates enhanced in Gc addition lines. A set of 30 isolated fragments that showed different DNA methylation or demethylation patterns between the three lines were sequenced and the results indicated that 8 fragments showed significant homology to known sequences, of which three were homologous to MITE transposon (Miniature inverted–repeat transposable elements, LTR-retrotransposon WIS-1p and retrotransposon Gypsy, respectively. Overall, our results showed that DNA methylation could play a role in the Gc action.

  14. Identification of genes in anonymous DNA sequences. Annual performance report, February 1, 1991--January 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, C.A.

    1996-06-01

    The objective of this project is the development of practical software to automate the identification of genes in anonymous DNA sequences from the human, and other higher eukaryotic genomes. A software system for automated sequence analysis, gm (gene modeler) has been designed, implemented, tested, and distributed to several dozen laboratories worldwide. A significantly faster, more robust, and more flexible version of this software, gm 2.0 has now been completed, and is being tested by operational use to analyze human cosmid sequence data. A range of efforts to further understand the features of eukaryoyic gene sequences are also underway. This progress report also contains papers coming out of the project including the following: gm: a Tool for Exploratory Analysis of DNA Sequence Data; The Human THE-LTR(O) and MstII Interspersed Repeats are subfamilies of a single widely distruted highly variable repeat family; Information contents and dinucleotide compostions of plant intron sequences vary with evolutionary origin; Splicing signals in Drosophila: intron size, information content, and consensus sequences; Integration of automated sequence analysis into mapping and sequencing projects; Software for the C. elegans genome project.

  15. DNA Repair Systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DNA molecule which makes it ideal for storage and propagation of genetic information. ... of these errors are broadly referred to as DNA repair. DNA can ... changes occur in the human genome per day. ..... nails, frequent physical and mental.

  16. Footprinting of Chlorella virus DNA ligase bound at a nick in duplex DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odell, M; Shuman, S

    1999-05-14

    The 298-amino acid ATP-dependent DNA ligase of Chlorella virus PBCV-1 is the smallest eukaryotic DNA ligase known. The enzyme has intrinsic specificity for binding to nicked duplex DNA. To delineate the ligase-DNA interface, we have footprinted the enzyme binding site on DNA and the DNA binding site on ligase. The size of the exonuclease III footprint of ligase bound a single nick in duplex DNA is 19-21 nucleotides. The footprint is asymmetric, extending 8-9 nucleotides on the 3'-OH side of the nick and 11-12 nucleotides on the 5'-phosphate side. The 5'-phosphate moiety is essential for the binding of Chlorella virus ligase to nicked DNA. Here we show that the 3'-OH moiety is not required for nick recognition. The Chlorella virus ligase binds to a nicked ligand containing 2',3'-dideoxy and 5'-phosphate termini, but cannot catalyze adenylation of the 5'-end. Hence, the 3'-OH is important for step 2 chemistry even though it is not itself chemically transformed during DNA-adenylate formation. A 2'-OH cannot substitute for the essential 3'-OH in adenylation at a nick or even in strand closure at a preadenylated nick. The protein side of the ligase-DNA interface was probed by limited proteolysis of ligase with trypsin and chymotrypsin in the presence and absence of nicked DNA. Protease accessible sites are clustered within a short segment from amino acids 210-225 located distal to conserved motif V. The ligase is protected from proteolysis by nicked DNA. Protease cleavage of the native enzyme prior to DNA addition results in loss of DNA binding. These results suggest a bipartite domain structure in which the interdomain segment either comprises part of the DNA binding site or undergoes a conformational change upon DNA binding. The domain structure of Chlorella virus ligase inferred from the solution experiments is consistent with the structure of T7 DNA ligase determined by x-ray crystallography.

  17. Molecular models for DNA damaged by photoreaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearlman, D.A.; Holbrook, S.R.; Pirkle, D.H.; Kim, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    Structural models of a DNA molecule containing a radiation-induced psoralen cross-link and of a DNA containing a thymine photodimer were constructed by applying energy-minimization techniques and model-building procedures to data from x-ray crystallographic studies. The helical axes of the models show substantial kinking and unwinding at the sites of the damage, which may have long-range as well as local effects arising from the concomitant changes in the supercoiling and overall structure of the DNA. The damaged areas may also serve as recognition sites for repair enzymes. These results should help in understanding the biologic effects of radiation-induced damage on cells

  18. LNA effects on DNA binding and conformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pabon-Martinez, Y Vladimir; Xu, You; Villa, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    -substitution in the duplex pyrimidine strand alters the double helix structure, affecting x-displacement, slide and twist favoring triplex formation through enhanced TFO major groove accommodation. Collectively, these findings should facilitate the design of potent anti-gene ONs.......The anti-gene strategy is based on sequence-specific recognition of double-strand DNA by triplex forming (TFOs) or DNA strand invading oligonucleotides to modulate gene expression. To be efficient, the oligonucleotides (ONs) should target DNA selectively, with high affinity. Here we combined...... hybridization analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assay with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to better understand the underlying structural features of modified ONs in stabilizing duplex- and triplex structures. Particularly, we investigated the role played by the position and number of locked...

  19. Automated Processing of 2-D Gel Electrophoretograms of Genomic DNA for Hunting Pathogenic DNA Molecular Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi; Nakazawa; Watanabe; Konagaya

    1999-01-01

    We have developed the automated processing algorithms for 2-dimensional (2-D) electrophoretograms of genomic DNA based on RLGS (Restriction Landmark Genomic Scanning) method, which scans the restriction enzyme recognition sites as the landmark and maps them onto a 2-D electrophoresis gel. Our powerful processing algorithms realize the automated spot recognition from RLGS electrophoretograms and the automated comparison of a huge number of such images. In the final stage of the automated processing, a master spot pattern, on which all the spots in the RLGS images are mapped at once, can be obtained. The spot pattern variations which seemed to be specific to the pathogenic DNA molecular changes can be easily detected by simply looking over the master spot pattern. When we applied our algorithms to the analysis of 33 RLGS images derived from human colon tissues, we successfully detected several colon tumor specific spot pattern changes.

  20. Complete cDNA sequence coding for human docking protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hortsch, M; Labeit, S; Meyer, D I

    1988-01-11

    Docking protein (DP, or SRP receptor) is a rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein essential for the targeting and translocation of nascent polypeptides across this membrane. It specifically interacts with a cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complex, the signal recognition particle (SRP). The nucleotide sequence of cDNA encoding the entire human DP and its deduced amino acid sequence are given.

  1. Object recognition memory in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Zacnicte; Morrill, Adam; Holcombe, Adam; Johnston, Travis; Gallup, Joshua; Fouad, Karim; Schalomon, Melike; Hamilton, Trevor James

    2016-01-01

    The novel object recognition, or novel-object preference (NOP) test is employed to assess recognition memory in a variety of organisms. The subject is exposed to two identical objects, then after a delay, it is placed back in the original environment containing one of the original objects and a novel object. If the subject spends more time exploring one object, this can be interpreted as memory retention. To date, this test has not been fully explored in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Zebrafish possess recognition memory for simple 2- and 3-dimensional geometrical shapes, yet it is unknown if this translates to complex 3-dimensional objects. In this study we evaluated recognition memory in zebrafish using complex objects of different sizes. Contrary to rodents, zebrafish preferentially explored familiar over novel objects. Familiarity preference disappeared after delays of 5 mins. Leopard danios, another strain of D. rerio, also preferred the familiar object after a 1 min delay. Object preference could be re-established in zebra danios by administration of nicotine tartrate salt (50mg/L) prior to stimuli presentation, suggesting a memory-enhancing effect of nicotine. Additionally, exploration biases were present only when the objects were of intermediate size (2 × 5 cm). Our results demonstrate zebra and leopard danios have recognition memory, and that low nicotine doses can improve this memory type in zebra danios. However, exploration biases, from which memory is inferred, depend on object size. These findings suggest zebrafish ecology might influence object preference, as zebrafish neophobia could reflect natural anti-predatory behaviour. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Synthesis of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    2008-11-18

    A method of synthesizing a desired double-stranded DNA of a predetermined length and of a predetermined sequence. Preselected sequence segments that will complete the desired double-stranded DNA are determined. Preselected segment sequences of DNA that will be used to complete the desired double-stranded DNA are provided. The preselected segment sequences of DNA are assembled to produce the desired double-stranded DNA.

  3. Integrated Spintronic Platforms for Biomolecular Recognition Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, V. C.; Cardoso, F. A.; Loureiro, J.; Mercier, M.; Germano, J.; Cardoso, S.; Ferreira, R.; Fonseca, L. P.; Sousa, L.; Piedade, M. S.; Freitas, P. P.

    2008-06-01

    This paper covers recent developments in magnetoresistive based biochip platforms fabricated at INESC-MN, and their application to the detection and quantification of pathogenic waterborn microorganisms in water samples for human consumption. Such platforms are intended to give response to the increasing concern related to microbial contaminated water sources. The presented results concern the development of biological active DNA chips and protein chips and the demonstration of the detection capability of the present platforms. Two platforms are described, one including spintronic sensors only (spin-valve based or magnetic tunnel junction based), and the other, a fully scalable platform where each probe site consists of a MTJ in series with a thin film diode (TFD). Two microfluidic systems are described, for cell separation and concentration, and finally, the read out and control integrated electronics are described, allowing the realization of bioassays with a portable point of care unit. The present platforms already allow the detection of complementary biomolecular target recognition with 1 pM concentration.

  4. Solvated protein-DNA docking using HADDOCK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijk, Marc van; Visscher, Koen M.; Kastritis, Panagiotis L.; Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J., E-mail: a.m.j.j.bonvin@uu.nl [Utrecht University, Bijvoet Center for Biomolecular Research, Faculty of Science-Chemistry (Netherlands)

    2013-05-15

    Interfacial water molecules play an important role in many aspects of protein-DNA specificity and recognition. Yet they have been mostly neglected in the computational modeling of these complexes. We present here a solvated docking protocol that allows explicit inclusion of water molecules in the docking of protein-DNA complexes and demonstrate its feasibility on a benchmark of 30 high-resolution protein-DNA complexes containing crystallographically-determined water molecules at their interfaces. Our protocol is capable of reproducing the solvation pattern at the interface and recovers hydrogen-bonded water-mediated contacts in many of the benchmark cases. Solvated docking leads to an overall improvement in the quality of the generated protein-DNA models for cases with limited conformational change of the partners upon complex formation. The applicability of this approach is demonstrated on real cases by docking a representative set of 6 complexes using unbound protein coordinates, model-built DNA and knowledge-based restraints. As HADDOCK supports the inclusion of a variety of NMR restraints, solvated docking is also applicable for NMR-based structure calculations of protein-DNA complexes.

  5. Solvated protein–DNA docking using HADDOCK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijk, Marc van; Visscher, Koen M.; Kastritis, Panagiotis L.; Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J.

    2013-01-01

    Interfacial water molecules play an important role in many aspects of protein–DNA specificity and recognition. Yet they have been mostly neglected in the computational modeling of these complexes. We present here a solvated docking protocol that allows explicit inclusion of water molecules in the docking of protein–DNA complexes and demonstrate its feasibility on a benchmark of 30 high-resolution protein–DNA complexes containing crystallographically-determined water molecules at their interfaces. Our protocol is capable of reproducing the solvation pattern at the interface and recovers hydrogen-bonded water-mediated contacts in many of the benchmark cases. Solvated docking leads to an overall improvement in the quality of the generated protein–DNA models for cases with limited conformational change of the partners upon complex formation. The applicability of this approach is demonstrated on real cases by docking a representative set of 6 complexes using unbound protein coordinates, model-built DNA and knowledge-based restraints. As HADDOCK supports the inclusion of a variety of NMR restraints, solvated docking is also applicable for NMR-based structure calculations of protein–DNA complexes.

  6. Efficient CEPSTRAL Normalization for Robust Speech Recognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Fu-Hua; Stern, Richard M; Huang, Xuedong; Acero, Alejandro

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we describe and compare the performance of a series of cepstrum-based procedures that enable the CMU SPHINX-II speech recognition system to maintain a high level of recognition accuracy...

  7. Double-check probing of DNA bending and unwinding by XPA-RPA: an architectural function in DNA repair

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Missura, M.; Buterin, T.; Hindges, R.; Hübscher, U.; Kašpárková, Jana; Brabec, Viktor; Naegeli, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 13 (2001), s. 3554-3564 ISSN 0261-4189 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : damage recognition * DNA repair * xeroderma pigmentosum Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 12.450, year: 2001

  8. ATM signaling and genomic stability in response to DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavin, Martin F.; Birrell, Geoff; Chen, Philip; Kozlov, Sergei; Scott, Shaun; Gueven, Nuri

    2005-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks represent the most threatening lesion to the integrity of the genome in cells exposed to ionizing radiation and radiomimetic chemicals. Those breaks are recognized, signaled to cell cycle checkpoints and repaired by protein complexes. The product of the gene (ATM) mutated in the human genetic disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) plays a central role in the recognition and signaling of DNA damage. ATM is one of an ever growing number of proteins which when mutated compromise the stability of the genome and predispose to tumour development. Mechanisms for recognising double strand breaks in DNA, maintaining genome stability and minimizing risk of cancer are discussed

  9. Data structures, computer graphics, and pattern recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Klinger, A; Kunii, T L

    1977-01-01

    Data Structures, Computer Graphics, and Pattern Recognition focuses on the computer graphics and pattern recognition applications of data structures methodology.This book presents design related principles and research aspects of the computer graphics, system design, data management, and pattern recognition tasks. The topics include the data structure design, concise structuring of geometric data for computer aided design, and data structures for pattern recognition algorithms. The survey of data structures for computer graphics systems, application of relational data structures in computer gr

  10. Recognition of an Independent Self-Consciousness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Henrik Jøker

    2009-01-01

    Hegel's concept in the Phenomenology of the Spirit of the "recognition of an independent self-consciousness" is investigated as a point of separation for contemporary philosophy of recognition. I claim that multiculturalism and the theories of recognition (such as Axel Honneth's) based on empiric...... psychology neglect or deny crucial metaphysical aspects of the Hegelian legacy. Instead, I seek to point at an additional, "spiritual", level of recognition, based on the concept of the subject in Lacanian psychoanalysis....

  11. Case-Based Policy and Goal Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Policy and Goal Recognizer (PaGR), a case- based system for multiagent keyhole recognition. PaGR is a knowledge recognition component within a decision...However, unlike our agent in the BVR domain, these recognition agents have access to perfect information. Single-agent keyhole plan recognition can be...listed below: 1. Facing Target 2. Closing on Target 3. Target Range 4. Within a Target’s Weapon Range 5. Has Target within Weapon Range 6. Is in Danger

  12. Hierarchical Recognition Scheme for Human Facial Expression Recognition Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Hameed Siddiqi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, human facial expressions recognition (FER has emerged as an important research area. Several factors make FER a challenging research problem. These include varying light conditions in training and test images; need for automatic and accurate face detection before feature extraction; and high similarity among different expressions that makes it difficult to distinguish these expressions with a high accuracy. This work implements a hierarchical linear discriminant analysis-based facial expressions recognition (HL-FER system to tackle these problems. Unlike the previous systems, the HL-FER uses a pre-processing step to eliminate light effects, incorporates a new automatic face detection scheme, employs methods to extract both global and local features, and utilizes a HL-FER to overcome the problem of high similarity among different expressions. Unlike most of the previous works that were evaluated using a single dataset, the performance of the HL-FER is assessed using three publicly available datasets under three different experimental settings: n-fold cross validation based on subjects for each dataset separately; n-fold cross validation rule based on datasets; and, finally, a last set of experiments to assess the effectiveness of each module of the HL-FER separately. Weighted average recognition accuracy of 98.7% across three different datasets, using three classifiers, indicates the success of employing the HL-FER for human FER.

  13. Hierarchical Recognition Scheme for Human Facial Expression Recognition Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqi, Muhammad Hameed; Lee, Sungyoung; Lee, Young-Koo; Khan, Adil Mehmood; Truc, Phan Tran Ho

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, human facial expressions recognition (FER) has emerged as an important research area. Several factors make FER a challenging research problem. These include varying light conditions in training and test images; need for automatic and accurate face detection before feature extraction; and high similarity among different expressions that makes it difficult to distinguish these expressions with a high accuracy. This work implements a hierarchical linear discriminant analysis-based facial expressions recognition (HL-FER) system to tackle these problems. Unlike the previous systems, the HL-FER uses a pre-processing step to eliminate light effects, incorporates a new automatic face detection scheme, employs methods to extract both global and local features, and utilizes a HL-FER to overcome the problem of high similarity among different expressions. Unlike most of the previous works that were evaluated using a single dataset, the performance of the HL-FER is assessed using three publicly available datasets under three different experimental settings: n-fold cross validation based on subjects for each dataset separately; n-fold cross validation rule based on datasets; and, finally, a last set of experiments to assess the effectiveness of each module of the HL-FER separately. Weighted average recognition accuracy of 98.7% across three different datasets, using three classifiers, indicates the success of employing the HL-FER for human FER. PMID:24316568

  14. Structure determination of uracil-DNA N-glycosylase from Deinococcus radiodurans in complex with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Hege Lynum; Johnson, Kenneth A; McVey, Colin E; Leiros, Ingar; Moe, Elin

    2015-10-01

    in the N-terminus of a symmetry-related molecule and the complementary DNA strand facing away from the active site were also observed which seem to stabilize the enzyme-DNA complex. However, the significance of this observation remains to be investigated. The results provide new insights into the current knowledge about DNA damage recognition and repair by uracil-DNA glycosylases.

  15. From milk to diet: feed recognition for milk authenticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponzoni, E; Gianì, S; Mastromauro, F; Breviario, D

    2009-11-01

    The presence of plastidial DNA fragments of plant origin in animal milk samples has been confirmed. An experimental plan was arranged with 4 groups of goats, each provided with a different monophytic diet: 3 fresh forages (oats, ryegrass, and X-triticosecale) and one 2-wk-old silage (X-triticosecale). Feed-derived rubisco (ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase, rbcL) DNA fragments were detected in 100% of the analyzed goat milk samples, and the nucleotide sequence of the PCR-amplified fragments was found to be 100% identical to the corresponding fragments amplified from the plant species consumed in the diet. Two additional chloroplast-based molecular markers were used to set up an assay for distinctiveness, conveniently based on a simple PCR. In one case, differences in single nucleotides occurring within the gene encoding for plant maturase K (matK) were exploited. In the other, plant species recognition was based on the difference in the length of the intron present within the transfer RNA leucine (trnL) gene. The presence of plastidial plant DNA, ascertained by the PCR-based amplification of the rbcL fragment, was also assessed in raw cow milk samples collected directly from stock farms or taken from milk sold on the commercial market. In this case, the nucleotide sequence of the amplified DNA fragments reflected the multiple forages present in the diet fed to the animals.

  16. Embedded Face Detection and Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göksel Günlü

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The need to increase security in open or public spaces has in turn given rise to the requirement to monitor these spaces and analyse those images on-site and on-time. At this point, the use of smart cameras – of which the popularity has been increasing – is one step ahead. With sensors and Digital Signal Processors (DSPs, smart cameras generate ad hoc results by analysing the numeric images transmitted from the sensor by means of a variety of image-processing algorithms. Since the images are not transmitted to a distance processing unit but rather are processed inside the camera, it does not necessitate high-bandwidth networks or high processor powered systems; it can instantaneously decide on the required access. Nonetheless, on account of restricted memory, processing power and overall power, image processing algorithms need to be developed and optimized for embedded processors. Among these algorithms, one of the most important is for face detection and recognition. A number of face detection and recognition methods have been proposed recently and many of these methods have been tested on general-purpose processors. In smart cameras – which are real-life applications of such methods – the widest use is on DSPs. In the present study, the Viola-Jones face detection method – which was reported to run faster on PCs – was optimized for DSPs; the face recognition method was combined with the developed sub-region and mask-based DCT (Discrete Cosine Transform. As the employed DSP is a fixed-point processor, the processes were performed with integers insofar as it was possible. To enable face recognition, the image was divided into sub-regions and from each sub-region the robust coefficients against disruptive elements – like face expression, illumination, etc. – were selected as the features. The discrimination of the selected features was enhanced via LDA (Linear Discriminant Analysis and then employed for recognition. Thanks to its

  17. Hidden neural networks: application to speech recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Søren Kamaric

    1998-01-01

    We evaluate the hidden neural network HMM/NN hybrid on two speech recognition benchmark tasks; (1) task independent isolated word recognition on the Phonebook database, and (2) recognition of broad phoneme classes in continuous speech from the TIMIT database. It is shown how hidden neural networks...

  18. Sequence specificity and biological consequences of drugs that bind covalently in the minor groove of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurley, L.H.; Needham-VanDevanter, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    DNA ligands which bind within the minor groove of DNA exhibit varying degrees of sequence selectivity. Factors which contribute to nucleotide sequence recognition by minor groove ligands have been extensively investigated. Electrostatic interactions, ligand and DNA dehydration energies, hydrophobic interactions and steric factors all play significant roles in sequence selectivity in the minor groove. Interestingly, ligand recognition of nucleotide sequence in the minor groove does not involve significant hydrogen bonding. This is in sharp contrast to cellular enzyme and protein recognition of nucleotide sequence, which is achieved in the major groove via specific hydrogen bond formation between individual bases and the ligand. The ability to read nucleotide sequence via hydrogen bonding allows precise binding of proteins to specific DNA sequences. Minor groove ligands examined to date exhibit a much lower sequence specificity, generally binding to a subset of possible sequences, rather than a single sequence. 19 refs., 7 figs

  19. DNA/RNA hybrid substrates modulate the catalytic activity of purified AID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdouni, Hala S; King, Justin J; Ghorbani, Atefeh; Fifield, Heather; Berghuis, Lesley; Larijani, Mani

    2018-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) converts cytidine to uridine at Immunoglobulin (Ig) loci, initiating somatic hypermutation and class switching of antibodies. In vitro, AID acts on single stranded DNA (ssDNA), but neither double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) oligonucleotides nor RNA, and it is believed that transcription is the in vivo generator of ssDNA targeted by AID. It is also known that the Ig loci, particularly the switch (S) regions targeted by AID are rich in transcription-generated DNA/RNA hybrids. Here, we examined the binding and catalytic behavior of purified AID on DNA/RNA hybrid substrates bearing either random sequences or GC-rich sequences simulating Ig S regions. If substrates were made up of a random sequence, AID preferred substrates composed entirely of DNA over DNA/RNA hybrids. In contrast, if substrates were composed of S region sequences, AID preferred to mutate DNA/RNA hybrids over substrates composed entirely of DNA. Accordingly, AID exhibited a significantly higher affinity for binding DNA/RNA hybrid substrates composed specifically of S region sequences, than any other substrates composed of DNA. Thus, in the absence of any other cellular processes or factors, AID itself favors binding and mutating DNA/RNA hybrids composed of S region sequences. AID:DNA/RNA complex formation and supporting mutational analyses suggest that recognition of DNA/RNA hybrids is an inherent structural property of AID. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Enzymatic Incorporation of Modified Purine Nucleotides in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu El Asrar, Rania; Margamuljana, Lia; Abramov, Mikhail; Bande, Omprakash; Agnello, Stefano; Jang, Miyeon; Herdewijn, Piet

    2017-12-14

    A series of nucleotide analogues, with a hypoxanthine base moiety (8-aminohypoxanthine, 1-methyl-8-aminohypoxanthine, and 8-oxohypoxanthine), together with 5-methylisocytosine were tested as potential pairing partners of N 8 -glycosylated nucleotides with an 8-azaguanine or 8-aza-9-deazaguanine base moiety by using DNA polymerases (incorporation studies). The best results were obtained with the 5-methylisocytosine nucleotide followed by the 1-methyl-8-aminohypoxanthine nucleotide. The experiments demonstrated that small differences in the structure (8-azaguanine versus 8-aza-9-deazaguanine) might lead to significant differences in recognition efficiency and selectivity, base pairing by Hoogsteen recognition at the polymerase level is possible, 8-aza-9-deazaguanine represents a self-complementary base pair, and a correlation exists between in vitro incorporation studies and in vivo recognition by natural bases in Escherichia coli, but this recognition is not absolute (exceptions were observed). © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Sequence-dependent DNA deformability studied using molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Satoshi; Kono, Hidetoshi; Takenaka, Shigeori; Go, Nobuhiro; Sarai, Akinori

    2007-01-01

    Proteins recognize specific DNA sequences not only through direct contact between amino acids and bases, but also indirectly based on the sequence-dependent conformation and deformability of the DNA (indirect readout). We used molecular dynamics simulations to analyze the sequence-dependent DNA conformations of all 136 possible tetrameric sequences sandwiched between CGCG sequences. The deformability of dimeric steps obtained by the simulations is consistent with that by the crystal structures. The simulation results further showed that the conformation and deformability of the tetramers can highly depend on the flanking base pairs. The conformations of xATx tetramers show the most rigidity and are not affected by the flanking base pairs and the xYRx show by contrast the greatest flexibility and change their conformations depending on the base pairs at both ends, suggesting tetramers with the same central dimer can show different deformabilities. These results suggest that analysis of dimeric steps alone may overlook some conformational features of DNA and provide insight into the mechanism of indirect readout during protein-DNA recognition. Moreover, the sequence dependence of DNA conformation and deformability may be used to estimate the contribution of indirect readout to the specificity of protein-DNA recognition as well as nucleosome positioning and large-scale behavior of nucleic acids.

  2. The automaticity of emotion recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Jessica L; Robins, Richard W

    2008-02-01

    Evolutionary accounts of emotion typically assume that humans evolved to quickly and efficiently recognize emotion expressions because these expressions convey fitness-enhancing messages. The present research tested this assumption in 2 studies. Specifically, the authors examined (a) how quickly perceivers could recognize expressions of anger, contempt, disgust, embarrassment, fear, happiness, pride, sadness, shame, and surprise; (b) whether accuracy is improved when perceivers deliberate about each expression's meaning (vs. respond as quickly as possible); and (c) whether accurate recognition can occur under cognitive load. Across both studies, perceivers quickly and efficiently (i.e., under cognitive load) recognized most emotion expressions, including the self-conscious emotions of pride, embarrassment, and shame. Deliberation improved accuracy in some cases, but these improvements were relatively small. Discussion focuses on the implications of these findings for the cognitive processes underlying emotion recognition.

  3. Individual Recognition in Ant Queens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Ettorre, Patrizia; Heinze, Jürgen

    2005-01-01

    Personal relationships are the cornerstone of vertebrate societies, but insect societies are either too large for individual recognition, or their members were assumed to lack the necessary cognitive abilities 1 and 2 . This paradigm has been challenged by the recent discovery that paper wasps...... recognize each other's unique facial color patterns [3] . Individual recognition is advantageous when dominance hierarchies control the partitioning of work and reproduction 2 and 4 . Here, we show that unrelated founding queens of the ant Pachycondyla villosa use chemical cues to recognize each other...... individually. Aggression was significantly lower in pairs of queens that had previously interacted than in pairs with similar social history but no experience with one another. Moreover, subordinates discriminated familiar and unfamiliar dominants in choice experiments in which physical contact, but not odor...

  4. Motion Primitives for Action Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fihl, Preben; Holte, Michael Boelstoft; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2007-01-01

    the actions as a sequence of temporal isolated instances, denoted primitives. These primitives are each defined by four features extracted from motion images. The primitives are recognized in each frame based on a trained classifier resulting in a sequence of primitives. From this sequence we recognize......The number of potential applications has made automatic recognition of human actions a very active research area. Different approaches have been followed based on trajectories through some state space. In this paper we also model an action as a trajectory through a state space, but we represent...... different temporal actions using a probabilistic Edit Distance method. The method is tested on different actions with and without noise and the results show recognition rates of 88.7% and 85.5%, respectively....

  5. Physics of Automatic Target Recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Sadjadi, Firooz

    2007-01-01

    Physics of Automatic Target Recognition addresses the fundamental physical bases of sensing, and information extraction in the state-of-the art automatic target recognition field. It explores both passive and active multispectral sensing, polarimetric diversity, complex signature exploitation, sensor and processing adaptation, transformation of electromagnetic and acoustic waves in their interactions with targets, background clutter, transmission media, and sensing elements. The general inverse scattering, and advanced signal processing techniques and scientific evaluation methodologies being used in this multi disciplinary field will be part of this exposition. The issues of modeling of target signatures in various spectral modalities, LADAR, IR, SAR, high resolution radar, acoustic, seismic, visible, hyperspectral, in diverse geometric aspects will be addressed. The methods for signal processing and classification will cover concepts such as sensor adaptive and artificial neural networks, time reversal filt...

  6. Damaging the Integrated HIV Proviral DNA with TALENs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christy L Strong

    Full Text Available HIV-1 integrates its proviral DNA genome into the host genome, presenting barriers for virus eradication. Several new gene-editing technologies have emerged that could potentially be used to damage integrated proviral DNA. In this study, we use transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs to target a highly conserved sequence in the transactivation response element (TAR of the HIV-1 proviral DNA. We demonstrated that TALENs cleave a DNA template with the HIV-1 proviral target site in vitro. A GFP reporter, under control of HIV-1 TAR, was efficiently inactivated by mutations introduced by transfection of TALEN plasmids. When infected cells containing the full-length integrated HIV-1 proviral DNA were transfected with TALENs, the TAR region accumulated indels. When one of these mutants was tested, the mutated HIV-1 proviral DNA was incapable of producing detectable Gag expression. TALEN variants engineered for degenerate recognition of select nucleotide positions also cleaved proviral DNA in vitro and the full-length integrated proviral DNA genome in living cells. These results suggest a possible design strategy for the therapeutic considerations of incomplete target sequence conservation and acquired resistance mutations. We have established a new strategy for damaging integrated HIV proviral DNA that may have future potential for HIV-1 proviral DNA eradication.

  7. Symbol Recognition using Spatial Relations

    OpenAIRE

    K.C., Santosh; Lamiroy, Bart; Wendling, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, we present a method for symbol recognition based on the spatio-structural description of a 'vocabulary' of extracted visual elementary parts. It is applied to symbols in electrical wiring diagrams. The method consists of first identifying vocabulary elements into different groups based on their types (e.g., circle, corner ). We then compute spatial relations between the possible pairs of labelled vocabulary types which are further used as a basis for bui...

  8. Automated road marking recognition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziyatdinov, R. R.; Shigabiev, R. R.; Talipov, D. N.

    2017-09-01

    Development of the automated road marking recognition systems in existing and future vehicles control systems is an urgent task. One way to implement such systems is the use of neural networks. To test the possibility of using neural network software has been developed with the use of a single-layer perceptron. The resulting system based on neural network has successfully coped with the task both when driving in the daytime and at night.

  9. The cutting edges in DNA repair, licensing, and fidelity: DNA and RNA repair nucleases sculpt DNA to measure twice, cut once.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutakawa, Susan E; Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien; Tainer, John A

    2014-07-01

    To avoid genome instability, DNA repair nucleases must precisely target the correct damaged substrate before they are licensed to incise. Damage identification is a challenge for all DNA damage response proteins, but especially for nucleases that cut the DNA and necessarily create a cleaved DNA repair intermediate, likely more toxic than the initial damage. How do these enzymes achieve exquisite specificity without specific sequence recognition or, in some cases, without a non-canonical DNA nucleotide? Combined structural, biochemical, and biological analyses of repair nucleases are revealing their molecular tools for damage verification and safeguarding against inadvertent incision. Surprisingly, these enzymes also often act on RNA, which deserves more attention. Here, we review protein-DNA structures for nucleases involved in replication, base excision repair, mismatch repair, double strand break repair (DSBR), and telomere maintenance: apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), Endonuclease IV (Nfo), tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase (TDP2), UV Damage endonuclease (UVDE), very short patch repair endonuclease (Vsr), Endonuclease V (Nfi), Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1), exonuclease 1 (Exo1), RNase T and Meiotic recombination 11 (Mre11). DNA and RNA structure-sensing nucleases are essential to life with roles in DNA replication, repair, and transcription. Increasingly these enzymes are employed as advanced tools for synthetic biology and as targets for cancer prognosis and interventions. Currently their structural biology is most fully illuminated for DNA repair, which is also essential to life. How DNA repair enzymes maintain genome fidelity is one of the DNA double helix secrets missed by James Watson and Francis Crick, that is only now being illuminated though structural biology and mutational analyses. Structures reveal motifs for repair nucleases and mechanisms whereby these enzymes follow the old carpenter adage: measure twice, cut once. Furthermore, to measure

  10. Visual recognition of permuted words

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Sheikh Faisal; Shafait, Faisal; Breuel, Thomas M.

    2010-02-01

    In current study we examine how letter permutation affects in visual recognition of words for two orthographically dissimilar languages, Urdu and German. We present the hypothesis that recognition or reading of permuted and non-permuted words are two distinct mental level processes, and that people use different strategies in handling permuted words as compared to normal words. A comparison between reading behavior of people in these languages is also presented. We present our study in context of dual route theories of reading and it is observed that the dual-route theory is consistent with explanation of our hypothesis of distinction in underlying cognitive behavior for reading permuted and non-permuted words. We conducted three experiments in lexical decision tasks to analyze how reading is degraded or affected by letter permutation. We performed analysis of variance (ANOVA), distribution free rank test, and t-test to determine the significance differences in response time latencies for two classes of data. Results showed that the recognition accuracy for permuted words is decreased 31% in case of Urdu and 11% in case of German language. We also found a considerable difference in reading behavior for cursive and alphabetic languages and it is observed that reading of Urdu is comparatively slower than reading of German due to characteristics of cursive script.

  11. Gender recognition from vocal source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, V. N.; Makarov, I. S.

    2008-07-01

    Efficiency of automatic recognition of male and female voices based on solving the inverse problem for glottis area dynamics and for waveform of the glottal airflow volume velocity pulse is studied. The inverse problem is regularized through the use of analytical models of the voice excitation pulse and of the dynamics of the glottis area, as well as the model of one-dimensional glottal airflow. Parameters of these models and spectral parameters of the volume velocity pulse are considered. The following parameters are found to be most promising: the instant of maximum glottis area, the maximum derivative of the area, the slope of the spectrum of the glottal airflow volume velocity pulse, the amplitude ratios of harmonics of this spectrum, and the pitch. On the plane of the first two main components in the space of these parameters, an almost twofold decrease in the classification error relative to that for the pitch alone is attained. The male voice recognition probability is found to be 94.7%, and the female voice recognition probability is 95.9%.

  12. Quadcopter Control Using Speech Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, H.; Darma, S.; Soekirno, S.

    2018-04-01

    This research reported a comparison from a success rate of speech recognition systems that used two types of databases they were existing databases and new databases, that were implemented into quadcopter as motion control. Speech recognition system was using Mel frequency cepstral coefficient method (MFCC) as feature extraction that was trained using recursive neural network method (RNN). MFCC method was one of the feature extraction methods that most used for speech recognition. This method has a success rate of 80% - 95%. Existing database was used to measure the success rate of RNN method. The new database was created using Indonesian language and then the success rate was compared with results from an existing database. Sound input from the microphone was processed on a DSP module with MFCC method to get the characteristic values. Then, the characteristic values were trained using the RNN which result was a command. The command became a control input to the single board computer (SBC) which result was the movement of the quadcopter. On SBC, we used robot operating system (ROS) as the kernel (Operating System).

  13. Multithread Face Recognition in Cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dakshina Ranjan Kisku

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Faces are highly challenging and dynamic objects that are employed as biometrics evidence in identity verification. Recently, biometrics systems have proven to be an essential security tools, in which bulk matching of enrolled people and watch lists is performed every day. To facilitate this process, organizations with large computing facilities need to maintain these facilities. To minimize the burden of maintaining these costly facilities for enrollment and recognition, multinational companies can transfer this responsibility to third-party vendors who can maintain cloud computing infrastructures for recognition. In this paper, we showcase cloud computing-enabled face recognition, which utilizes PCA-characterized face instances and reduces the number of invariant SIFT points that are extracted from each face. To achieve high interclass and low intraclass variances, a set of six PCA-characterized face instances is computed on columns of each face image by varying the number of principal components. Extracted SIFT keypoints are fused using sum and max fusion rules. A novel cohort selection technique is applied to increase the total performance. The proposed protomodel is tested on BioID and FEI face databases, and the efficacy of the system is proven based on the obtained results. We also compare the proposed method with other well-known methods.

  14. Non Audio-Video gesture recognition system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Craciunescu, Razvan; Mihovska, Albena Dimitrova; Kyriazakos, Sofoklis

    2016-01-01

    Gesture recognition is a topic in computer science and language technology with the goal of interpreting human gestures via mathematical algorithms. Gestures can originate from any bodily motion or state but commonly originate from the face or hand. Current research focus includes on the emotion...... recognition from the face and hand gesture recognition. Gesture recognition enables humans to communicate with the machine and interact naturally without any mechanical devices. This paper investigates the possibility to use non-audio/video sensors in order to design a low-cost gesture recognition device...

  15. Famous face recognition, face matching, and extraversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lander, Karen; Poyarekar, Siddhi

    2015-01-01

    It has been previously established that extraverts who are skilled at interpersonal interaction perform significantly better than introverts on a face-specific recognition memory task. In our experiment we further investigate the relationship between extraversion and face recognition, focusing on famous face recognition and face matching. Results indicate that more extraverted individuals perform significantly better on an upright famous face recognition task and show significantly larger face inversion effects. However, our results did not find an effect of extraversion on face matching or inverted famous face recognition.

  16. Full-length cDNA sequences from Rhesus monkey placenta tissue: analysis and utility for comparative mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Sang-Rae

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta are widely-used as experimental animals in biomedical research and are closely related to other laboratory macaques, such as cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis, and to humans, sharing a last common ancestor from about 25 million years ago. Although rhesus monkeys have been studied extensively under field and laboratory conditions, research has been limited by the lack of genetic resources. The present study generated placenta full-length cDNA libraries, characterized the resulting expressed sequence tags, and described their utility for comparative mapping with human RefSeq mRNA transcripts. Results From rhesus monkey placenta full-length cDNA libraries, 2000 full-length cDNA sequences were determined and 1835 rhesus placenta cDNA sequences longer than 100 bp were collected. These sequences were annotated based on homology to human genes. Homology search against human RefSeq mRNAs revealed that our collection included the sequences of 1462 putative rhesus monkey genes. Moreover, we identified 207 genes containing exon alterations in the coding region and the untranslated region of rhesus monkey transcripts, despite the highly conserved structure of the coding regions. Approximately 10% (187 of all full-length cDNA sequences did not represent any public human RefSeq mRNAs. Intriguingly, two rhesus monkey specific exons derived from the transposable elements of AluYRa2 (SINE family and MER11B (LTR family were also identified. Conclusion The 1835 rhesus monkey placenta full-length cDNA sequences described here could expand genomic resources and information of rhesus monkeys. This increased genomic information will greatly contribute to the development of evolutionary biology and biomedical research.

  17. Predicting Variation of DNA Shape Preferences in Protein-DNA Interaction in Cancer Cells with a New Biophysical Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batmanov, Kirill; Wang, Junbai

    2017-09-18

    DNA shape readout is an important mechanism of transcription factor target site recognition, in addition to the sequence readout. Several machine learning-based models of transcription factor-DNA interactions, considering DNA shape features, have been developed in recent years. Here, we present a new biophysical model of protein-DNA interactions by integrating the DNA shape properties. It is based on the neighbor dinucleotide dependency model BayesPI2, where new parameters are restricted to a subspace spanned by the dinucleotide form of DNA shape features. This allows a biophysical interpretation of the new parameters as a position-dependent preference towards specific DNA shape features. Using the new model, we explore the variation of DNA shape preferences in several transcription factors across various cancer cell lines and cellular conditions. The results reveal that there are DNA shape variations at FOXA1 (Forkhead Box Protein A1) binding sites in steroid-treated MCF7 cells. The new biophysical model is useful for elucidating the finer details of transcription factor-DNA interaction, as well as for predicting cancer mutation effects in the future.

  18. Nuclear translocation contributes to regulation of DNA excision repair activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Nina Østergaard; Andersen, Sofie Dabros; Lützen, Anne

    2009-01-01

    for regulation of nuclear import that is necessary for proper localization of the repair proteins. This review summarizes the current knowledge on nuclear import mechanisms of DNA excision repair proteins and provides a model that categorizes the import by different mechanisms, including classical nuclear import......DNA mutations are circumvented by dedicated specialized excision repair systems, such as the base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mismatch repair (MMR) pathways. Although the individual repair pathways have distinct roles in suppressing changes in the nuclear DNA......, it is evident that proteins from the different DNA repair pathways interact [Y. Wang, D. Cortez, P. Yazdi, N. Neff, S.J. Elledge, J. Qin, BASC, a super complex of BRCA1-associated proteins involved in the recognition and repair of aberrant DNA structures, Genes Dev. 14 (2000) 927-939; M. Christmann, M...

  19. Analysis of DNA interactions using single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzefeld, Markus; Walhorn, Volker; Anselmetti, Dario; Sewald, Norbert

    2013-06-01

    Protein-DNA interactions are involved in many biochemical pathways and determine the fate of the corresponding cell. Qualitative and quantitative investigations on these recognition and binding processes are of key importance for an improved understanding of biochemical processes and also for systems biology. This review article focusses on atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single-molecule force spectroscopy and its application to the quantification of forces and binding mechanisms that lead to the formation of protein-DNA complexes. AFM and dynamic force spectroscopy are exciting tools that allow for quantitative analysis of biomolecular interactions. Besides an overview on the method and the most important immobilization approaches, the physical basics of the data evaluation is described. Recent applications of AFM-based force spectroscopy to investigate DNA intercalation, complexes involving DNA aptamers and peptide- and protein-DNA interactions are given.

  20. The coevolution of recognition and social behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smead, Rory; Forber, Patrick

    2016-05-26

    Recognition of behavioral types can facilitate the evolution of cooperation by enabling altruistic behavior to be directed at other cooperators and withheld from defectors. While much is known about the tendency for recognition to promote cooperation, relatively little is known about whether such a capacity can coevolve with the social behavior it supports. Here we use evolutionary game theory and multi-population dynamics to model the coevolution of social behavior and recognition. We show that conditional harming behavior enables the evolution and stability of social recognition, whereas conditional helping leads to a deterioration of recognition ability. Expanding the model to include a complex game where both helping and harming interactions are possible, we find that conditional harming behavior can stabilize recognition, and thereby lead to the evolution of conditional helping. Our model identifies a novel hypothesis for the evolution of cooperation: conditional harm may have coevolved with recognition first, thereby helping to establish the mechanisms necessary for the evolution of cooperation.

  1. The Main Cognitive Model of Visual Recognition: Contour Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, YongHong

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we will study the following pattern recognition problem: Every pattern is a 3-dimensional graph, its surface can be split up into some regions, every region is composed of the pixels with the approximately same colour value and the approximately same depth value that is distance to eyes, and there may also be some contours, e.g., literal contours, on a surface of every pattern. For this problem we reveal the inherent laws. Moreover, we establish a cognitive model to reflect the...

  2. A Real Time PCR Platform for the Simultaneous Quantification of Total and Extrachromosomal HIV DNA Forms in Blood of HIV-1 Infected Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canovari, Benedetta; Scotti, Maddalena; Acetoso, Marcello; Valentini, Massimo; Petrelli, Enzo; Magnani, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Background The quantitative measurement of various HIV-1 DNA forms including total, unintegrated and integrated provirus play an increasingly important role in HIV-1 infection monitoring and treatment-related research. We report the development and validation of a SYBR Green real time PCR (TotUFsys platform) for the simultaneous quantification of total and extrachromosomal HIV-1 DNA forms in patients. This innovative technique makes it possible to obtain both measurements in a single PCR run starting from frozen blood employing the same primers and standard curve. Moreover, due to identical amplification efficiency, it allows indirect estimation of integrated level. To specifically detect 2-LTR a qPCR method was also developed. Methodology/Findings Primers used for total HIV-1 DNA quantification spanning a highly conserved region were selected and found to detect all HIV-1 clades of group M and the unintegrated forms of the same. A total of 195 samples from HIV-1 patients in a wide range of clinical conditions were analyzed with a 100% success rate, even in patients with suppressed plasma viremia, regardless of CD4+ or therapy. No significant correlation was observed between the two current prognostic markers, CD4+ and plasma viremia, while a moderate or high inverse correlation was found between CD4+ and total HIV DNA, with strong values for unintegrated HIV DNA. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, the results support the use of HIV DNA as another tool, in addition to traditional assays, which can be used to estimate the state of viral infection, the risk of disease progression and to monitor the effects of ART. The TotUFsys platform allowed us to obtain a final result, expressed as the total and unintegrated HIV DNA copy number per microgram of DNA or 104 CD4+, for 12 patients within two working days. PMID:25364909

  3. G-quadruplex recognition activities of E. Coli MutS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehrat Edward A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guanine quadruplex (G4 DNA is a four-stranded structure that contributes to genome instability and site-specific recombination. G4 DNA folds from sequences containing tandemly repetitive guanines, sequence motifs that are found throughout prokaryote and eukaryote genomes. While some cellular activities have been identified with binding or processing G4 DNA, the factors and pathways governing G4 DNA metabolism are largely undefined. Highly conserved mismatch repair factors have emerged as potential G4-responding complexes because, in addition to initiating heteroduplex correction, the human homologs bind non-B form DNA with high affinity. Moreover, the MutS homologs across species have the capacity to recognize a diverse range of DNA pairing variations and damage, suggesting a conserved ability to bind non-B form DNA. Results Here, we asked if E. coli MutS and a heteroduplex recognition mutant, MutS F36A, were capable of recognizing and responding to G4 DNA structures. We find by mobility shift assay that E. coli MutS binds to G4 DNA with high affinity better than binding to G-T heteroduplexes. In the same assay, MutS F36A failed to recognize G-T mismatched oligonucleotides, as expected, but retained an ability to bind to G4 DNA. Association with G4 DNA by MutS is not likely to activate the mismatch repair pathway because nucleotide binding did not promote release of MutS or MutS F36A from G4 DNA as it does for heteroduplexes. G4 recognition activities occur under physiological conditions, and we find that M13 phage harboring G4-capable DNA poorly infected a MutS deficient strain of E. coli compared to M13mp18, suggesting functional roles for mismatch repair factors in the cellular response to unstable genomic elements. Conclusions Taken together, our findings demonstrate that E. coli MutS has a binding activity specific for non-B form G4 DNA, but such binding appears independent of canonical heteroduplex repair activation.

  4. DNA Barcoding of Marine Metazoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucklin, Ann; Steinke, Dirk; Blanco-Bercial, Leocadio

    2011-01-01

    More than 230,000 known species representing 31 metazoan phyla populate the world's oceans. Perhaps another 1,000,000 or more species remain to be discovered. There is reason for concern that species extinctions may outpace discovery, especially in diverse and endangered marine habitats such as coral reefs. DNA barcodes (i.e., short DNA sequences for species recognition and discrimination) are useful tools to accelerate species-level analysis of marine biodiversity and to facilitate conservation efforts. This review focuses on the usual barcode region for metazoans: a ˜648 base-pair region of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene. Barcodes have also been used for population genetic and phylogeographic analysis, identification of prey in gut contents, detection of invasive species, forensics, and seafood safety. More controversially, barcodes have been used to delimit species boundaries, reveal cryptic species, and discover new species. Emerging frontiers are the use of barcodes for rapid and increasingly automated biodiversity assessment by high-throughput sequencing, including environmental barcoding and the use of barcodes to detect species for which formal identification or scientific naming may never be possible.

  5. Integrated and Total HIV-1 DNA Predict Ex Vivo Viral Outgrowth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Kiselinova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The persistence of a reservoir of latently infected CD4 T cells remains one of the major obstacles to cure HIV. Numerous strategies are being explored to eliminate this reservoir. To translate these efforts into clinical trials, there is a strong need for validated biomarkers that can monitor the reservoir over time in vivo. A comprehensive study was designed to evaluate and compare potential HIV-1 reservoir biomarkers. A cohort of 25 patients, treated with suppressive antiretroviral therapy was sampled at three time points, with median of 2.5 years (IQR: 2.4-2.6 between time point 1 and 2; and median of 31 days (IQR: 28-36 between time point 2 and 3. Patients were median of 6 years (IQR: 3-12 on ART, and plasma viral load (<50 copies/ml was suppressed for median of 4 years (IQR: 2-8. Total HIV-1 DNA, unspliced (us and multiply spliced HIV-1 RNA, and 2LTR circles were quantified by digital PCR in peripheral blood, at 3 time points. At the second time point, a viral outgrowth assay (VOA was performed, and integrated HIV-1 DNA and relative mRNA expression levels of HIV-1 restriction factors were quantified. No significant change was found for long- and short-term dynamics of all HIV-1 markers tested in peripheral blood. Integrated HIV-1 DNA was associated with total HIV-1 DNA (p<0.001, R² = 0.85, us HIV-1 RNA (p = 0.029, R² = 0.40, and VOA (p = 0.041, R2 = 0.44. Replication-competent virus was detected in 80% of patients by the VOA and it correlated with total HIV-1 DNA (p = 0.039, R² = 0.54. The mean quantification difference between Alu-PCR and VOA was 2.88 log10, and 2.23 log10 between total HIV-1 DNA and VOA. The levels of usHIV-1 RNA were inversely correlated with mRNA levels of several HIV-1 restriction factors (TRIM5α, SAMHD1, MX2, SLFN11, pSIP1. Our study reveals important correlations between the viral outgrowth and total and integrated HIV-1 DNA measures, suggesting that the total pool of HIV-1 DNA may predict the size of the

  6. Identification of Biomolecular Building Blocks by Recognition Tunneling: Stride towards Nanopore Sequencing of Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Suman

    DNA, RNA and Protein are three pivotal biomolecules in human and other organisms, playing decisive roles in functionality, appearance, diseases development and other physiological phenomena. Hence, sequencing of these biomolecules acquires the prime interest in the scientific community. Single molecular identification of their building blocks can be done by a technique called Recognition Tunneling (RT) based on Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM). A single layer of specially designed recognition molecule is attached to the STM electrodes, which trap the targeted molecules (DNA nucleoside monophosphates, RNA nucleoside monophosphates or amino acids) inside the STM nanogap. Depending on their different binding interactions with the recognition molecules, the analyte molecules generate stochastic signal trains accommodating their "electronic fingerprints". Signal features are used to detect the molecules using a machine learning algorithm and different molecules can be identified with significantly high accuracy. This, in turn, paves the way for rapid, economical nanopore sequencing platform, overcoming the drawbacks of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques. To read DNA nucleotides with high accuracy in an STM tunnel junction a series of nitrogen-based heterocycles were designed and examined to check their capabilities to interact with naturally occurring DNA nucleotides by hydrogen bonding in the tunnel junction. These recognition molecules are Benzimidazole, Imidazole, Triazole and Pyrrole. Benzimidazole proved to be best among them showing DNA nucleotide classification accuracy close to 99%. Also, Imidazole reader can read an abasic monophosphate (AP), a product from depurination or depyrimidination that occurs 10,000 times per human cell per day. In another study, I have investigated a new universal reader, 1-(2-mercaptoethyl)pyrene (Pyrene reader) based on stacking interactions, which should be more specific to the canonical DNA nucleosides. In addition

  7. A new selective developmental deficit: Impaired object recognition with normal face recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germine, Laura; Cashdollar, Nathan; Düzel, Emrah; Duchaine, Bradley

    2011-05-01

    Studies of developmental deficits in face recognition, or developmental prosopagnosia, have shown that individuals who have not suffered brain damage can show face recognition impairments coupled with normal object recognition (Duchaine and Nakayama, 2005; Duchaine et al., 2006; Nunn et al., 2001). However, no developmental cases with the opposite dissociation - normal face recognition with impaired object recognition - have been reported. The existence of a case of non-face developmental visual agnosia would indicate that the development of normal face recognition mechanisms does not rely on the development of normal object recognition mechanisms. To see whether a developmental variant of non-face visual object agnosia exists, we conducted a series of web-based object and face recognition tests to screen for individuals showing object recognition memory impairments but not face recognition impairments. Through this screening process, we identified AW, an otherwise normal 19-year-old female, who was then tested in the lab on face and object recognition tests. AW's performance was impaired in within-class visual recognition memory across six different visual categories (guns, horses, scenes, tools, doors, and cars). In contrast, she scored normally on seven tests of face recognition, tests of memory for two other object categories (houses and glasses), and tests of recall memory for visual shapes. Testing confirmed that her impairment was not related to a general deficit in lower-level perception, object perception, basic-level recognition, or memory. AW's results provide the first neuropsychological evidence that recognition memory for non-face visual object categories can be selectively impaired in individuals without brain damage or other memory impairment. These results indicate that the development of recognition memory for faces does not depend on intact object recognition memory and provide further evidence for category-specific dissociations in visual

  8. Visualization of DNA in highly processed botanical materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhengfei; Rubinsky, Maria; Babajanian, Silva; Zhang, Yanjun; Chang, Peter; Swanson, Gary

    2018-04-15

    DNA-based methods have been gaining recognition as a tool for botanical authentication in herbal medicine; however, their application in processed botanical materials is challenging due to the low quality and quantity of DNA left after extensive manufacturing processes. The low amount of DNA recovered from processed materials, especially extracts, is "invisible" by current technology, which has casted doubt on the presence of amplifiable botanical DNA. A method using adapter-ligation and PCR amplification was successfully applied to visualize the "invisible" DNA in botanical extracts. The size of the "invisible" DNA fragments in botanical extracts was around 20-220 bp compared to fragments of around 600 bp for the more easily visualized DNA in botanical powders. This technique is the first to allow characterization and visualization of small fragments of DNA in processed botanical materials and will provide key information to guide the development of appropriate DNA-based botanical authentication methods in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Pathogenic and Epiphenomenal Anti-DNA Antibodies in SLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Pavlovic

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The discoveries of natural and the development of manufactured highly efficient catalytic antibodies (abzymes opens the door to many practical applications. One of the most fascinating is the use of such antibodies in human therapy and prevention (vaccination, of cancer, AIDS, autoimmune diseases. A special entity of naturally occurring DNA hydrolytic anti-DNA antibodies is emerging within past decades linked to autoimmune and lymphoproliferative disorders, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, multiple sclerosis (MS, Sjogren Syndrome (SS, B - Chronic lymphocytic leucosis (B-CLL, and Multiple Myeloma (MM. The origin of the antibodies is unknown. The underlying mechanisms of these activities are suggested to be penetration into the living cells and translocation in the nucleus, with recognition of the specific binding sites at particular (ss or ds DNA. There are controversies in the literature whether hydrolysis is a sequence-specific event. The interplay between anti-DNA antibodies and DNA is not yet elucidated. This molecular “twist” also suggests that anti-DNA antibodies with DNA hydrolytic capacity could be the organism's immune response to a microbial attack, with microbial DNA, or specific genes within microbial DNA sequence, as a target for neutralization. The catalytic antibody-based approach can become a key tool in selective chemotherapeutic strategies.

  10. COMMERCIAL FUND, RECOGNITION AND ASSESSMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIOREL TRIF

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the immaterial investments within companies nowadays urges the specialists in accounting to find the ways to present more in the elements. In their studies researchers face the controversy reinvestments, as an asset in the balance sheet or an expense in the profit or loss account. The main goal of this paper is to analyze the difficulties in commercial fund. In the first part we will analyze various definitions of the problems concerning the commercial fund’s recognition and assessment. The paper also suggests that investments are really social and economic problems.

  11. Introduction to radar target recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Tait, P

    2006-01-01

    This new text provides an overview of the radar target recognition process and covers the key techniques being developed for operational systems. It is based on the fundamental scientific principles of high resolution radar, and explains how the techniques can be used in real systems, taking into account the characteristics of practical radar system designs and component limitations. It also addresses operational aspects, such as how high resolution modes would fit in with other functions such as detection and tracking. Mathematics is kept to a minimum and the complex techniques and issues are

  12. Comparing word and face recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robotham, Ro Julia; Starrfelt, Randi

    2017-01-01

    included, as a control, which makes designing experiments all the more challenging. Three main strategies have been used to overcome this problem, each of which has limitations: 1) Compare performances on typical tests of the three stimulus types (e.g., a Face Memory Test, an Object recognition test...... this framework to classify tests and experiments aiming to compare processing across these categories, it becomes apparent that core differences in characteristics (visual and semantic) between the stimuli make the problem of designing comparable tests an insoluble conundrum. By analyzing the experimental...

  13. Psychophysiological indices of recognition memory

    OpenAIRE

    Heaver, Becky

    2012-01-01

    It has recently been found that during recognition memory tests participants’ pupils dilate more when they view old items compared to novel items. This thesis sought to replicate this novel ‘‘Pupil Old/New Effect’’ (PONE) and to determine its relationship to implicit and explicit mnemonic processes, the veracity of participants’ responses, and the analogous Event-Related Potential (ERP) old/new effect. Across 9 experiments, pupil-size was measured with a video-based eye-tracker during a varie...

  14. Face Recognition using Gabor Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajjad MOHSIN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An Elastic Bunch Graph Map (EBGM algorithm is being proposed in this research paper that successfully implements face recognition using Gabor filters. The proposed system applies 40 different Gabor filters on an image. As aresult of which 40 images with different angles and orientation are received. Next, maximum intensity points in each filtered image are calculated and mark them as Fiducial points. The system reduces these points in accordance to distance between them. The next step is calculating the distances between the reduced points using distance formula. At last, the distances are compared with database. If match occurs, it means that the image is recognized.

  15. Peroxynitrite modified DNA presents better epitopes for anti-DNA autoantibodies in diabetes type 1 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Prashant; Moinuddin; Dixit, Kiran; Mir, Abdul Rouf; Habib, Safia; Alam, Khursheed; Ali, Asif

    2014-07-01

    Peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)), formed by the reaction between nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide (O2(-)), has been implicated in the etiology of numerous disease processes. Peroxynitrite interacts with DNA via direct oxidative reactions or via indirect radical-mediated mechanism. It can inflict both oxidative and nitrosative damages on DNA bases, generating abasic sites, resulting in the single strand breaks. Plasmid pUC 18 isolated from Escherichiacoli was modified with peroxynitrite, generated by quenched flow process. Modifications incurred in plasmid DNA were characterized by ultraviolet and fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism, HPLC and melting temperature studies. Binding characteristics and specificity of antibodies from diabetes patients were analyzed by direct binding and inhibition ELISA. Peroxynitrite modification of pUC 18 plasmid resulted in the formation of strand breaks and base modification. The major compound formed when peroxynitrite reacted with DNA was 8-nitroguanine, a specific marker for peroxynitrite induced DNA damage in inflamed tissues. The concentration of 8-nitroguanine was found to be 3.8 μM. Sera from diabetes type 1 patients from different age groups were studied for their binding to native and peroxynitrite modified plasmid. Direct binding and competitive-inhibition ELISA results showed higher recognition of peroxynitrite modified plasmid, as compared to the native form, by auto-antibodies present in diabetes patients. The preferential recognition of modified plasmid by diabetes autoantibodies was further reiterated by gel shift assay. Experimentally induced anti-peroxynitrite-modified plasmid IgG was used as a probe to detect nitrosative lesions in the DNA isolated from diabetes patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Hand gesture recognition by analysis of codons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra, Poornima; Shrikhande, Neelima

    2007-09-01

    The problem of recognizing gestures from images using computers can be approached by closely understanding how the human brain tackles it. A full fledged gesture recognition system will substitute mouse and keyboards completely. Humans can recognize most gestures by looking at the characteristic external shape or the silhouette of the fingers. Many previous techniques to recognize gestures dealt with motion and geometric features of hands. In this thesis gestures are recognized by the Codon-list pattern extracted from the object contour. All edges of an image are described in terms of sequence of Codons. The Codons are defined in terms of the relationship between maxima, minima and zeros of curvature encountered as one traverses the boundary of the object. We have concentrated on a catalog of 24 gesture images from the American Sign Language alphabet (Letter J and Z are ignored as they are represented using motion) [2]. The query image given as an input to the system is analyzed and tested against the Codon-lists, which are shape descriptors for external parts of a hand gesture. We have used the Weighted Frequency Indexing Transform (WFIT) approach which is used in DNA sequence matching for matching the Codon-lists. The matching algorithm consists of two steps: 1) the query sequences are converted to short sequences and are assigned weights and, 2) all the sequences of query gestures are pruned into match and mismatch subsequences by the frequency indexing tree based on the weights of the subsequences. The Codon sequences with the most weight are used to determine the most precise match. Once a match is found, the identified gesture and corresponding interpretation are shown as output.

  17. Cascade DNA nanomachine and exponential amplification biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianguo; Wu, Zai-Sheng; Shen, Weiyu; Xu, Huo; Li, Hongling; Jia, Lee

    2015-11-15

    DNA is a versatile scaffold for the assembly of multifunctional nanostructures, and potential applications of various DNA nanodevices have been recently demonstrated for disease diagnosis and treatment. In the current study, a powerful cascade DNA nanomachine was developed that can execute the exponential amplification of p53 tumor suppressor gene. During the operation of the newly-proposed DNA nanomachine, dual-cyclical nucleic acid strand-displacement polymerization (dual-CNDP) was ingeniously introduced, where the target trigger is repeatedly used as the fuel molecule and the nicked fragments are dramatically accumulated. Moreover, each displaced nicked fragment is able to activate the another type of cyclical strand-displacement amplification, increasing exponentially the value of fluorescence intensity. Essentially, one target binding event can induce considerable number of subsequent reactions, and the nanodevice was called cascade DNA nanomachine. It can implement several functions, including recognition element, signaling probe, polymerization primer and template. Using the developed autonomous operation of DNA nanomachine, the p53 gene can be quantified in the wide concentration range from 0.05 to 150 nM with the detection limit of 50 pM. If taking into account the final volume of mixture, the detection limit is calculated as lower as 6.2 pM, achieving an desirable assay ability. More strikingly, the mutant gene can be easily distinguished from the wild-type one. The proof-of-concept demonstrations reported herein is expected to promote the development and application of DNA nanomachine, showing great potential value in basic biology and medical diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Exemplar Based Recognition of Visual Shapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Søren I.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an approach of visual shape recognition based on exemplars of attributed keypoints. Training is performed by storing exemplars of keypoints detected in labeled training images. Recognition is made by keypoint matching and voting according to the labels for the matched keypoint....... The matching is insensitive to rotations, limited scalings and small deformations. The recognition is robust to noise, background clutter and partial occlusion. Recognition is possible from few training images and improve with the number of training images.......This paper presents an approach of visual shape recognition based on exemplars of attributed keypoints. Training is performed by storing exemplars of keypoints detected in labeled training images. Recognition is made by keypoint matching and voting according to the labels for the matched keypoints...

  19. Document recognition serving people with disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruchterman, James R.

    2007-01-01

    Document recognition advances have improved the lives of people with print disabilities, by providing accessible documents. This invited paper provides perspectives on the author's career progression from document recognition professional to social entrepreneur applying this technology to help people with disabilities. Starting with initial thoughts about optical character recognition in college, it continues with the creation of accurate omnifont character recognition that did not require training. It was difficult to make a reading machine for the blind in a commercial setting, which led to the creation of a nonprofit social enterprise to deliver these devices around the world. This network of people with disabilities scanning books drove the creation of Bookshare.org, an online library of scanned books. Looking forward, the needs for improved document recognition technology to further lower the barriers to reading are discussed. Document recognition professionals should be proud of the positive impact their work has had on some of society's most disadvantaged communities.

  20. DNA preservation in silk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yawen; Zheng, Zhaozhu; Gong, He; Liu, Meng; Guo, Shaozhe; Li, Gang; Wang, Xiaoqin; Kaplan, David L

    2017-06-27

    The structure of DNA is susceptible to alterations at high temperature and on changing pH, irradiation and exposure to DNase. Options to protect and preserve DNA during storage are important for applications in genetic diagnosis, identity authentication, drug development and bioresearch. In the present study, the stability of total DNA purified from human dermal fibroblast cells, as well as that of plasmid DNA, was studied in silk protein materials. The DNA/silk mixtures were stabilized on filter paper (silk/DNA + filter) or filter paper pre-coated with silk and treated with methanol (silk/DNA + PT-filter) as a route to practical utility. After air-drying and water extraction, 50-70% of the DNA and silk could be retrieved and showed a single band on electrophoretic gels. 6% silk/DNA + PT-filter samples provided improved stability in comparison with 3% silk/DNA + filter samples and DNA + filter samples for DNA preservation, with ∼40% of the band intensity remaining at 37 °C after 40 days and ∼10% after exposure to UV light for 10 hours. Quantitative analysis using the PicoGreen assay confirmed the results. The use of Tris/borate/EDTA (TBE) buffer enhanced the preservation and/or extraction of the DNA. The DNA extracted after storage maintained integrity and function based on serving as a functional template for PCR amplification of the gene for zinc finger protein 750 (ZNF750) and for transgene expression of red fluorescence protein (dsRed) in HEK293 cells. The high molecular weight and high content of a crystalline beta-sheet structure formed on the coated surfaces likely accounted for the preservation effects observed for the silk/DNA + PT-filter samples. Although similar preservation effects were also obtained for lyophilized silk/DNA samples, the rapid and simple processing available with the silk-DNA-filter membrane system makes it appealing for future applications.