WorldWideScience

Sample records for lowe syndrome gene

  1. Lowe syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loi Mario

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lowe syndrome (the oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe, OCRL is a multisystem disorder characterised by anomalies affecting the eye, the nervous system and the kidney. It is a uncommon, panethnic, X-linked disease, with estimated prevalence in the general population of approximately 1 in 500,000. Bilateral cataract and severe hypotonia are present at birth. In the subsequent weeks or months, a proximal renal tubulopathy (Fanconi-type becomes evident and the ocular picture may be complicated by glaucoma and cheloids. Psychomotor retardation is evident in childhood, while behavioural problems prevail and renal complications arise in adolescence. The mutation of the gene OCRL1 localized at Xq26.1, coding for the enzyme phosphatidylinositol (4,5 bisphosphate 5 phosphatase, PtdIns (4,5P2, in the trans-Golgi network is responsible for the disease. Both enzymatic and molecular testing are available for confirmation of the diagnosis and for prenatal detection of the disease. The treatment includes: cataract extraction, glaucoma control, physical and speech therapy, use of drugs to address behavioural problems, and correction of the tubular acidosis and the bone disease with the use of bicarbonate, phosphate, potassium and water. Life span rarely exceeds 40 years.

  2. Lowe syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Bahor

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Lowe syndrome is a rare X-linked multisystemic disorder, caused by mutation of the OCRL gene which encodes OCRL-1 protein. The disease is characterized by the triad of congenital cataracts, intellectual disability, and Fanconi-like proximal renal tubular dysfunction. Lifespan is short due to end-stage renal disease and other earlier complications and it rarely exceeds 40 years. The treatment is symptomatic, aimed at improving the clinical evolution of the patients and postpone the onset of terminal renal disease. The paper describes a case of a boy with Lowe syndrome with a novel genetic mutation.

  3. Mutation screening of USH3 gene (clarin-1) in Spanish patients with Usher syndrome: low prevalence and phenotypic variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, E; Jaijo, T; Oltra, S; Alió, J; Galán, F; Nájera, C; Beneyto, M; Millán, J M

    2004-12-01

    Usher syndrome type III is an autosomal recessive disorder clinically characterized by the association of retinitis pigmentosa (RP), variable presence of vestibular dysfunction and progressive hearing loss, being the progression of the hearing impairment the critical parameter classically used to distinguish this form from Usher syndrome type I and Usher syndrome type II. Usher syndrome type III clinical subtype is the rarest form of Usher syndrome in Spain, accounting only for 6% of all Usher syndrome Spanish cases. The gene responsible for Usher syndrome type III is named clarin-1 and it is thought to be involved in hair cell and photoreceptor cell synapses. Here, we report a screening for mutations in clarin-1 gene among our series of Usher syndrome Spanish patients. Clarin-1 has been found to be responsible for the disease in only two families: the first one is a previously reported family homozygous for Y63X mutation and the second one, described here, is homozygous for C40G. This accounts for 1.7% of Usher syndrome Spanish families. It is noticeable that, whereas C40G family is clinically compatible with Usher syndrome type III due to the progression of the hearing loss, Y63X family could be diagnosed as Usher syndrome type I because the hearing impairment is profound and stable. Thus, we consider that the progression of hearing loss is not the definitive key parameter to distinguish Usher syndrome type III from Usher syndrome type I and Usher syndrome type II.

  4. OCULO-CEREBRO-RENAL SYNDROME (LOWE'S SYNDROME)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1991-01-01

    Oculo-cerebro-renal syndrome (Lowe's syndrome) is characterized by mental and motor retardation, cataract, glaucoma and renal abnormalities. It is an X-linked recessive metabolic disease. Two brothers suffering from Lowe's syndrome are reported. Their mother with lenticular opacities and peculiar facial appearance is in concordance with the obligate carrier. The ocular changes and heridity are discussed.

  5. Mutations in the Wolfram syndrome 1 gene (WFS1) are a common cause of low frequency sensorineural hearing loss.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bespalova, I.N.; Camp, G. van; Bom, S.J.H.; Brown, D.J.; Cryns, K.; Wan, A.T. de; Erson, A.E.; Flothmann, K.; Kunst, H.P.M.; Kurnool, P.; Sivakumaran, T.A.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Leal, S.M.; Burmeister, M.; Lesperance, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    Non-syndromic low frequency sensorineural hearing loss (LFSNHL) affecting only 2000 Hz and below is an unusual type of hearing loss that worsens over time without progressing to profound deafness. This type of LFSNHL may be associated with mild tinnitus but is not associated with vertigo. We have

  6. Lowe Syndrome (Oculo-cerebro-renal Syndrome of Lowe: A Case Report from Eastern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipankar Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lowe syndrome (the oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe, OCRL is a rare X-linked recessive metabolic disorder that primarily affects eyes, kidneys and brain. It is caused by the deficiency of enzyme phosphatidylinositol 4, 5-bisphosphate 5-phosphatase. The gene coding for this enzyme, OCRL1 and mutations in it are responsible to cause Lowe Syndrome. We report a 6 years old boy from Eastern India, with Lowe Syndrome. Diagnosis was suggested by typical features in the MRI of the brain along with other clinical feature and investigation.

  7. Bartter's and Gitelman's syndromes: from gene to clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Naesens, Maarten; STEELS, Paul; Verberckmoes, René; Vanrenterghem, Yves; Kuypers, Dirk

    2004-01-01

    Bartter's and Gitelman's syndromes are characterized by hypokalemia, normal to low blood pressure and hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis. Recently, investigators have been able to demonstrate mutations of six genes encoding several renal tubular transporters and ion channels that can be held responsible for Bartter's and Gitelman's syndromes. Neonatal Bartter's syndrome is caused by mutations of NKCC2 or ROMK, classic Bartter's syndrome by mutations of ClC-Kb, Bartter's syndrome associated wit...

  8. Genes and Syndromic Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keats, Bronya J. B.

    2002-01-01

    This article provides a description of the human genome and patterns of inheritance and discusses genes that are associated with some of the syndromes for which hearing loss is a common finding, including: Waardenburg, Stickler, Jervell and Lange-Neilsen, Usher, Alport, mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, and sensorineural hearing loss. (Contains…

  9. Global Liver Gene Expression Analysis on a Murine Metabolic Syndrome Model Treated by Low-molecular-weight Lychee Fruit Polyphenol (Oligonol®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Hironobu; Uehara, Kaori; Nagashima, Takayuki; Nakata, Akifumi; Sato, Keisuke; Mihara, Yoshihiro; Komatsu, Ken-Ich; Takanari, Jun; Shimizu, Shigeomi; Wakame, Koji

    2016-07-01

    Oligonol® (OLG) is a low-molecular-weight lychee fruit polyphenol mainly containing catechin-type monomers and oligomers of proanthocyanidins. Dietary OLG supplementation reportedly improves lipid metabolism disorder and lowers the visceral fat level in animal and human studies. Thus, we investigated the mechanism behind the protective and beneficial effects of OLG on a Western diet (WD)-induced metabolic syndrome (MetS) of a murine model. Using the C57BL/6J mouse for the MetS model, mice were divided into three groups: control (normal diet: ND), Western diet (WD) and WD + 0.5% OLG (OLG) groups. The WD group was fed a high-calorie (high fructose plus high fat) diet for 12 weeks to develop MetS. At week 12, all mice were sacrificed and the blood and liver were obtained for histological and biological examinations and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). Body weight, liver weight, plasma triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (T-Cho) and alanine aminotransferase (ATS) levels of both OLG groups were significantly lower than those of the WD group. On histological examination of the liver, the area of fatty deposits was shown to be suppressed by OLG administration. Expression gene analysis in the liver of WD- versus OLG-fed mice by RNA-Seq showed that 464/45,706 genes exhibited a significant change of expression (corrected p-value metabolism-related genes Lpin1, Adig and Cidea were regulated by OLG administration. OLG may function to suppress MetS and the progression of geriatric diseases in WD-fed mice by regulating the expression of lipid metabolism, inflammation and tumor-related genes in the liver. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  10. [Research progress of mutational spectrum and pathophysiology of WFS1 gene in Wolfram syndrome and nonsyndromic low frequency sensorineural hearing loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, S M; Han, Y H; Wang, H B

    2016-09-07

    Compound homozygous or heterozygous mutations in WFS 1 can lead to autosomal recessive Wolfram syndrome (WS), and heterozygous mutations in WFS 1 can lead to autosomal dominant non-syndromic low frequency sensorineural hearing loss (LFSNHL). In addition, mutations in the WFS region has relationship with diabetes and psychiatric diseases. In this paper, we provide an overview of genetic research with different phenotypes, including WS and LFSNHL.

  11. Management of Lowe syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risky Vitria Prasetyo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lowe syndrome (the oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe, OCRL is a multisystem disorder characterized by anomalies affecting the eyes, nervous system and kidneys.1-3 The disorder was first recognized by Lowe et al. in 1952, and described as a unique syndrome with organic aciduria, decreased renal ammonia production, hydrophthalmos, and mental retardation. In 1954, renal Fanconi syndrome was recognized as being associated with Lowe syndrome and in 1965, a recessive X-linked pattern of inheritance was determined.2,4 Lowe syndrome is a very rare disease, with an estimated prevalence in the general population of 1 in 500,000. According to the Lowe Syndrome Association (LSA in the USA, the estimated prevalence is between 1 and 10 affected males in 1,000,000 people, with 190 living in the year 2000. The Italian Association of Lowe Syndrome estimated that there were 34 Lowe syndrome patients (33 boys and one girl living in Italy in the year 2005.2,4,5 It almost exclusively affects males.6 Physicians may not be familiar with Lowe syndrome due to its rarity.4

  12. Pleiotropic genes for metabolic syndrome and inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraja, Aldi T; Chasman, Daniel I; North, Kari E

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has become a health and financial burden worldwide. The MetS definition captures clustering of risk factors that predict higher risk for diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Our study hypothesis is that additional to genes influencing individual MetS risk factor...

  13. Eye Development Genes and Known Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavotinek, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    Anophthalmia and microphthalmia (A/M) are significant eye defects because they can have profound effects on visual acuity. A/M is associated with non-ocular abnormalities in an estimated 33–95% of cases and around 25% of patients have an underlying genetic syndrome that is diagnosable. Syndrome recognition is important for targeted molecular genetic testing, prognosis and for counseling regarding recurrence risks. This review provides clinical and molecular information for several of the commonest syndromes associated with A/M: Anophthalmia-Esophageal-Genital syndrome, caused by SOX2 mutations, Anophthalmia and pituitary abnormalities caused by OTX2 mutations, Matthew-Wood syndrome caused by STRA6 mutations, Oculocardiafaciodental syndrome and Lenz microphthalmia caused by BCOR mutations, Microphthalmia Linear Skin pigmentation syndrome caused by HCCS mutations, Anophthalmia, pituitary abnormalities, polysyndactyly caused by BMP4 mutations and Waardenburg anophthalmia caused by mutations in SMOC1. In addition, we briefly discuss the ocular and extraocular phenotypes associated with several other important eye developmental genes, including GDF6, VSX2, RAX, SHH, SIX6 and PAX6. PMID:22005280

  14. Low bone turnover phenotype in Rett syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roende, Gitte; Petersen, Janne; Ravn, Kirstine

    2014-01-01

    Background:Patients with Rett syndrome (RTT) are at risk of having low bone mass and low-energy fractures.Methods:We characterised bone metabolism by both bone formation and resorption markers in blood in a RTT population of 61 girls and women and 122 well-matched healthy controls. Levels of N-te...

  15. A patient with Werner syndrome and adiponectin gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Naotake; Hatanaka, Sachiko; Yokote, Koutaro; Kurosawa, Hiroko; Yoshida, Tomohiko; Iwai, Rie; Takahashi, Hidenori; Yoshida, Katsuya; Horie, Atsuya; Sakurai, Kenichi; Yagui, Kazuo; Saito, Yasushi; Yoshida, Shouji

    2007-01-01

    Werner syndrome is a premature aging disease characterized by genomic instability and increased cancer risk. Here, we report a 45-year-old diabetic man as the first Werner syndrome patient found to have an adiponectin gene mutation. Showing graying and loss of hair, skin atrophy, and juvenile cataract, he was diagnosed with Werner syndrome type 4 by molecular analysis. His serum adiponectin concentration was low. In the globular domain of the adiponectin gene, I164T in exon 3 was detected. When we examined effects of pioglitazone (15 mg/day) on serum adiponectin multimer and monomer concentrations using selective assays, the patient's relative percentage increased in adiponectin concentration was almost same as that in the 18 diabetic patients without an adiponectin mutation, but the absolute adiponectin concentration was half of those seen in diabetic patients treated with the same pioglitazone dose who had no adiponectin mutation. The response suggested that pioglitazone treatment might help to prevent future Werner syndrome-related acceleration of atherosclerosis. Present and further clinical relevant to atherosclerosis in this patient should be imformative concerning the pathogenesis and treatment of atherosclerosis in the presence of hypoadiponectinemia and insulin resistance.

  16. Pathological assessment of mismatch repair gene variants in Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Heinen, Christopher D; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte

    2012-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes and is the most prevalent hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome. A significant proportion of variants identified in MMR and other common cancer susceptibility genes are missense or noncoding changes whose...

  17. Beneficial effect of CLOCK gene polymorphism rs1801260 in combination with low-fat diet on insulin metabolism in the patients with metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic variation at the Circadian Locomotor Output Cycles Kaput (CLOCK) locus has been associated with lifestyle-related conditions such as obesity, metabolic syndrome (MetS) and cardiovascular diseases. In fact, it has been suggested that the disruption of the circadian system may play a causal ro...

  18. Blood Gene Expression Predicts Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Danger

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS, the main manifestation of chronic lung allograft dysfunction, leads to poor long-term survival after lung transplantation. Identifying predictors of BOS is essential to prevent the progression of dysfunction before irreversible damage occurs. By using a large set of 107 samples from lung recipients, we performed microarray gene expression profiling of whole blood to identify early biomarkers of BOS, including samples from 49 patients with stable function for at least 3 years, 32 samples collected at least 6 months before BOS diagnosis (prediction group, and 26 samples at or after BOS diagnosis (diagnosis group. An independent set from 25 lung recipients was used for validation by quantitative PCR (13 stables, 11 in the prediction group, and 8 in the diagnosis group. We identified 50 transcripts differentially expressed between stable and BOS recipients. Three genes, namely POU class 2 associating factor 1 (POU2AF1, T-cell leukemia/lymphoma protein 1A (TCL1A, and B cell lymphocyte kinase, were validated as predictive biomarkers of BOS more than 6 months before diagnosis, with areas under the curve of 0.83, 0.77, and 0.78 respectively. These genes allow stratification based on BOS risk (log-rank test p < 0.01 and are not associated with time posttransplantation. This is the first published large-scale gene expression analysis of blood after lung transplantation. The three-gene blood signature could provide clinicians with new tools to improve follow-up and adapt treatment of patients likely to develop BOS.

  19. [Gene mutation and clinical phenotype analysis of patients with Noonan syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X H; Ding, W W; Han, L; Liu, X R; Xiao, Y Y; Yang, J; Mo, Y

    2017-10-02

    Objective: To analyze the gene mutations and clinical features of patients with Noonan syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Method: Determined the mutation domain in five cases diagnosed with Noonan syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and identified the relationship between the mutant domain and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by searching relevant articles in pubmed database. Result: Three mutant genes (PTPN11 gene in chromosome 12, RIT1 gene in chromosome 1 and RAF1 gene in chromosome 3) in five cases all had been reported to be related to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The reported hypertrophic cardiomyopathy relevant genes MYPN, MYH6 and MYBP3 had also been found in case 1 and 2. Patients with same gene mutation had different clinical manifestations. Both case 4 and 5 had RAF1 mutation (c.770C>T). However, case 4 had special face, low IQ, mild pulmonary artery stenosis, and only mild ventricular hypertrophy. Conclusion: Noonan syndrome is a genetic heterogeneity disease. Our study identified specific gene mutations that could result in Noonan syndrome with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy through molecular biology methods. The results emphasize the importance of gene detection in the management of Noonan syndrome.

  20. Atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome associated with a hybrid complement gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian P Venables

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sequence analysis of the regulators of complement activation (RCA cluster of genes at chromosome position 1q32 shows evidence of several large genomic duplications. These duplications have resulted in a high degree of sequence identity between the gene for factor H (CFH and the genes for the five factor H-related proteins (CFHL1-5; aliases CFHR1-5. CFH mutations have been described in association with atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome (aHUS. The majority of the mutations are missense changes that cluster in the C-terminal region and impair the ability of factor H to regulate surface-bound C3b. Some have arisen as a result of gene conversion between CFH and CFHL1. In this study we tested the hypothesis that nonallelic homologous recombination between low-copy repeats in the RCA cluster could result in the formation of a hybrid CFH/CFHL1 gene that predisposes to the development of aHUS. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In a family with many cases of aHUS that segregate with the RCA cluster we used cDNA analysis, gene sequencing, and Southern blotting to show that affected individuals carry a heterozygous CFH/CFHL1 hybrid gene in which exons 1-21 are derived from CFH and exons 22/23 from CFHL1. This hybrid encodes a protein product identical to a functionally significant CFH mutant (c.3572C>T, S1191L and c.3590T>C, V1197A that has been previously described in association with aHUS. CONCLUSIONS: CFH mutation screening is recommended in all aHUS patients prior to renal transplantation because of the high risk of disease recurrence post-transplant in those known to have a CFH mutation. Because of our finding it will be necessary to implement additional screening strategies that will detect a hybrid CFH/CFHL1 gene.

  1. [Gender features of low back pain syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseĭkin, I A; Goĭdenko, V S; Aleksandrov, V I; Rudenko, I V; Borzunova, T A; Barashkov, G N

    2010-01-01

    Forty-four patients with low back pain caused by a radix syndrome (mean age 46.18±9.11 years) have been examined. Patients have been stratified by sex. The pain syndrome has been assessed in 1st, 10th and 21st by the VAS, pressure pain measurement and laboratory tests for measuring neurotransmitter levels. It has been shown that women endure a pain worse as assessed not only by the questionnaires but also by the pressure pain measurement especially at night. The analysis of blood serum revealed higher levels of β-endorphin, serotonin, dopamine that were correlated (р<0.05) with the pain level, their amount decreasing with the reduction of pain.

  2. Do the MTHFR gene polymorphism and Down syndrome pregnancy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Down syndrome, the most common trisomy 21 arises from abnormal chromosomal segregation. The etiology includes genetic and acquired factors. The main genetic factor that is well appreciated for onset of Down syndrome pregnancy is MTHFR gene polymorphism. But till date, no final conclusion has arrived ...

  3. Genes and Disease: Prader-Willi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MD): National Center for Biotechnology Information (US); 1998-. Genes and Disease [Internet]. Show details National Center for ... 45K) PDF version of this title (3.8M) Gene sequence Genome view see gene locations Entrez Gene ...

  4. Myopathic mtDNA Depletion Syndrome Due to Mutation in TK2 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Hernández, Elena; García-Silva, María Teresa; Quijada-Fraile, Pilar; Rodríguez-García, María Elena; Rivera, Henry; Hernández-Laín, Aurelio; Coca-Robinot, David; Fernández-Toral, Joaquín; Arenas, Joaquín; Martín, Miguel A; Martínez-Azorín, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing was used to identify the disease gene(s) in a Spanish girl with failure to thrive, muscle weakness, mild facial weakness, elevated creatine kinase, deficiency of mitochondrial complex III and depletion of mtDNA. With whole-exome sequencing data, it was possible to get the whole mtDNA sequencing and discard any pathogenic variant in this genome. The analysis of whole exome uncovered a homozygous pathogenic mutation in thymidine kinase 2 gene ( TK2; NM_004614.4:c.323 C>T, p.T108M). TK2 mutations have been identified mainly in patients with the myopathic form of mtDNA depletion syndromes. This patient presents an atypical TK2-related myopathic form of mtDNA depletion syndromes, because despite having a very low content of mtDNA (TK2 gene in mtDNA depletion syndromes and expanded the phenotypic spectrum.

  5. Mismatch repair genes in Lynch syndrome: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Cavalcanti Carneiro da Silva

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome represents 1-7% of all cases of colorectal cancer and is an autosomal-dominant inherited cancer predisposition syndrome caused by germline mutations in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA mismatch repair genes. Since the discovery of the major human genes with DNA mismatch repair function, mutations in five of them have been correlated with susceptibility to Lynch syndrome: mutS homolog 2 (MSH2; mutL homolog 1 (MLH1; mutS homolog 6 (MSH6; postmeiotic segregation increased 2 (PMS2; and postmeiotic segregation increased 1 (PMS1. It has been proposed that one additional mismatch repair gene, mutL homolog 3 (MLH3, also plays a role in Lynch syndrome predisposition, but the clinical significance of mutations in this gene is less clear. According to the InSiGHT database (International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumors, approximately 500 different LS-associated mismatch repair gene mutations are known, primarily involving MLH1 (50% and MSH2 (40%, while others account for 10%. Much progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of Lynch Syndrome. Molecular characterization will be the most accurate way of defining Lynch syndrome and will provide predictive information of greater accuracy regarding the risks of colon and extracolonic cancer and enable optimal cancer surveillance regimens.

  6. Nance-Horan syndrome: a contiguous gene syndrome involving deletion of the amelogenin gene? A case report and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, E; Hodgson, S; Lench, N; Roberts, G J

    1995-03-01

    A case of Nance-Horan syndrome in a male is presented, with some features of the condition in his carrier mother and her mother. It is proposed that Nance-Horan syndrome might be a contiguous gene syndrome mapping to chromosome Xp21.2-p22.3. The proband had congenital cataract microphthalmia and dental abnormalities including screwdriver shaped incisors and evidence of enamel pitting hypoplasia. The region Xp21.2-p22.3 also contains the tooth enamel protein gene, amelogenin (AMGX). Using molecular genetic techniques, we have shown that there is no evidence that the AMGX gene is deleted in this case of the Nance-Horan syndrome.

  7. A novel growth hormone receptor gene deletion mutation in a patient with primary growth hormone insensitivity syndrome (Laron syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Kouhara, Haruhiko; Iida, Keiji; Chihara, Kazuo; Kasayama, Soji

    2008-04-01

    Growth hormone (GH) insensitivity syndrome (Laron syndrome) is known to be caused by genetic disorders of the GH-IGF-1 axis. Although many mutations in the GH receptor have been identified, there have been only a few reports of deletions of the GH receptor gene. A Japanese adult female patient with Laron syndrome was subjected to chromosome analysis with basic G-banding and also with a high accuracy technique. Each exon of the GH receptor gene was amplified by means of PCR. Since this patient was diagnosed with osteoporosis, the effects of alendronate on bone mineral density (BMD) were also examined. The chromosome analysis with the high accuracy technique demonstrated a large deletion of the short arm in one allele of chromosome 5 from p11 to p13.1 [46, XX, del (5) (p11-p13.1)]. PCR amplification of exons of the GH receptor gene showed that only exons 2 and 3 were amplified. Low-dose IGF-1 administration (30microg/kg body weight) failed to increase her BMD, whereas alendronate administration resulted in an increase associated with a decrease in urinary deoxypyridinoline (DPD) and serum osteocalcin concentrations. The GH receptor gene of the patient was shown to lack exons 4-10. To the best of our knowledge, this is the third case report of Laron syndrome with large GH receptor deletion. Alendronate was effective for the enhancement of BMD.

  8. [Wolfram syndrome: clinical features, molecular genetics of WFS1 gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Katsuya; Matsunaga, Kimie; Hatanaka, Masayuki; Akiyama, Masaru; Tanizawa, Yukio

    2015-02-01

    Wolfram syndrome(WFS: OMIM 222300) is a rare recessive neuro-endocrine degenerative disorder, known as DIDMOAD(Diabetes Insipidus, early-onset Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy and Deafness) syndrome. Most affected individuals carry recessive mutations in the Wolfram syndrome 1 gene(WFS1). The WFS1 protein is an endoplasmic reticulum(ER) embedded protein, which functions in ER calcium homeostasis and unfolded protein responses. Dysregulation of these cellular processes results in the development of ER stress, leading to apoptosis. In addition, abundantly present WFS1 protein in insulin secretory granules plays a role in the intra-granular acidification. However, the phenotypic pleiomorphism and molecular complexity of this disease limit the understanding of WFS. Here we review clinical features, molecular mechanisms and mutations of WFS1 gene that relate to this syndrome.

  9. Thyroid peroxidase: evidence for disease gene exclusion in Pendred's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gausden, E; Armour, J A; Coyle, B; Coffey, R; Hochberg, Z; Pembrey, M; Britton, K E; Grossman, A; Reardon, W; Trembath, R

    1996-04-01

    Pendred's syndrome is an association between congenital neurosensory deafness and goitre with abnormal discharge of iodide following perchlorate challenge, indicating a defect of iodide organification. Although Pendred's syndrome may cause up to 7.5% of all cases of congenital deafness, the molecular basis of the association between the hearing loss and the thyroid organification defect remains unknown. We chose to investigate the role of the thyroid peroxidase (TPO) gene as the genetic defect in Pendred's syndrome. A highly informative variable number tandem repeat (VNTR), located 1.5 kb downstream of exon 10 of the TPO gene, was used to search for genetic linkage in multiple sibships affected by Pendred's syndrome. Seven kindreds were recruited from the UK, each with at least two affected members. We have also examined a large inbred Israeli family with two affected offspring and five unaffected children. Individuals were assigned affected status based on the characteristic clinical features of Pendred's syndrome, namely the presence of congenital sensorineural hearing loss and the appearance in early life of a goitre. Additionally, at least one affected member from each sibship had a characteristic positive perchlorate discharge test (Morgans & Trotter, 1958). PCR amplification of genomic DNA at the TPO VNTR allowed assignment of genotypes to each individual and the calculation of a two-point LOD score. In six of the nine sibships analysed we found obligatory recombination between TPO and Pendred's syndrome. Non-complementation observed in affected parents with an affected offspring excluded TPO in an affected sibship with genotype sharing and supports a hypothesis of genetic homogeneity for Pendred's syndrome. In two sibships, mutation of the TPO gene as the cause of Pendred's syndrome could not be excluded. These data suggest that defects at the thyroid peroxidase locus on chromosome 2 are not the major cause of Pendred's syndrome.

  10. DXA measurements in rett syndrome reveal small bones with low bone mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roende, Gitte; Ravn, Kirstine; Fuglsang, Kathrine

    2011-01-01

    Low bone mass is reported in growth-retarded patients harboring mutations in the X-linked methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene causing Rett syndrome (RTT). We present the first study addressing both bone mineral density (BMD) and bone size in RTT. Our object was to determine whether patients...

  11. Diagnostic test for prenatal identification of Down's syndrome and mental retardation and gene therapy therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Desmond J.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2000-01-01

    A a diagnostic test useful for prenatal identification of Down syndrome and mental retardation. A method for gene therapy for correction and treatment of Down syndrome. DYRK gene involved in the ability to learn. A method for diagnosing Down's syndrome and mental retardation and an assay therefor. A pharmaceutical composition for treatment of Down's syndrome mental retardation.

  12. Correlation of gene expression with bladder capacity in interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colaco, Marc; Koslov, David S; Keys, Tristan; Evans, Robert J; Badlani, Gopal H; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Walker, Stephen J

    2014-10-01

    Interstitial cystitis and bladder pain syndrome are terms used to describe a heterogeneous chronic pelvic and bladder pain disorder. Despite its significant prevalence, our understanding of disease etiology is poor. We molecularly characterized interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and determined whether there are clinical factors that correlate with gene expression. Bladder biopsies from female subjects with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and female controls without signs of the disease were collected and divided into those with normal and low anesthetized bladder capacity, respectively. Samples then underwent RNA extraction and microarray assay. Data generated by these assays were analyzed using Omics Explorer (Qlucore, Lund, Sweden), GeneSifter® Analysis Edition 4.0 and Ingenuity® Pathway Analysis to determine similarity among samples within and between groups, and measure differentially expressed transcripts unique to each phenotype. A total of 16 subjects were included in study. Principal component analysis and unsupervised hierarchical clustering showed clear separation between gene expression in tissues from subjects with low compared to normal bladder capacity. Gene expression in tissue from patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome who had normal bladder capacity did not significantly differ from that in controls without interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome. Pairwise analysis revealed that pathways related to inflammatory and immune response were most involved. Microarray analysis provides insight into the potential pathological condition underlying interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome. This pilot study shows that patients with this disorder who have low compared to normal bladder capacity have significantly different molecular characteristics, which may reflect a difference in disease pathophysiology. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc

  13. [RIT1: a novel gene associated with Noonan syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Carrera, I; Solo de Zaldivar-Tristancho, M; Martin-Fernandez, R; Vera-Torres, M; Gonzalez de Buitrago-Amigo, J F; Botet-Rodriguez, J

    2016-10-16

    Noonan syndrome is the most frequent of the congenital group of malformation syndromes caused by germline mutations that encode components of the RAS/MAPK pathway, termed RASopathies, one of the most frequent congenital genetic disorders in the clinical practice. Recently RIT1 mutations have been reported in patients with Noonan syndrome. A 7 years-old girl with a clinical diagnosis of Noonan syndrome, and with a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy included in her clinical manifestations, where a de novo heterozygous, probably pathogenic, novel mutation in RIT1, c.295T>C (p.Phe99Leu), has been identified. RIT1 shares homology with other RAS proteins and the expression of mutant alleles demonstrates a gain-of-function effect supporting a causative role in Noonan syndrome pathogenesis. Data suggest that the frequency of RIT1 mutations can be estimated as 3-5% in Noonan syndrome patients. These cases compared with Noonan patients harboring mutations in other genes are characterized by high frequency of prenatal abnormalities and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and lower frequencies of short stature and pectus abnormalities. We emphasize the importance of the novel identified genes in order to be included in the diagnostic panels.

  14. Marfan syndrome gene search intensifies following identification of basic defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall, T.

    1990-10-03

    Somewhere, quite possible along chromosomes 8 and/or 15, the gene(s) for Marfan syndrome will be found. The search is intensifying following a report that faulty scaffolding in the body's connective tissue appears to be the long sought after defect behind the syndrome, and inherited disorder that has caused the premature death of young, healthy-looking individuals. Finding that something in the living masonry of the human body has proven to be a 30-year inquisition of nearly two dozen molecules that has engaged investigators worldwide. Historically, researchers have searched for a structural flaw in one of the collagen molecules to explain the cause of Marfan Syndrome. Using monoclonal antibodies, researchers have implicated microfibrils, the extracellular filaments that provide a matrix for the deposit of elastin during embryonic development.

  15. Candidate gene association studies in syndromic and non-syndromic cleft lip and palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daack-Hirsch, S.; Basart, A.; Frischmeyer, P. [Univ. of Iowa, IA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Using ongoing case ascertainment through a birth defects registry, we have collected 219 nuclear families with non-syndromic cleft lip and/or palate and 111 families with a collection of syndromic forms. Syndromic cases include 24 with recognized forms and 72 with unrecognized syndromes. Candidate gene studies as well as genome-wide searches for evidence of microdeletions and isodisomy are currently being carried out. Candidate gene association studies, to date, have made use of PCR-based polymorphisms for TGFA, MSX1, CLPG13 (a CA repeat associated with a human homologue of a locus that results in craniofacial dysmorphogenesis in the mouse) and an STRP found in a Van der Woude syndrome microdeletion. Control tetranucleotide repeats, which insure that population-based differences are not responsible for any observed associations, are also tested. Studies of the syndromic cases have included the same list of candidate genes searching for evidence of microdeletions and a genome-wide search using tri- and tetranucleotide polymorphic markers to search for isodisomy or structural rearrangements. Significant associations have previously been identified for TGFA, and, in this report, identified for MSX1 and nonsyndromic cleft palate only (p = 0.04, uncorrected). Preliminary results of the genome-wide scan for isodisomy has returned no true positives and there has been no evidence for microdeletion cases.

  16. Kallmann syndrome and ichthyosis: a case of contiguous gene deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Berges-Raso

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Kallmann syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous form of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism caused by gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency and characterized by anosmia or hyposmia due to hypoplasia of the olfactory bulbs; osteoporosis and metabolic syndrome can develop due to longstanding untreated hypogonadism. Kallmann syndrome affects 1 in 10 000 men and 1 in 50 000 women. Defects in 17 genes, including KAL1, have been implicated. Kallmann syndrome can be associated with X-linked ichthyosis, a skin disorder characterized by early onset dark, dry, irregular scales affecting the limb and trunk, caused by a defect of the steroid sulfatase gene (STS. Both KAL1 and STS are located in the Xp22.3 region; therefore, deletions in this region cause a contiguous gene syndrome. We report the case of a 32-year-old man with ichthyosis referred for evaluation of excessive height (2.07 m and weight (BMI: 29.6 kg/m2, microgenitalia and absence of secondary sex characteristics. We diagnosed Kallmann syndrome with ichthyosis due to a deletion in Xp22.3, a rare phenomenon.

  17. Identification of the gene for Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, S P; Ebenezer, N D; Poopalasundaram, S; Lehmann, O J; Moore, A T; Hardcastle, A J

    2004-10-01

    The disease intervals for Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS [MIM 302350]) and X linked congenital cataract (CXN) overlap on Xp22. To identify the gene or genes responsible for these diseases. Families with NHS were ascertained. The refined locus for CXN was used to focus the search for candidate genes, which were screened by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing of potential exons and intron-exon splice sites. Genomic structures and homologies were determined using bioinformatics. Expression studies were undertaken using specific exonic primers to amplify human fetal cDNA and mouse RNA. A novel gene NHS, with no known function, was identified as causative for NHS. Protein truncating mutations were detected in all three NHS pedigrees, but no mutation was identified in a CXN family, raising the possibility that NHS and CXN may not be allelic. The NHS gene forms a new gene family with a closely related novel gene NHS-Like1 (NHSL1). NHS and NHSL1 lie in paralogous duplicated chromosomal intervals on Xp22 and 6q24, and NHSL1 is more broadly expressed than NHS in human fetal tissues. This study reports the independent identification of the gene causative for Nance-Horan syndrome and extends the number of mutations identified.

  18. A Marfan syndrome gene expression phenotype in cultured skin fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emond Mary

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marfan syndrome (MFS is a heritable connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene. This syndrome constitutes a significant identifiable subtype of aortic aneurysmal disease, accounting for over 5% of ascending and thoracic aortic aneurysms. Results We used spotted membrane DNA macroarrays to identify genes whose altered expression levels may contribute to the phenotype of the disease. Our analysis of 4132 genes identified a subset with significant expression differences between skin fibroblast cultures from unaffected controls versus cultures from affected individuals with known fibrillin-1 mutations. Subsequently, 10 genes were chosen for validation by quantitative RT-PCR. Conclusion Differential expression of many of the validated genes was associated with MFS samples when an additional group of unaffected and MFS affected subjects were analyzed (p-value -6 under the null hypothesis that expression levels in cultured fibroblasts are unaffected by MFS status. An unexpected observation was the range of individual gene expression. In unaffected control subjects, expression ranges exceeding 10 fold were seen in many of the genes selected for qRT-PCR validation. The variation in expression in the MFS affected subjects was even greater.

  19. Diverse growth hormone receptor gene mutations in Laron syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, M A; Argente, J; Chernausek, S; Gracia, R; Guevara-Aguirre, J; Hopp, M; Pérez-Jurado, L; Rosenbloom, A; Toledo, S P; Francke, U

    1993-01-01

    To better understand the molecular genetic basis and genetic epidemiology of Laron syndrome (growth-hormone insensitivity syndrome), we analyzed the growth-hormone receptor (GHR) genes of seven unrelated affected individuals from the United States, South America, Europe, and Africa. We amplified all nine GHR gene exons and splice junctions from these individuals by PCR and screened the products for mutations by using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). We identified a single GHR gene fragment with abnormal DGGE results for each affected individual, sequenced this fragment, and, in each case, identified a mutation likely to cause Laron syndrome, including two nonsense mutations (R43X and R217X), two splice-junction mutations, (189-1 G to T and 71 + 1 G to A), and two frameshift mutations (46 del TT and 230 del TA or AT). Only one of these mutations, R43X, has been previously reported. Using haplotype analysis, we determined that this mutation, which involves a CpG dinucleotide hot spot, likely arose as a separate event in this case, relative to the two prior reports of R43X. Aside from R43X, the mutations we identified are unique to patients from particular geographic regions. Ten GHR gene mutations have now been described in this disorder. We conclude that Laron syndrome is caused by diverse GHR gene mutations, including deletions, RNA processing defects, translational stop codons, and missense codons. All the identified mutations involve the extracellular domain of the receptor, and most are unique to particular families or geographic areas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8488849

  20. Gene mapping of the Usher syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimberling, W; Smith, R J

    1992-10-01

    USH is an autosomal recessive group of diseases characterized by auditory impairment and visual loss owing to RP. Two common types of USH are known, types I and II. USH type I is characterized by a congenital severe to profound hearing impairment, absent vestibular function, and a progressive pigmentary retinopathy. Persons with type I do not find hearing aids useful, have delayed motor development, and experience progressive night blindness and peripheral visual loss, which usually begins in their second decade. USH type II is characterized by a congenital moderate to severe hearing loss with a down-sloping audiogram, normal vestibular function, and a progressive pigmentary retinopathy. Persons with USH2 find hearing aids beneficial, have normal psychomotor development, and experience progressive night blindness and peripheral visual loss, which usually begins in their third decade. Vestibular dysfunction is the best distinguishing hallmark to differentiate USH type I from type II. One USH type II gene (called USH2) has been assigned to chromosome 1q. One USH type I gene has been tentatively assigned to chromosome 14q. There are other USH genes that have not yet been localized.

  1. Syndromes associated with Homo sapiens pol II regulatory genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bina, M; Demmon, S; Pares-Matos, E I

    2000-01-01

    The molecular basis of human characteristics is an intriguing but an unresolved problem. Human characteristics cover a broad spectrum, from the obvious to the abstract. Obvious characteristics may include morphological features such as height, shape, and facial form. Abstract characteristics may be hidden in processes that are controlled by hormones and the human brain. In this review we examine exaggerated characteristics presented as syndromes. Specifically, we focus on human genes that encode transcription factors to examine morphological, immunological, and hormonal anomalies that result from deletion, insertion, or mutation of genes that regulate transcription by RNA polymerase II (the Pol II genes). A close analysis of abnormal phenotypes can give clues into how sequence variations in regulatory genes and changes in transcriptional control may give rise to characteristics defined as complex traits.

  2. Variant of Rett syndrome and CDKL5 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pini, Giorgio; Bigoni, Stefania; Engerström, Ingegerd Witt

    2012-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder affecting almost exclusively females. The Hanefeld variant, or early-onset seizure variant, has been associated with mutations in CDKL5 gene. AIMS: In recent years more than 60 patients with mutations in the CDKL5 gene have...... been described in the literature, but the cardiorespiratory phenotype has not been reported. Our aim is to describe clinical and autonomic features of these girls. METHODS: 10 girls with CDKL5 mutations and a diagnosis of Hanefeld variant have been evaluated on axiological and clinical aspects. In all...

  3. Gene screening in a Chinese family with Marfan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jiao Xia

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To analyze the causative gene mutation for Marfan syndrome(MFSwith autosomal dominant hereditary in a Chinese family in Liaoning Province,China. METHODS: Venous blood was collected and candidate gene was selected to design primers according to the clinical phenotype. With genomic polymerase chain reaction(PCRperformed, the coding exons and their flanking intron in sequences of candidate gene were sequenced,DNA fragments separated by agarose gel electrophoresis and direct sequencing method was used to determine the pathogenic gene.RESULTS:Phenotype of the proband was presented as ectopic lentis. Sequencing of the coding regions of FBN1 gene showed the presence of a heterozygous A→G transversion at nucleotide 640 in the 7 exon of FBN1 and the missense mutation made for Glycine into Serine(G214S. CONCLUSION:A heterozygous mutation of FBN1 c.A640G(p.G214Sis responsible for the Marfan syndrome in the four generation Chinese pedigree.

  4. What's in a Gene? Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome and Pigment Dispersion Syndrome in the Same Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrovskaya, Olya; O'Brien, Colm

    2016-01-01

    Pseudoexfoliation syndrome (PXS) and pigment dispersion syndrome (PDS) are two of the commonest disorders to produce secondary open-angle glaucoma through trabecular meshwork blockage. Each is a defined clinical entity, and while genetics likely play a significant role in the pathogenesis of both, the specific genes involved appear to be distinct. There is surprisingly little published in the literature regarding the coexistence of PDS and PXS in the same patient. We present the intriguing case of a patient who developed PDS in one eye and PXS in the other. This unusual case acts as a platform for an interesting discussion of the genomics of PXS and PDS.

  5. What's in a Gene Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome and Pigment Dispersion Syndrome in the Same Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olya Pokrovskaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudoexfoliation syndrome (PXS and pigment dispersion syndrome (PDS are two of the commonest disorders to produce secondary open-angle glaucoma through trabecular meshwork blockage. Each is a defined clinical entity, and while genetics likely play a significant role in the pathogenesis of both, the specific genes involved appear to be distinct. There is surprisingly little published in the literature regarding the coexistence of PDS and PXS in the same patient. We present the intriguing case of a patient who developed PDS in one eye and PXS in the other. This unusual case acts as a platform for an interesting discussion of the genomics of PXS and PDS.

  6. RENIN ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM GENE POLYMORPHISMS IN CHILDREN WITH NEPHROTIC SYNDROM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zh.P. Sharnova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the role of the reninangiotensin system genes polymorphisms in develop and progression of nephrotic syndrom (NS in children we determined the genotypes of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE, angiotensinogen (AGT and angiotensin ii receptor (ATII-R of 1 type in 80 russian children with ns including and 15 children with chronic renal failure (CRF. Genotype frequencies did not differ between patients with ns and controls (n = 165. The distribution of ace, AGT and ATII-R 1 type genotypes was similar among ns sub groups, such as focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS (n = 18, steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome (n = 32, nephrotic syndrome with hypertension and hemoturia (n = 22 and with control group. When ns subjects with CRF (n = 15 were compared with control, the prevalence of ace DD genotype was significantly higher (47% VS 21%; χ2 = 4,44; p < 0,05. Our results indicate that the DD genotype ace may be a factor of risk for the dеvеlopment of progressive renal impairment in the children with nephrotic syndrome. The analysis of treatment's effect with inhibitor of ace in groups patients with steroid resistant NS (SRNS demonstrated decreasing of renoprotective effect of this drugs in patients with id and dd genotypes com? Pared with ii genotype: the degree of blood pressure, proteinuria and the rate of glomerular filtration decrease was significantly lower (55,46 ± 9,25 VS 92,74 ± 25; р < 0,05 in these patients.Key words: nephrotic syndrom, chronic renal failure, polymorphism of genes, renin-angiotensin system.

  7. Beyond Behaviour: Is Social Anxiety Low in Williams Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Helen F.; Schniering, Carolyn A.; Porter, Melanie A.

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) exhibit striking social behaviour that may be indicative of abnormally low social anxiety. The present research aimed to determine whether social anxiety is unusually low in WS and to replicate previous findings of increased generalised anxiety in WS using both parent and self report. Fifteen individuals…

  8. Sjogren Syndrome-Gene Therapy and its Prospective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Rahpeyma

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Sjogren syndrome is one of the autoimmune diseases which is characterized by lymphocytic infiltration to exocrine glands and causes keratoconjunctivitis sicca and xerostomia. Today, a large population, with a majority of women over 40, suffer from this disease and have several complications regarding oral health and reduced life quality such as severe dental caries, painful eyes, olfactory and gustatory deficiency, speech, mastication and swallowing discomforts. Unfortunately, these patients do not respond to the conventional therapies. Nowadays in medical world, which its target is basic therapy and not symptomatic one, several gene therapy approaches, have gained importance in treatment of this apparently incurable diseases. Due to the facts that this disease is the second prevelant autoimmune disease, after rheumatoid arthritis, and the conventional therapies of the disease are all relative and symptomatic, researchers have insisted on the basic and causative therapy through gene transfer more than before. In the Present article, through reviewing 58 references containing recent scientific and investigatory findings it has been tried, to consider the pathogenesis and conventional therapies of this syndrome. Another purpose of this study was to investigate several and potentially very effective gene transfer systems and different theraputic genes (mainly membrane water channels, ione transporter molecules, transcription factors, antifungal proteins and free radical scavengers.

  9. RAI1 gene mutations: mechanisms of Smith–Magenis Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falco M

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mariateresa Falco,1,* Sonia Amabile,1,* Fabio Acquaviva2 1Department of Molecular Medicine and Medical Biotechnology, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples, Italy; 2Department of Translational Medical Sciences (DISMET, Section of Pediatric Clinical Genetics, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Smith–Magenis syndrome (SMS; OMIM #182290 is a complex genetic disorder characterized by distinctive physical features, developmental delay, cognitive impairment, and a typical behavioral phenotype. SMS is caused by interstitial 17p11.2 deletions, encompassing multiple genes and including the retinoic acid-induced 1 gene (RAI1, or by mutations in RAI1 itself. About 10% of all the SMS patients, in fact, carry an RAI1 mutation responsible for the phenotype. RAI1 (OMIM *607642 is a dosage-sensitive gene expressed in many tissues and highly conserved among species. Over the years, several studies have demonstrated that RAI1 (or its homologs in animal models acts as a transcriptional factor implicated in embryonic neurodevelopment, neuronal differentiation, cell growth and cell cycle regulation, bone and skeletal development, lipid and glucose metabolisms, behavioral functions, and circadian activity. Patients with RAI1 pathogenic variants show some phenotypic differences when compared to those carrying the typical deletion. They usually have lower incidence of hypotonia and less cognitive impairment than those with 17p11.2 deletions but more frequently show the behavioral characteristics of the syndrome and overeating issues. These differences reflect the primary pathogenetic role of RAI1 without the pathogenetic contribution of the other genes included in the typical 17p11.2 deletion. The better comprehension of physiological roles of RAI1, its molecular co-workers and interactors, and its contribution in determining the typical SMS phenotype will certainly open a new path

  10. CT study in primary low spinal fluid pressure syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshino, Moritoshi; Okayama, Kenji; Kubo, Hiromasa; Watanabe, Hiromi; Endou, Riuko (Ohmiya Red Cross Hospital, Yono, Saitama (Japan))

    1991-02-01

    CT findings in primary low spinal fluid pressure syndrome were studied on the basis of 3 cases. Case 1 was a 43-year-old male with a complicated bilateral isodense subdural hematoma (SDH). Case 2 was a 45-year-old female with a complicated bilateral high dense SDH. Case 3 was a 36-year-old female discharged without any complications after spinal fluid pressure normalized. Slight downward displacement of the brain under low spinal fluid pressure was shown as the narrowing of a Sylvian fissures and infratentorial cisterns on CT. On the other hand, in this syndrome with a complicated bilateral isodense SDH, in addition to this finding, CT revealed distortion and narrowing of body lateral ventricles, which might be differential findings from this syndrome without complicated SDH. Under low spinal fluid pressure, bridging veins are more stretched by a downward displacement of the brain. And consequently they were easily injured and SDH was developed. (author).

  11. Marfan Syndrome and Related Disorders: 25 Years of Gene Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraeten, Aline; Alaerts, Maaike; Van Laer, Lut; Loeys, Bart

    2016-06-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a rare, autosomal-dominant, multisystem disorder, presenting with skeletal, ocular, skin, and cardiovascular symptoms. Significant clinical overlap with other systemic connective tissue diseases, including Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS), Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome (SGS), and the MASS phenotype, has been documented. In MFS and LDS, the cardiovascular manifestations account for the major cause of patient morbidity and mortality, rendering them the main target for therapeutic intervention. Over the past decades, gene identification studies confidently linked the aforementioned syndromes, as well as nonsyndromic aneurysmal disease, to genetic defects in proteins related to the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β pathway, greatly expanding our knowledge on the disease mechanisms and providing us with novel therapeutic targets. As a result, the focus of the developing pharmacological treatment strategies is shifting from hemodynamic stress management to TGF-β antagonism. In this review, we discuss the insights that have been gained in the molecular biology of MFS and related disorders over the past 25 years. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  12. A Novel Mutation in ERCC8 Gene Causing Cockayne Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Taghdiri

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cockayne syndrome (CS is a rare autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by impaired neurological and sensory functions, cachectic dwarfism, microcephaly, and photosensitivity. This syndrome shows a variable age of onset and rate of progression, and its phenotypic spectrum include a wide range of severity. Due to the progressive nature of this disorder, diagnosis can be more important when additional signs and symptoms appear gradually and become steadily worse over time. Therefore, mutation analysis of genes involved in CS pathogenesis can be helpful to confirm the suspected clinical diagnosis. Here, we report a novel mutation in ERCC8 gene in a 16-year-old boy who suffers from poor weight gain, short stature, microcephaly, intellectual disability, and photosensitivity. The patient was born to consanguineous family with no previous documented disease in his parents. To identify disease-causing mutation in the patient, whole exome sequencing utilizing next-generation sequencing on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform was performed. Results revealed a novel homozygote mutation in ERCC8 gene (NM_000082: exon 11, c.1122G>C in our patient. Another gene (ERCC6, which is also involved in CS did not have any disease-causing mutations in the proband. The new identified mutation was then confirmed by Sanger sequencing in the proband, his parents, and extended family members, confirming co-segregation with the disease. In addition, different bioinformatics programs which included MutationTaster, I-Mutant v2.0, NNSplice, Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion, The PhastCons, Genomic Evolutationary Rate Profiling conservation score, and T-Coffee Multiple Sequence Alignment predicted the pathogenicity of the mutation. Our study identified a rare novel mutation in ERCC8 gene and help to provide accurate genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis to minimize new affected individuals in this family.

  13. A Novel Mutation in ERCC8 Gene Causing Cockayne Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghdiri, Maryam; Dastsooz, Hassan; Fardaei, Majid; Mohammadi, Sanaz; Farazi Fard, Mohammad Ali; Faghihi, Mohammad Ali

    2017-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized by impaired neurological and sensory functions, cachectic dwarfism, microcephaly, and photosensitivity. This syndrome shows a variable age of onset and rate of progression, and its phenotypic spectrum include a wide range of severity. Due to the progressive nature of this disorder, diagnosis can be more important when additional signs and symptoms appear gradually and become steadily worse over time. Therefore, mutation analysis of genes involved in CS pathogenesis can be helpful to confirm the suspected clinical diagnosis. Here, we report a novel mutation in ERCC8 gene in a 16-year-old boy who suffers from poor weight gain, short stature, microcephaly, intellectual disability, and photosensitivity. The patient was born to consanguineous family with no previous documented disease in his parents. To identify disease-causing mutation in the patient, whole exome sequencing utilizing next-generation sequencing on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform was performed. Results revealed a novel homozygote mutation in ERCC8 gene (NM_000082: exon 11, c.1122G>C) in our patient. Another gene ( ERCC6 ), which is also involved in CS did not have any disease-causing mutations in the proband. The new identified mutation was then confirmed by Sanger sequencing in the proband, his parents, and extended family members, confirming co-segregation with the disease. In addition, different bioinformatics programs which included MutationTaster, I-Mutant v2.0, NNSplice, Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion, The PhastCons, Genomic Evolutationary Rate Profiling conservation score, and T-Coffee Multiple Sequence Alignment predicted the pathogenicity of the mutation. Our study identified a rare novel mutation in ERCC8 gene and help to provide accurate genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis to minimize new affected individuals in this family.

  14. Mutational spectrum of the WFS1 gene in Wolfram syndrome, nonsyndromic hearing impairment, diabetes mellitus, and psychiatric disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cryns, K; Sivakumaran, TA; Van den Ouweland, JMW; Pennings, RJE; Cremers, CWRJ; Flothmann, K; Young, TL; Smith, RJH; Lesperance, MM; Van Camp, G

    2003-01-01

    WFS1 is a novel gene and encodes an 890 amino-acid glycoprotein (wolframin), predominantly localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Mutations in WFS1 underlie autosomal recessive Wolfram syndrome and autosomal dominant low frequency sensorineural hearing impairment (LFSNHI) DFNA6/14. In addition,

  15. Mutational spectrum of the WFS1 gene in Wolfram syndrome, nonsyndromic hearing impairment, diabetes mellitus, and psychiatric disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cryns, K.; Sivakumaran, T.A.; Ouweland, J.M.W. van den; Pennings, R.J.E.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Flothmann, K.; Young, T.L.; Smith, R.J.H.; Lesperance, M.M.; Camp, G. van

    2003-01-01

    WFS1 is a novel gene and encodes an 890 amino-acid glycoprotein (wolframin), predominantly localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Mutations in WFS1 underlie autosomal recessive Wolfram syndrome and autosomal dominant low frequency sensorineural hearing impairment (LFSNHI) DFNA6/14. In addition,

  16. The 3-M syndrome. A heritable low birthweight dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Goethem, H; Malvaux, P

    1987-10-01

    Two male siblings and one girl with the 3-M syndrome are reported. The main clinical features include low birthweight, proportionate dwarfism, hatched-shaped cranio-facial configuration, abnormalities of mouth and teeth, short broad neck with prominent trapezius, pectus deformity, transverse grooves of anterior chest, and winged scapulae.

  17. Gut microbiota, low-grade inflammation, and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassaing, Benoit; Gewirtz, Andrew T

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal tract is inhabited by a large diverse community of bacteria collectively referred to as the gut microbiota. Alterations in gut microbiota composition are associated with a variety of disease states including obesity, diabetes, and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Transplant of microbiota from diseased persons (or mice) to germfree mice transfers some aspects of disease phenotype, indicating that altered microbiota plays a role in disease establishment and manifestation. There are myriad potential mechanisms by which alterations in gut microbiota might promote disease, including increasing energy harvest, production of toxic metabolites, and molecular mimicry of host proteins. However, our research indicates that an overarching mechanism by which an aberrant microbiota negatively impacts health is by driving chronic inflammation. More specifically, we hypothesize that the histopathologically evident gut inflammation that defines IBD is a severe but relatively rare outcome of an altered host-microbiota relationship, while a much more common consequence of such disturbances is "low-grade" inflammation characterized by elevated proinflammatory gene expression that associates with, and may promote, metabolic syndrome. In this context, a variety of chronic inflammatory diseases may stem from inability of the mucosal immune system to properly manage a stable healthy relationship with the gut microbiota. While one's ability to manage their gut microbiota is dictated in part by genetics, it can be markedly influenced by the composition of the microbiota one inherits from their early environment. Moreover, the host-microbiota relationship can be perturbed by instigator bacteria or dietary components, which may prove to play a role in promoting chronic inflammatory disease states.

  18. Amelioration of Hypophosphatemic Rickets and Osteoporosis With Pamidronate and Growth Hormone in Lowe Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Woei Hou

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe, an X-linked multisystem disorder, was diagnosed in a male patient who presented with typical abnormalities of the eyes, kidneys and nervous system. Besides congenital cataracts, renal tubular dysfunction and psychomotor retardation, the patient had also suffered from profound failure to thrive, growth hormone deficiency, severe osteoporosis with hypophosphatemic rickets, and progressive renal dysfunction since early childhood, which were attributed to the metabolic derangements following Fanconi syndrome. Direct sequencing of the OCRL1 gene (responsible for the oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe revealed a de novo c.2282_2283insT in exon 20, which resulted in premature termination of translation (D762X. After monthly intravenous administration of pamidronate since the age of 17.8 years, his urine creatinine clearance and tubular resorption of phosphate increased slightly and bone mineral density was much improved (Z score increased from −7.3 to −3.3 without deterioration of renal function. Simultaneous growth hormone therapy enhanced the positive response. The beneficial osseous and renal effects of the bisphosphonate, along with growth hormone treatment in Lowe syndrome with hypophosphatemia, may be related to reduced renal calcium and phosphate excretion.

  19. ABCD syndrome is caused by a homozygous mutation in the EDNRB gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheij, Joke B G M; Kunze, Jürgen; Osinga, Jan; van Essen, Anthonie J; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2002-03-15

    ABCD syndrome is an autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by albinism, black lock, cell migration disorder of the neurocytes of the gut (Hirschsprung disease [HSCR]), and deafness. This phenotype clearly overlaps with the features of the Shah-Waardenburg syndrome, comprising sensorineural deafness; hypopigmentation of skin, hair, and irides; and HSCR. Therefore, we screened DNA of the index patient of the ABCD syndrome family for mutations in the endothelin B receptor (EDNRB) gene, a gene known to be involved in Shah-Waardenburg syndrome. A homozygous nonsense mutation in exon 3 (R201X) of the EDNRB gene was found. We therefore suggest that ABCD syndrome is not a separate entity, but an expression of Shah-Waardenburg syndrome.

  20. Amniotic fluid RNA gene expression profiling provides insights into the phenotype of Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massingham, Lauren J; Johnson, Kirby L; Scholl, Thomas M; Slonim, Donna K; Wick, Heather C; Bianchi, Diana W

    2014-09-01

    Turner syndrome is a sex chromosome aneuploidy with characteristic malformations. Amniotic fluid, a complex biological material, could contribute to the understanding of Turner syndrome pathogenesis. In this pilot study, global gene expression analysis of cell-free RNA in amniotic fluid supernatant was utilized to identify specific genes/organ systems that may play a role in Turner syndrome pathophysiology. Cell-free RNA from amniotic fluid of five mid-trimester Turner syndrome fetuses and five euploid female fetuses matched for gestational age was extracted, amplified, and hybridized onto Affymetrix(®) U133 Plus 2.0 arrays. Significantly differentially regulated genes were identified using paired t tests. Biological interpretation was performed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and BioGPS gene expression atlas. There were 470 statistically significantly differentially expressed genes identified. They were widely distributed across the genome. XIST was significantly down-regulated (p Turner syndrome transcriptome from other aneuploidies we previously studied. Manual curation of the differentially expressed gene list identified genes of possible pathologic significance, including NFATC3, IGFBP5, and LDLR. Transcriptomic differences in the amniotic fluid of Turner syndrome fetuses are due to genome-wide dysregulation. The hematologic/immune system differences may play a role in early-onset autoimmune dysfunction. Other genes identified with possible pathologic significance are associated with cardiac and skeletal systems, which are known to be affected in females with Turner syndrome. The discovery-driven approach described here may be useful in elucidating novel mechanisms of disease in Turner syndrome.

  1. Whole Gene Capture Analysis of 15 CRC Susceptibility Genes in Suspected Lynch Syndrome Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Anne M L; Geilenkirchen, Marije A; van Wezel, Tom; Jagmohan-Changur, Shantie C; Ruano, Dina; van der Klift, Heleen M; van den Akker, Brendy E W M; Laros, Jeroen F J; van Galen, Michiel; Wagner, Anja; Letteboer, Tom G W; Gómez-García, Encarna B; Tops, Carli M J; Vasen, Hans F; Devilee, Peter; Hes, Frederik J; Morreau, Hans; Wijnen, Juul T

    2016-01-01

    Lynch Syndrome (LS) is caused by pathogenic germline variants in one of the mismatch repair (MMR) genes. However, up to 60% of MMR-deficient colorectal cancer cases are categorized as suspected Lynch Syndrome (sLS) because no pathogenic MMR germline variant can be identified, which leads to difficulties in clinical management. We therefore analyzed the genomic regions of 15 CRC susceptibility genes in leukocyte DNA of 34 unrelated sLS patients and 11 patients with MLH1 hypermethylated tumors with a clear family history. Using targeted next-generation sequencing, we analyzed the entire non-repetitive genomic sequence, including intronic and regulatory sequences, of 15 CRC susceptibility genes. In addition, tumor DNA from 28 sLS patients was analyzed for somatic MMR variants. Of 1979 germline variants found in the leukocyte DNA of 34 sLS patients, one was a pathogenic variant (MLH1 c.1667+1delG). Leukocyte DNA of 11 patients with MLH1 hypermethylated tumors was negative for pathogenic germline variants in the tested CRC susceptibility genes and for germline MLH1 hypermethylation. Somatic DNA analysis of 28 sLS tumors identified eight (29%) cases with two pathogenic somatic variants, one with a VUS predicted to pathogenic and LOH, and nine cases (32%) with one pathogenic somatic variant (n = 8) or one VUS predicted to be pathogenic (n = 1). This is the first study in sLS patients to include the entire genomic sequence of CRC susceptibility genes. An underlying somatic or germline MMR gene defect was identified in ten of 34 sLS patients (29%). In the remaining sLS patients, the underlying genetic defect explaining the MMRdeficiency in their tumors might be found outside the genomic regions harboring the MMR and other known CRC susceptibility genes.

  2. ADAMTS13 Gene Mutations in Children with Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyoung Soo; Cheong, Hae Il; Kim, Nam Keun

    2011-01-01

    We investigated ADAMTS13 activity as well as the ADAMTS13 gene mutation in children with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Eighteen patients, including 6 diarrhea-negative (D-HUS) and 12 diarrhea-associated HUS (D+HUS) patients, were evaluated. The extent of von Willebrand factor (VWF) degradation was assayed by multimer analysis, and all exons of the ADAMTS13 gene were PCR-amplified using Taq DNA polymerase. The median and range for plasma activity of ADAMTS13 in 6 D-HUS and 12 D+HUS patients were 71.8% (22.8-94.1%) and 84.9% (37.9-119.9%), respectively, which were not statistically significantly different from the control group (86.4%, 34.2-112.3%) (p>0.05). Five ADAMTS13 gene mutations, including 2 novel mutations [1584+2T>A, 3941C>T (S1314L)] and 3 polymorphisms (Q448E, P475S, S903L), were found in 2 D-HUS and one D+HUS patients, which were not associated with deficiency of ADAMTS13 activity. Whether these mutations without reduced ADAMTS13 activity are innocent bystanders or predisposing factors in HUS remains unanswered. PMID:21488199

  3. Neonatal bartter syndrome in an extremely low birth weight baby

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deeparaj Hegde

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Early diagnosis of Bartter syndrome (BS in the neonatal period is a clinical challenge, more so in an extremely low birth weight (ELBW baby because of the inherent renal immaturity and the associated difficulty in fluid management. However, once a diagnosis is made, the disorder is known to respond well to fluid and electrolyte management, prostaglandin inhibitors, and potassium-sparing diuretics. Herein, we report a case of neonatal BS in a very premature ELBW infant.

  4. Low-FODMAP Diet for Treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Magge, Suma; Lembo, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Functional bowel disorders, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), are common disorders that have a significant impact on patients’ quality of life. These disorders present major challenges to healthcare providers, as few effective medical therapies are currently available. Recently, there has been increasing interest in dietary therapies for IBS, particularly a diet low in fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAPs). Since ingestion of FODMAPs incre...

  5. Study of duplication 24bp of ARX gene among patients presenting a Mental Retardation with a syndromic and non syndromic forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essouissi, Imen

    2006-01-01

    Mental Retardation (MR) is the most frequent handicap. It touches 3% of the general population. The genetic causes of this handicap account for 40% of these cases. ARX gene (Aristaless related homeobox gene) belongs to the family of the genes homeobox located in Xp22.1. It is considered as the most frequently muted gene after the FMR1 gene. It is implicated in various forms of syndromic and nonsyndromic MR. Several types of mutation were identified on the level of this gene, including deletions/insertions, duplications, missense and nonsense mutations, responsible for a wide spectrum of phenotypes. The goal of this work is to seek the most frequent change of gene ARX: duplication 24pb (at the origin of an expansion of the field poly has protein ARX in the position 144-155AA) among Tunisian boys presenting in particular family forms of non specific MR, sporadic forms of non specific MR like certain patients presenting a West syndrome.To prove the duplication of 24 Pb, we used in this work the Pcr technique. The change of duplication 24pb was not found in our series, this could be explained by the low number of cases family studied (38 families) and by the absence of connection studies accusing a mode of transmission related to X chromosome in particular for the sporadic cases. (Author)

  6. Peeling skin syndrome associated with novel variant in FLG2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfares, Ahmed; Al-Khenaizan, Sultan; Al Mutairi, Fuad

    2017-12-01

    Peeling skin syndrome is a rare genodermatosis characterized by variably pruritic superficial generalized peeling of the skin with several genes involved until now little is known about the association between FLG2 and peeling skin syndrome. We describe multiple family members from a consanguineous Saudi family with peeling skin syndrome. Next Generation Sequencing identifies a cosegregating novel variant in FLG2 c.632C>G (p.Ser211*) as a likely etiology in this family. Here, we reported on the clinical manifestation of homozygous loss of function variant in FLG2 as a disease-causing gene for peeling skin syndrome and expand the dermatology findings. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Inhibitors of Histone Deacetylases Are Weak Activators of the FMR1 Gene in Fragile X Syndrome Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A. Dolskiy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome is the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability in humans. It is a result of CGG repeat expansion in the 5′ untranslated region (5′ UTR of the FMR1 gene. This gene encodes the FMRP protein that is involved in neuronal development. Repeat expansion leads to heterochromatinization of the promoter, gene silencing, and the subsequent absence of FMRP. To date, there is no specific therapy for the syndrome. All treatments in clinic practice provide symptomatic therapy. The development of drug therapy for Fragile X syndrome treatment is connected with the search for inhibitors of enzymes that are responsible for heterochromatinization. Here, we report a weak transcriptional activity of the FMR1 gene and the absence of FMRP protein after Fragile X syndrome cell lines treatment with two FDA approved inhibitors of histone deacetylases, romidepsin and vorinostat. We demonstrate that romidepsin, an inhibitor of class I histone deacetylases, does not activate FMR1 expression in patient cell cultures, whereas vorinostat, an inhibitor of classes I and II histone deacetylases, activates a low level of FMR1 expression in some patient cell lines.

  8. Mediators of low-grade chronic inflammation in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda-Ojeda, Miriam; Murri, Mora; Insenser, María; Escobar-Morreale, Héctor F

    2013-01-01

    Chronic low-grade subclinical inflammation has been increasingly recognized as an interposer in the endocrine, metabolic and reproductive disturbances that characterize the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Abdominal adiposity and obesity are often present in PCOS. Mounting evidence indicates that adipose tissue is involved in innate and adaptive immune responses. Continuous release of inflammatory mediators such as cytokines, acute phase proteins, and adipokines perpetuates the inflammatory condition associated with obesity in women with PCOS, possibly contributing to insulin resistance and other long-term cardiometabolic risk factors. Genetic variants in the genes encoding inflammation-related mediators underlie the development of PCOS and their interaction with environmental factors may contribute to the heterogeneous clinical phenotype of this syndrome. In the future, strategies ameliorating inflammation may prove useful for the management of PCOS and associated conditions.

  9. Exome-first approach identified a novel gloss deletion associated with Lowe syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Miki; Nakagawa, Ryuji; Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Naruto, Takuya; Suga, Ken-Ichi; Goji, Aya; Horikawa, Hideaki; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Kagami, Shoji; Imoto, Issei

    2016-01-01

    Lowe syndrome (LS) is an X-linked disorder affecting the eyes, nervous system and kidneys, typically caused by missense or nonsense/frameshift OCRL mutations. We report a 6-month-old male clinically suspected to have LS, but without the Fanconi-type renal dysfunction. Using a targeted-exome sequencing-first approach, LS was diagnosed by the identification of a deletion involving 1.7 Mb at Xq25-q26.1, encompassing the entire OCRL gene and neighboring loci.

  10. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in a patient with L1 syndrome: a new report of a contiguous gene deletion syndrome including L1CAM and AVPR2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knops, Noël B B; Bos, Krista K; Kerstjens, Mieke; van Dael, Karin; Vos, Yvonne J

    2008-07-15

    We report on an infant boy with congenital hydrocephalus due to L1 syndrome and polyuria due to diabetes insipidus. We initially believed his excessive urine loss was from central diabetes insipidus and that the cerebral malformation caused a secondary insufficient pituitary vasopressin release. However, he failed to respond to treatment with a vasopressin analogue, which pointed to nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). L1 syndrome and X-linked NDI are distinct clinical disorders caused by mutations in the L1CAM and AVPR2 genes, respectively, located in adjacent positions in Xq28. In this boy we found a deletion of 61,577 basepairs encompassing the entire L1CAM and AVPR2 genes and extending into intron 7 of the ARHGAP4 gene. To our knowledge this is the first description of a patient with a deletion of these three genes. He is the second patient to be described with L1 syndrome and NDI. During follow-up he manifested complications from the hydrocephalus and NDI including global developmental delay and growth failure with low IGF-1 and hypothyroidism. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Syndromes and Disorders Associated with Omphalocele (III: Single Gene Disorders, Neural Tube Defects, Diaphragmatic Defects and Others

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Omphalocele can be associated with single gene disorders, neural tube defects, diaphragmatic defects, fetal valproate syndrome, and syndromes of unknown etiology. This article provides a comprehensive review of omphalocele-related disorders: otopalatodigital syndrome type II; Melnick–Needles syndrome; Rieger syndrome; neural tube defects; Meckel syndrome; Shprintzen–Goldberg omphalocele syndrome; lethal omphalocele-cleft palate syndrome; cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome; fetal valproate syndrome; Marshall–Smith syndrome; fibrochondrogenesis; hydrolethalus syndrome; Fryns syndrome; omphalocele, diaphragmatic defects, radial anomalies and various internal malformations; diaphragmatic defects, limb deficiencies and ossification defects of skull; Donnai–Barrow syndrome; CHARGE syndrome; Goltz syndrome; Carpenter syndrome; Toriello–Carey syndrome; familial omphalocele; Cornelia de Lange syndrome; C syndrome; Elejalde syndrome; Malpuech syndrome; cervical ribs, Sprengel anomaly, anal atresia and urethral obstruction; hydrocephalus with associated malformations; Kennerknecht syndrome; lymphedema, atrial septal defect and facial changes; and craniosynostosis- mental retardation syndrome of Lin and Gettig. Perinatal identification of omphalocele should alert one to the possibility of omphalocele-related disorders and familial inheritance and prompt a thorough genetic counseling for these disorders.

  12. Association of polymorphisms of interleukin-18 gene promoter region with polycystic ovary syndrome in chinese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Mei-zhi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent research shows that polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS may have an association with low-grade chronic inflammation, and that PCOS may induce an increase in serum interleukin-18 (IL-18 levels. Methods To investigate the polymorphisms of the IL-18 gene promoters with PCOS, two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the promoter of the IL-18 gene (at positions -607C/A and -137G/C in 118 Chinese women with PCOS and 79 controls were evaluated using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results No significant differences were found in the genotype distribution, allele frequency and haplotype frequency between the PCOS and control groups. Further analysis demonstrated a relationship between IL-18 gene promoter polymorphisms and PCOS insulin resistance (IR. Regarding the -137 allele frequency, G and C allele frequencies were 93.5% and 6.5%, respectively, in the PCOS with IR patients; G and C allele frequencies were 85.4% and 14.6%, respectively, in PCOS patients without IR (chi2 = 3.601, P = 0.048. Conclusions The presence of a polymorphism in the IL-18 gene was found to have no correlation with the occurrence of PCOS. Carriage of the C allele at position -137 in the promoter of the IL-18 gene may play a protective role from the development of PCOS IR.

  13. New recurrent deletions in the PPARgamma and TP53 genes are associated with childhood myelodysplastic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silveira, Cássia G T; Oliveira, Fábio M; Valera, Elvis T

    2009-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a rare hematological malignancy in children. It was performed FISH analysis in 19 pediatric MDS patients to investigate deletions involving the PPARgamma and TP53 genes. Significant losses in the PPARgamma gene and deletions in the tumor suppressor gene TP53 were...

  14. Pharmacologic management of isolated low high-density lipoprotein syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez, Valmore; Cano, Raquel; Cano, Clímaco; Bermúdez, Fernando; Arraiz, Nailet; Acosta, Luis; Finol, Freddy; Pabón, María Rebeca; Amell, Anilsa; Reyna, Nadia; Hidalgo, Joaquin; Kendall, Paúl; Manuel, Velasco; Hernández, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol is a heterogeneous group of lipoproteins exhibiting a variety of properties like prostacyclin production stimulation, decrease in platelet aggregation, endothelial cell apoptosis inhibition, and low-density lipoprotein oxidation blockade. Epidemiologic studies have shown an inverse relation between HDL cholesterol levels and cardiovascular risk. Low HDL cholesterol is associated with increased risk for myocardial infarction, stroke, sudden death, peripheral artery disease, and postangioplasty restenosis. In contrast, high HDL levels are associated with longevity and protection against atherosclerotic disease development. Given the evolving epidemic of obesity, diabetes mellitus, and metabolic syndrome, the prevalence of low HDL will continue to rise. In the United States, low HDL is present in 35% of men, 15% of women, and approximately 63% of patients with coronary artery disease. Data extracted from the Framingham study highlight that 1-mg increase in HDL levels decreases by 2% to 3% the risk of cardiovascular disease. There is no doubt regarding clinical importance about isolated low HDL, but relatively few clinicians consider a direct therapeutic intervention of this dyslipidemia. In this sense, lifestyle measures should be the first-line strategy to manage low HDL levels. On the other hand, pharmacologic options include niacin, fibrates, and statins. Fibrates appear to reduce risk preferentially in patients with low HDL with metabolic syndrome, whereas statins reduce risk across all levels of HDL. Torcetrapib, a cholesteryl esters transfer protein inhibitor, represented a hope to raise this lipoprotein; however, all clinical trials on this drug had ceased after ILLUMINATE, RADIANCE and ERASE trials had recorded an increase in mortality, rates of myocardial infarction, angina, and heart failure. In the near future, drugs as beta-glucans, Apo-A1 mimetic peptides, and ACAT inhibitors, are the new promises to treat this

  15. Potassium toxicity at low serum potassium levels with refeeding syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemula, Praveen; Abela, Oliver G; Narisetty, Keerthy; Rhine, David; Abela, George S

    2015-01-01

    Refeeding syndrome is a life-threatening condition occurring in severely malnourished patients after initiating feeding. Severe hypophosphatemia with reduced adenosine triphosphate production has been implicated, but little data are available regarding electrolyte abnormalities. In this case, we report electrocardiographic changes consistent with hyperkalemia during potassium replacement after a serum level increase from 1.9 to 2.9 mEq/L. This was reversed by lowering serum potassium back to 2.0 mEq/L. In conclusion, the patient with prolonged malnutrition became adapted to low potassium levels and developed potassium toxicity with replacement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Investigation of Monnose-Binding Lectin gene Polymorphism in Patients with Erythema Multiforme, Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Overlap Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevil Toka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Monnose-Binding lectin (MBL appears to play an important role in the immune system. The genetic polymorphisms in the MBL2 gene can result in a reduction of serum levels, leading to a predisposition to recurrent infection. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of a polymorphism in codon 54 of the MBL2 gene on the susceptibility to Erythema Multiforme, Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Overlap Syndrome (EM, SJS and SJS/TEN overlap syndrome. Material and Methods: Our study included 64 patients who were clinically and/or histopathologically diagnosed with EM, SJS, and SJS/TEN overlap syndrome and 66 healthy control subjects who were genotyped for the MBL2 gene codon 54 polymorphism using the PCR-RFLP method. For all statistical analyses, the level of significance was set at p<0.05. Results: The prevalence of the B allele was 18% in the EM, SJS and SJS/TEN patient groups and 13% in the control group. No significant differences in allele frequencies of any polymorphism were observed between the patient and control groups, although the B allele was more frequent in the patient groups (p=0.328.Conclusion: Our results provide no evidence of a relationship between MBL2 gene codon 54 polymorphism and the susceptibility to EM, SJS and SJS/TEN overlap syndrome. However, these findings should be confirmed in studies with a larger sample size.

  17. Genetic basis of prune belly syndrome: screening for HNF1β gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granberg, Candace F; Harrison, Steven M; Dajusta, Daniel; Zhang, Shaohua; Hajarnis, Sachin; Igarashi, Peter; Baker, Linda A

    2012-01-01

    Although the cause of prune belly syndrome is unknown, familial evidence suggests a genetic component. Recently 2 nonfamilial cases of prune belly syndrome with chromosome 17q12 deletions encompassing the HNF1β gene have made this a candidate gene for prune belly syndrome. To date, there has been no large-scale screening of patients with prune belly syndrome for HNF1β mutations. We assessed the role of HNF1β in prune belly syndrome by screening for genomic mutations with functional characterization of any detected mutations. We studied patients with prune belly syndrome who were prospectively enrolled in our Pediatric Genitourinary DNA Repository since 2001. DNA from patient samples was amplified by polymerase chain reaction, sequenced for coding and splice regions of the HNF1β gene, and compared to control databases. We performed functional assay testing of the ability of mutant HNF1β to activate a luciferase construct with an HNF1β DNA binding site. From 32 prune belly syndrome probands (30 males, 2 females) HNF1β sequencing detected a missense mutation (V61G) in 1 child with prune belly syndrome. Absent in control databases, V61G was previously reported in 2 patients without prune belly syndrome who had congenital genitourinary anomalies. Functional testing showed similar luciferase activity compared to wild-type HNF1β, suggesting the V61G substitution does not disturb HNF1β function. One genomic HNF1β mutation was detected in 3% of patients with prune belly syndrome but found to be functionally normal. Thus, functionally significant HNF1β mutations are uncommon in prune belly syndrome, despite case reports of HNF1β deletions. Further genetic study is necessary, as identification of the genetic basis of prune belly syndrome may ultimately lead to prevention and improved treatments for this rare but severe syndrome. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Sarcomeric gene mutations in sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brion, Maria; Allegue, Catarina; Santori, Montserrat; Gil, Rocio; Blanco-Verea, Alejandro; Haas, Cordula; Bartsch, Christine; Poster, Simone; Madea, Burkhard; Campuzano, Oscar; Brugada, Ramon; Carracedo, Angel

    2012-06-10

    In developed countries, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) represents the most prevalent cause of death in children between 1 month and 1 year of age. SIDS is a diagnosis of exclusion, a negative autopsy which requires the absence of structural organ disease. Although investigators have confirmed that a significant percentage of SIDS cases are actually channelopathies, no data have been made available as to whether other sudden cardiac death-associated diseases, such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), could be responsible for some cases of SIDS. The presence of a genetic mutation in the sarcomeric protein usually affects the force of contraction of the myocyte, whose weakness is compensated with progressive hypertrophy and disarray. However, it is unclear whether in the most incipient forms, that is, first years of life, the lack of these phenotypes still confers a risk of arrhythmogenesis. The main goal of the present study is to wonder whether genetic defects in the sarcomeric proteins, previously associated with HCM, could be responsible for SIDS. We have analysed 286 SIDS cases for the most common genes implicated in HCM in adults. A total of 680 mutations localised in 16 genes were analysed by semi-automated matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDITOF-MS) using the Sequenom MassARRAY(®) System. Ten subjects with completely normal hearts showed mutated alleles at nine of the genetic variants analysed, and one additional novel mutation was detected by conventional sequencing. Therefore, a genetic mutation associated with HCM may cause sudden cardiac death in the absence of an identifiable phenotype. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Takotsubo syndrome and estrogen receptor genes: partners in crime?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzino, Gabriele; Bitto, Alessandra; Crea, Pasquale; Khandheria, Bijoy; Vriz, Olga; Carerj, Scipione; Squadrito, Francesco; Minisini, Rosalba; Citro, Rodolfo; Cusmà-Piccione, Maurizio; Madaffari, Antonio; Andò, Giuseppe; Altavilla, Domenica; Zito, Concetta

    2017-04-01

    We aimed to analyze genetic polymorphism of estrogen receptor (ESR) 1 and ESR2 in a series of postmenopausal women with Takotsubo syndrome (TS). In total, 81 consecutive white women were prospectively enrolled: 22 with TS (TS group; mean age 71.2 ± 9.8 years), 22 with acute myocardial infarction (MI group; mean age 73.2 ± 8 years), and 37 asymptomatic healthy controls (CTRL group; mean age 69 ± 4.2 years). Genotyping of ESR1 -397C>T (rs2234693) and -351A>G (rs9340799) and ESR2 -1839G>T (rs 1271572) and 1082G>A (rs1256049) genetic variants was performed. We estimated the odds ratio (OR) between the genotype of each examined locus with the occurrence of TS or MI. The risk of experiencing TS was higher for those study participants carrying the T allele at the rs2234693 locus of the ESR1 gene [OR: 2.0, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.973-4.11, P = 0.04, TS vs. MI + CTRL; OR: 2.79, 95% CI: 1.17-6.64, P = 0.016, TS vs. MI alone]. Women carrying a T allele at the rs1271572 locus of the ESR2 gene demonstrated an even higher risk (OR: 3.23, 95% CI: 1.55-6.73, P = 0.0019, TS vs. MI + CTRL; OR: 9.13, 95% CI: 2.78-29.9, P = 0.0001, TS vs. MI alone). The study reports preliminary findings suggesting a possible link between ESR polymorphisms and the occurrence of TS. Larger studies are needed to confirm our results.

  20. (GPR98) gene in an Iranian family with Usher syndrome type II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-12-04

    Dec 4, 2014 ... Genetics Research Center, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran 1985713834, Iran. [Kahrizi K. ... Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disease .... missense variants on the protein structures, pathogen severity .... genes to a Spanish Usher syndrome type 2 cohort.

  1. Mutations in KEOPS-complex genes cause nephrotic syndrome with primary microcephaly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braun, Daniela A; Rao, Jia; Mollet, Geraldine; Schapiro, David; Daugeron, Marie-Claire; Tan, Weizhen; Gribouval, Olivier; Boyer, Olivia; Revy, Patrick; Jobst-Schwan, Tilman; Schmidt, Johanna Magdalena; Lawson, Jennifer A; Schanze, Denny; Ashraf, Shazia; Ullmann, Jeremy F P; Hoogstraten, Charlotte A; Boddaert, Nathalie; Collinet, Bruno; Martin, Gaëlle; Liger, Dominique; Lovric, Svjetlana; Furlano, Monica; Guerrera, I Chiara; Sanchez-Ferras, Oraly; Hu, Jennifer F; Boschat, Anne-Claire; Sanquer, Sylvia; Menten, Björn; Vergult, Sarah; De Rocker, Nina; Airik, Merlin; Hermle, Tobias; Shril, Shirlee; Widmeier, Eugen; Gee, Heon Yung; Choi, Won-Il; Sadowski, Carolin E; Pabst, Werner L; Warejko, Jillian K; Daga, Ankana; Basta, Tamara; Matejas, Verena; Scharmann, Karin; Kienast, Sandra D; Behnam, Babak; Beeson, Brendan; Begtrup, Amber; Bruce, Malcolm; Ch'ng, Gaik-Siew; Lin, Shuan-Pei; Chang, Jui-Hsing; Chen, Chao-Huei; Cho, Megan T; Gaffney, Patrick M; Gipson, Patrick E; Hsu, Chyong-Hsin; Kari, Jameela A; Ke, Yu-Yuan; Kiraly-Borri, Cathy; Lai, Wai-Ming; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Littlejohn, Rebecca Okashah; Masri, Amira; Moghtaderi, Mastaneh; Nakamura, Kazuyuki; Ozaltin, Fatih; Praet, Marleen; Prasad, Chitra; Prytula, Agnieszka; Roeder, Elizabeth R; Rump, Patrick; Schnur, Rhonda E; Shiihara, Takashi; Sinha, Manish D; Soliman, Neveen A; Soulami, Kenza; Sweetser, David A; Tsai, Wen-Hui; Tsai, Jeng-Daw; Topaloglu, Rezan; Vester, Udo; Viskochil, David H; Vatanavicharn, Nithiwat; Waxler, Jessica L; Wierenga, Klaas J; Wolf, Matthias T F; Wong, Sik-Nin; Leidel, Sebastian A; Truglio, Gessica; Dedon, Peter C; Poduri, Annapurna; Mane, Shrikant; Lifton, Richard P; Bouchard, Maxime; Kannu, Peter; Chitayat, David; Magen, Daniella; Callewaert, Bert; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Zenker, Martin; Antignac, Corinne; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2017-01-01

    Galloway-Mowat syndrome (GAMOS) is an autosomal-recessive disease characterized by the combination of early-onset nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) and microcephaly with brain anomalies. Here we identified recessive mutations in OSGEP, TP53RK, TPRKB, and LAGE3, genes encoding the four subunits of the KEOPS

  2. Epilepsy in Rett syndrome, and CDKL5- and FOXG1-gene-related encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrini, Renzo; Parrini, Elena

    2012-12-01

    Rett syndrome is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder that manifests in early childhood with developmental stagnation, and loss of spoken language and hand use, with the development of distinctive hand stereotypies, severe cognitive impairment, and autistic features. About 60% of patients have epilepsy. Seizure onset before the age of 3 years is unlikely, and onset after age 20 is rare. Diagnosis of Rett syndrome is based on key clinical elements that identify "typical" Rett syndrome but also "variant" or "atypical" forms. Diagnostic criteria have been modified only slightly over time, even after discovering that MECP2 gene alterations are present in >90% of patients with typical Rett syndrome but only in 50-70% of atypical cases. Over the last several years, intragenic or genomic alterations of the CDKL5 and FOXG1 genes have been associated with severe cognitive impairment, early onset epilepsy and, often, dyskinetic movement disorders, which have variably been defined as Rett variants. It is now clearly emerging that epilepsy has distinctive characteristics in typical Rett syndrome and in the different syndromes caused by CDKL5 and FOXG1 gene alterations. The progressive parting of CDKL5- and FOXG1-gene-related encephalopathies from the core Rett syndrome is reflected by the effort to produce clearer diagnostic criteria for typical and atypical Rett syndrome. Efforts to characterize the molecular pathology underlying these developmental encephalopathies are pointing to abnormalities of telencephalic development, neuronal morphogenesis, maturation and maintenance, and dendritic arborization. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2012 International League Against Epilepsy.

  3. Identification of a novel FBN1 gene mutation in a large Pakistani family with Marfan syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Micheal, S.; Khan, M.I.; Akhtar, F.; Weiss, M.M.; Islam, F.; Ali, M.; Qamar, R.; Maugeri, A.; Hollander, A.I. den

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe a novel mutation in the fibrillin-1 (FBN1) gene in a large Pakistani family with autosomal dominant Marfan syndrome (MFS). METHODS: Blood samples were collected of 11 family members affected with Marfan syndrome, and DNA was isolated by phenol-extraction. The coding exons of

  4. Noonan syndrome-causing genes: Molecular update and an assessment of the mutation rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihssane El Bouchikhi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Noonan syndrome is a common autosomal dominant disorder characterized by short stature, congenital heart disease and facial dysmorphia with an incidence of 1/1000 to 2500 live births. Up to now, several genes have been proven to be involved in the disturbance of the transduction signal through the RAS-MAP Kinase pathway and the manifestation of Noonan syndrome. The first gene described was PTPN11, followed by SOS1, RAF1, KRAS, BRAF, NRAS, MAP2K1, and RIT1, and recently SOS2, LZTR1, and A2ML1, among others. Progressively, the physiopathology and molecular etiology of most signs of Noonan syndrome have been demonstrated, and inheritance patterns as well as genetic counseling have been established. In this review, we summarize the data concerning clinical features frequently observed in Noonan syndrome, and then, we describe the molecular etiology as well as the physiopathology of most Noonan syndrome-causing genes. In the second part of this review, we assess the mutational rate of Noonan syndrome-causing genes reported up to now in most screening studies. This review should give clinicians as well as geneticists a full view of the molecular aspects of Noonan syndrome and the authentic prevalence of the mutational events of its causing-genes. It will also facilitate laying the groundwork for future molecular diagnosis research, and the development of novel treatment strategies.

  5. Distinct Gene Expression Signatures in Lynch Syndrome and Familial Colorectal Cancer Type X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin, Mev; Therkildsen, Christina; Veerla, Srinivas

    2013-01-01

    Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects.......Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects....

  6. Usher syndrome: animal models, retinal function of Usher proteins, and prospects for gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, David S.

    2007-01-01

    Usher syndrome is a deafness-blindness disorder. The blindness occurs from a progressive retinal degeneration that begins after deafness and after the retina has developed. Three clinical subtypes of Usher syndrome have been identified, with mutations in any one of six different genes giving rise to type 1, in any one of three different genes to type 2, and in one identified gene causing Usher type 3. Mutant mice for most of the genes have been studied; while they have clear inner ear defects...

  7. Safe and Effective Gene Therapy for Murine Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Using an Insulated Lentiviral Vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Singh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS is a life-threatening immunodeficiency caused by mutations within the WAS gene. Viral gene therapy to restore WAS protein (WASp expression in hematopoietic cells of patients with WAS has the potential to improve outcomes relative to the current standard of care, allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. However, the development of viral vectors that are both safe and effective has been problematic. While use of viral transcriptional promoters may increase the risk of insertional mutagenesis, cellular promoters may not achieve WASp expression levels necessary for optimal therapeutic effect. Here we evaluate a self-inactivating (SIN lentiviral vector combining a chromatin insulator upstream of a viral MND (MPSV LTR, NCR deleted, dl587 PBS promoter driving WASp expression. Used as a gene therapeutic in Was−/− mice, this vector resulted in stable WASp+ cells in all hematopoietic lineages and rescue of T and B cell defects with a low number of viral integrations per cell, without evidence of insertional mutagenesis in serial bone marrow transplants. In a gene transfer experiment in non-human primates, the insulated MND promoter (driving GFP expression demonstrated long-term polyclonal engraftment of GFP+ cells. These observations demonstrate that the insulated MND promoter safely and efficiently reconstitutes clinically effective WASp expression and should be considered for future WAS therapy.

  8. Low-dose aripiprazole for refractory burning mouth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umezaki Y

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yojiro Umezaki,1 Miho Takenoshita,2 Akira Toyofuku2 1Psychosomatic Dentistry Clinic, Dental Hospital, 2Psychosomatic Dentistry, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: We report a case of refractory burning mouth syndrome (BMS ameliorated with low dose of aripiprazole. The patient was a 66-year-old female who had suffered from chronic burning pain in her tongue for 13 months. No abnormality associated with the burning sensation was detected in the laboratory tests and the oral findings. Considering the clinical feature and the history together, we diagnosed the burning sensation as BMS. The BMS pain was decreased by aripiprazole (powder 1.0 mg/d, though no other antidepressants had satisfying pain relief. It could be supposed that the efficacy of aripiprazole is caused by dopamine stabilization in this case, and BMS might have a subtype that is reactive to aripiprazole. Further studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of aripiprazole for BMS. Keywords: burning mouth syndrome, low-dose aripiprazole, chronic pain

  9. Long QT interval in Turner syndrome--a high prevalence of LQTS gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trolle, Christian; Mortensen, Kristian H; Pedersen, Lisbeth N; Berglund, Agnethe; Jensen, Henrik K; Andersen, Niels H; Gravholt, Claus H

    2013-01-01

    QT-interval prolongation of unknown aetiology is common in Turner syndrome. This study set out to explore the presence of known long QT mutations in Turner syndrome and to examine the corrected QT-interval (QTc) over time and relate the findings to the Turner syndrome phenotype. Adult women with Turner syndrome (n = 88) were examined thrice and 68 age-matched healthy controls were examined once. QTc was measured by one blinded reader (intra-reader variability: 0.7%), and adjusted for influence of heart rate by Bazett's (bQTc) and Hodges's formula (hQTc). The prevalence of mutations in genes related to Long QT syndrome was determined in women with Turner syndrome and a QTc >432.0 milliseconds (ms). Echocardiographic assessment of aortic valve morphology, 24-hour blood pressures and blood samples were done. The mean hQTc in women with Turner syndrome (414.0 ± 25.5 ms) compared to controls (390.4 ± 17.8 ms) was prolonged (pTurner syndrome karyotypes (418.2 ± 24.8 vs. 407.6 ± 25.5 ms; p = 0.055). In women with Turner syndrome and a bQTc >432 ms, 7 had mutations in major Long QT syndrome genes (SCN5A and KCNH2) and one in a minor Long QT syndrome gene (KCNE2). There is a high prevalence of mutations in the major LQTS genes in women with TS and prolonged QTc. It remains to be settled, whether these findings are related to the unexplained excess mortality in Turner women. NCT00624949. https://register.clinicaltrials.gov/prs/app/action/SelectProtocol/sid/S0001FLI/selectaction/View/ts/3/uid/U000099E.

  10. Oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe: magnetic resonance imaging findings in the first six years of life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho-Neto, Arnolfo de; Ono, Sergio Eiji; Cardoso, Georgina de Melo; Santos, Mara Lucia Schmitz Ferreira; Celidonio, Izabela [Hospital Pequeno Principe, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)], e-mail: ono.sergio@gmail.com

    2009-06-15

    The oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe (OCRL), was first recognized as a distinct disease in 1952 by Drs. Lowe, Terrey and MacLachlan at Massachusetts General Hospital, in Boston, USA, describing three male children with organic aciduria, decreased renal ammonia production, hydrophtalmos and mental retardation. The X-linked recessive inheritance pattern was recognized first by LeFebvre. It is present in all races, with a predominance in those of Caucasian and Asian ancestries. Rarely females are affected. It is a very rare disease, with estimated prevalence in the general population of 1 in 500,000. In USA the Lowe Syndrome Association (LSA) documented 190 living patients in the year 2000 (0.67 x million inhabitants). It is caused by a mutation in the gene encoding oculocerebrorenal- Lowe protein (OCRL1), isolated in 1992, linked to the Xq24-q26 region of the X chromosome,4-6. Approximately 60% of OCRL patients demonstrate a loss of OCRL gene expression, and the definitive laboratory test, that can be used for prenatal diagnosis, is the biochemical assay for deficiency of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate 5-phosphate in cultured fibroblasts. The classic triad of eye, central nervous system, and kidney involvement are required for the diagnosis of Lowe's syndrome. Cataract is present at birth in all patients and glaucoma is detected within the first year of life. Hypotonia compromises suction and causes serious respiratory problems in the first period of life. Motor development is retarded and mental retardation is moderate or severe in almost all cases. Obsessive-compulsive behavior is typical. Seizure is seen in approximately 50% of the patients over 18 years old. Renal disease is primarily characterized by renal Fanconi syndrome but many children are asymptomatic at birth. Renal involvement is initially related to bicarbonate, salt and water wasting, causing failure to thrive. Later, a significant number of patients develop chronic renal failure. The

  11. Oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe: magnetic resonance imaging findings in the first six years of life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho-Neto, Arnolfo de; Ono, Sergio Eiji; Cardoso, Georgina de Melo; Santos, Mara Lucia Schmitz Ferreira; Celidonio, Izabela

    2009-01-01

    The oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe (OCRL), was first recognized as a distinct disease in 1952 by Drs. Lowe, Terrey and MacLachlan at Massachusetts General Hospital, in Boston, USA, describing three male children with organic aciduria, decreased renal ammonia production, hydrophtalmos and mental retardation. The X-linked recessive inheritance pattern was recognized first by LeFebvre. It is present in all races, with a predominance in those of Caucasian and Asian ancestries. Rarely females are affected. It is a very rare disease, with estimated prevalence in the general population of 1 in 500,000. In USA the Lowe Syndrome Association (LSA) documented 190 living patients in the year 2000 (0.67 x million inhabitants). It is caused by a mutation in the gene encoding oculocerebrorenal- Lowe protein (OCRL1), isolated in 1992, linked to the Xq24-q26 region of the X chromosome,4-6. Approximately 60% of OCRL patients demonstrate a loss of OCRL gene expression, and the definitive laboratory test, that can be used for prenatal diagnosis, is the biochemical assay for deficiency of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate 5-phosphate in cultured fibroblasts. The classic triad of eye, central nervous system, and kidney involvement are required for the diagnosis of Lowe's syndrome. Cataract is present at birth in all patients and glaucoma is detected within the first year of life. Hypotonia compromises suction and causes serious respiratory problems in the first period of life. Motor development is retarded and mental retardation is moderate or severe in almost all cases. Obsessive-compulsive behavior is typical. Seizure is seen in approximately 50% of the patients over 18 years old. Renal disease is primarily characterized by renal Fanconi syndrome but many children are asymptomatic at birth. Renal involvement is initially related to bicarbonate, salt and water wasting, causing failure to thrive. Later, a significant number of patients develop chronic renal failure. The treatment

  12. Neonatal Marfan syndrome caused by an exon 25 mutation of the fibrillin-1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elçioglu, N H; Akalin, F; Elçioglu, M; Comeglio, P; Child, A H

    2004-01-01

    Neonatal Marfan syndrome caused by an exon 25 mutation of the Fibrillin-1 gene: We describe a male infant with severe arachnodactyly, hypermobility of the fingers, flexion contractures of elbows, wrists, hips, and knees, microretrognathia, crumpled ears, rockerbottom feet, loose redundant skin, and lens dislocations. Cardiac valve insufficiency and aortic dilatation resulted in cardiac failure, decompensated with digitalisation and death occurred at the age of 4 months. This case represents the severe end of the clinical spectrum of Marfan syndrome, namely neonatal Marfan syndrome. Molecular diagnostic analyses confirmed a de novo exon 25 mutation in the FBN1 gene.

  13. Clinical features and growth hormone receptor gene mutations of patients with Laron syndrome from a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Yan-Qin; Wei, Hong; Cao, Li-Zhi; Lu, Juan-Juan; Luo, Xiao-Ping

    2007-08-01

    Laron syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by defects of growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene. It is characterized by severe postnatal growth retardation and characteristic facial features as well as high circulating levels of growth hormone (GH) and low levels of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3). This report described the clinical features and GHR gene mutations in 2 siblings with Laron syndrome in a Chinese family. Their heights and weights were in the normal range at birth, but the growth was retarded after birth. When they presented to the clinic, the heights of the boy (8 years old) and his sister (11 years old) were 80.0 cm (-8.2 SDS) and 96.6 cm (-6.8 SDS) respectively. They had typical appearance features of Laron syndrome such as short stature and obesity, with protruding forehead, saddle nose, large eyes, sparse and thin silky hair and high-pitched voice. They had higher basal serum GH levels and lower serum levels of IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and growth hormone binding protein (GHBP) than normal controls. The peak serum GH level after colonidine and insulin stimulations in the boy was over 350 ng/mL. After one-year rhGH treatment, the boy's height increased from 80.0 cm to 83.3 cm. The gene mutation analysis revealed that two patients had same homozygous mutation of S65H (TCA -->CCA) in exon 4, which is a novel gene mutation. It was concluded that a definite diagnosis of Laron syndrome can be made based on characteristic appearance features and serum levels of GH, IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and GHBP. The S65H mutation might be the cause of Laron syndrome in the two patients.

  14. Cognitive-behavioral phenotypes of Williams syndrome are associated with genetic variation in the GTF2I gene, in a healthy population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Bernard J; Hurd, Peter L

    2014-11-28

    Individuals with Williams syndrome, a neurogenetic condition caused by deletion of a set of genes at chromosomal location 7q11.23, exhibit a remarkable suite of traits including hypersociality with high, nonselective friendliness and low social anxiety, expressive language relatively well-developed but under-developed social-communication skills overall, and reduced visual-spatial abilities. Deletions and duplications of the Williams-syndrome region have also been associated with autism, and with schizophrenia, two disorders centrally involving social cognition. Several lines of evidence have linked the gene GTF2I (General Transcription Factor IIi) with the social phenotypes of Williams syndrome, but a role for this gene in sociality within healthy populations has yet to be investigated. We genotyped a large set of healthy individuals for two single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the GTF2I gene that have recently been significantly associated with autism, and thus apparently exhibit functional effects on autism-related social phenotypes. GTF2I genotypes for these SNPs showed highly significant association with low social anxiety combined with reduced social-communication abilities, which represents a metric of the Williams-syndrome cognitive profile as described from previous studies. These findings implicate the GTF2I gene in the neurogenetic basis of social communication and social anxiety, both in Williams syndrome and among individuals in healthy populations.

  15. A novel small deletion in the NHS gene associated with Nance-Horan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huajin; Yang, Lizhu; Sun, Zixi; Yuan, Zhisheng; Wu, Shijing; Sui, Ruifang

    2018-02-05

    Nance-Horan syndrome is a rare X-linked recessive inherited disease with clinical features including severe bilateral congenital cataracts, characteristic facial and dental abnormalities. Data from Chinese Nance-Horan syndrome patients are limited. We assessed the clinical manifestations of a Chinese Nance-Horan syndrome pedigree and identified the genetic defect. Genetic analysis showed that 3 affected males carried a novel small deletion in NHS gene, c.263_266delCGTC (p.Ala89TrpfsTer106), and 2 female carriers were heterozygous for the same variant. All 3 affected males presented with typical Nance-Horan syndrome features. One female carrier displayed lens opacities centered on the posterior Y-suture in both eyes, as well as mild dental abnormalities. We recorded the clinical features of a Chinese Nance-Horan syndrome family and broadened the spectrum of mutations in the NHS gene.

  16. Severe visual impairment and retinal changes in a boy with a deletion of the gene for Nance-Horan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathys, R; Deconinck, H; Keymolen, K; Jansen, A; Van Esch, H

    2007-01-01

    We present the ophthalmologic findings in a boy with a deletion of Xp22 comprising the gene for Nance-Horan syndrome. Different mechanisms underlying the visual impairment in Nance-Horan syndrome are discussed.

  17. Síndrome de Diógenes Diogenes syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Perdigão Stumpf

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome de Diógenes (SD caracteriza-se por descuido extremo com a higiene pessoal, negligência com o asseio da própria moradia, isolamento social, suspeição e comportamento paranoico, sendo frequente a ocorrência de colecionismo. A incidência anual é de 5/10.000 entre aqueles acima de 60 anos, e pelo menos a metade é portadora de demência ou algum outro transtorno psiquiátrico. As principais hipóteses etiológicas são: (1 a condição representaria o "estágio final" de um transtorno de personalidade; (2 a síndrome seria uma manifestação de demência do lobo frontal; (3 a SD seria o estágio final do subtipo hoarding do TOC; (4 a SD seria uma via final comum a diferentes transtornos psiquiátricos, especialmente aqueles associados ao colecionismo; (5 a síndrome seria precipitada por estressores biológicos, psicológicos e sociais, associados com a idade, em indivíduos com traços de personalidade predisponentes. É conhecido que existem apenas relatos de casos envolvendo tratamentos específicos para a SD, particularmente a risperidona. Por se tratar de condição grave, com elevada mortalidade por problemas clínicos, estudos se fazem necessários para determinar as melhores estratégias de abordagem desses pacientes. Os autores descrevem o caso de uma paciente com SD e fazem uma breve revisão da literatura.Diogenes syndrome (DSis characterized by extreme self-neglect, domestic squalor, social withdrawal, suspiciousness and paranoid behaviour and is often accompanied by excessive hoarding. The annual incidence is five per ten thousand of the population aged over 60, at least half of whom will have dementia or some other form of mental illness. The main etiological hypotheses are: (1 the condition represents the "end-stage" of a personality disorder; (2 the syndrome is a manifestation of a frontal-lobe dementia; (3 DS may be an end stage of the hoarding subtype of OCD; (4 DS may be a final common pathway of different

  18. Distinct gene expression profiles in ovarian cancer linked to Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jenny-Maria; Bartuma, Katarina; Dominguez-Valentin, Mev

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer linked to Lynch syndrome represents a rare subset that typically presents at young age as early-stage tumors with an overrepresentation of endometrioid and clear cell histologies. We investigated the molecular profiles of Lynch syndrome-associated and sporadic ovarian cancer...... with the aim to identify key discriminators and central tumorigenic mechanisms in hereditary ovarian cancer. Global gene expression profiling using whole-genome c-DNA-mediated Annealing, Selection, extension, and Ligation was applied to 48 histopathologically matched Lynch syndrome-associated and sporadic...... ovarian cancers. Lynch syndrome-associated and sporadic ovarian cancers differed by 349 significantly deregulated genes, including PTPRH, BIRC3, SHH and TNFRSF6B. The genes involved were predominantly linked to cell growth, proliferation, and cell-to-cell signaling and interaction. When stratified...

  19. New mutations in the NHS gene in Nance-Horan Syndrome families from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florijn, Ralph J.; Loves, Willem; Maillette de Buy Wenniger-Prick, Liesbeth J. J. M.; Mannens, Marcel M. A. M.; Tijmes, Nel; Brooks, Simon P.; Hardcastle, Alison J.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in the NHS gene cause Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS), a rare X-chromosomal recessive disorder with variable features, including congenital cataract, microphthalmia, a peculiar form of the ear and dental anomalies. We investigated the NHS gene in four additional families with NHS from the

  20. A novel homozygous variant in the SMOC1 gene underlying Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Asmat; Umair, Muhammad; Ahmad, Farooq; Muhammad, Dost; Basit, Sulman; Ahmad, Wasim

    2017-01-01

    Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome (WAS), also known as ophthalmo-acromelic syndrome or anophthalmia-syndactyly, is a rare congenital disorder that segregates in an autosomal recessive pattern. Clinical features of the syndrome include malformation of the eyes and the skeleton. Mostly, WAS is caused by mutations in the SMOC-1 gene. The present report describes a large consanguineous family of Pakistani origin segregating Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome in an autosomal recessive pattern. Genotyping followed by Sanger sequencing was performed to search for a candidate gene. SNP genotyping using AffymetrixGeneChip Human Mapping 250K Nsp array established a single homozygous region among affected members on chromosome 14q23.1-q24.3 harboring the SMOC1 gene. Sequencing of the gene revealed a novel homozygous missense mutation (c.812G>A; p.Cys271Tyr) in the family. This is the first report of Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome caused by a SMOC1 variant in a Pakistani population. The mutation identified in the present investigation extends the body of evidence implicating the gene SMOC-1 in causing WAS.

  1. Low Anterior Resection Syndrome: Current Management and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridolfi, Timothy J; Berger, Nicholas; Ludwig, Kirk A

    2016-09-01

    Outcomes for rectal cancer surgery have improved significantly over the past 20 years with increasing rates of survival and recurrence, specifically local recurrence. These gains have been realized during a period of time in which there has been an increasing emphasis on sphincter preservation. As we have become increasingly aggressive in avoiding resection of the anus, we have begun accepting bowel dysfunction as a normal outcome. Low anterior resection syndrome, defined as a constellation of symptoms including incontinence, frequency, urgency, or feelings of incomplete emptying, has a significant impact on quality of life and results in many patients opting for a permanent colostomy to avoid these symptoms. In this article, we will highlight the most recent clinical and basic science research on this topic and discuss areas of future investigation.

  2. Low-dose aripiprazole for refractory burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezaki, Yojiro; Takenoshita, Miho; Toyofuku, Akira

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of refractory burning mouth syndrome (BMS) ameliorated with low dose of aripiprazole. The patient was a 66-year-old female who had suffered from chronic burning pain in her tongue for 13 months. No abnormality associated with the burning sensation was detected in the laboratory tests and the oral findings. Considering the clinical feature and the history together, we diagnosed the burning sensation as BMS. The BMS pain was decreased by aripiprazole (powder) 1.0 mg/d, though no other antidepressants had satisfying pain relief. It could be supposed that the efficacy of aripiprazole is caused by dopamine stabilization in this case, and BMS might have a subtype that is reactive to aripiprazole. Further studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of aripiprazole for BMS.

  3. New polymorphisms of Xeroderma Pigmentosum DNA repair genes in myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Sabrina Pinheiro; Junior, Howard Lopes Ribeiro; de Sousa, Juliana Cordeiro; de Paula Borges, Daniela; de Oliveira, Roberta Taiane Germano; Farias, Izabelle Rocha; Costa, Marília Braga; Maia, Allan Rodrigo Soares; da Nóbrega Ito, Mayumi; Magalhães, Silvia Maria Meira; Pinheiro, Ronald Feitosa

    2017-07-01

    The association between Xeroderma Pigmentosum DNA repair genes (XPA rs1800975, XPC rs2228000, XPD rs1799793 and XPF rs1800067) polymorphisms and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) have not been reported. To assess the functional role between these polymorphisms and MDS, we evaluated 189 samples stratified in two groups: 95 bone marrow samples from MDS patients and 94 from healthy elderly volunteers used as controls. Genotypes for all polymorphisms were identified in DNA samples in an allelic discrimination experiment by real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). We also studied the mRNA expression of XPA and XPC genes to evaluate if its polymorphisms were functional in 53 RNAm MDS patients by qPCR methodologies. To the rs2228000 polymorphism, the CT and TT polymorphic genotype were associated with increased odds ratio (OR) of more profound cytopenia (hemoglobin and neutrophils count). To the rs1799793 polymorphism, we found that the GG homozygous wild-type genotype was associated with a decreased chance of developing MDS. We observed low expression of XPA in younger patients, in hypoplastic MDS and patients with abnormal karyotype when presented AG or AA polymorphic genotypes. We also found that there was a statistically significant interaction between the presence of micromegakaryocyte on down regulation of XPC regarding the CT heterozygous genotype of the rs1800975 polymorphism. Our results suggest that new functional polymorphisms of Xeroderma Pigmentosum DNA repair genes in MDS are related to its pathogenesis and prognosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Marfan syndrome with a complex chromosomal rearrangement including deletion of the FBN1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colovati Mileny ES

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of Marfan syndrome (MFS cases is caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1, mapped to chromosome 15q21.1. Only few reports on deletions including the whole FBN1 gene, detected by molecular cytogenetic techniques, were found in literature. Results We report here on a female patient with clinical symptoms of the MFS spectrum plus craniostenosis, hypothyroidism and intellectual deficiency who presents a 1.9 Mb deletion, including the FBN1 gene and a complex rearrangement with eight breakpoints involving chromosomes 6, 12 and 15. Discussion This is the first report of MFS with a complex chromosome rearrangement involving a deletion of FBN1 and contiguous genes. In addition to the typical clinical findings of the Marfan syndrome due to FBN1 gene haploinsufficiency, the patient presents features which may be due to the other gene deletions and possibly to the complex chromosome rearrangement.

  5. Long QT interval in Turner syndrome--a high prevalence of LQTS gene mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Trolle

    Full Text Available QT-interval prolongation of unknown aetiology is common in Turner syndrome. This study set out to explore the presence of known long QT mutations in Turner syndrome and to examine the corrected QT-interval (QTc over time and relate the findings to the Turner syndrome phenotype.Adult women with Turner syndrome (n = 88 were examined thrice and 68 age-matched healthy controls were examined once. QTc was measured by one blinded reader (intra-reader variability: 0.7%, and adjusted for influence of heart rate by Bazett's (bQTc and Hodges's formula (hQTc. The prevalence of mutations in genes related to Long QT syndrome was determined in women with Turner syndrome and a QTc >432.0 milliseconds (ms. Echocardiographic assessment of aortic valve morphology, 24-hour blood pressures and blood samples were done.The mean hQTc in women with Turner syndrome (414.0 ± 25.5 ms compared to controls (390.4 ± 17.8 ms was prolonged (p432 ms, 7 had mutations in major Long QT syndrome genes (SCN5A and KCNH2 and one in a minor Long QT syndrome gene (KCNE2.There is a high prevalence of mutations in the major LQTS genes in women with TS and prolonged QTc. It remains to be settled, whether these findings are related to the unexplained excess mortality in Turner women.NCT00624949. https://register.clinicaltrials.gov/prs/app/action/SelectProtocol/sid/S0001FLI/selectaction/View/ts/3/uid/U000099E.

  6. Intracranial arteries in individuals with the elastin gene hemideletion of Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wint, D P; Butman, J A; Masdeu, J C; Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Mervis, C B; Sarpal, D; Morris, C A; Berman, K F

    2014-01-01

    Williams syndrome, a rare genetic disorder with a striking neurobehavioral profile characterized by extreme sociability and impaired visuospatial construction abilities, is caused by a hemideletion that includes the elastin gene, resulting in frequent supravavular aortic stenosis and other stenotic arterial lesions. Strokes have been reported in Williams syndrome. Although the extracranial carotid artery has been studied in a sample of patients with Williams syndrome, proximal intracranial arteries have not. Using MRA, we studied the intracranial vessels in 27 participants: 14 patients with Williams syndrome (age range, 18-44 years; mean age, 27.3 ± 9.1; 43% women) and 13 healthy control participants with similar age and sex distribution (age range, 22-52 years; mean age, 33.4 ± 7.6; 46% women). All participants with Williams syndrome had hemideletions of the elastin gene. Blinded to group allocation or to any other clinical data, a neuroradiologist determined the presence of intracranial vascular changes in the 2 groups. The Williams syndrome group and the healthy control group had similar patency of the proximal intracranial arteries, including the internal carotid and vertebral arteries; basilar artery; and stem and proximal branches of the anterior cerebral artery, MCA, and posterior cerebral arteries. The postcommunicating segment of the anterior cerebral artery was longer in the Williams syndrome group. Despite the elastin haploinsufficiency, the proximal intracranial arteries in Williams syndrome preserve normal patency.

  7. Splicing Analysis of Exonic OCRL Mutations Causing Lowe Syndrome or Dent-2 Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Suarez-Artiles

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the OCRL gene are associated with both Lowe syndrome and Dent-2 disease. Patients with Lowe syndrome present congenital cataracts, mental disabilities and a renal proximal tubulopathy, whereas patients with Dent-2 disease exhibit similar proximal tubule dysfunction but only mild, or no additional clinical defects. It is not yet understood why some OCRL mutations cause the phenotype of Lowe syndrome, while others develop the milder phenotype of Dent-2 disease. Our goal was to gain new insights into the consequences of OCRL exonic mutations on pre-mRNA splicing. Using predictive bioinformatics tools, we selected thirteen missense mutations and one synonymous mutation based on their potential effects on splicing regulatory elements or splice sites. These mutations were analyzed in a minigene splicing assay. Results of the RNA analysis showed that three presumed missense mutations caused alterations in pre-mRNA splicing. Mutation c.741G>T; p.(Trp247Cys generated splicing silencer sequences and disrupted splicing enhancer motifs that resulted in skipping of exon 9, while mutations c.2581G>A; p.(Ala861Thr and c.2581G>C; p.(Ala861Pro abolished a 5′ splice site leading to skipping of exon 23. Mutation c.741G>T represents the first OCRL exonic variant outside the conserved splice site dinucleotides that results in alteration of pre-mRNA splicing. Our results highlight the importance of evaluating the effects of OCRL exonic mutations at the mRNA level.

  8. IMPACT OF ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME GENE POLYMORPHISM ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF INSULIN RESISTANCE SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Roitberg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the distribution of components of insulin resistance (IR syndrome and to study the frequency of their combinations in relation to the genotypes and allelic variants of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE gene.Subjects and methods. A group of clinically healthy patients (50 women and 42 men with different genotypes of the ACE gene was examined.The distribution of IR syndrome components and the frequency of their combinations were analyzed in relation to the genotypes and allelicvariants of the ACE gene.Results. A group of D allele carriers compared to A allele ones showed a pronounced tendency for the frequency of IR to reduce due to thehigher proportion of patients with complete IR syndrome. This observation becomes statistically significant in the assessment of homozygous variants of the ACE gene. At the same time dyslipidemia and hypertension in the presence of IR significantly more frequently occurred in patients with the DD genotype than in those with genotype II.Conclusion. There was a marked predominance of the manifestations of IR syndrome with a complete set of components in the DD genotypicgroup, which confirms the significant strong association between ACE gene polymorphism and IR syndrome.

  9. Do the MTHFR gene polymorphism and Down syndrome pregnancy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Srinivasan Muthuswamy

    2015-09-28

    Sep 28, 2015 ... syndrome pregnancy association stands true? A case–control study of Indian population and meta-analysis. Srinivasan Muthuswamy ... Various clinical as well as experimental evidences have linked DNA hypomethylation to ...

  10. A new nonsense mutation in the NF1 gene with neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yimenicioğlu, Sevgi; Yakut, Ayten; Karaer, Kadri; Zenker, Martin; Ekici, Arzu; Carman, Kürşat Bora

    2012-12-01

    Neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder which combines neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) features with Noonan syndrome. NF1 gene mutations are reported in the majority of these patients. Sequence analysis of the established genes for Noonan syndrome revealed no mutation; a heterozygous NF1 point mutation c.7549C>T in exon 51, creating a premature stop codon (p.R2517X), had been demonstrated. Neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome recently has been considered a subtype of NF1 and caused by different NF1 mutations. We report the case of a 14-year-old boy with neurofibromatosis type 1 with Noonan-like features, who complained of headache with triventricular hydrocephaly and a heterozygous NF1 point mutation c.7549C>T in exon 51.

  11. Low doses of neutrons induce changes in gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, C.M.; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1993-01-01

    Studies were designed to identify genes induced following low-dose neutron but not following γ-ray exposure in fibroblasts. Our past work had shown differences in the expression of β-protein kinase C and c-fos genes, both being induced following γ-ray but not neutron exposure. We have identified two genes that are induced following neutron, but not γ-ray, exposure: Rp-8 (a gene induced by apoptosis) and the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the human immunodeficiency (HIV). Rp-8 mRNA induction was demonstrated in Syrian hamster embryo fibroblasts and was found to be induced in cells exposed to neutrons administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) and at high dose rate (12 cGy/min). The induction of transcription from the LTR of HIV was demonstrated in HeLa cells bearing a transfected construct of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene driven by the HIV-LTR promoter. Measures of CAT activity and CAT transcripts following irradiation demonstrated an unresponsiveness to γ rays over a broad range of doses. Twofold induction of the HIV-LTR was detected following neutron exposure (48 cGy) administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) but not high (12 cGy/min) dose rates. Ultraviolet-mediated HIV-LTR induction was inhibited by low-dose-rate neutron exposure

  12. Screening of the USH1G gene among Spanish patients with Usher syndrome. Lack of mutations and evidence of a minor role in the pathogenesis of the syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, Elena; Jaijo, Teresa; Beneyto, Magdalena; Nájera, Carmen; Morera, Constantino; Pérez-Garrigues, Herminio; Ayuso, Carmen; Millán, Jose

    2007-09-01

    The Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive hereditary disorder characterized by the association of sensorineural hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and, in some cases, vestibular dysfunction. The USH1G gene, encoding SANS, has been found to cause both Usher syndrome type I and atypical Usher syndrome. 109 Spanish unrelated patients suffering from Usher syndrome type I, type II, type III and unclassified Usher syndrome were screened for mutations in this gene, but only eight different changes without a clear pathogenic effect have been detected. Based on these results as well as previous studies in other populations where mutational analysis of this gene has been carried out, one can conclude that USH1G has a minor involvement in Usher syndrome pathogenesis.

  13. Novel mutations in cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) gene in Indian cases of Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Dhanjit Kumar; Mehta, Bhakti; Menon, Shyla R; Raha, Sarbani; Udani, Vrajesh

    2013-03-01

    Rett syndrome is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder, almost exclusively affecting females and characterized by a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. Both the classic and atypical forms of Rett syndrome are primarily due to mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. Mutations in the X-linked cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) gene have been identified in patients with atypical Rett syndrome, X-linked infantile spasms sharing common features of generally early-onset seizures and mental retardation. CDKL5 is known as serine/threonine protein kinase 9 (STK9) and is mapped to the Xp22 region. It has a conserved serine/threonine kinase domain within its amino terminus and a large C-terminal region. Disease-causing mutations are distributed in both the amino terminal domain and in the large C-terminal domain. We have screened the CDKL5 gene in 44 patients with atypical Rett syndrome who had tested negative for MECP2 gene mutations and have identified 6 sequence variants, out of which three were novel and three known mutations. Two of these novel mutations p.V966I and p.A1011V were missense and p.H589H a silent mutation. Other known mutations identified were p.V999M, p.Q791P and p.T734A. Sequence homology for all the mutations revealed that the two mutations (p.Q791P and p.T734A) were conserved across species. This indicated the importance of these residues in structure and function of the protein. The damaging effects of these mutations were analysed in silico using PolyPhen-2 online software. The PolyPhen-2 scores of p.Q791P and p.T734A were 0.998 and 0.48, revealing that these mutations could be deleterious and might have potential functional effect. All other mutations had a low score suggesting that they might not alter the activity of CDKL5. We have also analysed the position of the mutations in the CDKL5 protein and found that all the mutations were present in the C-terminal domain of the protein. The C-terminal domain is required for

  14. Sacral nerve stimulation can be an effective treatment for low anterior resection syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftaiha, S M; Balachandran, B; Marecik, S J; Mellgren, A; Nordenstam, J; Melich, G; Prasad, L M; Park, J J

    2017-10-01

    Sacral nerve stimulation has become a preferred method for the treatment of faecal incontinence in patients who fail conservative (non-operative) therapy. In previous small studies, sacral nerve stimulation has demonstrated improvement of faecal incontinence and quality of life in a majority of patients with low anterior resection syndrome. We evaluated the efficacy of sacral nerve stimulation in the treatment of low anterior resection syndrome using a recently developed and validated low anterior resection syndrome instrument to quantify symptoms. A retrospective review of consecutive patients undergoing sacral nerve stimulation for the treatment of low anterior resection syndrome was performed. Procedures took place in the Division of Colon and Rectal Surgery at two academic tertiary medical centres. Pre- and post-treatment Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Scores and Low Anterior Resection Syndrome scores were assessed. Twelve patients (50% men) suffering from low anterior resection syndrome with a mean age of 67.8 (±10.8) years underwent sacral nerve test stimulation. Ten patients (83%) proceeded to permanent implantation. Median time from anterior resection to stimulator implant was 16 (range 5-108) months. At a median follow-up of 19.5 (range 4-42) months, there were significant improvements in Cleveland Clinic Incontinence Scores and Low Anterior Resection Syndrome scores (P syndrome and may therefore be a viable treatment option. Colorectal Disease © 2017 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  15. Digenic mutations involving both the BSND and GJB2 genes detected in Bartter syndrome type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Han; Feng, Yong; Li, Hai-Bo; Wu, Hong; Mei, Ling-Yun; Wang, Xing-Wei; Jiang, Lu; He, Chu-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Bartter syndrome type IV, characterized by salt-losing nephropathies and sensorineural deafness, is caused by mutations of BSND or simultaneous mutations of both CLCNKA and CLCNKB. GJB2 is the primary causative gene for non-syndromic sensorineural deafness and associated with several syndromic sensorineural deafness. Owing to the rarity of Bartter syndrome, only a few mutations have been reported in the abovementioned causative genes. To investigate the underlying mutations in a Chinese patient with Bartter syndrome type IV, genetic analysis of BSND, CLCNKA, CLCNKB and GJB2 were performed by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing. Finally, double homozygous mutations c.22C > T (p.Arg8Trp) and c.127G > A (Val43Ile) were detected in exon 1 of BSND. Intriguingly, compound heterozygous mutations c.235delC (p.Leu79CysfsX3) and c.109G > A (p.Val37Ile) were also revealed in exon 2 of GJB2 in the same patient. No pathogenic mutations were found in CLCNKA and CLCNKB. Our results indicated that the homozygous mutation c.22C > T was the key genetic reason for the proband, and a digenic effect of BSND and GJB2 might contributed to sensorineural deafness. To our knowledge, it was the first report showing that the GJB2 gene mutations were detected in Bartter syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [MVK gene abnormality and new approach to treatment of hyper IgD syndrome and periodic fever syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruto, Takuya

    2007-04-01

    Hyper IgD and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS; OMIM 260920) is one of the hereditary autoinflammatory syndromes characterized by recurrent episodes of fever and inflammation.. HIDS is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by recurrent fever attacks in early childhood. HIDS caused by mevalonate kinase (MK) mutations, also that is the gene of mevalonic aciduria (OMIM 251170). During febrile episodes, urinary mevalonate concentrations were found to be significantly elevated in patients. Diagnosis of HIDS was retrieving gene or measurement of the enzyme activity in peripheral blood lymphocyte in general. This of HIDS is an activity decline of MK, and a complete deficiency of MK becomes a mevalonic aciduria with a nervous symptom. The relation between the fever and inflammation of mevalonate or isoprenoid products are uncertain. The therapy attempt with statins, which is inhibited the next enzyme after HMG-CoA reductase, or inhibit the proinflammatory cytokines.

  17. A novel small deletion in the NHS gene associated with Nance-Horan syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Huajin; Yang, Lizhu; Sun, Zixi; Yuan, Zhisheng; Wu, Shijing; Sui, Ruifang

    2018-01-01

    Nance-Horan syndrome is a rare X-linked recessive inherited disease with clinical features including severe bilateral congenital cataracts, characteristic facial and dental abnormalities. Data from Chinese Nance-Horan syndrome patients are limited. We assessed the clinical manifestations of a Chinese Nance-Horan syndrome pedigree and identified the genetic defect. Genetic analysis showed that 3 affected males carried a novel small deletion in NHS gene, c.263_266delCGTC (p.Ala89TrpfsTer106), a...

  18. Mitchell-Riley Syndrome: A Novel Mutation in RFX6 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Zegre Amorim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel RFX6 homozygous missense mutation was identified in an infant with Mitchell-Riley syndrome. The most common features of Mitchell-Riley syndrome were present, including severe neonatal diabetes associated with annular pancreas, intestinal malrotation, gallbladder agenesis, cholestatic disease, chronic diarrhea, and severe intrauterine growth restriction. Perijejunal tissue similar to pancreatic tissue was found in the submucosa, a finding that has not been previously reported in this syndrome. This case associating RFX6 mutation with structural and functional pancreatic abnormalities reinforces the RFX6 gene role in pancreas development and β-cell function, adding information to the existent mutation databases.

  19. The prognostic impact of mutations in spliceosomal genes for myelodysplastic syndrome patients without ring sideroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Min-Gu; Kim, Hye-Ran; Seo, Bo-Young; Lee, Jun Hyung; Choi, Seok-Yong; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Shin, Jong-Hee; Suh, Soon-Pal; Ahn, Jae-Sook; Shin, Myung-Geun

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in genes that are part of the splicing machinery for myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), including MDS without ring sideroblasts (RS), have been widely investigated. The effects of these mutations on clinical outcomes have been diverse and contrasting. We examined a cohort of 129 de novo MDS patients, who did not harbor RS, for mutations affecting three spliceosomal genes (SF3B1, U2AF1, and SRSF2). The mutation rates of SF3B1, U2AF1, and SRSF2 were 7.0 %, 7.8 %, and 10.1 %, respectively. Compared with previously reported results, these rates were relatively infrequent. The SRSF2 mutation strongly correlated with old age (P < 0.001), while the mutation status of SF3B1 did not affect overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) transformation. In contrast, MDS patients with mutations in U2AF1 or SRSF2 exhibited inferior PFS. The U2AF1 mutation was associated with inferior OS in low-risk MDS patients (P = 0.035). The SRSF2 mutation was somewhat associated with AML transformation (P = 0.083). Our findings suggest that the frequencies of the SF3B1, U2AF1, and SRSF2 splicing gene mutations in MDS without RS were relatively low. We also demonstrated that the U2AF1 and SRSF2 mutations were associated with an unfavorable prognostic impact in MDS patients without RS. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1493-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  20. Novel Myopia Genes and Pathways Identified From Syndromic Forms of Myopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughman, James; Wildsoet, Christine F.; Williams, Cathy; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose To test the hypothesis that genes known to cause clinical syndromes featuring myopia also harbor polymorphisms contributing to nonsyndromic refractive errors. Methods Clinical phenotypes and syndromes that have refractive errors as a recognized feature were identified using the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database. One hundred fifty-four unique causative genes were identified, of which 119 were specifically linked with myopia and 114 represented syndromic myopia (i.e., myopia and at least one other clinical feature). Myopia was the only refractive error listed for 98 genes and hyperopia and the only refractive error noted for 28 genes, with the remaining 28 genes linked to phenotypes with multiple forms of refractive error. Pathway analysis was carried out to find biological processes overrepresented within these sets of genes. Genetic variants located within 50 kb of the 119 myopia-related genes were evaluated for involvement in refractive error by analysis of summary statistics from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) conducted by the CREAM Consortium and 23andMe, using both single-marker and gene-based tests. Results Pathway analysis identified several biological processes already implicated in refractive error development through prior GWAS analyses and animal studies, including extracellular matrix remodeling, focal adhesion, and axon guidance, supporting the research hypothesis. Novel pathways also implicated in myopia development included mannosylation, glycosylation, lens development, gliogenesis, and Schwann cell differentiation. Hyperopia was found to be linked to a different pattern of biological processes, mostly related to organogenesis. Comparison with GWAS findings further confirmed that syndromic myopia genes were enriched for genetic variants that influence refractive errors in the general population. Gene-based analyses implicated 21 novel candidate myopia genes (ADAMTS18, ADAMTS2, ADAMTSL4, AGK, ALDH18A1, ASXL1, COL4A1

  1. DXA measurements in Rett syndrome reveal small bones with low bone mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roende, Gitte; Ravn, Kirstine; Fuglsang, Kathrine; Andersen, Henrik; Nielsen, Jytte Bieber; Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen; Jensen, Jens-Erik Beck

    2011-09-01

    Low bone mass is reported in growth-retarded patients harboring mutations in the X-linked methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene causing Rett syndrome (RTT). We present the first study addressing both bone mineral density (BMD) and bone size in RTT. Our object was to determine whether patients with RTT do have low BMD when correcting for smaller bones by examination with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). We compared areal BMD (aBMD(spine) and aBMD(total hip) ) and volumetric bone mineral apparent density (vBMAD(spine) and vBMAD(neck) ) in 61 patients and 122 matched healthy controls. Further, spine and hip aBMD and vBMAD of patients were associated with clinical risk factors of low BMD, low-energy fractures, MECP2 mutation groups, and X chromosome inactivation (XCI). Patients with RTT had reduced bone size on the order of 10% and showed lower values of spine and hip aBMD and vBMAD (p bone mass and small bones are evident in RTT, indicating an apparent low-bone-formation phenotype. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  2. A novel nonsense mutation in the WFS1 gene causes the Wolfram syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorian, Shahab; Savad, Shahram; Mohammadi, Davood Shah

    2016-05-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder, which is mostly caused by mutations in the WFS1 gene. The WFS1 gene product, which is called wolframin, is thought to regulate the function of endoplasmic reticulum. The endoplasmic reticulum has a critical role in protein folding and material transportation within the cell or to the surface of the cell. Identification of new mutations in WFS1 gene will unravel the molecular pathology of WS. The aim of this case report study is to describe a novel mutation in exon 4 of the WFS1 gene (c.330C>A) in a 9-year-old boy with WS.

  3. Study on the correlation between KCNJ11 gene polymorphism and metabolic syndrome in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fan; Liu, Ning; Chen, Xiao Zhuang; Han, Kun Yuan; Zhu, Cai Zhong

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the correlation between KCNJ11 gene polymorphism and metabolic syndrome in elderly patients. From January 2014 to January 2015, 54 elderly patients with metabolic syndrome were enrolled in this study as the observation group. During the same period, 46 healthy elderly individuals were enrolled in this study as the control group. KCNJ11 gene polymorphism (rs28502) was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The expression levels of mRNA in different genotypes were detected using FQ-PCR. ELISA was used to evaluate the KCNJ11 protein expression in different genotypes. KCNJ11 gene polymorphism and metabolic syndrome was studied by measuring the blood pressure levels in patients with different genotypes. Three genotypes of KCNJ11 gene in rs28502 were CC, CT and TT. The CC, CT and TT genotype frequencies in healthy population were 8.5, 9.2 and 82.2%, respectively, while the genotype frequencies in patients with metabolic syndrome were 42.4, 49.8 and 7.8%, respectively. There were significant differences between groups (P≤0.05). However, the genotype frequencies of C/T in healthy individuals and metabolic syndrome patients were 35.3 and 38.3%, respectively. There were no significant differences between groups (P>0.05). FQ-PCR results showed that the KCNJ11 mRNA expression levels in the control and observation groups had no significant differences (P>0.05). However, the results obtained from ELISA analysis revealed that KCNJ11 protein expression level in the observation group was significantly higher than that in the control group (Pmetabolic syndrome in the elderly. Elderly patients with the CC and TT genotypes are more likely to develop metabolic syndrome.

  4. Candidate genes and pathogenesis investigation for sepsis-related acute respiratory distress syndrome based on gene expression profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Yan, Jingjun; He, Xingxing; Zhong, Qiang; Zhan, Chengye; Li, Shusheng

    2016-04-18

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a potentially devastating form of acute inflammatory lung injury as well as a major cause of acute respiratory failure. Although researchers have made significant progresses in elucidating the pathophysiology of this complex syndrome over the years, the absence of a universal detail disease mechanism up until now has led to a series of practical problems for a definitive treatment. This study aimed to predict some genes or pathways associated with sepsis-related ARDS based on a public microarray dataset and to further explore the molecular mechanism of ARDS. A total of 122 up-regulated DEGs and 91 down-regulated differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were obtained. The up- and down-regulated DEGs were mainly involved in functions like mitotic cell cycle and pathway like cell cycle. Protein-protein interaction network of ARDS analysis revealed 20 hub genes including cyclin B1 (CCNB1), cyclin B2 (CCNB2) and topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2A). A total of seven transcription factors including forkhead box protein M1 (FOXM1) and 30 target genes were revealed in the transcription factor-target gene regulation network. Furthermore, co-cited genes including CCNB2-CCNB1 were revealed in literature mining for the relations ARDS related genes. Pathways like mitotic cell cycle were closed related with the development of ARDS. Genes including CCNB1, CCNB2 and TOP2A, as well as transcription factors like FOXM1 might be used as the novel gene therapy targets for sepsis related ARDS.

  5. Exclusion of RAI2 as the causative gene for Nance-Horan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walpole, S M; Ronce, N; Grayson, C; Dessay, B; Yates, J R; Trump, D; Toutain, A

    1999-05-01

    Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is an X-linked condition characterised by congenital cataracts, microphthalmia and/or microcornea, unusual dental morphology, dysmorphic facial features, and developmental delay in some cases. Recent linkage studies have mapped the NHS disease gene to a 3.5-cM interval on Xp22.2 between DXS1053 and DXS443. We previously identified a human homologue of a mouse retinoic-acid-induced gene (RAI2) within the NHS critical flanking interval and have tested the gene as a candidate for Nance-Horan syndrome in nine NHS-affected families. Direct sequencing of the RAI2 gene and predicted promoter region has revealed no mutations in the families screened; RAI2 is therefore unlikely to be associated with NHS.

  6. P63 gene mutations and human developmental syndromes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunner, H.G.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van

    2002-01-01

    The P63 gene is a recently discovered member of the p53 family. While P53 is ubiquitously expressed, p63 is expressed specifically in embryonic ectoderm and in the basal regenerative layers of epithelial tissues in the adult. Complete abrogation of P63 gene function in an animal model points to the

  7. Prospects for Gene Therapy in the Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattazzi, Mario C.; LaFauci, Giuseppe; Brown, W. Ted

    2004-01-01

    Gene therapy is unarguably the definitive way to treat, and possibly cure, genetic diseases. A straightforward concept in theory, in practice it has proven difficult to realize, even when directed to easily accessed somatic cell systems. Gene therapy for diseases in which the central nervous system (CNS) is the target organ presents even greater…

  8. Mutations du gene de la filamine et syndromes malformatifs | Koffi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Filamin is a cytoskeletal protein that occurs in the control of cytoskeleton structure and activity, the modulation of cell shape and migration as well as in the maintaining of cell shape. Mutations in the genes FLNA and FLNB provoke diverse malformative diseases in human. Mutations in the gene FLNA cause four X-Linked ...

  9. Novel mutations in the USH1C gene in Usher syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparisi, María José; García-García, Gema; Jaijo, Teresa; Rodrigo, Regina; Graziano, Claudio; Seri, Marco; Simsek, Tulay; Simsek, Enver; Bernal, Sara; Baiget, Montserrat; Pérez-Garrigues, Herminio; Aller, Elena; Millán, José María

    2010-12-31

    Usher syndrome type I (USH1) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe-profound sensorineural hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa, and vestibular areflexia. To date, five USH1 genes have been identified. One of these genes is Usher syndrome 1C (USH1C), which encodes a protein, harmonin, containing PDZ domains. The aim of the present work was the mutation screening of the USH1C gene in a cohort of 33 Usher syndrome patients, to identify the genetic cause of the disease and to determine the relative involvement of this gene in USH1 pathogenesis in the Spanish population. Thirty-three patients were screened for mutations in the USH1C gene by direct sequencing. Some had already been screened for mutations in the other known USH1 genes (myosin VIIA [MYO7A], cadherin-related 23 [CDH23], protocadherin-related 15 [PCDH15], and Usher syndrome 1G [USH1G]), but no mutation was found. Two novel mutations were found in the USH1C gene: a non-sense mutation (p.C224X) and a frame-shift mutation (p.D124TfsX7). These mutations were found in a homozygous state in two unrelated USH1 patients. In the present study, we detected two novel pathogenic mutations in the USH1C gene. Our results suggest that mutations in USH1C are responsible for 1.5% of USH1 disease in patients of Spanish origin (considering the total cohort of 65 Spanish USH1 patients since 2005), indicating that USH1C is a rare form of USH in this population.

  10. Ghrelin Gene Variants Influence on Metabolic Syndrome Components in Aged Spanish Population

    OpenAIRE

    Mora, Mireia; Adam, Victoria; Palomera, Elisabet; Blesa, Sebastian; Díaz, Gonzalo; Buquet, Xavier; Serra-Prat, Mateu; Martín-Escudero, Juan Carlos; Palanca, Ana; Chaves, Javier Felipe; Puig-Domingo, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of genetic variations within the ghrelin gene on cardiometabolic profile and nutritional status is still not clear in humans, particularly in elderly people. OBJECTIVES: We investigated six SNPs of the ghrelin gene and their relationship with metabolic syndrome (MS) components. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: 824 subjects (413 men/411 women, age 77.31±5.04) participating in the Mataró aging study (n = 310) and the Hortega study (n = 514) were analyzed. Anthropometric variables, ghr...

  11. Novel deletions involving the USH2A gene in patients with Usher syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa

    OpenAIRE

    García-García, Gema; Aller, Elena; Jaijo, Teresa; Aparisi, Maria J.; Larrieu, Lise; Faugère, Valérie; Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; Ayuso, Carmen; Roux, Anne-Francoise; Millán, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present work was to identify and characterize large rearrangements involving the USH2A gene in patients with Usher syndrome and nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa. Methods The multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique combined with a customized array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis was applied to 40 unrelated patients previously screened for point mutations in the USH2A gene in which none or only one pathologic mutation was...

  12. Comprehensive sequence analysis of nine Usher syndrome genes in the UK National Collaborative Usher Study

    OpenAIRE

    Le Quesne Stabej, Polona; Saihan, Zubin; Rangesh, Nell; Steele-Stallard, Heather B; Ambrose, John; Coffey, Alison; Emmerson, Jenny; Haralambous, Elene; Hughes, Yasmin; Steel, Karen P; Luxon, Linda M; Webster, Andrew R; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Background Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disorder comprising retinitis pigmentosa, hearing loss and, in some cases, vestibular dysfunction. It is clinically and genetically heterogeneous with three distinctive clinical types (I?III) and nine Usher genes identified. This study is a comprehensive clinical and genetic analysis of 172 Usher patients and evaluates the contribution of digenic inheritance. Methods The genes MYO7A, USH1C, CDH23, PCDH15, USH1G, USH2A, GPR98, WHRN, CLR...

  13. Coffin-Siris syndrome: a case of an extremely low birthweight infant with severe kyphoscoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzumura, H; Sakurai, K; Kano, K; Ichimura, T

    1996-10-01

    A case of Coffin-Siris syndrome in a male of extremely low birthweight with severe kyphoscoliosis is reported. His birthweight was 965 g, the lowest reported in the world for an infant with this syndrome. Coffin-Siris syndrome is characterized by nail hypoplasia of the fingers and toes, eyebrow hypertrichosis, prominent lips and prenatal or postnatal growth retardation. He was the only case who was mechanically ventilated from birth because of birth asphyxia. He died at 12 days of age because of sepsis, a poor immune system as in other extremely low birthweight infants, and because he easily suffered from upper respiratory infection as a result of Coffin-Siris syndrome. Kyphoscoliosis is suggested as one of the important features in low birthweight cases of Coffin-Siris syndrome in previous reports and in the present case.

  14. Mediterranean dietary pattern and VEGF +405 G/C gene polymorphisms in patients with metabolic syndrome: An aspect of gene-nutrient interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajiluian, Ghazaleh; Abbasalizad Farhangi, Mahdieh; Jahangiry, Leila

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between Mediterranean dietary pattern, anthropometric and metabolic biomarkers and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) +405 G/C gene polymorphism in patient with metabolic syndrome (Mets). In this study 150 patients with Mets and 50 healthy subjects were enrolled. Dietary intakes were evaluated with a semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and Mediterranean dietary quality index (Med-DQI) was assessed. Anthropometric assessments and blood pressure measurement were performed. Biochemical assays including fasting serum glucose (FSG), matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), liver enzymes and lipid profiles were also assessed. Polymorphism of +405 G/C VEGF gene was determined utilizing polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragments length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. Serum high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) was significantly lower and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC) concentrations and FSG were significantly higher in metabolic syndrome patients compared with control group (P consumption of "cholesterol" had significantly upper serum TG; also high consumption of "fish" and "vegetables-fruits" was associated with a significantly lower serum LDL concentrations. In metabolic syndrome patients with CC genotype, mean score of "saturated fatty acid" subgroup was significantly higher compared with other genotypes; whereas, in healthy individuals, mean score of "fruit-vegetable" subgroup in individuals of CC and GG genotype was significantly higher (P<0.05). Our findings indicated a significant relationship between Mediterranean dietary quality index and both anthropometric and metabolic risk factors. We also indicated a higher "saturated fatty acid" intake in CC genotype among metabolic syndrome patients.

  15. Risk factors for low bone density in pediatric nephrotic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Lisa

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Disturbances in bone mineral metabolism and side effects of corticosteroid treatment may cause decreased bone density in patients v.ith nephrotic syndrome (NS. Objectives To compare the prevalence oflow bone mineral density (BMD in children with and 'Without NS and to assess the effect of corticosteroid treatment on bone density in NS patients.  Methods We conducted a retrospective, cohort study in children aged 5-18 years diagnosed 'With NS for more than 2 months prior to data collection, and in children v.ithout NS as a control. BMD was assessed on calcaneal bone wlith ultrasound bone densitometry. Serum calcium, albumin, creatinine and phosphate levels were also assessed. Results The prevalence of low BMD was significantly higher in NS patients than nonNS subjects, 73.3% (22 in 30 vs. 33% (11 in 33, respectively. The prevalence ratio was 6.3 (95% CI 2.1 to 18.9. NS patients had lower serum calcium levels, With mean difference of -0.17 (95% CI -0.27 to -0.07 mMollL, P<0.009, and lower serum albumin, with mean difference of  -0.88 (95% CI -1.27 to -0.49 gIL; Plow BMD. Steroid-resistant and steroid-dependent patients had lower BMD than steroid-sensitive subjects (P=0.02. There was also a significant correlation between the onset of corticosteroid treatment and BMD (r=O.3; P=0.02. Conclusions NS patients had higher risk for low BMD compared to normal subjects. Response to steroid treatment influences the severity of impaired bone density.

  16. Identification of a Variety of Mutations in Cancer Predisposition Genes in Patients With Suspected Lynch Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurgelun, Matthew B; Allen, Brian; Kaldate, Rajesh R; Bowles, Karla R; Judkins, Thaddeus; Kaushik, Praveen; Roa, Benjamin B; Wenstrup, Richard J; Hartman, Anne-Renee; Syngal, Sapna

    2015-09-01

    Multigene panels are commercially available tools for hereditary cancer risk assessment that allow for next-generation sequencing of numerous genes in parallel. However, it is not clear if these panels offer advantages over traditional genetic testing. We investigated the number of cancer predisposition gene mutations identified by parallel sequencing in individuals with suspected Lynch syndrome. We performed germline analysis with a 25-gene, next-generation sequencing panel using DNA from 1260 individuals who underwent clinical genetic testing for Lynch syndrome from 2012 through 2013. All patients had a history of Lynch syndrome-associated cancer and/or polyps. We classified all identified germline alterations for pathogenicity and calculated the frequencies of pathogenic mutations and variants of uncertain clinical significance (VUS). We also analyzed data on patients' personal and family history of cancer, including fulfillment of clinical guidelines for genetic testing. Of the 1260 patients, 1112 met National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) criteria for Lynch syndrome testing (88%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 86%-90%). Multigene panel testing identified 114 probands with Lynch syndrome mutations (9.0%; 95% CI, 7.6%-10.8%) and 71 with mutations in other cancer predisposition genes (5.6%; 95% CI, 4.4%-7.1%). Fifteen individuals had mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2; 93% of these met the NCCN criteria for Lynch syndrome testing and 33% met NCCN criteria for BRCA1 and BRCA2 analysis (P = .0017). An additional 9 individuals carried mutations in other genes linked to high lifetime risks of cancer (5 had mutations in APC, 3 had bi-allelic mutations in MUTYH, and 1 had a mutation in STK11); all of these patients met NCCN criteria for Lynch syndrome testing. A total of 479 individuals had 1 or more VUS (38%; 95% CI, 35%-41%). In individuals with suspected Lynch syndrome, multigene panel testing identified high-penetrance mutations in cancer predisposition genes, many

  17. Mutation Profile of the CDH23 Gene in 56 Probands with Usher Syndrome Type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, A.; Jaijo, T.; Aller, E.; Millan, J.M.; Carney, C.; Usami, S.; Moller, C.; Kimberling, W.J.

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the human gene encoding cadherin 23 (CDH23) cause Usher syndrome type 1D (USH1D) and nonsyndromic hearing loss. Individuals with Usher syndrome type I have profound congenital deafness, vestibular areflexia and usually begin to exhibit signs of RP in early adolescence. In the present study, we carried out the mutation analysis in all 69 exons of the CDH23 gene in 56 Usher type 1 probands already screened for mutations in MYO7A. A total of 18 of 56 subjects (32.1%) were observed to have one or two CDH23 variants that are presumed to be pathologic. Twenty one different pathologic genome variants were observed of which 15 were novel. Out of a total of 112 alleles, 31 (27.7%) were considered pathologic. Based on our results it is estimated that about 20% of patients with Usher syndrome type I have CDH23 mutations. PMID:18429043

  18. A Novel Fibrillin-1 Gene Mutation Leading to Marfan Syndrome in a Korean Girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Hyo-Kyoung; Nam, Myung-Hyun; Ha, Kee-Soo; Rhie, Young-Jun; Lee, Kee-Hyoung

    2017-03-01

    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder caused by a connective tissue defect. A nine-year-old girl was referred to our pediatric endocrinology clinic for tall stature. Physical examination revealed a lens dislocation with strabismus, high palate, positive wrist and thumb signs, joint hypermobility, and pes planus. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed dilatation of the aortic root. She was diagnosed with Marfan syndrome based on the revised Ghent diagnostic criteria. Molecular investigation identified a heterozygous c.2810G >A variation in the FBN1 gene in the patient, but not in her parents. To our knowledge, this sequence variant has been reported as a polymorphism (rs113602180), but it is the first report identifying it as the genetic cause of Marfan syndrome. We hypothesize that this de novo novel missense FBN1 mutation disrupts fibrillin-1 function and is probably involved in the development of Marfan syndrome in this patient. © 2017 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  19. Prader-Willi Syndrome and Schaaf-Yang Syndrome: Neurodevelopmental Diseases Intersecting at the MAGEL2 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Fountain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by neonatal hypotonia, developmental delay/intellectual disability, and characteristic feeding behaviors with failure to thrive during infancy; followed by hyperphagia and excessive weight gain later in childhood. Individuals with PWS also manifest complex behavioral phenotypes. Approximately 25% meet criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD. PWS is caused by the absence of paternally expressed, maternally silenced genes at chromosome 15q11-q13. MAGEL2 is one of five protein-coding genes in the PWS-critical domain. Truncating point mutations of the paternal allele of MAGEL2 cause Schaaf-Yang syndrome, which has significant phenotypic overlap with PWS, but is also clinically distinct; based on the presence of joint contractures, and a particularly high prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (up to 75% of affected individuals. The clinical and molecular overlap between PWS and Schaaf-Yang syndrome, but also their distinguishing features provide insight into the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying both disorders.

  20. Respiratory and sleep disorders in female children with atypical Rett syndrome caused by mutations in the CDKL5 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagebeuk, Eveline E O; van den Bossche, Renilde A S; de Weerd, Al W

    2013-05-01

    In female children with drug-resistant seizures and developmental delay from birth, atypical Rett syndrome caused by mutations in the CDKL5 gene should be considered. Several clinical features resemble classic Rett syndrome. Respiratory and sleep abnormalities are frequently present in Rett syndrome, whereas little is known in patients with CDKL5 mutations. In four genetically confirmed female patients with CDKL5 mutations (age range 2-15 y), the presence of breathing and sleep abnormalities was evaluated using the validated Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children and polysomnography (PSG). The Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children indicated disorders of initiating and maintaining sleep, daytime somnolence, and sleep breathing disorders. In one patient, PSG showed central apnoeas during sleep: her total apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) was 4.9, of which the central AHI was 3.4/h. When awake, central apnoeas were present in two of the four female children (central AHI 28/h and 41/h respectively), all preceded by hyperventilation. PSG showed low rapid eye movement (REM) sleep (9.7-18.3%), frequent awakenings, and low sleep efficiency (range 59-78%). Episodic hyperventilation followed by central apnoeas was present while awake in two of four patients. This may indicate failure of brainstem respiratory centres. In addition, low REM sleep, frequent arousals (not caused by apnoeas/seizures), and low sleep efficiency were present. Similar to Rett syndrome, in patients with CDKL5 mutations PSG seems warranted to evaluate breathing and sleep disturbances. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2012 Mac Keith Press.

  1. Catecholamine-related gene expression in blood correlates with tic severity in tourette syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunther, Joan; Tian, Yingfang; Stamova, Boryana; Lit, Lisa; Corbett, Blythe; Ander, Brad; Zhan, Xinhua; Jickling, Glen; Bos-Veneman, Netty; Liu, Da; Hoekstra, Pieter; Sharp, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a heritable disorder characterized by tics that are decreased in some patients by treatment with alpha adrenergic agonists and dopamine receptor blockers. Thus, this study examines the relationship between catecholamine gene expression in blood and tic severity. TS

  2. Gene variants of unknown clinical significance in Lynch syndrome. An introduction for clinicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijmons, Rolf H.; Greenblatt, Marc S.; Genuardi, Maurizio

    Clinicians referring patients for genetic testing for Lynch syndrome will sooner or later receive results for DNA Mismatch Repair (MMR) genes reporting DNA changes that are unclear from a clinical point of view. These changes are referred to as variants of unknown, or unclear, clinical significance

  3. Development of lymphoma in Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS) and its relationship to Fas gene mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poppema, Sibrand; Maggio, Ewerton; van den Berg, Anke

    Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS) is generally the result of a mutation in genes associated with apoptosis, like Fas, Fas ligand, Casp 8 and Casp 10. As a result, the normal homeostasis of T- and B-lymphocytes is disturbed and a proliferation of polyclonal T lymphocytes occurs. This

  4. Gene, Brain, and Behavior Relationships in Fragile X Syndrome: Evidence from Neuroimaging Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightbody, Amy A.; Reiss, Allan L.

    2009-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FraX) remains the most common inherited cause of intellectual disability and provides a valuable model for studying gene-brain-behavior relationships. Over the past 15 years, structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have emerged with the goal of better understanding the neural pathways contributing to the…

  5. Fanconi syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Toni-Fanconi syndrome ... Fanconi syndrome can be caused by faulty genes, or it may result later in life due to kidney damage. Sometimes the cause of Fanconi syndrome is unknown. Common causes of Fanconi syndrome in ...

  6. Association of arginine vasopressin receptor 1a gene polymorphisms with hepatorenal syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.; Luo, X.; Ye, J.; Liu, S.; Miu, L.; Bao, J.; Wang, F.; Yu, Z.

    2017-01-01

    To assess the association of arginine vasopressin receptor 1a gene single nucleotide polymorphisms with type I hepatorenal syndrome. Methods: The case-control study was conducted at the Hangzhou City Xixi Hospital, Hangzhou, China, from January 2012 to June 2014, and comprised patients with type I hepatorenal syndrome and individuals with cirrhosis who acted as the control group. Arginine vasopressin receptor 1a gene rs113481894 locus single nucleotide polymorphisms were analysed by high-resolution melting methods. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 17. Results: Of the 60 participants, 28(46.7%) were in the hepatorenal syndrome group and 32(53.3%) were controls. The mean age was 42.21+-11.30years in the hepatorenal syndrome group and 43.69+-12.60 in the control group (p=0.64). Mean total bilirubin, albumin and prothrombin activity levels were 154.76+-51.58, 49.30+-24.67 and 33.42+-3.69 in the hepatorenal syndrome group compared to 181.26+-64.46, 41.78+-17.52 and 32.98+-4.81 among controls (p=0.09, p=0.18 and p=0.70). Statistically significant differences were found in the distributions of arginine vasopressin receptor 1a gene rs113481894 locus T allele between type I hepatorenal syndrome patients and the control group (odds ratio= 2.230; p= 0.040). Conclusion: T allele located at arginine vasopressin receptor 1a receptor promoter rs113481894 locus may be associated with the pathogenesis of type I hepatorenal syndrome. (author)

  7. Dutch validation of the low anterior resection syndrome score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupkens, B J P; Breukink, S O; Olde Reuver Of Briel, C; Tanis, P J; de Noo, M E; van Duijvendijk, P; van Westreenen, H L; Dekker, J W T; Chen, T Y T; Juul, T

    2018-04-21

    The aim of this study was to validate the Dutch translation of the low anterior resection syndrome (LARS) score in a population of Dutch rectal cancer patients. Patients who underwent surgery for rectal cancer received the LARS score questionnaire, a single quality of life (QoL) category question and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 questionnaire. A subgroup of patients received the LARS score twice to assess the test-retest reliability. A total of 165 patients were included in the analysis, identified in six Dutch centres. The response rate was 62.0%. The percentage of patients who reported 'major LARS' was 59.4%. There was a high proportion of patients with a perfect or moderate fit between the QoL category question and the LARS score, showing a good convergent validity. The LARS score was able to discriminate between patients with or without neoadjuvant radiotherapy (P = 0.003), between total and partial mesorectal excision (P = 0.008) and between age groups (P = 0.039). There was a statistically significant association between a higher LARS score and an impaired function on the global QoL subscale and the physical, role, emotional and social functioning subscales of the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire. The test-retest reliability of the LARS score was good, with an interclass correlation coefficient of 0.79. The good psychometric properties of the Dutch version of the LARS score are comparable overall to the earlier validations in other countries. Therefore, the Dutch translation can be considered to be a valid tool for assessing LARS in Dutch rectal cancer patients. Colorectal Disease © 2018 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  8. Finding new genes for non-syndromic hearing loss through an in silico prioritization study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Accetturo

    Full Text Available At present, 51 genes are already known to be responsible for Non-Syndromic hereditary Hearing Loss (NSHL, but the knowledge of 121 NSHL-linked chromosomal regions brings to the hypothesis that a number of disease genes have still to be uncovered. To help scientists to find new NSHL genes, we built a gene-scoring system, integrating Gene Ontology, NCBI Gene and Map Viewer databases, which prioritizes the candidate genes according to their probability to cause NSHL. We defined a set of candidates and measured their functional similarity with respect to the disease gene set, computing a score ( S S M avg that relies on the assumption that functionally related genes might contribute to the same (disease phenotype. A Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, comparing the pair-wise distribution on the disease gene set with the distribution on the remaining human genes, provided a statistical assessment of this assumption. We found at a p-value 0.99. The twenty top-scored genes were finally examined to evaluate their possible involvement in NSHL. We found that half of them are known to be expressed in human inner ear or cochlea and are mainly involved in remodeling and organization of actin formation and maintenance of the cilia and the endocochlear potential. These findings strongly indicate that our metric was able to suggest excellent NSHL candidates to be screened in patients and controls for causative mutations.

  9. Isolated and combined dystonia syndromes - an update on new genes and their phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, B; Bhatia, K P

    2015-04-01

    Recent consensus on the definition, phenomenology and classification of dystonia centres around phenomenology and guides our diagnostic approach for the heterogeneous group of dystonias. Current terminology classifies conditions where dystonia is the sole motor feature (apart from tremor) as 'isolated dystonia', while 'combined dystonia' refers to dystonias with other accompanying movement disorders. This review highlights recent advances in the genetics of some isolated and combined dystonic syndromes. Some genes, such as ANO3, GNAL and CIZ1, have been discovered for isolated dystonia, but they are probably not a common cause of classic cervical dystonia. Conversely, the phenotype associated with TUBB4A mutations expanded from that of isolated dystonia to a syndrome of hypomyelination with atrophy of the basal ganglia and cerebellum (H-ABC syndrome). Similarly, ATP1A3 mutations cause a wide phenotypic spectrum ranging from rapid-onset dystonia-parkinsonism to alternating hemiplegia of childhood. Other entities entailing dystonia-parkinsonism include dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome (SLC63 mutations); dopa-responsive dystonias; young-onset parkinsonism (PARKIN, PINK1 and DJ-1 mutations); PRKRA mutations; and X-linked TAF1 mutations, which rarely can also manifest in women. Clinical and genetic heterogeneity also characterizes myoclonus-dystonia, which includes not only the classical phenotype associated with epsilon-sarcoglycan mutations but rarely also presentation of ANO3 gene mutations, TITF1 gene mutations typically underlying benign hereditary chorea, and some dopamine synthesis pathway conditions due to GCH1 and TH mutations. Thus, new genes are being recognized for isolated dystonia, and the phenotype of known genes is broadening and now involves different combined dystonia syndromes. © 2015 EAN.

  10. GDNF gene is associated with tourette syndrome in a family study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas-Fernández, Ismael; Gómez-Garre, Pilar; Madruga-Garrido, Marcos; Bernal-Bernal, Inmaculada; Bonilla-Toribio, Marta; Martín-Rodríguez, Juan Francisco; Cáceres-Redondo, María Teresa; Vargas-González, Laura; Carrillo, Fátima; Pascual, Alberto; Tischfield, Jay A; King, Robert A; Heiman, Gary A; Mir, Pablo

    2015-07-01

    Tourette syndrome is a disorder characterized by persistent motor and vocal tics, and frequently accompanied by the comorbidities attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Impaired synaptic neurotransmission has been implicated in its pathogenesis. Our aim was to investigate the association of 28 candidate genes, including genes related to synaptic neurotransmission and neurotrophic factors, with Tourette syndrome. We genotyped 506 polymorphisms in a discovery cohort from the United States composed of 112 families and 47 unrelated singletons with Tourette syndrome (201 cases and 253 controls). Genes containing significant polymorphisms were imputed to fine-map the signal(s) to potential causal variants. Allelic analyses in Tourette syndrome cases were performed to check the role in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder comorbidities. Target polymorphisms were further studied in a replication cohort from southern Spain composed of 37 families and three unrelated singletons (44 cases and 73 controls). The polymorphism rs3096140 in glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene (GDNF) was significant in the discovery cohort after correction (P = 1.5 × 10(-4) ). No linkage disequilibrium was found between rs3096140 and other functional variants in the gene. We selected rs3096140 as target polymorphism, and the association was confirmed in the replication cohort (P = 0.01). No association with any comorbidity was found. As a conclusion, a common genetic variant in GDNF is associated with Tourette syndrome. A defect in the production of GDNF could compromise the survival of parvalbumin interneurons, thus altering the excitatory/inhibitory balance in the corticostriatal circuitry. Validation of this variant in other family cohorts is necessary. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  11. GDNF Gene Is Associated With Tourette Syndrome in a Family Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas-Fernández, Ismael; Gómez-Garre, Pilar; Madruga-Garrido, Marcos; Bernal-Bernal, Inmaculada; Bonilla-Toribio, Marta; Martín-Rodríguez, Juan Francisco; Cáceres-Redondo, María Teresa; Vargas-González, Laura; Carrillo, Fátima; Pascual, Alberto; Tischfield, Jay A.; King, Robert A.; Heiman, Gary A.; Mir, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Background Tourette syndrome is a disorder characterized by persistent motor and vocal tics, and frequently accompanied by the comorbidities attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Impaired synaptic neurotransmission has been implicated in its pathogenesis. Our aim was to investigate the association of 28 candidate genes, including genes related to synaptic neurotransmission and neurotrophic factors, with Tourette syndrome. Methods We genotyped 506 polymorphisms in a discovery cohort from the United States composed of 112 families and 47 unrelated singletons with Tourette syndrome (201 cases and 253 controls). Genes containing significant polymorphisms were imputed to fine-map the signal(s) to potential causal variants. Allelic analyses in Tourette syndrome cases were performed to check the role in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder comorbidities. Target polymorphisms were further studied in a replication cohort from southern Spain composed of 37 families and three unrelated singletons (44 cases and 73 controls). Results The polymorphism rs3096140 in glial cell line–derived neurotrophic factor gene (GDNF) was significant in the discovery cohort after correction (P = 1.5 × 10−4). No linkage disequilibrium was found between rs3096140 and other functional variants in the gene. We selected rs3096140 as target polymorphism, and the association was confirmed in the replication cohort (P = 0.01). No association with any comorbidity was found. Conclusions As a conclusion, a common genetic variant in GDNF is associated with Tourette syndrome. A defect in the production of GDNF could compromise the survival of parvalbumin interneurons, thus altering the excitatory/inhibitory balance in the corticostriatal circuitry. Validation of this variant in other family cohorts is necessary. PMID:26096985

  12. KANSL1 gene disruption associated with the full clinical spectrum of 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno-Igoa, María; Hernández-Charro, Blanca; Bengoa-Alonso, Amaya; Pérez-Juana-del-Casal, Aranzazu; Romero-Ibarra, Carlos; Nieva-Echebarria, Beatriz; Ramos-Arroyo, María Antonia

    2015-01-01

    Background Chromosome 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome is a multisystem genomic disorder caused by a recurrent 600-kb-long deletion, or haploinsufficiency of the chromatin modifier gene KANSL1, which maps to that region. Patients with KANSL1 intragenic mutations have been reported to display the major clinical features of 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome. However, they did not exhibit the full clinical spectrum of this disorder, which might indicate that an additional gene or genes, located in ...

  13. [Application of MALDI-TOF-MS in gene testing for non-syndromic hearing loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yun; Jiang, Dan; Feng, Da-fei; Jin, Dong-dong; Wu, Xiao-hui; Ding, Yan-li; Zou, Jing

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the feasibility of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) , according to the genetic test of non-syndromic hearing loss (NSHL), and check using the direct sequencing. Peripheral blood was collected from 454 NSHL patients. DNA samples were extracted and 20 loci of the four common disease-causing genes were analysed by MALDI-TOF-MS, including GJB2 (35delG, 167delT, 176_191del16, 235delC, 299_300delAT ), GJB3 (538C→T, 547G→A), SLC26A4 (281C→T, 589G→A, IVS7-2A→G, 1174A→T, 1226G→A, 1229C→T, IVS15+5G→A, 1975G→C, 2027T→A, 2162C→T, 2168A→G), and mitochondrial 12S rRNA (1494C→T, 1555A→G). Direct sequencing was also used to analyse the aforementioned 20 loci in order to validate the accuracy of MALDI-TOF-MS. Among the 454 patients, 166 cases (36.56%) of disease-causing mutations were detected, which included 69 cases (21.15%) of GJB2 gene mutation, four cases (0.88%) of GJB3 gene mutation, 64 cases (14.10%) of SLC26A4 gene mutation, and three cases (0.66%) of mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene mutation. Moreover, the results obtained from direct sequencing and MALDI-TOF-MS were consistent, and the results showed that the two methods were consistent. The MALDI-TOF-MS detection method was designed based on the hearing loss-related mutation hotspots seen in the Chinese population, and it has a high detection rate for NSHL related mutations. In comparison to the conventional detection methods, MALDI-TOF-MS has the following advantages: more detection sites, greater coverage, accurate, high throughput and low cost. Therefore, this method is capable of satisfying the needs of clinical detection for hearing impairment and it is suitable for large-scale implementation.

  14. Multiple Low Energy Long Bone Fractures in the Setting of Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Beckmann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rothmund-Thomson syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive genodermatosis characterized by a poikilodermatous rash starting in infancy as well as various skeletal anomalies, juvenile cataracts, and predisposition to certain cancers. Although Rothmund-Thomson syndrome is associated with diminished bone mineral density in addition to multiple skeletal abnormalities, there are few reports of the association with stress fractures or pathologic fractures in low energy trauma or delayed healing of fractures. Presented is a case of a young adult male with Rothmund-Thomson syndrome presenting with multiple episodes of long bone fractures caused by low energy trauma with one of the fractures exhibiting significantly delayed healing. The patient was also found to have an asymptomatic stress fracture of the lower extremity, another finding of Rothmund-Thomson syndrome rarely reported in the literature. A thorough review of the literature and comprehensive presentation of Rothmund-Thomson syndrome is provided in conjunction with our case.

  15. Roles of the sister chromatid cohesion apparatus in gene expression, development, and human syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsett, Dale

    2006-01-01

    The sister chromatid cohesion apparatus mediates physical pairing of duplicated chromosomes. This pairing is essential for appropriate distribution of chromosomes into the daughter cells upon cell division. Recent evidence shows that the cohesion apparatus, which is a significant structural component of chromosomes during interphase, also affects gene expression and development. The Cornelia de Lange (CdLS) and Roberts/SC phocomelia (RBS/SC) genetic syndromes in humans are caused by mutations affecting components of the cohesion apparatus. Studies in Drosophila suggest that effects on gene expression are most likely responsible for developmental alterations in CdLS. Effects on chromatid cohesion are apparent in RBS/SC syndrome, but data from yeast and Drosophila point to the likelihood that changes in expression of genes located in heterochromatin could contribute to the developmental deficits. PMID:16819604

  16. The gene for the Ellis-van Creveld syndrome is located on chromosome 4p16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polymeropoulos, M.H.; Ide, S.E. [National Institute of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Wright, M. [Univ. of Newcastle Upon Tyne (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by disproportionate dwarfism, polydactyly, and congenital heart disease. This rare disorder is found with increased frequency among the Old Order Amish community in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. We have used linkage analysis to localize the gene responsible for the EVC phenotype in nine interrelated Amish pedigrees and three unrelated families from Mexico, Ecuador, and Brazil. We now report the linkage for the Ellisvan Creveld syndrome gene to markers on the distal short arm of human chromosome 4, with Z{sub max} = 6.91 at {theta} = 0.02 for marker HOX7, in a region proximal to the FGFR3 gene responsible for the achondroplasia phenotype. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Transitional lumbosacral vertebrae and low back pain: diagnostic pitfalls and management of Bertolotti's syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida,Daniel Benzecry de; Mattei,Tobias Alécio; Sória,Marília Grando; Prandini,Mirto Nelso; Leal,André Giacomelli; Milano,Jerônimo Buzzeti; Ramina,Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Bertolotti's syndrome is a spine disorder characterized by the occurrence of a congenital lumbar transverse mega-apophysis in a transitional vertebral body that usually articulates with the sacrum or the iliac bone. It has been considered a possible cause of low back pain. METHOD: We analyzed the cases of Bertolotti's syndrome that failed clinical treatment and reviewed the literature concerning this subject. RESULTS: Five patients in our series had severe low back pain due to the ...

  18. [Severe type A insulin resistance syndrome due to a mutation in the insulin receptor gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, P; Colino-Alcol, E; Grasso, V; Barbetti, F; Argente, J

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance syndromes without lipodystrophy are an infrequent and heterogeneous group of disorders with variable clinical phenotypes, associated with hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. The three conditions related to mutations in the insulin receptor gene are leprechaunism or Donohue syndrome, Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome, and Type A syndrome. A case is presented on a patient diagnosed with type A insulin resistance, defined by the triad of extreme insulin resistance, acanthosis nigricans, and hyperandrogenism, carrying a heterozygous mutation in exon 19 of the insulin receptor gene coding for its tyrosine kinase domain that is crucial for the catalytic activity of the receptor. The molecular basis of the syndrome is reviewed, focusing on the structure-function relationships of the insulin receptor, knowing that the criteria for survival are linked to residual insulin receptor function. It is also pointed out that, although type A insulin resistance appears to represent a somewhat less severe condition, these patients have a high morbidity and their treatment is still unsatisfactory. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Three cases with L1 syndrome and two novel mutations in the L1CAM gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Rosario; Ley-Martos, Miriam; Gutiérrez, Gema; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Felicidad; Arroyo, Diego; Mora-López, Francisco

    2015-11-01

    Mutations in the L1CAM gene have been identified in the following various X-linked neurological disorders: congenital hydrocephalus; mental retardation, aphasia, shuffling gait, and adducted thumbs (MASA) syndrome; spastic paraplegia; and agenesis of the corpus callosum. These conditions are currently considered different phenotypes of a single entity known as L1 syndrome. We present three families with L1 syndrome. Sequencing of the L1CAM gene allowed the identification of the following mutations involved: a known splicing mutation (c.3531-12G>A) and two novel ones: a missense mutation (c.1754A>C; p.Asp585Ala) and a nonsense mutation (c.3478C>T; p.Gln1160Stop). The number of affected males and carrier females identified in a relatively small population suggests that L1 syndrome may be under-diagnosed. L1 syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intellectual disability or mental retardation in children, especially when other signs such as hydrocephalus or adducted thumbs are present.

  20. Analysis of Polymorphism of Angiotensin System Genes (ACE, AGTR1, and AGT) and Gene ITGB3 in Patients with Arterial Hypertension in Combination with Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotova, T Yu; Kubanova, A P; Azova, M M; Aissa, A Ait; Gigani, O O; Frolov, V A

    2016-07-01

    Changes in the frequencies of genotypes and mutant alleles of ACE, AGTR1, AGT, and ITGB3 genes were analyzed in patients with arterial hypertension coupled with metabolic syndrome (N=15) and compared with population data and corresponding parameters in patients with isolated hypertension (N=15). Increased frequency of genotype ID of ACE gene (hypertension predictor) was confirmed for both groups. In case of isolated hypertension, M235M genotype (gene AGT) was more frequent, in case of hypertension combined with metabolic syndrome, the frequency of genotypes A1166C and C1166C of the gene AGTR1 was higher in comparison with population data. Comparison of mutant allele frequencies in the two groups showed that at the 90% significance level allele T of the AGT gene was more frequent in hypertension coupled with metabolic syndrome (OR=1.26) and genotype A1166A of the AGTR1 gene was more frequent in the group with isolated hypertension.

  1. Surfactant protein B deficiency and gene mutations for neonatal respiratory distress syndrome in China Han ethnic population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiaojuan; Meng, Fanping; wang, Yan; Xie, Lu; Kong, Xiangyong; Feng, Zhichun

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the SP-B deficiency and gene mutations in exon 4 is associated with neonatal RDS in China Han ethnic population. Methods: The study population consisted of 40 neonates with RDS and 40 neonates with other diseases as control in China Han ethnic population. We Compared SP-B expression in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid with immunoblotting, and analyzed mutations in the SP-B gene with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gene sequencing. Results: In RDS group, low mature Surfactant protein B was found in both lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in 8 neonates. In control group, only 4 neonates with low mature Surfactant protein B in both lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In RDS group, 20 neonates were found to have mutations in exon 4, 12 homozygous mutations with C/C genotype and 8 heterozygous mutations with C/T genotype in surfactant protein B gene+1580 polymorphism. There were 8 cases mutations in control group, 1 in C/C and 7 in C/T genotype. The frequency of homozygotes with C/C genotype was 0.3 and frequency of heterozygotes with C/T genotype was 0.02 in RDS group. In control group, frequency of homozygotes with C/C genotype was 0.025 and frequency of heterozygote with C/T genotype was 0.175. Conclusion: Low mature Surfactant protein B is associated with the pathogenesis of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in China Han ethnic population. Mutations in exon 4 of the surfactant protein B gene demonstrate an association between homozygous mutations with C/C genotype in SP-B gene and neonatal RDS. PMID:23330012

  2. Numerous BAF complex genes are mutated in Coffin-Siris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Noriko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2014-09-01

    Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS; OMIM#135900) is a rare congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by intellectual disability, coarse face, hypertrichosis, and absence/hypoplasia of the fifth digits' nails. As the majority of patients are sporadic, an autosomal dominant inheritance model has been postulated. Recently, whole exome sequencing (WES) emerged as a comprehensive analytical method for rare variants. We applied WES on five CSS patients and found two de novo mutations in SMARCB1. SMARCB1 was completely sequenced in 23 CSS patients and the mutations were found in two more patients. As SMARCB1 encodes a subunit of the BAF complex functioning as a chromatin remodeling factor, mutations in 15 other subunit genes may cause CSS and thus were analyzed in 23 CSS patients. We identified heterozygous mutations in either of six genes (SMARCA4, SMARCB1, SMARCA2, SMARCE1, ARID1A, and ARID1B) in 20 out of 23 CSS patients. The patient with a SMARCA2 mutation was re-evaluated and identified as having Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome (OMIM#601358), which is similar to but different from CSS. Additionally, 49 more CSS patients were analyzed as a second cohort. Together with the first cohort, 37 out of 71 (22 plus 49) patients were found to have a mutation in either one of five BAF complex genes. Furthermore, two CSS patients were reported to have a PHF6 abnormality, which can also cause Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome (OMIM#301900), an X-linked intellectual disability syndrome with epilepsy and endocrine abnormalities. The current list of mutated genes in CSS is far from being complete and analysis of more patients is required. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Defect in IgV gene somatic hypermutation in common variable immuno-deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Y; Gupta, N; Le Deist, F; Garcia, C; Fischer, A; Weill, J C; Reynaud, C A

    1998-10-27

    Common Variable Immuno-Deficiency (CVID) is the most common symptomatic primary antibody-deficiency syndrome, but the basic immunologic defects underlying this syndrome are not well defined. We report here that among eight patients studied (six CVID and two hypogammaglobulinemic patients with recurrent infections), there is in two CVID patients a dramatic reduction in Ig V gene somatic hypermutation with 40-75% of IgG transcripts totally devoid of mutations in the circulating memory B cell compartment. Functional assays of the T cell compartment point to an intrinsic B cell defect in the process of antibody affinity maturation in these two cases.

  4. Long QT interval in Turner syndrome: a high prevalence of LQTS gene mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trolle, Christian

    Objective: QT interval prolongation of unknown aetiology is common in Turner syndrome (TS). This study set out to explore the presence of known pathogenic long QT (LQT) mutations in TS and to examine the corrected QT interval (QTc) over time and relate the findings to the TS phenotype. Methods......QTc). The prevalence of mutations in genes related to Long QT syndrome (LQTS) was determined in females with TS and a QTc >432.0 milliseconds (ms). Echocardiographic assessment of aortic valve morphology, 24-hour blood pressures and blood samples were done. Results: The mean hQTc in females with TS (414.0±25.5 ms...

  5. A possible genetic association with chronic fatigue in primary Sjögren's syndrome: a candidate gene study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norheim, Katrine Brække; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Nordmark, Gunnel; Harboe, Erna; Gøransson, Lasse; Brun, Johan G; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie; Jonsson, Roland; Omdal, Roald

    2014-02-01

    Fatigue is prevalent and disabling in primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS). Results from studies in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) indicate that genetic variation may influence fatigue. The aim of this study was to investigate single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variations in pSS patients with high and low fatigue. A panel of 85 SNPs in 12 genes was selected based on previous studies in CFS. A total of 207 pSS patients and 376 healthy controls were genotyped. One-hundred and ninety-three patients and 70 SNPs in 11 genes were available for analysis after quality control. Patients were dichotomized based on fatigue visual analogue scale (VAS) scores, with VAS fatigue" (n = 53) and VAS ≥50 denominated "high fatigue" (n = 140). We detected signals of association with pSS for one SNP in SLC25A40 (unadjusted p = 0.007) and two SNPs in PKN1 (both p = 0.03) in our pSS case versus control analysis. The association with SLC25A40 was stronger when only pSS high fatigue patients were analysed versus controls (p = 0.002). One SNP in PKN1 displayed an association in the case-only analysis of pSS high fatigue versus pSS low fatigue (p = 0.005). This candidate gene study in pSS did reveal a trend for associations between genetic variation in candidate genes and fatigue. The results will need to be replicated. More research on genetic associations with fatigue is warranted, and future trials should include larger cohorts and multicentre collaborations with sharing of genetic material to increase the statistical power.

  6. Genetic Alterations within the DENND1A Gene in Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Mette B; Nielsen, Michael F B; Brusgaard, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    sequencing. SNP genotyping was tested by allelic discrimination in real-time PCR in the additional patients and controls. Sequencing of the DENND1A gene identified eight SNPs; seven were not known to be associated with any diseases. One missense SNP was detected (rs189947178, A/C), potentially altering......Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the most common endocrine disease among premenopausal women, is caused by both genes and environment. We and others previously reported association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the DENND1A gene and PCOS. We therefore sequenced the DENND1A gene...... and FG-score or PCOS diagnosis, this could be a false positive finding. In conclusion, sequence analysis of the DENND1A gene of patients with PCOS did not identify alterations that alone could be responsible for the PCOS pathogenesis, but a missense SNP (rs189947178) was identified in one patient...

  7. Identification of a novel CLRN1 gene mutation in Usher syndrome type 3: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Hidekane; Oshikawa, Chie; Nakayama, Jun; Moteki, Hideaki; Usami, Shin-Ichi

    2015-05-01

    This study examines the CLRN1 gene mutation analysis in Japanese patients who were diagnosed with Usher syndrome type 3 (USH3) on the basis of clinical findings. Genetic analysis using massively parallel DNA sequencing (MPS) was conducted to search for 9 causative USH genes in 2 USH3 patients. We identified the novel pathogenic mutation in the CLRN1 gene in 2 patients. The missense mutation was confirmed by functional prediction software and segregation analysis. Both patients were diagnosed as having USH3 caused by the CLRN1 gene mutation. This is the first report of USH3 with a CLRN1 gene mutation in Asian populations. Validating the presence of clinical findings is imperative for properly differentiating among USH subtypes. In addition, mutation screening using MPS enables the identification of causative mutations in USH. The clinical diagnosis of this phenotypically variable disease can then be confirmed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Patients with rett syndrome sustain low-energy fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roende, Gitte; Ravn, Kirstine; Fuglsang, Kathrine

    2011-01-01

    We present the first case-control study addressing both fracture occurrence and fracture mechanisms in Rett syndrome (RTT). Two previous studies have shown increased fracture risk in RTT. This was also our hypothesis regarding the Danish RTT population. Therefore, we investigated risk factors...

  9. The relationship between low bone mass and metabolic syndrome in Korean women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, D-K; Choi, H-J

    2010-03-01

    We examined the relationship between low bond mass and metabolic syndrome in 2,475 Korean women. After adjustment for all covariates, mean vertebral BMD was significantly lower in women with metabolic syndrome. Moreover, age and weight adjusted vertebral BMD was significantly decreased with additional components of the metabolic syndrome. Obesity-induced chronic inflammation is a key component in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. It has been suggested that proinflammatory cytokines and low-grade systemic inflammation activate bone resorption and may lead to reduced bone mineral density (BMD). The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between low bone mass and metabolic syndrome in Korean women. This is a cross-sectional study of 2,548 women aged 18 years and over who had visited the Health Promotion Center. Physical examination and laboratory tests were performed. Vertebral BMD was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Metabolic syndrome was defined by National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Among 2,475 women, 511 (21.0%) women had metabolic syndrome. Women with abdominal obesity or hypertriglyceridemia had significantly lower vertebral BMD than women without respective components after adjustment for age, weight, and height. After adjustment for all covariates, mean vertebral BMD was significantly lower in women with metabolic syndrome (p = 0.031). Moreover, age- and weight-adjusted vertebral BMD were significantly decreased with additional components of the metabolic syndrome (p = 0.004). These findings suggest that metabolic syndrome might be another risk factor for osteoporosis and related fractures.

  10. Severe neonatal marfan syndrome resulting from a De Novo 3-bp insertion into the fibrillin gene on chromosome 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milewicz, D.M.; Duvic, M. (Univ. of Texas Medical School, Houston, TX (United States))

    1994-03-01

    Severe neonatal Marfan syndrome has features of the Marfan syndrome and congenital contractural arachnodactyly present at birth, along with unique features such as loose, redundant skin and pulmonary emphysema. Since the Marfan syndrome and congenital contractural arachnodactyly are due to mutations in different genes, it has been uncertain whether neonatal Marfan syndrome is due to mutations in the fibrillin gene on chromosome 15 or in another gene. The authors studied an infant with severe neonatal Marfan syndrome. Dermal fibroblasts were metabolically labeled and found to secrete fibrillin inefficiently when compared with control cells. Reverse transcription and amplification of the proband's fibroblast RNA was used to identify a 3-bp insertion between nucleotides 480-481 or 481-482 of the fibrillin cDNA. The insertion maintains the reading frame of the protein and inserts a cysteine between amino acids 160 and 161 in an epidermal growth-factor-like motif of fibrillin. This 3-bp insertion was not found in the fibrillin gene in 70 unrelated, unaffected individuals and 11 unrelated individuals with the Maran syndrome. The authors conclude that neonatal Marfan syndrome is the result of mutations in the fibrillin gene on chromosome 15 and is part of the Marfan syndrome spectrum. 32 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Assessment of a 44 gene classifier for the evaluation of chronic fatigue syndrome from peripheral blood mononuclear cell gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Frampton

    Full Text Available Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS is a clinically defined illness estimated to affect millions of people worldwide causing significant morbidity and an annual cost of billions of dollars. Currently there are no laboratory-based diagnostic methods for CFS. However, differences in gene expression profiles between CFS patients and healthy persons have been reported in the literature. Using mRNA relative quantities for 44 previously identified reporter genes taken from a large dataset comprising both CFS patients and healthy volunteers, we derived a gene profile scoring metric to accurately classify CFS and healthy samples. This metric out-performed any of the reporter genes used individually as a classifier of CFS.To determine whether the reporter genes were robust across populations, we applied this metric to classify a separate blind dataset of mRNA relative quantities from a new population of CFS patients and healthy persons with limited success. Although the metric was able to successfully classify roughly two-thirds of both CFS and healthy samples correctly, the level of misclassification was high. We conclude many of the previously identified reporter genes are study-specific and thus cannot be used as a broad CFS diagnostic.

  12. Low T3 syndrome as a predictor of poor prognosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Rui; Chen, Rui-Ze; Xia, Yi; Liang, Jin-Hua; Wang, Li; Zhu, Hua-Yuan; Zhu Wu, Jia-; Fan, Lei; Li, Jian-Yong; Yang, Tao; Xu, Wei

    2018-02-19

    Low triiodothyronine (T3) state is associated with poor prognosis in critical acute and prolonged illness. However, the information on thyroid dysfunction and cancer is limited. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prognostic value of low T3 syndrome in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Two hundred and fifty-eight patients with detailed thyroid hormone profile at CLL diagnosis were enrolled. Low T3 syndrome was defined by low free T3 (FT3) level accompanied by normal-to-low free tetraiodothyronine (FT4) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels. A propensity score-matched method was performed to balance the baseline characteristics. Multivariate Cox regression analyses screened the independent prognostic factors related to time-to-first-treatment (TTFT) and cancer-specific survival (CSS). Area under the curve (AUC) assessed the predictive accuracy of CLL-International Prognostic Index (IPI) together with low T3 syndrome. The results showed that 37 (14.34%) patients had low T3 syndrome, which was significantly associated with unfavorable TTFT and CSS in the propensity-matched cohort, and it was an independent prognostic indicator for both TTFT and CSS. Serum FT3 level was positively related to protein metabolism and anemia, and inversely related to inflammatory state. Patients with only low FT3 demonstrated better survival than those with synchronously low FT3 and FT4, while those with synchronously low FT3, FT4 and TSH had the worst clinical outcome. Low T3 syndrome together with CLL-IPI had larger AUCs compared with CLL-IPI alone in TTFT and CSS prediction. In conclusion, low T3 syndrome may be a good candidate for predicting prognosis in future clinical practice of CLL. © 2018 UICC.

  13. Low Triiodothyronine Syndrome in Patients With Radiation Enteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shengxian; Ni, Xiaodong; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Yongliang; Tao, Shen; Chen, Mimi; Li, Yousheng; Li, Jieshou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The implications of low triiodothyronine syndrome (LT3S) in patients with radiation enteritis (RE) have not been properly investigated. As such, we conducted this cohort study to investigate the association between LT3S and RE, to explore the etiology of LT3S in RE, to evaluate the clinical features and clinical outcomes of LT3S patients, and to inspect the correlation of clinical variables and LT3S in RE. This prospective study included 39 RE patients. Medical records and various laboratory parameters (including thyroidal, tumorous, nutritional, and radiotherapy variables) were collected in all participants. Our results showed that the incidence of LT3S was 84.6% in patients with RE. Total protein (71.7 ± 5.7 vs 63.2 ± 9.6 g/L, P = 0.04) and albumin (ALB, 46.0 ± 4.6 vs 38.7 ± 5.3 g/L, P = 0.01) were significantly lower in LT3S group compared with those in euthyroid group. Standard thyroid-stimulating hormone index (−0.89 ± 2.11 vs −2.39 ± 1.33, P = 0.03) and sum activity of deiodinases (19.74 ± 4.19 vs 12.55 ± 4.32 nmol/L, P = 0.01) were significantly lower in LT3S group. Patients with LT3S suffered longer duration of hospitalization (48.25 ± 23.29 days in LT3S vs 26.75 ± 10.56 days in euthyroid, P = 0.036). Low serum ALB (β = 0.694, 95% CI = 0.007–0.190, P = 0.037) was the only significant predictor of LT3S. LT3S was common in RE patients. A hypodeiodination condition and a potential pituitary-thyrotroph dysfunction might play a role in the pathophysiology of LT3S in RE. Worse nutritional status and clinical outcomes were confirmed in RE patients with LT3S. Furthermore, total protein and ALB were observed as protective and differentiating parameters of LT3S in RE. In summary, this was the 1st investigation to evaluate the clinical correlation between RE and LT3S, investigate the prevalence of LT3S in RE, and explore the pathogenesis of LT3S, despite the

  14. Computational analysis of TRAPPC9: candidate gene for autosomal recessive non-syndromic mental retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattak, Naureen Aslam; Mir, Asif

    2014-01-01

    Mental retardation (MR)/ intellectual disability (ID) is a neuro-developmental disorder characterized by a low intellectual quotient (IQ) and deficits in adaptive behavior related to everyday life tasks such as delayed language acquisition, social skills or self-help skills with onset before age 18. To date, a few genes (PRSS12, CRBN, CC2D1A, GRIK2, TUSC3, TRAPPC9, TECR, ST3GAL3, MED23, MAN1B1, NSUN1) for autosomal-recessive forms of non syndromic MR (NS-ARMR) have been identified and established in various families with ID. The recently reported candidate gene TRAPPC9 was selected for computational analysis to explore its potentially important role in pathology as it is the only gene for ID reported in more than five different familial cases worldwide. YASARA (12.4.1) was utilized to generate three dimensional structures of the candidate gene TRAPPC9. Hybrid structure prediction was employed. Crystal Structure of a Conserved Metalloprotein From Bacillus Cereus (3D19-C) was selected as best suitable template using position-specific iteration-BLAST. Template (3D19-C) parameters were based on E-value, Z-score and resolution and quality score of 0.32, -1.152, 2.30°A and 0.684 respectively. Model reliability showed 93.1% residues placed in the most favored region with 96.684 quality factor, and overall 0.20 G-factor (dihedrals 0.06 and covalent 0.39 respectively). Protein-Protein docking analysis demonstrated that TRAPPC9 showed strong interactions of the amino acid residues S(253), S(251), Y(256), G(243), D(131) with R(105), Q(425), W(226), N(255), S(233), its functional partner 1KBKB. Protein-protein interacting residues could facilitate the exploration of structural and functional outcomes of wild type and mutated TRAPCC9 protein. Actively involved residues can be used to elucidate the binding properties of the protein, and to develop drug therapy for NS-ARMR patients.

  15. [Analysis of USH2A gene mutation in a Chinese family affected with Usher syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengcheng; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Mingchang; Wang, Qiufen; Liu, Mugen

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the disease-causing mutation in a Chinese family affected with Usher syndrome type II. All of the 11 members from the family underwent comprehensive ophthalmologic examination and hearing test, and their genomic DNA were isolated from venous leukocytes. PCR and direct sequencing of USH2A gene were performed for the proband. Wild type and mutant type minigene vectors containing exon 42, intron 42 and exon 43 of the USH2A gene were constructed and transfected into Hela cells by lipofectamine reagent. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR was carried out to verify the splicing of the minigenes. Pedigree analysis and clinical diagnosis indicated that the patients have suffered from autosomal recessive Usher syndrome type II. DNA sequencing has detected a homozygous c.8559-2A>G mutation of the USH2A gene in the proband, which has co-segregated with the disease in the family. The mutation has affected a conserved splice site in intron 42, which has led to inactivation of the splice site. Minigene experiment has confirmed the retaining of intron 42 in mature mRNA. The c.8559-2A>G mutation in the USH2A gene probably underlies the Usher syndrome type II in this family. The splice site mutation has resulted in abnormal splicing of USH2A pre-mRNA.

  16. Cytochrome C oxydase deficiency: SURF1 gene investigation in patients with Leigh syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maalej, Marwa; Kammoun, Thouraya; Alila-Fersi, Olfa; Kharrat, Marwa; Ammar, Marwa; Felhi, Rahma; Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna; Keskes, Leila; Hachicha, Mongia; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2018-03-18

    Leigh syndrome (LS) is a rare progressive neurodegenerative disorder occurring in infancy. The most common clinical signs reported in LS are growth retardation, optic atrophy, ataxia, psychomotor retardation, dystonia, hypotonia, seizures and respiratory disorders. The paper reported a manifestation of 3 Tunisian patients presented with LS syndrome. The aim of this study is the MT[HYPHEN]ATP6 and SURF1 gene screening in Tunisian patients affected with classical Leigh syndrome and the computational investigation of the effect of detected mutations on its structure and functions by clinical and bioinformatics analyses. After clinical investigations, three Tunisian patients were tested for mutations in both MT-ATP6 and SURF1 genes by direct sequencing followed by in silico analyses to predict the effects of sequence variation. The result of mutational analysis revealed the absence of mitochondrial mutations in MT-ATP6 gene and the presence of a known homozygous splice site mutation c.516-517delAG in sibling patients added to the presence of a novel double het mutations in LS patient (c.752-18 A > C/c. c.751 + 16G > A). In silico analyses of theses intronic variations showed that it could alters splicing processes as well as SURF1 protein translation. Leigh syndrome (LS) is a rare progressive neurodegenerative disorder occurring in infancy. The most common clinical signs reported in LS are growth retardation, optic atrophy, ataxia, psychomotor retardation, dystonia, hypotonia, seizures and respiratory disorders. The paper reported a manifestation of 3 Tunisian patients presented with LS syndrome. The aim of this study is MT-ATP6 and SURF1 genes screening in Tunisian patients affected with classical Leigh syndrome and the computational investigation of the effect of detected mutations on its structure and functions. After clinical investigations, three Tunisian patients were tested for mutations in both MT-ATP6 and SURF1 genes by direct sequencing followed by in

  17. Syndromic Craniosynostosis Can Define New Candidate Genes for Suture Development or Result from the Non-specifc Effects of Pleiotropic Genes: Rasopathies and Chromatinopathies as Examples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Zollino

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Craniosynostosis is a heterogeneous condition caused by the premature fusion of cranial sutures, occurring mostly as an isolated anomaly. Pathogenesis of non-syndromic forms of craniosynostosis is largely unknown. In about 15–30% of cases craniosynostosis occurs in association with other physical anomalies and it is referred to as syndromic craniosynostosis. Syndromic forms of craniosynostosis arise from mutations in genes belonging to the Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR family and the interconnected molecular pathways in most cases. However it can occur in association with other gene variants and with a variety of chromosome abnormalities as well, usually in association with intellectual disability (ID and additional physical anomalies. Evaluating the molecular properties of the genes undergoing intragenic mutations or copy number variations (CNVs along with prevalence of craniosynostosis in different conditions and animal models if available, we made an attempt to define two distinct groups of unusual syndromic craniosynostosis, which can reflect direct effects of emerging new candidate genes with roles in suture homeostasis or a non-specific phenotypic manifestation of pleiotropic genes, respectively. RASopathies and 9p23p22.3 deletions are reviewed as examples of conditions in the first group. In particular, we found that craniosynostosis is a relatively common component manifestation of cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC syndrome. Chromatinopathies and neurocristopathies are presented as examples of conditions in the second group. We observed that craniosynostosis is uncommon on average in these conditions. It was randomly associated with Kabuki, Koolen-de Vries/KANSL1 haploinsufficiency and Mowat–Wilson syndromes and in KAT6B-related disorders. As an exception, trigonocephaly in Bohring-Opitz syndrome reflects specific molecular properties of the chromatin modifier ASXL1 gene. Surveillance for craniosynostosis in syndromic forms of

  18. Genetic screens to identify pathogenic gene variants in the common cancer predisposition Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drost, Mark; Lützen, Anne; van Hees, Sandrine

    2013-01-01

    In many individuals suspected of the common cancer predisposition Lynch syndrome, variants of unclear significance (VUS), rather than an obviously pathogenic mutations, are identified in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. The uncertainty of whether such VUS inactivate MMR, and therefore...... function. When a residue identified as mutated in an individual suspected of Lynch syndrome is listed as critical in such a reverse diagnosis catalog, there is a high probability that the corresponding human VUS is pathogenic. To investigate the applicability of this approach, we have generated....... Nearly half of these critical residues match with VUS previously identified in individuals suspected of Lynch syndrome. This aids in the assignment of pathogenicity to these human VUS and validates the approach described here as a diagnostic tool. In a wider perspective, this work provides a model...

  19. Complete exon sequencing of all known Usher syndrome genes greatly improves molecular diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Crystel; Grati, M'hamed; Marlin, Sandrine; Levilliers, Jacqueline; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Parodi, Marine; Niasme-Grare, Magali; Zelenika, Diana; Délépine, Marc; Feldmann, Delphine; Jonard, Laurence; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Weil, Dominique; Delobel, Bruno; Vincent, Christophe; Dollfus, Hélène; Eliot, Marie-Madeleine; David, Albert; Calais, Catherine; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Montaut-Verient, Bettina; Bonneau, Dominique; Dubin, Jacques; Thauvin, Christel; Duvillard, Alain; Francannet, Christine; Mom, Thierry; Lacombe, Didier; Duriez, Françoise; Drouin-Garraud, Valérie; Thuillier-Obstoy, Marie-Françoise; Sigaudy, Sabine; Frances, Anne-Marie; Collignon, Patrick; Challe, Georges; Couderc, Rémy; Lathrop, Mark; Sahel, José-Alain; Weissenbach, Jean; Petit, Christine; Denoyelle, Françoise

    2011-05-11

    Usher syndrome (USH) combines sensorineural deafness with blindness. It is inherited in an autosomal recessive mode. Early diagnosis is critical for adapted educational and patient management choices, and for genetic counseling. To date, nine causative genes have been identified for the three clinical subtypes (USH1, USH2 and USH3). Current diagnostic strategies make use of a genotyping microarray that is based on the previously reported mutations. The purpose of this study was to design a more accurate molecular diagnosis tool. We sequenced the 366 coding exons and flanking regions of the nine known USH genes, in 54 USH patients (27 USH1, 21 USH2 and 6 USH3). Biallelic mutations were detected in 39 patients (72%) and monoallelic mutations in an additional 10 patients (18.5%). In addition to biallelic mutations in one of the USH genes, presumably pathogenic mutations in another USH gene were detected in seven patients (13%), and another patient carried monoallelic mutations in three different USH genes. Notably, none of the USH3 patients carried detectable mutations in the only known USH3 gene, whereas they all carried mutations in USH2 genes. Most importantly, the currently used microarray would have detected only 30 of the 81 different mutations that we found, of which 39 (48%) were novel. Based on these results, complete exon sequencing of the currently known USH genes stands as a definite improvement for molecular diagnosis of this disease, which is of utmost importance in the perspective of gene therapy.

  20. Low-Dose Radiation Induces Genes Promoting Cell Survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shu-Zheng; Chen, Dong; Mu, Ying

    1999-01-01

    Apoptosis is an important process controlling homeostasis of the body. It is influenced by stimuli constantly arising from the external and internal environment of the organism. It is well known that radiation could induce apoptosis of cells in vitro and in vivo. However, the dose-effect relationship of apoptosis extending to the low-dose range has scarcely been studied. Here, the molecular basis of the phenomenon is explored by examining the changes in expression of some of the proapoptotic and antiapoptotic genes

  1. WS1 gene mutation analysis of Wolfram syndrome in a Chinese patient and a systematic review of literatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guang; Yu, Man-li; Wang, Jia-feng; Gao, Cong-rong; Chen, Zhong-jin

    2010-10-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a rare hereditary disease characterized by diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy. The outcome of this disease is always poor. WFS1 gene mutation is the main cause of this disease. A patient with diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, renal tract disorder, psychiatric abnormality, and cataract was diagnosed with Wolfram syndrome. Mutations in open reading frame (ORF) of WFS1 gene was analyzed by sequencing. Mutations in WFS1 gene was also summarized by a systematic review in Pubmed and Chinese biological and medical database. Sequencing of WFS1 gene in this patient showed a new mutation, 1962G>A, and two other non-sense mutations, 2433A>G and 2565G>A. Systematic review included 219 patients in total and identified 172 WFS1 gene mutations, most of which were located in Exon 8. These mutations in WFS1 gene might be useful in prenatal diagnosis of Wolfram syndrome.

  2. POLYMORPHISMS OF ENDOTHELIAL NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE GENE AS PREDICTORS OF WOLFF-PARKINSON-WHITE SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Matyushin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The discovery of new genetic predictors of cardiovascular diseases can be used in predicting and diagnosing latent forms of the disease. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW occurs in all age groups  and detected in 1-30 people per 10000, it manifests mainly in young age (on average 20 years, and the risk of sudden cardiac death is higher than in general population.Aim. To study the relationship of WPW syndrome with the polymorphism of endothelial nitric synthase gene (NOS3, and to identify genetic predictors of this syndrome.Material and methods. The study included 51 people with ECG proven WPW syndrome and 153 people with no cardiovascular disease. The patients were divided into subgroups according to sex: 21 women, 30 men. All patients underwent a standard cardiac examination (anamnesis, electrocardiography, echocardiography, bicycle ergometry, transesophageal electrical stimulation of the atria, Holter monitoring and blood was taken for molecular genetic testing of DNA.Results. The results showed a statistically significant prevalence of rare genotype 4b\\4b NOS3 gene in the control group of women (16.3%; р<0.05 compared with women from the main group, who did not have this genotype, while there was significant prevalence of genotype 4a\\4a in the main group of women (81.0%; р<0.05 compared with women from the control group.  In men this prevalence was not found.Conclusion. The presence of genotype 4b\\4b NOS3 gene reduces the likelihood of WPW syndrome and its symptoms in females. In men,  this prevalence is not found, presumably, in connection with some mechanisms of hormonal regulation. The results can be used in the genetic prediction of the course of the disease.

  3. Risk stratification in myelodysplastic syndromes: is there a role for gene expression profiling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidan, Amer M; Prebet, Thomas; Saad Aldin, Ehab; Gore, Steven David

    2014-04-01

    Evaluation of: Pellagatti A, Benner A, Mills KI et al. Identification of gene expression-based prognostic markers in the hematopoietic stem cells of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. J. Clin. Oncol. 31(28), 3557-3564 (2013). Patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) exhibit wide heterogeneity in clinical outcomes making accurate risk-stratification an integral part of the risk-adaptive management paradigm. Current prognostic schemes for MDS rely on clinicopathological parameters. Despite the increasing knowledge of the genetic landscape of MDS and the prognostic impact of many newly discovered molecular aberrations, none to date has been incorporated formally into the major risk models. Efforts are ongoing to use data generated from genome-wide high-throughput techniques to improve the 'individualized' outcome prediction for patients. We here discuss an important paper in which gene expression profiling (GEP) technology was applied to marrow CD34(+) cells from 125 MDS patients to generate and validate a standardized GEP-based prognostic signature.

  4. Bartter syndrome in two sisters with a novel mutation of the CLCNKB gene, one with deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robitaille, Pierre; Merouani, Aicha; He, Ning; Pei, York

    2011-09-01

    This article describes two sisters with type III Bartter syndrome (BS) due to a novel missense variant of the CLCNKB gene. The phenotypic expression of the disease was very different in these two siblings. In one sister, the disease followed a very severe course, especially in the neonatal period and as a toddler. Both the classic symptoms and the biochemical features of the syndrome were striking. In addition, she presented with sensorineural deafness, a complication yet unreported in this subtype of BS In contrast, the least affected sister was symptom free and the biochemical features of the disease although present remained discrete throughout the prolonged follow-up. It is suggested that such a difference in the phenotypic expression of the disease is possibly secondary to the modifier effect of a gene and/or results from environmental factor(s).

  5. Wolfram syndrome 1 gene negatively regulates ER stress signaling in rodent and human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Sonya G; Ishigaki, Shinsuke; Oslowski, Christine M; Lu, Simin; Lipson, Kathryn L; Ghosh, Rajarshi; Hayashi, Emiko; Ishihara, Hisamitsu; Oka, Yoshitomo; Permutt, M Alan; Urano, Fumihiko

    2010-03-01

    Wolfram syndrome is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, caused by nonautoimmune loss of beta cells, and neurological dysfunctions. We have previously shown that mutations in the Wolfram syndrome 1 (WFS1) gene cause Wolfram syndrome and that WFS1 has a protective function against ER stress. However, it remained to be determined how WFS1 mitigates ER stress. Here we have shown in rodent and human cell lines that WFS1 negatively regulates a key transcription factor involved in ER stress signaling, activating transcription factor 6alpha (ATF6alpha), through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. WFS1 suppressed expression of ATF6alpha target genes and repressed ATF6alpha-mediated activation of the ER stress response element (ERSE) promoter. Moreover, WFS1 stabilized the E3 ubiquitin ligase HRD1, brought ATF6alpha to the proteasome, and enhanced its ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation, leading to suppression of ER stress signaling. Consistent with these data, beta cells from WFS1-deficient mice and lymphocytes from patients with Wolfram syndrome exhibited dysregulated ER stress signaling through upregulation of ATF6alpha and downregulation of HRD1. These results reveal a role for WFS1 in the negative regulation of ER stress signaling and in the pathogenesis of diseases involving chronic, unresolvable ER stress, such as pancreatic beta cell death in diabetes.

  6. c.376G>A mutation in WFS1 gene causes Wolfram syndrome without deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarpour Lima, Behnam; Ghaedi, Hamid; Daftarian, Narsis; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Jamshidi, Javad; Khorrami, Mehdi; Noroozi, Rezvan; Sohrabifar, Nasim; Assarzadegan, Farhad; Hesami, Omid; Taghavi, Shaghayegh; Ahmadifard, Azadeh; Atakhorrami, Minoo; Rahimi-Aliabadi, Simin; Shahmohammadibeni, Neda; Alehabib, Elham; Andarva, Monavvar; Darvish, Hossein; Emamalizadeh, Babak

    2016-02-01

    Wolfram syndrome is one of the rare autosomal recessive, progressive, neurodegenerative disorders, characterized by diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy. Several other features are observed in patients including deafness, ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. A gene called WFS1 is identified on chromosome 4p, responsible for Wolfram syndrome. We investigated a family consisted of parents and 8 children, which 5 of them have been diagnosed for Wolfram syndrome. WFS1 gene in all family members was sequenced for causative mutations. A mutation (c.376G>A, p.A126T) was found in all affected members in homozygous state and in both parents in heterozygous state. The bioinformatics analysis showed the deleterious effects of this nucleotide change on the structure and function of the protein product. As all of the patients in the family showed the homozygote mutation, and parents were both heterozygote, this mutation is probably the cause of the disease. We identified this mutation in homozygous state for the first time as Wolfram syndrome causation. We also showed that this mutation probably doesn't cause deafness in affected individuals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Low basal salivary flow and burning mouth syndrome: new evidence in this enigmatic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadari, Francesco; Venesia, Paolo; Azzi, Lorenzo; Veronesi, Giovanni; Costantino, Dario; Croveri, Fabio; Farronato, Davide; Tagliabue, Angelo; Tettamanti, Lucia

    2015-03-01

    Burning mouth syndrome remains a puzzling condition. One symptom commonly associated with the burning sensation is xerostomia. The current study measured basal and stimulated salivary flow in a group of burning mouth syndrome patients. Three groups of patients were recruited: 44 burning mouth syndrome patients, 27 oral lichen planus patients and 40 healthy patients. We chose to measure basal salivary flow and stimulated salivary flow in the three groups of patients using the 'spitting' method. Thus, the patients were asked to spit every minute for 5 min. Afterwards, they were asked to repeat the procedure a second time, but a drop of citric acid was positioned on their tongue every minute to stimulate salivary secretion. After 14 days, the same procedure was repeated for 15 min. Although there was no significant difference between the burning mouth syndrome group and the other two groups regarding the stimulated volumes, an important difference was found in the basal volumes, with the burning mouth syndrome patients showing lower values. The outcomes of our research demonstrate the presence of very low basal salivary flow in burning mouth syndrome patients compared with the other two groups, but the stimulated salivary flow was equal, if not higher, in the burning mouth syndrome patients. This study contributes new topics for further investigation of a solution to the very mysterious pathology represented by burning mouth syndrome. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. A Next Generation Sequencing custom gene panel as first line diagnostic tool for atypical cases of syndromic obesity: Application in a case of Alström syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltese, Paolo E; Iarossi, Giancarlo; Ziccardi, Lucia; Colombo, Leonardo; Buzzonetti, Luca; Crinò, Antonino; Tezzele, Silvia; Bertelli, Matteo

    2018-02-01

    Obesity phenotype can be manifested as an isolated trait or accompanied by multisystem disorders as part of a syndromic picture. In both situations, same molecular pathways may be involved to different degrees. This evidence is stronger in syndromic obesity, in which phenotypes of different syndromes may overlap. In these cases, genetic testing can unequivocally provide a final diagnosis. Here we describe a patient who met the diagnostic criteria for Alström syndrome only during adolescence. Genetic testing was requested at 25 years of age for a final confirmation of the diagnosis. The genetic diagnosis of Alström syndrome was obtained through a Next Generation Sequencing genetic test approach using a custom-designed gene panel of 47 genes associated with syndromic and non-syndromic obesity. Genetic analysis revealed a novel homozygous frameshift variant p.(Arg1550Lysfs*10) on exon 8 of the ALMS1 gene. This case shows the need for a revision of the diagnostic criteria guidelines, as a consequence of the recent advent of massive parallel sequencing technology. Indications for genetic testing reported in these currently accepted diagnostic criteria for Alström syndrome, were drafted when sequencing was expensive and time consuming. Nowadays, Next Generation Sequencing testing could be considered as first line diagnostic tool not only for Alström syndrome but, more generally, for all those atypical or not clearly distinguishable cases of syndromic obesity, thus avoiding delayed diagnosis and treatments. Early diagnosis permits a better follow-up and pre-symptomatic interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical Variability in a Family with an Ectodermal Dysplasia Syndrome and a Nonsense Mutation in the TP63 Gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenkraft, A.; Pode-Shakked, B.; Goldstein, N.; Shpirer, Z.; Bokhoven, H. van; Anikster, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the TP63 gene have been associated with a variety of ectodermal dysplasia syndromes, among which the clinically overlapping Ankyloblepharon-Ectodermal defects-Cleft lip/palate (AEC) and the Rapp-Hodgkin syndromes. We report a multiplex nonconsanguineous family of Ashkenazi-Jewish

  10. Acral peeling skin syndrome associated with a novel CSTA gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muttardi, K; Nitoiu, D; Kelsell, D P; O'Toole, E A; Batta, K

    2016-06-01

    Acral peeling skin syndrome (APSS) is a rare autosomal recessive condition, characterized by asymptomatic peeling of the skin of the hands and feet, often linked to mutations in the gene TGM5. However, more recently recessive loss of function mutations in CSTA, encoding cystatin A, have been linked with APSS and exfoliative ichthyosis. We describe the clinical features in two sisters with APSS, associated with a novel large homozygous deletion encompassing exon 1 of CSTA. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  11. [Analysis of SOX10 gene mutation in a family affected with Waardenburg syndrome type II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lei; Yan, Yousheng; Chen, Xue; Zhang, Chuan; Zhang, Qinghua; Feng, Xuan; Hao, Shen

    2018-02-10

    OBJECTIVE To detect potential mutation of SOX10 gene in a pedigree affected with Warrdenburg syndrome type II. METHODS Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples of the proband and his family members. Exons and flanking sequences of MITF, PAX3, SOX10, SNAI2, END3 and ENDRB genes were analyzed by chip capturing and high throughput sequencing. Suspected mutations were verified with Sanger sequencing. RESULTS A c.127C>T (p.R43X) mutation of the SOX10 gene was detected in the proband, for which both parents showed a wild-type genotype. CONCLUSION The c.127C>T (p.R43X) mutation of SOX10 gene probably underlies the ocular symptoms and hearing loss of the proband.

  12. New mutations in the NHS gene in Nance-Horan Syndrome families from the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florijn, Ralph J; Loves, Willem; Maillette de Buy Wenniger-Prick, Liesbeth J J M; Mannens, Marcel M A M; Tijmes, Nel; Brooks, Simon P; Hardcastle, Alison J; Bergen, Arthur A B

    2006-09-01

    Mutations in the NHS gene cause Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS), a rare X-chromosomal recessive disorder with variable features, including congenital cataract, microphthalmia, a peculiar form of the ear and dental anomalies. We investigated the NHS gene in four additional families with NHS from the Netherlands, by dHPLC and direct sequencing. We identified an unique mutation in each family. Three out of these four mutations were not reported before. We report here the first splice site sequence alteration mutation and three protein truncating mutations. Our results suggest that X-linked cataract and NHS are allelic disorders.

  13. CAGE-defined promoter regions of the genes implicated in Rett Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitezic, Morana; Bertin, Nicolas; Andersson, Robin

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in three functionally diverse genes cause Rett Syndrome. Although the functions of Forkhead box G1 (FOXG1), Methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) and Cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) have been studied individually, not much is known about their relation to each other...... reveal the predominantly used transcription start sites (TSSs) for each gene including novel transcription start sites for FOXG1. We show that FOXG1 expression is poorly correlated with the expression of MECP2 and CDKL5. We identify promoter shapes for each TSS, the predicted location of enhancers...

  14. Gene Therapy for the Retinal Degeneration of Usher Syndrome Caused by Mutations in MYO7A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Vanda S; Williams, David S

    2015-01-20

    Usher syndrome is a deaf-blindness disorder. One of the subtypes, Usher 1B, is caused by loss of function of the gene encoding the unconventional myosin, MYO7A. A variety of different viral-based delivery approaches have been tested for retinal gene therapy to prevent the blindness of Usher 1B, and a clinical trial based on one of these approaches has begun. This review evaluates the different approaches. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  15. Mismatch repair gene mutation spectrum in the Swedish Lynch syndrome population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagerstedt-Robinson, Kristina; Rohlin, Anna; Aravidis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Lynch syndrome caused by constitutional mismatch‑repair defects is one of the most common hereditary cancer syndromes with a high risk for colorectal, endometrial, ovarian and urothelial cancer. Lynch syndrome is caused by mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes i.e., MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2...... Lynch syndrome families. These mutations affected MLH1 in 40%, MSH2 in 36%, MSH6 in 18% and PMS2 in 6% of the families. A large variety of mutations were identified with splice site mutations being the most common mutation type in MLH1 and frameshift mutations predominating in MSH2 and MSH6. Large...... deletions of one or several exons accounted for 21% of the mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 and 22% in PMS2, but were rare (4%) in MSH6. In 66% of the Lynch syndrome families the variants identified were private and the effect from founder mutations was limited and predominantly related to a Finnish founder...

  16. Comprehensive screening of the USH2A gene in Usher syndrome type II and non-syndromic recessive retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedahmadi, Babak Jian; Rivolta, Carlo; Keene, Julia A; Berson, Eliot L; Dryja, Thaddeus P

    2004-08-01

    A screen of the entire coding region of the USH2A gene in 129 unrelated patients with Usher syndrome type II (USH2) and in 146 unrelated patients with non-syndromic autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (ARRP) uncovered 54 different sequence variations, including 18 likely pathogenic mutations (13 frameshift, three nonsense, and two missense), 12 changes of uncertain pathogenicity (11 missense changes and one in-frame deletion), and 24 non-pathogenic rare variants or polymorphisms. Of the 18 likely pathogenic mutations, nine were novel. Among the USH2 patients, 50 (39%) had one or two likely pathogenic mutations. The most common mutant allele in USH2 patients was E767fs, which was found in 29 patients, including one homozygote. Among the ARRP patients, we found 17 (12%) with one or two likely pathogenic mutations. The most common mutant allele in ARRP patients was C759F and it was found in 10 patients. The C759F allele was also found in two USH2 patients; in neither of them was a change in the other allele found. The second most common mutant allele in both patient groups was L1447fs (found in 6/50 USH2 patients and 6/17 ARRP patients). Of the 50+17=67 patients with identified USH2A mutations, only one mutation in one allele was found in 41+12=53 (79%); the reason for the high proportion of patients with only one identified mutation is obscure. Our results indicate that USH2A mutations are found in about 7% of all cases of RP in North America, a frequency similar to the RPGR gene (8%) and the rhodopsin gene (10%).

  17. [Study of gene mutation and pathogenetic mechanism for a family with Waardenburg syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongsheng; Liao, Xinbin; Liu, Yalan; He, Chufeng; Zhang, Hua; Jiang, Lu; Feng, Yong; Mei, Lingyun

    2017-08-10

    To explore the pathogenetic mechanism of a family affected with Waardenburg syndrome. Clinical data of the family was collected. Potential mutation of the MITF, SOX10 and SNAI2 genes were screened. Plasmids for wild type (WT) and mutant MITF proteins were constructed to determine their exogenous expression and subcellular distribution by Western blotting and immunofluorescence assay, respectively. A heterozygous c.763C>T (p.R255X) mutation was detected in exon 8 of the MITF gene in the proband and all other patients from the family. No pathological mutation of the SOX10 and SNAI2 genes was detected. The DNA sequences of plasmids of MITF wild and mutant MITF R255X were confirmed. Both proteins were detected with the expected size. WT MITF protein only localized in the nucleus, whereas R255X protein showed aberrant localization in the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm. The c.763C>T mutation of the MITF gene probably underlies the disease in this family. The mutation can affect the subcellular distribution of MITF proteins in vitro, which may shed light on the molecular mechanism of Waardenburg syndrome caused by mutations of the MITF gene.

  18. Novel Mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 Genes in Mexican Patients with Lynch Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Miguel Moreno-Ortiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lynch Syndrome (LS is characterized by germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2. This syndrome is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern and is characterized by early onset colorectal cancer (CRC and extracolonic tumors. The aim of this study was to identify mutations in MMR genes in three Mexican patients with LS. Methods. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed as a prescreening method to identify absent protein expression. PCR, Denaturing High Performance Liquid Chromatography (dHPLC, and Sanger sequencing complemented the analysis. Results. Two samples showed the absence of nuclear staining for MLH1 and one sample showed loss of nuclear staining for MSH2. The mutations found in MLH1 gene were c.2103+1G>C in intron 18 and compound heterozygous mutants c.1852_1854delAAG (p.K618del and c.1852_1853delinsGC (p.K618A in exon 16. In the MSH2 gene, we identified mutation c.638dupT (p.L213fs in exon 3. Conclusions. This is the first report of mutations in MMR genes in Mexican patients with LS and these appear to be novel.

  19. Xp21 contiguous gene syndromes: Deletion quantitation with bivariate flow karyotyping allows mapping of patient breakpoints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, E.R.B.; Towbin, J.A. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Engh, G. van den; Trask, B.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1992-12-01

    Bivariate flow karyotyping was used to estimate the deletion sizes for a series of patients with Xp21 contiguous gene syndromes. The deletion estimates were used to develop an approximate scale for the genomic map in Xp21. The bivariate flow karyotype results were compared with clinical and molecular genetic information on the extent of the patients' deletions, and these various types of data were consistent. The resulting map spans >15 Mb, from the telomeric interval between DXS41 (99-6) and DXS68 (1-4) to a position centromeric to the ornithine transcarbamylase locus. The deletion sizing was considered to be accurate to [plus minus]1 Mb. The map provides information on the relative localization of genes and markers within this region. For example, the map suggests that the adrenal hypoplasia congenita and glycerol kinase genes are physically close to each other, are within 1-2 Mb of the telomeric end of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene, and are nearer to the DMD locus than to the more distal marker DXS28 (C7). Information of this type is useful in developing genomic strategies for positional cloning in Xp21. These investigations demonstrate that the DNA from patients with Xp21 contiguous gene syndromes can be valuable reagents, not only for ordering loci and markers but also for providing an approximate scale to the map of the Xp21 region surrounding DMD. 44 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Mutational analysis of the PTPN11 gene in Egyptian patients with Noonan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essawi, Mona L; Ismail, Manal F; Afifi, Hanan H; Kobesiy, Maha M; El Kotoury, Ahmed; Barakat, Maged M

    2013-11-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is inherited as an autosomal dominant disorder with dysmorphic facies, short stature, and cardiac defects, which can be caused by missense mutations in the protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor type 11 (PTPN11) gene, which encodes src homology region 2 domain containing tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP-2), a protein tyrosine phosphatase that acts in signal transduction downstream to growth factors and cytokines. The current study aimed to study the molecular characterization of the PTPN11 gene among Egyptian patients with Noonan syndrome. Eleven exons of the PTPN11 gene were amplified and screened by single stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP). DNA samples showing band shift in SSCP were subjected to sequencing. Mutational analysis of the PTPN11 gene revealed T→C transition at position 854 in exon 8, predicting Phe285Ser substitution within PTP domain of SHP-2 protein, in one NS patient and -21C→T polymorphism in intron 7 in four other cases. Knowing that NS is phenotypically heterogeneous, molecular characterization of the PTPN11 gene should serve to establish NS diagnosis in patients with atypical features, although lack of a mutation does not exclude the possibility of NS. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Comprehensive sequence analysis of nine Usher syndrome genes in the UK National Collaborative Usher Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Quesne Stabej, Polona; Saihan, Zubin; Rangesh, Nell; Steele-Stallard, Heather B; Ambrose, John; Coffey, Alison; Emmerson, Jenny; Haralambous, Elene; Hughes, Yasmin; Steel, Karen P; Luxon, Linda M; Webster, Andrew R; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disorder comprising retinitis pigmentosa, hearing loss and, in some cases, vestibular dysfunction. It is clinically and genetically heterogeneous with three distinctive clinical types (I-III) and nine Usher genes identified. This study is a comprehensive clinical and genetic analysis of 172 Usher patients and evaluates the contribution of digenic inheritance. The genes MYO7A, USH1C, CDH23, PCDH15, USH1G, USH2A, GPR98, WHRN, CLRN1 and the candidate gene SLC4A7 were sequenced in 172 UK Usher patients, regardless of clinical type. No subject had definite mutations (nonsense, frameshift or consensus splice site mutations) in two different USH genes. Novel missense variants were classified UV1-4 (unclassified variant): UV4 is 'probably pathogenic', based on control frequency A being the most common USH1 mutation in the cohort). USH2A was responsible for 79.3% of USH2 families and GPR98 for only 6.6%. No mutations were found in USH1G, WHRN or SLC4A7. One or two pathogenic/likely pathogenic variants were identified in 86% of cases. No convincing cases of digenic inheritance were found. It is concluded that digenic inheritance does not make a significant contribution to Usher syndrome; the observation of multiple variants in different genes is likely to reflect polymorphic variation, rather than digenic effects.

  2. A unique mosaic Turner syndrome patient with androgen receptor gene derived marker chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Rasime; Özdağ, Nermin; Bundak, Rüveyde; Çirakoğlu, Ayşe; Serakinci, Nedime

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Turner syndrome are generally characterized by having short stature with no secondary sexual characteristics. Some abnormalities, such as webbed neck, renal malformations (>50%) and cardiac defects (10%) are less common. The intelligence of these patients is considered normal. Non-mosaic monosomy X is observed in approximately 45% of postnatal patients with Turner syndrome and the rest of the patients have structural abnormalities or mosaicism involving 46,X,i(Xq), 45,X/46,XX, 45,X and other variants. The phenotype of 45,X/46,X,+mar individuals varies by the genetic continent and degree of the mosaicism. The gene content of the marker chromosome is the most important when correlating the phenotype with the genotype. Here we present an 11-year-old female who was referred for evaluation of her short stature and learning disabilities. Conventional cytogenetic investigation showed a mosaic 45,X/46,X,+mar karyotype. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that the marker chromosome originated from the X chromosome within the androgen receptor (AR) and X-inactive specific transcript (XIST) genes. Therefore, it is possible that aberrant activation of the marker chromosome, compromising the AR and XIST genes, may modify the Turner syndrome phenotype.

  3. Mutation spectrum of genes associated with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome in Chinese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Dang, Xiqiang; He, Qingnan; Zhen, Yan; He, Xiaoxie; Yi, Zhuwen; Zhu, Kuichun

    2017-08-20

    Approximately 20% of children with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome do not respond to steroid therapy. More than 30 genes have been identified as disease-causing genes for the steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS). Few reports were from the Chinese population. The coding regions of genes commonly associated with SRNS were analyzed to characterize the gene mutation spectrum in children with SRNS in central China. The first phase study involved 38 children with five genes (NPHS1, NPHS2, PLCE1, WT1, and TRPC6) by Sanger sequencing. The second phase study involved 33 children with 17 genes by next generation DNA sequencing (NGS. 22 new patients, and 11 patients from first phase study but without positive findings). Overall deleterious or putatively deleterious gene variants were identified in 19 patients (31.7%), including four NPHS1 variants among five patients and three PLCE1 variants among four other patients. Variants in COL4A3, COL4A4, or COL4A5 were found in six patients. Eight novel variants were identified, including two in NPHS1, two in PLCE1, one in NPHS2, LAMB2, COL4A3, and COL4A4, respectively. 55.6% of the children with variants failed to respond to immunosuppressive agent therapy, while the resistance rate in children without variants was 44.4%. Our results show that screening for deleterious variants in some common genes in children clinically suspected with SRNS might be helpful for disease diagnosis as well as prediction of treatment efficacy and prognosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Síndrome de Diógenes Diogenes syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Bárbara Perdigão Stumpf; Fábio Lopes Rocha

    2010-01-01

    A síndrome de Diógenes (SD) caracteriza-se por descuido extremo com a higiene pessoal, negligência com o asseio da própria moradia, isolamento social, suspeição e comportamento paranoico, sendo frequente a ocorrência de colecionismo. A incidência anual é de 5/10.000 entre aqueles acima de 60 anos, e pelo menos a metade é portadora de demência ou algum outro transtorno psiquiátrico. As principais hipóteses etiológicas são: (1) a condição representaria o "estágio final" de um transtorno de pers...

  5. Expression profile of immune response genes in patients with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai Dessmon

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS emerged in later February 2003, as a new epidemic form of life-threatening infection caused by a novel coronavirus. However, the immune-pathogenesis of SARS is poorly understood. To understand the host response to this pathogen, we investigated the gene expression profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs derived from SARS patients, and compared with healthy controls. Results The number of differentially expressed genes was found to be 186 under stringent filtering criteria of microarray data analysis. Several genes were highly up-regulated in patients with SARS, such as, the genes coding for Lactoferrin, S100A9 and Lipocalin 2. The real-time PCR method verified the results of the gene array analysis and showed that those genes that were up-regulated as determined by microarray analysis were also found to be comparatively up-regulated by real-time PCR analysis. Conclusions This differential gene expression profiling of PBMCs from patients with SARS strongly suggests that the response of SARS affected patients seems to be mainly an innate inflammatory response, rather than a specific immune response against a viral infection, as we observed a complete lack of cytokine genes usually triggered during a viral infection. Our study shows for the first time how the immune system responds to the SARS infection, and opens new possibilities for designing new diagnostics and treatments for this new life-threatening disease.

  6. No association of the Arg51Gln and Leu72Met polymorphisms of the ghrelin gene and polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kehua; Wang, Leiguang; Zhao, Yueran; Shi, Yuhua; Wang, Laicheng; Chen, Zi-Jiang

    2009-02-01

    Ghrelin plays a role in regulating glucose metabolism and energy balance. Polymorphisms in preproghrelin and ghrelin gene could be responsible for obesity, insulin resistance and low ghrelin levels observed in some individuals. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of ghrelin gene on the clinical, the hormonal and metabolic features in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in a Chinese population. A large sample of Chinese PCOS (n = 271) women and a control group (n = 296) of healthy women matched for age were studied. Hormone and metabolic profiles were measured and blood samples were collected for genotype and allelic frequency analysis. Non-synonymous SNPs in the coding region (exon 2) of the preproghrelin gene (Arg51Gln (346 G>A) and Leu72Met (408 C>A) were studied using PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. The polymorphism Arg51Gln was not found in the cohorts studied. The distribution of Leu72Met was similar in PCOS group and in healthy controls. There was no significant difference in age, BMI, waist-hip-ratio and levels of FSH, LH, estradiol, testosterone and prolactin between PCOS patients with different genotypes, and the level of plasma glucose and insulin was also similar. No association was found between Leu72Met and Arg51Gln polymorphisms in the ghrelin gene and PCOS in Chinese population.

  7. Association of MicroRNA-146a rs2910164 Gene Polymorphism with Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehanna, E T; Ghattas, M H; Mesbah, N M; Saleh, S M; Abo-Elmatty, D M

    2015-01-01

    Alteration in microRNA-146a (miRNA-146a) expression is an important event in the pathogenesis of many human diseases. MiRNA-146a rs2910164 is a functional polymorphism that showed association with several diseases. Metabolic syndrome is an aggregation of multiple risk factors including impaired glucose tolerance, increased highdensity lipoprotein, abdominal obesity, and high blood pressure. The aim of this study was to assess the relation of miRNA-146a rs2910164 with metabolic syndrome and its component traits in Egyptian women from the Suez Canal area. The study included 100 healthy female subjects and 100 metabolic syndrome patients. The component traits of metabolic syndrome were determined and the genotypes of the polymorphisms were assessed using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique using the restriction enzyme Hpy188I. The rare C allele had a significantly higher frequency in metabolic syndrome patients (P = 0.013). The heterozygote GC and the rare CC genotypes showed a significant increase in body mass index, waist circumference, triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, systolic and diastolic blood pressure. The GC genotype was associated with higher fasting blood glucose, fasting serum insulin and insulin resistance. The carriers of CC genotype had significantly lower HDL compared with the GG genotype carriers. In conclusion, The C allele of miRNA-146a rs2910164 showed positive association with increased susceptibility to metabolic syndrome and its phenotypes in the study population.

  8. Cumulative irritancy in the guinea pig from low grade irritant vehicles and the angry skin syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Maibach, H I

    1980-01-01

    A 4-week open cumulative irritancy test in guinea pigs discriminated between two low grade irritant vehicles, nonionic base (anhydrous) and hydrophilic ointment. The procedure might be useful as a predictive test for low grade irritants. The angry skin syndrome was established in the guinea pigs...

  9. Usher syndrome: animal models, retinal function of Usher proteins, and prospects for gene therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Usher syndrome is a deafness-blindness disorder. The blindness occurs from a progressive retinal degeneration that begins after deafness and after the retina has developed. Three clinical subtypes of Usher syndrome have been identified, with mutations in any one of six different genes giving rise to type 1, in any one of three different genes to type 2, and in one identified gene causing Usher type 3. Mutant mice for most of the genes have been studied; while they have clear inner ear defects, retinal phenotypes are relatively mild and have been difficult to characterize. The retinal functions of the Usher proteins are still largely unknown. Protein binding studies have suggested many interactions among the proteins, and a model of interaction among all the proteins in the photoreceptor synapse has been proposed. However this model is not supported by localization data from some laboratories, or the indication of any synaptic phenotype in mutant mice. An earlier suggestion, based on patient pathologies, of Usher protein function in the photoreceptor cilium continues to gain support from immunolocalization and mutant mouse studies, which are consistent with Usher protein interaction in the photoreceptor ciliary/periciliary region. So far, the most characterized Usher protein is myosin VIIa. It is present in the apical RPE and photoreceptor ciliary/periciliary region, where it is required for organelle transport and clearance of opsin from the connecting cilium, respectively. Usher syndrome is amenable to gene replacement therapy, but also has some specific challenges. Progress in this treatment approach has been achieved by correction of mutant phenotypes in Myo7a-null mouse retinas, following lentiviral delivery of MYO7A. PMID:17936325

  10. White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection in shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) exposed to low and high salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Carreño, Santiago; Valencia-Yáñez, Ricardo; Correa-Sandoval, Francisco; Ruíz-García, Noé; Díaz-Herrera, Fernando; Giffard-Mena, Ivone

    2014-09-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) has a worldwide distribution and is considered one of the most pathogenic and devastating viruses to the shrimp industry. A few studies have explored the effect of WSSV on shrimp acclimated to low (5 practical salinity units [psu]) or high ([40 psu) salinity conditions. In this work, we analysed the physiological response of WSSV-infected Litopenaeus vannamei juveniles that were acclimated to different salinities (5, 15, 28, 34 and 54 psu). We evaluated the osmotic response and survival of the shrimp at different times after infection (0 to 48 hours), and we followed the expression levels of a viral gene (vp664) in shrimp haemolymph using real-time PCR. Our results indicate that the susceptibility of the shrimp to the virus increased at extreme salinities (5 and 54 psu), with higher survival rates at 15 and 28 psu, which were closer to the iso-osmotic point (24.7 psu, 727.5 mOsmol/kg). Acute exposure to the virus made the haemolymph less hyperosmotic at 5 and 15 psu and less hypo-osmotic at higher salinities ([28 psu). The capacity of white shrimp to osmoregulate, and thus survive, significantly decreased following WSSV infection. According to our results, extreme salinities (5 or 54 psu) are more harmful than seawater.

  11. Linkage of Usher syndrome type I gene (USH1B) to the long arm of chromosome 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimberling, W J; Möller, C G; Davenport, S; Priluck, I A; Beighton, P H; Greenberg, J; Reardon, W; Weston, M D; Kenyon, J B; Grunkemeyer, J A

    1992-12-01

    Usher syndrome is the most commonly recognized cause of combined visual and hearing loss in technologically developed countries. There are several different types and all are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. There may be as many as five different genes responsible for at least two closely related phenotypes. The nature of the gene defects is unknown, and positional cloning strategies are being employed to identify the genes. This is a report of the localization of one gene for Usher syndrome type I to chromosome 11q, probably distal to marker D11S527. Another USH1 gene had been previously localized to chromosome 14q, and this second localization establishes the existence of a new and independent locus for Usher syndrome.

  12. Brugada syndrome with a novel missense mutation in SCN5A gene: A case report from Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Zahidus Sayeed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brugada syndrome is an inherited cardiac arrhythmia that follows autosomal dominant transmission and can cause sudden death. We report a case of Brugada syndrome in a 55-year-old male patient presented with recurrent palpitation, atypical chest pain and presyncope. ECG changes were consistent with type 1 Brugada. Gene analysis revealed a novel missense mutation in SCN5A gene with a genetic variation of D785N and a nucleotide change at 2353G-A. One of his children also had the same mutation. To our knowledge this is the first genetically proved case of Brugada syndrome in Bangladesh.

  13. Connected Gene Communities Underlie Transcriptional Changes in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudaoud, Imène; Fournier, Éric; Baguette, Audrey; Vallée, Maxime; Lamaze, Fabien C; Droit, Arnaud; Bilodeau, Steve

    2017-09-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a complex multisystem developmental disorder caused by mutations in cohesin subunits and regulators. While its precise molecular mechanisms are not well defined, they point toward a global deregulation of the transcriptional gene expression program. Cohesin is associated with the boundaries of chromosome domains and with enhancer and promoter regions connecting the three-dimensional genome organization with transcriptional regulation. Here, we show that connected gene communities, structures emerging from the interactions of noncoding regulatory elements and genes in the three-dimensional chromosomal space, provide a molecular explanation for the pathoetiology of CdLS associated with mutations in the cohesin-loading factor NIPBL and the cohesin subunit SMC1A NIPBL and cohesin are important constituents of connected gene communities that are centrally positioned at noncoding regulatory elements. Accordingly, genes deregulated in CdLS are positioned within reach of NIPBL- and cohesin-occupied regions through promoter-promoter interactions. Our findings suggest a dynamic model where NIPBL loads cohesin to connect genes in communities, offering an explanation for the gene expression deregulation in the CdLS. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  14. Deletions at the SOX10 gene locus cause Waardenburg syndrome types 2 and 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondurand, Nadege; Dastot-Le Moal, Florence; Stanchina, Laure; Collot, Nathalie; Baral, Viviane; Marlin, Sandrine; Attie-Bitach, Tania; Giurgea, Irina; Skopinski, Laurent; Reardon, William; Toutain, Annick; Sarda, Pierre; Echaieb, Anis; Lackmy-Port-Lis, Marilyn; Touraine, Renaud; Amiel, Jeanne; Goossens, Michel; Pingault, Veronique

    2007-12-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an auditory-pigmentary disorder that exhibits varying combinations of sensorineural hearing loss and abnormal pigmentation of the hair and skin. Depending on additional symptoms, WS is classified into four subtypes, WS1-WS4. Absence of additional features characterizes WS2. The association of facial dysmorphic features defines WS1 and WS3, whereas the association with Hirschsprung disease (aganglionic megacolon) characterizes WS4, also called "Waardenburg-Hirschsprung disease." Mutations within the genes MITF and SNAI2 have been identified in WS2, whereas mutations of EDN3, EDNRB, and SOX10 have been observed in patients with WS4. However, not all cases are explained at the molecular level, which raises the possibility that other genes are involved or that some mutations within the known genes are not detected by commonly used genotyping methods. We used a combination of semiquantitative fluorescent multiplex polymerase chain reaction and fluorescent in situ hybridization to search for SOX10 heterozygous deletions. We describe the first characterization of SOX10 deletions in patients presenting with WS4. We also found SOX10 deletions in WS2 cases, making SOX10 a new gene of WS2. Interestingly, neurological phenotypes reminiscent of that observed in WS4 (PCWH syndrome [peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy, WS, and Hirschsprung disease]) were observed in some WS2-affected patients with SOX10 deletions. This study further characterizes the molecular complexity and the close relationship that links the different subtypes of WS.

  15. Síndrome de Lowe: relato de cinco casos Lowe syndrome: report of five cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Liliane de Almeida Maia

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A síndrome de Lowe, ou distrofia oculocerebrorrenal (OCRL, tem herança recessiva ligada ao cromossomo X. Apresenta-se com catarata, glaucoma, atraso no desenvolvimento neuropsicomotor (DNPM, déficit cognitivo e síndrome de Fanconi. OBJETIVO: Descrever a evolução de cinco pacientes pediátricos atendidos no ambulatório de tubulopatias do Departamento de Nefrologia Pediátrica da Universidade Federal de São Paulo-Escola Paulista de Medicina Unifesp (Unifesp-EPM. MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo de cinco pacientes masculinos atendidos no ambulatório de tubulopatias. RESULTADOS: A média de idade na primeira consulta foi de 76,5 meses; o tempo médio de acompanhamento, de 30,5 meses (mínimo de 8 meses e máximo de 53 meses. Os sintomas e os sinais clínicos incluíram catarata e nistagmo. Atraso no DNPM e déficit de peso e de estatura estiveram presentes em todos os casos, bem como poliúria, polidipsia, constipação, acidose metabólica, fosfatúria, bicarbonatúria, proteinúria, hipercalciúria e hiperuricosúria. Nefrocalcinose foi identificada em um paciente; litíase renal, em três; e redução do tamanho renal, em dois. Fraturas patológicas e raquitismo foram observados em dois pacientes; rarefação óssea e atraso na idade óssea, em todos os pacientes. Um deles apresentou redução no ritmo de filtração glomerular. Terapeuticamente, todos receberam álcalis, fósforo e reposição com vitamina D, além de orientação dietética para suas necessidades. CONCLUSÃO: Este estudo preconiza a necessidade do diagnóstico precoce e do acompanhamento médico e nutricional desses pacientes para evitar complicações relacionadas com distúrbios metabólicos.INTRODUCTION: Lowe Syndrome, or Oculocerebrorenal Dystrophy (OCRL, has a recessive inheritance linked to X chromosome. It presents cataracts and glaucoma, delay in neuropsychomotor development, cognitive deficits, and renal Fanconi syndrome. OBJECTIVE: Describe five

  16. Pitt-Hopkins syndrome: report of a case with a TCF4 gene mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orsini Alessandro

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims We will discuss the clinical and genetic diagnosis of a child with severe psychomotor delay, who at 3 years of age presented with paroxysms of hyperpnea-apnea and seizures unrelated to breathing anomalies. Methods The child underwent genetic (karyotype, FISH telomeres and neuroradiological (cranial CT and MRI tests, which proved to be normal. He came under our clinical observation at 3 years and 5 months of age. Due to severe psychomotor delay and facial dysmorphisms we completed the genetic investigations based on his clinical feature and analysis of the available literature. Results The presence of severe mental retardation associated with anomalous breathing pattern may suggest the Joubert and Rett syndrome, however these were excluded on the basis of clinical and genetic examination. Angelman syndrome, suspected for facial dysmorphisms and absent language, was also excluded because of the presence of a normal pattern of methylation at SNRPN locus. Another possible diagnosis was the Pitt-Hopkins Syndrome (PHS, characterized by severe mental retardation, breathing anomalies (paroxisms of hyperpnea-apnea, dysmorphisms and sometimes epilepsy. Haploinsufficiency of TCF4 gene located at 18q21.2 region has been recently identified as causative of this syndrome. In our patient the research of TCF4 mutation by the Institute of Human Genetics, University Hospital Erlangen (Germany, showed a de novo mutation. Conclusions The diagnosis of Pitt-Hopkins syndrome, an underdiagnosed cause of mental retardation, was based on clinical and genetic findings. Searching for TCF4 mutations is highly recommended when others overlapping syndromes was excluded. At our knowledge our patient is the first italian case of PHS diagnosed at molecular level.

  17. Contiguous gene deletion of chromosome 2p16.3-p21 as a cause of Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo-Mullen, Erin E; Lynn, Patricio B; Wang, Lu; Walsh, Michael; Gopalan, Anuradha; Shia, Jinru; Tran, Christina; Man, Fung Ying; McBride, Sean; Schattner, Mark; Zhang, Liying; Weiser, Martin R; Stadler, Zsofia K

    2018-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition caused by pathogenic mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Although commonly associated with clinical features such as intellectual disability and congenital anomalies, contiguous gene deletions may also result in cancer predisposition syndromes. We report on a 52-year-old male with Lynch syndrome caused by deletion of chromosome 2p16.3-p21. The patient had intellectual disability and presented with a prostatic adenocarcinoma with an incidentally identified synchronous sigmoid adenocarcinoma that exhibited deficient MMR with an absence of MSH2 and MSH6 protein expression. Family history was unrevealing. Physical exam revealed short stature, brachycephaly with a narrow forehead and short philtrum, brachydactyly of the hands, palmar transverse crease, broad and small feet with hyperpigmentation of the soles. The patient underwent total colectomy with ileorectal anastomosis for a pT3N1 sigmoid adenocarcinoma. Germline genetic testing of the MSH2, MSH6, and EPCAM genes revealed full gene deletions. SNP-array based DNA copy number analysis identified a deletion of 4.8 Mb at 2p16.3-p21. In addition to the three Lynch syndrome associated genes, the deleted chromosomal section encompassed genes including NRXN1, CRIPT, CALM2, FBXO11, LHCGR, MCFD2, TTC7A, EPAS1, PRKCE, and 15 others. Contiguous gene deletions have been described in other inherited cancer predisposition syndromes, such as Familial Adenomatous Polyposis. Our report and review of the literature suggests that contiguous gene deletion within the 2p16-p21 chromosomal region is a rare cause of Lynch syndrome, but presents with distinct phenotypic features, highlighting the need for recognition and awareness of this syndromic entity.

  18. Analysis of gene expression profile microarray data in complex regional pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wulin; Song, Yiyan; Mo, Chengqiang; Jiang, Shuangjian; Wang, Zhongxing

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to predict key genes and proteins associated with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) using bioinformatics analysis. The gene expression profiling microarray data, GSE47603, which included peripheral blood samples from 4 patients with CRPS and 5 healthy controls, was obtained from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in CRPS patients compared with healthy controls were identified using the GEO2R online tool. Functional enrichment analysis was then performed using The Database for Annotation Visualization and Integrated Discovery online tool. Protein‑protein interaction (PPI) network analysis was subsequently performed using Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interaction Genes database and analyzed with Cytoscape software. A total of 257 DEGs were identified, including 243 upregulated genes and 14 downregulated ones. Genes in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) family were most significantly differentially expressed. Enrichment analysis demonstrated that signaling pathways, including immune response, cell motion, adhesion and angiogenesis were associated with CRPS. PPI network analysis revealed that key genes, including early region 1A binding protein p300 (EP300), CREB‑binding protein (CREBBP), signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3, STAT5A and integrin α M were associated with CRPS. The results suggest that the immune response may therefore serve an important role in CRPS development. In addition, genes in the HLA family, such as HLA‑DQB1 and HLA‑DRB1, may present potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of CRPS. Furthermore, EP300, its paralog CREBBP, and the STAT family genes, STAT3 and STAT5 may be important in the development of CRPS.

  19. Novel variant in the TP63 gene associated to ankyloblepharon-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft lip/palate (AEC) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Francisco; Loidi, Lourdes; Abalo-Lojo, Jose M

    2017-01-01

    Ankyloblepharon-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft lip/palate (AEC) syndrome is a disorder resulting from anomalous embryonic development of ectodermal tissues. There is evidence that AEC syndrome is caused by mutations in the TP63 gene, which encodes the p63 protein. This is an important regulatory protein involved in epidermal proliferation and differentiation. Genome sequencing was performed in DNA from peripheral blood leukocytes of a newborn with AEC syndrome and her parents. Variants were searched in all coding exons and intron-exon boundaries of the TP63 gene. A heterozygous missense variant (NM_003722.4:c.1063G>C (p.Asp355His) was found in the newborn patient. No variants were found in either of the parents. We identified a previously unreported variant in TP63 gene which seems to be involved in the somatic malformations found in the AEC syndrome. The absence of this variant in both parents suggests that the variant appeared de novo.

  20. Five low energy phosphorene allotropes constructed through gene segments recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chaoyu; Zhang, ChunXiao; Tang, Chao; Ouyang, Tao; Li, Jin; Zhong, Jianxin

    2017-04-27

    Based on the crystal structures of the previously proposed low energy η-P and θ-P, five new phosphorene allotropes were predicted through gene segments recombination method. These five new phosphorene allotropes are confirmed dynamically stable and energetically more favorable than their parents (η-P and θ-P). Especially, the XX-XX type G1-P is confirmed energetically more favorable than most of all the previously proposed phosphorene allotropes, including black phosphorene and blue phosphorene, which is highly expected to be synthesized in future experiment through vapor deposition or epitaxial growth method like blue β-P. The calculated results also show that such a new promising phosphorene allotrope G1-P is a potential candidate for application in nano-electronics according to its middle band gap of about 1.491 eV from DFT-HSE06 calculation.

  1. Characterization of ORF89 - A latency-related gene of white spot syndrome virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, M.S.; Khadijah, Siti; Kwang, Jimmy

    2004-01-01

    Open reading frame 89 (ORF89) is one of the three genes that are believed to be involved in the latent infection of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). Here, we report the structure and functional characterization of ORF89. cDNA sequencing, 5' RLM-RACE, and 3' RLM-RACE showed that ORF89 gene is transcribed into an unspliced mRNA of 4436 nucleotides, which is predicted to encode a protein of 1437 amino acids. ORF89 expressed an approximately 165-kDa protein in Sf9 cells that localized in the nucleus. Amino acids 678-683 were found to be essential for nuclear localization. Cotransfection assays demonstrated that ORF89 protein repressed its own promoter as well as those of a protein kinase and the thymidine-thymidylate kinase genes of WSSV. SYBR Green real-time PCR indicated that the repression occurred at the transcriptional level

  2. Gene Therapy Restores Balance and Auditory Functions in a Mouse Model of Usher Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isgrig, Kevin; Shteamer, Jack W; Belyantseva, Inna A; Drummond, Meghan C; Fitzgerald, Tracy S; Vijayakumar, Sarath; Jones, Sherri M; Griffith, Andrew J; Friedman, Thomas B; Cunningham, Lisa L; Chien, Wade W

    2017-03-01

    Dizziness and hearing loss are among the most common disabilities. Many forms of hereditary balance and hearing disorders are caused by abnormal development of stereocilia, mechanosensory organelles on the apical surface of hair cells in the inner ear. The deaf whirler mouse, a model of human Usher syndrome (manifested by hearing loss, dizziness, and blindness), has a recessive mutation in the whirlin gene, which renders hair cell stereocilia short and dysfunctional. In this study, wild-type whirlin cDNA was delivered to the inner ears of neonatal whirler mice using adeno-associated virus serotype 2/8 (AAV8-whirlin) by injection into the posterior semicircular canal. Unilateral whirlin gene therapy injection was able to restore balance function as well as improve hearing in whirler mice for at least 4 months. Our data indicate that gene therapy is likely to become a treatment option for hereditary disorders of balance and hearing. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Treatment of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) using low dose naltrexone (LDN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Pradeep; Cooper, Mark S

    2013-06-01

    Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a neuropathic pain syndrome, which involves glial activation and central sensitization in the central nervous system. Here, we describe positive outcomes of two CRPS patients, after they were treated with low-dose naltrexone (a glial attenuator), in combination with other CRPS therapies. Prominent CRPS symptoms remitted in these two patients, including dystonic spasms and fixed dystonia (respectively), following treatment with low-dose naltrexone (LDN). LDN, which is known to antagonize the Toll-like Receptor 4 pathway and attenuate activated microglia, was utilized in these patients after conventional CRPS pharmacotherapy failed to suppress their recalcitrant CRPS symptoms.

  4. Association Study between Ghrelin Gene Polymorphism and Metabolic Syndrome in a Han Chinese Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yueyue; Yu, Yaqin; Wu, Yanhua; Rao, Wenwang; Zhang, Yangyu; Liu, Yingyu; Yang, Guang; Fu, Yingli; Shi, Jieping; Kou, Changgui

    2017-01-01

    Ghrelin, in humans, is a hormone secreted from the stomach with an orexigenic effect, which is good for digestion and absorption, as well as regulating physical growth, metabolism, and energy balance. It is also involved in the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This study assessed the association between single nucleotide variants of the GHRL gene and the risk of metabolic syndrome in a Han Chinese population. A case-control study was performed on 3780 Han Chinese comprising 1813 MetS cases and 1967 controls. Three missense polymorphisms in GHRL (rs26802, rs10490816, and rs696217) were selected, and the association between these polymorphisms and the risk of MetS was investigated. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the criteria of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). Using Pearson's 2 test, we found that there were no significant differences in genotype distributions and allele frequencies between cases and controls (all p > 0.05). There were also no significant differences in haplotype distributions between MetS cases and healthy controls. Furthermore, we confirmed that rs26802 of the GHRL gene is associated with body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, systolic blood pressure (SBP), and fasting glucose; rs10490816 is associated with triglycerides (TG) and total cholesterol (TC); while rs696217 is associated with hip circumference and fasting glucose. We concluded that mutations in the GHRL gene did not confer risk for MetS in our study population. Therefore, functional analysis and replication studies in other populations are needed to further investigate the exact role of the GHRL gene in MetS.

  5. Genes, language, and the nature of scientific explanations: the case of Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musolino, Julien; Landau, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we discuss two experiments of nature and their implications for the sciences of the mind. The first, Williams syndrome, bears on one of cognitive science's holy grails: the possibility of unravelling the causal chain between genes and cognition. We sketch the outline of a general framework to study the relationship between genes and cognition, focusing as our case study on the development of language in individuals with Williams syndrome. Our approach emphasizes the role of three key ingredients: the need to specify a clear level of analysis, the need to provide a theoretical account of the relevant cognitive structure at that level, and the importance of the (typical) developmental process itself. The promise offered by the case of Williams syndrome has also given rise to two strongly conflicting theoretical approaches-modularity and neuroconstructivism-themselves offshoots of a perennial debate between nativism and empiricism. We apply our framework to explore the tension created by these two conflicting perspectives. To this end, we discuss a second experiment of nature, which allows us to compare the two competing perspectives in what comes close to a controlled experimental setting. From this comparison, we conclude that the "meaningful debate assumption", a widespread assumption suggesting that neuroconstructivism and modularity address the same questions and represent genuine theoretical alternatives, rests on a fallacy.

  6. A Case of Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere Syndrome Due To a Novel Mutation in Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatraman Thulasi BA

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by motor, sensory, and cranial neuronopathies, associated with mutations in SLC52A2 and SLC52A3 genes that code for human riboflavin transporters RFVT2 and RFVT3, respectively. The authors describe the clinical course of a 6-year-old girl with Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome and a novel homozygous mutation c.1156T>C in the SLC52A3 gene, who presented at the age of 2.5 years with progressive brain stem dysfunction including ptosis, facial weakness, hearing loss, dysphagia, anarthria with bilateral vocal cord paralysis, and ataxic gait. She subsequently developed respiratory failure requiring tracheostomy and worsening dysphagia necessitating a gastrostomy. Following riboflavin supplementation, resolution of facial diplegia and ataxia, improvements in ptosis, and bulbar function including vocalization and respiration were noted. However, her sensorineural hearing loss remained unchanged. Similar to other cases of Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome, our patient responded favorably to early riboflavin supplementation with significant but not complete neurologic recovery.

  7. Hearing impairment caused by mutations in two different genes responsible for nonsyndromic and syndromic hearing loss within a single family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niepokój, Katarzyna; Rygiel, Agnieszka M; Jurczak, Piotr; Kujko, Aleksandra A; Śniegórska, Dominika; Sawicka, Justyna; Grabarczyk, Alicja; Bal, Jerzy; Wertheim-Tysarowska, Katarzyna

    2018-02-01

    Usher syndrome is rare genetic disorder impairing two human senses, hearing and vision, with the characteristic late onset of vision loss. This syndrome is divided into three types. In all cases, the vision loss is postlingual, while loss of hearing is usually prelingual. The vestibular functions may also be disturbed in Usher type 1 and sometimes in type 3. Vestibular areflexia is helpful in making a proper diagnosis of the syndrome, but, often, the syndrome is misdiagnosed as a nonsyndromic hearing loss. Here, we present a Polish family with hearing loss, which was clinically classified as nonsyndromic. After excluding mutations in the DFNB1 locus, we implemented the next-generation sequencing method and revealed that hearing loss was syndromic and mutations in the USH2A gene indicate Usher syndrome. This research highlights the importance of molecular analysis in establishing a clinical diagnosis of congenital hearing loss.

  8. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, blood vessels, ... A problem with the fibrillin gene causes Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome can be mild to severe, and ...

  9. Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is caused by not having a copy of several genes. It may be passed down in families. ... history of the condition. However, people with Williams syndrome have a 50% chance of passing the disorder ...

  10. A 380-kb Duplication in 7p22.3 Encompassing the LFNG Gene in a Boy with Asperger Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vulto-van Silfhout, A.T.; de Brouwer, A.F.; de Leeuw, N.; Obihara, C.C.; Brunner, H.G.; Vries, L.B.A. de

    2012-01-01

    De novo genomic aberrations are considered an important cause of autism spectrum disorders. We describe a de novo 380-kb gain in band p22.3 of chromosome 7 in a patient with Asperger syndrome. This duplicated region contains 9 genes including the LNFG gene that is an important regulator of NOTCH

  11. Symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Down Syndrome: Effects of the Dopamine Receptor D4 Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Gina Marie; Spanó, Goffredina; Edgin, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    This study examined individual differences in ADHD symptoms and executive function (EF) in children with Down syndrome (DS) in relation to the dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) gene, a gene often linked to ADHD in people without DS. Participants included 68 individuals with DS (7-21 years), assessed through laboratory tasks, caregiver reports, and…

  12. PPARγ2 C1431T genotype increases metabolic syndrome risk in young men with low cardiorespiratory fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanada, Kiyoshi; Iemitsu, Motoyuki; Murakami, Haruka; Tabata, Izumi; Yamamoto, Kenta; Gando, Yuko; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Higuchi, Mitsuru; Miyachi, Motohiko

    2011-02-11

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2 (PPARγ2) genotypes are related to obesity and the metabolic syndrome (MetS). A low level of cardiorespiratory fitness is also a strong determining factor in the development of MetS. This cross-sectional study was performed to investigate the influence of the interaction between the PPARγ2 genotype and cardiorespiratory fitness on the risk of MetS. Healthy Japanese men (n = 211) and women (n = 505) participated in this study. All subjects were divided into 8 groups according to sex, fitness level (high and low fitness groups), and age (younger, age interacted to produce a significant effect on MetS risk in younger men and that the risk of MetS in the CC genotype group with low cardiorespiratory fitness was significantly higher than that in the corresponding CT+TT genotypes or in the high fitness groups. There was no significant interaction between fitness and genotype in determining MetS risk in middle-aged/older men or in women in any group. With regard to the Pro12Ala genotype of the PPARγ2 gene, there were no significant differences in fitness or genotype effects nor were there any interactions between measurement variables. We concluded that the CC genotype of C1431T in the PPARγ2 gene together with low cardiorespiratory fitness may increase the risk of MetS in younger men (age < 40 yr), even with adjustment for age.

  13. [PAX3 gene mutation analysis for two Waardenburg syndrome type Ⅰ families and their prenatal diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Y; Liu, N; Kong, X D; Yan, J; Qin, Z B; Wang, B

    2016-12-07

    Objective: To analyze the mutations of PAX3 gene in two Waardenburg syndrome type Ⅰ (WS1) pedigrees and make prenatal diagnosis for the high-risk 18-week-old fetus. Methods: PAX3 gene was first analyzed by Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification(MLPA) for detecting pathogenic mutation of the probands of the two pedigrees. The mutations were confirmed by MLPA and Sanger in parents and unrelated healthy individuals.Prenatal genetic diagnosis for the high-risk fetus was performed by amniotic fluid cell after genotyping. Results: A heterozygous PAX3 gene gross deletion (E7 deletion) was identified in all patients from WS1-01 family, and not found in 20 healthy individuals.Prenatal diagnosis in WS1-01 family indicated that the fetus was normal. Molecular studies identified a novel deletion mutation c. 1385_1386delCT within the PAX3 gene in all affected WS1-02 family members, but in none of the unaffected relatives and 200 healthy individuals. Conclusions: PAX3 gene mutation is etiological for two WS1 families. Sanger sequencing plus MLPA is effective and accurate for making gene diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis.

  14. Polyunsaturated fatty acid regulation of gene transcription: a molecular mechanism to improve the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, S D

    2001-04-01

    This review addresses the hypothesis that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), particularly those of the (n-3) family, play pivotal roles as "fuel partitioners" in that they direct fatty acids away from triglyceride storage and toward oxidation, and that they enhance glucose flux to glycogen. In doing this, PUFA may protect against the adverse symptoms of the metabolic syndrome and reduce the risk of heart disease. PUFA exert their beneficial effects by up-regulating the expression of genes encoding proteins involved in fatty acid oxidation while simultaneously down-regulating genes encoding proteins of lipid synthesis. PUFA govern oxidative gene expression by activating the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha. PUFA suppress lipogenic gene expression by reducing the nuclear abundance and DNA-binding affinity of transcription factors responsible for imparting insulin and carbohydrate control to lipogenic and glycolytic genes. In particular, PUFA suppress the nuclear abundance and expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 and reduce the DNA-binding activities of nuclear factor Y, Sp1 and possibly hepatic nuclear factor-4. Collectively, the studies discussed suggest that the fuel "repartitioning" and gene expression actions of PUFA should be considered among criteria used in defining the dietary needs of (n-6) and (n-3) and in establishing the dietary ratio of (n-6) to (n-3) needed for optimum health benefit.

  15. MYO7A and USH2A gene sequence variants in Italian patients with Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodi, Andrea; Mariottini, Alessandro; Passerini, Ilaria; Murro, Vittoria; Tachyla, Iryna; Bianchi, Benedetta; Menchini, Ugo; Torricelli, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the spectrum of sequence variants in the MYO7A and USH2A genes in a group of Italian patients affected by Usher syndrome (USH). Thirty-six Italian patients with a diagnosis of USH were recruited. They received a standard ophthalmologic examination, visual field testing, optical coherence tomography (OCT) scan, and electrophysiological tests. Fluorescein angiography and fundus autofluorescence imaging were performed in selected cases. All the patients underwent an audiologic examination for the 0.25-8,000 Hz frequencies. Vestibular function was evaluated with specific tests. DNA samples were analyzed for sequence variants of the MYO7A gene (for USH1) and the USH2A gene (for USH2) with direct sequencing techniques. A few patients were analyzed for both genes. In the MYO7A gene, ten missense variants were found; three patients were compound heterozygous, and two were homozygous. Thirty-four USH2A gene variants were detected, including eight missense variants, nine nonsense variants, six splicing variants, and 11 duplications/deletions; 19 patients were compound heterozygous, and three were homozygous. Four MYO7A and 17 USH2A variants have already been described in the literature. Among the novel mutations there are four USH2A large deletions, detected with multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technology. Two potentially pathogenic variants were found in 27 patients (75%). Affected patients showed variable clinical pictures without a clear genotype-phenotype correlation. Ten variants in the MYO7A gene and 34 variants in the USH2A gene were detected in Italian patients with USH at a high detection rate. A selective analysis of these genes may be valuable for molecular analysis, combining diagnostic efficiency with little time wastage and less resource consumption.

  16. Complete exon sequencing of all known Usher syndrome genes greatly improves molecular diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacombe Didier

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Usher syndrome (USH combines sensorineural deafness with blindness. It is inherited in an autosomal recessive mode. Early diagnosis is critical for adapted educational and patient management choices, and for genetic counseling. To date, nine causative genes have been identified for the three clinical subtypes (USH1, USH2 and USH3. Current diagnostic strategies make use of a genotyping microarray that is based on the previously reported mutations. The purpose of this study was to design a more accurate molecular diagnosis tool. Methods We sequenced the 366 coding exons and flanking regions of the nine known USH genes, in 54 USH patients (27 USH1, 21 USH2 and 6 USH3. Results Biallelic mutations were detected in 39 patients (72% and monoallelic mutations in an additional 10 patients (18.5%. In addition to biallelic mutations in one of the USH genes, presumably pathogenic mutations in another USH gene were detected in seven patients (13%, and another patient carried monoallelic mutations in three different USH genes. Notably, none of the USH3 patients carried detectable mutations in the only known USH3 gene, whereas they all carried mutations in USH2 genes. Most importantly, the currently used microarray would have detected only 30 of the 81 different mutations that we found, of which 39 (48% were novel. Conclusions Based on these results, complete exon sequencing of the currently known USH genes stands as a definite improvement for molecular diagnosis of this disease, which is of utmost importance in the perspective of gene therapy.

  17. Gene repair of an Usher syndrome causing mutation by zinc-finger nuclease mediated homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overlack, Nora; Goldmann, Tobias; Wolfrum, Uwe; Nagel-Wolfrum, Kerstin

    2012-06-26

    Human Usher syndrome (USH) is the most frequent cause of inherited deaf-blindness. It is clinically and genetically heterogeneous, assigned to three clinical types of which the most severe type is USH1. No effective treatment for the ophthalmic component of USH exists. Gene augmentation is an attractive strategy for hereditary retinal diseases. However, several USH genes, like USH1C, are expressed in various isoforms, hampering gene augmentation. As an alternative treatment strategy, we applied the zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) technology for targeted gene repair of an USH1C, causing mutation by homologous recombination. We designed ZFNs customized for the p.R31X nonsense mutation in Ush1c. We evaluated ZFNs for DNA cleavage capability and analyzed ZFNs biocompatibilities by XTT assays. We demonstrated ZFNs mediated gene repair on genomic level by digestion assays and DNA sequencing, and on protein level by indirect immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses. The specifically designed ZFNs did not show cytotoxic effects in a p.R31X cell line. We demonstrated that ZFN induced cleavage of their target sequence. We showed that simultaneous application of ZFN and rescue DNA induced gene repair of the disease-causing mutation on the genomic level, resulting in recovery of protein expression. In our present study, we analyzed for the first time ZFN-activated gene repair of an USH gene. The data highlight the ability of ZFNs to induce targeted homologous recombination and mediate gene repair in USH. We provide further evidence that the ZFN technology holds great potential to recover disease-causing mutations in inherited retinal disorders.

  18. Genetic testing of the FBN1 gene in Chinese patients with Marfan/Marfan-like syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hang; Luo, Mingyao; Chen, Qianlong; Fu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Jing; Qian, Xiangyang; Sun, Xiaogang; Fan, Yuxin; Zhou, Zhou; Chang, Qian

    2016-08-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder typically involving the ocular, skeletal and cardiovascular systems, and aortic aneurysms/dissection mainly contributes to its mortality. Here, we performed genetic testing of the FBN1 gene in 39 Chinese probands with Marfan/Marfan-like syndrome and their related family members by Sanger sequencing. In total, 29 pathogenic/likely pathogenic FBN1 mutations, including 17 novel ones, were identified. In addition, most MFS patients with aortic disease (62%) had a truncating or splicing mutation. These results expand the FBN1 mutation spectrum and enrich our knowledge of genotype-phenotype correlations. Genetic testing for MFS and its related aortic diseases is increasingly important for early intervention and treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Transitional lumbosacral vertebrae and low back pain: diagnostic pitfalls and management of Bertolotti's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Daniel Benzecry de; Mattei, Tobias Alécio; Sória, Marília Grando; Prandini, Mirto Nelso; Leal, André Giacomelli; Milano, Jerônimo Buzzeti; Ramina, Ricardo

    2009-06-01

    Bertolotti's syndrome is a spine disorder characterized by the occurrence of a congenital lumbar transverse mega-apophysis in a transitional vertebral body that usually articulates with the sacrum or the iliac bone. It has been considered a possible cause of low back pain. We analyzed the cases of Bertolotti's syndrome that failed clinical treatment and reviewed the literature concerning this subject. Five patients in our series had severe low back pain due to the neo-articulation and two of them were successfully submitted to surgical resection of the transverse mega-apophysis. Taking into account the clinical and surgical experience acquired with these cases, we propose a diagnostic-therapeutic algorithm. There is still no consensus about the most appropriate therapy for Bertolotti's syndrome. In patients in whom the mega-apophysis itself may be the source of back pain, surgical resection may be a safe and effective procedure.

  20. Mutation screening of the PCDH15 gene in Spanish patients with Usher syndrome type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaijo, Teresa; Oshima, Aki; Aller, Elena; Carney, Carol; Usami, Shin-ichi; Millán, José M; Kimberling, William J

    2012-01-01

    PCDH15 codes for protocadherin-15, a cell-cell adhesion protein essential in the morphogenesis and cohesion of stereocilia bundles and in the function or preservation of photoreceptor cells. Mutations in the PCDH15 gene are responsible for Usher syndrome type I (USH1F) and non-syndromic hearing loss (DFNB23). The purpose of this work was to perform PCDH15 mutation screening to identify the genetic cause of the disease in a cohort of Spanish patients with Usher syndrome type I and establish phenotype-genotype correlation. Mutation analysis of PCDH15 included additional exons recently identified and was performed by direct sequencing. The screening was performed in 19 probands with USH already screened for mutations in the most prevalent USH1 genes, myosin VIIA (MYO7A) and cadherin-23 (CDH23), and for copy number variants in PCDH15. Seven different point mutations, five novel, were detected. Including the large PCDH15 rearrangements previously reported in our cohort of patients, a total of seven of 19 patients (36.8%) were carriers of at least one pathogenic allele. Thirteen out of the 38 screened alleles carried pathogenic PCDH15 variants (34.2%). Five out of the seven point mutations reported in the present study are novel, supporting the idea that most PCDH15 mutations are private. Furthermore, no mutational hotspots have been identified. In most patients, detected mutations led to a truncated protein, reinforcing the hypothesis that severe mutations cause the Usher I phenotype and that missense variants are mainly responsible for non-syndromic hearing impairment.

  1. Common sequence variants in the LOXL1 gene in pigment dispersion syndrome and pigmentary glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardina, Emiliano; Oddone, Francesco; Lepre, Tiziana; Centofanti, Marco; Peconi, Cristina; Tanga, Lucia; Quaranta, Luciano; Frezzotti, Paolo; Novelli, Giuseppe; Manni, Gianluca

    2014-04-16

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the LOXL1 gene are associated with pseudoesfoliation syndrome and pseudoesfoliation glaucoma. The aim of our study is to investigate a potential involvement of LOXL1 gene in the pathogenesis of pigment dispersion syndrome (PDS) and pigmentary glaucoma (PG). A cohort of Caucasian origin of 84 unrelated and clinically well-characterised patients with PDS/PG and 200 control subjects were included in the study. Genomic DNA from whole blood was extracted and the coding and regulatory regions of LOXL1 gene were risequenced in both patients and controls to identify unknown sequence variations. Genotype and haplotype analysis were performed with UNPHASED software. The expression levels of LOXL1 were determined on c-DNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. A significant allele association was detected for SNP rs2304722 within the fifth intron of LOXL1 (Odds ratio (OR = 2.43, p-value = 3,05e-2). Haplotype analysis revealed the existence of risk and protective haplotypes associated with PG-PDS (OR = 3.35; p-value = 1.00e-5 and OR = 3.35; p-value = 1.00e-4, respectively). Expression analysis suggests that associated haplotypes can regulate the expression level LOXL1. Haplotypes of LOXL1 are associated with PG-PDS independently from rs1048661, leading to a differential expression of the transcript.

  2. Unusual presentation of Kallmannn syndrome with contiguous gene deletion in three siblings of a family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Venkat Madhu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of 3 brothers aged 34, 24, and 22 years, unmarried, who presented to our endocrinology clinic with absence of secondary sexual characters. There was no such history in other siblings, but their maternal uncle had similar complaints. On examination, all 3 had pre-pubertal appearance, voice, and genitalia along with anosmia and bimanual synkinesia. Cryptorchidism was noticed in 2 while third person had small hypoplastic testes. It was also noted that all 3 patients had icthyosis mainly involving trunk, back, and limbs. The hormonal assays were consistent with isolated hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. IQ testing revealed mental retardation in the 2 patients. Ultrasound showed ectopic right kidney in one patient, atrophic right kidney in the second patient while the third patient had normal kidneys. MRI brain of all the patients showed poorly visualized olfactory tract and bulb. Kallmann syndrome (KS was diagnosed based on hormonal evaluation and MRI results. Of the four types of KS: Synkinesia, renal anomaly, and X-linked pedigree pattern in our patients pointed towards X-linked type 1 KS as the possible cause. But, icthyosis and mental retardation are not usual presentation of type 1 KS. They are usually seen as a result of contiguous gene deletion of KAL1, steroid sulfatase (STS, and mental retardation (MRX gene on X chromosome. Hence, the possible gene defect in our cases is inherited defect in contiguous gene deletion. The contiguous gene deletion as the cause of KS in 3 patients of same family is very rare and worth reporting. Also, the significance of phenotype-genotypic association in Kallmann syndrome is discussed

  3. Quantitative Detection of ID4 Gene Aberrant Methylation in the Differentiation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome from Aplastic Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mian-Yang Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS, especially hypoplastic MDS, and MDS with low blast counts or normal karyotype may be problematic. This study characterized ID4 gene methylation in patients with MDS and aplastic anemia (AA. Methods: The methylation status of ID4 was analyzed by bisulfite sequencing polymerase chain reaction (PCR and quantitative real-time methylation-specific PCR (MethyLight PCR in 100 patients with MDS and 31 patients with AA. Results: The MDS group had a higher ID4 gene methylation positivity rate (22.22% and higher methylation levels (0.21 [0-3.79] than the AA group (P < 0.05. Furthermore, there were significant differences between the hypoplastic MDS and AA groups, the MDS with low blast count and the AA groups, and the MDS with normal karyotype and the AA groups. The combination of genetic and epigenetic markers was used in much more patients with MDS (62.5% [35/56] than the use of genetic markers only (51.79% [29/56]. Conclusions: These results showed that the detection of ID4 methylation positivity rates and levels could be a useful biomarker for MDS diagnosis.

  4. Metabolic syndrome in Mexican children: Low effectiveness of diagnostic definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Espinoza, Barbara Itzel; Granados-Silvestre, María de Los Ángeles; Sánchez-Pozos, Katy; Ortiz-López, María Guadalupe; Menjivar, Marta

    Early identification of children with metabolic syndrome (MS) is essential to decrease the risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Detection of MS is however challenging because of the different definitions for diagnosis; as a result, preventive actions are not taken in some children at risk. The study objective was therefore to compare prevalence of MS in children according to the IDF, NCEP-ATP-III, Cook, de Ferranti and Weiss definitions, considering insulin resistance (IR) markers such as HOMA-IR and/or metabolic index (MI). A total of 508 Mexican children (aged 9 to 13 years) from seven schools were enrolled in a cross-sectional study. Somatometric, biochemical, and hormonal measurements were evaluated. Frequency of MS was 2.4-45.9% depending on the definition used. Frequency of IR in children not diagnosed with MS was 12.4-25.2% using HOMA-IR and 4.0-16.3% using MI. When HOMA-IR or MI was included in each of the definitions, frequency of MS was 8.5-50.2% and 7.7-46.9% respectively. The kappa value including HOMA-IR and/or MI was greater than 0.8. This study demonstrated the poor effectiveness of the current criteria used to diagnose MS in Mexican children, as shown by the variability in the definitions and by the presence of IR in children who not diagnosed with MS. Inclusion of HOMA-IR and/or MI in definitions of MS (thus increasing agreement between them) decreases the chance of excluding children at risk and allows for MS prevalence between populations. Copyright © 2017 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Explaining low uptake for Down syndrome screening in the Netherlands : (and predicting utilisation of other programmes)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crombag, NMTH

    2016-01-01

    In the Netherlands, only a quarter of all pregnant women take part in the current Down syndrome screening(DSS) programme. Compared to other Northern European countries, Dutch uptake rates are very low. This thesis concentrates on the test-utilisation of DSS, in particular the factors impeding or

  6. MATERNAL HEMOLYSIS, ELEVATED LIVER-ENZYMES AND LOW PLATELETS SYNDROME - SPECIFIC PROBLEMS IN THE NEWBORN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    EELTINK, CM; VANLINGEN, RA; AARNOUDSE, JG; DERKS, JB; OKKEN, A

    To evaluate the effects of maternal haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets (HELLP) syndrome on the fetus and neonate we retrospectively investigated the outcome of 87 pregnancies. All women showed thrombocytopenia, elevated liver enzymes and haemolysis. None of them died. Nine infants

  7. Same MSH2 Gene Mutation But Variable Phenotypes in 2 Families With Lynch Syndrome: Two Case Reports and Review of Genotype-Phenotype Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liccardo, Raffaella; De Rosa, Marina; Duraturo, Francesca

    2018-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome that can be subdivided into Lynch syndrome I, or site-specific colonic cancer, and Lynch syndrome II, or extracolonic cancers, particularly carcinomas of the stomach, endometrium, biliary and pancreatic systems, and urinary tract. Lynch syndrome is associated with point mutations and large rearrangements in DNA MisMatch Repair ( MMR ) genes. This syndrome shows a variable phenotypic expression in people who carry pathogenetic mutations. So far, a correlation in genotype-phenotype has not been definitely established. In this study, we describe 2 Lynch syndrome cases presenting with the same genotype but different phenotypes and discuss possible reasons for this.

  8. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    NBCC syndrome; Gorlin-Goltz syndrome; Basal cell nevus syndrome; BCNS; Basal cell cancer - nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome ... Nevoid basal cell carcinoma nevus syndrome is a rare genetic ... syndrome is known as PTCH ("patched"). The gene is passed down ...

  9. Nucleocapsid gene analysis from an imported case of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor-Aziyah Mat-Rahim

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the complete nucleocapsid (N gene region of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV from imported case in Malaysia and the relations with human- and camel-derived MERS-CoV. Methods: Combination of throat and nasal swab specimens was subjected to viral RNA extraction. For screening, the extracted RNA was subjected to real-time RT-PCR targeting upstream of E gene, open reading frame 1b and open reading frame 1a. For confirmation, the RNA was subjected to RT-PCR targeting partial part of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and nucleocapsid, followed by amplification of complete N gene region. Nucleotide sequencing of the first Malaysian case of MERS-CoV was performed following the confirmation with real-time RT-PCR detection. Results: Initial analysis of partial RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and N gene revealed that the nucleotides had high similarity to Jeddah_1_2013 strain. Analysis of complete N gene region (1 242 nucleotides from the case showed high similarity and yet distinct to the nucleotide sequences of camel-derived MERS-CoV. Conclusions: From the finding, there are possibilities that the patient acquired the infection from zoonotic transmission from dromedary camels.

  10. ALK7 Gene Polymorphism is Associated with Metabolic Syndrome Risk and Cardiovascular Remodeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wenchao; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Wei [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Public Health, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China); Lv, Ruijuan [Department of Emergency, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China); Wang, Zhihao [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Public Health, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China); Department of Geriatrics, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China); Shang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yun; Zhong, Ming [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Public Health, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China); Chen, Yuguo; Tang, Mengxiong, E-mail: tangmengxiongsdu8@163.com [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Public Health, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China); Department of Emergency, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China)

    2013-08-15

    Activin receptor-like kinase 7 (ALK7) is a type I receptor for the TGF-β superfamily and has recently been demonstrated to play an important role in the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis. To investigate the association of the ALK7 gene polymorphism with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and cardiovascular remodeling in MetS patients. The single nucleotide polymorphism rs13010956 in the ALK7 gene was genotyped in 351 Chinese subjects undergoing carotid and cardiac ultrasonography. The associations of the ALK7 gene polymorphism with the MetS phenotype, MetS parameters, and cardiovascular ultrasonic features were analyzed. The rs13010956 polymorphism in the ALK7 gene was found to be significantly associated with the MetS phenotype in females (p < 0.05) and was also significantly associated with blood pressure in the total (p < 0.05) and female populations (p < 0.01). Further analysis revealed that rs13010956 was associated with mean intima-media thickness of the carotid arteries in females (p < 0.05). After control for body mass index, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, and triglycerides, rs13010956 was also found to be significantly associated with left ventricular mass index in the total (p < 0.05) and female populations (p < 0.05). Our findings suggested that the ALK7 gene polymorphism rs13010956 was significantly associated with MetS risk in females and may be involved in cardiovascular remodeling in MetS patients.

  11. Necdin, a Prader-Willi syndrome candidate gene, regulates gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nichol L G; Wevrick, Rachel; Mellon, Pamela L

    2009-01-15

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a complex genetic disorder characterized by hyperphagia, obesity and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism, all highly suggestive of hypothalamic dysfunction. The NDN gene, encoding the MAGE family protein, necdin, maps to the PWS chromosome region and is highly expressed in mature hypothalamic neurons. Adult mice lacking necdin have reduced numbers of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons, but the mechanism for this reduction is unknown. Herein, we show that, although necdin is not expressed in an immature, migratory GnRH neuronal cell line (GN11), high levels are present in a mature GnRH neuronal cell line (GT1-7). Furthermore, overexpression of necdin activates GnRH transcription through cis elements bound by the homeodomain repressor Msx that are located in the enhancer and promoter of the GnRH gene, and knock-down of necdin expression reduces GnRH gene expression. In fact, overexpression of Necdin relieves Msx repression of GnRH transcription through these elements and necdin co-immunoprecipitates with Msx from GnRH neuronal cells, indicating that necdin may activate GnRH gene expression by preventing repression of GnRH gene expression by Msx. Finally, necdin is necessary for generation of the full complement of GnRH neurons during mouse development and extension of GnRH axons to the median eminence. Together, these results indicate that lack of necdin during development likely contributes to the hypogonadotrophic hypogonadal phenotype in individuals with PWS.

  12. Necdin, a Prader–Willi syndrome candidate gene, regulates gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons during development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nichol L.G.; Wevrick, Rachel; Mellon, Pamela L.

    2009-01-01

    Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS) is a complex genetic disorder characterized by hyperphagia, obesity and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism, all highly suggestive of hypothalamic dysfunction. The NDN gene, encoding the MAGE family protein, necdin, maps to the PWS chromosome region and is highly expressed in mature hypothalamic neurons. Adult mice lacking necdin have reduced numbers of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons, but the mechanism for this reduction is unknown. Herein, we show that, although necdin is not expressed in an immature, migratory GnRH neuronal cell line (GN11), high levels are present in a mature GnRH neuronal cell line (GT1-7). Furthermore, overexpression of necdin activates GnRH transcription through cis elements bound by the homeodomain repressor Msx that are located in the enhancer and promoter of the GnRH gene, and knock-down of necdin expression reduces GnRH gene expression. In fact, overexpression of Necdin relieves Msx repression of GnRH transcription through these elements and necdin co-immunoprecipitates with Msx from GnRH neuronal cells, indicating that necdin may activate GnRH gene expression by preventing repression of GnRH gene expression by Msx. Finally, necdin is necessary for generation of the full complement of GnRH neurons during mouse development and extension of GnRH axons to the median eminence. Together, these results indicate that lack of necdin during development likely contributes to the hypogonadotrophic hypogonadal phenotype in individuals with PWS. PMID:18930956

  13. Mutations in a novel gene with transmembrane domains underlie Usher syndrome type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joensuu, T; Hämäläinen, R; Yuan, B; Johnson, C; Tegelberg, S; Gasparini, P; Zelante, L; Pirvola, U; Pakarinen, L; Lehesjoki, A E; de la Chapelle, A; Sankila, E M

    2001-10-01

    Usher syndrome type 3 (USH3) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by progressive hearing loss, severe retinal degeneration, and variably present vestibular dysfunction, assigned to 3q21-q25. Here, we report on the positional cloning of the USH3 gene. By haplotype and linkage-disequilibrium analyses in Finnish carriers of a putative founder mutation, the critical region was narrowed to 250 kb, of which we sequenced, assembled, and annotated 207 kb. Two novel genes-NOPAR and UCRP-and one previously identified gene-H963-were excluded as USH3, on the basis of mutational analysis. USH3, the candidate gene that we identified, encodes a 120-amino-acid protein. Fifty-two Finnish patients were homozygous for a termination mutation, Y100X; patients in two Finnish families were compound heterozygous for Y100X and for a missense mutation, M44K, whereas patients in an Italian family were homozygous for a 3-bp deletion leading to an amino acid deletion and substitution. USH3 has two predicted transmembrane domains, and it shows no homology to known genes. As revealed by northern blotting and reverse-transcriptase PCR, it is expressed in many tissues, including the retina.

  14. Neurogenetics and gene therapy for reward deficiency syndrome: are we going to the Promised Land?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Thanos, Peter K; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D; Febo, Marcelo; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Fratantonio, James; Demotrovics, Zsolt; Gold, Mark S

    2015-07-01

    Addiction is a substantial health issue with limited treatment options approved by the FDA and as such currently available. The advent of neuroimaging techniques that link neurochemical and neurogenetic mechanisms to the reward circuitry brain function provides a framework for potential genomic-based therapies. Through candidate and genome-wide association studies approaches, many gene polymorphisms and clusters have been implicated in drug, food and behavioral dependence linked by the common rubric reward deficiency syndrome (RDS). The results of selective studies that include the role of epigenetics, noncoding micro RNAs in RDS behaviors especially drug abuse involving alcohol, opioids, cocaine, nicotine, pain and feeding are reviewed in this article. New targets for addiction treatment and relapse prevention, treatment alternatives such as gene therapy in animal models, and pharmacogenomics and nutrigenomics methods to manipulate transcription and gene expression are explored. The recognition of the clinical benefit of early genetic testing to determine addiction risk stratification and dopaminergic agonistic, rather than antagonistic therapies are potentially the genomic-based wave of the future. In addition, further development, especially in gene transfer work and viral vector identification, could make gene therapy for RDS a possibility in the future.

  15. Novel mutations in the TBX5 gene in patients with Holt-Oram Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna P.R. Porto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Holt-Oram syndrome (HOS is an autosomal dominant condition characterized by upper limb and cardiac malformations. Mutations in the TBX5 gene cause HOS and have also been associated with isolated heart and arm defects. Interactions between the TBX5, GATA4 and NKX2.5 proteins have been reported in humans. We screened the TBX5, GATA4, and NKX2.5 genes for mutations, by direct sequencing, in 32 unrelated patients presenting classical (8 or atypical HOS (1, isolated congenital heart defects (16 or isolated upper-limb malformations (7. Pathogenic mutations in the TBX5 gene were found in four HOS patients, including two new mutations (c.374delG; c.678G > T in typical patients, and the hotspot mutation c.835C > T in two patients, one of them with an atypical HOS phenotype involving lower-limb malformations. Two new mutations in the GATA4 gene were found in association with isolated upper-limb malformations, but their clinical significance remains to be established. A previously described possibly pathogenic mutation in the NKX2.5 gene (c.73C > 7 was detected in a patient with isolated heart malformations and also in his clinically normal father.

  16. ALK7 Gene Polymorphism is Associated with Metabolic Syndrome Risk and Cardiovascular Remodeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wenchao; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Wei; Lv, Ruijuan; Wang, Zhihao; Shang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yun; Zhong, Ming; Chen, Yuguo; Tang, Mengxiong

    2013-01-01

    Activin receptor-like kinase 7 (ALK7) is a type I receptor for the TGF-β superfamily and has recently been demonstrated to play an important role in the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis. To investigate the association of the ALK7 gene polymorphism with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and cardiovascular remodeling in MetS patients. The single nucleotide polymorphism rs13010956 in the ALK7 gene was genotyped in 351 Chinese subjects undergoing carotid and cardiac ultrasonography. The associations of the ALK7 gene polymorphism with the MetS phenotype, MetS parameters, and cardiovascular ultrasonic features were analyzed. The rs13010956 polymorphism in the ALK7 gene was found to be significantly associated with the MetS phenotype in females (p < 0.05) and was also significantly associated with blood pressure in the total (p < 0.05) and female populations (p < 0.01). Further analysis revealed that rs13010956 was associated with mean intima-media thickness of the carotid arteries in females (p < 0.05). After control for body mass index, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, and triglycerides, rs13010956 was also found to be significantly associated with left ventricular mass index in the total (p < 0.05) and female populations (p < 0.05). Our findings suggested that the ALK7 gene polymorphism rs13010956 was significantly associated with MetS risk in females and may be involved in cardiovascular remodeling in MetS patients

  17. First Trimester Hemolysis, Elevated Liver Enzymes, Low Platelets Syndrome in a Surrogate Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Myer, Emily; Hill, James

    2015-01-01

    Background The occurrence of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets (HELLP) syndrome before 20 weeks of gestation is rare. HELLP is a possible but rare syndrome in gestational surrogate pregnancies for surrogates with risk factors for development of preeclampsia. Case A 32-year-old patient with chronic hypertension and positive antinuclear antibody presented for prenatal care at 13 weeks and 1 day. She was a surrogate for the embryo of a 43-year-old couple. By 15 weeks she developed...

  18. Fanconi syndrome due to prolonged use of low-dose adefovir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Bing Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi syndrome results from a generalized abnormality of the proximal tubules of the kidney and owing to phosphate depletion can cause hypophosphatemic osteomalacia. Adefovir dipivoxyl (ADV effectively suppresses hepatitis B virus replication but exhibits nephrotoxicity when administered at a low dosage. We report two cases of Fanconi syndrome induced by ADV at 10 mg/day to call for regular screening for evidence of proximal tubular dysfunction and detailed bone metabolic investigations for prompt detection of ADV nephrotoxicity is critically important to ensure timely drug withdrawal before the development of irreversible tubulointerstitial injury.

  19. Sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBP1) gene expression is similarly increased in polycystic ovary syndrome and endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiee, Mohamad N; Mongan, Nigel; Seedhouse, Claire; Chapman, Caroline; Deen, Suha; Abu, Jafaru; Atiomo, William

    2017-05-01

    Women with polycystic ovary syndrome have a three-fold higher risk of endometrial cancer. Insulin resistance and hyperlipidemia may be pertinent factors in the pathogenesis of both conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate endometrial sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 gene expression in polycystic ovary syndrome and endometrial cancer endometrium, and to correlate endometrial sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 gene expression with serum lipid profiles. A cross-sectional study was performed at Nottingham University Hospital, UK. A total of 102 women (polycystic ovary syndrome, endometrial cancer and controls; 34 participants in each group) were recruited. Clinical and biochemical assessments were performed before endometrial biopsies were obtained from all participants. Taqman real-time polymerase chain reaction for endometrial sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 gene and its systemic protein expression were analyzed. The body mass indices of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (29.28 ± 2.91 kg/m 2 ) and controls (28.58 ± 2.62 kg/m 2 ) were not significantly different. Women with endometrial cancer had a higher mean body mass index (32.22 ± 5.70 kg/m 2 ). Sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 gene expression was significantly increased in polycystic ovary syndrome and endometrial cancer endometrium compared with controls (p ovary syndrome, but this was not statistically significant. Similarly, statistically insignificant positive correlations were found between endometrial sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 gene expression and body mass index in endometrial cancer (r = 0.643, p = 0.06) and waist-hip ratio (r = 0.096, p = 0.073). Sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 gene expression was significantly positively correlated with triglyceride in both polycystic ovary syndrome and endometrial cancer (p = 0.028 and p = 0.027, respectively). Quantitative serum sterol regulatory element

  20. Differential allelic expression of a fibrillin gene (FBNI) in patients with Marfan syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hewett, D.; Lynch, J.; Sykes, B. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Firth, H. [Churchill Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom); Child, A. [St. George`s Hospital Medical School, London (United Kingdom)

    1994-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a connective-tissue disorder affecting cardiovascular, skeletal, and ocular systems. The major Marfan locus has been identified as the FBN1 gene on chromosome 15; this codes for the extracellular-matrix protein fibrillin, a 350-kD constituent of the 8-10-nm elastin-associated microfibrils. The authors identified five MFS patients who were heterozygous for an RsaI restriction-site dimorphism in the 3{prime} UTR of the FBN1 gene. This expressed variation was used to distinguish the mRNA output from each of the two FBN1 alleles in fibroblast cultures from these five patients. Three of the patients were shown to produce <5% of the normal level of FBN1 transcripts from one of their alleles. This null-allele phenotype was not observed in 10 nonmarfanoid fibroblast cell lines. 26 refs., 4 figs.

  1. VPA alleviates neurological deficits and restores gene expression in a mouse model of Rett syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weixiang Guo

    Full Text Available Rett syndrome (RTT is a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder that occurs once in every 10,000-15,000 live female births. Despite intensive research, no effective cure is yet available. Valproic acid (VPA has been used widely to treat mood disorder, epilepsy, and a growing number of other disorders. In limited clinical studies, VPA has also been used to control seizure in RTT patients with promising albeit somewhat unclear efficacy. In this study we tested the effect of VPA on the neurological symptoms of RTT and discovered that short-term VPA treatment during the symptomatic period could reduce neurological symptoms in RTT mice. We found that VPA restores the expression of a subset of genes in RTT mouse brains, and these genes clustered in neurological disease and developmental disorder networks. Our data suggest that VPA could be used as a drug to alleviate RTT symptoms.

  2. 657del5 mutation of the NBS1 gene in myelodysplastic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunjevacki Vera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS are clonal hematologic stem cell disorders with an as yet unknown molecular pathology. Genetic instability has been proposed as a cause of MDS. Mutations in the NBS1 gene, whose product nibrin (p95 is involved in DNA damage repair and cell-cycle control, might be associated with an elevated predisposition to the development of MDS. The aim of the study was to examine truncating 5 bp deletion (657del5, the most frequent NBS1 gene mutation in Slavic populations, in MDS patients. Among 71 MDS patients, we found one case that was heterozygous for the NBS1 657del5 mutation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a NBS1 mutation in MDS. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175091

  3. Recombinase Activating Gene 1 Deficiencies Without Omenn Syndrome May Also Present With Eosinophilia and Bone Marrow Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ulusoy, Ezgi; Karaca, Neslihan Edeer; Azarsiz, Elif; Berdeli, Afig; Aksu, Guzide; Kutukculer, Necil

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) syndromes are a heterogenous group of diseases characterized by impairment in both cellular and humoral immunity with a range of genetic disorders. Complete recombinase activating gene (RAG) deficiency is associated with classical T-B-NK+ SCID which is the most common phenotype of Turkish SCID patients. There is a broad spectrum of hypomorfic RAG mutations including Omenn syndrome, leaky or atypical SCID with expansion of ?? T cells, autoimmu...

  4. Concomitant mutation and epimutation of the MLH1 gene in a Lynch syndrome family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cini, Giulia; Carnevali, Ileana; Quaia, Michele; Chiaravalli, Anna Maria; Sala, Paola; Giacomini, Elisa; Maestro, Roberta; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Viel, Alessandra

    2015-04-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is an inherited predisposition cancer syndrome, typically caused by germline mutations in the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. In the last years, a role for epimutations of the same genes has also been reported. MLH1 promoter methylation is a well known mechanism of somatic inactivation in tumors, and more recently, several cases of constitutional methylation have been identified. In four subjects affected by multiple tumors and belonging to a suspected LS family, we detected a novel secondary MLH1 gene epimutation. The methylation of MLH1 promoter was always linked in cis with a 997 bp-deletion (c.-168_c.116+713del), that removed exon 1 and partially involved the promoter of the same gene. Differently from cases with constitutional primary MLH1 inactivation, this secondary methylation was allele-specific and CpGs of the residual promoter region were totally methylated, leading to complete allele silencing. In the colon tumor of the proband, MLH1 and PMS2 expression was completely lost as a consequence of a pathogenic somatic point mutation (MLH1 c.199G>A, p.Gly67Arg) that also abrogated local methylation by destroying a CpG site. The evidences obtained highlight how MLH1 mutations and epimutations can reciprocally influence each other and suggest that an altered structure of the MLH1 locus results in epigenetic alteration. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Investigation of the Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 Gene in Patients with Non-Syndromic Mitral Valve Prolapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maëlle Perrocheau

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Non-syndromic mitral valve prolapse (MVP is a common degenerative valvulopathy, predisposing to arrhythmia and sudden death. The etiology of MVP is suspected to be under genetic control, as supported by familial cases and its manifestation in genetic syndrome (e.g., Marfan syndrome. One candidate etiological mechanism is a perturbation of the extracellular matrix (ECM remodeling of the valve. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the role of genetic variants in the matrix metalloproteinase 2 gene (MMP2 known to regulate the ECM turnover by direct degradation of proteins and for which transgenic mice develop MVP. Direct sequencing of exons of MMP2 in 47 unrelated patients and segregation analyses in families did not reveal any causative mutation. We studied eight common single nucleotide polymorphisms (TagSNPs, which summarize the genetic information at the MMP2 locus. The association study in two case controls sets (NCases = 1073 and NControls = 1635 provided suggestive evidence for the association of rs1556888 located downstream MMP2 with the risk of MVP, especially in patients with the fibroelastic defiency form. Our study does not support the contribution of MMP2 rare variation in the etiology to MVP in humans, though further genetic and molecular investigation is required to confirm our current suggestive association of one common variant.

  6. A case report of Muir-Torre syndrome in a woman with breast cancer and MSI-Low skin squamous cell carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Kientz, Caroline; Joly, Marie-Odile; Faivre, Laurence; Clemenson, Alix; Dalac, Sophie; Lepage, C?me; Chapusot, Caroline; Jacquot, Caroline; Schiappa, Renaud; Lebrun, Marine

    2017-01-01

    Background The tumor spectrum in the Lynch syndrome is well defined, comprising an increased risk of developing colonic and extracolonic malignancies. Muir-Torre syndrome is a variant with a higher risk of skin disease. Patients have been described carrying mutations in the mismatch repair genes and presenting tumors with unusual histology or affected organ not part of the Lynch syndrome spectrum. Hence, the real link between Lynch syndrome, or Muir-Torre syndrome, and these tumors remains di...

  7. First Trimester Hemolysis, Elevated Liver Enzymes, Low Platelets Syndrome in a Surrogate Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, Emily; Hill, James

    2015-10-01

    Background The occurrence of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets (HELLP) syndrome before 20 weeks of gestation is rare. HELLP is a possible but rare syndrome in gestational surrogate pregnancies for surrogates with risk factors for development of preeclampsia. Case A 32-year-old patient with chronic hypertension and positive antinuclear antibody presented for prenatal care at 13 weeks and 1 day. She was a surrogate for the embryo of a 43-year-old couple. By 15 weeks she developed uncontrolled hypertension requiring hospitalization. She was expectantly managed until her condition deteriorated. At 16 weeks and 1 day she developed hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, thrombocytopenia, and fetal demise. Conclusions HELLP syndrome is rare and carries a significant morbidity and mortality for the mother and fetus. Clinicians should encourage the surrogate to share her medical history with the embryo donor for appropriate counseling on pregnancy risks.

  8. De novo dominant mutation of SOX10 gene in a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaitian; Zong, Ling; Liu, Min; Zhan, Yuan; Wu, Xuan; Zou, Wenting; Jiang, Hongyan

    2014-06-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a rare genetic disorder, inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. The condition is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigment disturbances of the hair, skin, and iris. The de novo mutation in the SOX10 gene, responsible for Waardenburg syndrome type II, is rarely seen. The present study aimed to identify the genetic causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II in a Chinese family. Clinical and molecular evaluations were conducted in a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II. A novel SOX10 heterozygous c.259-260delCT mutation was identified. Heterozygosity was not observed in the parents and sister of the proband, indicating that the mutation has arisen de novo. The novel frameshift mutation, located in exon 3 of the SOX10 gene, disrupted normal amino acid coding from Leu87, leading to premature termination at nucleotide 396 (TGA). The high mobility group domain of SOX10 was inferred to be partially impaired. The novel heterozygous c.259-260delCT mutation in the SOX10 gene was considered to be the cause of Waardenburg syndrome in the proband. The clinical and genetic characterization of this family would help elucidate the genetic heterogeneity of SOX10 in Waardenburg syndrome type II. Moreover, the de novo pattern expanded the mutation data of SOX10. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Otitis Media in a New Mouse Model for CHARGE Syndrome with a Deletion in the Chd7 Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Cong; Yu, Heping; Yang, Bin; Han, Fengchan; Zheng, Ye; Bartels, Cynthia F.; Schelling, Deborah; Arnold, James E.; Scacheri, Peter C.; Zheng, Qing Yin

    2012-01-01

    Otitis media is a middle ear disease common in children under three years old. Otitis media can occur in normal individuals with no other symptoms or syndromes, but it is often seen in individuals clinically diagnosed with genetic diseases such as CHARGE syndrome, a complex genetic disease caused by mutation in the Chd7 gene and characterized by multiple birth defects. Although otitis media is common in human CHARGE syndrome patients, it has not been reported in mouse models of CHARGE syndrome. In this study, we report a mouse model with a spontaneous deletion mutation in the Chd7 gene and with chronic otitis media of early onset age accompanied by hearing loss. These mice also exhibit morphological alteration in the Eustachian tubes, dysregulation of epithelial proliferation, and decreased density of middle ear cilia. Gene expression profiling revealed up-regulation of Muc5ac, Muc5b and Tgf-β1 transcripts, the products of which are involved in mucin production and TGF pathway regulation. This is the first mouse model of CHARGE syndrome reported to show otitis media with effusion and it will be valuable for studying the etiology of otitis media and other symptoms in CHARGE syndrome. PMID:22539951

  10. The Evaluation of Pelvic Cross Syndrome in Patients with Non-specific Chronic Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Masoud A'rab

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was the investigation of relationship between muscle imbalance syndrome in the lumbo-pelvic area (Pelvic Cross Syndrome which includes the combination of weakness of phasic muscles and tightness of postural muscles, lordosis and chronic low back pain. Materials & Methods: This study was a comparative - cross-sectional and case – control research. A convenience sample of 600 subjects participated in this study. The size of lordosis, strength of abdominal and gluteal muscles and the extensibility of iliopsoas and back extensor muscles were measured in each group. The best cut-off values obtained from Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curve analysis were used to categorize subjects as having weak or tight muscles in accordance with the assumptions. The lumbar lordosis in subjects with and without patterns of muscle impairments, and the association between lordosis and low back pain was assessed. Data were analyzed by using statistical methods such as: ICC, Kolmogroff – Smirnoff, Independent T test and ANOVA. Results: The Findings of this study showed no significant difference in the degree of lordosis in subjects with and without patterns of muscle impairment in pelvic cross syndrome (P=0.38 and no significant difference in the lordosis between subjects with and without low back pain among those with specific patterns of muscle impairment in pelvic cross syndrome (P=0.62. Data also showed no significant association between degree of lordosis and low back pain (P=0.25. Conclusion: The findings of this study did not support the Pelvic Cross Syndrome theory, which indicates certain patterns of muscle impairment would lead to exaggerated LL and LBP. Our data show a relationship between muscle impairment and occurrence of LBP, but probably not via changing the degree of lumbar lordosis as it has been proposed in PCS theory.

  11. [Analgesic efficacy of magnetoledotherapy in patients with low back pain syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krukowska, Jolanta; Woldańska-Okońska, Marta; Jankowska, Katarzyna; Kwiecień-Czerwieniec, Ilona; Czernicki, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Low back pain syndromes most often occur due to overloading of the musculoskeletal system. The cause is a frequent, improper lifting of heavy objects, most commonly by those working physically, with repetitive movements of bending and straightening of the trunk (turning and bending with load). This problem affects not only adults but also children and adolescents. There is a growing interest in new forms of analgesic therapy nowadays, especially in those that exhibit synergistic therapeutic effects. The aim of this work is to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of magnetoledotherapy in patients with lumbar--sacrum spinal pain syndromes caused by joints degenerative changes. The examination was carried out in 66 patients of both sexes aged 30 to 76 (average 54.7 +/- 13.8) with low back pain syndrome caused by spinal degenerative changes. The patients were divided into three groups according to the applied analgesic therapy (magnetoledotherapy, magnetostimulation, TENS currents). Level of pain has been evaluated four times in all patients--before the start of therapy and after 5, 10 and 15 applications with the use of the modified Laitinen Questionnaire and Visual-Analoque Scale (VAS). Post therapy levels of pain in the studied patients decreased significantly. According to Laitinen questionnaire, the greatest improvement was observed in the group treated with magnetoledotherapy and TENS currents and the smallest improvement was observed in the group treated with magnetostimulation. 1. Magnetoledotherapy shows significant analgesic efficacy in patients with low back pain syndrome and shows no side effects. 2. Concurrent application of both the infrared radiation generated by LED's and magnetostimulation synergistically reinforces analgesic effect in patients with low back pain syndrome, especially in level of pain and frequency of its occurrence, which results in the increase of movement activity and decrease in administration of analgesics.

  12. Low tendon stiffness and abnormal ultrastructure distinguish classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome from benign joint hypermobility syndrome in patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rie Harboe; Couppé, Christian; Jensen, Jacob Kildevang

    2014-01-01

    There is a clinical overlap between classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (cEDS) and benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS), with hypermobility as the main symptom. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of type V collagen mutations and tendon pathology in these 2 syndromes. In patients...... and abnormal ultrastructure distinguish classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome from benign joint hypermobility syndrome in patients....

  13. Genetic mapping of the gene for Usher syndrome: Linkage analysis in a large Samaritan kindred

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonne-Tamir, B.; Korostishevsky, M.; Kalinsky, H.; Seroussi, E.; Beker, R.; Weiss, S. (Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Ramat-Aviv (Israel)); Godel, V. (Ichilov Hospital, Tel-Aviv (Israel))

    1994-03-01

    Usher syndrome is a group of autosomal recessive disorders associated with congenital sensorineural deafness and progressive visual loss due to retinitis pigmentosa. Sixteen members of the small inbred Samaritan isolate with autosomal recessive deafness from 59 individuals including parents and affected and nonaffected sibs were typed for markers on chromosomes 1q and 11q for which linkage has recently been established for Usher syndrome types II and I. Statistically significant linkage was observed with four markers on 11q (D11S533, D11S527, OMP, and INT2) with a maximum six-point location score of 11.61 at the D11S533 locus. Analysis of haplotypes supports the notion that the mutation arose only once in an ancestral chromosome carrying a specific haplotype. The availability of markers closely linked to the disease locus allows indirect genotype analysis and identifies all carriers of the gene within the community. Furthermore, the detection of complete linkage disequilibrium between the D11S533 marker and the Usher gene suggests that these loci are either identical or adjacent and narrows the critical region to which physical mapping efforts are currently directed. 35 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Common mutations identified in the MLH1 gene in familial Lynch syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jisha Elias

    2017-12-01

    In this study we identified three families with Lynch syndrome from a rural cancer center in western India (KCHRC, Goraj, Gujarat, where 70-75 CRC patients are seen annually. DNA isolated from the blood of consented family members of all three families (8-10 members/family was subjected to NGS sequencing methods on an Illumina HiSeq 4000 platform. We identified unique mutations in the MLH1 gene in all three HNPCC family members. Two of the three unrelated families shared a common mutation (154delA and 156delA. Total 8 members of a family were identified as carriers for 156delA mutation of which 5 members were unaffected while 3 were affected (age of onset: 1 member <30yrs & 2 were>40yr. The family with 154delA mutation showed 2 affected members (>40yr carrying the mutations.LYS618DEL mutation found in 8 members of the third family showed that both affected and unaffected carried the mutation. Thus the common mutations identified in the MLH1 gene in two unrelated families had a high risk for lynch syndrome especially above the age of 40.

  15. Mutational Analysis of PTPN11 Gene in Taiwanese Children with Noonan Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Sui Hung

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Noonan syndrome (NS is an autosomal dominant disorder presenting with characteristic facies, short stature, skeletal anomalies, and congenital heart defects. Mutations in protein-tyrosine phosphatase, nonreceptor-type 11 (PTPN11, encoding SHP-2, account for 33-50% of NS. This study screened for mutations in the PTPN11 gene in 34 Taiwanese patients with NS. Mutation analysis of the 15 coding exons and exon/intron boundaries was performed by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing of the PTPN11 gene. We identified 10 different missense mutations in 13 (38% patients, including a novel missense mutation (855T > G, F285L. These mutations were clustered in exon 3 (n = 6 encoding the N-SH2 domain, exon 4 (n = 2 encoding the C-SH2 domain, and in exons 8 (n = 2 and 13 (n = 3 encoding the PTP domain. In conclusion, this study provides further support that PTPN11 mutations are responsible for Noonan syndrome in Taiwanese patients. [J Formos Med Assoc 2007;106(2:169-172

  16. Mutations in KEOPS-complex genes cause nephrotic syndrome with primary microcephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Daniela A; Rao, Jia; Mollet, Geraldine; Schapiro, David; Daugeron, Marie-Claire; Tan, Weizhen; Gribouval, Olivier; Boyer, Olivia; Revy, Patrick; Jobst-Schwan, Tilman; Schmidt, Johanna Magdalena; Lawson, Jennifer A; Schanze, Denny; Ashraf, Shazia; Ullmann, Jeremy F P; Hoogstraten, Charlotte A; Boddaert, Nathalie; Collinet, Bruno; Martin, Gaëlle; Liger, Dominique; Lovric, Svjetlana; Furlano, Monica; Guerrera, I Chiara; Sanchez-Ferras, Oraly; Hu, Jennifer F; Boschat, Anne-Claire; Sanquer, Sylvia; Menten, Björn; Vergult, Sarah; De Rocker, Nina; Airik, Merlin; Hermle, Tobias; Shril, Shirlee; Widmeier, Eugen; Gee, Heon Yung; Choi, Won-Il; Sadowski, Carolin E; Pabst, Werner L; Warejko, Jillian K; Daga, Ankana; Basta, Tamara; Matejas, Verena; Scharmann, Karin; Kienast, Sandra D; Behnam, Babak; Beeson, Brendan; Begtrup, Amber; Bruce, Malcolm; Ch'ng, Gaik-Siew; Lin, Shuan-Pei; Chang, Jui-Hsing; Chen, Chao-Huei; Cho, Megan T; Gaffney, Patrick M; Gipson, Patrick E; Hsu, Chyong-Hsin; Kari, Jameela A; Ke, Yu-Yuan; Kiraly-Borri, Cathy; Lai, Wai-Ming; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Littlejohn, Rebecca Okashah; Masri, Amira; Moghtaderi, Mastaneh; Nakamura, Kazuyuki; Ozaltin, Fatih; Praet, Marleen; Prasad, Chitra; Prytula, Agnieszka; Roeder, Elizabeth R; Rump, Patrick; Schnur, Rhonda E; Shiihara, Takashi; Sinha, Manish D; Soliman, Neveen A; Soulami, Kenza; Sweetser, David A; Tsai, Wen-Hui; Tsai, Jeng-Daw; Topaloglu, Rezan; Vester, Udo; Viskochil, David H; Vatanavicharn, Nithiwat; Waxler, Jessica L; Wierenga, Klaas J; Wolf, Matthias T F; Wong, Sik-Nin; Leidel, Sebastian A; Truglio, Gessica; Dedon, Peter C; Poduri, Annapurna; Mane, Shrikant; Lifton, Richard P; Bouchard, Maxime; Kannu, Peter; Chitayat, David; Magen, Daniella; Callewaert, Bert; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Zenker, Martin; Antignac, Corinne; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2017-10-01

    Galloway-Mowat syndrome (GAMOS) is an autosomal-recessive disease characterized by the combination of early-onset nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) and microcephaly with brain anomalies. Here we identified recessive mutations in OSGEP, TP53RK, TPRKB, and LAGE3, genes encoding the four subunits of the KEOPS complex, in 37 individuals from 32 families with GAMOS. CRISPR-Cas9 knockout in zebrafish and mice recapitulated the human phenotype of primary microcephaly and resulted in early lethality. Knockdown of OSGEP, TP53RK, or TPRKB inhibited cell proliferation, which human mutations did not rescue. Furthermore, knockdown of these genes impaired protein translation, caused endoplasmic reticulum stress, activated DNA-damage-response signaling, and ultimately induced apoptosis. Knockdown of OSGEP or TP53RK induced defects in the actin cytoskeleton and decreased the migration rate of human podocytes, an established intermediate phenotype of SRNS. We thus identified four new monogenic causes of GAMOS, describe a link between KEOPS function and human disease, and delineate potential pathogenic mechanisms.

  17. Spectrum of mismatch repair gene mutations and clinical presentation of Hispanic individuals with Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunga, Annette Y; Ricker, Charité; Espenschied, Carin R; Castillo, Danielle; Melas, Marilena; Herzog, Josef; Bannon, Sarah; Cruz-Correa, Marcia; Lynch, Patrick; Solomon, Ilana; Gruber, Stephen B; Weitzel, Jeffrey N

    2017-04-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS), the most common hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome, is caused by mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations. However, data about MMR mutations in Hispanics are limited. This study aims to describe the spectrum of MMR mutations in Hispanics with LS and explore ancestral origins. This case series involved an IRB-approved retrospective chart review of self-identified Hispanic patients (n = 397) seen for genetic cancer risk assessment at four collaborating academic institutions in California, Texas, and Puerto Rico who were evaluated by MMR genotyping and/or tumor analysis. A literature review was conducted for all mutations identified. Of those who underwent clinical genetic testing (n = 176), 71 had MMR gene mutations. Nine mutations were observed more than once. One third (3/9) of recurrent mutations and two additional mutations (seen only once) were previously reported in Spain, confirming the influence of Spanish ancestry on MMR mutations in Hispanic populations. The recurrent mutations identified (n = 9) included both previously reported mutations as well as unique mutations not in the literature. This is the largest report of Hispanic MMR mutations in North America; however, a larger sample and haplotype analyses are needed to better understand recurrent MMR mutations in Hispanic populations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Identification of four novel mutations of the WFS1 gene in Iranian Wolfram syndrome pedigrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahraman, Martha; Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza; Vakili, Rahim; Hosseini, Sousan; Fardi Golyan, Fatemeh; Ghaemi, Nosrat; Forghanifard, Mohammad Mahdi

    2016-12-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a rare neurodegenerative disorder with an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance characterized by various clinical manifestations. The related gene, WFS1, encodes a transmembrane glycoprotein, named wolframin. Genetic analyses demonstrated that mutations in this gene are associated with WS type 1. Our aim in this study was to sequence WFS1 coding region in Iranian Wolfram syndrome pedigrees. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood of 12 WS patients and their healthy parents. Exons 2-8 and the exon-intron junctions of WFS1 were sequenced. DNA sequences were compared to the reference using Sequencher software. Molecular analysis of WFS1 revealed six different mutations. Four novel and two previously reported mutations were identified. One novel mutation, c.1379_1381del, is predicted to produce an aberrant protein. A second novel mutation, c.1384G > T, encodes a truncated protein. Novel mutation, c.1097-1107dup (11 bp), causes a frameshift which results in a premature stop codon. We screened for the novel missense mutation, c.1010C > T, in 100 control alleles. This mutation was not found in any of the healthy controls. Our study increased the spectrum of WFS1 mutations and supported the role of WFS1 in susceptibility to WS. We hope that these findings open new horizons to future molecular investigations which may help to prevent and treat this devastating disease.

  19. Genetic mapping of the gene for Usher syndrome: linkage analysis in a large Samaritan kindred.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonné-Tamir, B; Korostishevsky, M; Kalinsky, H; Seroussi, E; Beker, R; Weiss, S; Godel, V

    1994-03-01

    Usher syndrome is a group of autosomal recessive disorders associated with congenital sensorineural deafness and progressive visual loss due to retinitis pigmentosa. Sixteen members of the small inbred Samaritan isolate with autosomal recessive deafness were studied in 10 related sibships. DNA samples from 59 individuals including parents and affected and nonaffected sibs were typed for markers on chromosomes 1q and 11q for which linkage has recently been established for Usher syndrome types II and I. Statistically significant linkage was observed with four markers on 11q (D11S533, D11S527, OMP, and INT2) with a maximum six-point location score of 11.61 at the D11S533 locus. Analysis of haplotypes supports the notion that the mutation arose only once in an ancestral chromosome carrying a specific haplotype. The availability of markers closely linked to the disease locus allows indirect genotype analysis and identifies all carriers of the gene within the community. Furthermore, the detection of complete linkage disequilibrium between the D11S533 marker and the Usher gene suggests that these loci are either identical or adjacent and narrows the critical region to which physical mapping efforts are currently directed.

  20. Interventional radiological therapy of benign low back pain syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huegli, R.W.; Jacob, A.L.; Steinbrich, W.

    2007-01-01

    Spinal affections belong to the most widespread sources of back pain. Beside medical history and clinical examination, the radiological investigation plays an important rote in the clinical workup especially with the modern Cross sectional imaging methods such as computed and magnetic resonance tomography. After exclusion of a malignant disease usually a conservative therapeutic approach is the first line treatment option. If the conservative treatment approach falls a minimalinvasive image guided diagnostic or therapeutic infiltration may be considered. Thereby the interventional radiologist should be a member of the team which decides the clinical strategy. This article describes epidemiology and pathophysiology, common pre-interventional diagnostic strategies, drugs, indications, possible complications and the impact of diagnostic and therapeutic minimally invasive image guided techniques in low back pain. In this context facet joint blockade, periradicular and peridural therapy as well as sacroiliac joint blockades are discussed

  1. Nelson`s syndrome associated with a somatic frame shift mutation in the glucocorticoid recepter gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karl, M.; Stratakis, C.A.; Chrousos, G.P.; Katz, D.A.; Ali, I.U.; Oldfield, E.H. [National Inst. of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-01-01

    Nelson`s syndrome is the appearance and/or progression of ACTH-secreting pituitary macroadenomas in patients who had previously undergone bilateral adrenalectomy for Cushing`s disease. Extremely high plasma ACTH levels and aggressive neoplastic growth might be explained by the lack of appropriate glucocorticoid negative feedback due to defective glucocorticoid signal transduction. To study the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene in Nelson`s syndrome, DNA was extracted from pituitary adenomas and leukocytes of four patients with this condition and amplified by PCR for direct sequence analysis. In one of the tumors, a heterozygous mutation, consisting of an insertion of a thymine between complementary DNA nucleotides 1188 and 1189, was found in exon 2. This frame-shift mutation led to premature termination at amino acid residue 366 of the world-type coding sequence, excluding the expression of a functioning receptor protein from the defective allele. The mutation was not detected in the sequence of the GR gene in the patient`s leukocyte DNA, indicating a somatic origin. By lowering the receptor number in tumorous cells, this defect might have caused local resistance to negative glucocorticoid feedback similar to that caused by the presence of a null allele in a kindred with the generalized glucocorticoid resistance syndrome. P53 protein accumulation, previously reported in 60% of corticotropinomas, could not be detected in any of the four pituitary tumors examined by immunohistochemistry. We suggest that a somatic GR defect might have played a pathophysiological role in the tumorigenesis of the corticotropinoma bearing this mutation. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Cholesterol Transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1 Gene Expression in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Tavoosi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABCA1 and ABCG1 genes encode the cholesterol transporter proteins that play a key role in cholesterol and phospholipids homeostasis. This study was aimed at evaluating and comparing ABCA1 and ABCG1 genes expression in metabolic syndrome patients and healthy individuals. This case-control study was performed on 36 patients with metabolic syndrome and the same number of healthy individuals in Hamadan (west of Iran during 2013-2014. Total RNA was extracted from mononuclear cells and purified using RNeasy Mini Kit column. The expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1 genes was performed by qRT-PCR. Lipid profile and fasting blood glucose were measured using colorimetric procedures. ABCG1 expression in metabolic syndrome patients was significantly lower (about 75% compared to that of control group, while for ABCA1 expression, there was no significant difference between the two studied groups. Comparison of other parameters such as HDL-C, FBS, BMI, waist circumference, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure between metabolic syndrome patients and healthy individuals showed significant differences (P<0.05. Decrease in ABCG1 expression in metabolic syndrome patients compared to healthy individuals suggests that hyperglycemia, related metabolites, and hyperlipidemia over the transporter capacity resulted in decreased expression of ABCG1. Absence of a significant change in ABCA1 gene expression between two groups can indicate a different regulation mechanism for ABCA1 expression.

  3. MASA syndrome is caused by mutations in the neural cell adhesion gene, L1CAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, C.E.; Wang, Y.; Schroer, R.J.; Stevenson, R.E. [Greenwood Genetic Center, SC (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The MASA syndrome is a recessive X-linked disorder characterized by Mental retardation, Adducted thumbs, Shuffling gait and Aphasia. Recently we found that MASA in one family was likely caused by a point mutation in exon 6 of the L1CAM gene. This gene has also been shown to be involved in X-linked hydrocephalus (HSAS). We have screened 60 patients with either sporadic HSAS or MASA as well as two additional families with MASA. For the screening, we initially utilized 3 cDNA probes for the L1CAM gene. In one of the MASA families, K8310, two affected males were found to have an altered BglII band. The band was present in their carrier mother but not in their normal brothers. This band was detected by the entire cDNA probe as well as the cDNA probe for 3{prime} end of the gene. Analysis of the L1CAM sequence indicated the altered BglII site is distal to the exon 28 but proximal to the punative poly A signal site. It is hypothesized that this point mutation alters the stability of the L1CAM mRNA. This is being tested using cell lines established from the two affected males.

  4. Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome due to mutations in the RRM2B gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Belén; Area, Estela; Flanigan, Kevin M; Ganesh, Jaya; Jayakar, Parul; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Coku, Jorida; Naini, Ali; Shanske, Sara; Tanji, Kurenai; Hirano, Michio; DiMauro, Salvatore

    2008-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome (MDS) is characterized by a reduction in mtDNA copy number and has been associated with mutations in eight nuclear genes, including enzymes involved in mitochondrial nucleotide metabolism (POLG, TK2, DGUOK, SUCLA2, SUCLG1, PEO1) and MPV17. Recently, mutations in the RRM2B gene, encoding the p53-controlled ribonucleotide reductase subunit, have been described in seven infants from four families, who presented with various combinations of hypotonia, tubulopathy, seizures, respiratory distress, diarrhea, and lactic acidosis. All children died before 4 months of age. We sequenced the RRM2B gene in three unrelated cases with unexplained severe mtDNA depletion. The first patient developed intractable diarrhea, profound weakness, respiratory distress, and died at 3 months. The other two unrelated patients had a much milder phenotype and are still alive at ages 27 and 36 months. All three patients had lactic acidosis and severe depletion of mtDNA in muscle. Muscle histochemistry showed RRF and COX deficiency. Sequencing the RRM2B gene revealed three missense mutations and two single nucleotide deletions in exons 6, 8, and 9, confirming that RRM2B mutations are important causes of MDS and that the clinical phenotype is heterogeneous and not invariably fatal in infancy.

  5. MSX ₁ gene variant and non-syndromic clefting: association or rejection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Naveen Admala; Gopinath, Adusumilli; Reddy, Jayaprakash Thirumala; Devanna, Raghu; Saravanan, Pichai; Rohra, Mayur G

    2014-01-01

    Non-syndromic cleft lip/palate (NSCL/P) is a congenital anomaly with significant medical, psychological and social ramifications. There is sufficient evidence to hypothesize that locus for this condition can be identified by candidate genes. The aim of this study is to amplify the chosen region (799 G >T) of MSX 1 gene, investigate the degree of association and perform a mutation research from Raichur cleft lip and palate patient sample. Case history and clinical examination of the patient were recorded to rule. Written consent was obtained from patients and controls for in vivo study. STUDY WAS DESIGNED IN FOUR STEPS AS FOLLOWS: a. Collection of a blood sample; b. Genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extraction; c. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR); d. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Blood samples were collected from 50 subjects having NSCL/P and 50 controls. Genomic DNA was extracted, PCR and RFLP was performed for digestion products that were evaluated. Chi-square test with P value at 95% confidence intervals. The results showed a positive correlation between MSX 1 799 G >T gene variant and NSCL/P patients in Raichur patients. From a genetically diverse etiology MSX 1 799 G >T gene variant may be a good screening marker for NSCL/P in Raichur patients.

  6. Insulin gene polymorphisms in type 1 diabetes, Addison's disease and the polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hahner Stefanie

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphisms within the insulin gene can influence insulin expression in the pancreas and especially in the thymus, where self-antigens are processed, shaping the T cell repertoire into selftolerance, a process that protects from β-cell autoimmunity. Methods We investigated the role of the -2221Msp(C/T and -23HphI(A/T polymorphisms within the insulin gene in patients with a monoglandular autoimmune endocrine disease [patients with isolated type 1 diabetes (T1D, n = 317, Addison's disease (AD, n = 107 or Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT, n = 61], those with a polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II (combination of T1D and/or AD with HT or GD, n = 62 as well as in healthy controls (HC, n = 275. Results T1D patients carried significantly more often the homozygous genotype "CC" -2221Msp(C/T and "AA" -23HphI(A/T polymorphisms than the HC (78.5% vs. 66.2%, p = 0.0027 and 75.4% vs. 52.4%, p = 3.7 × 10-8, respectively. The distribution of insulin gene polymorphisms did not show significant differences between patients with AD, HT, or APS-II and HC. Conclusion We demonstrate that the allele "C" of the -2221Msp(C/T and "A" -23HphI(A/T insulin gene polymorphisms confer susceptibility to T1D but not to isolated AD, HT or as a part of the APS-II.

  7. Gene expression in response to exercise in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Keech

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS is a debilitating disorder of unknown pathogenesis, characterised by fatigue, which is exacerbated after minimal exercise. We examined the effect of a single bout of aerobic exercise on leucocyte mRNA expression of genes putatively linked to exaggerated afferent signalling as an under-pinning of the fatigue state. A carefully-characterised sample of patients with CFS (N = 10 and healthy matched control participants (N = 12 were included. Participant ratings of fatigue and other symptoms, as well as blood samples, were obtained at baseline, and five other time-points up to 72 hours after 25 minutes of moderate-intensity cycling exercise. Leucocyte mRNA of 19 metabolite-sensing, adrenergic, immune and neurotransmission genes was examined using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Patients with CFS reported substantial fatigue, functional impairment and poor sleep at baseline (all p < 0.02, and exercise immediately induced worsened patients’ fatigue (effect size, ES = 1.17. There were no significant changes in gene expression after exercise and patients did not differ from control participants at any time point. Higher levels of expression of ficolin (FCN1 and a purinergic receptor (P2RX4 in patients with CFS were found when all time points were combined. Patients with CFS did not show significant exercise-induced changes in leucocyte mRNA of 19 metabolite-sensing, adrenergic, immune and neurotransmission genes despite a prominent exacerbation of fatigue.

  8. Catecholamine-related gene expression in blood correlates with tic severity in tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunther, Joan; Tian, Yingfang; Stamova, Boryana; Lit, Lisa; Corbett, Blythe; Ander, Brad; Zhan, Xinhua; Jickling, Glen; Bos-Veneman, Netty; Liu, Da; Hoekstra, Pieter; Sharp, Frank

    2012-12-30

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a heritable disorder characterized by tics that are decreased in some patients by treatment with alpha adrenergic agonists and dopamine receptor blockers. Thus, this study examines the relationship between catecholamine gene expression in blood and tic severity. TS diagnosis was confirmed using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV criteria and tic severity measured using the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS) for 26 un-medicated subjects with TS. Whole blood was collected and Ribonucleic acid (RNA) processed on Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 ST arrays. An Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) identified 3627 genes correlated with tic severity (pdisorders, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). Correlation of gene expression in peripheral blood with tic severity may allow inferences about catecholamine pathway dysfunction in TS subjects. Findings built on previous work suggest that at least some genes expressed peripherally are relevant for central nervous system (CNS) pathology in the brain of individuals with TS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Gene mutation analysis and prenatal diagnosis of a family with Bartter syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Long; Ma, Na; Li, Xiu-Rong; Gong, Fei; DU, Juan

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the mutation of related genes and prenatal diagnosis of a family with Bartter syndrome (BS). The high-throughput capture sequencing technique and PCR-Sanger sequencing were used to detect pathogenic genes in the proband of this family and analyze the whole family at the genomic level. After the genetic cause was clarified, the amniotic fluid was collected from the proband's mother who was pregnant for 5 months for prenatal diagnosis. The proband carried compound heterozygous mutations of c.88C>T(p.Arg30*) and c.968+2T>A in the CLCNKB gene; c.88C>T(p.Arg30*) had been reported as a pathogenic mutation, and c.968+2T>A was a new mutation. Pedigree analysis showed that the two mutations were inherited from the mother and father, respectively. Prenatal diagnosis showed that the fetus did not inherit the mutations from parents and had no mutations at the two loci. The follow-up visit confirmed that the infant was in a healthy state, which proved the accuracy of genetic diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis. The compound heterozygous mutations c.88C>T(p.Arg30*) and c.968+2T>A in the CLCNKB gene are the cause of BS in the proband, and prenatal diagnosis can prevent the risk of recurrence of BS in this family.

  10. MDE heteroduplex analysis of PCR products spanning each exon of the fibrillin (FBN1) gene greatly increases the efficiency of mutation detection in the Marfan syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nijbroek, G.; Dietz, H.C. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Med., Baltimore, MD (United States); Pereira, L.; Ramirz, F. [Mount Sinai School of Med., New York, NY (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Defects in fibrillin (FNB1) cause the Marfan syndrome (MFS). Classic Marfan phenotype cosegregates with intragenic and/or flanking marker alleles in all families tested and a significant number of FBN1 mutations have been identified in affected individuals. Using a standard method of mutation detection, SSCP analysis of overlapping RT-PCR amplimers that span the entire coding sequence, the general experience has been a low yield of identifiable mutations, ranging from 10-20%. Possible explanations included low sensitivity of mutation screening procedures, under-representation of mutant transcript in patient samples either due to deletions or mutant alleles containing premature termination codons, clustering of mutations in yet uncharacterized regions of the gene, including regulatory elements, or genetic heterogeneity. In order to compensate for a potential reduced mutant transcript stability, we have devised a method to screen directly from genomic DNA. The intronic boundaries flanking each of the 65 FBN1 exons were characterized and primer pairs were fashioned such that all splice junctions would be included in the resultant amplimers. The entire gene was screened for a panel of 9 probands with classic Marfan syndrome using mutation detection enhancement (MDE) gel heteroduplex analysis. A mutation was identified in 5/9 (55%) of patient samples. All were either missense mutations involving a cysteine residue or small deletions that did not create a frame shift. In addition, 10 novel polymorphisms were found. We conclude that the majority of mutations causing Marfan syndrome reside in the FBN1 gene and that mutations creating premature termination codons are not the predominant cause of inefficient mutation detection using RT-PCR. We are currently modifying screening methods to increase sensitivity and targeting putative FBN1 gene promoter sequences for study.

  11. Identification of a novel mutation in the human growth hormone receptor gene (GHR) in a patient with Laron syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennero, Isabelle; Edouard, Thomas; Rashad, Mona; Bieth, Eric; Conte-Aurio, Françoise; Marin, Françoise; Tauber, Maithé; Salles, Jean Pierre; El Kholy, Mohamed

    2007-07-01

    Deletions and mutations in the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene are the underlying etiology of Laron syndrome (LS) or growth hormone (GH) insensitivity syndrome (GHIS), an autosomal recessive disease. Most patients are distributed in or originate from Mediterranean and Middle-Eastern countries. Sixty mutations have been described so far. We report a novel mutation in the GHR gene in a patient with LS. Genomic DNA sequencing of exon 5 revealed a TT insertion at nucleotide 422 after codon 122. The insertion resulted in a frameshift introducing a premature termination codon that led to a truncated receptor. We present clinical, biochemical and molecular evidence of LS as the result of this homozygous insertion.

  12. Gitelman or Bartter type 3 syndrome? A case of distal convoluted tubulopathy caused by CLCNKB gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, António José; Castro, Alexandra

    2013-01-22

    A 32-year-old woman with no significant medical history was sent to our consultation due to hypokalaemia (syndrome (GS) came negative. CLCNKB gene mutation analysis present in both GS and Bartter (BS) type 3 syndromes was positive. The patient is now being treated with potassium and magnesium oral supplements, ramipril and spironolactone with stable near-normal potassium and magnesium levels. This article presents the case of a patient with hypokalaemia caused by CLCNKB gene mutation hard to categorise as GS or BS type 3.

  13. Treatment of burning mouth syndrome with a low-level energy diode laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui-Wen; Huang, Yu-Feng

    2011-02-01

    To test the therapeutic efficacy of low-level energy diode laser on burning mouth syndrome. Burning mouth syndrome is characterized by burning and painful sensations in the mouth, especially the tongue, in the absence of significant mucosal abnormalities. Although burning mouth syndrome is relatively common, little is known regarding its etiology and pathophysiology. As a result, no treatment is effective in all patients. Low-level energy diode laser therapy has been used in a variety of chronic and acute pain conditions, including neck, back and myofascial pain, degenerative osteoarthritis, and headache. A total of 17 patients who had been diagnosed with burning mouth syndrome were treated with an 800-nm wavelength diode laser. A straight handpiece was used with an end of 1-cm diameter with the fiber end standing 4 cm away from the end of handpiece. When the laser was applied, the handpiece directly contacted or was immediately above the symptomatic lingual surface. The output used was 3 W, 50 msec intermittent pulsing, and a frequency of 10 Hz, which was equivalent to an average power of 1.5 W/cm(2) (3 W × 0.05 msec × 10 Hz = 1.5 W/cm(2)). Depending on the involved area, laser was applied to a 1-cm(2) area for 70 sec until all involved area was covered. Overall pain and discomfort were analyzed with a 10-cm visual analogue scale. All patients received diode laser therapy between one and seven times. The average pain score before the treatment was 6.7 (ranging from 2.9 to 9.8). The results showed an average reduction in pain of 47.6% (ranging from 9.3% to 91.8%). The burning sensation remained unchanged for up to 12 months. Low-level energy diode laser may be an effective treatment for burning mouth syndrome.

  14. The Lowe syndrome protein OCRL1 is required for endocytosis in the zebrafish pronephric tubule.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Oltrabella

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Lowe syndrome and Dent-2 disease are caused by mutation of the inositol 5-phosphatase OCRL1. Despite our increased understanding of the cellular functions of OCRL1, the underlying basis for the renal tubulopathy seen in both human disorders, of which a hallmark is low molecular weight proteinuria, is currently unknown. Here, we show that deficiency in OCRL1 causes a defect in endocytosis in the zebrafish pronephric tubule, a model for the mammalian renal tubule. This coincides with a reduction in levels of the scavenger receptor megalin and its accumulation in endocytic compartments, consistent with reduced recycling within the endocytic pathway. We also observe reduced numbers of early endocytic compartments and enlarged vacuolar endosomes in the sub-apical region of pronephric cells. Cell polarity within the pronephric tubule is unaffected in mutant embryos. The OCRL1-deficient embryos exhibit a mild ciliogenesis defect, but this cannot account for the observed impairment of endocytosis. Catalytic activity of OCRL1 is required for renal tubular endocytosis and the endocytic defect can be rescued by suppression of PIP5K. These results indicate for the first time that OCRL1 is required for endocytic trafficking in vivo, and strongly support the hypothesis that endocytic defects are responsible for the renal tubulopathy in Lowe syndrome and Dent-2 disease. Moreover, our results reveal PIP5K as a potential therapeutic target for Lowe syndrome and Dent-2 disease.

  15. Low-power laser therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome: effective optical power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-power laser therapy has been used for the non-surgical treatment of mild to moderate carpal tunnel syndrome, although its efficacy has been a long-standing controversy. The laser parameters in low-power laser therapy are closely related to the laser effect on human tissue. To evaluate the efficacy of low-power laser therapy, laser parameters should be accurately measured and controlled, which has been ignored in previous clinical trials. Here, we report the measurement of the effective optical power of low-power laser therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome. By monitoring the backside reflection and scattering laser power from human skin at the wrist, the effective laser power can be inferred. Using clinical measurements from 30 cases, we found that the effective laser power differed significantly among cases, with the measured laser reflection coefficient ranging from 1.8% to 54%. The reflection coefficient for 36.7% of these 30 cases was in the range of 10–20%, but for 16.7% of cases, it was higher than 40%. Consequently, monitoring the effective optical power during laser irradiation is necessary for the laser therapy of carpal tunnel syndrome.

  16. Prenatal diagnosis of the fragile X syndrome : loss of mutation owing to a double recombinant or gene conversion event at the FMR1 locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Losekoot, M; Hoogendoorn, E; Olmer, R; Jansen, CCAM; Oosterwijk, JC; vandenOuweland, AMW; Halley, DJJ; Warren, ST; Willemsen, R; Oostra, BA; Bakker, E

    1997-01-01

    The fragile X syndrome, an X linked mental retardation syndrome, is caused by an expanded CGG repeat in the first exon of the FMR1 gene. In patients with an expanded repeat the FMR1 promoter is methylated and, consequently, the gene is silenced and no FMR1 protein (FMRP) is produced, thus leading to

  17. The low-recombining pericentromeric region of barley restricts gene diversity and evolution but not gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Katie; Bayer, Micha; Cook, Nicola; Dreißig, Steven; Dhillon, Taniya; Russell, Joanne; Hedley, Pete E; Morris, Jenny; Ramsay, Luke; Colas, Isabelle; Waugh, Robbie; Steffenson, Brian; Milne, Iain; Stephen, Gordon; Marshall, David; Flavell, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    The low-recombining pericentromeric region of the barley genome contains roughly a quarter of the genes of the species, embedded in low-recombining DNA that is rich in repeats and repressive chromatin signatures. We have investigated the effects of pericentromeric region residency upon the expression, diversity and evolution of these genes. We observe no significant difference in average transcript level or developmental RNA specificity between the barley pericentromeric region and the rest of the genome. In contrast, all of the evolutionary parameters studied here show evidence of compromised gene evolution in this region. First, genes within the pericentromeric region of wild barley show reduced diversity and significantly weakened purifying selection compared with the rest of the genome. Second, gene duplicates (ohnolog pairs) derived from the cereal whole-genome duplication event ca. 60MYa have been completely eliminated from the barley pericentromeric region. Third, local gene duplication in the pericentromeric region is reduced by 29% relative to the rest of the genome. Thus, the pericentromeric region of barley is a permissive environment for gene expression but has restricted gene evolution in a sizeable fraction of barley's genes. PMID:24947331

  18. Increased serum levels of hyaluronic acid in pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia or hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmers, R G; Schütz, E; Diedrich, F; Wehry, B; Krauss, T; Oellerich, M; Kuhn, W

    1998-02-01

    Fifteen percent of patients who later have hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets syndrome develop initially have nonspecific symptoms. Early diagnosis could ensure adequate obstetric management; however, prognostic biochemical tests are lacking. We hypothesized that elevated hyaluronic acid serum levels might be an early indicator of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets syndrome because it is known to be a sensitive marker of liver cell function. Hyaluronic acid in serum was measured in patients with normal pregnancies (n = 109) and in those patients with pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia (n = 14) or hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets syndrome (n = 11). A significant increase in hyaluronic acid serum concentrations was observed in patients with hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets syndrome or with preeclampsia (p hyaluronic acid serum levels in hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets syndrome correlated with the clinical severity of the individual course of disease as measured by intensive care unit time (r = 0.72; p hyaluronic acid in preeclampsia and hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets syndrome are significantly elevated and might play an important diagnostic and prognostic role in patients with hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets syndrome.

  19. Pendred syndrome (goitre and sensorineural hearing loss) maps to chromosome 7 in the region containing the nonsyndromic deafness gene DFNB4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, B; Coffey, R; Armour, J A; Gausden, E; Hochberg, Z; Grossman, A; Britton, K; Pembrey, M; Reardon, W; Trembath, R

    1996-04-01

    Inherited causes account for about 50% of individuals presenting with childhood (prelingual) hearing loss, of which 70% are due to mutation in numerous single genes which impair auditory function alone (non-syndromic). The remainder are associated with other developmental anomalies termed syndromic deafness. Genes responsible for syndromic forms of hearing loss include the COL4A5 gene in Alport syndrome and the PAX3 and MITF genes in Waardenburg syndrome. Pendred syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder associated with developmental abnormalities of the cochlea, sensorineural hearing loss and diffuse thyroid enlargement (goitre). Pendred syndrome is the most common syndromal form of deafness, yet the primary defect remains unknown. We have established a panel of 12 families with two or more affected individuals and used them to search for the location of the Pendred gene by linkage analysis. We excluded localization to four previously mapped nonsyndromic deafness loci but obtained conclusive evidence for linkage of the Pendred syndrome gene to microsatellite markers on chromosome 7q31 (D7S495 Zmax 7.32, Qmax = 0). This region contains a gene, DFNBL, for autosomal recessive non-syndromic sensorineural hearing loss. Multipoint analysis indicates that DFNB4 and Pendred syndrome co-localize to the same 5.5 centiMorgan (cM) interval flanked by D7S501 and D7S523. These data raise the possibility that Pendred syndrome is either allelic with DFNB4 or may represent an inherited contiguous gene disorder, not clinically manifest in the heterozygote.

  20. Characterization of low-molecular-weight glutenin subunit genes of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-09-16

    Sep 16, 2015 ... 4Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory for Crop Genetic Resources and Improvement in Southwest China, ... gene mining have also been conducted in Aegilops genus, ... sites and pair-wise deletion for gaps/missing data.

  1. A novel mutation of WFS1 gene in a Chinese patient with Wolfram syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Liu, Jia; Yi, Huan; Xu, Li; Zhong, Xiufeng; Peng, Fuhua

    2018-03-17

    Wolfram syndrome (WS), caused by mutations of the Wolfram syndrome 1 (WFS1) gene on chromosome 4p16.1, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by diabetes insipidus (DI), neuro-psychiatric disorders, hearing deficit, and urinary tract anomalies. Here we report a 11-year-old Chinese boy who presented with visual loss, was suspected with optic neuritis (ON) or neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and referred to our department for further diagnosis. Finally he was diagnosed with WS because of diabetes mellitus (DM) and optic atrophy (OA). Eight exons and flanking introns of WFS1 gene were analyzed by sequencing. A novel mutation c.1760G > A in WFS1 gene of exon 8 was identified. This report reviews a case of WS associated with a novel mutation, c.1760G > A in WFS1 gene of exon 8, and emphasizes that WS should be taken into account for juveniles with visual loss and diabetes mellitus.

  2. Investigating the potential role of genetic and epigenetic variation of DNA methyltransferase genes in hyperplastic polyposis syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Drini

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Hyperplastic Polyposis Syndrome (HPS is a condition associated with multiple serrated polyps, and an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC. At least half of CRCs arising in HPS show a CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP, potentially linked to aberrant DNA methyltransferase (DNMT activity. CIMP is associated with methylation of tumor suppressor genes including regulators of DNA mismatch repair (such as MLH1, MGMT, and negative regulators of Wnt signaling (such as WIF1. In this study, we investigated the potential for interaction of genetic and epigenetic variation in DNMT genes, in the aetiology of HPS.We utilized high resolution melting (HRM analysis to screen 45 cases with HPS for novel sequence variants in DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, and DNMT3L. 21 polyps from 13 patients were screened for BRAF and KRAS mutations, with assessment of promoter methylation in the DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, DNMT3L MLH1, MGMT, and WIF1 gene promoters.No pathologic germline mutations were observed in any DNA-methyltransferase gene. However, the T allele of rs62106244 (intron 10 of DNMT1 gene was over-represented in cases with HPS (p<0.01 compared with population controls. The DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B promoters were unmethylated in all instances. Interestingly, the DNMT3L promoter showed low levels of methylation in polyps and normal colonic mucosa relative to matched disease free cells with methylation level negatively correlated to expression level in normal colonic tissue. DNMT3L promoter hypomethylation was more often found in polyps harbouring KRAS mutations (p = 0.0053. BRAF mutations were common (11 out of 21 polyps, whilst KRAS mutations were identified in 4 of 21 polyps.Genetic or epigenetic alterations in DNMT genes do not appear to be associated with HPS, but further investigation of genetic variation at rs62106244 is justified given the high frequency of the minor allele in this case series.

  3. Association study of serotonin transporter SLC6A4 gene with Chinese Han irritable bowel syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yuan

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a common clinical gastrointestinal dysfunction disorders. 5-sertonon (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT is a very important neurotransmitter, which is involved in gastrointestinal motion and sensation. Solute carrier family 6 member 4 (SLC6A4 gene encode serotonin transporter (SERT which function is to rapidly reuptake the most of 5-HT. Therefore, it is needed to explore the association between SLC6A4 gene polymorphisms and IBS. METHODS: 119 patients and 238 healthy controls were administrated to detect the SLC6A4 gene polymorphisms including 5-HT-transporter-gene-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR, variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs and three selected tag Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs rs1042173, rs3794808, rs2020936 by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR and TaqMan® SNP Genotyping. RESULTS: There were significant difference for 5-HTTLPR between IBS and control groups (X2 = 106.168, P<0.0001. In control group, genotypes were mainly L/L (58.4%, however, the genotypes in IBS were S/S (37.8%. The significant difference was shown in D-IBS subjects when compared to the controls (X(2 = 50.850, P<0.0001 for 5-HTTLPR. For STin2 VNTR, rs1042173, rs3794808, and rs2020936 polymorphisms, there were no any significant differences between IBS and control groups. There were no statistical significantly haplotypes for 5-HTTLPR, VNTRs and the three SNPs between IBS and controls. CONCLUSION: The S allele in 5-HTTLPR was a susceptible allele with Chinese Han IBS, but other associations of VNTRs, three selected Tag SNPs and positive haplotype with IBS were not found. It is indicated that much research are needed to study the relationship between other polymorphisms in SLC6A4 gene and IBS.

  4. 15 years of research on Oral-Facial-Digital syndromes: from 1 to 16 causal genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruel, Ange-Line; Franco, Brunella; Duffourd, Yannis; Thevenon, Julien; Jego, Laurence; Lopez, Estelle; Deleuze, Jean-François; Doummar, Diane; Giles, Rachel H.; Johnson, Colin A.; Huynen, Martijn A.; Chevrier, Véronique; Burglen, Lydie; Morleo, Manuela; Desguerres, Isabelle; Pierquin, Geneviève; Doray, Bérénice; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Reversade, Bruno; Steichen-Gersdorf, Elisabeth; Baumann, Clarisse; Panigrahi, Inusha; Fargeot-Espaliat, Anne; Dieux, Anne; David, Albert; Goldenberg, Alice; Bongers, Ernie; Gaillard, Dominique; Argente, Jesús; Aral, Bernard; Gigot, Nadège; St-Onge, Judith; Birnbaum, Daniel; Phadke, Shubha R.; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Eguether, Thibaut; Pazour, Gregory J.; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Lee, Jaclyn S.; Pasquier, Laurent; Loget, Philippe; Saunier, Sophie; Mégarbané, André; Rosnet, Olivier; Leroux, Michel R.; Wallingford, John B.; Blacque, Oliver E.; Nachury, Maxence V.; Attie-Bitach, Tania; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Faivre, Laurence; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel

    2017-01-01

    Oral-facial-digital syndromes (OFDS) gather rare genetic disorders characterized by facial, oral and digital abnormalities associated with a wide range of additional features (polycystic kidney disease, cerebral malformations and several others) to delineate a growing list of OFD subtypes. The most frequent, OFD type I, is caused by a heterozygous mutation in the OFD1 gene encoding a centrosomal protein. The wide clinical heterogeneity of OFDS suggests the involvement of other ciliary genes. For 15 years, we have aimed to identify the molecular bases of OFDS. This effort has been greatly helped by the recent development of whole exome sequencing (WES). Here, we present all our published and unpublished results for WES in 24 OFDS cases. We identified causal variants in five new genes (C2CD3, TMEM107, INTU, KIAA0753, IFT57) and related the clinical spectrum of four genes in other ciliopathies (C5orf42, TMEM138, TMEM231, WDPCP) to OFDS. Mutations were also detected in two genes previously implicated in OFDS. Functional studies revealed the involvement of centriole elongation, transition zone and intraflagellar transport defects in OFDS, thus characterizing three ciliary protein modules: the complex KIAA0753-FOPNL-OFD1, a regulator of centriole elongation; the MKS module, a major component of the transition zone; and the CPLANE complex necessary for IFT-A assembly. OFDS now appear to be a distinct subgroup of ciliopathies with wide heterogeneity, which makes the initial classification obsolete. A clinical classification restricted to the three frequent/well-delineated subtypes could be proposed, and for patients who do not fit one of these 3 main subtypes, a further classification could be based on the genotype. PMID:28289185

  5. Adiponectin gene polymorphism is selectively associated with the concomitant presence of metabolic syndrome and essential hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Bang Leu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Cardiovascular risk increases with the presence of both metabolic syndrome (MetS and hypertension (HTN. Although the adiponectin (ADIPOQ gene has been reported to be involved in MetS, its association with HTN remained undetermined. This study aimed to investigate the association of ADIPOQ gene with the phenotypes of HTN and MetS. METHODS: A total of 962 participants from 302 families from the Taiwan young-onset hypertension genetic study were enrolled. Plasma adiponectin were measured, and association analysis was conducted by using GEE regression-based method. Another study, of 1448 unrelated participants, was conducted to replicate the association between ADIPOQ gene and variable phenotypes of MetS with or without HTN. RESULTS: Among 962 subjects from family samples, the lowest plasma adiponectin value was observed in MetS with HTN component (9.3±0.47 µg/ml compared with hypertensives (13.4±0.74 µg /ml or MetS without HTN (11.9±0.60 µg/ml, P<0.05. The SNP rs1501299 (G276T in ADIPOQ gene was found associated with the presence of HTN in MetS (odds ratio for GG+GT vs. TT = 2.46; 95% CI: 1.14-5.3, p = 0.02, but not rs2241766 (T45G. No association of ADIPOQ gene with HTN alone or MetS without HTN was observed. The significant association of the SNP rs1501299 (G276T with the phenotype of presence of HTN in MetS was confirmed (odds ratio for GG+GT vs. TT = 2.15; 95% CI: 1.1-4.3 in the replication study. CONCLUSIONS: ADIPOQ genetic variants were selectively and specifically associated with the concomitant presence of MetS and HTN, suggesting potential genetic linkage between MetS and HTN.

  6. Genetic alterations within the DENND1A gene in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mette B Eriksen

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, the most common endocrine disease among premenopausal women, is caused by both genes and environment. We and others previously reported association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the DENND1A gene and PCOS. We therefore sequenced the DENND1A gene in white patients with PCOS to identify possible alterations that may be implicated in the PCOS pathogenesis. Patients were referred with PCOS and/or hirsutism between 1998 and 2011 (n = 261. PCOS was diagnosed according to the Rotterdam criteria (n = 165. Sequence analysis was performed in 10 patients with PCOS. Additional patients (n = 251 and healthy female controls (n = 248 were included for SNP genotyping. Patients underwent clinical examination including Ferriman-Gallwey score (FG-score, biochemical analyses and transvaginal ultrasound. Mutation analysis was carried out by bidirectional sequencing. SNP genotyping was tested by allelic discrimination in real-time PCR in the additional patients and controls. Sequencing of the DENND1A gene identified eight SNPs; seven were not known to be associated with any diseases. One missense SNP was detected (rs189947178, A/C, potentially altering the structural conformation of the DENND1A protein. SNP genotyping of rs189947178 showed significantly more carriers among patients with PCOS and moderate hirsutism compared to controls. However, due to small sample size and lack of multiple regression analysis supporting an association between rs189947178 and FG-score or PCOS diagnosis, this could be a false positive finding. In conclusion, sequence analysis of the DENND1A gene of patients with PCOS did not identify alterations that alone could be responsible for the PCOS pathogenesis, but a missense SNP (rs189947178 was identified in one patient and significantly more carriers of rs189947178 were found among patients with PCOS and moderate hirsutism vs. controls. Additional studies with independent cohort are needed

  7. Association of Low Ficolin-Lectin Pathway Parameters with Cardiac Syndrome X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horváth, Z; Csuka, Dorottya; Vargova, K

    2016-01-01

    In patients with typical angina pectoris, inducible myocardial ischaemia and macroscopically normal coronaries (cardiac syndrome X (CSX)), a significantly elevated plasma level of terminal complement complex (TCC), the common end product of complement activation, has been observed without.......003). In conclusion, in patients with typical angina and myocardial ischaemia despite macroscopically normal coronary arteries, low levels of several lectin pathway parameters were observed, indicating complement activation and consumption. Complement activation through the ficolin-lectin pathway might play a role...

  8. Low T3 syndrome in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder: Associations with disease activity and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eun Bin; Min, Ju-Hong; Cho, Hye-Jin; Seok, Jin Myoung; Lee, Hye Lim; Shin, Hee Young; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Byoung Joon

    2016-11-15

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) sometimes coexists with serological marker-positive, non-organ-specific autoimmune disorders. We evaluated the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction and anti-thyroid antibodies in patients with NMO spectrum disorder (NMOSD) and investigated the associations between thyroid dysfunction/autoimmunity and clinical features of NMOSD. Forty-nine NMOSD patients with anti-aquaporin-4 antibody and 392 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were included. We measured the levels of thyroid hormones and anti-thyroid antibodies. The prevalence of clinical hypothyroidism, subclinical hyperthyroidism, and low T3 syndrome were higher in patients with NMOSD (4.1%, 12.2%, and 20.4%, respectively) compared with healthy controls (0.3%, 2.8%, and 0.5%, respectively; p=0.034, p=0.001, and p<0.001, respectively). However, anti-thyroperoxidase antibody (anti-TPO)-positivity did not significantly differ between NMOSD patients (20.4%) and controls (11.5%). Low T3 syndrome was more prevalent among patients during an attack (N=10/19, 52.6%) than those in remission (N=1/30, 3.3%). In addition, patients with low T 3 syndrome had significantly higher EDSS scores at the last visits as well as at sampling compared to those without low T3 syndrome. T3 levels were inversely correlated with EDSS score at the last visit after adjustment for age, sex, disease duration, clinical status (attack vs. remission), oral prednisolone use, iv methylprednisolone use, other immunosuppressive agents use, and the location of lesion (ρ=-0.416, p=0.010). Our study suggests that thyroid dysfunction is frequent in patients with NMOSD; particularly, serum T3 levels may be a useful indicator of disease activity and disability in NMOSD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Polycystic ovary syndrome and low-grade inflammation with special reference to YKL-40

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aziz, M; Wissing, M L M; Naver, K V

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the plasma level of YKL-40 in a Danish polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) population and to investigate whether YKL-40 is associated with CVD risk factors such as waist circumference, body mass index (BMI), insulin resistance (IR), fasting glucose, fasting insulin, blood lipids......, triglycerides, and CRP. Total and free testosterone were independent predictors of YKL-40. CONCLUSION: YKL-40, the marker of low-grade inflammation is not increased in women with PCOS....

  10. Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) syndrome previously diagnosed as Seckel syndrome: report of a novel mutation of the PCNT gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piane, Maria; Della Monica, Matteo; Piatelli, Gianluca; Lulli, Patrizia; Lonardo, Fortunato; Chessa, Luciana; Scarano, Gioacchino

    2009-11-01

    We report on a 3-year-old boy with prenatal onset of proportionate dwarfism, postnatal severe microcephaly, high forehead with receded hairline, sparse scalp hair, beaked nose, mild retrognathia and hypotonia diagnosed at birth as Seckel syndrome. At age 3 years, he became paralyzed due to a cerebrovascular malformation. Based on the clinical and radiological features showing evidence of skeletal dysplasia, the diagnosis was revised to Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) syndrome. Western blot analysis of the patient's lymphoblastoid cell line lysate showed the absence of the protein pericentrin. Subsequent molecular analysis identified a novel homozygous single base insertion (c.1527_1528insA) in exon 10 of the PCNT gene, which leads to a frameshift (Treo510fs) and to premature protein truncation. PCNT mutations must be considered diagnostic of MOPD II syndrome. A possible role of pericentrin in the development of cerebral vessels is suggested. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Clarin-1, encoded by the Usher Syndrome III causative gene, forms a membranous microdomain: possible role of clarin-1 in organizing the actin cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Guilian; Zhou, Yun; Hajkova, Dagmar; Miyagi, Masaru; Dinculescu, Astra; Hauswirth, William W; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Geng, Ruishuang; Alagramam, Kumar N; Isosomppi, Juha; Sankila, Eeva-Marja; Flannery, John G; Imanishi, Yoshikazu

    2009-07-10

    Clarin-1 is the protein product encoded by the gene mutated in Usher syndrome III. Although the molecular function of clarin-1 is unknown, its primary structure predicts four transmembrane domains similar to a large family of membrane proteins that include tetraspanins. Here we investigated the role of clarin-1 by using heterologous expression and in vivo model systems. When expressed in HEK293 cells, clarin-1 localized to the plasma membrane and concentrated in low density compartments distinct from lipid rafts. Clarin-1 reorganized actin filament structures and induced lamellipodia. This actin-reorganizing function was absent in the modified protein encoded by the most prevalent North American Usher syndrome III mutation, the N48K form of clarin-1 deficient in N-linked glycosylation. Proteomics analyses revealed a number of clarin-1-interacting proteins involved in cell-cell adhesion, focal adhesions, cell migration, tight junctions, and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Consistent with the hypothesized role of clarin-1 in actin organization, F-actin-enriched stereocilia of auditory hair cells evidenced structural disorganization in Clrn1(-/-) mice. These observations suggest a possible role for clarin-1 in the regulation and homeostasis of actin filaments, and link clarin-1 to the interactive network of Usher syndrome gene products.

  12. [Connexin gene 26 (GJB2) mutations in patients with hereditary non-syndromic sensorineural loss of hearing in the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barashkov, N A; Dzhemileva, L U; Fedorova, S A; Maksimova, N R; Khusnutdinova, E K

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to elucidate the causes of hereditary non-syndromic loss of hearing, a frequent monogene pathology in the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia). A search for mutations in the coding sequence of the connexin 26 gene gap-junction B2 (GJB2) was undertaken in 79 members of 65 unrelated families with the diagnosis of grade III-IV non-syndromic bilateral sensorineural loss of hearing. Five recessive mutations (35delG, V371, 312-326del14, 333-334delAA, R127H) and three polymorphic variants (V271, M34T, E114G) were identified in Yakut patients. Mutations 35delG (41.7%), 312-326dell4 (4.2%), and 333-334delAA (4.2%) were found in Caucasian patients (Russians, Ukrainians, Inguish). Yakuts were carriers of mutations 35delG (2.1%), V371 (2.1%), R127H (1.0%) and sequence variants V271 (6.3%), M34T (1.0%), E114G (1.0%). GJB2 mutations were identified in 50.1% of the Caucasian patients and in 7.2% of the Yakut patients. The low frequency of GJB2 mutations in Yakuts with non-syndromic sensorineural loss of hearing testifies to the presence of mutations of other genes controlling sound perception in this population.

  13. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T gene polymorphism in Turkish patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadeniz, Muammer; Erdogan, Mehmet; Zengi, Ayhan; Eroglu, Zuhal; Tamsel, Sadik; Olukman, Murat; Saygili, Fusun; Yilmaz, Candeger

    2010-08-01

    Higher Levels of Hcy are associated with several clinical conditions, among them non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, endometrial dysplasia and hypertension with insulin resistance, and polycystic ovary syndrome. The purpose of this study was to investigate the serum homocystein levels and other metabolic parameters in relationship with the MTHFR C677T gene polymorphism in patients with PCOS. Our study included 86 young women with PCOS constituting the study group and 70 healthy women constituting the control group. Homocystein levels, metabolic, and hormonal parameters were measured, and genetic analysis of the MTHFR C677T gene polymorphism was performed in all the subjects. A statistically significant difference was observed in mean homocystein levels between patients with PCOS when compared to the control group. The MTHFR 677 CC genotypes had significantly higher proportions in the control group compared to the PCOS patients (χ(2) = 21.381, P homocystein levels were higher than normal subjects in patients with PCOS and that the MTHFR C677T gene polymorphism does not influence homocystein levels of patients with PCOS.

  14. Interferons in Sjögren’s syndrome: genes, mechanisms, and effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He eLi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren’s syndrome (SS is a common, progressive autoimmune exocrinopathy distinguished by dry eyes and mouth and affects ~0.7% of European population. Overexpression of transcripts induced by interferons (IFN, termed as an ‘IFN signature’, has been found in SS patients. Four microarray studies have been published in SS that identified dysregulated genes within type I IFN signaling in either salivary glands or peripheral blood of SS patients. The mechanism of this type I IFN activation is still obscure, but several possible explanations have been proposed, including virus infection-initiated and immune-complex-initiated type I IFN production by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs. Genetic predisposition to increased type I IFN signaling is supported by candidate gene studies showing evidence for association of variants within IFN-related genes. Once activated, IFN signaling may contribute to numerous aspects of SS pathophysiology, including lymphocyte infiltration into exocrine glands, autoantibody production, and glandular cell apoptosis. Thus, dysregulation of IFN pathways is an important feature that can be potentially used as a serum biomarker for diagnosis and targeting of new treatments in this complex autoimmune disease.

  15. A Restricted Spectrum of Mutations in the SMAD4 Tumor-Suppressor Gene Underlies Myhre Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Viviana; Cianetti, Luciano; Niceta, Marcello; Carta, Claudio; Ciolfi, Andrea; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Carrani, Eugenio; Dentici, Maria Lisa; Biamino, Elisa; Belligni, Elga; Garavelli, Livia; Boccone, Loredana; Melis, Daniela; Andria, Generoso; Gelb, Bruce D.; Stella, Lorenzo; Silengo, Margherita; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Tartaglia, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Myhre syndrome is a developmental disorder characterized by reduced growth, generalized muscular hypertrophy, facial dysmorphism, deafness, cognitive deficits, joint stiffness, and skeletal anomalies. Here, by performing exome sequencing of a single affected individual and coupling the results to a hypothesis-driven filtering strategy, we establish that heterozygous mutations in SMAD4, which encodes for a transducer mediating transforming growth factor β and bone morphogenetic protein signaling branches, underlie this rare Mendelian trait. Two recurrent de novo SMAD4 mutations were identified in eight unrelated subjects. Both mutations were missense changes altering Ile500 within the evolutionary conserved MAD homology 2 domain, a well known mutational hot spot in malignancies. Structural analyses suggest that the substituted residues are likely to perturb the binding properties of the mutant protein to signaling partners. Although SMAD4 has been established as a tumor suppressor gene somatically mutated in pancreatic, gastrointestinal, and skin cancers, and germline loss-of-function lesions and deletions of this gene have been documented to cause disorders that predispose individuals to gastrointestinal cancer and vascular dysplasias, the present report identifies a previously unrecognized class of mutations in the gene with profound impact on development and growth. PMID:22243968

  16. Growth hormone receptor gene mutations in two Italian patients with Laron Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassone, L; Corneli, G; Bellone, S; Camacho-Hübner, C; Aimaretti, G; Cappa, M; Ubertini, G; Bona, G

    2007-05-01

    Laron Syndrome (LS) represents a condition characterized by GH insensitivity caused by molecular defects in the GH receptor (GHR) gene or in the post-receptor signalling pathway. We report the molecular characterization of two unrelated Italian girls from Sicily diagnosed with LS. The DNA sequencing of the GHR gene revealed the presence of different nonsense mutations, occurring in the same background haplotype. The molecular defects occurred in the extracellular domain of the GHR leading to a premature termination signal and to a truncated non-functional receptor. In one patient, a homozygous G to T transversion, in exon 6, led to the mutation GAA to TAA at codon 180 (E180X), while in the second patient a homozygous C to T transition in exon 7 was detected, causing the CGA to TAA substitution at codon 217 (R217X). Both probands presented the polymorphisms Gly168Gly and Ile544Leu in a homozygous state in exons 6 and 10, respectively. The E180X represents a novel defect of the GHR gene, while the R217X mutation has been previously reported in several patients from different ethnic backgrounds but all from countries located in the Mediterranean and Middle Eastern region.

  17. Nonalcoholic fatty liver in patients with Laron syndrome and GH gene deletion - preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laron, Zvi; Ginsberg, Shira; Webb, Muriel

    2008-10-01

    There is little information on the relationship between growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I (GH/IGF-I) deficiency or IGF-I treatment on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) a disorder linked to obesity and insulin resistance. To find out whether the markedly obese patients with Laron syndrome (LS) and GH gene deletion have fatty livers. We studied 11 untreated adult patients with LS (5M, 6F), five girls with LS treated by IGF-I and five adult patients with GH gene deletion (3M, 3F), four previously treated by hGH in childhood. Fatty liver was quantitatively evaluated by ultrasonography using a phase array US system (HITACHI 6500, Japan). Body adiposity was determined by DEXA, and insulin resistance was estimated by HOMA-IR using the fasting serum glucose and insulin values. Six out of 11 adult patients with LS, two out of the five IGF-I treated girls with LS and three out of five adult hGH gene deletion patients were found to have NAFLD (nonalcoholic fatty liver disease). NAFLD is a frequent complication in untreated and treated congenital IGF-I deficiency. No correlation between NAFLD and age, sex, degree of obesity, blood lipids, or degree of insulin resistance was observed.

  18. Association Study between Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome and the Susceptibility Genes Polymorphisms in Hui Chinese Women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingxia Ha

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is one of the most common endocrine-metabolic disorders. Evidence of familial aggregation analysis and different clinical traits among different regions and ethnicities indicated that the pathogenesis of PCOS is associated with multiple genetic and environmental factors. Our previous research had identified three susceptibility loci (rs2479106, DENND1A; rs13405728, LHCGR; rs13429458, THADA for PCOS in Han Chinese women. The overall aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between three susceptibility gene polymorphisms and PCOS in Hui ethnic women.151 patients with PCOS (case group and 99 healthy women (control group were recruited from the Reproductive Medicine Center of the General Hospital of Ningxia Medical University. Clinical data and serum hormone characteristics of case and control groups were collected and analyzed. The three susceptibility single-nucleotide polymorphisms have been replicated in both case and control groups. Gene polymorphisms were detected by direct sequencing after polymerase chain reaction.The Body Mass Index, LH, LH/FSH ratio and total testosterone were significantly elevated in PCOS patients compared to control group (P0.05.The present study suggested that the SNP rs13405728 in the LHCGR gene was associated with PCOS in Hui ethnic women, and its TT genotype characterized with higher level of TT, TG and LDL.

  19. Genotyping Rs2274625 Marker in NPHS2 Gene Associated with Nephrotic Syndrome in Isfahan Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Esmaili Chamgordani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nephrotic syndrome (NS is a genetic disease belonging to a heterogeneous group of glomerular disorders, which mainly occurs within the children. Linkage analysis using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP is used as an indirect method in molecular diagnosis of the disease. A large number of SNP markers have been introduced in NPHS2gene in the available electronic databases. Method: In the present study, the genotype and informative status of rs2274625 marker in NPHS2 genewas investigated in 120 unrelated healthy individuals using Tetra-primer ARMS PCR technique and newly designed primers. Allelic frequency and presence of Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE was estimated using GenePop website. Furthermore, PowerMarker software was utilized in order to compute the index of polymorphism information content (PIC. Results: The study results indicated allele frequency of 97% and 3% for C and T alleles, respectively, in regard with rs2274625 marker within Isfahan population. Moreover, the PIC for the rs2274625 marker was 0.5%, and HWE revealed the equilibruim of the study population in regard with the related marker. Conclusion: As the study findings indicated, rs2274625 could be introduced as an SNP marker in the linkage analysis in order to molecularly trace NPHS2 gene mutations in molecular NS diagnosis in Isfahan population as a representative sample of the Iranian population.

  20. Mutation analysis of GJB2 gene and prenatal diagnosis in a non-syndromic deafness family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-hua CHEN

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To identify the pathogenic gene in a non-syndromic deafness family, provide an accurate genetic consultation and early intervention for deaf family to reduce the incidence of congenital deafness. Methods Mutation analysis was carried out by polymerase chain reaction followed by DNA sequencing of coding region of GJB2 gene. The fetal DNA was extracted from the amniotic fluid cells by amniocentesis at 20 weeks during pregnancy. The genotype of the fetus was characterized for predicting the status of hearing. Results Complex heterozygous mutations 235delC and 176-191del16bp were detected in the proband of the family, heterozygous mutation 176-191del16bp was detected in the father, and 235delC was detected in the mother. Fetus carried 235delC heterozygous mutation inherited from his mother. Conclusions The proband's hearing loss is resulted from the complex heterozygous mutations 235delC and 176-191del16bp in GJB2 gene. Fetus is a heterozygous mutation 235delC carrier. Prenatal diagnosis for deafness assisted by genetic test can provide efficient guidance about offspring's hearing condition, and prevent another deaf-mute member from birth. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.07.09

  1. NUCB2 gene polymorphism and its relationship with nesfatin-1 levels in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskin, Mine Islimye; Eser, Betul; Adali, Ertan; Kara, Hayrettin; Cuce, Coskun; Hismiogulları, Adnan Adil

    2016-01-01

    Nesfatin-1, encoded by the nucleobindin-2 (NUCB2) gene, is an anorexigenic protein related to energy metabolism, obesity, and insulin resistance. The aim of this study was to evaluate NUCB2 gene polymorphism (rs757081) and its association with serum levels of nesfatin-1 in obese and non-obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). In the study population, we analyzed 60 patients with PCOS and 26 age-matched healthy women as controls. The patients with PCOS were divided into two groups based on body mass index (BMI): obese group (n = 28) or non-obese group (n = 32). NUCB2 was genotyped using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction (PCR) technique. Serum nesfatin-1 level was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Nesfatin-1 levels in the obese PCOS group were significantly lower than those in the non-obese PCOS and control groups (p  0.05), whereas nesfatin-1 levels in the CC and CG genotypes were lower than those in the GG genotype. Nesfatin-1 decreases in PCOS, especially in obese women, and is negatively correlated with cardiometabolic risk factors. Although genotype disturbances of NUCB2 were similar among the groups, CC and CG genotypes accompanied lower nesfatin-1 levels. C allele of NUCB2 gene polymorphism and nesfatin-1 may play a role in the pathophysiology of PCOS.

  2. Novel mutations of endothelin-B receptor gene in Pakistani patients with Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabeen, Raheela; Babar, Masroor Ellahi; Ahmad, Jamil; Awan, Ali Raza

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in EDNRB gene have been reported to cause Waardenburg-Shah syndrome (WS4) in humans. We investigated 17 patients with WS4 for identification of mutations in EDNRB gene using PCR and direct sequencing technique. Four genomic mutations were detected in four patients; a G to C transversion in codon 335 (S335C) in exon 5 and a transition of T to C in codon (S361L) in exon 5, a transition of A to G in codon 277 (L277L) in exon 4, a non coding transversion of T to A at -30 nucleotide position of exon 5. None of these mutations were found in controls. One of the patients harbored two novel mutations (S335C, S361L) in exon 5 and one in Intronic region (-30exon5 A>G). All of the mutations were homozygous and novel except the mutation observed in exon 4. In this study, we have identified 3 novel mutations in EDNRB gene associated with WS4 in Pakistani patients.

  3. Lowe Syndrome protein OCRL1 supports maturation of polarized epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam G Grieve

    Full Text Available Mutations in the inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase OCRL1 cause Lowe Syndrome, leading to cataracts, mental retardation and renal failure. We noted that cell types affected in Lowe Syndrome are highly polarized, and therefore we studied OCRL1 in epithelial cells as they mature from isolated individual cells into polarized sheets and cysts with extensive communication between neighbouring cells. We show that a proportion of OCRL1 targets intercellular junctions at the early stages of their formation, co-localizing both with adherens junctional components and with tight junctional components. Correlating with this distribution, OCRL1 forms complexes with junctional components α-catenin and zonula occludens (ZO-1/2/3. Depletion of OCRL1 in epithelial cells growing as a sheet inhibits maturation; cells remain flat, fail to polarize apical markers and also show reduced proliferation. The effect on shape is reverted by re-expressed OCRL1 and requires the 5'-phosphatase domain, indicating that down-regulation of 5-phosphorylated inositides is necessary for epithelial development. The effect of OCRL1 in epithelial maturation is seen more strongly in 3-dimensional cultures, where epithelial cells lacking OCRL1 not only fail to form a central lumen, but also do not have the correct intracellular distribution of ZO-1, suggesting that OCRL1 functions early in the maturation of intercellular junctions when cells grow as cysts. A role of OCRL1 in junctions of polarized cells may explain the pattern of organs affected in Lowe Syndrome.

  4. Obesity and the metabolic syndrome: Impact of gene-diet interaction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Every disease susceptibility or medical condition is caused, regulated or influenced by genes and obesity is no exception. Although overeating in combination with low physical activity is the main cause of obesity, genetically determined influences on energy balance regulation also play an important role. Individuals ...

  5. MELAS syndrome associated with a new mitochondrial tRNA-Val gene mutation (m.1616A>G).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoshima, Yuka; Tanaka, Yuji; Satomi, Kazuo

    2017-09-11

    We describe the case of a 40-year-old-man with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome, with cardiomyopathy and severe heart failure. He had a mitochondrial transfer RNA (tRNA) mutation (m.1616A>G) of the (tRNA-Val) gene, and it was not found in MELAS syndrome ever before. The presence of this newly observed tRNA-Val mutation (m.1616A>G) may induce multiple respiratory chain enzyme deficiencies and contribute to MELAS syndrome symptoms that are associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. We report that the pathognomonic symptom in MELAS syndrome caused by this newly observed mtDNA mutation may be rapid progression of cardiomyopathy and severe heart failure. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. A novel syndrome of autosomal-dominant hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia linked to a mutation in the human insulin receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Kurt; Hansen, Torben; Lajer, Maria

    2004-01-01

    a missense mutation (Arg1174Gln) in the tyrosine kinase domain of the insulin receptor gene that cosegregated with the disease phenotype (logarithm of odds [LOD] score 3.21). In conclusion, we report a novel syndrome of autosomal-dominant hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. The findings demonstrate...

  7. When silence is noise: infantile-onset Barth syndrome caused by a synonymous substitution affecting TAZ gene transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferri, L.; Dionisi-Vici, C.; Taurisano, R.; Vaz, F. M.; Guerrini, R.; Morrone, A.

    2016-01-01

    Barth syndrome (BTHS) is an X-linked inborn error of metabolism which affects males. The main manifestations are cardiomyopathy, myopathy, hypotonia, growth delay, intermittent neutropenia and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. Diagnosis is confirmed by mutational analysis of the TAZ gene and biochemical

  8. The long-term outcome of boys with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome and a mutation in the androgen receptor gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucas-Herald, A.; S. Bertelloni (Silvano); A. Juul (Anders); J. Bryce (Jillian); Jiang, J.; M. Rodie (Martina); R. Sinnott (Richard); Boroujerdi, M.; Lindhardt Johansen, M.; O. Hiort (Olaf); P-M. Holterhus (Paul-Martin); M.L. Cools (Martine); Guaragna-Filho, G.; Guerra-Junior, G.; N. Weintrob (Naomi); S.E. Hannema (Sabine); S.L.S. Drop (Stenvert); T. Guran (Tulay); F. Darendeliler (Feyza); A. Nordenström (Anna); I.A. Hughes (Ieuan A.); Acerini, C.; Tadokoro-Cuccaro, R.; S.F. Ahmed (Faisal)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In boys with suspected partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS), systematic evidence that supports the long-term prognostic value of identifying a mutation in the androgen receptor gene (AR) is lacking. Objective: To assess the clinical characteristics and long-term

  9. Mutations in the VLGR1 gene implicate G-protein signaling in the pathogenesis of Usher syndrome type II.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weston, M.D.; Luijendijk, M.W.J.; Humphrey, K.D.; Moller, C.G.; Kimberling, W.J.

    2004-01-01

    Usher syndrome type II (USH2) is a genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder with at least three genetic subtypes (USH2A, USH2B, and USH2C) and is classified phenotypically as congenital hearing loss and progressive retinitis pigmentosa. The VLGR1 (MASS1) gene in the 5q14.3-q21.1 USH2C

  10. The fragile X syndrome: Isolation of the FMR-1 gene and characterization of the fragile X mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.A. Oostra (Ben); A. Verkerk

    1992-01-01

    markdownabstractConclusion Rapid progress has been made in the analysis of the fragile X syndrome during 1991. Different groups have discovered that fragile X chromosomes are preferentially methylated. In these X chromosomes an insertion has been found in the methylated region. The FMR-1 gene,

  11. Clinical aspects of Usher syndrome and the USH2A gene in a cohort of 433 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; Jaijo, Teresa; Aller, Elena; Avila-Fernandez, Almudena; López-Molina, María Isabel; Giménez, Ascensión; García-Sandoval, Blanca; Millán, José M; Ayuso, Carmen

    2015-02-01

    A new statistical approach is needed to describe the clinical differences between type I and type II Usher syndrome and between the 2 most frequent mutations in the USH2A gene. To describe the primary phenotypic characteristics and differences between type I and type II Usher syndrome and to establish a phenotype-genotype correlation for the 2 most frequent mutations in the USH2A gene. Cross-sectional study at a genetics department, in which clinical evaluations were performed for 433 patients (297 unrelated families) who were classified as having type I, II, III, atypical, or unclassified Usher syndrome according to their clinical history, pedigree data, results from ophthalmological studies, and audiological, neurophysiological, and vestibular test results. Molecular studies were performed for 304 patients (256 unrelated families). The Mann-Whitney U test or the χ2 test was used for calculating the differences between mean values for the analyzed parameters. Age at diagnosis; age at onset of night blindness, visual field loss, visual acuity loss, and cataracts; and severity and age at diagnosis of hearing loss. The comparison between patients with type I Usher syndrome and those with type II Usher syndrome revealed P Usher syndrome and between the 2 most frequent mutations in the USH2A gene. Detailed genotype-phenotype correlations, as presented in our study, allow for a better correlation of clinical signs with a known genotype and can improve the clinical management, genetic counseling, and risk assessment of patients with Usher syndrome because an estimated prognosis of their disease can be made.

  12. NHS Gene Mutations in Ashkenazi Jewish Families with Nance-Horan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoshany, Nadav; Avni, Isaac; Morad, Yair; Weiner, Chen; Einan-Lifshitz, Adi; Pras, Eran

    2017-09-01

    To describe ocular and extraocular abnormalities in two Ashkenazi Jewish families with infantile cataract and X-linked inheritance, and to identify their underlying mutations. Seven affected members were recruited. Medical history, clinical findings, and biometric measurements were recorded. Mutation analysis of the Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) gene was performed by direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified exons. An unusual anterior Y-sutural cataract was documented in the affected male proband. Other clinical features among examined patients included microcorneas, long and narrow faces, and current or previous dental anomalies. A nonsense mutation was identified in each family, including a previously described 742 C>T, p.(Arg248*) mutation in Family A, and a novel mutation 2915 C>A, p.(Ser972*) in Family B. Our study expands the repertoire of NHS mutations and the related phenotype, including newly described anterior Y-sutural cataract and dental findings.

  13. Generation of a lentiviral vector producer cell clone for human Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew M Wielgosz

    Full Text Available We have developed a producer cell line that generates lentiviral vector particles of high titer. The vector encodes the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS protein. An insulator element has been added to the long terminal repeats of the integrated vector to limit proto-oncogene activation. The vector provides high-level, stable expression of WAS protein in transduced murine and human hematopoietic cells. We have also developed a monoclonal antibody specific for intracellular WAS protein. This antibody has been used to monitor expression in blood and bone marrow cells after transfer into lineage negative bone marrow cells from WAS mice and in a WAS negative human B-cell line. Persistent expression of the transgene has been observed in transduced murine cells 12–20 weeks following transplantation. The producer cell line and the specific monoclonal antibody will facilitate the development of a clinical protocol for gene transfer into WAS protein deficient stem cells.

  14. Disrupted auto-regulation of the spliceosomal gene SNRPB causes cerebro–costo–mandibular syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Danielle C.; Revil, Timothée; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Bhoj, Elizabeth J.; Innes, A. Micheil; Lamont, Ryan E.; Lemire, Edmond G.; Chodirker, Bernard N.; Taylor, Juliet P.; Zackai, Elaine H.; McLeod, D. Ross; Kirk, Edwin P.; Hoover-Fong, Julie; Fleming, Leah; Savarirayan, Ravi; Boycott, Kym; MacKenzie, Alex; Brudno, Michael; Bulman, Dennis; Dyment, David; Majewski, Jacek; Jerome-Majewska, Loydie A.; Parboosingh, Jillian S.; Bernier, Francois P.

    2014-01-01

    Elucidating the function of highly conserved regulatory sequences is a significant challenge in genomics today. Certain intragenic highly conserved elements have been associated with regulating levels of core components of the spliceosome and alternative splicing of downstream genes. Here we identify mutations in one such element, a regulatory alternative exon of SNRPB as the cause of cerebro–costo–mandibular syndrome. This exon contains a premature termination codon that triggers nonsense-mediated mRNA decay when included in the transcript. These mutations cause increased inclusion of the alternative exon and decreased overall expression of SNRPB. We provide evidence for the functional importance of this conserved intragenic element in the regulation of alternative splicing and development, and suggest that the evolution of such a regulatory mechanism has contributed to the complexity of mammalian development. PMID:25047197

  15. Disrupted auto-regulation of the spliceosomal gene SNRPB causes cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Danielle C; Revil, Timothée; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Bhoj, Elizabeth J; Innes, A Micheil; Lamont, Ryan E; Lemire, Edmond G; Chodirker, Bernard N; Taylor, Juliet P; Zackai, Elaine H; McLeod, D Ross; Kirk, Edwin P; Hoover-Fong, Julie; Fleming, Leah; Savarirayan, Ravi; Majewski, Jacek; Jerome-Majewska, Loydie A; Parboosingh, Jillian S; Bernier, Francois P

    2014-07-22

    Elucidating the function of highly conserved regulatory sequences is a significant challenge in genomics today. Certain intragenic highly conserved elements have been associated with regulating levels of core components of the spliceosome and alternative splicing of downstream genes. Here we identify mutations in one such element, a regulatory alternative exon of SNRPB as the cause of cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome. This exon contains a premature termination codon that triggers nonsense-mediated mRNA decay when included in the transcript. These mutations cause increased inclusion of the alternative exon and decreased overall expression of SNRPB. We provide evidence for the functional importance of this conserved intragenic element in the regulation of alternative splicing and development, and suggest that the evolution of such a regulatory mechanism has contributed to the complexity of mammalian development.

  16. Analysis of unstable DNA sequence in FRM1 gene in Polish families with fragile X syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milewski, Michal; Bal, Jerzy; Obersztyn, Ewa; Bocian, Ewa; Mazurczak, Tadeusz; Zygulska, Marta; Horst, Juergen; Deelen, Wout H.; Halley, Dicky J.J.

    1996-01-01

    The unstable DNA sequence in the FMR1 gene was analyzed in 85 individuals from Polish families with fragile X syndrome in order to characterize mutations responsible for the disease in Poland. In all affected individuals classified on the basis of clinical features and expression of the fragile site at X(q27.3) a large expansion of the unstable sequence (full mutation) was detected. About 5% (2 of 43) of individuals with full mutation did not express the fragile site. Among normal alleles, ranging in size from 20 to 41 CGC repeats, allele with 29 repeats was the most frequent (37%). Transmission of premutated and fully mutated alleles to the offspring was always associated with size increase. No change in repeat number was found when normal alleles were transmitted. (author). 19 refs., 4 figs, 1 tab

  17. Searching for Tourette’s syndrome gene. Part 1. Heterogeneity of clinical phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kowalska

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The French neuropsychiatrist Georges Gilles de la Tourette described in 1885 the “Maladie des Tics” which later was named after him, as Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS. Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by simple and complex motor and vocal tics with multiple neuropsychiatric comorbidities. GTS is often concurrent with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. There are several clinical GTS subtypes: GTS only, GTS OCD, and GTS OCD ADHD. Additional clinical aspects of the disorder include occurrence of anger episodes, anxiety and mood disorders, and learning and sleeping disturbances. The genetics of GTS is complex and remains unclear. So far, no causative candidate genes have been identified. However, segregation studies in families and twins with GTS provide strong evidence for the existence of a genetic background associated with a multifactorial mode of inheritance. Progress in studies on genome variability among patients with GTS is necessary to improve pharmacotherapeutic strategies of the disorder.

  18. Sequence variants of the DFNB31 gene among Usher syndrome patients of diverse origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aller, Elena; Jaijo, Teresa; van Wijk, Erwin; Ebermann, Inga; Kersten, Ferry; García-García, Gema; Voesenek, Krysta; Aparisi, María José; Hoefsloot, Lies; Cremers, Cor; Díaz-Llopis, Manuel; Pennings, Ronald; Bolz, Hanno J.; Kremer, Hannie; Millán, José M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose It has been demonstrated that mutations in deafness, autosomal recessive 31 (DFNB31), the gene encoding whirlin, is responsible for nonsyndromic hearing loss (NSHL; DFNB31) and Usher syndrome type II (USH2D). We screened DFNB31 in a large cohort of patients with different clinical subtypes of Usher syndrome (USH) to determine the prevalence of DFNB31 mutations among USH patients. Methods DFNB31 was screened in 149 USH2, 29 USH1, six atypical USH, and 11 unclassified USH patients from diverse ethnic backgrounds. Mutation detection was performed by direct sequencing of all coding exons. Results We identified 38 different variants among 195 patients. Most variants were clearly polymorphic, but at least two out of the 15 nonsynonymous variants (p.R350W and p.R882S) are predicted to impair whirlin structure and function, suggesting eventual pathogenicity. No putatively pathogenic mutation was found in the second allele of patients with these mutations. Conclusions DFNB31 is not a major cause of USH. PMID:20352026

  19. Mutations in the evolutionarily highly conserved KEOPS complex genes cause nephrotic syndrome with microcephaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Daniela A.; Rao, Jia; Mollet, Geraldine; Schapiro, David; Daugeron, Marie-Claire; Tan, Weizhen; Gribouval, Olivier; Boyer, Olivia; Revy, Patrick; Jobst-Schwan, Tilman; Schmidt, Johanna Magdalena; Lawson, Jennifer A.; Schanze, Denny; Ashraf, Shazia; Boddaert, Nathalie; Collinet, Bruno; Martin, Gaëlle; Liger, Dominique; Lovric, Svjetlana; Furlano, Monica; Guerrera, I. Chiara; Sanchez-Ferras, Oraly; Menten, Björn; Vergult, Sarah; De Rocker, Nina; Airik, Merlin; Hermle, Tobias; Shril, Shirlee; Widmeier, Eugen; Gee, Heon Yung; Choi, Won-Il; Sadowski, Carolin E.; Pabst, Werner L.; Warejko, Jillian; Daga, Ankana; LeBerre, Tamara Basta; Matejas, Verena; Behnam, Babak; Beeson, Brendan; Begtrup, Amber; Bruce, Malcolm; Ch'ng, Gaik-Siew; Lin, Shuan-Pei; Chang, Jui-Hsing; Chen, Chao-Huei; Cho, Megan T.; Gipson, Patrick E.; Hsu, Chyong-Hsin; Kari, Jameela A.; Ke, Yu-Yuan; Kiraly-Borri, Cathy; Lai, Wai-ming; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Littlejohn, Rebecca Okasha; Masri, Amira; Moghtaderi, Mastaneh; Nakamura, Kazuyuki; Praet, Marleen; Prasad, Chitra; Prytula, Agnieszka; Roeder, Elizabeth; Rump, Patrick; Schnur, Rhonda E.; Shiihara, Takashi; Sinha, Manish; Soliman, Neveen A; Soulami, Kenza; Sweetser, David A.; Tsai, Wen-Hui; Tsai, Jeng-Daw; Vester, Udo; Viskochil, David H.; Vatanavicharn, Nithiwat; Waxler, Jessica L.; Wolf, Matthias T.F.; Wong, Sik-Nin; Poduri, Annapurna; Truglio, Gessica; Mane, Shrikant; Lifton, Richard P.; Bouchard, Maxime; Kannu, Peter; Chitayat, David; Magen, Daniella; Calleweart, Bert; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Zenker, Martin; Antignac, Corinne; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2018-01-01

    Galloway-Mowat syndrome (GAMOS) is a severe autosomal-recessive disease characterized by the combination of early-onset steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) and microcephaly with brain anomalies. To date, mutations of WDR73 are the only known monogenic cause of GAMOS and in most affected individuals the molecular diagnosis remains elusive. We here identify recessive mutations of OSGEP, TP53RK, TPRKB, or LAGE3, encoding the 4 subunits of the KEOPS complex in 33 individuals of 30 families with GAMOS. CRISPR/Cas9 knockout in zebrafish and mice recapitulates the human phenotype of microcephaly and results in early lethality. Knockdown of OSGEP, TP53RK, or TPRKB inhibits cell proliferation, which human mutations fail to rescue, and knockdown of either gene activates DNA damage response signaling and induces apoptosis. OSGEP and TP53RK molecularly interact and co-localize with the actin-regulating ARP2/3 complex. Furthermore, knockdown of OSGEP and TP53RK induces defects of the actin cytoskeleton and reduces migration rate of human podocytes, an established intermediate phenotype of SRNS. We thus identify 4 novel monogenic causes of GAMOS, describe the first link between KEOPS function and human disease, and delineate potential pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:28805828

  20. [Mutation screening of MITF gene in patients with Waardenburg syndrome type 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Yang, Shu-Zhi; Liu, Jun; Han, Bing; Wang, Guo-Jian; Zhang, Xin; Kang, Dong-Yang; Dai, Pu; Young, Wie-Yen; Yuan, Hui-Jun

    2008-04-01

    Warrgenburg syndrome type 2 (WS2) is the most common autosomal dominantly-inherited syndrome with hearing loss. MITF (microphthalmia associated transcription factor)is a basic-helix-loop-helix-luecine zipper (bHLHZip) factor which regulates expression of tyrosinase, and is involved in melanocyte differentiation. Mutations in MITF associated with WS2 have been identified in some but not all affected families. Here, we report a three-generation Chinese family with a point mutation in the MITF gene causing WS2. The proband exhibits congenital severe sensorineural hearing loss, heterochromia iridis and facial freckles. One of family members manifests sensorineural deafness, and the other patients show premature greying or/and freckles. This mutation, heterozygous deletion c.639delA, creates a stop codon in exon 7 and is predicted to result in a truncated protein lacking normal interaction with its target DNA motif. This mutation is a novel mutation and the third case identified in exon 7 of MITF in WS2. Though there is only one base pair distance between this novel mutation and the other two documented cases and similar amino acids change, significant difference is seen in clinical phenotype, which suggests genetic background may play an important role.

  1. The Tourette International Collaborative Genetics (TIC Genetics) study, finding the genes causing Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Andrea; Fernandez, Thomas V; King, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by recurrent motor and vocal tics, often accompanied by obsessive-compulsive disorder and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. While the evidence for a genetic contribution is strong, its exact nature has yet to be clarif......Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by recurrent motor and vocal tics, often accompanied by obsessive-compulsive disorder and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. While the evidence for a genetic contribution is strong, its exact nature has yet......, it is clear that large patient cohorts and open-access repositories will be essential to further advance the field. To that end, the large multicenter Tourette International Collaborative Genetics (TIC Genetics) study was established. The goal of the TIC Genetics study is to undertake a comprehensive gene...... discovery effort, focusing both on familial genetic variants with large effects within multiply affected pedigrees and on de novo mutations ascertained through the analysis of apparently simplex parent-child trios with non-familial tics. The clinical data and biomaterials (DNA, transformed cell lines, RNA...

  2. Darbepoetin alpha for the treatment of anaemia in low-intermediate risk myelodysplastic syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musto, Pellegrino; Lanza, Francesco; Balleari, Enrico

    2005-01-01

    Thirty-seven anaemic subjects with low-to-intermediate risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) received the highly glycosylated, long-acting erythropoiesis-stimulating molecule darbepoetin-alpha (DPO) at the single, weekly dose of 150 microg s.c. for at least 12 weeks. Fifteen patients (40.5%) achieved......, no excess of blasts and hypoplastic bone marrow. This study suggests that DPO, at the dose and schedule used, can be safely given in low-intermediate risk MDS and may be effective in a significant proportion of these patients....

  3. Effects of levosimendan for low cardiac output syndrome in critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koster, Geert; Wetterslev, Jørn; Gluud, Christian

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the benefits and harms of levosimendan for low cardiac output syndrome in critically ill patients. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses (TSA) of randomised clinical trials comparing levosimendan with any type of control. Two...... in the systematic review and 49 trials (6,688 patients) in the meta-analysis. One trial had low risk of bias and nine trials (2,490 patients) were considered lower risk of bias. Trials compared levosimendan with placebo, control interventions, and other inotropes. Pooling all trials including heterogenous...

  4. Metabolic syndrome, diabetes and atherosclerosis: Influence of gene-environment interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreassi, Maria Grazia

    2009-01-01

    Despite remarkable progress in diagnosis and understanding of risk factors, cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains still the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world's developed countries. The metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors (visceral obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia, and hypertension), is increasingly being recognized as a new risk factor for type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Nevertheless, there is wide variation in both the occurrence of disease and age of onset, even in individuals who display very similar risk profiles. There is now compelling evidence that a complex interplay between genetic determinants and environmental factors (still largely unknown) is the reason for this large inter-individual variation in disease susceptibility. The purpose of the present review is to describe the current status of our knowledge concerning the gene-environment interactions potentially implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. It focuses predominantly on studies of genes (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, alcohol dehydrogenase type 1C, apolipoprotein E, glutathione S-transferases T1 and M1) that are known to be modified by dietary and lifestyle habits (fat diet, intake of alcohol and smoking habit). It also describes the limited current understanding of the role of genetic variants of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and their interactions with environmental toxicants. Additional studies are needed in order to clarify whether inter-individual differences in detoxification of environmental toxicants may have an essential role in the development of CVD and contribute to the emerging field of 'environmental cardiology'. Such knowledge may be particularly relevant for improving cardiovascular risk stratification and conceiving the development of 'personalized intervention program'.

  5. Metabolic syndrome, diabetes and atherosclerosis: Influence of gene-environment interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreassi, Maria Grazia, E-mail: andreas@ifc.cnr.it [CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, G. Pasquinucci Hospital, Via Aurelia Sud, Massa (Italy)

    2009-07-10

    Despite remarkable progress in diagnosis and understanding of risk factors, cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains still the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world's developed countries. The metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors (visceral obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia, and hypertension), is increasingly being recognized as a new risk factor for type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Nevertheless, there is wide variation in both the occurrence of disease and age of onset, even in individuals who display very similar risk profiles. There is now compelling evidence that a complex interplay between genetic determinants and environmental factors (still largely unknown) is the reason for this large inter-individual variation in disease susceptibility. The purpose of the present review is to describe the current status of our knowledge concerning the gene-environment interactions potentially implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. It focuses predominantly on studies of genes (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, alcohol dehydrogenase type 1C, apolipoprotein E, glutathione S-transferases T1 and M1) that are known to be modified by dietary and lifestyle habits (fat diet, intake of alcohol and smoking habit). It also describes the limited current understanding of the role of genetic variants of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and their interactions with environmental toxicants. Additional studies are needed in order to clarify whether inter-individual differences in detoxification of environmental toxicants may have an essential role in the development of CVD and contribute to the emerging field of 'environmental cardiology'. Such knowledge may be particularly relevant for improving cardiovascular risk stratification and conceiving the development of 'personalized intervention program'.

  6. Recent Trends in WRN Gene Mutation Patterns in Individuals with Werner Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaga, Masaya; Takemoto, Minoru; Takada-Watanabe, Aki; Koizumi, Naoko; Kitamoto, Takumi; Sakamoto, Kenichi; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Koshizaka, Masaya; Maezawa, Yoshiro; Yokote, Koutaro

    2017-08-01

    To determine recent trends in mutation patterns in the WRN gene, which cause Werner syndrome (WS), a rare, inheritable progeroid syndrome in Japan. Retrospective cohort. Longitudinal survey of WS and literature search for case reports. Individuals whose genetic testing their facilities had requested between 2009 and October 2016 (N = 67). A nationwide epidemiological study was conducted from 2009 to 2011 to improve understanding of the pathology of WS and develop therapeutic guidelines. Since 2009, Chiba University Hospital consecutively evaluated the WRN gene in 67 individuals throughout Japan who had requested genetic testing. A literature search was also conducted for case reports on Japanese WS reported since 1997. A definitive diagnosis of WS was confirmed genetically in 50 of 67 participants. Through the literature search, 16 individuals diagnosed genetically with WS were identified. Of these 66 individuals with WS, 42 were homozygous for a WRN mutation, and 21 were compound heterozygotes. One novel mutant allele was identified in an individual with the compound heterozygous genotype. The proportion of compound heterozygotes (31.8%) was significantly greater than reported previously (14.2%), indicating that the incidence of consanguineous marriage of parents has decreased. The increased frequency of individuals with WS with the compound heterozygous genotype is a recent trend in Japan. A long-term follow-up study on WRN homozygotes and compound heterozygotes will allow the relationship between WRN genotype and clinical severity of WS to be evaluated in the future. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  7. Gene expression changes in mononuclear cells in patients with metabolic syndrome after acute intake of phenol-rich virgin olive oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez-Miranda Jose

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have shown that acute intake of high-phenol virgin olive oil reduces pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidant and pro-thrombotic markers compared with low phenols virgin olive oil, but it still remains unclear whether effects attributed to its phenolic fraction are exerted at transcriptional level in vivo. To achieve this goal, we aimed at identifying expression changes in genes which could be mediated by virgin olive oil phenol compounds in the human. Results Postprandial gene expression microarray analysis was performed on peripheral blood mononuclear cells during postprandial period. Two virgin olive oil-based breakfasts with high (398 ppm and low (70 ppm content of phenolic compounds were administered to 20 patients suffering from metabolic syndrome following a double-blinded, randomized, crossover design. To eliminate the potential effect that might exist in their usual dietary habits, all subjects followed a similar low-fat, carbohydrate rich diet during the study period. Microarray analysis identified 98 differentially expressed genes (79 underexpressed and 19 overexpressed when comparing the intake of phenol-rich olive oil with low-phenol olive oil. Many of these genes seem linked to obesity, dyslipemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Among these, several genes seem involved in inflammatory processes mediated by transcription factor NF-κB, activator protein-1 transcription factor complex AP-1, cytokines, mitogen-activated protein kinases MAPKs or arachidonic acid pathways. Conclusion This study shows that intake of virgin olive oil based breakfast, which is rich in phenol compounds is able to repress in vivo expression of several pro-inflammatory genes, thereby switching activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to a less deleterious inflammatory profile. These results provide at least a partial molecular basis for reduced risk of cardiovascular disease observed in Mediterranean countries, where virgin olive

  8. Clinical characteristics and STK11 gene mutations in Chinese children with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhiheng; Miao, Shijian; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Ping; Wu, Bingbing; Wu, Jie; Huang, Ying

    2015-11-25

    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited disease characterized by gastrointestinal hamartomatous polyps and mucocutaneous melanin spots. Germline mutation of the serine/threonine kinase 11 (STK11) gene are responsible for PJS. In this study, we investigated the clinical characteristics and molecular basis of the disease in Chinese children with PJS. Thirteen children diagnosed with PJS in our hospital were enrolled in this study from 2011 to 2015, and their clinical data on polyp characteristics, intussusceptions events, family histories, etc. were described. Genomic DNA was extracted from whole-blood samples from each subject, and the entire coding sequence of the STK11 gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and analyzed by direct sequencing. The median age at the onset of symptoms was 2 years and 4 months. To date, these children have undergone 40 endoscopy screenings, 17 laparotomies and 9 intussusceptions. Polyps were found in the stomach, duodenum, small bowel, colon and rectum, with large polyps found in 7 children. Mutations were found in eleven children, including seven novel mutations (c.481het_dupA, c.943_944het_delCCinsG, c.397het_delG, c.862 + 1G > G/A, c.348_349het_delGT, and c.803_804het_delGGinsC and c.121_139de l19insTT) and four previously reported mutations (c.658C > C/T, c.890G > G/A, c.1062 C > C/G, and c.290 + 1G > G/A). One PJS patient did not have any STK11 mutations. The polyps caused significant clinical consequences in children with PJS, and mutations of the STK11 gene are generally the cause of PJS in Chinese children. This study expands the spectrum of known STK11 gene mutations.

  9. Characterization of low-molecular-weight glutenin subunit genes of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supplementary data, J. Genet. 94, 497–501. Table 2. LMW-GS genes obtained in this study. Species. Accession no. Clone. Length (bp). Sequence similarity. Ae. bicornis. CIae 47. Sb47-1. 1053. EU189089 96% T. aestivum. (SbSb). Sb47-2. 1053. EU189089 96% T. aestivum. Sb47-3. 1053. EU305550 97% Ae. longissima.

  10. Loeys-Dietz Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the signs and symptoms of Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Marfan syndrome is different from Loeys-Dietz syndrome in that the gene mutation which causes Marfan syndrome is in fibrillin-1 (FBN-1), a protein ...

  11. A mammalian model for Laron syndrome produced by targeted disruption of the mouse growth hormone receptor/binding protein gene (the Laron mouse)

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Yihua; Xu, Bixiong C.; Maheshwari, Hiralal G.; He, Li; Reed, Michael; Lozykowski, Maria; Okada, Shigeru; Cataldo, Lori; Coschigamo, Karen; Wagner, Thomas E.; Baumann, Gerhard; Kopchick, John J.

    1997-01-01

    Laron syndrome [growth hormone (GH) insensitivity syndrome] is a hereditary dwarfism resulting from defects in the GH receptor (GHR) gene. GHR deficiency has not been reported in mammals other than humans. Many aspects of GHR dysfunction remain unknown because of ethical and practical limitations in studying humans. To create a mammalian model for this disease, we generated mice bearing a disrupted GHR/binding protein (GHR/BP) gene through a homologous gene targeting approach. Homozygous GHR/...

  12. Treating metabolic syndrome's metaflammation with low level light therapy: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Tania M.; Kato, Ilka T.; Deana, Alessandro M.; Ribeiro, Martha S.

    2014-02-01

    Metabolic syndrome comprises a constellation of morbidities such as insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, atherogenic dyslipidemia, dysglycemia and obesity (especially abdominal). Metabolic alterations are observed in major insulin target organs, increasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases, type-2 diabetes and therefore mortality. Tissue alterations are characterized by immune cells infiltrates (especially activated macrophages). Released inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α induce chronic inflammation in subjects with metabolic syndrome, since inflammatory pathways are activated in the neighboring cells. The intra-abdominal adipose tissue appears to be of particular importance in the onset of the inflammatory state, and strategies contributing to modulate the inflammatory process within this adipose tissue can mitigate the metabolic syndrome consequences. Considering the low level light therapy (LLLT) recognized benefits in inflammatory conditions, we hypothesized this therapeutic approach could promote positive effects in modulating the inflammatory state of metabolic syndrome. That being the scope of this study, male C57BL/6 mice were submitted to a high-fat/high-fructose diet among 8 weeks to induce metabolic syndrome. Animals were then irradiated on the abdominal region during 21 days using an 850 nm LED (6 sessions, 300 seconds per session, 60 mW output power, ~6 J/cm2 fluence, ~19 mW/cm2 fluence rate). Before and during treatment, blood was sampled either from the retroorbital plexus or from tail puncture for glucose, total cholesterol and triglycerides analysis. So far our results indicate no alterations on these metabolic parameters after LLLT. For further investigations, blood was collected for plasma inflammatory cytokine quantification and fresh ex vivo samples of liver and intra-abdominal adipose tissue were harvested for immunohistochemistry purposes.

  13. Mutation analysis of the SHOC2 gene in Noonan-like syndrome and in hematologic malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Komatsuzaki, Shoko; Aoki, Yoko; Niihori, Tetsuya; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Hopman, Saskia; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Mizuno, Seiji; Watanabe, Yoriko; Kamasaki, Hotaka; Kondo, Ikuko; Moriyama, Nobuko; Kurosawa, Kenji; Kawame, Hiroshi; Okuyama, Ryuhei; Imaizumi, Masue; Rikiishi, Takeshi; Tsuchiya, Shigeru; Kure, Shigeo; Matsubara, Yoichi

    2010-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by dysmorphic features, webbed neck, cardiac anomalies, short stature and cryptorchidism. It shows phenotypic overlap with Costello syndrome and cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC) syndrome. Noonan syndrome and related disorders are caused by

  14. DNA microarray revealed and RNAi plants confirmed key genes conferring low Cd accumulation in barley grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Hongyan; Chen, Zhong-Hua; Chen, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Background Understanding the mechanism of low Cd accumulation in crops is crucial for sustainable safe food production in Cd-contaminated soils. Results Confocal microscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry, gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence analyses revealed a distinct difference in Cd...... with a substantial difference between the two genotypes. Cd stress led to higher expression of genes involved in transport, carbohydrate metabolism and signal transduction in the low-grain-Cd-accumulating genotype. Novel transporter genes such as zinc transporter genes were identified as being associated with low Cd...... accumulation. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed our microarray data. Furthermore, suppression of the zinc transporter genes HvZIP3 and HvZIP8 by RNAi silencing showed increased Cd accumulation and reduced Zn and Mn concentrations in barley grains. Thus, HvZIP3 and HvZIP8 could be candidate genes related to low...

  15. Hyper IgM Syndrome with low IgM and thrombocytosis: an unusual case of immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Ejaz; Arshad Alvi, M

    2016-09-01

    We report a 5 years old male child with low serum IgG, IgA and IgM levels, who presented with recurrent perianal and oral ulcers, intermittent fever, and protracted diarrhea. Despite the lack of typical respiratory symptoms, low serum IgM level and persistent thrombocytosis, an X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome (X-HIGM) was considered. Laboratory investigations revealed a diagnosis of hyper-IgM syndrome caused by CD40L deficiency.

  16. A novel variant in the SLC12A1 gene in two families with antenatal Bartter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breinbjerg, Anders; Siggaard Rittig, Charlotte; Gregersen, Niels; Rittig, Søren; Hvarregaard Christensen, Jane

    2017-01-01

    Bartter syndrome is an autosomal-recessive inherited disease in which patients present with hypokalaemia and metabolic alkalosis. We present two apparently nonrelated cases with antenatal Bartter syndrome type I, due to a novel variant in the SLC12A1 gene encoding the bumetanide-sensitive sodium-(potassium)-chloride cotransporter 2 in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle. Blood samples were received from the two cases and 19 of their relatives, and deoxyribonucleic acid was extracted. The coding regions of the SLC12A1 gene were amplified using polymerase chain reaction, followed by bidirectional direct deoxyribonucleic acid sequencing. Each affected child in the two families was homozygous for a novel inherited variant in the SLC12A1gene, c.1614T>A. The variant predicts a change from a tyrosine codon to a stop codon (p.Tyr538Ter). The two cases presented antenatally and at six months of age, respectively. The two cases were homozygous for the same variant in the SLC12A1 gene, but presented clinically at different ages. This could eventually be explained by the presence of other gene variants or environmental factors modifying the phenotypes. The phenotypes of the patients were similar to other patients with antenatal Bartter syndrome. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Low disease prevalence and inappropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator shock rate in Brugada syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Anders Gaarsdal; Jensen, Henrik Kjærulf; Eschen, Ole

    2012-01-01

    AimsBrugada syndrome (BrS) is an inherited channelopathy that predisposes to malignant ventricular arrhythmias and thereby syncope and sudden cardiac death. Prior studies characterizing BrS patients have used highly selected referral populations from tertiary centres and prevalence estimates have...... been carried out using electrocardiogram (ECG) surveys only. We aimed to identify and characterize all diagnosed BrS patients in Denmark (population 5.4 million).Methods and resultsBrugada syndrome patients were identified using several modalities including identification in all Danish tertiary......%) experienced inappropriate shocks during a median follow-up of 47 months. No patient died or experienced aborted sudden cardiac death during follow-up.ConclusionsWe report the first nationwide study of BrS patients. We found a low incidence of diagnosed definite BrS compared with estimates from ECG surveys...

  18. Kearns-Sayre syndrome with facial and white matter extensive involvement: a (mitochondrial and nuclear gene related? neurocristopathy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostino Berio

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Authors report on a patient with Kearns-Sayre syndrome, large mtDNA deletion (7/kb, facial abnormalities and severe central nervous system (CNS white matter radiological features, commonly attributed to spongy alterations. The common origin from neural crest cell (NCC of facial structures (cartilagineous, osseous, vascular and of the peripheral nervous system and of peripheral glia and partially of the CNS white matter are underlined and the facial and glial abnormalities are attributed to the abnormal reproduction/migration of NCC. In this view, the CNS spongy alterations in KSS may be not only a dystrophic process (leukodystrophy but also a dysplastic condition (leukodysplasia. The Authors hypothesize that the symptoms may be related to mtDNA mutations associated to NCC nuclear gene abnormality. SOX 10 gene may be a nuclear candidate gene, as reported in some case of Waardenburg IV syndrome.

  19. [From gene to disease; genetic causes of hearing loss and visual impairment sometimes accompanied by vestibular problems (Usher syndrome)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennings, R J E; Kremer, H; Deutman, A F; Kimberling, W J; Cremers, C W R J

    2002-12-07

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessively inherited disease, characterised by sensorineural hearing loss, tapetoretinal degeneration and in some cases vestibular problems. Based on the clinical heterogeneity, the disease can be classified into three clinical types (I, II and III), which have their own genetic subtypes (Usher 1A-Usher IG, Usher 2A-Usher 2C and Usher 3). The majority of the Usher type I cases are caused by mutations in the MYO7A gene (Usher 1B) while mutations in the USH2A gene (Usher 2A) are the cause of most cases of type II. Usher syndrome type III, caused by mutations in the USH3 gene, is frequently seen only in Finland.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Costello syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other genetic conditions, cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome (CFC syndrome) and Noonan syndrome . In affected infants, it can be difficult to ... These individuals may actually have CFC syndrome or Noonan syndrome , which are caused by mutations in related genes. ...

  1. Imaging features of tuberous sclerosis complex with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease: a contiguous gene syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Back, Susan J.; Andronikou, Savvas; Kilborn, Tracy; Kaplan, Bernard S.; Darge, Kassa

    2015-01-01

    Genes for tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) type 2 and autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) type 1 are both encoded over a short segment of chromosome 16. When deletions involve both genes, an entity known as the TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome, variable phenotypes of TSC and ADPKD are exhibited. This syndrome has not been reviewed in the radiology literature. Unlike renal cysts in TSC, cystic disease in TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome results in hypertension and renal failure. A radiologist might demonstrate polycystic kidney disease before the patient develops other stigmata of TSC. Conversely, in patients with known TSC, enlarged and polycystic kidneys should signal the possibility of the TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome and not simply TSC. Distinguishing these diagnoses has implications in prognosis, treatment and genetic counseling. To describe the clinical and imaging findings of tuberous sclerosis complex and polycystic kidney disease in seven pediatric patients. We retrospectively reviewed renal and brain imaging of children and young adults with genetically proven or high clinical suspicion for TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome. We included seven pediatric patients from two referral institutions. Ages ranged from birth to 21 years over the course of imaging. The mean follow-up period was 9 years 8 months (4 years 6 months to 20 years 6 months). No child progressed to end-stage renal disease during this period. Three patients were initially imaged for stigmata of TSC, three for abdominal distension and one for elevated serum creatinine concentration. All patients developed enlarged, polycystic kidneys. The latest available imaging studies demonstrated that in 12 of the 14 kidneys 50% or more of the parenchyma was ultimately replaced by >15 cysts, resulting in significant cortical thinning. The largest cysts in each kidney ranged from 2.4 cm to 9.3 cm. Echogenic lesions were present in 13 of the 14 kidneys, in keeping with

  2. Imaging features of tuberous sclerosis complex with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease: a contiguous gene syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, Susan J. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Andronikou, Savvas [University of the Witwatersrand, Radiology Department, Faculty of Health Sciences, Johannesburg (South Africa); Kilborn, Tracy [University of Cape Town, Red Cross War Memorial Children' s Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa); Kaplan, Bernard S. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Nephrology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Darge, Kassa [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Genes for tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) type 2 and autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) type 1 are both encoded over a short segment of chromosome 16. When deletions involve both genes, an entity known as the TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome, variable phenotypes of TSC and ADPKD are exhibited. This syndrome has not been reviewed in the radiology literature. Unlike renal cysts in TSC, cystic disease in TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome results in hypertension and renal failure. A radiologist might demonstrate polycystic kidney disease before the patient develops other stigmata of TSC. Conversely, in patients with known TSC, enlarged and polycystic kidneys should signal the possibility of the TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome and not simply TSC. Distinguishing these diagnoses has implications in prognosis, treatment and genetic counseling. To describe the clinical and imaging findings of tuberous sclerosis complex and polycystic kidney disease in seven pediatric patients. We retrospectively reviewed renal and brain imaging of children and young adults with genetically proven or high clinical suspicion for TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome. We included seven pediatric patients from two referral institutions. Ages ranged from birth to 21 years over the course of imaging. The mean follow-up period was 9 years 8 months (4 years 6 months to 20 years 6 months). No child progressed to end-stage renal disease during this period. Three patients were initially imaged for stigmata of TSC, three for abdominal distension and one for elevated serum creatinine concentration. All patients developed enlarged, polycystic kidneys. The latest available imaging studies demonstrated that in 12 of the 14 kidneys 50% or more of the parenchyma was ultimately replaced by >15 cysts, resulting in significant cortical thinning. The largest cysts in each kidney ranged from 2.4 cm to 9.3 cm. Echogenic lesions were present in 13 of the 14 kidneys, in keeping with

  3. Blau syndrome-associated mutations in exon 4 of the caspase activating recruitment domain 15 (CARD 15) gene are not found in ethnic Danes with sarcoidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milman, Nils; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Distinct mutations of the caspase activating recruitment domain 15 (CARD15) gene (also known as nucleotide-binding oligomerisation domain protein 2) on chromosome 16q are associated with the chronic granulomatous disease called Blau syndrome. Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous...... disease, which has features in common with Blau syndrome. AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether ethnic Danes with sarcoidosis have CARD15 mutations associated with Blau syndrome. METHODS: Analysis of exon 4 of the CARD15 gene containing mutations associated with Blau syndrome was performed...

  4. Novel mutation in forkhead box G1 (FOXG1) gene in an Indian patient with Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Dhanjit Kumar; Jadhav, Vaishali; Ghattargi, Vikas C; Udani, Vrajesh

    2014-03-15

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by the progressive loss of intellectual functioning, fine and gross motor skills and communicative abilities, deceleration of head growth, and the development of stereotypic hand movements, occurring after a period of normal development. The classic form of RTT involves mutation in MECP2 while the involvement of CDKL5 and FOXG1 genes has been identified in atypical RTT phenotype. FOXG1 gene encodes for a fork-head box protein G1, a transcription factor acting primarily as transcriptional repressor through DNA binding in the embryonic telencephalon as well as a number of other neurodevelopmental processes. In this report we have described the molecular analysis of FOXG1 gene in Indian patients with Rett syndrome. FOXG1 gene mutation analysis was done in a cohort of 34 MECP2/CDKL5 mutation negative RTT patients. We have identified a novel mutation (p. D263VfsX190) in FOXG1 gene in a patient with congenital variant of Rett syndrome. This mutation resulted into a frameshift, thereby causing an alteration in the reading frames of the entire coding sequence downstream of the mutation. The start position of the frameshift (Asp263) and amino acid towards the carboxyl terminal end of the protein was found to be well conserved across species using multiple sequence alignment. Since the mutation is located at forkhead binding domain, the resultant mutation disrupts the secondary structure of the protein making it non-functional. This is the first report from India showing mutation in FOXG1 gene in Rett syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Diversity of the Genes Implicated in Algerian Patients Affected by Usher Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, Samia; Bahloul, Amel; Behlouli, Asma; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Makrelouf, Mohamed; Boudjelida, Kamel; Louha, Malek; Cheknene, Ahmed; Belouni, Rachid; Rous, Yahia; Merad, Zahida; Selmane, Djamel; Hasbelaoui, Mokhtar; Bonnet, Crystel; Zenati, Akila; Petit, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a dual sensory impairment affecting hearing and vision. USH is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. Ten different causal genes have been reported. We studied the molecular bases of the disease in 18 unrelated Algerian patients by targeted-exome sequencing, and identified the causal biallelic mutations in all of them: 16 patients carried the mutations at the homozygous state and 2 at the compound heterozygous state. Nine of the 17 different mutations detected in MYO7A (1 of 5 mutations), CDH23 (4 of 7 mutations), PCDH15 (1 mutation), USH1C (1 mutation), USH1G (1 mutation), and USH2A (1 of 2 mutations), had not been previously reported. The deleterious consequences of a missense mutation of CDH23 (p.Asp1501Asn) and the in-frame single codon deletion in USH1G (p.Ala397del) on the corresponding proteins were predicted from the solved 3D-structures of extracellular cadherin (EC) domains of cadherin-23 and the sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain of USH1G/sans, respectively. In addition, we were able to show that the USH1G mutation is likely to affect the binding interface between the SAM domain and USH1C/harmonin. This should spur the use of 3D-structures, not only of isolated protein domains, but also of protein-protein interaction interfaces, to predict the functional impact of mutations detected in the USH genes.

  6. High incidence of large deletions in the PMS2 gene in Spanish Lynch syndrome families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brea-Fernández, A J; Cameselle-Teijeiro, J M; Alenda, C; Fernández-Rozadilla, C; Cubiella, J; Clofent, J; Reñé, J M; Anido, U; Milá, M; Balaguer, F; Castells, A; Castellvi-Bel, S; Jover, R; Carracedo, A; Ruiz-Ponte, C

    2014-06-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is caused by germline mutations in one of the four mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Defects in this pathway lead to microsatellite instability (MSI) in DNA tumors, which constitutes the molecular hallmark of this disease. Selection of patients for genetic testing in LS is usually based on fulfillment of diagnostic clinical criteria (i.e. Amsterdam criteria or the revised Bethesda guidelines). However, following these criteria PMS2 mutations have probably been underestimated as their penetrances appear to be lower than those of the other MMR genes. The use of universal MMR study-based strategies, using MSI testing and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining, is being one proposed alternative. Besides, germline mutation detection in PMS2 is complicated by the presence of highly homologous pseudogenes. Nevertheless, specific amplification of PMS2 by long-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the improvement of the analysis of large deletions/duplications by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) overcome this difficulty. By using both approaches, we analyzed 19 PMS2-suspected carriers who have been selected by clinical or universal strategies and found five large deletions and one frameshift mutation in PMS2 in six patients (31%). Owing to the high incidence of large deletions found in our cohort, we recommend MLPA analysis as the first-line method for searching germline mutations in PMS2. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Identification of fibrillin 1 gene mutations in patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) without Marfan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most frequent congenital heart disease with frequent involvement in thoracic aortic dilatation, aneurysm and dissection. Although BAV and Marfan syndrome (MFS) share some clinical features, and some MFS patients with BAV display mutations in FBN1, the gene encoding fibrillin-1, the genetic background of isolated BAV is poorly defined. Methods Ten consecutive BAV patients [8 men, age range 24–42 years] without MFS were clinically characterized. BAV phenotype and function, together with evaluation of aortic morphology, were comprehensively assessed by Doppler echocardiography. Direct sequencing of each FBN1 exon with flanking intron sequences was performed on eight patients. Results We detected three FBN1 mutations in two patients (aged 24 and 25 years) displaying aortic root aneurysm ≥50 mm and moderate aortic regurgitation. In particular, one patient had two mutations (p.Arg2726Trp and p.Arg636Gly) one of which has been previously associated with variable Marfanoid phenotypes. The other patient showed a pArg529Gln substitution reported to be associated with an incomplete MFS phenotype. Conclusions The present findings enlarge the clinical spectrum of isolated BAV to include patients with BAV without MFS who have involvement of FBN1 gene. These results underscore the importance of accurate phenotyping of BAV aortopathy and of clinical characterization of BAV patients, including investigation of systemic connective tissue manifestations and genetic testing. PMID:24564502

  8. Variant of Rett syndrome and CDKL5 gene: clinical and autonomic description of 10 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Giorgio; Bigoni, Stefania; Engerström, Ingegerd Witt; Calabrese, Olga; Felloni, Beatrice; Scusa, Maria Flora; Di Marco, Pietro; Borelli, Paolo; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo; Julu, Peter O O; Nielsen, Jytte Bieber; Morin, Bodil; Hansen, Stig; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Visconti, Paola; Pintaudi, Maria; Edvige, Veneselli; Romanelli, Anna; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Casarano, Manuela; Battini, Roberta; Cioni, Giovanni; Ariani, Francesca; Renieri, Alessandra; Benincasa, Alberto; Delamont, Robert S; Zappella, Michele

    2012-02-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder affecting almost exclusively females. The Hanefeld variant, or early-onset seizure variant, has been associated with mutations in CDKL5 gene. In recent years more than 60 patients with mutations in the CDKL5 gene have been described in the literature, but the cardiorespiratory phenotype has not been reported. Our aim is to describe clinical and autonomic features of these girls. 10 girls with CDKL5 mutations and a diagnosis of Hanefeld variant have been evaluated on axiological and clinical aspects. In all subjects an evaluation of the autonomic system was performed using the Neuroscope. Common features were gaze avoidance, repetitive head movements and hand stereotypies. The autonomic evaluation disclosed eight cases with the Forceful breather cardiorespiratory phenotype and two cases with the Apneustic breather phenotype. The clinical picture remains within the RTT spectrum but some symptoms are more pronounced in addition to the very early onset of seizures. The cardiorespiratory phenotype was dominated by Forceful breathers, while Feeble breathers were not found, differently from the general Rett population, suggesting a specific behavioral and cardiorespiratory phenotype of the RTT the Hanefeld variant. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  9. A functional alternative splicing mutation in AIRE gene causes autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyu Zhang

    Full Text Available Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1 is a rare autosomal recessive disease defined by the presence of two of the three conditions: mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison's disease. Loss-of-function mutations of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE gene have been linked to APS-1. Here we report mutational analysis and functional characterization of an AIRE mutation in a consanguineous Chinese family with APS-1. All exons of the AIRE gene and adjacent exon-intron sequences were amplified by PCR and subsequently sequenced. We identified a homozygous missense AIRE mutation c.463G>A (p.Gly155Ser in two siblings with different clinical features of APS-1. In silico splice-site prediction and minigene analysis were carried out to study the potential pathological consequence. Minigene splicing analysis and subsequent cDNA sequencing revealed that the AIRE mutation potentially compromised the recognition of the splice donor of intron 3, causing alternative pre-mRNA splicing by intron 3 retention. Furthermore, the aberrant AIRE transcript was identified in a heterozygous carrier of the c.463G>A mutation. The aberrant intron 3-retaining transcript generated a truncated protein (p.G155fsX203 containing the first 154 AIRE amino acids and followed by 48 aberrant amino acids. Therefore, our study represents the first functional characterization of the alternatively spliced AIRE mutation that may explain the pathogenetic role in APS-1.

  10. Novel deletions involving the USH2A gene in patients with Usher syndrome and retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, Gema; Aller, Elena; Jaijo, Teresa; Aparisi, Maria J; Larrieu, Lise; Faugère, Valérie; Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; Ayuso, Carmen; Roux, Anne-Francoise; Millán, José M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to identify and characterize large rearrangements involving the USH2A gene in patients with Usher syndrome and nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa. The multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) technique combined with a customized array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis was applied to 40 unrelated patients previously screened for point mutations in the USH2A gene in which none or only one pathologic mutation was identified. We detected six large deletions involving USH2A in six out of the 40 cases studied. Three of the patients were homozygous for the deletion, and the remaining three were compound heterozygous with a previously identified USH2A point mutation. In five of these cases, the patients displayed Usher type 2, and the remaining case displayed nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa. The exact breakpoint junctions of the deletions found in USH2A in four of these cases were characterized. Our study highlights the need to develop improved efficient strategies of mutation screening based upon next generation sequencing (NGS) that reduce cost, time, and complexity and allow simultaneous identification of all types of disease-causing mutations in diagnostic procedures.

  11. Cataract as a phenotypic marker for a mutation in WFS1, the Wolfram syndrome gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titah, Salah Mohamed Cherif; Meunier, Isabelle; Blanchet, Catherine; Lopez, Severine; Rondouin, Gerard; Lenaers, Guy; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Reynier, Pascal; Paquis-Flucklinger, Veronique; Hamel, Christian P

    2012-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) or diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness (DIDMOAD) (OMIM 222300) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease characterized by diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy as the 2 major criteria, followed later in life by deafness, diabetes insipidus, and various signs of neurologic impairment. The presence of a cataract has been variably mentioned in WS. Two members of a family had thorough ophthalmic examination and their DNA was screened for mutations in mitochondrial DNA, WFS1, OPA1, and OPA3 genes. We report a patient who first had surgery for bilateral cataract at age 5 and who subsequently presented typical signs of WS, i.e., diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy with reduced visual acuity at 20/400 on both eyes at age 22, and mild deafness. The patient was found to be a compound heterozygote for 2 truncating mutations in WFS1, the major WS gene. She carried the previously reported c.1231_1233 delCT and a novel c.2431_2465dup35 mutation. She also was heterozygote for a novel OPA1 sequence variant, c.929A>G in exon 9, whose pathogenicity remains uncertain. The patient's mother was a heterozygous carrier of the c.2431_2465dup35 mutation. She did not have diabetes mellitus or optic atrophy but had bilateral polar cataract. She did not carry the OPA1 sequence variant. Cataract could be a marker for the WFS1 heterozygosity in this family, namely the c.2431_2465dup35 mutation.

  12. A low-carbohydrate survey: Evidence for sustainable metabolic syndrome reversal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark T. Cucuzzella

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Metabolic syndrome has become a significant problem, with the American Diabetes Association estimating the cost of diabetes and pre-diabetes in the United States alone to be $322 billion per year. Numerous clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of low-carbohydrate diets in reversing metabolic syndrome and its associated disorders. Aim: This study was designed to examine how voluntary adherents to a low-carbohydrate diet rate its effectiveness and sustainability using an online survey. Setting and methods: The 57-question survey was administered online and shared internationally via social media and ‘low-carb’ communities. Where appropriate, chi-squared tests and paired t-tests were used to analyse the responses. Results: There were 1580 respondents. The majority of respondents had consumed less than 100 g of carbohydrates per day for over a year, typically for reasons of weight loss or disease management. There was a reported decrease in waist circumference and weight with a simultaneous decrease in hunger and increase in energy level. Of those who provided laboratory values, the majority saw improvements in their HbA1c, blood glucose measurements, and lipid panel results. There was a reduction in usage of various medications, and 25% reported medication cost savings, with average monthly savings of $288 for those respondents. In particular, the usage of pain relievers and anti-inflammatories dropped with a simultaneous decreased rating of pain and increase in mobility. Conclusion: We conclude that low-carbohydrate diets are a sustainable method of metabolic syndrome reversal in a community setting.

  13. Minimally Invasive Microendoscopic Resection of the Transverse Process for Treatment of Low Back Pain with Bertolotti’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichiro Takata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bertolotti’s syndrome is characterized by anomalous enlargement of the transverse process of the most caudal lumbar segment, causing chronic and persistent low back pain or sciatica. We describe the case of a 45-year-old woman who presented with left sciatic pain and low back pain due to a recurrent lumbar disc herniation at L4-5 with Bertolotti’s syndrome. Selective L5 nerve root block and local injection of lidocaine into the articulation between the transverse process and sacral ala temporarily relieved the left sciatic pain and low back pain, respectively. To confirm the effect of local injection on low back pain, we gave a second local injection, which once again relieved the low back pain. Microendoscopic resection of the pseudoarticulation region and discectomy successfully relieved all symptoms. This report illustrates the effectiveness of minimally invasive resection of the transverse process for the treatment of low back pain with Bertolotti’s syndrome.

  14. Minimally Invasive Microendoscopic Resection of the Transverse Process for Treatment of Low Back Pain with Bertolotti's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Yoichiro; Sakai, Toshinori; Higashino, Kosaku; Goda, Yuichiro; Mineta, Kazuaki; Sugiura, Kosuke; Sairyo, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Bertolotti's syndrome is characterized by anomalous enlargement of the transverse process of the most caudal lumbar segment, causing chronic and persistent low back pain or sciatica. We describe the case of a 45-year-old woman who presented with left sciatic pain and low back pain due to a recurrent lumbar disc herniation at L4-5 with Bertolotti's syndrome. Selective L5 nerve root block and local injection of lidocaine into the articulation between the transverse process and sacral ala temporarily relieved the left sciatic pain and low back pain, respectively. To confirm the effect of local injection on low back pain, we gave a second local injection, which once again relieved the low back pain. Microendoscopic resection of the pseudoarticulation region and discectomy successfully relieved all symptoms. This report illustrates the effectiveness of minimally invasive resection of the transverse process for the treatment of low back pain with Bertolotti's syndrome.

  15. Screening non-classical 21-hydroxylase gene deficiency from patients diagnosed as polycystic ovary syndrome by gene assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie HU

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To screen non-classical 21-hydroxylase deficiency (NC-21OHD from patients diagnosed as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS by gene assay. Methods  Ninety-eight patients with PCOS were enrolled according to 2003 Rotterdam criteria from Department of Endocrinology, Tangdu Hospital of Fourth Military Medical University, and they were divided into three groups according to the modified Ferriman-Gallway (mF-G score as follows: group A with score 0-2; group B with score 3-5, and group C with score ≥6. Meanwhile, 30 healthy subjects from the Medical Center of the Hospital were recruited as control group. Peripheral blood of all subjects were collected for extracting DNA, the CYP21A2 gene were amplified by 5 pairs of specific primers, and then the PCR products were sequenced by Shanghai Sangon Co. The subjects would accept test for serum cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH at 8:00am if their CYP21A2 was proved to be abnormal. Results  Thirty subjects of control group had no any defects in CYP21A2, but 5 of 98 patients with PCOS were proved to be deficient in CYP21A2, and the genotypes were V281L/920-921insT (P1, V281L/I230M (P2, V281L/Normal (P3, P4, P5, respectively, and all of them were heterozygous mutations. The incidences of NC-21OHD in group C and B were 28.6% and 3.3%, respectively. Genotype P1 had been identified to belong to NC-21OHD, which was consistent with its clinical phenotype. All genotypes P3, P4 and P5 belonged to carriers. But for P2, since I230M hadn't been reported in literature, the patient with V281L/I230M couldn't be classified now. Serum biochemical results showed that only in P1 the cortisol was close to the normal lower level, and ACTH was close to the normal upper limit of the reported level in the literature, and the remainders were all normal. Conclusions  Although PCOS and NC-21OHD are very similar in clinical manifestations, they are different completely in the pathogenesis and treatment. So it

  16. A novel heterozygous germline deletion in MSH2 gene in a five generation Chinese family with Lynch syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Bin; Ji, Wuyang; Liang, Shengran; Ling, Chao; You, Yan; Xu, Lai; Zhong, Min-Er; Xiao, Yi; Qiu, Hui-Zhong; Lu, Jun-Yang; Banerjee, Santasree

    2017-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is one of the most common familial forms of colorectal cancer predisposing syndrome with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. LS is caused by the germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes including MSH2, MLH1, MSH6 and PMS2. Clinically, LS is characterized by high incidence of early-onset colorectal cancer as well as endometrial, small intestinal and urinary tract cancers, usually occur in the third to fourth decade of the life. Here we describe a five ge...

  17. Novel PSTPIP1 gene mutation in a patient with pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindwall, Elvira; Singla, Shikha; Davis, William E; Quinet, Robert J

    2015-08-01

    Pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne (PAPA) syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disease that usually presents in childhood with recurrent sterile arthritis. As the child ages into puberty, cutaneous features develop and arthritis subsides. We report the case of a now 25-year-old male patient with PAPA syndrome with the E250K mutation in PSTPIP1. We also present a systematic literature review of other PAPA cases. We conducted a literature search of PubMed using the following search terms: E250K mutation, PSTPIP1, and PAPA. PAPA syndrome is caused by mutations on chromosome 15q affecting the proline-serine-threonine phosphatase-interacting protein 1 (PSTPIP1) gene, also known as CD2-binding protein 1 (CD2BP1). The reported cases of PAPA syndrome currently in the literature involve mutations in A230T and E250Q. One case of a novel E250K mutation has been reported, which presented with a different phenotype to previously described cases of PAPA syndrome. With variation present between disease presentations from case to case, it is possible that the spectrum of PAPA syndrome is wider than currently thought. Further research is needed which may uncover an as-yet undiscovered genetic abnormality linking these interrelated diseases together. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Molecular pathogenesis of Waardenburg syndrome type II resulting from SOX10 gene mutation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Chen, Hongsheng; Feng, Yong; Qian, Minfei; Li, Jiping; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Chun

    2016-08-01

    To explore the molecular mechanism of Waardenburg syndrome type II (WS2) resulting from SOX10 gene mutation E248fs through in vitro experiment. 293T cells were transiently transfected with wild type (WT) SOX10 and mutant type (MT) E248fs plasmids. The regulatory effect of WT/MT SOX10 on the transcriptional activity of MITF gene and influence of E248fs on WT SOX10 function were determined with a luciferase activity assay. The DNA binding capacity of the WT/MT SOX10 with the promoter of the MITF gene was determined with a biotinylated double-stranded oligonucleotide probe containing the SOX10 binding sequence cattgtc to precipitate MITF and E248fs, respectively. The stability of SOX10 and E248fs were also analyzed. As a loss-of-function mutation, the E248fs mutant failed to transactivate the MITF promoter as compared with the WT SOX10 (P<0.01), which also showed a dominant-negative effect on WT SOX10. The WT SOX10 and E248fs mutant were also able to bind specifically to the cattgtc motif in the MITF promoter, whereas E248fs had degraded faster than WT SOX10. Despite the fact that the E248fs has a dominant-negative effect on SOX10, its reduced stability may down-regulate the transcription of MITF and decrease the synthesis of melanin, which may result in haploinsufficiency of SOX10 protein and cause the milder WS2 phenotype.

  19. Vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms and risk of polycystic ovary syndrome in South Indian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddamalla, Swapna; Reddy, Tumu Venkat; Govatati, Suresh; Erram, Nagendram; Deenadayal, Mamata; Shivaji, Sisinthy; Bhanoori, Manjula

    2018-02-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder of reproductive age women. Emerging evidence suggests that Vitamin D Receptor (VDR) might be a causal factor for characteristics associated with PCOS such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. Present study investigated association between VDR gene BsmI A/G (rs1544410), ApaI A/C (rs7975232) and TaqI T/C (rs731236) single nucleotide polymorphisms and PCOS risk in South Indian women. Genotyping of VDR gene SNPs was carried out in PCOS patients (n = 95) and controls (n = 130) by PCR-RFLP method and confirmed by sequencing analysis. Haplotype frequencies for multiple loci and the standardized disequilibrium coefficient (D') for pairwise linkage disequilibrium (LD) were assessed by Haploview software. Results showed significantly increased frequencies of BsmI G/G (p = .0197), ApaI C/C (p = .048), TaqI C/C (p = .044) genotypes and BsmI G (p = .0181), ApaI C (p = .0092), TaqI C (p = .0066) alleles in patients compared to controls. In addition, the frequency of the 'BsmI G, ApaI C, TaqI C' haplotype was also significantly elevated in patients (p = .0087). In conclusion, the VDR gene BsmI A/G ApaI A/C TaqI T/C and haplotype may constitute an inheritable risk factor for PCOS in South Indian women.

  20. Nonsense mutations in the PAX3 gene cause Waardenburg syndrome type I in two Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shu-Zhi; Cao, Ju-Yang; Zhang, Rui-Ning; Liu, Li-Xian; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Xin; Kang, Dong-Yang; Li, Mei; Han, Dong-Yi; Yuan, Hui-Jun; Yang, Wei-Yan

    2007-01-05

    Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, pigmental abnormalities of the eye, hair and skin, and dystopia canthorum. The gene mainly responsible for WS1 is PAX3 which is involved in melanocytic development and survival. Mutations of PAX3 have been reported in familiar or sporadic patients with WS1 in several populations of the world except Chinese. In order to explore the genetic background of Chinese WS1 patients, a mutation screening of PAX3 gene was carried out in four WS1 pedigrees. A questionnaire survey and comprehensive clinical examination were conducted in four Chinese pedigrees of WS1. Genomic DNA from each patient and their family members was extracted and exons of PAX3 were amplified by PCR. PCR fragments were ethanol-purified and sequenced in both directions on an ABI_Prism 3100 DNA sequencer with the BigDye Terminator Cycle Sequencing Ready Reaction Kit. The sequences were obtained and aligned to the wild type sequence of PAX3 with the GeneTool program. Two nonsense PAX3 mutations have been found in the study population. One is heterozygous for a novel nonsense mutation S209X. The other is heterozygous for a previously reported mutation in European population R223X. Both mutations create stop codons leading to truncation of the PAX3 protein. This is the first demonstration of PAX3 mutations in Chinese WS1 patients and one of the few examples of an identical mutation of PAX3 occurred in different populations.

  1. Morquio A syndrome: Cloning, sequence, and structure of the human N-acetylgalactosamine 6-sulfatase (GALNS) gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, C.P.; Guo, Xiao-Hui; Apostolou, S. [Adelaide Children`s Hospital, North Adelaide (Australia)] [and others

    1994-08-01

    Deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme, N-acetylgalactosamine 6-sulfatase (GALNS;EC 3.1.6.4), results in the storage of the glycosaminoglycans, keratan sulfate and chrondroitin 6-sulfate, which leads to the lysosomal storage disorder Morquio A syndrome. Four overlapping genomic clones derived from a chromosome 16-specific gridded cosmid library containing the entire GALNS gene were isolated. The structure of the gene and the sequence of the exon/intron boundaries and the 5{prime} promoter region were determined. The GALNS gene is split into 14 exons spanning approximately 40 kb. The potential promoter for GALNS lacks a TATA box but contains GC box consensus sequences, consistent with its role as a housekeeping gene. The GALNS gene contains an Alu repeat in intron 5 and a VNTR-like sequence in intron 6. 12 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Low Oxygen Consumption is Related to a Hypomethylation and an Increased Secretion of IL-6 in Obese Subjects with Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Pascual, Amaya; Lasa, Arrate; Portillo, María P; Arós, Fernando; Mansego, María L; González-Muniesa, Pedro; Martinez, J Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) methylation is an epigenetic modification involved in gene expression regulation, usually via gene silencing, which contributes to the risks of many multifactorial diseases. The aim of the present study was to analyze the influence of resting oxygen consumption on global and gene DNA methylation as well as protein secretion of inflammatory markers in blood cells from obese subjects with sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (SAHS). A total of 44 obese participants with SAHS were categorized in 2 groups according to their resting oxygen consumption. DNA methylation levels were evaluated using a methylation-sensitive high resolution melting approach. The analyzed interleukin 6 (IL6) gene cytosine phosphate guanine (CpG) islands showed a hypomethylation, while serum IL-6 was higher in the low compared to the high oxygen consumption group (p DNA methylation of tumor necrosis factor (B = -0.82, 95% CI -1.33 to -0.30) and long interspersed nucleotide element 1 (B = -0.46; 95% CI -0.87 to -0.04) gene CpGs were found. Finally, studied CpG methylation levels of serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade E member 1 (r = 0.43; p = 0.01), and IL6 (r = 0.41; p = 0.02) were positively associated with fat-free mass. These findings suggest a potential role of oxygen in the regulation of inflammatory genes. Oxygen consumption measurement at rest could be proposed as a clinical biomarker of metabolic health. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. The influence of bovine milk high or low in isoflavones on hepatic gene expression in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaanild, Mette Tingleff; Nielsen, Tina Skau

    2012-01-01

    Isoflavones have generated much attention due to their potential positive effects in various diseases. Phytoestrogens especially equol can be found in bovine milk, as feed ration for dairy cows is comprised of plants containing phytoestrogens. The aim of this study was to analyze the changes...... in hepatic gene expression after dietary intake of milk high and low in isoflavones. In addition to pelleted feed female NMRI mice were offered water, water added either 17β-estradiol, equol, Tween 80, and milk high and low in isoflavone content for a week. Gene expression was analyzed using an array q......PCR kit. It was revealed that Tween 80 and 17β-estradiol upregulated both phase I and phase II genes to the same extent whereas equol alone, high and low isoflavone milk did not alter the expression of phase I genes but decreased the expression of phase II genes. This study shows that dietary isoflavones...

  4. Evaluating compliance to a low glycaemic index (GI diet in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atiomo William

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A low Glycaemic Index (GI diet may decrease some long-term health risks in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS such as endometrial cancer. This study was performed to assess compliance to a low GI diet in women with PCOS. Food diaries prospectively collected over 6 months from women on a low GI diet or healthy eating diet were analysed retrospectively. The women were recruited for a pilot randomised control trial investigating whether a low GI diet decreased the risk of Endometrial Cancer. Nine women with PCOS completed 33 food diaries (17 from women on a low GI diet and 16 from women on a healthy eating diet recording 3023 food items (low GI group:n = 1457; healthy eating group:n = 1566. Data was analysed using Foster-Powell international values inserted into an SPSS database as no scientifically valid established nutrition software was found. The main outcome measures were mean item GI and Glyacemic Load (GL, mean meal GL, percentage high GI foods and mean weight loss. Findings Women allocated the low GI diet had a statistically significant lower GI of food items (33.67 vs 36.91, p Conclusion Women with PCOS on a low GI diet consumed food items with a significantly lower mean GI and GL compared to the healthy eating diet group. Longer term compliance needs evaluation in subsequent studies to ascertain that this translates to reduced long term health risks. Trial Registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN86420258

  5. Efficacy of low level laser therapy in the treatment of burning mouth syndrome: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Maweri, Sadeq Ali; Javed, Fawad; Kalakonda, Butchibabu; AlAizari, Nader A; Al-Soneidar, Walid; Al-Akwa, Ameen

    2017-03-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic pain condition with indefinite cure, predominantly affecting post-menopausal women. The aim of this study was to systematically review the efficacy of low level laser therapy in the treatment of burning mouth syndrome (BMS). PubMed, Embase and Scopus were searched from date of inception till and including October 2016 using various combinations of the following keywords: burning mouth syndrome, BMS, stomatodynia, laser therapy, laser treatment and phototherapy. The inclusion criteria were: Prospective, retrospective and case series studies. Letter to editors, reviews, experimental studies, studies that were not published in English, theses, monographs, and abstracts presented in scientific events were excluded. Due to heterogeneity of data no statistical analyses were performed. Ten clinical studies fulfilled the eligibility criteria, five of which were randomized clinical trials. In these studies, the laser wavelengths, power output and duration of irradiation ranged between 630-980nm, 20-300mW, 10s-15min, respectively. Most of studies reported laser to be an effective therapy strategy for management of BMS. Majority of the studies showed that laser therapy seemed to be effective in reducing pain in BMS patients. However, due to the varied methodologies and substantial variations in laser parameters among these studies, more clinical trials are required to ascertain the efficacy of laser for treating BMS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Low Median Nerve Palsy as Initial Manifestation of Churg-Strauss Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Young Hak; Koh, Young Do; Noh, Jung Ho; Gong, Hyun Sik; Baek, Goo Hyun

    2017-06-01

    Anterior interosseous nerve (AIN) syndrome is typically characterized by forearm pain and partial or complete dysfunction of the AIN-innervated muscles. Although the exact etiology and pathophysiology of the disorder remain unclear, AIN syndrome is increasingly thought to be an inflammatory condition of the nerve rather than a compressive neuropathy because the symptoms often resolve spontaneously following prolonged observation. However, peripheral neuropathy can be 1 of the first symptoms of systemic vasculitis that needs early systemic immunotherapy to prevent extensive nerve damage. Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS; eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis) is 1 type of primary systemic vasculitis that frequently damages the peripheral nervous system. CSS-associated neuropathy usually involves nerves of the lower limb, and few studies have reported on the involvement of the upper limb alone. We report on a rare case of low median nerve palsy as the initial manifestation of CSS. The patient recovered well with early steroid treatment for primary systemic vasculitis. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Association between Two Resistin Gene Polymorphisms and Metabolic Syndrome in Jilin, Northeast China: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingli Fu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome (MetS is a significant health care problem worldwide and is characterized by increased fasting glucose and obesity. Resistin is a protein hormone produced both by adipocytes and immunocompetent cells, including those residing in adipose tissue, and is believed to modulate glucose tolerance and insulin action. This study examined the association of resistin gene polymorphisms, rs1862513 and rs3745368, and related haplotypes with the development of metabolic syndrome in a Han Chinese population. This case-control study was performed on 3792 subjects, including 1771 MetS cases and 2021 healthy controls from the Jilin province of China. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the criteria of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the relationship between gene polymorphism and MetS. Our results showed that there were no significant associations between MetS and the genotype distributions in four kinds of inheritance models, allele frequencies, and related haplotypes of resistin gene polymorphisms rs1862513 and rs3745368 (all p values > 0.05. Based on our study findings, we concluded that mutations in resistin genes are not associated with the presence of MetS in a Han Chinese population from Jilin province in China.

  8. The Emerging Role of Chronic Low-Grade Inflammation in the Pathophysiology of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorakae, Soulmaz; Teede, Helena; de Courten, Barbora; Lambert, Gavin; Boyle, Jacqueline; Moran, Lisa J

    2015-07-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) has become increasingly common over recent years and is associated with reproductive features as well as cardiometabolic risk factors, including visceral obesity, dyslipidemia and impaired glucose homeostasis, and potentially cardiovascular disease. Emerging evidence suggests that these long-term metabolic effects are linked to a low-grade chronic inflammatory state with the triad of hyperinsulinemia, hyperandrogenism, and low-grade inflammation acting together in a vicious cycle in the pathophysiology of PCOS. Dysregulation of the sympathetic nervous system may also act as an important component, potentially creating a tetrad in the pathophysiology of PCOS. The aim of this review is to examine the role of chronic inflammation and the sympathetic nervous system in the development of obesity and PCOS and review potential therapeutic options to alleviate low-grade inflammation in this setting. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  9. Excruciating Low Back Pain After Strenuous Exertion: Beware of Lumbar Paraspinal Compartment Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanbrabant, Peter; Moke, Lieven; Meersseman, Wouter; Vanderschueren, Geert; Knockaert, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Low back pain is extremely common and usually a minor self-limiting condition. Rarely, however, it is a harbinger of serious medical illness. Paraspinal compartment syndrome is a rare condition, but its timely recognition is important to allow adequate treatment. A 16-year-old boy presented to the Emergency Department (ED) with severe low back pain, necessitating intravenous opioids. Laboratory results showed severe rhabdomyolysis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine showed diffuse edema and swelling in the paraspinal muscles. Aggressive fluid therapy was started but despite narcotic analgesia the pain persisted and creatine kinase (CK) levels increased. Compartment pressures of the erector spinae were found to be increased. The decision was made to proceed with bilateral paraspinal fasciotomies. Postoperatively, the patient noted immediate pain relief with rapid decrease of CK level. The patient is pain free and resumed running and swimming 3 months after admission in the ED. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Although paraspinal compartment syndrome is a rare condition, its recognition is of paramount importance to allow adequate surgical treatment, preventing muscle necrosis. Although back pain most often has a benign course, a careful history and physical examination in patients presenting with low back pain allows determination of "red flags." Mandatory further diagnostic tests can identify underlying serious illness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Induction and prevention of low-T3 syndrome in exercising women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, A B; Callister, R

    1993-05-01

    To investigate the influence of exercise on thyroid metabolism, 46 healthy young regularly menstruating sedentary women were randomly assigned to a 3 x 2 experimental design of aerobic exercise and energy availability treatments. Energy availability was defined as dietary energy intake minus energy expenditure during exercise. After 4 days of treatments, low energy availability (8 vs. 30 kcal.kg body wt-1.day-1) had reduced 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) by 15% and free T3 (fT3) by 18% and had increased thyroxine (T4) by 7% and reverse T3 (rT3) by 24% (all P Exercise quantity (0 vs. 1,300 kcal/day) and intensity (40 vs. 70% of aerobic capacity) did not affect any thyroid hormone (all P > 0.10). That is, low-T3 syndrome was induced by the energy cost of exercise and was prevented in exercising women by increasing dietary energy intake. Selective observation of low-T3 syndrome in amenorrheic and not in regularly menstruating athletes suggests that exercise may compromise the availability of energy for reproductive function in humans. If so, athletic amenorrhea might be prevented or reversed through dietary reform without reducing exercise quantity or intensity.

  11. Meta-analysis and candidate gene mining of low-phosphorus tolerance in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongwei; Uddin, Mohammed Shalim; Zou, Cheng; Xie, Chuanxiao; Xu, Yunbi; Li, Wen-Xue

    2014-03-01

    Plants with tolerance to low-phosphorus (P) can grow better under low-P conditions, and understanding of genetic mechanisms of low-P tolerance can not only facilitate identifying relevant genes but also help to develop low-P tolerant cultivars. QTL meta-analysis was conducted after a comprehensive review of the reports on QTL mapping for low-P tolerance-related traits in maize. Meta-analysis produced 23 consensus QTL (cQTL), 17 of which located in similar chromosome regions to those previously reported to influence root traits. Meanwhile, candidate gene mining yielded 215 genes, 22 of which located in the cQTL regions. These 22 genes are homologous to 14 functionally characterized genes that were found to participate in plant low-P tolerance, including genes encoding miR399s, Pi transporters and purple acid phosphatases. Four cQTL loci (cQTL2-1, cQTL5-3, cQTL6-2, and cQTL10-2) may play important roles for low-P tolerance because each contains more original QTL and has better consistency across previous reports. © 2014 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  12. Identification of 51 novel exons of the Usher syndrome type 2A (USH2A) gene that encode multiple conserved functional domains and that are mutated in patients with Usher syndrome type II.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, E. van; Pennings, R.J.E.; Brinke, H. te; Claassen, A.M.W.; Yntema, H.G.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Kremer, J.M.J.

    2004-01-01

    The USH2A gene is mutated in patients with Usher syndrome type IIa, which is the most common subtype of Usher syndrome and is characterized by hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa. Since mutation analysis by DNA sequencing of exons 1-21 revealed only ~63% of the expected USH2A mutations, we

  13. Low cardiac output predicts development of hepatorenal syndrome and survival in patients with cirrhosis and ascites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, A; Bendtsen, F; Møller, S

    2010-01-01

    (130 (SD 46) vs 78 (SD 29) mumol/l, psyndrome type 1 within 3 months was higher in the group with low CI than in the high CI group (43% vs 5%, p = 0.04). Patients with the lowest CI (N = 8) had significantly poorer survival at 3, 9, and 12 months......OBJECTIVES: Recent studies suggest that cardiac dysfunction precedes development of the hepatorenal syndrome. In this follow-up study, we aimed to investigate the relation between cardiac and renal function in patients with cirrhosis and ascites and the impact of cardiac systolic function...

  14. Efficacy of the low FODMAP diet for treating irritable bowel syndrome: the evidence to date

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanayakkara WS

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Wathsala S Nanayakkara,1 Paula ML Skidmore,1 Leigh O'Brien,2 Tim J Wilkinson,3 Richard B Gearry,31Department of Human Nutrition, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand; 2Dietary Specialists, Christchurch, New Zealand; 3Department of Medicine, University of Otago, Christchurch, New Zealand Abstract: This review summarizes the published clinical studies concerning the management of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS using restriction of Fermentable Oligosaccharide, Disaccharide, Monosaccharide, and Polyols in the diet (low FODMAP diet. In recent years, the data supporting low FODMAP diet for the management of IBS symptoms have emerged, including several randomized controlled trials, case-control studies, and other observational studies. Unlike most dietary manipulations tried in the past to alleviate gastrointestinal symptoms of IBS, all studies on low FODMAP diet have consistently shown symptomatic benefits in the majority of patients with IBS. However, dietary adherence by the patients and clear dietary intervention led by specialized dietitians appear to be vital for the success of the diet. Up to 86% of patients with IBS find improvement in overall gastrointestinal symptoms as well as individual symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, constipation, diarrhea, abdominal distention, and flatulence following the diet. FODMAP restriction reduces the osmotic load and gas production in the distal small bowel and the proximal colon, providing symptomatic relief in patients with IBS. Long-term health effects of a low FODMAP diet are not known; however, stringent FODMAP restriction is not recommended owing to risks of inadequate nutrient intake and potential adverse effects from altered gut microbiota. In conclusion, the evidence to date strongly supports the efficacy of a low FODMAP diet in the treatment of IBS. Further studies are required to understand any potential adverse effects of long-term restriction of FODMAPs. Keywords: irritable bowel

  15. The place of the CT scan in the three concept view (TCV) of the low back syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geldermann, P.W.

    1982-01-01

    From the historical lines along which our thinking about low back pain developed, three concepts can be deduced: radicular, stenotic and axial. The patient with a low back pain syndrome (LBS) should be seen with this three concept view (TCV) in mind. Modern insight into the degenerative process of the low back support this concept. The clinical syndromes illustrating these concepts, radicular syndromes, Neurogenic Peripheral Intermittent Claudication (NPIC), and axial low back pain, can intermingle. To determine the place of the CT scan in the process of diagnosis of the LBS, we carried out a total of 56 CT-examinations on about 200 low back patients with various indications. The results are discussed. In addition to radiological suppositions, NPIC plays an important part in deciding whether or not to perform a CT scan. (Author)

  16. Mutations in the paired domain of the human PAX3 gene cause Klein-Waardenburg syndrome (WS-III) as well as Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS-I).

    OpenAIRE

    Hoth, C F; Milunsky, A; Lipsky, N; Sheffer, R; Clarren, S K; Baldwin, C T

    1993-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS-I) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, dystopia canthorum, pigmentary disturbances, and other developmental defects. Klein-Waardenburg syndrome (WS-III) is a disorder with many of the same characteristics as WS-I and includes musculoskeletal abnormalities. We have recently reported the identification and characterization of one of the first gene defects, in the human PAX3 gene, which causes WS-I. PAX3 is a DNA-binding ...

  17. Bloom's syndrome. VI. The disorder in Israel and an estimation of the gene frequency in the Ashkenazim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, J; Bloom, D; Passarge, E; Fried, K; Goodman, R M; Katzenellenbogen, I; Laron, Z; Legum, C; Levin, S; Wahrman

    1977-01-01

    An effort was made to identify all individuals with Bloom's syndrome living in Israel between September 1971 and September 1972. Each of the eight individuals located were Jewish and could readily be classified Ashkenazic. The frequency of the Bloom's syndrome gene in Ashkenazim was estimated to be .0042 (minimum), implying a heterozygote frequency greater than 1 in 120. A striking distortion of the sex ratio (M/F = 7.0) may have been due to underascertainment of affected females. One of the affected individuals ascertained during the survey subsequently has died from cancer, which is in keeping with the recognized cancer proneness of this condition. Four of the affected have married, but no conception is known to have occurred, which suggests that sub- or infertility is a feature of the syndrome. PMID:930922

  18. Ghrelin Gene Variants Influence on Metabolic Syndrome Components in Aged Spanish Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Mireia; Adam, Victoria; Palomera, Elisabet; Blesa, Sebastian; Díaz, Gonzalo; Buquet, Xavier; Serra-Prat, Mateu; Martín-Escudero, Juan Carlos; Palanca, Ana; Chaves, Javier Felipe; Puig-Domingo, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The role of genetic variations within the ghrelin gene on cardiometabolic profile and nutritional status is still not clear in humans, particularly in elderly people. We investigated six SNPs of the ghrelin gene and their relationship with metabolic syndrome (MS) components. 824 subjects (413 men/411 women, age 77.31±5.04) participating in the Mataró aging study (n = 310) and the Hortega study (n = 514) were analyzed. Anthropometric variables, ghrelin, lipids, glucose and blood pressure levels were measured, and distribution of SNPs -994CT (rs26312), -604GA (rs27647), -501AC (rs26802), R51Q (rs34911341), M72L (rs696217) and L90G (rs4684677) of the ghrelin gene evaluated. Genotypes were determined by multiplex PCR and SNaPshot minisequencing. MS (IDF criteria) was found in 54.9%. No association between any of the SNPs and levels of total fasting circulating ghrelin levels was found. C/A-A/A genotype of M72L was associated with increased risk of central obesity according to IDF criteria, while G/A-G/G genotypes of -604GA with reduced risk. A/A genotype of -501AC polymorphism was associated to decreased BMI. In relation to lipid profile, the same genotypes of -604GA were associated with increased total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol and -501AC with reduced triglycerides. There were no associations with systolic or diastolic blood pressure levels or with hypertension, glucose levels or diabetes and ghrelin polymorphisms. However, G/G genotype of -604GA was associated with glucose >100 mg/dL. Haplotype analysis showed that only one haplotype is associated with increased risk of waist circumference and central obesity. The analysis of subjects by gender showed an important and different association of these polymorphisms regarding MS parameters. Ghrelin gene variants -604GA, -501AC and M72L are associated with certain components of MS, in particular to BMI and lipid profile in elderly Spanish subjects.

  19. Ghrelin Gene Variants Influence on Metabolic Syndrome Components in Aged Spanish Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireia Mora

    Full Text Available The role of genetic variations within the ghrelin gene on cardiometabolic profile and nutritional status is still not clear in humans, particularly in elderly people.We investigated six SNPs of the ghrelin gene and their relationship with metabolic syndrome (MS components.824 subjects (413 men/411 women, age 77.31±5.04 participating in the Mataró aging study (n = 310 and the Hortega study (n = 514 were analyzed. Anthropometric variables, ghrelin, lipids, glucose and blood pressure levels were measured, and distribution of SNPs -994CT (rs26312, -604GA (rs27647, -501AC (rs26802, R51Q (rs34911341, M72L (rs696217 and L90G (rs4684677 of the ghrelin gene evaluated. Genotypes were determined by multiplex PCR and SNaPshot minisequencing. MS (IDF criteria was found in 54.9%.No association between any of the SNPs and levels of total fasting circulating ghrelin levels was found. C/A-A/A genotype of M72L was associated with increased risk of central obesity according to IDF criteria, while G/A-G/G genotypes of -604GA with reduced risk. A/A genotype of -501AC polymorphism was associated to decreased BMI. In relation to lipid profile, the same genotypes of -604GA were associated with increased total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol and -501AC with reduced triglycerides. There were no associations with systolic or diastolic blood pressure levels or with hypertension, glucose levels or diabetes and ghrelin polymorphisms. However, G/G genotype of -604GA was associated with glucose >100 mg/dL. Haplotype analysis showed that only one haplotype is associated with increased risk of waist circumference and central obesity. The analysis of subjects by gender showed an important and different association of these polymorphisms regarding MS parameters.Ghrelin gene variants -604GA, -501AC and M72L are associated with certain components of MS, in particular to BMI and lipid profile in elderly Spanish subjects.

  20. Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor 2 Gene Variants in Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazuki Komuro

    Full Text Available Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH plays an important role in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS and regulates the stress response through two CRH receptors (R1 and R2. Previously, we reported that a CRHR1 gene polymorphism (rs110402, rs242924, and rs7209436 and haplotypes were associated with IBS. However, the association between the CRHR2 gene and IBS was not investigated. We tested the hypothesis that genetic polymorphisms and haplotypes of CRHR2 are associated with IBS pathophysiology and negative emotion in IBS patients.A total of 142 IBS patients and 142 healthy controls participated in this study. Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of the CRHR2 gene (rs4722999, rs3779250, rs2240403, rs2267710, rs2190242, rs2284217, and rs2284220 were genotyped. Subjects' psychological states were evaluated using the Perceived-Stress Scale, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Self-Rating Depression Scale.We found that rs4722999 and rs3779250, located in intronic region, were associated with IBS in terms of genotype frequency (rs4722999: P = 0.037; rs3779250: P = 0.017 and that the distribution of the major allele was significantly different between patients and controls. There was a significant group effect (controls vs. IBS, and a CRHR2 genotype effect was observed for three psychological scores, but the interaction was not significant. We found a haplotype of four SNPs (rs4722999, rs3779250, rs2240403, and rs2267710 and two SNPs (rs2284217 and rs2284220 in strong linkage disequilibrium (D' > 0.90. We also found that haplotypes of the CRHR2 gene were significantly different between IBS patients and controls and that they were associated with negative emotion.Our findings support the hypothesis that genetic polymorphisms and haplotypes of CRHR2 are related to IBS. In addition, we found associations between CRHR2 genotypes and haplotypes and negative emotion in IBS patients and controls. Further studies on IBS and the CRH

  1. ABCD syndrome is caused by a homozygous mutation in the EDNRB gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, JBGM; Kunze, J; Osinga, J; van Essen, AJ; Hofstra, RMW

    2002-01-01

    ABCD syndrome is an autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by albinism, black lock, cell migration disorder of the neurocytes of the gut (Hirschsprung disease [HSCR]), and deafness. This phenotype clearly overlaps with the features of the Shah-Waardenburg syndrome, comprising sensorineural

  2. IGF-I generation test in prepubertal children with Noonan syndrome due to mutations in the PTPN11 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelloni, Silvano; Baroncelli, Giampiero I; Dati, Eleonora; Ghione, Silvia; Baldinotti, Fulvia; Toschi, Benedetta; Simi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Short stature represents one of the main features of children with Noonan syndrome. The reason for impaired growth remains largely unknown. To assess GH and IGF1 secretion in children with Noonan syndrome. 12 prepubertal children with Noonan syndrome due to mutations in the PTPN11 gene [7 males, 6 females; median age, years: 8.6 (range 5.1-13.4)] were studied; 12 prepubertal children with short stature (SS) [7 males, 5 females; median age, years: 8.1 (range 4.8-13.1)] served as the control group. GH secretion after arginine stimulation test; IGF1 generation test by measurement of IGF1 levels before and after recombinant GH (rGH) administration (0.05 mg/kg/day for 4 days). Baseline and stimulated peak values of GH were not significantly different between the two groups. At +120 minutes, GH levels remained significantly higher (p = 0.0121) in comparison with baseline values in children with Noonan syndrome. Baseline IGFI levels in patients and in SS controls were not significantly different, in contrast to values after the rGH generation test [205 ng/mL (interquartiles 138.2-252.5 ng/mL) and 284.5 ng/mL (interquartiles 172-476 ng/mL), respectively; p = 0.0248]. IGF1 values were significantly related to height (baseline: r = 773, p = 0.0320; peak: r = 0.591, p = 0.0428) in children with Noonan syndrome. Blunted increase of IGF1 after the rGH generation test was present in children with Noonan syndrome due to mutations in the PTPN11 gene in comparison with SS children. This finding may be due to partial GH resistance in the former likely related to altered Ras-MAPK signaling pathway.

  3. Polymorphisms in the LPL and CETP Genes and Haplotype in the ESR1 Gene Are Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Women from Southwestern Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ángel Cahua-Pablo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome (MetS is a combination of metabolic disorders associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD. Studies in women reported associations between polymorphisms in ESR1, LPL and CETP genes and MetS. Our aim was to evaluate the association between variants in ESR1, LPL and CETP genes with MetS and its components. Four hundred and eighty women were analyzed, anthropometric features and biochemical profiles were evaluated, and genotyping was performed by real-time PCR. We found an association with elevated glucose levels (odds ratio (OR = 2.9; p = 0.013 in carrying the AA genotype of rs1884051 in the ESR1 gene compared with the GG genotype, and the CC genotype of rs328 in the LPL gene was associated with MetS compared to the CG or GG genotype (OR = 2.8; p = 0.04. Moreover, the GA genotype of rs708272 in the CETP gene is associated with MetS compared to the GG or AA genotype (OR = 1.8; p = 0.006. In addition the ACTCCG haplotype in the ESR1 gene is associated with a decrease in the risk of MetS (OR = 0.02; p < 0.001. In conclusion, our results show the involvement of the variants of ESR1, LPL and CETP genes in metabolic events related to MetS or some of its features.

  4. Low-carbohydrate-diet score and metabolic syndrome: An epidemiologic study among Iranian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirani, Fatemeh; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad; Keshteli, Ammar Hassanzadeh; Adibi, Peyman; Azadbakht, Leila

    2015-09-01

    Epidemiologic studies linking carbohydrate consumption and risk for metabolic syndrome (MetS) are limited. The association between low-carbohydrate-diet score and MetS has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate low-carbohydrate-diet score in relation to MetS among a group of Iranian women. This cross-sectional study was conducted with 442 Iranian female teachers >20 y of age. Usual dietary intakes were assessed using a validated, dish-based semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute/International Diabetes Federation definition guidelines. The prevalence of MetS in the lowest and highest quintile of low-carbohydrate-diet score was 17.5% and 18.8%, respectively (P = 0.97). There was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence between extreme quartiles low-carbohydrate-diet score and MetS (odds ratio, 0.93; 95% confidence interval, 0.38-2.28). After controlling for age, energy intake, and other potential confounders, low-carbohydrate-diet score was not significantly associated with MetS. A significant association was observed between this score and abnormal fasting plasma glucose. We failed to find a significant relationship between this score and other components of MetS. Diets with lower amounts of carbohydrate and higher contents of fat and protein were not significantly associated with the risk for MetS in a cross-sectional study with a group of Iranian women. More longitudinal studies are needed to confirm these results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Novel mutations in the long isoform of the USH2A gene in patients with Usher syndrome type II or non-syndromic retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Terri L; Seyedahmadi, Babak Jian; Sweeney, Meredith O; Dryja, Thaddeus P; Berson, Eliot L

    2010-07-01

    Usher syndrome type II (USH2) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterised by retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss. Mutations in the USH2A gene are the most common cause of USH2 and are also a cause of some forms of RP without hearing loss (ie, non-syndromic RP). The USH2A gene was initially identified as a transcript comprised of 21 exons but subsequently a longer isoform containing 72 exons was identified. The 51 exons unique to the long isoform of USH2A were screened for mutations among a core set of 108 patients diagnosed with USH2 and 80 patients with non-syndromic RP who were all included in a previously reported screen of the short isoform of USH2A. For several exons, additional patients were screened. In total, 35 deleterious mutations were identified including 17 nonsense mutations, 9 frameshift mutations, 5 splice-site mutations, and 4 small in-frame deletions or insertions. Twenty-seven mutations were novel. In addition, 65 rare missense changes were identified. A method of classifying the deleterious effect of the missense changes was developed using the summed results of four different mutation assessment algorithms, SIFT, pMUT, PolyPhen, and AGVGD. This system classified 8 of the 65 changes as 'likely deleterious' and 9 as 'possibly deleterious'. At least one mutation was identified in 57-63% of USH2 cases and 19-23% of cases of non-syndromic recessive RP (calculated without and including probable/possible deleterious changes) thus supporting that USH2A is the most common known cause of RP in the USA.

  6. Low Triiodothyronine Syndrome and Long-Term Cardiovascular Outcome in Incident Peritoneal Dialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tae Ik; Nam, Joo Young; Shin, Sug Kyun; Kang, Ea Wha

    2015-06-05

    A direct association between low triiodothyronine (T3) syndrome and cardiovascular (CV) mortality has been reported in hemodialysis patients. However, the implications of this syndrome in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients have not been properly investigated. This study examined the association between low T3 syndrome and CV mortality including sudden death in a large cohort of incident PD patients. This prospective observational study included 447 euthyroid patients who started PD between January 2000 and December 2009. Measurement of thyroid hormones was performed at baseline. All-cause and cause-specific deaths were registered during the median 46 months of follow-up. The survival rate was compared among three groups based on tertile of T3 levels. In Kaplan-Meyer analysis, patients with the lowest tertile were significantly associated with higher risk of all-cause and CV mortality including sudden death (P<0.001 for trend). In Cox analyses, T3 level was a significant predictor of all-cause mortality (per 10-unit increase, adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.86; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.78 to 0.94; P=0.002), CV death (per 10-unit increase, adjusted HR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.75 to 0.98; P=0.01), and sudden death (per 10-unit increase, adjusted HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.56 to 0.86; P=0.001) after adjusting for well known risk factors including inflammation and malnutrition. The higher T3 level was also independently associated with lower risk for sudden death (per 10-unit increase, adjusted HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.56 to 0.90; P=0.01) even when accounting for competing risks of death from other causes. T3 level at the initiation of PD was a strong independent predictor of long-term CV mortality, particularly sudden death, even after adjusting well known risk factors. Low T3 syndrome might represent a factor directly implicated in cardiac complications in PD patients. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  7. Severe manifestation of Bartter syndrome Type IV caused by a novel insertion mutation in the BSND gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pablos, Augusto Luque; García-Nieto, Victor; López-Menchero, Jesús C; Ramos-Trujillo, Elena; González-Acosta, Hilaria; Claverie-Martín, Félix

    2014-05-01

    Bartter syndrome Type IV is a rare subtype of the Bartter syndromes that leads to both severe renal salt wasting and sensorineural deafness. This autosomal recessive disease is caused by mutations in the gene encoding barttin, BSND, an essential subunit of the ClC-K chloride channels expressed in renal and inner ear epithelia. Patients differ in the severity of renal symptoms, which appears to depend on the modification of channel function by the mutant barttin. To date, only a few BSND mutations have been reported, most of which are missense or nonsense mutations. In this study, we report the identification of the first insertion mutation, p.W102Vfs*7, in the BSND gene of a newborn girl with acute clinical symptoms including early-onset chronic renal failure. The results support previous data indicating that mutations that are predicted to abolish barttin expression are associated with a severe phenotype and early onset renal failure.

  8. A novel mutation in the NOD2 gene associated with Blau syndrome: a Norwegian family with four affected members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milman, N; Ursin, K; Rødevand, E

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blau syndrome is a chronic granulomatous disease with an autosomal dominant trait characterized by the triad granulomatous dermatitis, arthritis, and uveitis. It is caused by mutations in the NOD2 gene, also termed the CARD15 gene. OBJECTIVE: To report a novel mutation in the NOD2 gen...... with an autosomal dominant heritage. Most likely the mutation has arisen de novo in the proband. Genetic counselling and antenatal diagnostics should be available to the involved families....... associated with Blau syndrome. METHODS AND RESULTS: The proband was a 68-year-old ethnic Norwegian male who had uveitis and arthritis since 10 years of age followed by lifelong recurrent arthritis and chronic eye involvement. Genetic analysis showed a heterozygous c.1814 C>A, T605N mutation in NOD2 that has...

  9. Intragenic deletions affecting two alternative transcripts of the IMMP2L gene in patients with Tourette syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelsen, Birgitte; Melchior, Linea; Jensen, Lars R; Groth, Camilla; Glenthøj, Birte; Rizzo, Renata; Debes, Nanette Mol; Skov, Liselotte; Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen; Paschou, Peristera; Silahtaroglu, Asli; Tümer, Zeynep

    2014-01-01

    Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by multiple motor and vocal tics, and the disorder is often accompanied by comorbidities such as attention-deficit hyperactivity-disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder. Tourette syndrome has a complex etiology, but the underlying environmental and genetic factors are largely unknown. IMMP2L (inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase, subunit 2) located on chromosome 7q31 is one of the genes suggested as a susceptibility factor in disease pathogenesis. Through screening of a Danish cohort comprising 188 unrelated Tourette syndrome patients for copy number variations, we identified seven patients with intragenic IMMP2L deletions (3.7%), and this frequency was significantly higher (P=0.0447) compared with a Danish control cohort (0.9%). Four of the seven deletions identified did not include any known exons of IMMP2L, but were within intron 3. These deletions were found to affect a shorter IMMP2L mRNA species with two alternative 5′-exons (one including the ATG start codon). We showed that both transcripts (long and short) were expressed in several brain regions, with a particularly high expression in cerebellum and hippocampus. The current findings give further evidence for the role of IMMP2L as a susceptibility factor in Tourette syndrome and suggest that intronic changes in disease susceptibility genes should be investigated further for presence of alternatively spliced exons. PMID:24549057

  10. Triple-A syndrome with prominent ophthalmic features and a novel mutation in the AAAS gene: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Caroline

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Triple-A syndrome (Allgrove syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by adrenal insufficiency, alacrima, achalasia, and – occasionally – autonomic instability. Mutations have been found in the AAAS gene on 12q13. Case presentation We present the case of a 12 year-old boy with classic systemic features of triple-A syndrome and several prominent ophthalmic features, including: accommodative spasm, dry eye, superficial punctate keratopathy, and pupillary hypersensitivity to dilute pilocarpine. MRI showed small lacrimal glands bilaterally. DNA sequencing of PCR-amplified fragments from the 16 exons of the AAAS gene revealed compound heterozygosity for a new, out-of-frame 5-bp deletion in exon 15, c1368-1372delGCTCA, and a previously-described nonsense mutation in exon 9, c938C>T, R286X. Conclusions In addition to known ophthalmic manifestations, triple-A syndrome can present with accommodative dysregulation and ocular signs of autonomic dysfunction.

  11. [Study on gene differential expressions of substance and energy metabolism in chronic superficial gastritis patients of Pi deficiency syndrome and of pi-wei hygropyrexia syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ze-Min; Chen, Wei-Wen; Wang, Ying-Fang

    2012-09-01

    To analyze the metabolic levels of energy and substance in chronic superficial gastritis (CSG) patients of Pi deficiency syndrome (PDS) and of Pi-Wei hygropyrexia syndrome (PWHS), including lipid, protein, nucleic acid, carbohydrate, trace element, and energy metabolism, and to study the pathogenesis mechanism of PDS from substance and energy metabolisms. Recruited were 8 CSG patients who visited at First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine from June 2004 to March 2005, including 4 patients of PDS and 4 of PWHS. Their gastric mucosae were used for experiments of DNA microarray. The dual-channel DNA microarray data were bioinformatically analyzed by BRB ArrayTools and IPA Software. Obtained were fifty-six differentially expressed genes involved in substance and energy metabolisms with the expression fold more than 2, including 11 genes up-regulated and 45 genes down-regulated. Of them, genes correlated to lipid metabolism included CRLS1, LRP11, FUT9, GPCPD1, PIGL, SULT1A4, B3GNT1, ST8SIA4, and ACADVL, mainly involved in the metabolic processes of fatty acid, cholesterol, phospholipids, and glycolipid. Genes correlated to protein metabolism included ASRGL1, AARSD1, EBNA1BP2, PUM2, MRPL52, C120RF65, PSMB8, PSME2, UBA7, RNF11, FBXO44, ZFYVE26, CHMP2A, SSR4, SNX4, RAB3B, RABL2A, GOLGA2, KDELR1, PHPT1, ACPP, PTPRF, CRKL, HDAC7, ADPRHL2, B3GNT1, ST8SIA4, DDOST, and FUT9, mainly involved in the biosynthesis processes of protein, ubiquitination, targeted transport and post-translation modification. Genes correlated to nucleic acid metabolism included DFFB, FLJ35220, TOP2A, SF3A3, CREB3, CRTC2, NR1D2, MED6, GTF2IRD1, C1ORF83, ZNF773, and ZMYND11, mainly involved in DNA replication and repair, transcription regulation. Genes correlated to carbohydrate metabolism included AGL, B3GNT1, FUT9, ST8SIA4, SULT1A4, DDOST, and PIGL, mainly involved in glucogen degradation and

  12. Truncating mutation in the NHS gene: phenotypic heterogeneity of Nance-Horan syndrome in an asian Indian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramprasad, Vedam Lakshmi; Thool, Alka; Murugan, Sakthivel; Nancarrow, Derek; Vyas, Prateep; Rao, Srinivas Kamalakar; Vidhya, Authiappan; Ravishankar, Krishnamoorthy; Kumaramanickavel, Govindasamy

    2005-01-01

    A four-generation family containing eight affected males who inherited X-linked developmental lens opacity and microcornea was studied. Some members in the family had mild to moderate nonocular clinical features suggestive of Nance-Horan syndrome. The purpose of the study was to map genetically the gene in the large 57-live-member Asian-Indian pedigree. PCR-based genotyping was performed on the X-chromosome, by using fluorescent microsatellite markers (10-cM intervals). Parametric linkage analysis was performed by using two disease models, assuming either recessive or dominant X-linked transmission by the MLINK/ILINK and FASTLINK (version 4.1P) programs (http:www.hgmp.mrc.ac.uk/; provided in the public domain by the Human Genome Mapping Project Resources Centre, Cambridge, UK). The NHS gene at the linked region was screened for mutation. By fine mapping, the disease gene was localized to Xp22.13. Multipoint analysis placed the peak LOD of 4.46 at DSX987. The NHS gene mapped to this region. Mutational screening in all the affected males and carrier females (heterozygous form) revealed a truncating mutation 115C-->T in exon 1, resulting in conversion of glutamine to stop codon (Q39X), but was not observed in unaffected individuals and control subjects. conclusions. A family with X-linked Nance-Horan syndrome had severe ocular, but mild to moderate nonocular, features. The clinical phenotype of the truncating mutation (Q39X) in the NHS gene suggests allelic heterogeneity at the NHS locus or the presence of modifier genes. X-linked families with cataract should be carefully examined for both ocular and nonocular features, to exclude Nance-Horan syndrome. RT-PCR analysis did not suggest nonsense-mediated mRNA decay as the possible mechanism for clinical heterogeneity.

  13. Mutation inactivation of Nijmegen breakage syndrome gene (NBS1 in hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    Full Text Available Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS with NBS1 germ-line mutation is a human autosomal recessive disease characterized by genomic instability and enhanced cancer predisposition. The NBS1 gene codes for a protein, Nbs1(p95/Nibrin, involved in the processing/repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is a complex and heterogeneous tumor with several genomic alterations. Recent studies have shown that heterozygous NBS1 mice exhibited a higher incidence of HCC than did wild-type mice. The objective of the present study is to assess whether NBS1 mutations play a role in the pathogenesis of human primary liver cancer, including HBV-associated HCC and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC. Eight missense NBS1 mutations were identified in six of 64 (9.4% HCCs and two of 18 (11.1% ICCs, whereas only one synonymous mutation was found in 89 control cases of cirrhosis and chronic hepatitis B. Analysis of the functional consequences of the identified NBS1 mutations in Mre11-binding domain showed loss of nuclear localization of Nbs1 partner Mre11, one of the hallmarks for Nbs1 deficiency, in one HCC and two ICCs with NBS1 mutations. Moreover, seven of the eight tumors with NBS1 mutations had at least one genetic alteration in the TP53 pathway, including TP53 mutation, MDM2 amplification, p14ARF homozygous deletion and promoter methylation, implying a synergistic effect of Nbs1 disruption and p53 inactivation. Our findings provide novel insight on the molecular pathogenesis of primary liver cancer characterized by mutation inactivation of NBS1, a DNA repair associated gene.

  14. Cone structure in patients with usher syndrome type III and mutations in the Clarin 1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnam, Kavitha; Västinsalo, Hanna; Roorda, Austin; Sankila, Eeva-Marja K; Duncan, Jacque L

    2013-01-01

    To study macular structure and function in patients with Usher syndrome type III (USH3) caused by mutations in the Clarin 1 gene (CLRN1). High-resolution macular images were obtained by adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and spectral domain optical coherence tomography in 3 patients with USH3 and were compared with those of age-similar control subjects. Vision function measures included best-corrected visual acuity, kinetic and static perimetry, and full-field electroretinography. Coding regions of the CLRN1 gene were sequenced. CLRN1 mutations were present in all the patients; a 20-year-old man showed compound heterozygous mutations (p.N48K and p.S188X), and 2 unrelated women aged 25 and 32 years had homozygous mutations (p.N48K). Best-corrected visual acuity ranged from 20/16 to 20/40, with scotomas beginning at 3° eccentricity. The inner segment-outer segment junction or the inner segment ellipsoid band was disrupted within 1° to 4° of the fovea, and the foveal inner and outer segment layers were significantly thinner than normal. Cones near the fovea in patients 1 and 2 showed normal spacing, and the preserved region ended abruptly. Retinal pigment epithelial cells were visible in patient 3 where cones were lost. Cones were observed centrally but not in regions with scotomas, and retinal pigment epithelial cells were visible in regions without cones in patients with CLRN1 mutations. High-resolution measures of retinal structure demonstrate patterns of cone loss associated with CLRN1 mutations. These findings provide insight into the effect of CLRN1 mutations on macular cone structure, which has implications for the development of treatments for USH3. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00254605.

  15. Multi-exon deletions of the FBN1 gene in Marfan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schrijver Iris

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the fibrillin -1 gene (FBN1 cause Marfan syndrome (MFS, an autosomal dominant multi-system connective tissue disorder. The 200 different mutations reported in the 235 kb, 65 exon-containing gene include only one family with a genomic multi-exon deletion. Methods We used long-range RT-PCR for mutation detection and long-range genomic PCR and DNA sequencing for identification of deletion breakpoints, allele-specific transcript analyses to determine stability of the mutant RNA, and pulse-chase studies to quantitate fibrillin synthesis and extracellular matrix deposition in cultured fibroblasts. Southern blots of genomic DNA were probed with three overlapping fragments covering the FBN1 coding exons Results Two novel multi-exon FBN1 deletions were discovered. Identical nucleotide pentamers were found at or near the intronic breakpoints. In a Case with classic MFS, an in-frame deletion of exons 42 and 43 removed the C-terminal 24 amino acids of the 5th LTBP (8-cysteine domain and the adjacent 25th calcium-binding EGF-like (6-cysteine domain. The mutant mRNA was stable, but fibrillin synthesis and matrix deposition were significantly reduced. A Case with severe childhood-onset MFS has a de novo deletion of exons 44–46 that removed three EGF-like domains. Fibrillin protein synthesis was normal, but matrix deposition was strikingly reduced. No genomic rearrangements were detected by Southern analysis of 18 unrelated MFS samples negative for FBN1 mutation screening. Conclusions Two novel deletion cases expand knowledge of mutational mechanisms and genotype/phenotype correlations of fibrillinopathies. Deletions or mutations affecting an LTBP domain may result in unstable mutant protein cleavage products that interfere with microfibril assembly.

  16. Diversity of the Genes Implicated in Algerian Patients Affected by Usher Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Abdi

    Full Text Available Usher syndrome (USH is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a dual sensory impairment affecting hearing and vision. USH is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. Ten different causal genes have been reported. We studied the molecular bases of the disease in 18 unrelated Algerian patients by targeted-exome sequencing, and identified the causal biallelic mutations in all of them: 16 patients carried the mutations at the homozygous state and 2 at the compound heterozygous state. Nine of the 17 different mutations detected in MYO7A (1 of 5 mutations, CDH23 (4 of 7 mutations, PCDH15 (1 mutation, USH1C (1 mutation, USH1G (1 mutation, and USH2A (1 of 2 mutations, had not been previously reported. The deleterious consequences of a missense mutation of CDH23 (p.Asp1501Asn and the in-frame single codon deletion in USH1G (p.Ala397del on the corresponding proteins were predicted from the solved 3D-structures of extracellular cadherin (EC domains of cadherin-23 and the sterile alpha motif (SAM domain of USH1G/sans, respectively. In addition, we were able to show that the USH1G mutation is likely to affect the binding interface between the SAM domain and USH1C/harmonin. This should spur the use of 3D-structures, not only of isolated protein domains, but also of protein-protein interaction interfaces, to predict the functional impact of mutations detected in the USH genes.

  17. Cone Structure in Patients With Usher Syndrome Type III and Mutations in the Clarin 1 Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnam, Kavitha; Västinsalo, Hanna; Roorda, Austin; Sankila, Eeva-Marja K.; Duncan, Jacque L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study macular structure and function in patients with Usher syndrome type III (USH3) caused by mutations in the Clarin 1 gene (CLRN1). Methods High-resolution macular images were obtained by adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and spectral domain optical coherence tomography in 3 patients with USH3 and were compared with those of age-similar control subjects. Vision function measures included best-corrected visual acuity, kinetic and static perimetry, and full-field electroretinography. Coding regions of the CLRN1 gene were sequenced. Results CLRN1 mutations were present in all the patients; a 20-year-old man showed compound heterozygous mutations (p.N48K and p.S188X), and 2 unrelated women aged 25 and 32 years had homozygous mutations (p.N48K). Best-corrected visual acuity ranged from 20/16 to 20/40, with scotomas beginning at 3° eccentricity. The inner segment-outer segment junction or the inner segment ellipsoid band was disrupted within 1° to 4° of the fovea, and the foveal inner and outer segment layers were significantly thinner than normal. Cones near the fovea in patients 1 and 2 showed normal spacing, and the preserved region ended abruptly. Retinal pigment epithelial cells were visible in patient 3 where cones were lost. Conclusions Cones were observed centrally but not in regions with scotomas, and retinal pigment epithelial cells were visible in regions without cones in patients with CLRN1 mutations. High-resolution measures of retinal structure demonstrate patterns of cone loss associated with CLRN1 mutations. Clinical Relevance These findings provide insight into the effect of CLRN1 mutations on macular cone structure, which has implications for the development of treatments for USH3. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00254605 PMID:22964989

  18. Potential hot spot for de novo mutations in PTCH1 gene in Gorlin syndrome patients: a case report of twins from Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musani, Vesna; Ozretić, Petar; Trnski, Diana; Sabol, Maja; Poduje, Sanja; Tošić, Mateja; Šitum, Mirna; Levanat, Sonja

    2018-02-28

    We describe a case of twins with sporadic Gorlin syndrome. Both twins had common Gorlin syndrome features including calcification of the falx cerebri, multiple jaw keratocysts, and multiple basal cell carcinomas, but with different expressivity. One brother also had benign testicular mesothelioma. We propose this tumor type as a possible new feature of Gorlin syndrome. Gorlin syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by both developmental abnormalities and cancer predisposition, with variable expression of various developmental abnormalities and different types of tumors. The syndrome is primarily caused by mutations in the Patched 1 (PTCH1) gene, although rare mutations of Patched 2 (PTCH2) or Suppressor of Fused (SUFU) genes have also been found. Neither founder mutations nor hot spot locations have been described for PTCH1 in Gorlin syndrome patients. Although de novo mutations of the PTCH1 gene occur in almost 50% of Gorlin syndrome cases, there are a few recurrent mutations. Our twin patients were carriers of a de novo mutation in the PTCH1 gene, c.3364_3365delAT (p.Met1122ValfsX22). This is, to our knowledge, the first Gorlin syndrome-causing mutation that has been reported four independent times in distant geographical locations. Therefore, we propose the location of the described mutation as a potential hot spot for mutations in PTCH1.

  19. A Female Patient with Down Syndrome and Low-Penetrance Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Starleen E. Frousiakis

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 19-year-old female with a history of Down syndrome (DS who was referred to our neuro-ophthalmology clinic for evaluation of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON. The patient's family history was significant for a known G11778A mutation in a maternal relative, consistent with LHON. The patient was also positive for the G11778A mutation; however, the genotype demonstrated low penetrance in the pedigree, with only 1 out of 10 adult male offspring showing signs or symptoms of the disease. Mitochondrial mutations implicated in LHON have been shown to impair complex I of the electron transport chain and thereby reducing the effective generation of adenosine triphosphate and increasing the production of toxic reactive oxygen species. Although the partial or complete triplicate of chromosome 21 constitutes the etiology of DS, some of the pleiotropic phenotypes of the syndrome have been attributed to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Given the low penetrance of the mutation and the patient's sex, this case illustrates the possibility that the mitochondrial mutation demonstrated increased penetrance due to pre-existing mitochondrial dysfunction related to DS.

  20. Low-FODMAP Diet for Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Is It Ready for Prime Time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Ali; Nusrat, Salman; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Nawras, Ali; Bielefeldt, Klaus

    2015-05-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic gastrointestinal disease, which adversely affects the quality of life. Its prevalence has been reported to be around 10-15 % in North America and constitutes the most common cause for gastroenterology referral. Unfortunately, the pathophysiology of IBS is not completely understood. Not surprisingly, the management strategies can leave the patients with inadequate symptom control, making IBS a debilitating gastrointestinal syndrome. Dietary interventions as a treatment strategy for IBS have been recently evaluated. One such intervention includes dietary restriction of fermentable oligo-, di-, and monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs). FODMAPs define a group of short-chain carbohydrates that are incompletely absorbed in small intestine and later fermented in the colon. Evidence in the form of randomized controlled trials and observational studies have evaluated the mechanism of action and efficacy of low-FODMAP diet. This dietary intervention has showed promising results in symptom reduction in IBS patients. However, latest trials have also shown that the low-FODMAP diet is associated with marked changes in gut microbiota specifically reduction in microbiota with prebiotic properties. Implications of such changes on gastrointestinal health need to be further evaluated in future trials.

  1. Waardenburg Syndrome: description of two novel mutations in the PAX3 gene, one of which incompletely penetrant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliete Pardono

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe two different novel mutations in the PAX3 gene, detected in two families with cases of Waardenburg syndrome type I (WSI. The missense mutation detected in one family involved a single substitution in exon 2 (c.142 G > T and was present both in the affected individual and in his clinically normal father. The mutation found in the second family consisted of a deletion of 13 bases, c.764-776del(TTACCCTGACATT, in exon 5.

  2. Detection of Brazilian hantavirus by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction amplification of N gene in patients with hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos Lázaro Moreli; Ricardo Luiz Moro de Sousa; Luiz Tadeu Moraes Figueiredo

    2004-01-01

    We report a nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for hantavirus using primers selected to match high homology regions of hantavirus genomes detected from the whole blood of hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) patients from Brazil, also including the N gene nucleotide sequence of Araraquara virus. Hantavirus genomes were detected in eight out of nine blood samples from the HCPS patients by RT-PCR (88.9% positivity) and in all 9 blood samples (100% positi...

  3. Novel growth hormone receptor gene mutation in a patient with Laron syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arman, Ahmet; Yüksel, Bilgin; Coker, Ajda; Sarioz, Ozlem; Temiz, Fatih; Topaloglu, Ali Kemal

    2010-04-01

    Growth Hormone (GH) is a 22 kDa protein that has effects on growth and glucose and fat metabolisms. These effects are initiated by binding of growth hormone (GH) to growth hormone receptors (GHR) expressed in target cells. Mutations or deletions in the growth hormone receptor cause an autosomal disorder called Laron-type dwarfism (LS) characterized by high circulating levels of serum GH and low levels of insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). We analyzed the GHR gene for genetic defect in seven patients identified as Laron type dwarfism. We identified two missense mutations (S40L and W104R), and four polymorphisms (S473S, L526I, G168G and exon 3 deletion). We are reporting a mutation (W104R) at exon 5 of GHR gene that is not previously reported, and it is a novel mutation.

  4. The study of the patient and his parents' gene with thyroid hormone resistance syndrome with review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Chenwei; Zhang Xi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the genoty of a family of the thyroid hormone receptor β (TRβ) gene and the clinical representation in a patient with thyroid hormone resistance syndrome (THRS). Methods : The peripheral blood samples of the patient and her parents were collected, then DNA was isolated. PCR and direct sequencing techniques were performed to determine if there were mutations in their THRβ gene. Results: There was a point mutation in exon 3d TRβ of the patient and her father, there was a base inserting in the third exon of the third chromosome. Her mother was normal. Conclusion: THRS is a disease related to thyroid hormone receptor gene mutation. The final diagnosis of this disease depends on gene analysis. (authors)

  5. To Screen Inactivation Mutation of Exon 1 of FSHR Gene in Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome: A South Indian Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Nishu; Yeole, Samiksha; Pradeep, Rashmi; Prabhu, Yogamaya D.; Renu, Kaviyarasi; Ramgir, Shalaka S.; Abilash, V. G.

    2017-11-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is an endocrine disorder. Irregular menstrual cycle, acne, facial hair and elevated androgen levels are the most common signs for PCOS. PCOS has an estimated prevalence of 4-12% among reproductive age women, thus making it a forerunner in female infertility. FSHR plays an important role in FSH signaling pathway making it an important gene for PCOS. In this study, we aim to focus on any association between the FSHR gene and PCOS. Our study was to evaluate any polymorphism of exon 1 of FSHR gene associated with PCOS.PCR-RFLP technique was performed on the PCOS samples. Hormonal changes were found in the patients. Exon 1 inactivation mutation of FSHR gene was not observed in the patient sample. A study of this association needs to be done using large sample size.

  6. Heat stress and sudden infant death syndrome--stress gene expression after exposure to moderate heat stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Marianne Cathrine; Corydon, Thomas Juhl; Hansen, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate stress gene expression in cultured primary fibroblasts established from Achilles tendons collected during autopsies from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) cases, and age-matched controls (infants dying in a traumatic event). Expression of 4 stress...... responsive genes, HSPA1B, HSPD1, HMOX1, and SOD2, was studied by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analysis of RNA purified from cells cultured under standard or various thermal stress conditions. The expression of all 4 genes was highly influenced by thermal stress in both SIDS and control cells. High...... interpersonal variance found in the SIDS group indicated that they represented a more heterogeneous group than controls. The SIDS group responded to thermal stress with a higher expression of the HSPA1B and HSPD1 genes compared to the control group, whereas no significant difference was observed...

  7. Novel mutations in the SOX10 gene in the first two Chinese cases of type IV Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lu; Chen, Hongsheng; Jiang, Wen; Hu, Zhengmao; Mei, Lingyun; Xue, Jingjie; He, Chufeng; Liu, Yalan; Xia, Kun; Feng, Yong

    2011-05-20

    We analyzed the clinical features and family-related gene mutations for the first two Chinese cases of type IV Waardenburg syndrome (WS4). Two families were analyzed in this study. The analysis included a medical history, clinical analysis, a hearing test and a physical examination. In addition, the EDNRB, EDN3 and SOX10 genes were sequenced in order to identify the pathogenic mutation responsible for the WS4 observed in these patients. The two WS4 cases presented with high phenotypic variability. Two novel heterozygous mutations (c.254G>A and c.698-2A>T) in the SOX10 gene were detected. The mutations identified in the patients were not found in unaffected family members or in 200 unrelated control subjects. This is the first report of WS4 in Chinese patients. In addition, two novel mutations in SOX10 gene have been identified. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Role of folate-homocysteine pathway gene polymorphisms and nutritional cofactors in Down syndrome: A triad study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukla, K K; Jaiswal, S K; Rai, A K; Mishra, O P; Gupta, V; Kumar, A; Raman, R

    2015-08-01

    Do gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in folate-homocysteine (Hcy) pathway have a predisposing role for Down syndrome (DS)? The study provides evidence that in addition to advanced age, maternal genotype, micronutrient deficiency and elevated Hcy levels, individually and in combination, are risk factors for Down syndrome. Polymorphisms in certain folate-Hcy-pathway genes (especially the T allele of MTHFR C677T), elevated Hcy and poor folate levels in mothers during pregnancy have been shown to be risk factors for Down syndrome in certain Asian populations (including the eastern region of India), while the same SNPs are not a risk factor in European populations. This conflicting situation alludes to differential gene-environment (nutrition) interactions in different populations which needs to be explored. Between 2008 and 2012, 151 Down syndrome triads and 200 age-matched controls (Control mothers n = 186) were included in the study. Seven polymorphisms in six genes of folate-Hcy metabolic pathway, along with Hcy, cysteine (Cys), vitamin B12 (vit-B12) and folate levels, were analysed and compared among the case and control groups. Genotyping was performed by the PCR-RFLP technique. Levels of homocysteine and cysteine were measured by HPLC while vitamin B12 and folate were estimated by chemiluminescence. We demonstrate that polymorphisms in the folate-Hcy pathway genes in mothers collectively constitute a genotypic risk for DS which is effectively modified by interactions among genes and by the environment affecting folate, Hcy and vitamin B12 levels. The study also supports the idea that these maternal risk factors provide an adaptive advantage during pregnancy supporting live birth of the DS child. Our inability to obtain genotype and nutritional assessments of unaffected siblings of the DS children was an important limitation of the study. Also, its confinement to a specific geographic region (the eastern part) of India, and relatively small sample size

  9. Ala397Asp mutation of myosin VIIA gene segregating in a Spanish family with type-Ib Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinós, C; Millán, J M; Sánchez, F; Beneyto, M; Nájera, C

    1998-06-01

    In the current study, 12 Spanish families affected by type-I Usher syndrome, that was previously linked to chromosome 11q, were screened for the presence of mutations in the N-terminal coding portion of the motor domain of the myosin VIIA gene by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of the first 14 exons. A mutation (Ala397Asp) segregating with the disease was identified, and several polymorphisms were also detected. It is presumed that the other USHIB mutations in these families could be located in the unscreened regions of the gene.

  10. Prevalence and spectrum of large deletions or duplications in the major long QT syndrome-susceptibility genes and implications for long QT syndrome genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tester, David J; Benton, Amber J; Train, Laura; Deal, Barbara; Baudhuin, Linnea M; Ackerman, Michael J

    2010-10-15

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a cardiac channelopathy associated with syncope, seizures, and sudden death. Approximately 75% of LQTS is due to mutations in genes encoding for 3 cardiac ion channel α-subunits (LQT1 to LQT3). However, traditional mutational analyses have limited detection capabilities for atypical mutations such as large gene rearrangements. We set out to determine the prevalence and spectrum of large deletions/duplications in the major LQTS-susceptibility genes in unrelated patients who were mutation negative after point mutation analysis of LQT1- to LQT12-susceptibility genes. Forty-two unrelated, clinically strong LQTS patients were analyzed using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, a quantitative fluorescent technique for detecting multiple exon deletions and duplications. The SALSA multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification LQTS kit from MRC-Holland was used to analyze the 3 major LQTS-associated genes, KCNQ1, KCNH2, and SCN5A, and the 2 minor genes, KCNE1 and KCNE2. Overall, 2 gene rearrangements were found in 2 of 42 unrelated patients (4.8%, confidence interval 1.7 to 11). A deletion of KCNQ1 exon 3 was identified in a 10-year-old Caucasian boy with a corrected QT duration of 660 ms, a personal history of exercise-induced syncope, and a family history of syncope. A deletion of KCNQ1 exon 7 was identified in a 17-year-old Caucasian girl with a corrected QT duration of 480 ms, a personal history of exercise-induced syncope, and a family history of sudden cardiac death. In conclusion, because nearly 5% of patients with genetically elusive LQTS had large genomic rearrangements involving the canonical LQTS-susceptibility genes, reflex genetic testing to investigate genomic rearrangements may be of clinical value. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Tietz/Waardenburg type 2A syndrome associated with posterior microphthalmos in two unrelated patients with novel MITF gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-González, Vianney; Zenteno, Juan Carlos; Guzmán-Sánchez, Martín; Giordano-Herrera, Verónica; Guadarrama-Vallejo, Dalia; Ruíz-Quintero, Narlly; Villanueva-Mendoza, Cristina

    2016-12-01

    Tietz syndrome and Waardenburg syndrome type 2A are allelic conditions caused by MITF mutations. Tietz syndrome is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern and is characterized by congenital deafness and generalized skin, hair, and eye hypopigmentation, while Waardenburg syndrome type 2A typically includes variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss and patches of de-pigmented skin, hair, and irides. In this paper, we report two unrelated families with MITF mutations. The first family showed an autosomal dominant pattern and variable expressivity. The second patient was isolated. MITF gene analysis in the first family demonstrated a c.648A>C heterozygous mutation in exon 8 c.648A>C; p. (R216S), while in the isolated patient, an apparently de novo heterozygous c.1183_1184insG truncating mutation was demonstrated in exon 10. All patients except one had bilateral reduced ocular anteroposterior axial length and a high hyperopic refractive error corresponding to posterior microphthalmos, features that have not been described as part of the disease. Our results suggest that posterior microphthalmos might be part of the clinical characteristics of Tietz/Waardenburg syndrome type 2A and expand both the clinical and molecular spectrum of the disease. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Lumbar facet syndrome - Lumbar facet joint injection and low back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acevedo Gonzalez, Juan Carlos; Jimenez Hakim, Enrique; Rodriguez, Jose Maria; Hakim Daccach, Fernando; Quinonez, German; Rodriguez Munera, Andres

    2004-01-01

    The authors conducted a retrospective study lo evaluate the effectiveness of injection therapy in the lumbar zygapophysial joints with anesthetics and steroids in patients with persisting low back pain and lumbar facer syndrome. Thirty-seven patients with low back pain who reported immediate relief of their pain after controlled blocks into the facet joints between the fourth and fifth lumbar vertebrae and the fifth lumbar and first sacral vertebrae were evaluated. Outcome was evaluated using the visual analog pain scales. All outcome measures were repeated at eight days and six weeks alter controlled injection. At six-week follow-up examination 83,7% of thirty-seven patients experienced a good response to controlled blocks of the lumbar zygaphyseal (facet) joints. Good result is the pain relief of 50% or more. Fifteen patients experienced a good response with pain relief of eight points or more in the VAS

  13. Malignant Tregs express low molecular splice forms of FOXP3 in Sézary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krejsgaard, T; Gjerdrum, L M; Ralfkiaer, E

    2008-01-01

    Sézary syndrome (SS) is an aggressive variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. During disease progression, immunodeficiency develops; however, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we study the regulatory T cell (Treg) function and the expression of FOXP3...... in SS. We demonstrate that malignant T cells in 8 of 15 patients stain positive with an anti-FOXP3 antibody. Western blotting analysis shows expression of two low molecular splice forms of FOXP3, but not of wild-type (wt) FOXP3. The malignant T cells produce interleukin-10 and TGF-beta and suppress...... the growth of non-malignant T cells. The Treg phenotype and the production of suppressive cytokines are driven by aberrant activation of Jak3 independent of the FOXP3 splice forms. In contrast to wt FOXP3, the low molecular splice forms of FOXP3 have no inhibitory effect on nuclear factor-kappaB (NF...

  14. Waardenburg syndrome type II in a Chinese patient caused by a novel nonsense mutation in the SOX10 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Zhang, Tie-Song; Lin, Ken; Sun, Hao; Jiang, Hong-Chao; Yang, Yan-Li; Low, Fan; Gao, Ying-Qin; Ruan, Biao

    2016-06-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a congenital genetic disorder. It is the most common type of syndromic hearing impairment with highly genetic heterogeneity and proved to be related by 6 genes as follows: PAX3, MITF, SNAI2, EDN3, EDNRB and SOX10. This article aims to identify the genetic causes of a Chinese WS child patient. A Chinese WS child was collected for clinical data collection by questionnaire survey. DNA samples of proband and his parents were extracted from peripheral blood samples. Six candidate genes were sequenced by the Trusight One sequencing panel on the illumina NextSeq 500 platform. A novel nonsense heterozygous mutation was found in the coding region of exon 2 in the SOX10 gene of proband. The novel nonsense heterozygous mutation could cause the replacement of the 55th lysine codon by stop codon (484T > C, C142R) and further more possibly cause terminating the protein translation in advance. However, both proband's parents had no mutation of genes above mentioned. The gene mutation of SOX10 [NM_006941.3 c.163A > T] is a novel nonsense mutation. No record of this mutation has been found in dbSNP, HGMD, 1000 Genomes Project, ClinVar and ESP6500 databases. It meets the condition of PS2 of strong evidence in 2015 ACMG Standards and Guidelines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. 1p13.2 deletion displays clinical features overlapping Noonan syndrome, likely related to NRAS gene haploinsufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Duarte Linhares

    Full Text Available Abstract Deletion-induced hemizygosity may unmask deleterious autosomal recessive variants and be a cause of the phenotypic variability observed in microdeletion syndromes. We performed complete exome sequencing (WES analysis to examine this possibility in a patient with 1p13.2 microdeletion. Since the patient displayed clinical features suggestive of Noonan Syndrome (NS, we also used WES to rule out the presence of pathogenic variants in any of the genes associated with the different types of NS. We concluded that the clinical findings could be attributed solely to the 1p13.2 haploinsufficiency. Retrospective analysis of other nine reported patients with 1p13.2 microdeletions showed that six of them also presented some characteristics of NS. In all these cases, the deleted segment included the NRAS gene. Gain-of-function mutations of NRAS gene are causally related to NS type 6. Thus, it is conceivable that NRAS haploinsufficiency and gain-of-function mutations may have similar clinical consequences. The same phenomenon has been described for two other genes belonging to the Ras/MAPK pathway: MAP2K2 and SHOC2. In conclusion, we here report genotype-phenotype correlations in patients with chromosome 1p13.2 microdeletions and we propose that NRAS may be a critical gene for the NS characteristics in the patients.

  16. Associations between neurodevelopmental genes, neuroanatomy, and ultra high risk symptoms of psychosis in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Carlie A; Karelis, Jason; Middleton, Frank A; Gentile, Karen; Coman, Ioana L; Radoeva, Petya D; Mehta, Rashi; Fremont, Wanda P; Antshel, Kevin M; Faraone, Stephen V; Kates, Wendy R

    2017-04-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome is a neurogenetic disorder resulting in the deletion of over 40 genes. Up to 40% of individuals with 22q11.2DS develop schizophrenia, though little is known about the underlying mechanisms. We hypothesized that allelic variation in functional polymorphisms in seven genes unique to the deleted region would affect lobar brain volumes, which would predict risk for psychosis in youth with 22q11.2DS. Participants included 56 individuals (30 males) with 22q11.2DS. Anatomic MR images were collected and processed using Freesurfer. Participants were genotyped for 10 SNPs in the COMT, DGCR8, GNB1L, PIK4CA, PRODH, RTN4R, and ZDHHC8 genes. All subjects were assessed for ultra high risk symptoms of psychosis. Allelic variation of the rs701428 SNP of RTN4R was significantly associated with volumetric differences in gray matter of the lingual gyrus and cuneus of the occipital lobe. Moreover, occipital gray matter volumes were robustly associated with ultra high risk symptoms of psychosis in the presence of the G allele of rs701428. Our results suggest that RTN4R, a relatively under-studied gene at the 22q11 locus, constitutes a susceptibility gene for psychosis in individuals with this syndrome through its alteration of the architecture of the brain. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Significant association between polymorphism of the erythropoietin gene promoter and myelodysplastic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Brien Susan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS may be induced by certain mutagenic environmental or chemotherapeutic toxins; however, the role of susceptibility genes remains unclear. The G/G genotype of the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs1617640 in the erythropoietin (EPO promoter has been shown to be associated with decreased EPO expression. We examined the association of rs1617640 genotype with MDS. Methods We genotyped the EPO rS1617640 SNP in 189 patients with MDS, 257 with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, 106 with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 97 with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, 353 with chronic myeloid leukemia, and 95 healthy controls. Results The G/G genotype was significantly more common in MDS patients (47/187; 25.1% than in controls (6/95; 6.3% or in patients with other leukemias (101/813; 12.4% (all P P = 0.03. Time to neutrophils recovery after therapy was significantly longer in MDS patients with the G/G genotype (P = 0.02. Conclusions These findings suggest a strong association between the rs1617640 G/G genotype and MDS. Further studies are warranted to investigate the utility of screening for this marker in individuals exposed to environmental toxins or chemotherapy.

  18. Whole exome sequencing identifies mutations in Usher syndrome genes in profoundly deaf Tunisian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, Zied; Bonnet, Crystel; Zainine, Rim; Lahbib, Saida; Bouyacoub, Yosra; Bechraoui, Rym; Marrakchi, Jihène; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Louha, Malek; Largueche, Leila; Ben Yahia, Salim; Kheirallah, Moncef; Elmatri, Leila; Besbes, Ghazi; Abdelhak, Sonia; Petit, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by combined deafness-blindness. It accounts for about 50% of all hereditary deafness blindness cases. Three clinical subtypes (USH1, USH2, and USH3) are described, of which USH1 is the most severe form, characterized by congenital profound deafness, constant vestibular dysfunction, and a prepubertal onset of retinitis pigmentosa. We performed whole exome sequencing in four unrelated Tunisian patients affected by apparently isolated, congenital profound deafness, with reportedly normal ocular fundus examination. Four biallelic mutations were identified in two USH1 genes: a splice acceptor site mutation, c.2283-1G>T, and a novel missense mutation, c.5434G>A (p.Glu1812Lys), in MYO7A, and two previously unreported mutations in USH1G, i.e. a frameshift mutation, c.1195_1196delAG (p.Leu399Alafs*24), and a nonsense mutation, c.52A>T (p.Lys18*). Another ophthalmological examination including optical coherence tomography actually showed the presence of retinitis pigmentosa in all the patients. Our findings provide evidence that USH is under-diagnosed in Tunisian deaf patients. Yet, early diagnosis of USH is of utmost importance because these patients should undergo cochlear implant surgery in early childhood, in anticipation of the visual loss.

  19. Polymorphisms of interleukin-1β and MUC7 genes in burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moon-Jong; Kim, Jihoon; Chang, Ji-Youn; Kim, Yoon-Young; Kho, Hong-Seop

    2017-04-01

    The objectives of the present study are to compare polymorphisms of the IL-1β and MUC7 genes between patients with burning mouth syndrome (BMS) and controls and to investigate relationships between these polymorphisms and clinical characteristics in BMS patients. Forty female BMS patients and 40 gender- and age-matched controls were included. Genomic DNA was extracted from saliva samples. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms of IL-1β -511 and +3954 and variation in number of tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism of MUC7 were analyzed. Relationships between genotypic polymorphism data and clinical characteristics in BMS patients were also analyzed. There were no significant differences in the genotypes of IL-1β -511 and +3954 and of MUC7 between the groups. There were no significant differences in symptom duration and intensity of BMS patients according to their IL-1β and MUC7 genotypes. The T allele of IL-1β -511 showed associations with psychometry results in BMS patients: paranoid ideation (P = 0.014), Global Severity Index (P = 0.025), and Positive Symptom Total (P = 0.008). The genotypic polymorphisms of IL-1β -511 and +3954, and of MUC7 VNTR, had no direct associations with the development of BMS. However, the T allele of IL-1β -511 may increase the risk of BMS by increasing psychological asthenia. The genotypic polymorphisms of IL-1β -511 may increase the risk for the development of BMS by increasing psychological asthenia.

  20. Whole exome sequencing identifies mutations in Usher syndrome genes in profoundly deaf Tunisian patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zied Riahi

    Full Text Available Usher syndrome (USH is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by combined deafness-blindness. It accounts for about 50% of all hereditary deafness blindness cases. Three clinical subtypes (USH1, USH2, and USH3 are described, of which USH1 is the most severe form, characterized by congenital profound deafness, constant vestibular dysfunction, and a prepubertal onset of retinitis pigmentosa. We performed whole exome sequencing in four unrelated Tunisian patients affected by apparently isolated, congenital profound deafness, with reportedly normal ocular fundus examination. Four biallelic mutations were identified in two USH1 genes: a splice acceptor site mutation, c.2283-1G>T, and a novel missense mutation, c.5434G>A (p.Glu1812Lys, in MYO7A, and two previously unreported mutations in USH1G, i.e. a frameshift mutation, c.1195_1196delAG (p.Leu399Alafs*24, and a nonsense mutation, c.52A>T (p.Lys18*. Another ophthalmological examination including optical coherence tomography actually showed the presence of retinitis pigmentosa in all the patients. Our findings provide evidence that USH is under-diagnosed in Tunisian deaf patients. Yet, early diagnosis of USH is of utmost importance because these patients should undergo cochlear implant surgery in early childhood, in anticipation of the visual loss.

  1. Metabolomics of the Wolfram Syndrome 1 Gene (Wfs1) Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porosk, Rando; Terasmaa, Anton; Mahlapuu, Riina; Soomets, Ursel; Kilk, Kalle

    2017-12-01

    Wolfram syndrome 1 is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease characterized by diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness. Mutations in the WFS1 gene encoding the wolframin glycoprotein can lead to endoplasmic reticulum stress and unfolded protein responses in cells, but the pathophysiology at whole organism level is poorly understood. In this study, several organs (heart, liver, kidneys, and pancreas) and bodily fluids (trunk blood and urine) of 2- and 6-month old Wfs1 knockout (KO), heterozygote (HZ), and wild-type (WT) mice were analyzed by untargeted and targeted metabolomics using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The key findings were significant perturbations in the metabolism of pancreas and heart before the onset of related clinical signs such as glycosuria that precedes hyperglycemia and thus implies a kidney dysfunction before the onset of classical diabetic nephropathy. The glucose use and gluconeogenesis in KO mice are intensified in early stages, but later the energetic needs are mainly covered by lipolysis. Furthermore, in young mice liver and trunk blood hypouricemia, which in time turns to hyperuricemia, was detected. In summary, we show that the metabolism in Wfs1-deficient mice markedly differs from the metabolism of WT mice in many aspects and discuss the future biological and clinical relevance of these observations.

  2. Assignment of an Usher syndrome type III (USH3) gene to chromosome 3q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankila, E M; Pakarinen, L; Kääriäinen, H; Aittomäki, K; Karjalainen, S; Sistonen, P; de la Chapelle, A

    1995-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) refers to genetically and clinically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorders with combined visual and hearing loss. Type I (USH1) is characterized by a congenital, severe to profound hearing loss and absent vestibular function; in type II (USH2) the hearing loss is congenital and moderate to severe, and the vestibular function is normal. Progressive pigmentary retinopathy (PPR) is present in both types. A third type (USH3) differing from USH2 by the progressive nature of its hearing loss has been suggested. USH3 has previously been estimated to comprise 2% of all USH. However, based on clinical criteria, in Finland 42% of USH patients have progressive hearing loss suggesting enrichment of an USH3 gene. We excluded the four previously mapped USH regions as the site of the USH3 disease locus. Systematic search for USH3 by genetic linkage analyses in 10 multiple affected families using polymorphic microsatellite markers revealed significant linkage with markers mapping to chromosome 3q. Pairwise lod scores at zero recombination distance were 7.87 for D3S1308, and 11.29 for D3S1299, incorporating the observed linkage disequilibrium. Conventional multipoint linkage analysis gave a maximum lod score of 9.88 at D3S1299 assigning USH3 to the 5 cM interval between markers D3S1555 and D3S1279 in 3q21-25.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Low pH induces co-ordinate regulation of gene expression in oesophageal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Shane P; Gallagher, William M; Fox, Edward J P; Abdel-Latif, Mohammed M; Reynolds, John V; Kelleher, Dermot

    2006-02-01

    The development of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is known to be a causative risk factor in the evolution of adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus. The major component of this reflux is gastric acid. However, the impact of low pH on gene expression has not been extensively studied in oesophageal cells. This study utilizes a transcriptomic and bioinformatic approach to assess regulation of gene expression in response to low pH. In more detail, oesophageal adenocarcinoma cell lines were exposed to a range of pH environments. Affymetrix microarrays were used for gene-expression analysis and results were validated using cycle limitation and real-time RT-PCR analysis, as well as northern and western blotting. Comparative promoter transcription factor binding site (TFBS) analysis (MatInspector) of hierarchically clustered gene-expression data was employed to identify the elements which may co-ordinately regulate individual gene clusters. Initial experiments demonstrated maximal induction of EGR1 gene expression at pH 6.5. Subsequent array experimentation revealed significant induction of gene expression from such functional categories as DNA damage response (EGR1-4, ATF3) and cell-cycle control (GADD34, GADD45, p57). Changes in expression of EGR1, EGR3, ATF3, MKP-1, FOSB, CTGF and CYR61 were verified in separate experiments and in a variety of oesophageal cell lines. TFBS analysis of promoters identified transcription factors that may co-ordinately regulate gene-expression clusters, Cluster 1: Oct-1, AP4R; Cluster 2: NF-kB, EGRF; Cluster 3: IKRS, AP-1F. Low pH has the ability to induce genes and pathways which can provide an environment suitable for the progression of malignancy. Further functional analysis of the genes and clusters identified in this low pH study is likely to lead to new insights into the pathogenesis and therapeutics of GORD and oesophageal cancer.

  4. Influence of white spot syndrome virus infection on hepatopancreas gene expression of `Huanghai No. 2' shrimp ( Fenneropenaeus chinensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xianhong; Shi, Xiaoli; Kong, Jie; Luan, Sheng; Luo, Kun; Cao, Baoxiang; Liu, Ning; Lu, Xia; Li, Xupeng; Deng, Kangyu; Cao, Jiawang; Zhang, Yingxue; Zhang, Hengheng

    2017-10-01

    To elucidate the molecular response of shrimp hepatopancreas to white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection, microarray was applied to investigate the differentially expressed genes in the hepatopancreas of `Huanghai No. 2' ( Fenneropenaeus chinensis). A total of 59137 unigenes were designed onto a custom-made 60K Agilent chip. After infection, the gene expression profiles in the hepatopancreas of the shrimp with a lower viral load at early (48-96 h), peak (168-192 h) and late (264-288 h) infection phases were analyzed. Of 18704 differentially expressed genes, 6412 were annotated. In total, 5453 differentially expressed genes (1916 annotated) expressed at all three phases, and most of the annotated were either up- or down-regulated continuously. These genes function diversely in, for example, immune response, cytoskeletal system, signal transduction, stress resistance, protein synthesis and processing, metabolism among others. Some of the immune-related genes, including antilipopolysaccharide factor, Kazal-type proteinase inhibitor, C-type lectin and serine protease encoding genes, were up-regulated after WSSV infection. These genes have been reported to be involved in the anti-WSSV responses. The expression of genes related to the cytoskeletal system, including β-actin and myosin but without tubulin genes, were down-regulated after WSSV infection. Astakine was found for the first time in the WSSV-infected F. chinensis. To further confirm the expression of differentially expressed genes, quantitative real-time PCR was performed to test the expression of eight randomly selected genes and verified the reliability and accuracy of the microarray expression analysis. The data will provide valuable information to understanding the immune mechanism of shrimp's response to WSSV.

  5. [Mutational frequencies in usherin(USH2A gene) in 26 Colombian individuals with Usher syndrome type II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Greizy; Gelvez, Nancy Yaneth; Tamayo, Martalucía

    2011-03-01

    Usher syndrome is a disorder characterized by progressive retinitis pigmentosa, prelingual sensory hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. It is the most frequent cause of deaf-blindness in humans. Three clinical types and twelve genetic subtypes have been characterized. Type II is the most common, and among these cases, nearly 80% have mutations in the USH2A gene. The aim of the study was to establish the mutational frequencies for the short isoform of USH2A gene in Usher syndrome type II. Twenty-six Colombian individuals with Usher syndrome type II were included. SSCP analysis for 20 exons of the short isoform was performed and abnormal patterns were sequenced. Sequencing of exon 13 of the USH2A gene was performed for all the individuals because the most frequent mutation is located in this exon. The most frequent mutation was c.2299delG, identified in the 27% (n=8) of the sample. The second mutation, p.R334W, showed a frequency of 15%. A new variant identified in the 5’UTR region, g.129G>T, was present in 1 individual (4%). Four polymorphisms were identified; one of them is a new deletion in exon 20, first reported in this study. Mutations in the usherin short isoform were identified in 38% of a sample of 26 USH2 cases. Molecular diagnosis was established in 7 of the 26.

  6. Duplication and relocation of the functional DPY19L2 gene within low copy repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheung Joseph

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low copy repeats (LCRs are thought to play an important role in recent gene evolution, especially when they facilitate gene duplications. Duplicate genes are fundamental to adaptive evolution, providing substrates for the development of new or shared gene functions. Moreover, silencing of duplicate genes can have an indirect effect on adaptive evolution by causing genomic relocation of functional genes. These changes are theorized to have been a major factor in speciation. Results Here we present a novel example showing functional gene relocation within a LCR. We characterize the genomic structure and gene content of eight related LCRs on human Chromosomes 7 and 12. Two members of a novel transmembrane gene family, DPY19L, were identified in these regions, along with six transcribed pseudogenes. One of these genes, DPY19L2, is found on Chromosome 12 and is not syntenic with its mouse orthologue. Instead, the human locus syntenic to mouse Dpy19l2 contains a pseudogene, DPY19L2P1. This indicates that the ancestral copy of this gene has been silenced, while the descendant copy has remained active. Thus, the functional copy of this gene has been relocated to a new genomic locus. We then describe the expansion and evolution of the DPY19L gene family from a single gene found in invertebrate animals. Ancient duplications have led to multiple homologues in different lineages, with three in fish, frogs and birds and four in mammals. Conclusion Our results show that the DPY19L family has expanded throughout the vertebrate lineage and has undergone recent primate-specific evolution within LCRs.

  7. Growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene polymorphism and scoliosis in Prader-Willi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Merlin G; Hossain, Waheeda; Hassan, Maaz; Manzardo, Ann M

    2018-04-01

    A growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene polymorphism impacts sensitivity to endogenous and exogenous growth hormone (GH) to moderate growth and development. Increased sensitivity may accelerate spinal growth and contribute to scoliosis, particularly in GH-deficient and treated populations such as Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). Therefore, we examined the relationship between GHR genotype and scoliosis (case and control) in PWS cohorts. We utilized a case-control design in a study of 73 subjects (34M; 39F) with genetically confirmed PWS in 32 individuals previously diagnosed with moderate to severe scoliosis (mean age=16.9±10.2years; age range of 1 to 41years) and 41 adults with no evidence of scoliosis (mean age=30.8±9.7years; age range of 18 to 56years). The GHR gene polymorphism was determined using PCR specific primers to capture the two recognized GHR gene fragment sizes [i.e., full length (fl) or exon 3 deletions (d3)]. Twenty-three (72%) of the 32 case subjects with scoliosis required surgical correction with an approximately equal balance for gender and PWS genetic subtype among cases and 41 control subjects without scoliosis. The GHR d3/d3 genotype was identified in N=2 of 8 (25%) cases with scoliosis and the d3/fl genotype was identified in N=11 of 25 (44%) cases with scoliosis but the distribution difference did not statistically differ. The GHR fl/fl genotype was correlated with a significantly faster rate and heavier weight gain among case subjects. Our examination of demographic and genetic markers associated with scoliosis and surgical repair in PWS found no evidence to support differences in gender, PWS genetic subtype or GHR d3 allele distributions among the case vs control groups. Those with fl/fl alleles were heavier than those with d3/d3 or d3/fl genotypes and warrant further study with a larger sample size and possibly to include other vulnerable populations requiring growth hormone treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Low Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Levels Are Associated with Dry Eye Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Young Yoon

    Full Text Available Dry eye syndrome (DES is a common tear film and ocular surface disease that results in discomfort, visual disturbance, and tear film instability with potential damage to the ocular surface. Systemic diseases associated with DES include diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis, depression, anxiety, thyroid disease, allergic diseases, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic pain syndrome, and hyperlipidemia. Interestingly, it has been found that most of these are associated with low levels of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD or inadequate sunlight exposure.In this cross-sectional data analysis, noninstitutionalized adults aged ≥19 years (N = 17,542 who participated in Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2010-2012 were included. Information regarding duration of sunlight exposure was collected from the survey participants. Serum 25(OHD and zinc levels were measured. The confounding variables were age, gender, sunlight exposure time, region of residence, obesity, serum 25(OHD level, diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis, depression, thyroid disorder, atopic dermatitis, history of ocular surgery, regular exercise, and walking exercise.Mean serum 25(OHD levels of subjects with and without DES were 16.90 ± 6.0 and 17.52 ± 6.07 (p<0.001. Inadequate sunlight exposure time (odds ratio [OR], 1.554; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.307-1.848, urban residence (OR, 1.669; 95% CI, 1.456-1.913, indoor occupation (OR, 1.578; 95% CI, 1.389-1.814, and low serum 25(OHD level (OR, 1.158; 95% CI, 1.026-1.308 were the risk factors for DES. After adjusting for age, sex, obesity, diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis, depression, thyroid disorder, atopic dermatitis, history of ocular surgery, regular exercise, and occupation, low serum 25(OHD level (OR, 1.178; 95% CI, 1.010-1.372 and deficient sunlight exposure time (OR, 1.383; 95% CI, 1.094-1.749 were the risk factors for diagnosed DES.Low serum 25(OHD levels and inadequate sunlight exposure are

  9. Functional analysis of lipid metabolism genes in wine yeasts during alcoholic fermentation at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Malo, María; García-Ríos, Estéfani; Chiva, Rosana; Guillamon, José M

    2014-10-29

    Wine produced by low-temperature fermentation is mostly considered to have improved sensory qualities. However few commercial wine strains available on the market are well-adapted to ferment at low temperature (10 - 15°C). The lipid metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae plays a central role in low temperature adaptation. One strategy to modify lipid composition is to alter transcriptional activity by deleting or overexpressing the key genes of lipid metabolism. In a previous study, we identified the genes of the phospholipid, sterol and sphingolipid pathways, which impacted on growth capacity at low temperature. In the present study, we aimed to determine the influence of these genes on fermentation performance and growth during low-temperature wine fermentations. We analyzed the phenotype during fermentation at the low and optimal temperature of the lipid mutant and overexpressing strains in the background of a derivative commercial wine strain. The increase in the gene dosage of some of these lipid genes, e.g., PSD1 , LCB3, DPL1 and OLE1, improved fermentation activity during low-temperature fermentations, thus confirming their positive role during wine yeast adaptation to cold. Genes whose overexpression improved fermentation activity at 12°C were overexpressed by chromosomal integration into commercial wine yeast QA23. Fermentations in synthetic and natural grape must were carried out by this new set of overexpressing strains. The strains overexpressing OLE1 and DPL1 were able to finish fermentation before commercial wine yeast QA23. Only the OLE1 gene overexpression produced a specific aroma profile in the wines produced with natural grape must.

  10. Functional analysis of lipid metabolism genes in wine yeasts during alcoholic fermentation at low temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María López-Malo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Wine produced by low-temperature fermentation is mostly considered to have improved sensory qualities. However few commercial wine strains available on the market are well-adapted to ferment at low temperature (10 – 15°C. The lipid metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae plays a central role in low temperature adaptation. One strategy to modify lipid composition is to alter transcriptional activity by deleting or overexpressing the key genes of lipid metabolism. In a previous study, we identified the genes of the phospholipid, sterol and sphingolipid pathways, which impacted on growth capacity at low temperature. In the present study, we aimed to determine the influence of these genes on fermentation performance and growth during low-temperature wine fermentations. We analyzed the phenotype during fermentation at the low and optimal temperature of the lipid mutant and overexpressing strains in the background of a derivative commercial wine strain. The increase in the gene dosage of some of these lipid genes, e.g., PSD1, LCB3, DPL1 and OLE1, improved fermentation activity during low-temperature fermentations, thus confirming their positive role during wine yeast adaptation to cold. Genes whose overexpression improved fermentation activity at 12°C were overexpressed by chromosomal integration into commercial wine yeast QA23. Fermentations in synthetic and natural grape must were carried out by this new set of overexpressing strains. The strains overexpressing OLE1 and DPL1 were able to finish fermentation before commercial wine yeast QA23. Only the OLE1 gene overexpression produced a specific aroma profile in the wines produced with natural grape must.

  11. Evidence of cardiac involvement in the fetal inflammatory response syndrome: disruption of gene networks programming cardiac development in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Timothy; MacDonald, James W; Srinouanpranchanh, Sengkeo; Bammler, Theodor K; Merillat, Sean; Boldenow, Erica; Coleman, Michelle; Agnew, Kathy; Baldessari, Audrey; Stencel-Baerenwald, Jennifer E; Tisoncik-Go, Jennifer; Green, Richard R; Gale, Michael J; Rajagopal, Lakshmi; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M

    2018-04-01

    Most early preterm births are associated with intraamniotic infection and inflammation, which can lead to systemic inflammation in the fetus. The fetal inflammatory response syndrome describes elevations in the fetal interleukin-6 level, which is a marker for inflammation and fetal organ injury. An understanding of the effects of inflammation on fetal cardiac development may lead to insight into the fetal origins of adult cardiovascular disease. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the fetal inflammatory response syndrome is associated with disruptions in gene networks that program fetal cardiac development. We obtained fetal cardiac tissue after necropsy from a well-described pregnant nonhuman primate model (pigtail macaque, Macaca nemestrina) of intrauterine infection (n=5) and controls (n=5). Cases with the fetal inflammatory response syndrome (fetal plasma interleukin-6 >11 pg/mL) were induced by either choriodecidual inoculation of a hypervirulent group B streptococcus strain (n=4) or intraamniotic inoculation of Escherichia coli (n=1). RNA and protein were extracted from fetal hearts and profiled by microarray and Luminex (Millipore, Billerica, MA) for cytokine analysis, respectively. Results were validated by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Statistical and bioinformatics analyses included single gene analysis, gene set analysis, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (Qiagen, Valencia, CA), and Wilcoxon rank sum. Severe fetal inflammation developed in the context of intraamniotic infection and a disseminated bacterial infection in the fetus. Interleukin-6 and -8 in fetal cardiac tissues were elevated significantly in fetal inflammatory response syndrome cases vs controls (P1.5-fold change, P<.05) in the fetal heart (analysis of variance). Altered expression of select genes was validated by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction that included several with known functions in cardiac injury, morphogenesis

  12. Effect of a low glycemic index compared with a conventional healthy diet on polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Kate A; Steinbeck, Katharine S; Atkinson, Fiona S; Petocz, Peter; Brand-Miller, Jennie C

    2010-07-01

    Women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) are intrinsically insulin resistant and have a high risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Weight loss improves risk factors, but the optimal diet composition is unknown. Low-glycemic index (low-GI) diets are recommended without evidence of their clinical effectiveness. We compared changes in insulin sensitivity and clinical outcomes after similar weight losses after consumption of a low-GI diet compared with a conventional healthy diet in women with PCOS. We assigned overweight and obese premenopausal women with PCOS (n = 96) to consume either an ad libitum low-GI diet or a macronutrient-matched healthy diet and followed the women for 12 mo or until they achieved a 7% weight loss. We compared changes in whole-body insulin sensitivity, which we assessed using the insulin sensitivity index derived from the oral-glucose-tolerance test (ISI(OGTT)); glucose tolerance; body composition; plasma lipids; reproductive hormones; health-related quality of life; and menstrual cycle regularity. The attrition rate was high in both groups (49%). Among completers, ISI(OGTT) improved more with the low-GI diet than with the conventional healthy diet (mean +/- SEM: 2.2 +/- 0.7 compared with 0.7 +/- 0.6, respectively; P = 0.03). There was a significant diet-metformin interaction (P = 0.048), with greater improvement in ISI(OGTT) among women prescribed both metformin and the low-GI diet. Compared with women who consumed the conventional healthy diet, more women who consumed the low-GI diet showed improved menstrual cyclicity (95% compared with 63%, respectively; P = 0.03). Among the biochemical measures, only serum fibrinogen concentrations showed significant differences between diets (P < 0.05). To the best of our knowledge, this study provides the first objective evidence to justify the use of low-GI diets in the management of PCOS.

  13. Performance on verbal and low-verbal false belief tasks: evidence from children with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Herwegen, Jo; Dimitriou, Dagmara; Rundblad, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies that have investigated the relationship between performance on theory of mind (ToM) tasks and verbal abilities in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) have reported contradictory findings with some showing that language abilities aid performance on ToM tasks while others have found that participants with WS fail these tasks because of their verbal demands. The current study investigated this relationship again comparing performance on a classical change-location task to two newly developed low-verbal tasks, one change-location task and one unexpected content task. Thirty children with WS (aged 5-17;01 years) and 30 typically developing (TD) children (aged between 2;10 years and 9;09 years), who were matched for vocabulary comprehension scores were included in the study. Although performance in the WS group was significantly poorer compared to the TD group on all three tasks, performance was not predicted by their receptive vocabulary or grammatical ability scores. In addition, ToM abilities in both groups depended on the cognitive demands of the task at hand. This finding shows that performance on ToM tasks in WS is not necessarily hindered by their delayed language abilities but rather by the task administered. This could potentially affect the diagnosis of developmental disorders, such as Autism Spectrum Disorders, and comparison of ToM abilities across developmental disorders. Readers of this article should be able to (1) describe the current state of theory of mind research in Williams syndrome, (2) identify which cognitive abilities might explain performance on theory of mind tasks in both typically developing children and in children with Williams syndrome, and (3) interpret the importance of task demands when assessing children's theory of mind abilities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Radiation-induced liver injury showing low intensity on T2-weighted images noted in Budd-Chiari syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Harushi [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Saida, Yukihisa; Itai, Yuji [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Mori, Kensaku [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Hospital; Ahmadi, T. [Shahid Beheshti Univ. of Medical Sciences, Teheran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Okumura, Toshiyuki [Ibaraki Prefectural Central Hospital, Tomobe (Japan)

    2002-04-01

    Although it is documented that radiation can cause density or intensity changes on computed tomography or MR imaging in the irradiated hepatic parenchyma, few researchers have reported or understood the MR presentation of changes in hepatic parenchyma following radiotherapy in the patient with Budd-Chiari syndrome. The purpose of this study was to investigate the MR appearance of hepatic radiation injury in Budd-Chiari syndrome and to consider the underlying pathophysiology. The MR examinations of two patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome was compared with those of 11 patients without Budd-Chiari syndrome. The two groups, both of which suffered from hepatocellular carcinoma, underwent 50-72 Gy of proton-beam irradiation during a period of 14-43 days. Examinations including T1- and T2-weighted imaging, superparamagnetic iron oxide-enhanced imaging, and dynamic study were performed 3-10 weeks after the end of irradiation. Radiation-induced hepatic injury was observed as a low-intensity area on T2-weighted images and on delayed phase images of dynamic study in the Budd-Chiari patients, and as iso- or high-intensity areas on both images in the patients without Budd-Chiari syndrome. US-guided needle biopsy from the irradiated area in one patient with Budd-Chiari syndrome revealed mostly necrotic tissue and fibrous tissue. These MR features of hepatic radiation injury in Budd-Chiari syndrome were considered to be due to severe hepatic fibrosis. (author)

  15. Apa-I polymorphism in VDR gene is related to metabolic syndrome in polycystic ovary syndrome: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Betânia Rodrigues; Lecke, Sheila Bunecker; Spritzer, Poli Mara

    2018-04-18

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine disorder determined by polygenic traits as well as environmental factors. Lower vitamin D levels have been detected in PCOS women and related to hormone and metabolic disturbances. Vitamin D acts in tissues through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). VDR gene variants have been associated with worse metabolic profile in the general population. We investigated the genotype and haplotype distribution of the Bsm-I (rs1544410), Apa-I (rs7975232), and Taq-I (rs731236) VDR gene polymorphisms in PCOS and non-hirsute women from southern Brazil. We further investigated the associations of these gene variants and their haplotypes with PCOS, vitamin D levels, and metabolic abnormalities, including the metabolic syndrome (MetS). A group of 191 women with PCOS (Rotterdam criteria) and 100 non-hirsute controls with regular ovulatory cycles were genotyped for all polymorphisms by real-time PCR, with allelic discrimination assays. MetS and the cutoffs for its isolated components were defined in accordance with the Joint Scientific Statement. Women with PCOS were younger and had significantly higher BMI and total testosterone levels than controls (p Apa-I entailed higher risk of MetS in PCOS (OR: 2.133; 95% CI 1.020-4.464, p = 0.042), and was associated with higher systolic blood pressure (p = 0.009), total cholesterol (p = 0.040), and LDL-cholesterol (p = 0.038) in both PCOS and control groups (two-way ANOVA). The frequencies of VDR haplotypes were similar in PCOS and control women. The present results suggest that the Apa-I variant in VDR gene may be associated with MetS in southern Brazilian women with PCOS, and with blood pressure, total cholesterol, and LDL-c in women with and without PCOS.

  16. A novel mutation in the PAX3 gene causes Waardenburg syndrome type I in an Iranian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian, Nazanin; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Farhadi, Mohammad; Bahrami, Tayyeb; Noori-Daloii, Mohammad Reza

    2015-10-01

    Sensorineural hearing impairment (HI) is one of the most frequent congenital defects, with a prevalence of 1 in 500 among neonates. Although there are over 400 syndromes involving HI, most cases of HI are nonsyndromic (70%), 20% of which follow autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Waardenburg syndrome (WS) ranks first among autosomal dominant syndromic forms of HI. WS is characterized by sensorineural hearing impairment, pigmentation abnormalities of hair and skin and hypoplastic blue eyes or heterochromia iridis. WS is subdivided into four major types, WS1-WS4. WS1 is diagnosed by the presence of dystopia canthorum and PAX3 is the only gene involved. This study aims to determine the pathogenic mutation in a large Iranian pedigree affected with WS1 in order to further confirm the clinical diagnosis. In the present study, a family segregating HI was ascertained in a genetic counseling center. Upon clinical inspection, white forelock, dystopia canthorum, broad high nasal root and synophrys, characteristic of WS1 were evident. In order to clarify the genetic etiology and confirm the clinical data, primers were designed to amplify exons and exon-intron boundaries of the responsible gene, PAX3 with 10 exons, followed by the Sanger DNA sequencing method. Genetic analysis of PAX3 revealed a novel mutation in PAX3 (c.1024_1040 del AGCACGATTCCTTCCAA). Our data provide genotype-phenotype correlation for the mutation in PAX3 and WS1 in the studied family, with implications for genetic counseling, which necessitates detailed clinical inspection of HI patients to distinguish syndromic HI from the more common non-syndromic cases. Our results reveal the value of phenotype-directed genetic analysis and could further expand the spectrum of PAX3 mutations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Two White Spot Syndrome Virus MicroRNAs Target the Dorsal Gene To Promote Virus Infection in Marsupenaeus japonicus Shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Qian; Huang, Xin; Cui, Yalei; Sun, Jiejie; Wang, Wen; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2017-04-15

    In eukaryotes, microRNAs (miRNAs) serve as regulators of many biological processes, including virus infection. An miRNA can generally target diverse genes during virus-host interactions. However, the regulation of gene expression by multiple miRNAs has not yet been extensively explored during virus infection. This study found that the Spaztle (Spz)-Toll-Dorsal-antilipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) signaling pathway plays a very important role in antiviral immunity against invasion of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in shrimp ( Marsupenaeus japonicus ). Dorsal , the central gene in the Toll pathway, was targeted by two viral miRNAs (WSSV-miR-N13 and WSSV-miR-N23) during WSSV infection. The regulation of Dorsal expression by viral miRNAs suppressed the Spz-Toll-Dorsal-ALF signaling pathway in shrimp in vivo , leading to virus infection. Our study contributes novel insights into the viral miRNA-mediated Toll signaling pathway during the virus-host interaction. IMPORTANCE An miRNA can target diverse genes during virus-host interactions. However, the regulation of gene expression by multiple miRNAs during virus infection has not yet been extensively explored. The results of this study indicated that the shrimp Dorsal gene, the central gene in the Toll pathway, was targeted by two viral miRNAs during infection with white spot syndrome virus. Regulation of Dorsal expression by viral miRNAs suppressed the Spz-Toll-Dorsal-ALF signaling pathway in shrimp in vivo , leading to virus infection. Our study provides new insight into the viral miRNA-mediated Toll signaling pathway in virus-host interactions. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. Report of Chinese family with severe dermatitis, multiple allergies and metabolic wasting syndrome caused by novel homozygous desmoglein-1 gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ruhong; Yan, Ming; Ni, Cheng; Zhang, Jia; Li, Ming; Yao, Zhirong

    2016-10-01

    Recently, homozygous mutations in the desmoglein-1 (DSG1) gene and heterozygous mutation in the desmoplakin (DSP) gene have been demonstrated to be associated with severe dermatitis, multiple allergies and metabolic wasting (SAM) syndrome (Mendelian Inheritance in Man no. 615508). We aim to identify the molecular basis for a Chinese pedigree of SAM syndrome. A Chinese pedigree of SAM syndrome was subjected to mutation detection in the DSG1 gene. Sequence analysis of the DSG1 gene and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis for gene expression of DSG1 using cDNA derived from the epidermis of patients and controls were both performed. Skin biopsies were also taken from patients for pathological study and transmission electron microscopy observation. Novel homozygous splicing mutation c.1892-1delG in the exon-intron border of the DSG1 gene has been demonstrated to be associated with SAM syndrome. We report a new family of SAM syndrome of Asian decent and expand the spectrum of mutations in the DSG1 gene. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  19. Refeeding syndrome in very-low-birth-weight intrauterine growth-restricted neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, J R; Finch, C; Ebeling, M; Taylor, S N

    2013-09-01

    Determine the incidence of refeeding syndrome, defined by the presence of hypophosphatemia in very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) compared with those without IUGR. In this retrospective cohort study, VLBW infants admitted over a 10-year period (271 IUGR and 1982 non-IUGR) were evaluated for specific electrolyte abnormalities in the first postnatal week. IUGR infants were significantly more likely to have hypophosphatemia (41% vs 8.9%, relative risk (95% confidence interval: 7.25 (5.45, 9.65)) and severe hypophosphatemia (11.4% vs 1%, 12.06 (6.82, 21.33)) in the first postnatal week. The incidence of hypophosphatemia was significantly associated with the presence of maternal preeclampsia in all VLBW infants (odds ratio (OR): 2.58 (1.96, 3.40)) when controlling for birth weight and gestational age. Refeeding syndrome occurs in VLBW infants with IUGR and born to mothers with preeclampsia. Close monitoring of electrolytes, especially phosphorus, is warranted in this population.

  20. Current status of prenatal diagnosis in Cuba: causes of low prevalence of Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Rosado, L A; Hechavarría-Estenoz, D; de la Torre, M E; Pimentel-Benitez, H; Hernández-Gil, J; Perez, B; Barrios-Martínez, A; Morales-Rodriguez, E; Soriano-Torres, M; Garcia, M; Suarez-Mayedo, U; Cedeño-Aparicio, N; Blanco, I; Díaz-Véliz, P; Vidal-Hernández, B; Mitjans-Torres, M; Miñoso, S; Alvarez-Espinosa, D; Reyes-Hernández, E; Angulo-Cebada, E; Torres-Palacios, M; Lozano-Lezcano, L; Lima-Rodriguez, U; Mayeta, M; Noblet, M; Benítez, Y; Lardoeyt-Ferrer, R; Yosela-Martin, S; Carbonell, P; Pérez-Ramos, M; de León, N; Perez, M; Carbonell, J

    2014-11-01

    To analyze trends in cytogenetic prenatal diagnosis in Cuba and to analyze possible causes leading to a low Down syndrome prevalence in a country where the triple test is not available. An analysis of the Cuban program in prenatal cytogenetic diagnosis from 1984 to 2012 was conducted. Results are described, with particular emphasis on indications, abnormal results, types of invasive procedures, and terminations of pregnancy. Cytogenetic prenatal diagnostic analyses (n = 75,095) were conducted; maternal age was the indication for 77.9% of the amniocenteses and chorionic villus samplings. The detection rate of chromosomally abnormal pregnancies was 2.3% for maternal age and increased to 8-9% for other indications. When a chromosomal abnormality was identified, 88.5% terminated the pregnancy. In 2002, the live birth prevalence of Down syndrome was 8.4 per 10,000 live births, and in 2012, 7 per 10,000. Prenatal diagnosis in Cuba has contributed to a significant reduction in chromosomal aberrations. The impact increased because of the demographic trends of the population, the high index of terminations of pregnancy, and the establishment of a network of cytogenetic laboratories throughout Cuba. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Ophthalmic manifestations of 107 cases with hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erbagci, I.; Okumus, S.; Bekir, Necdet A.; Karaca, M.; Ugur, Mete G.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to present various ophthalmologic disorders in a clinical series of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome cases. This is a prospective clinical study performed between 2002 and 2005. One hundred seven HELLP attended in either Departments of Ophthalmology or Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical School, Gaziantep University, Gaziantep, Turkey were evaluated. Mean age was 25.5 (22-36 years). Mean levels were 2.5 gravidity, 1.3 parity, 55,200/mm3 platelet counts, 308.7 U/I aspartate transaminase, 255.4 U/I alanine transminase and 1711.6U/I lactate dehydrogenase. Four patients died (3.7%) despite the proper treatments. Cortical blindness was observed in 3 cases (2.7%), serous retinal detachments in 4 (3.7%) and mild hypertension changes in 18 (16%). Ophthalmic complications are possible during and after this syndrome. Almost all ophthalmologic changes recover after delivery by cesarean section, nevertheless, it is essential that ophthalmologists should be aware of retinal disorders when this fatal complication of pregnancy is encountered. (author)

  2. Gene p63: In ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia clefting, ankyloblepharon-ectodermal dysplasia, Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Straten, Cornelia; Butow, Kurt-W

    2013-01-01

    An analysis was made of three different syndromes associated with p63 gene mutations, known as ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome (EEC), ankyloblepharon-ectodermal dysplasia clefting syndrome (AEC or Hay-Wells) and Rapp-Hodgkin syndrome (RHS). The postoperative complications associated with their cleft reconstructions were also evaluated. Extensive demographic information, in particular of the clinical appearances, associated malformations, and the types and complications of the reconstructive surgical procedures, were recorded of these syndromic cases occurring in a database of 3621 facial cleft deformity patients. The data was analyzed using the Microsoft Excel program. A total of 10 (0.28%) cases of p63 associated syndromes were recorded: EEC (6), RHS (3), and AEC (1). The following clinical cleft appearances were noted - EEC = 6: CLA 1 -right side unilateral (female); CLAP 4 - right side (1) + left side (1) unilateral (male + female); bilateral (2) (males); hPsP 1 (female) (divided in 3 Black, 2 White, 1 Indian); RHS = 3: CLAP 2 (White males); hPsP 1 (White female); AEC = 1: CLAP bilateral (White male). Other features of the syndromes were: skin, hand, foot, tooth, hair and nail involvement, and light sensitivity. Postoperative complications included: (i) stenosis of nasal opening, especially after reconstruction of the bilateral cleft lip and the columella lengthening (2 cases), (ii) premaxilla-prolabium fusion (2 cases), (iii) repeated occurrence of oro-nasal fistula in the hard palate (4 cases), and (iv) dysgnathial development of midfacial structures (3 cases). Three different p63 associated syndromes (EEC, AEC, and RHS) were diagnosed (0.27% of the total facial cleft deformities database). The majority of the cases presented with a bilateral CLAP in males only. A number of females and males had unilateral CLA. The hPsP-cleft was recorded in females only. The associated ectodermal component most probably had a profoundly negative influence

  3. Differential gene expression in granulosa cells from polycystic ovary syndrome patients with and without insulin resistance: identification of susceptibility gene sets through network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Surleen; Archer, Kellie J; Devi, M Gouri; Kriplani, Alka; Strauss, Jerome F; Singh, Rita

    2012-10-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous, genetically complex, endocrine disorder of uncertain etiology in women. Our aim was to compare the gene expression profiles in stimulated granulosa cells of PCOS women with and without insulin resistance vs. matched controls. This study included 12 normal ovulatory women (controls), 12 women with PCOS without evidence for insulin resistance (PCOS non-IR), and 16 women with insulin resistance (PCOS-IR) undergoing in vitro fertilization. Granulosa cell gene expression profiling was accomplished using Affymetrix Human Genome-U133 arrays. Differentially expressed genes were classified according to gene ontology using ingenuity pathway analysis tools. Microarray results for selected genes were confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. A total of 211 genes were differentially expressed in PCOS non-IR and PCOS-IR granulosa cells (fold change≥1.5; P≤0.001) vs. matched controls. Diabetes mellitus and inflammation genes were significantly increased in PCOS-IR patients. Real-time quantitative PCR confirmed higher expression of NCF2 (2.13-fold), TCF7L2 (1.92-fold), and SERPINA1 (5.35-fold). Increased expression of inflammation genes ITGAX (3.68-fold) and TAB2 (1.86-fold) was confirmed in PCOS non-IR. Different cardiometabolic disease genes were differentially expressed in the two groups. Decreased expression of CAV1 (-3.58-fold) in PCOS non-IR and SPARC (-1.88-fold) in PCOS-IR was confirmed. Differential expression of genes involved in TGF-β signaling (IGF2R, increased; and HAS2, decreased), and oxidative stress (TXNIP, increased) was confirmed in both groups. Microarray analysis demonstrated differential expression of genes linked to diabetes mellitus, inflammation, cardiovascular diseases, and infertility in the granulosa cells of PCOS women with and without insulin resistance. Because these dysregulated genes are also involved in oxidative stress, lipid metabolism, and insulin signaling, we hypothesize that these

  4. A novel mutation in the WFS1 gene identified in a Taiwanese family with low-frequency hearing impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Shing-Fang

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wolfram syndrome gene 1 (WFS1 accounts for most of the familial nonsyndromic low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss (LFSNHL which is characterized by sensorineural hearing losses equal to and below 2000 Hz. The current study aimed to contribute to our understanding of the molecular basis of LFSNHL in an affected Taiwanese family. Methods The Taiwanese family with LFSNHL was phenotypically characterized using audiologic examination and pedigree analysis. Genetic characterization was performed by direct sequencing of WFS1 and mutation analysis. Results Pure tone audiometry confirmed that the family members affected with LFSNHL had a bilateral sensorineural hearing loss equal to or below 2000 Hz. The hearing loss threshold of the affected members showed no progression, a characteristic that was consistent with a mutation in the WFS1 gene located in the DFNA6/14/38 locus. Pedigree analysis showed a hereditarily autosomal dominant pattern characterized by a full penetrance. Among several polymorphisms, a missense mutation Y669H (2005T>C in exon 8 of WFS1 was identified in members of a Taiwanese family diagnosed with LFSNHL but not in any of the control subjects. Conclusion We discovered a novel heterozygous missense mutation in exon 8 of WFS1 (i.e., Y669H which is likely responsible for the LFSNHL phenotype in this particular Taiwanese family.

  5. Heterozygous deletion at the SOX10 gene locus in two patients from a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzhi, He; Ruijin, Wen; Jieliang, Li; Xiaoyan, Ma; Haibo, Liu; Xiaoman, Wang; Jiajia, Xian; Shaoying, Li; Shuanglin, Li; Qing, Li

    2015-10-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare disease characterized by sensorineural deafness and pigment disturbance. To date, almost 100 mutations have been reported, but few reports on cases with SOX10 gene deletion. The inheritance pattern of SOX10 gene deletion is still unclear. Our objective was to identify the genetic causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II in a two-generation Chinese family. Clinical evaluations were conducted in both of the patients. Microarray analysis and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) were performed to identify disease-related copy number variants (CNVs). DNA sequencing of the SOX10, MITF and SNAI2 genes was performed to identify the pathogenic mutation responsible for WS2. A 280kb heterozygous deletion at the 22q13.1 chromosome region (including SOX10) was detected in both of the patients. No mutation was found in the patients, unaffected family members and 30 unrelated healthy controls. This report is the first to describe SOX10 heterozygous deletions in Chinese WS2 patients. Our result conform the thesis that heterozygous deletions at SOX10 is an important pathogenicity for WS, and present as autosomal dominant inheritance. Nevertheless, heterozygous deletion of the SOX10 gene would be worth investigating to understand their functions and contributions to neurologic phenotypes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A novel mutation in the succinate dehydrogenase subunit D gene in siblings with the hereditary paraganglioma–pheochromocytoma syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaithra Prasad

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in the succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit D gene are now known to be associated with hereditary paraganglioma–pheochromocytoma syndromes. Since the initial succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit D gene mutation was identified about a decade ago, more than 131 unique variants have been reported. We report the case of two siblings presenting with multiple paragangliomas and pheochromocytomas; they were both found to carry a mutation in the succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit D gene involving a substitution of thymine to guanine at nucleotide 236 in exon 3. This particular mutation of the succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit D gene has only been reported in one previous patient in Japan; this is, therefore, the first report of this pathogenic mutation in siblings and the first report of this mutation in North America. With continued screening of more individuals, we will be able to create a robust mutation database that can help us understand disease patterns associated with particular variants and may be a starting point in the development of new therapies for familial paraganglioma syndromes.

  7. Genomic profiling in Down syndrome acute lymphoblastic leukemia identifies histone gene deletions associated with altered methylation profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudin, Michael G.; Wang, Jinhua; Leung, Hon-Chiu Eastwood; Gurusiddappa, Sivashankarappa; Meyer, Julia; Condos, Gregory; Morrison, Debra; Tsimelzon, Anna; Devidas, Meenakshi; Heerema, Nyla A.; Carroll, Andrew J.; Plon, Sharon E.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Basso, Giuseppe; Pession, Andrea; Bhojwani, Deepa; Carroll, William L.; Rabin, Karen R.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Down syndrome (DS) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have distinct clinical and biological features. Whereas most DS-ALL cases lack the sentinel cytogenetic lesions that guide risk assignment in childhood ALL, JAK2 mutations and CRLF2 overexpression are highly enriched. To further characterize the unique biology of DS-ALL, we performed genome-wide profiling of 58 DS-ALL and 68 non-Down syndrome (NDS) ALL cases by DNA copy number, loss of heterozygosity, gene expression, and methylation analyses. We report a novel deletion within the 6p22 histone gene cluster as significantly more frequent in DS-ALL, occurring in 11 DS (22%) and only two NDS cases (3.1%) (Fisher’s exact p = 0.002). Homozygous deletions yielded significantly lower histone expression levels, and were associated with higher methylation levels, distinct spatial localization of methylated promoters, and enrichment of highly methylated genes for specific pathways and transcription factor binding motifs. Gene expression profiling demonstrated heterogeneity of DS-ALL cases overall, with supervised analysis defining a 45-transcript signature associated with CRLF2 overexpression. Further characterization of pathways associated with histone deletions may identify opportunities for novel targeted interventions. PMID:21647151

  8. Attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis and Muir-Torre syndrome linked to compound biallelic constitutional MYH gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponti, G; Ponz de Leon, M; Maffei, S; Pedroni, M; Losi, L; Di Gregorio, C; Gismondi, V; Scarselli, A; Benatti, P; Roncari, B; Seidenari, S; Pellacani, G; Varotti, C; Prete, E; Varesco, L; Roncucci, L

    2005-11-01

    Attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis and Muir-Torre syndrome linked to compound biallelic constitutional MYH gene mutations.Peculiar dermatologic manifestations are present in several heritable gastrointestinal disorders. Muir-Torre syndrome (MTS) is a genodermatosis whose peculiar feature is the presence of sebaceous gland tumors associated with visceral malignancies. We describe one patient in whom multiple sebaceous gland tumors were associated with early onset colon and thyroid cancers and attenuated polyposis coli. Her family history was positive for colonic adenomas. She had a daughter presenting with yellow papules in the forehead region developed in the late infancy. Skin and visceral neoplasms were tested for microsatellite instability and immunohistochemical status of mismatch repair (MMR), APC and MYH proteins. The proband colon and skin tumors were microsatellite stable and showed normal expression of MMR proteins. Cytoplasmic expression of MYH protein was revealed in colonic cancer cells. Compound heterozygosity due to biallelic mutations in MYH, R168H and 379delC, was identified in the proband. The 11-year-old daughter was carrier of the monoallelic constitutional mutation 379delC in the MYH gene; in the sister, the R168H MYH gene mutation was detected. This report presents an interesting case of association between MYH-associated polyposis and sebaceous gland tumors. These findings suggest that patients with MTS phenotype that include colonic polyposis should be screened for MYH gene mutations.

  9. Mutation update for the CSB/ERCC6 and CSA/ERCC8 genes involved in Cockayne syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugel, V; Dalloz, C; Durand, M; Sauvanaud, F; Kristensen, U; Vincent, M C; Pasquier, L; Odent, S; Cormier-Daire, V; Gener, B; Tobias, E S; Tolmie, J L; Martin-Coignard, D; Drouin-Garraud, V; Heron, D; Journel, H; Raffo, E; Vigneron, J; Lyonnet, S; Murday, V; Gubser-Mercati, D; Funalot, B; Brueton, L; Sanchez Del Pozo, J; Muñoz, E; Gennery, A R; Salih, M; Noruzinia, M; Prescott, K; Ramos, L; Stark, Z; Fieggen, K; Chabrol, B; Sarda, P; Edery, P; Bloch-Zupan, A; Fawcett, H; Pham, D; Egly, J M; Lehmann, A R; Sarasin, A; Dollfus, H

    2010-02-01

    Cockayne syndrome is an autosomal recessive multisystem disorder characterized principally by neurological and sensory impairment, cachectic dwarfism, and photosensitivity. This rare disease is linked to mutations in the CSB/ERCC6 and CSA/ERCC8 genes encoding proteins involved in the transcription-coupled DNA repair pathway. The clinical spectrum of Cockayne syndrome encompasses a wide range of severity from severe prenatal forms to mild and late-onset presentations. We have reviewed the 45 published mutations in CSA and CSB to date and we report 43 new mutations in these genes together with the corresponding clinical data. Among the 84 reported kindreds, 52 (62%) have mutations in the CSB gene. Many types of mutations are scattered along the whole coding sequence of both genes, but clusters of missense mutations can be recognized and highlight the role of particular motifs in the proteins. Genotype-phenotype correlation hypotheses are considered with regard to these new molecular and clinical data. Additional cases of molecular prenatal diagnosis are reported and the strategy for prenatal testing is discussed. Two web-based locus-specific databases have been created to list all identified variants and to allow the inclusion of future reports (www.umd.be/CSA/ and www.umd.be/CSB/). (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Mutations in the G6PC3 gene cause Dursun syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banka, Siddharth; Newman, William G; Ozgül, R Koksal; Dursun, Ali

    2010-10-01

    Dursun syndrome is a triad of familial primary pulmonary hypertension, leucopenia, and atrial septal defect. Here we demonstrate that mutations in G6PC3 cause Dursun syndrome. Mutations in G6PC3 are known to also cause severe congenital neutropenia type 4. Identification of the genetic basis of Dursun syndrome expands the pre-existing knowledge about the phenotypic effects of mutations in G6PC3. We propose that Dursun syndrome should now be considered as a subset of severe congenital neutropenia type 4 with pulmonary hypertension as an important clinical feature. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Cancer spectrum in DNA mismatch repair gene mutation carriers: results from a hospital based Lynch syndrome registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Mala; Wei, Chongjuan; Chen, Jinyun; Amos, Christopher I; Lynch, Patrick M; Lu, Karen H; Lucio, Laura A; Boyd-Rogers, Stephanie G; Bannon, Sarah A; Mork, Maureen E; Frazier, Marsha L

    2012-09-01

    The spectrum of cancers seen in a hospital based Lynch syndrome registry of mismatch repair gene mutation carriers was examined to determine the distribution of cancers and examine excess cancer risk. Overall there were 504 cancers recorded in 368 mutation carriers from 176 families. These included 236 (46.8 %) colorectal and 268 (53.2 %) extracolonic cancers. MLH1 mutation carriers had a higher frequency of colorectal cancers whereas MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 mutation carriers had more extracolonic cancers although these differences were not statistically significant. Men had fewer extracolonic cancers than colorectal (45.3 vs. 54.7 %), whereas women had more extracolonic than colorectal cancers (59.0 vs. 41.0 %). The mean age at diagnosis overall for extracolonic cancers was older than for colorectal, 49.1 versus 44.8 years (P ≤ 0.001). As expected, the index cancer was colorectal in 58.1 % of patients and among the extracolonic index cancers, endometrial was the most common (13.8 %). A significant number of non-Lynch syndrome index cancers were recorded including breast (n = 5) prostate (n = 3), thyroid (n = 3), cervix (n = 3), melanoma (n = 3), and 1 case each of thymoma, sinus cavity, and adenocarcinoma of the lung. However, standardized incidence ratios calculated to assess excess cancer risk showed that only those cancers known to be associated with Lynch syndrome were significant in our sample. We found that Lynch syndrome patients can often present with cancers that are not considered part of Lynch syndrome. This has clinical relevance both for diagnosis of Lynch syndrome and surveillance for cancers of different sites during follow-up of these patients.

  12. Minimally Invasive Microendoscopic Resection of the Transverse Process for Treatment of Low Back Pain with Bertolotti’s Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Takata, Yoichiro; Sakai, Toshinori; Higashino, Kosaku; Goda, Yuichiro; Mineta, Kazuaki; Sugiura, Kosuke; Sairyo, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Bertolotti’s syndrome is characterized by anomalous enlargement of the transverse process of the most caudal lumbar segment, causing chronic and persistent low back pain or sciatica. We describe the case of a 45-year-old woman who presented with left sciatic pain and low back pain due to a recurrent lumbar disc herniation at L4-5 with Bertolotti’s syndrome. Selective L5 nerve root block and local injection of lidocaine into the articulation between the transverse process and sacral ala tempor...

  13. Simultaneous analysis of the expression of 14 genes with individual prognostic value in myelodysplastic syndrome patients at diagnosis: WT1 detection in peripheral blood adversely affects survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría, Carlos; Ramos, Fernando; Puig, Noemi; Barragán, Eva; de Paz, Raquel; Pedro, Carme; Insunza, Andrés; Tormo, Mar; Del Cañizo, Consuelo; Diez-Campelo, María; Xicoy, Blanca; Salido, Eduardo; Sánchez del Real, Javier; Hernández, Montserrat; Chillón, Carmen; Sanz, Guillermo F; García-Sanz, Ramón; San Miguel, Jesús F; González, Marcos

    2012-12-01

    Several studies have evaluated the prognostic value of the individual expression of certain genes in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, none of them includes their simultaneous analysis by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We evaluated relative expression levels of 14 molecular markers in 193 peripheral blood samples from untreated MDS patients using real-time PCR. Detectable WT1 expression levels, low TET2, and low IER3 gene expression were the only markers showing in univariate analysis a poor prognostic value for all treatment-free (TFS), progression-free (PFS), and overall survival (OS). In multivariate analysis, molecular parameters associated with a shorter TFS were: WT1 detection (p = 0.014), low TET2 (p = 0.002), and low IER3 expression (p = 0.025). WT1 detection (p = 0.006) and low TET2 (p = 0.006) expression were associated with a shorter PFS when multivariate analysis was carried out by including only molecular markers. Molecular values with an independent value in OS were: WT1 detection (p = 0.003), high EVI1 expression (p = 0.001), and undetectatable p15-CDKN2B (p = 0.037). WT1 expressers were associated with adverse clinical-biological features, high IPSS and WPSS scoring, and unfavorable molecular expression profile. In summary, detectable WT1 expression levels, and low TET2 and low IER3 expression in peripheral blood showed a strong association with adverse prognosis in MDS patients at diagnosis. However, WT1 was the only molecular marker displaying an independent prognostic value in both OS and TFS.

  14. Gene expression profiling in gill tissues of White spot syndrome virus infected black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon by DNA microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, M S; Gomathi, A; Gopikrishna, G; Ponniah, A G

    2015-06-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) continues to be the most devastating viral pathogen infecting penaeid shrimp the world over. The genome of WSSV has been deciphered and characterized from three geographical isolates and significant progress has been made in developing various molecular diagnostic methods to detect the virus. However, the information on host immune gene response to WSSV pathogenesis is limited. Microarray analysis was carried out as an approach to analyse the gene expression in black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon in response to WSSV infection. Gill tissues collected from the WSSV infected shrimp at 6, 24, 48 h and moribund stage were analysed for differential gene expression. Shrimp cDNAs of 40,059 unique sequences were considered for designing the microarray chip. The Cy3-labeled cRNA derived from healthy and WSSV-infected shrimp was subjected to hybridization with all the DNA spots in the microarray which revealed 8,633 and 11,147 as up- and down-regulated genes respectively at different time intervals post infection. The altered expression of these numerous genes represented diverse functions such as immune response, osmoregulation, apoptosis, nucleic acid binding, energy and metabolism, signal transduction, stress response and molting. The changes in gene expression profiles observed by microarray analysis provides molecular insights and framework of genes which are up- and down-regulated at different time intervals during WSSV infection in shrimp. The microarray data was validated by Real Time analysis of four differentially expressed genes involved in apoptosis (translationally controlled tumor protein, inhibitor of apoptosis protein, ubiquitin conjugated enzyme E2 and caspase) for gene expression levels. The role of apoptosis related genes in WSSV infected shrimp is discussed herein.

  15. [Association analysis of SNP-63 and indel-19 variant in the calpain-10 gene with polycystic ovary syndrome in women of reproductive age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Martínez, Silvia Esperanza; Castro-Martínez, Anna Gabriela; López-Quintero, Andrés; García-Zapién, Alejandra Guadalupe; Torres-Rodríguez, Ruth Noemí; Sánchez-Corona, José

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is a complex and heterogeneous disease involving both reproductive and metabolic problems. It has been suggested a genetic predisposition in the etiology of this syndrome. The identification of calpain-10 gene (CAPN10) as the first candidate gene for type 2 diabetes mellitus, has focused the interest in investigating their possible relation with the polycystic ovary syndrome, because this syndrome is associated with hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance, two metabolic abnormalities associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus. To investigate if there is association between the SNP-63 and the variant indel-19 of the CAPN10 gene and polycystic ovary syndrome in women of reproductive age. This study included 101 women (55 with polycystic ovary syndrome and 46 without polycystic ovary syndrome). The genetic variant indel-19 was identified by electrophoresis of the amplified fragments by PCR, and the SNP-63 by PCR-RFLP. The allele and genotype frequencies of the two variants do not differ significatly between women with polycystic ovary syndrome and control women group. The haplotype 21 (defined by the insertion allele of indel-19 variant and C allele of SNP-63) was found with higher frequency in both study groups, being more frequent in the polycystic ovary syndrome patients group, however, this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.8353). The results suggest that SNP-63 and indel-19 variant of the CAPN10 gene do not represent a risk factor for polycystic ovary syndrome in our patients group. Copyright © 2015. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A.

  16. Associations between metabolic syndrome, breast cancer recurrence, and the 21-gene recurrence score assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, Jeanette; Kidwell, Kelley M; Henry, N Lynn

    2016-06-01

    The 21-gene recurrence score (RS) assay is prognostic in estrogen receptor-positive (HR+), HER2-negative, node-negative breast cancer (BC). The interaction between RS and host factors including metabolic syndrome (MS) is unclear. MS conditions such as obesity have been associated with worse BC prognosis. The aim of this study was to identify associations between presence of MS conditions and RS group or breast cancer recurrence. Demographic, pathologic, and treatment data, MS criteria, and menopausal status were abstracted from medical records of women with stage I-II, HR+, HER2-negative BC evaluated with the RS assay at a single institution since 2005. MS was defined as presence of ≥3 of the following within 2 years of diagnosis: body mass index ≥27.7 kg/m(2); hypertension; impaired fasting glucose; HDL <50 mg/dL; hypertriglyceridemia. Of 533 eligible women, 22 % had MS. MS was more common in post- vs premenopausal women (30 vs 9 %; P < 0.0001). There was no significant association between RS group and overall MS status or any individual criterion, controlling for stage, and no association after stratification by menopausal status. Postmenopausal status was associated with higher RS group (P = 0.039), independent of stage. With 4.2-year median follow-up, no association between disease recurrence and MS was identified. Although MS has been associated with worse BC outcomes, we were unable to identify associations between RS group and MS criteria. Identification of prognostic factors other than RS that underlie this higher risk will be important for optimizing breast cancer treatment decision-making in patients with MS.

  17. Association of luteinizing hormone chorionic gonadotropin receptor gene polymorphism (rs2293275) with polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thathapudi, Sujatha; Kodati, Vijayalakshmi; Erukkambattu, Jayashankar; Addepally, Uma; Qurratulain, Hasan

    2015-03-01

    Polycystic ovaries and irregular menstruation/anovulation are important diagnostic criteria along with hyperandrogenism as per the Androgen Excess Society-2006 criteria for polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). In the etiopathogenesis of PCOS, one of the candidate genes causing ovarian failure is the luteinizing hormone (LH) chorionic gonadotropin hormone receptor (LHCGR). Our aim was to study the association of LHCGR polymorphism (rs2293275) with PCOS in our study population. Genetic case-control study from multiple gynecological centers from Hyderabad, a cosmopolitan city in South India. The study involved 204 women with PCOS and 204 healthy, sex-, and age-matched controls. Anthropometric and biochemical profiles were taken in a well-designed pro forma. Isolation of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and genotype analysis were done for the entire study population using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method followed by 12% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In this study, we have demonstrated an association between LHCGR (rs2293275) polymorphism and PCOS. The frequency of the G allele was 0.60 in PCOS and 0.49 in controls (odds ratio [OR] 1.531, confidence interval [CI] 1.16-2.01, and p-value=0.0026), which indicates that the G allele is associated with PCOS in our population. The GG genotype conferred a significant risk of developing PCOS (OR 3.36, CI 1.96-5.75, and p-value<0.0001). We found a significant association of the GG allele with body-mass index, waist to hip ratio, insulin resistance, LH, and LH/follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) ratio in PCOS when compared with controls. The AA allele showed high basal FSH levels. This study suggests that LHCGR (rs2293275) polymorphism is associated with PCOS and could be used as a relevant molecular marker to identify women with the risk of developing PCOS in our population and may provide an understanding about the etiology of PCOS.

  18. New splice site acceptor mutation in AIRE gene in autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireia Mora

    Full Text Available Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 (APS-1, OMIM 240300 is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by the presence of at least two of three major diseases: hypoparathyroidism, Addison's disease, and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. We aim to identify the molecular defects and investigate the clinical and mutational characteristics in an index case and other members of a consanguineous family. We identified a novel homozygous mutation in the splice site acceptor (SSA of intron 5 (c.653-1G>A in two siblings with different clinical outcomes of APS-1. Coding DNA sequencing revealed that this AIRE mutation potentially compromised the recognition of the constitutive SSA of intron 5, splicing upstream onto a nearby cryptic SSA in intron 5. Surprisingly, the use of an alternative SSA entails the uncovering of a cryptic donor splice site in exon 5. This new transcript generates a truncated protein (p.A214fs67X containing the first 213 amino acids and followed by 68 aberrant amino acids. The mutation affects the proper splicing, not only at the acceptor but also at the donor splice site, highlighting the complexity of recognizing suitable splicing sites and the importance of sequencing the intron-exon junctions for a more precise molecular diagnosis and correct genetic counseling. As both siblings were carrying the same mutation but exhibited a different APS-1 onset, and one of the brothers was not clinically diagnosed, our finding highlights the possibility to suspect mutations in the AIRE gene in cases of childhood chronic candidiasis and/or hypoparathyroidism otherwise unexplained, especially when the phenotype is associated with other autoimmune diseases.

  19. SEMA3A, a gene involved in axonal pathfinding, is mutated in patients with Kallmann syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanchate, Naresh Kumar; Giacobini, Paolo; Lhuillier, Pierre; Parkash, Jyoti; Espy, Cécile; Fouveaut, Corinne; Leroy, Chrystel; Baron, Stéphanie; Campagne, Céline; Vanacker, Charlotte; Collier, Francis; Cruaud, Corinne; Meyer, Vincent; García-Piñero, Alfons; Dewailly, Didier; Cortet-Rudelli, Christine; Gersak, Ksenija; Metz, Chantal; Chabrier, Gérard; Pugeat, Michel; Young, Jacques; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Prevot, Vincent; Dodé, Catherine

    2012-08-01

    Kallmann syndrome (KS) associates congenital hypogonadism due to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) deficiency and anosmia. The genetics of KS involves various modes of transmission, including oligogenic inheritance. Here, we report that Nrp1(sema/sema) mutant mice that lack a functional semaphorin-binding domain in neuropilin-1, an obligatory coreceptor of semaphorin-3A, have a KS-like phenotype. Pathohistological analysis of these mice indeed showed abnormal development of the peripheral olfactory system and defective embryonic migration of the neuroendocrine GnRH cells to the basal forebrain, which results in increased mortality of newborn mice and reduced fertility in adults. We thus screened 386 KS patients for the presence of mutations in SEMA3A (by Sanger sequencing of all 17 coding exons and flanking splice sites) and identified nonsynonymous mutations in 24 patients, specifically, a frameshifting small deletion (D538fsX31) and seven different missense mutations (R66W, N153S, I400V, V435I, T688A, R730Q, R733H). All the mutations were found in heterozygous state. Seven mutations resulted in impaired secretion of semaphorin-3A by transfected COS-7 cells (D538fsX31, R66W, V435I) or reduced signaling activity of the secreted protein in the GN11 cell line derived from embryonic GnRH cells (N153S, I400V, T688A, R733H), which strongly suggests that these mutations have a pathogenic effect. Notably, mutations in other KS genes had already been identified, in heterozygous state, in five of these patients. Our findings indicate that semaphorin-3A signaling insufficiency contributes to the pathogenesis of KS and further substantiate the oligogenic pattern of inheritance in this developmental disorder.

  20. SEMA3A, a gene involved in axonal pathfinding, is mutated in patients with Kallmann syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh Kumar Hanchate

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Kallmann syndrome (KS associates congenital hypogonadism due to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH deficiency and anosmia. The genetics of KS involves various modes of transmission, including oligogenic inheritance. Here, we report that Nrp1(sema/sema mutant mice that lack a functional semaphorin-binding domain in neuropilin-1, an obligatory coreceptor of semaphorin-3A, have a KS-like phenotype. Pathohistological analysis of these mice indeed showed abnormal development of the peripheral olfactory system and defective embryonic migration of the neuroendocrine GnRH cells to the basal forebrain, which results in increased mortality of newborn mice and reduced fertility in adults. We thus screened 386 KS patients for the presence of mutations in SEMA3A (by Sanger sequencing of all 17 coding exons and flanking splice sites and identified nonsynonymous mutations in 24 patients, specifically, a frameshifting small deletion (D538fsX31 and seven different missense mutations (R66W, N153S, I400V, V435I, T688A, R730Q, R733H. All the mutations were found in heterozygous state. Seven mutations resulted in impaired secretion of semaphorin-3A by transfected COS-7 cells (D538fsX31, R66W, V435I or reduced signaling activity of the secreted protein in the GN11 cell line derived from embryonic GnRH cells (N153S, I400V, T688A, R733H, which strongly suggests that these mutations have a pathogenic effect. Notably, mutations in other KS genes had already been identified, in heterozygous state, in five of these patients. Our findings indicate that semaphorin-3A signaling insufficiency contributes to the pathogenesis of KS and further substantiate the oligogenic pattern of inheritance in this developmental disorder.

  1. A common polymorphism in a Williams syndrome gene predicts amygdala reactivity and extraversion in healthy adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Johnna R.; Waller, Rebecca; Bogdan, Ryan; Knodt, Annchen R.; Sabhlok, Aditi; Hyde, Luke W.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic disorder resulting from hemizygous microdeletion of chromosome 7q11.23, has emerged as a model for identifying the genetic architecture of socioemotional behavior. Recently, common polymorphisms in GTF2I, which is found within the WS microdeletion, have been associated with reduced social anxiety in the general population. Identifying neural phenotypes affected by these polymorphisms will help advance our understanding not only of this specific genetic association but also the broader neurogenetic mechanisms of variability in socioemotional behavior. Methods Through an ongoing parent protocol, the Duke Neurogenetics Study, we measured threat-related amygdala reactivity to fearful and angry facial expressions using functional MRI (fMRI), assessed trait personality using the Revised NEO Personality Inventory, and imputed GTF2I rs13227433 from saliva-derived DNA using custom Illumina arrays. Participants included 808 non-Hispanic Caucasian, African American, and Asian university students. Resul