WorldWideScience

Sample records for low-temperature gaseous surface

  1. Low temperature gaseous surface hardening of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The present contribution gives an overview of some of the technological aspects of low temperature thermochemical treatment of stainless steel. Examples of low temperature gaseous nitriding, carburising and nitrocarburising of stainless steel are presented and discussed. In particular......, the morphology, microstructure and characteristics of so-called expanite “layers” on stainless steel are addressed....

  2. Influence of Plastic Deformation on Low Temperature Surface Hardening of Austenitic Stainless Steel by Gaseous Nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottoli, Federico; Winther, Grethe; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses an investigation of the influence of plastic deformation on low temperature surface hardening by gaseous nitriding of two commercial austenitic stainless steels: AISI 304 and EN 1.4369. The materials were plastically deformed to different equivalent strains by uniaxial...... demonstrate that a case of expanded austenite develops and that, in particular, strain-induced martensite has a large influence on the nitrided zone....

  3. Influence of plastic deformation on low temperature surface hardening of stainless steel by gaseous nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottoli, Federico; Winther, Grethe; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses an investigation of the influence of plastic deformation on low temperature surface hardening by gaseous nitriding of three commercial austenitic stainless steels: AISI 304, EN 1.4369 and Sandvik Nanoflex® with various degrees of austenite stability. The materials were...... analysis, reflected light microscopy and microhardness indentation. The results demonstrate that a case of expanded austenite develops and that, in particular, the presence of strain-induced martensite in the initial (deformed) microstructure has a large influence on the nitrided zone....

  4. Influence of Plastic Deformation on Low Temperature Surface Hardening of Austenitic and Precipitation Hardening Stainless Steels by Gaseous Nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottoli, Federico; Winther, Grethe; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses an investigation of the influence of plastic deformation on low temperature surface hardening by gaseous nitriding of three commercial austenitic stainless steels: AISI 304, EN 1.4369 and Sandvik Nanoflex® with various degrees of austenite stability. The materials were...... case included X-ray diffraction analysis, reflected light microscopy and microhardness. The results demonstrate that a case of expanded austenite develops and that, in particular, strain-induced martensite has a large influence on the nitrided zone....

  5. Influence of Plastic Deformation on Low-Temperature Surface Hardening of Austenitic Stainless Steel by Gaseous Nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottoli, Federico; Winther, Grethe; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses an investigation of the influence of plastic deformation on low-temperature surface hardening by gaseous nitriding of two commercial stainless steels: EN 1.4369 and AISI 304. The materials were plastically deformed to several levels of equivalent strain by conventional......, reflected-light microscopy, and microhardness testing. The results demonstrate that a case of expanded austenite develops and that the presence of plastic deformation has a significant influence on the morphology of the nitrided case. The presence of strain-induced martensite favors the formation of Cr...

  6. Low-temperature gaseous surface hardening of stainless steel: the current status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2009-01-01

    a hardened case at the surface, while maintaining the superior corrosion performance. This can be achieved by dissolving colossal amounts of nitrogen and/or carbon without forming nitrides and/or carbides, thus developing so-called expanded austenite. The present work gives an overview over results obtained...... on homogeneous expanded austenite and covers the crystallography for nitrogen- and carbon-stabilised expanded austenite, the solubility for nitrogen and carbon, the diffusion of these interstitials as well as the stability of expanded austenite with respect to nitride and carbide formation. Subsequently...

  7. Low temperature gaseous nitriding of Ni based superalloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasen, K. M.; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    In the present work the nitriding response of selected Ni based superalloys at low temperatures is addressed. The alloys investigated are nimonic series nos. 80, 90, 95 and 100 and nichrome (Ni/Cr......In the present work the nitriding response of selected Ni based superalloys at low temperatures is addressed. The alloys investigated are nimonic series nos. 80, 90, 95 and 100 and nichrome (Ni/Cr...

  8. Low temperature surface chemistry and nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, G. B.; Shabatina, T. I.

    2002-03-01

    The new scientific field of low temperature surface chemistry, which combines the low temperature chemistry (cryochemistry) and surface chemistry approaches, is reviewed in this paper. One of the most exciting achievements in this field of science is the development of methods to create highly ordered hybrid nanosized structures on different organic and inorganic surfaces and to encapsulate nanosized metal particles in organic and polymer matrices. We consider physical and chemical behaviour for the systems obtained by co-condensation of the components vapours on the surfaces cooled down to 4-10 and 70-100 K. In particular the size effect of both types, the number of atoms in the reactive species structure and the thickness of growing co-condensate film, on the chemical activity of the system is analysed in detail. The effect of the internal mechanical stresses on the growing interfacial co-condensate film formation and on the generation of fast (explosive) spontaneous reactions at low temperatures is discussed. The examples of unusual chemical interactions of metal atoms, clusters and nanosized particles, obtained in co-condensate films on the cooled surfaces under different conditions, are presented. The examples of highly ordered surface and volume hybrid nanostructures formation are analysed.

  9. The development of gaseous detectors with solid photocathodes for low temperature applications

    CERN Document Server

    Periale, L.; Iacobaeus, C.; Francke, T.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Pavlopoulos, N.; Picchi, P.; Pietropaolo, F.

    2004-01-01

    There are several applications and fundamental research areas which require the detection of VUV light at cryogenic temperatures. For these applications we have developed and successfully tested special designs of gaseous detectors with solid photocathodes able to operate at low temperatures: sealed gaseous detectors with MgF2 windows and windowless detectors. We have experimentally demonstrated, that both primary and secondary (due to the avalanche multiplication inside liquids) scintillation lights could be recorded by photosensitive gaseous detectors. The results of this work may allow one to significantly improve the operation of some noble liquid gas TPCs.

  10. Low Temperature Surface Carburization of Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Sunniva R; Heuer, Arthur H; Sikka, Vinod K

    2007-12-07

    Low-temperature colossal supersaturation (LTCSS) is a novel surface hardening method for carburization of austenitic stainless steels (SS) without the precipitation of carbides. The formation of carbides is kinetically suppressed, enabling extremely high or colossal carbon supersaturation. As a result, surface carbon concentrations in excess of 12 at. % are routinely achieved. This treatment increases the surface hardness by a factor of four to five, improving resistance to wear, corrosion, and fatigue, with significant retained ductility. LTCSS is a diffusional surface hardening process that provides a uniform and conformal hardened gradient surface with no risk of delamination or peeling. The treatment retains the austenitic phase and is completely non-magnetic. In addition, because parts are treated at low temperature, they do not distort or change dimensions. During this treatment, carbon diffusion proceeds into the metal at temperatures that constrain substitutional diffusion or mobility between the metal alloy elements. Though immobilized and unable to assemble to form carbides, chromium and similar alloying elements nonetheless draw enormous amounts of carbon into their interstitial spaces. The carbon in the interstitial spaces of the alloy crystals makes the surface harder than ever achieved before by more conventional heat treating or diffusion process. The carbon solid solution manifests a Vickers hardness often exceeding 1000 HV (equivalent to 70 HRC). This project objective was to extend the LTCSS treatment to other austenitic alloys, and to quantify improvements in fatigue, corrosion, and wear resistance. Highlights from the research include the following: • Extension of the applicability of the LTCSS process to a broad range of austenitic and duplex grades of steels • Demonstration of LTCSS ability for a variety of different component shapes and sizes • Detailed microstructural characterization of LTCSS-treated samples of 316L and other alloys

  11. Low Temperature Gaseous Nitriding of a Stainless Steel Containing Strong Nitride Formers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    Low temperature thermochemical surface hardening of the precipitation hardening austenitic stainless steel A286 in solution treated state was investigated. A286 contains, besides high amounts of Cr, also substantial amounts of strong nitride formers as Ti, Al and V. It is shown that simultaneous...

  12. Low-temperature plasma techniques in surface modification of biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Xiangfen; Xie Hankun; Zhang Jing

    2002-01-01

    Since synthetic polymers usually can not meet the biocompatibility and bio-functional demands of the human body, surface treatment is a prerequisite for them to be used as biomaterials. A very effective surface modification method, plasma treatment, is introduced. By immobilizing the bio-active molecules with low temperature plasma, polymer surfaces can be modified to fully satisfy the requirements of biomaterials

  13. Solitary ionizing surface waves on low-temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirov, S.V.; Yu, M.Y.

    1993-01-01

    It is demonstrated that at the boundary of semi-infinite low-temperature plasma new types of localized ionizing surface wave structures can propagate. The solitary waves are described by an evolution equation similar to the KdV equation, but the solutions differ considerably from that of the latter

  14. Low-temperature carbonization of bituminous coal for the production of solid, liquid, and gaseous fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1942-01-01

    Properties and uses of low-temperature coke for producing ferrosilicon, CaC/sub 2/ generator gas and water gas, as a fuel for boilers and household use and as a diluent for coking coal, and the properties and uses of low-temperature tar, gasoline, gas, and liquefied gas are described. By using a circulating gas, it is possible to obtain in low-temperature carbonization of bituminous coal a fuel oil for the navy. Aging-test data of such an oil are given. Several plants in Upper Silesia, using the Lurgi circulation process are producing a fuel oil that meets specification.

  15. Low temperature self-cleaning properties of superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fajun; Shen, Taohua; Li, Changquan; Li, Wen; Yan, Guilong

    2014-10-01

    Outdoor surfaces are usually dirty surfaces. Ice accretion on outdoor surfaces could lead to serious accidents. In the present work, the superhydrophobic surface based on 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-Perfluorodecanethiol (PFDT) modified Ag/PDMS composite was prepared to investigate the anti-icing property and self-cleaning property at temperatures below freezing point. The superhydrophobic surface was deliberately polluted with activated carbon before testing. It was observed that water droplet picked up dusts on the cold superhydrophobic surface and took it away without freezing at a measuring temperature of -10 °C. While on a smooth PFDT surface and a rough surface base on Ag/PDMS composite without PFDT modification, water droplets accumulated and then froze quickly at the same temperature. However, at even lower temperature of -12 °C, the superhydrophobic surface could not prevent the surface water from icing. In addition, it was observed that the frost layer condensed from the moisture pay an important role in determining the low temperature self-cleaning properties of a superhydrophobic surface.

  16. Production of jet fuel range paraffins by low temperature polymerization of gaseous light olefins using ionic liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Peiwen; Wu, Xiaoping; Zhu, Lijuan; Jin, Feng; Liu, Junxu; Xia, Tongyan; Wang, Tiejun; Li, Quanxin

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A novel catalytic transformation of light olefins into jet fuel range iso-paraffins by the low-temperature olefin polymerizations under atmospheric conditions. - Highlights: • A novel transformation of light olefins to jet fuel range paraffins was demonstrated. • The synthetic fuels can be produced by atmospheric olefin polymerizations. • C 8 –C 15 iso-paraffins from light olefins was achieved with a selectivity of 80.6%. - Abstract: This work demonstrated a novel catalytic transformation of gaseous olefins into jet fuel range iso-paraffins by the low-temperature olefin polymerizations under atmospheric conditions. The production of the desired C 8 –C 15 iso-paraffins with the selectivity of 80.6 C mol% was achieved by the room-temperature polymerizations of gaseous light olefins using the [BMIM] Al 2 Cl 7 ionic liquid. The influences of the reaction conditions on the olefinic polymerizations were investigated in detail. The properties of hydrocarbons in the synthetic fuels were determined by the GC–MS analyses combined with 1 H NMR, and 13 C NMR analyses. The formation of C 8 –C 15 hydrocarbons from gaseous light olefins was illustrated by the identified products and the functional groups. This transformation potentially provides a useful avenue for the production of the most important components of iso-paraffins required in jet fuels.

  17. Extremely low temperature behaviour of the thermodynamical properties of gaseous UF6 under an exact quantum approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amarante, J.A.A. do.

    1979-10-01

    The thermodynamic functions of molecules of type XF 6 are calculated under an exact quantum-mechanical approach, which also yields general expressions valid for other types of molecules. The formalism is used to analyse the behavior of gaseous UF 6 at very low temperatures (around and below 1 0 K), where symmetry effects due to Pauli principle lead to results which are very markedly different from those obtained with the semi-classical approximation. It is shown that this approximation becomes sufficiently accurate only for temperatures about ten times the rotational temperature. (Author) [pt

  18. Laser spectroscopy of Ag atoms in liquid helium and gaseous helium at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hui, Q.; Persson, J. L.; Jakubek, Z. J.; Takami, M.

    1998-01-01

    Neutral Ag atoms are dispersed in liquid and gaseous helium by laser ablation and dissociation. Following the excitation of the D2 line, a broad emission band is observed to the red side of the D1 emission line. This band is assigned to the A 2 Π 3/2 → X 2 Σ + bound-free transition of the AgHe 2 exciplex. The assignment has been confirmed by an ab initio calculation on the AgHe 2 complex. The temperature and the pressure dependences of the D1 emission and the broad emission in the gas phase indicate that the 4d 9 5s 2 2 D 5/2 level may play an important role in the 5p 2 P 3/2 → 5p 2 1/2 non-radiative relaxation and the exciplex formation processes

  19. submitter Superconducting instrumentation for high Reynolds turbulence experiments with low temperature gaseous helium

    CERN Document Server

    Pietropinto, S; Baudet, C; Castaing, B; Chabaud, B; Gagne, Y; Hébral, B; Ladam, Y; Lebrun, P; Pirotte, O; Roche, P

    2003-01-01

    Turbulence is of common experience and of high interest for industrial applications, despite its physical grounds is still not understood. Cryogenic gaseous helium gives access to extremely high Reynolds numbers (Re). We describe an instrumentation hosted in CERN, which provides a 6 kW @ 4.5 K helium refrigerator directly connected to the experiment. The flow is a round jet; the flow rates range from 20 g/s up to 260 g/s at 4.8 K and about 1.2 bar, giving access to the highest controlled Re flow ever developed. The experimental challenge lies in the range of scales which have to be investigated: from the smallest viscous scale η, typically 1 μm at Re=107 to the largest L∼10 cm. The corresponding frequencies: f=v/η can be as large as 1 MHz. The development of an original micrometric superconducting anemometer using a hot spot and its characteristics will be discussed together with its operation and the perspectives associated with superconducting anemometry.

  20. Low Friction Surfaces for Low Temperature Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Lunar and other extraterrestrial environments put extreme demands on moving mechanical components. Gears must continue to function and surfaces must continue to...

  1. Surface characterization of low-temperature grown yttrium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Mirosław; Lisowski, Wojciech; Pisarek, Marcin; Nikiforow, Kostiantyn; Jablonski, Aleksander

    2018-04-01

    The step-by-step growth of yttrium oxide layer was controlled in situ using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The O/Y atomic concentration (AC) ratio in the surface layer of finally oxidized Y substrate was found to be equal to 1.48. The as-grown yttrium oxide layers were then analyzed ex situ using combination of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), elastic-peak electron spectroscopy (EPES) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in order to characterize their surface chemical composition, electron transport phenomena and surface morphology. Prior to EPES measurements, the Y oxide surface was pre-sputtered by 3 kV argon ions, and the resulting AES-derived composition was found to be Y0.383O0.465C0.152 (O/Y AC ratio of 1.21). The SEM images revealed different surface morphology of sample before and after Ar sputtering. The oxide precipitates were observed on the top of un-sputtered Y oxide layer, whereas the oxide growth at the Ar ion-sputtered surface proceeded along defects lines normal to the layer plane. The inelastic mean free path (IMFP) characterizing electron transport was evaluated as a function of energy in the range of 0.5-2 keV from the EPES method. Two reference materials (Ni and Au) were used in these measurements. Experimental IMFPs determined for the Y0.383O0.465C0.152 and Y2O3 surface compositions, λ, were uncorrected for surface excitations and approximated by the simple function λ = kEp at electron energies E between 500 eV and 2000 eV, where k and p were fitted parameters. These values were also compared with IMFPs resulting from the TPP-2 M predictive equation for both oxide compositions. The fitted functions were found to be reasonably consistent with the measured and predicted IMFPs. In both cases, the average value of the mean percentage deviation from the fits varied between 5% and 37%. The IMFPs measured for Y0.383O0.465C0.152 surface composition were found to be similar to the IMFPs for Y2O3.

  2. New Stainless Steel Alloys for Low Temperature Surface Hardening?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The present contribution showcases the possibility for developing new surface hardenable stainless steels containing strong nitride/carbide forming elements (SNCFE). Nitriding of the commercial alloys, austenitic A286, and ferritic AISI 409 illustrates the beneficial effect of having SNCFE presen...

  3. Low temperature surface hardening of stainless steel; the role of plastic deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottoli, Federico; Jespersen, Freja Nygaard; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    : - plastic deformation of metastable austenitic stainless steels leads to the development of strain-induced martensite, which compromises the uniformity and the homogeneity of the expanded austenite zone. - during low temperature surface engineering composition and stress profiles develop. On numerical......Thermochemical surface engineering by nitriding of austenitic stainless steel transforms the surface zone into expanded austenite, which improves the wear resistance of the stainless steel while preserving the stainless behavior. As a consequence of the thermochemical surface engineering, huge...

  4. Sound absorption of low-temperature reusable surface insulation candidate materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    Sound absorption data from tests of four candidate low-temperature reusable surface insulation materials are presented. Limitations on the use of the data are discussed, conclusions concerning the effective absorption of the materials are drawn, and the relative significance to Vibration and Acoustic Test Facility test planning of the absorption of each material is assessed.

  5. Atomic species recognition on oxide surfaces using low temperature scanning probe microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Zong Min, E-mail: mzmncit@163.com [National Key Laboratory for Electronic Measurement Technology, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); Key Laboratory of Instrumentation Science & Dynamic Measurement, North University of China, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); School of Instrument and Electronics, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); Shi, Yun Bo; Mu, Ji Liang; Qu, Zhang; Zhang, Xiao Ming; Qin, Li [National Key Laboratory for Electronic Measurement Technology, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); Key Laboratory of Instrumentation Science & Dynamic Measurement, North University of China, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); School of Instrument and Electronics, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); Liu, Jun, E-mail: liuj@nuc.edu.cn [National Key Laboratory for Electronic Measurement Technology, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); Key Laboratory of Instrumentation Science & Dynamic Measurement, North University of China, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan, 030051 (China); School of Instrument and Electronics, North University of China, Taiyuan, 030051 (China)

    2017-02-01

    Highlights: • The coexisted phase of p(2 × 1)and c(6 × 2) on Cu(110)-O surface using AFM under UHV at low temperature. • Two different c(6 × 2) phase depending on the status of the tip apex. • Electronic state of tip seriously effect the resolution and stability of the sample surface. - Abstract: In scanning probe microscopy (SPM), the chemical properties and sharpness of the tips of the cantilever greatly influence the scanning of a sample surface. Variation in the chemical properties of the sharp tip apex can induce transformation of the SPM images. In this research, we explore the relationship between the tip and the structure of a sample surface using dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) on a Cu(110)-O surface under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) at low temperature (78 K). We observed two different c(6 × 2) phase types in which super-Cu atoms show as a bright spot when the tip apex is of O atoms and O atoms show as a bright spot when the tip apex is of Cu atoms. We also found that the electronic state of the tip has a serious effect on the resolution and stability of the sample surface, and provide an explanation for these phenomena. This technique can be used to identify atom species on sample surfaces, and represents an important development in the SPM technique.

  6. Microstructure and initial growth characteristics of the low temperature microcrystalline silicon films on silicon nitride surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Young-Bae; Rhee, Shi-Woo

    2001-01-01

    Microstructure and initial growth characteristics of the hydrogenated microcrystalline Si (μc-Si:H) films grown on hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiN x :H) surface at low temperature were investigated using high resolution transmission electron microscope and micro-Raman spectroscopy. With increasing the Si and Si - H contents in the SiN x :H surfaces, μc-Si crystallites, a few nanometers in size, were directly grown on amorphous nitride surfaces. It is believed that the crystallites were grown through the nucleation and phase transition from amorphous to crystal in a hydrogen-rich ambient of gas phase and growing surface. The crystallite growth characteristics on the dielectric surface were dependent on the stoichiometric (x=N/Si) ratio corresponding hydrogen bond configuration of the SiN x :H surface. Surface facetting and anisotropic growth of the Si crystallites resulted from the different growth rate on the different lattice planes of Si. No twins and stacking faults were observed in the (111) lattice planes of the Si crystallites surrounding the a-Si matrix. This atomic-scale structure was considered to be the characteristic of the low temperature crystallization of the μc-Si:H by the strain relaxation of crystallites in the a-Si:H matrix. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  7. Surface single-molecule dynamics controlled by entropy at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrig, J. C.; Penedo, M.; Parschau, M.; Schwenk, J.; Marioni, M. A.; Hudson, E. W.; Hug, H. J.

    2017-02-01

    Configuration transitions of individual molecules and atoms on surfaces are traditionally described using an Arrhenius equation with energy barrier and pre-exponential factor (attempt rate) parameters. Characteristic parameters can vary even for identical systems, and pre-exponential factors sometimes differ by orders of magnitude. Using low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) to measure an individual dibutyl sulfide molecule on Au(111), we show that the differences arise when the relative position of tip apex and molecule changes by a fraction of the molecule size. Altering the tip position on that scale modifies the transition's barrier and attempt rate in a highly correlated fashion, which results in a single-molecular enthalpy-entropy compensation. Conversely, appropriately positioning the STM tip allows selecting the operating point on the compensation line and modifying the transition rates. The results highlight the need to consider entropy in transition rates of single molecules, even at low temperatures.

  8. Surface Damage and Treatment by Impact of a Low Temperature Nitrogen Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laribou, Hicham; Fressengeas, Claude; Entemeyer, Denis; Jeanclaude, Véronique; Tazibt, Abdel

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen jets under high pressure and low temperature have been introduced recently. The process consists in projecting onto a surface a low temperature jet obtained from releasing the liquid nitrogen stored in a high pressure tank (e.g. 3000 bars) through a nozzle. It can be used in a range of industrial applications, including surface treatment or material removal through cutting, drilling, striping and cleaning. The process does not generate waste other than the removed matter, and it only releases neutral gas into the atmosphere. This work is aimed at understanding the mechanisms of the interaction between the jet and the material surface. Depending on the impacted material, the thermo-mechanical shock and blast effect induced by the jet can activate a wide range of damage mechanisms, including cleavage, crack nucleation and spalling, as well as void expansion and localized ductile failure. The test parameters (standoff distance, dwell time, operating pressure) play a role in selecting the dominant damage mechanism, but combinations of these various modes are usually present. Surface treatment through phase transformation or grain fragmentation in a layer below the surface can also be obtained by adequate tuning of the process parameters. In the current study, work is undertaken to map the damage mechanisms in metallic materials as well as the influence of the test parameters on damage, along with measurements of the thermo-mechanical conditions (impact force, temperature) in the impacted area.

  9. SiGe Based Low Temperature Electronics for Lunar Surface Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojarradi, Mohammad M.; Kolawa, Elizabeth; Blalock, Benjamin; Cressler, John

    2012-01-01

    The temperature at the permanently shadowed regions of the moon's surface is approximately -240 C. Other areas of the lunar surface experience temperatures that vary between 120 C and -180 C during the day and night respectively. To protect against the large temperature variations of the moon surface, traditional electronics used in lunar robotics systems are placed inside a thermally controlled housing which is bulky, consumes power and adds complexity to the integration and test. SiGe Based electronics have the capability to operate over wide temperature range like that of the lunar surface. Deploying low temperature SiGe electronics in a lander platform can minimize the need for the central thermal protection system and enable the development of a new generation of landers and mobility platforms with highly efficient distributed architecture. For the past five years a team consisting of NASA, university and industry researchers has been examining the low temperature and wide temperature characteristic of SiGe based transistors for developing electronics for wide temperature needs of NASA environments such as the Moon, Titan, Mars and Europa. This presentation reports on the status of the development of wide temperature SiGe based electronics for the landers and lunar surface mobility systems.

  10. Tuning of perovskite solar cell performance via low-temperature brookite scaffolds surface modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trilok Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The nature of metal oxide scaffold played a pivotal role for the growth of high quality perovskites and subsequently facilitates efficient photovoltaics devices. We demonstrate an effective way to fabricate a low-temperature TiO2 brookite scaffold layer with a uniform and pinhole-free layer for enhancing photovoltaic properties of perovskite solar cells. Various concentrations of TiCl4 were used to modify brookite TiO2 for efficient charge generation and fast charge extraction. We observed that the brookite layer with an appropriate TiCl4 treatment possesses a smooth surface with full coverage of the substrates, whereas TiCl4 treatment further improves the contact of the TiO2/perovskite interface which facilitates charge extraction and drastically influenced charge recombination. The surface treated brookite scaffolds perovskite devices showed an improved performance with an average power conversion efficiency more than 17%. The time resolved photoluminescence showed that the treated samples have obvious effect on the charge carrier dynamics. The striking observation of this study was very low appearance of hysteresis and high reproducibility in the treated samples, which opens up the possibilities for the fabrication of high efficient devices at relatively low temperatures with negligible hysteresis via facile surface modifications.

  11. Low temperature formation of electrode having electrically conductive metal oxide surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Simone; Anders, Andre; Brown, Ian G.; McLarnon, Frank R.; Kong, Fanping

    1998-01-01

    A low temperature process is disclosed for forming metal suboxides on substrates by cathodic arc deposition by either controlling the pressure of the oxygen present in the deposition chamber, or by controlling the density of the metal flux, or by a combination of such adjustments, to thereby control the ratio of oxide to metal in the deposited metal suboxide coating. The density of the metal flux may, in turn, be adjusted by controlling the discharge current of the arc, by adjusting the pulse length (duration of on cycle) of the arc, and by adjusting the frequency of the arc, or any combination of these parameters. In a preferred embodiment, a low temperature process is disclosed for forming an electrically conductive metal suboxide, such as, for example, an electrically conductive suboxide of titanium, on an electrode surface, such as the surface of a nickel oxide electrode, by such cathodic arc deposition and control of the deposition parameters. In the preferred embodiment, the process results in a titanium suboxide-coated nickel oxide electrode exhibiting reduced parasitic evolution of oxygen during charging of a cell made using such an electrode as the positive electrode, as well as exhibiting high oxygen overpotential, resulting in suppression of oxygen evolution at the electrode at full charge of the cell.

  12. Surface characterization of polyethylene terephthalate films treated by ammonia low-temperature plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Zhiwen; Ren Li; Feng Wenjiang; Zhai Zhichen; Wang Yingjun

    2012-01-01

    In order to study the surface characterization and protein adhesion behavior of polyethylene terephthalate film, low temperature ammonia plasma was used to modify the film. Effects of plasma conditions of the surface structures and properties were investigated. Results indicated that surface hydrophilicity of polyethylene terephthalate was significantly improved by ammonia plasma treatment. Ammonia plasma played the role more important than air treatment in the process of modification. Furthermore, by Fourier Transform Infrared spectra some new bonds such as -N=O and N-H which could result in the improvement of the surface hydrophilicity were successfully grafted on the film surface. Atom force microscope experiments indicated that more protein adsorbed on hydrophobic surfaces than hydrophilic ones, and the blobs arranged in a straight line at etching surface by plasma. Modified membrane after ammonia plasma treatment had a good cell affinity and could be effective in promoting the adhesion and growth of cells on the material surface. Timeliness experiments showed that the plasma treatment gave the material a certain performance only in a short period of time and the hydrophobicity recovered after 12 days.

  13. Surface modification of superaustenitic and maraging stainless steels by low-temperature gas-phase carburization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentil, Johannes

    Low-temperature gas-phase carburization of 316L austenitic stainless steel was developed in recent years by the Swagelok company. This process generates great mechanical and electrochemical surface properties. Hardness, wear resistance, fatigue behavior, and corrosion resistance are dramatically improved, while the formation of carbides is effectively suppressed. This new technique is of technical, economical, but especially of scientific interest because the surface properties of common stainless steel can be enhanced to a level of more sophisticated and more expensive superalloys. The consequential continuation of previous research is the application of the carburization process to other steel grades. Differences in chemical composition, microstructure, and passivity between the various alloys may cause technical problems and it is expected that the initial process needs to be optimized for every specific material. This study presents results of low-temperature carburization of AL-6XN (superaustenitic stainless steel) and PH13-8Mo (precipitation-hardened martensitic stainless steel). Both alloys have been treated successfully in terms of creating a hardened surface by introducing high amounts of interstitially dissolved carbon. The surface hardness of AL-6XN was increased to 12GPa and is correlated with a colossal carbon supersaturation at the surface of up to 20 at.%. The hardened case develops a carburization time-dependent thickness between 10mum after one carburization cycle and up to 35mum after four treatments and remains highly ductile. Substantial broadening of X-ray diffraction peaks in low-temperature carburized superaustenitic stainless steels are attributed to the generation of very large compressive biaxial residual stresses. Those large stresses presumably cause relaxations of the surface, so-called undulations. Heavily expanded regions of carburized AL-6XN turn ferromagnetic. Non-carburized AL-6XN is known for its outstanding corrosion resistance

  14. Low Temperature Scanning Force Microscopy of the Si(111)-( 7x7) Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lantz, M. A.; Hug, H. J.; Schendel, P. J. A. van; Hoffmann, R.; Martin, S.; Baratoff, A.; Abdurixit, A.; Guentherodt, H.-J.; Gerber, Ch.

    2000-01-01

    A low temperature scanning force microscope (SFM) operating in a dynamic mode in ultrahigh vacuum was used to study the Si(111)-(7x7) surface at 7.2 K. Not only the twelve adatoms but also the six rest atoms of the unit cell are clearly resolved for the first time with SFM. In addition, the first measurements of the short range chemical bonding forces above specific atomic sites are presented. The data are in good agreement with first principles computations and indicate that the nearest atoms in the tip and sample relax significantly when the tip is within a few Angstrom of the surface. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  15. A method of surface area measurement of fuel materials by fission gas release at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaimal, K.N.G.; Naik, M.C.; Paul, A.R.; Venkateswarlu, K.S.

    1989-01-01

    The present report deals with the development of a method for surface area measurement of nuclear fuel as well as fissile doped materials by fission gas release study at low temperature. The method is based on the evaluation of knock-out release rate of fission 133 Xe from irradiated fuel after sufficient cooling to decay the short lived activity. The report also describes the fabrication of an ampoule breaker unit for such study. Knock-out release rate of 133 Xe has been studied from UO 2 powders having varying surface area 'S' ranging from 270 cm 2 /gm to 4100 cm 2 /gm at two fissioning rates 10 12 f/cm 3 . sec. and 3.2x10 10 f/cm.sec. A relation between K and A has been established and discussed in this report. (author). 6 refs

  16. Enhanced adhesion between carbon nanotubes and substrate surfaces by low-temperature annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Chi Woong; Byun, Young Tae; Woo, Deok Ha; Lee, Seok; Jhon, Young Min

    2012-01-01

    We enhanced the adhesion forces between carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the substrate surface by using a low-temperature annealing process at 180 .deg. C for 300 s to protect the CNTs throughout the processes in photolithography for fabricating CNT-based devices, especially ion and bio sensors which are always exposed to liquids. The adhesion force was tested by using the adhesion durability test of soaking the fabricated CNT field effect transistors (CNT-FETs) in de-ionized water at room temperature for 300 s, and the adsorption quantities of CNTs were analyzed by using I - V measurements on the CNT-FETs before and after each adhesion durability test. The conductance change of the CNT-FETs fabricated with the annealing process was considerably decreased by more than a factor of 10 5 compared to that without the annealing process, implying that CNTs adhere much more strongly to the substrate after the annealing process.

  17. Modelling of composition and stress profiles in low temperature surface engineered stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Freja Nygaard; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    temperature, time and gas composition is a prerequisite for targeted process optimization. A realistic model to simulate the developing case has to take the following influences on composition and stress into account: - a concentration dependent diffusion coefficient - trapping of nitrogen by chromium atoms...... stresses are introduced in the developing case, arising from the volume expansion that accompanies the dissolution of high interstitial contents in expanded austenite. Modelling of the composition and stress profiles developing during low temperature surface engineering from the processing parameters...... - the effect of residual stress on diffusive flux - the effect of residual stress on solubility of interstitials - plastic accommodation of residual stress. The effect of all these contributions on composition and stress profiles will be addressed....

  18. Sensitivity of Mesoporous CoSb2O6 Nanoparticles to Gaseous CO and C3H8 at Low Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Guillén-Bonilla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous CoSb2O6 nanoparticles, synthesized through a nonaqueous method (using cobalt nitrate, antimony trichloride, ethylenediamine, and ethanol as a solvent, were tested to establish their sensitivity to CO and C3H8 atmospheres at relatively low temperatures. The precursor material was dried at 200°C and calcined at 600°C. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were employed to verify the existence of crystal phases (P42/mnm and the morphology of this trirutile-type CoSb2O6 oxide. Pyramidal and cubic shaped crystals (average size: 41.1 nm, embedded in the material’s surface, were identified. Mesopores (average size: 6.5 nm on the nanoparticles’ surface were observed by means of transmission electron microscopy. The best sensitivity of the CoSb2O6 in a CO atmosphere was at the relatively low temperatures of 250 and 350°C, whereas, in a C3H8 atmosphere, the sensitivity increased uniformly with temperature. These results encourage using the CoSb2O6 nanoparticles as gas sensors.

  19. Surface-Bound Intermediates in Low-Temperature Methanol Synthesis on Copper. Participants and Spectators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yong; Mei, Donghai; Peden, Charles HF; Campbell, Charles T.; Mims, Charles A.

    2015-11-03

    The reactivity of surface adsorbed species present on copper catalysts during methanol synthesis at low temperatures was studied by simultaneous infrared spectroscopy (IR) and mass spectroscopy (MS) measurements during “titration” (transient surface reaction) experiments with isotopic tracing. The results show that adsorbed formate is a major bystander species present on the surface under steady-state methanol synthesis reaction conditions, but it cannot be converted to methanol by reaction with pure H2, nor with H2 plus added water. Formate-containing surface adlayers for these experiments were produced during steady state catalysis in (a) H2:CO2 (with substantial formate coverage) and (b) moist H2:CO (with no IR visible formate species). Both these reaction conditions produce methanol at steady state with relatively high rates. Adlayers containing formate were also produced by (c) formic acid adsorption. Various "titration" gases were used to probe these adlayers at modest temperatures (T = 410-450K) and 6 bar total pressure. Methanol gas (up to ~1% monolayer equivalent) was produced in "titration" from the H2:CO2 catalytic adlayers by H2 plus water, but not by dry hydrogen. The decay in the formate IR features accelerated in the presence of added water vapor. The H2:CO:H2O catalytic adlayer produced similar methanol titration yields in H2 plus water but showed no surface formate features in IR (less than 0.2% monolayer coverage). Finally, formate from formic acid chemisorption produced no methanol under any titration conditions. Even under (H2:CO2) catalytic reaction conditions, isotope tracing showed that pre-adsorbed formate from formic acid did not contribute to the methanol produced. Although non-formate intermediates exist during low temperature methanol synthesis on copper which can be converted to methanol gas

  20. Low-temperature micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy on laser-doped silicon with different surface conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Young-Joon; Franklin, Evan; Fell, Andreas; Ernst, Marco; Nguyen, Hieu T.; Macdonald, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Low-temperature micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy (μ-PLS) is applied to investigate shallow layers of laser-processed silicon for solar cell applications. Micron-scale measurement (with spatial resolution down to 1 μm) enables investigation of the fundamental impact of laser processing on the electronic properties of silicon as a function of position within the laser-processed region, and in particular at specific positions such as at the boundary/edge of processed and unprocessed regions. Low-temperature μ-PLS enables qualitative analysis of laser-processed regions by identifying PLS signals corresponding to both laser-induced doping and laser-induced damage. We show that the position of particular luminescence peaks can be attributed to band-gap narrowing corresponding to different levels of subsurface laser doping, which is achieved via multiple 248 nm nanosecond excimer laser pulses with fluences in the range 1.5-4 J/cm2 and using commercially available boron-rich spin-on-dopant precursor films. We demonstrate that characteristic defect PL spectra can be observed subsequent to laser doping, providing evidence of laser-induced crystal damage. The impact of laser parameters such as fluence and number of repeat pulses on laser-induced damage is also analyzed by observing the relative level of defect PL spectra and absolute luminescence intensity. Luminescence owing to laser-induced damage is observed to be considerably larger at the boundaries of laser-doped regions than at the centers, highlighting the significant role of the edges of laser-doped region on laser doping quality. Furthermore, by comparing the damage signal observed after laser processing of two different substrate surface conditions (chemically-mechanically polished and tetramethylammonium hydroxide etched), we show that wafer preparation can be an important factor impacting the quality of laser-processed silicon and solar cells.

  1. Low temperature removal of surface oxides and hydrocarbons from Ge(100) using atomic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, M., E-mail: m.walker@warwick.ac.uk; Tedder, M.S.; Palmer, J.D.; Mudd, J.J.; McConville, C.F.

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • Preparation of a clean, well-ordered Ge(100) surface with atomic hydrogen. • Surface oxide layers removed by AHC at room temperature, but not hydrocarbons. • Increasing surface temperature during AHC dramatically improves efficiency. • AHC with the surface heated to 250 °C led to a near complete removal of contaminants. • (2 × 1) LEED pattern from IBA and AHC indicates asymmetric dimer reconstruction. - Abstract: Germanium is a group IV semiconductor with many current and potential applications in the modern semiconductor industry. Key to expanding the use of Ge is a reliable method for the removal of surface contamination, including oxides which are naturally formed during the exposure of Ge thin films to atmospheric conditions. A process for achieving this task at lower temperatures would be highly advantageous, where the underlying device architecture will not diffuse through the Ge film while also avoiding electronic damage induced by ion irradiation. Atomic hydrogen cleaning (AHC) offers a low-temperature, damage-free alternative to the common ion bombardment and annealing (IBA) technique which is widely employed. In this work, we demonstrate with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) that the AHC method is effective in removing surface oxides and hydrocarbons, yielding an almost completely clean surface when the AHC is conducted at a temperature of 250 °C. We compare the post-AHC cleanliness and (2 × 1) low energy electron diffraction (LEED) pattern to that obtained via IBA, where the sample is annealed at 600 °C. We also demonstrate that the combination of a sample temperature of 250 °C and atomic H dosing is required to clean the surface. Lower temperatures prove less effective in removal of the oxide layer and hydrocarbons, whilst annealing in ultra-high vacuum conditions only removes weakly bound hydrocarbons. Finally, we examine the subsequent H-termination of an IBA-cleaned sample using XPS, LEED and ultraviolet

  2. A method of eliminating the surface defect in low-temperature oxidation powder added UO2 pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, H. S.; Lee, S. J.; Kim, J. I.; Jeon, K. R.; Kim, J. W.

    2002-01-01

    A study on methods to eliminate surface defect shown in low-temperature oxidation powder added UO 2 pellet has been performed. Powders oxidized at 350 .deg. C for 4 hrs were prepared and mixed with UO 2 powder after crushing them. After being sintered, surfaces of the pellet were inspected both visually and optically. A large number of defects were observed on the surface of the specimens in which low-temperature oxidation powders were directly mixed or master mixed with UO 2 powder while both specimens produced from mixed powders including milled oxidation powders and powders that were milled totally after mixing had clean surfaces. However, optical examination showed considerably large defected pores in the milled oxidation powder added pellet and it was confirmed that the inner defects can be eliminated completely only when milling the entire mixture on UO 2 and low-temperature oxidation powder, but not by crushing only oxidation powder

  3. Low-temperature structure and Fermi surface of (La,Ce)TiGe{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerster, Tobias; Grasemann, Jacob; Uhlarz, Marc; Wosnitza, Jochen [Dresden High Magnetic Field Laboratory (HLD), Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Rosner, Helge; Stockert, Oliver [Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Dresden (Germany); Kittler, Wolfram; Loehneysen, Hilbert von [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Fritsch, Veronika [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Augsburg, Augsburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    CeTiGe{sub 3} presents the rare case of a ferromagnetically (T{sub C} ∼ 14 K) ordered Kondo-lattice compound and is probably the first known example of an intermetallic hexagonal perovskite of the BaNiO{sub 3} structure type. LaTiGe{sub 3} may be used as its nonmagnetic reference, since both compounds crystallize in the same crystal structure. To clarify the interplay between structural, localized, and itinerant degrees of freedom an accurate knowledge of the electronic band structure is necessary. Here, we present a detailed electronic-structure study of both compounds applying full potential density functional calculations. Since the Ge's atomic position couples strongly to the band structure at the Fermi energy, a low-temperature, high-resolution structure refinement was made. We attempt to separate the influence of different parameters on the topology of the respective Fermi surfaces and will compare our results with de Haas-van Alphen measurements.

  4. Correlating the silicon surface passivation to the nanostructure of low-temperature a-Si:H after rapid thermal annealing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macco, B.; Melskens, J.; Podraza, N.J.; Arts, K.; Pugh, C.; Thomas, O.; Kessels, W.M.M.

    2017-01-01

    Using an inductively coupled plasma, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films have been prepared at very low temperatures (<50 °C) to provide crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface passivation. Despite the limited nanostructural quality of the a-Si:H bulk, a surprisingly high minority carrier

  5. Identification of near surface events using athermal phonon signals in low temperature Ge bolometers for the EDELWEISS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marnieros, S.; Juillard, A.; Berge, L.; Collin, S.; Dumoulin, L.

    2004-01-01

    We present a study of a 100 g low temperature Ge detector, allowing identification of surface events down to the energy threshold. The bolometer is fitted with segmented electrodes and two NbSi Anderson insulator thermometric layers. Analysis of the athermal signals amplitudes allows us to identify and reject all events occurring in the first millimeter under the electrodes

  6. Identification of near surface events using athermal phonon signals in low temperature Ge bolometers for the EDELWEISS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marnieros, S. E-mail: marniero@csnsm.in2p3.fr; Juillard, A.; Berge, L.; Collin, S.; Dumoulin, L

    2004-03-11

    We present a study of a 100 g low temperature Ge detector, allowing identification of surface events down to the energy threshold. The bolometer is fitted with segmented electrodes and two NbSi Anderson insulator thermometric layers. Analysis of the athermal signals amplitudes allows us to identify and reject all events occurring in the first millimeter under the electrodes.

  7. Surface modification of chromatography adsorbents by low temperature low pressure plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arpanaei, Ayyoob; Winther-Jensen, Bjørn; Theodosiou, E.

    2010-01-01

    In this study we show how low temperature glow discharge plasma can be used to prepare bi-layered chromatography adsorbents with non-adsorptive exteriors. The commercial strong anion exchange expanded bed chromatography matrix, Q HyperZ, was treated with plasmas in one of two general ways. Using ...

  8. Gaseous surface hardening of martensitic stainless steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibollo, Chiara; Villa, Matteo; Christiansen, Thomas L.

    The present work addresses heat and surface treatments of martensitic stainless steel EN 1.4028. Different combinations of heat treatments and surface treatments were performed: conventional austenitisation, cryogenic treatment and in particular high temperature solution nitriding (HTSN) and low...... that cubic lath martensite in conventionally austenitised EN 1.4028 dissolves nitrogen and develops expanded martensite (ferrite) during LTSH. HTSN leads to a microstructure of tetragonal plate martensite and retained austenite. The content of retained austenite can be reduced by a cryo...

  9. Nanosecond laser ablated copper superhydrophobic surface with tunable ultrahigh adhesion and its renewability with low temperature annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, An; Liu, Wenwen; Xue, Wei; Yang, Huan; Cao, Yu

    2018-03-01

    Recently, metallic superhydrophobic surfaces with ultrahigh adhesion have got plentiful attention on account of their significance in scientific researches and industrial applications like droplet transport, drug delivery and novel microfluidic devices. However, the long lead time and transience hindered its in-depth development and industrial application. In this work, nanosecond laser ablation was carried out to construct grid of micro-grooves on copper surface, whereafter, by applying fast ethanol assisted low-temperature annealing, we obtained surface with superhydrophobicity and ultrahigh adhesion within hours. And the ultrahigh adhesion force was found tunable by varying the groove spacing. Using ultrasonic cleaning as the simulation of natural wear and tear in service, the renewability of superhydrophobicity was also investigated, and the result shows that the contact angle can rehabilitate promptly by the processing of ethanol assisted low-temperature annealing, which gives a promising fast and cheap circuitous strategy to realize the long wish durable metallic superhydrophobic surfaces in practical applications.

  10. Low-temperature magnetism of alabandite: Crucial role of surface oxidation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čuda, J.; Kohout, Tomáš; Filip, J.; Tuček, J.; Kosterov, A.; Haloda, J.; Skála, Roman; Santala, E.; Medřík, I.; Zbořil, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 98, 8/9 (2013), s. 1550-1556 ISSN 0003-004X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB300130903 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : alabandite (MnS) * hausmannite (Mn3O4) * magnetism * troilite (FeS) * crystallization * experimental mineralogy * ferromanganese deposit * hysteresis * low temperature * magnetic anomaly * magnetic field * manganese deposit * oxidation * remanent magnetization * stoichiometry * sulfide Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 2.059, year: 2013

  11. Structure and properties of nitrided surface layer produced on NiTi shape memory alloy by low temperature plasma nitriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czarnowska, Elżbieta; Borowski, Tomasz; Sowińska, Agnieszka; Lelątko, Józef; Oleksiak, Justyna; Kamiński, Janusz; Tarnowski, Michał; Wierzchoń, Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Low temperature plasma nitriding process of NiTi shape memory alloy is presented. • The possibility of treatment details of sophisticated shape. • TiN surface layer has diffusive character. • TiN surface layer increases corrosion resistance of NiTi alloy. • Produced TiN layer modify the biological properties of NiTi alloy. - Abstract: NiTi shape memory alloys are used for bone and cardiological implants. However, on account of the metallosis effect, i.e. the release of the alloy elements into surrounding tissues, they are subjected to various surface treatment processes in order to improve their corrosion resistance and biocompatibility without influencing the required shape memory properties. In this paper, the microstructure, topography and morphology of TiN surface layer on NiTi alloy, and corrosion resistance, both before and after nitriding in low-temperature plasma at 290 °C, are presented. Examinations with the use of the potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods were carried out and show an increase of corrosion resistance in Ringer's solution after glow-discharge nitriding. This surface titanium nitride layer also improved the adhesion of platelets and the proliferation of osteoblasts, which was investigated in in vitro experiments with human cells. Experimental data revealed that nitriding NiTi shape memory alloy under low-temperature plasma improves its properties for bone implant applications

  12. Structure and properties of nitrided surface layer produced on NiTi shape memory alloy by low temperature plasma nitriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarnowska, Elżbieta [Children' s Memorial Health Institute, Pathology Department, Al. Dzieci Polskich 20, 04-730 Warsaw (Poland); Borowski, Tomasz [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Sowińska, Agnieszka [Children' s Memorial Health Institute, Pathology Department, Al. Dzieci Polskich 20, 04-730 Warsaw (Poland); Lelątko, Józef [Silesia University, Faculty of Computer Science and Materials Science, 75 Pułku Piechoty 1A, 41-500 Chorzów (Poland); Oleksiak, Justyna; Kamiński, Janusz; Tarnowski, Michał [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Wierzchoń, Tadeusz, E-mail: twierz@inmat.pw.edu.pl [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Low temperature plasma nitriding process of NiTi shape memory alloy is presented. • The possibility of treatment details of sophisticated shape. • TiN surface layer has diffusive character. • TiN surface layer increases corrosion resistance of NiTi alloy. • Produced TiN layer modify the biological properties of NiTi alloy. - Abstract: NiTi shape memory alloys are used for bone and cardiological implants. However, on account of the metallosis effect, i.e. the release of the alloy elements into surrounding tissues, they are subjected to various surface treatment processes in order to improve their corrosion resistance and biocompatibility without influencing the required shape memory properties. In this paper, the microstructure, topography and morphology of TiN surface layer on NiTi alloy, and corrosion resistance, both before and after nitriding in low-temperature plasma at 290 °C, are presented. Examinations with the use of the potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods were carried out and show an increase of corrosion resistance in Ringer's solution after glow-discharge nitriding. This surface titanium nitride layer also improved the adhesion of platelets and the proliferation of osteoblasts, which was investigated in in vitro experiments with human cells. Experimental data revealed that nitriding NiTi shape memory alloy under low-temperature plasma improves its properties for bone implant applications.

  13. Study on the surface of fluorosilicone acrylate RGP contact lens treated by low-temperature nitrogen plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Li; Yin Shiheng; Zhao Lianna; Wang Yingjun; Chen Hao; Qu Jia

    2008-01-01

    In order to improve the surface hydrophilicity of fluorosilicone acrylate rigid gas permeable (RGP) contact lens, low temperature nitrogen plasma was used to modify the lens surface. Effects of plasma conditions on the surface structures and properties were investigated. Results indicated that the surface hydrophilicity of RGP contact lens was significantly improved after treatment. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results showed that the nitrogen element was successfully incorporated into the surface. Furthermore, some new bonds such as N-C=O, F - and silicate were formed on the lens surface after nitrogen plasma treatment, which could result in the improvement of the surface hydrophilicity. Scanning electronic microscope (SEM) results indicated that nitrogen plasma with moderate power could make the surface smoother in some degree, while plasma with higher power could etch the surface

  14. Formation of plasmonic silver nanoparticles using rapid thermal annealing at low temperature and study in reflectance reduction of Si surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Bidyut; Dhasmana, Hrishikesh; Verma, Abhishek; Kumar, Amit; Pratap Chaudhary, Shiv; Jain, V. K.

    2017-09-01

    This work presents studies of plasmonic silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) formation at low temperatures (200 °C-300 °C) onto Si surface by sputtering followed with rapid thermal processing (RTP) for different time durations(5-30 min). The study reveals that 20 min RTP at all temperatures show minimum average size of AgNPs (60.42 nm) with corresponding reduction in reflectance of Si surface from 40.12% to mere 1.15% only in wavelength region 300-800 nm for RTP at 200 °C. A detailed supporting growth mechanism is also discussed. This low temperature technique can be helpful in achieving efficiency improvement in solar cells via reflectance reduction with additional features such as reproducibility, minimal time and very good adhesion without damaging underlying layers device parameters.

  15. Low-temperature aluminum reduction of graphene oxide, electrical properties, surface wettability, and energy storage applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Dongyun; Yang, Chongyin; Lin, Tianquan; Tang, Yufeng; Zhou, Mi; Zhong, Yajuan; Huang, Fuqiang; Lin, Jianhua

    2012-10-23

    Low-temperature aluminum (Al) reduction is first introduced to reduce graphene oxide (GO) at 100-200 °C in a two-zone furnace. The melted Al metal exhibits an excellent deoxygen ability to produce well-crystallized reduced graphene oxide (RGO) papers with a low O/C ratio of 0.058 (Al-RGO), compared with 0.201 in the thermally reduced one (T-RGO). The Al-RGO papers possess outstanding mechanical flexibility and extremely high electrical conductivities (sheet resistance R(s) ~ 1.75 Ω/sq), compared with 20.12 Ω/sq of T-RGO. More interestingly, very nice hydrophobic nature (90.5°) was observed, significantly superior to the reported chemically or thermally reduced papers. These enhanced properties are attributed to the low oxygen content in the RGO papers. During the aluminum reduction, highly active H atoms from H(2)O reacted with melted Al promise an efficient oxygen removal. This method was also applicable to reduce graphene oxide foams, which were used in the GO/SA (stearic acid) composite as a highly thermally conductive reservoir to hold the phase change material for thermal energy storage. The Al-reduced RGO/SnS(2) composites were further used in an anode material of lithium ion batteries possessing a higher specific capacity. Overall, low-temperature Al reduction is an effective method to prepare highly conductive RGO papers and related composites for flexible energy conversion and storage device applications.

  16. Low-temperature α-alumina thin film growth: ab initio studies of Al adatom surface migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallin, E; Helmersson, U; Muenger, E P; Chirita, V

    2009-01-01

    Investigations of activation energy barriers for Al surface hopping on α-Al 2 O 3 (0 0 0 1) surfaces have been carried out by means of first-principles density functional theory calculations and the nudged elastic band method. Results show that surface diffusion on the (most stable) Al-terminated surface is relatively fast with an energy barrier of 0.75 eV, whereas Al hopping on the O-terminated surface is slower, with barriers for jumps from the two metastable positions existing on this surface to the stable site of 0.31 and 0.99 eV. Based on this study and on the literature, the governing mechanisms during low-temperature α-alumina thin film growth are summarized and discussed. Our results support suggestions made in some previous experimental studies, pointing out that limited surface diffusivity is not the main obstacle for α-alumina growth at low-to-moderate temperatures, and that other effects should primarily be considered when designing novel processes for low-temperature α-alumina deposition.

  17. Preparation, quantitative surface analysis, intercalation characteristics and industrial implications of low temperature expandable graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Tiefeng; Liu, Bin; Gao, Xuechao; Luo, Liqun; Sun, Hongjuan

    2018-06-01

    Expandable graphite is widely used as a new functional carbon material, especially as fire-retardant; however, its practical application is limited due to the high expansion temperature. In this work, preparation process of low temperature and highly expandable graphite was studied, using natural flake graphite as raw material and KMnO4/HClO4/NH4NO3 as oxidative intercalations. The structure, morphology, functional groups and thermal properties were characterized during expanding process by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectra, thermo-gravimetry differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The analysis showed that by oxidation intercalation, some oxygen-containing groups were grafted on the edge and within the graphite layer. The intercalation reagent entered the graphite layer to increase the interlayer spacing. After expansion, the original flaky expandable graphite was completely transformed into worm-like expanded graphite. The order of graphite intercalation compounds (GICs) was proposed and determined to be 3 for the prepared expandable graphite, based on quantitative XRD peak analysis. Meanwhile, the detailed intercalation mechanisms were also proposed. The comprehensive investigation paved a benchmark for the industrial application of such sulfur-free expanded graphite.

  18. Surface modification of fluorosilicone acrylate RGP contact lens via low-temperature argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Shiheng; Wang Yingjun; Ren Li; Zhao Lianna; Kuang Tongchun; Chen Hao; Qu Jia

    2008-01-01

    A fluorosilicone acrylate rigid gas permeable (RGP) contact lens was modified via argon plasma to improve surface hydrophilicity and resistance to protein deposition. The influence of plasma treatment on surface chemical structure, hydrophilicity and morphology of RGP lens was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS), contact angle measurements and scanning electron microscope (SEM), respectively. The contact angle results showed that the hydrophilicity of the contact lens was improved after plasma treatment. XPS results indicated that the incorporation of oxygen-containing groups on surface and the transformation of silicone into hydrophilic silicate after plasma treatment are the main reasons for the surface hydrophilicity improvement. SEM results showed that argon plasma with higher power could lead to surface etching

  19. Surface treatment of a titanium implant using low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Young; Tang, Tianyu; Ok, Jung-Woo; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Ho-Jun; Lee, Hae June

    2015-09-01

    During the last two decades, atmospheric pressure plasmas(APP) are widely used in diverse fields of biomedical applications, reduction of pollutants, and surface treatment of materials. Applications of APP to titanium surface of dental implants is steadily increasing as it renders surfaces wettability and modifies the oxide layer of titanium that hinders the interaction with cells and proteins. In this study, we have treated the titanium surfaces of screw-shaped implant samples using a plasma jet which is composed of a ceramic coaxial tube of dielectrics, a stainless steel inner electrode, and a coper tube outer electrode. The plasma ignition occurred with Ar gas flow between two coaxial metal electrodes and a sinusoidal bias voltage of 3 kV with a frequency of 20 kHz. Titanium materials used in this study are screw-shaped implants of which diameter and length are 5 mm and 13 mm, respectively. Samples were mounted at a distance of 5 mm below the plasma source, and the plasma treatment time was set to 3 min. The wettability of titanium surface was measured by the moving speed of water on its surface, which is enhanced by plasma treatment. The surface roughness was also measured by atomic force microscopy. The optimal condition for wettability change is discussed.

  20. Fundamental Experiments at Liquid Helium Temperatures (Low Temperature Studies of Anomalous Surface Shielding and Related Phenomena).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-30

    study of the copper surface indicated that the copper oxide layer was approximately 20 Angstroms thick. Hanni and Madey 3 2 have evaluated the...REFERENCES 1. John Bardeen, "Comments on Shielding by Surface States," in Near Zero: New Frontiers of Physics, to be published. 2. R. S. Hanni and...Michel, H. E. Rorschach, and G. T. Trammel, Phys. Rev. 168 (1968), 737. 31. C. Herring, Phys. Rev. 171 (1968), 1361. 32. R. S. Hanni and J.M.J. Madey

  1. Effect of Water Vapor and Surface Morphology on the Low Temperature Response of Metal Oxide Semiconductor Gas Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Maier

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the low temperature response of metal oxide semiconductor gas sensors is analyzed. Important characteristics of this low-temperature response are a pronounced selectivity to acid- and base-forming gases and a large disparity of response and recovery time constants which often leads to an integrator-type of gas response. We show that this kind of sensor performance is related to the trend of semiconductor gas sensors to adsorb water vapor in multi-layer form and that this ability is sensitively influenced by the surface morphology. In particular we show that surface roughness in the nanometer range enhances desorption of water from multi-layer adsorbates, enabling them to respond more swiftly to changes in the ambient humidity. Further experiments reveal that reactive gases, such as NO2 and NH3, which are easily absorbed in the water adsorbate layers, are more easily exchanged across the liquid/air interface when the humidity in the ambient air is high.

  2. THE EFFECT OF ACTIVATED CARBON SURFACE MOISTURE ON LOW TEMPERATURE MERCURY ADSORPTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experiments with elemental mercury (Hg0) adsorption by activated carbons were performed using a bench-scale fixed-bed reactor at room temperature (27 degrees C) to determine the role of surface moisture in capturing Hg0. A bituminous-coal-based activated carbon (BPL) and an activ...

  3. Low-temperature hydrogenation of diamond nanoparticles using diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kromka, Alexander; Čech, J.; Kozak, Halyna; Artemenko, Anna; Ižák, Tibor; Čermák, Jan; Rezek, Bohuslav; Černák, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 252, č. 11 (2015), s. 2602-2607 ISSN 0370-1972 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : atmospheric plasma * diamond nanoparticles * diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge * FTIR * XPS Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.522, year: 2015

  4. A new technique for the identification of surface contamination in low temperature bolometric experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangiorgio, S.; Arnaboldi, C.; Brofferio, C.; Bucci, C.; Capelli, S.; Carbone, L.; Clemenza, M.; Cremonesi, O.; Fiorini, E.; Foggetta, L.; Giuliani, A.; Gorla, P.; Nones, C.; Nucciotti, A.; Pavan, M.; Pedretti, M.; Pessina, G.; Pirro, S.; Previtali, E.; Salvioni, C.

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of the bolometric experiment CUORE, a new and promising technique has been developed in order to control the dangerous contamination coming from the surfaces close to the detector. In fact, by means of a composite bolometer, it is possible to partially overcome the loss of spatial resolution of the bolometer itself and to clearly identify events coming from outside.

  5. Low temperature atmospheric microplasma jet array for uniform treatment of polymer surface for flexible electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Xiaolin; Yang, Bin; Chen, Xiang; Yang, Chunsheng; Liu, Jingquan

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the uniformity of polymer film etching by an atmospheric pressure He/O2 microplasma jet array (μPJA) is first investigated with different applied voltage. Plasma characteristics of μPJA were recorded by optical discharge images. Morphologies and chemical compositions of polymer film etched by μPJA were analyzed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). By increasing the applied voltage from 8.5 kV to 16.4 kV, the non-uniformity of the luminous intensity of the plasma jets increases. It is interesting that the plasma treated regions are actually composed of an etched region and modification region, with distinct morphologies and chemical compositions. The diameters of the etched parylene-C film show the increase of non-uniformity with higher applied voltage. SEM results show that the non-uniformity of surface morphologies of both the modification regions and etched regions increases with the increase of applied voltage. EDS and XPS results also present the significant effect of higher applied voltage on the non-uniformity of surface chemical compositions of both modification and etched regions. The Coulomb interaction of the streamer heads and the hydrodynamic interaction between the plasma jets and the surrounding air are considered to be responsible for this phenomenon. The results shown in this work can help improve the processing quality of polymer film etched by an atmospheric pressure microplasma jet array and two applications are demonstrated to illustrate the uniform downstream surface treatment.

  6. Theory of ortho-para conversion in hydrogen adsorbed on metal and paramagnetic surfaces at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yucel, S.

    1989-01-01

    In order to explain the experimental results on Cu(100), Ag(111), Ag thin films, graphite, and H 2 bubbles in Cu, the ortho-para conversion rates of H 2 and D 2 adsorbed on metal and paramagnetic surfaces at low temperatures have been considered. The conversion rates due to magnetic dipole-dipole, Fermi contact, and spin-orbit interaction between the conduction electrons, and nuclear spins of H 2 (D 2 ) are calculated to elucidate the role of the metal surface. Although the rates on clean metal surfaces are found to be too slow to account for the observed rates on Ag, they may explain the catalytic conversion on H 2 bubble surfaces at 1.3 K. Additionally, effects of impurities and defects on the surface are investigated by calculating the conversion rate in two-dimensional solid D 2 (H 2 ) by emission of one (two) phonon(s). Fast conversion rates observed on Ag and graphite surfaces as well as on the surfaces of H 2 bubbles may be accounted for by paramagnetic impurities or defects. On Grafoil, both in (√3 x √3)R30 0 commensurate and incommensurate solid phase, a temperature-independent conversion rate is predicted if the mobility of the molecules is high enough to prevent concentration gradients

  7. Low-temperature electron irradiation induced defects in gallium arsenide: bulk and surface acoustic wave studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brophy, M.J. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Irradiation of GaAs with 2.25 to 2.5 MeV electrons at temperatures below 190 K produces two peaks in ultrasonic attenuation versus temperature. The defects responsible for both peaks have trigonal symmetry and were observed in n-type and semi-insulating GaAs with bulk and surface acoustic waves (SAW) respectively. Bulk waves at eight frequencies between 9 and 130 MHz and SAW at 73 and 145 MHz were used. The reorientation kinetics of both peaks follow the Arrhenius law. The annealing of both peaks was studied with isochronal and isothermal anneals in the temperature range 200 to 335 K. Peak I anneals with a spectrum of activation energies in the range 0.7-1.1 eV between 220 and 335 K. Peak II anneals with a single activation energy of about 1.1 eV above 300K. The different annealing characteristics indicate that these peaks represent two distinct defects. The annealing above 300 K has not been seen in electrical resistivity measurements, but was observed in earlier length change experiments. Irradiation of GaAs:Cr produces no Cr-radiation defect complexes. The attenuation peak associated with Cr 2+ decrease with electron dose, but starts to recover at 150 K

  8. Inkjet printed paper based frequency selective surfaces and skin mounted RFID tags : the interrelation between silver nanoparticle ink, paper substrate and low temperature sintering technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Romaquera, V.; Wïnscher, S.; Turki, B.M.; Abbel, R.J.; Barbosa, S.; Tate, D.J.; Oyeka, D.; Batchelor, J.C.; Parker, E.A.; Schubert, U.S.; Yeates, S.G.

    2015-01-01

    Inkjet printing of functional frequency selective surfaces (FSS) and radio frequency identification (RFID) tags on commercial paper substrates using silver nanoparticle inks sintered using low temperature thermal, plasma and photonic techniques is reported. Printed and sintered FSS devices

  9. Surface acidity of calcium phosphate and calcium hydroxyapatite: FTIR spectroscopic study of low-temperature CO adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pekounov, Yassen; Chakarova, Kristina; Hadjiivanov, Konstantin

    2009-01-01

    The surface properties of calcium phosphate precursor (CP) and crystalline calcium hydroxyapatite (HA) prepared biomimetically have been studied by IR spectroscopy of adsorbed CO. Both samples are characterized by the absence of Bronsted acidity. Low-temperature CO adsorption on CP evacuated at 523 K leads to formation of only one family of Ca 2+ -CO species (2168 cm -1 ). The analysis indicates that the respective calcium ions on the surface are not isolated. Similar spectra were obtained with HA evacuated at 573 K. In this case, however, the Ca 2+ -CO band was detected at 2165 cm -1 due to enhanced lateral interaction between the adsorbed CO molecules. Another family of Ca 2+ sites (Ca 2+ -CO band at 2178 cm -1 ) was created after evacuation of the HA sample at 673 K. These sites were assumed to be a result of sample dehydroxylation. The results demonstrate the absence of any protonic acidity of the samples (i.e. P-OH surface groups) and weak electrostatic Lewis acidity caused by coordinatively unsaturated Ca 2+ cations.

  10. Fast wettability transition from hydrophilic to superhydrophobic laser-textured stainless steel surfaces under low-temperature annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Chi-Vinh; Chun, Doo-Man

    2017-07-01

    Recently, the fabrication of superhydrophobic metallic surfaces by means of pulsed laser texturing has been developed. After laser texturing, samples are typically chemically coated or aged in ambient air for a relatively long time of several weeks to achieve superhydrophobicity. To accelerate the wettability transition from hydrophilicity to superhydrophobicity without the use of additional chemical treatment, a simple annealing post process has been developed. In the present work, grid patterns were first fabricated on stainless steel by a nanosecond pulsed laser, then an additional low-temperature annealing post process at 100 °C was applied. The effect of 100-500 μm step size of the textured grid upon the wettability transition time was also investigated. The proposed post process reduced the transition time from a couple of months to within several hours. All samples showed superhydrophobicity with contact angles greater than 160° and sliding angles smaller than 10° except samples with 500 μm step size, and could be applied in several potential applications such as self-cleaning and control of water adhesion.

  11. Investigations by the surface photo-E. M. F. method of the effect of low temperature vacuum baking of an Si(111) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dlugosz, B.; Kochowski, S.

    1982-02-26

    Investigations of the effect of low temperature vacuum baking on the surface potential of silicon are reported. The surface potential Vsub(s0) was measured by the surface photo-e.m.f. method. No noticeable changes in Vsub(s0) occurred after baking of samples which had been freshly etched in HF for 2 h in a vacuum of 6.6 x 10/sup -3/ Pa (5 x 10/sup -5/ Torr) at temperatures of 573, 623 and 723 K. Radical changes were observed when the samples had been aged in air for 2 months before vacuum baking. These results suggest that the direction and the value of the surface potential changes during vacuum baking are determined by the initial surface state.

  12. Determination of surface coverage of catalysts : temperature programmed experiments on platinum and iridium sponge catalysts after low temperature ammonia oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, A.C.M.; Grondelle, van J.; Santen, van R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The activity of iridium and platinum sponge catalysts was studied in the low temperature gas phase oxidation of ammonia with oxygen. Under the reaction conditions used, iridium was found to be more active and more selective to nitrogen than platinum. Furthermore it was established from activity

  13. Low temperature back-surface-field contacts deposited by hot-wire CVD for heterojunction solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, D.; Voz, C.; Martin, I.; Orpella, A.; Alcubilla, R.; Villar, F.; Bertomeu, J.; Andreu, J.; Roca-i-Cabarrocas, P.

    2008-01-01

    The growing interest in using thinner wafers ( 2 ) have been fabricated and characterized by External Quantum Efficiency and current-voltage measurements. Total-area conversion efficiencies up to 14.5% were achieved in a fully low temperature process (< 200 deg. C)

  14. Low-Temperature Synthesis of Anatase TiO2 Nanoparticles with Tunable Surface Charges for Enhancing Photocatalytic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Qin, Zhenping; Guo, Hongxia; Yang, Hanxiao; Zhang, Guojun; Ji, Shulan; Zeng, Tingying

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the positively or negatively charged anatase TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized via a low temperature precipitation-peptization process (LTPPP) in the presence of poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) and poly(sodium4- styrenesulfonate) (PSS). X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern and high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) confirmed the anatase crystalline phase. The charges of the prepared TiO2, PEI-TiO2 and PSS-TiO2 nanoparticles were investigated by zeta potentials. The results showed that the zeta potentials of PEI-TiO2 nanoparticles can be tuned from +39.47 mV to +95.46 mV, and that of PSS-TiO2 nanoparticles can be adjusted from −56.63 mV to −119.32 mV. In comparison with TiO2, PSS-TiO2 exhibited dramatic adsorption and degradation of dye molecules, while the PEI modified TiO2 nanoparticles showed lower photocatalytic activity. The photocatalytic performances of these charged nanoparticles were elucidated by the results of UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) and the photoluminescence (PL) spectra, which indicated that the PSS-TiO2 nanoparticles showed a lower recombination rate of electron-hole pairs than TiO2 and PEI-TiO2. PMID:25506839

  15. Studies on reactivity of coal surfaces at low temperature; Teion ni okeru sekitan hyomen no hannosei no kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, H.; Kaiho, M.; Yamada, O.; Soneda, Y.; Kobayashi, M.; Makino, M. [National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    With an objective to learn reactivity of coal at its surface, surfaces of oxidized coal samples were investigated. Miike coal was oxidized by using {sup 18}O2 in a closed loop system. As the reaction progresses, proportion of CO2 including isotopes increased rapidly as a result of oxidation of CO sites existing in the coal and the newly generated C{sup 18}O sites. The oxidizing reaction progressed via oxygen adsorbing sites generated near the surface, and oxygen containing groups. An FT-IR analysis estimated the depth of the oxidized layer to be 10{mu}m or less from particle surface. The oxidized coal was pulverized to see its surface condition. Functional groups introduced by the oxidation enter into the vicinity of the surface in a form to desorb as CO. CO2 is trapped in inner pores. The coal surface was observed by using an atomic force microscope. No observable openings in the pore structure were discerned on the surface before the oxidation, and the structure agrees with a closed pore model. Surface image oxidized in-situ by oxygen for one hour had slight roundness, which led to a supposition of structural change, and changes in the functional group and adsorption species. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Improvement in surface hydrophilicity and resistance to deformation of natural leather through O2/H2O low-temperature plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Xuewei; Gou, Li; Tong, Xingye

    2016-01-01

    The natural leather was modified through O2/H2O low-temperature plasma treatment. Surface morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the results showed that the pores on the leather surface became deeper and larger with enhanced permeability of water and vapor. XPS and FTIR-ATR was performed to determine the chemical composition of natural leather surface. Oxygen-containing groups were successfully grafted onto the surface of natural leather and oxygen content increased with longer treatment time. After O2/H2O plasma treatment, initial water contact angle was about 21° and water contact angles were not beyond 55° after being stored for 3 days. Furthermore, the tensile test indicated that the resistance to deformation had a prominent transform without sacrificing the tensile strength.

  17. Potential Impact of Rainfall on the Air-Surface Exchange of Total Gaseous Mercury from Two Common Urban Ground Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    The impact of rainfall on total gaseous mercury (TGM) flux from pavement and street dirt surfaces was investigated in an effort to determine the influence of wet weather events on mercury transport in urban watersheds. Street dirt and pavement are common urban ground surfaces tha...

  18. Low-temperature wafer direct bonding of silicon and quartz glass by a two-step wet chemical surface cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenxi; Xu, Jikai; Zeng, Xiaorun; Tian, Yanhong; Wang, Chunqing; Suga, Tadatomo

    2018-02-01

    We demonstrate a facile bonding process for combining silicon and quartz glass wafers by a two-step wet chemical surface cleaning. After a post-annealing at 200 °C, strong bonding interfaces with no defects or microcracks were obtained. On the basis of the detailed surface and bonding interface characterizations, the bonding mechanism was explored and discussed. The amino groups terminated on the cleaned surfaces might contribute to the bonding strength enhancement during the annealing. This cost-effective bonding process has great potentials for silicon- and glass-based heterogeneous integrations without requiring a vacuum system.

  19. Surface morphology modelling for the resistivity analysis of low temperature sputtered indium tin oxide thin films on polymer substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Xuesong; Tang Wu; Weng Xiaolong; Deng Longjiang

    2009-01-01

    Amorphous or weakly crystalline indium tin oxide (ITO) thin film samples have been prepared on polymethylmethacrylate and polyethylene terephthalate substrates by RF-magnetron sputtering at a low substrate temperature. The surface morphological and electrical properties of the ITO layers were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and a standard four-point probe measurement. The effect of surface morphology on the resistivity of ITO thin films was studied, which presented some different variations from crystalline films. Then, a simplified film system model, including the substrate, continuous ITO layer and ITO surface grain, was proposed to deal with these correlations. Based on this thin film model and the AFM images, a quadratic potential was introduced to simulate the characteristics of the ITO surface morphology, and the classical Kronig-Penney model, the semiconductor electrical theory and the modified Neugebauer-Webb model were used to expound the detailed experimental results. The modelling equation was highly in accord with the experimental variations of the resistivity on the characteristics of the surface morphology.

  20. Influence of steel composition and plastic deformation on the surface properties induced by low temperature thermochemical processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottoli, Federico

    to the formation of a supersaturated solid solution known as expanded austenite, or S-Phase. Expanded austenite is characterized by high hardness, up to 1400 Vickers, and high compressive stresses in the surface region, which result in improved wear and fatigue resistance of the components. Along....../nitrocarburizing on the stress distribution. The experimental techniques applied entail X-ray diffraction (XRD), Glow Discharge Optical EmissionSpectroscopy (GD-OES), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), light optical microscopy (LOM) and hardness measurement....

  1. The Study of Selected Properties of Ti EB PVD Coating Deposited Onto Inner Tube Surface at Low Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kottfer D.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the selected properties of the thin Ti coating applied by activated evaporation EB PVD technique. This technique was used for the deposition of Ti thin coating onto inner surface of OKhN3 MFA steel tubes. Deposition process was carried out at temperature 200°C. Conventional type of coatings - monolayer Ti - was analyzed by standard techniques for surface status and quality assessment - coating thickness, chemical composition by EDX analysis, adhesion, hardness, roughness, and growth direction of columns at room temperature. Ti monolayer achieved roughness Ra equal from 0.42 μm to 0.47 μm. The resulting hardness was from 2 GPa to 8.5 GPa depending on the sample location inside the vacuum chamber. Placing of the coated surface also affected the direction of grain growth of Ti coating columns. The angles α of grain growth were found to be from 40° to 60°. Angle α increased two to three times more than the incidence angle β (from 12° to 28° of evaporated Ti particles. Values of the adhesion measured along the Ti growth direction were mostly higher (up to 10% or the same as those measured perpendicular to it.

  2. Influence of processing parameters on the characteristics of surface layers of low temperature plasma nitrocarburized AISI 630 martensitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Insup

    2017-11-01

    Plasma nitrocarburizing was performed on solution-treated AISI 630 martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steel samples with a gas mixture of H2, N2, and CH4 with changing temperature, discharge voltage and amount of CH4. When nitrocarburized with increasing temperature from 380 °C to 430 °C at fixed 25% N2 and 6% CH4, the thickness of expanded martensite (α'N) layer and surface hardness increased up to 10 μm and 1323 HV0.05, respectively but the corrosion resistance decreased. Though the increase of discharge voltage from 400 V to 600 V increased α'N layer thickness and surface hardness (up to 13 μm and 1491 HV0.05, respectively), the treated samples still showed very poor corrosion behavior. Thus, to further improve the corrosion resistance, the influence of variation of the amount of CH4 in the nitrocarburizing process was investigated. Increasing the CH4 percentage aided higher corrosion resistance, although it decreased the α'N layer thickness. The most appropriate conditions for moderate α'N layer thickness, high surface hardness and better corrosion resistance than the solution-treated bare sample were established, which is plasma nitrocarburizing at 400 °C with 400 V discharge voltage and containing 25% N2 and 4% CH4.

  3. Low-temperature oxidizing plasma surface modification and composite polymer thin-film fabrication techniques for tailoring the composition and behavior of polymer surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, Brendan D.

    This dissertation examines methods for modifying the composition and behavior of polymer material surfaces. This is accomplished using (1) low-temperature low-density oxidizing plasmas to etch and implant new functionality on polymers, and (2) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) techniques to fabricate composite polymer materials. Emphases are placed on the structure of modified polymer surfaces, the evolution of polymer surfaces after treatment, and the species responsible for modifying polymers during plasma processing. H2O vapor plasma modification of high-density polyethylene (HDPE), low-density polyethylene (LDPE), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), polycarbonate (PC), and 75A polyurethane (PU) was examined to further our understanding of polymer surface reorganization leading to hydrophobic recovery. Water contact angles (wCA) measurements showed that PP and PS were the most susceptible to hydrophobic recovery, while PC and HDPE were the most stable. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed a significant quantity of polar functional groups on the surface of all treated polymer samples. Shifts in the C1s binding energies (BE) with sample age were measured on PP and PS, revealing that surface reorganization was responsible for hydrophobic recovery on these materials. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to rule out the intrinsic thermal properties as the cause of reorganization and hydrophobic recovery on HDPE, LDPE, and PP. The different contributions that polymer cross-linking and chain scission mechanisms make to polymer aging effects are considered. The H2O plasma treatment technique was extended to the modification of 0.2 microm and 3.0 microm track-etched polycarbonate (PC-TE) and track-etched polyethylene terephthalate (PET-TE) membranes with the goal of permanently increasing the hydrophilicity of the membrane surfaces. Contact angle measurements on freshly treated and aged samples confirmed the wettability of the

  4. Influence of Microstructure and Process Conditions on Simultaneous Low-Temperature Surface Hardening and Bulk Precipitation Hardening of Nanoflex®

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottoli, Federico; Winther, Grethe; Christiansen, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    Precipitation hardening martensitic stainless steel Nanoflex was low-temperature nitrided or nitrocarburized. In these treatments, simultaneous hardening of the bulk, by precipitation hardening, and the surface by dissolving nitrogen/carbon can be obtained because the treatment temperatures...... and times for these essentially different hardening mechanisms are compatible. The effect of the processing history of the steel on the nitrided/nitrocarburized case was investigated by varying the amounts of austenite and martensite through variation of the degree of plastic deformation by tensile strain...... consisting of martensite results in the deepest nitrided case, while a shallow case develops on a microstructure consisting of austenite. For an initial microstructure consisting of both martensite and austenite a non-uniform case depth is achieved. Simultaneous bulk and surface hardening is only possible...

  5. Kinetics of Microstructure Evolution during Gaseous Thermochemical Surface Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A.J.; Christiansen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The incorporation of nitrogen or carbon in steel is widely applied to provide major improvements in materials performance with respect to fatigue, wear, tribology and atmospheric corrosion. These improvements rely on a modification of the surface adjacent region of the material, by the (internal...... and the interplay with mechanical stress. In the present article a few examples, covering research on the interaction of carbon and/or nitrogen with iron-based metals, are included to illustrate the various aspects of gas-metal interactions....

  6. Measurement of grain-boundary diffusion at low temperature by the surface-accumulation method. II. Results for gold-silver system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, J.C.M.; Pan, J.D.; Balluffi, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    Grain-boundary diffusion rates in the gold-silver system were measured at relatively low temperatures by the surface-accumulation method which was analyzed in Paper I. The specimen was a polycrystalline gold film possessing columnar grains on which a silver layer was initially deposited epitaxially on one surface. During subsequent low-temperature annealing lattice diffusion was frozen out, and diffusion then occurred along the grain boundary and free-surface short circuits. The silver, therefore, diffused into the film from the silver layer along the boundaries, eventually reaching the opposite surface where it accumulated and was measured by Auger spectroscopy. The silver layer acted as an effective constant silver source, and grain-boundary diffusivities were calculated from the accumulation data. However, the exact location of the effective constant source in the silver layer could not be determined and this led to an uncertainty in the values of the grain-boundary diffusivities of a factor of 10. Lower- and upper-bound values were therefore described by D/sub b/(lower bound) =7.8 x 10 -6 exp(-0.62eV/kT) and D/sub b/(upper bound) =7.8 x 10 -5 exp(-0.62eV/kT) cm 2 /s in the temperature range 30--269 0 C. An examination of available grain-boundary diffusion data (including the present) suggests a tendency for the observed activation energy to decrease with decreasing temperature, and this was ascribed to a spectrum of activated jumps in the grain boundary and/or a spectrum of grain-boundary types in the specimen employed. The constant source behavior was tentatively ascribed, at least in part, to a grain-boundary ''Kirkendall effect'' resulting from the faster diffusion of silver than gold. The work indicates a need for increased understanding of the details of grain-boundary diffusion in alloys

  7. McWRI1, a transcription factor of the AP2/SHEN family, regulates the biosynthesis of the cuticular waxes on the apple fruit surface under low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Qianlong; Zhang, Kezhong; Yang, Mingfeng

    2017-01-01

    Cuticular waxes of plant and organ surfaces play an important role in protecting plants from biotic and abiotic stress and extending the freshness, storage time and shelf life in the post-harvest agricultural products. WRI1, a transcription factor of AP2/SHEN families, had been found to trigger the related genes taking part in the biosynthesis of seed oil in many plants. But whether WRI1 is involved in the biosynthesis of the cuticular waxes on the Malus fruits surface has been unclear. We investigated the changes of wax composition and structure, the related genes and WRI1 expression on Malus asiatica Nakai and sieversii fruits with the low temperature treatments, found that low temperature induced the up-regulated expression of McWRI1, which promoted gene expression of McKCS, McLACs and McWAX in very-long-chain fatty acid biosynthesis pathway, resulting in the accumulation of alkanes component and alteration of wax structure on the fruit surface. Corresponding results were verified in McWRI1 silenced by VIGS, and WRI1 silenced down-regulated the related genes on two kinds of fruits, it caused the diversity alteration in content of some alkanes, fatty acid and ester component in two kinds of fruits. We further conducted Y1H assay to find that McWRI1 transcription factor activated the promoter of McKCS, McLAC and McWAX to regulate their expression. These results demonstrated that McWRI1 is involved in regulating the genes related synthesis of very long chain fatty acid on surface of apple fruits in storage process, providing a highlight for improvement of the modified atmosphere storage of apple fruits. PMID:29073205

  8. WORKSHOP: Low temperature devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    With extraterrestrial neutrinos (whether from the sun or further afield) continuing to make science news, and with the search for the so far invisible 'dark matter' of the universe a continual preoccupation, physicists from different walks of life (solid state, low temperature, particles, astrophysics) gathered at a workshop on low temperature devices for the detection of neutrinos and dark matter, held from 12-13 March at Ringberg Castle on Lake Tegernsee in the Bavarian Alps, and organized by the Max Planck Institute for Physics and Astrophysics in Munich

  9. WORKSHOP: Low temperature devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1987-06-15

    With extraterrestrial neutrinos (whether from the sun or further afield) continuing to make science news, and with the search for the so far invisible 'dark matter' of the universe a continual preoccupation, physicists from different walks of life (solid state, low temperature, particles, astrophysics) gathered at a workshop on low temperature devices for the detection of neutrinos and dark matter, held from 12-13 March at Ringberg Castle on Lake Tegernsee in the Bavarian Alps, and organized by the Max Planck Institute for Physics and Astrophysics in Munich.

  10. Improvement in surface hydrophilicity and resistance to deformation of natural leather through O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O low-temperature plasma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Xuewei; Gou, Li, E-mail: gouli@scu.edu.cn; Tong, Xingye

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O can increase oxygen concentration in the plasma compared to the pure O{sub 2} atmosphere. • Pores at the surface of natural leather became larger and deeper with enhanced permeability of water. • The initial water contact angle was about 21°. • Its preferable surface hydrophilicity kept for 3 days, which gives guidance for next process. • The elongation of the treated sample for 10 min was twice as large as that of the untreated sample. - Abstract: The natural leather was modified through O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O low-temperature plasma treatment. Surface morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the results showed that the pores on the leather surface became deeper and larger with enhanced permeability of water and vapor. XPS and FTIR-ATR was performed to determine the chemical composition of natural leather surface. Oxygen-containing groups were successfully grafted onto the surface of natural leather and oxygen content increased with longer treatment time. After O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O plasma treatment, initial water contact angle was about 21° and water contact angles were not beyond 55° after being stored for 3 days. Furthermore, the tensile test indicated that the resistance to deformation had a prominent transform without sacrificing the tensile strength.

  11. Improvement in surface hydrophilicity and resistance to deformation of natural leather through O_2/H_2O low-temperature plasma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Xuewei; Gou, Li; Tong, Xingye

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • O_2/H_2O can increase oxygen concentration in the plasma compared to the pure O_2 atmosphere. • Pores at the surface of natural leather became larger and deeper with enhanced permeability of water. • The initial water contact angle was about 21°. • Its preferable surface hydrophilicity kept for 3 days, which gives guidance for next process. • The elongation of the treated sample for 10 min was twice as large as that of the untreated sample. - Abstract: The natural leather was modified through O_2/H_2O low-temperature plasma treatment. Surface morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the results showed that the pores on the leather surface became deeper and larger with enhanced permeability of water and vapor. XPS and FTIR-ATR was performed to determine the chemical composition of natural leather surface. Oxygen-containing groups were successfully grafted onto the surface of natural leather and oxygen content increased with longer treatment time. After O_2/H_2O plasma treatment, initial water contact angle was about 21° and water contact angles were not beyond 55° after being stored for 3 days. Furthermore, the tensile test indicated that the resistance to deformation had a prominent transform without sacrificing the tensile strength.

  12. Effect of Plastic Pre-straining on Residual Stress and Composition Profiles in Low-Temperature Surface-Hardened Austenitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottoli, Federico; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Winther, Grethe

    2016-01-01

    The present work deals with the evaluation of the residual stress profiles in expanded austenite by applying grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GI-XRD) combined with successive sublayer removal. Annealed and deformed (εeq=0.5) samples of stable stainless steel EN 1.4369 were nitrided...... or nitrocarburized. The residual stress profiles resulting from the thermochemical low-temperature surface treatment were measured. The results indicate high-residual compressive stresses of several GPa’s in the nitrided region, while lower-compressive stresses are produced in the carburized case. Plastic...... deformation in the steel prior to thermochemical treatment has a hardly measurable influence on the nitrogen-rich zone, while it has a measurable effect on the stresses and depth of the carbon-rich zone....

  13. Low temperature surface passivation of crystalline silicon and its application to interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction (ibc-shj) solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Zhan

    With the absence of shading loss together with improved quality of surface passivation introduced by low temperature processed amorphous silicon crystalline silicon (a-Si:H/c-Si) heterojunction, the interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction (IBC-SHJ) solar cell exhibits a potential for higher conversion efficiency and lower cost than a traditional front contact diffused junction solar cell. In such solar cells, the front surface passivation is of great importance to achieve both high open-circuit voltage (Voc) and short-circuit current (Jsc). Therefore, the motivation of this work is to develop a low temperature processed structure for the front surface passivation of IBC-SHJ solar cells, which must have an excellent and stable passivation quality as well as a good anti-reflection property. Four different thin film materials/structures were studied and evaluated for this purpose, namely: amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiNx:H), thick amorphous silicon film (a-Si:H), amorphous silicon/silicon nitride/silicon carbide (a-Si:H/a-SiN x:H/a-SiC:H) stack structure with an ultra-thin a-Si:H layer, and zinc sulfide (ZnS). It was demonstrated that the a-Si:H/a-SiNx:H/a-SiC:H stack surpasses other candidates due to both of its excellent surface passivation quality (SRVSi surface is found to be resulted from (i) field effect passivation due to the positive fixed charge (Q fix~1x1011 cm-2 with 5 nm a-Si:H layer) in a-SiNx:H as measured from capacitance-voltage technique, and (ii) reduced defect state density (mid-gap Dit~4x1010 cm-2eV-1) at a-Si:H/c-Si interface provided by a 5 nm thick a-Si:H layer, as characterized by conductance-frequency measurements. Paralleled with the experimental studies, a computer program was developed in this work based on the extended Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) model of surface recombination. With the help of this program, the experimental injection level dependent SRV curves of the stack passivated c-Si samples were successfully reproduced and

  14. Wear characterization of a tool steel surface modified by melting and gaseous alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizvi, S.A.

    1999-01-01

    Hot forging dies are subjected to laborious service conditions and so there is a need to explore means of improving die life to increase productivity and quality of forgings. Surface modification in order to produce wear resistant surface is an attractive method as it precludes the need to use expensive and highly alloyed steels. In this study, a novel, inexpensive surface modification technique is used to improve the tri biological properties of an H13 tool steel. Surface melting was achieved using a tungsten heat source and gaseous alloying produced under a shield of argon, carbon dioxide, carbon dioxide-argon mixture and nitrogen gases. The change in wear behaviour was compared through micro-hardness indentation measurements and using a dry sliding pin-on-plate wear testing machine. This study shows superior wear behaviour of the modified surfaces when compared to the untreated surfaces. The increase in wear resistance is attributed to the formation of carbides when surfaces are melted under a carbon dioxide shield. However, in the case of nitrogen and argon gaseous alloying, an increase in wear resistance can be attributed to an increase in surface hardness which in turn effects surface deformation behaviour. (author)

  15. Surface segregation of Ge during Si growth on Ge/Si(0 0 1) at low temperature observed by high-resolution RBS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, K.; Hosaka, N.; Hattori, T.; Kimura, K.

    2002-01-01

    The Si/Ge/Si(0 0 1) multilayer with about 1 ML Ge layer is fabricated by evaporating Si overlayer on a Ge/Si(0 0 1) surface at 20-300 deg. C. The depth profile of the Ge atoms is observed by high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy to investigate the possibility of Ge delta doping in Si. The observed profile of the Ge atoms spreads over several atomic layers even at 20 deg. C and a significant amount of Ge is located in the surface layer at higher temperatures. The results at 20-150 deg. C are well explained with two-layer model for surface segregation of the Ge atoms and the segregation rates are estimated. The activation energy for surface segregation of Ge atoms in amorphous Si is evaluated to be 0.035 eV, which is much smaller than the value reported for Si deposition at 500 deg. C. The small activation energy suggests that local heating during the Si deposition is dominant at low temperature

  16. Low temperatures - hot topic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1988-09-15

    Neutrino mass measurements, next-generation double beta experiments, solar neutrino detection, searches for magnetic monopoles and the challenge of discovering what most of the Universe is made of (dark matter), not to mention axions (cosmic and solar), supersymmetric neutral particles and cosmic neutrinos. All this physics could use cryogenic techniques. Thus the second European Workshop on Low Temperature Devices for the Detection of Low Energy Neutrinos and Dark Matter, held at LAPP (Annecy) in May, covered an active and promising field.

  17. Low temperatures - hot topic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    Neutrino mass measurements, next-generation double beta experiments, solar neutrino detection, searches for magnetic monopoles and the challenge of discovering what most of the Universe is made of (dark matter), not to mention axions (cosmic and solar), supersymmetric neutral particles and cosmic neutrinos. All this physics could use cryogenic techniques. Thus the second European Workshop on Low Temperature Devices for the Detection of Low Energy Neutrinos and Dark Matter, held at LAPP (Annecy) in May, covered an active and promising field

  18. Low temperature carbonization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, A A

    1934-01-10

    A process is described in which coal is passed through a distillation chamber in one retort at a comparatively low temperature, then passing the coal through a distillation chamber of a second retort subjected to a higher temperature, thence passing the coal through the distillation chamber of a third retort at a still higher temperature and separately collecting the liquid and vapors produced from each retort.

  19. Sweating at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalaye, H.; Launay, J.P.

    1980-11-01

    Tests of penetration liquids normally used between 10 and 40 0 C have shown that the arrangement of operationaal conditions (penetration and revealing times) was not sufficient to maintain their sensitivity below 10 0 C, thereby confirming that this temperature is a limit below which such products cannot be employed. The results achieved with a penetrant and a tracer specially devised for low temperatures (SHERWIN B 305 + D100) are satisfactory between 0 0 C and 15 0 C [fr

  20. Low temperature sensitization behavior in the weld metal of austenitic stainless steel. Study on low temperature sensitization in weldments of austenitic stainless steels and its improvement by laser surface melting treatment. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Hiroaki; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi; Nakao, Yoshikuni

    1996-01-01

    Low temperature sensitization (LTS) behavior in the weld metal of Type308 stainless steel was investigated in this study. Three kinds of Type308 stainless steels, of which carbon contents were 0.04%, 0.06% and 0.08%, were used for this study. TIG welding method was adopted to make the weld metals. Weld metals were subjected to the sensitizing heat treatment in the temperature range between 773 K and 1073 K. The degree of sensitization were examined by the EPR method and the Strauss test. Chromium carbide was absorbed to precipitate at δ/γ grain boundaries in the as-welded weld metals Corrosion test results have shown that the higher carbon content in the weld metal is, the earlier sensitization yields in it. Sensitization in weld metals is found to occur faster than in those solution heat-treated at 1273 K prior to sensitizing heat-treatment. This fact suggests that preexisted chromium carbides have an effect to accelerate sensitization. That is, it is apparent that LTS phenomenon occur even in the weld metal. Moreover, sensitization in the weld metal has occurred in much shorter time than in HAZ, which is attributed to the preferential precipitation of chromium carbide at δ/γ grain boundaries in the weld metals. (author)

  1. Low-Temperature Sol-Gel Synthesis of Nitrogen-Doped Anatase/Brookite Biphasic Nanoparticles with High Surface Area and Visible-Light Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Jiang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen doping in combination with the brookite phase or a mixture of TiO2 polymorphs nanomaterials can enhance photocatalytic activity under visible light. Generally, nitrogen-dopedanatase/brookite mixed phases TiO2 nanoparticles obtained by hydrothermal or solvothermal method need to be at high temperature and with long time heating treatment. Furthermore, the surface areas of them are low (<125 m2/g. There is hardly a report on the simple and direct preparation of N-doped anatase/brookite mixed phase TiO2 nanostructures using sol-gel method at low heating temperature. In this paper, the nitrogen-doped anatase/brookite biphasic nanoparticles with large surface area (240 m2/g were successfully prepared using sol-gel method at low temperature (165 °C, and with short heating time (4 h under autogenous pressure. The obtained sample without subsequent annealing at elevated temperatures showed enhanced photocatalytic efficiency for the degradation of methyl orange (MO with 4.2-, 9.6-, and 7.5-fold visible light activities compared to P25 and the amorphous samples heated in muffle furnace with air or in tube furnace with a flow of nitrogen at 165 °C, respectively. This result was attributed to the synergistic effects of nitrogen doping, mixed crystalline phases, and high surface area.

  2. Surface decoration through electrostatic interaction leading to enhanced reactivity: Low temperature synthesis of nanostructured chromium borides (CrB and CrB2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menaka,; Kumar, Bharat; Kumar, Sandeep; Ganguli, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    The present study describes a novel low temperature route at ambient pressure for the synthesis of nanocrystalline chromium borides (CrB and CrB 2 ) without using any flux or additives. The favorable and intimate mixing of nanoparticles of chromium acetate (Cr source) and boron forms an active chromium–boron precursor which decomposes at much lower temperature (400 °C) to form CrB (which is ∼1000 °C less than the known ambient pressure synthesis). The chromium acetate nanoparticles (∼5 nm) decorate the larger boron particles (150–200 nm) due to electrostatic interactions resulting from opposing surface charges of boron (zeta potential:+48.101 mV) and chromium acetate (zeta potential:−4.021 mV) in ethanolic medium and is evident in the TEM micrographs. The above method leads to the formation of pure CrB film like structure at 400 °C and nanospheres (40–60 nm) at 600 °C. Also, chromium diboride (CrB 2 ) nanoparticles (25 nm) could be obtained at 1000 °C. - Graphical abstract: Variation of surface charge of reactants, precursor and the products, chromium borides (CrB and CrB 2 ). Highlights: ► Novel borothermal reduction process for synthesis of chromium boride. ► Significant lowering of reaction temperature to obtain nanocrystalline chromium boride. ► Enhanced reactivity due to appropriate surface interactions

  3. A Monte Carlo simulation of the exchange reaction between gaseous molecules and the atoms on a heterogeneous solid surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Hisao

    1980-01-01

    A method of the Monte Carlo simulation of the isotopic exchange reaction between gaseous molecules and the atoms on an arbitrarily heterogeneous solid surface is described by employing hydrogen as an example. (author)

  4. Low temperature destructive distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1938-07-05

    A process is given and apparatus is described for the destructive distillation at low temperature of coal, oil shale, and the like by subjection to the action of a stream of hot gases or superhearted steam, flowing in a closed circuit. Subsequent treatment of the distillation residues with a gas stream containing oxygen results in combustion of the carbon-containing material therein brings to a high temperature the solid residue, in which the process comprises subsequently contacting the hot solid residue with the fluid stream effecting the distillation.

  5. Low Temperature (180°C Growth of Smooth Surface Germanium Epilayers on Silicon Substrates Using Electron Cyclotron Resonance Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng-Hsiang Chang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a new method to grow thin germanium (Ge epilayers (40 nm on c-Si substrates at a low growth temperature of 180°C using electron cyclotron resonance chemical vapor deposition (ECR-CVD process. The full width at half maximum (FWHM of the Ge (004 in X-ray diffraction pattern and the compressive stain in a Ge epilayer of 683 arcsec and 0.12% can be achieved. Moreover, the Ge/Si interface is observed by transmission electron microscopy to demonstrate the epitaxial growth of Ge on Si and the surface roughness is 0.342 nm. The thin-thickness and smooth surface of Ge epilayer grown on Si in this study is suitable to be a virtual substrate for developing the low cost and high efficiency III-V/Si tandem solar cells in our opinion. Furthermore, the low temperature process can not only decrease costs but can also reduce the restriction of high temperature processes on device manufacturing.

  6. Improvement of the surface morphology of a-plane InN using low-temperature InN buffer layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikata, G.; Hirano, S.; Inoue, T.; Hijikata, Y.; Orihara, M.; Yaguchi, H.; Yoshida, S.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the improvement of the surface morphology of a-plane InN films grown by RF molecular beam epitaxy. By using low-temperature (LT) InN buffer layers, we could successfully obtain InN films with a smooth surface. The full width at half maximum values of the X-ray diffraction (11-20) rocking curve along the [0001]InN direction were 2870 arcsec and 3410 arcsec for a-plane InN samples grown at 500 C with and without LT-InN buffer layers, respectively. Thus, we could improve also the crystalline quality of a-plane InN films by using LT-InN buffer layers. We observed strong polarization anisotropy in the photoluminescence spectra of a-plane InN, which is typical of nonpolar wurtzite III-nitride films. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Low temperature distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandegrift, J N; Postel, C

    1929-04-09

    To recover gas, oil tars, and coked residues by low temperature distillation from bituminous coals, lignites, oil shales, and the like, the raw material is fed from a hopper into a rotary retort which is zonally heated, the temperature being greatest at the discharge end. The material is heated first to a relatively low temperature, thereby removing the moisture and lighter volatiles which are withdrawn through a pipe by the suction of a pump, while the higher boiling point volatiles and fixed gases are withdrawn by suction through an outlet from the higher temperature zone. The vapors withdrawn from the opposite ends of the retort pass through separate vapor lines and condensers, and the suction in each end of the retort, caused by the pumps, is controlled by valves, which also control the location of the neutral point in the retort formed by said suction. Air and inert gas may be introduced into the retort from pipe and stack respectively through a pipe, and steam may be admitted into the high temperature zone through a pipe.

  8. Low-temperature carbonization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strankmuller, J

    1954-01-01

    The low-temperature carbonization plant at Boehlen in Eastern Germany (the first in which Lurgi type ovens were installed) worked with a throughput of 300 tons of brown-coal briquets per day per oven since 1936, later increased to 365 tons per day. The rising demand for low-temperature tar for hydrogenation purposes led to development of a modified oven of 450 tons throughput. This was achieved by stepping up the flow of the circulating gas and air mixture from 420,000 to 560,000 cubic feet per hour and by additional rows of V-shaped deflectors across the width of the oven chamber, which break up and loosen the charge, thus reducing cooling-gas pressure and allowing a greater flow of scavenging gas. The distance traversed by each briquet is nearly doubled, and the temperature gradient is less. It is claimed that the tar and the coke from modified ovens are of comparable quality. The compressive strength of the briquets was found to have an appreciable effect on the output. Better qts the chemistry, mechanism and thermodynamics of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction and aectromagnetic radiation.

  9. Surface passivation at low temperature of p- and n-type silicon wafers using a double layer a-Si:H/SiNx:H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Focsa, A.; Slaoui, A.; Charifi, H.; Stoquert, J.P.; Roques, S.

    2009-01-01

    Surface passivation of bare silicon or emitter region is of great importance towards high efficiency solar cells. Nowadays, this is usually accomplished by depositing an hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiNx:H) layer on n + p structures that serves also as an excellent antireflection layer. On the other hand, surface passivation of p-type silicon is better assured by an hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layer but suffers from optical properties. In this paper, we reported the surface passivation of p-type and n-type silicon wafers by using an a-Si:H/SiNx:H double layer formed at low temperature (50-400 deg. C) with ECR-PECVD technique. We first investigated the optical properties (refraction index, reflectance, and absorbance) and structural properties by FTIR (bonds Si-H, N-H) of the deposited films. The hydrogen content in the layers was determined by elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). The passivation effect was monitored by measuring the minority carrier effective lifetime vs. different parameters such as deposition temperature and amorphous silicon layer thickness. We have found that a 10-15 nm a-Si film with an 86 nm thick SiN layer provides an optimum of the minority carriers' lifetime. It increases from an initial value of about 50-70 μs for a-Si:H to about 760 and 800 μs for a-Si:H/SiNx:H on Cz-pSi and FZ-nSi, respectively, at an injection level 2 x 10 15 cm -3 . The effective surface recombination velocity, S eff , for passivated double layer on n-type FZ Si reached 11 cm/s and for FZ-pSi-14 cm/s, and for Cz-pSi-16-20 cm/s. Effect of hydrogen in the passivation process is discussed.

  10. Ammonia synthesis at low temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Thomas Holm; Logadottir, Ashildur; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2000-01-01

    have been carried out to evaluate its feasibility. The calculations suggest that it might be possible to catalytically produce ammonia from molecular nitrogen at low temperatures and pressures, in particular if energy is fed into the process electrochemically. (C) 2000 American Institute of Physics.......Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of reaction paths and energies for the industrial and the biological catalytic ammonia synthesis processes are compared. The industrial catalyst is modeled by a ruthenium surface, while the active part of the enzyme is modeled by a MoFe6S9 complex...

  11. Study on the surface oxidation of uranium in different gaseous atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoling; Fu Yibei; Xie Renshou

    1996-03-01

    The studying for the surface oxidation of uranium and oxide by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), and the surface oxidation of uranium in different gaseous atmospheres such as O 2 , H 2 , CO, CO 2 , H 2 O(v) and air were reviewed. The surface oxidation of uranium is greatly influenced by a number of parameters including atmospheric temperature, pressure, diffusion of adsorbed gas atoms through the oxide layer, surface and interface chemical component, and defect structure and electron nature of the oxide layer. The initial oxidation mechanism and kinetics have been discussed. Suggestions for future work have also been presented. (32 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.)

  12. Low temperature rate coefficients of the H + CH(+) → C(+) + H2 reaction: New potential energy surface and time-independent quantum scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfelli, Ghofran; Halvick, Philippe; Honvault, Pascal; Kerkeni, Boutheïna; Stoecklin, Thierry

    2015-09-21

    The observed abundances of the methylidyne cation, CH(+), in diffuse molecular clouds can be two orders of magnitude higher than the prediction of the standard gas-phase models which, in turn, predict rather well the abundances of neutral CH. It is therefore necessary to investigate all the possible formation and destruction processes of CH(+) in the interstellar medium with the most abundant species H, H2, and e(-). In this work, we address the destruction process of CH(+) by hydrogen abstraction. We report a new calculation of the low temperature rate coefficients for the abstraction reaction, using accurate time-independent quantum scattering and a new high-level ab initio global potential energy surface including a realistic model of the long-range interaction between the reactants H and CH(+). The calculated thermal rate coefficient is in good agreement with the experimental data in the range 50 K-800 K. However, at lower temperatures, the experimental rate coefficient takes exceedingly small values which are not reproduced by the calculated rate coefficient. Instead, the latter rate coefficient is close to the one given by the Langevin capture model, as expected for a reaction involving an ion and a neutral species. Several recent theoretical works have reported a seemingly good agreement with the experiment below 50 K, but an analysis of these works show that they are based on potential energy surfaces with incorrect long-range behavior. The experimental results were explained by a loss of reactivity of the lowest rotational states of the reactant; however, the quantum scattering calculations show the opposite, namely, a reactivity enhancement with rotational excitation.

  13. Low Temperature Plasma Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, David

    2013-10-01

    Ionized gas plasmas near room temperature are used in a remarkable number of technological applications mainly because they are extraordinarily efficient at exploiting electrical power for useful chemical and material transformations near room temperature. In this tutorial address, I will focus on the newest area of low temperature ionized gas plasmas (LTP), in this case operating under atmospheric pressure conditions, in which the temperature-sensitive material is living tissue. LTP research directed towards biomedical applications such as sterilization, surgery, wound healing and anti-cancer therapy has seen remarkable growth in the last 3-5 years, but the mechanisms responsible for the biomedical effects have remained mysterious. It is known that LTP readily create reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). ROS and RNS (or RONS), in addition to a suite of other radical and non-radical reactive species, are essential actors in an important sub-field of aerobic biology termed ``redox'' (or oxidation-reduction) biology. I will review the evidence suggesting that RONS generated by plasmas are responsible for their observed therapeutic effects. Other possible bio-active mechanisms include electric fields, charges and photons. It is common in LTP applications that synergies between different mechanisms can play a role and I will review the evidence for synergies in plasma biomedicine. Finally, I will address the challenges and opportunities for plasma physicists to enter this novel, multidisciplinary field.

  14. Low-Temperature Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Erik J.; West, William C.; Smart, Marshall C.

    2008-01-01

    An effort to extend the low-temperature operational limit of supercapacitors is currently underway. At present, commercially available non-aqueous supercapacitors are rated for a minimum operating temperature of -40 C. A capability to operate at lower temperatures would be desirable for delivering power to systems that must operate in outer space or in the Polar Regions on Earth. Supercapacitors (also known as double-layer or electrochemical capacitors) offer a high power density (>1,000 W/kg) and moderate energy density (about 5 to 10 Wh/kg) technology for storing energy and delivering power. This combination of properties enables delivery of large currents for pulsed applications, or alternatively, smaller currents for low duty cycle applications. The mechanism of storage of electric charge in a supercapacitor -- at the electrical double-layer formed at a solid-electrode/liquid-electrolyte interface -- differs from that of a primary or secondary electrochemical cell (i.e., a battery) in such a manner as to impart a long cycle life (typically >10(exp 6) charge/discharge cycles).

  15. The influence of surface preparation on low temperature HfO2 ALD on InGaAs (001) and (110) surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kent, Tyler; Edmonds, Mary; Kummel, Andrew C.; Tang, Kechao; Negara, Muhammad Adi; McIntyre, Paul; Chobpattana, Varistha; Mitchell, William; Sahu, Bhagawan; Galatage, Rohit; Droopad, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Current logic devices rely on 3D architectures, such as the tri-gate field effect transistor (finFET), which utilize the (001) and (110) crystal faces simultaneously thus requiring passivation methods for the (110) face in order to ensure a pristine 3D surface prior to further processing. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and correlated electrical measurement on MOSCAPs were utilized to compare the effects of a previously developed in situ pre-atomic layer deposition (ALD) surface clean on the InGaAs (001) and (110) surfaces. Ex situ wet cleans are very effective on the (001) surface but not the (110) surface. Capacitance voltage indicated the (001) surface with no buffered oxide etch had a higher C max hypothesized to be a result of poor nucleation of HfO 2 on the native oxide. An in situ pre-ALD surface clean employing both atomic H and trimethylaluminum (TMA) pre-pulsing, developed by Chobpattana et al. and Carter et al. for the (001) surface, was demonstrated to be effective on the (110) surface for producing low D it high C ox MOSCAPs. Including TMA in the pre-ALD surface clean resulted in reduction of the magnitude of the interface state capacitance. The XPS studies show the role of atomic H pre-pulsing is to remove both carbon and oxygen while STM shows the role of TMA pre-pulsing is to eliminate H induced etching. Devices fabricated at 120 °C and 300 °C were compared

  16. Uptake of gaseous formaldehyde onto soil surfaces: a coated-wall flow tube study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guo; Su, Hang; Li, Xin; Meusel, Hannah; Kuhn, Uwe; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shao, Min; Cheng, Yafang

    2015-04-01

    Gaseous formaldehyde (HCHO) is an important intermediate molecule and source of HO2 radicals. However, discrepancies exist between model simulated and observed HCHO concentrations, suggesting missing sources or sinks in the HCHO budget. Multiphase processes on the surface of soil and airborne soil-derived particles have been suggested as an important mechanism for the production/removal of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols. In this work, the uptake of gaseous HCHO on soil surfaces were investigated through coated-wall flow tube experiments with HCHO concentration ranging from 10 to 40 ppbv. The results show that the adsorption of HCHO occurred on soil surfaces, and the uptake coefficient dropped gradually (i.e., by a factor of 5 after 1 hour) as the reactive surface sites were consumed. The HCHO uptake coefficient was found to be affected by the relative humidity (RH), decreasing from (2.4 ± 0.5) × 10-4 at 0% RH to (3.0 ± 0.08) × 10-5 at 70% RH, due to competition of water molecule absorption on the soil surface. A release of HCHO from reacted soil was also detected by applying zero air, suggesting the nature of reversible physical absorption and the existence of an equilibrium at the soil-gas interface. It implies that soil could be either a source or a sink for HCHO, depending on the ambient HCHO concentration. We also develop a Matlab program to calculate the uptake coefficient under laminar flow conditions based on the Cooney-Kim-Davis method.

  17. Final Technical Report: Metal—Organic Surface Catalyst for Low-temperature Methane Oxidation: Bi-functional Union of Metal—Organic Complex and Chemically Complementary Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tait, Steven L. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Stabilization and chemical control of transition metal centers is a critical problem in the advancement of heterogeneous catalysts to next-generation catalysts that exhibit high levels of selectivity, while maintaining strong activity and facile catalyst recycling. Supported metal nanoparticle catalysts typically suffer from having a wide range of metal sites with different coordination numbers and varying chemistry. This project is exploring new possibilities in catalysis by combining features of homogeneous catalysts with those of heterogeneous catalysts to develop new, bi-functional systems. The systems are more complex than traditional heterogeneous catalysts in that they utilize sequential active sites to accomplish the desired overall reaction. The interaction of metal—organic catalysts with surface supports and their interactions with reactants to enable the catalysis of critical reactions at lower temperatures are at the focus of this study. Our work targets key fundamental chemistry problems. How do the metal—organic complexes interact with the surface? Can those metal center sites be tuned for selectivity and activity as they are in the homogeneous system by ligand design? What steps are necessary to enable a cooperative chemistry to occur and open opportunities for bi-functional catalyst systems? Study of these systems will develop the concept of bringing together the advantages of heterogeneous catalysis with those of homogeneous catalysis, and take this a step further by pursuing the objective of a bi-functional system. The use of metal-organic complexes in surface catalysts is therefore of interest to create well-defined and highly regular single-site centers. While these are not likely to be stable in the high temperature environments (> 300 °C) typical of industrial heterogeneous catalysts, they could be applied in moderate temperature reactions (100-300 °C), made feasible by lowering reaction temperatures by better catalyst control. They also

  18. Low temperature anodic bonding to silicon nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weichel, Steen; Reus, Roger De; Bouaidat, Salim

    2000-01-01

    Low-temperature anodic bonding to stoichiometric silicon nitride surfaces has been performed in the temperature range from 3508C to 4008C. It is shown that the bonding is improved considerably if the nitride surfaces are either oxidized or exposed to an oxygen plasma prior to the bonding. Both bu...

  19. Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM emissions from snow surfaces in northern New York.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Alexander Maxwell

    Full Text Available Snow surface-to-air exchange of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM was measured using a modified Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP dynamic flux chamber (DFC in a remote, open site in Potsdam, New York. Sampling was conducted during the winter months of 2011. The inlet and outlet of the DFC were coupled with a Tekran Model 2537A mercury (Hg vapor analyzer using a Tekran Model 1110 two port synchronized sampler. The surface GEM flux ranged from -4.47 ng m(-2 hr(-1 to 9.89 ng m(-2 hr(-1. For most sample periods, daytime GEM flux was strongly correlated with solar radiation. The average nighttime GEM flux was slightly negative and was not well correlated with any of the measured meteorological variables. Preliminary, empirical models were developed to estimate GEM emissions from snow surfaces in northern New York. These models suggest that most, if not all, of the Hg deposited with and to snow is reemitted to the atmosphere.

  20. Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) emissions from snow surfaces in northern New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, J Alexander; Holsen, Thomas M; Mondal, Sumona

    2013-01-01

    Snow surface-to-air exchange of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) was measured using a modified Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) dynamic flux chamber (DFC) in a remote, open site in Potsdam, New York. Sampling was conducted during the winter months of 2011. The inlet and outlet of the DFC were coupled with a Tekran Model 2537A mercury (Hg) vapor analyzer using a Tekran Model 1110 two port synchronized sampler. The surface GEM flux ranged from -4.47 ng m(-2) hr(-1) to 9.89 ng m(-2) hr(-1). For most sample periods, daytime GEM flux was strongly correlated with solar radiation. The average nighttime GEM flux was slightly negative and was not well correlated with any of the measured meteorological variables. Preliminary, empirical models were developed to estimate GEM emissions from snow surfaces in northern New York. These models suggest that most, if not all, of the Hg deposited with and to snow is reemitted to the atmosphere.

  1. Industrial Applications of Low Temperature Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardsley, J N

    2001-01-01

    The use of low temperature plasmas in industry is illustrated by the discussion of four applications, to lighting, displays, semiconductor manufacturing and pollution control. The type of plasma required for each application is described and typical materials are identified. The need to understand radical formation, ionization and metastable excitation within the discharge and the importance of surface reactions are stressed

  2. Characterization of light gaseous hydrocarbons of the surface soils of Krishna-Godavari basin, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, M; Rasheed, M A; Madhavi, T; Kalpana, M S; Patil, D J; Dayal, A M

    2012-01-01

    Several techniques are used for the exploration of hydrocarbons, of which; the geochemical techniques involving the microbiological technique use the principle of detecting the light hydrocarbon seepage activities for indication of sub-surface petroleum accumulations. Asurvey was carried out to characterize the light gaseous hydrocarbons seeping in oil and gas fields of Krishna-Godavari basin ofAndhra Pradesh. Aset of 50 sub-soil samples were collected at depths of about 3 m for geochemical analyses and 1m for microbiological analysis. The microbial prospecting studies showed the presence of high bacterial population for methane 2.5 x 10(2) to 6.0 x 10(6) cfu g(-1), propane 1x10(2) to 8.0 x 10(6) cfu g(-1) in soil samples. The adsorbed soil gas analysis showed the presence of moderate to low concentrations of methane (26 to 139 ppb), ethane (0 to 17 ppb), propane (0 to 8 ppb), butane (0 to 5 ppb) and pentane (0 to 2 ppb) in the soil samples of the study area. Carbon isotope analysis for methane ('13C1) ranging from -36.6 to -22.7 per hundred Pee Dee Belemnite (PDB) suggests these gases are of thermogenic origin. Geo-microbial prospecting method coupled with adsorbed soil gas and carbon isotope ratio analysis have thus shown good correlation with existing oil/gas fields of Krishna-Godavari basin.

  3. Up-cycling waste glass to minimal water adsorption/absorption lightweight aggregate by rapid low temperature sintering: optimization by dual process-mixture response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velis, Costas A; Franco-Salinas, Claudia; O'Sullivan, Catherine; Najorka, Jens; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Cheeseman, Christopher R

    2014-07-01

    Mixed color waste glass extracted from municipal solid waste is either not recycled, in which case it is an environmental and financial liability, or it is used in relatively low value applications such as normal weight aggregate. Here, we report on converting it into a novel glass-ceramic lightweight aggregate (LWA), potentially suitable for high added value applications in structural concrete (upcycling). The artificial LWA particles were formed by rapidly sintering (shrinkage during sintering, density and water adsorption/absorption. The diametrical expansion could be effectively modeled via the RSM and controlled to meet a wide range of specifications; here we optimized for LWA structural concrete. The optimally designed LWA is sintered in comparatively low temperatures (825-835 °C), thus potentially saving costs and lowering emissions; it had exceptionally low water adsorption/absorption (6.1-7.2% w/wd; optimization target: 1.5-7.5% w/wd); while remaining substantially lightweight (density: 1.24-1.28 g.cm(-3); target: 0.9-1.3 g.cm(-3)). This is a considerable advancement for designing effective environmentally friendly lightweight concrete constructions, and boosting resource efficiency of waste glass flows.

  4. Activation of surface lattice oxygen in single-atom Pt/CeO 2 for low-temperature CO oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, Lei; Mei, Donghai; Xiong, Haifeng; Peng, Bo; Ren, Zhibo; Pereira Hernandez, Xavier I.; DelaRiva, Andrew; Wang, Meng; Engelhard, Mark H.; Kovarik, Libor; Datye, Abhaya K.; Wang, Yong

    2017-12-14

    While single-atom catalysts can provide high catalytic activity and selectivity, application in industrial catalysts demands long term performance and the ability to regenerate the catalysts. We have investigated the factors that lead to improved catalytic activity of a Pt/CeO2 catalyst for low temperature CO oxidation. Single-atom Pt/CeO2 becomes active for CO oxidation under lean condition only at elevated temperatures, because CO is strongly bound to ionic Pt sites. Reducing the catalyst, even under mild conditions, leads to onset of CO oxidation activity even at room temperature. This high activity state involves the transformation of mononuclear Pt species to sub-nanometer sized Pt particles. Under oxidizing conditions, the Pt can be restored to its stable, single-atom state. The key to facile regeneration is the ability to create mobile Pt species and suitable trapping sites on the support, making this a prototypical catalyst system for industrial application of single-atom catalysis.

  5. Low-temperature thermal expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collings, E.W.

    1986-01-01

    This chapter discusses the thermal expansion of insulators and metals. Harmonicity and anharmonicity in thermal expansion are examined. The electronic, magnetic, an other contributions to low temperature thermal expansion are analyzed. The thermodynamics of the Debye isotropic continuum, the lattice-dynamical approach, and the thermal expansion of metals are discussed. Relative linear expansion at low temperatures is reviewed and further calculations of the electronic thermal expansion coefficient are given. Thermal expansions are given for Cu, Al and Ti. Phenomenologic thermodynamic relationships are also discussed

  6. Humidity effects on surface dielectric barrier discharge for gaseous naphthalene decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelaziz, Ayman A.; Ishijima, Tatsuo; Seto, Takafumi

    2018-04-01

    Experiments are performed using dry and humid air to clarify the effects of water vapour on the characteristics of surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) and investigate its impact on the performance of the SDBD for decomposition of gaseous naphthalene in air stream. The current characteristics, including the discharge and the capacitive currents, are deeply analyzed and the discharge mechanism is explored. The results confirmed that the humidity affected the microdischarge distribution without affecting the discharge mode. Interestingly, it is found that the water vapour had a significant influence on the capacitance of the reactor due to its deposition on the discharge electrode and the dielectric, which, in turn, affects the power loss in the dielectric and the total power consumed in the reactor. Thus, the factor of the humidity effect on the power loss in the dielectric should be considered in addition to its effect on the attachment coefficient. Additionally, there was an optimum level of the humidity for the decomposition of naphthalene in the SDBD, and its value depended on the gas composition, where the maximum naphthalene decomposition efficiency in O2/H2O is achieved at the humidity level ˜10%, which was lower than that obtained in air/H2O (˜28%). The results also revealed that the role of the humidity in the decomposition efficiency was not significant in the humidified O2 at high power level. This was attributed to the significant increase in oxygen-derived species (such as O atoms and O3) at high power, which was enough to overcome the negative effects of the humidity.

  7. New Constraints on Terrestrial Surface-Atmosphere Fluxes of Gaseous Elemental Mercury Using a Global Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnan, Yannick; Le Dantec, Théo; Moore, Christopher W; Edwards, Grant C; Obrist, Daniel

    2016-01-19

    Despite 30 years of study, gaseous elemental mercury (Hg(0)) exchange magnitude and controls between terrestrial surfaces and the atmosphere still remain uncertain. We compiled data from 132 studies, including 1290 reported fluxes from more than 200,000 individual measurements, into a database to statistically examine flux magnitudes and controls. We found that fluxes were unevenly distributed, both spatially and temporally, with strong biases toward Hg-enriched sites, daytime and summertime measurements. Fluxes at Hg-enriched sites were positively correlated with substrate concentrations, but this was absent at background sites. Median fluxes over litter- and snow-covered soils were lower than over bare soils, and chamber measurements showed higher emission compared to micrometeorological measurements. Due to low spatial extent, estimated emissions from Hg-enriched areas (217 Mg·a(-1)) were lower than previous estimates. Globally, areas with enhanced atmospheric Hg(0) levels (particularly East Asia) showed an emerging importance of Hg(0) emissions accounting for half of the total global emissions estimated at 607 Mg·a(-1), although with a large uncertainty range (-513 to 1353 Mg·a(-1) [range of 37.5th and 62.5th percentiles]). The largest uncertainties in Hg(0) fluxes stem from forests (-513 to 1353 Mg·a(-1) [range of 37.5th and 62.5th percentiles]), largely driven by a shortage of whole-ecosystem fluxes and uncertain contributions of leaf-atmosphere exchanges, questioning to what degree ecosystems are net sinks or sources of atmospheric Hg(0).

  8. Vol. 5: Low Temperature Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitenko, A.

    1993-01-01

    Problems of modern physics and the situation with physical research in Ukraine are considered. Programme of the conference includes scientific and general problems. Its proceeding are published in 6 volumes. The papers presented in this volume refer to low-temperature physics

  9. Certification testing at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noss, P.W.; Ammerman, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    Regulations governing the transport of radioactive materials require that most hypothetical accident condition tests or analyses consider the effects of the environmental temperature that most challenges package performance. For many packages, the most challenging temperature environment is the cold condition (-29 C according to U.S. regulations), primarily because the low temperature causes the highest free drop impact forces due to the higher strength of many energy-absorbing materials at this temperature. If it is decided to perform low temperature testing, it is only necessary that the relevant parts of the package have the required temperature prior to the drop. However, the details of performing a drop at low temperature can have a large influence on testing cost and technical effectiveness. The selection of the test site, the chamber and type of chilling equipment, instrumentation, and even the time of year are all important. Control of seemingly minor details such as the effect on internal pressure, placement of monitoring thermocouples, the thermal time constant of the test article, and icing of equipment are necessary to ensure a successful low temperature test. This paper will discuss these issues and offer suggestions based on recent experience

  10. Science with low temperature detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadoulet, B.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA; California Univ., Berkeley

    1996-01-01

    The novel technique of particle detection with low temperature detectors opens a number of new scientific opportunities. We review some of these, focusing on three generic applications: far infrared bolometry taking as an example the cosmic microwave background, X-ray spectroscopy for astrophysics and biological applications, and massive calorimeters for dark matter searches and neutrino physics. (orig.)

  11. Preparation of atomically clean and flat Si(1 0 0) surfaces by low-energy ion sputtering and low-temperature annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.C.; Ji, J.-Y.; Kline, J.S.; Tucker, J.R.; Shen, T.-C.

    2003-01-01

    Si(1 0 0) surfaces were prepared by wet-chemical etching followed by 0.3-1.5 keV Ar ion sputtering, either at elevated or room temperature (RT). After a brief anneal under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions, the resulting surfaces were examined by scanning tunneling microscopy. We find that wet-chemical etching alone cannot produce a clean and flat Si(1 0 0) surface. However, subsequent 300 eV Ar ion sputtering at room temperature followed by a 700 deg. C anneal yields atomically clean and flat Si(1 0 0) surfaces suitable for nanoscale device fabrication

  12. Pressurized-helium breakdown at very low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metas, R J

    1972-06-01

    An investigation of the electrical-breakdown behavior of helium at very low temperatures has been carried out to assist the design and development of superconducting power cables. At very high densities, both liquid and gaseous helium showed an enhancement in electric strength when pressurized to a few atmospheres; conditioned values of breakdown fields then varied between 30 and 45 MV/m. Breakdown processes occurring over a wide range of helium densities are discussed. 24 references.

  13. Containment test in area of high latitude and low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Jiantao; Ni Yongsheng; Jia Wutong

    2014-01-01

    The effects of high latitude and low temperature on containment test are detailed analyzed from the view of design, equipment, construct and start-up, and the solution is put forward. The major problems resolved is as below: the effects of low temperature and high wind on defect inspection of the containment surface, the effects of test load on the affiliated equipment of containment in the condition of low temperature, and the effects of low temperature on the containment leak rate measurement. Application in Hongyanhe Unit 1 showed that the proposed scheme can effectively overcome the influence of adverse weather on the containment test. (authors)

  14. The effect of MAO processing time on surface properties and low temperature infrared emissivity of ceramic coating on aluminium 6061 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Bosta, Mohannad M. S.; Ma, Keng-Jeng; Chien, Hsi-Hsin

    2013-09-01

    MAO ceramic coatings were prepared on aluminium 6061 surfaces at different treating durations (10, 20, ... 60 min), using alkali silicate electrolyte and pulsed bipolar current mode. The surface microstructures and properties were studied using SEM, XRD, EDX and a surface roughness tester. Image-Pro Plus and MATCH! softwares were used to analyze SEM micrographs and XRD results, respectively. The infrared emissivities of the ceramic coatings were measured at the 70 °C using FTIR spectrometer. We found a linear correlation between the volcano-like area and the surface roughness. The compositions and phases were associated with the volcano-like population and area. The curve of IR spectral emissivity was influenced by surface roughness, γ-alumina, sillimanite and cristobalite phases. The emissivity was enhanced by the surface roughness in the ranges 4.0-9.6 μm and 10.5-14.8 μm. In the range 7.0-8.0 μm, α-alumina and sillimanite phases enhanced the emissivity, while the cristobalite has a negative impact to the emissivity. A negative contributions were found for α-alumina in the region 9.6-16.0 μm and for the surface thickness in the region 15.0-16.0 μm. Overall, the average of long wave infrared (LWIR) emissivity ranged from 87.05% to 91.65%.

  15. Automatic low-temperature calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malyshev, V.M.; Mil'ner, G.A.; Shibakin, V.F.; Sorkin, E.L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes a low-temperature adiabatic calorimeter with a range of 1.5-500K. The system for maintaining adiabatic conditions is implemented by two resitance thermometers, whose sensitivity at low temperatures is several orders higher than that of thermocouples. The calorimeter cryostat is installed in an STG-40 portable Dewar flask. The calorimeter is controlled by an Elektronika-60 microcomputer. Standard platinum and germanium thermometers were placed inside of the calorimeter to calibrate the thermometers of the calorimeter and the shield, and the specific heats of specimens of OSCh 11-4 copper and KTP-8 paste were measured to demonstrate the possibilities of the described calorimeter. Experience with the calorimeter has shown that a thorough study of the dependence of heat capacity on temperature (over 100 points for one specimen) can be performed in one or two dats

  16. Low-temperature growth of (2 1-bar 1-bar 0) ZnO nanofilm on NaCl (0 0 1) surface by ion beam sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Jung-Hsiung; Yeh, Sung-Wei; Huang, Hsing-Lu; Gan, Dershin

    2009-01-01

    ZnO nanofilm of the (2 1 -bar 1 -bar 0) surface was prepared by ion beam sputtering deposition. The nanofilm was prepared on NaCl (0 0 1) surface at 200 o C to produce nearly pure (2 1 -bar 1 -bar 0) ZnO texture and the orientation relationship was determined and the interface discussed. Transmission electron microscopy lattice images were used to find the interface formed between ZnO nanocrystals. The ZnO nanocrystals coalesced to form a straight (0 1 -bar 1 -bar 2) interface. The photoluminescence spectrum from the (2 1 -bar 1 -bar 0) ZnO surface showed only a near-band-edge UV emission peak.

  17. Influence of nitrogen surface functionalities on the catalytic activity of activated carbon in low temperature SCR of NOx with NH3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szymanski, Grzegorz S.; Grzybek, Teresa; Papp, Helmut

    2004-01-01

    The reduction of nitrogen oxide with ammonia was studied using carbon catalysts with chemically modified surfaces. Carbon samples with different surface chemistry were obtained from commercial activated carbon D43/1 (CarboTech, Essen, Germany) by chemical modification involving oxidation with conc. nitric acid (DOx) (1); high temperature treatment (=1000K) under vacuum (DHT) (2); or in ammonia (DHTN, DOxN) (3). Additionally, a portion of the DOx sample was promoted with iron(III) ions (DOxFe). The catalytic tests were performed in a microreactor at a temperature range of 413-573K. The carbon sample annealed under vacuum (DHT) showed the lowest activity. The formation of surface acidic surface oxides by nitric acid treatment (DOx) enhanced the catalytic activity only slightly. However, as can be expected, subsequent promotion of the DOx sample with iron(III) ions increased drastically its catalytic activity. However, this was accompanied by some loss of selectivity, i.e. formation of N 2 O as side product. This effect can be avoided using ammonia-treated carbons which demonstrated reasonable activity with simultaneous high selectivity. The most active and selective among them was the sample that was first oxidized with nitric acid and then heated in an ammonia stream (DOxN). A correlation between catalytic activity and surface nitrogen content was observed. Surface nitrogen species seem to play an important role in catalytic selective reduction of nitrogen oxide with ammonia, possibly facilitating NO 2 formation (a reaction intermediate) as a result of easier chemisorption of oxygen and nitrogen oxide

  18. Influence of nitrogen surface functionalities on the catalytic activity of activated carbon in low temperature SCR of NO{sub x} with NH{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szymanski, Grzegorz S. [Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Gagarina 7, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Grzybek, Teresa [Faculty of Fuels and Energy, AGH, University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Papp, Helmut [Faculty of Chemistry and Mineralogy, Institute of Technical Chemistry, University of Leipzig, Linnerstrasse 3, 04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2004-06-15

    The reduction of nitrogen oxide with ammonia was studied using carbon catalysts with chemically modified surfaces. Carbon samples with different surface chemistry were obtained from commercial activated carbon D43/1 (CarboTech, Essen, Germany) by chemical modification involving oxidation with conc. nitric acid (DOx) (1); high temperature treatment (=1000K) under vacuum (DHT) (2); or in ammonia (DHTN, DOxN) (3). Additionally, a portion of the DOx sample was promoted with iron(III) ions (DOxFe). The catalytic tests were performed in a microreactor at a temperature range of 413-573K. The carbon sample annealed under vacuum (DHT) showed the lowest activity. The formation of surface acidic surface oxides by nitric acid treatment (DOx) enhanced the catalytic activity only slightly. However, as can be expected, subsequent promotion of the DOx sample with iron(III) ions increased drastically its catalytic activity. However, this was accompanied by some loss of selectivity, i.e. formation of N{sub 2}O as side product. This effect can be avoided using ammonia-treated carbons which demonstrated reasonable activity with simultaneous high selectivity. The most active and selective among them was the sample that was first oxidized with nitric acid and then heated in an ammonia stream (DOxN). A correlation between catalytic activity and surface nitrogen content was observed. Surface nitrogen species seem to play an important role in catalytic selective reduction of nitrogen oxide with ammonia, possibly facilitating NO{sub 2} formation (a reaction intermediate) as a result of easier chemisorption of oxygen and nitrogen oxide.

  19. Plenary lectures of the divisions semiconductor physics, thin films, dynamics and statistical physics, magnetism, metal physics, surface physics, low temperature physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roessler, U.

    1992-01-01

    This volume contains a selection of plenary and invited lectures of the Solid State Division spring meeting of the DPG (Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft) 1992 in Regensburg. The constribution come mainly from five fields of the physics of condensed matter: doped fullerenes and high Tc superconductors, surfaces, time-resolved on nonlinear optics, polymer melts, and low-dimensional semiconductor systems. (orig.)

  20. Molecular hydrogen formation on surfaces of astrophysical interest: first results on water ice at very low temperature and on graphite at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baouche, Saoud

    2004-01-01

    As the generally admitted mechanism of formation of the H_2 molecule in the interstellar medium (ISM) is a catalytic reaction between two atoms of H on the surface of cosmic powder grains, where grains are supposed to be carbons or silicates and could have ice coats, this research thesis aims at providing some elements about the efficiency of this reaction, what happens to the bound energy released after formation of the H_2 molecule. The author first describes the FORMOLISM experiment (Formation of molecule in the ISM), and then reports the study of the source of H or D atoms which is a very important component of the experiment. He reports and comments results obtained on the formation of H_2 and D_2 molecules on amorphous water ice. He reports the study of the dynamics of formation of the D_2 molecule on a graphite surface by using the laser-aided associative adsorption technique

  1. Li insertion into Li4Ti5O12 spinel prepared by low temperature solid state route: Charge capability vs surface area

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zukalová, Markéta; Fabián, M.; Klusáčková, Monika; Klementová, Mariana; Pitňa Lásková, Barbora; Danková, Z.; Senna, M.; Kavan, Ladislav

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 265 (2018), s. 480-487 ISSN 0013-4686 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-06511S; GA MŠk LM2015087; GA MŠk 8F15003 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : Li4Ti5O12 * Charge capacity * Solid state * Li insertion * Surface area Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry OBOR OECD: Electrochemistry (dry cells, batteries, fuel cells, corrosion metals, electrolysis) Impact factor: 4.798, year: 2016

  2. Nanoporous silver cathode surface treated by atomic layer deposition of CeO_x for low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neoh, Ke Chean; Han, Gwon Deok; Kim, Manjin; Kim, Jun Woo; Choi, Hyung Jong; Park, Suk Won; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) with a 50 nm thin silver (Ag) cathode surface treated with cerium oxide (CeO_x) by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The performances of bare and ALD-treated Ag cathodes were evaluated on gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) electrolyte supporting cells with a platinum (Pt) anode over 300 °C–450 °C. Our work confirms that ALD CeO_x treatment enhances cathodic performance and thermal stability of the Ag cathode. The performance difference between cells using a Ag cathode optimally treated with an ALD CeO_x surface and a reference Pt cathode is about 50% at 450 °C in terms of fuel cell power output in our experiment. The bare Ag cathode completely agglomerated into islands during fuel cell operation at 450 °C, while the ALD CeO_x treatment effectively protects the porosity of the cathode. We also discuss the long-term stability of ALD CeO_x-treated Ag cathodes related to the microstructure of the layers. (paper)

  3. Effect of halide salts on development of surface browning on fresh-cut 'Granny Smith' (Malus × domestica Borkh) apple slices during storage at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongxin; Wills, Ron B H; Golding, John B; Huque, Roksana

    2015-03-30

    The postharvest life of fresh-cut apple slices is limited by browning on cut surfaces. Dipping in halide salt solutions was examined for their inhibition of surface browning on 'Granny Smith' apple slices and the effects on biochemical factors associated with browning. Delay in browning by salts was greatest with chloride = phosphate > sulfate > nitrate with no difference between sodium, potassium and calcium ions. The effectiveness of sodium halides on browning was fluoride > chloride = bromide > iodide = control. Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity of tissue extracted from chloride- and fluoride-treated slices was not different to control but when added into the assay solution, NaF > NaCl both showed lower PPO activity at pH 3-5 compared to control buffer. The level of polyphenols in treated slices was NaF > NaCl > control. Addition of chlorogenic acid to slices enhanced browning but NaCl and NaF counteracted this effect. There was no effect of either halide salt on respiration, ethylene production, ion leakage, and antioxidant activity. Dipping apple slices in NaCl is a low cost treatment with few impediments to commercial use and could be a replacement for other anti-browning additives. The mode of action of NaCl and NaF is through decreasing PPO activity resulting in reduced oxidation of polyphenols. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Thermoluminescent system for low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, L.A.R. da; Caldas, L.V.E.; Leite, N.G.

    1988-09-01

    A system for measurements of the thermoluminescent glow curve, the thermoluminescent emission spectrum and the optical absorption spectrum of solid samples, from liquid nitrogen temperature up to 473 K, is reported. A specially designed temperature programmer provides a linear heating of the sample at a wide range of selectable heating rates, as also long term steady-state temperatures for annealing and isothermal decay studies. The system operates at a pressure of 1.33 x 10 -3 Pa. Presently it is being used for lithium fluoride low temperature thermoluminescent studies. (author) [pt

  5. Mechanical pumping at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perin, J.P.; Claudet, G.; Disdier, F.

    1995-01-01

    This novel concept consist of a mechanical pump able to run at low temperature (25K). Since gas density varies inversely with temperature, this pump would deliver much higher mass flow rate than at room temperature for a given size. Advantages of this concept are order of magnitude reduction in size, weight, when compared to a conventional pump scaled to perform the same mass flow rate at room temperature. This pump would be a solution to allow continuously tritium extraction and minimize the mass inventory. (orig.)

  6. Carburizing plasma in a low temperature austenitic stainless steel AISI 304

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mota, W.T.; Ramos, F.D.; Rocha, R.C.; Barcelos, M.V.; Barcelos, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    The industrial use of thermochemical treatment assisted by the cold plasma has been widely employed in recent years, mainly oriented to the excellent results obtained in the surface modification of engineering materials, when compared to more traditional methods. In this work, we studied the plasma carburizing low temperature steel AISI 304 mechanical parts used in construction. The thermochemical treatment was performed at a fixed gas atmosphere 7% CH 4 (g) and 93 % H 2 (g), 350 ° C and times of 1, 3 and 5 hours. Samples being tested for Vickers hardness, abrasive microwear, microstructure evaluation by optical microscopy and SEM and X-ray diffraction. The results show significant improvement in surface hardness, wear resistance and good formation of expanded austenite layer and no identifiers peaks of carbides. The results achieved are due to diffusion/adsorption of carbon present in the gaseous atmosphere to the evaluated samples. (author)

  7. Wolte 5. low temperature electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balestra, F.; Dieudonne, F.; Jomaah, J.

    2002-01-01

    This book present the latest research and development results in advanced materials, technologies, devices, circuits and systems for low temperature electronics. The main themes of the papers are ranging from physics and fundamental aspects, modeling and simulation, to device and circuit design. The topics include advanced process and characterization, novel devices and cryogenic instrumentation. The papers are divided into nine sections, reflecting the main research efforts in different areas: i) deep submicron silicon MOSFETs, ii) alternative MOSFETs (SOI, innovating device architectures), iii) III-V devices, iv) other semiconductor devices (Ge devices, p-n junctions, IR sensors, semiconductor microcrystals), v) emerging devices and phenomena (nano Si-based devices, conduction and fluctuations mechanisms), vi) superconducting materials, vii) superconducting detectors, viii) superconducting devices and circuits (RSFQ, SIS mixers, metal-superconducting-semiconductor structures), ix) low temperature electronics for space applications. Six invited papers presented by internationally recognized authors, and 39 contributed papers are presented. The invited papers provide an excellent overview of today's status and progress, as well as tomorrow's challenges and trends in this important discipline for many cryogenic applications. (authors)

  8. Microstructural Characterization of Low Temperature Gas Nitrided Martensitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The present work presents microstructural investigations of the surface zone of low temperature gas nitrided precipitation hardening martensitic stainless steel AISI 630. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction was applied to investigate the present phases after successive removal of very thin sections...... of the sample surface. The development of epsilon nitride, expanded austenite and expanded martensite resulted from the low temperature nitriding treatments. The microstructural features, hardness and phase composition are discussed with emphasis on the influence of nitriding duration and nitriding potential....

  9. Correlation between Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior and Fracture Surface Roughness on Cold-Rolled Austenitic Stainless Steels in Gaseous Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Cheng Chen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Austenitic stainless steels are often considered candidate materials for use in hydrogen-containing environments because of their low hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility. In this study, the fatigue crack growth behavior of the solution-annealed and cold-rolled 301, 304L, and 310S austenitic stainless steels was characterized in 0.2 MPa gaseous hydrogen to evaluate the hydrogen-assisted fatigue crack growth and correlate the fatigue crack growth rates with the fracture feature or fracture surface roughness. Regardless of the testing conditions, higher fracture surface roughness could be obtained in a higher stress intensity factor (∆K range and for the counterpart cold-rolled specimen in hydrogen. The accelerated fatigue crack growth of 301 and 304L in hydrogen was accompanied by high fracture surface roughness and was associated with strain-induced martensitic transformation in the plastic zone ahead of the fatigue crack tip.

  10. The effect of feeding high fat diet to beef cattle on manure composition and gaseous emission from a feedlot pen surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhan Prasad Gautam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary manipulation is a common practice to mitigate gaseous emission from livestock production facilities, and the variation of fat level in the diet has shown great influence on ruminal volatile fatty acids (VFA and enteric methane generation. The changes in dietary fat levels influence rumen chemistry that could modify manure nutrient composition along with odor and gaseous emissions from manure management facilities. Methods A field experiment was carried out on beef cattle feedlots to investigate the effect of four levels of dietary fat concentrations (3 to 5.5 % on the manure composition and gaseous emissions (methane-CH4, nitrous oxide-N2O, carbon dioxide-CO2 and hydrogen sulfide-H2S from the feedlot pen surface. The experiment was carried out over a 5-month period from June to October during North Dakota’s summer-fall climatic condition. Air and manure sampling was conducted five times at a 20–30 day intervals. Results Overall, this research indicated that fat levels in diet have no or little effect on the nutrient composition of manure and gaseous emission from the pens with cattle fed with different diet. Though significant variation of gaseous emission and manure composition were observed between different sampling periods, no effect of high fat diet was observed on manure composition and gaseous emission. Conclusions It can be concluded that addition of fat to animal diet may not have any impact on gaseous emission and manure compositions.

  11. The effect of feeding high fat diet to beef cattle on manure composition and gaseous emission from a feedlot pen surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Dhan Prasad; Rahman, Shafiqur; Borhan, Md Saidul; Engel, Chanda

    2016-01-01

    Dietary manipulation is a common practice to mitigate gaseous emission from livestock production facilities, and the variation of fat level in the diet has shown great influence on ruminal volatile fatty acids (VFA) and enteric methane generation. The changes in dietary fat levels influence rumen chemistry that could modify manure nutrient composition along with odor and gaseous emissions from manure management facilities. A field experiment was carried out on beef cattle feedlots to investigate the effect of four levels of dietary fat concentrations (3 to 5.5 %) on the manure composition and gaseous emissions (methane-CH4, nitrous oxide-N2O, carbon dioxide-CO2 and hydrogen sulfide-H2S) from the feedlot pen surface. The experiment was carried out over a 5-month period from June to October during North Dakota's summer-fall climatic condition. Air and manure sampling was conducted five times at a 20-30 day intervals. Overall, this research indicated that fat levels in diet have no or little effect on the nutrient composition of manure and gaseous emission from the pens with cattle fed with different diet. Though significant variation of gaseous emission and manure composition were observed between different sampling periods, no effect of high fat diet was observed on manure composition and gaseous emission. It can be concluded that addition of fat to animal diet may not have any impact on gaseous emission and manure compositions.

  12. The Low temperature CFB gasifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoholm, P.; Nielsen, Rasmus Glar; Fock, Martin W.

    2003-01-01

    %) particle separation by the hot secondary cyclone. The next LT-CFB experiment, currently under preparation, is expected to be on either municipal/industrial waste or animal manure. Eventually a 500 kW LT-CFB test plant scheduled for commission during summer 2003, and the anticipated primary LT......The Low Temperature Circulating Fluidised Bed (LT-CFB) gasification process aims at avoiding problems due to ash deposition and agglomeration when using difficult fuels such as agricultural biomass and many waste materials. This, as well as very simple gas cleaning, is achieved by pyrolysing...... the fuel at around 650?C in a CFB reaction chamber and subsequently gasifying the char at around 730oC in a slowly fluidised bubbling bed chamber located in the CFB particle recirculation path. In this paper the novel LT-CFB concept is further described together with the latest test results from the 50 k...

  13. Low Temperature Hydrogen Antihydrogen Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armour, E. A. G.; Chamberlain, C. W.

    2001-01-01

    In view of current interest in the trapping of antihydrogen (H-bar) atoms at low temperatures, we have carried out a full four-body variational calculation to determine s-wave elastic phase shifts for hydrogen antihydrogen scattering, using the Kohn Variational Principle. Terms outside the Born-Oppenheimer approximation have been taken into account using the formalism of Kolos and Wolniewicz. As far as we are aware, this is the first time that these terms have been included in an H H-bar scattering calculation. This is a continuation of earlier work on H-H-bar interactions. Preliminary results differ substantially from those calculated using the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. A method is outlined for reducing this discrepancy and taking the rearrangement channel into account.

  14. Mechanical pumping at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perin, J.P.; Claudet, G.; Disdier, F.

    1994-12-31

    This new concept consists of a mechanical pump able to run at low temperature (25 K). Since gas density varies inversely with temperature, the pump could deliver much higher mass flow rate than at room temperature for a given size. Advantages of this concept are reduction of an order of magnitude in size and weight when compared to a conventional pump scaled to perform the same mass flow rate at room temperature. Results obtained at 80 K and 25 K with a Holweck type molecular drag pump of 100 mm diameter and with few stages of a turbomolecular pump running at the same temperatures, are given. This pump would be a solution to allow continuous tritium extraction and minimize the mass inventory for the ITER (International Tokamak Experiment Reactor). 5 figs., 2 tabs., 4 refs.

  15. The effect of surface treatment and gaseous rust protection paper on the atmospheric corrosion stability of aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Guizhong

    1992-03-01

    The experimental results of atmospheric corrosion of 166 aluminium alloy of Al-Mg-Si-Cu system and 167 aluminium alloy of Al-Mg-Si-Cu-Fe-Ni system for different surface treatment and different wrapping papers used are introduced. The results show: 1. The composition of aluminium alloy has some effect on the performance of atmospheric corrosion stability and the local corrosion depth for 167 aluminium alloy specimen is considerable. 2. After 8 years storage, the 167 aluminium alloy tubular specimen, which was treated with surface treatment in deionized water at 100 ∼ 230 C degree, has no spot of atmospheric corrosion found. 3. Within the test period, the performance of atmospheric corrosion stability by sulphuric-acid anodization film is remarkable. 4. The No. 19 gaseous rust protection paper has no effect of atmospheric corrosion stability on the 166 and 167 aluminium alloys which were treated with quenching and natural ageing method

  16. The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, T.; Holmes, W.; Lai, A.; Croonquist, A.; Eraker, J.; Abbott, R.; Mills, G.; Mohl, J.; Craig, J.; Balachandra, B.; hide

    2000-01-01

    We describe the design and development of the Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility, which is intended to provide a unique environment of low temperature and microgravity for the scientists to perform breakthrough investigations on board the International Space Station.

  17. Biomedical applications using low temperature plasma technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Xiujuan; Jiang Nan

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature plasma technology and biomedicine are two different subjects, but the combination of the two may play a critical role in modern science and technology. The 21 st century is believed to be a biotechnology century. Plasma technology is becoming a widely used platform for the fabrication of biomaterials and biomedical devices. In this paper some of the technologies used for material surface modification are briefly introduced. Some biomedical applications using plasma technology are described, followed by suggestions as to how a bridge between plasma technology and biomedicine can be built. A pulsed plasma technique that is used for surface functionalization is discussed in detail as an example of this kind of bridge or combination. Finally, it is pointed out that the combination of biomedical and plasma technology will be an important development for revolutionary 21st century technologies that requires different experts from different fields to work together. (authors)

  18. The Low Temperature CFB Gasifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoholm, P.; Nielsen, Rasmus Glar; Richardt, K.

    2004-01-01

    straw, animal manure and waste and for co-firing the product gas in existing, e.g. coal fired power plant boilers. The aim is to prevent fouling, agglomeration and high temperature corrosion caused by potassium and chlorine and other fuel components when producing electricity. So far 92 hours......The Low Temperature Circulating Fluidised Bed (LT-CFB) gasification process is described together with the 50 kW and the 500 kW test plants and latest test results. The LT-CFB process is especially developed for medium and large scale (few to >100 MW) gasification of problematic bio-fuels like...... of experiments with the 50 kW test plant with two extremely difficult types of straw has shown low char losses and high retentions of ash including e.g. potassium. Latest 27 hours of experiments with dried, high ash pig- and hen manure has further indicated the concepts high fuel flexibility. The new 500 kW test...

  19. Low-temperature nuclear orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, N.J.; Postma, H.

    1986-01-01

    This book comprehensively surveys the many aspects of the low temperature nuclear orientation method. The angular distribution of radioactive emissions from nuclei oriented by hyperfine interactions in solids, is treated experimentally and theoretically. A general introductory chapter is followed by formal development of the theory of the orientation process and the anisotropic emission of decay products from oriented nuclei, applied to radioactive decay and to reactions. Five chapters on applications to nuclear physics cover experimental studies of alpha, beta and gamma emission, nuclear moment measurement and level structure information. Nuclear orientation studies of parity non-conservation and time reversal asymmetry are fully described. Seven chapters cover aspects of hyperfine interactions, magnetic and electric, in metals, alloys and insulating crystals, including ordered systems. Relaxation phenomena and the combined technique of NMR detection using oriented nuclei are treated at length. Chapters on the major recent development of on-line facilities, giving access to short lived nuclei far from stability, on the use of nuclear orientation for thermometry below 1 Kelvin and on technical aspects of the method complete the main text. Extensive appendices, table of relevant parameters and over 1000 references are included to assist the design of future experiments. (Auth.)

  20. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harlan U. Anderson

    2000-03-31

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and Testing of Planar Single Cells. During this time period substantial progress has been made in developing low temperature deposition techniques to produce dense, nanocrystalline yttrium-stabilized zirconia films on both dense oxide and polymer substrates. Progress has been made in the preparation and characterization of thin electrolytes and porous LSM substrates. Both of these tasks are essentially on or ahead of schedule. In our proposal, we suggested that the ZrO{sub 2}/Sc system needed to be considered as a candidate as a thin electrolyte. This was because microcrystalline ZrO{sub 2}/Sc has a significantly higher ionic conductivity than YSZ, particularly at the lower temperatures. As a result, some 0.5 micron thick film of ZrO{sub 2}/16% Sc on an alumina substrate (grain size 20nm) was prepared and the electrical conductivity measured as a function of temperature and oxygen activity. The Sc doped ZrO{sub 2} certainly has a higher conductivity that either 20nm or 2400nm YSZ, however, electronic conductivity dominates the conductivity for oxygen activities below 10{sup -15}. Whereas for YSZ, electronic conductivity is not a problem until the oxygen activity decreases below 10{sup -25}. These initial results show that the ionic conductivity of 20nm YSZ and 20nm ZrO{sub 2}/16% Sc are essentially the same and the enhanced conductivity which is observed for Sc doping in microcrystalline specimens is not observed for the same composition when it is nanocrystalline. In addition they show that the electronic conductivity of Sc doped ZrO{sub 2} is at least two orders of magnitude higher than that observed for YSZ. The conclusion one reaches is that for 0.5 to 1 micron thick nanocrystalline films, Sc doping of ZrO{sub 2} has no benefits compared to YSZ. As a result, electrolyte films of ZrO{sub 2}/Sc should not be considered as candidates

  1. Uptake of gaseous formaldehyde by soil surfaces: a combination of adsorption/desorption equilibrium and chemical reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gaseous formaldehyde (HCHO is an important precursor of OH radicals and a key intermediate molecule in the oxidation of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs. Budget analyses reveal large discrepancies between modeled and observed HCHO concentrations in the atmosphere. Here, we investigate the interactions of gaseous HCHO with soil surfaces through coated-wall flow tube experiments applying atmospherically relevant HCHO concentrations of  ∼  10 to 40 ppbv. For the determination of uptake coefficients (γ, we provide a Matlab code to account for the diffusion correction under laminar flow conditions. Under dry conditions (relative humidity  =  0 %, an initial γ of (1.1 ± 0.05  ×  10−4 is determined, which gradually drops to (5.5 ± 0.4  ×  10−5 after 8 h experiments. Experiments under wet conditions show a smaller γ that drops faster over time until reaching a plateau. The drop of γ with increasing relative humidity as well as the drop over time can be explained by the adsorption theory in which high surface coverage leads to a reduced uptake rate. The fact that γ stabilizes at a non-zero plateau suggests the involvement of irreversible chemical reactions. Further back-flushing experiments show that two-thirds of the adsorbed HCHO can be re-emitted into the gas phase while the residual is retained by the soil. This partial reversibility confirms that HCHO uptake by soil is a complex process involving both adsorption/desorption and chemical reactions which must be considered in trace gas exchange (emission or deposition at the atmosphere–soil interface. Our results suggest that soil and soil-derived airborne particles can either act as a source or a sink for HCHO, depending on ambient conditions and HCHO concentrations.

  2. Uptake of gaseous formaldehyde by soil surfaces: a combination of adsorption/desorption equilibrium and chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guo; Su, Hang; Li, Xin; Kuhn, Uwe; Meusel, Hannah; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Ammann, Markus; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shao, Min; Cheng, Yafang

    2016-08-01

    Gaseous formaldehyde (HCHO) is an important precursor of OH radicals and a key intermediate molecule in the oxidation of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Budget analyses reveal large discrepancies between modeled and observed HCHO concentrations in the atmosphere. Here, we investigate the interactions of gaseous HCHO with soil surfaces through coated-wall flow tube experiments applying atmospherically relevant HCHO concentrations of ˜ 10 to 40 ppbv. For the determination of uptake coefficients (γ), we provide a Matlab code to account for the diffusion correction under laminar flow conditions. Under dry conditions (relative humidity = 0 %), an initial γ of (1.1 ± 0.05) × 10-4 is determined, which gradually drops to (5.5 ± 0.4) × 10-5 after 8 h experiments. Experiments under wet conditions show a smaller γ that drops faster over time until reaching a plateau. The drop of γ with increasing relative humidity as well as the drop over time can be explained by the adsorption theory in which high surface coverage leads to a reduced uptake rate. The fact that γ stabilizes at a non-zero plateau suggests the involvement of irreversible chemical reactions. Further back-flushing experiments show that two-thirds of the adsorbed HCHO can be re-emitted into the gas phase while the residual is retained by the soil. This partial reversibility confirms that HCHO uptake by soil is a complex process involving both adsorption/desorption and chemical reactions which must be considered in trace gas exchange (emission or deposition) at the atmosphere-soil interface. Our results suggest that soil and soil-derived airborne particles can either act as a source or a sink for HCHO, depending on ambient conditions and HCHO concentrations.

  3. Hard Surface Layers by Pack Boriding and Gaseous Thermo-Reactive Deposition and Diffusion Treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Bottoli, Federico; Dahl, Kristian Vinter

    2017-01-01

    ) layers with hardnesses up to 1800 HV. Titanizing of ARNE tool steel results in a surface layer consisting of TiC with a hardness of approximately 4000 HV. Duplex treatments, where boriding is combined with subsequent (TRD) titanizing, result in formation of hard TiB2 on top of a thick layer of Fe......Thermo-reactive deposition and diffusion (TRD) and boriding are thermochemical processes that result in very high surface hardness by conversion of the surface into carbides/nitrides and borides, respectively. These treatments offer significant advantages in terms of hardness, adhesion, tribo...... subjected to TRD (chromizing and titanizing) and boriding treatments. For the steels with low carbon content, chromizing results in surface alloying with chromium, i.e., formation of a (soft) “stainless” surface zone. Steels containing higher levels of carbon form chromium carbide (viz. Cr23C6, Cr7C3...

  4. Gaseous nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    Gaseous nebulae are large, tenuous clouds of ionized gas that are associated with hot stars and that emit visible light because of the energy that they receive from the ultraviolet radiation of the stars. Examples include H II regions, planetary nebulae, and nova/supernova remnants. The emphasis is on the physical processes that occur in gaseous nebulae as opposed to a study of the objects themselves. The introduction discusses thermodynamic vs. steady-state equilibrium and excitation conditions in a dilute radiation field. Subsequent sections take up important atomic processes in gaseous nebulae (particle--particle collision rates, radiative interaction rates, cross sections), the ionization equilibrium (sizes of H II regions, ionization of the heavier elements), kinetic temperature and energy balance (heating of the electrons, cooling of the electrons), and the spectra of gaseous nebulae (line fluxes in nebulae). 7 figures, 5 tables

  5. Radically Different Kinetics at Low Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Ian

    2014-06-01

    The use of the CRESU (Cinétique de Réaction en Ecoulement Supersonique Uniforme, or Reaction Kinetics in Uniform Supersonic Flow) technique coupled with pulsed laser photochemical kinetics methods has shown that reactions involving radicals can be very rapid at temperatures down to 10 K or below. The results have had a major impact in astrochemistry and planetology, as well as proving an exacting test for theory. The technique has also been applied to the formation of transient complexes of interest both in atmospheric chemistry and combustion. Until now, all of the chemical reactions studied in this way have taken place on attractive potential energy surfaces with no overall barrier to reaction. The F + H2 {→} HF + H reaction does possess a substantial energetic barrier ({\\cong} 800 K), and might therefore be expected to slow to a negligible rate at very low temperatures. In fact, this H-atom abstraction reaction does take place efficiently at low temperatures due entirely to tunneling. I will report direct experimental measurements of the rate of this reaction down to a temperature of 11 K, in remarkable agreement with state-of-the-art quantum reactive scattering calculations by François Lique (Université du Havre) and Millard Alexander (University of Maryland). It is thought that long chain cyanopolyyne molecules H(C2)nCN may play an important role in the formation of the orange haze layer in Titan's atmosphere. The longest carbon chain molecule observed in interstellar space, HC11N, is also a member of this series. I will present new results, obtained in collaboration with Jean-Claude Guillemin (Ecole de Chimie de Rennes) and Stephen Klippenstein (Argonne National Labs), on reactions of C2H, CN and C3N radicals (using a new LIF scheme by Hoshina and Endo which contribute to the low temperature formation of (cyano)polyynes. H. Sabbah, L. Biennier, I. R. Sims, Y. Georgievskii, S. J. Klippenstein, I. W. M. Smith, Science 317, 102 (2007). S. D. Le Picard, M

  6. Surface modification of polyvinyl alcohol/malonic acid nanofibers by gaseous dielectric barrier discharge plasma for glucose oxidase immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afshari, Esmail; Mazinani, Saeedeh; Ranaei-Siadat, Seyed-Omid; Ghomi, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We fabricated polyvinyl alcohol/malonic acid nanofibers using electrospinning. • The surface nanofibers were modified by gaseous (air, nitrogen, CO_2 and argon) dielectric barrier discharge. • Among them, air plasma had the most significant effect on glucose oxidase immobilization. • Chemical analysis showed that after modification of nanofibers by air plasma, the carboxyl group increased. • After air plasma treatment, reusability and storage stability of glucose oxidase immobilized on nanofibers improved. - Abstract: Polymeric nanofiber prepares a suitable situation for enzyme immobilization for variety of applications. In this research, we have fabricated polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/malonic acid nanofibers using electrospinning. After fabrication of nanofibers, the effect of air, nitrogen, CO_2, and argon DBD (dielectric barrier discharge) plasmas on PVA/malonic acid nanofibers were analysed. Among them, air plasma had the most significant effect on glucose oxidase (GOx) immobilization. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectrum analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results revealed that in case of air plasma modified nanofibers, the carboxyl groups on the surface are increased. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that, after GOx immobilization, the modified nanofibers with plasma has retained its nanofiber structure. Finally, we analysed reusability and storage stability of GOx immobilized on plasma modified and unmodified nanofibers. The results were more satisfactory for modified nanofibers with respect to unmodified ones.

  7. Surface modification of polyvinyl alcohol/malonic acid nanofibers by gaseous dielectric barrier discharge plasma for glucose oxidase immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afshari, Esmail, E-mail: e.afshari@mail.sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Evin, 1983963113 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mazinani, Saeedeh [Amirkabir Nanotechnology Research Institute (ANTRI), Amirkabir University of Technology, 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ranaei-Siadat, Seyed-Omid [Protein Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University, Evin, 1983963113 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghomi, Hamid [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, Evin, 1983963113 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We fabricated polyvinyl alcohol/malonic acid nanofibers using electrospinning. • The surface nanofibers were modified by gaseous (air, nitrogen, CO{sub 2} and argon) dielectric barrier discharge. • Among them, air plasma had the most significant effect on glucose oxidase immobilization. • Chemical analysis showed that after modification of nanofibers by air plasma, the carboxyl group increased. • After air plasma treatment, reusability and storage stability of glucose oxidase immobilized on nanofibers improved. - Abstract: Polymeric nanofiber prepares a suitable situation for enzyme immobilization for variety of applications. In this research, we have fabricated polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/malonic acid nanofibers using electrospinning. After fabrication of nanofibers, the effect of air, nitrogen, CO{sub 2}, and argon DBD (dielectric barrier discharge) plasmas on PVA/malonic acid nanofibers were analysed. Among them, air plasma had the most significant effect on glucose oxidase (GOx) immobilization. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectrum analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results revealed that in case of air plasma modified nanofibers, the carboxyl groups on the surface are increased. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that, after GOx immobilization, the modified nanofibers with plasma has retained its nanofiber structure. Finally, we analysed reusability and storage stability of GOx immobilized on plasma modified and unmodified nanofibers. The results were more satisfactory for modified nanofibers with respect to unmodified ones.

  8. Air-surface exchange measurements of gaseous elemental mercury over naturally enriched and background terrestrial landscapes in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. C. Edwards

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the first gaseous elemental mercury (GEM air-surface exchange measurements obtained over naturally enriched and background (−1 Hg terrestrial landscapes in Australia. Two pilot field studies were carried out during the Australian autumn and winter periods at a copper-gold-cobalt-arsenic-mercury mineral field near Pulganbar, NSW. GEM fluxes using a dynamic flux chamber approach were measured, along with controlling environmental parameters over three naturally enriched and three background substrates. The enriched sites results showed net emission to the atmosphere and a strong correlation between flux and substrate Hg concentration, with average fluxes ranging from 14 ± 1 ng m−2 h−1 to 113 ± 6 ng m−2 h−1. Measurements at background sites showed both emission and deposition. The average Hg flux from all background sites showed an overall net emission of 0.36 ± 0.06 ng m−2 h−1. Fluxes show strong relationships with temperature, radiation, and substrate parameters. A compensation point of 2.48, representative of bare soils was determined. For periods of deposition, dry deposition velocities ranged from 0.00025 cm s−1 to 0.0083 cm s−1 with an average of 0.0041 ± 0.00018 cm s−1, representing bare soil, nighttime conditions. Comparison of the Australian data to North American data suggests the need for Australian-specific mercury air-surface exchange data representative of Australia's unique climatic conditions, vegetation types, land use patterns and soils.

  9. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harlan U. Anderson; Wayne Huebner; Igor Kosacki

    2001-09-30

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. In this portion of study we have focused on producing YSZ films on porous LSM substrates. When using the polymer precursor there are a number of obstacles to overcome in order to form dense electrolyte layers on porous substrates (cathode or anode). Probably the most difficult problems are: (1) Extreme penetration of the polymer into the substrate must be prevented. (2) Shrinkage cracking must be avoided. (3) Film thickness in the 1 to 5{micro}m range must be achieved. We have demonstrated that cracking due to shrinkage involved during the elimination of solvents and organic matter and densification of the remaining oxide is not a problem as long as the resulting oxide film is < {approx} 0.15 {micro}m in thickness. We have also shown that we can make thicker films by making multiple depositions if the substrate is smooth (roughness {le} 0.1 {micro}m) and contains no surface pores > 0.2 {micro}m. The penetration of the polymer into the porous substrate can be minimized by increasing the viscosity of the polymer and reducing the largest pore at the surface of the substrate to {le} 0.2 {micro}m. We have shown that this can be done, but we have also shown that it is difficult to make dense films that are defect free with areas > 1 cm{sup 2}. This is because of the roughness of the substrate and the difficulty in making a substrate which does not have surface voids > 0.2 {micro}m. Thus the process works well for dense, smooth substrates for films < 1 {micro}m thick, but is difficult to apply to rough, porous surfaces and to make film thickness > 1 {micro}m. As a result of these problems, we have been addressing the issue of how to make dense films in the thickness range of 1 to 5 {micro}m on sintered porous substrates without introducing cracks and holes due to shrinkage and surface voids? These

  10. Out of Thin Air: Microbial Utilization of Atmospheric Gaseous Organics in the Surface Ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Arrieta, J M; Duarte, Carlos M.; Sala, M. Montserrat; Dachs, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Volatile and semi-volatile gas-phase organic carbon (GOC) is a largely neglected component of the global carbon cycle, with poorly resolved pools and fluxes of natural and anthropogenic GOC in the biosphere. Substantial amounts of atmospheric GOC are exchanged with the surface ocean, and subsequent utilization of specific GOC compounds by surface ocean microbial communities has been demonstrated. Yet, the final fate of the bulk of the atmospheric GOC entering the surface ocean is unknown. Our data show experimental evidence of efficient use of atmospheric GOC by marine prokaryotes at different locations in the NE Subtropical Atlantic, the Arctic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. We estimate that between 2 and 27% of the prokaryotic carbon demand was supported by GOC with a major fraction of GOC inputs being consumed within the mixed layer. The role of the atmosphere as a key vector of organic carbon subsidizing marine microbial metabolism is a novel link yet to be incorporated into the microbial ecology of the surface ocean as well as into the global carbon budget.

  11. Out of Thin Air: Microbial Utilization of Atmospheric Gaseous Organics in the Surface Ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Arrieta, Jesus

    2016-01-20

    Volatile and semi-volatile gas-phase organic carbon (GOC) is a largely neglected component of the global carbon cycle, with poorly resolved pools and fluxes of natural and anthropogenic GOC in the biosphere. Substantial amounts of atmospheric GOC are exchanged with the surface ocean, and subsequent utilization of specific GOC compounds by surface ocean microbial communities has been demonstrated. Yet, the final fate of the bulk of the atmospheric GOC entering the surface ocean is unknown. Our data show experimental evidence of efficient use of atmospheric GOC by marine prokaryotes at different locations in the NE Subtropical Atlantic, the Arctic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. We estimate that between 2 and 27% of the prokaryotic carbon demand was supported by GOC with a major fraction of GOC inputs being consumed within the mixed layer. The role of the atmosphere as a key vector of organic carbon subsidizing marine microbial metabolism is a novel link yet to be incorporated into the microbial ecology of the surface ocean as well as into the global carbon budget.

  12. Out of Thin Air: Microbial Utilization of Atmospheric Gaseous Organics in the Surface Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Jesús M; Duarte, Carlos M; Sala, M Montserrat; Dachs, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Volatile and semi-volatile gas-phase organic carbon (GOC) is a largely neglected component of the global carbon cycle, with poorly resolved pools and fluxes of natural and anthropogenic GOC in the biosphere. Substantial amounts of atmospheric GOC are exchanged with the surface ocean, and subsequent utilization of specific GOC compounds by surface ocean microbial communities has been demonstrated. Yet, the final fate of the bulk of the atmospheric GOC entering the surface ocean is unknown. Our data show experimental evidence of efficient use of atmospheric GOC by marine prokaryotes at different locations in the NE Subtropical Atlantic, the Arctic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. We estimate that between 2 and 27% of the prokaryotic carbon demand was supported by GOC with a major fraction of GOC inputs being consumed within the mixed layer. The role of the atmosphere as a key vector of organic carbon subsidizing marine microbial metabolism is a novel link yet to be incorporated into the microbial ecology of the surface ocean as well as into the global carbon budget.

  13. Out of thin air: Microbial utilization of atmospheric gaseous organics in the surface ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus M Arrieta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Volatile and semi-volatile gas-phase organic carbon (GOC is a largely neglected component of the global carbon cycle, with poorly resolved pools and fluxes of natural and anthropogenic GOC in the biosphere. Substantial amounts of atmospheric GOC are exchanged with the surface ocean, and subsequent utilization of specific GOC compounds by surface ocean microbial communities has been demonstrated. Yet, the final fate of the bulk of the atmospheric GOC entering the surface ocean is unknown. Our data show experimental evidence of efficient use of atmospheric GOC by marine prokaryotes at different locations in the NE Subtropical Atlantic, the Arctic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. We estimate that between 2 to 27% of the prokaryotic carbon demand was supported by GOC with a major fraction of GOC inputs being consumed within the mixed layer. The role of the atmosphere as a key vector of organic carbon subsidising marine microbial metabolism is a novel link yet to be incorporated into the microbial ecology of the surface ocean as well as into the global carbon budget.

  14. Quantification of Gaseous Elemental Mercury Dry Deposition to Environmental Surfaces using Mercury Stable Isotopes in a Controlled Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, A. P.; Schauer, J. J.; Shafer, M. M.; Olson, M.; Robinson, M.; Vanderveer, P.; Creswell, J. E.; Parman, A.; Mallek, J.; Gorski, P.

    2009-12-01

    Andrew P. Rutter (1) * *, James J, Schauer (1,2) *, Martin M. Shafer(1,2), Michael R. Olson (1), Michael Robinson (1), Peter Vanderveer (3), Joel Creswell (1), Justin L. Mallek (1), Andrew M. Parman (1) (1) Environmental Chemistry and Technology Program, 660 N. Park St, Madison, WI 53705. (2) Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene, 2601 Agriculture Drive, Madison, WI 53718. (3) Biotron, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 2115 Observatory Drive, Madison, WI 53706 * Correspond author(jjschauer@wisc.edu) * *Presenting author (aprutter@wisc.edu) Abstract Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) is the predominant component of atmospheric mercury outside of arctic depletion events, and locations where anthropogenic point sources are not influencing atmospheric concentrations. GEM constitutes greater than 99% of the mercury mass in most rural and remote locations. While dry and wet deposition of atmospheric mercury is thought to be dominated by oxidized mercury (a.k.a. reactive mercury), only small GEM uptake to environmental surfaces could impact the input of mercury to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Dry deposition and subsequent re-emission of gaseous elemental mercury is a pathway from the atmosphere that remains only partially understood from a mechanistic perspective. In order to properly model GEM dry deposition and re-emission an understanding of its dependence on irradiance, temperature, and relative humidity must be measured and parameterized for a broad spectrum of environmental surfaces colocated with surrogate deposition surfaces used to make field based dry deposition measurements. Measurements of isotopically enriched GEM dry deposition were made with a variety of environmental surfaces in a controlled environment room at the University of Wisconsin Biotron. The experimental set up allowed dry deposition components which are not easily separated in the field to be decoupled. We were able to isolate surface transfer processes from variabilities caused by

  15. Low temperature study of nonstoichiometric titanium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashmetov, M.Yu.

    2005-05-01

    By low temperature neutron diffraction method was studied structure in nonstoichiometric titanium carbide from room temperature up to 12K. It is found of low temperature phase in titanium carbide- TiC 0.71 . It is established region and borders of this phase. It is determined change of unit cell parameter. (author)

  16. Low-temperature plasma modelling and simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van J.

    2011-01-01

    Since its inception in the beginning of the twentieth century, low-temperature plasma science has become a major ¿eld of science. Low-temperature plasma sources and gas discharges are found in domestic, industrial, atmospheric and extra-terrestrial settings. Examples of domestic discharges are those

  17. Thermal conductivity at very low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Locatelli, M [CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38 (France). Service des Basses Temperatures

    1976-06-01

    The interest of low and very low temperatures in solid physics and especially that of thermal measurements is briefly mentioned. Some notes on the thermal conductivity of dielectrics, the method and apparatus used to measure this property at very low temperatures (T<1.5K) and some recent results of fundamental and applied research are then presented.

  18. Evaluation of mechanism of cold atmospheric pressure plasma assisted polymerization of acrylic acid on low density polyethylene (LDPE) film surfaces: Influence of various gaseous plasma pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramkumar, M. C.; Pandiyaraj, K. Navaneetha; Arun Kumar, A.; Padmanabhan, P. V. A.; Uday Kumar, S.; Gopinath, P.; Bendavid, A.; Cools, P.; De Geyter, N.; Morent, R.; Deshmukh, R. R.

    2018-05-01

    Owing to its exceptional physiochemical properties, low density poly ethylene (LDPE) has wide range of tissue engineering applications. Conversely, its inadequate surface properties make LDPE an ineffectual candidate for cell compatible applications. Consequently, plasma-assisted polymerization with a selected precursor is a good choice for enhancing its biocompatibility. The present investigation studies the efficiency of plasma polymerization of acrylic acid (AAC) on various gaseous plasma pretreated LDPE films by cold atmospheric pressure plasma, to enhance its cytocompatibility. The change in chemical composition and surface topography of various gaseous plasma pretreated and acrylic deposited LDPE films has been assessed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The changes in hydrophilic nature of surface modified LDPE films were studied by contact angle (CA) analysis. Cytocompatibility of the AAC/LDPE films was also studied in vitro, using RIN-5F cells. The results acquired by the XPS and AFM analysis clearly proved that cold atmospheric pressure (CAP) plasma assisted polymerization of AAC enhances various surface properties including carboxylic acid functional group density and increased surface roughness on various gaseous plasma treated AAC/LDPE film surfaces. Moreover, contact angle analysis clearly showed that the plasma polymerized samples were hydrophilic in nature. In vitro cytocompatibility analysis undoubtedly validates that the AAC polymerized various plasma pretreated LDPE films surfaces stimulate cell distribution and proliferation compared to pristine LDPE films. Similarly, cytotoxicity analysis indicates that the AAC deposited various gaseous plasma pretreated LDPE film can be considered as non-toxic as well as stimulating cell viability significantly. The cytocompatible properties of AAC polymerized Ar + O2 plasma pretreated LDPE films were found to be more pronounced compared to the other plasma pretreated

  19. Gaseous Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Angelo, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    aseous Matter focuses on the many important discoveries that led to the scientific interpretation of matter in the gaseous state. This new, full-color resource describes the basic characteristics and properties of several important gases, including air, hydrogen, helium, oxygen, and nitrogen. The nature and scope of the science of fluids is discussed in great detail, highlighting the most important scientific principles upon which the field is based. Chapters include:. Gaseous Matter An Initial Perspective. Physical Characteristics of Gases. The Rise of the Science of Gases. Kinetic Theory of

  20. Liquid Hydrogen Propellant Tank Sub-Surface Pressurization with Gaseous Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.; Cartagena, W.

    2015-01-01

    A series of tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of a propellant tank pressurization system with the pressurant diffuser intentionally submerged beneath the surface of the liquid. Propellant tanks and pressurization systems are typically designed with the diffuser positioned to apply pressurant gas directly into the tank ullage space when the liquid propellant is settled. Space vehicles, and potentially propellant depots, may need to conduct tank pressurization operations in micro-gravity environments where the exact location of the liquid relative to the diffuser is not well understood. If the diffuser is positioned to supply pressurant gas directly to the tank ullage space when the propellant is settled, then it may become partially or completely submerged when the liquid becomes unsettled in a microgravity environment. In such case, the pressurization system performance will be adversely affected requiring additional pressurant mass and longer pressurization times. This series of tests compares and evaluates pressurization system performance using the conventional method of supplying pressurant gas directly to the propellant tank ullage, and then supplying pressurant gas beneath the liquid surface. The pressurization tests were conducted on the Engineering Development Unit (EDU) located at Test Stand 300 at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). EDU is a ground based Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) test article supported by Glenn Research Center (GRC) and MSFC. A 150 ft3 propellant tank was filled with liquid hydrogen (LH2). The pressurization system used regulated ambient helium (GHe) as a pressurant, a variable position valve to maintain flow rate, and two identical independent pressurant diffusers. The ullage diffuser was located in the forward end of the tank and was completely exposed to the tank ullage. The submerged diffuser was located in the aft end of the tank and was completely submerged when the tank liquid level was 10% or greater

  1. Extremely low temperature properties of epoxy GFRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadotani, Kenzo; Nagai, Matao; Aki, Fumitake.

    1983-01-01

    The examination of fiber-reinforced plastics, that is, plastics such as epoxy, polyester and polyimide reinforced with high strength fibers such as glass, carbon, boron and steel, for extremely low temperature use began from the fuel tanks of rockets. Therafter, the trial manufacture of superconducting generators and extremely low temperature transformers and the manufacture of superconducting magnets for nuclear fusion experimental setups became active, and high performance FRPs have been adopted, of which the extremely low temperature properties have been sufficiently grasped. Recently, the cryostats made of FRPs have been developed, fully utilizing such features of FRPs as high strength, high rigidity, non-magnetic material, insulation, low heat conductivity, light weight and the freedom of molding. In this paper, the mechanical properties at extremely low temperature of the plastic composite materials used as insulators and structural materials for extremely low temperature superconducting equipment is outlined, and in particular, glass fiber-reinforced epoxy laminates are described somewhat in detail. The fracture strain of GFRP at extremely low temperature is about 1.3 times as large as that at room temperature, but at extremely low temperature, clear cracking occurred at 40% of the fracture strain. The linear thermal contraction of GFRP showed remarkable anisotropy. (Kako, I.)

  2. Frugal Biotech Applications of Low-Temperature Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machala, Zdenko; Graves, David B

    2017-09-01

    Gas discharge low-temperature air plasma can be utilized for a variety of applications, including biomedical, at low cost. We term these applications 'frugal plasma' - an example of frugal innovation. We demonstrate how simple, robust, low-cost frugal plasma devices can be used to safely disinfect instruments, surfaces, and water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Improved Low Temperature Performance of Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Erik J.; West, William C.; Smart, Marshall C.; Gnanaraj, Joe

    2013-01-01

    Low temperature double-layer capacitor operation enabled by: - Base acetonitrile / TEATFB salt formulation - Addition of low melting point formates, esters and cyclic ethers center dot Key electrolyte design factors: - Volume of co-solvent - Concentration of salt center dot Capacity increased through higher capacity electrodes: - Zeolite templated carbons - Asymmetric cell designs center dot Continuing efforts - Improve asymmetric cell performance at low temperature - Cycle life testing Motivation center dot Benchmark performance of commercial cells center dot Approaches for designing low temperature systems - Symmetric cells (activated carbon electrodes) - Symmetric cells (zeolite templated carbon electrodes) - Asymmetric cells (lithium titanate/activated carbon electrodes) center dot Experimental results center dot Summary

  4. Active carbons from low temperature conversion chars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adebowale, K.O.; Bayer, E.

    2002-05-01

    Hulls obtained from the fruits of five tropical biomass have been subjected to low temperature conversion process and their chars activated by partial physical gasification to produce active carbons. The biomass are T. catappa, B. nitida, L leucophylla, D. regia and O. martiana. The bulk densities of the samples ranged from 0.32 g.cm 3 to 0.52 g.cm 3 . Out of the samples T. catappa recorded the highest cellulose content (41.9 g.100g -1 ), while O. martiana contained the highest lignin content (40.7 g.100g -1 ). The ash of the samples were low (0.5 - 4.4%). The percentage of char obtained after conversion were high (33.7% - 38.6%). Active carbons obtained from T. catappa, D. regia and O. martiana, recorded high methylene blue numbers and iodine values. They also displayed good micro- and mesostructural characteristics. Micropore volume (V micro ) was between 0.33cm 3 .g -1 - 0.40cm 3 .g -1 , while the mesopore volume(V meso ) was between 0.05 cm 3 .g -1 - 0.07 cm 3 .g -1 . The BET specific surface exceeds 1000 m 2 .g -1 . All these values compared favourably with high grade commercial active carbons. (author)

  5. Active carbons from low temperature conversion chars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adebowale, K O [Department of Chemistry, University of lbadan, lbadan (Nigeria); Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy); Bayer, E [Universitaet Tuebingen, Institut fuer Organische Chemie, Forschungstelle Nukleinsaeure- und Peptidchemie, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2002-05-01

    Hulls obtained from the fruits of five tropical biomass have been subjected to low temperature conversion process and their chars activated by partial physical gasification to produce active carbons. The biomass are T. catappa, B. nitida, L leucophylla, D. regia and O. martiana. The bulk densities of the samples ranged from 0.32 g.cm{sup 3} to 0.52 g.cm{sup 3}. Out of the samples T. catappa recorded the highest cellulose content (41.9 g.100g{sup -1}), while O. martiana contained the highest lignin content (40.7 g.100g{sup -1}). The ash of the samples were low (0.5 - 4.4%). The percentage of char obtained after conversion were high (33.7% - 38.6%). Active carbons obtained from T. catappa, D. regia and O. martiana, recorded high methylene blue numbers and iodine values. They also displayed good micro- and mesostructural characteristics. Micropore volume (V{sub micro}) was between 0.33cm{sup 3}.g{sup -1} - 0.40cm{sup 3}.g{sup -1}, while the mesopore volume(V{sub meso}) was between 0.05 cm{sup 3}.g{sup -1} - 0.07 cm{sup 3}.g{sup -1}. The BET specific surface exceeds 1000 m{sup 2}.g{sup -1}. All these values compared favourably with high grade commercial active carbons. (author)

  6. Surface Sampling-Based Decontamination Studies and Protocol for Determining Sporicidal Efficacy of Gaseous Fumigants on Military-Relevant Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    non-porous surfaces is vital to decon protocol development. Spore density (spore number per unit area) can result in layering and clustering over a...1999, 281, 1735-1745. 9. AOAC International Method 966.04; Official Methods of Analisis , 21’t ed.; Chapter 6: AOAC International: Gaithersburg, MD

  7. Analysis of low-temperature tar fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikkawa, S; Yamada, F

    1952-01-01

    A preliminary comparative study was made on the applicability of the methods commonly used for the type analysis of petroleum products to the low-temperature tar fractions. The usability of chromatography was also studied.

  8. Low temperature plasma technology methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Paul K

    2013-01-01

    Written by a team of pioneering scientists from around the world, Low Temperature Plasma Technology: Methods and Applications brings together recent technological advances and research in the rapidly growing field of low temperature plasmas. The book provides a comprehensive overview of related phenomena such as plasma bullets, plasma penetration into biofilms, discharge-mode transition of atmospheric pressure plasmas, and self-organization of microdischarges. It describes relevant technology and diagnostics, including nanosecond pulsed discharge, cavity ringdown spectroscopy, and laser-induce

  9. Characteristic of Low Temperature Carburized Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istiroyah; Pamungkas, M. A.; Saroja, G.; Ghufron, M.; Juwono, A. M.

    2018-01-01

    Low temperature carburizing process has been carried out on austenitic stainless steel (ASS) type AISI 316L, that contain chromium in above 12 at%. Therefore, conventional heat treatment processes that are usually carried out at high temperatures are not applicable. The sensitization process due to chromium migration from the grain boundary will lead to stress corrosion crack and decrease the corrosion resistance of the steel. In this study, the carburizing process was carried out at low temperatures below 500 °C. Surface morphology and mechanical properties of carburized specimens were investigated using optical microscopy, non destructive profilometer, and Vicker microhardness. The surface roughness analysis show the carburising process improves the roughness of ASS surface. This improvement is due to the adsorption of carbon atoms on the surface of the specimen. Likewise, the hardness test results indicate the carburising process increases the hardness of ASS.

  10. Treatment of low-temperature tar-gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schick, F

    1928-07-04

    Process for the treating and conversion of low-temperature tar-vapor and gas mixtures in the presence of metals or metal oxides as well as bodies of large surface, without previous condensation of the liquid material to be treated, characterized by the treatment taking place with a mixture of desulfurizing metals and metal oxides which, if necessary, are precipitated on carriers and large surface nonmetal cracking catalysts, such as active carbon and silica gel.

  11. Low-temperature field evaporation of Nb3Sn compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ksenofontov, V.A.; Kul'ko, V.B.; Kutsenko, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    Investigation results on field evaporation of superconducting Nb 3 Sn compound wth A15 lattice are presented. Compound evaporation is shown to proceed in two stages. Evaporation field and ionic composition of evaporating material are determined. It is found out that in strong electric fields compound surface represents niobium skeleton, wich does not form regular image. Comparison of ion-microscopic and calculated images formed by low-temperature field evaporation indicates to possibility of sample surface reconstruction after preferable tin evaporation

  12. A passive air sampler for characterizing the vertical concentration profile of gaseous phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in near soil surface air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yuzhong; Deng Shuxing; Liu Yanan; Shen Guofeng; Li Xiqing; Cao Jun; Wang Xilong; Reid, Brian; Tao Shu

    2011-01-01

    Air-soil exchange is an important process governing the fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A novel passive air sampler was designed and tested for measuring the vertical concentration profile of 4 low molecular weight PAHs in gaseous phase (PAH LMW4 ) in near soil surface air. Air at various heights from 5 to 520 mm above the ground was sampled by polyurethane foam disks held in down-faced cartridges. The samplers were tested at three sites: A: an extremely contaminated site, B: a site near A, and C: a background site on a university campus. Vertical concentration gradients were revealed for PAH LMW4 within a thin layer close to soil surface at the three sites. PAH concentrations either decreased (Site A) or increased (Sites B and C) with height, suggesting either deposition to or evaporation from soils. The sampler is a useful tool for investigating air-soil exchange of gaseous phase semi-volatile organic chemicals. - Research highlights: → Design, field test and calibration of the novel passive air sampler, PAS-V-I. → Vertical concentration gradients of PAH LMW4 within a thin layer close to soil. → Comparison of results between PAS-V-I measurement and fugacity approach. → Potential application of PAS-V-I and further modifications. - A novel passive sampling device was developed and tested for measuring vertical concentration profile of gaseous phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in near soil surface air.

  13. Filter bag De-NOx system with powder type catalysts at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byung-Hwan; Kim, Jeong-Heon; Kang, Pil-Sun; Yoo, Seung-Kwan; Yoon, Kyoon-Duk

    2010-01-01

    Combustion of carbon source materials (MSW, RDF, sludge, coal etc.) leads to the emission of harmful gaseous pollutants such as SO x , NO x , mercury, particulate matter, and dioxins etc. In particular, the emission of nitrogen oxides (NO x ) from the solid waste incinerator remains a serious air pollution problem. The previous research concerns have focused mainly on NO x reduction of stationary sources at high temperature SCR or SNCR process. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH 3 is the most widespread system used to control NO x emissions. However, this process suffers from several disadvantages due to the use of thermo fragile honeycomb type module and high temperature (about 300 degree Celsius) operation which consumes additional heating energy. To overcome this hurdle, filter bag De-NO x system with powder type catalysts at low temperature (less than 200 degree Celsius) has been under investigation in recent years and looks interesting because neither additional heat nor honeycomb type modules are required. Filter bag and powder type catalysts are cheap and effective materials to remove NO x at low temperature. In this study, the selective catalytic reduction of NO x was carried out on a filter support reactor with 300 mesh powder type catalysts at low temperature. The experiments were performed by powder type MnO x and V 2 O 5 / TiO 2 catalyst at low temperature ranging between 130 and 250 degree Celsius. Also, the effect of SO 2 and H 2 O on the NO conversion was investigated under our test conditions. The powder type catalysts were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectrum (XPS) for measuring the state of oxygen on the catalyst surface and X-ray diffraction (XRD). It was observed that NO conversion of the powder type V 2 O 5 / TiO 2 catalyst was 85 % at 200 degree Celsius under presence of oxygen and that of MnO x was 50 % at the same condition. From these results, the powder type V 2 O 5 / TiO 2 catalyst showed an excellent performance on the

  14. Minimizing material damage using low temperature irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craven, E.; Hasanain, F.; Winters, M.

    2012-01-01

    Scientific advancements in healthcare driven both by technological breakthroughs and an aging and increasingly obese population have lead to a changing medical device market. Complex products and devices are being developed to meet the demands of leading edge medical procedures. Specialized materials in these medical devices, including pharmaceuticals and biologics as well as exotic polymers present a challenge for radiation sterilization as many of these components cannot withstand conventional irradiation methods. The irradiation of materials at dry ice temperatures has emerged as a technique that can be used to decrease the radiation sensitivity of materials. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of low temperature irradiation on a variety of polymer materials, and over a range of temperatures from 0 °C down to −80 °C. The effectiveness of microbial kill is also investigated under each of these conditions. The results of the study show that the effect of low temperature irradiation is material dependent and can alter the balance between crosslinking and chain scission of the polymer. Low temperatures also increase the dose required to achieve an equivalent microbiological kill, therefore dose setting exercises must be performed under the environmental conditions of use. - Highlights: ► A study is performed to quantify low temperature irradiation effects on polymer materials and BIs. ► Low temperature irradiation alters the balance of cross-linking and chain scissoning in polymers. ► Low temperatures provide radioprotection for BIs. ► Benefits of low temperatures are application specific and must be considered when dose setting.

  15. Basics of Low-temperature Refrigeration

    CERN Document Server

    Alekseev, A.

    2014-07-17

    This chapter gives an overview of the principles of low temperature refrigeration and the thermodynamics behind it. Basic cryogenic processes - Joule-Thomoson process, Brayton process as well as Claude process - are described and compared. A typical helium laboratory refrigerator based on Claude process is used as a typical example of a low-temperature refrigeration system. A description of the hardware components for helium liquefaction is an important part of this paper, because the design of the main hardware components (compressors, turbines, heat exchangers, pumps, adsorbers, etc.) provides the input for cost calculation, as well as enables to estimate the reliability of the plant and the maintenance expenses. All these numbers are necessary to calculate the economics of a low temperature application.

  16. Kinetics and spectroscopy of low temperature plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Loureiro, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    This is a comprehensive textbook designed for graduate and advanced undergraduate students. Both authors rely on more than 20 years of teaching experience in renowned Physics Engineering courses to write this book addressing the students’ needs. Kinetics and Spectroscopy of Low Temperature Plasmas derives in a full self-consistent way the electron kinetic theory used to describe low temperature plasmas created in the laboratory with an electrical discharge, and presents the main optical spectroscopic diagnostics used to characterize such plasmas. The chapters with the theoretical contents make use of a deductive approach in which the electron kinetic theory applied to plasmas with basis on the electron Boltzmann equation is derived from the basic concepts of Statistical and Plasma Physics. On the other hand, the main optical spectroscopy diagnostics used to characterize experimentally such plasmas are presented and justified from the point of view of the Atomic and Molecular Physics. Low temperature plasmas...

  17. Basics of Low-temperature Refrigeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, A [Linde AG, Munich (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    This chapter gives an overview of the principles of low temperature refrigeration and the thermodynamics behind it. Basic cryogenic processes - Joule-Thomoson process, Brayton process as well as Claude process - are described and compared. A typical helium laboratory refrigerator based on Claude process is used as a typical example of a low-temperature refrigeration system. A description of the hardware components for helium liquefaction is an important part of this paper, because the design of the main hardware components (compressors, turbines, heat exchangers, pumps, adsorbers, etc.) provides the input for cost calculation, as well as enables to estimate the reliability of the plant and the maintenance expenses. All these numbers are necessary to calculate the economics of a low temperature application.

  18. Low temperature monitoring system for subsurface barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; McKinzie, II Billy John [Houston, TX

    2009-08-18

    A system for monitoring temperature of a subsurface low temperature zone is described. The system includes a plurality of freeze wells configured to form the low temperature zone, one or more lasers, and a fiber optic cable coupled to at least one laser. A portion of the fiber optic cable is positioned in at least one freeze well. At least one laser is configured to transmit light pulses into a first end of the fiber optic cable. An analyzer is coupled to the fiber optic cable. The analyzer is configured to receive return signals from the light pulses.

  19. Materials for low-temperature fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Ladewig, Bradley; Yan, Yushan; Lu, Max

    2014-01-01

    There are a large number of books available on fuel cells; however, the majority are on specific types of fuel cells such as solid oxide fuel cells, proton exchange membrane fuel cells, or on specific technical aspects of fuel cells, e.g., the system or stack engineering. Thus, there is a need for a book focused on materials requirements in fuel cells. Key Materials in Low-Temperature Fuel Cells is a concise source of the most important and key materials and catalysts in low-temperature fuel cells. A related book will cover key materials in high-temperature fuel cells. The two books form part

  20. Low-temperature carbonization plant for lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiotsuki, Y

    1949-01-01

    The design and operational data of a low-temperature carbonization plant for Japanese lignite are described. The retort had a vertical cylinder with a capacity of about 10 tons per day. By continuous operation, in which a part of the gas produced was circulated and burned in the lignite zone, about 40 percent semicoke and 3 to 4 percent tar were obtained. From the tar the following products were separated: Low-temperature carbonization cresol, 18.3; motor fuel, 1.00; solvent, 9.97; cresol for medical uses, 11.85; and creosote oil, 32 percent.

  1. Low temperature CVD growth of ultrathin carbon films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Yang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the low temperature, large area growth of ultrathin carbon films by chemical vapor deposition under atmospheric pressure on various substrates. In particularly, uniform and continuous carbon films with the thickness of 2-5 nm were successfully grown at a temperature as low as 500 oC on copper foils, as well as glass substrates coated with a 100 nm thick copper layer. The characterizations revealed that the low-temperature-grown carbon films consist on few short, curved graphene layers and thin amorphous carbon films. Particularly, the low-temperature grown samples exhibited over 90% transmittance at a wavelength range of 400-750 nm and comparable sheet resistance in contrast with the 1000oC-grown one. This low-temperature growth method may offer a facile way to directly prepare visible ultrathin carbon films on various substrate surfaces that are compatible with temperatures (500-600oC used in several device processing technologies.

  2. Low temperature thermophysical properties of lunar soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremers, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    The thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of lunar fines samples from the Apollo 11 and Apollo 12 missions, determined at low temperatures as a function of temperature and various densities, are reviewed. It is shown that the thermal conductivity of lunar soil is nearly the same as that of terrestrial basaltic rock under the same temperature and pressure conditions.

  3. Neutrinos, dark matter and low temperature detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Mestres, L.; Perret-Gallix, D.

    1988-01-01

    The present status of cryogenic detector developments for particle physics is discussed, with emphasis on applications at the cross-disciplinary frontier between particle physics and astrophysics, where low temperature devices appear to be particularly well suited. The overwiew of results is completed by a sketch of new ideas and possible ways for further improvements. Neutrino role importance is particularly shown

  4. Low Temperature Cure Powder Coatings (LTCPC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    Dr. Glen Merfeld, General Electric Global Research evaluated and optimized the formulation, and cure and performance parameters of candidate LTCPC...Unacceptable test result = Marginal test result = Acceptable test result 80 therefore suffer from brittleness at extremely low temperatures. NASA’s

  5. Arc generators of low-temperature plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krolikowski, Cz.; Niewiedzial, R.; Siwiec, J.

    1979-01-01

    This paper is a review of works concerning investigation and use of low-temperature plasma in arc plasma generators made in Electric Power Institute of PP. There are discussed: analytical approach to a problem of volt-current and operational characteristics of DC arc plasma generators, determination of limits of their stable work and possibilities of their use to technological aims. (author)

  6. Muonium in Al2O3 powder at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefl, R.F.; Warren, J.B.; Oram, C.J; Brewer, J.H.; Harshman, D.R.

    1982-04-01

    Measurements of muonium (μ + e - ) spin relaxation in a finely powdered sample of γ-Al 2 O 3 in a He (or Ne) atmosphere indicate that the muonium atoms escape the powder grains with a high efficiency at low temperatures (T < 30 K). The muonium spin relaxation rate is proportional to the fraction of the powder surface area not covered by adsorbed He (Ne)

  7. Fly ash particles spheroidization using low temperature plasma energy

    OpenAIRE

    Shekhovtsov, V. V.; Volokitin, O. G.; Vitske, Rudolf Evaldovich; Kondratyuk, Alexey Alekseevich

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the investigations on producing spherical particles 65-110 [mu]m in size using the energy of low temperature plasma (LTP). These particles are based on flow ash produced by the thermal power plant in Seversk, Tomsk region, Russia. The obtained spherical particles have no defects and are characterized by a smooth exterior surface. The test bench is designed to produce these particles. With due regard for plasma temperature field distribution, it is shown that the transition ...

  8. Low temperature CVD deposition of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dariel, M.; Yeheskel, J.; Agam, S.; Edelstein, D.; Lebovits, O.; Ron, Y.

    1991-04-01

    The coating of graphite on silicon carbide from the gaseous phase in a hot-well, open flow reactor at 1150degC is described. This study constitutes the first part of an investigation of the process for the coating of nuclear fuel by chemical vapor deposition (CVD)

  9. Manufacturing Demonstration Facility: Low Temperature Materials Synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, David E.; Moon, Ji-Won; Armstrong, Beth L.; Datskos, Panos G.; Duty, Chad E.; Gresback, Ryan; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Jellison, Gerald Earle; Jang, Gyoung Gug; Joshi, Pooran C.; Jung, Hyunsung; Meyer, Harry M.; Phelps, Tommy

    2015-01-01

    The Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) low temperature materials synthesis project was established to demonstrate a scalable and sustainable process to produce nanoparticles (NPs) for advanced manufacturing. Previous methods to chemically synthesize NPs typically required expensive, high-purity inorganic chemical reagents, organic solvents and high temperatures. These processes were typically applied at small laboratory scales at yields sufficient for NP characterization, but insufficient to support roll-to-roll processing efforts or device fabrication. The new NanoFermentation processes described here operated at a low temperature (~60 C) in low-cost, aqueous media using bacteria that produce extracellular NPs with controlled size and elemental stoichiometry. Up-scaling activities successfully demonstrated high NP yields and quality in a 900-L pilot-scale reactor, establishing this NanoFermentation process as a competitive biomanufacturing strategy to produce NPs for advanced manufacturing of power electronics, solid-state lighting and sensors.

  10. Low temperature experiments in radiation biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moan, J.

    1977-01-01

    The reasons for performing experiments in radiation biophysics at low temperatures, whereby electron spectra may be studied, are explained. The phenomenon of phosphorescence spectra observed in frozen aqueous solutions of tryptophan and adenosine is also described. Free radicals play an important part in biological radiation effects and may be studied by ESR spectroscopy. An ESR spectrum of T 1 bacteriophages irradiated dry at 130K is illustrated and discussed. Hydrogen atoms, which give lines on the spectrum, are believed to be those radiation products causing most biological damage in a dry system. Low temperature experiments are of great help in explaining the significance of direct and indirect effects. This is illustrated for the case of trypsin. (JIW)

  11. Dehydration of hydrated low-temperature tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, T

    1949-01-01

    Yoshida examined the mechanism of the dehydration of hydrated low-temperature tar with a microscope. The tar containing free carbon and coal dust is so stable that the removal of the above substances and water by a physical method is very difficult. Addition of light oil produced by fractionation of low-temperature tar facilitates the operations. Yoshida tried using the separate acid, neutral, and basic components of the light oil; the acid oil proved to be most effective. For many reasons it is convenient to use light oil as it is. In this method the quantity of light oil required is 2 to 3 times that of tar. But in supplementing the centrifugal method, the quantity of light oil needed might be only half the amount of tar.

  12. Technological uses of low temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, J.

    1975-01-01

    Types of low temperature plasma sources considered include; arc discharge, high pressure discharge, low pressure discharge and flame. The problems of uniform heating of a gas are discussed and it is considered that the most reliable technique is the magnetically rotated arc, but expanded discharges of one kind or another are likely to be serious competitors in the future. The uses of low temperature plasma in chemistry and combustion are considered. The potential for plasma chemistry lies with processes in which the reactions occur in the plasma itself or its neighbouring gas phase, including those which require the vaporization of liquefaction of a refractory material and also highly endothermic reactions. The production of thixotropic silica and acetylene are discussed as examples of such reactions. The field of plasma and combustion including; ignition, flame ionization and soot formation, and the MHD generator, is considered. (U.K.)

  13. Manufacturing Demonstration Facility: Low Temperature Materials Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, David E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Moon, Ji-Won [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Armstrong, Beth L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Datskos, Panos G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Duty, Chad E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gresback, Ryan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ivanov, Ilia N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jacobs, Christopher B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jellison, Gerald Earle [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jang, Gyoung Gug [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Joshi, Pooran C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jung, Hyunsung [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Meyer, III, Harry M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Phelps, Tommy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-06-30

    The Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) low temperature materials synthesis project was established to demonstrate a scalable and sustainable process to produce nanoparticles (NPs) for advanced manufacturing. Previous methods to chemically synthesize NPs typically required expensive, high-purity inorganic chemical reagents, organic solvents and high temperatures. These processes were typically applied at small laboratory scales at yields sufficient for NP characterization, but insufficient to support roll-to-roll processing efforts or device fabrication. The new NanoFermentation processes described here operated at a low temperature (~60 C) in low-cost, aqueous media using bacteria that produce extracellular NPs with controlled size and elemental stoichiometry. Up-scaling activities successfully demonstrated high NP yields and quality in a 900-L pilot-scale reactor, establishing this NanoFermentation process as a competitive biomanufacturing strategy to produce NPs for advanced manufacturing of power electronics, solid-state lighting and sensors.

  14. Behaviour of polar crystals at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozhdin, S.N.; Novik, V.K.; Gavrilova, N.D.; Koptsik, V.A.; Popova, T.V.

    1975-01-01

    Temperature dependencies of pyrocoefficient for a wide class of various pyroactive crystals in the temperature range from 4,2 to 300 deg K were investigated. The problems to be solved were: to confirm a conclusion on the pyrocoefficient γsup(sigma) tending to zero at T → 0; to compare experimental data with conclusions of existing theories; to reveal specific features in the behaviour of both linear pyroelectrics and segnetoelectrics at low temperatures. The behaviour of the total pyrocoefficient for all crystals obeys the regularity γsup(sigma) → 0 at T → O. In the range of low temperatures the pyrocoefficient varies by the power law: γsup(sigma) approximately Tsup(α). For the majority of crystals studied α is close to 3. CdS, BeO, ZiNbO 3 and other crystals were studied

  15. Study on low temperature plasma driven permeation of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takizawa, Masayuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    It is one of the most important problem in PWI of fusion devices from the point of view of tritium leakage that hydrogen diffuses in the wall of the device and permeates through it, which results in hydrogen being released to the coolant side. In this study, plasma driven permeation experiments were carried out with several kinds of metal membranes in the low temperature plasma where ionic and atomic hydrogen as well as electron existed in order to survey PDP mechanism from the many view points. In addition, incident flux rate from the plasma to the membrane surface was evaluated by calculation analysis. As a result the mechanism of low temperature PDP was found out and described as PDP models. The simulation of the membrane pump system was executed and the system performance was estimated with the models. (author). 135 refs.

  16. Study on low temperature plasma driven permeation of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizawa, Masayuki

    1998-03-01

    It is one of the most important problem in PWI of fusion devices from the point of view of tritium leakage that hydrogen diffuses in the wall of the device and permeates through it, which results in hydrogen being released to the coolant side. In this study, plasma driven permeation experiments were carried out with several kinds of metal membranes in the low temperature plasma where ionic and atomic hydrogen as well as electron existed in order to survey PDP mechanism from the many view points. In addition, incident flux rate from the plasma to the membrane surface was evaluated by calculation analysis. As a result the mechanism of low temperature PDP was found out and described as PDP models. The simulation of the membrane pump system was executed and the system performance was estimated with the models. (author). 135 refs

  17. Low-temperature mobility measurements on CMOS devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hairpetian, A.; Gitlin, D.; Viswanathan, C.R.

    1989-01-01

    The surface channel mobility of carriers in eta- and rho-MOS transistors fabricated in a CMOS process was accurately determined at low temperatures down to 5 Κ. The mobility was obtained by an accurate measurement of the inversion charge density using a split C-V technique and the conductance at low drain voltages. The split C-V technique was validated at all temperatures using a one-dimensional Poisson solver (MOSCAP), which was modified for low-temperature application. The mobility dependence on the perpendicular electric field for different substrate bias values appears to have different temperature dependence for eta- and rho-channel devices. The electron mobility increases with a decrease in temperature at all gate voltages. On the other hand, the hole mobility exhibits a different temperature behavior depending upon whether the gate voltage corresponds to strong inversion or is near threshold

  18. Low-temperature conductivity of gadolinium sulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mustafaeva, S. N., E-mail: solmust@gmail.com [Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan); Asadov, S. M., E-mail: mirasadov@gmail.com [Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Catalysis and Inorganic Chemistry (Azerbaijan)

    2016-09-15

    In samples of GdS{sub x} (x = 1.475–2) of various compositions, the conductivity temperature dependences are investigated for the case of direct current in the low-temperature region (4.2–225 K). The presence of the activation and activationless hopping mechanisms of charge transport over the band gap of the samples of GdS{sub x} phases is established. The parameters of localized states in GdS{sub x} are determined.

  19. Thermodynamic power stations at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malherbe, J.; Ployart, R.; Alleau, T.; Bandelier, P.; Lauro, F.

    The development of low-temperature thermodynamic power stations using solar energy is considered, with special attention given to the choice of the thermodynamic cycle (Rankine), working fluids (frigorific halogen compounds), and heat exchangers. Thermomechanical conversion machines, such as ac motors and rotating volumetric motors are discussed. A system is recommended for the use of solar energy for irrigation and pumping in remote areas. Other applications include the production of cold of fresh water from brackish waters, and energy recovery from hot springs.

  20. Crystal growth from low-temperature solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangwal, K.

    1994-01-01

    The state of the art in crystal growth from solutions at low-temperatures has been done. The thermodynamic and kinetic parameters have been discussed in respect to different systems. The methods of crystal growth from water and organic solutions and different variants of their technical realizations have been reviewed. Also the growth by chemical reactions and gel growth have been described. The large number of examples have been shown. 21 refs, 30 figs, 3 tabs

  1. Minimizing material damage using low temperature irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, E.; Hasanain, F.; Winters, M.

    2012-08-01

    Scientific advancements in healthcare driven both by technological breakthroughs and an aging and increasingly obese population have lead to a changing medical device market. Complex products and devices are being developed to meet the demands of leading edge medical procedures. Specialized materials in these medical devices, including pharmaceuticals and biologics as well as exotic polymers present a challenge for radiation sterilization as many of these components cannot withstand conventional irradiation methods. The irradiation of materials at dry ice temperatures has emerged as a technique that can be used to decrease the radiation sensitivity of materials. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of low temperature irradiation on a variety of polymer materials, and over a range of temperatures from 0 °C down to -80 °C. The effectiveness of microbial kill is also investigated under each of these conditions. The results of the study show that the effect of low temperature irradiation is material dependent and can alter the balance between crosslinking and chain scission of the polymer. Low temperatures also increase the dose required to achieve an equivalent microbiological kill, therefore dose setting exercises must be performed under the environmental conditions of use.

  2. Computational Chemistry of Cyclopentane Low Temperature Oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    El Rachidi, Mariam

    2015-03-30

    Cycloalkanes are significant constituents of conventional fossil fuels, but little is known concerning their combustion chemistry and kinetics, particularly at low temperatures. This study investigates the pressure dependent kinetics of several reactions occurring during low-temperature cyclopentane combustion using theoretical chemical kinetics. The reaction pathways of the cyclopentyl + O2 adduct is traced to alkylhydroperoxide, cyclic ether, β-scission and HO2 elimination products. The calculations are carried out at the UCCSD(T)-F12b/cc-pVTZ-F12//M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. The barrierless entrance channel is treated using variable-reaction-coordinate transition state theory (VRC-TST) at the CASPT2(7e,6o) level of theory, including basis set, geometry relaxation and ZPE corrections. 1-D time-dependent multiwell master equation analysis is used to determine pressure-and temperature-dependent rate parameters of all investigated reactions. Tunneling corrections are included using Eckart barriers. Comparison with cyclohexane is used to elucidate the effect of ring size on the low temperature reactivity of naphthenes. The rate coefficients reported herein are suitable for use in cyclopentane and methylcyclopentane combustion models, even below ~900 K, where ignition is particularly sensitive to these pressure-dependent values.

  3. Neutron moderation at very low temperatures (1691)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacaze, A.

    1961-04-01

    Starting from Harwell experiment carried out inside a low-power reactor, we intended to maintain a liquid hydrogen cell in a channel of the EL3 reactor (at Saclay) whose thermal neutrons flux is 10 14 neutrons/cm 2 /s. We tried to work out a device giving off an important beam of cold neutrons and able to operate in a way as automatic as possible during many consecutive day without a stop. Several circuits have already been achieved at very low temperatures but they brought out volumes and fluxes much lower than those we used this time. The difficulties we have met in carrying out such a device arose on the one hand from the very high energy release to which any kind of experiment is inevitably submitted when placed near the core of the reactor, on the other, hand from the very little room which is available in experimental channels of reactors. In such condition, it is necessary to use a moderator as effective as possible. This study is divided into three parts ; in the first part, we try to determine: a) conditions in which moderation takes place, hence the volume of the cell; b) materials likely to be used at low temperature and in pile; c) cooling system; hence we had to study fluid flow conditions at very low temperatures in very long ducts. The second part is devoted to the description of the device. The third part ventilates the results we have obtained. (author) [fr

  4. Air–surface exchange of gaseous mercury over permafrost soil: an investigation at a high-altitude (4700 m a.s.l. and remote site in the central Qinghai–Tibet Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Ci

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The pattern of air–surface gaseous mercury (mainly Hg(0 exchange in the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau (QTP may be unique because this region is characterized by low temperature, great temperature variation, intensive solar radiation, and pronounced freeze–thaw process of permafrost soils. However, the air–surface Hg(0 flux in the QTP is poorly investigated. In this study, we performed field measurements and controlled field experiments with dynamic flux chambers technique to examine the flux, temporal variation and influencing factors of air–surface Hg(0 exchange at a high-altitude (4700 m a.s.l. and remote site in the central QTP. The results of field measurements showed that surface soils were the net emission source of Hg(0 in the entire study (2.86 ng m−2 h−1 or 25.05 µg m−2 yr−1. Hg(0 flux showed remarkable seasonality with net high emission in the warm campaigns (June 2014: 4.95 ng m−2 h−1; September 2014: 5.16 ng m−2 h−1; and May–June 2015: 1.95 ng m−2 h−1 and net low deposition in the winter campaign (December 2014: −0.62 ng m−2 h−1 and also showed a diurnal pattern with emission in the daytime and deposition in nighttime, especially on days without precipitation. Rainfall events on the dry soils induced a large and immediate increase in Hg(0 emission. Snowfall events did not induce the pulse of Hg(0 emission, but snowmelt resulted in the immediate increase in Hg(0 emission. Daily Hg(0 fluxes on rainy or snowy days were higher than those of days without precipitation. Controlled field experiments suggested that water addition to dry soils significantly increased Hg(0 emission both on short (minutes and relatively long (hours timescales, and they also showed that UV radiation was primarily attributed to Hg(0 emission in the daytime. Our findings imply that a warm climate and environmental change could facilitate Hg release from the permafrost terrestrial ecosystem

  5. A passive air sampler for characterizing the vertical concentration profile of gaseous phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in near soil surface air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuzhong; Deng, Shuxing; Liu, Yanan; Shen, Guofeng; Li, Xiqing; Cao, Jun; Wang, Xilong; Reid, Brian; Tao, Shu

    2011-03-01

    Air-soil exchange is an important process governing the fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A novel passive air sampler was designed and tested for measuring the vertical concentration profile of 4 low molecular weight PAHs in gaseous phase (PAH(LMW4)) in near soil surface air. Air at various heights from 5 to 520 mm above the ground was sampled by polyurethane foam disks held in down-faced cartridges. The samplers were tested at three sites: A: an extremely contaminated site, B: a site near A, and C: a background site on a university campus. Vertical concentration gradients were revealed for PAH(LMW4) within a thin layer close to soil surface at the three sites. PAH concentrations either decreased (Site A) or increased (Sites B and C) with height, suggesting either deposition to or evaporation from soils. The sampler is a useful tool for investigating air-soil exchange of gaseous phase semi-volatile organic chemicals. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Low Temperature Synthesis of Magnesium Aluminate Spinel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedovskaya, E.G.; Gabelkov, S.V.; Litvinenko, L.M.; Logvinkov, D.S.; Mironova, A.G.; Odejchuk, M.A.; Poltavtsev, N.S.; Tarasov, R.V.

    2006-01-01

    The low-temperature synthesis of magnesium-aluminum spinel is carried out by a method of thermal decomposition in combined precipitated hydrates. The fine material of magnesium-aluminium spinel with average size of coherent dispersion's area 4...5 nanometers is obtained. Magnesium-aluminum spinel and initial hydrates were investigated by methods of the differential thermal analysis, the x-ray phase analysis and measurements of weight loss during the dehydration and thermal decomposition. It is established that synthesis of magnesium-aluminum spinel occurs at temperature 300 degree C by method of the x-ray phase analysis

  7. Low temperature photoresponse of monolayer tungsten disulphide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingchen Cao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available High photoresponse can be achieved in monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides. However, the response times are inconveniently limited by defects. Here, we report low temperature photoresponse of monolayer tungsten disulphide prepared by exfoliation and chemical vapour deposition (CVD method. The exfoliated device exhibits n-type behaviour; while the CVD device exhibits intrinsic behaviour. In off state, the CVD device has four times larger ratio of photoresponse for laser on/off and photoresponse decay–rise times are 0.1 s (limited by our setup, while the exfoliated device has few seconds. These findings are discussed in terms of charge trapping and localization.

  8. Low-temperature preparation of pyrolytic carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kidd, R.W.; Seifert, D.A.; Browning, M.F.

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that nuclear waste forms coated with chemical vapor deposited pyrolytic carbon (PyC) at about 1273 K can provide ground water leach protection. To minimize the release during coating of volatile material from the waste forms and permit the coating of waste forms with a low softening point, a study was initiated to develop parameters for the catalytic deposition of PyC at low temperatures. The parameters surveyed in a fluidized-bed coater were deposition temperatures, carbon precursors, catalyst, diluent gas, concentration, and pressure

  9. Investigations of Low Temperature Time Dependent Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Sluys, W A; Robitz, E S; Young, B A; Bloom, J

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to investigate metallurgical and mechanical phenomena associated with time dependent cracking of cold bent carbon steel piping at temperatures between 327 C and 360 C. Boiler piping failures have demonstrated that understanding the fundamental metallurgical and mechanical parameters controlling these failures is insufficient to eliminate it from the field. The results of the project consisted of the development of a testing methodology to reproduce low temperature time dependent cracking in laboratory specimens. This methodology was used to evaluate the cracking resistance of candidate heats in order to identify the factors that enhance cracking sensitivity. The resultant data was integrated into current available life prediction tools.

  10. Ionometric determination of fluorides at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostyukova, I.S.; Ennan, A.A.; Dzerzhko, E.K.; Leivikova, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    A method for determining fluoride ions in solution at low temperatures using a solid-contact fluorine-selective electrode (FSE) has been developed. The effect of temperature (60 to -15 degrees C) on the calibration slope, potential equilibrium time, and operational stability is studied; the effect of an organic additive (cryoprotector) on the calibration slope is also studied. The temperature relationships obtained for the solid-contact FSEs allow appropriate corrections to be applied to the operational algorithm of the open-quotes Ftoringclose quotes hand-held semiautomatic HF gas analyzer for the operational temperature range of -16 to 60 degrees C

  11. Low-temperature centrifugal helium compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawada, M.; Togo, S.; Akiyama, Y.; Wada, R.

    1974-01-01

    A centrifugal helium compressor with gas bearings, which can be operated at the temperature of liquid nitrogen, has been investigated. This compressor has the advantages that the compression ratio should be higher than the room temperature operation and that the contamination of helium could be eliminated. The outer diameter of the rotor is 112 mm. The experimental result for helium gas at low temperature shows a flow rate of 47 g/s and a compression ratio of 1.2 when the inlet pressure was 1 ata and the rotational speed 550 rev/s. The investigation is now focused on obtaining a compression ratio of 1.5. (author)

  12. A simple test procedure for evaluating low temperature crack resistance of asphalt concrete : executive summary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Low temperature cracking is one of the major : distress modes in asphalt pavement and is : disastrous to pavement performance and service : life. A poor riding surface leads to an increase in : maintenance and eventual early replacement of : the pave...

  13. Characterization of Si(100) homoepitaxy grown in the STM at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grube, H. (Holger); Brown, G. W. (Geoffrey W.); Pomeroy, J. M. (Joshua M.); Hawley, M. E. (Marilyn E.)

    2002-01-01

    We explore the growth of low-temperature bulk-like Si(100) homoepitaxy with regard to microscopic surface roughness and defects We characterize films grown at different temperatures up to 500K in-situ by means of an effusion cell added to our UHVSTM. The development of novel architectures for future generation computers calls for high-quality homoepitaxial (WOO) grown at low temperature. Even though Si(100) can be grown crystalline up to a limited thickness: the microstructure reveals significant small-scale surface roughness and defects specific to low-temperature growth. Both can he detrimental to fabrication and operation of small-scale electronic devices.

  14. Exploitation of low-temperature energy sources from cogeneration gas engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caf, A.; Urbancl, D.; Trop, P.; Goricanec, D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an original and innovative technical solution for exploiting low-temperature energy sources from cogeneration gas reciprocating engines installed within district heating systems. This solution is suitable for those systems in which the heat is generated by the use of reciprocating engines powered by gaseous fuel for combined heat and power production. This new technical solution utilizes low-temperature energy sources from a reciprocating gas engine which is used for a combined production of heat and power. During the operation of the cogeneration system low-temperature heat is released, which can be raised to as much as 85 °C with the use of a high-temperature heat-pump, thus enabling a high-temperature regime for heating commercial buildings, district heating or in industrial processes. In order to demonstrate the efficiency of utilizing low-temperature heat sources in the cogeneration system, an economic calculation is included which proves the effectiveness and rationality of integrating high-temperature heat-pumps into new or existing systems for combined heat and power production with reciprocating gas engines. - Highlights: • The use of low-temperature waste heat from the CHP is described. • Total energy efficiency of the CHP can be increased to more than 103.3%. • Low-temperature heat is exploited with high-temperature heat pump. • High-temperature heat pump allows temperature rise to up to 85 °C. • Exploitation of low-temperature waste heat increases the economics of the CHP.

  15. Nitrous oxide emissions at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martikainen, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    Microbial processes in soil are generally stimulated by temperature, but at low temperatures there are anomalies in the response of microbial activities. Soil physical-chemical characteristics allow existence of unfrozen water in soil also at temperatures below zero. Therefore, some microbial activities, including those responsible for nitrous oxide (N 2 0) production, can take place even in 'frozen' soil. Nitrous oxide emissions during winter are important even in boreal regions where they can account for more than 50% of the annual emissions. Snow pack therefore has great importance for N 2 0 emissions, as it insulates soil from the air allowing higher temperatures in soil than in air, and possible changes in snoav cover as a result of global warming would thus affect the N 2 0 emission from northern soils. Freezing-thawing cycles highly enhance N 2 0 emissions from soil, probably because microbial nutrients, released from disturbed soil aggregates and lysed microbial cells, support microbial N 2 0 production. However, the overall interactions between soil physics, chemistry, microbiology and N 2 0 production at low temperatures, including effects of freezing-thawing cycles, are still poorly known. (au)

  16. Efficient prepreg recycling at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannkoke, Kord; Oethe, Marcus; Busse, Jürgen

    When manufacturing fibre reinforced plastics engineers are still confronted with a lack of experience concerning efficient recycling methods for prepreg cutting waste. Normally, the prepregs are cured and subsequently milled to use them as a filler material for polymers. However, this method is expensive and it is difficult to find applications for the milled FRP. An alternative method to recycle CFRP prepregs will be presented in this paper. Cutting the uncured prepreg waste was done by means of a saw mill which was cooled down to low temperatures. Working temperatures of -30°C are sufficient to harden the uncured resin and to achieve cuttable prepregs. Furthermore, post-curing during the cutting process is avoided with this technique. The result is a `cotton'-like matted structure with random fibre orientation and fibre length distribution. Subsequent curing was done by means of a press and an autoclave, respectively. It will be shown by means of tension and bending tests that low-temperature cutting of uncured prepregs is a way to partly conserve the high valuation of FRP during recycling. Furthermore, it offers possibilities for various applications.

  17. Measurement of low-temperature specific heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    The measurement of low-temperature specific heat (LTSH) (0.1 K< T<60 K) has seen a number of breakthroughs both in design concepts and instrumentation in the last 15 years: particularly in small sample calorimetry. This review attempts to provide an overview of both large and small sample calorimetry techniques at temperatures below 60 K, with sufficient references to enable more detailed study. A comprehensive review is made of the most reliable measurements of the LTSH of 84 of the elements to illustrate briefly some of the problems of measurements and analysis, as well as to provide additional references. More detail is devoted to three special areas of low-temperature calorimetry that have seen rapid development recently: (1) measurement of the specific heat of highly radioactive samples, (2) measurement of the specific heat of materials in high magnetic fields (18 T), and (3) measurement of the specific heat of very small (100 μg) samples. The review ends with a brief discussion of the frontier research currently underway on microcalorimetry for nanogram sample weights

  18. Extreme low temperature tolerance in woody plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Richard Strimbeck

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Woody plants in boreal to arctic environments and high mountains survive prolonged exposure to temperatures below -40˚C and minimum temperatures below -60˚C, and laboratory tests show that many of these species can also survive immersion in liquid nitrogen at -196˚C. Studies of biochemical changes that occur during acclimation, including recent proteomic and metabolomic studies, have identified changes in carbohydrate and compatible solute concentrations, membrane lipid composition, and proteins, notably dehydrins, that may have important roles in survival at extreme low temperature. Consideration of the biophysical mechanisms of membrane stress and strain lead to the following hypotheses for cellular and molecular mechanisms of survival at extreme low temperature: 1. Changes in lipid composition stabilize membranes at temperatures above the lipid phase transition temperature (-20 to 30˚C, preventing phase changes that result in irreversible injury. 2. High concentrations of oligosaccharides promote vitrification or high viscosity in the cytoplasm in freeze-dehydrated cells, which would prevent deleterious interactions between membranes. 3. Dehydrins bind membranes and further promote vitrification or act stearically to prevent membrane-membrane interactions.

  19. Computational Chemistry of Cyclopentane Low Temperature Oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    El Rachidi, Mariam; Zá dor, Judit; Sarathy, Mani

    2015-01-01

    reactions occurring during low-temperature cyclopentane combustion using theoretical chemical kinetics. The reaction pathways of the cyclopentyl + O2 adduct is traced to alkylhydroperoxide, cyclic ether, β-scission and HO2 elimination products. The calculations are carried out at the UCCSD(T)-F12b/cc-pVTZ-F12//M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. The barrierless entrance channel is treated using variable-reaction-coordinate transition state theory (VRC-TST) at the CASPT2(7e,6o) level of theory, including basis set, geometry relaxation and ZPE corrections. 1-D time-dependent multiwell master equation analysis is used to determine pressure-and temperature-dependent rate parameters of all investigated reactions. Tunneling corrections are included using Eckart barriers. Comparison with cyclohexane is used to elucidate the effect of ring size on the low temperature reactivity of naphthenes. The rate coefficients reported herein are suitable for use in cyclopentane and methylcyclopentane combustion models, even below ~900 K, where ignition is particularly sensitive to these pressure-dependent values.

  20. Correlation and prediction of gaseous diffusion coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, T. R.; Mason, E. A.

    1973-01-01

    A new correlation method for binary gaseous diffusion coefficients from very low temperatures to 10,000 K is proposed based on an extended principle of corresponding states, and having greater range and accuracy than previous correlations. There are two correlation parameters that are related to other physical quantities and that are predictable in the absence of diffusion measurements. Quantum effects and composition dependence are included, but high-pressure effects are not. The results are directly applicable to multicomponent mixtures.

  1. Anomalous low-temperature desorption from preirradiated rare gas solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savchenko, E.V.; Gumenchuk, G.B.; Yurtaeva, E.M.; Belov, A.G.; Khyzhniy, I.V.; Frankowski, M.; Beyer, M.K.; Smith-Gicklhorn, A.M.; Ponomaryov, A.N.; Bondybey, V.E.

    2005-01-01

    The role for the exciton-induced defects in the stimulation of anomalous low-temperature desorption of the own lattice atoms from solid Ar and Ne preirradiated by an electron beam is studied. The free electrons from shallow traps-structural defects-was monitored by the measurements of a yield of the thermally induced exoelectron emission (TSEE). The reaction of recombination of self-trapped holes with electrons is considered as a source of energy needed for the desorption of atoms from the surface of preirradiated solids. A key part of the exciton-induced defects in the phenomenon observed is demonstrated

  2. The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Experiments Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Warren; Lai, Anthony; Croonquist, Arvid; Chui, Talso; Eraker, J. H.; Abbott, Randy; Mills, Gary; Mohl, James; Craig, James; Balachandra, Balu; hide

    2000-01-01

    The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility (LTMPF) is being developed by NASA to provide long duration low temperature and microgravity environment on the International Space Station (ISS) for performing fundamental physics investigations. Currently, six experiments have been selected for flight definition studies. More will be selected in a two-year cycle, through NASA Research Announcement. This program is managed under the Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Experiments Project Office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The facility is being designed to launch and returned to earth on a variety of vehicles including the HII-A and the space shuttle. On orbit, the facility will be connected to the Exposed Facility on the Japanese Experiment Module, Kibo. Features of the facility include a cryostat capable of maintaining super-fluid helium at a temperature of 1.4 K for 5 months, resistance thermometer bridges, multi-stage thermal isolation system, thermometers capable of pico-Kelvin resolution, DC SQUID magnetometers, passive vibration isolation, and magnetic shields with a shielding factor of 80dB. The electronics and software architecture incorporates two VME buses run using the VxWorks operating system. Technically challenging areas in the design effort include the following: 1) A long cryogen life that survives several launch and test cycles without the need to replace support straps for the helium tank. 2) The minimization of heat generation in the sample stage caused by launch vibration 3) The design of compact and lightweight DC SQUID electronics. 4) The minimization of RF interference for the measurement of heat at pico-Watt level. 5) Light weighting of the magnetic shields. 6) Implementation of a modular and flexible electronics and software architecture. The first launch is scheduled for mid-2003, on an H-IIA Rocket Transfer Vehicle, out of the Tanegashima Space Center of Japan. Two identical facilities will be built. While one facility is onboard

  3. Low temperature distillation of coal, shale, etc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1938-08-12

    A process is disclosed for the low temperature distillation of solid carbonaceous fuels, such as coal, lignite, shale or the like, which comprises feeding or supplying the comminuted fuel in the form of a layer of shallow depth to drying and distilling zones in succession moving the fuel forward through the zones, submitting it to progressively increasing nonuniform heating therein by combustion gases supplied to the distillation zone and traveling thence to the drying zone, the gases heating the distillation zone indirectly and the drying zone both indirectly and then directly such that the fuel retains its solid discrete form during substantially the whole of its travel through the drying and distillation zones, subjecting the fuel for a portion of its travel to a zigzag ploughing and propelling movement on a heated sole, and increasing the heating so as to cause fusion of the fuel immediately prior to its discharge from the distillation zone.

  4. On Low-temperature Polyamorphous transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakay, A.S.

    2006-01-01

    A theory of polyamorphous transformations in glasses is constructed in the framework of a model of heterophase fluctuations with allowance for the fact that a glass inherits the short- and intermediate-range order from the liquid. A multicomponent order parameter describing the concentration of fluctuons with different types of short-range order is introduced, along with the concepts of isoconfigurational and non-isoconfigurational transitions in the glass. Taking the nonergodicity, nonequilibrium, and multiplicity of structural states of a glass into account leads to a kinetic criterion of observability of polyamorphism of a glass. As an example, a theory is constructed for the low-temperature first-order phase transition in an orientational glass based on doped fullerite. The relaxation processes of this system are described, including the subsystem of tunneling states. The possibility of a hierarchy of polyamorphous transformations in a glass is discussed

  5. Shock waves in helium at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liepmann, H.W.; Torczynski, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Results are reported from studies of the properties of low temperature He-4 using shock waves as a probe. Ideal shock tube theory is used to show that sonic speeds of Mach 40 are attainable in He at 300 K. Viscosity reductions at lower temperatures minimize boundary layer effects at the side walls. A two-fluid model is described to account for the phase transition which He undergoes at temperatures below 2.2 K, after which the quantum fluid (He II) and the normal compressed superfluid (He I) coexist. Analytic models are provided for pressure-induced shocks in He I and temperature-induced shock waves (called second sound) which appear in He II. The vapor-fluid interface of He I is capable of reflecting second and gasdynamic sound shocks, which can therefore be used as probes for studying phase transitions between He I and He II. 17 references

  6. Preparation of silver nanoparticles at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Mini, E-mail: mishramini5@gmail.com [Centre of Environmental Science, Department of Botany, University of Allahabad, Allahabad, U.P. (India); Chauhan, Pratima, E-mail: mangu167@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, University of Allahabad, Allahabad U.P. (India)

    2016-04-13

    Silver from ancient time is used as antimicrobial agent in the bulk form but now with the advancement in nanotechnology silver in the form of nanoparticles shown potential effect against microbes which make us easy to fight with many diseases plants and animals. In this work silver nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical routes using sodium borohydride as reducing agent at low temperature. The particles were characterized through UV-Visible spectroscopy as well as X-Ray Diffraction. The UV-visible spectra of silver nanoparticles exhibited absorption at 425 cm; the crystallite size of the particles is between 19nm to 39nm. EDAX graph shows two peaks of silver and oxygen. Water absorbed by silver nanoparticles was removed by the calcinations.

  7. Preparation of silver nanoparticles at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Mini; Chauhan, Pratima

    2016-01-01

    Silver from ancient time is used as antimicrobial agent in the bulk form but now with the advancement in nanotechnology silver in the form of nanoparticles shown potential effect against microbes which make us easy to fight with many diseases plants and animals. In this work silver nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical routes using sodium borohydride as reducing agent at low temperature. The particles were characterized through UV-Visible spectroscopy as well as X-Ray Diffraction. The UV-visible spectra of silver nanoparticles exhibited absorption at 425 cm; the crystallite size of the particles is between 19nm to 39nm. EDAX graph shows two peaks of silver and oxygen. Water absorbed by silver nanoparticles was removed by the calcinations.

  8. Desalination by very low temperature nuclear heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saari, Risto

    1977-01-01

    A new sea water desalination method has been developed: Nord-Aqua Vacuum Evaporation, which utilizes waste heat at a very low temperature. The requisite vacuum is obtained by the aid of a barometric column and siphon, and the dissolved air is removed from the vacuum by means of water flows. According to test results from a pilot plant, the process is operable if the waste heat exists at a temperature 7degC higher than ambient. The pumping energy which is then required is 9 kcal/kg, or 1.5% of the heat of vaporization of water. Calculations reveal that the method is economically considerably superior to conventional distilling methods. (author)

  9. Recrystallization of magnesium deformed at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fromageau, R.; Pastol, J.L.; Revel, G.

    1978-01-01

    The recrystallization of magnesium was studied after rolling at temperatures ranging between 248 and 373 K. For zone refined magnesium the annealing behaviour as observed by electrical resistivity measurements showed two stages at about 250 K and 400 K due respectively to recrystallization and grain growth. The activation energy associated with the recrystallization stage was 0.75 +- 0.01 eV. In less pure magnesium, with nominal purity 99.99 and 99.9%, the recrystallization stage was decomposed into two substages. Activation energies were determined in relation with deformation temperature and purity. The magnesium of intermediate purity (99.99%) behaved similarly to the lowest purity metal when it was deformed at high temperature and to the purest magnesium when the deformation was made at low temperature. This behaviour was discussed in connection with the theories of Luecke and Cahn. (Auth.)

  10. Low temperature distillation of powdered materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1929-04-11

    In the low temperature distillation of powdered material such as coal, brown coal, or oil shale, dust carried by the gases and vapors is precipitated by supplying liquid hydrocarbons to the effluent gases, for example, to a dust remover through which the distillates pass. The material is supplied through a hopper and moved through a retort by a worm feed, and is discharged into a sump. Scavenging gases such as steam may be introduced through a pipe. Two conveyor worms moving in opposite directions are provided in an outlet conduit which may be surrounded by a cooling jacket. Heavy hydrocarbons condense on the walls of the conduit and on the conveyor worms and serve as dust catchers for the distillates, the lighted volatiles escaping through an outlet. The high boiling point oils flow back to and are cracked in the retort. Oils such as tar oils may be sprayed into the conduit or directly adjacent the entry of the material from feeding hopper.

  11. Installation for low temperature vapor explosion experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsuwankosit, Sunchai; Archakositt, Urith

    2000-01-01

    A preparation for the experiment on the low temperature vapor explosion was planned at the department of Nuclear Technology, Chulalongkorn University, Thailand. The objective of the experiment was to simulate the interaction between the molten fuel and the volatile cooling liquid without resorting to the high temperature. The experiment was expected to involve the injection of the liquid material at a moderate temperature into the liquid material with the very low boiling temperature in order to observe the level of the pressurization as a function of the temperatures and masses of the applied materials. For this purpose, the liquid nitrogen and the water were chosen as the coolant and the injected material for this experiment. Due to the size of the installation and the scale of the interaction, only lumped effect of various parameters on the explosion was expected from the experiment at this initial stage. (author)

  12. Low-temperature geothermal resources of Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, J.E. [Washington State Dept. of Natural Resources, Olympia, WA (United States). Div. of Geology and Earth Resources; Bloomquist, R.G. [Washington State Energy Office, Olympia, WA (United States)

    1994-06-01

    This report presents information on the location, physical characteristics, and water chemistry of low-temperature geothermal resources in Washington. The database includes 941 thermal (>20C or 68F) wells, 34 thermal springs, lakes, and fumaroles, and 238 chemical analyses. Most thermal springs occur in the Cascade Range, and many are associated with stratovolcanoes. In contrast, 97 percent of thermal wells are located in the Columbia Basin of southeastern Washington. Some 83.5 percent are located in Adams, Benton, Franklin, Grant, Walla Walla, and Yakima Counties. Yakima County, with 259 thermal wells, has the most. Thermal wells do not seem to owe their origin to local sources of heat, such as cooling magma in the Earth`s upper crust, but to moderate to deep circulation of ground water in extensive aquifers of the Columbia River Basalt Group and interflow sedimentary deposits, under the influence of a moderately elevated (41C/km) average geothermal gradient.

  13. Low-temperature glycerolysis of avocado oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satriana, Arpi, Normalina; Supardan, Muhammad Dani; Gustina, Rizka Try; Mustapha, Wan Aida Wan

    2018-04-01

    Glycerolysis can be a useful technique for production of mono- and diacylglycerols from triacylglycerols present in avocado oil. In the present work, the effect of catalyst and co-solvent concentration on low-temperature glycerolysis of avocado oil was investigated at 40oC of reaction temperature. A hydrodynamic cavitation system was used to enhance the miscibility of the oil and glycerol phases. NaOH and acetone were used as catalyst and co-solvent, respectively. The experimental results showed that the catalyst and co-solvent concentration affected the glycerolysis reaction rate. The catalyst concentration of 1.5% and co-solvent concentration of 300% were the optimised conditions. A suitable amount of NaOH and acetone must be added to achieve an optimum of triacylglycerol conversion.

  14. Low Temperature Waste Immobilization Testing Vol. I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Smith, D. E.; Gallegos, Autumn B.; Telander, Monty R.; Pitman, Stan G.

    2006-09-14

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is evaluating low-temperature technologies to immobilize mixed radioactive and hazardous waste. Three waste forms—alkali-aluminosilicate hydroceramic cement, “Ceramicrete” phosphate-bonded ceramic, and “DuraLith” alkali-aluminosilicate geopolymer—were selected through a competitive solicitation for fabrication and characterization of waste-form properties. The three contractors prepared their respective waste forms using simulants of a Hanford secondary waste and Idaho sodium bearing waste provided by PNNL and characterized their waste forms with respect to the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and compressive strength. The contractors sent specimens to PNNL, and PNNL then conducted durability (American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society [ANSI/ANS] 16.1 Leachability Index [LI] and modified Product Consistency Test [PCT]) and compressive strength testing (both irradiated and as-received samples). This report presents the results of these characterization tests.

  15. Steady state behaviour of gaseous fission products in UO2 nuclear fuel at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, C.B.; Raj, Baldev

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical modelling studies have been performed on steady state fission gas behaviour in UO 2 fuels at temperatures in the range 1073deg K to 1473deg K. The concentrations of gas atoms in the matrix and in the bubbles are determined. Fraction of total generated gas atoms migrating to and forming bubbles at grain boundaries is calculated. Contributions of intragranular and intergranular bubbles to the swelling are also computed. The various assumptions made to simplify computer calculations and their validity are discussed at length. Effects of changes in the fission rate, the resolution parameter, bubble concentration, gas atom diffusivity and grain radius on swelling and gas release are studied. The results of this model are compared to other theoretical models and experimental results available in literature. Possibility of extending the present model to advanced carbide and nitride fuels is discussed. (auth.)

  16. Low temperature spalling of silicon: A crack propagation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertoni, Mariana; Uberg Naerland, Tine; Stoddard, Nathan; Guimera Coll, Pablo

    2017-06-08

    Spalling is a promising kerfless method for cutting thin silicon wafers while doubling the yield of a silicon ingot. The main obstacle in this technology is the high total thickness variation of the spalled wafers, often as high as 100% of the wafer thickness. It has been suggested before that a strong correlation exists between low crack velocities and a smooth surface, but this correlation has never been shown during a spalling process in silicon. The reason lies in the challenge associated to measuring such velocities. In this contribution, we present a new approach to assess, in real time, the crack velocity as it propagates during a low temperature spalling process. Understanding the relationship between crack velocity and surface roughness during spalling can pave the way to attain full control on the surface quality of the spalled wafer.

  17. Versatile piezoelectric pulsed molecular beam source for gaseous compounds and organic molecules with femtomole accuracy for UHV and surface science applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiesser, Alexander; Schaefer, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    This note describes the construction of a piezoelectric pulsed molecular beam source based upon a design presented in an earlier work [D. Proch and T. Trickl, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 60, 713 (1988)]. The design features significant modifications that permit the determination of the number of molecules in a beam pulse with an accuracy of 1x10 11 molecules per pulse. The 21 cm long plunger-nozzle setup allows the molecules to be brought to any point of the UHV chamber with very high intensity. Furthermore, besides typical gaseous compounds, also smaller organic molecules with a vapor pressure higher than 0.1 mbar at room temperature may serve as feed material. This makes the new design suitable for various applications in chemical and surface science studies.

  18. The effect of low temperature cryocoolers on the development of low temperature superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.

    2000-01-01

    The commercial development of reliable 4 K cryocoolers improves the future prospects for magnets made from low temperature superconductors (LTS). The hope of the developers of high temperature superconductors (HTS) has been to replace liquid helium cooled LTS magnets with HTS magnets that operate at or near liquid nitrogen temperature. There has been limited success in this endeavor, but continued problems with HTS conductors have greatly slowed progress toward this goal. The development of cryocoolers that reliably operate below 4 K will allow magnets made from LTS conductor to remain very competitive for many years to come. A key enabling technology for the use of low temperature cryocoolers on LTS magnets has been the development of HTS leads. This report describes the characteristics of LTS magnets that can be successfully melded to low-temperature cryocoolers. This report will also show when it is not appropriate to consider the use of low-temperature cryocoolers to cool magnets made with LTS conductor. A couple of specific examples of LTS magnets where cryocoolers can be used are given

  19. Method of separating tritium contained in gaseous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Yasuo; Oozono, Hideaki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease tritium concentration in gaseous wastes to less than the allowable level by removing tritium in gaseous wastes generated upon combustion of radioactive wastes by using a plurality of heat exchangers. Method: Gaseous wastes at high temperature generated upon combustion of radioactive wastes in an incinerator are removed with radioactive solid substances through filters, cooled down to a temperature below 10 0 C by the passage through first and second heat exchangers and decreased with tritium content to less than the allowable concentration by the gaseous wastes at low temperature from the second heat exhcanger. The gaseous wastes at low temperature are used as the cooling medium for the first heat exchanger. They are heat exchanged at the upstream of the second heat exchanger with the cooling water from the third heat exchanger and cooled at the downstream by the cooling water cooled by the cooling medium. The gaseous wastes at low temperature thus cooled below 10 0 C are heated to about 350 0 C in the first heat exchanger and discharged. (Moriyama, K.)

  20. Low Temperature Densities from (218 to 364) K and up to 50 MPa in Pressure and Surface Tension for Trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium Bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide and Dicyanamide and 1-Hexyl-3-methylimidazolium Hexafluorophosphate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klomfar, Jaroslav; Součková, Monika; Pátek, Jaroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 59, July (2014), s. 2263-2274 ISSN 0021-9568 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-00145S; GA ČR GA101/09/0010 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium cation * 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate * bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide anion * dicyanamide anion * experimental pvT data * surface tension * internal pressure Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 2.037, year: 2014

  1. Low temperature Moessbauer study of amorphous Fe83B17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miglierini, M.; Sitek, J.

    1987-01-01

    Information about changes in magnetic structures of metallic glass Fe 83 B 17 at low temperatures has been obtained by 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy in the temperature range from 295 to 77 K. The mean values of the magnetic hyperfine field have been calculated from magnetic splitting of Moessbauer spectra. The angle between the direction of magnetization and the γ-ray direction θ obtained from line intensity ratios is given as a function of temperature. The curve shows a minimum at 120 K. The influence of decreasing temperature on the magnetic structure may be caused by a change in magnetic anisotropy and a reorientation of surface spins. The main contribution to the changes in θ comes from the reorientation of surface domains

  2. Low Temperature Catalyst for NH3 Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, Oscar; Melendez, Orlando

    2013-01-01

    Air revitalization technologies maintain a safe atmosphere inside spacecraft by the removal of C02, ammonia (NH3), and trace contaminants. NH3 onboard the International Space Station (ISS) is produced by crew metabolism, payloads, or during an accidental release of thermal control refrigerant. Currently, the ISS relies on removing NH3 via humidity condensate and the crew wears hooded respirators during emergencies. A different approach to cabin NH3 removal is to use selective catalytic oxidation (SCO), which builds on thermal catalytic oxidation concepts that could be incorporated into the existing TCCS process equipment architecture on ISS. A low temperature platinum-based catalyst (LTP-Catalyst) developed at KSC was used for converting NH3 to H20 and N2 gas by SCO. The challenge of implementing SCO is to reduce formation of undesirable byproducts like NOx (N20 and NO). Gas mixture analysis was conducted using FTIR spectrometry in the Regenerable VOC Control System (RVCS) Testbed. The RVCS was modified by adding a 66 L semi-sealed chamber, and a custom NH3 generator. The effect of temperature on NH3 removal using the LTP-Catalyst was examined. A suitable temperature was found where NH3 removal did not produce toxic NO, (NO, N02) and N20 formation was reduced.

  3. Pyrocatechol from low-temperature tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowenstein-Lom, W

    1950-01-01

    A method for production and purification of pyrocatechol (I) from low-temperature carbonization effluents was described. Phenosolvan, a mixture of isobutyl, butyl, and amyl acetates, was used for extraction of I from the effluent. After removing most of the solvent by distillation, the separation was completed by batch vacuum distillation at 25 to 50 millimeter Hg. The 4th fraction, containing I 49.2, I homologues 31.1, o-cresol 6.8, xylenols 7.3, and higher boiling material and residue 5.6 percent, was treated in a purification pilot plant, which was described. This fraction was dissolved in an equal weight of C/sub 6/H/sub 6/, then cooled. I was crystallized out in a vacuum crystallizer, centrifuged, and washed with C/sub 6/H/sub 6/, dried in a rotating-plate drier and taken to storage. The purified I melted 100/sup 0/ to 102/sup 0/ and contained 4 to 8 percent homologues or other impurities. A further recrystallization raised its purity to 99.2 percent. Plant capacities and production costs are given.

  4. Enhanced Design Alternative I: Low Temperature Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacNeil, K.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to evaluate Enhanced Design Alternative (EDA) 1, the low temperature repository design concept (CRWMS M and O 1999a). This technical document will provide supporting information for Site Recommendation (SR) and License Application (LA). Preparation of this evaluation will be in accordance with the technical document preparation plan (TDPP), (CRWMS M and O 1999b). EDA 1, one of five EDAs, was evolved from evaluation of a series of design features and alternatives developed during the first phase of the License Application Design Selection (LADS) process. Low, medium, and high temperature concepts were developed from the design features and alternatives prepared during Phase 1 of the LADS effort (CRWMS M and O 1999a). EDA 1 will first be evaluated against a single Screening Criterion, outlined in CRWMS M and O 1999a, which addresses post-closure performance of the repository. The performance of the repository is defined quantitatively as the peak radiological dose rate to an average individual of a critical group at a distance of 20 km from the repository site within 10,000 years. To satisfy this criterion the peak dose rate must not exceed the anticipated regulatory level of 25 mrem/yr within 10,000 years. If the EDA meets the screening criterion, the EDA will be further evaluated against the LADS Phase 2 Evaluation Criteria contained in CRWMS M and O 1999a

  5. Low temperature nitrogen chemistry. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glarborg, P.; Dam-Johansen, K.; Kristensen, P.G.; Alzueta, M.; Roejel, H.

    1997-04-01

    The results of a two tasks program on Natural Gas Reburning are reported. The work involved an experimental and theoretical study of the reburning and hybrid reburning/SNCR chemistry in the 1000-1500 K range. The interactions between hydrocarbon and nitrogen chemistry under fuel-rich conditions were investigated in order to assess the NO{sub x} reduction potential of low temperature reburning. The effect of reburn fuel(carbon monoxide, methane, acetylene, ethylene, ethane, and methane/ethane mixture), temperature, stoichiometry, reactant dilution, reaction time, and inlet NO level were studied. The results indicate a significant NO reduction potential even below 1400 K, but extrapolation to practical conditions are complicated by inadequate knowledge of the detailed chemistry as well as of the effect of mixing. The possibilities of enhancing the conversion to N{sub 2} instead of NO by adding selective reducing agents (hybrid reburning/SNCR) were evaluated. Our results indicate little synergistic effect between reburn and SNCR. The most simple configuration, where the selective reducing agent is injected together with the burnout air, is not expected to be effective, unless the N-agent is injected in form of an aqueous solution. A chemical kinetic model for reburning and reburn/SNCR is listed and can be obtained by e-mail from pgl(commerical at)kt.dtu.dk.(au) 145 refs.

  6. Low temperature humidification dehumidification desalination process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Enezi, Ghazi; Ettouney, Hisham; Fawzy, Nagla

    2006-01-01

    The humidification dehumidification desalination process is viewed as a promising technique for small capacity production plants. The process has several attractive features, which include operation at low temperature, ability to utilize sustainable energy sources, i.e. solar and geothermal, and requirements of low technology level. This paper evaluates the characteristics of the humidification dehumidification desalination process as a function of operating conditions. A small capacity experimental system is used to evaluate the process characteristics as a function of the flow rate of the water and air streams, the temperature of the water stream and the temperature of the cooling water stream. The experimental system includes a packed humidification column, a double pipe glass condenser, a constant temperature water circulation tank and a chiller for cooling water. The water production is found to depend strongly on the hot water temperature. Also, the water production is found to increase upon the increase of the air flow rate and the decrease of the cooling water temperature. The measured air and water temperatures, air relative humidity and the flow rates are used to calculate the air side mass transfer coefficient and the overall heat transfer coefficient. Measured data are found to be consistent with previous literature results

  7. New developments in low temperature physics New developments in low temperature physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, Bob; Paalanenn, Mikko

    2009-04-01

    Below you will find part of the activity report to the IUPAP General Assembly, October 2008, by the present and previous Chairmen of C5. It provides an overview of the most important and recent developments in low temperature physics, much in line with the program of LT25. For the field of experimental low temperature physics, the ability to conduct research has been damaged by the dramatic increase in the price of liquid helium. In the USA, for example, the price of liquid helium has approximately doubled over the past two years. This has led to a reduction in activity in many laboratories as the funding agencies have not quickly increased support in proportion. The increase in price of liquid helium has accelerated interest in the development and use of alternative cooling systems. In particular, pulse-tube coolers are now available that will allow cryostats with modest cooling needs to operate dilution refrigerators without the need for repeated refills of liquid helium from external supply sources. Solid helium research has seen a dramatic resurgence. Torsional oscillator experiments have been interpreted to show that solid helium may undergo a transition to a state in which some of the atoms in the container do not follow the motion of the container, e.g. may be 'supersolid'. The observation is robust, but the interpretation is controversial. The shear modulus of solid helium undergoes a similar signature with respect to temperature. Experiments that should be expected to cause helium to flow give conflicting results. Theory predicts that a perfect solid cannot show supersolid behavior, but novel superfluid-like behavior should be seen in various defects that can exist in the solid, and vorticity may play a significant role. And, recently there have been reports of unusual mass decoupling in films of pure 4He on graphite surfaces as well as 3He- 4He mixture films on solid hydrogen surfaces. These may be other examples of unusual superfluid-like behavior. There

  8. The physics of the low-temperature plasma in Czechoslovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kracik, J.

    1985-01-01

    A survey is given of low-temperature plasma research in Czechoslovakia since 1954 and its main results are pointed out. In the first years, various processes in electric discharges and electromagnetic acceleration of plasma clusters were studied at Czechoslovak universities and in the Institute of Physics. In the study of ionization waves, Czechoslovak physicists achieved world priority. Later on, low-temperature plasma investigation began in the Institute of Plasma Physics, founded in 1959. The issues of plasma interaction with the solid state and plasma applications in plasma chemistry were studied mainly by its Department of Applied Plasma Physics. The main effort of this group, transferred recently to the Institute of Physics, is aimed at thin film production and plasma-surface interactions; similar experimental studies are also carried out at universities in Brno and Bratislava. Last but not least, arc spraying of powder materials using water-cooled plasmatrons is being developed by the Department of Plasma Technology of the Institute of Plasma Physics. (J.U.)

  9. Oxidative regeneration of toluene-saturated natural zeolite by gaseous ozone: The influence of zeolite chemical surface characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alejandro, Serguei [Laboratorio de Tecnologías Limpias (F. Ingeniería), Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción, Alonso de Ribera 2850, Concepción (Chile); Núcleo de Energías Renovables (F. Ingeniería), Universidad Católica de Temuco, Rudecindo Ortega 02950, Temuco (Chile); Valdés, Héctor, E-mail: hvaldes@ucsc.cl [Laboratorio de Tecnologías Limpias (F. Ingeniería), Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción, Alonso de Ribera 2850, Concepción (Chile); Manéro, Marie-Hélène [Université de Toulouse (France); INPT, UPS (France); Laboratoire de Génie Chimique, 4, Allée Emile Monso, F–31030 Toulouse (France); CNRS (France); Laboratoire de Génie Chimique, F–31030 Toulouse (France); Zaror, Claudio A. [Departamento de Ingeniería Química (F. Ingeniería), Universidad de Concepción, Concepción, Correo 3, Casilla 160–C (Chile)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Surface acidity of modified natural zeolite is related to its chemical reactivity. • Brønsted acid sites are associated to toluene adsorption. • Lewis acid sites could decompose ozone generating surface active oxygen species. • Infrared spectra evidence active atomic oxygen and oxidation by-product formation. • 2NH4Z1 sample shows the highest reactivity toward adsorbed toluene. - Abstract: In this study, the effect of zeolite chemical surface characteristics on the oxidative regeneration of toluene saturated-zeolite samples is investigated. A Chilean natural zeolite (53% clinoptilolite, 40% mordenite and 7% quartz) was chemically modified by acid treatment with hydrochloric acid and by ion-exchange with ammonium sulphate. Thermal pre-treatments at 623 and 823 K were applied and six zeolite samples with different chemical surface characteristics were generated. Chemical modification of natural zeolite followed by thermal out-gassing allows distinguishing the role of acidic surface sites on the regeneration of exhausted zeolites. An increase in Brønsted acid sites on zeolite surface is observed as a result of ammonium-exchange treatment followed by thermal treatment at 623 K, thus increasing the adsorption capacity toward toluene. High ozone consumption could be associated to a high content of Lewis acid sites, since these could decompose ozone into atomic active oxygen species. Then, surface oxidation reactions could take part among adsorbed toluene at Brønsted acid sites and surface atomic oxygen species, reducing the amount of adsorbed toluene after the regenerative oxidation with ozone. Experimental results show that the presence of adsorbed oxidation by-products has a negative impact on the recovery of zeolite adsorption capacity.

  10. Oxidative regeneration of toluene-saturated natural zeolite by gaseous ozone: The influence of zeolite chemical surface characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alejandro, Serguei; Valdés, Héctor; Manéro, Marie-Hélène; Zaror, Claudio A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Surface acidity of modified natural zeolite is related to its chemical reactivity. • Brønsted acid sites are associated to toluene adsorption. • Lewis acid sites could decompose ozone generating surface active oxygen species. • Infrared spectra evidence active atomic oxygen and oxidation by-product formation. • 2NH4Z1 sample shows the highest reactivity toward adsorbed toluene. - Abstract: In this study, the effect of zeolite chemical surface characteristics on the oxidative regeneration of toluene saturated-zeolite samples is investigated. A Chilean natural zeolite (53% clinoptilolite, 40% mordenite and 7% quartz) was chemically modified by acid treatment with hydrochloric acid and by ion-exchange with ammonium sulphate. Thermal pre-treatments at 623 and 823 K were applied and six zeolite samples with different chemical surface characteristics were generated. Chemical modification of natural zeolite followed by thermal out-gassing allows distinguishing the role of acidic surface sites on the regeneration of exhausted zeolites. An increase in Brønsted acid sites on zeolite surface is observed as a result of ammonium-exchange treatment followed by thermal treatment at 623 K, thus increasing the adsorption capacity toward toluene. High ozone consumption could be associated to a high content of Lewis acid sites, since these could decompose ozone into atomic active oxygen species. Then, surface oxidation reactions could take part among adsorbed toluene at Brønsted acid sites and surface atomic oxygen species, reducing the amount of adsorbed toluene after the regenerative oxidation with ozone. Experimental results show that the presence of adsorbed oxidation by-products has a negative impact on the recovery of zeolite adsorption capacity

  11. Oxidative regeneration of toluene-saturated natural zeolite by gaseous ozone: the influence of zeolite chemical surface characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejandro, Serguei; Valdés, Héctor; Manéro, Marie-Hélène; Zaror, Claudio A

    2014-06-15

    In this study, the effect of zeolite chemical surface characteristics on the oxidative regeneration of toluene saturated-zeolite samples is investigated. A Chilean natural zeolite (53% clinoptilolite, 40% mordenite and 7% quartz) was chemically modified by acid treatment with hydrochloric acid and by ion-exchange with ammonium sulphate. Thermal pre-treatments at 623 and 823K were applied and six zeolite samples with different chemical surface characteristics were generated. Chemical modification of natural zeolite followed by thermal out-gassing allows distinguishing the role of acidic surface sites on the regeneration of exhausted zeolites. An increase in Brønsted acid sites on zeolite surface is observed as a result of ammonium-exchange treatment followed by thermal treatment at 623K, thus increasing the adsorption capacity toward toluene. High ozone consumption could be associated to a high content of Lewis acid sites, since these could decompose ozone into atomic active oxygen species. Then, surface oxidation reactions could take part among adsorbed toluene at Brønsted acid sites and surface atomic oxygen species, reducing the amount of adsorbed toluene after the regenerative oxidation with ozone. Experimental results show that the presence of adsorbed oxidation by-products has a negative impact on the recovery of zeolite adsorption capacity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Some experiments in low-temperature thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogle, W.E.

    1982-11-01

    A powdered cerous magnesium nitrate (CMN) temperature scale has been developed in the 0.016 to 3.8 K region which represents an interpolation between the 3 He/ 4 He (T 62 /T 58 ) vapor pressure scale and absolute temperatures in the millikelvin region as determined with a 60 Co in hcp Co nuclear orientation thermometer (NOT). Both ac and dc susceptibility thermometers were used in these experiments. The ac susceptibility of a 13 mg CMN-oil slurry was measured with a mutual inductance bridge employing a SQUID null detector while the dc susceptibility of a 3 mg slurry was measured with a SQUID/flux transformer combination. To check the internal consistency of the NOT, γ-ray intensities were measured both parallel and perpendicular to the Co crystal c-axis. The independent temperatures determined in this fashion were found to agree to within experimental error. For the CMN thermometers employed in these experiments, the susceptibility was found to obey a Curie-Weiss law with a Weiss constant of Δ = 1.05 +- 0.1 mK. The powdered CMN scale in the 0.05 to 1.0 K region was transferred to two germanium resistance thermometers for use in low-temperature specific heat measurements. The integrity of the scale was checked by examining the temperature dependence of the specific heat of high purity copper in the 0.1 to 1 K region. In more recent experiments in this laboratory, the scale was also checked by a comparison with the National Bureau of Standards cryogenic temperature scale (NBS-CTS-1). The agreement between the two scales in the 99 to 206 mK region was found to be on the order of the stated accuracy of the NBS scale

  13. Surfaces of solids and their interactions with gaseous ambients. An introduction to the theory and experimental methods, with some examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgen, P.

    1977-10-01

    The physics and chemistry of ambient gases interacting with solid surfaces are discussed. The necessary theory and experimental techniques and apparatus used are described in detail. Results are presented for two semiconductor materials, silicon and zinc oxide. (W.D.L.)

  14. Low temperature oxidation and spontaneous combustion characteristics of upgraded low rank coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, H.K.; Kim, S.D.; Yoo, J.H.; Chun, D.H.; Rhim, Y.J.; Lee, S.H. [Korea Institute of Energy Research, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    The low temperature oxidation and spontaneous combustion characteristics of dried coal produced from low rank coal using the upgraded brown coal (UBC) process were investigated. To this end, proximate properties, crossing-point temperature (CPT), and isothermal oxidation characteristics of the coal were analyzed. The isothermal oxidation characteristics were estimated by considering the formation rates of CO and CO{sub 2} at low temperatures. The upgraded low rank coal had higher heating values than the raw coal. It also had less susceptibility to low temperature oxidation and spontaneous combustion. This seemed to result from the coating of the asphalt on the surface of the coal, which suppressed the active functional groups from reacting with oxygen in the air. The increasing upgrading pressure negatively affected the low temperature oxidation and spontaneous combustion.

  15. Composite Materials for Low-Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Composite materials with improved thermal conductivity and good mechanical strength properties should allow for the design and construction of more thermally efficient components (such as pipes and valves) for use in fluid-processing systems. These materials should have wide application in any number of systems, including ground support equipment (GSE), lunar systems, and flight hardware that need reduced heat transfer. Researchers from the Polymer Science and Technology Laboratory and the Cryogenics Laboratory at Kennedy Space Center were able to develop a new series of composite materials that can meet NASA's needs for lightweight materials/composites for use in fluid systems and also expand the plastic-additive markets. With respect to thermal conductivity and physical properties, these materials are excellent alternatives to prior composite materials and can be used in the aerospace, automotive, military, electronics, food-packaging, and textile markets. One specific application of the polymeric composition is for use in tanks, pipes, valves, structural supports, and components for hot or cold fluid-processing systems where heat flow through materials is a problem to be avoided. These materials can also substitute for metals in cryogenic and other low-temperature applications. These organic/inorganic polymeric composite materials were invented with significant reduction in heat transfer properties. Decreases of 20 to 50 percent in thermal conductivity versus that of the unmodified polymer matrix were measured. These novel composite materials also maintain mechanical properties of the unmodified polymer matrix. These composite materials consist of an inorganic additive combined with a thermoplastic polymer material. The intrinsic, low thermal conductivity of the additive is imparted into the thermoplastic, resulting in a significant reduction in heat transfer over that of the base polymer itself, yet maintaining most of the polymer's original properties. Normal

  16. Geochemical assessment of light gaseous hydrocarbons in near-surface soils of Kutch-Saurashtra: Implication for hydrocarbon prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, P. Lakshmi Srinivasa; Madhavi, T.; Srinu, D.; Kalpana, M. S.; Patil, D. J.; Dayal, A. M.

    2013-02-01

    Light hydrocarbons in soil have been used as direct indicators in geochemical hydrocarbon exploration, which remains an unconventional path in the petroleum industry. The occurrence of adsorbed soil gases, methane and heavier homologues were recorded in the near-surface soil samples collected from Kutch-Saurashtra, India. Soil gas alkanes were interpreted to be derived from deep-seated hydrocarbon sources and have migrated to the surface through structural discontinuities. The source of hydrocarbons is assessed to be thermogenic and could have been primarily derived from humic organic matter with partial contribution from sapropelic matter. Gas chromatographic analyses of hydrocarbons desorbed from soil samples through acid extraction technique showed the presence of methane through n-butane and the observed concentrations (in ppb) vary from: methane (C1) from 4-291, ethane (C2) from 0-84, propane (C3) from 0-37, i-butane (iC4) from 0-5 and n-butane (nC4) from 0-4. Carbon isotopes measured for methane and ethane by GC-C-IRMS, range between -42.9‰ to -13.3‰ (Pee Dee Belemnite - PDB) and -21.2‰ to -12.4‰ (PDB), respectively. The increased occurrence of hydrocarbons in the areas near Anjar of Kutch and the area south to Rajkot of Saurashtra signifies the area potential for oil and gas.

  17. Surface modification of polyvinyl alcohol/malonic acid nanofibers by gaseous dielectric barrier discharge plasma for glucose oxidase immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshari, Esmail; Mazinani, Saeedeh; Ranaei-Siadat, Seyed-Omid; Ghomi, Hamid

    2016-11-01

    Polymeric nanofiber prepares a suitable situation for enzyme immobilization for variety of applications. In this research, we have fabricated polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/malonic acid nanofibers using electrospinning. After fabrication of nanofibers, the effect of air, nitrogen, CO2, and argon DBD (dielectric barrier discharge) plasmas on PVA/malonic acid nanofibers were analysed. Among them, air plasma had the most significant effect on glucose oxidase (GOx) immobilization. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectrum analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results revealed that in case of air plasma modified nanofibers, the carboxyl groups on the surface are increased. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that, after GOx immobilization, the modified nanofibers with plasma has retained its nanofiber structure. Finally, we analysed reusability and storage stability of GOx immobilized on plasma modified and unmodified nanofibers. The results were more satisfactory for modified nanofibers with respect to unmodified ones.

  18. Inkjet-Printed Porous Silver Thin Film as a Cathode for a Low-Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chen-Chiang; Baek, Jong Dae; Su, Chun-Hao; Fan, Liangdong; Wei, Jun; Liao, Ying-Chih; Su, Pei-Chen

    2016-04-27

    In this work we report a porous silver thin film cathode that was fabricated by a simple inkjet printing process for low-temperature solid oxide fuel cell applications. The electrochemical performance of the inkjet-printed silver cathode was studied at 300-450 °C and was compared with that of silver cathodes that were fabricated by the typical sputtering method. Inkjet-printed silver cathodes showed lower electrochemical impedance due to their porous structure, which facilitated oxygen gaseous diffusion and oxygen surface adsorption-dissociation reactions. A typical sputtered nanoporous silver cathode became essentially dense after the operation and showed high impedance due to a lack of oxygen supply. The results of long-term fuel cell operation show that the cell with an inkjet-printed cathode had a more stable current output for more than 45 h at 400 °C. A porous silver cathode is required for high fuel cell performance, and the simple inkjet printing technique offers an alternative method of fabrication for such a desirable porous structure with the required thermal-morphological stability.

  19. Low temperature vapor phase digestion of graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Robert A.

    2017-04-18

    A method for digestion and gasification of graphite for removal from an underlying surface is described. The method can be utilized to remove graphite remnants of a formation process from the formed metal piece in a cleaning process. The method can be particularly beneficial in cleaning castings formed with graphite molding materials. The method can utilize vaporous nitric acid (HNO.sub.3) or vaporous HNO.sub.3 with air/oxygen to digest the graphite at conditions that can avoid damage to the underlying surface.

  20. LOW-TEMPERATURE SURFACE HARDENING FOR DIAMOND TOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Shmatov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure and properties of cutting diamond tools subjected to thermo-hydro-chemical treatment are examined in the paper. The process involves a chemical treatment of tools in a specially prepared aqueous suspension of oxides Ti, Mo and other ingredients and subsequent heat treatment (minimal process temperature 130 °C. Thermo-hydro-chemical method permits to increase a wear resistance of cutting diamond tools by the factor of 1.3–4.0 in comparison with traditional one.

  1. Modeling of low temperature plasma for surface and Airborne decontamination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihailova, D.; van Dijk, J.; Hagelaar, G.; Belenguer, P.; Guillot, P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to study and develop new plasma-based technology for the next generation of molecular decontamination systems. A capacitively coupled plasma is considered for cleaning using the plasma fluxes directed to the walls. The model used for this purpose is the PLASIMO fluid module applied

  2. Quantum Simulations of Low Temperature High Energy Density Matter

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Voth, Gregory

    2004-01-01

    .... Using classical molecular dynamics simulations to evaluate these equilibrium properties would predict qualitatively incorrect results for low temperature solid hydrogen, because of the highly quantum...

  3. Low Temperature Selective Catalytic Reduction of Nitrogen Oxides in Production of Nitric Acid by the Use of Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabljanac, Ž.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the application of low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of nitrous oxides in the tail gas of the dual-pressure process of nitric acid production. The process of selective catalytic reduction is carried out using the TiO2/WO3 heterogeneous catalyst applied on a ceramic honeycomb structure with a high geometric surface area per volume. The process design parameters for nitric acid production by the dual-pressure procedure in a capacity range from 75 to 100 % in comparison with designed capacity for one production line is shown in the Table 1. Shown is the effectiveness of selective catalytic reduction in the temperature range of the tail gas from 180 to 230 °C with direct application of liquid ammonia, without prior evaporation to gaseous state. The results of inlet and outlet concentrations of nitrous oxides in the tail gas of the nitric acid production process are shown in Figures 1 and 2. Figure 3 shows the temperature dependence of the selective catalytic reduction of nitrous oxides expressed as NO2in the tail gas of nitric acid production with the application of a constant mass flow of liquid ammonia of 13,0 kg h-1 and average inlet mass concentration of the nitrous oxides expressed as NO2of 800,0 mgm-3 during 100 % production capacity. The specially designed liquid-ammonia direct-dosing system along with the effective homogenization of the tail gas resulted in emission levels of nitrous oxides expressed as NO2 in tail gas ranging from 100,0 to 185,0 mg m-3. The applied low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of the nitrous oxides in the tail gases by direct use of liquid ammonia is shown in Figure 4. It is shown that low-temperature selective catalytic reduction with direct application of liquid ammonia opens a new opportunity in the reduction of nitrous oxide emissions during nitric acid production without the risk of dangerous ammonium nitrate occurring in the process of subsequent energy utilization of

  4. Design of stirling engine operating at low temperature difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedlák Josef

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many sources of free energy available in the form of heat that is often simply wasted. The aim of this paper is to design and build a low temperature differential Stirling engine that would be powered exclusively from heat sources such as waste hot water or focused solar rays. A prototype is limited to a low temperature differential modification because of a choice of ABSplus plastic as a construction material for its key parts. The paper is divided into two parts. The first part covers a brief history of Stirling engine and its applications nowadays. Moreover, it describes basic principles of its operation that are supplemented by thermodynamic relations. Furthermore, an analysis of applied Fused Deposition Modelling has been done since the parts with more complex geometry had been manufactured using this additive technology. The second (experimental part covers 4 essential steps of a rapid prototyping method - Computer Aided Design of the 3D model of Stirling engine using parametric modeller Autodesk Inventor, production of its components using 3D printer uPrint, assembly and final testing. Special attention was devoted to last two steps of the process since the surfaces of the printed parts were sandpapered and sprayed. Parts, where an ABS plus plastic would have impeded the correct function, had been manufactured from aluminium and brass by cutting operations. Remaining parts had been bought in a hardware store as it would be uneconomical and unreasonable to manufacture them. Last two chapters of the paper describe final testing, mention the problems that appeared during its production and propose new approaches that could be used in the future to improve the project.

  5. Improvements relating to the low temperature carbonisation of coal, shale, and other suitable fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackford, J E

    1930-03-10

    In the low-temperature carbonization of coal, shale, and other suitable fuel is interposed between the fuel to be carbonized and the container, conveyor, grate, or other surface or surfaces with which the fuel normally contacts during the heat treatment. A medium decomposes during the said heat treatment, to produce a dry carbon at the surface or surfaces contacted without passing through an intermediate plastic or liquid phase during decomposition.

  6. The technique of autoradiography at very low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellerin, P.

    1959-01-01

    Biological samples frozen in liquid nitrogen (-195 deg. C) acquire the hardness of light metals, enabling the surface for autoradiography to be cut on a milling machine. The autoradiographic exposure is made in saturated nitrogen vapour. The emulsion, on a plastic base, is laid on the milled surface in a dark room and this assembly is then placed above the liquid nitrogen in a foam-teflon container. Measurements show that, a temperature gradient is established between -190 deg. C at the liquid nitrogen surface and -121 deg. C at the top of the closed container. Developing is done at room temperature, the speed of the emulsion being practically unchanged. This technique enables the specimen to be kept far below the freezing-point, from the moment the animal is killed until the plate is developed. Freezing ensures complete absence of chemical diffusion and that the recorded tracer distribution is precisely that obtaining at the time of death. The distribution at different levels can be investigated by milling off successive layers. Pseudo-radiographic effects are wholly non-existent. The enhancement of natural colours in the anatomical elements, brought about by low temperatures, is such that it becomes possible to dispense with staining when making colour autoradiograms of sections. (author) [fr

  7. Pulling adsorbed polymers at an angle: A low temperature theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliev, Gerasim; Whittington, Stuart

    2012-02-01

    We consider several partially-directed walk models in two- and three-dimensions to study the problem of a homopolymer interacting with a surface while subject to a force at the terminal monomer. The force is applied with a component parallel to the surface as well as a component perpendicular to the surface. Depending on the relative values of the force in each direction, the force can either enhance the adsorption transition or lead to desorption in an adsorbed polymer. For each model, we determine the associated generating function and extract the phase diagram, identifying states where the polymer is thermally desorbed, adsorbed, and under the influence of the force. We note the different regimes that appear in the problem and provide a low temperature approximation to describe them. The approximation is exact at T=0 and models the exact results extremely well for small values of T. This work is an extension of a model considered by S. Whittington and E. Orlandini.

  8. Low temperature ozone oxidation of solid waste surrogates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabity, James A.; Lee, Jeffrey M.

    2015-09-01

    Solid waste management presents a significant challenge to human spaceflight and especially, long-term missions beyond Earth orbit. A six-month mission will generate over 300 kg of solid wastes per crewmember that must be dealt with to eliminate the need for storage and prevent it from becoming a biological hazard to the crew. There are several methods for the treatment of wastes that include oxidation via ozone, incineration, microbial oxidation or pyrolysis and physical methods such as microwave drying and compaction. In recent years, a low temperature oxidation process using ozonated water has been developed for the chemical conversion of organic wastes to CO2 and H2O. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the rate and effectiveness with which ozone oxidized several different waste materials. Increasing the surface area by chopping or shredding the solids into small pieces more than doubled the rate of oxidation. A greater flow of ozone and agitation of the ozonated water system also increased processing rates. Of the materials investigated, plastics have proven the most difficult to oxidize. The processing of plastics above the glass transition temperatures caused the plastics to clump together which reduced the exposed surface area, while processing at lower temperatures reduced surface reaction kinetics.

  9. Carbon diffusion behavior in molybdenum at relatively low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraoka, Yutaka, E-mail: hiraoka@dap.ous.ac.j [Department of Applied Physics, Okayama University of Science, 1-1 Ridai-cho, Okayama 700-0005 (Japan); Imamura, Kyosuke [Graduate School of Science, Okayama University of Science, 1-1 Ridai-cho, Okayama 700-0005 (Japan); Kadokura, Takanori; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu [Materials Research Department, A.L.M.T. Corp., 2 Iwasekoshi-machi, Toyama 931-8543 (Japan)

    2010-01-07

    Purpose of this study is to investigate the carbon diffusion behavior in pure molybdenum at relatively low temperatures by means of fracture surface observation. Carbon addition was performed at a temperature of 1273-1373 K with the heating time being changed. Fracture surface of the specimen after carbon addition was examined using SEM and the carbon diffusion distance was estimated from the change of fracture mode as a function of the distance from the surface. Results are summarized as follows. First, the carbon diffusion distance increased approximately linearly with the increase of heating time from 1.2 to 10.8 ks. This relationship does not agree with that obtained at much higher temperatures. From Arrhenius plots of the slope of the straight line and the temperature, activation energy was calculated (155 kJ/mol). Secondly, the carbon diffusion distance estimated in this study was generally larger than that simulated using the data of Rudman, particularly at a longer heating time.

  10. Low temperature sintering of hyperstoichiometric uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevrel, H.

    1991-12-01

    In the lattice of uranium dioxide with hyperstoichiometric oxygen content (UO 2+x ), each additional oxygen atoms is introduced by shifting two anions from normal sites to interstitial ones, thereby creating two oxygen vacancies. The point defects then combine to form complex defects comprising several interstitials and vacancies. The group of anions (3x) in the interstitial position participate in equilibria promoting the creation of uranium vacancies thereby considerably increasing uranium self-diffusion. However, uranium grain boundaries diffusion governs densification during the first two stages of sintering of uranium dioxide with hyperstoichiometric oxygen content, i.e., up to 93% of the theoretical density. Surface diffusion and evaporation-condensation, which are considerably accentuated by the hyperstoichiometric deviation, play an active role during sintering by promoting crystalline growth during the second and third stages of sintering. U 8 O 8 can be added to adjust the stoichiometry and to form a finely porous structure and thus increase the pore area subjected to surface phenomena. The composition with an O/U ratio equal to 2.25 is found to densify the best, despite a linear growth in sintering activation energy with hyperstoichiometric oxygen content, increasing from 300 kj.mol -1 for UO 2.10 to 440 kJ.mol -1 for UO 2.25 . Seeds can be introduced to obtain original microstructures, for example the presence of large grains in small-grain matrix

  11. Low temperature barrier wellbores formed using water flushing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinzie, II; John, Billy [Houston, TX; Keltner, Thomas Joseph [Spring, TX

    2009-03-10

    A method of forming an opening for a low temperature well is described. The method includes drilling an opening in a formation. Water is introduced into the opening to displace drilling fluid or indigenous gas in the formation adjacent to a portion of the opening. Water is produced from the opening. A low temperature fluid is applied to the opening.

  12. Effects of low temperature and drought on the physiological and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To find out how oil palm adapts to the environmental conditions, the dynamics of a series of important physiological components derived from the leaves of potted oil palm seedlings under drought stress (DS) (water with holding) and low temperature stress (LTS) (10°C) were studied. The results showed that low temperature ...

  13. Low temperature magnetic structure of MnSe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper we report low temperature neutron diffraction studies on MnSe in order to understand the anomalous behaviour of their magnetic and transport prop- erties. Our study indicates that at low temperatures MnSe has two coexisting crystal structures, high temperature NaCl and hexagonal NiAs. NiAs phase ...

  14. Physiological and biochemical responses to low temperature stress ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cuttings of three hybrid clones of P. ussuriensis × P. deltoides were exposed to different low temperatures (cold and freezing) for 24 h, or consecutive low temperatures (5°C, 0 to 120 h), to determine physiological and biochemical responses to cold stress in these woody plants. Soluble sugar and protein contents increased ...

  15. Freezer-sublimer for gaseous diffusion plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reti, G.R.

    1978-01-01

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for freezing and subliming uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) as part of a gaseous diffusion plant from which a quantity of the UF 6 inventory is intermittently withdrawn and frozen to solidify it. A plurality of upright heat pipes holds a coolant and is arranged in a two compartment vessel, the lower compartment is exposed to UF 6 , the higher one serves for condensing the evaporated coolant by means of cooling water. In one embodiment, each pipe has a quantity of coolant such as freon, hermetically sealded therein. In the other embodiment, each pipe is sealed only at the lower end while the upper end communicates with a common vapor or cooling chamber which contains a water cooled condenser. The cooling water has a sufficiently low temperature to condense the evaporated coolant. The liquid coolant flows gravitationally downward to the lower end portion of the pipe. UF 6 gas is flowed into the tank where it contacts the finned outside surface of the heat pipes. Heat from the gas evaporates the coolant and the gas in turn is solidified on the exterior of the heat pipe sections in the tank. To recover UF 6 gas from the tank, the solidified UF 6 is sublimed by passing compressed UF 6 gas over the frozen UF 6 gas on the pipes or by externally heating the lower ends of the pipes sufficiently to evaporate the coolant therein above the subliming temperature of the UF 6 . The subliming UF 6 gas then condenses the coolant in the vertical heat pipes, so that it can gravitationally flow back to the lower end portions

  16. Low-temperature graphene synthesis using microwave plasma CVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takatoshi; Kim, Jaeho; Ishihara, Masatou; Hasegawa, Masataka

    2013-01-01

    The graphene chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technique at substrate temperatures around 300 °C by a microwave plasma sustained by surface waves (surface wave plasma chemical vapour deposition, SWP-CVD) is discussed. A low-temperature, large-area and high-deposition-rate CVD process for graphene films was developed. It was found from Raman spectra that the deposited films on copper (Cu) substrates consisted of high-quality graphene flakes. The fabricated graphene transparent conductive electrode showed uniform optical transmittance and sheet resistance, which suggests the possibility of graphene for practical electrical and optoelectronic applications. It is intriguing that graphene was successfully deposited on aluminium (Al) substrates, for which we did not expect the catalytic effect to decompose hydrocarbon and hydrogen molecules. We developed a roll-to-roll SWP-CVD system for continuous graphene film deposition towards industrial mass production. A pair of winder and unwinder systems of Cu film was installed in the plasma CVD apparatus. Uniform Raman spectra were confirmed over the whole width of 297 mm of Cu films. We successfully transferred the deposited graphene onto PET films, and confirmed a transmittance of about 95% and a sheet resistance of less than 7 × 10 5 Ω/sq.

  17. Low-temperature graphene synthesis using microwave plasma CVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takatoshi; Kim, Jaeho; Ishihara, Masatou; Hasegawa, Masataka

    2013-02-01

    The graphene chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technique at substrate temperatures around 300 °C by a microwave plasma sustained by surface waves (surface wave plasma chemical vapour deposition, SWP-CVD) is discussed. A low-temperature, large-area and high-deposition-rate CVD process for graphene films was developed. It was found from Raman spectra that the deposited films on copper (Cu) substrates consisted of high-quality graphene flakes. The fabricated graphene transparent conductive electrode showed uniform optical transmittance and sheet resistance, which suggests the possibility of graphene for practical electrical and optoelectronic applications. It is intriguing that graphene was successfully deposited on aluminium (Al) substrates, for which we did not expect the catalytic effect to decompose hydrocarbon and hydrogen molecules. We developed a roll-to-roll SWP-CVD system for continuous graphene film deposition towards industrial mass production. A pair of winder and unwinder systems of Cu film was installed in the plasma CVD apparatus. Uniform Raman spectra were confirmed over the whole width of 297 mm of Cu films. We successfully transferred the deposited graphene onto PET films, and confirmed a transmittance of about 95% and a sheet resistance of less than 7 × 105 Ω/sq.

  18. Low temperature plasma biomedicine: A tutorial review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Gas discharge plasmas formed at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature have recently been shown to be potentially useful for surface and wound sterilization, antisepsis, bleeding cessation, wound healing, and cancer treatment, among other biomedical applications. This tutorial review summarizes the field, stressing the likely role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species created in these plasmas as the biologically and therapeutically active agents. Reactive species, including radicals and non-radical compounds, are generated naturally within the body and are now understood to be essential for normal biological functions. These species are known to be active agents in existing therapies for wound healing, infection control, and cancer treatment. But they are also observed at elevated levels in persons with many diseases and are associated with aging. The physical and chemical complexity of plasma medical devices and their associated biochemical effects makes the development of safe, effective plasma medical devices and procedures a challenge, but encouragingly rapid progress has been reported around the world in the last several years

  19. Low temperature plasma biomedicine: A tutorial review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, David B., E-mail: graves@berkeley.edu [University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Gas discharge plasmas formed at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature have recently been shown to be potentially useful for surface and wound sterilization, antisepsis, bleeding cessation, wound healing, and cancer treatment, among other biomedical applications. This tutorial review summarizes the field, stressing the likely role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species created in these plasmas as the biologically and therapeutically active agents. Reactive species, including radicals and non-radical compounds, are generated naturally within the body and are now understood to be essential for normal biological functions. These species are known to be active agents in existing therapies for wound healing, infection control, and cancer treatment. But they are also observed at elevated levels in persons with many diseases and are associated with aging. The physical and chemical complexity of plasma medical devices and their associated biochemical effects makes the development of safe, effective plasma medical devices and procedures a challenge, but encouragingly rapid progress has been reported around the world in the last several years.

  20. Low temperature plasma biomedicine: A tutorial reviewa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, David B.

    2014-08-01

    Gas discharge plasmas formed at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature have recently been shown to be potentially useful for surface and wound sterilization, antisepsis, bleeding cessation, wound healing, and cancer treatment, among other biomedical applications. This tutorial review summarizes the field, stressing the likely role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species created in these plasmas as the biologically and therapeutically active agents. Reactive species, including radicals and non-radical compounds, are generated naturally within the body and are now understood to be essential for normal biological functions. These species are known to be active agents in existing therapies for wound healing, infection control, and cancer treatment. But they are also observed at elevated levels in persons with many diseases and are associated with aging. The physical and chemical complexity of plasma medical devices and their associated biochemical effects makes the development of safe, effective plasma medical devices and procedures a challenge, but encouragingly rapid progress has been reported around the world in the last several years.

  1. Gaseous poison injection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Ryuji; Sugisaki, Toshihiko; Inada, Ikuo.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To rapidly control the chain reaction due to thermal neutrons in a reactor core by using gaseous poisons as back-up means for control rod drives. Constitution: Gaseous poisons having a large neutron absorption cross section are used as back-up means for control rod drives. Upon failure of control rod insertion, the gaseous poisons are injected into the lower portion of the reactor core to control the reactor power. As the gaseous poisons, vapors at a high temperature and a higher pressure than that of the coolants in the reactor core are injected to control the reactor power due to the void effects. Since the gaseous poisons thus employed rapidly reach the reactor core and form gas bubbles therein, the deccelerating effect of the thermal neutrons is decreased to reduce the chain reaction. (Moriyama, K.)

  2. Development of gaseous photomultiplier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokanai, F.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Sugiyama, H.; Okada, T.

    2014-01-01

    We have been developing gaseous photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) with alkali photocathode combined with micropattern gas detectors (MPGDs). The potential advantage of the gaseous PMT is that it can achieve a very large effective area with adequate position and timing resolutions. In addition, it will be easily operated under a very high magnetic field, compared with the conventional vacuum-based PMT. To evaluate the gaseous PMTs filled with Ne and Ar based gas mixture, we have developed gaseous PMTs with an alkali photocathode combined with MPGDs such as a glass capillary plate, GEM, and Micromegas detector. We describe the recent development of the gaseous PMTs, particularly the production of the photocathode, gas gain, ion and photon feedbacks, quantum efficiency, and the characteristics in the magnetic field environment. (author)

  3. Martensitic Stainless Steels Low-temperature Nitriding: Dependence of Substrate Composition

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Lauro Mariano; Brunatto, Silvio Francisco; Cardoso, Rodrigo Perito

    2015-01-01

    Low-temperature plasma assisted nitriding is a very promising technique to improve surface mechanical properties of stainless steels, keeping unaltered or even improving their surface corrosion resistance. During treatment, nitrogen diffuses into the steel surface, increasing its hardness and wear resistance. In the present work the nitriding process of different martensitic stainless steels was studied. As-quenched AISI 410, 410NiMo, 416 and 420 stainless steel samples were plasma nitrided a...

  4. Evolution of low-temperature phases in a low-temperature structural transition of a La cuprate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Y.; Horibe, Y.; Koyama, Y.

    1997-01-01

    The microstructure produced by a low-temperature structural phase transition in La 1.5 Nd 0.4 Sr 0.1 CuO 4 has been examined by transmission electron microscopy with the help of imaging plates. The low-temperature transition was found to be proceeded not only by the growth of the Pccn/low-temperature-tetragonal phases nucleated along the twin boundary but also by the nucleation and growth of the phases in the interior of the low-temperature-orthorhombic domain. In addition, because the map of the octahedron tilt as an order parameter is not identical to that of the spontaneous strain accompanied by the transition, the microstructure below the transition is understood to be a very complex mixture of the low-temperature phases. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  5. Low Temperature Geothermal Resource Assessment for Membrane Distillation Desalination in the United States: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akar, Sertac; Turchi, Craig

    2016-10-01

    Substantial drought and declines in potable groundwater in the United States over the last decade has increased the demand for fresh water. Desalination of saline water such as brackish surface or groundwater, seawater, brines co-produced from oil and gas operations, industrial wastewater, blow-down water from power plant cooling towers, and agriculture drainage water can reduce the volume of water that requires disposal while providing a source of high-quality fresh water for industrial or commercial use. Membrane distillation (MD) is a developing technology that uses low-temperature thermal energy for desalination. Geothermal heat can be an ideal thermal-energy source for MD desalination technology, with a target range of $1/m3 to $2/m3 for desalinated water depending on the cost of heat. Three different cases were analyzed to estimate levelized cost of heat (LCOH) for integration of MD desalination technology with low-grade geothermal heat: (1) residual heat from injection brine at a geothermal power plant, (2) heat from existing underutilized low-temperature wells, and (3) drilling new wells for low-temperature resources. The Central and Western United States have important low-temperature (<90 degrees C) geothermal resource potential with wide geographic distribution, but these resources are highly underutilized because they are inefficient for power production. According to the USGS, there are 1,075 identified low temperature hydrothermal systems, 55 low temperature sedimentary systems and 248 identified medium to high temperature geothermal systems in the United States. The estimated total beneficial heat potential from identified low temperature hydrothermal geothermal systems and residual beneficial heat from medium to high temperature systems is estimated as 36,300 MWth, which could theoretically produce 1.4 to 7 million m3/day of potable water, depending on desalination efficiency.

  6. Low Temperature Geothermal Resource Assessment for Membrane Distillation Desalination in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akar, Sertac; Turchi, Craig

    2017-05-01

    Substantial drought and declines in potable groundwater in the United States over the last decade has increased the demand for fresh water. Desalination of saline water such as brackish surface or groundwater, seawater, brines co-produced from oil and gas operations, industrial wastewater, blow-down water from power plant cooling towers, and agriculture drainage water can reduce the volume of water that requires disposal while providing a source of high-quality fresh water for industrial or commercial use. Membrane distillation (MD) is a developing technology that uses low-temperature thermal energy for desalination. Geothermal heat can be an ideal thermal-energy source for MD desalination technology, with a target range of $1/m3 to $2/m3 for desalinated water depending on the cost of heat. Three different cases were analyzed to estimate levelized cost of heat (LCOH) for integration of MD desalination technology with low-grade geothermal heat: (1) residual heat from injection brine at a geothermal power plant, (2) heat from existing underutilized low-temperature wells, and (3) drilling new wells for low-temperature resources. The Central and Western United States have important low-temperature (<90 degrees C) geothermal resource potential with wide geographic distribution, but these resources are highly underutilized because they are inefficient for power production. According to the USGS, there are 1,075 identified low temperature hydrothermal systems, 55 low temperature sedimentary systems and 248 identified medium to high temperature geothermal systems in the United States. The estimated total beneficial heat potential from identified low temperature hydrothermal geothermal systems and residual beneficial heat from medium to high temperature systems is estimated as 36,300 MWth, which could theoretically produce 1.4 to 7 million m3/day of potable water, depending on desalination efficiency.

  7. Effect of low-temperature aging on the mechanical behavior of ground Y-TZP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereira, G.K.R.; Amaral, M.; Cesar, P.F.; Bottino, M.C.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Valandro, L.F.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of low-temperature aging on the surface topography, phase transformation, biaxial flexural strength, and structural reliability of a ground Y-TZP ceramic. Disc-shaped specimens were manufactured and divided according to two factors: "grinding" - without grinding

  8. Low-temperature phase transformation in rubidium and cesium superoxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alikhanov, R.A.; Toshich, B.S.; Smirnov, L.S.

    1980-01-01

    Crystal structures of rubidium and cesium superoxides which are two interpenetrating lattices of metal ions and oxygen molecule ions reveal a number of phase transformations with temperature decrease. Crystal-phase transformations in CsO 2 are 1-2, 2-3 and low temperature one 3-4 at 378, 190 and 10 K. Low temperature transition is considered as the instability of lattice quadrupoles of oxygen molecule ions to phase transformation of the order-disorder type. Calculated temperatures of low temperature phase transformations in PbO 2 and CsO 2 agree with experimental calculations satisfactory [ru

  9. Low temperature safety of lithium-thionyl chloride cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbarao, S.; Deligiannis, F.; Shen, D. H.; Dawson, S.; Halpert, G.

    The use of lithium thionyl chloride cells for low-temperature applications is presently restricted because of their unsafe behavior. An attempt is made in the present investigation to identify the safe/unsafe low temperature operating conditions and to understand the low temperature cell chemistry responsible for the unsafe behavior. Cells subjected to extended reversal at low rate and -40 C were found to explode upon warm-up. Lithium was found to deposit on the carbon cathodes during reversal. Warming up to room temperature may be accelerating the lithium corrosion in the electrolyte. This may be one of the reasons for the cell thermal runaway.

  10. Inactivation of possible micromycete food contaminants using the low-temperature plasma and hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Čeřovský, M.; Khun, J.; Rusová, K.; Scholtz, V.; Soušková, H.

    2013-01-01

    The inhibition effect of hydrogen peroxide aerosol, low-temperature plasma and their combinations has been studied on several micromycetes spores. The low-temperature plasma was generated in corona discharges in the open air apparatus with hydrogen peroxide aerosol. Micromycete spores were inoculated on the surface of agar plates, exposed solely to the hydrogen peroxide aerosol, corona discharge or their combination. After incubation the diameter of inhibition zone was measured. The solely positive corona discharge exhibits no inactivation effect, the solely negative corona discharge and solely hydrogen peroxide aerosol exhibit the inactivation effect, however their combinations exhibit to be much more effective. Low-temperature plasma and hydrogen peroxide aerosol present a possible alternative method of microbial decontamination of food, food packages or other thermolabile materials

  11. Inactivation of possible micromycete food contaminants using the low-temperature plasma and hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Čeřovský, M., E-mail: scholtz@aldebaran.cz [Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Department of Food Preservation, Faculty of Food and Biochemical Technology (Czech Republic); Khun, J. [Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Department of Physics and Measurements, Faculty of Chemical Engineering (Czech Republic); Rusová, K. [Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Department of Food Preservation, Faculty of Food and Biochemical Technology (Czech Republic); Scholtz, V. [Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Department of Physics and Measurements, Faculty of Chemical Engineering (Czech Republic); Soušková, H. [Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Department of Computing and Control Engineering, Faculty of Chemical Engineering (Czech Republic)

    2013-09-15

    The inhibition effect of hydrogen peroxide aerosol, low-temperature plasma and their combinations has been studied on several micromycetes spores. The low-temperature plasma was generated in corona discharges in the open air apparatus with hydrogen peroxide aerosol. Micromycete spores were inoculated on the surface of agar plates, exposed solely to the hydrogen peroxide aerosol, corona discharge or their combination. After incubation the diameter of inhibition zone was measured. The solely positive corona discharge exhibits no inactivation effect, the solely negative corona discharge and solely hydrogen peroxide aerosol exhibit the inactivation effect, however their combinations exhibit to be much more effective. Low-temperature plasma and hydrogen peroxide aerosol present a possible alternative method of microbial decontamination of food, food packages or other thermolabile materials.

  12. Strength and low temperature toughness of Fe-13%Ni-Mo alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Keisuke; Maruyama, Norio; Tsuya, Kazuo

    1978-01-01

    Mechanical tests were made on newly developed Fe-13%Ni-Mo alloys for eryogenic service. The effects of the additional elements were investigated from the viewpoint of the strength and the low temperature toughness. The alloys added by Al, Ti or V have the better balance of these properties. They did not show low temperature brittleness induced by cleavage fracture in Charpy impact test at 77 K. The microfractography showed the utterly dimple rupture patterns on the broken surface of all specimens. It would be supposed that the cleavage fracture stress is considerably higher than the flow stress. These alloys are superior to some commercial structural materials for low temperature use in the balance between the strength at 300 K and the toughness at 77 K. Additionally, it is noted that these experimental alloys have a good advantage in getting high strength and high toughness by the rather simple heat treatment. (auth.)

  13. Foundations of modelling of nonequilibrium low-temperature plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, L. L.; Bogaerts, A.; Guerra, V.; Turner, M. M.

    2018-02-01

    This work explains the need for plasma models, introduces arguments for choosing the type of model that better fits the purpose of each study, and presents the basics of the most common nonequilibrium low-temperature plasma models and the information available from each one, along with an extensive list of references for complementary in-depth reading. The paper presents the following models, organised according to the level of multi-dimensional description of the plasma: kinetic models, based on either a statistical particle-in-cell/Monte-Carlo approach or the solution to the Boltzmann equation (in the latter case, special focus is given to the description of the electron kinetics); multi-fluid models, based on the solution to the hydrodynamic equations; global (spatially-average) models, based on the solution to the particle and energy rate-balance equations for the main plasma species, usually including a very complete reaction chemistry; mesoscopic models for plasma-surface interaction, adopting either a deterministic approach or a stochastic dynamical Monte-Carlo approach. For each plasma model, the paper puts forward the physics context, introduces the fundamental equations, presents advantages and limitations, also from a numerical perspective, and illustrates its application with some examples. Whenever pertinent, the interconnection between models is also discussed, in view of multi-scale hybrid approaches.

  14. Low temperature spent fuel oxidation under tuff repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einziger, R.E.; Woodley, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project is studying the suitability of tuffaceous rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada, for high level waste disposal. The oxidation state of LWR spent fuel in a tuff repository may be a significant factor in determining its ability to inhibit radionuclide migration. Long term exposure at low temperatures to the moist air expected in a tuff repository is expected to increase the oxidation state of the fuel. A program is underway to determine the spent fuel oxidation mechanisms which might be active in a tuff repository. Initial work involves a series of TGA experiments to determine the effectiveness of the technique and to obtain preliminary oxidation data. Tests were run at 200 0 C and 225 0 C for as long as 720 hours. Grain boundary diffusion appears to open up a greater surface area for oxidation prior to onset of bulk diffusion. Temperature strongly influences the oxidation rates. The effect of moisture is small but readily measurable. 25 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  15. Atomic layer deposition of GaN at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozgit, Cagla; Donmez, Inci; Alevli, Mustafa; Biyikli, Necmi [UNAM - Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2012-01-15

    The authors report on the self-limiting growth of GaN thin films at low temperatures. Films were deposited on Si substrates by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition using trimethylgallium (TMG) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) as the group-III and -V precursors, respectively. GaN deposition rate saturated at 185 deg. C for NH{sub 3} doses starting from 90 s. Atomic layer deposition temperature window was observed from 185 to {approx}385 deg. C. Deposition rate, which is constant at {approx}0.51 A/cycle within the temperature range of 250 - 350 deg. C, increased slightly as the temperature decreased to 185 deg. C. In the bulk film, concentrations of Ga, N, and O were constant at {approx}36.6, {approx}43.9, and {approx}19.5 at. %, respectively. C was detected only at the surface and no C impurities were found in the bulk film. High oxygen concentration in films was attributed to the oxygen impurities present in group-V precursor. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy studies revealed a microstructure consisting of small crystallites dispersed in an amorphous matrix.

  16. Fly ash particles spheroidization using low temperature plasma energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhovtsov, V. V.; Volokitin, O. G.; Kondratyuk, A. A.; Vitske, R. E.

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents the investigations on producing spherical particles 65-110 μm in size using the energy of low temperature plasma (LTP). These particles are based on flow ash produced by the thermal power plant in Seversk, Tomsk region, Russia. The obtained spherical particles have no defects and are characterized by a smooth exterior surface. The test bench is designed to produce these particles. With due regard for plasma temperature field distribution, it is shown that the transition of fly ash particles to a state of viscous flow occurs at 20 mm distance from the plasma jet. The X-ray phase analysis is carried out for the both original state of fly ash powders and the particles obtained. This analysis shows that fly ash contains 56.23 wt.% SiO2; 20.61 wt.% Al2O3 and 17.55 wt.% Fe2O3 phases that mostly contribute to the integral (experimental) intensity of the diffraction maximum. The LTP treatment results in a complex redistribution of the amorphous phase amount in the obtained spherical particles, including the reduction of O2Si, phase, increase of O22Al20 and Fe2O3 phases and change in Al, O density of O22Al20 chemical unit cell.

  17. Low temperature radio-chemical energy conversion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomberg, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a radio-chemical method of converting radiated energy into chemical energy form comprising the steps of: (a) establishing a starting chemical compound in the liquid phase that chemically reacts endothermically to radiation and heat energy to produce a gaseous and a solid constituent of the compound, (b) irradiating the compound in its liquid phase free of solvents to chemically release therefrom in response to the radiation the gaseous and solid constituents, (c) physically separating the solid and gaseous phase constituents from the liquid, and (d) chemically processing the constituents to recover therefrom energy stored therein by the irradiation step (b)

  18. Low-temperature localization in the transport properties of self ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Transport properties; scattering mechanisms; low temperature localization. 1. Introduction ... Mn4+ appears in these compounds due to the La defi- ciency, leading ... microscopy (SEM) image in figure 1 shows the size and mor- phology of the ...

  19. Detection of dark matter particles with low temperature phonon sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadoulet, B.

    1988-03-01

    Taking as an example the development effort in Berkeley, the author discusses for nonspecialists (Astronomers and Particle Physicists) the promises of phonon sensing at low temperature for the detection of dark matter particles and the difficulties faced. 31 refs

  20. Total Dose Effects on Bipolar Integrated Circuits at Low Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, A. H.; Swimm, R. T.; Thorbourn, D. O.

    2012-01-01

    Total dose damage in bipolar integrated circuits is investigated at low temperature, along with the temperature dependence of the electrical parameters of internal transistors. Bandgap narrowing causes the gain of npn transistors to decrease far more at low temperature compared to pnp transistors, due to the large difference in emitter doping concentration. When irradiations are done at temperatures of -140 deg C, no damage occurs until devices are warmed to temperatures above -50 deg C. After warm-up, subsequent cooling shows that damage is then present at low temperature. This can be explained by the very strong temperature dependence of dispersive transport in the continuous-time-random-walk model for hole transport. For linear integrated circuits, low temperature operation is affected by the strong temperature dependence of npn transistors along with the higher sensitivity of lateral and substrate pnp transistors to radiation damage.

  1. 2014 Low-Temperature and Coproduced Geothermal Resources Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tim Reinhardt, Program Manager

    2014-09-01

    As a growing sector of geothermal energy development, the Low-Temperature Program supports innovative technologies that enable electricity production and cascaded uses from geothermal resources below 300° Fahrenheit.

  2. Automation of low temperature positron annihilation spectroscopy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaturvedi, T.P.; Venkiteswaran, S.; Pujari, P.K.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the automation implemented in the low temperature measurements in positron annihilation spectroscopic studies. This has not only widened the scope of the positron research, but also helps achieve result with better precision. (author). 3 refs., 1 fig

  3. Physiological and biochemical responses to low temperature stress ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-09

    Nov 9, 2011 ... Levels of electrolyte leak and MDA were lower than in UD189 or UD191. Poplar hybrid clones ... humidity, exposure, and water status and health conditions of ... consecutive low temperature treatment; and to detect variation ...

  4. Highly Effective Thermal Regenerator for Low Temperature Cryocoolers, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future missions to investigate the structure and evolution of the universe require highly efficient, low-temperature cryocoolers for low-noise detector systems. We...

  5. Strong anisotropy in the low temperature Compton profiles of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    able for comparison with theory, the resistivity data in α-Ga at low temperature strongly support this anisotropic ... renormalized free-atom (RFA) model [3], band model [5–7] and quantum Monte Carlo ... probability distribution function.

  6. Evaluation Method for Low-Temperature Performance of Lithium Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H. W.; Ma, Q.; Fu, Y. L.; Tao, Z. Q.; Xiao, H. Q.; Bai, H.; Bai, H.

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, the evaluation method for low temperature performance of lithium battery is established. The low temperature performance level was set up to determine the best operating temperature range of the lithium battery using different cathode materials. Results are shared with the consumers for the proper use of lithium battery to make it have a longer service life and avoid the occurrence of early rejection.

  7. Measured Performance of a Low Temperature Air Source Heat Pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.K. Johnson

    2013-09-01

    A 4-ton Low Temperature Heat Pump (LTHP) manufactured by Hallowell International was installed in a residence near New Haven, Connecticut and monitored over two winters of operation. After attending to some significant service issues, the heat pump operated as designed. This report should be considered a review of the dual compressor “boosted heat pump” technology. The Low Temperature Heat Pump system operates with four increasing levels of capacity (heat output) as the outdoor temperature drops.

  8. INFLUENCE OF A LOW TEMPERATURE AGEING ON THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of a low temperature ageing treatment on the hardness, tensile and corrosion characteristics of sand cast Al-6.5%Si-0.35%Mg alloy was studied. The temper conditions are low temperature ageing at 90oC, 95oC, 100oCand 105oC respectively followed by ageing to 180oC for 2 hrs. This was compared with the ...

  9. Correlation functions of one-dimensional bosons at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, K.K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Maillet, J.M. [CNRS, ENS Lyon (France). Lab. de Physique; Slavnov, N.A. [Steklov Mathematical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-12-15

    We consider the low-temperature limit of the long-distance asymptotic behavior of the finite temperature density-density correlation function in the one-dimensional Bose gas derived recently in the algebraic Bethe Ansatz framework. Our results confirm the predictions based on the Luttinger liquid and conformal field theory approaches. We also demonstrate that the amplitudes arising in this asymptotic expansion at low-temperature coincide with the amplitudes associated with the so-called critical form factors. (orig.)

  10. A low-temperature research facility for space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is proposing to NASA a new initiative to construct a Low Temperature Research Facility for use in space. The facility is described, together with some details of timing and support. An advisory group has been formed which seeks to advise JPL and NASA of the capabilities required in this facility and to invite investigators to propose experiments which require the combination of low temperature and reduced gravity to be successful. (orig.)

  11. Corrosion test by low-temperature coal tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, S; Yamamoto, S

    1952-01-01

    Corrosive actions of various fractions of low-temperature coal tar against mild steel or Cr 13-steel were compared at their boiling states. Corrosions became severe when the boiling points exceeded 240/sup 0/. The acidic fractions were more corrosive. In all instances, corrosion was excessive at the beginning of immersion testing and then gradually became mild; boiling accelerated the corrosion. Cr 13-steel was corrosion-resistant to low-temperature coal-tar fractions.

  12. Innovative system for delivery of low temperature district heating

    OpenAIRE

    Ianakiev, A; Cui, JM; Garbett, S; Filer, A

    2017-01-01

    An innovative low temperature district heating (LTDH) local network is developed in Nottingham, supported by the REMOURBAN project, part of the H2020 Smart City and Community Lighthouse scheme. It was proposed that a branch emanating from the return pipe of the existing district heating system in Nottingham would be created to use low temperature heating for the first time on such scale in the UK. The development is aimed to extract unused heat from existing district heating system and to mak...

  13. Handheld low-temperature plasma probe for portable "point-and-shoot" ambient ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Joshua S; Shelley, Jacob T; Cooks, R Graham

    2013-07-16

    We describe a handheld, wireless low-temperature plasma (LTP) ambient ionization source and its performance on a benchtop and a miniature mass spectrometer. The source, which is inexpensive to build and operate, is battery-powered and utilizes miniature helium cylinders or air as the discharge gas. Comparison of a conventional, large-scale LTP source against the handheld LTP source, which uses less helium and power than the large-scale version, revealed that the handheld source had similar or slightly better analytical performance. Another advantage of the handheld LTP source is the ability to quickly interrogate a gaseous, liquid, or solid sample without requiring any setup time. A small, 7.4-V Li-polymer battery is able to sustain plasma for 2 h continuously, while the miniature helium cylinder supplies gas flow for approximately 8 continuous hours. Long-distance ion transfer was achieved for distances up to 1 m.

  14. Low-temperature atmospheric oxidation of mixtures of titanium and carbon black or brown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elizarova, V.A.; Babaitsev, I.V.; Barzykin, V.V.; Gerusova, V.P.; Rozenband, V.I.

    1984-01-01

    This article reports on the thermogravimetric investigation of mixtures of titanium no. 2 and carbon black with various mass carbon contents. Adding carbon black (as opposed to boron) to titanium leads to an increase in the rate of heat release of the oxidation reaction. An attempt is made to clarify the low-temperature oxidation mechanism of titanium mixtures in air. An x-ray phase and chemical (for bound carbon) analysis of specimens of a stoichiometric Ti + C mixture after heating in air to a temperature of 650 0 C at the rate of 10 0 /min was conducted. The results indicate that the oxidation of the titanium-carbon mixture probably proceeds according to a more complex mechanism associated with the transport of the gaseous carbon oxidation products and their participation in the titanium oxidation

  15. Low-temperature conversion of high-moisture biomass: Topical report, January 1984--January 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Elliott, D.C.; Butner, R.S.; Neuenschwander, G.G.

    1988-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing a low-temperature, catalytic process that converts high-moisture biomass feedstocks and other wet organic substances to useful gaseous and liquid fuels. The advantage of this process is that it works without the need for drying or dewatering the feedstock. Conventional thermal gasification processes, which require temperatures above 750/degree/C and air or oxygen for combustion to supply reaction heat, generally cannot utilize feedstocks with moisture contents above 50 wt %, as the conversion efficiency is greatly reduced as a result of the drying step. For this reason, anaerobic digestion or other bioconversion processes traditionally have been used for gasification of high-moisture feedstocks. However, these processes suffer from slow reaction rates and incomplete carbon conversion. 50 refs., 21 figs., 22 tabs.

  16. Low Temperature Regolith Bricks for In-Situ Structural Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Kevin; Sakthivel, Tamil S.; Mantovani, James; Seal, Sudipta

    2016-01-01

    Current technology for producing in-situ structural materials on future missions to Mars or the moon relies heavily on energy-intensive sintering processes to produce solid bricks from regolith. This process requires heating the material up to temperatures in excess of 1000 C and results in solid regolith pieces with compressive strengths in the range of 14000 to 28000 psi, but are heavily dependent on the porosity of the final material and are brittle. This method is currently preferred over a low temperature cementation process to prevent consumption of precious water and other non-renewable materials. A high strength structural material with low energy requirements is still needed for future colonization of other planets. To fulfill these requirements, a nano-functionalization process has been developed to produce structural bricks from regolith simulant and shows promising mechanical strength results. Functionalization of granular silicate particles into alkoxides using a simple low temperature chemical process produces a high surface area zeolite particles that are held together via inter-particle oxygen bonding. Addition of water in the resulting zeolite particles produces a sol-gel reaction called "inorganic polymerization" which gives a strong solid material after a curing process at 60 C. The aqueous solution by-product of the reaction is currently being investigated for its reusability; an essential component of any ISRU technology. For this study, two batches of regolith bricks are synthesized from JSC-1A; the first batch from fresh solvents and chemicals, the second batch made from the water solution by-product of the first batch. This is done to determine the feasibility of recycling necessary components of the synthesis process, mainly water. Characterization including BET surface area, SEM, and EDS has been done on the regolith bricks as well as the constituent particles,. The specific surface area of 17.53 sq m/g (average) of the granular regolith

  17. High density microelectronics package using low temperature cofirable ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, S.-L.; Hsi, C.-S.; Chen, L.-S.; Lin, W. K.

    1997-01-01

    Low Temperature Cofired Ceramics (LTCC) is a relative new thick film process and has many engineering and manufacturing advantages over both the sequential thick film process and high temperature cofired ceramic modules. Because of low firing temperature, low sheet resistance metal conductors, commercial thick film resistors, and thick film capacitors can be buried in or printed on the substrates. A 3-D multilayer ceramic substrate can be prepared via laminating and co-firing process. The packing density of the LTCC substrates can be increased by this 3-D packing technology. At Kaohsiung Polytechnic Institute (KPI), a LTCC substrate system has been developed for high density packaging applications, which had buried surface capacitors and resistors. The developed cordierite-glass ceramic substrate, which has similar thermal expansion as silicon chip, is a promising material for microelectronic packaging. When the substrates were sintered at temperatures between 850-900 degree centigrade, a relative density higher than 96 % can be obtained. The substrate had a dielectric constant between 5.5 and 6.5. Ruthenium-based resistor pastes were used for resistors purposes. The resistors fabricated in/on the LTCC substrates were strongly depended on the microstructures developed in the resistor films. Surface resistors were laser trimmed in order to obtain specific values for the resistors. Material with composition Pb(Fe 2/3 W 1/3 ) x (Fe l/2 Nb l/2 ) y Ti 2 O 3 was used as dielectric material of the capacitor in the substrate. The material can be sintered at temperatures between 850-930 degree centigrade, and has dielectric constant as high as 26000. After cofiring, good adhesion between dielectric and substrate layers was obtained. Combing the buried resistors and capacitors together with the lamination of LTCC layer, a 3-dimensional multilayered ceramic package was fabricated. (author)

  18. High density microelectronics package using low temperature cofirable ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, S -L; Hsi, C -S; Chen, L -S; Lin, W K [Kaoshiung Polytechnic Institute Ta-Hsu, Kaoshiung (China)

    1998-12-31

    Low Temperature Cofired Ceramics (LTCC) is a relative new thick film process and has many engineering and manufacturing advantages over both the sequential thick film process and high temperature cofired ceramic modules. Because of low firing temperature, low sheet resistance metal conductors, commercial thick film resistors, and thick film capacitors can be buried in or printed on the substrates. A 3-D multilayer ceramic substrate can be prepared via laminating and co-firing process. The packing density of the LTCC substrates can be increased by this 3-D packing technology. At Kaohsiung Polytechnic Institute (KPI), a LTCC substrate system has been developed for high density packaging applications, which had buried surface capacitors and resistors. The developed cordierite-glass ceramic substrate, which has similar thermal expansion as silicon chip, is a promising material for microelectronic packaging. When the substrates were sintered at temperatures between 850-900 degree centigrade, a relative density higher than 96 % can be obtained. The substrate had a dielectric constant between 5.5 and 6.5. Ruthenium-based resistor pastes were used for resistors purposes. The resistors fabricated in/on the LTCC substrates were strongly depended on the microstructures developed in the resistor films. Surface resistors were laser trimmed in order to obtain specific values for the resistors. Material with composition Pb(Fe{sub 2/3}W{sub 1/3}){sub x}(Fe{sub l/2}Nb{sub l/2}){sub y}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3} was used as dielectric material of the capacitor in the substrate. The material can be sintered at temperatures between 850-930 degree centigrade, and has dielectric constant as high as 26000. After cofiring, good adhesion between dielectric and substrate layers was obtained. Combing the buried resistors and capacitors together with the lamination of LTCC layer, a 3-dimensional multilayered ceramic package was fabricated. (author)

  19. Carbon monoxide oxidation on Pt single crystal electrodes: understanding the catalysis for low temperature fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Gonzalo; Koper, Marc T M

    2011-08-01

    Herein the general concepts of fuel cells are discussed, with special attention to low temperature fuel cells working in alkaline media. Alkaline low temperature fuel cells could well be one of the energy sources in the next future. This technology has the potential to provide power to portable devices, transportation and stationary sectors. With the aim to solve the principal catalytic problems at the anode of low temperature fuel cells, a fundamental study of the mechanism and kinetics of carbon monoxide as well as water dissociation on stepped platinum surfaces in alkaline medium is discussed and compared with those in acidic media. Furthermore, cations involved as promoters for catalytic surface reactions are also considered. Therefore, the aim of the present work is not only to provide the new fundamental advances in the electrocatalysis field, but also to understand the reactions occurring at fuel cell catalysts, which may help to improve the fabrication of novel electrodes in order to enhance the performance and to decrease the cost of low temperature fuel cells. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Catalysis of metal-clay intercalation compound in the low temperature coal hydrogasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuda, Kiyoshi; Kimura, Mitsuhiko; Miyamoto, Norimitsu; Matsunaga, Toshiaki

    1986-10-23

    Focusing the hydrogenating methanation by gaseous phase catalytic reactions of low temperature volatile components, the catalytic effects of Ni metal and the effects of carriers having sensitive effects on the catalytic activities of Ni metal were studied. Sample coals were prepared from Shin-Yubari coal, and Ni hydride-montmorillonite complex catalysts and the catalysts produced by carring Ni nitrate on alumina and burning in hydrogen gas flows were prepared. The hydrogasification were carried out in a reaction tube. As a result, the montmorillonite-Ni compounds catalysts had high catalitic effects and high conversion ratio of 90% or more in the low temperature coal gasification. The catalitic effects of carried Ni metal strongly depended on the carrier substances, and the rank of effects for the carriers was montmorillonite>zeorite>TiO/sub 2/>alpha-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/>MgO>SiO/sub 2/=gamma-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. (3 figs, 3 tabs, 3 refs)

  1. On improved understanding of plasma-chemical processes in complex low-temperature plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röpcke, Jürgen; Loffhagen, Detlef; von Wahl, Eric; Nave, Andy S. C.; Hamann, Stephan; van Helden, Jean-Piere H.; Lang, Norbert; Kersten, Holger

    2018-05-01

    Over the last years, chemical sensing using optical emission spectroscopy (OES) in the visible spectral range has been combined with methods of mid infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (MIR-LAS) in the molecular fingerprint region from 3 to 20 μm, which contains strong rotational-vibrational absorption bands of a large variety of gaseous species. This optical approach established powerful in situ diagnostic tools to study plasma-chemical processes of complex low-temperature plasmas. The methods of MIR-LAS enable to detect stable and transient molecular species in ground and excited states and to measure the concentrations and temperatures of reactive species in plasmas. Since kinetic processes are inherent to discharges ignited in molecular gases, high time resolution on sub-second timescales is frequently desired for fundamental studies as well as for process monitoring in applied research and industry. In addition to high sensitivity and good temporal resolution, the capacity for broad spectral coverage enabling multicomponent detection is further expanding the use of OES and MIR-LAS techniques. Based on selected examples, this paper reports on recent achievements in the understanding of complex low-temperature plasmas. Recently, a link with chemical modeling of the plasma has been provided, which is the ultimate objective for a better understanding of the chemical and reaction kinetic processes occurring in the plasma. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Fundamentals of Complex Plasmas", edited by Jürgen Meichsner, Michael Bonitz, Holger Fehske, Alexander Piel.

  2. Low temperature incineration of mixed wastes using bulk metal oxide catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, M.J.; Gaur, S.; Kelkar, S.; Baldwin, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    Volume reduction of low-level mixed wastes from former nuclear weapons facilities is a significant environmental problem. Processing of these materials presents unique scientific and engineering problems due to the presence of minute quantities of radionuclides which must be contained and concentrated for later safe disposal. Low-temperature catalytic incineration is one option that has been utilized at the Rocky Flats facility for this purpose. This paper presents results of research regarding evaluation of bulk metal oxides as catalysts for low-temperature incineration of carbonaceous residues which are typical by-products of fluidized bed combustion of mixed wastes under oxygen-lean conditions. A series of 14 metal oxides were screened in a thermogravimetric analyzer, using on-line mass spectrometry for speciation of reaction product gases. Catalyst evaluation criteria focused on the thermal-redox activity of the metals using both carbon black and PVC char as surrogate waste materials. Results indicated that metal oxides which were P-type semiconductor materials were suitable as catalysts for this application. Oxides of cobalt, molybdenum, vanadium, and manganese were found to be particularly stable and active catalysts under conditions specific to this process (T<650C, low oxygen partial pressures). Bench-scale evaluation of these metal oxides with respect to stability to chlorine (HCl) attack was carried out at 550C using a TG/MS system. Cobalt oxide was found to be resistant to metal loss in a HCl/He gaseous environment while metal loss from Mo, Mn, and V-based catalysts was moderate to severe. XRD and SEM/EDX analysis of spent Co catalysts indicated the formation of non-stoichiometric cobalt chlorides. Regeneration of chlorinated cobalt was found to successfully restore the low-temperature combustion activity to that of the fresh metal oxide

  3. Evaluation of stress-corrosion cracking of sensitized 304SS in low-temperature borated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.H.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Bruemmer, S.M.

    1981-05-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking has been observed in constant extension rate tests, CERT and constant load tests of 304SS tested at 32 0 C in borated water plus 15 ppM C1 - . Evidence of IGSCC was obtained in CERT tests of welded pipe samples only when the original inner diameter surface was intact and with 15 ppM C1 - added to the borated water while IGSCC occurred in a furnace sensitized pipe sample after 500 h at a constant stress of 340 MPa in borated water containing 15 ppM C1 - . These results indicate that surface features associated with weld preparation grinding contributed to the susceptibility of sensitized 304SS to IGSCC in low temperature borated water; however, the constant load test indicates that such surface defects are not necessary for IGSCC in low temperature borated water

  4. Effect of Diluent on Ultra-low Temperature Curable Conductive Silver Adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xingli; Wang, Likun; Liao, Qingwei; Yan, Chao; Du, Haibo; Qin, Lei

    2018-03-01

    The ultra-low temperature curable conductive silver adhesive needed urgently for the surface conductive treatment of piezoelectric composite material. The effect of diluent acetone on ultra-low temperature curable conductive silver adhesive were investigated for surface conductive treatment of piezoelectric composite material. In order to improve the operability and extend the life of the conductive adhesive, the diluent was added to dissolve and disperse conductive adhesive. With the increase of the content of diluent, the volume resistivity of conductive adhesive decreased at first and then increased, and the shear strength increased at first and then decreased. When the acetone content is 10%, the silver flaky bonded together, arranged the neatest, the smallest gap, the most closely connected, the surface can form a complete conductive network, and the volume resistivity is 2.37 × 10-4Ω · cm, the shear strength is 5.13MPa.

  5. Low temperature aluminum nitride thin films for sensory applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarar, E.; Zamponi, C.; Piorra, A.; Quandt, E., E-mail: eq@tf.uni-kiel.de [Institute for Materials Science, Chair for Inorganic Functional Materials, Kiel University, D-24143 Kiel (Germany); Hrkac, V.; Kienle, L. [Institute for Materials Science, Chair for Synthesis and Real Structure, Kiel University, D-24143 Kiel (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    A low-temperature sputter deposition process for the synthesis of aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films that is attractive for applications with a limited temperature budget is presented. Influence of the reactive gas concentration, plasma treatment of the nucleation surface and film thickness on the microstructural, piezoelectric and dielectric properties of AlN is investigated. An improved crystal quality with respect to the increased film thickness was observed; where full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the AlN films decreased from 2.88 ± 0.16° down to 1.25 ± 0.07° and the effective longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient (d{sub 33,f}) increased from 2.30 ± 0.32 pm/V up to 5.57 ± 0.34 pm/V for film thicknesses in the range of 30 nm to 2 μm. Dielectric loss angle (tan δ) decreased from 0.626% ± 0.005% to 0.025% ± 0.011% for the same thickness range. The average relative permittivity (ε{sub r}) was calculated as 10.4 ± 0.05. An almost constant transversal piezoelectric coefficient (|e{sub 31,f}|) of 1.39 ± 0.01 C/m{sup 2} was measured for samples in the range of 0.5 μm to 2 μm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations performed on thin (100 nm) and thick (1.6 μm) films revealed an (002) oriented AlN nucleation and growth starting directly from the AlN-Pt interface independent of the film thickness and exhibit comparable quality with the state-of-the-art AlN thin films sputtered at much higher substrate temperatures.

  6. Topographic evolution of Yosemite Valley from Low Temperature Thermochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy-Lang, A.; Shuster, D. L.; Cuffey, K. M.; Fox, M.

    2014-12-01

    In this contribution, we interrogate the timing of km-scale topography development in the region around Yosemite Valley, California. Our goal is to determine when this spectacular glacial valley was carved, and how this might help address controversy surrounding the topographic evolution of the Sierra Nevada. At the scale of the range, two rival hypotheses are each supported by different datasets. Low-temperature thermochronology supports the idea that the range has been high-standing since the Cretaceous, whereas geomorphic evidence suggests that much of the elevation of the Sierra Nevada was attained during the Pliocene. Recent work by McPhillips and Brandon (2012) suggests instead that both ideas are valid, with the range losing much elevation during the Cenozoic, but regaining it during Miocene surface uplift.At the local scale, the classic study of Matthes (1930) determined that most of Yosemite Valley was excavated by the Sherwin-age glaciation that ended ~1 Ma. The consensus view is in agreement, although some argue that nearby comparable valleys comparable were carved long ago (e.g., House et al., 1998). If the Quaternary and younger glaciations were responsible for the bulk of the valley's >1 km depth, we might expect apatite (U-Th)/He ages at the valley floor to be histories at these locations, these data constrain patterns of valley topography development through time. We also supplement these data with zircon 4He/3He thermochronometry, which is a newly developed method that provides information on continuous cooling paths through ~120-220 °C. We will present both the apatite and zircon 4He/3He data and, in conjunction with thermo-kinematic modeling, discuss the ability and limitations of these data to test models of Sierra Nevada topography development through time. Matthes (1930) USGS Professional Paper House et al. (1998) Nature McPhillips and Brandon (2012) American Journal of Science

  7. Low temperature laser scanning microscopy of a superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Ciovati, G.; Anlage, Steven M.; Baldwin, C.; Cheng, G.; Flood, R.; Jordan, K.; Kneisel, P.; Morrone, M.; Nemes, G.; Turlington, L.; Wang, H.; Wilson, K.; Zhang, S.

    2012-01-01

    An apparatus was developed to obtain, for the first time, 2D maps of the surface resistance of the inner surface of an operating superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity by a low-temperature laser scanning microscopy technique. This allows identifying non-uniformities of the surface resistance with a spatial resolution of about one order of magnitude better than with earlier methods and surface resistance resolution of ~ 1 micro-Ohm at 3.3 GHz. A signal-to-noise ratio of about 10 dB was...

  8. Design for a low temperature ion implantation and luminescence cryostat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noonan, J.R.; Kirkpatrick, C.G.; Myers, D.R.; Streetman, B.G.

    1976-01-01

    Several simple design changes of a conventional liquid helium optical Dewar can significantly improve the cryostat's versatility for use in low temperature particle irradiation. A bellows assembly provides precise sample positioning and allows convenient access for electrical connections. A heat exchanger consisting of thin walled tubing with a 'goose neck' bend provides a simple, effective means of cooling the sample as well as excellent thermal isolation of the sample holder from the coolant reservoir during controlled anneals. The addition of a vane-type vacuum valve, optical windows, and a rotatable tailpiece facilitates the study of optical properties of materials following low temperature ion implantation. (author)

  9. Heat Transfer and Cooling Techniques at Low Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Baudouy, B

    2014-07-17

    The first part of this chapter gives an introduction to heat transfer and cooling techniques at low temperature. We review the fundamental laws of heat transfer (conduction, convection and radiation) and give useful data specific to cryogenic conditions (thermal contact resistance, total emissivity of materials and heat transfer correlation in forced or boiling flow for example) used in the design of cooling systems. In the second part, we review the main cooling techniques at low temperature, with or without cryogen, from the simplest ones (bath cooling) to the ones involving the use of cryocoolers without forgetting the cooling flow techniques.

  10. Instrument for Measuring Thermal Conductivity of Materials at Low Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, James; Sass, Jared; Johnson, Wesley

    2010-01-01

    With the advance of polymer and other non-metallic material sciences, whole new series of polymeric materials and composites are being created. These materials are being optimized for many different applications including cryogenic and low-temperature industrial processes. Engineers need these data to perform detailed system designs and enable new design possibilities for improved control, reliability, and efficiency in specific applications. One main area of interest is cryogenic structural elements and fluid handling components and other parts, films, and coatings for low-temperature application. An important thermal property of these new materials is the apparent thermal conductivity (k-value).

  11. Heat Transfer and Cooling Techniques at Low Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudouy, B [Saclay (France)

    2014-07-01

    The first part of this chapter gives an introduction to heat transfer and cooling techniques at low temperature. We review the fundamental laws of heat transfer (conduction, convection and radiation) and give useful data specific to cryogenic conditions (thermal contact resistance, total emissivity of materials and heat transfer correlation in forced or boiling flow for example) used in the design of cooling systems. In the second part, we review the main cooling techniques at low temperature, with or without cryogen, from the simplest ones (bath cooling) to the ones involving the use of cryocoolers without forgetting the cooling flow techniques.

  12. Photoresist removal using gaseous sulfur trioxide cleaning technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Puppo, Helene; Bocian, Paul B.; Waleh, Ahmad

    1999-06-01

    A novel cleaning method for removing photoresists and organic polymers from semiconductor wafers is described. This non-plasma method uses anhydrous sulfur trioxide gas in a two-step process, during which, the substrate is first exposed to SO3 vapor at relatively low temperatures and then is rinsed with de-ionized water. The process is radically different from conventional plasma-ashing methods in that the photoresist is not etched or removed during the exposure to SO3. Rather, the removal of the modified photoresist takes place during the subsequent DI-water rinse step. The SO3 process completely removes photoresist and polymer residues in many post-etch applications. Additional advantages of the process are absence of halogen gases and elimination of the need for other solvents and wet chemicals. The process also enjoys a very low cost of ownership and has minimal environmental impact. The SEM and SIMS surface analysis results are presented to show the effectiveness of gaseous SO3 process after polysilicon, metal an oxide etch applications. The effects of both chlorine- and fluorine-based plasma chemistries on resist removal are described.

  13. Ultra-low temperature curable nano-silver conductive adhesive for piezoelectric composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chao; Liao, Qingwei; Zhou, Xingli; Wang, Likun; Zhong, Chao; Zhang, Di

    2018-01-01

    Limited by the low thermal resistance of composite material, ultra-low temperature curable conductive silver adhesive with curing temperature less than 100 °C needed urgently for the surface conduction treatment of piezoelectric composite material. An ultra-low temperature curable nano-silver conductive adhesive with high adhesion strength for the applications of piezoelectric composite material was investigated. The crystal structure of cured adhesive, SEM/EDS analysis, thermal analysis, adhesive properties and conductive properties of different content of nano-silver filler or micron-silver doping samples were studied. The results show that with 60 wt.% nano-silver filler the ultra-low temperature curable conductive silver adhesive had the relatively good conductivity as volume resistivity of 2.37 × 10-4 Ω cm, and good adhesion strength of 5.13 MPa. Minor micron-doping (below 15 wt.%) could improve conductivity, but would decrease other properties. The ultra-low temperature curable nano-silver conductive adhesive could successfully applied to piezoelectric composite material.

  14. Low temperature kinetics of In-Cd solid solution decomposition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pal-Val, P.P.; Pal-Val, L.N.; Ostapovets, A.A.; Vaněk, Přemysl

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 137, - (2008), s. 35-42 ISSN 1012-0394 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : low temperatures * In-based alloys * solid solutions * isothermal structure instability * Young's modulus * electrical resistivity * phase diagrams Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://www.scientific.net/3-908451-53-1/35/

  15. New polymer electrolytes for low temperature fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundholm, F.; Elomaa, M.; Ennari, J.; Hietala, S.; Paronen, M. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland). Lab. of Polymer Chemistry

    1998-12-31

    Proton conducting polymer membranes for demanding applications, such as low temperature fuel cells, have been synthesised and characterised. Pre-irradiation methods are used to introduce sulfonic acid groups, directly or using polystyrene grafting, in stable, preformed polymer films. The membranes produced in this work show promise for the development of cost-effective, highly conducting membranes. (orig.)

  16. Low Temperature Oxidation of Methane: The Influence of Nitrogen Oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Anders Broe; Glarborg, Peter; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2000-01-01

    by the competition between three reaction paths from CH3 to CH2O. A direct high temperature path (A), a two-step NO2 enhanced low temperature path (B) and a slow three step NO enhanced path (C), which may produce NO2 to activate path B. The negative temperature coefficient behaviour was explained by a competition...

  17. Radioluminescence and thermoluminescence of albite at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Can, N.; Garcia-Guinea, J.; Kibar, R.; Cetin, A.; Ayvacikli, M.; Townsend, P.D.

    2011-01-01

    Feldspar as an archaeological and geological natural material for dating and retrospective dosimetry is receiving more and more attention because of its useful luminescence properties. In this study, the 25-280 K thermoluminescence (TL) and radioluminescence (RL) spectra in albite, which is a component of the two main feldspar series, the alkali feldspar (Na, K)AlSi 3 O 8 and the plagioclases (NaAlSi 3 O 8 -CaAl 2 Si 2 O 8 ) have been presented for aliquots along (001) and (010) crystallographic orientations. There are four main emission bands that are considered to arise from complexes of intrinsic defects linked in larger complexes with impurities such as Na + , Mn 2+ or Fe 3+ ions. The consequence of their association is to produce different luminescence efficiencies that produce wavelength sensitive TL curves. Radioluminescence data at low temperature for albites is distorted by contributions from the TL sites, even when the RL is run in a cooling cycle. This indicates the potential for a far more general problem for analysis of low temperature RL in insulating materials. - Highlights: → TL and RL spectra in albite were presented for different orientations. → There are 4 emission bands that are considered to arise from complexes of intrinsic. → RL data at low temperature for albite is distorted by contributions from TL sites. → This indicates the potential problem for analysis of low temperature RL.

  18. Measuring Systems for Thermometer Calibration in Low-Temperature Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmyrka-Grzebyk, A.; Lipiński, L.; Manuszkiewicz, H.; Kowal, A.; Grykałowska, A.; Jancewicz, D.

    2011-12-01

    The national temperature standard for the low-temperature range between 13.8033 K and 273.16 K has been established in Poland at the Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research (INTiBS). The standard consists of sealed cells for realization of six fixed points of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) in the low-temperature range, an adiabatic cryostat and Isotech water and mercury triple-point baths, capsule standard resistance thermometers (CSPRT), and AC and DC bridges with standard resistors for thermometers resistance measurements. INTiBS calibrates CSPRTs at the low-temperature fixed points with uncertainties less than 1 mK. In lower temperature range—between 2.5 K and about 25 K — rhodium-iron (RhFe) resistance thermometers are calibrated by comparison with a standard which participated in the EURAMET.T-K1.1 comparison. INTiBS offers a calibration service for industrial platinum resistance thermometers and for digital thermometers between 77 K and 273 K. These types of thermometers may be calibrated at INTiBS also in a higher temperature range up to 550°C. The Laboratory of Temperature Standard at INTiBS acquired an accreditation from the Polish Centre for Accreditation. A management system according to EN ISO/IEC 17025:2005 was established at the Laboratory and presented on EURAMET QSM Forum.

  19. Recent progress in low-temperature silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, M.; D'Ambrosio, N.; Bell, W.; Berglund, P.; Borchi, E.; Boer, W. de; Borer, K.; Bruzzi, M.; Buontempo, S.; Casagrande, L.; Chapuy, S.; Cindro, V.; Devine, S.R.H.; Dezillie, B.; Dierlamm, A.; Dimcovski, Z.; Eremin, V.; Esposito, A.; Granata, V.; Grigoriev, E.; Grohmann, S.; Hauler, F.; Heijne, E.; Heising, S.; Hempel, O.; Herzog, R.; Haerkoenen, J.; Janos, S.; Jungermann, L.; Konorov, I.; Li, Z.; Lourenco, C.; De Masi, R.; Menichelli, D.; Mikuz, M.; Niinikoski, T.O.; O'Shea, V.; Pagano, S.; Palmieri, V.G.; Paul, S.; Pretzl, K.; Smith, K.; Solano, B. Pere; Sousa, P.; Pirollo, S.; Rato Mendes, P.; Ruggiero, G.; Sonderegger, P.; Tuominen, E.; Verbitskaya, E.; Da Via, C.; Watts, S.; Wobst, E.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2003-01-01

    The CERN RD39 Collaboration studies the possibility to extend the detector lifetime in a hostile radiation environment by operating them at low temperatures. The outstanding illustration is the Lazarus effect, which showed a broad operational temperature range around 130 K for neutron irradiated silicon detectors

  20. Electron-dislocation interaction at low temperatures. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The interaction of mobile dislocations with electrons in copper and copper alloys has shown that dislocation motion in copper, at low temperature, can be treated as an analog of an underdamped oscillator. We have also shown that the viscous drag on mobile dislocations in type II superconductors can be treated as an acoustic attenuation of an elastic wave

  1. Challenges in Smart Low-Temperature District Heating Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Hongwei; Wang, Stephen Jia

    2014-01-01

    Previous research and development shows that low temperature district heating (LTDH) system is economic feasible for low energy buildings and buildings at sparse areas. Coupling with reduced network temperature and well-designed district heating (DH) networks, LTDH can reduce network heat loss by...

  2. Oregon Low-Temperature-Resource Assessment Program. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priest, G.R.; Black, G.L.; Woller, N.M.

    1981-01-01

    Numerous low-temperature hydrothermal systems are available for exploitation throughout the Cascades and eastern Oregon. All of these areas have heat flow significantly higher than crustal averages and many thermal aquifers. In northeastern Oregon, low temperature geothermal resources are controlled by regional stratigraphic aquifers of the Columbia River Basalt Group at shallow depths and possibly by faults at greater depths. In southeastern Oregon most hydrothermal systems are of higher temperature than those of northeastern Oregon and are controlled by high-angle fault zones and layered volcanic aquifers. The Cascades have very high heat flow but few large population centers. Direct use potential in the Cascades is therefore limited, except possibly in the cities of Oakridge and Ashland, where load may be great enough to stimulate development. Absence of large population centers also inhibits initial low temperature geothermal development in eastern Oregon. It may be that uses for the abundant low temperature geothermal resources of the state will have to be found which do not require large nearby population centers. One promising use is generation of electricity from freon-based biphase electrical generators. These generators will be installed on wells at Vale and Lakeview in the summer of 1982 to evaluate their potential use on geothermal waters with temperatures as low as 80/sup 0/C (176/sup 0/F).

  3. Low-temperature magnetic modification of sensitive biological materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospišková, K.; Šafařík, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 142, mar (2015), s. 184-188 ISSN 0167-577X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13021 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : magnetic iron oxides particles * microwave-assisted synthesis * low-temperature magnetic modification * immobilized enzymes Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.437, year: 2015

  4. Chamber for uniaxial pressure application at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grillo, M.L.N.; Carmo, L.C.S. do; Picon, A.P.

    1984-08-01

    A chamber for alignment of low temperature ferroelastic domains in crystals by the use of uniaxial stress was built. The system allows the use of EPR and optical techniques, as well as X-ray irradiation at temperatures as low as 77K. (Author) [pt

  5. Strong anisotropy in the low temperature Compton profiles of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Compton profiles of momentum distribution of conduction electrons in the orthorhombic phase of -Ga metal at low temperature are calculated in the band model for the three crystallographic directions (100), (010), and (001). Unlike the results at room temperature, previously reported by Lengeler, Lasser and Mair, the ...

  6. Scintillation of sapphire under particle excitation at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amare, J; Beltran, B; Cebrian, S; Coron, N; Dambier, G; GarcIa, E; Gomez, H; Irastorza, I G; Leblanc, J; Luzon, G; Marcillac, P de; Martinez, M; Morales, J; Ortiz de Solorzano, A; Pobes, C; Puimedon, J; Redon, T; RodrIguez, A; Ruz, J; Sarsa, M L; Torres, L; Villar, J A

    2006-01-01

    The scintillation properties of undoped sapphire at very low temperature have been studied in the framework of the ROSEBUD (Rare Objects SEarch with Bolometers UnDerground) Collaboration devoted to dark matter searches. We present an estimation of its light yield under gamma, alpha and neutron excitation

  7. Low temperature spin wave dynamics in classical Heisenberg chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, P.; Blume, M.

    1977-11-01

    A detailed and quantitative study of the low-temperature spin-wave dynamics was made for the classical Heisenberg-coupled chain using computer simulation. Results for the spin-wave damping rates and the renormalization of the spin-wave frequencies are presented and compared with existing predictions

  8. Potential market and characteristics of low-temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerouge, B.

    1975-01-01

    The low-temperature (100 to 200 deg C) heat market for industrial applications and district heating is very important. Two main studies have been developed: a swimming pool reactor delivering water at 110 deg C and a prestressed concrete vessel reactor delivering water at 200 deg C [fr

  9. Low-temperature enhancement of plasmonic performance in silver films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jayanti, S.V.; Park, J.H.; Dejneka, Alexandr; Chvostová, Dagmar; McPeak, K.M.; Chen, X.; Oh, S.H.; Norris, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 5 (2015), 1147-1155 ISSN 2159-3930 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-13853S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : plasmonic performance * silver films * low temperature * spectroscopic ellipsometry Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.657, year: 2015

  10. Development of Low Temperature Catalysts for an Integrated Ammonia PEM Fuel Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Alfred

    2014-01-01

    It is proposed that an integrated ammonia-PEM fuel cell could unlock the potential of ammonia to act as a high capacity chemical hydrogen storage vector and enable renewable energy to be delivered eectively to road transport applications. Catalysts are developed for low temperature ammonia decomposition with activity from 450 K (ruthenium and cesium on graphitised carbon nanotubes). Results strongly suggest that the cesium is present on the surface and close proximity to ruthenium nanoparticl...

  11. A solution for the helium problem. Cryogen-free cooling systems for low temperatures; Eine Loesung fuer das Heliumproblem. Kryogenfreie Kuehlsysteme fuer tiefe Temperaturen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Good, Jeremy [Cryogenic Limited, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    Pulse tube or Gifford-McMahon coolers are related to Stirling engines. Extremely low temperatures - 1 K can be reached with these devices. As a cryogen-free system the devices need only small amounts of helium as working gas. This fact reduces the gaseous and liquid helium consumption of research labs considerably and allows new applications. The cost-efficiency of this alternative technique is important for research facilities that use superconducting magnets.

  12. Phenomenon of quantum low temperature limit of chemical reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gol'danskij, V.I.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of quantum-mechanical effects on one of the fundamental laws of chemical kinetics - the Arrhenius law - is considered. Criteria characterising the limits of the low-temperature region where the extent of quantum-mechanical tunnelling transitions exceeds exponentially the transitions over the barrier are quoted. Studies of the low-temperature tunnelling of electrons and hydrogen atoms are briefly mentioned and the history of research on low-temperature radiation-induced solid-phase polymerisation, the development of which led to the discovery of the phenomenon of the low-temperature quantum-mechanical limit for the rates of chemical reactions in relation to the formaldehyde polymerisation reaction, is briefly considered. The results of experiments using low-inertia calorimeters, whereby it is possible to determine directly the average time (tau 0 ) required to add one new link to the polymer chain of formaldehyde during its polymerisation by radiation and during postpolymerisation and to establish that below 80K the increase of tau 0 slows down and that at T approximately equal to 10-4K the time tau 0 reaches a plateau (tau 0 approximately equals 0.01s), are described. Possible explanations of the observed low-temperature limit for the rate of a chemical reaction are critically examined and a semiquantitative explanation is given for this phenomenon, which may be particularly common in combined electronic-confirmational transitions in complex biological molecules and may play a definite role in chemical and biological evolution (cold prehistory of life)

  13. Phenomenon of quantum low temperature limit of chemical reaction rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gol' danskii, V I [AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Khimicheskoj Fiziki

    1975-12-01

    The influence of quantum-mechanical effects on one of the fundamental laws of chemical kinetics - the Arrhenius Law - is considered. Criteria characterising the limits of the low-temperature region where the extent of quantum-mechanical tunnelling transitions exceeds exponentially the transitions over the barrier are quoted. Studies of the low-temperature tunnelling of electrons and hydrogen atoms are briefly mentioned and the history of research on low-temperature radiation-induced solid-phase polymerization, the development of which led to the discovery of the phenomenon of the low-temperature quantum-mechanical limit for the rates of chemical reactions in relation to the formaldehyde polymerization reaction, is briefly considered. The results of experiments using low-inertia calorimeters, whereby it is possible to determine directly the average time (tau/sub 0/) required to add one new link to the polymer chain of formaldehyde during its polymerization by radiation and during postpolymerization and to establish that below 80K the increase of tau/sub 0/ slows down and that at T approximately equal to 10-4K the time tau/sub 0/ reaches a plateau (tau/sub 0/ approximately equals 0.01s), are described. Possible explanations of the observed low-temperature limit for the rate of a chemical reaction are critically examined and a semiquantitative explanation is given for this phenomenon, which may be particularly common in combined electronic-confirmational transitions in complex biological molecules and may play a definite role in chemical and biological evolution (cold prehistory of life).

  14. Gaseous waste processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konno, Masanobu; Uchiyama, Yoshio; Suzuki, Kunihiko; Kimura, Masahiro; Kawabe, Ken-ichi.

    1992-01-01

    Gaseous waste recombiners 'A' and 'B' are connected in series and three-way valves are disposed at the upstream and the downstream of the recombiners A and B, and bypass lines are disposed to the recombiners A and B, respectively. An opening/closing controller for the three-way valves is interlocked with a hydrogen densitometer disposed to a hydrogen injection line. Hydrogen gas and oxygen gas generated by radiolysis in the reactor are extracted from a main condenser and caused to flow into a gaseous waste processing system. Gaseous wastes are introduced together with overheated steams to the recombiner A upon injection of hydrogen. Both of the bypass lines of the recombiners A and B are closed, and recombining reaction for the increased hydrogen gas is processed by the recombiners A and B connected in series. In an operation mode not conducting hydrogen injection, it is passed through the bypass line of the recombiner A and processed by the recombiner B. With such procedures, the increase of gaseous wastes due to hydrogen injection can be coped with existent facilities. (I.N.)

  15. Low temperature corrosion in bark fuelled, small boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindau, Leif; Goldschmidt, Barbara

    2008-05-15

    A number of small (3-12 MW), new biofuel boiler plants in southern Sweden, and (at least) in Austria, have suffered a high (wastage of mm/yrs) corrosion rate on the low temperature boiler side. This problem has been investigated with respect to its occurrence and its character by contacts with operators, by plant inspections, and by analysis of cold-side deposits. The plants affected have low feed water temperatures (< 100 deg C). The plants fire most types of Swedish biofuel: chips, bark, hog fuel, and 'GROT' (=twigs and tops). The results found give basis for a hypothesis that the corrosion results from the presence of an aqueous phase in the deposits, this phase being stabilized by dissolved salts having high solubility. It then follows that for each salt, there is a critical relative humidity (calculated from the flue gas water partial pressure and the cooling surface temperature as is common practice among boiler engineers) for both the presence of the aqueous phase and the corrosion. Some critical single salts, ZnCl{sub 2} and CaCl{sub 2} have been identified, and they give critical 'relative humidities' of 5% and 18% respectively. These figures are a lower bound. The corresponding figure, derived from the practical experience and the reported plant operational data, is between 20 and 30%. Corrosion tests have been carried out by exposing an air-cooled probe in the flue gases at a 12 MW boiler at Saevelundsverket in Alingsaas, and the material wastage at different temperatures has been measured with a profilometer. The high corrosion rates were reproduced in the tests for high relative humidities. The corrosion rate was small and not measurable (<0.1 mm/year) for relative humidity <22%. The work shows by means of indirect evidence that the corrosion critical components are ZnCl{sub 2} and possibly CaCl{sub 2} as well. The practical engineering design criterion derived from the work is that the relative humidity (calculated from the flue

  16. Method of eliminating gaseous hydrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagakura, Masaaki; Imaizumi, Hideki; Suemori, Nobuo; Aizawa, Takashi; Naito, Taisei.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent external diffusion of gaseous hydrogen isotopes such as tritium or the like upon occurrence of tritium leakage accident in a thermonuclear reactor by recovering to eliminate the isotopes rapidly and with safety. Method: Gases at the region of a reactor container where hydrogen isotopes might leak are sucked by a recycing pump, dehumidified in a dehumidifier and then recycled from a preheater through a catalytic oxidation reactor to a water absorption tower. In this structure, the dehumidifier is disposed at the upstream of the catalytic oxidation reactor to reduce the water content of the gases to be processed, whereby the eliminating efficiency for the gases to be processed can be maintained well even when the oxidation reactor is operated at a low temperature condition near the ambient temperature. This method is based on the fact that the oxidating reactivity of the catalyst can be improved significantly by eliminating the water content in the gases to be processed. (Yoshino, Y.)

  17. Experiments on Quantum Hall Topological Phases in Ultra Low Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Rui-Rui

    2015-01-01

    This project is to cool electrons in semiconductors to extremely low temperatures and to study new states of matter formed by low-dimensional electrons (or holes). At such low temperatures (and with an intense magnetic field), electronic behavior differs completely from ordinary ones observed at room temperatures or regular low temperature. Studies of electrons at such low temperatures would open the door for fundamental discoveries in condensed matter physics. Present studies have been focused on topological phases in the fractional quantum Hall effect in GaAs/AlGaAs semiconductor heterostructures, and the newly discovered (by this group) quantum spin Hall effect in InAs/GaSb materials. This project consists of the following components: 1) Development of efficient sample cooling techniques and electron thermometry: Our goal is to reach 1 mK electron temperature and reasonable determination of electron temperature; 2) Experiments at ultra-low temperatures: Our goal is to understand the energy scale of competing quantum phases, by measuring the temperature-dependence of transport features. Focus will be placed on such issues as the energy gap of the 5/2 state, and those of 12/5 (and possible 13/5); resistive signature of instability near 1/2 at ultra-low temperatures; 3) Measurement of the 5/2 gaps in the limit of small or large Zeeman energies: Our goal is to gain physics insight of 5/2 state at limiting experimental parameters, especially those properties concerning the spin polarization; 4) Experiments on tuning the electron-electron interaction in a screened quantum Hall system: Our goal is to gain understanding of the formation of paired fractional quantum Hall state as the interaction pseudo-potential is being modified by a nearby screening electron layer; 5) Experiments on the quantized helical edge states under a strong magnetic field and ultralow temperatures: our goal is to investigate both the bulk and edge states in a quantum spin Hall insulator under

  18. Low-Temperature Synthesis Routes to Intermetallic Superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaak, Raymond E

    2008-01-08

    Over the past few years, our group has gained expertise at developing low-temperature solution-based synthetic pathways to complex nanoscale solids, with particular emphasis on nanocrystalline intermetallic compounds. Our synthetic capabilities are providing tools to reproducibly generate intermetallic nanostructures with simultaneous control over crystal structure, composition, and morphology. This DOE-funded project aims to expand these capabilities to intermetallic superconductors. This could represent an important addition to the tools that are available for the synthesis and processing of intermetallic superconductors, which traditionally utilize high-temperature, high-pressure, thin film, or gas-phase vacuum deposition methods. Our current knowledge of intermetallic superconductors suggests that significant enhancements could result from the inherent benefits of low-temperature solution synthesis, e.g. metastable phase formation, control over nanoscale morphology to facilitate size-dependent property studies, robust and inexpensive processability, low-temperature annealing and consolidation, and impurity incorporation (for doping, stoichiometry control, flux pinning, and improving the critical fields). Our focus is on understanding the superconducting properties as a function of synthetic route, crystal structure, crystallite size, and morphology, and developing the synthetic tools necessary to accomplish this. This research program can currently be divided into two classes of superconducting materials: intermetallics (transition metal/post transition metal) and metal carbides/borides. Both involve the development and exploitation of low-temperature synthesis routes followed by detailed characterization of structures and properties, with the goal of understanding how the synthetic pathways influence key superconducting properties of selected target materials. Because of the low-temperature methods used to synthesize them and the nanocrystalline morphologies

  19. Analysis of Low-Temperature Utilization of Geothermal Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Brian

    2015-06-30

    Full realization of the potential of what might be considered “low-grade” geothermal resources will require that we examine many more uses for the heat than traditional electricity generation. To demonstrate that geothermal energy truly has the potential to be a national energy source we will be designing, assessing, and evaluating innovative uses for geothermal-produced water such as hybrid biomass-geothermal cogeneration of electricity and district heating and efficiency improvements to the use of cellulosic biomass in addition to utilization of geothermal in district heating for community redevelopment projects. The objectives of this project were: 1) to perform a techno-economic analysis of the integration and utilization potential of low-temperature geothermal sources. Innovative uses of low-enthalpy geothermal water were designed and examined for their ability to offset fossil fuels and decrease CO2 emissions. 2) To perform process optimizations and economic analyses of processes that can utilize low-temperature geothermal fluids. These processes included electricity generation using biomass and district heating systems. 3) To scale up and generalize the results of three case study locations to develop a regionalized model of the utilization of low-temperature geothermal resources. A national-level, GIS-based, low-temperature geothermal resource supply model was developed and used to develop a series of national supply curves. We performed an in-depth analysis of the low-temperature geothermal resources that dominate the eastern half of the United States. The final products of this study include 17 publications, an updated version of the cost estimation software GEOPHIRES, and direct-use supply curves for low-temperature utilization of geothermal resources. The supply curves for direct use geothermal include utilization from known hydrothermal, undiscovered hydrothermal, and near-hydrothermal EGS resources and presented these results at the Stanford

  20. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Low Temperature Molecular Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Molecular spectroscopy has achieved rapid and significant progress in recent years, the low temperature techniques in particular having proved very useful for the study of reactive species, phase transitions, molecular clusters and crystals, superconductors and semiconductors, biochemical systems, astrophysical problems, etc. The widening range of applications has been accompanied by significant improvements in experimental methods, and low temperature molecular spectroscopy has been revealed as the best technique, in many cases, to establish the connection between experiment and theoretical calculations. This, in turn, has led to a rapidly increasing ability to predict molecular spectroscopic properties. The combination of an advanced tutorial standpoint with an emphasis on recent advances and new perspectives in both experimental and theoretical molecular spectroscopy contained in this book offers the reader insight into a wide range of techniques, particular emphasis being given to supersonic jet and matri...

  1. Fuel oil from low-temperature carbonization of coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thau, A

    1941-01-01

    A review has been given of German developments during the last 20 years. Four methods for the low-temperature carbonization of coal have been developed to the industrial stage; two involving the use of externally heated, intermittent, metallic chamber ovens; and two employing the principle of internal heating by means of a current of gas. Tar from externally heated retorts can be used directly as fuel oil, but that from internally heated retorts requires further treatment. In order to extend the range of coals available for low-temperature carbonization, and to economize metals, an externally heated type of retort constructed of ceramic material has been developed to the industrial stage by T. An excellent coke and a tar that can be used directly as fuel oil are obtained. The properties of the tar obtained from Upper Silesian coal are briefly summarized.

  2. Solution-phase synthesis of nanomaterials at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yongchun; Qian, Yitai

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the solution-phase synthesis of nanoparticles via some routes at low temperatures, such as room temperature route, wave-assisted synthesis (γ-irradiation route and sonochemical route), directly heating at low temperatures, and hydrothermal/solvothermal methods. A number of strategies were developed to control the shape, the size, as well as the dispersion of nanostructures. Using diethylamine or n-butylamine as solvent, semiconductor nanorods were yielded. By the hydrothermal treatment of amorphous colloids, Bi2S3 nanorods and Se nanowires were obtained. CdS nanowires were prepared in the presence of polyacrylamide. ZnS nanowires were obtained using liquid crystal. The polymer poly (vinyl acetate) tubule acted as both nanoreactor and template for the CdSe nanowire growth. Assisted by the surfactant of sodium dodecyl benzenesulfonate (SDBS), nickel nanobelts were synthesized. In addition, Ag nanowires, Te nanotubes and ZnO nanorod arrays could be prepared without adding any additives or templates.

  3. Flow processes at low temperatures in ultrafine-grained aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinh, Nguyen Q.; Szommer, Peter; Csanadi, Tamas; Langdon, Terence G.

    2006-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the flow behavior of pure aluminum at low temperatures. Samples were processed by equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) to give a grain size of ∼1.2 μm and compression samples were cut from the as-pressed billets and tested over a range of strain rates at temperatures up to 473 K. The results show the occurrence of steady-state flow in these highly deformed samples and a detailed analysis gives a low strain rate sensitivity and an activation energy similar to the value for grain boundary diffusion. By using depth-sensing indentation testing and atomic force microscopy, it is shown that grain boundary sliding occurs in this material at low temperatures. This result is attributed to the presence of high-energy non-equilibrium boundaries in the severely deformed samples

  4. Tar bases in low-temperature coal tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiura, S; Ueno, H; Yokoyama, H

    1951-01-01

    Tar bases were extracted from three fractions, that boil below 260/sup 0/ at 260/sup 0/ to 280/sup 0/, and 280/sup 0/ to 330/sup 0/, respectively, of the low-temperature tar obtained by the carbonization of Ube coal in a Koppers' vertical retort at approximately 750/sup 0/. These were divided, respectively, into three groups, acetate-forming amine, HCl salt-forming bases (I), and CHCl/sub 3/-soluble bases (II), and further fractionally distilled. From the physical and chemical properties of the fractions thus obtained, it was concluded that low-temperature coal tar contained no low boiling pyridine homologues and that, besides higher homologues of pyridine, nonaromatic, more saturated, and less basic compounds of larger atomic weight and smaller refractive index, such as derivatives of pyrrole and indole, also existed as in crude petroleum.

  5. Low Temperature District Heating for Future Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Dietrich; Kallert, Anna; Blesl, Markus

    2017-01-01

    of the building stock. Low temperature district heating (LTDH) can contribute significantly to a more efficient use of energy resources as well as better integration of renewable energy (e.g. geothermal or solar heat), and surplus heat (e.g. industrial waste heat) into the heating sector. LTDH offers prospects......The building sector is responsible for more than one third of the final energy consumption of societies and produces the largest amount of greenhouse gas emissions of all sectors. This is due to the utilisation of combustion processes of mainly fossil fuels to satisfy the heating demand...... for both the demand side (community building structure) and the supply side (network properties or energy sources). Especially in connection with buildings that demand only low temperatures for space heating. The utilisation of lower temperatures reduces losses in pipelines and can increase the overall...

  6. On the Interpretation of Low Temperature Calorimetry Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Ane Mette; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2008-01-01

    The effect of selected factors and phenomena on Low Temperature Calorimetry (LTC) results has been investigated, in order to determine the possibilities and limitations of using LTC for characterisation of the porosity of cement-based materials. LTC was carried out on a model material with mono......-sized pores of approximately 14 nm saturated with either distilled water or a sodium chloride solution, as well as on water, the salt solution, and an artificial pore solution, alone. It was found that supercooling is unavoidable during the liquid-solid phase transition, and that even at low temperature...... to limit transport of liquid, whereas heating should be undertaken at a low rate to limit the effect of non-equilibrium....

  7. Innovative system for delivery of low temperature district heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Ivanov Ianakiev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An innovative Low Temperature District Heating (LTDH local network is developed in Nottingham, supported by REMOURBAN project, part of the H2020 Smart City and Community Lighthouse scheme. It was proposed that a branch emanating from the return pipe of the of the existing district heating system in Nottingham would be created to use low temperature heating for the first time in UK. The development is aimed to extract wasted (unused heat from existing district heating system and make it more efficient and profitable. Four maisonette blocks of 94 low-raised flats, at Nottingham demo site of the REMOURBAN project will be connected to this new LTDH system. The scheme will provide a primary supply of heat and hot water at approximately 50oC to 60oC. Innovated solutions have been put forward to overcome certain barriers, such as legionella related risks and peak loads during extreme heating seasons and occasional maintenance.

  8. Low-temperature creep of austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, R. P.; Walsh, R. P.

    2017-09-01

    Plastic deformation under constant load (creep) in austenitic stainless steels has been measured at temperatures ranging from 4 K to room temperature. Low-temperature creep data taken from past and unreported austenitic stainless steel studies are analyzed and reviewed. Creep at cryogenic temperatures of common austenitic steels, such as AISI 304, 310 316, and nitrogen-strengthened steels, such as 304HN and 3116LN, are included. Analyses suggests that logarithmic creep (creep strain dependent on the log of test time) best describe austenitic stainless steel behavior in the secondary creep stage and that the slope of creep strain versus log time is dependent on the applied stress/yield strength ratio. The role of cold work, strain-induced martensitic transformations, and stacking fault energy on low-temperature creep behavior is discussed. The engineering significance of creep on cryogenic structures is discussed in terms of the total creep strain under constant load over their operational lifetime at allowable stress levels.

  9. Low-temperature random matrix theory at the soft edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelman, Alan; Persson, Per-Olof; Sutton, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    “Low temperature” random matrix theory is the study of random eigenvalues as energy is removed. In standard notation, β is identified with inverse temperature, and low temperatures are achieved through the limit β → ∞. In this paper, we derive statistics for low-temperature random matrices at the “soft edge,” which describes the extreme eigenvalues for many random matrix distributions. Specifically, new asymptotics are found for the expected value and standard deviation of the general-β Tracy-Widom distribution. The new techniques utilize beta ensembles, stochastic differential operators, and Riccati diffusions. The asymptotics fit known high-temperature statistics curiously well and contribute to the larger program of general-β random matrix theory

  10. Low Temperature District Heating for Future Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ford, Rufus; Pietruschka, Dirk; Sipilä, Kari

    participants being VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT), Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Stuttgart Technology University of Applied Sciences (HFT) and SSE Enterprise in United Kingdom. The demonstration cases described in the report......This report titled “Case studies and demonstrations” is the subtask D report of the IEA DHC|CHP Annex TS1 project “Low Temperature District Heating for Future Energy Systems” carried out between 2013 and 2016. The project was led by Fraunhofer Institute for Building Physics (IBP) with the other...... include examples on low temperature district heating systems, solar heating in a district heating system, heat pump based heat supply and energy storages for both peak load management and for seasonal heat storage. Some demonstrations have been implemented while others are at planning phase...

  11. Exergy and Energy Analysis of Low Temperature District Heating Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Hongwei; Svendsen, Svend

    is in line with a pilot project that is carrying out in Denmark with network supply/return temperature at 55oC/25 oC. The consumer domestic hot water (DHW) demand is supplied with a special designed district heating (DH) storage tank. The space heating (SH) demand is supplied with a low temperature radiator......Low temperature district heating (LTDH) with reduced network supply and return temperature provides better match of the low quality building thermal demand and the low quality waste heat supply. In this paper, an exemplary LTDH network was designed for 30 low energy demand residential houses, which....... The network thermal and hydraulic conditions were simulated under steady state with an in-house district heating network design and simulation code. Through simulation, the overall system energetic and exergetic efficiencies were calculated and the exergy losses for the major district heating system...

  12. Energy and exergy analysis of low temperature district heating network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Hongwei; Svendsen, Svend

    2012-01-01

    is designed to supply heating for 30 low energy detached residential houses. The network operational supply/return temperature is set as 55 °C/25 °C, which is in line with a pilot project carried out in Denmark. Two types of in-house substations are analyzed to supply the consumer domestic hot water demand...... energy/exergy losses and increase the quality match between the consumer heating demand and the district heating supply.......Low temperature district heating with reduced network supply and return temperature provides better match of the low quality building heating demand and the low quality heating supply from waste heat or renewable energy. In this paper, a hypothetical low temperature district heating network...

  13. Mechanical behavior and fatigue in polymeric composites at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, Y.; Bussiba, A.; Mathias, H.

    1986-01-01

    Advanced fiber reinforced polymeric composite materials are often suggested as structural materials at low temperature. In this study, graphite epoxy and Kevlar-49/epoxy systems were investigated. Fatigue behavior was emphasized after establishing the standard monotonic mechanical properties, including fracture resistance parameters at 77, 190, and 296 K. Tension-tension fatigue crack propagation testing was carried out at nominal constant stress intensity amplitudes using precracked compact tensile specimens. The crack tip damage zone was measured and tracked by an electro-potential device, opening displacement gage, microscopic observation, and acoustic emission activity recording. Fractograhic and metallographic studies were performed with emphasis on fracture morphology and modes, failure processes, and description of sequential events. On the basis of these experimental results, the problem of fatigue resistance, including low temperature effects, is analyzed and discussed. The fundamental concepts of fatigue in composites are assessed, particularly in terms of fracture mechanics methods

  14. Ash behavior and de-fluidization in low temperature circulating fluidized bed biomass gasifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Narayan, Vikas

    ensures that high-alkali biomass fuels can be used without risks of bed de-fluidization. This thesis aims to understand the behavior of alkali metals and ash in the LTCFB system. The thesis work involved measurements made on bed material and product gas dust samples on a 100kW LTCFB gasifier placed......Biomass is increasingly used as a fuel for power generation. Herbaceous fuels however, contain high amounts of alkali metals which get volatilized at high temperatures and forms salts with low melting points and thus condense on pipelines, reactor surfaces and may cause de-fluidization. A Low......-Temperature Circulating Fluidized Bed System (LTCFB) gasifier allows pyrolysis and gasification of biomass to occur at low temperatures thereby improving the retention of alkali and other ash species within the system and minimizing the amount of ash species in the product gas. In addition, the low reactor temperature...

  15. Exploring the limits: A low-pressure, low-temperature Haber-Bosch process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Medford, Andrew James; Studt, Felix; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Khan, Tuhin Suvra; Bligaard, T.; Nørskov, J. K.

    2014-04-01

    The Haber-Bosch process for ammonia synthesis has been suggested to be the most important invention of the 20th century, and called the ‘Bellwether reaction in heterogeneous catalysis’. We examine the catalyst requirements for a new low-pressure, low-temperature synthesis process. We show that the absence of such a process for conventional transition metal catalysts can be understood as a consequence of a scaling relation between the activation energy for N2 dissociation and N adsorption energy found at the surface of these materials. A better catalyst cannot obey this scaling relation. We define the ideal scaling relation characterizing the most active catalyst possible, and show that it is theoretically possible to have a low pressure, low-temperature Haber-Bosch process. The challenge is to find new classes of catalyst materials with properties approaching the ideal, and we discuss the possibility that transition metal compounds have such properties.

  16. Low temperature synthesis of graphene on arbitrary substrates and its transport properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Rong; Akhtar, Meysam; Alruqi, Adel; Jasinski, Jacek; Sumanasekera, Gamini; Department of Physics; Astronomy, University of Louisville Collaboration; Conn CenterRenewable Energy, University of Louisville Collaboration

    Here we report the direct synthesis of uniform and vertically oriented graphene films on multiple substrates including glass, Si/SiO2, and copper foil by radio-frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using methane as the carbon precursor at relatively low temperatures. Raman spectra of all the samples show characteristic Raman peaks of graphene. The temperature dependence of electrical transport properties such as 4-probe resistance, thermo electrical power and hall mobility were measured for graphene grown on glass substrates at varying temperature from 500 ° C to 700 ° C. The morphological and surface characteristics were also studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This work demonstrates the potential of low temperature and transfer-free graphene growth for future graphene-based electronic applications.

  17. Ultra-low Temperature Curable Conductive Silver Adhesive with different Resin Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xingli; Wang, Likun; Liao, Qingwei; Yan, Chao; Li, Xing; Qin, Lei

    2018-03-01

    The ultra-low temperature curable conductive silver adhesive with curing temperature less than 100 °C needed urgently for the surface conductive treatment of piezoelectric composite material due to the low thermal resistance of composite material and low adhesion strength of adhesive. An ultra-low temperature curable conductive adhesive with high adhesion strength was obtained for the applications of piezoelectric composite material. The microstructure, conductive properties and adhesive properties with different resin matrix were investigated. The conductive adhesive with AG-80 as the resin matrix has the shorter curing time (20min), lower curing temperature (90°C) and higher adhesion strength (7.6MPa). The resistivity of AG-80 sample has the lower value (2.13 × 10-4Ω·cm) than the 618 sample (4.44 × 10-4Ω·cm).

  18. Effect of low temperature oxygen plasma treatment on microstructure and adhesion force of graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun; Deng, Heijun; Xue, Wei; Wang, Quan

    2018-01-01

    Graphene has attracted strong attention due to its unique mechanical, electrical, thermal and magnetic properties. In this work, we investigate the effect of low temperature oxygen plasma treatment on microstructure and adhesion force of single-layer graphene (SLG). Low temperature oxygen plasma is used to treat SLG grown by chemical vapor deposition through varying the exposure time. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy are utilized to identify changes before and after treatment. Raman spectra of treated graphene reveal that peak intensity of the characteristic D and D' peaks increase. Meanwhile, degradation of the G and 2D peaks in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates that abundant Csbnd OH and Cdbnd O functional groups are introduced into graphene after treatment. AFM investigation shows that surface roughness and adhesion force of treated graphene increase significantly firstly and then slowly. Therefore, this work would offer a practical route to improve the performance of graphene-based devices.

  19. Thermodynamics of partially confined Fermi gases at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toms, David J

    2004-01-01

    We examine the behaviour of non-interacting Fermi gases at low temperature. If there is a confining potential present the thermodynamic behaviour is altered from the familiar results for the unconfined gas. The role of de Haas-van Alphen type oscillations that are a consequence of the confining potential is considered. Attention is concentrated on the behaviour of the chemical potential and the specific heat. Results are compared and contrasted with those for an unconfined and a totally confined gas

  20. Study of Plant Waxes Using Low Temperature Method for ESEM

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neděla, Vilém; Tihlaříková, Eva; Schiebertová, P.; Zajícová, I.; Schwarzerová, K.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, S3 (2016), s. 1180-1181 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22777S; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LO1211 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : ESEM * plant waxes * low temperature method Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.891, year: 2016

  1. Application of piezoceramic materials in low temperature scanning tunnel microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volodin, A.P.; Panich, A.E.

    1989-01-01

    Temperature dependences of the voltage-to-movement conversion coefficients for piezoceramic domestic materials PKR and TsTS-19 are measured using a capacitance dilatometer in the 0.4< T<300K temperature range. Anisotropy of thermal expansion of materials determined by the polarization vector is observed. Some recommendations concerning the use of the given materials in low-temperature scanning tunnel microscopes are given

  2. Account of low temperature hardening in calculation of permissible stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, N.V.; Ul'yanenko, A.P.; Gorodyskij, N.I.

    1980-01-01

    Suggested is a calculation scheme of permissible stresses with the account of temperature hardening for steels and alloys, the dependences of strength, plasticity and rupture work of which on cooling temperature do not have threshold changes in a wide range of low temperatures (from 300 to 4.2 K). Application of the suggested scheme is considered on the example of 12Kh18N10T austenitic chromium-nickel steel

  3. Low temperature chemical processing of graphite-clad nuclear fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Robert A.

    2017-10-17

    A reduced-temperature method for treatment of a fuel element is described. The method includes molten salt treatment of a fuel element with a nitrate salt. The nitrate salt can oxidize the outer graphite matrix of a fuel element. The method can also include reduced temperature degradation of the carbide layer of a fuel element and low temperature solubilization of the fuel in a kernel of a fuel element.

  4. Technological aspects of UO2 sintering at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thern, Gerardo G.; Dominguez, Carlos A.; Benitez, Ana M.; Marajofsky, Adolfo

    1999-01-01

    Within the Fuel Cycle Program of CNEA, the knowledge that plant personnel has on sintering at low temperature was evaluated, because this process could decrease costs for UO 2 and (U,Gd)O 2 pellets production, simplify the furnace maintenance and facilitate the automation of the production process, specially convenient for uranium recovery. By applying this technology, some companies have achieved production at pilot-scale and irradiated a significant number of pellets. (author)

  5. Aspects of the application of low temperatures in electrical engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1968-01-01

    After a short assessment of superconductors and high field coils as well as normal conductors at low temperature, refrigerating units and thermal insulation are discussed. In the case of superconductor direct current cables for 2 by 400 kV, a comparison is made with hvdc overhead lines and it was found that the cost of erection, as well as the annual operating costs, are equivalent for a transmitted load of 2 to 3 GW.

  6. Coulometric titration at low temperatures-nonstoichiometric silver selenide

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, Gesa K.; Janek, Jürgen

    2003-01-01

    A modified coulometric titration technique is described for the investigation of nonstoichiometric phases at low temperatures. It allows to obtain titration curves at temperatures where the conventional coulometric titration technique fails because of too small chemical diffusion coefficients of the mobile component. This method for indirect coulometric titration is applied to silver selenide between -100 and 100 °C. The titration curves are analyzed on the basis of a defect chemical model an...

  7. Performance Limits and Opportunities for Low Temperature Thermal Desalination

    OpenAIRE

    Nayar, Kishor Govind; Swaminathan, Jaichander; Warsinger, David Elan Martin; Lienhard, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Conventional low temperature thermal desalination (LTTD) uses ocean thermal temperature gradients to drive a single stage flash distillation process to produce pure water from seawater. While the temperature difference in the ocean drives distillation and provides cooling in LTTD, external electrical energy is required to pump the water streams from the ocean and to maintain a near vacuum in the flash chamber. In this work, an LTTD process from the literature is compared against, the thermody...

  8. Low temperature specific heat anomalies in melanins and tumor melanosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizutani, U [Carnegie--Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh; Massalski, T B; McGinness, J E; Corry, P M

    1976-02-12

    Human malignant melanoma cells obtained at autopsy were used. Data indicate that melanins exhibit a large linear term (50-200 erg g/sup -1/K/sup -2/) and that they seem to undergo a phase transition as indicated by the heat capacity near 1.9/sup 0/K. A table is presented to show low temperature specific heat data for melanin samples. The measurements include two anomalies, a transition and an unusually high linear contribution. (HLW)

  9. Extraction of low-temperature tar by various alcohols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, N; Osawa, M; Azuma, H

    1948-01-01

    MeOH was the most effective of the alcohols tested (MeOH to pentanol) in extracting acid components from low-temperature tar. The optimum concentrations of MeOH were 70 to 80% for 1 extraction and 70 to 75% for repeated or continuous extractions when the solvent-tar ratio was 1:1. By 2 to 3 extractions neutral oil could be separated in about 90% yield including > 3% acidic oil.

  10. Low temperature radiation embrittlement for reactor vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginding, I.A.; Chirkina, L.A.

    1978-01-01

    General conceptions of cold brittleness of bcc metals are in a review. Considered are experimental data and theoretical representations about the effect of irradiation conditions, chemical composition, phase and structural constitutions, grain size, mechanical and thermomechanical treatments on low-temperature irradiation embrittlement of reactor vessel steels. Presented are the methods for increasing radiation stability of metals (carbon and Cr-Mo steels) used in manufacturing reactor vessels

  11. Low-temperature heating systems and public administration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerner, H

    1981-06-01

    The even temperature distribution and comfortable climate in rooms heated by low-temperature heating systems is mostly due to one of the preconditions of this type of heating system namely, efficient thermal insulation of the rooms. Thermal insulation is already required as part of the pertinent legal regulations but it is also in the interest of the builder-owner as it will, in the long run, greatly reduce the heating cost.

  12. Low-temperature strain gauges based on silicon whiskers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Druzhinin A. A.

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available To create low-temperature strain gauges based on p-type silicon whiskers tensoresistive characteristics of these crystals in 4,2—300 K temperature range were studied. On the basis of p-type Si whiskers with different resistivity the strain gauges for different materials operating at cryogenic temperatures with extremely high gauge factor at 4,2 K were developed, as well as strain gauges operating at liquid helium temperatures in high magnetic fields.

  13. Dynamics of implanted muons at low temperatures in white tin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solt, G.; Zimmermann, U.; Herlach, D.

    2008-01-01

    The low temperature lattice site of the implanted μ + particle and its subsequent delocalization at higher temperatures was investigated in single crystal white tin for 2 + was found to reside at the interstitial sites of type d. With increasing temperature thermally activated hopping sets in at T=48±2K, resulting in complete delocalization near 60 K. The activation energy for hopping, E a =113±15meV, is substantially higher than that found previously for the equally tetragonal indium

  14. Energy and exergy analysis of low temperature district heating network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hongwei; Svendsen, Svend

    2012-01-01

    Low temperature district heating with reduced network supply and return temperature provides better match of the low quality building heating demand and the low quality heating supply from waste heat or renewable energy. In this paper, a hypothetical low temperature district heating network is designed to supply heating for 30 low energy detached residential houses. The network operational supply/return temperature is set as 55 °C/25 °C, which is in line with a pilot project carried out in Denmark. Two types of in-house substations are analyzed to supply the consumer domestic hot water demand. The space heating demand is supplied through floor heating in the bathroom and low temperature radiators in the rest of rooms. The network thermal and hydraulic conditions are simulated under steady state. A district heating network design and simulation code is developed to incorporate the network optimization procedure and the network simultaneous factor. Through the simulation, the overall system energy and exergy efficiencies are calculated and the exergy losses for the major district heating system components are identified. Based on the results, suggestions are given to further reduce the system energy/exergy losses and increase the quality match between the consumer heating demand and the district heating supply. -- Highlights: ► Exergy and energy analysis for low and medium temperature district heating systems. ► Different district heating network dimensioning methods are analyzed. ► Major exergy losses are identified in the district heating network and the in-house substations. ► Advantages to apply low temperature district heating are highlighted through exergy analysis. ► The influence of thermal by-pass on system exergy/energy performance is analyzed.

  15. National Low-Temperature Neutron-Irradiation Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coltman, R.R. Jr.; Klabunde, C.E.; Young, F.W. Jr.

    1983-08-01

    The Materials Sciences Division of the United States Department of Energy will establish a National Low Temperature Neutron Irradiation Facility (NLTNIF) which will utilize the Bulk Shielding Reactor (BSR) located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The facility will provide high radiation intensities and special environmental and testing conditions for qualified experiments at no cost to users. This report describes the planned experimental capabilities of the new facility

  16. The future of the low temperature district heating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yingzhong; Wang Dazhong; Ma Changwen; Dong Duo; Tian Jiafu.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper, the role, development and situation of the low temperature district heating reactor (LTDHR) are briefly summarized. There are four types of LTDHR. They are PWR, reactor with boiling in the chimney, organic reactor and swimming pool reactor. The features of these reactors are introduced. The situation and role of the LTDHR in the future of the energy system are also discussed. The experiment on nuclear district heating with the swimming pool reactor in Qinghua Univ. is described briefly. (Author)

  17. Electron microscopic observation at low temperature on superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, Yasuhiro; Hashimoto, Hatsujiro; Yoshida, Hiroyuki.

    1991-01-01

    The authors have observed superconducting materials with a high resolution electron microscope at liquid helium temperature. First, observation was carried out on Nb system intermetallic compounds such as Nb 3 Al and Nb 3 Sn of Al 5 type and Nb 3 Ge of 11 type at extremely low temperature. Next, the observation of high temperature superconductive ceramics in the state of superconductivity was attempted. In this paper, first the development of the liquid helium sample holder for a 400 kV electron microscope to realize the observation is reported. Besides, the sample holder of Gatan Co. and an extremely low temperature, high resolution electron microscope with a superconducting lens are described. The purpose of carrying out the electron microscope observation of superconductors at low temperature is the direct observation of the crystalline lattice image in the state of superconductivity. Also the structural transformation from tetragonal crystals to rhombic crystals in Al 5 type superconductors can be observed. The results of observation are reported. (K.I.)

  18. Future directions in geobiology and low-temperature geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Katherine H.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    2011-01-01

    Humanity is confronted with an enormous challenge, as succinctly stated by the late Steven Schneider (2001; quoted by Jantzen 2004*): “Humans are forcing the Earth’s environmental systems to change at a rate that is more advanced than their knowledge of the consequences.” Geobiologists and low-temperature geochemists characterize material from the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere to understand processes operating within and between these components of the Earth system from the atomic to the planetary scale. For this reason, the interwoven disciplines of geobiology and low-temperature geochemistry are central to understanding and ultimately predicting the behavior of these life-sustaining systems. We present here comments and recommendations from the participants of a workshop entitled “Future Directions in Geobiology and Low-Temperature Geochemistry,” hosted by the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Geophysical Laboratory, Washington, DC, on 27–28 August 2010. The goal of the workshop was to suggest ways to leverage the vast intellectual and analytical capabilities of our diverse scientific community to characterize the Earth’s past, present, and future geochemical habitat as we enter the second decade of what E. O. Wilson dubbed “the century of the environment.”

  19. The 2017 Plasma Roadmap: Low temperature plasma science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovich, I.; Baalrud, S. D.; Bogaerts, A.; Bruggeman, P. J.; Cappelli, M.; Colombo, V.; Czarnetzki, U.; Ebert, U.; Eden, J. G.; Favia, P.; Graves, D. B.; Hamaguchi, S.; Hieftje, G.; Hori, M.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Kortshagen, U.; Kushner, M. J.; Mason, N. J.; Mazouffre, S.; Mededovic Thagard, S.; Metelmann, H.-R.; Mizuno, A.; Moreau, E.; Murphy, A. B.; Niemira, B. A.; Oehrlein, G. S.; Petrovic, Z. Lj; Pitchford, L. C.; Pu, Y.-K.; Rauf, S.; Sakai, O.; Samukawa, S.; Starikovskaia, S.; Tennyson, J.; Terashima, K.; Turner, M. M.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.; Vardelle, A.

    2017-08-01

    Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics published the first Plasma Roadmap in 2012 consisting of the individual perspectives of 16 leading experts in the various sub-fields of low temperature plasma science and technology. The 2017 Plasma Roadmap is the first update of a planned series of periodic updates of the Plasma Roadmap. The continuously growing interdisciplinary nature of the low temperature plasma field and its equally broad range of applications are making it increasingly difficult to identify major challenges that encompass all of the many sub-fields and applications. This intellectual diversity is ultimately a strength of the field. The current state of the art for the 19 sub-fields addressed in this roadmap demonstrates the enviable track record of the low temperature plasma field in the development of plasmas as an enabling technology for a vast range of technologies that underpin our modern society. At the same time, the many important scientific and technological challenges shared in this roadmap show that the path forward is not only scientifically rich but has the potential to make wide and far reaching contributions to many societal challenges.

  20. Low temperature storage test phase 2 : identification of problem species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-12-15

    The use of renewable fuels such as biodiesel, in motor vehicle fuels is expected to grow rapidly in North America as a result of governmental mandates. Biodiesel is a fuel component made from plant and animal feedstocks via a transesterification process. The fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) of biodiesel have cloud points that range from 5 degrees C to -15 degrees C. The poor low temperature performance of blends containing FAME must be understood in order to avoid operability issues. This paper presented the results of several testing programs conducted by researchers to investigate filter plugging in biodiesel fuels caused by high levels of saturated monoglycerides. The low temperature storage stability of 57 biodiesel fuels comprised of B5 and B20 made with canola methyl ester (CME), soybean methyl ester (SME), tallow methyl ester (TME) and palm methyl ester (PME) was investigated. Filter blocking tests were conducted to assess storage stability. Deposits from the blends were analyzed using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in order to identify the problem species. Results of the study confirmed the deleterious impact of saturated mono-glycerides in FAME on the low temperature operability of filters in fuel handling systems. 11 refs., 7 tabs., 5 figs. 9 appendices.

  1. Low-Temperature Co-Fired Unipoled Multilayer Piezoelectric Transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiangyu; Yan, Yongke; Carazo, Alfredo Vazquez; Dong, Shuxiang; Priya, Shashank

    2018-03-01

    The reliability of piezoelectric transformers (PTs) is dependent upon the quality of fabrication technique as any heterogeneity, prestress, or misalignment can lead to spurious response. In this paper, unipoled multilayer PTs were investigated focusing on high-power composition and co-firing profile in order to provide low-temperature synthesized high-quality device measured in terms of efficiency and power density. The addition of 0.2 wt% CuO into Pb 0.98 Sr 0.02 (Mg 1/3 Nb 2/3 ) 0.06 (Mn 1/3 Nb 2/3 ) 0.06 (Zr 0.48 Ti 0.52 ) 0.88 O 3 (PMMnN-PZT) reduces the co-firing temperature from 1240 °C to 930 °C, which allows the use of Ag/Pd inner electrode instead of noble Pt inner electrode. Low-temperature synthesized material was found to exhibit excellent piezoelectric properties ( , , %, pC/N, and °C). The performance of the PT co-fired with Ag/Pd electrode at 930 °C was similar to that co-fired at 1240 °C with Pt electrode (25% reduction in sintering temperature). Both high- and low-temperature synthesized PTs demonstrated 5-W output power with >90% efficiency and 11.5 W/cm 3 power density.

  2. Sucrose Phosphate Synthase and Sucrose Accumulation at Low Temperature 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Charles L.; Huber, Joan L. A.; Huber, Steven C.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of growth temperature on the free sugar and sucrose phosphate synthase content and activity of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaf tissue was studied. When plants were grown at 25°C for 3 weeks and then transferred to a constant 5°C, sucrose, glucose, and fructose accumulated to high levels during a 14-d period. Predawn sugar levels increased from 14- to 20-fold over the levels present at the outset of the low-temperature treatment. Sucrose was the most abundant free sugar before, during, and after exposure to 5°C. Leaf sucrose phosphate synthase activity was significantly increased by the low-temperature treatment, whereas sucrose synthase and invertases were not. Synthesis of the sucrose phosphate synthase subunit was increased during and after low-temperature exposure and paralleled an increase in the steady-state level of the subunit. The increases in sucrose and its primary biosynthetic enzyme, sucrose phosphate synthase, are discussed in relation to adjustment of metabolism to low nonfreezing temperature and freezing stress tolerance. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:16652990

  3. 12th International Workshop on Low Temperature Electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    The present volume of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series represents contributions from participants of the 12th International Workshop on Low Temperature Electronics held in Tempe, Arizona, USA from September 18-21, 2016. The conference was organized by the School of Earth and Space Exploration at Arizona State University.The International Workshop on Low Temperature Electronics (WOLTE) is a biennial conference devoted to the presentation and exchange of the most recent advances in the field of low temperature electronics and its applications. This international forum is open to everyone in the field.The technical program included oral presentations and posters on fundamental properties of cryogenic materials, cryogenic transistors, quantum devices and systems, astronomy and physics instrumentation, and fabrication of cryogenic devices. More than 50 scientists and engineers from various academic, government, and industrial institutions in Europe, Asia, and the Americas attended the conference.We would like to thank all speakers for their presentations and all attendees for their participation. We would also like to express our sincerest gratitude to our sponsors: Lake Shore Cryotronics, ASU NewSpace, ASU School of Earth and Space Exploration, and IRA A. Fulton Schools of Engineering for making this conference possible. (paper)

  4. The 2017 Plasma Roadmap: Low temperature plasma science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamovich, I; Baalrud, S D; Bogaerts, A; Bruggeman, P J; Cappelli, M; Colombo, V; Czarnetzki, U; Ebert, U; Eden, J G; Favia, P; Graves, D B; Hamaguchi, S; Hieftje, G; Hori, M

    2017-01-01

    Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics published the first Plasma Roadmap in 2012 consisting of the individual perspectives of 16 leading experts in the various sub-fields of low temperature plasma science and technology. The 2017 Plasma Roadmap is the first update of a planned series of periodic updates of the Plasma Roadmap. The continuously growing interdisciplinary nature of the low temperature plasma field and its equally broad range of applications are making it increasingly difficult to identify major challenges that encompass all of the many sub-fields and applications. This intellectual diversity is ultimately a strength of the field. The current state of the art for the 19 sub-fields addressed in this roadmap demonstrates the enviable track record of the low temperature plasma field in the development of plasmas as an enabling technology for a vast range of technologies that underpin our modern society. At the same time, the many important scientific and technological challenges shared in this roadmap show that the path forward is not only scientifically rich but has the potential to make wide and far reaching contributions to many societal challenges. (topical review)

  5. Low-temperature phase diagram of YbBiPt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Movshovich, R.; Lacerda, A.; Canfield, P.C.; Thompson, J.D.; Fisk, Z.

    1994-01-01

    Resistivity measurements are reported on the cubic heavy-fermion compound YbBiPt at ambient and hydrostatic pressures to ∼19 kbar and in magnetic fields to 1 T. The phase transition at T c =0.4 K is identified by a sharp rise in resistivity. That feature is used to build low-temperature H-T and P-T phase diagrams. The phase boundary in the H-T plane follows the weak-coupling BCS expression remarkably well from T c to T c /4, while small hydrostatic pressure of ∼1 kbar suppresses the low-temperature phase entirely. These effects of hydrostatic pressure and magnetic field on the phase transition are consistent with an spin-density-wave (SDW) formation in a very heavy electron band at T=0.4 K. Outside of the SDW phase at low temperature, hydrostatic pressure increases the T 2 coefficient of resistivity, signaling an increase in heavy-fermion correlations with hydrostatic pressure. The residual resistivity decreases with pressure, contrary to trends in other Yb heavy-fermion compounds

  6. Muon nuclear fusion and low temperature nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagamine, Kanetada

    1990-01-01

    Low temperature (or normal temperature) nuclear fusion is one of the phenomena causing nuclear fusion without requiring high temperature. In thermal nuclear fusion, the Coulomb barrier is overcome with the help of thermal energy, but in the low temperature nuclear fusion, the Coulomb barrier is neutralized by the introduction of the particles having larger mass than electrons and negative charges, at this time, if two nuclei can approach to the distance of 10 -13 cm in the neutral state, the occurrence of nuclear fusion reaction is expected. As the mass of the particles is heavier, the neutral region is smaller, and nuclear fusion is easy to occur. The particles to meet this purpose are the electrons within substances and muons. The research on muon nuclear fusion became suddenly active in the latter half of 1970s, the cause of which was the discovery of the fact that the formation of muons occurs resonantly rapidly in D-T and D-D systems. Muons are the unstable elementary particles having the life of 2.2 μs, and they can have positive and negative charges. In the muon catalyzed fusion, the muons with negative charge take part. The principle of the muon catalyzed fusion, its present status and future perspective, and the present status of low temperature nuclear fusion are reported. (K.I.)

  7. Low Temperature Graphene Synthesis from Poly(methyl methacrylate) Using Microwave Plasma Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takatoshi; Ishihara, Masatou; Hasegawa, Masataka

    2013-11-01

    A graphene film having low sheet resistance (600 Ω/sq.) was synthesized at low temperatures of 280 °C. Utilizing microwave plasma treatment, graphene films were synthesized from a solid phase on a copper surface. The full width at half maximum of the 2D-band in the Raman spectrum indicated that a high quality graphene film was formed. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy observation revealed that the deposited graphene films consisted of single- or double-layer graphene flakes of nanometer order on the Cu surface, which agrees with the estimated number of layers from an average optical transmittance of 96%.

  8. Gaseous diffusion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, G.A.; Shacter, J.

    1978-01-01

    A gaseous diffusion system is described comprising a plurality of diffusers connected in cascade to form a series of stages, each of the diffusers having a porous partition dividing it into a high pressure chamber and a low pressure chamber, and means for combining a portion of the enriched gas from a succeeding stage with a portion of the enriched gas from the low pressure chamber of each stage and feeding it into one extremity of the high pressure chamber thereof

  9. Effects of low temperature on the cold start gaseous emissions from light duty vehicles fuelled by ethanol-blended gasoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clairotte, M.; Adam, T.W.; Zardini, A.A.; Manfredi, U.; Martini, G.; Krasenbrink, A.; Vicet, A.; Tournié, E.; Astorga, C.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Most of the pollutants studied were emitted during the cold start of the vehicle. ► More carbonyls were associated with oxygenated fuel (E85–E75) than with E5. ► Acetaldehyde emissions were found particularly enhanced at −7 °C with E75. ► Elevated methane and ozone precursor emissions were measured at −7 °C with E75. ► Ammonia and toluene emissions associated to E75–E85 were lower than with E5. -- Abstract: According to directives 2003/30/EC and 2009/28/EC of the European Parliament and the Council, Member States should promote the use of biofuel. Consequently, since 2011 all fuels on the market used for transport purpose must contain a fraction of 5.75% renewable energy sources. Ethanol in gasoline is a promising solution to reach this objective. In addition to decrease the dependence on fossil fuel, ethanol contributes to reducing air pollutant emissions during combustion (carbon monoxide and total hydrocarbons), and has a positive effect on greenhouse gas emissions. These considerations rely on numerous emission studies performed in standard conditions (20–30 °C), however, very few emission data are available for cold ambient temperatures, as they prevail in winter times in e.g., Northern Europe. This paper presents a chassis dynamometer study examining the effect of ethanol (E75–E85) versus gasoline (E5) at standard and low ambient temperatures (22 °C and −7 °C, respectively). Emissions of modern passenger cars complying with the latest European standards (Euro4 and Euro5a) were recorded over the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) and the Common Artemis Driving Cycle (CADC). Unregulated compounds such as methane, ammonia, and small chain hydrocarbons were monitored by an online Fourier Transformed Infra-Red spectrometer. In addition, a number of ozone precursors (carbonyls and volatile organic hydrocarbons) were collected and analyzed offline by liquid and gas chromatography in order to evaluate the ozone formation potential (OFP) of the exhaust. Results showed higher unregulated emissions at −7 °C than at 22 °C, regardless of the ethanol content in the fuel blend. More carbonyls were associated with oxygenated fuel, and acetaldehyde emissions were found particularly enhanced at −7 °C with E75. In addition, elevated methane emission was measured at low ambient temperature when ethanol fuel was used. Moreover, the OFP of the exhaust gas at −7 °C increased with the amount of ethanol in gasoline when the cold start excess emissions were included. However, regardless of the ambient temperature, the ammonia and toluene emissions associated to E75–E85 were lower than with E5.

  10. Power generation from low-temperature heat source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakew, Amlaku Abie

    2012-07-01

    The potential of low-temperature heat sources for power production has been discussed for decades. The diversity and availability of low-temperature heat sources makes it interesting for power production. The thermodynamic power cycle is one of the promising technologies to produce electricity from low-temperature heat sources. There are different working fluids to be used in a thermodynamic power cycle. Working fluid selection is essential for the performance of the power cycle. Over the last years, different working fluid screening criteria have been used. In broad speaking the screening criteria can be grouped as thermodynamic performance, component size requirement, economic performance, safety and environmental impact. Screening of working fluids at different heat source temperatures (80-200 Celsius degrees) using thermodynamic performance (power output and exergy efficiency) and component size (heat exchanger and turbine) is investigated. It is found that the 'best' working fluid depends on the criteria used and heat source temperature level. Transcritical power cycles using carbon dioxide as a working fluid is studied to produce power at 100 Celsius degrees. Carbon dioxide is an environmentally friendly refrigerant. The global warming potential of carbon dioxide is 1. Furthermore, because of its low critical temperature (31 Celsius degrees), carbon dioxide can operate in a transcritical power cycle for lower heat source temperatures. A transcritical configuration avoids the problem of pinching which otherwise would happened in subcritical power cycle. In the process, better temperature matching is achieved and more heat is extracted. Thermodynamic analysis of transcritical cycle is performed; it is found that there is an optimal operating pressure for highest net power output. The pump work is a sizable fraction of the work produced by the turbine. The effect of efficiency deterioration of the pump and the turbine is compared. When the

  11. Fatigue limit of polycrystalline zirconium oxide ceramics: Effect of grinding and low-temperature aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, G K R; Silvestri, T; Amaral, M; Rippe, M P; Kleverlaan, C J; Valandro, L F

    2016-08-01

    The following study aimed to evaluate the effect of grinding and low-temperature aging on the fatigue limit of Y-TZP ceramics for frameworks and monolithic restorations. Disc specimens from each ceramic material, Lava Frame (3M ESPE) and Zirlux FC (Ivoclar Vivadent) were manufactured according to ISO:6872-2008 and assigned in accordance with two factors: (1) "surface treatment"-without treatment (as-sintered, Ctrl), grinding with coarse diamond bur (181µm; Grinding); and (2) "low-temperature aging (LTD)" - presence and absence. Grinding was performed using a contra-angle handpiece under constant water-cooling. LTD was simulated in an autoclave at 134°C under 2-bar pressure for 20h. Mean flexural fatigue limits (20,000 cycles) were determined under sinusoidal loading using stair case approach. For Lava ceramic, it was observed a statistical increase after grinding procedure and different behavior after LTD stimuli (Ctrllow-temperature aging promoted a statistical increase in the fatigue limit (Ctrllow temperature aging did not damage the fatigue limit values significantly for both materials evaluated, even though those conditions promoted increase in m-phase. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Generation of Hydrogen and Methane during Experimental Low-Temperature Reaction of Ultramafic Rocks with Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollom, Thomas M.; Donaldson, Christopher

    2016-06-01

    Serpentinization of ultramafic rocks is widely recognized as a source of molecular hydrogen (H2) and methane (CH4) to support microbial activity, but the extent and rates of formation of these compounds in low-temperature, near-surface environments are poorly understood. Laboratory experiments were conducted to examine the production of H2 and CH4 during low-temperature reaction of water with ultramafic rocks and minerals. Experiments were performed by heating olivine or harzburgite with aqueous solutions at 90°C for up to 213 days in glass bottles sealed with butyl rubber stoppers. Although H2 and CH4 increased steadily throughout the experiments, the levels were very similar to those found in mineral-free controls, indicating that the rubber stoppers were the predominant source of these compounds. Levels of H2 above background were observed only during the first few days of reaction of harzburgite when CO2 was added to the headspace, with no detectable production of H2 or CH4 above background during further heating of the harzburgite or in experiments with other mineral reactants. Consequently, our results indicate that production of H2 and CH4 during low-temperature alteration of ultramafic rocks may be much more limited than some recent experimental studies have suggested. We also found no evidence to support a recent report suggesting that spinels in ultramafic rocks may stimulate H2 production. While secondary silicates were observed to precipitate during the experiments, formation of these deposits was dominated by Si released by dissolution of the glass bottles, and reaction of the primary silicate minerals appeared to be very limited. While use of glass bottles and rubber stoppers has become commonplace in experiments intended to study processes that occur during serpentinization of ultramafic rocks at low temperatures, the high levels of H2, CH4, and SiO2 released during heating indicate that these reactor materials are unsuitable for this purpose.

  13. Improved Thermal-Insulation Systems for Low Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, James E.; Augustynowicz, Stanislaw D.

    2003-01-01

    Improved thermal-insulation materials and structures and the techniques for manufacturing them are undergoing development for use in low-temperature applications. Examples of low-temperature equipment for which these thermal insulation systems could provide improved energy efficiency include storage tanks for cryogens, superconducting electric-power-transmission equipment, containers for transport of food and other perishable commodities, and cold boxes for low-temperature industrial processes. These systems could also be used to insulate piping used to transfer cryogens and other fluids, such as liquefied natural gas, refrigerants, chilled water, crude oil, or low-pressure steam. The present thermal-insulation systems are layer composites based partly on the older class of thermal-insulation systems denoted generally as multilayer insulation (MLI). A typical MLI structure includes an evacuated jacket, within which many layers of radiation shields are stacked or wrapped close together. Low-thermal-conductivity spacers are typically placed between the reflection layers to keep them from touching. MLI can work very well when a high vacuum level (less than 10(exp-4) torr) is maintained and utmost care is taken during installation, but its thermal performance deteriorates sharply as the pressure in the evacuated space rises into the soft vacuum range [pressures greater than 0.1 torr (greater than 13 Pa)]. In addition, the thermal performance of MLI is extremely sensitive to mechanical compression and edge effects and can easily decrease from one to two orders of magnitude from its ideal value even when the MLI is kept under high vacuum condition. The present thermal-insulation systems are designed to perform well under soft vacuum level, in particular the range of 1 to 10 torr. They are also designed with larger interlayer spacings to reduce vulnerability to compression (and consequent heat leak) caused by installation and use. The superiority of these systems is the

  14. Low-Temperature Baseboard Heaters in Built Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ploskic, Adnan

    2010-10-15

    The European Union has adopted a plan to decrease 20 % of total energy consumption through improved energy efficiency by 2020. One way of achieving this challenging goal may be to use efficient water-based heating systems supplied by heat pumps or other sustainable systems. The goal of this research was to analyze and improve the thermal performance of water-based baseboard heaters at low-temperature water supply. Both numerical (CFD) and analytical simulations were used to investigate the heat efficiency of the system. An additional objective of this work was to ensure that the indoor thermal comfort was satisfied in spaces served by such a low-temperature heating system. Analyses showed that it was fully possible to cover both transmission and ventilation heat losses using baseboard heaters supplied by 45 deg C water flow. The conventional baseboards, however, showed problems in suppressing the cold air down-flow created by 2.0 m high glazing and an outdoor temperature of -12 deg C. The draught discomfort at ankle level was slightly above the upper limit recommended by international and national standards. On the other hand, thermal baseboards with integrated ventilation air supply showed better ability to neutralize cold downdraught at the same height and conditions. Calculations also showed that the heat output from the integrated system with one ventilation inlet was approximately twice as high as that of the conventional one. The general conclusion from this work was that low temperature baseboards, especially with integrated ventilation air supply, are an efficient heating system and able to be combined with devices that utilize the low-quality sustainable energy sources such as heat pumps

  15. Silk-Quality, Spinnability and Low Temperature Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-02

    inert  atmosphere  (N2   gas   flow  rate  of  100  mL/min).  Changes   in  weight  percentage  during   temperature...Performance 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 01-06-2012 to 31-05-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Silk-Quality, Spinnability and Low Temperature Behaviour 5a...deploy the huge range in mechanical behaviour between different silk species and intra-species varieties. In particular, I set out to formulate a

  16. Design for ASIC reliability for low-temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan; Mojaradi, Mohammad; Westergard, Lynett; Billman, Curtis; Cozy, Scott; Burke, Gary; Kolawa, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present a methodology to design for reliability for low temperature applications without requiring process improvement. The developed hot carrier aging lifetime projection model takes into account both the transistor substrate current profile and temperature profile to determine the minimum transistor size needed in order to meet reliability requirements. The methodology is applicable for automotive, military, and space applications, where there can be varying temperature ranges. A case study utilizing this methodology is given to design for reliability into a custom application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for a Mars exploration mission.

  17. Engineered Nanostructured MEA Technology for Low Temperature Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yimin

    2009-07-16

    The objective of this project is to develop a novel catalyst support technology based on unique engineered nanostructures for low temperature fuel cells which: (1) Achieves high catalyst activity and performance; (2) Improves catalyst durability over current technologies; and (3) Reduces catalyst cost. This project is directed at the development of durable catalysts supported by novel support that improves the catalyst utilization and hence reduce the catalyst loading. This project will develop a solid fundamental knowledge base necessary for the synthetic effort while at the same time demonstrating the catalyst advantages in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFCs).

  18. Design and Modelling of Small Scale Low Temperature Power Cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wronski, Jorrit

    he work presented in this report contributes to the state of the art within design and modelling of small scale low temperature power cycles. The study is divided into three main parts: (i) fluid property evaluation, (ii) expansion device investigations and (iii) heat exchanger performance......-oriented Modelica code and was included in the thermo Cycle framework for small scale ORC systems. Special attention was paid to the valve system and a control method for variable expansion ratios was introduced based on a cogeneration scenario. Admission control based on evaporator and condenser conditions...

  19. Characterization of commercial supercapacitors for low temperature applications

    OpenAIRE

    Iwama, Etsuro; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Azais, Philippe; Brégeon, Laurent; Simon, Patrice

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Electrochemical characterizations at low temperature and floating tests have been performed on 600F commercial supercapacitor (SC) for acetonitrile (AN)-based and AN + methyl acetate (MA) mixed electrolytes. From −40 to +20 °C, AN electrolyte showed slightly higher capacitance than those of AN + MA mixed electrolytes (25 and 33 vol.% of MA). At −55 °C, however, AN electrolyte did not cycle at all, while MA mixed electrolyte normally cycled with a slight decrease in the...

  20. Low temperature catalytic combustion of natural gas - hydrogen - air mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newson, E; Roth, F von; Hottinger, P; Truong, T B [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The low temperature catalytic combustion of natural gas - air mixtures would allow the development of no-NO{sub x} burners for heating and power applications. Using commercially available catalysts, the room temperature ignition of methane-propane-air mixtures has been shown in laboratory reactors with combustion efficiencies over 95% and maximum temperatures less than 700{sup o}C. After a 500 hour stability test, severe deactivation of both methane and propane oxidation functions was observed. In cooperation with industrial partners, scaleup to 3 kW is being investigated together with startup dynamics and catalyst stability. (author) 3 figs., 3 refs.

  1. New insights in the low-temperature oxidation of acetylene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Bing-Yin; Liu, Yue-Xi; Weng, Jun-Jie

    2017-01-01

    This work presents new experimental data of C2H2 low-temperature oxidation for equivalence ratios Φ= 0.5–3.0 in a newly designed jet-stirred reactor over a temperature range of 600–1100K at atmospheric pressure with residence time corresponding from 1.94 to 1.06s. Mole fraction profiles of 17...... intermediates including aromatic compounds such as toluene, styrene and ethylbenzene were quantified. A detailed kinetic mechanism involving 295 species and 1830 reactions was established to predict the oxidation of C2H2 and formation of PAH. In developing the mechanism, particular attention was paid...

  2. A low temperature aluminizing treatment of hot work tool steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matijevic, B., E-mail: bozidar.matijevic@fsb.hr [University of Zagreb, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2010-07-01

    Conventional aluminizing processes by pack cementation are typically carried out at elevated temperatures. A low temperature powder aluminizing technology was applied to hot tool steel H13. The aluminizing treating temperature was from 550 to 620°C. Effects of temperature and time on the microstructure and phase evolution were investigated. Also, the intermetallic layer thickness was measured in the aluminized layer of a steel substrate. The cross-sectional microstructures, the aluminized layer thickness and the oxide layer were studied. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), glow discharge optical spectroscopy (GDOS) were applied to observe the cross-sections and the distribution of elements. (author)

  3. A LOW TEMPERATURE ALUMINIZING TREATMENT OF HOT WORK TOOL STEEL

    OpenAIRE

    Matijević, Božidar

    2013-01-01

    Conventional aluminizing processes by pack cementation are typically carried out at elevated temperatures. A low temperature powder aluminizing technology was applied to the X40CrMoV5-1 hot tool steel. The aluminizing temperature was from 550 °C to 620 °C. Effects of temperature and time on the microstructure and phase evolution were investigated. Also, the intermetallic layer thickness was measured in the aluminized layer of a steel substrate. The cross-sectional microstructures, the alumini...

  4. Postmortem magnetic resonance imaging dealing with low temperature objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Tomoya; Shiotani, Seiji; Isobe, Tomonori

    2010-01-01

    In Japan, the medical examiner system is not widespread, the rate of autopsy is low, and many medical institutions therefore perform postmortem imaging using clinical equipment. Postmortem imaging is performed to clarify cause of death, select candidates for autopsy, make a guide map for autopsy, or provide additional information for autopsy. Findings are classified into 3 categories: cause of death and associated changes, changes induced by cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and postmortem changes. Postmortem magnetic resonance imaging shows characteristic changes in signal intensity related to low body temperature after death; they are low temperature images. (author)

  5. Sea water desalination utilizing waste heat by low temperature evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raha, A.; Srivastava, A.; Rao, I.S.; Majumdar, M.; Srivastava, V.K.; Tewari, P.K.

    2007-01-01

    Economics of a process is controlled by management of energy and resources. Fresh water has become most valued resource in industries. Desalination is a process by which fresh water resource is generated from sea water or brackish water, but it is an energy intensive process. The energy cost contributes around 25-40% to the total cost of the desalted water. Utilization of waste heat from industrial streams is one of the ecofriendly ways to produce low cost desalted water. Keeping this in mind Low Temperature Evaporation (LTE) desalination technology utilizing low quality waste heat in the form of hot water (as low as 50 deg C) or low pressure steam (0.13 bar) has been developed for offshore and land based applications to produce high purity water (conductivity < 2μS/cm) from sea water. The probability of the scale formation is practically eliminated by operating it at low temperature and controlling the brine concentration. It also does not require elaborate chemical pretreatment of sea water except chlorination, so it has no environmental impact. LTE technology has found major applications in nuclear reactors where large quantity of low quality waste heat is available to produce high quality desalted water for make up water requirement replacing conventional ion exchange process. Successful continuous operation of 30 Te/day LTE desalination plant utilizing waste heat from nuclear research reactor has demonstrated the safety, reliability, extreme plant availability and economics of nuclear desalination by LTE technology. It is also proposed to utilize waste heat from Main Heat Transport (MHT) purification circuit of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) to produce about 250 Te/ day high quality desalinated water by Low Temperature Evaporation (LTE) process for the reactor make up and plant utilization. Recently we have commissioned a 50 Te/day 2-effect low temperature desalination plant with cooling tower where the specific energy and cooling water requirement are

  6. Programming Enhancements for Low Temperature Thermal Decomposition Workstation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igou, R.E.

    1998-10-01

    This report describes a new control-and-measurement system design for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant's Low Temperature Thermal Decomposition (LTTD) process. The new design addresses problems with system reliability stemming from equipment obsolescence and addresses specific functional improvements that plant production personnel have identified, as required. The new design will also support new measurement techniques, which the Y-12 Development Division has identified for future operations. The new techniques will function in concert with the original technique so that process data consistency is maintained.

  7. Aspects of Low Temperature Irradiation in Neutron Activation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brune, D.

    1968-08-01

    Neutron irradiation of the sample while frozen in a cooling device inserted in a reactor channel has been carried out in the analysis of iodine in aqueous samples as well as of mercury in biological tissue and water. For the simultaneous irradiation of a large number of aqueous solutions the samples were arranged in a suitable geometry in order to avoid mutual flux perturbation effects. The influence of the neutron temperature on the activation process has been discussed. Potential applications of the low temperature irradiation technique are outlined

  8. The Fungal Spores Survival Under the Low-Temperature Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soušková, Hana; Scholtz, V.; Julák, J.; Savická, D.

    This paper presents an experimental apparatus for the decontamination and sterilization of water suspension of fungal spores. The fungicidal effect of stabilized positive and negative corona discharges on four fungal species Aspergillus oryzae, Clacosporium sphaerospermum, Penicillium crustosum and Alternaria sp. was studied. Simultaneously, the slower growing of exposed fungal spores was observed. The obtained results are substantially different in comparison with those of the analogous experiments performed with bacteria. It may be concluded that fungi are more resistant to the low-temperature plasma.

  9. Utilization of low temperature heat for environmentally friendly electricity production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jesper Graa; Elmegaard, Brian; Haglind, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    the benefits of using mixtures compared to pure fluids as working fluids in organic Rankine cycles. In order to do so, thermodynamic and economic analyses are carried out, first on an overall cycle level, and next on component level including detailed modelling of heat exchangers, pumps and expanders involving...... project collaborators with expertise in these areas. In addition to this, novel innovative cycle layouts are developed with the aim of increasing the economic feasibility of utilizing low temperature heat. As an example, this can be achieved by implementing separators in the power cycle to create optimal...

  10. Peculiarities of luminescence of low-temperature-deformed cadmium sulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negrij, V.D.; Osip' yan, Yu.A. (AN SSSR, Chernogolovka. Inst. Fiziki Tverdogo Tela)

    1982-02-01

    Spatially resolved photoluminescence of CdS crystals deformed at low temperatures is investigated. It is revealed that production and movement of certain dislocations, i. e. microplastic deformation take place in the crystal under the effect of uniaxial loading F >= 10 kG/mm/sup 3/ at 6 K. Dislocations during their movement in the sliding planes produce specific defects in the crystalline lattice which, being the effective centres of irradiation recombination with characteristic radiation spectrum are presented in the form of luminescent traces which passed through the dislocation crystal. A group of symmetry of these centers is determined by means of piesospectroscopic investigations of the obtained radiation spectrum.

  11. A low temperature aluminizing treatment of hot work tool steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matijevic, B.

    2010-01-01

    Conventional aluminizing processes by pack cementation are typically carried out at elevated temperatures. A low temperature powder aluminizing technology was applied to hot tool steel H13. The aluminizing treating temperature was from 550 to 620°C. Effects of temperature and time on the microstructure and phase evolution were investigated. Also, the intermetallic layer thickness was measured in the aluminized layer of a steel substrate. The cross-sectional microstructures, the aluminized layer thickness and the oxide layer were studied. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), glow discharge optical spectroscopy (GDOS) were applied to observe the cross-sections and the distribution of elements. (author)

  12. Industrial applications of low-temperature plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, F.F.

    1995-01-01

    The application of plasma physics to the manufacturing and processing of materials may be the new frontier of our discipline. Already partially ionized discharges are used in industry, and the performance of plasmas has a large commercial and technological impact. However, the science of low-temperature plasmas is not as well developed as that of high-temperature, collisionless plasmas. In this paper several major areas of application are described and examples of forefront problems in each are given. The underlying thesis is that gas discharges have evolved beyond a black art, and that intellectually challenging problems with elegant solutions can be found. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  13. Low-temperature catalytic conversion of carbonaceous materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabakaev Roman B.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Laws of the rate of carbon conversion in steam atmosphere at a temperature in modes of the catalytic low-temperature treatment of peat, brown coal, semi-coke from peat and brown coal are obtained by experiments. Increasing of the rate of carbon conversion in temperature range up to 500 °C is achieved by using of catalysts. The possibility of using results is associated with the burners, a working zone of which is porous filling from carbonaceous particles.

  14. Programming Enhancements for Low Temperature Thermal Decomposition Workstation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igou, R.E.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes a new control-and-measurement system design for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant's Low Temperature Thermal Decomposition (LTTD) process. The new design addresses problems with system reliability stemming from equipment obsolescence and addresses specific functional improvements that plant production personnel have identified, as required. The new design will also support new measurement techniques, which the Y-12 Development Division has identified for future operations. The new techniques will function in concert with the original technique so that process data consistency is maintained

  15. Aspects of Low Temperature Irradiation in Neutron Activation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brune, D

    1968-08-15

    Neutron irradiation of the sample while frozen in a cooling device inserted in a reactor channel has been carried out in the analysis of iodine in aqueous samples as well as of mercury in biological tissue and water. For the simultaneous irradiation of a large number of aqueous solutions the samples were arranged in a suitable geometry in order to avoid mutual flux perturbation effects. The influence of the neutron temperature on the activation process has been discussed. Potential applications of the low temperature irradiation technique are outlined.

  16. Developmental Testing of Liquid and Gaseous/Vaporous Decontamination on Bacterial Spores and Other Biological Warfare Agents on Military Relevant Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-11

    Vaporous Decontamination on Bacterial Spores and Other Biological Warfare Agents on Military-Relevant Surfaces 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT... DECONTAMINATION ON BACTERIAL SPORES AND OTHER BIOLOGICAL WARFARE AGENTS ON MILITARY-RELEVANT SURFACES Page Paragraph 1. SCOPE...surfaces before and after decontamination . The protocol in this TOP is based on the developed test methodologies from Edgewood Chemical Biological

  17. Upgrading biogas by a low-temperature CO2 removal techni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M.I. Yousef

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Biogas, a renewable energy source, is primarily composed of methane and carbon dioxide and other gaseous species. Biogas upgrading for removing CO2 from raw biogas is a necessary step before the biogas to be used as vehicle fuel or injected into the natural gas grid. Therefore, the present work aimed to propose a low-temperature CO2 removal process as an alternative to the conventional biogas upgrading technologies (water scrubbing, chemical and physical scrubbing, membranes and Pressure swing adsorption. A typical model biogas mixture of 60 mol.% CH4 and 40 mol.% CO2 is considered. The present process showed that a product purity of 94.5 mol.% CH4 is obtained from compressed biogas by combining distillation, flash separation, auxiliary refrigeration and internal heat recovery with a potential specific energy consumption of 0.26 kW h/Nm3 raw biogas. The process has been simulated in Aspen HYSYS with avoiding the occurrence of CO2 freeze-out. The process delivers the captured CO2 in liquid form with a purity of 99.7 mol.% as a by-product for transport at 110 bar. It is concluded that the proposed upgrading process can serve as a new environmentally friendly approach to CO2 removal with an interesting energy-efficient alternative to the conventional upgrading techniques.

  18. Development of iodine waste forms using low-temperature sintering glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumhansl, James Lee; Nenoff, Tina Maria; Garino, Terry J.; Rademacher, David

    2010-01-01

    This presentation will describe our recent work on the use of low temperature-sintering glass powders mixed with either AgI or AgI-zeolite to produce a stable waste form. Radioactive iodine ( 129 I, half-life of 1.6 x 10 7 years) is generated in the nuclear fuel cycle and is of particular concern due to its extremely long half-life and its effects on human health. As part of the DOE/NE Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), the separation of 129 I from spent fuel during fuel reprocessing is being studied. In the spent fuel reprocessing scheme under consideration, the iodine is released in gaseous form and collected using Ag-loaded zeolites, to form AgI. Although AgI has extremely low solubility in water, it has a relatively high vapor pressure at moderate temperatures (>550 C), thus limiting the thermal processing. Because of this, immobilization using borosilicate glass is not feasible. Therefore, a bismuth oxide-based glasses are being studied due to the low solubility of bismuth oxide in aqueous solution at pH > 7. These waste forms were processed at 500 C, where AgI volatility is low but the glass powder is able to first densify by viscous sintering and then crystallize. Since the glass is not melted, a more chemically stable glass can be used. The AgI-glass mixture was found to have high iodine leach resistance in these initial studies.

  19. Fabrication and Characterization of Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers with Low-Temperature Wafer Direct Bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a fabrication method of capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs by wafer direct bonding, which utilizes both the wet chemical and O2plasma activation processes to decrease the bonding temperature to 400 °C. Two key surface properties, the contact angle and surface roughness, are studied in relation to the activation processes, respectively. By optimizing the surface activation parameters, a surface roughness of 0.274 nm and a contact angle of 0° are achieved. The infrared images and static deflection of devices are assessed to prove the good bonding effect. CMUTs having silicon membranes with a radius of 60 μm and a thickness of 2 μm are fabricated. Device properties have been characterized by electrical and acoustic measurements to verify their functionality and thus to validate this low-temperature process. A resonant frequency of 2.06 MHz is obtained by the frequency response measurements. The electrical insertion loss and acoustic signal have been evaluated. This study demonstrates that the CMUT devices can be fabricated by low-temperature wafer direct bonding, which makes it possible to integrate them directly on top of integrated circuit (IC substrates.

  20. Low-temperature thermal properties of yttrium and lutetium dodecaborides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czopnik, A; Shitsevalova, N; Pluzhnikov, V; Krivchikov, A; Paderno, Yu; Onuki, Y

    2005-01-01

    The heat capacity (C p ) and dilatation (α) of YB 12 and LuB 12 are studied. C p of the zone-melted YB 12 tricrystal is measured in the range 2.5-70 K, of the zone-melted LuB 12 single crystal in the range 0.6-70 K, and of the LuB 12 powder sample in the range 4.3-300 K; α of the zone-melted YB 12 tricrystal and LuB 12 single crystals is measured in the range 5-200 K. At low temperatures a negative thermal expansion (NTE) is revealed for both compounds: for YB 12 at 50-70 K, for LuB 12 at 10-20 K and 60-130 K. Their high-temperature NTE is a consequence of nearly non-interacting freely oscillating metal ions (Einstein oscillators) in cavities of a simple cubic rigid Debye lattice formed by B 12 cage units. The Einstein temperatures are ∼254 and ∼164 K, and the Debye temperatures are ∼1040 K and ∼1190 K for YB 12 and LuB 12 respectively. The LuB 12 low-temperature NTE is connected with an induced low-energy defect mode. The YB 12 superconducting transition has not been detected up to 2.5 K

  1. NTD germanium: a novel material for low-temperature bolometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, E.E.; Palaio, N.P.; Rodder, M.; Hansen, W.L.; Kreysa, E.

    1982-06-01

    Six samples of ultra-pure (absolute value N/sub A/ - N/sub D/ absolute value less than or equal to 10 11 cm -3 ), single-crystal germanium have been neutron transmutation doped with neutron doses between 7.5 x 10 16 and 1.88 x 10 18 cm -2 . After thermal annealing at 400 0 C for six hours in a pure argon atmosphere, the samples have been characterized with Hall effect and resistivity measurements between 300 and 0.3 K. Our results show that the resistivity in the low temperature, hopping conduction regime can be approximated with rho = rho 0 exp(Δ/T). The three more heavily doped samples show values for rho 0 and Δ ranging from 430 to 3.3 Ω cm and from 4.9 to 2.8 K, respectively. The excellent reproducibility of neutron transmutation doping and the values of rho 0 and Δ make NTD Ge a prime candidate for the fabrication of low temperature, low noise bolometers. The large variation in the tabulated values of the thermal neutron cross sections for the different germanium isotopes makes it clear that accurate measurements of these cross-sections for well defined neutron energy spectra would be highly desirable

  2. Three-particle recombination at low temperature: QED approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Roy, A.

    2001-01-01

    A theoretical study of three-body recombination of proton in presence of a spectator electron with electronic beam at near-zero temperature is presented using field theory and invariant Lorentz gauge. Contributions from the Feynman diagrams of different orders give an insight into the physics of the phenomena. Recombination rate coefficient is obtained for low lying principal quantum number n = 1 to 10. At a fixed ion beam temperature (300 K) recombination rate coefficient is found to increase in general with n, having a flat and a sharp peak at quantum states 3 to 5, respectively. In absence of any theoretical and experimental results for low temperature formation of H-atom by three-body recombination at low lying quantum states, we have presented the theoretical results of Stevefelt and group for three-body recombination of deuteron with electron along with the present results. Three-body recombination of antihydrogen in antiproton-positron plasma is expected to yield similar result as that for three-body recombination of hydrogen formation in proton-electron plasma. The necessity for experimental investigation of low temperature three-body recombination at low quantum states is stressed. (author)

  3. Measured Performance of a Low Temperature Air Source Heat Pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R. K. [Johnson Research LLC, Pueblo West, CO (United States)

    2013-09-01

    A 4-ton Low Temperature Heat Pump (LTHP) manufactured by Hallowell International was installed in a residence near New Haven, Connecticut and monitored over two winters of operation. After attending to some significant service issues, the heat pump operated as designed. This report should be considered a review of the dual compressor 'boosted heat pump' technology. The Low Temperature Heat Pumpsystem operates with four increasing levels of capacity (heat output) as the outdoor temperature drops. The system was shown to select capacity correctly, supplying the appropriate amount of heat to the house across the full range of outdoor temperatures. The system's Coefficient of Performance (Seasonal COP, or SCOP) over two entire winters was calculated, based on measured data, to be 3.29over the first winter and 2.68 over the second winter. A second seasonal efficiency calculation by a different method yielded a SCOP of 2.78 for the first winter and 2.83 for the second winter. This second seasonal efficiency calculation was determined by comparing measured heat pump energy use to the in situ energy use with resistance heat alone. This method is the ratio of the slopes of thedaily energy use load lines.

  4. Low temperature irradiation facility at Kyoto University Reactor (KUR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atobe, Kozo; Okada, Moritami; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Kodaka, Hisao; Miyata, Kiyomi.

    1977-01-01

    A new refrigeration system has been substituted to the low temperature irradiation facility at KUR instead of the previous one, since April in 1975. The model 1204 CTi He liquifier was designed to be modified for the refrigerator with the capacity of 30 watts at 10 K. The refrigeration capacity of 38 watts at 10 K was defined using a special cryostat and transfer-tubes, and the lowest temperature of about 18 K was measured using the irradiation loop without reactor operation. The reconstructed facility enables us to hold the many specimens simultaneously in the sample chamber of the irradiation loop at about 25 K during reactor operation of 5 MW. The irradiation dose has been reached about 6.6 x 10 16 n sub(f)/cm 2 and 6.1 x 10 17 n sub(th)/cm 2 with the normal reactor operation cycle of up to 77 hours. The stable operation condition of the machine and the special safety system for the refrigeration system enable us to maintain easily the facility with a constant operation condition for such a long time irradiation. Many kinds of low temperature neutron irradiation experiments are carried out using the facility, which techniques are partially reported. (auth.)

  5. Low-temperature tar and oil: properties and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinze, R

    1942-01-01

    In Germany the value of low-temperature tar is largely dependent on its fuel fractions; these vary with the coal and the method of carbonization (external heating or recirculated gases). Brown-coal tars can be processed by distillation, cracking under pressure, hydrogenation under pressure (largest volume of tar is processed by this method) and by solvent extraction, with EtOH, SO/sub 2/, or phenol. Each of these processes is discussed in detail. In the pressure-hydrogenation process, 1.25 kilogram of brown-coal tar yields approximately 1 kilogram of gasoline with an octane number of 60 to 70. Low-temperature tars from bituminous coals can be hydrogenated readily but are not well adapted to solvent extraction. Attempts should be made to produce tar approximating the desired characteristics for fuel directly from the carbonizing apparatus. For laboratory carbonization tests, an approximation to results secured by externally heated retorts is secured by using an insert consisting of a series of perforated trays in the 200-gram Fischer aluminum retort; this reduces the capacity to 100 gram. Fractional condensation is used to separate heavy oil, middle oil, and liquor; low-boiling products are condensed at -20/sup 0/ by solid CO/sub 2/.

  6. Brittle fracture tests at low temperature for transport cask materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosaki, Akio; Ito, Chihiro; Arai, Taku; Saegusa, Toshiari

    1993-01-01

    The IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material were revised in 1985, and brittle fracture assessment at low temperature for transport packages are now required. This report discusses the applicability of the actual method for brittle fracture assessment of type-B transport cask materials used in JAPAN. The necessity of brittle fracture assessment at low temperature was estimated for each material of type-B transport casks used in Japan and the applicability was investigated. Dynamic fracture toughness values, K Id (J Id ), and RT NDT values of Low-Mn Carbon Steels, that are SA 350 Gr.LF1 Modify and SA 516 Gr.70 material which used in type-B transport cask body, were also obtained to check whether or not an easier and conventional test method, that prescribed in ASME CODE SECTION III, can be substituted for the dynamic fracture test method. And for bolt materials, which include 1.8Ni-0.8Cr-0.3Mo Carbon Steel and type 630 H Stainless Steel, toughness data were obtained for reference. (J.P.N.)

  7. Analysis of optimal design of low temperature economizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, J. H.; Wang, S.

    2017-11-01

    This paper has studied the Off-design characteristic of low temperature economizer system based on thermodynamics analysis. Based on the data from one 1000 MW coal-fired unit, two modes of operation are contrasted and analyzed. One is to fix exhaust gas temperature and the other one is to take into account both of the average temperature difference and the exhaust gas temperature. Meanwhile, the cause of energy saving effect change is explored. Result shows that: in mode 1, the amount of decrease in coal consumption reduces from 1.11 g/kWh (under full load) to 0.54 g/kWh (under half load), and in mode 2, when the load decreases from 90% to 50%, the decrease in coal consumption reduces from 1.29 g/kWh to 0.84 g/kWh. From the result, under high load, the energy saving effect is superior, and under lower work load, energy saving effect declines rapidly when load is reduced. When load changes, the temperature difference of heat transfer, gas flow, the flue gas heat rejection and the waste heat recovery change. The energy saving effect corresponding changes result in that the energy saving effect under high load is superior and more stable. However, rational adjustment to the temperature of outlet gas can alleviate the decline of the energy saving effect under low load. The result provides theoretical analysis data for the optimal design and operation of low temperature economizer system of power plant.

  8. Flare pits wastes remediation by low temperature oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalan, L. J. L.; Jamaluddin, A. K. M.; Mehta, R.; Moore, R. G.; Okazawa, N.; Ursenbach, M.

    1997-01-01

    The remediation of contaminated soil in oilfield sites, flare pits in particular, is subject to strict environmental regulations. Most current remediation techniques such as biological or thermal treatment are not particularly effective in highly contaminated sites, or effective only at costs that are considered prohibitive. This contribution describes a cost-effective method for the treatment of contaminated soil in-situ. The proposed treatment involves low temperature oxidation which converts the hydrocarbons in the contaminated soil to inert coke. In laboratory studies contaminated soil was oxidized with air at temperatures between 150 degrees C and 170 degrees C for three weeks. After the three week treatment extractable hydrocarbon levels were reduced to less than 0.1 per cent. Bioassays also demonstrated that toxicity associated with hydrocarbons was eliminated. Salts and metals remaining in the soil after treatment were removed by leaching with water. Low temperature oxidation requires no special equipment; it can occur under conditions and with equipment that are readily available in an oilfield setting. 5 refs., 8 tabs., 7 figs

  9. Material for electrodes of low temperature plasma generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Malcolm; Vinogradov, Sergel Evge'evich; Ribin, Valeri Vasil'evich; Shekalov, Valentin Ivanovich; Rutberg, Philip Grigor'evich; Safronov, Alexi Anatol'evich

    2008-12-09

    Material for electrodes of low temperature plasma generators. The material contains a porous metal matrix impregnated with a material emitting electrons. The material uses a mixture of copper and iron powders as a porous metal matrix and a Group IIIB metal component such as Y.sub.2O.sub.3 is used as a material emitting electrons at, for example, the proportion of the components, mass %: iron: 3-30; Y.sub.2O.sub.3:0.05-1; copper: the remainder. Copper provides a high level of heat conduction and electric conductance, iron decreases intensity of copper evaporation in the process of plasma creation providing increased strength and lifetime, Y.sub.2O.sub.3 provides decreasing of electronic work function and stability of arc burning. The material can be used for producing the electrodes of low temperature AC plasma generators used for destruction of liquid organic wastes, medical wastes, and municipal wastes as well as for decontamination of low level radioactive waste, the destruction of chemical weapons, warfare toxic agents, etc.

  10. Potential of low-temperature nuclear heat applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    At present, more than one third of the fossil fuel currently used is being consumed to produce space heating and to meet industrial needs in many countries of the world. Imported oil still represents a large portion of this fossil fuel and despite its present relatively low price future market evolutions with consequent upward cost revisions cannot be excluded. Thus the displacement of the fossil fuel by cheaper low-temperature heat produced in nuclear power plants is a matter which deserves careful consideration. Technico-economic studies in many countries have shown that the use of nuclear heat is fully competitive with most of fossil-fuelled plants, the higher investment costs being offset by lower production cost. Another point in favour of heat generation by nuclear source is its indisputable advantage in terms of benefits to the environment. The IAEA activity plans for 1985-86 concentrate on information exchange with specific emphasis on the design criteria, operating experience, safety requirements and specifications of heat-only reactors, co-generation plants and existing power plants backfitted for additional heat applications. The information gained up to 1985 was discussed during the Advisory Group Meeting on the Potential of Low-Temperature Nuclear Heat Applications held in the Federal Institute for Reactor Research, Wuerenlingen, Switzerland in September 1985 and, is included in the present Technical Document

  11. NMR study of CeTe at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinderer, J. [Laboratorium fuer Festkoerperphysik, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)]. E-mail: hinderer@phys.ethz.ch; Weyeneth, S.M. [Laboratorium fuer Festkoerperphysik, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Weller, M. [Laboratorium fuer Festkoerperphysik, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Gavilano, J.L. [Laboratorium fuer Festkoerperphysik, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Felder, E. [Laboratorium fuer Festkoerperphysik, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Hulliger, F. [Laboratorium fuer Festkoerperphysik, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Ott, H.R. [Laboratorium fuer Festkoerperphysik, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2006-05-01

    We present {sup 125}Te NMR measurements on CeTe powder at temperatures between 1 and 150K and in magnetic fields between 5 and 8T. CeTe is a rocksalt-type intermetallic compound. It orders antiferromagnetically at T{sub N}{approx}2.2K with a much reduced ordered moment [H.R. Ott, J.K. Kjems, F. Hulliger, Phys. Rev. Lett. 42 20 (1979) 1378]. From our low-temperature NMR spectra we infer the presence of at least three inequivalent Te sites at low temperatures. Considering the crystal structure this result is completely unexpected. The linewidths and the Knight shifts of the individual lines are significantly different and increase substantially with decreasing temperature. They follow the temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility above 20K. Above T{sub N}, hyperfine fields of 1.6, 0.8 and 0.0T at the three Te sites per Bohr magneton of Ce moment are deduced from Knight shift vs. magnetic susceptibility data. These values are typical for transferred hyperfine fields via conduction electrons.

  12. Final Report - Low Temperature Combustion Chemistry And Fuel Component Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooldridge, Margaret [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-02-24

    Recent research into combustion chemistry has shown that reactions at “low temperatures” (700 – 1100 K) have a dramatic influence on ignition and combustion of fuels in virtually every practical combustion system. A powerful class of laboratory-scale experimental facilities that can focus on fuel chemistry in this temperature range is the rapid compression facility (RCF), which has proven to be a versatile tool to examine the details of fuel chemistry in this important regime. An RCF was used in this project to advance our understanding of low temperature chemistry of important fuel compounds. We show how factors including fuel molecular structure, the presence of unsaturated C=C bonds, and the presence of alkyl ester groups influence fuel auto-ignition and produce variable amounts of negative temperature coefficient behavior of fuel ignition. We report new discoveries of synergistic ignition interactions between alkane and alcohol fuels, with both experimental and kinetic modeling studies of these complex interactions. The results of this project quantify the effects of molecular structure on combustion chemistry including carbon bond saturation, through low temperature experimental studies of esters, alkanes, alkenes, and alcohols.

  13. Mechanical behavior of a Y-TZP ceramic for monolithic restorations: effect of grinding and low-temperature aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereira, G.K.R.; Silvestri, T.; Camargo, R.; Rippe, M.P.; Amaral, M.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Valandro, L.F.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of grinding with diamond burs and low-temperature aging on the mechanical behavior (biaxial flexural strength and structural reliability), surface topography, and phase transformation of a Y-TZP ceramic for monolithic dental restorations. Disc-shaped

  14. Low temperature laser scanning microscopy of a superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciovati, G.; Anlage, Steven M.; Baldwin, C.; Cheng, G.; Flood, R.; Jordan, K.; Kneisel, P.; Morrone, M.; Nemes, G.; Turlington, L.; Wang, H.; Wilson, K.; Zhang, S.

    2012-03-01

    An apparatus was developed to obtain, for the first time, 2D maps of the surface resistance of the inner surface of an operating superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity by a low-temperature laser scanning microscopy technique. This allows identifying non-uniformities of the surface resistance with a spatial resolution of about 2.4 mm and surface resistance resolution of ˜1 μΩ at 3.3 GHz. A signal-to-noise ratio of about 10 dB was obtained with 240 mW laser power and 1 Hz modulation frequency. The various components of the apparatus, the experimental procedure and results are discussed in detail in this contribution.

  15. Low temperature laser scanning microscopy of a superconducting radio-frequency cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciovati, G; Anlage, Steven M; Baldwin, C; Cheng, G; Flood, R; Jordan, K; Kneisel, P; Morrone, M; Nemes, G; Turlington, L; Wang, H; Wilson, K; Zhang, S

    2012-03-01

    An apparatus was developed to obtain, for the first time, 2D maps of the surface resistance of the inner surface of an operating superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity by a low-temperature laser scanning microscopy technique. This allows identifying non-uniformities of the surface resistance with a spatial resolution of about 2.4 mm and surface resistance resolution of ~1 μΩ at 3.3 GHz. A signal-to-noise ratio of about 10 dB was obtained with 240 mW laser power and 1 Hz modulation frequency. The various components of the apparatus, the experimental procedure and results are discussed in detail in this contribution.

  16. Metallurgical study of low-temperature plasma carbon diffusion treatments for stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D.B.; Leyland, A.; Stevenson, P.R.; Cawley, J.; Matthews, A.

    1993-01-01

    We recently reported a novel low-temperature carbon diffusion technique for surface hardening of stainless steels. The treatment was shown to provide benefits in terms of abrasive wear resistance. There is also evidence to suggest that by performing diffusion treatments at low temperatures (i.e. below 400 C), these benefits can be achieved without compromising corrosion resistance. Here a variety of surface analysis and depth profiling techniques have been used to determine the physical and mechanical properties of carbon-rich layers produced on a range of stainless steel substrate materials. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was employed to determine the crystallographic structure, whilst wavelength dispersive X-ray analysis (WDX) and glow discharge optical spectroscopy (GDOS) gave information on the concentration and distribution of the diffused species within the treated layers. A variety of carbide-based structures was detected, including the expected M 23 C 6 and, more surprisingly, M 3 C. Optical and electron microscopy techniques were used to provide information on layer morphology. The surfaces produced by the low-temperature carbon-diffusion process generally exhibit a distinct diffusion layer of between 1 and 20 μm, depending on the material and the treatment conditions. Austenitic stainless steels appear to give the best response to treatment, however other types of stainless steel can be treated, particularly if the microstructure contains above 5% retained austenite. Here we discuss the changes in mechanical and metallurgical properties provided by this technique and its potential value for treatment of both austenitic and other stainless steel substrate materials. (orig.)

  17. Transient thermal-mechanical behavior of cracked glass-cloth-reinforced epoxy laminates at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindo, Y.; Ueda, S.

    1997-01-01

    We consider the transient thermal-mechanical response of cracked G-10CR glass-cloth-reinforced epoxy laminates with temperature-dependent properties. The glass-cloth-reinforced epoxy laminates are suddenly cooled on the surfaces. A generalized plane strain finite element model is used to study the influence of warp angle and crack formation on the thermal shock behavior of two-layer woven laminates at low temperatures. Numerical calculations are carried out, and the transient temperature distribution and the thermal-mechanical stresses are shown graphically

  18. Low temperature ultrahigh vacuum cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscope for luminescence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khang, Yoonho; Park, Yeonjoon; Salmeron, Miquel; Weber, Eicke R.

    1999-01-01

    We have constructed a scanning tunneling microscope with simultaneous light collection capabilities in order to investigate the opto-electronic properties of semiconductors. The microscope has in situ sample cleavage mechanism for cross-sectional sample. In order to reach low temperature (4 K), we used a specially designed cryostat. The efficiency of light collection generated in the tip-surface junction was greatly improved by use of a small parabolic mirror with the tip located at its focal point. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics

  19. Morphological study of electrodeposited copper under the influence of ultrasound and low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallik, A.; Ray, B.C.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of temperature and cavitation on the electrochemistry principle were experimented here by adding the impact of sonication to synthesize ultrafine grained deposits at low temperatures. The X-ray diffraction analysis and microscopic studies confirmed the nanorange deposit. Scanning electron microscopy images have also confirmed the powdery and highly scattered deposits in silent conditions. Ultrasound was found to have a significant effect on the deposit morphology. The deposit obtained was compact, uniform and adherent. Energy dispersive spectroscopy result of the deposits revealed an oxidized silent deposit along with some adsorbed sulfur onto the electrode surface. In contrary the in situ cleaning associated with sonication has resulted in cleaner deposits.

  20. Some Aspects of the RHEED Behavior of Low-Temperature GaAs Growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemcsics, A.

    2005-01-01

    The reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) behavior manifested during MBE growth on a GaAs(001) surface under low-temperature (LT) growth conditions is examined in this study. RHEED and its intensity oscillations during LT GaAs growth exhibit some particular behavior. The intensity, phase, and decay of the oscillations depend on the beam equivalent pressure (BEP) ratio and substrate temperature, etc. Here, the intensity dependence of RHEED behavior on the BEP ratio, substrate temperature, and excess of As content in the layer are examined. The change in the decay constant of the RHEED oscillations is also discussed

  1. Erosion-corrosion resistance properties of 316L austenitic stainless steels after low-temperature liquid nitriding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangfeng; Wang, Jun; Fan, Hongyuan; Pan, Dong

    2018-05-01

    The low-temperature liquid nitriding of stainless steels can result in the formation of a surface zone of so-called expanded austenite (S-phase) by the dissolution of large amounts of nitrogen in the solid solution and formation of a precipitate-free layer supersaturated with high hardness. Erosion-corrosion measurements were performed on low-temperature nitrided and non-nitrided 316L stainless steels. The total erosion-corrosion, erosion-only, and corrosion-only wastages were measured directly. As expected, it was shown that low-temperature nitriding dramatically reduces the degree of erosion-corrosion in stainless steels, caused by the impingement of particles in a corrosive medium. The nitrided 316L stainless steels exhibited an improvement of almost 84% in the erosion-corrosion resistance compared to their non-nitrided counterparts. The erosion-only rates and synergistic levels showed a general decline after low-temperature nitriding. Low-temperature liquid nitriding can not only reduce the weight loss due to erosion but also significantly reduce the weight loss rate of interactions, so that the total loss of material decreased evidently. Therefore, 316L stainless steels displayed excellent erosion-corrosion behaviors as a consequence of their highly favorable corrosion resistances and superior wear properties.

  2. Characterization of biosurfactants produced by the oil-degrading bacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis S67 at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, T M; Ponamoreva, O N; Nechaeva, I A; Petrikov, K V; Delegan, Ya A; Surin, A K; Linklater, D; Filonov, A E

    2018-01-04

    Production of trehalolipid biosurfactants by Rhodococcus erythropolis S67 depending on the growth temperature was studied. R. erythropolis S67 produced glycolipid biosurfactants such as 2,3,4-succinoyl-octanoyl-decanoyl-2'-decanoyl trehalose and 2,3,4-succinoyl-dioctanoyl-2'-decanoyl trehalose during the growth in n-hexadecane medium at 26 and 10 °C, despite the different aggregate state of the hydrophobic substrate at low temperature. The surface tension of culture medium was found being reduced from 72 to 27 and 45 mN m -1 , respectively. Production of trehalolipid biosurfactants by R. erythropolis S67 at low temperature could be useful for the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons at low temperatures by enhancing the bioremediation performance in cold regions.

  3. Low-temperature plasma nitriding of sintered PIM 316L austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Aecio Fernando; Scheuer, Cristiano Jose; Joanidis, Ioanis Labhardt; Cardoso, Rodrigo Perito; Mafra, Marcio; Klein, Aloisio Nelmo; Brunatto, Silvio Francisco, E-mail: brunatto@ufpr.br [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Grupo de Tecnologia de Fabricacao Assistida pro Plasma e Metalurgia do Po

    2014-08-15

    This work reports experimental results on sintered PIM 316L stainless steel low-temperature plasma nitriding. The effect of treatment temperature and time on process kinetics, microstructure and surface characteristics of the nitrided samples were investigated. Nitriding was carried out at temperatures of 350, 380, 410 and 440 °C , and times of 4, 8 and 16 h, using a gas mixture composed by 60% N2 + 20% H2 + 20% Ar, at a gas flow rate of 5.00 X 10{sup 6} Nm{sup 3-1}, and a pressure of 800 Pa. The treated samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry and microhardness measurements. Results indicate that low-temperature plasma nitriding is a diffusion controlled process. The calculated activation energy for nitrided layer growth was 111.4 kJmol{sup -1}. Apparently precipitation-free layers were produced in this study. It was also observed that the higher the treatment temperature and time the higher is the obtained surface hardness. Hardness up to 1343 HV{sub 0.025} was verified for samples nitrided at 440 °C. Finally, the characterization of the treated surface indicates the formation of cracks, which were observed in regions adjacent to the original pores after the treatment. (author)

  4. Thickness dependent growth of low temperature atomic layer deposited zinc oxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montiel-González, Z.; Castelo-González, O.A.; Aguilar-Gama, M.T.; Ramírez-Morales, E.; Hu, H.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Polycrystalline columnar ZnO thin films deposited by ALD at low temperatures. • Higher deposition temperature leads to a greater surface roughness in the ALD ZnO films. • Higher temperature originates larger refractive index values of the ALD ZnO films. • ZnO thin films were denser as the numbers of ALD deposition cycles were larger. • XPS analysis revels mayor extent of the DEZ reaction during the ALD process. - Abstract: Zinc oxide films are promising to improve the performance of electronic devices, including those based on organic materials. However, the dependence of the ZnO properties on the preparation conditions represents a challenge to obtain homogeneous thin films that satisfy specific applications. Here, we prepared ZnO films of a wide range of thicknesses by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at relatively low temperatures, 150 and 175 °C. From the results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry it is concluded that the polycrystalline structure of the wurtzite is the main phase of the ALD samples, with OH groups on their surface. Ellipsometry revealed that the temperature and the deposition cycles have a strong effect on the films roughness. Scanning electron micrographs evidenced such effect, through the large pyramids developed at the surface of the films. It is concluded that crystalline ZnO thin films within a broad range of thickness and roughness can be obtained for optic or optoelectronic applications.

  5. Calorimetric low temperature detectors for heavy ion physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egelhof, P.; Kraft-Bermuth, S. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany)]|[Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik

    2005-05-01

    Calorimetric low temperature detectors have the potential to become powerful tools for applications in many fields of heavy ion physics. A brief overview of heavy ion physics at present and at the next generation heavy ion facilities is given with a special emphasis on the conditions for heavy ion detection and the potential advantage of cryogenic detectors for applications in heavy ion physics. Two types of calorimetric low temperature detectors for the detection of energetic heavy ions have been developed and their response to the impact of heavy ions was investigated systematically for a wide range of energies (E=0.1-360 MeV/amu) and ion species ({sup 4}He.. {sup 238}U). Excellent results with respect to energy resolution, {delta}E/E ranging from 1 to 5 x 10{sup -3} even for the heaviest ions, and other basic detector properties such as energy linearity with no indication of a pulse height defect, energy threshold, detection efficiency and radiation hardness have been obtained, representing a considerable improvement as compared to conventional heavy ion detectors based on ionization. With the achieved performance, calorimetric low temperature detectors bear a large potential for applications in various fields of basic and applied heavy ion research. A brief overview of a few prominent examples, such as high resolution nuclear spectroscopy, high resolution nuclear mass determination, which may be favourably used for identification of superheavy elements or in direct reaction experiments with radioactive beams, as well as background discrimination in accelerator mass spectrometry, is given, and first results are presented. For instance, the use of cryogenic detectors allowed to improve the sensitivity in trace analysis of {sup 236}U by one order of magnitude and to determine the up to date smallest isotope ratio of {sup 236}U/{sup 238}U = 6.1 x 10{sup -12} in a sample of natural uranium. Besides the detection of heavy ions, the concept of cryogenic detectors also

  6. Calorimetric low temperature detectors for heavy ion physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egelhof, P.; Kraft-Bermuth, S.; Mainz Univ.

    2005-07-01

    Calorimetric low temperature detectors have the potential to become powerful tools for applications in many fields of heavy ion physics. A brief overview of heavy ion physics at present and at the next generation heavy ion facilities is given with a special emphasis on the conditions for heavy ion detection and the potential advantage of cryogenic detectors for applications in heavy ion physics. Two types of calorimetric low temperature detectors for the detection of energetic heavy ions have been developed and their response to the impact of heavy ions was investigated systematically for a wide range of energies (E=0.1-360 MeV/amu) and ion species ( 4 He.. 238 U). Excellent results with respect to energy resolution, ΔE/E ranging from 1 to 5 x 10 -3 even for the heaviest ions, and other basic detector properties such as energy linearity with no indication of a pulse height defect, energy threshold, detection efficiency and radiation hardness have been obtained, representing a considerable improvement as compared to conventional heavy ion detectors based on ionization. With the achieved performance, calorimetric low temperature detectors bear a large potential for applications in various fields of basic and applied heavy ion research. A brief overview of a few prominent examples, such as high resolution nuclear spectroscopy, high resolution nuclear mass determination, which may be favourably used for identification of superheavy elements or in direct reaction experiments with radioactive beams, as well as background discrimination in accelerator mass spectrometry, is given, and first results are presented. For instance, the use of cryogenic detectors allowed to improve the sensitivity in trace analysis of 236 U by one order of magnitude and to determine the up to date smallest isotope ratio of 236 U/ 238 U = 6.1 x 10 -12 in a sample of natural uranium. Besides the detection of heavy ions, the concept of cryogenic detectors also provides considerable advantage for X

  7. Retention of gaseous isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarbro, O.O.; Mailen, J.C.; Stephenson, M.J.

    1977-01-01

    Retention of gaseous fission products during fuel reprocessing has, in the past, been limited to a modest retention of 131 I when processing fuels decayed less than about 180 days. The projected rapid growth of the nuclear power industry along with a desire to minimize environmental effects is leading to the reassessment of requirements for retention of gaseous fission products, including 131 I, 129 I, 85 Kr, 3 H, and 14 C. Starting in the late 1960s, a significant part of the LMFBR reprocessing development program has been devoted to understanding the behavior of gaseous fission products in plant process and effluent streams and the development of advanced systems for their removal. Systems for iodine control include methods for evolving up to 99% of the iodine from dissolver solutions to minimize its introduction and distribution throughout downstream equipment. An aqueous scrubbing system (Iodox) using 20 M HNO 3 as the scrubbing media effectively removes all significant iodine forms from off-gas streams while handling the kilogram quantities of iodine present in head-end and dissolver off-gas streams. Silver zeolite is very effective for removing iodine forms at low concentration from the larger-volume plant off-gas streams. Removal of iodine from plant liquid effluents by solid sorbents either prior to or following final vaporization appears feasible. Krypton is effectively released during dissolution and can be removed from the relatively small volume head-end and dissolver off-gas stream. Two methods appear applicable for removal and concentration of krypton: (1) selective absorption in fluorocarbons, and (2) cryogenic absorption in liquid nitrogen. The fluorocarbon absorption process appears to be rather tolerant of the normal contaminants (H 2 O, CO 2 , NOsub(x), and organics) present in typical reprocessing plant off-gas whereas the cryogenic system requires an extensive feed gas pretreatment system. Retention of tritium in a reprocessing plant is

  8. Solid density, low temperature plasma formation in a capillary discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kania, D.R.; Jones, L.A.; Maestas, M.D.; Shepherd, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    This work discusses the ability of the authors to produce solid density, low temperature plasmas in polyurethane capillary discharges. The initial capillary diameter is 20 μm. The plasma is produced by discharging a one Ohm parallel plate waterline and Marx generator system through the capillary. A peak current of 340 kA in 300 ns heats the inner wall of the capillary, and the plasma expands into the surrounding material. The authors studied the evolution of the discharge using current and voltage probes, axial and radial streak photography, axial x-ray diode array and schlieren photography, and have estimated the peak temperature of the discharge to be approximately 10 eV and the density to be near 10/sup 23/cm/sup -3/. This indicates that the plasma may approach the strongly coupled regime. They discuss their interpretation of the data and compare their results with theoretical models of the plasma dynamics

  9. 0-D study of the compression of low temperature spheromaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerhofer, D.D.; Hulse, R.A.; Zweibel, E.G.

    1985-09-01

    Compression of low temperature spheromak plasmas has been studied with the aid of a O-D two-fluid computer code. It is found that in a plasma which is radiation dominated, the electron temperature can be increased by up to a factor of seven for a compression of a factor of two, provided the temperature is above some critical value (approx.25eV) and the electron density particle confinement time product n/sub e/tau/sub p/ greater than or equal to 1 x 10 9 s/cm 3 . If the energy balance is dominated by particle confinement losses rather than radiation losses, the effect of compression is to raise the temperature as T/sub e/ approx.C/sup 6/5/, for constant tau/sub p/

  10. Containment for low temperature district nuclear-heating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Shuyan; Dong Duo

    1992-03-01

    Integral arrangement is adopted for Low Temperature District Nuclear-heating Reactor. Primary heat exchangers, control rod drives and spent fuel elements are put in the reactor pressure vessel together with reactor core. Primary coolant flows through reactor core and primary heat exchangers in natural circulation. Primary coolant pipes penetrating the wall of reactor pressure vessel are all of small diameters. The reactor vessel constitutes the main part of pressure boundary of primary coolant. Therefore the small sized metallic containment closed to the wall of reactor vessel can be used for the reactor. Design principles and functions of the containment are as same as the containment for PWR. But the adoption of small sized containment brings about some benefits such as short period of manufacturing, relatively low cost, and easy for sealing. Loss of primary coolant accident would not be happened during the rupture accident of primary coolant pressure boundary inside the containment owing to its intrinsic safety

  11. HEAT PUMP USING SUBSOIL WATERS AS LOW TEMPERATURE HEAT SOURCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denysova Alla

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the basic directions of perfection of heat supply systems is the tendency of transition to the low-temperature heating systems based on application of heat pump installations. We consider heat supply system with heat pump installations using subsoil waters. Numerical simulation of thermal processes in the elements of a single-stage and double-stage heat pump systems has been worked out. Values of depths of wells and their quantity, necessary for effective operation of the offered installations, and values of capacity of electric water pumps for subsoil waters unit are calculated. Capacity of compressor electric drive and coefficient of performance of heat pump for the conditions of the city of Odessa are presented.

  12. Low temperature conversion of plastic waste into light hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Sajid Hussain; Khan, Zahid Mahmood; Raja, Iftikhar Ahmad; Mahmood, Qaisar; Bhatti, Zulfiqar Ahmad; Khan, Jamil; Farooq, Ather; Rashid, Naim; Wu, Donglei

    2010-01-01

    Advance recycling through pyrolytic technology has the potential of being applied to the management of plastic waste (PW). For this purpose 1 l volume, energy efficient batch reactor was manufactured locally and tested for pyrolysis of waste plastic. The feedstock for reactor was 50 g waste polyethylene. The average yield of the pyrolytic oil, wax, pyrogas and char from pyrolysis of PW were 48.6, 40.7, 10.1 and 0.6%, respectively, at 275 deg. C with non-catalytic process. Using catalyst the average yields of pyrolytic oil, pyrogas, wax and residue (char) of 50 g of PW was 47.98, 35.43, 16.09 and 0.50%, respectively, at operating temperature of 250 deg. C. The designed reactor could work at low temperature in the absence of a catalyst to obtain similar products as for a catalytic process.

  13. Low-temperature behaviour of the engine oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtěch Kumbár

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour of engine oil is very important. In this paper has been evaluated temperature dependence kinematic viscosity of engine oils in the low temperatures. Five different commercially distributed engine oils (primarily intended for automobile engines with viscosity class 0W–40, 5W–40, 10W–40, 15W–40, and 20W–40 have been evaluated. The temperature dependence kinematic viscosity has been observed in the range of temperature from −15 °C to 15 °C (for all oils. Considerable temperature dependence kinematic viscosity was found and demonstrated in case of all samples, which is in accordance with theoretical assumptions and literature data. Mathematical models have been developed and tested. Temperature dependence dynamic viscosity has been modeled using a polynomials 3rd and 4th degree. The proposed models can be used for prediction of flow behaviour of oils. With monitoring and evaluating we can prevent technical and economic losses.

  14. Low temperature hydrothermal destruction of organics in Hanford tank wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orth, R.J.; Elmore, M.R.; Zacher, A.H.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Schmidt, A.J.; Jones, E.O.; Hart, T.R.; Poshusta, J.C.

    1994-08-01

    The objective of this work is to evaluate and develop a low temperature hydrothermal process (HTP) for the destruction of organics that are present wastes temporarily stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site. Organic compounds contribute to tank waste safety issues, such as hydrogen generation. Some organic compounds act as complexants, promoting the solubility of radioactive constituents such as 90 Sr and 241 Am, which is undesirable for waste pretreatment processing. HTP is thermal-chemical autogenous processing method that is typically operated between 250 degrees C and 375 degrees C and approximately 200 atm. Testing with simulated tank waste, containing a variety of organics has been performed. The distribution of strontium, cesium and bulk metals between the supernatant and solid phases as a function of the total organic content of the waste simulant will be presented. Test results using simulant will be compared with similar tests conducted using actual radioactive waste

  15. Towards spontaneous parametric down-conversion at low temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akatiev Dmitrii

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of observing spontaneous parametric down-conversion in doped nonlinear crystals at low temperatures, which would be useful for combining heralded single-photon sources and quantum memories, is studied theoretically. The ordinary refractive index of a lithium niobate crystal doped with magnesium oxide LiNbO3:MgO is measured at liquid nitrogen and helium temperatures. On the basis of the experimental data, the coefficients of the Sellmeier equation are determined for the temperatures from 5 to 300 K. In addition, a poling period of the nonlinear crystal has been calculated for observing type-0 spontaneous parametric down-conversion (ooo-synchronism at the liquid helium temperature under pumping at the wavelength of λp = 532 nm and emission of the signal field at the wavelength of λs = 794 nm, which corresponds to the resonant absorption line of Tm3+ doped ions.

  16. Hydrothermal carbonization of biomass waste under low temperature condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putra Herlian Eriska

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the use of banana peel for energy purposes was investigated. Banana peel is a lignocellulosic waste since it is the most widely produced and consumed fruit in Indonesia. Among the others, hydrothermal carbonization (HTC was chosen as alternative themochemical process, suitable for high moisture biomass. Through a 1 L stirred reactor, hydrothermal treatments were performed under low temperature condition (190, 210 and 230 °C, residence times (30 and 60 min, and biomass to water ratio (1:3, 1:5, and 1:10. Three of product were collected from the process with primary material balance. Solid phase (hydrochar was evaluated in terms of calorific value, proximate and ultimate analysis. The results suggested that the hydrothermal carbonization of banana peel gave high heating value (HHV of 20.09 MJ/kg for its char after dried naturally.

  17. Single interval Rényi entropy at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Wu, Jie-qiang

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we calculate the Rényi entropy of one single interval on a circle at finite temperature in 2D CFT. In the low temperature limit, we expand the thermal density matrix level by level in the vacuum Verma module, and calculate the first few leading terms in e -π/ T L explicitly. On the other hand, we compute the same Rényi entropy holographically. After considering the dependence of the Rényi entropy on the temperature, we manage to fix the interval-independent constant terms in the classical part of holographic Rényi entropy. We furthermore extend the analysis in [9] to higher orders and find exact agreement between the results from field theory and bulk computations in the large central charge limit. Our work provides another piece of evidence to support holographic computation of Rényi entropy in AdS3/CFT2 correspondence, even with thermal effect.

  18. Generator of the low-temperature heterogeneous plasma flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusupov, D. I.; Gadzhiev, M. Kh; Tyuftyaev, A. S.; Chinnov, V. F.; Sargsyan, M. A.

    2018-01-01

    A generator of low-temperature dc plasma with an expanding channel of an output electrode for gas-thermal spraying was designed and constructed. The delivery of the sprayed powder into the cathode and anode arc-binding zones or into the plasma jet below the anode binding was realized. The electrophysical characteristics of both the plasma torch and the heterogeneous plasma flow with Al2O3 powder are studied. It is shown that the current-voltage characteristic (CVC) of a plasma torch depends on the gas flow rate. If the flow rate varies from 1 to 3 g/s, the falling CVC becomes gradually increasing. The speed and temperature of the sprayed powder are determined.

  19. Low-temperature excitations within the Bethe approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biazzo, I; Ramezanpour, A

    2013-01-01

    We propose the variational quantum cavity method to construct a minimal energy subspace of wavevectors that are used to obtain some upper bounds for the energy cost of the low-temperature excitations. Given a trial wavefunction we use the cavity method of statistical physics to estimate the Hamiltonian expectation and to find the optimal variational parameters in the subspace of wavevectors orthogonal to the lower-energy wavefunctions. To this end, we write the overlap between two wavefunctions within the Bethe approximation, which allows us to replace the global orthogonality constraint with some local constraints on the variational parameters. The method is applied to the transverse Ising model and different levels of approximations are compared with the exact numerical solutions for small systems. (paper)

  20. The low-temperature phase of morpholinium tetrafluoroborate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz Lis

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the low-temperature form of the title compound, C4H10NO+·BF4−, was determined at 80 K. Two reversible phase transitions, at 158/158 and 124/126 K (heating/cooling, were detected by differential scanning calorimetry for this compound, and the sequence of phase transitions was subsequently confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiments. The asymmetric unit at 80 K consists of three BF4− tetrahedral anions and three morpholinium cations (Z′ = 3. Hydrogen-bonded morpholinium cations form chains along the [100] direction. The BF4− anions are connected to these chains by N—H...F hydrogen bonds. In the crystal structure, two different layers perpendicular to the [001] direction can be distinguished, which differ in the geometry of the hydrogen bonds between cationic and anionic species.