WorldWideScience

Sample records for low-magnetic-field mri system

  1. Open-Access, Low-Magnetic-Field MRI System for Lung Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, Ross W.; Rosen, Matthew S.; Tsai, Leo L.; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Hrovat, Mirko I.; Patz, Samuel; Ruset, Iullian C.; Hersman, F. William

    2009-01-01

    An open-access magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system is being developed for use in research on orientational/gravitational effects on lung physiology and function. The open-access geometry enables study of human subjects in diverse orientations. This system operates at a magnetic flux density, considerably smaller than the flux densities of typical other MRI systems, that can be generated by resistive electromagnet coils (instead of the more-expensive superconducting coils of the other systems). The human subject inhales air containing He-3 or Xe-129 atoms, the nuclear spins of which have been polarized by use of a laser beam to obtain a magnetic resonance that enables high-resolution gas space imaging at the low applied magnetic field. The system includes a bi-planar, constant-current, four-coil electromagnet assembly and associated electronic circuitry to apply a static magnetic field of 6.5 mT throughout the lung volume; planar coils and associated circuitry to apply a pulsed magnetic-field-gradient for each spatial dimension; a single, detachable radio-frequency coil and associated circuitry for inducing and detecting MRI signals; a table for supporting a horizontal subject; and electromagnetic shielding surrounding the electromagnet coils.

  2. System and method for magnetic current density imaging at ultra low magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espy, Michelle A.; George, John Stevens; Kraus, Robert Henry; Magnelind, Per; Matlashov, Andrei Nikolaevich; Tucker, Don; Turovets, Sergei; Volegov, Petr Lvovich

    2016-02-09

    Preferred systems can include an electrical impedance tomography apparatus electrically connectable to an object; an ultra low field magnetic resonance imaging apparatus including a plurality of field directions and disposable about the object; a controller connected to the ultra low field magnetic resonance imaging apparatus and configured to implement a sequencing of one or more ultra low magnetic fields substantially along one or more of the plurality of field directions; and a display connected to the controller, and wherein the controller is further configured to reconstruct a displayable image of an electrical current density in the object. Preferred methods, apparatuses, and computer program products are also disclosed.

  3. Transducer project and optimization of the ultra low magnetic field NMR tomograph reception system system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidoto, Edson Luiz Gea

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to optimize the signal to noise ratio in our NMR imaging system (TORM 005) by improving transducer's reception quality through better designed coils, balanced tuning circuit for this coils and power decoupling circuits and by reducing interference from the electromagnetic environment. For this purpose, we had to modify the internal electromagnetic shielding and incorporate line filters in the more critical signals paths. Also, new types of coils were developed, improving the signal to noise ratio, and allowing us to make clinical exams with superior quality for several anatomies. Balanced circuits for tuning and matching of the coil were studied and built, allowing a reduction of the coil losses because patient's load. This produced a more reliable coil tuning after positioning each new patient. Circuits to avoid the receiver input overload and decoupling circuits for the isolation of receiver coils from excitation coil were designed and incorporated to the TORM 005. All these alterations of our imaging system (TORM 005) contributed to a significant improvement in the signal to noise ratio, reliability and reproducibility of the system. This permitted to operate the system routinely for clinical applications, research and development in the area of ultra low magnetic field tomography. (author)

  4. Characterization of natural porous media by NMR and MRI techniques. High and low magnetic field studies for estimation of hydraulic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stingaciu, Laura-Roxana

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this thesis is to apply different NMR techniques for: i) understanding the relaxometric properties of unsaturated natural porous media and ii) for a reliable quantification of water content and its spatial and temporal change in model porous media and soil cores. For that purpose, porous media with increasing complexity and heterogeneity were used (coarse and fine sand and different mixture of sand/clay) to determine the relaxation parameters in order to adapt optimal sequence and parameters for water imaging. Conventional imaging is mostly performed with superconducting high field scanners but low field scanners promise longer relaxation times and therefore smaller loss of signal from water in small and partially filled pores. By this reason high and low field NMR experiments were conducted on these porous media to characterize the dependence on the magnetic field strength. Correlations of the NMR experiments with classical soil physics method like mercury intrusion porosimetry; water retention curves (pF) and multi-step-outflow (MSO) were performed for the characterization of the hydraulic properties of the materials. Due to the extensive research the experiments have been structured in three major parts as follows. In the first part a comparison study between relaxation experiments in high and low magnetic field was performed in order to observe the influence of the magnetic field on the relaxation properties. Due to these results, in the second part of the study only low field relaxation experiments were used in the attempt of correlations with classical soil physics methods (mercury intrusion porosimetry and water retention curves) for characterizing the hydraulic behavior of the samples. Further, the aim was to combine also MRI experiments (2D and 3D NMR) with classical soil physics methods (multi-step-outflow, MSO) for the same purpose of investigating the hydraulic properties. Because low field MRI systems are still under developing for the

  5. Characterization of natural porous media by NMR and MRI techniques. High and low magnetic field studies for estimation of hydraulic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stingaciu, Laura-Roxana

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to apply different NMR techniques for: i) understanding the relaxometric properties of unsaturated natural porous media and ii) for a reliable quantification of water content and its spatial and temporal change in model porous media and soil cores. For that purpose, porous media with increasing complexity and heterogeneity were used (coarse and fine sand and different mixture of sand/clay) to determine the relaxation parameters in order to adapt optimal sequence and parameters for water imaging. Conventional imaging is mostly performed with superconducting high field scanners but low field scanners promise longer relaxation times and therefore smaller loss of signal from water in small and partially filled pores. By this reason high and low field NMR experiments were conducted on these porous media to characterize the dependence on the magnetic field strength. Correlations of the NMR experiments with classical soil physics method like mercury intrusion porosimetry; water retention curves (pF) and multi-step-outflow (MSO) were performed for the characterization of the hydraulic properties of the materials. Due to the extensive research the experiments have been structured in three major parts as follows. In the first part a comparison study between relaxation experiments in high and low magnetic field was performed in order to observe the influence of the magnetic field on the relaxation properties. Due to these results, in the second part of the study only low field relaxation experiments were used in the attempt of correlations with classical soil physics methods (mercury intrusion porosimetry and water retention curves) for characterizing the hydraulic behavior of the samples. Further, the aim was to combine also MRI experiments (2D and 3D NMR) with classical soil physics methods (multi-step-outflow, MSO) for the same purpose of investigating the hydraulic properties. Because low field MRI systems are still under developing for the

  6. Transducer project and optimization of the ultra low magnetic field NMR tomograph reception system system; Projeto de transdutores e otimizacao do sistema de recepcao do tomografo de RMN de campo magnetico ultra baixo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidoto, Edson Luiz Gea

    1995-12-31

    The aim of the present work was to optimize the signal to noise ratio in our NMR imaging system (TORM 005) by improving transducer`s reception quality through better designed coils, balanced tuning circuit for this coils and power decoupling circuits and by reducing interference from the electromagnetic environment. For this purpose, we had to modify the internal electromagnetic shielding and incorporate line filters in the more critical signals paths. Also, new types of coils were developed, improving the signal to noise ratio, and allowing us to make clinical exams with superior quality for several anatomies. Balanced circuits for tuning and matching of the coil were studied and built, allowing a reduction of the coil losses because patient`s load. This produced a more reliable coil tuning after positioning each new patient. Circuits to avoid the receiver input overload and decoupling circuits for the isolation of receiver coils from excitation coil were designed and incorporated to the TORM 005. All these alterations of our imaging system (TORM 005) contributed to a significant improvement in the signal to noise ratio, reliability and reproducibility of the system. This permitted to operate the system routinely for clinical applications, research and development in the area of ultra low magnetic field tomography. (author) 46 refs., 66 figs., 11 tabs.

  7. Transducer project and optimization of the ultra low magnetic field NMR tomograph reception system system; Projeto de transdutores e otimizacao do sistema de recepcao do tomografo de RMN de campo magnetico ultra baixo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidoto, Edson Luiz Gea

    1996-12-31

    The aim of the present work was to optimize the signal to noise ratio in our NMR imaging system (TORM 005) by improving transducer`s reception quality through better designed coils, balanced tuning circuit for this coils and power decoupling circuits and by reducing interference from the electromagnetic environment. For this purpose, we had to modify the internal electromagnetic shielding and incorporate line filters in the more critical signals paths. Also, new types of coils were developed, improving the signal to noise ratio, and allowing us to make clinical exams with superior quality for several anatomies. Balanced circuits for tuning and matching of the coil were studied and built, allowing a reduction of the coil losses because patient`s load. This produced a more reliable coil tuning after positioning each new patient. Circuits to avoid the receiver input overload and decoupling circuits for the isolation of receiver coils from excitation coil were designed and incorporated to the TORM 005. All these alterations of our imaging system (TORM 005) contributed to a significant improvement in the signal to noise ratio, reliability and reproducibility of the system. This permitted to operate the system routinely for clinical applications, research and development in the area of ultra low magnetic field tomography. (author) 46 refs., 66 figs., 11 tabs.

  8. Improvement of spin-exchange optical pumping of xenon-129 using in situ NMR measurement in ultra-low magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Shun; Kumagai, Hiroshi

    2018-02-01

    Hyperpolarized (HP) noble gas has attracted attention in NMR / MRI. In an ultra-low magnetic field, the effectiveness of signal enhancement by HP noble gas should be required because reduction of the signal intensity is serious. One method of generating HP noble gas is spin exchange optical pumping which uses selective excitation of electrons of alkali metal vapor and spin transfer to nuclear spin by collision to noble gas. Although SEOP does not require extreme cooling or strong magnetic field, generally it required large-scale equipment including high power light source to generate HP noble gas with high efficiency. In this study, we construct a simply generation system of HP xenon-129 by SEOP with an ultralow magnetic field (up to 1 mT) and small-scale light source (about 1W). In addition, we measure in situ NMR signal at the same time, and then examine efficient conditions for SEOP in ultra-low magnetic fields.

  9. Superconductive MRI system, FLEXARTTM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hirokazu; Nishikawa, Mineki; Goro, Takehiko

    1994-01-01

    Since the establishment of TAMI (Toshiba America MRI Inc.) in 1989, it has been jointly working with Toshiba on developing a new infrastructure for computer and software technologies to be applied to new MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) systems. As a result of these efforts, the first product of a new series of MRI systems has been introduced on the market. Known as FLEXART TM (a newly created word combining FLEXible and ART), this MRI system incorporates a new 32-bit RISC computer and a new controller for pulse sequences and data acquisition. The product concepts of FLEXART TM are high image quality, high patient throughput, and ease of use, all of which are necessary features for an MRI system in the premium mid-field MRI market segment. (author)

  10. Application of stable, nitroxide free radicals in solution to low magnetic fields measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besson, Rene

    1973-01-01

    The first attempts to use the Overhauser-Abragam effect for measuring low magnetic fields date back to 1956. However, the instability of the free radical used, PREMY'S Salt, as well as its virtual insolubility in solvents other than water, hampered the development of the nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometer realized in accordance to this principle: dynamic polarization of protons. New free radicals stable and soluble in many solvents, will enhanced the interest in the device. In particular, the use of 2,2,6,6, tetramethyl- piperidine-4-one-1-oxide (TANO or TANONE) leads to a high sensitivity, low field magnetometer. The methods of measurements, the required apparatus and sample preparation are first described. Next the results of measurements made both in high and low magnetic fields with various free radicals in different solvents are presented in tabular and graphical form. These measurements have determined which radical-solvent couple will yield a high dynamic polarization coefficient. In addition, the improvement obtained by complete deuteration of the free radical has been demonstrated. Problems connected with the application of such radicals in solution to the 'double effect probe' of the magnetometer built by LETI at CEN Grenoble and the solutions reached are discussed. (author) [fr

  11. Study of two medium size 'C' core electromagnets generating low magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, M.S.; Dass, S.; Chatterjee, U.K.

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic field requirements of laboratories may impose constraints that often call for a variety of non-standard designs. The designer has to fulfil these demands without letting the design to become too inefficient. Since no ready design procedures are available he has to resort to intuition calculation and modelling. In spite of this there may be wide discrepancy between the design values and the actual results. This report describes the experience gained on two 'C' core electromagnets being used by authors. These magnets generate low magnetic fields over reasonably large volumes, a requirement that runs opposite to that of most other magnets. The study reveals the dependence of overall performance efficiency, field uniformity etc. on the design parameters. 31 figures. (author)

  12. A highly sensitive CMOS digital Hall sensor for low magnetic field applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yue; Pan, Hong-Bin; He, Shu-Zhuan; Li, Li

    2012-01-01

    Integrated CMOS Hall sensors have been widely used to measure magnetic fields. However, they are difficult to work with in a low magnetic field environment due to their low sensitivity and large offset. This paper describes a highly sensitive digital Hall sensor fabricated in 0.18 μm high voltage CMOS technology for low field applications. The sensor consists of a switched cross-shaped Hall plate and a novel signal conditioner. It effectively eliminates offset and low frequency 1/f noise by applying a dynamic quadrature offset cancellation technique. The measured results show the optimal Hall plate achieves a high current related sensitivity of about 310 V/AT. The whole sensor has a remarkable ability to measure a minimum ± 2 mT magnetic field and output a digital Hall signal in a wide temperature range from -40 °C to 120 °C.

  13. VISARTTM superconducting MRI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usui, Yoshiyuki; Goro, Takehiko; Yamagata, Hitoshi.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed VISART TM , a 1.5 T high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system based on technology developed for both the FLEXART TM (0.5T) and MRT-200/GP (1.5T) systems as the first and second products, respectively, of a new series of MRI systems. VISART TM is a newly coined word combining VISion and state-of-the-ART. A higher power gradient system and new high-speed imaging techniques have been developed to meet the market demand for higher resolution images and shorter scan times. The product concepts of VISART TM are high image quality, high patient throughput, flexible clinical application, and ease of use, all of which are essential features for an MRI system in the high-field MRI market segment. (author)

  14. The Outburst Decay of the Low Magnetic Field Magnetar SGR 0418+5729

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, N.; Israel, G. L.; Pons, J. A.; Turolla, R.; Viganò, D.; Zane, S.; Esposito, P.; Perna, R.; Papitto, A.; Terreran, G.; Tiengo, A.; Salvetti, D.; Girart, J. M.; Palau, Aina; Possenti, A.; Burgay, M.; Göğüş, E.; Caliandro, G. A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Götz, D.; Mignani, R. P.; Ratti, E.; Stella, L.

    2013-06-01

    We report on the long-term X-ray monitoring of the outburst decay of the low magnetic field magnetar SGR 0418+5729 using all the available X-ray data obtained with RXTE, Swift, Chandra, and XMM-Newton observations from the discovery of the source in 2009 June up to 2012 August. The timing analysis allowed us to obtain the first measurement of the period derivative of SGR 0418+5729: \\dot{P}=4(1)\\times 10^{-15} s s-1, significant at a ~3.5σ confidence level. This leads to a surface dipolar magnetic field of B dip ~= 6 × 1012 G. This measurement confirms SGR 0418+5729 as the lowest magnetic field magnetar. Following the flux and spectral evolution from the beginning of the outburst up to ~1200 days, we observe a gradual cooling of the tiny hot spot responsible for the X-ray emission, from a temperature of ~0.9 to 0.3 keV. Simultaneously, the X-ray flux decreased by about three orders of magnitude: from about 1.4 × 10-11 to 1.2 × 10-14 erg s-1 cm-2. Deep radio, millimeter, optical, and gamma-ray observations did not detect the source counterpart, implying stringent limits on its multi-band emission, as well as constraints on the presence of a fossil disk. By modeling the magneto-thermal secular evolution of SGR 0418+5729, we infer a realistic age of ~550 kyr, and a dipolar magnetic field at birth of ~1014 G. The outburst characteristics suggest the presence of a thin twisted bundle with a small heated spot at its base. The bundle untwisted in the first few months following the outburst, while the hot spot decreases in temperature and size. We estimate the outburst rate of low magnetic field magnetars to be about one per year per galaxy, and we briefly discuss the consequences of such a result in several other astrophysical contexts.

  15. THE OUTBURST DECAY OF THE LOW MAGNETIC FIELD MAGNETAR SGR 0418+5729

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rea, N.; Papitto, A.; Terreran, G.; Girart, J. M.; Palau, Aina; Caliandro, G. A.; Israel, G. L.; Pons, J. A.; Viganò, D.; Turolla, R.; Zane, S.; Esposito, P.; Tiengo, A.; Salvetti, D.; Perna, R.; Possenti, A.; Burgay, M.; Göğüş, E.; Kouveliotou, C.; Götz, D.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the long-term X-ray monitoring of the outburst decay of the low magnetic field magnetar SGR 0418+5729 using all the available X-ray data obtained with RXTE, Swift, Chandra, and XMM-Newton observations from the discovery of the source in 2009 June up to 2012 August. The timing analysis allowed us to obtain the first measurement of the period derivative of SGR 0418+5729: P-dot =4(1)×10 -15 s s –1 , significant at a ∼3.5σ confidence level. This leads to a surface dipolar magnetic field of B dip ≅ 6 × 10 12 G. This measurement confirms SGR 0418+5729 as the lowest magnetic field magnetar. Following the flux and spectral evolution from the beginning of the outburst up to ∼1200 days, we observe a gradual cooling of the tiny hot spot responsible for the X-ray emission, from a temperature of ∼0.9 to 0.3 keV. Simultaneously, the X-ray flux decreased by about three orders of magnitude: from about 1.4 × 10 –11 to 1.2 × 10 –14 erg s –1 cm –2 . Deep radio, millimeter, optical, and gamma-ray observations did not detect the source counterpart, implying stringent limits on its multi-band emission, as well as constraints on the presence of a fossil disk. By modeling the magneto-thermal secular evolution of SGR 0418+5729, we infer a realistic age of ∼550 kyr, and a dipolar magnetic field at birth of ∼10 14 G. The outburst characteristics suggest the presence of a thin twisted bundle with a small heated spot at its base. The bundle untwisted in the first few months following the outburst, while the hot spot decreases in temperature and size. We estimate the outburst rate of low magnetic field magnetars to be about one per year per galaxy, and we briefly discuss the consequences of such a result in several other astrophysical contexts.

  16. High magnetoresistance at low magnetic fields in self-assembled ZnO-Co nanocomposite films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedrecy, N; Hamieh, M; Hebert, C; Perriere, J

    2017-07-27

    The solid phase growth of self-assembled nanocrystals embedded in a crystalline host matrix opens up wide perspectives for the coupling of different physical properties, such as magnetic and semiconducting. In this work, we report the pulsed laser growth at room temperature of thin films composed of a dispersed array of ferromagnetic Co (0001) nanoclusters with an in-plane mono-size width of 1.3 nm, embedded in a ZnO (0001) crystalline matrix. The as-grown films lead to very high values of magnetoresistance, ranging at 9 T from -11% at 300 K to -19% at 50 K, with a steep decrease of the magnetoresistance at low magnetic fields. We establish the relationship between the magnetoresistance behavior and the magnetic response of the Co nanocluster assembly. A spin-dependent tunneling of the electrons between the Co nanoclusters through and by the semi-insulating ZnO host is achieved in our films, promising with regard to magnetic field sensors or Si-integrated spintronic devices. The effects of thermal annealing are also discussed.

  17. Musculoskeletal MRI: dedicated systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masciocchi, C.; Barile, A.; Satragno, L.

    2000-01-01

    The ''dedicated'' MRI units have characteristics of high diagnostic accuracy and lower installation and management costs as compared with whole-body systems. The dedicated MRI units are easy to install. The low weight allows their installation also under unfavorable circumstances. In a dedicated system cost-effectiveness and ease of installation must be accompanied by the capability of providing high-quality images. In our experience, the high number of examinations performed, the most part of which provided with the surgical controls, allowed an accurate evaluation of the diagnostic potentialities of the dedicated magnet. We were not able to perform the examinations in only 3 % of cases due to the physical shape of the patient and the clinical condition of the patient which may hinder the correct positioning of the limb. The overlapping of the diagnostic accuracy of the E-scan and Artoscan units in the study of the lower limbs, compared with whole-body units and surgery, prompted us to exploit the potentialities of the E-Scan in the study of the shoulder. We had a good correlation between E-Scan, whole-body units, and surgical findings, which confirmed the high diagnostic accuracy of the dedicated system. In conclusion, in our experience carried out in the musculoskeletal system, the dedicated magnets showed promising results. Their diagnostic reliability and utility was comparable to that obtained from conventional units operating at higher magnetic fields. (orig.)

  18. Extremely Large Magnetoresistance at Low Magnetic Field by Coupling the Nonlinear Transport Effect and the Anomalous Hall Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhaochu; Xiong, Chengyue; Zhang, Xu; Guo, Zhen-Gang; Cai, Jianwang; Zhang, Xiaozhong

    2016-04-13

    The anomalous Hall effect of a magnetic material is coupled to the nonlinear transport effect of a semiconductor material in a simple structure to achieve a large geometric magnetoresistance (MR) based on a diode-assisted mechanism. An extremely large MR (>10(4) %) at low magnetic fields (1 mT) is observed at room temperature. This MR device shows potential for use as a logic gate for the four basic Boolean logic operations. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Recombination yield of geminate radical pairs in low magnetic fields - A Green's function method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doktorov, A.B.; Hansen, M.J.; Pedersen, J. Boiden

    2006-01-01

    An analytic expression for the recombination yield of a geminate radical pair with a single spin one half nuclei is derived. The expression is valid for any field strength of the static magnetic field. It is assumed that the spin mixing is caused solely by the hyperfine interaction of the nuclear spin and the difference in Zeeman energies of the two radical partners, that the recombination occurs at the distance of closest approach, and that there is a locally strong dephasing at contact. This is a special result of a new general approach where a Green's function technique is used to recast the stochastic Liouville equation into a low dimensional matrix equation that is particularly convenient for locally strong dephasing systems. The equation is expressed in terms of special values (determined by the magnetic parameters) of the Green's function for the relative motion of the radicals and it is therefore valid for any motional model, e.g. diffusion, one and two site models. The applicability of the strong dephasing approximation is illustrated by comparison with numerical exact results

  20. Development of accurate techniques for controlling polarization of a long wavelength neutron beam in very low magnetic fields. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Takeshi; Ebisawa, Toru; Tasaki, Seiji; Akiyoshi, Tsunekazu; Eguchi, Yoshiaki; Hino, Masahiro; Achiwa, Norio.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of our study is to develop accurate techniques for controlling polarization of a long wavelength neutron beam and to make a thin-film dynamical spin-flip device operated in magnetizing fields less than 100 gauss and in a shorter switching time up to 20 kHz. The device would work as a chopper for a polarized neutron beam and as a magnetic switching device for a multilayer neutron interferometer. We have started to develop multilayer polarizing mirrors functioning under magnetizing fields less than 100 gauss. The multilayers of Permalloy-Ge and Fe-Ge have been produced using the evaporation method under magnetizing fields of about 100 gauss parallel to the Si-wafer substrate surface. The hysteresis loop for in-plane magnetization of the multilayers were measured to discuss their feasibilities for the polarizing device functioning under very low magnetizing fields. The polarizing efficiencies of Fe-Ge and Permalloy-Ge multilayers were 95 % and 91 % with reflectivities of 50 % and 66 % respectively under magnetizing fields of 80 gauss. The report also discusses problems in applying these multilayer polarizing mirrors to ultracold neutrons. (author)

  1. Characterization of large-area photomultipliers under low magnetic fields: Design and performance of the magnetic shielding for the Double Chooz neutrino experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Fernandez-Bedoya, C.; Gil-Botella, I.; Palomares, C.; Rodriguez, I.; Toral, F.; Verdugo, A.

    2010-01-01

    A precise quantitative measurement of the effect of low magnetic fields in Hamamatsu R7081 photomultipliers has been performed. These large-area photomultipliers will be used in the Double Chooz neutrino experiment. A magnetic shielding has been developed for these photomultipliers. Its design and performance is also reported in this paper.

  2. Superconducting magnet systems for MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawksworth, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    MRI is the first large scale commercial application of superconductivity and has not achieved the status of a mature industry with an annual turnover in the magnet industry alone in excess of $150M. Conservative estimates put the investment of the medical industry in MRI as a whole at more than a billion dollars. In the nine years since shipment of the first superconducting whole body imaging magnets of 0.3 Tesla field the standard product of the industry has become a system of 1 meter bore and field strength 0.5 Tesla to 1.5 Tesla. In this paper the evolution of present day MRI magnets from small bore but high field spectrometer magnets is reviewed and the direction of future developments discussed

  3. TU-H-BRA-02: The Physics of Magnetic Field Isolation in a Novel Compact Linear Accelerator Based MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, D; Mutic, S; Shvartsman, S; Chmielewski, T; Fought, G; Sharma, A; Dempsey, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a method for isolating the MRI magnetic field from field-sensitive linear accelerator components at distances close to isocenter. Methods: A MRI-guided radiation therapy system has been designed that integrates a linear accelerator with simultaneous MR imaging. In order to accomplish this, the magnetron, port circulator, radiofrequency waveguide, gun driver, and linear accelerator needed to be placed in locations with low magnetic fields. The system was also required to be compact, so moving these components far from the main magnetic field and isocenter was not an option. The magnetic field sensitive components (exclusive of the waveguide) were placed in coaxial steel sleeves that were electrically and mechanically isolated and whose thickness and placement were optimized using E&M modeling software. Six sets of sleeves were placed 60° apart, 85 cm from isocenter. The Faraday effect occurs when the direction of propagation is parallel to the magnetic RF field component, rotating the RF polarization, subsequently diminishing RF power. The Faraday effect was avoided by orienting the waveguides such that the magnetic field RF component was parallel to the magnetic field. Results: The magnetic field within the shields was measured to be less than 40 Gauss, significantly below the amount needed for the magnetron and port circulator. Additional mu-metal was employed to reduce the magnetic field at the linear accelerator to less than 1 Gauss. The orientation of the RF waveguides allowed the RT transport with minimal loss and reflection. Conclusion: One of the major challenges in designing a compact linear accelerator based MRI-guided radiation therapy system, that of creating low magnetic field environments for the magnetic-field sensitive components, has been solved. The measured magnetic fields are sufficiently small to enable system integration. This work supported by ViewRay, Inc.

  4. TU-H-BRA-02: The Physics of Magnetic Field Isolation in a Novel Compact Linear Accelerator Based MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Low, D [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Mutic, S [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Shvartsman, S; Chmielewski, T; Fought, G; Sharma, A; Dempsey, J [ViewRay, Inc., Oakwood Village, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a method for isolating the MRI magnetic field from field-sensitive linear accelerator components at distances close to isocenter. Methods: A MRI-guided radiation therapy system has been designed that integrates a linear accelerator with simultaneous MR imaging. In order to accomplish this, the magnetron, port circulator, radiofrequency waveguide, gun driver, and linear accelerator needed to be placed in locations with low magnetic fields. The system was also required to be compact, so moving these components far from the main magnetic field and isocenter was not an option. The magnetic field sensitive components (exclusive of the waveguide) were placed in coaxial steel sleeves that were electrically and mechanically isolated and whose thickness and placement were optimized using E&M modeling software. Six sets of sleeves were placed 60° apart, 85 cm from isocenter. The Faraday effect occurs when the direction of propagation is parallel to the magnetic RF field component, rotating the RF polarization, subsequently diminishing RF power. The Faraday effect was avoided by orienting the waveguides such that the magnetic field RF component was parallel to the magnetic field. Results: The magnetic field within the shields was measured to be less than 40 Gauss, significantly below the amount needed for the magnetron and port circulator. Additional mu-metal was employed to reduce the magnetic field at the linear accelerator to less than 1 Gauss. The orientation of the RF waveguides allowed the RT transport with minimal loss and reflection. Conclusion: One of the major challenges in designing a compact linear accelerator based MRI-guided radiation therapy system, that of creating low magnetic field environments for the magnetic-field sensitive components, has been solved. The measured magnetic fields are sufficiently small to enable system integration. This work supported by ViewRay, Inc.

  5. Effect of the low magnetic field on the electrodeposition of Co{sub x}Ni{sub 100−x} alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olvera, S. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, Departamento de Ingeniería en Metalurgia y Materiales, 07738 México, D.F., México (Mexico); Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Química-Física Aplicada, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Arce Estrada, E.M. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, Departamento de Ingeniería en Metalurgia y Materiales, 07738 México, D.F., México (Mexico); Sanchez-Marcos, J. [Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Química-Física Aplicada, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Palomares, F.J.; Vazquez, L. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM-CSIC, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Herrasti, P., E-mail: pilar.herrasti@uam.es [Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Química-Física Aplicada, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-07-15

    Magnetic, chemical and structural properties of electrosynthesized Co{sub x}Ni{sub 100−x} have been studied. The electrodeposition has been conducted both in the presence and absence of a low magnetic field. The application of a perpendicular magnetic field during the synthesis modified slightly the morphology of the alloys. These changes depend more on the film composition than on the applied field, as demonstrated by AFM images. In the absence of magnetic field, the Co{sub x}Ni{sub 100−x} film grows along the (200) direction. However, when the magnetic field was applied, a preferential orientation along the (111) direction was observed. No important magnetic changes are induced by the presence of the magnetic field during the growth. Based on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) experiments, the chemical composition of the films was preserved during preparation regardless of whether or not magnetic field is applied. There has been observed an increase in deposition rate in the presence of field even at these low magnetic fields. - Highlights: • CoNi alloys were electrosynthesized in the absence and presence of a low magnetic field. • Application of a magnetic field produced an orientation in the (111) plane of the alloy. • An external field changes the voltammetric curves reducing the energy required for the alloy formation. • The composition and magnetic properties were constant in the absence and presence of magnetic field.

  6. Central nervous system tuberculosis: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kioumehr, F.; Dadsetan, M.R.; Rooholamini, S.A.; Au, A.

    1994-02-01

    The MRI findings of 18 proven cases of central nervous system (CNS) tuberculosis were reviewed; 10 patients were seropositive for HIV. All had medical, laboratory, or surgical proof of CNS tuberculosis. Eleven patients had meningitis, of whom two also had arachnoiditis. Five patients had focal intra-axial tuberculomas: four brain masses and one an intramedullary spinal lesion. Two patients had focal extra-axial tuberculomas: one in the pontine cistern, and one in the spine. In all 11 patients with meningitis MRI showed diffuse, thick, meningeal enhancement. All intraparenchymal tuberculomas showed low signal intensity on T2-weighted images and ring or nodular enhancement. The extra-axial tuberculomas had areas isointense or hypointense relative to normal brain and spinal cord on T2-weighted images. Although tuberculous meningitis cannot be differentiated from other meningitides on the basis of MR findings, intraparenchymal tuberculomas show characteristic T2 shortening, not found in most other space-occupying lesions. In the appropriate clinical setting, tuberculoma should be considered. (orig.)

  7. Giant room-temperature magnetoresistance in La0.8Tb0.2MnO3 under the low magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yingtang; Chen Ziyu; Wang Chunchang; Jie Qiu; Lue Huibin

    2009-01-01

    Polycrystalline perovskite La 0.8 Tb 0.2 MnO 3 (LTMO) with an orthorhombic phase was synthesized by conventional solid-state reaction. The magnetic and electric properties of La 0.8 Tb 0.2 MnO 3 were examined. The striking finding is that the material exhibits giant magnetoresistance at room temperature as high as -31.8% and -35.7% under the low magnetic fields of 100 and 1000 Oe, respectively. This result suggests that La 0.8 Tb 0.2 MnO 3 has a promising potential in future device developments

  8. Giant room-temperature magnetoresistance in La{sub 0.8}Tb{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} under the low magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yingtang [Physics of Department, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100083 (China); Institute of Physics and Center for Condensed Matter Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Shaanxi University of Technology, Hanzhong 723003 (China)], E-mail: zhangyingtang76@sina.com; Chen Ziyu [Physics of Department, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100083 (China)], E-mail: chenzy@buaa.edu.cn; Wang Chunchang; Jie Qiu; Lue Huibin [Institute of Physics and Center for Condensed Matter Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China)

    2009-05-15

    Polycrystalline perovskite La{sub 0.8}Tb{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LTMO) with an orthorhombic phase was synthesized by conventional solid-state reaction. The magnetic and electric properties of La{sub 0.8}Tb{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} were examined. The striking finding is that the material exhibits giant magnetoresistance at room temperature as high as -31.8% and -35.7% under the low magnetic fields of 100 and 1000 Oe, respectively. This result suggests that La{sub 0.8}Tb{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} has a promising potential in future device developments.

  9. MR cholangio-pancreatography using an open, low magnetic field of 0.2 Tesla. Early clinical results and comparison with a higher magnetic field (1.5 Tesla) and with ERCP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wacker, Q.; Branding, G.; Wolf, K.J.; Zimmer, T.; Faiss, S.

    1997-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate MR cholangio-pancreatography (MRCP) using an open low magnetic field apparatus in normals and in patients with mechanical cholestasis. Methods: MRCP was performed on five normals and on 30 patients, using both an 0.2 Tesla and 1.5 Tesla apparatus. With the low field system, rapid acquisition by relaxation enhancement was used, for the high field system, half Fourier acquisition single shot turbo spin-echo sequences were used. In all patients, sonography and ERCP of PTC was performed; 23 underwent surgery. Results: In all normals it was possible to show the bile duct, hepatic duct, gall bladder and intrahepatic ducts of the first order. Using the high field system, second order ducts could be shown and sometimes third order ducts. In the patients, MRCP, using either system, demonstrated all 21 obstructive sites due to tumours or stenoses. Stones were shown in 69% by the low field system and in 88% by the high field system. Conclusion: MRCP can be successfully carried out using the low field system. In the presence of mechanical cholestasis, image quality is adequate for the localisation of stenoses and occlusions, and using an open magnet, is suitable for planning further intervention. (orig.) [de

  10. Superconducting MRI system, MRT-50A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Asahina, Kiyotaka

    1987-01-01

    The writers' developmental work on MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) was started in 1983. The model used first was MRT-15A (0.15 T). The next model was MRT-22A (0.22 T) which had a magnetic self-shield. As for the development of superconducting MRI system, they started clinical evaluation at Toshiba Central Hospital MRI Center in 1984 and got the official approval in 1985. For the model, use was made of MRT-50A (0.5 T) employing a superconducting magnet made by Toshiba. Herein represented are the basis of the images obtained through MRT-50 and the fact that the application fields of MRI are going on increasing (not only to brain and spine areas but also to the areas of the chest, abdomen and joints), and also the results of the work-in-progress of application software. (author)

  11. MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeter, Aileen; Rudin, Markus; Gianolio, Eliana

    2017-01-01

    This chapter discusses principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and MRI followed by a survey on the major classes of MRI contrast agents (CA), their modes of action, and some of the most significative applications. The two more established classes of MRI-CA are represented by paramagnetic...... been attained that markedly increase the number and typology of systems with CEST properties. Currently much attention is also devoted to hyperpolarized molecules that display a sensitivity enhancement sufficient for their direct exploitation for the formation of the MR image. A real breakthrough...

  12. Comparative study on the critical current performance of Bi-2223/Ag and YBCO wires in low magnetic fields at liquid nitrogen temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, F.; Qu, T.-M.; Gu, C.; Xin, Y.; Gong, W.-Z.; Wu, W.; Han, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The I c values of Bi-2223/Ag and YBCO wires in low fields at 77 K were compared. → The performance of Bi-2223/Ag in low parallel fields was better than that of YBCO. → The phenomenon mentioned above can be verified by the published literature datum. → A new aspect was brought to understand the transport properties of HTS wires. - Abstract: A comparative study on the critical current performance of Bi-2223/Ag and YBCO coated conductor wires in low magnetic fields at liquid nitrogen temperature was carried out in this work. Five commercial high temperature superconductor wires from different manufacturers were collected. Their critical currents were measured in magnetic fields, ranging from 0 to 0.4 T. On contrary to the common conception, the Bi-2223/Ag samples had better performance than YBCO coated conductor samples in the magnetic fields parallel to the wide surface of superconducting wires within the experimental scope. We also found similar results by collecting the concerned datum from the published literatures to confirm our measurement results. At the present stage, this fact made that the Bi-2223/Ag wires might be the preferred choice for the applications with mainly low parallel fields involved, unless other considerations were prioritized.

  13. TU-H-BRA-08: The Design and Characteristics of a Novel Compact Linac-Based MRI Guided Radiation Therapy (MR-IGRT) System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutic, S; Low, D; Chmielewski, T; Fought, G; Hernandez, M; Kawrakow, I; Sharma, A; Shvartsman, S; Dempsey, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the design and characteristics of a novel linac-based MRI guided radiation therapy system that addresses RF and magnetic field interference and that can be housed in conventional radiotherapy vaults. Methods: The MR-IGRT system will provide simultaneous MR imaging combined with both simple (3D) and complex (IMRT, SBRT, SRS) techniques. The system is a combination of a) double-donut split solenoidal superconducting 0.345T MRI; and b) a 90 cm isocenter ring-gantry mounted 6MV, flattening filter-free linac coupled with a stacked doubly-focused multileaf collimator with 4 mm resolution. A novel RF shielding and absorption technology was developed to isolate the beam generating RF emissions from the MR, while a novel magnetic shielding sleeve system was developed to place the magnetic field-sensitive components in low-magnetic field regions. The system design produces high spatial resolution radiation beams with state-of-the art radiation dose characteristics and simultaneous MR imaging. Results: Prototype testing with a spectrum analyzer has demonstrated complete elimination of linac RF inside the treatment room. The magnetic field inside of the magnetic shielding was well below the specification, allowing the linear accelerator to operate normally. A novel on-gantry shimming system maintained < 25 ppm magnetic field homogeneity over a 45 cm spherical field of view for all gantry angles. Conclusion: The system design demonstrates the feasibility coupling a state-of-the art linac system with a 0.345T MRI, enabling highly conformal radiation therapy with simultaneous MR image guidance. S. Mutic’s employer (Washington University) has grant with ViewRay; D. Low is former ViewRay scientific advisory board member (ended October 2015); T. Chmielewski, G. Fought, M. Hernandez, I. Kawrakow, A. Sharma, S. Shvartsman, J. Dempsey are employees of ViewRay with stock options (Dempsey has leadership role and Dempsey/Kawrakow have stock).

  14. TU-H-BRA-08: The Design and Characteristics of a Novel Compact Linac-Based MRI Guided Radiation Therapy (MR-IGRT) System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutic, S [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Low, D [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Chmielewski, T; Fought, G; Hernandez, M; Kawrakow, I; Sharma, A; Shvartsman, S; Dempsey, J [ViewRay, Inc., Oakwood Village, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To describe the design and characteristics of a novel linac-based MRI guided radiation therapy system that addresses RF and magnetic field interference and that can be housed in conventional radiotherapy vaults. Methods: The MR-IGRT system will provide simultaneous MR imaging combined with both simple (3D) and complex (IMRT, SBRT, SRS) techniques. The system is a combination of a) double-donut split solenoidal superconducting 0.345T MRI; and b) a 90 cm isocenter ring-gantry mounted 6MV, flattening filter-free linac coupled with a stacked doubly-focused multileaf collimator with 4 mm resolution. A novel RF shielding and absorption technology was developed to isolate the beam generating RF emissions from the MR, while a novel magnetic shielding sleeve system was developed to place the magnetic field-sensitive components in low-magnetic field regions. The system design produces high spatial resolution radiation beams with state-of-the art radiation dose characteristics and simultaneous MR imaging. Results: Prototype testing with a spectrum analyzer has demonstrated complete elimination of linac RF inside the treatment room. The magnetic field inside of the magnetic shielding was well below the specification, allowing the linear accelerator to operate normally. A novel on-gantry shimming system maintained < 25 ppm magnetic field homogeneity over a 45 cm spherical field of view for all gantry angles. Conclusion: The system design demonstrates the feasibility coupling a state-of-the art linac system with a 0.345T MRI, enabling highly conformal radiation therapy with simultaneous MR image guidance. S. Mutic’s employer (Washington University) has grant with ViewRay; D. Low is former ViewRay scientific advisory board member (ended October 2015); T. Chmielewski, G. Fought, M. Hernandez, I. Kawrakow, A. Sharma, S. Shvartsman, J. Dempsey are employees of ViewRay with stock options (Dempsey has leadership role and Dempsey/Kawrakow have stock).

  15. High magnetic field MRI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Hideaki; Urata, Masami; Satoh, Kozo

    1990-01-01

    A high field superconducting magnet, 4-5 T in central magnetic field, is required for magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) on 31 P, essential nuclei for energy metabolism of human body. This paper reviews superconducting magnets for high field MRSI systems. Examples of the cross-sectional image and the spectrum of living animals are shown in the paper. (author)

  16. Shimadzu superconductive MRI system, SMT-100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Mikio; Shimizu, Koji; Itoh, Masamichi; Fujio, Yasuo; Hashimoto, Yasushi

    1989-01-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system SMT-100 operating at 1.0 T (Tesla) developed lately is reported on this paper. SMT-100 is graded as higher class and more effective system in MR-imaging systems. Purpose of development are (1) supply of high quality imaging, (2) high patient throughput, and (3) low operating cost. Following developments are carried out in this system: (1) development of 1.0 T superconducting magnet without liquid nitrogen vessel, attached self-magnetic shield, (2) development of digital controller system for being able to correspond to future pulse sequences, (3) development of flexible coil and establishment of displacement scanning method by fitting the coil on examination position, (4) separate console system (viewing console and scanning console) for high patient throughput. The outline of SMT-100 and clinical data by the system are reported here. (author)

  17. Cardiac MRI in patients with complex CHD following primary or secondary implantation of MRI-conditional pacemaker system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wakeel, Nadya; O h-Ici, Darach; Schmitt, Katharina R; Messroghli, Daniel R; Riesenkampff, Eugénie; Berger, Felix; Kuehne, Titus; Peters, Bjoern

    2016-02-01

    In patients with CHD, cardiac MRI is often indicated for functional and anatomical assessment. With the recent introduction of MRI-conditional pacemaker systems, cardiac MRI has become accessible for patients with pacemakers. The present clinical study aims to evaluate safety, susceptibility artefacts, and image reading of cardiac MRI in patients with CHD and MRI-conditional pacemaker systems. Material and methods CHD patients with MRI-conditional pacemaker systems and a clinical need for cardiac MRI were examined with a 1.5-T MRI system. Lead function was tested before and after MRI. Artefacts and image readings were evaluated using a four-point grading scale. A total of nine patients with CHD (mean age 34.0 years, range 19.5-53.6 years) received a total of 11 cardiac MRI examinations. Owing to clinical indications, seven patients had previously been converted from conventional to MRI-conditional pacemaker systems. All MRI examinations were completed without adverse effects. Device testing immediately after MRI and at follow-up showed no alteration of pacemaker device and lead function. Clinical questions could be addressed and answered in all patients. Cardiac MRI can be performed safely with high certainty of diagnosis in CHD patients with MRI-conditional pacemaker systems. In case of clinically indicated lead and box changing, CHD patients with non-MRI-conditional pacemaker systems should be considered for complete conversion to MRI-conditional systems.

  18. Superconductive MRI system, MRT-50A/SUPER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hirokazu; Goro, Takehiko

    1992-01-01

    The MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) market has been rapidly growing and more than 1,300 MRI systems are now operating in the Japanese domestic market. An upper-middle range MRI market, which is characterized by high-image quality, has newly appeared between the high-end and middle-range market niches since last year. To be competitive in this upper-middle range market, Toshiba has developed a superconductive MRI system, the MRT-50A/SUPER. The new system featured a high-performance actively shielded gradient coil called the TSGC (twin-shielded gradient coil), installed in a compact superconductive magnet. This paper introduces the MRT-50A/SUPER and describes recent developments in MRI technology. (author)

  19. Neurodegenerative diseases of the central motor system in MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfke, K.

    2005-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases of the central motor system often lead to discrete but functionally important parenchymal abnormalities in various parts of the brain. MRI is the most sensitive imaging method to detect these abnormalities. Various neurodegenerative diseases are presented with their clinical symptoms and MRI findings. Criteria for differential diagnosis are provided as well. (orig.)

  20. Abnormal muscle MRI in a patient with systemic juvenile arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.L.; Levinson, L.; Pachman, L.M.; Poznanski, A.

    1995-01-01

    Although myositis has been described in children with systemic-onset juvenile arthritis (JA), its documentation by MRI has not been reported. We describe a 13-year-old boy with systemic-onset JA, severe myalgia, and elevated muscle enzymes, but normal muscle strength, who had an MRI consistent with myositis. Magnetic resonance imaging can identify the specific location of myositis, allowing more precise definition of a potential complication of systemic JA. (orig.)

  1. Abnormal muscle MRI in a patient with systemic juvenile arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.L. [Dept. of Pediatrics, Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States); Levinson, L. [Dept. of Pediatrics, Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States); Pachman, L.M. [Dept. of Pediatrics, Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States); Poznanski, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Although myositis has been described in children with systemic-onset juvenile arthritis (JA), its documentation by MRI has not been reported. We describe a 13-year-old boy with systemic-onset JA, severe myalgia, and elevated muscle enzymes, but normal muscle strength, who had an MRI consistent with myositis. Magnetic resonance imaging can identify the specific location of myositis, allowing more precise definition of a potential complication of systemic JA. (orig.)

  2. Interference between PET and MRI sub-systems in a silicon-photomultiplier-based PET/MRI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Watabe, Hiroshi; Kanai, Yasukazu; Hatazawa, Jun; Aoki, Masaaki; Sugiyama, Eiji; Watabe, Tadashi; Imaizumi, Masao; Shimosegawa, Eku

    2011-01-01

    The silicon-photomultiplier (Si-PM) is a promising photodetector, especially for integrated PET/MRI systems, due to its small size, high gain, and low sensitivity to static magnetic fields. The major problem using a Si-PM-based PET system within the MRI system is the interference between the PET and MRI units. We measured the interference by combining a Si-PM-based PET system with a permanent-magnet MRI system. When the RF signal-induced pulse height exceeded the lower energy threshold level of the PET system, interference between the Si-PM-based PET system and MRI system was detected. The prompt as well as the delayed coincidence count rates of the Si-PM-based PET system increased significantly. These noise counts produced severe artifacts on the reconstructed images of the Si-PM-based PET system. In terms of the effect of the Si-PM-based PET system on the MRI system, although no susceptibility artifact was observed on the MR images, electronic noise from the PET detector ring was detected by the RF coil and reduced the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the MR images. The S/N degradation of the MR images was reduced when the distance between the RF coil and the Si-PM-based PET system was increased. We conclude that reducing the interference between the PET and MRI systems is essential for achieving the optimum performance of integrated Si-PM PET/MRI systems.

  3. MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the room. Pins, hairpins, metal zippers, and similar metallic items can distort the images. Removable dental work ... an MRI can cause heart pacemakers and other implants not to work as well. The magnets can ...

  4. Experimental research on electric field jump in low magnetic fields: Detection of damage in new ex-situ MgB{sub 2} barriers in MgB{sub 2} wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gajda, D., E-mail: dangajda@op.pl [International Laboratory of High Magnetic Fields and Low Temperatures, Gajowicka 95, 53-421 Wroclaw (Poland); Morawski, A. [Institute of High Pressure Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Sokolowska 29/37, 01-142 Warszawa (Poland); Zaleski, A. [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Okólna 2, 50-422 Wroclaw (Poland); Hossain, M.S.A. [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, AIIM, University of Wollongong, North Wollongong, NSW 2519 (Australia); Rindfleisch, M. [Hyper Tech Research, Inc, 1275 Kinnear Road, Columbus, OH 43212 (United States); Cetner, T. [Institute of High Pressure Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Sokolowska 29/37, 01-142 Warszawa (Poland)

    2015-10-25

    We explored the incorporation of field sweep (constant current and rapidly increasing magnetic field) into the four-probe method as a new technique to detect defects in barrier layers in superconducting MgB{sub 2} wires. This method allows us to observe jumps in the electric field in low magnetic fields. The scanning electron microscopy results indicate that such a jump originates from cracks in Nb barriers and ex-situ MgB{sub 2} barriers. Our research indicates that the field sweep allows us to detect damage to barriers that are made of superconducting materials. This method can be the basis for an industrial method for detecting damages in MgB{sub 2} wires. These defects reduce the critical current of MgB{sub 2} wire. Detection and removal of these defects will allow us to produce MgB{sub 2} wires with ex-situ MgB{sub 2} and Nb barriers that will have improved critical current density. Manufacturing of MgB{sub 2} wires with new ex-situ MgB{sub 2} barriers is a new technological concept. This type of barrier is cheaper and easier to manufacture, leading to cheaper MgB{sub 2} wires. Moreover, we show that critical current can be measured by two methods: current sweep (constant magnetic field and quickly increasing current) and field sweep. - Graphical abstract: Our results indicate that the jump electric field low magnetic fields. This jump indicates damage in Nb and ex situ MgB{sub 2} barrier. Detection and removal of defects will increase J{sub c} in MgB{sub 2} wires and will increase the applicability of MgB{sub 2} wire. - Highlights: • Jump electric field in the 1 T indicates damage to the Nb barrier. • Jump resistance at 9 K indicates damage to the Nb barrier. • Jump electric field in low magnetic field indicates damage to ex situ MgB{sub 2} barrier. • Damage Nb and ex situ MgB{sub 2} barrier significantly reduces the critical current density in the MgB{sub 2} wire.

  5. The OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scoring system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Peterfy, Charles G.; Bird, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scoring system (RAMRIS), evaluating bone erosion, bone marrow edema/osteitis, and synovitis, was introduced in 2002, and is now the standard method of objectively quantifying...... inflammation and damage by MRI in RA trials. The objective of this paper was to identify subsequent advances and based on them, to provide updated recommendations for the RAMRIS. Methods: MRI studies relevant for RAMRIS and technical and scientific advances were analyzed by the OMERACT MRI in Arthritis Working...... Group, which used these data to provide updated considerations on image acquisition, RAMRIS definitions, and scoring systems for the original and new RA pathologies. Further, a research agenda was outlined. Results: Since 2002, longitudinal studies and clinical trials have documented RAMRIS variables...

  6. 19F-MRI of stomach and intestine using 50% FTPA emulsion under 2T MRI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Teturou; Mishima, Hideyuki

    1991-01-01

    1 H-MRI is of clinical value in many lesions, but imaging of gastrointestinal lesions is still difficult by 1 H-MRI. To overcome this weak point of 1 H-MRI, rabbit stomachs were examined by 19 F-MRI using 50% FTPA emulsion. We also examined the stability of 50% FTPA emulsion in the stomach and its absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. We found that 50% FTPA emulsion was very stable at pH 1.5, and only a very small amount was absorbed. A rabbit (weighing 2 kg) was anesthetized, and 100 ml of 50% FTPA emulsion was infused into the stomach by catheter. 19 F-MRI was performed in this rabbit using a 2 T superconducting MRI system designed for human use, and clear pictures of the stomach were obtained. From our results we conclude that 19 F-MRI of the stomach using 50% FTPA emulsion is of practical value. (author)

  7. [Microinjection Monitoring System Design Applied to MRI Scanning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yongfeng

    2017-09-30

    A microinjection monitoring system applied to the MRI scanning was introduced. The micro camera probe was used to stretch into the main magnet for real-time video injection monitoring of injection tube terminal. The programming based on LabVIEW was created to analysis and process the real-time video information. The feedback signal was used for intelligent controlling of the modified injection pump. The real-time monitoring system can make the best use of injection under the condition that the injection device was away from the sample which inside the magnetic room and unvisible. 9.4 T MRI scanning experiment showed that the system in ultra-high field can work stability and doesn't affect the MRI scans.

  8. A new MRI grading system for chondromalacia patellae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özgen, Ali; Taşdelen, Neslihan; Fırat, Zeynep

    2017-04-01

    Background Chondromalacia patellae is a very common disorder. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is widely used to investigate patellar cartilage lesions, there is no descriptive MRI-based grading system for chondromalacia patellae. Purpose To propose a new MRI grading system for chondromalacia patellae with corresponding high resolution images which might be useful in precisely reporting and comparing knee examinations in routine daily practice and used in predicting natural course and clinical outcome of the patellar cartilage lesions. Material and Methods High resolution fat-saturated proton density (FS PD) images in the axial plane with corresponding T2 mapping images were reviewed. A detailed MRI grading system covering the deficiencies of the existing gradings has been set and presented on these images. Two experienced observers blinded to clinical data examined 44 knee MR images and evaluated patellar cartilage changes according to the proposed grading system. Inter- and intra-rater validity testing using kappa statistics were calculated. Results A descriptive and detailed grading system with corresponding FS PD and T2 mapping images has been presented. Inter-rater agreement was 0.80 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.71-0.89). Intra-rater agreements were 0.83 (95% CI, 0.74-0.91) for observer A and 0.79 (95% CI, 0.70-0.88) for observer B (k-values). Conclusion We present a new MRI grading system for chondromalacia patellae with corresponding images and good inter- and intra-rater agreement which might be useful in reporting and comparing knee MRI examinations in daily practice and may also have the potential for using more precisely predicting prognosis and clinical outcome of the patients.

  9. Clinical application of MRI to fetal central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guangbing; Chen Liguang; Ma Yuxiang; Liu Wen; Lin Xiangtao; Shi Hao; Yang Zhenzhen; Qu Jun

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the value of MRI on fetal central nervous system. Methods: Twenty-four women with complicated pregnancies, aged from 22 to 32 years (average 27 years) and with gestation from 23-39 weeks (average 30 weeks) were studied with a 1.5T superconductive MR unit within 24 hours after ultrasound studies. T 2 -weighted MR imaging was performed using HASTE and T 1 -weighted MR imaging was using FLASH. Comparison of the diagnosis of MRI and ultrasound were done with autopsy or postnatal follow-up MRI. Results: Of the 24 cases, 24 fetus were found. The fetal brain, gyrus, sulcus, corpus callosum, thalamus, cerebellum, brain stem, and spinal cord were shown more clearly on MR T 2 -weighted images. T 1 -weighted images were not as good as T 2 -weighted images. Twenty-seven lesions were visualized by ultrasound and thirty-one by MRI in these twenty-four fetuses. By MRI study, two cases were conformed their ultrasound diagnosis, ten cases were completed their ultrasound diagnosis, and twelve cases were made the same diagnosis as ultrasound. Conclusion: MR has advantages in displaying fetal central nervous system anatomy over ultrasound, the quality of MR images is not affected by maternal somatotype, volume of amniotic fluid, fetal skull and the pelvic skeleton of pregnant women. Based on ultrasound, MR imaging is a valuable complement to sonography in difficult cases, it can conforming, completing, even more correcting the diagnosis made by ultrasound. (authors)

  10. Passive magnetic shielding in MRI-Linac systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Brendan; Kolling, Stefan; Oborn, Brad M.; Keall, Paul

    2018-04-01

    Passive magnetic shielding refers to the use of ferromagnetic materials to redirect magnetic field lines away from vulnerable regions. An application of particular interest to the medical physics community is shielding in MRI systems, especially integrated MRI-linear accelerator (MRI-Linac) systems. In these systems, the goal is not only to minimize the magnetic field in some volume, but also to minimize the impact of the shield on the magnetic fields within the imaging volume of the MRI scanner. In this work, finite element modelling was used to assess the shielding of a side coupled 6 MV linac and resultant heterogeneity induced within the 30 cm diameter of spherical volume (DSV) of a novel 1 Tesla split bore MRI magnet. A number of different shield parameters were investigated; distance between shield and magnet, shield shape, shield thickness, shield length, openings in the shield, number of concentric layers, spacing between each layer, and shield material. Both the in-line and perpendicular MRI-Linac configurations were studied. By modifying the shield shape around the linac from the starting design of an open ended cylinder, the shielding effect was boosted by approximately 70% whilst the impact on the magnet was simultaneously reduced by approximately 10%. Openings in the shield for the RF port and beam exit were substantial sources of field leakage; however it was demonstrated that shielding could be added around these openings to compensate for this leakage. Layering multiple concentric shield shells was highly effective in the perpendicular configuration, but less so for the in-line configuration. Cautious use of high permeability materials such as Mu-metal can greatly increase the shielding performance in some scenarios. In the perpendicular configuration, magnetic shielding was more effective and the impact on the magnet lower compared with the in-line configuration.

  11. Low-Cost High-Performance MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarracanie, Mathieu; Lapierre, Cristen D.; Salameh, Najat; Waddington, David E. J.; Witzel, Thomas; Rosen, Matthew S.

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is unparalleled in its ability to visualize anatomical structure and function non-invasively with high spatial and temporal resolution. Yet to overcome the low sensitivity inherent in inductive detection of weakly polarized nuclear spins, the vast majority of clinical MRI scanners employ superconducting magnets producing very high magnetic fields. Commonly found at 1.5-3 tesla (T), these powerful magnets are massive and have very strict infrastructure demands that preclude operation in many environments. MRI scanners are costly to purchase, site, and maintain, with the purchase price approaching $1 M per tesla (T) of magnetic field. We present here a remarkably simple, non-cryogenic approach to high-performance human MRI at ultra-low magnetic field, whereby modern under-sampling strategies are combined with fully-refocused dynamic spin control using steady-state free precession techniques. At 6.5 mT (more than 450 times lower than clinical MRI scanners) we demonstrate (2.5 × 3.5 × 8.5) mm3 imaging resolution in the living human brain using a simple, open-geometry electromagnet, with 3D image acquisition over the entire brain in 6 minutes. We contend that these practical ultra-low magnetic field implementations of MRI (standards for affordable (<$50,000) and robust portable devices.

  12. Fetal central nervous system anomalies: fast MRI vs ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Wenzhong; Xia Liming; Yang Minjie; Feng Dingyi; Hu Junwu; Zou Mingli; Wang Chengyuan; Chen Xinlin; Yang Xiaohong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the ability of fast MRI to detect fetal central nervous system (CNS) anomalies and to compare its performance with that of prenatal ultrasonography (US). Methods Forty-eight pregnant women were detected by conventional prenatal US and MRI. Twenty-two fetuses with CNS anomalies were conformed by autopsy and follow-up. The MR and US appearances of fetal CNS structure were compared to each other and to that of autopsy. Results: A total of 26 CNS anomalies were identified by autopsy (n=17) and follow-up (n=9) including anencephaly (n=6), rachischisis (n=2), encephalocele (n=3), congenital hydrocephalus (n=7), alobar holoprosencephaly (n=1), porencephalia (n=3), arachnoid cyst (n=2) and choroids plexus cyst (n=2). US diagnosed 24 CNS anomalies, the correct diagnostic rate was 92.3%, the false-positive rate was 3.8%, the missed-diagnostic rate was 3.8%. MRI diagnosed 23 CNS anomalies, the correct-diagnostic rate was 88.5%, the false-positive rate was 3.8% ,the missed-diagnostic rate was 7.7%. There was no difference between US and MRI (P>0.05), but MRI have larger FOV, higher tissues resolution, and can demonstrate gray-white matter in detail. Conclusions: MR imaging has a similar sensitivity to that of US in the detection of fetal CNS anomalies. (authors)

  13. An MRI-compatible hand sensory vibrotactile system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Fa; Lakshminarayanan, Kishor; Slota, Gregory P; Seo, Na Jin; Webster, John G

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the application of vibrotactile noise to the wrist or back of the hand has been shown to enhance fingertip tactile sensory perception (Enders et al 2013), supporting the potential for an assistive device worn at the wrist, that generates minute vibrations to help the elderly or patients with sensory deficit. However, knowledge regarding the detailed physiological mechanism behind this sensory improvement in the central nervous system, especially in the human brain, is limited, hindering progress in development and use of such assistive devices. To enable investigation of the impact of vibrotactile noise on sensorimotor brain activity in humans, a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-compatible vibrotactile system was developed to provide vibrotactile noise during an MRI of the brain. The vibrotactile system utilizes a remote (outside the MR room) signal amplifier which provides a voltage from –40 to +40 V to drive a 12 mm diameter piezoelectric vibrator (inside the MR room). It is portable and is found to be MRI-compatible which enables its use for neurologic investigation with MRI. The system was also found to induce an improvement in fingertip tactile sensation, consistent with the previous study. (note)

  14. Ultra-low field MRI food inspection system prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawagoe, Satoshi, E-mail: s133413@edu.tut.ac.jp; Toyota, Hirotomo; Hatta, Junichi; Ariyoshi, Seiichiro; Tanaka, Saburo, E-mail: tanakas@ens.tut.ac.jp

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • We have developed a ULF-MRI system using HTS-SQUID for food inspection. • We developed a compact magnetically shielded box to attenuate environmental noise. • The 2D-MR image was reconstructed from the grid processing data using 2D-FFT method. • The 2D-MR images of a disk-shaped and a multiple cell water sample were obtained. • The results showed the possibility of applying the ULF-MRI system to food inspection. - Abstract: We develop an ultra-low field (ULF) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system using a high-temperature superconducting quantum interference device (HTS-SQUID) for food inspection. A two-dimensional (2D)-MR image is reconstructed from the grid processing raw data using the 2D fast Fourier transform method. In a previous study, we combined an LC resonator with the ULF-MRI system to improve the detection area of the HTS-SQUID. The sensitivity was improved, but since the experiments were performed in a semi-open magnetically shielded room (MSR), external noise was a problem. In this study, we develop a compact magnetically shielded box (CMSB), which has a small open window for transfer of a pre-polarized sample. Experiments were performed in the CMSB and 2D-MR images were compared with images taken in the semi-open MSR. A clear image of a disk-shaped water sample is obtained, with an outer dimension closer to that of the real sample than in the image taken in the semi-open MSR. Furthermore, the 2D-MR image of a multiple cell water sample is clearly reconstructed. These results show the applicability of the ULF-MRI system in food inspection.

  15. Fetal MRI of the urinary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoermann, Marcus; Brugger, Peter C.; Balassy, Csilla; Witzani, Linde; Prayer, Daniela

    2006-01-01

    The assessment of the urinary system is typically performed by ultrasound. Nevertheless, an ultrasound may be inconclusive in fetuses with renal diseases that result in anhydramnios or oligohydramnios. In such cases, and in other cases in which ultrasound is limited, further investigation with MR should be considered. In the following article, we will provide an overview of the most commonly encountered disorders of the urinary system and their appearance on fetal MR imaging. Fetal MR imaging can accurately diagnose a wide variety of urinary tract disorders and must be seen as a valuable complementary tool to ultrasound in the assessment of the urinary system, particularly in cases of inconclusive ultrasound findings

  16. Fetal MRI of the urinary system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoermann, Marcus [Department of Radiodiagnostics, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: marcus.hoermann@meduniwien.ac.at; Brugger, Peter C. [Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Balassy, Csilla [Department of Radiodiagnostics, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Witzani, Linde [Department of Radiodiagnostics, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Prayer, Daniela [Department of Radiodiagnostics, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-02-15

    The assessment of the urinary system is typically performed by ultrasound. Nevertheless, an ultrasound may be inconclusive in fetuses with renal diseases that result in anhydramnios or oligohydramnios. In such cases, and in other cases in which ultrasound is limited, further investigation with MR should be considered. In the following article, we will provide an overview of the most commonly encountered disorders of the urinary system and their appearance on fetal MR imaging. Fetal MR imaging can accurately diagnose a wide variety of urinary tract disorders and must be seen as a valuable complementary tool to ultrasound in the assessment of the urinary system, particularly in cases of inconclusive ultrasound findings.

  17. Development of a new compact intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging system: concept and initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Akio; Sameshima, Tetsuro; Sora, Shigeo; Kimura, Toshikazu; Nishimura, Kengo; Itoh, Hirotaka; Shibahashi, Keita; Shono, Naoyuki; Machida, Toru; Hara, Naoko; Mikami, Nozomi; Harihara, Yasushi; Kawate, Ryoichi; Ochiai, Chikayuki; Wang, Weimin; Oguro, Toshiki

    2014-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during surgery has been shown to improve surgical outcomes, but the current intraoperative MRI systems are too large to install in standard operating suites. Although 1 compact system is available, its imaging quality is not ideal. We developed a new compact intraoperative MRI system and evaluated its use for safety and efficacy. This new system has a magnetic gantry: a permanent magnet of 0.23 T and an interpolar distance of 32 cm. The gantry system weighs 2.8 tons and the 5-G line is within the circle of 2.6 m. We created a new field-of-view head coil and a canopy-style radiofrequency shield for this system. A clinical trial was initiated, and the system has been used in 44 patients. This system is significantly smaller than previous intraoperative MRI systems. High-quality T2 images could discriminate tumor from normal brain tissue and identify anatomic landmarks for accurate surgery. The average imaging time was 45.5 minutes, and no clinical complications or MRI system failures occurred. Floating organisms or particles were minimal (1/200 L maximum). This intraoperative, compact, low-magnetic-field MRI system can be installed in standard operating suites to provide relatively high-quality images without sacrificing safety. We believe that such a system facilitates the introduction of the intraoperative MRI.

  18. Superconductors Enable Lower Cost MRI Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The future looks bright, light, and green, especially where aircraft are concerned. The division of NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program called the Subsonic Fixed Wing Project is aiming to reach new heights by 2025-2035, improving the efficiency and environmental impact of air travel by developing new capabilities for cleaner, quieter, and more fuel efficient aircraft. One of the many ways NASA plans to reach its aviation goals is by combining new aircraft configurations with an advanced turboelectric distributed propulsion (TeDP) system. Jeff Trudell, an engineer at Glenn Research Center, says, "The TeDP system consists of gas turbines generating electricity to power a large number of distributed motor-driven fans embedded into the airframe." The combined effect increases the effective bypass ratio and reduces drag to meet future goals. "While room temperature components may help reduce emissions and noise in a TeDP system, cryogenic superconducting electric motors and generators are essential to reduce fuel burn," says Trudell. Superconductors provide significantly higher current densities and smaller and lighter designs than room temperature equivalents. Superconductors are also able to conduct direct current without resistance (loss of energy) below a critical temperature and applied field. Unfortunately, alternating current (AC) losses represent the major part of the heat load and depend on the frequency of the current and applied field. A refrigeration system is necessary to remove the losses and its weight increases with decreasing temperature. In 2001, a material called magnesium diboride (MgB2) was discovered to be superconducting. The challenge, however, has been learning to manufacture MgB2 inexpensively and in long lengths to wind into large coils while meeting the application requirements.

  19. Simulation of spin dynamics: a tool in MRI system development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoecker, Tony; Vahedipour, Kaveh; Shah, N Jon

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a routine diagnostic tool in the clinics and the method of choice in soft-tissue contrast medical imaging. It is an important tool in neuroscience to investigate structure and function of the living brain on a systemic level. The latter is one of the driving forces to further develop MRI technology, as neuroscience especially demands higher spatiotemporal resolution which is to be achieved through increasing the static main magnetic field, B 0 . Although standard MRI is a mature technology, ultra high field (UHF) systems, at B 0 ≥ 7 T, offer space for new technical inventions as the physical conditions dramatically change. This work shows that the development strongly benefits from computer simulations of the measurement process on the basis of a semi-classical, nuclear spin-1/2 treatment given by the Bloch equations. Possible applications of such simulations are outlined, suggesting new solutions to the UHF-specific inhomogeneity problems of the static main field as well as the high-frequency transmit field.

  20. MRI findings of central nervous system granulocytic sarcoma (chloroma)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Man; Kim, Myung Soon; Kim, Ik Soo; Cho, Kwan Soo

    1997-01-01

    To characterize MRI findings of central nervous system (CNS) granulocytic sarcoma (chloroma) and to analyse the points which differentiate it from other CNS tumors. We evaluated MRI in six patients with CNS granulocytic sarcoma proven by surgery or bone marrow biopsy (intracranical, one case and spine five cases). A 0.5T superconductive MR machine was used for diagnosis and, axial, coronal and sagittal T1- and T2-weighted spin echo images and Gd-DTPA enhanced T1-weighted images were obtained. We retrospectively analized the location, signal intensity, margin, contrast enhancement and homogeneity, and bony change around the tumor. MRI findings of CNS granulocytic sarcomas were as follows : one tumor was seen to be an extra-axial mass in the posterior fossa of the brain, four were epidural, and one was an epidural and presacral masses in the spine;tumor magins were lobulated and three were smooth. On T1-weighted images, all tumors were of isoignal intensity;on T2-weighted images, four were of isosignal intersity and two were of high signal intensity. Contrast enhancement was inhomogeneous in five of six cases. Bony change around the tumor was seen in two cases. On T1-weighted images, CNS granulocytic sarcomas (chloromas) were of isosignal intensity, relative to brain parenchyma or spinal cord;on T2-weighted images, they were of iso or high signal intensity, with relative contrast enhancement. These points could be useful in differentiating them from other CNS tumors

  1. Clinical and MRI correlation in multiple system atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negoro, Kiyoshi; Morimatsu, Mitsunori (Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1994-05-01

    By using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we studied 11 patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA): 5 olivo-pontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA), 2 Shy-Drager syndrome (SDS), and 4 striatonigral degeneration (SND). The diagnoses of OPCA, SDS and SND were clinically made. The MR images were performed on 1.5 tesla MRI unit (Siemens Asahi Medical, Magnetom H15), using a T[sub 2]-weighted spin echo (SE) sequence (TR: 2000-3000 ms, TE: 80-90 ms), a T[sub 1]-weighted SE sequence (TR: 550, TE: 15), and a proton density-weighted (PD) SE sequence (TR: 2000-3000, TE: 12-22). In the patients with OPCA, MRI revealed cerebellar and brainstem atrophy and degeneration of pontine transverse fibers more marked than in the patients with SDS and SND. T[sub 2]-weighted images showed low intensity in posterolateral putamina in one OPCA patient and all of SDS and SND patients. PD images demonstrated the abnormal slit-like high signals in posterolateral putamina in three SND. The degree of cerebellar ataxia was not well correlated with cerebellar and brainstem atrophy and degeneration of pontine transverse fibers. There was a positive correlation between the atrophy of cerebellum and brainstem and the duration of cerebellar ataxia. In most of the patients with Parkinsonism, MRI demonstrated abnormal low signals in putamina on T[sub 2]-weighted images. There were positive correlations between the abnormal low signals putamina and the duration and severity of Parkinsonism. Though abnormal low signals in lateral putamina may be seen in normal aging and other disorders on T[sub 2]-weighted images, it is useful to evaluate Parkinsonism in MSA. We believe that the abnormal slit-like high signals in posterolateral putamina in MSA may suggest loss of neurons and gliosis. (author).

  2. Robotic System for MRI-Guided Stereotactic Neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Cole, Gregory A.; Shang, Weijian; Harrington, Kevin; Camilo, Alex; Pilitsis, Julie G.; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    Stereotaxy is a neurosurgical technique that can take several hours to reach a specific target, typically utilizing a mechanical frame and guided by preoperative imaging. An error in any one of the numerous steps or deviations of the target anatomy from the preoperative plan such as brain shift (up to 20 mm), may affect the targeting accuracy and thus the treatment effectiveness. Moreover, because the procedure is typically performed through a small burr hole opening in the skull that prevents tissue visualization, the intervention is basically “blind” for the operator with limited means of intraoperative confirmation that may result in reduced accuracy and safety. The presented system is intended to address the clinical needs for enhanced efficiency, accuracy, and safety of image-guided stereotactic neurosurgery for Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) lead placement. The work describes a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided, robotically actuated stereotactic neural intervention system for deep brain stimulation procedure, which offers the potential of reducing procedure duration while improving targeting accuracy and enhancing safety. This is achieved through simultaneous robotic manipulation of the instrument and interactively updated in situ MRI guidance that enables visualization of the anatomy and interventional instrument. During simultaneous actuation and imaging, the system has demonstrated less than 15% signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) variation and less than 0.20% geometric distortion artifact without affecting the imaging usability to visualize and guide the procedure. Optical tracking and MRI phantom experiments streamline the clinical workflow of the prototype system, corroborating targeting accuracy with 3-axis root mean square error 1.38 ± 0.45 mm in tip position and 2.03 ± 0.58° in insertion angle. PMID:25376035

  3. Analysis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) involving the central nervous system by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Kimihiro; Hara, Masako; Nakajima, Shinji and others

    1989-04-01

    Involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) commonly occurs in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). But definitive diagnosis remains difficult even with computed tomography (CT). In this study, we used the recently developed technique, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for CNS lupus and compared it with CT scans. CT was performed with a General Electric 8800 CT/T scanner. MRI was performed using a Mitsubishi Electric MMI-150 S. Ten patients with CNS lupus were divided into 3 groups. Group I included 4 cases with neurological manifestations alone. All lesions seen on CT were also detected by MRI, with greater clarity and extent. Furthermore, MRI depicted several microinfarcts in white matter without symptoms. Group II included 5 cases with psychiatric features alone. MRI detected a thalamic microinfarct in only one case while CT showed no abnormality in all cases. Group III included 1 case with both neurological and psychiatric symptoms. MRI demonstrated a small infarct of midbrain corresponding with neurological symptoms, more clearly than CT. Therefore MRI demonstrates the degree of brain involvement in SLE more accurately than CT. (author).

  4. Analysis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) involving the central nervous system by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kimihiro; Hara, Masako; Nakajima, Shinji

    1989-01-01

    Involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) commonly occurs in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). But definitive diagnosis remains difficult even with computed tomography (CT). In this study, we used the recently developed technique, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for CNS lupus and compared it with CT scans. CT was performed with a General Electric 8800 CT/T scanner. MRI was performed using a Mitsubishi Electric MMI-150 S. Ten patients with CNS lupus were divided into 3 groups. Group I included 4 cases with neurological manifestations alone. All lesions seen on CT were also detected by MRI, with greater clarity and extent. Furthermore, MRI depicted several microinfarcts in white matter without symptoms. Group II included 5 cases with psychiatric features alone. MRI detected a thalamic microinfarct in only one case while CT showed no abnormality in all cases. Group III included 1 case with both neurological and psychiatric symptoms. MRI demonstrated a small infarct of midbrain corresponding with neurological symptoms, more clearly than CT. Therefore MRI demonstrates the degree of brain involvement in SLE more accurately than CT. (author)

  5. Value of prenatal MRI in early evaluation of fetal central nervous system anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Keiichi [Kugayama Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Nakamura, Masanao; Hino, Ken [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine] [and others

    2002-08-01

    Advances in technology and the need for accurate prenatal diagnoses have produced great improvements in fetal diagnosis by MRI. However, there are still many problems with diagnosis of central nervous system (CNS) anomalies using MRI (e.g., time of diagnosis, factors limiting diagnostic ability. Fifteen cases referred to our clinic from 1992 to 2001 and examined using intrauterine ultrasound, prenatal MRI and postnatal MRI were reviewed retrospectively. All clinical records and findings from prenatal MRI, postnatal MRI and ultrasound were reviewed. Prenatal MRI was found to be equal in diagnostic power to ultrasound and postnatal MRI in 10 of the 15 cases. In the remaining 5 fetuses, the findings of prenatal MRI were not the same to those of prenatal ultrasound and postnatal MRI. Our goal was to determine the value of prenatal MRI in diagnosis of fetal CNS anomalies, to ascertain how this information might be used for counseling, and to assess its impact on pregnancy management. Prenatal MRI provided useful information for support personnel (e.g., physicians, nurses, caseworkers, religious advisers). (author)

  6. Modeling systemic and renal gadolinium chelate transport with MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Votaw, John R.; Martin, Diego [Emory University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2008-01-15

    The advent of modern MRI scanners and computer equipment permits the rapid sequential collection of images of gadolinium chelate (Gd) transit through the kidney. The excellent spatial and temporal (0.9 s) resolution permits analyzing the shape of the recovered curves with a sophisticated model that includes both space and time. The purpose of this manuscript is to present such a mathematical model. By building into the model significant physical processes that contribute to the shape of the measured curve, quantitative values can be assigned to important parameters. In this work, quantitative values are determined for blood dispersion through the cardio-pulmonary system, systemic clearance rate of Gd, blood flow into each kidney, blood transit time in each kidney, the extraction rate of Gd across the capillary membrane, interstitial distribution volume, and the GFR for each kidney. (orig.)

  7. Quantitative evaluation of the reticuloendothelial system function with dynamic MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Liu

    Full Text Available To evaluate the reticuloendothelial system (RES function by real-time imaging blood clearance as well as hepatic uptake of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPIO using dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with two-compartment pharmacokinetic modeling.Kinetics of blood clearance and hepatic accumulation were recorded in young adult male 01b74 athymic nude mice by dynamic T2* weighted MRI after the injection of different doses of SPIO nanoparticles (0.5, 3 or 10 mg Fe/kg. Association parameter, Kin, dissociation parameter, Kout, and elimination constant, Ke, derived from dynamic data with two-compartment model, were used to describe active binding to Kupffer cells and extrahepatic clearance. The clodrosome and liposome were utilized to deplete macrophages and block the RES function to evaluate the capability of the kinetic parameters for investigation of macrophage function and density.The two-compartment model provided a good description for all data and showed a low sum squared residual for all mice (0.27±0.03. A lower Kin, a lower Kout and a lower Ke were found after clodrosome treatment, whereas a lower Kin, a higher Kout and a lower Ke were observed after liposome treatment in comparison to saline treatment (P<0.005.Dynamic SPIO-enhanced MR imaging with two-compartment modeling can provide information on RES function on both a cell number and receptor function level.

  8. Techniques for Interventional MRI Guidance in Closed-Bore Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Harald; Kahn, Thomas; Moche, Michael

    2018-02-01

    Efficient image guidance is the basis for minimally invasive interventions. In comparison with X-ray, computed tomography (CT), or ultrasound imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides the best soft tissue contrast without ionizing radiation and is therefore predestined for procedural control. But MRI is also characterized by spatial constraints, electromagnetic interactions, long imaging times, and resulting workflow issues. Although many technical requirements have been met over the years-most notably magnetic resonance (MR) compatibility of tools, interventional pulse sequences, and powerful processing hardware and software-there is still a large variety of stand-alone devices and systems for specific procedures only.Stereotactic guidance with the table outside the magnet is common and relies on proper registration of the guiding grids or manipulators to the MR images. Instrument tracking, often by optical sensing, can be added to provide the physicians with proper eye-hand coordination during their navigated approach. Only in very short wide-bore systems, needles can be advanced at the extended arm under near real-time imaging. In standard magnets, control and workflow may be improved by remote operation using robotic or manual driving elements.This work highlights a number of devices and techniques for different interventional settings with a focus on percutaneous, interstitial procedures in different organ regions. The goal is to identify technical and procedural elements that might be relevant for interventional guidance in a broader context, independent of the clinical application given here. Key challenges remain the seamless integration into the interventional workflow, safe clinical translation, and proper cost effectiveness.

  9. The OMERACT Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Scoring System: Updated Recommendations by the OMERACT MRI in Arthritis Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Peterfy, Charles G; Bird, Paul; Gandjbakhch, Frédérique; Glinatsi, Daniel; Eshed, Iris; Haavardsholm, Espen A; Lillegraven, Siri; Bøyesen, Pernille; Ejbjerg, Bo; Foltz, Violaine; Emery, Paul; Genant, Harry K; Conaghan, Philip G

    2017-11-01

    The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scoring system (RAMRIS), evaluating bone erosion, bone marrow edema/osteitis, and synovitis, was introduced in 2002, and is now the standard method of objectively quantifying inflammation and damage by MRI in RA trials. The objective of this paper was to identify subsequent advances and based on them, to provide updated recommendations for the RAMRIS. MRI studies relevant for RAMRIS and technical and scientific advances were analyzed by the OMERACT MRI in Arthritis Working Group, which used these data to provide updated considerations on image acquisition, RAMRIS definitions, and scoring systems for the original and new RA pathologies. Further, a research agenda was outlined. Since 2002, longitudinal studies and clinical trials have documented RAMRIS variables to have face, construct, and criterion validity; high reliability and sensitivity to change; and the ability to discriminate between therapies. This has enabled RAMRIS to demonstrate inhibition of structural damage progression with fewer patients and shorter followup times than has been possible with conventional radiography. Technical improvements, including higher field strengths and improved pulse sequences, allow higher image resolution and contrast-to-noise ratio. These have facilitated development and validation of scoring methods of new pathologies: joint space narrowing and tenosynovitis. These have high reproducibility and moderate sensitivity to change, and can be added to RAMRIS. Combined scores of inflammation or joint damage may increase sensitivity to change and discriminative power. However, this requires further research. Updated 2016 RAMRIS recommendations and a research agenda were developed.

  10. Positioning device for MRI-guided high intensity focused ultrasound system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damianou, Christakis [Frederick Institute of Technology (FIT), Limassol (Cyprus); MEDSONIC, LTD, Limassol (Cyprus); Ioannides, Kleanthis [Polikliniki Igia, Limassol (Cyprus); Milonas, Nicos [Frederick Institute of Technology (FIT), Limassol (Cyprus)

    2008-04-15

    A prototype magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)- compatible positioning device was used to move an MRI-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducer. The positioning device has three user-controlled degrees of freedom that allow access to various targeted lesions. The positioning device was designed and fabricated using construction materials selected for compatibility with high magnetic fields and fast switching magnetic field gradients encountered inside MRI scanners. The positioning device incorporates only MRI compatible materials such as piezoelectric motors, plastic sheets, brass screws, plastic pulleys and timing belts. The HIFU/MRI system includes the multiple subsystems (a) HIFU system, (b) MR imaging, (c) Positioning device (robot) and associate drivers, (d) temperature measurement, (e) cavitation detection, (f) MRI compatible camera, and (g) Soft ware. The MRI compatibility of the system was successfully demonstrated in a clinical high-field MRI scanner. The ability of the robot to accurately move the transducer thus creating discrete and overlapping lesions in biological tissue was tested successfully. A simple, cost effective, portable positioning device has been developed which can be used in virtually any clinical MRI scanner since it can be sited on the scanner's table. The propagation of HIFU can use either a lateral or superior-inferior approach. Discrete and large lesions were created successfully with reproducible results. (orig.)

  11. First image from a combined positron emission tomography and field-cycled MRI system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindseil, Geron A; Gilbert, Kyle M; Scholl, Timothy J; Handler, William B; Chronik, Blaine A

    2011-07-01

    Combining positron emission tomography and MRI modalities typically requires using either conventional MRI with a MR-compatible positron emission tomography system or a modified MR system with conventional positron emission tomography. A feature of field-cycled MRI is that all magnetic fields can be turned off rapidly, enabling the use of conventional positron emission tomography detectors based on photomultiplier tubes. In this demonstration, two photomultiplier tube-based positron emission tomography detectors were integrated with a field-cycled MRI system (0.3 T/4 MHz) by placing them into a 9-cm axial gap. A positron emission tomography-MRI phantom consisting of a triangular arrangement of positron-emitting point sources embedded in an onion was imaged in a repeating interleaved sequence of ∼1 sec MRI then 1 sec positron emission tomography. The first multimodality images from the combined positron emission tomography and field-cycled MRI system show no additional artifacts due to interaction between the systems and demonstrate the potential of this approach to combining positron emission tomography and MRI. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Acoustic fMRI noise : Linear time-invariant system model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sierra, Carlos V. Rizzo; Versluis, Maarten J.; Hoogduin, Johannes M.; Duifhuis, Hendrikus (Diek)

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) enables sites of brain activation to be localized in human subjects. For auditory system studies, however, the acoustic noise generated by the scanner tends to interfere with the assessments of this activation. Understanding and modeling fMRI acoustic

  13. Vantage TitanTM 3T 3-tesla MRI system with enhanced serviceability and comfort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, Hitoshi; Okamoto, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Takao

    2011-01-01

    Since 3-tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems appeared on the market, in addition to their clinical usefulness a variety of issues have been pointed out in the clinical setting. The 3-tesla MRI system has therefore gained a reputation as a difficult system suitable only for hospital facilities including university hospitals that specialize in medical research. To rectify this situation, Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation has developed the Vantage Titan TM 3T, which is expected to not only improve the MRI examination environment, but also to be applicable to patients with claustrophobia and those with large physiques for whom MRI examination has not been appropriate until now, while maintaining the clinical usefulness of the 3-tesla MRI system. The Vantage Titan 3T system also incorporates the Pianissimo TM noise reduction mechanism, which has already been introduced in our 1.5-tesla MRI system and has been highly evaluated by the market. This reduces the stress of patients by providing a quieter and more open examination environment compared with conventional MRI systems. (author)

  14. Diffusion microscopist simulator - The development and application of a Monte Carlo simulation system for diffusion MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, C.H.

    2011-09-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) has made a significant breakthrough in neurological disorders and brain research thanks to its exquisite sensitivity to tissue cyto-architecture. However, as the water diffusion process in neuronal tissues is a complex biophysical phenomena at molecular scale, it is difficult to infer tissue microscopic characteristics on a voxel scale from dMRI data. The major methodological contribution of this thesis is the development of an integrated and generic Monte Carlo simulation framework, 'Diffusion Microscopist Simulator' (DMS), which has the capacity to create 3D biological tissue models of various shapes and properties, as well as to synthesize dMRI data for a large variety of MRI methods, pulse sequence design and parameters. DMS aims at bridging the gap between the elementary diffusion processes occurring at a micrometric scale and the resulting diffusion signal measured at millimetric scale, providing better insights into the features observed in dMRI, as well as offering ground-truth information for optimization and validation of dMRI acquisition protocols for different applications. We have verified the performance and validity of DMS through various benchmark experiments, and applied to address particular research topics in dMRI. Based on DMS, there are two major application contributions in this thesis. First, we use DMS to investigate the impact of finite diffusion gradient pulse duration (delta) on fibre orientation estimation in dMRI. We propose that current practice of using long delta, which is enforced by the hardware limitation of clinical MRI scanners, is actually beneficial for mapping fibre orientations, even though it violates the underlying assumption made in q-space theory. Second, we employ DMS to investigate the feasibility of estimating axon radius using a clinical MRI system. The results suggest that the algorithm for mapping the direct microstructures is applicable to dMRI data acquired from

  15. Longitudinal diffusion MRI for treatment response assessment: Preliminary experience using an MRI-guided tri-cobalt 60 radiotherapy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yingli; Cao, Minsong; Sheng, Ke; Gao, Yu; Chen, Allen; Kamrava, Mitch; Lee, Percy; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Lamb, James; Thomas, David; Low, Daniel; Hu, Peng

    2016-03-01

    To demonstrate the preliminary feasibility of a longitudinal diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) strategy for assessing patient response to radiotherapy at 0.35 T using an MRI-guided radiotherapy system (ViewRay). Six patients (three head and neck cancer, three sarcoma) who underwent fractionated radiotherapy were enrolled in this study. A 2D multislice spin echo single-shot echo planar imaging diffusion pulse sequence was implemented on the ViewRay system and tested in phantom studies. The same pulse sequence was used to acquire longitudinal diffusion data (every 2-5 fractions) on the six patients throughout the entire course of radiotherapy. The reproducibility of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements was assessed using reference regions and the temporal variations of the tumor ADC values were evaluated. In diffusion phantom studies, the ADC values measured on the ViewRay system matched well with reference ADC values with ViewRay MRI. Larger patient cohort studies are warranted to correlate the longitudinal diffusion measurements to patient outcomes. Such an approach may enable response-guided adaptive radiotherapy.

  16. Third Degree Skin Burns Caused by an MRI Compatible Electrocardiographic Monitoring System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Lau; Isaksen, Christin Rosendahl Graff; Kristensen, Birgitte Hornbæk

    of the assigned compatibility specifications of the leads due to the use of TFE sequences with high SAR values. MRI compatible monitoring systems are only safe when used with proper care. The presented burn cases may have been avoided if space had been provided between the ECG leads and the skin using a cloth....... This holds true even in cases in which the devices are MRI compatible and therefore safe in specified MRI environments. Of particular interest to this case report is skin burns caused by the ECG monitoring equipment. In this context, several cases of ECG electrode related burns have been reported, while...... burns caused by the ECG cables are less common [1]. This case report presents two unusual cases of skin burns which were caused by MRI safe ECG leads during scanning. Cases:Two patients suffered third degree burns using MRI approved ECG leads (Medrad® Veris MR Monitor system) in a Siemens Skyra 3...

  17. MRI study of degenerative process in multiple system atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagishita, Toshiyuki; Kojima, Shigeyuki; Hirayama, Keizo

    1995-01-01

    The characteristic morphological changes of the brainstem and cerebellar regions of multiple system atrophy (MSA) were studied by MRI in varing subtypes, that is olivoponto cerebellar atrophy (OPCA: 23 cases), striatonigral degeneration (SND: 7 cases) and Shy-Drager's syndrome (SDS: 9 cases). OPCA was characterized by atrophy of the entire regions of the brainstem and the cerebellum. SND and SDS tended to show atrophy similar in type but lessin extent to OPCA. The common lesions in MSA were atrophy of the pontine base and cerebellum, and dilation of the fourth ventricle. Atrophy of the pontine base was more dominant in the inferior part than in the superior part, and cerebellar atrophy was more dominant in the superior part than in the inferior part, indicating that degeneration of the pontocerebellar pathway proceeds principally along fibers connecting the inferior part of the pons and the superior part of the cerebellum. Dilation of the fourth ventricle indicated atrophy of the middle cerebellar peduncle. In almost all the cases of OPCA and about a half the cases of SND and SDS, the pontine base and the middle cerebellar peduncle appeared as high signal intensity on T 2 weighted image and as low intensity on T 1 , suggesting degeneration and demyelination. In a few cases of OPCA, the dorsolateral part of the putamen were demonstrated as low signal intensity on T 2 weighted image. (author)

  18. MRI study of degenerative process in multiple system atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagishita, Toshiyuki; Kojima, Shigeyuki; Hirayama, Keizo [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1995-02-01

    The characteristic morphological changes of the brainstem and cerebellar regions of multiple system atrophy (MSA) were studied by MRI in varing subtypes, that is olivoponto cerebellar atrophy (OPCA: 23 cases), striatonigral degeneration (SND: 7 cases) and Shy-Drager`s syndrome (SDS: 9 cases). OPCA was characterized by atrophy of the entire regions of the brainstem and the cerebellum. SND and SDS tended to show atrophy similar in type but lessin extent to OPCA. The common lesions in MSA were atrophy of the pontine base and cerebellum, and dilation of the fourth ventricle. Atrophy of the pontine base was more dominant in the inferior part than in the superior part, and cerebellar atrophy was more dominant in the superior part than in the inferior part, indicating that degeneration of the pontocerebellar pathway proceeds principally along fibers connecting the inferior part of the pons and the superior part of the cerebellum. Dilation of the fourth ventricle indicated atrophy of the middle cerebellar peduncle. In almost all the cases of OPCA and about a half the cases of SND and SDS, the pontine base and the middle cerebellar peduncle appeared as high signal intensity on T{sub 2} weighted image and as low intensity on T{sub 1}, suggesting degeneration and demyelination. In a few cases of OPCA, the dorsolateral part of the putamen were demonstrated as low signal intensity on T{sub 2} weighted image. (author).

  19. MRI changes in the central nervous system in a child with lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gieron, M.A.; Khoromi, S.; Campos, A.

    1995-01-01

    We report on a 10-year-old girl with systemic lupus erythematosus who presented in status epilepticus as the only manifestation of central nervous system involvement. MRI of the brain showed diffuse gray and white matter lesions which almost completely resolved after treatment with methylprednisolone. MRI findings in this child are similar to those in adults with diffuse clinical manifestations. The study is essential in the initial evaluation of patients suspected of central nervous system lupus. (orig.)

  20. MRI changes in the central nervous system in a child with lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gieron, M A [Dept. of Pediatrics, Univ. of South Florida, Coll. of Medicine, Tampa, FL (United States); Khoromi, S [Dept. of Neurology, Univ. of South Florida, Coll. of Medicine, Tampa, FL (United States); Campos, A [Dept. of Pediatrics, Univ. of South Florida, Coll. of Medicine, Tampa, FL (United States)

    1995-05-01

    We report on a 10-year-old girl with systemic lupus erythematosus who presented in status epilepticus as the only manifestation of central nervous system involvement. MRI of the brain showed diffuse gray and white matter lesions which almost completely resolved after treatment with methylprednisolone. MRI findings in this child are similar to those in adults with diffuse clinical manifestations. The study is essential in the initial evaluation of patients suspected of central nervous system lupus. (orig.)

  1. An MRI system for imaging neonates in the NICU: initial feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkach, Jean A.; Loew, Wolfgang; Pratt, Ron G.; Daniels, Barret R.; Giaquinto, Randy O.; Winter, Patrick M.; Li, Yu; Dumoulin, Charles L. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Imaging Research Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Hillman, Noah H.; Jobe, Alan H.; Kallapur, Suhas G.; Merhar, Stephanie L.; Ikegami, Machiko; Whitsett, Jeffrey A. [Perinatal Institute, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Neonatology and Pulmonary Biology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Kline-Fath, Beth M. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Transporting premature infants from a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to a radiology department for MRI has medical risks and logistical challenges. To develop a small 1.5-T MRI system for neonatal imaging that can be easily installed in the NICU and to evaluate its performance using a sheep model of human prematurity. A 1.5-T MRI system designed for orthopedic use was adapted for neonatal imaging. The system was used for MRI examinations of the brain, chest and abdomen in 12 premature lambs during the first hours of life. Spin-echo, fast spin-echo and gradient-echo MR images were evaluated by two pediatric radiologists. All animals remained physiologically stable throughout the imaging sessions. Animals were imaged at two or three time points. Seven brain MRI examinations were performed in seven different animals, 23 chest examinations in 12 animals and 19 abdominal examinations in 11 animals. At each anatomical location, high-quality images demonstrating good spatial resolution, signal-to-noise ratio and tissue contrast were routinely obtained within 30 min using standard clinical protocols. Our preliminary experience demonstrates the feasibility and potential of the neonatal MRI system to provide state-of-the-art MRI capabilities within the NICU. Advantages include overall reduced cost and site demands, lower acoustic noise, improved ease of access and reduced medical risk to the neonate. (orig.)

  2. An MRI system for imaging neonates in the NICU: initial feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkach, Jean A.; Loew, Wolfgang; Pratt, Ron G.; Daniels, Barret R.; Giaquinto, Randy O.; Winter, Patrick M.; Li, Yu; Dumoulin, Charles L.; Hillman, Noah H.; Jobe, Alan H.; Kallapur, Suhas G.; Merhar, Stephanie L.; Ikegami, Machiko; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Kline-Fath, Beth M.

    2012-01-01

    Transporting premature infants from a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to a radiology department for MRI has medical risks and logistical challenges. To develop a small 1.5-T MRI system for neonatal imaging that can be easily installed in the NICU and to evaluate its performance using a sheep model of human prematurity. A 1.5-T MRI system designed for orthopedic use was adapted for neonatal imaging. The system was used for MRI examinations of the brain, chest and abdomen in 12 premature lambs during the first hours of life. Spin-echo, fast spin-echo and gradient-echo MR images were evaluated by two pediatric radiologists. All animals remained physiologically stable throughout the imaging sessions. Animals were imaged at two or three time points. Seven brain MRI examinations were performed in seven different animals, 23 chest examinations in 12 animals and 19 abdominal examinations in 11 animals. At each anatomical location, high-quality images demonstrating good spatial resolution, signal-to-noise ratio and tissue contrast were routinely obtained within 30 min using standard clinical protocols. Our preliminary experience demonstrates the feasibility and potential of the neonatal MRI system to provide state-of-the-art MRI capabilities within the NICU. Advantages include overall reduced cost and site demands, lower acoustic noise, improved ease of access and reduced medical risk to the neonate. (orig.)

  3. An MRI system for imaging neonates in the NICU: initial feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkach, Jean A; Hillman, Noah H; Jobe, Alan H; Loew, Wolfgang; Pratt, Ron G; Daniels, Barret R; Kallapur, Suhas G; Kline-Fath, Beth M; Merhar, Stephanie L; Giaquinto, Randy O; Winter, Patrick M; Li, Yu; Ikegami, Machiko; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Dumoulin, Charles L

    2012-11-01

    Transporting premature infants from a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to a radiology department for MRI has medical risks and logistical challenges. To develop a small 1.5-T MRI system for neonatal imaging that can be easily installed in the NICU and to evaluate its performance using a sheep model of human prematurity. A 1.5-T MRI system designed for orthopedic use was adapted for neonatal imaging. The system was used for MRI examinations of the brain, chest and abdomen in 12 premature lambs during the first hours of life. Spin-echo, fast spin-echo and gradient-echo MR images were evaluated by two pediatric radiologists. All animals remained physiologically stable throughout the imaging sessions. Animals were imaged at two or three time points. Seven brain MRI examinations were performed in seven different animals, 23 chest examinations in 12 animals and 19 abdominal examinations in 11 animals. At each anatomical location, high-quality images demonstrating good spatial resolution, signal-to-noise ratio and tissue contrast were routinely obtained within 30 min using standard clinical protocols. Our preliminary experience demonstrates the feasibility and potential of the neonatal MRI system to provide state-of-the-art MRI capabilities within the NICU. Advantages include overall reduced cost and site demands, lower acoustic noise, improved ease of access and reduced medical risk to the neonate.

  4. WE-EF-BRD-02: Battling Maxwell’s Equations: Physics Challenges and Solutions for Hybrid MRI Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keall, P. [University of Sydney (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    MRI-guided treatment is a growing area of medicine, particularly in radiotherapy and surgery. The exquisite soft tissue anatomic contrast offered by MRI, along with functional imaging, makes the use of MRI during therapeutic procedures very attractive. Challenging the utility of MRI in the therapy room are many issues including the physics of MRI and the impact on the environment and therapeutic instruments, the impact of the room and instruments on the MRI; safety, space, design and cost. In this session, the applications and challenges of MRI-guided treatment will be described. The session format is: Past, present and future: MRI-guided radiotherapy from 2005 to 2025: Jan Lagendijk Battling Maxwell’s equations: Physics challenges and solutions for hybrid MRI systems: Paul Keall I want it now!: Advances in MRI acquisition, reconstruction and the use of priors to enable fast anatomic and physiologic imaging to inform guidance and adaptation decisions: Yanle Hu MR in the OR: The growth and applications of MRI for interventional radiology and surgery: Rebecca Fahrig Learning Objectives: To understand the history and trajectory of MRI-guided radiotherapy To understand the challenges of integrating MR imaging systems with linear accelerators To understand the latest in fast MRI methods to enable the visualisation of anatomy and physiology on radiotherapy treatment timescales To understand the growing role and challenges of MRI for image-guided surgical procedures My disclosures are publicly available and updated at: http://sydney.edu.au/medicine/radiation-physics/about-us/disclosures.php.

  5. WE-EF-BRD-02: Battling Maxwell’s Equations: Physics Challenges and Solutions for Hybrid MRI Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keall, P.

    2015-01-01

    MRI-guided treatment is a growing area of medicine, particularly in radiotherapy and surgery. The exquisite soft tissue anatomic contrast offered by MRI, along with functional imaging, makes the use of MRI during therapeutic procedures very attractive. Challenging the utility of MRI in the therapy room are many issues including the physics of MRI and the impact on the environment and therapeutic instruments, the impact of the room and instruments on the MRI; safety, space, design and cost. In this session, the applications and challenges of MRI-guided treatment will be described. The session format is: Past, present and future: MRI-guided radiotherapy from 2005 to 2025: Jan Lagendijk Battling Maxwell’s equations: Physics challenges and solutions for hybrid MRI systems: Paul Keall I want it now!: Advances in MRI acquisition, reconstruction and the use of priors to enable fast anatomic and physiologic imaging to inform guidance and adaptation decisions: Yanle Hu MR in the OR: The growth and applications of MRI for interventional radiology and surgery: Rebecca Fahrig Learning Objectives: To understand the history and trajectory of MRI-guided radiotherapy To understand the challenges of integrating MR imaging systems with linear accelerators To understand the latest in fast MRI methods to enable the visualisation of anatomy and physiology on radiotherapy treatment timescales To understand the growing role and challenges of MRI for image-guided surgical procedures My disclosures are publicly available and updated at: http://sydney.edu.au/medicine/radiation-physics/about-us/disclosures.php

  6. Characterization of acoustic noise in a neonatal intensive care unit MRI system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkach, Jean A.; Li, Yu; Pratt, Ronald G.; Loew, Wolfgang; Daniels, Barret R.; Giaquinto, Randy O.; Dumoulin, Charles L. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Imaging Research Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Baroch, Kelly A. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Audiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Merhar, Stephanie L. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Neonatology and Pulmonary Biology, Perinatal Institute, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Kline-Fath, Beth M. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2014-08-15

    To eliminate the medical risks and logistical challenges of transporting infants from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to the radiology department for magnetic resonance imaging, a small-footprint 1.5-T MRI scanner has been developed for neonatal imaging within the NICU. MRI is known to be noisy, and exposure to excessive acoustic noise has the potential to elicit physiological distress and impact development in the term and preterm infant. To measure and compare the acoustic noise properties of the NICU MRI system against those of a conventional 1.5-T MRI system. We performed sound pressure level measurements in the NICU MRI scanner and in a conventional adult-size whole-body 1.5-T MRI system. Sound pressure level measurements were made for six standard clinical MR imaging protocols. The average sound pressure level value, reported in unweighted (dB) and A-weighted (dBA) decibels for all six imaging pulse sequences, was 73.8 dB and 88 dBA for the NICU scanner, and 87 dB and 98.4 dBA for the conventional MRI scanner. The sound pressure level values measured on the NICU scanner for each of the six MR imaging pulse sequences were consistently and significantly (P = 0.03) lower, with an average difference of 14.2 dB (range 10-21 dB) and 11 dBA (range 5-18 dBA). The sound pressure level frequency response of the two MR systems showed a similar harmonic structure above 200 Hz for all imaging sequences. The amplitude, however, was appreciably lower for the NICU scanner, by as much as 30 dB, for frequencies below 200 Hz. The NICU MRI system is quieter than conventional MRI scanners, improving safety for the neonate and facilitating siting of the unit within the NICU. (orig.)

  7. Characterization of acoustic noise in a neonatal intensive care unit MRI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkach, Jean A.; Li, Yu; Pratt, Ronald G.; Loew, Wolfgang; Daniels, Barret R.; Giaquinto, Randy O.; Dumoulin, Charles L.; Baroch, Kelly A.; Merhar, Stephanie L.; Kline-Fath, Beth M.

    2014-01-01

    To eliminate the medical risks and logistical challenges of transporting infants from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to the radiology department for magnetic resonance imaging, a small-footprint 1.5-T MRI scanner has been developed for neonatal imaging within the NICU. MRI is known to be noisy, and exposure to excessive acoustic noise has the potential to elicit physiological distress and impact development in the term and preterm infant. To measure and compare the acoustic noise properties of the NICU MRI system against those of a conventional 1.5-T MRI system. We performed sound pressure level measurements in the NICU MRI scanner and in a conventional adult-size whole-body 1.5-T MRI system. Sound pressure level measurements were made for six standard clinical MR imaging protocols. The average sound pressure level value, reported in unweighted (dB) and A-weighted (dBA) decibels for all six imaging pulse sequences, was 73.8 dB and 88 dBA for the NICU scanner, and 87 dB and 98.4 dBA for the conventional MRI scanner. The sound pressure level values measured on the NICU scanner for each of the six MR imaging pulse sequences were consistently and significantly (P = 0.03) lower, with an average difference of 14.2 dB (range 10-21 dB) and 11 dBA (range 5-18 dBA). The sound pressure level frequency response of the two MR systems showed a similar harmonic structure above 200 Hz for all imaging sequences. The amplitude, however, was appreciably lower for the NICU scanner, by as much as 30 dB, for frequencies below 200 Hz. The NICU MRI system is quieter than conventional MRI scanners, improving safety for the neonate and facilitating siting of the unit within the NICU. (orig.)

  8. [Mechanical Shimming Method and Implementation for Permanent Magnet of MRI System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Tingqiang; Chen, Jinjun

    2015-03-01

    A mechanical shimming method and device for permanent magnet of MRI system has been developed to meet its stringent homogeneity requirement without time-consuming passive shimming on site, installation and adjustment efficiency has been increased.

  9. 4 Tesla Whole Body MRI MRSI System for Investigation of Neurodegenerative Diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weiner, Michael W

    2004-01-01

    The overall long-term goal of imaging research to be performed with this 4 Tesla Siemens/Bruker MRI system is the development of improved diagnostic methods for accurate detection of neurodegenerative...

  10. Testing the quality of images for permanent magnet desktop MRI systems using specially designed phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jianfeng; Wang, Guozhu; Min, Jiao; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Pengcheng

    2013-12-21

    Our aim was to measure the performance of desktop magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems using specially designed phantoms, by testing imaging parameters and analysing the imaging quality. We designed multifunction phantoms with diameters of 18 and 60 mm for desktop MRI scanners in accordance with the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) report no. 28. We scanned the phantoms with three permanent magnet 0.5 T desktop MRI systems, measured the MRI image parameters, and analysed imaging quality by comparing the data with the AAPM criteria and Chinese national standards. Image parameters included: resonance frequency, high contrast spatial resolution, low contrast object detectability, slice thickness, geometrical distortion, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and image uniformity. The image parameters of three desktop MRI machines could be measured using our specially designed phantoms, and most parameters were in line with MRI quality control criterion, including: resonance frequency, high contrast spatial resolution, low contrast object detectability, slice thickness, geometrical distortion, image uniformity and slice position accuracy. However, SNR was significantly lower than in some references. The imaging test and quality control are necessary for desktop MRI systems, and should be performed with the applicable phantom and corresponding standards.

  11. MRI system scoring for differentiation of malignant versus benign stricture of the common bile duct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savastano S

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to differentiate between malignant and benign strictures of the common bile duct by using a scoring system. MRI scans of 34 patients with indeterminate biliary stricture on prior imaging were reviewed; non-enhanced MRI, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP, diffusion weighted imaging, and contrast-enhanced MRIs were considered for analysis. Ten radiologic findings were significant for malignancy: luminal irregularity, post-contrast conspicuity, high signal intensity on diffusion weighted MRI, luminal stenosis asymmetry, T2-weighted MRI signal intensity, indistinct outer border, abrupt stenosis, bile duct dilatation ≥ 12.5 mm, stenosis length ≥ 10.5 mm, and wall thickness ≥ 4.5 mm. Since none of these findings was pathognomonic for malignancy, a simple system scoring based on statistically significant findings was developed, where each of the above findings counts for one point. A score of 6 or higher was found only in patients with a malignant stricture of the common bile duct; 70% of patients with a benign stenosis had a score of 1, or 2, and all patients with benign lesions had scores of less than 5. This MRI scoring system can assist in the differential diagnosis of common bile duct stricture with high accuracy; to be widely applicable, the MRI score needs to be validated in a prospective patient population.

  12. Testing the quality of images for permanent magnet desktop MRI systems using specially designed phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, Jianfeng; Wang, Guozhu; Min, Jiao; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Pengcheng

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to measure the performance of desktop magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems using specially designed phantoms, by testing imaging parameters and analysing the imaging quality. We designed multifunction phantoms with diameters of 18 and 60 mm for desktop MRI scanners in accordance with the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) report no. 28. We scanned the phantoms with three permanent magnet 0.5 T desktop MRI systems, measured the MRI image parameters, and analysed imaging quality by comparing the data with the AAPM criteria and Chinese national standards. Image parameters included: resonance frequency, high contrast spatial resolution, low contrast object detectability, slice thickness, geometrical distortion, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and image uniformity. The image parameters of three desktop MRI machines could be measured using our specially designed phantoms, and most parameters were in line with MRI quality control criterion, including: resonance frequency, high contrast spatial resolution, low contrast object detectability, slice thickness, geometrical distortion, image uniformity and slice position accuracy. However, SNR was significantly lower than in some references. The imaging test and quality control are necessary for desktop MRI systems, and should be performed with the applicable phantom and corresponding standards. (paper)

  13. Piezoelectrically Actuated Robotic System for MRI-Guided Prostate Percutaneous Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Hao; Shang, Weijian; Cole, Gregory; Li, Gang; Harrington, Kevin; Camilo, Alexander; Tokuda, Junichi; Tempany, Clare M.; Hata, Nobuhiko; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a fully-actuated robotic system for percutaneous prostate therapy under continuously acquired live magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance. The system is composed of modular hardware and software to support the surgical workflow of intra-operative MRI-guided surgical procedures. We present the development of a 6-degree-of-freedom (DOF) needle placement robot for transperineal prostate interventions. The robot consists of a 3-DOF needle driver module and a 3-DOF Cartesian...

  14. Desmoid fibromatosis: MRI features of response to systemic therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheth, Pooja J.; Subhawong, Ty K. [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine/Jackson Memorial Hospital, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States); Del Moral, Spencer; Wilky, Breelyn A.; Trent, Jonathan C. [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine/Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Cohen, Jonathan [Oncology and Radiation Associates, Miami, FL (United States); Rosenberg, Andrew E. [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Miami, FL (United States); Temple, H.T. [Center for Orthopedic Innovations, Miami, FL (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Imaging criteria for measuring the response of desmoid fibromatosis to systemic therapy are not well established. We evaluated a series of patients with desmoids who underwent systemic therapy to document magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features associated with a positive clinical response. This Institutional Review Board-approved retrospective study included 23 patients (mean age 40.5) with 29 extra-abdominal tumors. Therapeutic regimens included cytotoxic chemotherapy (n = 19), targeted therapy (n = 3), and nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS; n = 1). Clinical effects were categorized as progressive disease, stable, or partial response. Maximum tumor dimension (D{sub max}), approximate tumor volume (V{sub Tumor}), and quantitative tumor T2 hyperintensity and contrast enhancement (relative to muscle) for pre- and post-treatment MRIs were compared. Three lesions progressed, 5 lesions were stable, whereas 21 showed a clinical response. D{sub max} decreased more in responders (mean -11.0 %) than in stable/progressive lesions (mean -3.6 and 0 % respectively, p = 0.28, ANOVA); by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST 1.1) 27 out of 29 lesions were ''stable,'' including the 3 progressive lesions. In responders, V{sub Tumor} change averaged -29.4 %, but -19.2 % and +32.5 % in stable and progressive lesions respectively (p = 0.002, ANOVA); by 3D criteria 14 out of 29 lesions showed a partial response. T2 hyperintensity decreased by 50-54 % in partial response/stable disease, but only by 10 % in progressive lesions (p = 0.049, t test). Changes in contrast enhancement ranged from -23 % to 0 %, but were not statistically significant among response groups (p = 0.37). Change in T2 hyperintensity showed a positive correlation with volumetric change (r = 0.40). Decreases in volume and T2 hyperintensity reflect the positive response of desmoid fibromatosis to systemic therapy; RECIST 1.1 criteria are not sensitive to clinically

  15. Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma: Incorporating MRI in the Planning of Treatment Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eloraby, A.; Zaki, I.

    2001-01-01

    Primary lymphoma of the central nervous system is becoming increasingly encountered secondary to the acquired immune-deficiency disorders. MRI is rapidly evolving diagnostic tool in the management of the lymphomatous CNS primary infiltrates. Methods and materials: 40 patients of the National Cancer Institute of Cairo University were studied by medium and high power MRI machines before and after intra-venous contrast enhancement. Results: The cerebral lesions exhibited specific diagnostic criteria regarding the anatomical configuration, signal pattern, peri-focal oedema and response to steroids, such manifestations made. Conclusion: MRI a highly reliable tool in the management of the disease. The work proved that spinal cord primary lymphoma is a rare entity

  16. Clinical evaluation of shoulder kinematic MRI using an open-type system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Seiichiro; Togami, Izumi; Sasai, Nobuya

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies on kinematic MRI of the shoulder using cylindrical-type MRI systems were limited to internal or external rotation. The open-type MRI system enables kinematic MRI to be carried out for the abductive position, and is expected to permit evaluation of the superior and inferior glenoid labrum. It is important to evaluate the superior and inferior glenoid labrum in cases of sports injuries (baseball, tennis, etc.). We evaluated the superior and inferior glenoid labrum for abductive motion in asymptomatic healthy volunteers as a preliminary study. As the abduction angle increased, the superior labrum moved into the joint space. Its shape changed from round or triangular to crescent (p<0.0001), and there was increased signal for larger abduction angles (p<0.0001). On the other hand, the shape of the inferior labrum tended to change from crescent to triangular or round (p<0.0001). Increased signal was seen in the inferior labrum on about half the shoulders (N.P.). This did not change as the abduction angle increased. Our results define normal patterns for the superior and inferior glenoid labrum on abductive kinematic MRI in healthy volunteers. Abductive kinematic studies using an open-type MRI system, which permits dynamic evaluation of the superior and inferior glenoid labrum, are expected to be useful for various patients with sports injuries. (author)

  17. Respiratory motion-resolved, self-gated 4D-MRI using Rotating Cartesian K-space (ROCK): Initial clinical experience on an MRI-guided radiotherapy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fei; Zhou, Ziwu; Du, Dongsu; Gao, Yu; Rashid, Shams; Cao, Minsong; Shaverdian, Narek; Hegde, John V; Steinberg, Michael; Lee, Percy; Raldow, Ann; Low, Daniel A; Sheng, Ke; Yang, Yingli; Hu, Peng

    2018-06-01

    To optimize and evaluate the respiratory motion-resolved, self-gated 4D-MRI using Rotating Cartesian K-space (ROCK-4D-MRI) method in a 0.35 T MRI-guided radiotherapy (MRgRT) system. The study included seven patients with abdominal tumors treated on the MRgRT system. ROCK-4D-MRI and 2D-CINE, was performed immediately after one of the treatment fractions. Motion quantification based on 4D-MRI was compared with those based on 2D-CINE. The image quality of 4D-MRI was evaluated against 4D-CT. The gross tumor volumes (GTV) were defined based on individual respiratory phases of both 4D-MRI and 4D-CT and compared for their variability over the respiratory cycle. The motion measurements based on 4D-MRI matched well with 2D-CINE, with differences of 1.04 ± 0.52 mm in the superior-inferior and 0.54 ± 0.21 mm in the anterior-posterior directions. The image quality scores of 4D-MRI were significantly higher than 4D-CT, with better tumor contrast (3.29 ± 0.76 vs. 1.86 ± 0.90) and less motion artifacts (3.57 ± 0.53 vs. 2.29 ± 0.95). The GTVs were more consistent in 4D-MRI than in 4D-CT, with significantly smaller GTV variability (9.31 ± 4.58% vs. 34.27 ± 23.33%). Our study demonstrated the clinical feasibility of using the ROCK-4D-MRI to acquire high quality, respiratory motion-resolved 4D-MRI in a low-field MRgRT system. The 4D-MRI image could provide accurate dynamic information for radiotherapy treatment planning. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of pharmacokinetic parameters derived with high temporal resolution DCE MRI using simultaneous PET/MRI system in breast cancer: A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jena, Amarnath, E-mail: drjena2002@gmail.com [Department of Molecular Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals, Sarita Vihar, Delhi–Mathura Road, New Delhi 110076 (India); Taneja, Sangeeta; Singh, Aru; Negi, Pradeep; Mehta, Shashi Bhushan [Department of Molecular Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals, Sarita Vihar, Delhi–Mathura Road, New Delhi 110076 (India); Sarin, Ramesh [Department of Surgical Oncology, Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals, Sarita Vihar, Delhi–Mathura Road, New Delhi 110076 (India)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Simultaneous PET/MRI (with 3T MRI in the core) for quantitative pharmacokinetics. • Diagnostic accuracy of pharmacokinetic parameters like K{sup trans}, K{sub ep} and v{sub e} acquired through this system. • Incorporating high temporal resolution sequence with short acquisition time of 60 s within the routine DCE MRI in a simultaneous PET/MRI system. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the reliability of pharmacokinetic parameters like K{sup trans}, Kep and v{sub e} derived through DCE MRI breast protocol using 3 T Simultaneous PET/MRI (3 Tesla Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging) system in distinguishing benign and malignant lesions. Materials and methods: High temporal resolution DCE (Dynamic Contrast Enhancement) MRI performed as routine breast MRI for diagnosis or as a part of PET/MRI for cancer staging using a 3 T simultaneous PET/MRI system in 98 women having 109 breast lesions were analyzed for calculation of pharmacokinetic parameters (K{sup trans}, v{sub e}, and Kep) at 60 s time point using an in-house developed computation scheme. Results: Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed a cut off value for K{sup trans}, Kep, v{sub e} as 0.50, 2.59, 0.15 respectively which reliably distinguished benign and malignant breast lesions. Data analysis revealed an overall accuracy of 94.50%, 79.82% and 87.16% for K{sup trans}, Kep, v{sub e} respectively. Introduction of native T1 normalization with an externally placed phantom showed a higher accuracy (94.50%) than without native T1 normalization (93.50%) with an increase in specificity of 87% vs 84%. Conclusion: Overall the results indicate that reliable measurement of pharmacokinetic parameters with reduced acquisition time is feasible in a 3TMRI embedded PET/MRI system with reasonable accuracy and application may be extended to exploit the potential of simultaneous PET/MRI in further work on breast cancer.

  19. A validated clinical MRI injury scoring system in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, Shamik B.; Vesoulis, Zachary A.; Rao, Rakesh; Liao, Steve M.; Mathur, Amit M. [Washington University School of Medicine, Division of Newborn Medicine, Edward Mallinckrodt Department of Pediatrics, St. Louis, MO (United States); Shimony, Joshua S.; McKinstry, Robert C. [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2017-10-15

    Deep nuclear gray matter injury in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is associated with worse neurodevelopmental outcomes. We previously published a qualitative MRI injury scoring system utilizing serial T1-weighted, T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), weighted for deep nuclear gray matter injury. To establish the validity of the MRI scoring system with neurodevelopmental outcome at 18-24 months. MRI scans from neonates with moderate to severe HIE treated with therapeutic hypothermia were evaluated. Signal abnormality was scored on T1-weighted, T2-weighted and DWI sequences and assessed using an established system in five regions: (a) subcortical: caudate nucleus, globus pallidus and putamen, thalamus and the posterior limb of the internal capsule; (b) white matter; (c) cortex, (d) cerebellum and (e) brainstem. MRI injury was graded as none, mild, moderate or severe. Inter-rater reliability was tested on a subset of scans by two independent and blinded neuroradiologists. Surviving infants underwent the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development-III (Bayley-III) at 18-24 months. Data were analyzed using univariate and multivariate linear and logistic regression. Fifty-seven eligible neonates underwent at least one MRI scan in the first 2 weeks of life. Mean postnatal age at scan 1 was 4±2 days in 50/57 (88%) neonates and 48/54 (89%) surviving infants underwent scan 2 at 10±2 days. In 54/57 (95%) survivors, higher MRI injury grades were significantly associated with worse outcomes in the cognitive, motor and language domains of the Bayley-III. A qualitative MRI injury scoring system weighted for deep nuclear gray matter injury is a significant predictor of neurodevelopmental outcome at 18-24 months in neonates with HIE. (orig.)

  20. A validated clinical MRI injury scoring system in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivedi, Shamik B.; Vesoulis, Zachary A.; Rao, Rakesh; Liao, Steve M.; Mathur, Amit M.; Shimony, Joshua S.; McKinstry, Robert C.

    2017-01-01

    Deep nuclear gray matter injury in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is associated with worse neurodevelopmental outcomes. We previously published a qualitative MRI injury scoring system utilizing serial T1-weighted, T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), weighted for deep nuclear gray matter injury. To establish the validity of the MRI scoring system with neurodevelopmental outcome at 18-24 months. MRI scans from neonates with moderate to severe HIE treated with therapeutic hypothermia were evaluated. Signal abnormality was scored on T1-weighted, T2-weighted and DWI sequences and assessed using an established system in five regions: (a) subcortical: caudate nucleus, globus pallidus and putamen, thalamus and the posterior limb of the internal capsule; (b) white matter; (c) cortex, (d) cerebellum and (e) brainstem. MRI injury was graded as none, mild, moderate or severe. Inter-rater reliability was tested on a subset of scans by two independent and blinded neuroradiologists. Surviving infants underwent the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development-III (Bayley-III) at 18-24 months. Data were analyzed using univariate and multivariate linear and logistic regression. Fifty-seven eligible neonates underwent at least one MRI scan in the first 2 weeks of life. Mean postnatal age at scan 1 was 4±2 days in 50/57 (88%) neonates and 48/54 (89%) surviving infants underwent scan 2 at 10±2 days. In 54/57 (95%) survivors, higher MRI injury grades were significantly associated with worse outcomes in the cognitive, motor and language domains of the Bayley-III. A qualitative MRI injury scoring system weighted for deep nuclear gray matter injury is a significant predictor of neurodevelopmental outcome at 18-24 months in neonates with HIE. (orig.)

  1. CT and MRI analysis of central nervous system Rosai-Dorfman disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jiatang; Lang Senyang; Pu Chuanqiang; Zhu Ruyuan; Wang Dianjun

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the CT and MRI imaging features of central nervous system Rosai-Dorfman disease and to enhance knowledge and differential diagnostic ability for central nervous system Rosai-Doffman disease. Methods: The CT and MRI imaging appearances in 4 cases of pathologically proven Rosai-Dorfman disease were retrospectively evaluated and the literature of central nervous system Rosai- Dorfman disease were reviewed. Results: Two cases had cranial CT scans, 4 cases had cranial MRI scans. On CT scans, cerebral edema was demonstrated in one case and the other case was normal. MRI scans showed the lesions were solitary in saddle area in 3 cases, and multiple in anterior cranial fossa in 1 case. The lesions exhibited iso- to hypointensity on both T 1 WI and T 2 WI images. Following intravenous injection of contrast medium, ring-like enhancement was seen in 2 cases and homogeneous enhancement in 1 case. Nodular enhancement was seen in the case of multiple lesions in the anterior cranial fossa. All lesions were dural-based. Conclusions: In patients with fever, headache, elevation of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and a polyclonal increase in γ-globulins, the possibility of central nervous system Rosai-Dorfman disease should be considered when single or multiple dural-based mass lesions, especially in sellar region, were identified by CT and MRI. (authors)

  2. Evaluation of Brain and Cervical MRI Abnormality Rates in Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus With or Without Neurological Manifestations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harirchian, Mohammad Hossein; Saberi, Hazhir; Najafizadeh, Seyed Reza; Hashemi, Seyed Ali

    2011-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement has been observed in 14-80% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an appropriate method for evaluating CNS involvement in these patients. Clinical manifestations and MRI findings of CNS lupus should be differentiated from other mimicking diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and extent of brain and cervical cord MRI lesions of lupus patients. The relationship between neurological signs and symptoms and MRI findings were evaluated as well. Fifty SLE patients who had been referred to the rheumatology clinic of our hospital within 2009 were included in a cross sectional study. All patients fulfilled the revised 1981 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for SLE. We evaluated the neurological signs and symptoms and brain and cervical MRI findings in these patients. Forty-one patients (82%) were female and nine (18%) were male. The mean age was 30.1 ± 9.3 years. Twenty eight (56%) patients had an abnormal brain MRI. No one showed any abnormality in the cervical MRI. The lesions in 20 patients were similar to demyelinative plaques. Seventeen patients with abnormal brain MRI were neurologically asymptomatic. There was only a significant relationship between neurological motor manifestations and brain MRI abnormal findings. Unlike the brain, cervical MRI abnormality and especially asymptomatic cord involvement in MRI is quite rare in SLE patients. This finding may be helpful to differentiate SLE from other CNS disorders such as MS

  3. Magnetic field simulation and shimming analysis of 3.0T superconducting MRI system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Z. K.; Liu, Z. Z.; Tang, G. S.; Zhang, X. C.; Duan, L. J.; Liu, W. C.

    2018-04-01

    3.0T superconducting magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system has become the mainstream of modern clinical MRI system because of its high field intensity and high degree of uniformity and stability. It has broad prospects in scientific research and other fields. We analyze the principle of magnet designing in this paper. We also perform the magnetic field simulation and shimming analysis of the first 3.0T/850 superconducting MRI system in the world using the Ansoft Maxwell simulation software. We guide the production and optimization of the prototype based on the results of simulation analysis. Thus the magnetic field strength, magnetic field uniformity and magnetic field stability of the prototype is guided to achieve the expected target.

  4. A head-mounted display system for augmented reality: Initial evaluation for interventional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendt, M.; Wacker, F.K.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To discuss the technical details of a head mounted display with an augmented reality (AR) system and to describe a first pre-clinical evaluation in interventional MRI. Method: The AR system consists of a video-see-through head mounted display (HMD), mounted with a mini video camera for tracking and a stereo pair of mini cameras that capture live images of the scene. The live video view of the phantom/patient is augmented with graphical representations of anatomical structures from MRI image data and is displayed on the HMD. The application of the AR system with interventional MRI was tested using a MRI data set of the head and a head phantom. Results: The HMD enables the user to move around and observe the scene dynamically from various viewpoints. Within a short time the natural hand-eye coordination can easily be adapted to the slightly different view. The 3D perception is based on stereo and kinetic depth cues. A circular target with a diameter of 0.5 square centimeter was hit in 19 of 20 attempts. In a first evaluation the MRI image data augmented reality scene of a head phantom allowed good planning and precise simulation of a puncture. Conclusion: The HMD in combination with AR provides a direct, intuitive guidance for interventional MR procedures. (orig.) [de

  5. Abnormal findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus involving the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Akira; Okada, Jun; Kondo, Hirobumi (Kitasato Univ., Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine); Kashiwazaki, Sadao

    1992-06-01

    To elucidate the clinical significance of MRI on central nervous system systemic lupus erythematosus (CNS-SLE), MRI and CT scans were performed in 35 patients with SLE, of 18 patients who had CNS manifestations at the time of MRI examinations. The investigations were also carried out in 17 patients without CNS-SLE. The rate of detection of abnormal findings on MRI in patients with CNS-SLE was 77.2% (14/18), which was high, as compared with the rate of those on CT scans (50%: 9/18). Especially, all of 4 patients with seizure and 3 patients with encephalopathy showed abnormal MRI findings, although respectively 50% and 33.3% of them had abnormal CT scan findings. MRI findings were classified into 4 groups below: (1) Large focal are as increased signal intensity at T2 weighted image. These were observed in 2 of 4 patients with seizure and 1 of 3 patients with encephalopathy, which were completely resolved after treatment. (2) Patchy subcortical foci of increased signal intensity at T2 weighted image. These were observed in 11 of 18 CNS-SLE and 7 of 17 without CNS-SLE, which were not detected by CT scan. (3) All of six patients with cerebral infarctions showed high signal intensity areas at T2 weighted image and low signal intensity areas at T1 weighted image. (4) Normal findings were observed in 4 of 18 CNS-SLE (22.2%). We concluded that MRI is useful for the evaluation of CNS-SLE and provides more information than CT scan. (author).

  6. Abnormal findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus involving the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Akira; Okada, Jun; Kondo, Hirobumi; Kashiwazaki, Sadao.

    1992-01-01

    To elucidate the clinical significance of MRI on central nervous system systemic lupus erythematosus (CNS-SLE), MRI and CT scans were performed in 35 patients with SLE, of 18 patients who had CNS manifestations at the time of MRI examinations. The investigations were also carried out in 17 patients without CNS-SLE. The rate of detection of abnormal findings on MRI in patients with CNS-SLE was 77.2% (14/18), which was high, as compared with the rate of those on CT scans (50%: 9/18). Especially, all of 4 patients with seizure and 3 patients with encephalopathy showed abnormal MRI findings, although respectively 50% and 33.3% of them had abnormal CT scan findings. MRI findings were classified into 4 groups below: 1) Large focal are as increased signal intensity at T2 weighted image. These were observed in 2 of 4 patients with seizure and 1 of 3 patients with encephalopathy, which were completely resolved after treatment. 2) Patchy subcortical foci of increased signal intensity at T2 weighted image. These were observed in 11 of 18 CNS-SLE and 7 of 17 without CNS-SLE, which were not detected by CT scan. 3) All of six patients with cerebral infarctions showed high signal intensity areas at T2 weighted image and low signal intensity areas at T1 weighted image. 4) Normal findings were observed in 4 of 18 CNS-SLE (22.2%). We concluded that MRI is useful for the evaluation of CNS-SLE and provides more information than CT scan. (author)

  7. Volume based DCE-MRI breast cancer detection with 3D visualization system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chia, F.K.; Sim, K.S.; Chong, S.S.; Tan, S.T.; Ting, H.Y.; Abbas, S.F.; Omar, S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a computer aided design auto probing system is presented to detect breast lesions based on Dynamic contrast enhanced Magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) images. The system is proposed in order to aid the radiologists and doctors in the interpretation of MRI breast images and enhance the detection accuracy. A series of approaches are presented to enhance the detection accuracy and refine the breast region of interest (Roil) automatically. Besides, a semi-quantitative analysis is used to segment the breast lesions from selected breast Roil and classify the detected tumour is whether benign, suspicious or malignant. The entire breast Roil including the detected tumour will display in 3D. The methodology has been applied on 104 sets of digital imaging and communications in medicine (Dico) breast MRI datasets images. The biopsy results are verified by 2 radiologists from Hospital Malaysia. The experimental results are demonstrated the proposed scheme can precisely identify breast cancer regions with 93% accuracy. (author)

  8. Development of an outdoor MRI system for measuring flow in a living tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Akiyoshi; Kose, Katsumi; Terada, Yasuhiko

    2016-04-01

    An outdoor MRI system for noninvasive, long-term measurements of sap flow in a living tree in its natural environment has been developed. An open-access, 0.2 T permanent magnet with a 160 mm gap was combined with a radiofrequency probe, planar gradient coils, electromagnetic shielding, several electrical units, and a waterproofing box. Two-dimensional cross-sectional images were acquired for a ring-porous tree, and the anatomical structures, including xylem and phloem, were identified. The MRI flow measurements demonstrated the diurnal changes in flow velocity in the stem on a per-pixel basis. These results demonstrate that our outdoor MRI system is a powerful tool for studies of water transport in outdoor trees.

  9. MRI findings in Tolosa-Hunt syndrome before and after systemic corticosteroid therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cakirer, Sinan E-mail: scakirer@yahoo.com

    2003-02-01

    Tolosa-Hunt syndrome (THS) is characterized by painful ophthalmoplegia due to a granulomatous inflammation in the cavernous sinus. Corticosteroid therapy dramatically resolves both the clinical and radiological findings of THS. We present MRI findings of six patients with a clinical history of at least one episode of unilateral or bilateral orbital-periorbital pain, clinical findings of associated paresis of one or more of 3rd, 4th, 5th or 6th cranial nerves. All of the patients revealed an enlargement of the symptomatic cavernous sinus on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Five patients revealed total resolution of the clinical findings within 1-8 weeks, following systemic corticosteroid treatment. One patient revealed only minor regression of clinical findings within 2 weeks after the initiation of the treatment, so the cavernous sinus lesion was reevaluated as meningioma on MRI, and the patient underwent surgical resection of the mass with resultant histopathological finding of cavernous sinus meningioma. A follow-up MRI scan was performed for five patients at the end of 8-weeks of steroid therapy. Three of these five patients showed total resolution of the cavernous sinus lesions whereas two of them revealed a partial regression of the cavernous sinus lesions. MRI findings before and after systemic corticosteroid therapy are important diagnostic criteria to put the definitive diagnosis of THS and to differentiate it from other cavernous sinus lesions that simulate THS both clinically and radiologically.

  10. An optically coupled system for quantitative monitoring of MRI-induced RF currents into long conductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchi, Marta G; Venook, Ross; Pauly, John M; Scott, Greig C

    2010-01-01

    The currents induced in long conductors such as guidewires by the radio-frequency (RF) field in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are responsible for potentially dangerous heating of surrounding media, such as tissue. This paper presents an optically coupled system with the potential to quantitatively measure the RF currents induced on these conductors. The system uses a self shielded toroid transducer and active circuitry to modulate a high speed light-emitting-diode transmitter. Plastic fiber guides the light to a photodiode receiver and transimpedance amplifier. System validation included a series of experiments with bare wires that compared wire tip heating by fluoroptic thermometers with the RF current sensor response. Validations were performed on a custom whole body 64 MHz birdcage test platform and on a 1.5 T MRI scanner. With this system, a variety of phenomena were demonstrated including cable trap current attenuation, lossy dielectric Q-spoiling and even transverse electromagnetic wave node patterns. This system should find applications in studies of MRI RF safety for interventional devices such as pacemaker leads, and guidewires. In particular, variations of this device could potentially act as a realtime safety monitor during MRI guided interventions.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cardiovascular system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Shigeru

    1991-01-01

    Qualitative assessments of the hypertrophied myocardium were performed using spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) and spin-spin relaxation time (T2) obtained by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 15 normotensive patients with asymmetric septal hypertrophy (ASH), 10 hypertensive patients with concentric hypertrophy (CH) and 5 normal subjects (N). The changes of these values were evaluated related to cardiac cycle, and their usefulness in differentiating diseases. The wall thickness and internal dimension of the left ventricle (LV) in 10 cases were obtained using echocardiography and MRI, and there was a good correlation coefficient in wall thickness (r=0.987) and in internal dimension (r=0.991). Left ventricular short-axis images were obtained using ECG-gated spin-echo sequence (Te=30, 80 msec) and using inversion recovery sequence. T1 and T2 images were calculated at endsystolic and diastolic cardiac phases. The regional wall thickness (WT) and T1 and T2 values were measured in the anterior septum, anterior wall, lateral wall, posterior wall and posterior septum. Myocardial T1 and T2 values were significantly decreased in systole (T1: 185.6±37.9 msec, T2: 24.4±6.3 msec) compared to those in diastole (T1: 249.2±56.7 msec, T2: 31.7±9.4 msec). In both ASH and CH groups, significant correlations were observed between diastolic T1 values and WT (ASH: r=0.80, CH: r=0.45), and between diastolic T2 values and WT (ASH: r=0.58, CH: r=0.60). In the regions where diastolic WT were more than 17 mm, T1 values in the ASH group (343.4±40.5 msec) were significantly higher than those of the CH group (247.3±21.4 msec), although the mean wall thickness values were similar in both groups. These results indicate that myocardial relaxation times are related to cardiac cycle, wall thickness and types of hypertrophy. The T1 and T2 values at diastolic cardiac phase might be useful for distinguishing hypertrophic cardiomyopathy from hypertrophy due to hypertension. (author)

  12. Black blood MRI in suspected large artery primary angiitis of the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferkorn, Thomas; Linn, Jennifer; Habs, Maximilian; Opherk, Christina; Cyran, Clemens; Ottomeyer, Caroline; Straube, Andreas; Dichgans, Martin; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Saam, Tobias

    2013-07-01

    Single case reports suggest that black blood MRI (T1-weighted fat and blood suppressed sequences with and without contrast injection; BB-MRI) may visualize intracranial vessel wall contrast enhancement (CE) in primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS). In this single-center observational pilot study we prospectively investigated the value of BB-MRI in the diagnosis of large artery PACNS. Patients with suspected large artery PACNS received a standardized diagnostic program including BB-MRI. Vessel wall CE was graded (grade 0-2) by two experienced readers blinded to clinical data and correlated to the final diagnosis. Four of 12 included patients received a final diagnosis of PACNS. All of them showed moderate (grade 1) to strong (grade 2) vessel wall CE at the sites of stenosis. A moderate (grade 1) vessel wall CE grade was also observed in 6 of the remaining 8 patients in whom alternative diagnoses were made: arteriosclerotic disease (n = 4), intracranial dissection (n = 1), and Moyamoya disease (n = 1). Our pilot study demonstrates that vessel wall CE is a frequent finding in PACNS and its mimics. Larger trials will be necessary to evaluate the utility of BB-MRI in the diagnostic workup of PACNS. Copyright © 2012 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  13. Value of MRI of the brain in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and neurologic disturbance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennings, J.E.; Sundgren, P.C.; Maly, P.; Attwood, J.; McCune, J.

    2004-01-01

    Our objective was to review the frequency and pattern of signal abnormalities seen on conventional MRI in patients with suspected neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NP-SLE). We reviewed 116 MRI examinations of the brain performed on 85 patients with SLE, (81 women, four men, aged 21-78 years, mean 40.6 years) presenting with neurological disturbances. MRI was normal or nearly normal in 34%. In 60% high-signal lesions were observed on T2-weighted images, frequently in the frontal and parietal subcortical white matter. Infarct-like lesions involving gray and white matter were demonstrated in 21 of cases. Areas of restricted diffusion were seen in 12 of the 67 patients who underwent diffusion-weighted imaging. Other abnormalities included loss of brain volume, hemorrhage, meningeal enhancement, and bilateral high signal in occipital white-matter. The MRI findings alone did not allow us to distinguish between thromboembolic and inflammatory events in many patients. Some patients with normal MRI improved clinically while on immunosuppressive therapy. More sensitive and/or specific imaging methods, such as spectroscopy and perfusion-weighted imaging, should be investigated in these subgroups of patients with suspected NP-SLE. (orig.)

  14. Development of a high-resolution detection module for the INSERT SPECT/MRI system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busca, Paolo; Fiorini, Carlo; Butt, Arslan D; Occhipinti, Michele; Quaglia, Riccardo; Trigilio, Paolo [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Via Golgi 40, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Nemeth, Gabor; Major, Peter; Bukki, Tamas; Nagy, Kalman [Mediso Medical Imaging Systems, Alsotorokvesz 14, H-1022 Budapest (Hungary); Piemonte, Claudio; Ferri, Alessandro; Gola, Alberto [Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK), Via Sommarive, 18, 38123 Trento (Italy); Rieger, Jan [MRI.TOOLS GmbH, Robert-Roessle-Str. 10, 13125 Berlin (Germany); Niendorf, Thoralf [MRI.TOOLS GmbH, Robert-Roessle-Str. 10, 13125 Berlin (Germany); Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.UniversityF.F.), Max-Delbrueck-Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-07-29

    A new multi-modality imaging tool is under development in the framework of the INSERT (Integrated SPECT/MRI for Enhanced Stratification in Radio-chemo Therapy) project, supported by the European Community. The final goal is to develop a custom SPECT apparatus that can be used as an insert for commercially available MRI systems. INSERT is expected to offer more effective and earlier diagnosis with potentially better outcome in survival for the treatment of brain tumors, primarily glioma. Two SPECT prototypes are being developed, one dedicated to preclinical imaging (7 and 9.4 T), the second one dedicated to clinical imaging (3 T).

  15. PET/MRI of central nervous system: current status and future perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhen Lu; Zhang, Long Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Imaging plays an increasingly important role in the early diagnosis, prognosis prediction and therapy response evaluation of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. The newly emerging hybrid positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) can perform ''one-stop-shop'' evaluation, including anatomic, functional, biochemical and metabolic information, even at the molecular level, for personalised diagnoses and treatments of CNS diseases. However, there are still several problems to be resolved, such as appropriate PET detectors, attenuation correction and so on. This review will introduce the basic physical principles of PET/MRI and its potential clinical applications in the CNS. We also provide the future perspectives for this field. (orig.)

  16. Development of a high-resolution detection module for the INSERT SPECT/MRI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busca, Paolo; Fiorini, Carlo; Butt, Arslan D; Occhipinti, Michele; Quaglia, Riccardo; Trigilio, Paolo; Nemeth, Gabor; Major, Peter; Bukki, Tamas; Nagy, Kalman; Piemonte, Claudio; Ferri, Alessandro; Gola, Alberto; Rieger, Jan; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2014-01-01

    A new multi-modality imaging tool is under development in the framework of the INSERT (Integrated SPECT/MRI for Enhanced Stratification in Radio-chemo Therapy) project, supported by the European Community. The final goal is to develop a custom SPECT apparatus that can be used as an insert for commercially available MRI systems. INSERT is expected to offer more effective and earlier diagnosis with potentially better outcome in survival for the treatment of brain tumors, primarily glioma. Two SPECT prototypes are being developed, one dedicated to preclinical imaging (7 and 9.4 T), the second one dedicated to clinical imaging (3 T).

  17. Hip Inflammation MRI Scoring System (HIMRISS) to predict response to hyaluronic acid injection in hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deseyne, Nicolas; Conrozier, Thierry; Lellouche, Henri

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess predictors of response, according to hip MRI inflammatory scoring system (HIMRISS), in a sample of patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA) treated by hyaluronic acid (HA) injection. METHOD: Sixty patients with hip OA were included. Clinical outcomes were assessed at baseline...... SP=0.97, sensitivity SN=0.39, and positive and negative predictive values of 0.91 and 0.64, respectively. CONCLUSION: HIMRISS is reliable for total scores and sub-domains. It permits identification of responders to HA injection in hip OA patients........64, 0.83 and 0.78. Associations between MRI features and clinical data were assessed. Logistic regression (univariate and multivariate) was used to explore associations between MRI features and response to HA injection, according to WOMAC50 response at three months. RESULTS: In total, 45.5% of patients...

  18. Skeletal age assessment in children using an open compact MRI system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Yasuhiko; Kono, Saki; Tamada, Daiki; Uchiumi, Tomomi; Kose, Katsumi; Miyagi, Ryo; Yamabe, Eiko; Yoshioka, Hiroshi

    2013-06-01

    MRI may be a noninvasive and alternative tool for skeletal age assessment in children, although few studies have reported on this topic. In this article, skeletal age was assessed over a wide range of ages using an open, compact MRI optimized for the imaging of a child's hand and wrist, and its validity was evaluated. MR images and their three-dimensional segmentation visualized detailed skeletal features of each bone in the hand and wrist. Skeletal age was then independently scored from the MR images by two raters, according to the Tanner-Whitehouse Japan system. The skeletal age assessed by MR rating demonstrated a strong positive correlation with chronological age. The intrarater and inter-rater reproducibilities were significantly high. These results demonstrate the validity and reliability of skeletal age assessment using MRI. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Assessment of three different software systems in the evaluation of dynamic MRI of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurz, K.D.; Steinhaus, D.; Klar, V.; Cohnen, M.; Wittsack, H.J.; Saleh, A.; Moedder, U.; Blondin, D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to compare the diagnostic performance and handling of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of the breast with two commercial software solutions ('CADstream' and '3TP') and one self-developed software system ('Mammatool'). Materials and methods: Identical data sets of dynamic breast MRI from 21 patients were evaluated retrospectively with all three software systems. The exams were classified according to the BI-RADS classification. The number of lesions in the parametric mapping was compared to histology or follow-up of more than 2 years. In addition, 25 quality criteria were judged by 3 independent investigators with a score from 0 to 5. Statistical analysis was performed to document the quality ranking of the different software systems. Results: There were 9 invasive carcinomas, one pure DCIS, one papilloma, one radial scar, three histologically proven changes due to mastopathy, one adenosis and two fibroadenomas. Additionally two patients with enhancing parenchyma followed with MRI for more than 3 years and one scar after breast conserving therapy were included. All malignant lesions were classified as BI-RADS 4 or 5 using all software systems and showed significant enhancement in the parametric mapping. 'CADstream' showed the best score on subjective quality criteria. '3TP' showed the lowest number of false-positive results. 'Mammatool' produced the lowest number of benign tissues indicated with parametric overlay. Conclusion: All three software programs tested were adequate for sensitive and efficient assessment of dynamic MRI of the breast. Improvements in specificity may be achievable

  20. Assessment of three different software systems in the evaluation of dynamic MRI of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, K D; Steinhaus, D; Klar, V; Cohnen, M; Wittsack, H J; Saleh, A; Mödder, U; Blondin, D

    2009-02-01

    The aim was to compare the diagnostic performance and handling of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of the breast with two commercial software solutions ("CADstream" and "3TP") and one self-developed software system ("Mammatool"). Identical data sets of dynamic breast MRI from 21 patients were evaluated retrospectively with all three software systems. The exams were classified according to the BI-RADS classification. The number of lesions in the parametric mapping was compared to histology or follow-up of more than 2 years. In addition, 25 quality criteria were judged by 3 independent investigators with a score from 0 to 5. Statistical analysis was performed to document the quality ranking of the different software systems. There were 9 invasive carcinomas, one pure DCIS, one papilloma, one radial scar, three histologically proven changes due to mastopathy, one adenosis and two fibroadenomas. Additionally two patients with enhancing parenchyma followed with MRI for more than 3 years and one scar after breast conserving therapy were included. All malignant lesions were classified as BI-RADS 4 or 5 using all software systems and showed significant enhancement in the parametric mapping. "CADstream" showed the best score on subjective quality criteria. "3TP" showed the lowest number of false-positive results. "Mammatool" produced the lowest number of benign tissues indicated with parametric overlay. All three software programs tested were adequate for sensitive and efficient assessment of dynamic MRI of the breast. Improvements in specificity may be achievable.

  1. Design and characterization of Stormram 4 : an MRI-compatible robotic system for breast biopsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenhuis, Vincent; Siepel, Françoise Jeanette; Veltman, Jeroen; Stramigioli, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Targeting of small lesions with high precision is essential in an early phase of breast cancer for diagnosis and accurate follow up, and subsequently determines prognosis. Current techniques to diagnose breast cancer are suboptimal, and there is a need for a small, MRI-compatible robotic system able

  2. Reliability of the echoMRI infant system for water and fat measurements in newborns

    Science.gov (United States)

    The precision and accuracy of a quantitative magnetic resonance (EchoMRI Infants) system in newborns were determined. Canola oil and drinking water phantoms (increments of 10 g to 1.9 kg) were scanned four times. Instrument reproducibility was assessed from three scans (within 10 minutes) in 42 heal...

  3. Intra- and interrater reliability of three different MRI grading and classification systems after acute hamstring injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wangensteen, Arnlaug; Tol, Johannes L.; Roemer, Frank W.; Bahr, Roald; Dijkstra, H. Paul; Crema, Michel D.; Farooq, Abdulaziz; Guermazi, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Three different MRI grading and classification systems for acute hamstring injuries are overall reliable. • Reliability for the subcategories within these MRI grading and classification systems remains, however, unclear. - Abstract: Objective: To assess and compare the intra- and interrater reliability of three different MRI grading and classification systems after acute hamstring injury. Methods: Male athletes (n = 40) with clinical diagnosis of acute hamstring injury and MRI ≤5 days were selected from a prospective cohort. Two radiologists independently evaluated the MRIs using standardised scoring form including the modified Peetrons grading system, the Chan acute muscle strain injury classification and the British Athletics Muscle Injury Classification. Intra-and interrater reliability was assessed with linear weighted kappa (κ) or unweighted Cohen's κ and percentage agreement was calculated. Results: We observed ‘substantial’ to ‘almost perfect’ intra- (κ range 0.65–1.00) and interrater reliability (κ range 0.77–1.00) with percentage agreement 83–100% and 88–100%, respectively, for severity gradings, overall anatomical sites and overall classifications for the three MRI systems. We observed substantial variability (κ range −0.05 to 1.00) for subcategories within the Chan classification and the British Athletics Muscle Injury Classification, however, the prevalence of positive scorings was low for some subcategories. Conclusions: The modified Peetrons grading system, overall Chan classification and overall British Athletics Muscle Injury Classification demonstrated ‘substantial' to ‘almost perfect' intra- and interrater reliability when scored by experienced radiologists. The intra- and interrater reliability for the anatomical subcategories within the classifications remains unclear.

  4. Intra- and interrater reliability of three different MRI grading and classification systems after acute hamstring injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wangensteen, Arnlaug, E-mail: arnlaug.wangensteen@nih.no [Aspetar, Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha (Qatar); Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center, Department of Sports Medicine, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo (Norway); Tol, Johannes L., E-mail: johannes.tol@aspetar.com [Aspetar, Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha (Qatar); Amsterdam Center for Evidence Sports Medicine, Academic Medical Center (Netherlands); The Sports Physician Group, OLVG, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Roemer, Frank W. [Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Bahr, Roald [Aspetar, Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha (Qatar); Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center, Department of Sports Medicine, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo (Norway); Dijkstra, H. Paul [Aspetar, Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha (Qatar); Crema, Michel D. [Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiology, Saint-Antoine Hospital, University Paris VI, Paris (France); Farooq, Abdulaziz [Aspetar, Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha (Qatar); Guermazi, Ali [Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Three different MRI grading and classification systems for acute hamstring injuries are overall reliable. • Reliability for the subcategories within these MRI grading and classification systems remains, however, unclear. - Abstract: Objective: To assess and compare the intra- and interrater reliability of three different MRI grading and classification systems after acute hamstring injury. Methods: Male athletes (n = 40) with clinical diagnosis of acute hamstring injury and MRI ≤5 days were selected from a prospective cohort. Two radiologists independently evaluated the MRIs using standardised scoring form including the modified Peetrons grading system, the Chan acute muscle strain injury classification and the British Athletics Muscle Injury Classification. Intra-and interrater reliability was assessed with linear weighted kappa (κ) or unweighted Cohen's κ and percentage agreement was calculated. Results: We observed ‘substantial’ to ‘almost perfect’ intra- (κ range 0.65–1.00) and interrater reliability (κ range 0.77–1.00) with percentage agreement 83–100% and 88–100%, respectively, for severity gradings, overall anatomical sites and overall classifications for the three MRI systems. We observed substantial variability (κ range −0.05 to 1.00) for subcategories within the Chan classification and the British Athletics Muscle Injury Classification, however, the prevalence of positive scorings was low for some subcategories. Conclusions: The modified Peetrons grading system, overall Chan classification and overall British Athletics Muscle Injury Classification demonstrated ‘substantial' to ‘almost perfect' intra- and interrater reliability when scored by experienced radiologists. The intra- and interrater reliability for the anatomical subcategories within the classifications remains unclear.

  5. Development of an Optical Fiber-Based MR Compatible Gamma Camera for SPECT/MRI Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Watabe, Tadashi; Kanai, Yasukazu; Watabe, Hiroshi; Hatazawa, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Optical fiber is a promising material for integrated positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) PET/MRI systems. Because its material is plastic, it has no interference between MRI. However, it is unclear whether this material can also be used for a single photon emission tomography (SPECT)/MRI system. For this purpose, we developed an optical fiber-based block detector for a SPECT/MRI system and tested its performance by combining 1.2 ×1.2 ×6 mm Y2SiO5 (YSO) pixels into a 15 ×15 block and was coupled it to an optical fiber image guide that used was 0.5-mm in diameter with 80-cm long double clad fibers. The image guide had 22 ×22 mm rectangular input and an equal size output. The input of the optical fiber-based image guide was bent at 90 degrees, and the output was optically coupled to a 1-in square high quantum efficiency position sensitive photomultiplier tube (HQE-PSPMT). The parallel hole, 7-mm-thick collimator made of tungsten plastic was mounted on a YSO block. The diameter of the collimator holes was 0.8 mm which was positioned one-to-one coupled to the YSO pixels. We evaluated the intrinsic and system performances. We resolved most of the YSO pixels in a two-dimensional histogram for Co-57 gamma photons (122-keV) with an average peak-to-value ratio of 1.5. The energy resolution was 38% full-width at half-maximum (FWHM). The system resolution was 1.7-mm FWHM, 1.5 mm from the collimator surface, and the sensitivity was 0.06%. Images of a Co-57 point source could be successfully obtained inside 0.3 T MRI without serious interference. We conclude that the developed optical fiber-based YSO block detector is promising for SPECT/MRI systems.

  6. Development of contaminant detection system based on ultra-low field SQUID-NMR/MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunaki, S; Yamamoto, M; Hatta, J; Hatsukade, Y; Tanaka, S

    2014-01-01

    We have developed an ultra-low field (ULF) NMR/MRI system using an HTS-rf-SQUID and evaluated performance of the system as a contaminant detection system for foods and drinks. In this work, we measured 1D MRIs from water samples with or without various contaminants, such as aluminum and glass balls using the system. In the 1D MRIs, changes of the MRI spectra were detected, corresponding to positions of the contaminants. We measured 2D MRIs from food samples with and without a hole. In the 2D MRIs, the hole position in the sample was well visualized. These results show that the feasibility of the system to detect and localize contaminants in foods and drinks.

  7. Nanodiamond-enhanced MRI via in situ hyperpolarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddington, David E. J.; Sarracanie, Mathieu; Zhang, Huiliang; Salameh, Najat; Glenn, David R.; Rej, Ewa; Gaebel, Torsten; Boele, Thomas; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Reilly, David J.; Rosen, Matthew S.

    2017-04-01

    Nanodiamonds are of interest as nontoxic substrates for targeted drug delivery and as highly biostable fluorescent markers for cellular tracking. Beyond optical techniques, however, options for noninvasive imaging of nanodiamonds in vivo are severely limited. Here, we demonstrate that the Overhauser effect, a proton-electron polarization transfer technique, can enable high-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of nanodiamonds in water at room temperature and ultra-low magnetic field. The technique transfers spin polarization from paramagnetic impurities at nanodiamond surfaces to 1H spins in the surrounding water solution, creating MRI contrast on-demand. We examine the conditions required for maximum enhancement as well as the ultimate sensitivity of the technique. The ability to perform continuous in situ hyperpolarization via the Overhauser mechanism, in combination with the excellent in vivo stability of nanodiamond, raises the possibility of performing noninvasive in vivo tracking of nanodiamond over indefinitely long periods of time.

  8. Heart MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  9. Implementation of a ferromagnetic detection system in a clinical MRI setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orchard, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the implementation of a ferromagnetic detection system (FMDS) into a clinical MRI setting. Materials and methods: One thousand patients were considered for MRI safety screening using an FMDS. Equipment used was a Ferroguard ® Screener (Metrasens Ltd, Malvern, Worcestershire, UK). Fully gowned patients rotated 360° in front of the FMDS in a standardized manner following traditional MRI screening methods (the use of a written questionnaire (Fig. B.1) and verbal interview. Results: Final results included 1032 individual screening events performed in 977 patients. There were 922 (94%) initial passes using the FMDS; 34 (4%) failed initial screens but passed a subsequent screen; 21 (2%) failed the initial and subsequent screens. Thus, including all screening events (n = 1032), there were 956 (93%) true negatives (TN); 21 (2%) false positives (FP) and 55 (5%) true positives (TP). No false negatives (FN) were recorded. Therefore, sensitivity was 100% and specificity was 98%. Conclusion: Implementation and correct usage of an FMDS proved to increase safety within a clinical MRI environment by alerting staff to ferromagnetic items or implants not identified using traditional MRI screening methods. An FMDS should be used as an adjunct to these methods. The information in this study pertains to the specific equipment used in this investigation. - Highlights: • Ferromagnetic detection system sensitivity in this study was 100%. • Ferromagnetic detection system specificity in this study was 98%. • The additional screening procedure had little impact on throughput ie additional time taken was minimal. • Staff training, technique and compliance is important in implementing the screening procedures. • The ferromagnetic detection system identified objects that may have demonstrated projectile, heating or artefact effects

  10. MRI-guided periradicular nerve root infiltration therapy in low-field (0.23-T) MRI system using optical instrument tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sequeiros, Roberto Blanco; Ojala, Risto O.; Klemola, Rauli; Jyrkinen, Lasse; Tervonen, Osmo A.; Vaara, Teuvo J.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of the MRI-guided periradicular nerve root infiltration therapy. Sixty-seven nerve root infiltrations under MRI guidance were done for 61 patients suffering from lumbosacral radicular pain. Informed consent was acquired from all patients. A 0.23-T open-MRI scanner with interventional tools (Outlook Proview, Philips Medical Systems, MR Technologies, Finland) was used. A surface coil was used in all cases. Nerve root infiltration was performed with MRI-compatible 20-G needle (Chiba type MReye, Cook, Bloomington, Ind.; or Manan type, MD Tech, Florida). The evaluation of clinical outcome was achieved with 6 months of clinical follow-up and questionnaire. The effect of nerve root infiltration to the radicular pain was graded: 1=good to excellent, i.e., no pain or not disturbing pain allowing normal physical activity at 3 months from the procedure; 2=temporary, i.e., temporary relief of pain; 3=no relief of pain; and 4=worsening of pain. As an adjunct to MRI-guided positioning of the needle the correct needle localization by the nerve root was confirmed with saline injection to nerve root channel and single-shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) imaging. The MRI guidance allowed adequate needle positioning in all but 1 case (98.5%). This failure was caused by degeneration-induced changes in anatomy. Of patients, 51.5% had good to excellent effect with regard to radicular pain from the procedure, 22.7% had temporary relief, 21.2% had no effect, and in 4.5% the pain worsened. Our results show that MRI guidance is accurate and safe in performing nerve root infiltration at lumbosacral area. The results of radicular pain relief from nerve root infiltration are comparable to CT or fluoroscopy studies on the subject. (orig.)

  11. Visualization of suspicious lesions in breast MRI based on intelligent neural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twellmann, Thorsten; Lange, Oliver; Nattkemper, Tim Wilhelm; Meyer-Bäse, Anke

    2006-05-01

    Intelligent medical systems based on supervised and unsupervised artificial neural networks are applied to the automatic visualization and classification of suspicious lesions in breast MRI. These systems represent an important component of future sophisticated computer-aided diagnosis systems and enable the extraction of spatial and temporal features of dynamic MRI data stemming from patients with confirmed lesion diagnosis. By taking into account the heterogenity of the cancerous tissue, these techniques reveal the malignant, benign and normal kinetic signals and and provide a regional subclassification of pathological breast tissue. Intelligent medical systems are expected to have substantial implications in healthcare politics by contributing to the diagnosis of indeterminate breast lesions by non-invasive imaging.

  12. CT and MRI findings of cerebral ischemic lesions in the cortical and perforating arterial system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kameyama, Masakuni; Udaka, Fukashi; Nishinaka, Kazuto; Kodama, Mitsuo; Urushidani, Makoto; Kawamura, Kazuyuki; Inoue, Haruhisa; Kageyama, Taku [Sumitomo Hospital, Osaka (Japan)

    1995-07-01

    It is clinically useful to divide the location of infarction into the cortical and perforating arterial system. Computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) now make the point of infarction a simple and useful task in daily practice. The diagnostic modality has also demonstrated that risk factors and clinical manifestations are different for infarction in the cortical as opposed to the perforating system. In this paper, we present various aspects of images of cerebral ischemia according to CT and/or MRI findings. With the advance of imaging mechanics, diagnostic capability of CT or/and MRI for cerebral infarction has markedly been improved. We must consider these points on evaluating the previously reported results. In addition, we always consider the pathological background of these image-findings for the precise interpretation of their clinical significance. In some instances, dynamic study such as PET or SPECT is needed for real interpretations of CT and/or MRI images. We paid special reference to lacunar stroke and striatocapsular infarct. In addition, `branch atheromatous disease (Caplan)` was considered, in particular, for their specific clinical significances. Large striatocapsular infarcts frequently show cortical signs and symptoms such as aphasia or agnosia in spite of their subcortical localization. These facts, although have previously been known, should be re-considered for their pathoanatomical mechanism. (author).

  13. CT and MRI findings of cerebral ischemic lesions in the cortical and perforating arterial system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameyama, Masakuni; Udaka, Fukashi; Nishinaka, Kazuto; Kodama, Mitsuo; Urushidani, Makoto; Kawamura, Kazuyuki; Inoue, Haruhisa; Kageyama, Taku

    1995-01-01

    It is clinically useful to divide the location of infarction into the cortical and perforating arterial system. Computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) now make the point of infarction a simple and useful task in daily practice. The diagnostic modality has also demonstrated that risk factors and clinical manifestations are different for infarction in the cortical as opposed to the perforating system. In this paper, we present various aspects of images of cerebral ischemia according to CT and/or MRI findings. With the advance of imaging mechanics, diagnostic capability of CT or/and MRI for cerebral infarction has markedly been improved. We must consider these points on evaluating the previously reported results. In addition, we always consider the pathological background of these image-findings for the precise interpretation of their clinical significance. In some instances, dynamic study such as PET or SPECT is needed for real interpretations of CT and/or MRI images. We paid special reference to lacunar stroke and striatocapsular infarct. In addition, 'branch atheromatous disease (Caplan)' was considered, in particular, for their specific clinical significances. Large striatocapsular infarcts frequently show cortical signs and symptoms such as aphasia or agnosia in spite of their subcortical localization. These facts, although have previously been known, should be re-considered for their pathoanatomical mechanism. (author)

  14. Piezoelectrically Actuated Robotic System for MRI-Guided Prostate Percutaneous Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hao; Shang, Weijian; Cole, Gregory; Li, Gang; Harrington, Kevin; Camilo, Alexander; Tokuda, Junichi; Tempany, Clare M.; Hata, Nobuhiko; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a fully-actuated robotic system for percutaneous prostate therapy under continuously acquired live magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance. The system is composed of modular hardware and software to support the surgical workflow of intra-operative MRI-guided surgical procedures. We present the development of a 6-degree-of-freedom (DOF) needle placement robot for transperineal prostate interventions. The robot consists of a 3-DOF needle driver module and a 3-DOF Cartesian motion module. The needle driver provides needle cannula translation and rotation (2-DOF) and stylet translation (1-DOF). A custom robot controller consisting of multiple piezoelectric motor drivers provides precision closed-loop control of piezoelectric motors and enables simultaneous robot motion and MR imaging. The developed modular robot control interface software performs image-based registration, kinematics calculation, and exchanges robot commands and coordinates between the navigation software and the robot controller with a new implementation of the open network communication protocol OpenIGTLink. Comprehensive compatibility of the robot is evaluated inside a 3-Tesla MRI scanner using standard imaging sequences and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) loss is limited to 15%. The image deterioration due to the present and motion of robot demonstrates unobservable image interference. Twenty-five targeted needle placements inside gelatin phantoms utilizing an 18-gauge ceramic needle demonstrated 0.87 mm root mean square (RMS) error in 3D Euclidean distance based on MRI volume segmentation of the image-guided robotic needle placement procedure. PMID:26412962

  15. Fat ViP MRI: Virtual Phantom Magnetic Resonance Imaging of water-fat systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvati, Roberto; Hitti, Eric; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Saint-Jalmes, Hervé; Gambarota, Giulio

    2016-06-01

    Virtual Phantom Magnetic Resonance Imaging (ViP MRI) is a method to generate reference signals on MR images, using external radiofrequency (RF) signals. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of ViP MRI to generate complex-data images of phantoms mimicking water-fat systems. Various numerical phantoms with a given fat fraction, T2* and field map were designed. The k-space of numerical phantoms was converted into RF signals to generate virtual phantoms. MRI experiments were performed at 4.7T using a multi-gradient-echo sequence on virtual and physical phantoms. The data acquisition of virtual and physical phantoms was simultaneous. Decomposition of the water and fat signals was performed using a complex-based water-fat separation algorithm. Overall, a good agreement was observed between the fat fraction, T2* and phase map values of the virtual and numerical phantoms. In particular, fat fractions of 10.5±0.1 (vs 10% of the numerical phantom), 20.3±0.1 (vs 20%) and 30.4±0.1 (vs 30%) were obtained in virtual phantoms. The ViP MRI method allows for generating imaging phantoms that i) mimic water-fat systems and ii) can be analyzed with water-fat separation algorithms based on complex data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Visual MRI grading system to evaluate atrophy of the supeaspinatus muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Hyun Kyoung; Hong, Sung Hwan; Yoo, Hye Jin; Choi, Ja Young; Kim, Sae Hoon; Choi, Jung Ah; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    To investigate the interobserver reproducibility and diagnostic feasibility of a visual grading system for assessing atrophy of the supraspinatus muscle on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Three independent radiologists retrospectively evaluated the occupying ratio of the supraspinatus muscle in the supraspinatus fossa on 192 shoulder MRI examinations in 188 patients using a 3-point visual grading system (1, ≥ 60%; 2, 30-59%; 3, < 30%) on oblique sagittal T1-weighted images. The inter-reader agreement and the agreement with the reference standard (3-point grades according to absolute occupying ratio values quantitatively measured by directly contouring the muscles on MRI) were analyzed using weighted kappa. The visual grading was applied by a single reader to a group of 100 consecutive patients who had undergone rotator cuff repair to retrospectively determine the association between the visual grades at preoperative state and postsurgical occurrences of retear. The inter-reader weighted kappa value for the visual grading was 0.74 when averaged across three reader pairs (0.70-0.77 for individual reader pairs). The weighted kappa value between the visual grading and the reference standard ranged from 0.75 to 0.83. There was a significant difference in retear rates of the rotator cuff between the 3 visual grades of supraspinatus muscle atrophy on MRI in univariable analysis (p < 0.001), but not in multivariable analysis (p = 0.026). The 3-point visual grading system may be a feasible method to assess the severity of supraspinatus muscle atrophy on MRI and assist in the clinical management of patients with rotator cuff tear.

  17. Visual MRI grading system to evaluate atrophy of the supeaspinatus muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Hyun Kyoung; Hong, Sung Hwan; Yoo, Hye Jin; Choi, Ja Young; Kim, Sae Hoon; Choi, Jung Ah; Kang, Heung Sik

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the interobserver reproducibility and diagnostic feasibility of a visual grading system for assessing atrophy of the supraspinatus muscle on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Three independent radiologists retrospectively evaluated the occupying ratio of the supraspinatus muscle in the supraspinatus fossa on 192 shoulder MRI examinations in 188 patients using a 3-point visual grading system (1, ≥ 60%; 2, 30-59%; 3, < 30%) on oblique sagittal T1-weighted images. The inter-reader agreement and the agreement with the reference standard (3-point grades according to absolute occupying ratio values quantitatively measured by directly contouring the muscles on MRI) were analyzed using weighted kappa. The visual grading was applied by a single reader to a group of 100 consecutive patients who had undergone rotator cuff repair to retrospectively determine the association between the visual grades at preoperative state and postsurgical occurrences of retear. The inter-reader weighted kappa value for the visual grading was 0.74 when averaged across three reader pairs (0.70-0.77 for individual reader pairs). The weighted kappa value between the visual grading and the reference standard ranged from 0.75 to 0.83. There was a significant difference in retear rates of the rotator cuff between the 3 visual grades of supraspinatus muscle atrophy on MRI in univariable analysis (p < 0.001), but not in multivariable analysis (p = 0.026). The 3-point visual grading system may be a feasible method to assess the severity of supraspinatus muscle atrophy on MRI and assist in the clinical management of patients with rotator cuff tear.

  18. A compact 3 T all HTS cryogen-free MRI system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, B. J.; Bouloukakis, K.; Slade, R. A.

    2017-12-01

    We have designed and built a passively shielded, cryogen-free 3 T 160 mm bore bismuth strontium calcium copper oxide HTS magnet with shielded gradient coils suitable for use in small animal imaging applications. The magnet is cooled to approximately 16 K using a two-stage cryocooler and is operated at 200 A. The magnet has been passively shimmed so as to achieve ±10 parts per million (ppm) homogeneity over a 60 mm diameter imaging volume. We have demonstrated that B 0 temporal stability is fit-for-purpose despite the magnet operating in the driven mode. The system has produced good quality spin-echo and gradient echo images. This compact HTS-MRI system is emerging as a true alternative to conventional low temperature superconductor based cryogen-free MRI systems, with much more efficient cryogenics since it operates entirely from a single phase alternating current electrical supply.

  19. MRI of the spinocerebellar degeneration (multiple system atrophy, Holmes type, and Menzel-Joseph type)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Eiichiro; Makino, Naoki.

    1991-01-01

    We have analyzed MRI in 33 patients with several forms of spinocerebellar degeneration; 17 with multiple system atrophy, 10 with Holmes type, and 6 with Menzel-Joseph type. The MRIs were obtained using a 1.5-T GEMR System. Patients with multiple system atrophy demonstrated: atrophy of the brain stem, particularly basis pontis; decreased signal intensity of the white matter of pons; atrophy of the white matter of cerebellum; atrophy and decreased signal intensity of the putamen, particularly along their lateral and posterior portions; and atrophy of the cerebrum. Patients with Holmes type showed: atrophy of the cerebellum; atrophy of the vermis more than hemispheres; and nuclei of the cerebellum with no decreased intensity on T 2 -weighted sequences. Patients with Menzel-Joseph type demonstrated moderate atrophy of the brain stem and mild atrophy of the white matter of cerebellum. MRI is a useful diagnostic tool in the management of the spinocerebellar degeneration. (author)

  20. MRI-guided prostate focal laser ablation therapy using a mechatronic needle guidance system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepek, Jeremy; Lindner, Uri; Ghai, Sangeet; Davidson, Sean R. H.; Trachtenberg, John; Fenster, Aaron

    2014-03-01

    Focal therapy of localized prostate cancer is receiving increased attention due to its potential for providing effective cancer control in select patients with minimal treatment-related side effects. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided focal laser ablation (FLA) therapy is an attractive modality for such an approach. In FLA therapy, accurate placement of laser fibers is critical to ensuring that the full target volume is ablated. In practice, error in needle placement is invariably present due to pre- to intra-procedure image registration error, needle deflection, prostate motion, and variability in interventionalist skill. In addition, some of these sources of error are difficult to control, since the available workspace and patient positions are restricted within a clinical MRI bore. In an attempt to take full advantage of the utility of intraprocedure MRI, while minimizing error in needle placement, we developed an MRI-compatible mechatronic system for guiding needles to the prostate for FLA therapy. The system has been used to place interstitial catheters for MRI-guided FLA therapy in eight subjects in an ongoing Phase I/II clinical trial. Data from these cases has provided quantification of the level of uncertainty in needle placement error. To relate needle placement error to clinical outcome, we developed a model for predicting the probability of achieving complete focal target ablation for a family of parameterized treatment plans. Results from this work have enabled the specification of evidence-based selection criteria for the maximum target size that can be confidently ablated using this technique, and quantify the benefit that may be gained with improvements in needle placement accuracy.

  1. Central nervous system lesions in adult T-cell leukaemia: MRI and pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitajima, M.; Korogi, Y.; Shigematsu, Y.; Liang, L.; Takahashi, M. [Department of Radiology, Kumamoto University School of Medicine, Honjo, Kumamoto (Japan); Matsuoka, M. [Second Division of Internal Medicine, Kumamoto University School of Medicine, Honjo, Kumamoto (Japan); Yamamoto, T. [Department of Pathology, Kumamoto University School of Medicine, Honjo, Kumamoto (Japan); Jhono, M. [Department of Dermatology, Kumamoto University School of Medicine, Honjo, Kumamoto (Japan); Eto, K. [The National Institute for Minamata Disease, Minamata (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Adult T-cell leukaemia (ATL) is a T-cell lymphoid neoplasm caused by human T-cell leukaemia virus type I (HTLV-I). Radiological findings in central nervous system (CNS) involvement have not been well characterised. We reviewed the MRI of 18 patients with ATL who developed new neurological symptoms or signs, and pathology specimens from a 53-year-old woman who died of ATL. MRI findings were divided into three categories: definite, probable, and other abnormal. Definite and probable findings were defined as ATL-related. The characteristic findings were multiple parenchymal masses with or without contrast enhancement adjacent to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaced and the deep grey matter of both cerebral hemispheres, plus leptomeningeal lesion. One patient had both cerebral and spinal cord lesions. Other abnormal findings in eight patients included one case of leukoencephalopathy caused by methotrexate. The histology findings consisted of clusters of tumour cells along perivascular spaces, and scattered infiltration of the parenchyma, with nests of tumour cells. Leptomeningeal infiltration by tumour spread into the parenchyma and secondary degeneration of the neuronal tracts was observed. MRI was useful for detecting CNS invasion by ATL and differentiating it from other abnormalities. The MRI findings seemed to correlate well with the histological changes. (orig.)

  2. Central nervous system lesions in adult T-cell leukaemia: MRI and pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitajima, M.; Korogi, Y.; Shigematsu, Y.; Liang, L.; Takahashi, M.; Matsuoka, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Jhono, M.; Eto, K.

    2002-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukaemia (ATL) is a T-cell lymphoid neoplasm caused by human T-cell leukaemia virus type I (HTLV-I). Radiological findings in central nervous system (CNS) involvement have not been well characterised. We reviewed the MRI of 18 patients with ATL who developed new neurological symptoms or signs, and pathology specimens from a 53-year-old woman who died of ATL. MRI findings were divided into three categories: definite, probable, and other abnormal. Definite and probable findings were defined as ATL-related. The characteristic findings were multiple parenchymal masses with or without contrast enhancement adjacent to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaced and the deep grey matter of both cerebral hemispheres, plus leptomeningeal lesion. One patient had both cerebral and spinal cord lesions. Other abnormal findings in eight patients included one case of leukoencephalopathy caused by methotrexate. The histology findings consisted of clusters of tumour cells along perivascular spaces, and scattered infiltration of the parenchyma, with nests of tumour cells. Leptomeningeal infiltration by tumour spread into the parenchyma and secondary degeneration of the neuronal tracts was observed. MRI was useful for detecting CNS invasion by ATL and differentiating it from other abnormalities. The MRI findings seemed to correlate well with the histological changes. (orig.)

  3. MINIPILOT SOLAR SYSTEM: DESIGN/OPERATION OF SYSTEM AND RESULTS OF NON-SOLAR TESTING AT MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior to this project, MRI had carried out work for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on the conceptual design of a solar system for solid waste disposal and a follow-on project to study the feasibility of bench-scale testing of desorption of organics from soil with destr...

  4. Intra- and interrater reliability of three different MRI grading and classification systems after acute hamstring injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangensteen, Arnlaug; Tol, Johannes L; Roemer, Frank W; Bahr, Roald; Dijkstra, H Paul; Crema, Michel D; Farooq, Abdulaziz; Guermazi, Ali

    2017-04-01

    To assess and compare the intra- and interrater reliability of three different MRI grading and classification systems after acute hamstring injury. Male athletes (n=40) with clinical diagnosis of acute hamstring injury and MRI ≤5days were selected from a prospective cohort. Two radiologists independently evaluated the MRIs using standardised scoring form including the modified Peetrons grading system, the Chan acute muscle strain injury classification and the British Athletics Muscle Injury Classification. Intra-and interrater reliability was assessed with linear weighted kappa (κ) or unweighted Cohen's κ and percentage agreement was calculated. We observed 'substantial' to 'almost perfect' intra- (κ range 0.65-1.00) and interrater reliability (κ range 0.77-1.00) with percentage agreement 83-100% and 88-100%, respectively, for severity gradings, overall anatomical sites and overall classifications for the three MRI systems. We observed substantial variability (κ range -0.05 to 1.00) for subcategories within the Chan classification and the British Athletics Muscle Injury Classification, however, the prevalence of positive scorings was low for some subcategories. The modified Peetrons grading system, overall Chan classification and overall British Athletics Muscle Injury Classification demonstrated 'substantial' to 'almost perfect' intra- and interrater reliability when scored by experienced radiologists. The intra- and interrater reliability for the anatomical subcategories within the classifications remains unclear. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. SPECT data acquisition and image reconstruction in a stationary small animal SPECT/MRI system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingyan; Chen, Si; Yu, Jianhua; Meier, Dirk; Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Patt, Bradley E.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    2010-04-01

    The goal of the study was to investigate data acquisition strategies and image reconstruction methods for a stationary SPECT insert that can operate inside an MRI scanner with a 12 cm bore diameter for simultaneous SPECT/MRI imaging of small animals. The SPECT insert consists of 3 octagonal rings of 8 MR-compatible CZT detectors per ring surrounding a multi-pinhole (MPH) collimator sleeve. Each pinhole is constructed to project the field-of-view (FOV) to one CZT detector. All 24 pinholes are focused to a cylindrical FOV of 25 mm in diameter and 34 mm in length. The data acquisition strategies we evaluated were optional collimator rotations to improve tomographic sampling; and the image reconstruction methods were iterative ML-EM with and without compensation for the geometric response function (GRF) of the MPH collimator. For this purpose, we developed an analytic simulator that calculates the system matrix with the GRF models of the MPH collimator. The simulator was used to generate projection data of a digital rod phantom with pinhole aperture sizes of 1 mm and 2 mm and with different collimator rotation patterns. Iterative ML-EM reconstruction with and without GRF compensation were used to reconstruct the projection data from the central ring of 8 detectors only, and from all 24 detectors. Our results indicated that without GRF compensation and at the default design of 24 projection views, the reconstructed images had significant artifacts. Accurate GRF compensation substantially improved the reconstructed image resolution and reduced image artifacts. With accurate GRF compensation, useful reconstructed images can be obtained using 24 projection views only. This last finding potentially enables dynamic SPECT (and/or MRI) studies in small animals, one of many possible application areas of the SPECT/MRI system. Further research efforts are warranted including experimentally measuring the system matrix for improved geometrical accuracy, incorporating the co

  6. A graphics processing unit accelerated motion correction algorithm and modular system for real-time fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheinost, Dustin; Hampson, Michelle; Qiu, Maolin; Bhawnani, Jitendra; Constable, R Todd; Papademetris, Xenophon

    2013-07-01

    Real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) has recently gained interest as a possible means to facilitate the learning of certain behaviors. However, rt-fMRI is limited by processing speed and available software, and continued development is needed for rt-fMRI to progress further and become feasible for clinical use. In this work, we present an open-source rt-fMRI system for biofeedback powered by a novel Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) accelerated motion correction strategy as part of the BioImage Suite project ( www.bioimagesuite.org ). Our system contributes to the development of rt-fMRI by presenting a motion correction algorithm that provides an estimate of motion with essentially no processing delay as well as a modular rt-fMRI system design. Using empirical data from rt-fMRI scans, we assessed the quality of motion correction in this new system. The present algorithm performed comparably to standard (non real-time) offline methods and outperformed other real-time methods based on zero order interpolation of motion parameters. The modular approach to the rt-fMRI system allows the system to be flexible to the experiment and feedback design, a valuable feature for many applications. We illustrate the flexibility of the system by describing several of our ongoing studies. Our hope is that continuing development of open-source rt-fMRI algorithms and software will make this new technology more accessible and adaptable, and will thereby accelerate its application in the clinical and cognitive neurosciences.

  7. Volumetric MRI of the limbic system: anatomic determinants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilir, E.; Craven, W.; Hugg, J.; Gilliam, F.; Martin, R.; Faught, E.; Kuzniecky, R. [UAB Epilepsy Center, Department of Neurology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The limbic system comprises the hippocampal formation, fornix, mamillary bodies, thalamus, and other integrated structures. It is involved in complex functions including memory and emotion and in diseases such as temporal lobe epilepsy. Volume measurements of the amygdala and hippocampus have been used reliably to study patients with temporal lobe epilepsy but have not extended to other limbic structures. We performed volume measurements of hippocampus, amygdala, fornix and mamillary bodies in healthy individuals. Measurements of the amygdala, hippocampus, fornix and mamillary bodies revealed significant differences in volume between right and left sides (P < 0.001). The intraclass coefficient of variation for measurements was high for all structures except the mamillary bodies. Qualitative image assessment of the same structures revealed no asymmetries between the hemispheres. This technique can be applied to the study of disorders affecting the limbic system. (orig.) With 4 figs., 2 tabs., 23 refs.

  8. Volumetric MRI of the limbic system: anatomic determinants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilir, E.; Craven, W.; Hugg, J.; Gilliam, F.; Martin, R.; Faught, E.; Kuzniecky, R.

    1998-01-01

    The limbic system comprises the hippocampal formation, fornix, mamillary bodies, thalamus, and other integrated structures. It is involved in complex functions including memory and emotion and in diseases such as temporal lobe epilepsy. Volume measurements of the amygdala and hippocampus have been used reliably to study patients with temporal lobe epilepsy but have not extended to other limbic structures. We performed volume measurements of hippocampus, amygdala, fornix and mamillary bodies in healthy individuals. Measurements of the amygdala, hippocampus, fornix and mamillary bodies revealed significant differences in volume between right and left sides (P < 0.001). The intraclass coefficient of variation for measurements was high for all structures except the mamillary bodies. Qualitative image assessment of the same structures revealed no asymmetries between the hemispheres. This technique can be applied to the study of disorders affecting the limbic system. (orig.)

  9. Functional MRI of the olfactory system in conscious dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Jia

    Full Text Available We depend upon the olfactory abilities of dogs for critical tasks such as detecting bombs, landmines, other hazardous chemicals and illicit substances. Hence, a mechanistic understanding of the olfactory system in dogs is of great scientific interest. Previous studies explored this aspect at the cellular and behavior levels; however, the cognitive-level neural substrates linking them have never been explored. This is critical given the fact that behavior is driven by filtered sensory representations in higher order cognitive areas rather than the raw odor maps of the olfactory bulb. Since sedated dogs cannot sniff, we investigated this using functional magnetic resonance imaging of conscious dogs. We addressed the technical challenges of head motion using a two pronged strategy of behavioral training to keep dogs' head as still as possible and a single camera optical head motion tracking system to account for residual jerky movements. We built a custom computer-controlled odorant delivery system which was synchronized with image acquisition, allowing the investigation of brain regions activated by odors. The olfactory bulb and piriform lobes were commonly activated in both awake and anesthetized dogs, while the frontal cortex was activated mainly in conscious dogs. Comparison of responses to low and high odor intensity showed differences in either the strength or spatial extent of activation in the olfactory bulb, piriform lobes, cerebellum, and frontal cortex. Our results demonstrate the viability of the proposed method for functional imaging of the olfactory system in conscious dogs. This could potentially open up a new field of research in detector dog technology.

  10. Assessment of three different software systems in the evaluation of dynamic MRI of the breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurz, K.D. [Department of Radiology, Stavanger University Hospital, Postbox 8100, Stavanger (Norway)], E-mail: kurk@sus.no; Steinhaus, D. [Institute of Daignostic Radiology, Duesseldorf University Hospital, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: Daniele.Steinhaus@med.uni-duesseldorf.de; Klar, V. [Institute of Daignostic Radiology, Duesseldorf University Hospital, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: verena.klar@uni-duesseldorf.de; Cohnen, M. [Institute of Daignostic Radiology, Duesseldorf University Hospital, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: cohnen@med.uni-duesseldorf.de; Wittsack, H.J. [Institute of Daignostic Radiology, Duesseldorf University Hospital, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: wittsack@uni-duesseldorf.de; Saleh, A. [Institute of Daignostic Radiology, Duesseldorf University Hospital, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: saleh@uni-duesseldorf.de; Moedder, U. [Institute of Daignostic Radiology, Duesseldorf University Hospital, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: moedder@med.uni-duesseldorf.de; Blondin, D. [Institute of Daignostic Radiology, Duesseldorf University Hospital, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: blondin@med.uni-duesseldorf.de

    2009-02-15

    Objective: The aim was to compare the diagnostic performance and handling of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of the breast with two commercial software solutions ('CADstream' and '3TP') and one self-developed software system ('Mammatool'). Materials and methods: Identical data sets of dynamic breast MRI from 21 patients were evaluated retrospectively with all three software systems. The exams were classified according to the BI-RADS classification. The number of lesions in the parametric mapping was compared to histology or follow-up of more than 2 years. In addition, 25 quality criteria were judged by 3 independent investigators with a score from 0 to 5. Statistical analysis was performed to document the quality ranking of the different software systems. Results: There were 9 invasive carcinomas, one pure DCIS, one papilloma, one radial scar, three histologically proven changes due to mastopathy, one adenosis and two fibroadenomas. Additionally two patients with enhancing parenchyma followed with MRI for more than 3 years and one scar after breast conserving therapy were included. All malignant lesions were classified as BI-RADS 4 or 5 using all software systems and showed significant enhancement in the parametric mapping. 'CADstream' showed the best score on subjective quality criteria. '3TP' showed the lowest number of false-positive results. 'Mammatool' produced the lowest number of benign tissues indicated with parametric overlay. Conclusion: All three software programs tested were adequate for sensitive and efficient assessment of dynamic MRI of the breast. Improvements in specificity may be achievable.

  11. The OMERACT psoriatic arthritis magnetic resonance imaging scoring system (PsAMRIS): definitions of key pathologies, suggested MRI sequences, and preliminary scoring system for PsA Hands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; McQueen, Fiona; Wiell, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a preliminary OMERACT psoriatic arthritis magnetic resonance image scoring system (PsAMRIS) for evaluation of inflammatory and destructive changes in PsA hands, which was developed by the international OMERACT MRI in inflammatory arthritis group. MRI definitions of important...... pathologies in peripheral PsA and suggestions concerning appropriate MRI sequences for use in PsA hands are also provided....

  12. MRI and CT appearances in metabolic encephalopathies due to systemic diseases in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathla, G.; Hegde, A.N.

    2013-01-01

    The term encephalopathy refers to a clinical scenario of diffuse brain dysfunction, commonly due to a systemic, metabolic, or toxic derangement. Often the clinical evaluation is unsatisfactory in this scenario and imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis, assessment of treatment response, and prognostication of the disorder. Hence, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with the imaging features of some relatively frequently acquired metabolic encephalopathies encountered in the hospital setting. This study reviews the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of a number of metabolic encephalopathies that occur as part of systemic diseases in adults. The following conditions are covered in this review: hypoglycaemic encephalopathy, hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy, non-ketotic hyperglycaemia, hepatic encephalopathy, uraemic encephalopathy, hyperammonaemic encephalopathy, and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. MRI is the imaging method of choice in evaluating these conditions. Due to their high metabolic activity, bilateral basal ganglia changes are evident in the majority of cases. Concurrent imaging abnormalities in other parts of the central nervous system often provide useful diagnostic information about the likely underlying cause of the encephalopathy. Besides this, abnormal signal intensity and diffusion restriction patterns on MRI and MR spectroscopy features may provide important clues as to the diagnosis and guide further management. Frequently, the diagnosis is not straightforward and typical imaging features require correlation with clinical and laboratory data for accurate assessment

  13. A low cost fMRI-compatible tracking system using the Nintendo Wii remote.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modroño, Cristián; Rodríguez-Hernández, Antonio F; Marcano, Francisco; Navarrete, Gorka; Burunat, Enrique; Ferrer, Marta; Monserrat, Raquel; González-Mora, José L

    2011-11-15

    It is sometimes necessary during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments to capture different movements made by the subjects, e.g. to enable them to control an item or to analyze its kinematics. The aim of this work is to present an inexpensive hand tracking system suitable for use in a high field MRI environment. It works by introducing only one light-emitting diode (LED) in the magnet room, and by receiving its signal with a Nintendo Wii remote (the primary controller for the Nintendo Wii console) placed outside in the control room. Thus, it is possible to take high spatial and temporal resolution registers of a moving point that, in this case, is held by the hand. We tested it using a ball and racket virtual game inside a 3 Tesla MRI scanner to demonstrate the usefulness of the system. The results show the involvement of a number of areas (mainly occipital and frontal, but also parietal and temporal) when subjects are trying to stop an object that is approaching from a first person perspective, matching previous studies performed with related visuomotor tasks. The system presented here is easy to implement, easy to operate and does not produce important head movements or artifacts in the acquired images. Given its low cost and ready availability, the method described here is ideal for use in basic and clinical fMRI research to track one or more moving points that can correspond to limbs, fingers or any other object whose position needs to be known. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. MRI-compatible audio/visual system: impact on pediatric sedation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harned, R.K. II; Strain, J.D.

    2001-01-01

    Background. While sedation is necessary for much pediatric imaging, there are new alternatives that may help patients hold still without medication. Objective. We examined the effect of an audio/visual system consisting of video goggles and earphones on the need for sedation during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods. All MRI examinations from May 1999 to October 1999 performed after installation of the MRVision 2000 (Resonance Technology, Inc.) were compared to the same 6-month period in 1998. Imaging and sedation protocols remained constant. Data collected included: patient age, type of examination, use of intravenous contrast enhancement, and need for sedation. The average supply charge and nursing cost per sedated patient were calculated. Results. The 955 patients from 1998 and 1,112 patients from 1999 were similar in demographics and examination distribution. There was an overall reduction in the percent of patients requiring sedation in the group using the video goggle system from 49 to 40 % (P < 0.001). There was no significant change for 0-2 years (P = 0.805), but there was a reduction from 53 to 40 % for age 3-10 years (P < 0.001) and 16 to 8 % for those older than 10 years (P < 0.001). There was a 17 % decrease in MRI room time for those patients whose examinations could be performed without sedation. Sedation costs per patient were $80 for nursing and $29 for supplies. Conclusion. The use of this video system reduced the number of children requiring sedation for MRI examination by 18 %. In addition to reducing patient risk, this can potentially reduce cost. (orig.)

  15. MRI findings in central nervous system of neurofibromatosis-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Maoen; Huang Suiqiao; Shen Jun; Hong Guobin; Wu Zhuo; Lin Xiaofeng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the diagnostic value of MR imaging in central nervous system involvement of neurofibromatosis II. Methods: 7 patients with surgically and pathologically proved neurofibromatosis II were included. Their MR imaging findings and clinical features were retrospectively analyzed. Results: The main findings of 7 cases of neurofibraomaosis II on MR imaging included bilateral acoustic neurilemoma, multiple neurofibroma, meningioma and schwannoma. Among the 7 patients, Tl-weighted imaging after contrast enhancement displayed additional lesions which had been ignored on un-enhanced scan. Conclusion: MR imaging has advantages in the detection of central nervous sys- tem involvement of neurofibromatosis II with regard to its ability to show the lesions well, meanwhile displaying the size, morphology and signal features clearly. (authors)

  16. A novel optically transparent RF shielding for fully integrated PET/MRI systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parl, C.; Kolb, A.; Schmid, A. M.; Wehrl, H. F.; Disselhorst, J. A.; Soubiran, P. D.; Stricker-Shaver, D.; Pichler, B. J.

    2017-09-01

    Preclinical imaging benefits from simultaneous acquisition of high-resolution anatomical and molecular data. Additionally, PET/MRI systems can provide functional PET and functional MRI data. To optimize PET sensitivity, we propose a system design that fully integrates the MRI coil into the PET system. This allows positioning the scintillators near the object but requires an optimized design of the MRI coil and PET detector. It further requires a new approach in realizing the radiofrequency (RF) shielding. Thus, we propose the use of an optically transparent RF shielding material between the PET scintillator and the light sensor, suppressing the interference between both systems. We evaluated two conductive foils (ITO, 9900) and a wire mesh. The PET performance was tested on a dual-layer scintillator consisting of 12  ×  12 LSO matrices, shifted by half a pitch. The pixel size was 0.9  ×  0.9 mm2 the lengths were 10.0 mm and 5.0 mm, respectively. For a light sensor, we used a 4  ×  4 SiPM array. The RF attenuation was measured from 320 kHz to 420 MHz using two pick-up coils. MRI-compatibility and shielding effect of the materials were evaluated with an MRI system. The average FWHM energy resolution at 511 keV of all 144 crystals of the layer next to the SiPM was deteriorated from 15.73  ±  0.24% to 16.32  ±  0.13%, 16.60  ±  0.25%, and 19.16  ±  0.21% by the ITO foil, 9900 foil, mesh material, respectively. The average peak-to-valley ratio of the PET detector changed from 5.77  ±  0.29 to 4.50  ±  0.39, 4.78  ±  0.48, 3.62  ±  0.16, respectively. The ITO, 9900, mesh attenuated the scintillation light by 11.3  ±  1.6%, 11.0  ±  1.8%, 54.3  ±  0.4%, respectively. To attenuate the RF from 20 MHz to 200 MHz, mesh performed better than copper. The results show that an RF shielding material that is sufficiently transparent for

  17. Microcomputer-based image processing system for CT/MRI scans II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok, J.C.K.; Yu, P.K.N.; Cheng, A.Y.S.; Ho, W.C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that a microcomputer-based image processing system is used to digitize and process serial sections of CT/MRI scan and reconstruct three-dimensional images of brain structures and brain lesions. The images grabbed also serve as templates and different vital regions with different risk values are also traced out for 3D reconstruction. A knowledge-based system employing rule-based programming has been built to help identifying brain lesions and to help planning trajectory for operations. The volumes of the lesions are also automatically determined. Such system is very useful for medical skills archival, tumor size monitoring, survival and outcome forecasting, and consistent neurosurgical planning

  18. Spiral Gradient Coil Design for Use in Cylindrical MRI Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaohui; Xin, Xuegang; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2018-04-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging, the stream function based method is commonly used in the design of gradient coils. However, this method can be prone to errors associated with the discretization of continuous current density and wire connections. In this paper, we propose a novel gradient coil design scheme that works directly in the wire space, avoiding the system errors that may appear in the stream function approaches. Specifically, the gradient coil pattern is described with dedicated spiral functions adjusted to allow the coil to produce the required field gradients in the imaging area, minimal stray field, and other engineering terms. The performance of a designed spiral gradient coil was compared with its stream-function counterpart. The numerical evaluation shows that when compared with the conventional solution, the inductance and resistance was reduced by 20.9 and 10.5%, respectively. The overall coil performance (evaluated by the figure of merit (FoM)) was improved up to 26.5% for the x -gradient coil design; for the z-gradient coil design, the inductance and resistance were reduced by 15.1 and 6.7% respectively, and the FoM was increased by 17.7%. In addition, by directly controlling the wire distributions, the spiral gradient coil design was much sparser than conventional coils.

  19. MRI compatibility study of an integrated PET/RF-coil prototype system at 3 T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Md Shahadat Hossain; Obata, Takayuki; Suga, Mikio; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Yoshida, Eiji; Saito, Kazuyuki; Yamaya, Taiga

    2017-10-01

    We have been working on the development of a PET insert for existing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems for simultaneous PET/MR imaging, which integrates radiofrequency (RF)-shielded PET detector modules with an RF head coil. In order to avoid interferences between the PET detector circuits and the different MRI-generated electromagnetic fields, PET detector circuits were installed inside eight Cu-shielded fiber-reinforced plastic boxes, and these eight shielded PET modules were integrated in between the eight elements of a 270-mm-diameter and 280-mm-axial-length cylindrical birdcage RF coil, which was designed to be used with a 3-T clinical MRI system. The diameter of the PET scintillators with a 12-mm axial field-of-view became 255 mm, which was very close to the imaging region. In this study, we have investigated the effects of this PET/RF-coil integrated system on the performance of MRI, which include the evaluation of static field (Bo) inhomogeneity, RF field (B1) distribution, local specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution, average SAR, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). For the central 170-mm-diameter and 80-mm-axial-length of a homogenous cylindrical phantom (with the total diameter of 200 mm and axial-length of 100 mm), an increase of about a maximum of 3 μT in the Bo inhomogeneity was found, both in the central and 40-mm off-centered transverse planes, and a 5 percentage point increase of B1 field inhomogeneity was observed in the central transverse plane (from 84% without PET to 79% with PET), while B1 homogeneity along the coronal plane was almost unchanged (77%) following the integration of PET with the RF head coil. The average SAR and maximum local SAR were increased by 1.21 and 1.62 times, respectively. However, the SNR study for both spin-echo and gradient-echo sequences showed a reduction of about 70% and 60%, respectively, because of the shielded PET modules. The overall results prove the feasibility of this integrated PET/RF-coil system

  20. [Utilization of polymeric micelle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent for theranostic system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Kouichi

    2013-01-01

    We applied a polymeric micelle carrier system for the targeting of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. Prepared polymeric micelle MRI contrast agent exhibited a long circulation characteristic in blood, and considerable amount of the contrast agent was found to accumulate in colon 26 solid tumor by the EPR effect. The signal intensities of tumor area showed 2-folds increase in T1-weighted images at 24 h after i.v. injection. To observe enhancement of the EPR effect by Cderiv pretreatment on tumor targeting, we used the contrast agent for the evaluation by means of MRI. Cderiv pretreatment significantly enhanced tumor accumulation of the contrast agent. Interestingly, very high signal intensity in tumor region was found at 24 h after the contrast agent injection in Cderiv pretreated mice. The contrast agent visualized a microenvironmental change in tumor. These results indicate that the contrast agent exhibits potential use for tumor diagnostic agent. To combine with a polymeric micelle carrier system for therapeutic agent, the usage of the combination makes a new concept of "theranostic" for a better cancer treatment.

  1. PET/MRI of central nervous system: current status and future perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhen Lu; Zhang, Long Jiang [Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)

    2016-10-15

    Imaging plays an increasingly important role in the early diagnosis, prognosis prediction and therapy response evaluation of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. The newly emerging hybrid positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) can perform ''one-stop-shop'' evaluation, including anatomic, functional, biochemical and metabolic information, even at the molecular level, for personalised diagnoses and treatments of CNS diseases. However, there are still several problems to be resolved, such as appropriate PET detectors, attenuation correction and so on. This review will introduce the basic physical principles of PET/MRI and its potential clinical applications in the CNS. We also provide the future perspectives for this field. (orig.)

  2. CT of the musculoskeletal system: What is left is the days of MRI?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, A.T.H.; Marshall, T.J.; Bearcroft, P.W.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a central role in the modern imaging of musculoskeletal disorders, due to its ability to produce multiplanar images and characterise soft tissues accurately. However, computed tomography (CT) still has an important role to play, not merely as an alternative to MRI, but as being the preferred imaging investigation in some situations. This article briefly reviews the history of CT technology, the technical factors involved and a number of current applications, as well as looking at future areas where CT may be employed. The advent of ever-increasing numbers of rows of detectors has opened up more possible uses for CT technology. However, diagnostic images may be obtained from CT systems with four rows of detectors or more, and their ability to produce near isotropic voxels and therefore multiplanar reformats. (orig.)

  3. KneeTex: an ontology-driven system for information extraction from MRI reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasić, Irena; Zhao, Bo; Jones, Christopher B; Button, Kate

    2015-01-01

    In the realm of knee pathology, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the advantage of visualising all structures within the knee joint, which makes it a valuable tool for increasing diagnostic accuracy and planning surgical treatments. Therefore, clinical narratives found in MRI reports convey valuable diagnostic information. A range of studies have proven the feasibility of natural language processing for information extraction from clinical narratives. However, no study focused specifically on MRI reports in relation to knee pathology, possibly due to the complexity of knee anatomy and a wide range of conditions that may be associated with different anatomical entities. In this paper we describe KneeTex, an information extraction system that operates in this domain. As an ontology-driven information extraction system, KneeTex makes active use of an ontology to strongly guide and constrain text analysis. We used automatic term recognition to facilitate the development of a domain-specific ontology with sufficient detail and coverage for text mining applications. In combination with the ontology, high regularity of the sublanguage used in knee MRI reports allowed us to model its processing by a set of sophisticated lexico-semantic rules with minimal syntactic analysis. The main processing steps involve named entity recognition combined with coordination, enumeration, ambiguity and co-reference resolution, followed by text segmentation. Ontology-based semantic typing is then used to drive the template filling process. We adopted an existing ontology, TRAK (Taxonomy for RehAbilitation of Knee conditions), for use within KneeTex. The original TRAK ontology expanded from 1,292 concepts, 1,720 synonyms and 518 relationship instances to 1,621 concepts, 2,550 synonyms and 560 relationship instances. This provided KneeTex with a very fine-grained lexico-semantic knowledge base, which is highly attuned to the given sublanguage. Information extraction results were evaluated

  4. A Tumor-Targeted Nanodelivery System to Improve Early MRI Detection of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen F. Pirollo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of improvements in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI that would enhance sensitivity, leading to earlier detection of cancer and visualization of metastatic disease, is an area of intense exploration. We have devised a tumor-targeting, liposomal nanodelivery platform for use in gene medicine. This systemically administered nanocomplex has been shown to specifically and efficiently deliver both genes and oligonucleotides to primary and metastatic tumor cells, resulting in significant tumor growth inhibition and even tumor regression. Here we examine the effect on MRI of incorporating conventional MRI contrast agent Magnevist® into our anti-transferrin receptor single-chain antibody (TfRscFv liposomal complex. Both in vitro and in an in vivo orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer, we show increased resolution and image intensity with the complexed Magnevist®. Using advanced microscopy techniques (scanning electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy, we also established that the Magnevist® is in fact encapsulated by the liposome in the complex and that the complex still retains its nanodimensional size. These results demonstrate that this TfRscFv-liposome-Magnevist® nanocomplex has the potential to become a useful tool in early cancer detection.

  5. MR-guided discography using an open 1 Tesla MRI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streitparth, Florian; Bucourt, M. de; Hamm, B.; Teichgraeber, U.; Hartwig, T.; Strube, P.; Putzier, M.; Schnackenburg, B.; Chopra, S.

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of MR-guided discography using an open 1 Tesla MRI system. 48 disc segments of 41 patients scheduled for intradiscal thermal treatment, total disc replacement or spondylodesis were examined. A 1.0-T open MRI was used for instrument guidance and imaging. After primary disc puncture under guidance of interactive PDw TSE imaging, 1-2 ml of gadolinium contrast saline mixture was injected into the disc. The occurrence of memory pain during injection was recorded. Axial and sagittal T1w TSE images with and without fat saturation were obtained. All MRI discograms were analysed by two readers, who were blinded to the clinical findings. Overall, the placement of the puncture needle in the targeted disc was accurate under real-time MR guidance. Injections were technically successful in all cases. No major complications occurred. The mean procedure time was 17 min (range 13-34 min). Image quality of contrast-enhanced MR discograms was excellent when using an optimized gadolinium contrast saline mixture of 1:600. Memory pain was detected in 16 out of 48 affected segments. MR-guided discography is accurate and safe. Multiplanar dynamic imaging facilitates the puncture of discs and provides high-quality MR discograms. (orig.)

  6. Multiple fMRI system-level baseline connectivity is disrupted in patients with consciousness alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demertzi, Athena; Gómez, Francisco; Crone, Julia Sophia; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey; Tshibanda, Luaba; Noirhomme, Quentin; Thonnard, Marie; Charland-Verville, Vanessa; Kirsch, Murielle; Laureys, Steven; Soddu, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    In healthy conditions, group-level fMRI resting state analyses identify ten resting state networks (RSNs) of cognitive relevance. Here, we aim to assess the ten-network model in severely brain-injured patients suffering from disorders of consciousness and to identify those networks which will be most relevant to discriminate between patients and healthy subjects. 300 fMRI volumes were obtained in 27 healthy controls and 53 patients in minimally conscious state (MCS), vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (VS/UWS) and coma. Independent component analysis (ICA) reduced data dimensionality. The ten networks were identified by means of a multiple template-matching procedure and were tested on neuronality properties (neuronal vs non-neuronal) in a data-driven way. Univariate analyses detected between-group differences in networks' neuronal properties and estimated voxel-wise functional connectivity in the networks, which were significantly less identifiable in patients. A nearest-neighbor "clinical" classifier was used to determine the networks with high between-group discriminative accuracy. Healthy controls were characterized by more neuronal components compared to patients in VS/UWS and in coma. Compared to healthy controls, fewer patients in MCS and VS/UWS showed components of neuronal origin for the left executive control network, default mode network (DMN), auditory, and right executive control network. The "clinical" classifier indicated the DMN and auditory network with the highest accuracy (85.3%) in discriminating patients from healthy subjects. FMRI multiple-network resting state connectivity is disrupted in severely brain-injured patients suffering from disorders of consciousness. When performing ICA, multiple-network testing and control for neuronal properties of the identified RSNs can advance fMRI system-level characterization. Automatic data-driven patient classification is the first step towards future single-subject objective diagnostics

  7. TU-H-BRA-05: A System Design for Integration of An Interior MRI and a Linear Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, W [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States); Wang, G [Rensselaer Polytechnic Instit., Troy, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: MRI is a highly desirable modality to guide radiation therapy but it is difficult to combine a conventional MRI scanner directly with a linear accelerator (linac). An interior MRI (iMRI) concept has been proposed to acquire MRI images within a small field of view only covering targets and immediate surrounding tissues. The objective of this project is to design an interior MRI system to work with a linac using a magnet to provide a field around 0.2T in a cube of 20cm per side, and perform image reconstruction with a slightly inhomogeneous static magnetic fields. Methods: All the results are simulated using a commercially available software package, FARADY. In our design, a ring structure holds the iMRI system and also imbeds a linac treatment head. The ring is synchronized to the linac gantry rotation. Half of the ring is made of steel and becomes a magnetic flux return path (yoke) so that a strong magnetic field will be limited inside the iron circuit and fringe fields will be very weak. In order to increase the static magnetic field homogeneity, special steel magnet boots or tips were simulated. Three curved boots were designed based on two-dimensional curves: arc, parabola and hyperbola. Results: Different boot surfaces modify magnetic field distributions differently. With the same pair of neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnets, the magnetic induction at the centers are 0.217T, 0.201T, 0.204T, and 0.212T for flat, arc, parabola and hyperbola boots, respectively. The hyperbola boots lead to the most homogeneous results, the static magnetic field deviations are within 0.5% in a cube of 20cm, and can be further improved using shimming techniques. Conclusion: This study supports the concept of an iMRI design. Successful development of iMRI will provide crucial information for tumor delineation in radiation therapy.

  8. TU-H-BRA-05: A System Design for Integration of An Interior MRI and a Linear Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, W; Wang, G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: MRI is a highly desirable modality to guide radiation therapy but it is difficult to combine a conventional MRI scanner directly with a linear accelerator (linac). An interior MRI (iMRI) concept has been proposed to acquire MRI images within a small field of view only covering targets and immediate surrounding tissues. The objective of this project is to design an interior MRI system to work with a linac using a magnet to provide a field around 0.2T in a cube of 20cm per side, and perform image reconstruction with a slightly inhomogeneous static magnetic fields. Methods: All the results are simulated using a commercially available software package, FARADY. In our design, a ring structure holds the iMRI system and also imbeds a linac treatment head. The ring is synchronized to the linac gantry rotation. Half of the ring is made of steel and becomes a magnetic flux return path (yoke) so that a strong magnetic field will be limited inside the iron circuit and fringe fields will be very weak. In order to increase the static magnetic field homogeneity, special steel magnet boots or tips were simulated. Three curved boots were designed based on two-dimensional curves: arc, parabola and hyperbola. Results: Different boot surfaces modify magnetic field distributions differently. With the same pair of neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnets, the magnetic induction at the centers are 0.217T, 0.201T, 0.204T, and 0.212T for flat, arc, parabola and hyperbola boots, respectively. The hyperbola boots lead to the most homogeneous results, the static magnetic field deviations are within 0.5% in a cube of 20cm, and can be further improved using shimming techniques. Conclusion: This study supports the concept of an iMRI design. Successful development of iMRI will provide crucial information for tumor delineation in radiation therapy.

  9. Integrated navigation and control software system for MRI-guided robotic prostate interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Junichi; Fischer, Gregory S; DiMaio, Simon P; Gobbi, David G; Csoma, Csaba; Mewes, Philip W; Fichtinger, Gabor; Tempany, Clare M; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2010-01-01

    A software system to provide intuitive navigation for MRI-guided robotic transperineal prostate therapy is presented. In the system, the robot control unit, the MRI scanner, and the open-source navigation software are connected together via Ethernet to exchange commands, coordinates, and images using an open network communication protocol, OpenIGTLink. The system has six states called "workphases" that provide the necessary synchronization of all components during each stage of the clinical workflow, and the user interface guides the operator linearly through these workphases. On top of this framework, the software provides the following features for needle guidance: interactive target planning; 3D image visualization with current needle position; treatment monitoring through real-time MR images of needle trajectories in the prostate. These features are supported by calibration of robot and image coordinates by fiducial-based registration. Performance tests show that the registration error of the system was 2.6mm within the prostate volume. Registered real-time 2D images were displayed 1.97 s after the image location is specified. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Multi-Channel RF System for MRI-Guided Transurethral Ultrasound Thermal Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yak, Nicolas; Asselin, Matthew; Chopra, Rajiv; Bronskill, Michael

    2009-04-01

    MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound thermal therapy is an approach to treating localized prostate cancer which targets precise deposition of thermal energy within a confined region of the gland. This treatment requires a system incorporating a heating applicator with multiple planar ultrasound transducers and associated RF electronics to control individual elements independently in order to achieve accurate 3D treatment. We report the design, construction, and characterization of a prototype multi-channel system capable of controlling 16 independent RF signals for a 16-element heating applicator. The main components are a control computer, microcontroller, and a 16-channel signal generator with 16 amplifiers, each incorporating a low-pass filter and transmitted/reflected power detection circuit. Each channel can deliver from 0.5 to 10 W of electrical power and good linearity from 3 to 12 MHz. Harmonic RF signals near the Larmor frequency of a 1.5 T MRI were measured to be below -30 dBm and heating experiments within the 1.5 T MR system showed no significant decrease in SNR of the temperature images. The frequency and power for all 16 channels could be changed in less than 250 ms, which was sufficiently rapid for proper performance of the control algorithms. A common backplane design was chosen which enabled an inexpensive, modular approach for each channel resulting in an overall system with minimal footprint.

  11. Integrated navigation and control software system for MRI-guided robotic prostate interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Junichi; Fischer, Gregory S.; DiMaio, Simon P.; Gobbi, David G.; Csoma, Csaba; Mewes, Philip W.; Fichtinger, Gabor; Tempany, Clare M.; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2010-01-01

    A software system to provide intuitive navigation for MRI-guided robotic transperineal prostate therapy is presented. In the system, the robot control unit, the MRI scanner, and the open-source navigation software are connected together via Ethernet to exchange commands, coordinates, and images using an open network communication protocol, OpenIGTLink. The system has six states called “workphases” that provide the necessary synchronization of all components during each stage of the clinical workflow, and the user interface guides the operator linearly through these workphases. On top of this framework, the software provides the following features for needle guidance: interactive target planning; 3D image visualization with current needle position; treatment monitoring through real-time MR images of needle trajectories in the prostate. These features are supported by calibration of robot and image coordinates by fiducial-based registration. Performance tests show that the registration error of the system was 2.6 mm within the prostate volume. Registered real-time 2D images were displayed 1.97 s after the image location is specified. PMID:19699057

  12. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI in central nervous system Behcet's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdem, E. (Dept. of Radiology (Neuroradiology), Hopital de Bicetre, Paris-Sud Univ. (France)); Carlier, R. (Dept. of Radiology (Neuroradiology), Hopital de Bicetre, Paris-Sud Univ. (France)); Idir, A.B.C. (Dept. of Radiology (Neuroradiology), Hopital de Bicetre, Paris-Sud Univ. (France)); Masnou, P.O. (Dept. of Neurology, Hopital de Bicetre, Paris-Sud Univ. (France)); Moulonguet, A. (Dept. of Neurology, Hopital de Bicetre, Paris-Sud Univ. (France)); Adams, D. (Dept. of Neurology, Hopital de Bicetre, Paris-Sud Univ. (France)); Doyon, D. (Dept. of Radiology (Neuroradiology), Hopital de Bicetre, Paris-Sud Univ. (France))

    1993-02-01

    Two cases of central nervous system Behcet's disease, studied by gadolinium-enhanced MRI, are presented. In one patient, whose clinical picture was dominated by a brain stem syndrome, the gadolinium enhancement resolved with clinical improvement, although the hyperintense areas in the mesencephalon on T2-weighted images persisted. In the second, who had a pseudobulbar palsy and a mild right hemiparesis, there were many abnormal areas, but an enhancing focus in the posterior limb of the left internal capsule was probably the lesion responsible for the hemiparesis. (orig.)

  13. Fetal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayer, D.; Brugger, P.C.

    2004-01-01

    New, ultrafast sequences have made it possible to obtain MR images of the fetus without maternal sedation or immobilization of the fetus itself. While fetal MRI began as an adjunct to ultrasound, it has now been shown that MRI can provide additional information that may change prognosis, the management of pregnancy, or the treatment of the newborn child. It is of particular value in the assessment of malformations of the central nervous system. The steady development and adaptation of MR-sequences to the needs of fetal imaging has led to new indications that can support prognostic and therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  14. Interventional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, Junta; Dohi, Michiko; Yoshihiro, Akiko; Mogami, Takuji; Kuwada, Tomoko; Nakata, Norio [Jikei Univ., Chiba (Japan). Kashiwa Hospital

    2000-06-01

    Open type MR system and fast sequence is now available and MRI becomes a new modality for interventional Radiology, including biopsy, drainage operation, and monitoring for minimally invasive therapy. Experimental studies of temperature monitoring were performed under hot and cold status. Signal changes of porcine disc and meat under microwave and laser ablation were observed as low signal area by signal intensity method. Using proton chemical shift method, signal change by laser ablation was displaced color imaging and correlated with thermometric temperature measurement. The very T2 relaxation time of ice affords excellent contrast between ice and surrounding gelatin tissue allowing acute depiction of the extent of the iceball under MRI. (author)

  15. Fetal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prayer, D.; Brugger, P.C. [University Hospital of Vienna (Austria). Division of Neuroradiology

    2004-07-01

    New, ultrafast sequences have made it possible to obtain MR images of the fetus without maternal sedation or immobilization of the fetus itself. While fetal MRI began as an adjunct to ultrasound, it has now been shown that MRI can provide additional information that may change prognosis, the management of pregnancy, or the treatment of the newborn child. It is of particular value in the assessment of malformations of the central nervous system. The steady development and adaptation of MR-sequences to the needs of fetal imaging has led to new indications that can support prognostic and therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  16. A simple scoring system for breast MRI interpretation: does it compensate for reader experience?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marino, Maria Adele; Clauser, Paola; Woitek, Ramona; Wengert, Georg J.; Kapetas, Panagiotis; Bernathova, Maria; Pinker-Domenig, Katja; Helbich, Thomas H.; Baltzer, Pascal A.T.; Preidler, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the impact of a scoring system (Tree) on inter-reader agreement and diagnostic performance in breast MRI reading. This IRB-approved, single-centre study included 100 patients with 121 consecutive histopathologically verified lesions (52 malignant, 68 benign). Four breast radiologists with different levels of MRI experience and blinded to histopathology retrospectively evaluated all examinations. Readers independently applied two methods to classify breast lesions: BI-RADS and Tree. BI-RADS provides a reporting lexicon that is empirically translated into likelihoods of malignancy; Tree is a scoring system that results in a diagnostic category. Readings were compared by ROC analysis and kappa statistics. Inter-reader agreement was substantial to almost perfect (kappa: 0.643-0.896) for Tree and moderate (kappa: 0.455-0.657) for BI-RADS. Diagnostic performance using Tree (AUC: 0.889-0.943) was similar to BI-RADS (AUC: 0.872-0.953). Less experienced radiologists achieved AUC: improvements up to 4.7 % using Tree (P-values: 0.042-0.698); an expert's performance did not change (P = 0.526). The least experienced reader improved in specificity using Tree (16 %, P = 0.001). No further sensitivity and specificity differences were found (P > 0.1). The Tree scoring system improves inter-reader agreement and achieves a diagnostic performance similar to that of BI-RADS. Less experienced radiologists, in particular, benefit from Tree. (orig.)

  17. Limbic system, the main focus of dementia syndrome; A study with MRI and PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuzawa, Taiju [Morinosato Hospital, Atsugi, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1990-12-01

    Alzheimer disease and multi-infarct dementia are two entirely different diseases producing almost the same abnormalities as dementia syndrome. The statistical studies with MRI to locate the focus of dementia syndrome in the neocortex was an absolute failure. With MRI there is drastic atrophy and destruction of the amygdala and hippocampus suggesting the limbic system as the focus of dementia syndrome. Destruction of the limbic system in particular amygdala and hippocampus produced the functional obstruction brought about by the marked reduction in the glucose utilization with PET in the bilateral temporal, parietal and occipital association cortices. Although this type constitutes only about 1/5 of all dementia patients. It is considered the fundamental type of dementia syndrome. Aside from this, there is a type wherein simultaneous and symmetrical reductions in glucose utilization of the frontal association cortex and the motor association cortex in the anterior part of the neocortex. This is referred to as type II. It constitutes about 4/5 of all dementia patients which is far more than type I. Based on these results, it is thought that limbic system is the main focus of dementia syndrome. (author).

  18. SU-F-J-171: Robust Atlas Based Segmentation of the Prostate and Peripheral Zone Regions On MRI Utilizing Multiple MRI System Vendors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padgett, K; Pollack, A; Stoyanova, R; Swallen, A; Nelson, A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Automatically generated prostate MRI contours can be used to aid in image registration with CT or ultrasound and to reduce the burden of contouring for radiation treatment planning. In addition, prostate and zonal contours can assist to automate quantitative imaging features extraction and the analyses of longitudinal MRI studies. These potential gains are limited if the solutions are not compatible across different MRI vendors. The goal of this study is to characterize an atlas based automatic segmentation procedure of the prostate collected on MRI systems from multiple vendors. Methods: The prostate and peripheral zone (PZ) were manually contoured by an expert radiation oncologist on T2-weighted scans acquired on both GE (n=31) and Siemens (n=33) 3T MRI systems. A leave-one-out approach was utilized where the target subject is removed from the atlas before the segmentation algorithm is initiated. The atlas-segmentation method finds the best nine matched atlas subjects and then performs a normalized intensity-based free-form deformable registration of these subjects to the target subject. These nine contours are then merged into a single contour using Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation (STAPLE). Contour comparisons were made using Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) and Hausdorff distances. Results: Using the T2 FatSat (FS) GE datasets the atlas generated contours resulted in an average DSC of 0.83±0.06 for prostate, 0.57±0.12 for PZ and 0.75±0.09 for CG. Similar results were found when using the Siemens data with a DSC of 0.79±0.14 for prostate, 0.54±0.16 and 0.70±0.9. Contrast between prostate and surrounding anatomy and between the PZ and CG contours for both vendors demonstrated superior contrast separation; significance was found for all comparisons p-value < 0.0001. Conclusion: Atlas-based segmentation yielded promising results for all contours compared to expertly defined contours in both Siemens and GE 3T systems providing

  19. SU-F-J-171: Robust Atlas Based Segmentation of the Prostate and Peripheral Zone Regions On MRI Utilizing Multiple MRI System Vendors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padgett, K; Pollack, A; Stoyanova, R [University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Swallen, A; Nelson, A [MIM Software Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Automatically generated prostate MRI contours can be used to aid in image registration with CT or ultrasound and to reduce the burden of contouring for radiation treatment planning. In addition, prostate and zonal contours can assist to automate quantitative imaging features extraction and the analyses of longitudinal MRI studies. These potential gains are limited if the solutions are not compatible across different MRI vendors. The goal of this study is to characterize an atlas based automatic segmentation procedure of the prostate collected on MRI systems from multiple vendors. Methods: The prostate and peripheral zone (PZ) were manually contoured by an expert radiation oncologist on T2-weighted scans acquired on both GE (n=31) and Siemens (n=33) 3T MRI systems. A leave-one-out approach was utilized where the target subject is removed from the atlas before the segmentation algorithm is initiated. The atlas-segmentation method finds the best nine matched atlas subjects and then performs a normalized intensity-based free-form deformable registration of these subjects to the target subject. These nine contours are then merged into a single contour using Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation (STAPLE). Contour comparisons were made using Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) and Hausdorff distances. Results: Using the T2 FatSat (FS) GE datasets the atlas generated contours resulted in an average DSC of 0.83±0.06 for prostate, 0.57±0.12 for PZ and 0.75±0.09 for CG. Similar results were found when using the Siemens data with a DSC of 0.79±0.14 for prostate, 0.54±0.16 and 0.70±0.9. Contrast between prostate and surrounding anatomy and between the PZ and CG contours for both vendors demonstrated superior contrast separation; significance was found for all comparisons p-value < 0.0001. Conclusion: Atlas-based segmentation yielded promising results for all contours compared to expertly defined contours in both Siemens and GE 3T systems providing

  20. Impact of real-time virtual sonography, a coordinated sonography and MRI system that uses an image fusion technique, on the sonographic evaluation of MRI-detected lesions of the breast in second-look sonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Shogo; Kousaka, Junko; Fujii, Kimihito; Yorozuya, Kyoko; Yoshida, Miwa; Mouri, Yukako; Akizuki, Miwa; Tetsuka, Rie; Ando, Takahito; Fukutomi, Takashi; Oshima, Yukihiko; Kimura, Junko; Ishiguchi, Tsuneo; Arai, Osamu

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the utility of second-look sonography using real-time virtual sonography (RVS)-a coordinated sonography with an MRI system that uses an image fusion technique with magnetic navigation-on the sonographic evaluation of MRI-detected lesions of the breast. Of the 196 consecutive patients who were examined with breast MRI in our hospital from 2006 to 2009, those patients who underwent second-look sonography to identify MRI-detected lesions were enrolled in this study. MRI was performed using a 1.5-T imager with the patient in a supine position. To assess the efficacy benefits of RVS, the correlations between lesion detection rates, MRI features, distribution, and histopathological classification on second-look sonography using conventional B-mode or RVS were analyzed. Of the 196 patients, 55 (28 %) demonstrated 67 lesions initially detected by MRI, followed by second-look sonography. Of the 67 MRI-detected lesions, 18 (30 %) were identified with second-look sonography using conventional B-mode alone, whereas 60 (90 %) lesions were detected with second-look sonography using RVS (p use of RVS on second-look sonography significantly increases the sonographic detection rate of MRI-detected lesions without operator dependence.

  1. Evaluation of femoral perfusion in a rabbit model of steroid-induced osteonecrosis by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI with a high magnetic field MRI system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Shigeki; Fujioka, Mikihiro; Ikoma, Kazuya; Saito, Masazumi; Ueshima, Keiichiro; Ishida, Masashi; Kuribayashi, Masaaki; Ikegami, Akira; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate perfusion during the early phase after steroid administration in vivo using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) with a high magnetic field MRI system. The main pathogenesis of steroid-induced osteonecrosis is considered to be ischemia. A single dose of methylprednisolone (MPSL) was injected into nine rabbits. DCE-MRI was performed for these rabbits before MPSL administration and 1, 5, 10, and 14 days after administration. Time-signal intensity curves were created for each femur based on the signal intensity to evaluate perfusion. Enhancement ratio (ER), initial slope (IS), and area under the curve (AUC) were calculated and the value before MPSL administration and the minimal value after administration were compared statistically. ER, IS, and AUC values after MPSL administration significantly decreased (P < 0.05, P < 0.01, and P < 0.01, respectively). All of them decreased by the 5th day in 56% of the femora and by the 14th day in 83%, and some femora even showed a decrease from the 1st day. In this study, decreased perfusion in the femora after steroid administration was proven. Additionally, we could show that it occurred from the early days after steroid administration. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. MRI of the fingers in patients with systemic scleroderma. Early results of contrast-enhanced examinations on a dedicated MRI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonel, H.; Seemann, M.; Reiser, M.; Messer, G.; Walchner, M.; Roecken, M.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose. To estimate disease activity in patients with systemic sclerosis using contrast-enhanced MRI of the skin. Material and Methods. In a pre-study, sequences of a low-field (0.2 T) scanner (Artoscan, Esaote, Genova, Italy) were optimized for detection of intravenous contrast (0.1 mmol/l Gd-DTPA) in six patients with the autoimmune disease systemic scleroderma. Based on the results of the pre-study, 17 patients with scleroderma (7 sclerotic/10 active inflammatory disease) were scanned using gradient-spoiled 3D GRE sequences (FA 90 , TR 100 ms, TE 18 ms), which had been established as most sensitive for intravenous contrast. Contrast enhancement of the skin was determined quantitatively by contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR), comparing post- to pre-contrast and dynamic scans (for 6 min, 1 acquisition/min). Patients in the chronic state with sclerodactylia and active inflammation of the hands were considered separately and compared to a control group (n=10) matched according to age. Results. CNR increase after intravenous contrast was significantly higher in patients with active disease (86±16% increase) than sclerosing disease (29±3%, p [de

  3. SU-E-T-20: Removal of Electron Contamination in Longitudinal Field MRI-Linac Systems: A Monte Carlo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oborn, B M; Metcalfe, P; Butson, M; Crozier, S; Keall, P

    2012-06-01

    The prototype inline MRI-linac system has some advantages over perpendicular models including avoiding the electron return effect. One of the disadvantages of the inline approach is the increased skin dose, estimated to be 400-1000% of the dmax dose. The purpose of this work was to design a feasible method to reduce this skin dose to acceptable levels. Magnetic modeling of proposed MRI-linac designs have been simulated with the inclusion of an optimized permanent magnet system to purge/deflect the electron contamination. The region of air above the phantom was also replaced with a helium bag (region of helium gas) and a beam scrapper below the deflector was added to collect deflected off-axis contamination. Monte Carlo simulations were then performed including the accurate 3D magnetic field maps. Surface dosimetry was recorded to verify the changes to the skin doses. Magnetic modelling showed that an optimized NdFeB permanent magnet system located outside the MRI coils (below the MLC's) can provide a strong enough region to purge/deflect a significant portion of the electron contamination from the x-ray beam. The impact on the MRI uniformity is around 100 ppm and hence is correctable via active/passive shimming of the MRI. The helium region also significantly limits the production of contamination traveling towards the phantom surface. Entry doses near CAX are predicted to be similar to the 0 T case. Magnetic and Monte Carlo modeling were performed to estimate the effect that a permanent magnet purging system, beam scrapper, and helium bag would have on lowering the skin doses in an inline MRI-Linac system. MRI non-uniformities introduced by the deflector could be corrected, contamination is mostly purged or blocked, and the helium bag minimizes air-generated contamination. As a result skin doses are comparable to having zero magnetic field. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  4. TU-AB-BRA-07: Distortion-Free 3D Diffusion MRI On An MRI-Guided Radiotherapy System for Longitudinal Tumor Response Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Y; Yang, Y; Rangwala, N; Cao, M; Low, D; Hu, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a reliable, 3D distortion-free diffusion MRI technique for longitudinal tumor response assessment and MRI-guided adaptive radiotherapy(RT). Methods: A diffusion prepared 3D turbo spin echo readout (DP-TSE) sequence was developed and compared with the conventional diffusion-weighted single-shot echo-planar-imaging (DW-ssEPI) sequence in a commercially available diffusion phantom, and one head-and-neck and one brain cancer patient on an MRI-guided RT system (ViewRay). In phantom study, the geometric fidelity was quantified as the ratio between the left-right (RL) and anterior-posterior (AP) dimension. Ten slices were measured on DP-TSE, DW-ssEPI and standard TSE images where the later was used as the geometric reference. ADC accuracy was verified at both 0°C (reference ADC available) and room temperature with a range of diffusivity between 0.35 and 2.0*10"−"3mm"2/s. The ADC reproducibility was assessed based on 8 room-temperature measurements on 6 different days. In the pilot single-slice in-vivo study, CT images were used as the geometric reference, and ADC maps from both diffusion sequences were compared. Results: Distortion and susceptive-related artifact were severe in DW-ssEPI, with significantly lower RL/AP ratio (0.9579±0.0163) than DP-TSE (0.9990±0.0031) and TSE (0.9995±0.0031). ADCs from the two diffusion sequences both matched well with the vendor-provided values at 0°C; however DW-ssEPI fails to provide accurate ADC for high diffusivity vials at room temperature due to high noise level (10 times higher than DP-TSE). The DP-TSE sequence had excellent ADC reproducibility with <4% ADC variation among 8 separate measurements. In patient study, DP-TSE exhibited substantially improved geometric reliability. ROI analysis in ADC maps generated from DP-TSE and DW-ssEPI showed <5% difference where high b-value images were excluded from the latter approach due to excessive noise level. Conclusion: A diffusion MRI sequence with excellent

  5. TU-AB-BRA-07: Distortion-Free 3D Diffusion MRI On An MRI-Guided Radiotherapy System for Longitudinal Tumor Response Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Y; Yang, Y; Rangwala, N; Cao, M; Low, D; Hu, P [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a reliable, 3D distortion-free diffusion MRI technique for longitudinal tumor response assessment and MRI-guided adaptive radiotherapy(RT). Methods: A diffusion prepared 3D turbo spin echo readout (DP-TSE) sequence was developed and compared with the conventional diffusion-weighted single-shot echo-planar-imaging (DW-ssEPI) sequence in a commercially available diffusion phantom, and one head-and-neck and one brain cancer patient on an MRI-guided RT system (ViewRay). In phantom study, the geometric fidelity was quantified as the ratio between the left-right (RL) and anterior-posterior (AP) dimension. Ten slices were measured on DP-TSE, DW-ssEPI and standard TSE images where the later was used as the geometric reference. ADC accuracy was verified at both 0°C (reference ADC available) and room temperature with a range of diffusivity between 0.35 and 2.0*10{sup −3}mm{sup 2}/s. The ADC reproducibility was assessed based on 8 room-temperature measurements on 6 different days. In the pilot single-slice in-vivo study, CT images were used as the geometric reference, and ADC maps from both diffusion sequences were compared. Results: Distortion and susceptive-related artifact were severe in DW-ssEPI, with significantly lower RL/AP ratio (0.9579±0.0163) than DP-TSE (0.9990±0.0031) and TSE (0.9995±0.0031). ADCs from the two diffusion sequences both matched well with the vendor-provided values at 0°C; however DW-ssEPI fails to provide accurate ADC for high diffusivity vials at room temperature due to high noise level (10 times higher than DP-TSE). The DP-TSE sequence had excellent ADC reproducibility with <4% ADC variation among 8 separate measurements. In patient study, DP-TSE exhibited substantially improved geometric reliability. ROI analysis in ADC maps generated from DP-TSE and DW-ssEPI showed <5% difference where high b-value images were excluded from the latter approach due to excessive noise level. Conclusion: A diffusion MRI sequence with

  6. Fetal lung volume measurement by MRI with high-speed imaging systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osada, Hisao; Kaku, Kenshi [Chiba Univ. (Japan). Hospital

    2002-08-01

    Although ultrasonography is widely used for fetal morphologic observation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has gained popularity as a new prenatal diagnostic method with recent introduction of high-speed imaging systems. Infants with lung hypoplasia affecting respiratory function require intensive management starting immediately after birth. Therefore, accurate prenatal differential diagnosis and severity evaluation are extremely important for these fetuses. The aim of this study is to measure fetal lung volume using a computer-based, three-dimensional MRI imaging system and to evaluate the possibility of clinical applications of this procedure. A total of 96 fetuses were evaluated, all were morphologically abnormal, and MRI was done for advanced assessment from 24 to 39 weeks gestation. Three-directional views of fetal chest were imaged by Signa Horizon, 1.5 Tesla, version 5.6 (General Electronics) with the following conditions; coil: TORSO coil, sequence: SSFSE (single shot fast spin echo), slice thickness: 5 mm, and imaging speed: 2 seconds/slice. To calculate the lung volume and create three-dimensional image, the lung area in each slice was traced out, then multiplied using computer image processing. Simultaneously, the volumes of all slices were summed to give the volume of each lung. Linear regression analysis and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) were used for statistical analyses. In all cases, clear images were obtained, and were adequate for three-dimensional evaluation of the fetal lung. Thirty-five fetuses had poor outcomes, such as intrauterine fetal death, neonatal death, and intensive respiratory care. Regression lines of lung volume versus gestational week were calculated for these fetuses with poor outcome and 61 other fetuses with good outcome. ANCOVA, with gestational week as a covariant, revealed a significant intergroup difference in the lung volume (p<0.001). Similarly, regression lines of lung volume versus fetal body weight estimated by

  7. Correlation between anatomic foot and ankle movement measured with MRI and with a motion analysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez-Barrientos, C; Liu, X C; Lyon, R; Tassone, C; Thometz, J; Tarima, S

    2012-07-01

    Several studies have attempted to measure how well external markers track internal bone movement using pins drilled into the foot, but this is too invasive for the pediatric population. This study investigated how well a six segment foot model (6SFM) using external markers was able to measure bone movement in the foot compared to MRI measurements. The foot was moved into different positions using a plastic foot jig and measurements were taken with both systems. The aims were to: (1) Look at the correlation between movement tracked with an Electronic Motion Tracking System (EMTS) and by measurements derived from MRI images, specifically the principal intercept angles (PIAs) which are the angles of intersection between principal axes of inertia of bone volumes. (2) To see how well external motion measured by the 6SFM could predict PIAs. Four bone pairs had their movement tracked: Tibia-Calcaneus, Calcaneus-Cuboid, Navicular-1st Metatarsal, and 1st Metatarsal-Hallux. The results showed moderate correlation between measured PIAs and those predicted at the Tibia-Calcaneus, Navicular-1st Metatarsal, and 1st Metatarsal-Hallux joints. Moderate to high correlation was found between the PIA and movement in a single anatomic plane for all four joints at several positions. The 6SFM using the EMTS allows reliable tracking of 3D rotations in the pediatric foot, except at the Calcaneus-Cuboid joint. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Concurrent TMS-fMRI Reveals Interactions between Dorsal and Ventral Attentional Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leitao, Joana; Thielscher, Axel; Tuennerhoff, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    interactively in this process. This fMRI study used concurrent transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) as a causal perturbation approach to investigate the interactions between dorsal and ventral attentional systems and sensory processing areas. In a sustained spatial attention paradigm, human participants......Adaptive behavior relies on combining bottom-up sensory inputs with top-down control signals to guide responses in line with current goals and task demands. Over the past decade, accumulating evidence has suggested that the dorsal and ventral frontoparietal attentional systems are recruited......-TMS relative to Sham-TMS increased activation in the parietal cortex regardless of sensory stimulation, confirming the neural effectiveness of TMS stimulation. Visual targets increased activations in the anterior insula, a component of the ventral attentional system responsible for salience detection...

  9. Real-time 3-dimensional virtual reality navigation system with open MRI for breast-conserving surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomikawa, Morimasa; Konishi, Kozo; Ieiri, Satoshi; Hong, Jaesung; Uemura, Munenori; Hashizume, Makoto; Shiotani, Satoko; Tokunaga, Eriko; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2011-01-01

    We report here the early experiences using a real-time three-dimensional (3D) virtual reality navigation system with open magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Two patients with a non-palpable MRI-detected breast tumor underwent BCS under the guidance of the navigation system. An initial MRI for the breast tumor using skin-affixed markers was performed immediately prior to excision. A percutaneous intramammary dye marker was applied to delineate an excision line, and the computer software '3D Slicer' generated a real-time 3D virtual reality model of the tumor and the puncture needle in the breast. Under guidance by the navigation system, marking procedures were performed without any difficulties. Fiducial registration errors were 3.00 mm for patient no.1, and 4.07 mm for patient no.2. The real-time 3D virtual reality navigation system with open MRI is feasible for safe and accurate excision of non-palpable MRI-detected breast tumors. (author)

  10. Simultaneous fMRI-PET of the opioidergic pain system in human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wey, Hsiao-Ying; Catana, Ciprian; Hooker, Jacob M

    2014-01-01

    distinct components of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) fMRI signal has not yet been shown. We obtained sixteen fMRI-PET data sets from eight healthy volunteers. Each subject participated in randomized order in a pain scan and a control (nonpainful pressure) scan on the same day. Dynamic PET......MRI and PET provide complementary information for studying brain function. While the potential use of simultaneous MRI/PET for clinical diagnostic and disease staging has been demonstrated recently; the biological relevance of concurrent functional MRI-PET brain imaging to dissect neurochemically...... data were acquired with an opioid radioligand, [(11)C]diprenorphine, to detect endogenous opioid releases in response to pain. BOLD fMRI data were collected at the same time to capture hemodynamic responses. In this simultaneous human fMRI-PET imaging study, we show co-localized responses in thalamus...

  11. A computer-aided detection system for rheumatoid arthritis MRI data interpretation and quantification of synovial activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kubassove, Olga; Boesen, Mikael; Cimmino, Marco A

    2009-01-01

    and interpretation slow down development in this area. Existing scoring systems of especially synovitis are too rigid and insensitive to measure early treatment response and quantify inflammation. This study tested a novel automated, computer system for analysis of dynamic MRI data acquired from patients with RA...

  12. Proof-of-principle study of a small animal PET/field-cycled MRI combined system using conventional PMT technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Hao; Handler, William B.; Scholl, Timothy J.; Simpson, P.J.; Chronik, Blaine A.

    2010-01-01

    There are currently several approaches to the development of combined PET/MRI systems, all of which need to address adverse interactions between the two systems. Of particular relevance to the majority of proposed PET/MRI systems is the effect that static and dynamic magnetic fields have on the performance of PET detection systems based on photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). In the work reported in this paper, performance of two conventional PMTs has been systematically investigated and characterized as a function of magnetic field exposure conditions. Detector gain, energy resolution, time resolution, and efficiency were measured for static field exposures between 0 and 6.3 mT. Additionally, the short-term recovery and long-term stability of gain and energy resolution were measured in the presence of repeatedly applied dynamic magnetic fields changing at 4 T/s. It was found that the detectors recovered normal operation within several milliseconds following the end of large pulsed magnetic fields. In addition, the repeated applications of large pulsed magnetic fields did not significantly affect detector stability. Based on these results, we implemented a proof-of-principle PET/field-cycled MRI (FCMRI) system for small animal imaging using commercial PMT-based PET detectors. The first PET images acquired within the PET/FCMRI system are presented. The image quality, in terms of spatial resolution, was compared between standalone PET and the PET/FCMRI system. Finally, the relevance of these results to various aspects of PET/MRI system design is discussed.

  13. Quantitative MRI study of progressive cerebral atrophy in multiple system atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konagaya, Masaaki; Matsuoka, Yukihiko; Konagaya, Yoko

    2002-01-01

    We investigated cerebral atrophy in multiple system atrophy (MSA) by quantitative analysis of MRI. The subjects were 28 patients with MSA (14 striato-nigral degeneration; SND, 14 olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy; OPCA. 106 MRI examinations were performed totally) and 85 normal persons for control. The ratios of the ventral pons to the infratentorial space in the sagittal section, the putamen, cerebrum, frontal lobe and parietal and occipital lobes to the intracranial space in the horizontal section, and the temporal lobe to the intracranial space in the coronal section were measured. In the early stage of the disease, OPCA showed significant atrophy of the ventral pons compared with SND, and conversely, SND demonstrated significantly smaller putamen than that in OPCA. According to the progression of the disease, the atrophy of these neural tissues progressed, which resulted in so significant differences between SND and OPCA. The cerebral atrophy was observed in 17 MSA patients. The atrophy of the frontal lobe was much frequent and prominent to that in the temporal lobe and parietal and occipital lobes. SND showed higher incidence of the cerebral atrophy than OPCA in the early stage of the disease. In long period follow-up cases, one case showed cerebral atrophy in earlier stage, and another case in late stage. We indicated the involvement of the cerebral hemispheres in MSA, especially the frontal lobe. (author)

  14. Quantitative MRI study of progressive cerebral atrophy in multiple system atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konagaya, Masaaki; Matsuoka, Yukihiko [Suzuka National Hospital, Suzuka, Mie (Japan); Konagaya, Yoko [JR Tokai General Hospital, Nagoya (Japan)

    2002-02-01

    We investigated cerebral atrophy in multiple system atrophy (MSA) by quantitative analysis of MRI. The subjects were 28 patients with MSA (14 striato-nigral degeneration; SND, 14 olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy; OPCA. 106 MRI examinations were performed totally) and 85 normal persons for control. The ratios of the ventral pons to the infratentorial space in the sagittal section, the putamen, cerebrum, frontal lobe and parietal and occipital lobes to the intracranial space in the horizontal section, and the temporal lobe to the intracranial space in the coronal section were measured. In the early stage of the disease, OPCA showed significant atrophy of the ventral pons compared with SND, and conversely, SND demonstrated significantly smaller putamen than that in OPCA. According to the progression of the disease, the atrophy of these neural tissues progressed, which resulted in so significant differences between SND and OPCA. The cerebral atrophy was observed in 17 MSA patients. The atrophy of the frontal lobe was much frequent and prominent to that in the temporal lobe and parietal and occipital lobes. SND showed higher incidence of the cerebral atrophy than OPCA in the early stage of the disease. In long period follow-up cases, one case showed cerebral atrophy in earlier stage, and another case in late stage. We indicated the involvement of the cerebral hemispheres in MSA, especially the frontal lobe. (author)

  15. Characteristic MRI findings in multiple system atrophy: comparison of the three subtypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naka, H.; Ohshita, T.; Murata, Y.; Imon, Y.; Mimori, Y.; Nakamura, S. [Department of Internal Medicine, Hiroshima University School of Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    We reviewed MRI findings in 29 patients with probable multiple system atrophy (MSA) to see whether there were common and or less common neuroradiological findings in the various clinical subtypes. We divided the patients into three clinical subtypes according to initial and predominant symptoms: 14 with olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA), eight with the Shy-Drager syndrome (SDS) and seven with striatonigral degeneration (SND). The patients showed atrophy of the brain stem and cerebellum, high signal on T2-weighted images of the base of the pons and middle cerebellar peduncles, high and low signal on T2-weighted images of the putamen and atrophy of frontal and parietal lobes. The degree of atrophy of the middle cerebellar peduncle and cerebellum was greater in OPCA patients and a high-signal lateral rim to the putamen more frequent in SND. However, all findings were observed in all subtypes, and the degrees of atrophy of the putamen and pons and the frequency of high signal in the base of the pons were similar in the subtypes. We also found atrophy of the cerebral hemispheres, especially the frontal and parietal lobes, but its degree was not significantly different in the various subtypes. Our findings suggest that, although MSA can be divided clinically into three subtypes, most of the features on MRI are common and overlap in the subtypes, independently of the clinical presentation. (orig.)

  16. The development of an MRI lesion quantifying system for multiple sclerosis patients undergoing treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moin, Paymann; Ma, Kevin; Amezcua, Lilyana; Gertych, Arkadiusz; Liu, Brent

    2009-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system that affects approximately 2.5 million people worldwide. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an established tool for the assessment of disease activity, progression and response to treatment. The progression of the disease is variable and requires routine follow-up imaging studies. Currently, MRI quantification of multiple sclerosis requires a manual approach to lesion measurement and yields an estimate of lesion volume and interval change. In the setting of several prior studies and a long treatment history, trends related to treatment change quickly become difficult to extrapolate. Our efforts seek to develop an imaging informatics based MS lesion computer aided detection (CAD) package to quantify and track MS lesions including lesion load, volume, and location. Together, with select clinical parameters, this data will be incorporated into an MS specific e- Folder to provide decision support to evaluate and assess treatment options for MS in a manner tailored specifically to an individual based on trends in MS presentation and progression.

  17. An Automated and Intelligent Medical Decision Support System for Brain MRI Scans Classification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Faisal Siddiqui

    Full Text Available A wide interest has been observed in the medical health care applications that interpret neuroimaging scans by machine learning systems. This research proposes an intelligent, automatic, accurate, and robust classification technique to classify the human brain magnetic resonance image (MRI as normal or abnormal, to cater down the human error during identifying the diseases in brain MRIs. In this study, fast discrete wavelet transform (DWT, principal component analysis (PCA, and least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM are used as basic components. Firstly, fast DWT is employed to extract the salient features of brain MRI, followed by PCA, which reduces the dimensions of the features. These reduced feature vectors also shrink the memory storage consumption by 99.5%. At last, an advanced classification technique based on LS-SVM is applied to brain MR image classification using reduced features. For improving the efficiency, LS-SVM is used with non-linear radial basis function (RBF kernel. The proposed algorithm intelligently determines the optimized values of the hyper-parameters of the RBF kernel and also applied k-fold stratified cross validation to enhance the generalization of the system. The method was tested by 340 patients' benchmark datasets of T1-weighted and T2-weighted scans. From the analysis of experimental results and performance comparisons, it is observed that the proposed medical decision support system outperformed all other modern classifiers and achieves 100% accuracy rate (specificity/sensitivity 100%/100%. Furthermore, in terms of computation time, the proposed technique is significantly faster than the recent well-known methods, and it improves the efficiency by 71%, 3%, and 4% on feature extraction stage, feature reduction stage, and classification stage, respectively. These results indicate that the proposed well-trained machine learning system has the potential to make accurate predictions about brain abnormalities

  18. Whole-body MRI in children with Langerhans cell histiocytosis for the evaluation of the skeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinborn, M.; Woertler, K.; Rummeny, E.J.; Nathrath, M.; Schoeniger, M.; Hahn, H.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: the usefulness of whole-body MRI (WB-MRI) for the detection of skeletal lesions in patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis should be documented on the basis of case presentations. Materials and methods: in six patients with histologically proven Langerhans cell histiocytosis, 14 WB-MRI examinations were performed to evaluate the skeletal system within disease staging (6 primary, 8 follow-up examinations). The examinations were performed on a 1.5 Tesla, 32-channel whole-body scanner. The examination protocol consisted of T1-weighted and STIR sequences in coronal and sagittal orientation. For comparison, radiographs of the initial skeletal lesions and those that were additionally detected on WB-MRI were available. Results: in 4 patients no additional skeletal lesions were found on WB-MRI besides the initial lesion leading to the diagnosis of unifocal single system disease. In 2 patients WB-MRI was able to identify additional skeletal lesions. In a 5 1/2 year-old boy with the primary lesion located in the cervical spine, a second lesion was detected in the lumbar spine on the initial scan and in the skull and proximal femur during follow-up examination. In a 12 year-old girl with a primary lesion of the thoracic spine, WB-MRI diagnosed additional lesions in the pelvic bone and the tibia. In both patients the diagnosis of multifocal skeletal involvement led to chemotherapy. During follow-up examination, the healing response under therapy could be demonstrated. Comparison with conventional imaging showed that especially lesions located in the spine or the pelvis were not detectable on radiographs even when knowing the MR results. (orig.)

  19. A computer-aided detection system for rheumatoid arthritis MRI data interpretation and quantification of synovial activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kubassove, Olga; Boesen, Mikael; Cimmino, Marco A

    2009-01-01

    RATIONAL AND OBJECTIVE: Disease assessment and follow-up of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients require objective evaluation and quantification. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has a large potential to supplement such information for the clinician, however, time spent on data reading...... and interpretation slow down development in this area. Existing scoring systems of especially synovitis are too rigid and insensitive to measure early treatment response and quantify inflammation. This study tested a novel automated, computer system for analysis of dynamic MRI data acquired from patients with RA......, Dynamika-RA, which incorporates efficient data processing and analysis techniques....

  20. A Java-based fMRI processing pipeline evaluation system for assessment of univariate general linear model and multivariate canonical variate analysis-based pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Liang, Lichen; Anderson, Jon R; Gatewood, Lael; Rottenberg, David A; Strother, Stephen C

    2008-01-01

    As functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) becomes widely used, the demands for evaluation of fMRI processing pipelines and validation of fMRI analysis results is increasing rapidly. The current NPAIRS package, an IDL-based fMRI processing pipeline evaluation framework, lacks system interoperability and the ability to evaluate general linear model (GLM)-based pipelines using prediction metrics. Thus, it can not fully evaluate fMRI analytical software modules such as FSL.FEAT and NPAIRS.GLM. In order to overcome these limitations, a Java-based fMRI processing pipeline evaluation system was developed. It integrated YALE (a machine learning environment) into Fiswidgets (a fMRI software environment) to obtain system interoperability and applied an algorithm to measure GLM prediction accuracy. The results demonstrated that the system can evaluate fMRI processing pipelines with univariate GLM and multivariate canonical variates analysis (CVA)-based models on real fMRI data based on prediction accuracy (classification accuracy) and statistical parametric image (SPI) reproducibility. In addition, a preliminary study was performed where four fMRI processing pipelines with GLM and CVA modules such as FSL.FEAT and NPAIRS.CVA were evaluated with the system. The results indicated that (1) the system can compare different fMRI processing pipelines with heterogeneous models (NPAIRS.GLM, NPAIRS.CVA and FSL.FEAT) and rank their performance by automatic performance scoring, and (2) the rank of pipeline performance is highly dependent on the preprocessing operations. These results suggest that the system will be of value for the comparison, validation, standardization and optimization of functional neuroimaging software packages and fMRI processing pipelines.

  1. Contrast-Enhanced Spectral Mammography is Comparable to MRI in the Assessment of Residual Breast Cancer Following Neoadjuvant Systemic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Bhavika K; Hilal, Talal; Covington, Matthew; Zhang, Nan; Kosiorek, Heidi E; Lobbes, Marc; Northfelt, Donald W; Pockaj, Barbara A

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the performance of contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) compared to MRI in the assessment of tumor response in breast cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant systemic therapy (NST). The institutional review board approved this study. From September 2014 to June 2017, we identified patients with pathologically confirmed invasive breast cancer who underwent NST. All patients had both CESM and MRI performed pre- and post-NST with pathological assessment after surgical management. Size of residual malignancy on post-NST CESM and MRI was compared with surgical pathology. Lin concordance and Pearson correlation coefficient were used to assess agreement. Bland-Altman plots were used to visualize the differences between tumor size on imaging and pathology. Sixty-five patients were identified. Mean age was 52.7 (range 30-76) years. Type of NST included chemotherapy in 53 (82%) and endocrine therapy in 12 (18%). Mean tumor size after NST was 14.6 (range 0-105) mm for CESM and 14.2 mm (range 0-75 mm) for MRI compared with 19.6 (range 0-100) mm on final surgical pathology. Equivalence tests demonstrated that mean tumor size measured by CESM (p = 0.009) or by MRI (p = 0.01) was equivalent to the mean tumor size measured by pathology within - 1 and 1-cm range. Comparing CESM versus MRI for assessment of complete response, the sensitivity was 95% versus 95%, specificity 66.7% versus 68.9%, positive predictive value 55.9% versus 57.6%, and negative predictive value 96.7% versus 96.9% respectively. CESM was comparable to MRI in assessing residual malignancy after completion of NST.

  2. Efficiency of unenhanced MRI in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis: Comparison with Alvarado scoring system and histopathological results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inci, Ercan; Hocaoglu, Elif; Aydin, Sibel; Palabiyik, Figen; Cimilli, Tan; Turhan, Ahmet Nuray; Ayguen, Ersan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of unenhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and compare with Alvarado scores and histopathological results. Materials and methods: The study included 85 consecutive patients (mean age, 26.5 ± 11.3 years) who were clinically suspected of having acute appendicitis. Each patients Alvarado scores were recorded and unenhanced MRI was performed, consisting of T1-weighted, T2-weighted and fat-suppressed T2-weighted fast spin-echo sequences. The MR images were prospectively reviewed in consensus for the presence of acute appendicitis by two radiologists who were blinded to the results of the Alvarado scores. The study population were divided into three subgroups based on the MRI findings: Group I: definitely not appendicitis, Group II: probably appendicitis, Group III: definitely appendicitis. All patients were divided into two subgroups according to Alvarado scores as Group A (low: 1-6), and Group B (high: 7-10). MR findings were compared with Alvarado scores and histopathological findings. Results: Sixty-six (77.6%) of the 85 patients with clinically suspected acute appendicitis, had undergone surgery. The diagnosis of appendicitis could be correctly achieved with MRI in 55 (83.3%) of 57 (86.4%) patients with histopathologically proven acute appendicitis. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of MRI examination and Alvarado scoring system in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis were 96.49%, 66.67%, 94.83%, 75.0% and 84.21%, 66.67%, 94.12%, 40.0%, respectively. Conclusions: MRI is a valuable technique for detecting acute appendicitis even in the cases with low Alvarado scores. To increase the diagnostic accuracy and preventing unnecessary laparotomies for suspected appendicitis, shorter and cheaper unenhanced basic MRI may be performed.

  3. Efficiency of unenhanced MRI in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis: Comparison with Alvarado scoring system and histopathological results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inci, Ercan, E-mail: ercan_inci@mynet.com [Department of Radiology, Istanbul Bakirkoy Dr. Sadi Konuk Training and Research Hospital, Incirli-Bakirkoy, Istanbul (Turkey); Hocaoglu, Elif; Aydin, Sibel; Palabiyik, Figen; Cimilli, Tan [Department of Radiology, Istanbul Bakirkoy Dr. Sadi Konuk Training and Research Hospital, Incirli-Bakirkoy, Istanbul (Turkey); Turhan, Ahmet Nuray; Ayguen, Ersan [Department of Surgery, Istanbul Bakirkoy Dr. Sadi Konuk Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of unenhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis and compare with Alvarado scores and histopathological results. Materials and methods: The study included 85 consecutive patients (mean age, 26.5 {+-} 11.3 years) who were clinically suspected of having acute appendicitis. Each patients Alvarado scores were recorded and unenhanced MRI was performed, consisting of T1-weighted, T2-weighted and fat-suppressed T2-weighted fast spin-echo sequences. The MR images were prospectively reviewed in consensus for the presence of acute appendicitis by two radiologists who were blinded to the results of the Alvarado scores. The study population were divided into three subgroups based on the MRI findings: Group I: definitely not appendicitis, Group II: probably appendicitis, Group III: definitely appendicitis. All patients were divided into two subgroups according to Alvarado scores as Group A (low: 1-6), and Group B (high: 7-10). MR findings were compared with Alvarado scores and histopathological findings. Results: Sixty-six (77.6%) of the 85 patients with clinically suspected acute appendicitis, had undergone surgery. The diagnosis of appendicitis could be correctly achieved with MRI in 55 (83.3%) of 57 (86.4%) patients with histopathologically proven acute appendicitis. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of MRI examination and Alvarado scoring system in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis were 96.49%, 66.67%, 94.83%, 75.0% and 84.21%, 66.67%, 94.12%, 40.0%, respectively. Conclusions: MRI is a valuable technique for detecting acute appendicitis even in the cases with low Alvarado scores. To increase the diagnostic accuracy and preventing unnecessary laparotomies for suspected appendicitis, shorter and cheaper unenhanced basic MRI may be performed.

  4. A medical software system for volumetric analysis of cerebral pathologies in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, Jan; Kappus, Christoph; Freisleben, Bernd; Nimsky, Christopher

    2012-08-01

    In this contribution, a medical software system for volumetric analysis of different cerebral pathologies in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data is presented. The software system is based on a semi-automatic segmentation algorithm and helps to overcome the time-consuming process of volume determination during monitoring of a patient. After imaging, the parameter settings-including a seed point-are set up in the system and an automatic segmentation is performed by a novel graph-based approach. Manually reviewing the result leads to reseeding, adding seed points or an automatic surface mesh generation. The mesh is saved for monitoring the patient and for comparisons with follow-up scans. Based on the mesh, the system performs a voxelization and volume calculation, which leads to diagnosis and therefore further treatment decisions. The overall system has been tested with different cerebral pathologies-glioblastoma multiforme, pituitary adenomas and cerebral aneurysms- and evaluated against manual expert segmentations using the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC). Additionally, intra-physician segmentations have been performed to provide a quality measure for the presented system.

  5. An Optically-Coupled System for Quantitative Monitoring of MRI-Induced RF Currents into Long Conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchi, Marta G.; Venook, Ross; Pauly, John M.; Scott, Greig C.

    2010-01-01

    The currents induced in long conductors such as guidewires by the radio frequency (RF) field in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are responsible for potentially dangerous heating of surrounding media, such as tissue. This paper presents an optically-coupled system with the potential to quantitatively measure the RF currents induced on these conductors. The system uses a self shielded toroid transducer and active circuitry to modulate a high speed LED transmitter. Plastic fiber guides the light to a photodiode receiver and transimpedance amplifier. System validation included a series of experiments with bare wires that compared wire tip heating by fluoroptic thermometers with the RF current sensor response. Validations were performed on a custom whole body 64 MHz birdcage test platform and on a 1.5T MRI scanner. With this system, a variety of phenomena were demonstrated including cable trap current attenuation, lossy dielectric Q-spoiling and even transverse electromagnetic wave node patterns. This system should find applications in studies of MRI RF safety for interventional devices such as pacemaker leads, and guidewires. In particular, variations of this device could potentially act as a realtime safety monitor during MRI guided interventions. PMID:19758855

  6. A multimodal MRI approach to identify and characterize microstructural brain changes in neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercan, Ece; Ingo, Carson; Tritanon, Oranan; Magro-Checa, Cesar; Smith, Alex; Smith, Seth; Huizinga, Tom; van Buchem, Mark A; Ronen, Itamar

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with multi-organ involvement and results in neurological and psychiatric (NP) symptoms in up to 40% of the patients. To date, the diagnosis of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) poses a challenge due to the lack of neuroradiological gold standards. In this study, we aimed to better localize and characterize normal appearing white matter (NAWM) changes in NPSLE by combining data from two quantitative MRI techniques, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and magnetization transfer imaging (MTI). 9 active NPSLE patients (37 ± 13 years, all females), 9 SLE patients without NP symptoms (44 ± 11 years, all females), and 14 healthy controls (HC) (40 ± 9 years, all females) were included in the study. MTI, DTI and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images were collected from all subjects on a 3 T MRI scanner. Magnetization transfer ratio (MTR), mean diffusivity (MD), fractional anisotropy (FA), radial diffusivity (RD), axial diffusivity (AD) maps and white matter lesion maps based on the FLAIR images were created for each subject. MTR and DTI data were then co-analyzed using tract-based spatial statistics and a cumulative lesion map to exclude lesions. Significantly lower MTR and FA and significantly higher AD, RD and MD were found in NPSLE compared to HC in NAWM regions. The differences in DTI measures and in MTR, however, were only moderately co-localized. Additionally, significant differences in DTI measures, but not in MTR, were found between NPSLE and SLE patients, suggesting that the underlying microstructural changes detected by MD are linked to the onset of NPSLE. The co-analysis of the anatomical distribution of MTI and DTI measures can potentially improve the diagnosis of NPSLE and contribute to the understanding of the underlying microstructural damage.

  7. MRI zoo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Christoffer

    The basic idea was to use MRI to produce a sequence of 3D gray scale image slices of various animals, subsequentlyimaged with a clinical CT system. For this purpose, these animals were used: toad, lungfish, python snake and a horseshoe crab. Each animal was sacrificed according to standard...... visually inspected, both in 2D and 3D, and compared with photographs and anatomy atlases found at library and on the internet....

  8. Third degree skin burns caused by a MRI conditional electrocardiographic monitoring system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brix L

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Two unusual cases of third degree skin burns are reported using MRI approved electrocardiographic leads. This is very uncommon as it is most often the electrodes which are the source of heat related issues. Both patients were sedated due to pain related issues of their lower spine. The burns were caused by a combination of using a 3 Tesla MRI scanner and the inability to cry out during scanning. We would like to bring forward a message that even when using MRI conditional equipment, clinical staff must be extremely careful in order to secure safe image acquisition using MRI.

  9. Brain PET and functional MRI: why simultaneously using hybrid PET/MR systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchin, Diego; Palombit, Alessandro; Castellaro, Marco; Silvestri, Erica; Bui, Franco; Barthel, Henryk; Sabri, Osama; Corbetta, Maurizio; Bertoldo, Alessandra

    2017-12-01

    In the last 20 years growing attention has been devoted to multimodal imaging. The recent literature is rich of clinical and research studies that have been performed using different imaging modalities on both separate and integrated positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance (MR) scanners. However, today, hybrid PET/MR systems measure signals related to brain structure, metabolism, neurochemistry, perfusion, and neuronal activity simultaneously, i.e. in the same physiological conditions. A frequently raised question at meeting and symposia is: "Do we really need a hybrid PET/MR system? Are there any advantages over acquiring sequential and separate PET and MR scans?" The present paper is an attempt to answer these questions specifically in relation to PET combined with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and arterial spin labeling. We searched (last update: June 2017) the databases PubMed, PMC, Google Scholar and Medline. We also included additional studies if they were cited in the selected articles. No language restriction was applied to the search, but the reviewed articles were all in English. Among all the retrieved articles, we selected only those performed using a hybrid PET/MR system. We found a total of 17 papers that were selected and discussed in three main groups according to the main radiopharmaceutical used: 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) (N.=8), 15O-water (15O-H2O) (N.=3) and neuroreceptors (N.=6). Concerning studies using 18F-FDG, simultaneous PET/fMRI revealed that global aspects of functional organization (e.g. graph properties of functional connections) are partially associated with energy consumption. There are remarkable spatial and functional similarities across modalities, but also discrepant findings. More work is needed on this point. There are only a handful of papers comparing blood flow measurements with PET 15O-H2O and MR arterial spin label (ASL) measures, and they show significant regional CBF differences

  10. Ultra-sensitive molecular MRI of cerebrovascular cell activation enables early detection of chronic central nervous system disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montagne, Axel; Gauberti, Maxime; Jullienne, Amandine; Briens, Aurelien; Docagne, Fabian; Vivien, Denis; Maubert, Eric; Macrez, Richard; Defer, Gilles; Raynaud, Jean-Sebastien; Louin, Gaelle; Buisson, Alain; Haelewyn, Benoit

    2012-01-01

    Since endothelial cells can be targeted by large contrast-carrying particles, molecular imaging of cerebrovascular cell activation is highly promising to evaluate the underlying inflammation of the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, we aimed to demonstrate that molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cerebrovascular cell activation can reveal CNS disorders in the absence of visible lesions and symptoms. To this aim, we optimized contrast carrying particles targeting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and MRI protocols through both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Although, pre-contrast MRI images failed to reveal the ongoing pathology, contrast-enhanced MRI revealed hypoperfusion-triggered CNS injury in vascular dementia, unmasked amyloid-induced cerebrovascular activation in Alzheimer's disease and allowed monitoring of disease activity during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Moreover, contrast-enhanced MRI revealed the cerebrovascular cell activation associated with known risk factors of CNS disorders such as peripheral inflammation, ethanol consumption, hyperglycemia and aging. By providing a dramatically higher sensitivity than previously reported methods and molecular contrast agents, the technology described in the present study opens new avenues of investigation in the field of neuro-inflammation. (authors)

  11. Liver Imaging Reporting and Data System on CT and gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Dong Ik; Jang, Kyung Mi; Kim, Seong Hyun; Kang, Tae Wook; Song, Kyoung Doo [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    To assess major imaging features of Liver Imaging Reporting and Data System (LI-RADS) on contrast-enhanced CT and gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and to estimate whether the combination of signal intensity favouring HCC on hepatobiliary phase (HBP) and diffusion-weighted images (DWI) can act as a major feature in LI-RADS. Four hundred twenty one patients with 445 observations were included. Major features of LI-RADS on CT and MRI as well as HBP and DWI features were assessed. Diagnostic performances of LR-5 according to LI-RADS v2014 and modified LI-RADS which incorporate combination of HBP and DWI were assessed. Pairwise comparisons of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were performed. For HCCs, capsule appearance had the highest rate of discordance between CT and MRI (32.7%), followed by washout appearance (22.2%). Specificity (75%) of LR-5 of LI-RADS v2014 was lower than that (77.1-79.2%) of modified LI-RADS. Area under the ROC curve of modified LI-RADS (0.755-0.775) was not significantly different from that of LI-RADS v 2014 (0.709) (p > 0.05). There were substantial discordances between CT and MRI for capsule and washout appearances in hepatic observations, and combination of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and DWI might be able to be incorporated as a major feature of LI-RADS. (orig.)

  12. MRI in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulert, Christoph; Shenton, Martha E.

    2014-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive textbook on the use of MRI in psychiatry covering imaging techniques, brain systems and a review of findings in different psychiatric disorders. The book is divided into three sections, the first of which covers in detail all the major MRI-based methodological approaches available today, including fMRI, EEG-fMRI, DTI, and MR spectroscopy. In addition, the role of MRI in imaging genetics and combined brain stimulation and imaging is carefully explained. The second section provides an overview of the different brain systems that are relevant for psychiatric disorders, including the systems for perception, emotion, cognition, and reward. The final part of the book presents the MRI findings that are obtained in all the major psychiatric disorders using the previously discussed techniques. Numerous carefully chosen images support the informative text, making this an ideal reference work for all practitioners and trainees with an interest in this flourishing field.

  13. MRI in psychiatry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulert, Christoph [UKE, Hamburg (Germany). Psychiatry Neuroimaging Branch; Shenton, Martha E. (ed.) [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry and Radiology

    2014-07-01

    This is the first comprehensive textbook on the use of MRI in psychiatry covering imaging techniques, brain systems and a review of findings in different psychiatric disorders. The book is divided into three sections, the first of which covers in detail all the major MRI-based methodological approaches available today, including fMRI, EEG-fMRI, DTI, and MR spectroscopy. In addition, the role of MRI in imaging genetics and combined brain stimulation and imaging is carefully explained. The second section provides an overview of the different brain systems that are relevant for psychiatric disorders, including the systems for perception, emotion, cognition, and reward. The final part of the book presents the MRI findings that are obtained in all the major psychiatric disorders using the previously discussed techniques. Numerous carefully chosen images support the informative text, making this an ideal reference work for all practitioners and trainees with an interest in this flourishing field.

  14. Distortion-free diffusion MRI using an MRI-guided Tri-Cobalt 60 radiotherapy system: Sequence verification and preliminary clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu; Han, Fei; Zhou, Ziwu; Cao, Minsong; Kaprealian, Tania; Kamrava, Mitchell; Wang, Chenyang; Neylon, John; Low, Daniel A; Yang, Yingli; Hu, Peng

    2017-10-01

    Monitoring tumor response during the course of treatment and adaptively modifying treatment plan based on tumor biological feedback may represent a new paradigm for radiotherapy. Diffusion MRI has shown great promises in assessing and predicting tumor response to radiotherapy. However, the conventional diffusion-weighted single-shot echo-planar-imaging (DW-ssEPI) technique suffers from limited resolution, severe distortion, and possibly inaccurate ADC at low field strength. The purpose of this work was to develop a reliable, accurate and distortion-free diffusion MRI technique that is practicable for longitudinal tumor response evaluation and adaptive radiotherapy on a 0.35 T MRI-guided radiotherapy system. A diffusion-prepared turbo spin echo readout (DP-TSE) sequence was developed and compared with the conventional diffusion-weighted single-shot echo-planar-imaging sequence on a 0.35 T MRI-guided radiotherapy system (ViewRay). A spatial integrity phantom was used to quantitate and compare the geometric accuracy of the two diffusion sequences for three orthogonal orientations. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) accuracy was evaluated on a diffusion phantom under both 0 °C and room temperature to cover a diffusivity range between 0.40 × 10 -3 and 2.10 × 10 -3 mm 2 /s. Ten room temperature measurements repeated on five different days were conducted to assess the ADC reproducibility of DP-TSE. Two glioblastoma (GBM) and six sarcoma patients were included to examine the in vivo feasibility. The target registration error (TRE) was calculated to quantitate the geometric accuracy where structural CT or MR images were co-registered to the diffusion images as references. ADC maps from DP-TSE and DW-ssEPI were calculated and compared. A tube phantom was placed next to patients not treated on ViewRay, and ADCs of this reference tube were also compared. The proposed DP-TSE passed the spatial integrity test (< 1 mm within 100 mm radius and < 2 mm within 175 mm radius

  15. Robot-assisted biopsies in a high-field MRI system. First clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schell, B.; Eichler, K.; Mack, M.G.; Mueller, C.; Kerl, J.M.; Beeres, M.; Thalhammer, A.; Vogl, T.J.; Zangos, S.; Czerny, C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical use of MR-guided biopsies in patients with suspicious lesions using a new MR-compatible assistance system in a high-field MR system. Materials and Methods: Six patients with suspicious focal lesions in various anatomic regions underwent percutanous biopsy in a high-field MR system (1.5 T, Magnetom Espree, Siemens) using a new MR-compatible assistance system (Innomotion). The procedures were planned and guided using T1-weighted FLASH and TrueFISP sequences. A servopneumatic drive then moved the guiding arm automatically to the insertion point. An MRI compatible 15G biopsy system (Somatex) was introduced by a physician guided by the needle holder and multiple biopsies were performed using the coaxial technique. The feasibility, duration of the intervention and biopsy findings were analyzed. Results: The proposed new system allows accurate punctures in a high-field MR system. The assistance device did not interfere with the image quality, and guided the needle virtually exactly as planned. Histological examination could be conducted on every patient. The lesion was malignant in four cases, and an infectious etiology was diagnosed for the two remaining lesions. Regarding the differentiation of anatomical and pathological structures and position monitoring of the insertion needle, TrueFISP images are to be given preference. The average intervention time was 41 minutes. Lesions up to 15.4 cm beneath the skin surface were punctured. Conclusion: The proposed MR-guided assistance system can be successfully utilized in a high-field MR system for accurate punctures of even deep lesions in various anatomic regions. (orig.)

  16. MRI-guided trephine biopsy and fine-needle aspiration in the diagnosis of bone lesions in low-field (0.23 T) MRI system using optical instrument tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto; Klemola, Rauli; Ojala, Risto; Jyrkinen, Lasse; Tervonen, Osmo; Lappi-Blanco, Elisa; Soini, Ylermi

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of MRI-guided bone biopsy with optical instrument tracking and evaluate advantage of combined fine-needle aspiration (FNA) with trephine biopsy. Twenty trephine bone biopsies and 13 FNAs were performed under MRI and CT guidance in 14 patients. Informed consent was obtained from all patients. The evaluation of diagnostic accuracy was achieved by comparing the histopathological and cytological diagnosis with current or final diagnosis made during 6-month clinical follow-up. A 0.23-T open MRI scanner with interventional tools (Outlook Proview, Marconi Medical Systems, Cleveland, Ohio) was used. A surface coil was used. For trephine biopsy MRI-compatible bone biopsy set (Daum medical, Schwerin, Germany) was used. The FNA was performed with MRI compatible 20-G needle (Cook, Bloomington, Ind.). The diagnostic accuracy of MRI-guided trephine biopsy was 95%. The FNA sample diagnosis concurred with the histological in 54%. Our results show that MRI guidance in bone biopsies is accurate and safe. It is comparable to CT-guided or open biopsy. The role of combined FNA with bone biopsies remains controversial. (orig.)

  17. Ultra-high field MRI: Advancing systems neuroscience towards mesoscopic human brain function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dumoulin, Serge O; Fracasso, A.; Van der Zwaag, W.; Siero, Jeroen C W; Petridou, Natalia

    2018-01-01

    Human MRI scanners at ultra-high magnetic field strengths of 7 T and higher are increasingly available to the neuroscience community. A key advantage brought by ultra-high field MRI is the possibility to increase the spatial resolution at which data is acquired, with little reduction in image

  18. WE-FG-202-08: Assessment of Treatment Response Via Longitudinal Diffusion MRI On A MRI-Guided System: Initial Experience of Quantitative Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, X; Yang, Y; Yang, L; Low, D; Sheng, K [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To report our initial experience of systematic monitoring treatment response using longitudinal diffusion MR images on a Co-60 MRI-guided radiotherapy system. Methods: Four patients, including 2 head-and-necks, 1 sarcoma and 1 GBM treated on a 0.35 Tesla MRI-guided treatment system, were analyzed. For each patient, 3D TrueFISP MRIs were acquired during CT simulation and before each treatment for treatment planning and patient setup purposes respectively. Additionally, 2D diffusion-weighted MR images (DWI) were acquired weekly throughout the treatment course. The gross target volume (GTV) and brainstem (as a reference structure) were delineated on weekly 3D TrueFISP MRIs to monitor anatomy changes, the contours were then transferred onto the corresponding DWI images after fusing with the weekly TrueFISP images. The patient-specific temporal and spatial variations during the entire treatment course, such as anatomic changes, target apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) distribution were evaluated in a longitudinal pattern. Results: Routine MRI revealed progressive soft-tissue GTV volume changes (up to 53%) for the H&N cases during the treatment course of 5–7 weeks. Within the GTV, the mean ADC values varied from −44% (ADC decrease) to +26% (ADC increase) in a week. The gradual increase of ADC value was inversely associated with target volume variation for one H&N case. The maximal changes of mean ADC values within the brainstem were 5.3% for the H&N cases. For the large size sarcoma and GBM tumors, spatial heterogeneity and temporal variations were observed through longitudinal ADC analysis. Conclusion: In addition to the superior soft-tissue visualization, the 0.35T MR system on ViewRay showed the potential to quantitatively measure the ADC values for both tumor and normal tissues. For normal tissue that is minimally affected by radiation, its ADC values are reproducible. Tumor ADC values show temporal and spatial fluctuation that can be exploited for

  19. Gradient pre-emphasis to counteract first-order concomitant fields on asymmetric MRI gradient systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Shengzhen; Weavers, Paul T; Trzasko, Joshua D; Shu, Yunhong; Huston, John; Lee, Seung-Kyun; Frigo, Louis M; Bernstein, Matt A

    2017-06-01

    To develop a gradient pre-emphasis scheme that prospectively counteracts the effects of the first-order concomitant fields for any arbitrary gradient waveform played on asymmetric gradient systems, and to demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach using a real-time implementation on a compact gradient system. After reviewing the first-order concomitant fields that are present on asymmetric gradients, we developed a generalized gradient pre-emphasis model assuming arbitrary gradient waveforms to counteract their effects. A numerically straightforward, easily implemented approximate solution to this pre-emphasis problem was derived that was compatible with the current hardware infrastructure of conventional MRI scanners for eddy current compensation. The proposed method was implemented on the gradient driver subsystem, and its real-time use was tested using a series of phantom and in vivo data acquired from two-dimensional Cartesian phase-difference, echo-planar imaging, and spiral acquisitions. The phantom and in vivo results demonstrated that unless accounted for, first-order concomitant fields introduce considerable phase estimation error into the measured data and result in images with spatially dependent blurring/distortion. The resulting artifacts were effectively prevented using the proposed gradient pre-emphasis. We have developed an efficient and effective gradient pre-emphasis framework to counteract the effects of first-order concomitant fields of asymmetric gradient systems. Magn Reson Med 77:2250-2262, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  20. Perceptual Characterization of the Macronutrient Picture System (MaPS for Food Image fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill L. King

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Food image fMRI paradigms are used widely for investigating the neural basis of ingestive behavior. However, these paradigms have not been validated in terms of ingestive behavior constructs, engagement of food-relevant neural systems, or test-retest reliability, making the generalizability of study findings unclear. Therefore, we validated the Macronutrient Picture System (MaPS (McClernon et al., 2013, which includes food images from the six categories represented in the Geiselman Food Preference Questionnaire (FPQ (Geiselman et al., 1998. Twenty-five healthy young adults (n = 21 female, mean age = 20.6 ± 1.1 years, mean BMI = 22.1 ± 1.9 kg/m2 rated the MaPS images in terms of visual interest, appetitive quality, nutrition, emotional valence, liking, and frequency of consumption, and completed the FPQ. In a second study, 12 individuals (n=8 female, mean age = 25.0 ± 6.5 years, mean BMI = 28.2 ± 8.7 kg/m2 viewed MaPS and control images (vegetables and non-food during two separate 3T BOLD fMRI scans after fasting overnight. Intuitively, high fat/high sugar (HF/HS and high fat/high complex carbohydrate (HF/HCCHO images achieved higher liking and appetitive ratings, and lower nutrition ratings, than low fat/low complex carbohydrate/high protein (LF/LCHO/HP images on average. Within each food category, FPQ scores correlated strongly with MaPS image liking ratings (p < 0.001. Brain activation differences between viewing images of HF/HS and vegetables, and between HF/HCCHO and vegetables, were seen in several reward-related brain regions (e.g., putamen, insula, and medial frontal gyrus. Intra-individual, inter-scan agreement in a summary measure of brain activation differences in seven reward network regions of interest was high (ICC = 0.61, and was even higher when two distinct sets of food images with matching visual ratings were shown in the two scans (ICC = 0.74. These results suggest that the MaPS provides valid representation of food

  1. Dynamic MRI-based computer aided diagnostic systems for early detection of kidney transplant rejection: A survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostapha, Mahmoud; Khalifa, Fahmi; Alansary, Amir; Soliman, Ahmed; Gimel'farb, Georgy; El-Baz, Ayman

    2013-10-01

    Early detection of renal transplant rejection is important to implement appropriate medical and immune therapy in patients with transplanted kidneys. In literature, a large number of computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) systems using different image modalities, such as ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and radionuclide imaging, have been proposed for early detection of kidney diseases. A typical CAD system for kidney diagnosis consists of a set of processing steps including: motion correction, segmentation of the kidney and/or its internal structures (e.g., cortex, medulla), construction of agent kinetic curves, functional parameter estimation, diagnosis, and assessment of the kidney status. In this paper, we survey the current state-of-the-art CAD systems that have been developed for kidney disease diagnosis using dynamic MRI. In addition, the paper addresses several challenges that researchers face in developing efficient, fast and reliable CAD systems for the early detection of kidney diseases.

  2. A TMS coil positioning/holding system for MR image-guided TMS interleaved with fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohning, Daryl E; Denslow, S; Bohning, P A; Walker, J A; George, M S

    2003-11-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be interleaved with fMRI to visualize regional brain activity in response to direct, non-invasive, cortical stimulation, making it a promising tool for studying brain function. A major practical difficulty is accurately positioning the TMS coil within the MRI scanner for stimulating a particular area of brain cortex. The objective of this work was to design and build a self-contained hardware/software system for MR-guided TMS coil positioning in interleaved TMS/fMRI studies. A compact, manually operated, articulated TMS coil positioner/holder with 6 calibrated degrees of freedom was developed for use inside a cylindrical RF head coil, along with a software package for transforming between MR image coordinates, MR scanner space coordinates, and positioner/holder settings. Phantom calibration studies gave an accuracy for positioning within setups of dx=+/-1.9 mm, dy=+/-1.4 mm, dz=+/-0.8 mm and a precision for multiple setups of dx=+/-0.8 mm, dy=+/-0.1 mm, dz=+/-0.1 mm. This self-contained, integrated MR-guided TMS system for interleaved TMS/fMRI studies provides fast, accurate location of motor cortex stimulation sites traditionally located functionally, and a means of consistent, anatomy-based TMS coil positioning for stimulation of brain areas without overt response.

  3. Teleoperation System with Hybrid Pneumatic-Piezoelectric Actuation for MRI-Guided Needle Insertion with Haptic Feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Shang, Weijian; Su, Hao; Li, Gang; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a surgical master-slave tele-operation system for percutaneous interventional procedures under continuous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance. This system consists of a piezoelectrically actuated slave robot for needle placement with integrated fiber optic force sensor utilizing Fabry-Perot interferometry (FPI) sensing principle. The sensor flexure is optimized and embedded to the slave robot for measuring needle insertion force. A novel, compact opto-mechanical FPI ...

  4. Multiparametric MRI of the prostate: diagnostic performance and interreader agreement of two scoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Ching; Muglia, Valdair F; Silva, Gyl E B; Chodraui Filho, Salomão; Reis, Rodolfo B; Westphalen, Antonio C

    2016-06-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracies and interreader agreements of the Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) v. 2 and University of California San Francisco (UCSF) multiparametric prostate MRI scale for diagnosing clinically significant prostate cancer. This institutional review board-approved retrospective study included 49 males who had 1.5 T endorectal MRI and prostatectomy. Two radiologists scored suspicious lesions on MRI using PI-RADS v. 2 and the UCSF scale. Percent agreement, 2 × 2 tables and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (Az) were used to assess and compare the individual and overall scores of these scales. Interreader agreements were estimated with kappa statistics. Reader 1 (R1) detected 78 lesions, and Reader 2 (R2) detected 80 lesions. Both identified 52 of 65 significant cancers. The Az for PI-RADS v. 2 and UCSF scale for R1 were 0.68 and 0.69 [T2 weighted imaging (T2WI)], 0.75 and 0.68 [diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)] and 0.64 and 0.72 (overall score), respectively, and were 0.72 and 0.75 (T2WI), 0.73 and 0.67 (DWI) and 0.66 and 0.75 (overall score) for R2. The dynamic contrast-enhanced percent agreements between scales were 100% (R1) and 95% (R2). PI-RADS v. 2 DWI of R1 performed better than UCSF DWI (Az = 0.75 vs Az = 0.68; p = 0.05); no other differences were found. The interreader agreements were higher for PI-RADS v. 2 (T2WI: 0.56 vs 0.42; DWI: 0.60 vs 0.46; overall: 0.61 vs 0.42). The UCSF approach to derive the overall PI-RADS v. 2 scores increased the Az for the identification of significant cancer (R1 to 0.76, p < 0.05; R2 to 0.71, p = 0.35). Although PI-RADS v. 2 DWI score may have a higher discriminatory performance than the UCSF scale counterpart to diagnose clinically significant cancer, the utilization of the UCSF scale weighing system for the integration of PI-RADS v. 2 individual parameter scores improved the accuracy its overall score. PI-RADS v. 2 is

  5. High performance MRI simulations of motion on multi-GPU systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthis, Christos G; Venetis, Ioannis E; Aletras, Anthony H

    2014-07-04

    MRI physics simulators have been developed in the past for optimizing imaging protocols and for training purposes. However, these simulators have only addressed motion within a limited scope. The purpose of this study was the incorporation of realistic motion, such as cardiac motion, respiratory motion and flow, within MRI simulations in a high performance multi-GPU environment. Three different motion models were introduced in the Magnetic Resonance Imaging SIMULator (MRISIMUL) of this study: cardiac motion, respiratory motion and flow. Simulation of a simple Gradient Echo pulse sequence and a CINE pulse sequence on the corresponding anatomical model was performed. Myocardial tagging was also investigated. In pulse sequence design, software crushers were introduced to accommodate the long execution times in order to avoid spurious echoes formation. The displacement of the anatomical model isochromats was calculated within the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) kernel for every timestep of the pulse sequence. Experiments that would allow simulation of custom anatomical and motion models were also performed. Last, simulations of motion with MRISIMUL on single-node and multi-node multi-GPU systems were examined. Gradient Echo and CINE images of the three motion models were produced and motion-related artifacts were demonstrated. The temporal evolution of the contractility of the heart was presented through the application of myocardial tagging. Better simulation performance and image quality were presented through the introduction of software crushers without the need to further increase the computational load and GPU resources. Last, MRISIMUL demonstrated an almost linear scalable performance with the increasing number of available GPU cards, in both single-node and multi-node multi-GPU computer systems. MRISIMUL is the first MR physics simulator to have implemented motion with a 3D large computational load on a single computer multi-GPU configuration. The incorporation

  6. Signal to noise ratio (SNR) and image uniformity: an estimate of performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, P.; Suri, S.; Choudhary, S.R.

    2001-01-01

    In most general definition, noise in an image, is any variation that represents a deviation from truth. Noise sources in MRI can be systematic or random and statistical in nature. Data processing algorithms that smooth and enhance the edges by non-linear intensity assignments among other factors can affect the distribution of statistical noise. The SNR and image uniformity depends on the various parameters of NMR imaging system (viz. General system calibration, Gain coil tuning, AF shielding, coil loading, image processing and scan parameters like TE, TR, interslice distance, slice thickness, pixel size and matrix size). A study on SNR and image uniformity have been performed using standard head AF coil with different TR and the estimates of their variation are presented. A comparison between different techniques has also been evaluated using standard protocol of the Siemens Magnetom Vision Plus MRI system

  7. Three-dimensional motion analysis of an improved head immobilization system for simulation, CT, MRI, and PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, A.F. Jr.; Ten Haken, R.K.; Gerhardsson, A.; Correll, M.

    1991-01-01

    A mask/marker immobilization system for the routine radiation therapy treatment of head and neck disease is described, utilizing a commercially available thermoplastic mesh, indexed and mounted for a rigid frame attached to the therapy couch. Designed to permit CT, MRI, and PET diagnostics scans of the patient to be performed in the simulation and treatment position employing the same mask, the system has been tested in order to demonstrate the reproducibility of immobilization throughout a radical course of irradiation. Three-dimensional analysis of patient position over an 8-week course of daily radiation treatment has been performed for 9 patients from digitization of anatomic points identified on orthogonal radiographs. Studies employing weekly constructed system permits rapid mask formation to be performed on the treatment simulator, resulting in an immobilization device comparable to masks produced with vacuum-forming techniques. Details of motion analysis and central axis CT, MRI, and PET markers are offered. (author). 16 refs.; 3 figs

  8. Quality assurance in functional MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Thomas T; Glover, Gary H; Mueller, Bryon A

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has ben- efited greatly from improvements in MRI hardware and software. At the same time, fMRI researchers have pushed the technical limits of MRI systems and greatly in- fluenced the development of state-of-the-art systems...... consistent data throughout the course of a study, and consistent stability across time and sites is needed to allow data from different time periods or acquisition sites to be optimally integrated....

  9. Activation of Visuomotor Systems during Visually Guided Movements: A Functional MRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellermann, Jutta M.; Siegal, Joel D.; Strupp, John P.; Ebner, Timothy J.; Ugurbil, Kâmil

    1998-04-01

    The dorsal stream is a dominant visuomotor pathway that connects the striate and extrastriate cortices to posterior parietal areas. In turn, the posterior parietal areas send projections to the frontal primary motor and premotor areas. This cortical pathway is hypothesized to be involved in the transformation of a visual input into the appropriate motor output. In this study we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the entire brain to determine the patterns of activation that occurred while subjects performed a visually guided motor task. In nine human subjects, fMRI data were acquired on a 4-T whole-body MR system equipped with a head gradient coil and a birdcage RF coil using aT*2-weighted EPI sequence. Functional activation was determined for three different tasks: (1) a visuomotor task consisting of moving a cursor on a screen with a joystick in relation to various targets, (2) a hand movement task consisting of moving the joystick without visual input, and (3) a eye movement task consisting of moving the eyes alone without visual input. Blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast-based activation maps of each subject were generated using period cross-correlation statistics. Subsequently, each subject's brain was normalized to Talairach coordinates, and the individual maps were compared on a pixel by pixel basis. Significantly activated pixels common to at least four out of six subjects were retained to construct the final functional image. The pattern of activation during visually guided movements was consistent with the flow of information from striate and extrastriate visual areas, to the posterior parietal complex, and then to frontal motor areas. The extensive activation of this network and the reproducibility among subjects is consistent with a role for the dorsal stream in transforming visual information into motor behavior. Also extensively activated were the medial and lateral cerebellar structures, implicating the cortico

  10. Clinical evaluation of a computer-aided diagnosis system for determining cancer aggressiveness in prostate MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litjens, Geert J.S.; Barentsz, Jelle O.; Karssemeijer, Nico; Huisman, Henkjan J.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the added value of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) on the diagnostic accuracy of PIRADS reporting and the assessment of cancer aggressiveness. Multi-parametric MRI and histopathological outcome of MR-guided biopsies of a consecutive set of 130 patients were included. All cases were prospectively PIRADS reported and the reported lesions underwent CAD analysis. Logistic regression combined the CAD prediction and radiologist PIRADS score into a combination score. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and Spearman's correlation coefficient were used to assess the diagnostic accuracy and correlation to cancer grade. Evaluation was performed for discriminating benign lesions from cancer and for discriminating indolent from aggressive lesions. In total 141 lesions (107 patients) were included for final analysis. The area-under-the-ROC-curve of the combination score was higher than for the PIRADS score of the radiologist (benign vs. cancer, 0.88 vs. 0.81, p = 0.013 and indolent vs. aggressive, 0.88 vs. 0.78, p < 0.01). The combination score correlated significantly stronger with cancer grade (0.69, p = 0.0014) than the individual CAD system or radiologist (0.54 and 0.58). Combining CAD prediction and PIRADS into a combination score has the potential to improve diagnostic accuracy. Furthermore, such a combination score has a strong correlation with cancer grade. (orig.)

  11. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... provides movie-like sequential imaging of the cardiovascular system that is important to assess the health and ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  12. MRI of neonatal encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khong, P.L.; Lam, B.C.C.; Tung, H.K.S.; Wong, V.; Chan, F.L.; Ooi, G.C.

    2003-01-01

    We present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in neonatal encephalopathy, including hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy, perinatal/neonatal stroke, metabolic encephalopathy from inborn errors of metabolism, congenital central nervous system infections and birth trauma. The applications of advanced MRI techniques, such as diffusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are emphasized

  13. Benchtop-magnetic resonance imaging (BT-MRI) characterization of push-pull osmotic controlled release systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaterre, Vincent; Metz, Hendrik; Ogorka, Joerg; Gurny, Robert; Loggia, Nicoletta; Mäder, Karsten

    2009-01-05

    The mechanism of drug release from push-pull osmotic systems (PPOS) has been investigated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) using a new benchtop apparatus. The signal intensity profiles of both PPOS layers were monitored non-invasively over time to characterize the hydration and swelling kinetics. The drug release performance was well-correlated to the hydration kinetics. The results show that (i) hydration and swelling critically depend on the tablet core composition, (ii) high osmotic pressure developed by the push layer may lead to bypassing the drug layer and incomplete drug release and (iii) the hydration of both the drug and the push layers needs to be properly balanced to efficiently deliver the drug. MRI is therefore a powerful tool to get insights on the drug delivery mechanism of push-pull osmotic systems, which enable a more efficient optimization of such formulations.

  14. Comparison of PET/CT and PET/MRI hybrid systems using a 68Ga-labelled PSMA ligand for the diagnosis of recurrent prostate cancer: initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afshar-Oromieh, A.; Haberkorn, U.; Schlemmer, H.P.; Fenchel, M.; Roethke, M.; Eder, M.; Eisenhut, M.; Hadaschik, B.A.; Kopp-Schneider, A.

    2014-01-01

    68 Ga-labelled HBED-CC-PSMA is a highly promising tracer for imaging recurrent prostate cancer (PCa). The intention of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of PET/MRI with this tracer. Twenty patients underwent PET/CT 1 h after injection of the 68 Ga-PSMA ligand followed by PET/MRI 3 h after injection. Data from the two investigations were first analysed separately and then compared with respect to tumour detection rate and radiotracer uptake in various tissues. To evaluate the quantification accuracy of the PET/MRI system, differences in SUVs between PET/CT and corresponding PET/MRI were compared with differences in SUVs between PET/CT 1 h and 3 h after injection in another patient cohort. This cohort was investigated using the same PET/CT system. With PET/MRI, different diagnostic sequences, higher contrast of lesions and higher resolution of MRI enabled a subjectively easier evaluation of the images. In addition, four unclear findings on PET/CT could be clarified as characteristic of PCa metastases by PET/MRI. However, in PET images of the PET/MRI, a reduced signal was observed at the level of the kidneys (in 11 patients) and around the urinary bladder (in 15 patients). This led to reduced SUVs in six lesions. SUV mean values provided by the PET/MRI system were different in muscles, blood pool, liver and spleen. PCa was detected more easily and more accurately with Ga-PSMA PET/MRI than with PET/CT and with lower radiation exposure. Consequently, this new technique could clarify unclear findings on PET/CT. However, scatter correction was challenging when the specific 68 Ga-PSMA ligand was used. Moreover, direct comparison of SUVs from PET/CT and PET/MR needs to be conducted carefully. (orig.)

  15. Brain MRI screening showing evidences of early central nervous system involvement in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Reem Hamdy A; Sabry, Yousriah Y; Nasef, Amr A

    2011-05-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a multisystem autoimmune collagen disease where structural and functional abnormalities of small blood vessels prevail. Transient ischemic attacks, ischemic stroke, and hemorrhage have been reported as primary consequence of vascular central nervous system affection in systemic sclerosis. Magnetic resonance imaging is considered to be the most sensitive diagnostic technique for detecting symptomatic and asymptomatic lesions in the brain in cases of multifocal diseases. The objective of this study is to detect subclinical as well as clinically manifest cerebral vasculopathy in patients with systemic sclerosis using magnetic resonance imaging. As much as 30 female patients with systemic sclerosis aged 27-61 years old, with disease duration of 1-9 years and with no history of other systemic disease or cerebrovascular accidents, were enrolled. Age-matched female control group of 30 clinically normal subjects, underwent brain magnetic resonance examination. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in the form of white matter hyperintense foci of variable sizes were found in significantly abundant forms in systemic sclerosis patients on magnetic resonance evaluation than in age-related control group, signifying a form of CNS vasculopathy. Such foci showed significant correlation to clinical features of organic CNS lesion including headaches, fainting attacks and organic depression as well as to the severity of peripheral vascular disease with insignificant correlation with disease duration. In conclusion, subclinical as well as clinically manifest CNS ischemic vasculopathy is not uncommon in systemic sclerosis patients and magnetic resonance imaging is considered a sensitive noninvasive screening tool for early detection of CNS involvement in patients with systemic sclerosis.

  16. Whole-body MRI: comprehensive evaluation on a 48-channel 3T MRI system in less than 40 minutes. Preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus de Andrade Hernandes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a comprehensive MRI protocol that investigates for cancer, vascular disease, and degenerative/inflammatory disease from the head to the pelvis in less than 40 minutes on a new generation 48-channel 3T system. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All MR studies were performed on a 48-channel 3T MR scanner. A 20-channel head/neck coil, two 18-channel body arrays, and a 32-channel spine array were employed. A total of 4 healthy individuals were studied. The designed protocol included a combination of single-shot T2-weighted sequences, T1-weighted 3D gradient-echo pre- and post-gadolinium. All images were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists independently for overall image quality. RESULTS: The image quality for cancer was rated as excellent in the liver, pancreas, kidneys, lungs, pelvic organs, and brain, and rated as fair in the colon and breast. For vascular diseases ratings were excellent in the aorta, major branch vessel origins, inferior vena cava, portal and hepatic veins, rated as good in pulmonary arteries, and as poor in the coronary arteries. For degenerative/inflammatory diseases ratings were excellent in the brain, liver and pancreas. The inter-observer agreement was excellent. CONCLUSION: A comprehensive and time efficient screening for important categories of disease processes may be achieved with high quality imaging in a new generation 48-channel 3T system.

  17. Whole-body MRI: comprehensive evaluation on a 48-channel 3T MRI system in less than 40 minutes. Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandes, Mateus de Andrade; Semelka, Richard C.; Bamrungchart, Saraporn; Stallings, Clifton, E-mail: richsem@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Elias Junior, Jorge [Imaging and Medical Physics Center, School of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Dale, Brian M. [Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Cary, NC (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: To evaluate a comprehensive MRI protocol that investigates for cancer, vascular disease, and degenerative/inflammatory disease from the head to the pelvis in less than 40 minutes on a new generation 48-channel 3T system. Materials and Methods: All MR studies were performed on a 48-channel 3T MR scanner. A 20-channel head/neck coil, two 18-channel body arrays, and a 32-channel spine array were employed. A total of 4 healthy individuals were studied. The designed protocol included a combination of single-shot T2-weighted sequences, T1-weighted 3D gradient echo pre- and post-gadolinium. All images were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists independently for overall image quality. Results: The image quality for cancer was rated as excellent in the liver, pancreas, kidneys, lungs, pelvic organs, and brain, and rated as fair in the colon and breast. For vascular diseases ratings were excellent in the aorta, major branch vessel origins, inferior vena cava, portal and hepatic veins, rated as good in pulmonary arteries, and as poor in the coronary arteries. For degenerative/inflammatory diseases ratings were excellent in the brain, liver and pancreas. The inter-observer agreement was excellent. Conclusion: A comprehensive and time efficient screening for important categories of disease processes may be achieved with high quality imaging in a new generation 48-channel 3T system. (author)

  18. Experimental MRI-SPECT insert system with Hybrid Semiconductor detectors Timepix for MR animal scanner Bruker 47/20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajicek, J.; Burian, M.; Soukup, P.; Novak, V.; Macko, M.; Jakubek, J.

    2017-01-01

    Multimodal medical imaging based on Magnetic Resonance is mainly combinated with one of the scintigraphic method like PET or SPECT. These methods provide functional information whereas magnetic resonance imaging provides high spatial resolution of anatomical information or complementary functional information. Fusion of imaging modalities allows researchers to obtain complimentary information in a single measurement. The combination of MRI with SPECT is still relatively new and challenging in many ways. The main complication of using SPECT in MRI systems is the presence of a high magnetic field therefore (ferro)magnetic materials have to be eliminated. Furthermore the application of radiofrequency fields within the MR gantry does not allow for the use of conductive structures such as the common heavy metal collimators. This work presents design and construction of an experimental MRI-SPECT insert system and its initial tests. This unique insert system consists of an MR-compatible SPECT setup with CdTe pixelated sensors Timepix tungsten collimators and a radiofrequency coil. Measurements were performed on a gelatine and tissue phantom with an embedded radioisotopic source (57Co 122 keV γ ray) inside the RF coil by the Bruker BioSpec 47/20 (4.7 T) MR animal scanner. The project was performed in the framework of the Medipix Collaboration.

  19. Comparative magnetic resonance imaging of renal space-occupying lesions with a high and a low field MRI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehl, H.B.; Lorch, H.; Amblank, O.B.M.; Engerhoff, B.; Weiss, H.D.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: A prospective study of the diagnostic accuracy and image quality of two MRI systems in the detection of renal tumors was investigated. Materials and Methods: 34 patients with the clinical suspicion of a space-occupying renal lesion were examined by MRI with a low field (0.2 Tesla magnet) and a high field (1.5 Tesla magnet) for comparison. An 'informed' and a 'blind' observer evaluated all of the MR images. In addition, the signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios were evaluated as second quality parameters. Results: In 29 cases the results could be compared with a confirmed release diagnosis. Diagnostic accuracy was comparable with both systems (Sensitivity for both observer on LF apparatus: 83%, HF apparatus: 81%) although the signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios were significantly poorer at low field. Conclusions: The low field system in comparable to the high field MRI for detection and differentiation of renal space-occupying lesions. (orig.) [de

  20. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI Patient Instructions ... Gotway MB, Panse PM, Gruden JF, Elicker BM. Thoracic radiology. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et ...

  1. Evaluation of pneumonia in children: comparison of MRI with fast imaging sequences at 1.5T with chest radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yikilmaz, Ali; Koc, Ali; Coskun, Abdulhakim (Dept. of Radiology, Erciyes Medical School, Kayseri (Turkey)); Ozturk, Mustafa K (Dept. of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Erciyes Medical School, Kayseri (Turkey)); Mulkern, Robert V; Lee, Edward Y (Dept. of Radiology and Dept. of Medicine, Pulmonary Div., Children' s Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States)), email: Edward.lee@childrens.harvard.edu

    2011-10-15

    Background Although there has been a study aimed at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of pneumonia in children at a low magnetic field (0.2T), there is no study which assessed the efficacy of MRI, particularly with fast imaging sequences at 1.5T, for evaluating pneumonia in children. Purpose To investigate the efficacy of chest MRI with fast imaging sequences at 1.5T for evaluating pneumonia in children by comparing MRI findings with those of chest radiographs. Material and Methods This was an Institutional Review Board-approved, HIPPA-compliant prospective study of 40 consecutive pediatric patients (24 boys, 16 girls; mean age 7.3 years +- 6.6 years) with pneumonia, who underwent PA and lateral chest radiographs followed by MRI within 24 h. All MRI studies were obtained in axial and coronal planes with two different fast imaging sequences: T1-weighted FFE (Fast Field Echo) (TR/TE: 83/4.6) and T2-weighted B-FFE M2D (Balanced Fast Field Echo Multiple 2D Dimensional) (TR/TE: 3.2/1.6). Two experienced pediatric radiologists reviewed each chest radiograph and MRI for the presence of consolidation, necrosis/abscess, bronchiectasis, and pleural effusion. Chest radiograph and MRI findings were compared with Kappa statistics. Results All consolidation, lung necrosis/abscess, bronchiectasis, and pleural effusion detected with chest radiographs were also detected with MRI. There was statistically substantial agreement between chest radiographs and MRI in detecting consolidation (k = 0.78) and bronchiectasis (k = 0.72) in children with pneumonia. The agreement between chest radiographs and MRI was moderate for detecting necrosis/abscess (k = 0.49) and fair for detecting pleural effusion (k = 0.30). Conclusion MRI with fast imaging sequences is comparable to chest radiographs for evaluating underlying pulmonary consolidation, bronchiectasis, necrosis/abscess, and pleural effusion often associated with pneumonia in children

  2. Comparison between target magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in-gantry and cognitively directed transperineal or transrectal-guided prostate biopsies for Prostate Imaging-Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) 3-5 MRI lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaxley, Anna J; Yaxley, John W; Thangasamy, Isaac A; Ballard, Emma; Pokorny, Morgan R

    2017-11-01

    To compare the detection rates of prostate cancer (PCa) in men with Prostate Imaging-Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) 3-5 abnormalities on 3-Tesla multiparametric (mp) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using in-bore MRI-guided biopsy compared with cognitively directed transperineal (cTP) biopsy and transrectal ultrasonography (cTRUS) biopsy. This was a retrospective single-centre study of consecutive men attending the private practice clinic of an experienced urologist performing MRI-guided biopsy and an experienced urologist performing cTP and cTRUS biopsy techniques for PI-RADS 3-5 lesions identified on 3-Tesla mpMRI. There were 595 target mpMRI lesions from 482 men with PI-RADS 3-5 regions of interest during 483 episodes of biopsy. The abnormal mpMRI target lesion was biopsied using the MRI-guided method for 298 biopsies, the cTP method for 248 biopsies and the cTRUS method for 49 biopsies. There were no significant differences in PCa detection among the three biopsy methods in PI-RADS 3 (48.9%, 40.0% and 44.4%, respectively), PI-RADS 4 (73.2%, 81.0% and 85.0%, respectively) or PI-RADS 5 (95.2, 92.0% and 95.0%, respectively) lesions, and there was no significant difference in detection of significant PCa among the biopsy methods in PI-RADS 3 (42.2%, 30.0% and 33.3%, respectively), PI-RADS 4 (66.8%, 66.0% and 80.0%, respectively) or PI-RADS 5 (90.5%, 89.8% and 90.0%, respectively) lesions. There were also no differences in PCa or significant PCa detection based on lesion location or size among the methods. We found no significant difference in the ability to detect PCa or significant PCa using targeted MRI-guided, cTP or cTRUS biopsy methods. Identification of an abnormal area on mpMRI appears to be more important in increasing the detection of PCa than the technique used to biopsy an MRI abnormality. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Design and implementation of a simple multinuclear MRI system for ultra high-field imaging of animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chang-Hoon; Ha, YongHyun; Veeraiah, Pandichelvam; Felder, Jörg; Möllenhoff, Klaus; Shah, N. Jon

    2016-12-01

    Non-proton MRI has recently garnered gathering interest with the increased availability of ultra high-field MRI system. Assuming the availability of a broadband RF amplifier, performing multinuclear MR experiments essentially requires additional hardware, such as an RF resonator and a T/R switch for each nucleus. A double- or triple-resonant RF probe is typically constructed using traps or PIN-diode circuits, but this approach degrades the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and image quality compared to a single-resonant coil and this is a limiting factor. In this work, we have designed the required hardware for multinuclear MR imaging experiments employing six single-resonant coil sets and a purpose-built animal bed; these have been implemented into a home-integrated 9.4 T preclinical MRI scanner. System capabilities are demonstrated by distinguishing concentration differences and sensitivity of X-nuclei imaging and spectroscopy without SNR penalty for any nuclei, no subject interruption and no degradation of the static shim conditions.

  4. Coupled circuit numerical analysis of eddy currents in an open MRI system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Md. Shahadat Hossain; Terada, Yasuhiko; Keiichiro, Ishi; Kose, Katsumi

    2014-08-01

    We performed a new coupled circuit numerical simulation of eddy currents in an open compact magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. Following the coupled circuit approach, the conducting structures were divided into subdomains along the length (or width) and the thickness, and by implementing coupled circuit concepts we have simulated transient responses of eddy currents for subdomains in different locations. We implemented the Eigen matrix technique to solve the network of coupled differential equations to speed up our simulation program. On the other hand, to compute the coupling relations between the biplanar gradient coil and any other conducting structure, we implemented the solid angle form of Ampere’s law. We have also calculated the solid angle for three dimensions to compute inductive couplings in any subdomain of the conducting structures. Details of the temporal and spatial distribution of the eddy currents were then implemented in the secondary magnetic field calculation by the Biot-Savart law. In a desktop computer (Programming platform: Wolfram Mathematica 8.0®, Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Duo E7500 @ 2.93 GHz; OS: Windows 7 Professional; Memory (RAM): 4.00 GB), it took less than 3 min to simulate the entire calculation of eddy currents and fields, and approximately 6 min for X-gradient coil. The results are given in the time-space domain for both the direct and the cross-terms of the eddy current magnetic fields generated by the Z-gradient coil. We have also conducted free induction decay (FID) experiments of eddy fields using a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe to verify our simulation results. The simulation results were found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. In this study we have also conducted simulations for transient and spatial responses of secondary magnetic field induced by X-gradient coil. Our approach is fast and has much less computational complexity than the conventional electromagnetic numerical

  5. Comparative safety of gadodiamide, dimeglumine gadopentetate and meglumine gadoterate in MRI of the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanalet, S.; Bruneton, J.N.; Masson, B.; Boyer, L.; Laffont, J.

    1995-01-01

    The development of new non-ionic magnetic resonance (MR) contrast media as gadodiamide injection increased the choice of paramagnetic contrast agents available in MR of the central nervous system (CNS). The purpose of our paper was to compare at the dose of 0.1 mmol/kg b.w. the safety of gadodiamide (Gd-DTPA-BMA) to gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA) and to gadoterate meglumine (Gd-DOTA) in two multi centric double-blind studies. A total of 551 patients were enrolled with 143 patients in the Gd-DTPA group, 132 patients in the Gd-DOTA group and 276 patients in the Gd-DTPA-BMA group. Safety was assessed by recording the adverse events up to 24 hours after the injection. One or more adverse events were recorded in 14% of the Gd-DTPA patients, in 15.1% of the Gd-DOTA patients and in 11.6% of the Gd-DTPA-BMA patients. These reactions were related to the contrast media in 9.1%, 13.6% and 8.7% of the cases respectively. Their intensity was defined as mild in 8.4% of the patients in the Gd-DTPA group, in 13.6% of the patients in the Gd-DOTA group and in 8.3% of the patients in the Gd-DTPA-BMA group. No severe reaction or death were recorded. An injection-site reaction (heat, coldness, pain) has been observed in 43% of the cases although an adverse event other than local reactions (headache, dizziness, nausea) has been noticed in 57% of the cases. No significant statistical difference was observed between the groups. Gadodiamide is a safe and effective contrast agent in MRI of the CNS in comparison with Gd-DTPA and Gd-DOTA currently in routine use

  6. A simple classification system (the Tree flowchart) for breast MRI can reduce the number of unnecessary biopsies in MRI-only lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woitek, Ramona; Spick, Claudio; Schernthaner, Melanie; Kapetas, Panagiotis; Bernathova, Maria; Furtner, Julia; Pinker, Katja; Helbich, Thomas H.; Baltzer, Pascal A.T. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Rudas, Margaretha [Medical University of Vienna, Clinical Institute of Pathology, Vienna (Austria)

    2017-09-15

    To assess whether using the Tree flowchart obviates unnecessary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided biopsies in breast lesions only visible on MRI. This retrospective IRB-approved study evaluated consecutive suspicious (BI-RADS 4) breast lesions only visible on MRI that were referred to our institution for MRI-guided biopsy. All lesions were evaluated according to the Tree flowchart for breast MRI by experienced readers. The Tree flowchart is a decision rule that assigns levels of suspicion to specific combinations of diagnostic criteria. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to evaluate diagnostic accuracy. To assess reproducibility by kappa statistics, a second reader rated a subset of 82 patients. There were 454 patients with 469 histopathologically verified lesions included (98 malignant, 371 benign lesions). The area under the curve (AUC) of the Tree flowchart was 0.873 (95% CI: 0.839-0.901). The inter-reader agreement was almost perfect (kappa: 0.944; 95% CI 0.889-0.998). ROC analysis revealed exclusively benign lesions if the Tree node was ≤2, potentially avoiding unnecessary biopsies in 103 cases (27.8%). Using the Tree flowchart in breast lesions only visible on MRI, more than 25% of biopsies could be avoided without missing any breast cancer. (orig.)

  7. Effects of haloperidol and aripiprazole on the human mesolimbic motivational system: A pharmacological fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolstad, Ingeborg; Andreassen, Ole A; Groote, Inge; Server, Andres; Sjaastad, Ivar; Kapur, Shitij; Jensen, Jimmy

    2015-12-01

    The atypical antipsychotic drug aripiprazole is a partial dopamine (DA) D2 receptor agonist, which differentiates it from most other antipsychotics. This study compares the brain activation characteristic produced by aripiprazole with that of haloperidol, a typical D2 receptor antagonist. Healthy participants received an acute oral dose of haloperidol, aripiprazole or placebo, and then performed an active aversive conditioning task with aversive and neutral events presented as sounds, while blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was carried out. The fMRI task, targeting the mesolimbic motivational system that is thought to be disturbed in psychosis, was based on the conditioned avoidance response (CAR) animal model - a widely used test of therapeutic potential of antipsychotic drugs. In line with the CAR animal model, the present results show that subjects given haloperidol were not able to avoid more aversive than neutral task trials, even though the response times were shorter during aversive events. In the aripiprazole and placebo groups more aversive than neutral events were avoided. Accordingly, the task-related BOLD-fMRI response in the mesolimbic motivational system was diminished in the haloperidol group compared to the placebo group, particularly in the ventral striatum, whereas the aripiprazole group showed task-related activations intermediate of the placebo and haloperidol groups. The current results show differential effects on brain function by aripiprazole and haloperidol, probably related to altered DA transmission. This supports the use of pharmacological fMRI to study antipsychotic properties in humans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  8. A computer-aided detection system for rheumatoid arthritis MRI data interpretation and quantification of synovial activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubassova, Olga; Boesen, Mikael; Cimmino, Marco A.; Bliddal, Henning

    2010-01-01

    Rational and objective: Disease assessment and follow-up of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients require objective evaluation and quantification. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has a large potential to supplement such information for the clinician, however, time spent on data reading and interpretation slow down development in this area. Existing scoring systems of especially synovitis are too rigid and insensitive to measure early treatment response and quantify inflammation. This study tested a novel automated, computer system for analysis of dynamic MRI data acquired from patients with RA, Dynamika-RA, which incorporates efficient data processing and analysis techniques. Materials and methods: 140 MRI scans from hands and wrists of 135 active RA patients and 5 healthy controls were processed using Dynamika-RA and evaluated with RAMRIS. To reduce patient motion artefacts, MRI data were processed using Dynamika-RA, which removed motion in 2D and 3D planes. Then synovial enhancement was visualised and qualified using a novel fully automated voxel-by-voxel analysis based algorithm. This algorithm was used to replace traditional region-of-interest (ROI) and subtraction methods, yielding observer independent quantitative results. Results: Conventional scoring performed by an observer took 30-45 min per dataset. Dynamika-RA reduced motion artefacts, visualised inflammation and quantified disease activity in less than 3 min. Data processing allowed increasing signal to noise ratio by a factor 3. Due to fully automated procedure of data processing, there was no intertest variation in the results. Conclusions: Algorithms incorporated into Dynamika-RA allow for the significant enhancement of data quality through eliminating motion artefacts and reduction of time for evaluation of synovial inflammation.

  9. Controlling the Stormram 2: An MRI-compatible Robotic System for Breast Biopsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdelaziz, Mohamed E.M.K.; Groenhuis, Vincent; Veltman, Jeroen; Siepel, Françoise Jeanette; Stramigioli, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently life-threatening diagnosed type of cancer among women. Early and accurate diagnosis by acquiring a tissue sample using biopsy techniques is essential. However, small lesions only visible by MRI are often missed in standard methods, indicating the need for a

  10. CT and MRI in severe hypophosphataemia with central nervous system involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, U.; Hueppe, T.; Niehaus, L.

    2000-01-01

    We report a 38-year-old woman with extreme hypophosphataemia in whom CT and MRI disclosed bilateral lesions within the basal ganglia, thalamus and occipital lobes. After adequate substitution of phosphate the lesions grossly resolved and the patient recovered. This case is the first to demonstrate that profound changes of serum phosphate may be associated with reversible brain lesions. (orig.)

  11. Computer-assisted three-dimensional reconstruction of the corticospinal system as a reference for CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhmann, C. [Department of Neuroanatomy, Hannover Medical School (Germany)]|[University Hospital Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Kretschmann, H.J. [Department of Neuroanatomy, Hannover Medical School (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3D) anatomical computer-graphics model of the corticospinal system acquired from equidistant serial anatomical slices of six intracranially-fixed human brains. This model is part of a neuroanatomical reference system (NeuRef) which enables 3D visualization of the brain and shows the relationship of its components such as anatomical structures, functional fibre tracts and arteries. Sections through the models can be matched with corresponding CT or MR images. This allows the probable localisation of corticospinal fibres on CT or MRI. (orig.) (orig.) With 18 figs., 3 tabs., 40 refs.

  12. Computer-assisted three-dimensional reconstruction of the corticospinal system as a reference for CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhmann, C.; Kretschmann, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3D) anatomical computer-graphics model of the corticospinal system acquired from equidistant serial anatomical slices of six intracranially-fixed human brains. This model is part of a neuroanatomical reference system (NeuRef) which enables 3D visualization of the brain and shows the relationship of its components such as anatomical structures, functional fibre tracts and arteries. Sections through the models can be matched with corresponding CT or MR images. This allows the probable localisation of corticospinal fibres on CT or MRI. (orig.) (orig.)

  13. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... has any questions. Some implanted devices require a short period of time after placement (usually six weeks) ... center of the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also provides movie-like sequential imaging of the cardiovascular system that is important to assess the health ... invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven valuable in diagnosing a ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... prior obstruction of blood flow). determine blood flow dynamics in the vessels and heart chambers. display lymph ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vessels, from almost any angle. MRI also provides movie-like sequential imaging of the cardiovascular system that ... headsets so that the child can watch a movie while the scan is being performed. Thus, the ...

  17. Clinico-MRI study of hemispheric disorder in long-term follow-up cases of multiple system atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konagaya, Masaaki; Miwa, Shigeru; Matsuoka, Yukihiko; Konagaya, Yoko

    1998-01-01

    Twelve cases of multiple system atrophy (MSA) were studied for clinical and MRI findings of the cerebral hemispheric involvement. The subjects consisted of five olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA) type and seven striatonigral degeneration (SND) type. The age at onset was 56.7±8.0 (M±SD) years, duration of illness at the first MRI study 3.2±1.1 years, duration of illness at the last study 8.1±2.2 years, and the following up duration 4.9±2.0 years. The grasping phenomenon was observed in 70% of the cases examined, snout reflex in 80%, slowness of verbal response in 88%, and decrease of spontaneous speech in 100%. Three cases finally fell into the state of mutism. Three out of ten cases were categorized as dementia by HDS-R (Hasegawa Dementia Scale-Revised) test. Besides the progression of the pontocerebellar atrophy and putaminal changes, MRI study revealed progressive frontal lobe atrophy in most cases. At six years after the onset, SND type showed significantly higher incidence of conspicuous frontal lobe atrophy and dilatation of the Sylvian fissure than OPCA type. Cerebral ventricular dilatation was common feature, and atrophy of the temporal and occipital lobes were observed in several cases. We indicated the possible involvement of the cerebral hemisphere, especially the frontal lobe, and higher nervous function in MSA. (author)

  18. Clinico-MRI study of hemispheric disorder in long-term follow-up cases of multiple system atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konagaya, Masaaki; Miwa, Shigeru; Matsuoka, Yukihiko [Suzuka National Hospital, Mie (Japan); Konagaya, Yoko

    1998-12-01

    Twelve cases of multiple system atrophy (MSA) were studied for clinical and MRI findings of the cerebral hemispheric involvement. The subjects consisted of five olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA) type and seven striatonigral degeneration (SND) type. The age at onset was 56.7{+-}8.0 (M{+-}SD) years, duration of illness at the first MRI study 3.2{+-}1.1 years, duration of illness at the last study 8.1{+-}2.2 years, and the following up duration 4.9{+-}2.0 years. The grasping phenomenon was observed in 70% of the cases examined, snout reflex in 80%, slowness of verbal response in 88%, and decrease of spontaneous speech in 100%. Three cases finally fell into the state of mutism. Three out of ten cases were categorized as dementia by HDS-R (Hasegawa Dementia Scale-Revised) test. Besides the progression of the pontocerebellar atrophy and putaminal changes, MRI study revealed progressive frontal lobe atrophy in most cases. At six years after the onset, SND type showed significantly higher incidence of conspicuous frontal lobe atrophy and dilatation of the Sylvian fissure than OPCA type. Cerebral ventricular dilatation was common feature, and atrophy of the temporal and occipital lobes were observed in several cases. We indicated the possible involvement of the cerebral hemisphere, especially the frontal lobe, and higher nervous function in MSA. (author)

  19. Evaluation of the incidence of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with moderate renal insufficiency administered gadobenate dimeglumine for MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, B.J.; Im, K.; Broome, D.R.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To determine the incidence of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) in stage 3 chronic kidney disease patients following intravenous exposure to gadobenate dimeglumine. Materials and methods: A prospective study was performed on 168 consecutive patients at a single institution with stage 3 chronic kidney disease who underwent clinically-indicated contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations with gadobenate dimeglumine from January 2007 to March 2008. All patients were contacted by phone by investigators 3 months after MRI to verify the presence or absence of NSF signs or symptoms. If signs or symptoms suggestive of NSF developed, dermatologic referral was made and confirmatory skin biopsy performed if indicated. Results: One hundred and eighty contrast-enhanced MRI examinations with gadobenate dimeglumine were performed on the 168 patients. Twenty patients were lost to follow-up, but 160 incidents of contrast medium exposure were followed up for 3-months and 105 incidents were followed up for 6 months. The mean contrast medium dose per weight was 0.093 mmol/kg (range 0.042-0.153 mmol/kg). The mean estimated creatinine clearance was 50.4 ml/min/1.73 m 2 (range from 30-59 ml/min/1.73 m 2 ). Ten patients developed skin rashes during the 3-month follow-up period, but none were confirmed to represent NSF (0% prevalence rate). No other signs or symptoms of NSF were reported. Conclusion: Based on this limited study, NSF does not appear to occur in patients with stage 3 chronic kidney disease exposed to intravenous gadobenate dimeglumine for MRI at standard dosing of ∼0.1 mmol/kg.

  20. Anaesthesia for MRI: ….child's play?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    radiology as well as in the operating room. MRI offers superior soft-tissue contrast and can create images through any body plane. The success of an MRI ... MRI then became a practical real- ity with the ... Magnetic field strengths in MRI systems range from 0. 15-3. 0 tesla. ... Time varied magnetic field interference. Magnetic ...

  1. Teleoperation System with Hybrid Pneumatic-Piezoelectric Actuation for MRI-Guided Needle Insertion with Haptic Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Weijian; Su, Hao; Li, Gang; Fischer, Gregory S

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a surgical master-slave tele-operation system for percutaneous interventional procedures under continuous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance. This system consists of a piezoelectrically actuated slave robot for needle placement with integrated fiber optic force sensor utilizing Fabry-Perot interferometry (FPI) sensing principle. The sensor flexure is optimized and embedded to the slave robot for measuring needle insertion force. A novel, compact opto-mechanical FPI sensor interface is integrated into an MRI robot control system. By leveraging the complementary features of pneumatic and piezoelectric actuation, a pneumatically actuated haptic master robot is also developed to render force associated with needle placement interventions to the clinician. An aluminum load cell is implemented and calibrated to close the impedance control loop of the master robot. A force-position control algorithm is developed to control the hybrid actuated system. Teleoperated needle insertion is demonstrated under live MR imaging, where the slave robot resides in the scanner bore and the user manipulates the master beside the patient outside the bore. Force and position tracking results of the master-slave robot are demonstrated to validate the tracking performance of the integrated system. It has a position tracking error of 0.318mm and sine wave force tracking error of 2.227N.

  2. Teleoperation System with Hybrid Pneumatic-Piezoelectric Actuation for MRI-Guided Needle Insertion with Haptic Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Weijian; Su, Hao; Li, Gang; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a surgical master-slave tele-operation system for percutaneous interventional procedures under continuous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance. This system consists of a piezoelectrically actuated slave robot for needle placement with integrated fiber optic force sensor utilizing Fabry-Perot interferometry (FPI) sensing principle. The sensor flexure is optimized and embedded to the slave robot for measuring needle insertion force. A novel, compact opto-mechanical FPI sensor interface is integrated into an MRI robot control system. By leveraging the complementary features of pneumatic and piezoelectric actuation, a pneumatically actuated haptic master robot is also developed to render force associated with needle placement interventions to the clinician. An aluminum load cell is implemented and calibrated to close the impedance control loop of the master robot. A force-position control algorithm is developed to control the hybrid actuated system. Teleoperated needle insertion is demonstrated under live MR imaging, where the slave robot resides in the scanner bore and the user manipulates the master beside the patient outside the bore. Force and position tracking results of the master-slave robot are demonstrated to validate the tracking performance of the integrated system. It has a position tracking error of 0.318mm and sine wave force tracking error of 2.227N. PMID:25126446

  3. Toward an MRI-based method to measure non-uniform cartilage deformation: an MRI-cyclic loading apparatus system and steady-state cyclic displacement of articular cartilage under compressive loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, C P; Hull, M L

    2003-04-01

    Recent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have shown potential for measuring non-uniform deformations throughout the volume (i.e. three-dimensional (3D) deformations) in small orthopedic tissues such as articular cartilage. However, to analyze cartilage deformation using MRI techniques, a system is required which can construct images from multiple acquisitions of MRI signals from the cartilage in both the underformed and deformed states. The objectives of the work reported in this article were to 1) design an apparatus that could apply highly repeatable cyclic compressive loads of 400 N and operate in the bore of an MRI scanner, 2) demonstrate that the apparatus and MRI scanner can be successfully integrated to observe 3D deformations in a phantom material, 3) use the apparatus to determine the load cycle necessary to achieve a steady-state deformation response in normal bovine articular cartilage samples using a flat-surfaced and nonporous indentor in unconfined compression. Composed of electronic and pneumatic components, the apparatus regulated pressure to a double-acting pneumatic cylinder so that (1) load-controlled compression cycles were applied to cartilage samples immersed in a saline bath, (2) loading and recovery periods within a cycle varied in time duration, and (3) load magnitude varied so that the stress applied to cartilage samples was within typical physiological ranges. In addition the apparatus allowed gating for MR image acquisition, and operation within the bore of an MRI scanner without creating image artifacts. The apparatus demonstrated high repeatability in load application with a standard deviation of 1.8% of the mean 400 N load applied. When the apparatus was integrated with an MRI scanner programmed with appropriate pulse sequences, images of a phantom material in both the underformed and deformed states were constructed by assembling data acquired through multiple signal acquisitions. Additionally, the number of cycles to reach

  4. MRI of 'brain death'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Shigeki; Itoh, Takahiko; Tuchida, Shohei; Kinugasa, Kazushi; Asari, Shoji; Nishimoto, Akira; Sanou, Kazuo.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was undertaken for two patients who suffered from severe cerebrovascular diseases and were clinically brain dead. The MRI system we used was Resona (Yokogawa Medical Systems, superconductive system 0.5 T) and the CT apparatus was Toshiba TCT-300. Initial CT and MRI were undertaken as soon as possible after admission, and repeated sequentially. After diagnosis of brain death, we performed angiography to determine cerebral circulatory arrest, and MRI obtained at the same time was compared with the angiogram and CT. Case 1 was a 77-year-old man who was admitted in an unconscious state. CT and MRI on the second day after hospitalization revealed cerebellar infarction. He was diagnosed as brain dead on day 4. Case 2 was a 35-year-old man. When he was transferred to our hospital, he was in cardiorespiratory arrested. Cardiac resuscitation was successful but no spontaneous respiration appeared. CT and MRI on admission revealed right intracerebral hemorrhage. Angiography revealed cessation of contrast medium in intracranial vessels in both of the patients. We found no 'flow signal void sign' in the bilateral internal carotid and basilar arteries on MRI images in both cases after brain death. MRI, showing us the anatomical changes of the brain, clearly revealed brain herniations, even though only nuclear findings of 'brain tamponade' were seen on CT. But in Case 1, we could not see the infarct lesions in the cerebellum on MR images obtained after brain death. This phenomenon was caused by the whole brain ischemia masking the initial ischemic lesions. We concluded that MRI was useful not only the anatomical display of lesions and brain herniation with high contrast resolution but for obtaining information on cerebral circulation of brain death. (author)

  5. Real-time image reconstruction and display system for MRI using a high-speed personal computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haishi, T; Kose, K

    1998-09-01

    A real-time NMR image reconstruction and display system was developed using a high-speed personal computer and optimized for the 32-bit multitasking Microsoft Windows 95 operating system. The system was operated at various CPU clock frequencies by changing the motherboard clock frequency and the processor/bus frequency ratio. When the Pentium CPU was used at the 200 MHz clock frequency, the reconstruction time for one 128 x 128 pixel image was 48 ms and that for the image display on the enlarged 256 x 256 pixel window was about 8 ms. NMR imaging experiments were performed with three fast imaging sequences (FLASH, multishot EPI, and one-shot EPI) to demonstrate the ability of the real-time system. It was concluded that in most cases, high-speed PC would be the best choice for the image reconstruction and display system for real-time MRI. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  6. Central nervous system infectious diseases mimicking multiple sclerosis: recognizing distinguishable features using MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Jose da Rocha

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The current diagnostic criteria for multiple sclerosis (MS confirm the relevant role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, supporting the possibility of characterizing the dissemination in space (DIS and the dissemination in time (DIT in a single scan. To maintain the specificity of these criteria, it is necessary to determine whether T2/FLAIR visible lesions and the gadolinium enhancement can be attributed to diseases that mimic MS. Several diseases are included in the MS differential diagnosis list, including diseases with exacerbation, remitting periods and numerous treatable infectious diseases, which can mimic the MRI features of MS. We discuss the most relevant imaging features in several infectious diseases that resemble MS and examine the primary spatial distributions of lesions and the gadolinium enhancement patterns related to MS. Recognizing imaging "red flags" can be useful for the proper diagnostic evaluation of suspected cases of MS, facilitating the correct differential diagnosis by assessing the combined clinical, laboratory and MR imaging information.

  7. Development of an MRI-Guided Intra-Prostatic Needle Placement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Downloaded on August 09,2010 at 01:03:56 UTC from IEEE Xplore . Restrictions apply. Fig. 5. This mechanis provides for...Authorized licensed use limited to: Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Downloaded on August 09,2010 at 01:03:56 UTC from IEEE Xplore . Restrictions apply...A, Su H, Approaches to Creating and Controlling Motion in MRI, In Proceedings of the 33rd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in

  8. Superconducting Electromagnetic Suspension (EMS) system for Grumman Maglev concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalsi, Swarn S.

    1994-01-01

    The Grumman developed Electromagnetic Suspension (EMS) Maglev system has the following key characteristics: a large operating airgap--40 mm; levitation at all speeds; both high speed and low speed applications; no deleterious effects on SC coils at low vehicle speeds; low magnetic field at the SC coil--less than 0.35 T; no need to use non-magnetic/non-metallic rebar in the guideway structure; low magnetic field in passenger cabin--approximately 1 G; low forces on the SC coil; employs state-of-the-art NbTi wire; no need for an active magnet quench protection system; and lower weight than a magnet system with copper coils. The EMS Maglev described in this paper does not require development of any new technologies. The system could be built with the existing SC magnet technology.

  9. Comparison of PET/CT with Sequential PET/MRI Using an MR-Compatible Mobile PET System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamoto, Ryusuke; Nakamoto, Yuji; Ishimori, Takayoshi; Fushimi, Yasutaka; Kido, Aki; Togashi, Kaori

    2018-05-01

    The current study tested a newly developed flexible PET (fxPET) scanner prototype. This fxPET system involves dual arc-shaped detectors based on silicon photomultipliers that are designed to fit existing MRI devices, allowing us to obtain fused PET and MR images by sequential PET and MR scanning. This prospective study sought to evaluate the image quality, lesion detection rate, and quantitative values of fxPET in comparison with conventional whole-body (WB) PET and to assess the accuracy of registration. Methods: Seventeen patients with suspected or known malignant tumors were analyzed. Approximately 1 h after intravenous injection of 18 F-FDG, WB PET/CT was performed, followed by fxPET and MRI. For reconstruction of fxPET images, MRI-based attenuation correction was applied. The quality of fxPET images was visually assessed, and the number of detected lesions was compared between the 2 imaging methods. SUV max and maximum average SUV within a 1 cm 3 spheric volume (SUV peak ) of lesions were also compared. In addition, the magnitude of misregistration between fxPET and MR images was evaluated. Results: The image quality of fxPET was acceptable for diagnosis of malignant tumors. There was no significant difference in detectability of malignant lesions between fxPET and WB PET ( P > 0.05). However, the fxPET system did not exhibit superior performance to the WB PET system. There were strong positive correlations between the 2 imaging modalities in SUV max (ρ = 0.88) and SUV peak (ρ = 0.81). SUV max and SUV peak measured with fxPET were approximately 1.1-fold greater than measured with WB PET. The average misregistration between fxPET and MR images was 5.5 ± 3.4 mm. Conclusion: Our preliminary data indicate that running an fxPET scanner near an existing MRI system provides visually and quantitatively acceptable fused PET/MR images for diagnosis of malignant lesions. © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  10. Masked assessment of MRI findings: is it possible to differentiate neuro-Behcet`s disease from other central nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coban, O.; Bahar, S.; Akman-Demir, G.; Tasci, B.; Serdaroglu, P. [Univ. of Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Neurology; Yurdakul, S.; Yazici, H. [Univ. of Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Internal Medicine

    1999-04-01

    Two neuroradiologists reviewed MRI studies of 34 patients with neuro-Behcet`s disease (NBD), 22 with multiple sclerosis (MS) and 7 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with central nervous system involvement, masked to the clinical diagnosis, age and sex of the patients. Of the patients with NBD 12 were in an acute attack; the others had chronic disease. MRI was assessed using a set of criteria, looking at atrophy, the site of discrete parenchymal lesions, regions of predominant involvement and the extent of the lesion(s). The observers also made a guess at the clinical diagnosis. The brain stem and/or basal ganglia were the most predominantly involved sites in all patients with acute NBD; 75 % of these lesions were large and confluent, mainly extending from the brain stem to the diencephalon and basal ganglia. However, in chronic cases, the predominant involvement was in the brain stem and/or basal ganglia in only 36 %, and in cerebral hemisphere white matter in another 36 %; 27 % of these patients showed no parenchymal lesion. Hemisphere white-matter lesions were equally distributed between periventricular and other areas in NBD, while in MS more were periventricular, and in SLE more were nonperiventricular. Brain-stem atrophy was seen in 21 % of patients with NBD, with a specificity of 96.5 %. In the absence of cortical atrophy, its specificity was 100 %. The attempt at making a radiological diagnosis was successful in all cases of acute NBD and 95.5 % of patients with MS, but in only 40 % of patients with chronic NBD. Most of this latter groups MRI studies were interpreted as MS. An extensive lesion involving the brain stem and basal ganglia seemed to be diagnostic of acute NBD. However, hemisphere white-matter lesions could not be differentiated from those in MS. (orig.) With 3 figs., 6 tabs., 18 refs.

  11. Indications for body MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dujardin, M. [Department of Radiology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, BEFY, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: martine.dujardin@gmail.com; Vandenbroucke, F. [Department of Radiology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: frederik.vandenbroucke@az.vub.ac.be; Boulet, C. [Department of Radiology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: cedric.boulet@az.vub.ac.be; Op de Beeck, B. [Department of Radiology, UZA and Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: bart.op.de.beeck@uza.be; Mey, J. de [Department of Radiology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, BEFY, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: johan.demey@az.vub.ac.be

    2008-02-15

    The lack of ionizing radiation use in MRI makes the high spatial resolution technique very appealing. Also, the easy access to multiplanar imaging and the fact that gadolinium-DTPA is well tolerated and not nephrotoxic makes MRI a robust alternative in the healthy as well as the renal compromised patient. Furthermore, MRI adds advanced possibility for tissue characterization and pathology detection and dynamic imaging can be performed. Specific contrast agents specific to the hepatobiliary or the reticuloendothelial system can help with additional information in problem cases. The role of MRI for different organs is discussed and a review of the literature is given. We concluded that MRI is considered a useful and non-invasive diagnostic tool for the detection of hepatic iron concentration, to correct misdiagnosis (pseudolesions) from US and CT in focal steatosis and to help with focal lesion detection and characterization, in the healthy and especially in the cirrhotic liver, where MRI is superior to CT. Moreover, MRCP is excellent for identifying the presence and the level of biliary obstruction in malignant invasion and is considered in the literature as a non-invasive screening tool for common bile duct stones, appropriately selecting candidates for preoperative ERCP and sparing others the need for an endoscopic procedure with its associated complications. MRI is the first choice modality for adrenal evaluation in contemporary medical imaging. It is a useful examination in renal as well as splenic pathology and best assesses loco-regional staging, i.e. arterial involvement in pancreatic cancer.

  12. A fully automated system for quantification of background parenchymal enhancement in breast DCE-MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ufuk Dalmiş, Mehmet; Gubern-Mérida, Albert; Borelli, Cristina; Vreemann, Suzan; Mann, Ritse M.; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2016-03-01

    Background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) observed in breast dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has been identified as an important biomarker associated with risk for developing breast cancer. In this study, we present a fully automated framework for quantification of BPE. We initially segmented fibroglandular tissue (FGT) of the breasts using an improved version of an existing method. Subsequently, we computed BPEabs (volume of the enhancing tissue), BPErf (BPEabs divided by FGT volume) and BPErb (BPEabs divided by breast volume), using different relative enhancement threshold values between 1% and 100%. To evaluate and compare the previous and improved FGT segmentation methods, we used 20 breast DCE-MRI scans and we computed Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) values with respect to manual segmentations. For evaluation of the BPE quantification, we used a dataset of 95 breast DCE-MRI scans. Two radiologists, in individual reading sessions, visually analyzed the dataset and categorized each breast into minimal, mild, moderate and marked BPE. To measure the correlation between automated BPE values to the radiologists' assessments, we converted these values into ordinal categories and we used Spearman's rho as a measure of correlation. According to our results, the new segmentation method obtained an average DSC of 0.81 0.09, which was significantly higher (p<0.001) compared to the previous method (0.76 0.10). The highest correlation values between automated BPE categories and radiologists' assessments were obtained with the BPErf measurement (r=0.55, r=0.49, p<0.001 for both), while the correlation between the scores given by the two radiologists was 0.82 (p<0.001). The presented framework can be used to systematically investigate the correlation between BPE and risk in large screening cohorts.

  13. An MRI-Guided Telesurgery System Using a Fabry-Perot Interferometry Force Sensor and a Pneumatic Haptic Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hao; Shang, Weijian; Li, Gang; Patel, Niravkumar; Fischer, Gregory S

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a surgical master-slave teleoperation system for percutaneous interventional procedures under continuous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance. The slave robot consists of a piezoelectrically actuated 6-degree-of-freedom (DOF) robot for needle placement with an integrated fiber optic force sensor (1-DOF axial force measurement) using the Fabry-Perot interferometry (FPI) sensing principle; it is configured to operate inside the bore of the MRI scanner during imaging. By leveraging the advantages of pneumatic and piezoelectric actuation in force and position control respectively, we have designed a pneumatically actuated master robot (haptic device) with strain gauge based force sensing that is configured to operate the slave from within the scanner room during imaging. The slave robot follows the insertion motion of the haptic device while the haptic device displays the needle insertion force as measured by the FPI sensor. Image interference evaluation demonstrates that the telesurgery system presents a signal to noise ratio reduction of less than 17% and less than 1% geometric distortion during simultaneous robot motion and imaging. Teleoperated needle insertion and rotation experiments were performed to reach 10 targets in a soft tissue-mimicking phantom with 0.70 ± 0.35 mm Cartesian space error.

  14. SU-E-J-210: Characterizing Tissue Equivalent Materials for the Development of a Dual MRI-CT Heterogeneous Anthropomorphic Phantom Designed Specifically for MRI Guided Radiotherapy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinmann, A; Stafford, R; Yung, J; Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI guided radiotherapy (MRIgRT) is an emerging technology which will eventually require a proficient quality auditing system. Due to different principles in which MR and CT acquire images, there is a need for a multi-imaging-modality, end-to-end QA phantom for MRIgRT. The purpose of this study is to identify lung, soft tissue, and tumor equivalent substitutes that share similar human-like CT and MR properties (i.e. Hounsfield units and relaxation times). Methods: Materials of interested such as common CT QA phantom materials, and other proprietary gels/silicones from Polytek, SmoothOn, and CompositeOne were first scanned on a GE 1.5T Signa HDxT MR. Materials that could be seen on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images were then scanned on a GE Lightspeed RT16 CT simulator and a GE Discovery 750HD CT scanner and their HU values were then measured. The materials with matching HU values of lung (−500 to −700HU), muscle (+40HU) and soft tissue (+100 to +300HU) were further scanned on GE 1.5T Signa HDx to measure their T1 and T2 relaxation times from varying parameters of TI and TE. Results: Materials that could be visualized on T1-weighted and T2-weighted images from a 1.5T MR unit and had an appropriate average CT number, −650, −685, 46,169, and 168 HUs were: compressed cork saturated with water, Polytek Platsil™ Gel-00 combined with mini styrofoam balls, radiotherapy bolus material, SmoothOn Dragon-Skin™ and SmoothOn Ecoflex™, respectively. Conclusion: Post processing analysis is currently being performed to accurately map T1 and T2 values for each material tested. From previous MR visualization and CT examinations it is expected that Dragon-Skin™, Ecoflex™ and bolus will have values consistent with tissue and tumor substitutes. We also expect compressed cork statured with water, and Polytek™-styrofoam combination to have approximate T1 and T2 values suitable for lung-equivalent materials.

  15. SU-E-J-210: Characterizing Tissue Equivalent Materials for the Development of a Dual MRI-CT Heterogeneous Anthropomorphic Phantom Designed Specifically for MRI Guided Radiotherapy Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinmann, A; Stafford, R; Yung, J; Followill, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: MRI guided radiotherapy (MRIgRT) is an emerging technology which will eventually require a proficient quality auditing system. Due to different principles in which MR and CT acquire images, there is a need for a multi-imaging-modality, end-to-end QA phantom for MRIgRT. The purpose of this study is to identify lung, soft tissue, and tumor equivalent substitutes that share similar human-like CT and MR properties (i.e. Hounsfield units and relaxation times). Methods: Materials of interested such as common CT QA phantom materials, and other proprietary gels/silicones from Polytek, SmoothOn, and CompositeOne were first scanned on a GE 1.5T Signa HDxT MR. Materials that could be seen on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images were then scanned on a GE Lightspeed RT16 CT simulator and a GE Discovery 750HD CT scanner and their HU values were then measured. The materials with matching HU values of lung (−500 to −700HU), muscle (+40HU) and soft tissue (+100 to +300HU) were further scanned on GE 1.5T Signa HDx to measure their T1 and T2 relaxation times from varying parameters of TI and TE. Results: Materials that could be visualized on T1-weighted and T2-weighted images from a 1.5T MR unit and had an appropriate average CT number, −650, −685, 46,169, and 168 HUs were: compressed cork saturated with water, Polytek Platsil™ Gel-00 combined with mini styrofoam balls, radiotherapy bolus material, SmoothOn Dragon-Skin™ and SmoothOn Ecoflex™, respectively. Conclusion: Post processing analysis is currently being performed to accurately map T1 and T2 values for each material tested. From previous MR visualization and CT examinations it is expected that Dragon-Skin™, Ecoflex™ and bolus will have values consistent with tissue and tumor substitutes. We also expect compressed cork statured with water, and Polytek™-styrofoam combination to have approximate T1 and T2 values suitable for lung-equivalent materials

  16. Temperature mapping using proton phase shift on a 0.3 T permanent magnet open MRI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komura, Kazumi; Takahashi, Tetsuhiko; Dohi, Michiko; Harada, Junta

    2000-01-01

    Temperature mapping using proton phase shift (PPS) was evaluated for ex vivo objects. The evaluation was done on a 0.3 T permanent magnet open magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine, like those widely used for clinical diagnosis. Temperature maps were acquired using a gradient echo sequence (TR/TE =80/30 ms, flip angle =60 degrees, field of view =200 x 200 mm, slice thickness =8 mm, matrix size =128 x 128, data acquisition number =1, and imaging time =10.2 s). Specific first order data correction was performed to eliminate calculated temperature fluctuation due to magnetic field instability. A ham, 10 cm in diameter, was heated with a Nd: YAG laser with a wavelength of 1064 nm. The laser fiber was inserted into the ham to a depth of 3 cm. The laser power was 5, 8, or 10 W. Magnetic resonance images were taken continually during and after irradiation. Temperature maps were taken every 15 s. The maps taken during laser ablation showed color changes for the heated areas. Temperatures measured by the MRI and thermocouple had a linear relationship of r 2 =0.80. The inter-image standard deviation of the temperature maps of a non-heated object was 2.07 degrees for a 4.68 x 4.68 x 8 mm volume. This value is negligible for a monitored laser heating process since temperature rise is typically larger than 30 degrees. These results show that temperature mapping based on PPS is feasible for a 0.3 T permanent magnet open MRI system. (author)

  17. Optimizing a machine learning based glioma grading system using multi-parametric MRI histogram and texture features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Yan, Lin-Feng; Hu, Yu-Chuan; Li, Gang; Yang, Yang; Han, Yu; Sun, Ying-Zhi; Liu, Zhi-Cheng; Tian, Qiang; Han, Zi-Yang; Liu, Le-De; Hu, Bin-Quan; Qiu, Zi-Yu; Wang, Wen; Cui, Guang-Bin

    2017-07-18

    Current machine learning techniques provide the opportunity to develop noninvasive and automated glioma grading tools, by utilizing quantitative parameters derived from multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. However, the efficacies of different machine learning methods in glioma grading have not been investigated.A comprehensive comparison of varied machine learning methods in differentiating low-grade gliomas (LGGs) and high-grade gliomas (HGGs) as well as WHO grade II, III and IV gliomas based on multi-parametric MRI images was proposed in the current study. The parametric histogram and image texture attributes of 120 glioma patients were extracted from the perfusion, diffusion and permeability parametric maps of preoperative MRI. Then, 25 commonly used machine learning classifiers combined with 8 independent attribute selection methods were applied and evaluated using leave-one-out cross validation (LOOCV) strategy. Besides, the influences of parameter selection on the classifying performances were investigated. We found that support vector machine (SVM) exhibited superior performance to other classifiers. By combining all tumor attributes with synthetic minority over-sampling technique (SMOTE), the highest classifying accuracy of 0.945 or 0.961 for LGG and HGG or grade II, III and IV gliomas was achieved. Application of Recursive Feature Elimination (RFE) attribute selection strategy further improved the classifying accuracies. Besides, the performances of LibSVM, SMO, IBk classifiers were influenced by some key parameters such as kernel type, c, gama, K, etc. SVM is a promising tool in developing automated preoperative glioma grading system, especially when being combined with RFE strategy. Model parameters should be considered in glioma grading model optimization.

  18. Analysis of task-evoked systemic interference in fNIRS measurements: insights from fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdoğan, Sinem B; Yücel, Meryem A; Akın, Ata

    2014-02-15

    Functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a promising method for monitoring cerebral hemodynamics with a wide range of clinical applications. fNIRS signals are contaminated with systemic physiological interferences from both the brain and superficial tissues, resulting in a poor estimation of the task related neuronal activation. In this study, we use the anatomical resolution of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to extract scalp and brain vascular signals separately and construct an optically weighted spatial average of the fMRI blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal for characterizing the scalp signal contribution to fNIRS measurements. We introduce an extended superficial signal regression (ESSR) method for canceling physiology-based systemic interference where the effects of cerebral and superficial systemic interference are treated separately. We apply and validate our method on the optically weighted BOLD signals, which are obtained by projecting the fMRI image onto optical measurement space by use of the optical forward problem. The performance of ESSR method in removing physiological artifacts is compared to i) a global signal regression (GSR) method and ii) a superficial signal regression (SSR) method. The retrieved signals from each method are compared with the neural signals that represent the 'ground truth' brain activation cleaned from cerebral systemic fluctuations. We report significant improvements in the recovery of task induced neural activation with the ESSR method when compared to the other two methods as reflected in the Pearson R(2) coefficient and mean square error (MSE) metrics (two tailed paired t-tests, pnoise (CNR) improvement (60%). Our findings suggest that, during a cognitive task i) superficial scalp signal contribution to fNIRS signals varies significantly among different regions on the forehead and ii) using an average scalp measurement together with a local measure of superficial hemodynamics better accounts

  19. MRI Primer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldendorf, W.; Oldendorf, W. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Designed for studies, radiologists, and clinicians at all levels of training, this book provides a basic introduction to the principles, physics, and instrumentation of magnetic resonance imaging. The fundamental concepts that are essential for the optimal clinical use of MRI are thoroughly explained in easily accessible terms. To facilitate the reader's comprehension, the material is presented nonmathematically, using no equations and a minimum of symbols and abbreviations. MRI Primer presents a clear account of the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and the use of gradient magnetic fields to create clinically useful images of cross-sectional slices. Close attention is given to the magnetization vector as a means of expressing nuclear behavior, the role of T 1 and T 2 weighing in imaging, the use of contrast agents, and the pulse sequences most often used in clinical practice, as well as to the relative capabilities and limitations of MRI and CT. The basic hardware components of an MRI scanner are described in detail. Sample MRI scans illustrate how MRI characterizes tissue. An appendix provides a brief introduction to quantum processes in MRI

  20. MRI of the fetal abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoermann, M.; Brugger, P.C.; Witzani, L.; Prayer, D.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important diagnostic component for central nervous system and thoracic diseases during fetal development. Although ultrasound remains the method of choice for observing the fetus during pregnancy, fetal MRI is being increasingly used as an additional technique for the accurate diagnosis of abdominal diseases. Recent publications confirm the value of MRI in the diagnosis of fetal gastrointestinal tract and urogenital system diseases. The following report provides an overview of MRI-examination techniques for the most frequent diseases of the abdomen. (orig.) [de

  1. Early perfusion changes within 1 week of systemic treatment measured by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI may predict survival in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Bang-Bin; Yu, Chih-Wei; Liang, Po-Chin [National Taiwan University College of Medicine and Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiology, Taipei City (China); Hsu, Chao-Yu [National Taiwan University College of Medicine and Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiology, Taipei City (China); Taipei Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Department of Radiology, New Taipei City (China); Hsu, Chiun; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Cheng, Ann-Lii [National Taiwan University College of Medicine and Hospital, Department of Oncology, Taipei City (China); Shih, Tiffany Ting-Fang [National Taiwan University College of Medicine and Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiology, Taipei City (China); Taipei City Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei City (China); National Taiwan University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei (China)

    2017-07-15

    To correlate early changes in the parameters of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) within 1 week of systemic therapy with overall survival (OS) in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Eighty-nine patients with advanced HCC underwent DCE-MRI before and within 1 week following systemic therapy. The relative changes of six DCE-MRI parameters (Peak, Slope, AUC, Ktrans, Kep and Ve) of the tumours were correlated with OS using the Kaplan-Meier model and the double-sided log-rank test. All patients died and the median survival was 174 days. Among the six DCE-MRI parameters, reductions in Peak, AUC, and Ktrans, were significantly correlated with one another. In addition, patients with a high Peak reduction following treatment had longer OS (P = 0.023) compared with those with a low Peak reduction. In multivariate analysis, a high Peak reduction was an independent favourable prognostic factor in all patients [hazard ratio (HR), 0.622; P = 0.038] after controlling for age, sex, treatment methods, tumour size and stage, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status. Early perfusion changes within 1 week following systemic therapy measured by DCE-MRI may aid in the prediction of the clinical outcome in patients with advanced HCC. (orig.)

  2. An open-source hardware and software system for acquisition and real-time processing of electrophysiology during high field MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdon, Patrick L; Millan, Hernan; Fuller, Peter L; Bonmassar, Giorgio

    2008-11-15

    Simultaneous recording of electrophysiology and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a technique of growing importance in neuroscience. Rapidly evolving clinical and scientific requirements have created a need for hardware and software that can be customized for specific applications. Hardware may require customization to enable a variety of recording types (e.g., electroencephalogram, local field potentials, or multi-unit activity) while meeting the stringent and costly requirements of MRI safety and compatibility. Real-time signal processing tools are an enabling technology for studies of learning, attention, sleep, epilepsy, neurofeedback, and neuropharmacology, yet real-time signal processing tools are difficult to develop. We describe an open-source system for simultaneous electrophysiology and fMRI featuring low-noise (tested up to 7T), and user-programmable real-time signal processing. The hardware distribution provides the complete specifications required to build an MRI-compatible electrophysiological data acquisition system, including circuit schematics, print circuit board (PCB) layouts, Gerber files for PCB fabrication and robotic assembly, a bill of materials with part numbers, data sheets, and vendor information, and test procedures. The software facilitates rapid implementation of real-time signal processing algorithms. This system has been used in human EEG/fMRI studies at 3 and 7T examining the auditory system, visual system, sleep physiology, and anesthesia, as well as in intracranial electrophysiological studies of the non-human primate visual system during 3T fMRI, and in human hyperbaric physiology studies at depths of up to 300 feet below sea level.

  3. A wavelet-based regularized reconstruction algorithm for SENSE parallel MRI with applications to neuroimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaari, L.; Pesquet, J.Ch.; Chaari, L.; Ciuciu, Ph.; Benazza-Benyahia, A.

    2011-01-01

    To reduce scanning time and/or improve spatial/temporal resolution in some Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) applications, parallel MRI acquisition techniques with multiple coils acquisition have emerged since the early 1990's as powerful imaging methods that allow a faster acquisition process. In these techniques, the full FOV image has to be reconstructed from the resulting acquired under sampled k-space data. To this end, several reconstruction techniques have been proposed such as the widely-used Sensitivity Encoding (SENSE) method. However, the reconstructed image generally presents artifacts when perturbations occur in both the measured data and the estimated coil sensitivity profiles. In this paper, we aim at achieving accurate image reconstruction under degraded experimental conditions (low magnetic field and high reduction factor), in which neither the SENSE method nor the Tikhonov regularization in the image domain give convincing results. To this end, we present a novel method for SENSE-based reconstruction which proceeds with regularization in the complex wavelet domain by promoting sparsity. The proposed approach relies on a fast algorithm that enables the minimization of regularized non-differentiable criteria including more general penalties than a classical l 1 term. To further enhance the reconstructed image quality, local convex constraints are added to the regularization process. In vivo human brain experiments carried out on Gradient-Echo (GRE) anatomical and Echo Planar Imaging (EPI) functional MRI data at 1.5 T indicate that our algorithm provides reconstructed images with reduced artifacts for high reduction factors. (authors)

  4. Development of Laser-Polarized Noble Gas Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2004-01-01

    We are developing technology for laser-polarized noble gas nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with the aim of enabling it as a novel biomedical imaging tool for ground-based and eventually space-based application. This emerging multidisciplinary technology enables high-resolution gas-space magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-e.g., of lung ventilation, perfusion, and gas-exchange. In addition, laser-polarized noble gases (3He and 1BXe) do not require a large magnetic field for sensitive NMR detection, opening the door to practical MRI with novel, open-access magnet designs at very low magnetic fields (and hence in confined spaces). We are pursuing two specific aims in this technology development program. The first aim is to develop an open-access, low-field (less than 0.01 T) instrument for MRI studies of human gas inhalation as a function of subject orientation, and the second aim is to develop functional imaging of the lung using laser-polarized He-3 and Xe-129.

  5. Flagellated Magnetotactic Bacteria as Controlled MRI-trackable Propulsion and Steering Systems for Medical Nanorobots Operating in the Human Microvasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Sylvain; Mohammadi, Mahmood; Felfoul, Ouajdi; Lu, Zhao; Pouponneau, Pierre

    2009-04-01

    Although nanorobots may play critical roles for many applications in the human body such as targeting tumoral lesions for therapeutic purposes, miniaturization of the power source with an effective onboard controllable propulsion and steering system have prevented the implementation of such mobile robots. Here, we show that the flagellated nanomotors combined with the nanometer-sized magnetosomes of a single Magnetotactic Bacterium (MTB) can be used as an effective integrated propulsion and steering system for devices such as nanorobots designed for targeting locations only accessible through the smallest capillaries in humans while being visible for tracking and monitoring purposes using modern medical imaging modalities such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Through directional and magnetic field intensities, the displacement speeds, directions, and behaviors of swarms of these bacterial actuators can be controlled from an external computer.

  6. MRI pattern of arthritis in systemic lupus erythematosus: a comparative study with rheumatoid arthritis and healthy subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tani, Chiara; Possemato, Niccolo; Delle Sedie, Andrea; Bombardieri, Stefano; Mosca, Marta [University of Pisa, Rheumatology Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pisa (Italy); D' aniello, Dario; Caramella, Davide [Radiology Unit, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2014-10-24

    In this study we aimed to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pattern of the distribution of bone marrow edema (BME) and joint erosion in hands and wrists of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with arthritis in comparison with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and healthy subjects (H). SLE patients with arthritis (n = 50), patients with RA (n = 22), and H (n = 48) were enrolled. Every patient underwent a non-dominant hand (2nd-5th metacarpophalangeal joints) and wrist MRI without contrast injection with a low-field extremity dedicated 0.2-Tesla instrument. BME was observed in two SLE patients in the hand (4 %) and in 15 in the wrist (13 %) versus three (30 %), and 14 (63 %) RA patients. No BME was found in H. Erosions were observed in the hand in 24 SLE patients (48 %), 15 RA patients (68 %), and 9 H (18 %); in the wrist, in 41 (82 %) SLE, all RA and 47 (97 %) H. The cumulative erosive burden in SLE was significantly higher than in H (c = 0.002) but similar to RA patients. Joint involvement of the wrist in SLE is similar to RA and is not as rare as expected, as shown by the comparison with healthy subjects. On the contrary, the involvement of the hand in SLE is significantly lower compared to RA. (orig.)

  7. MRI pattern of arthritis in systemic lupus erythematosus: a comparative study with rheumatoid arthritis and healthy subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Chiara; Possemato, Niccolo; Delle Sedie, Andrea; Bombardieri, Stefano; Mosca, Marta; D'aniello, Dario; Caramella, Davide

    2015-01-01

    In this study we aimed to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pattern of the distribution of bone marrow edema (BME) and joint erosion in hands and wrists of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with arthritis in comparison with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and healthy subjects (H). SLE patients with arthritis (n = 50), patients with RA (n = 22), and H (n = 48) were enrolled. Every patient underwent a non-dominant hand (2nd-5th metacarpophalangeal joints) and wrist MRI without contrast injection with a low-field extremity dedicated 0.2-Tesla instrument. BME was observed in two SLE patients in the hand (4 %) and in 15 in the wrist (13 %) versus three (30 %), and 14 (63 %) RA patients. No BME was found in H. Erosions were observed in the hand in 24 SLE patients (48 %), 15 RA patients (68 %), and 9 H (18 %); in the wrist, in 41 (82 %) SLE, all RA and 47 (97 %) H. The cumulative erosive burden in SLE was significantly higher than in H (c = 0.002) but similar to RA patients. Joint involvement of the wrist in SLE is similar to RA and is not as rare as expected, as shown by the comparison with healthy subjects. On the contrary, the involvement of the hand in SLE is significantly lower compared to RA. (orig.)

  8. Flip angle modulations in late phase Gd-EOB-DTPA MRI improve the identification of the biliary system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelter, Lars, E-mail: lars.stelter@charite.de [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Grieser, Christian, E-mail: christian.grieser@charite.de [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Fernandes, Carmen Maria Perez, E-mail: carmen.perez-fernandez@charite.de [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Rothe, Jan Holger, E-mail: jan-holger.rothe@charite.de [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Streitparth, Florian, E-mail: florian.streitparth@charite.de [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Seehofer, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.seehofer@charite.de [Klinik fuer Allgemein-, Viszeral- und Transplantationschirurgie, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); and others

    2012-11-15

    Objectives: To assess the improvement of bile duct visualization in Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced MR-cholangiography (EOB-MRC) by using an increased flip angle. Methods: 35 patients underwent Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced MRI of the liver including T2-weighted MRCP and hepatobiliary phase EOB-MRC using a flip angle of 10 Degree-Sign (FA10) and of 35 Degree-Sign (FA35), respectively. Images were evaluated regarding the delineation of biliary ducts, the order of branching and anatomic visualization of the biliary tree. ROI analysis was performed to estimate the signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios. Results: Applying the FA35 resulted in a significantly better SNR and CNR as compared to FA10. The overall image quality was rated as good for both, FA10 and FA35. The overall rating for regional delineation of the biliary system was rated significantly better for FA35 than for FA10 (p = 0.02). Classification of bile duct anatomy variations, however, was equivalent in both techniques. Conclusions: Increasing the flip angle of a T1-weighted 3D-sequence from 10 Degree-Sign to 35 Degree-Sign during the hepatobiliary phase of Gd-EOB enhanced MRI visually and quantitatively improved the visualization of the biliary ducts.

  9. A novel computer-aided diagnosis system for breast MRI based on feature selection and ensemble learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Li, Zhe; Chu, Jinghui

    2017-04-01

    Breast cancer is a common cancer among women. With the development of modern medical science and information technology, medical imaging techniques have an increasingly important role in the early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. In this paper, we propose an automated computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) framework for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The scheme consists of an ensemble of several machine learning-based techniques, including ensemble under-sampling (EUS) for imbalanced data processing, the Relief algorithm for feature selection, the subspace method for providing data diversity, and Adaboost for improving the performance of base classifiers. We extracted morphological, various texture, and Gabor features. To clarify the feature subsets' physical meaning, subspaces are built by combining morphological features with each kind of texture or Gabor feature. We tested our proposal using a manually segmented Region of Interest (ROI) data set, which contains 438 images of malignant tumors and 1898 images of normal tissues or benign tumors. Our proposal achieves an area under the ROC curve (AUC) value of 0.9617, which outperforms most other state-of-the-art breast MRI CADx systems. Compared with other methods, our proposal significantly reduces the false-positive classification rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A test material for tissue characterisation and system calibration in MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, P.M.; Lerski, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    A tissue-equivalent test material for MR1 has been produced from a polysaccharide gel, agarose, containing gadolinium chloride chelated to EDTA. By varying the amounts of each constituent, the T 1 and T 2 of the material can be varied independently. As a result, the entire range of in vivo tissue relaxation times can be covered. Through the mathematical modelling of the 1 H relaxation theories for both the gel and chelated paramagnetic ion, it has been possible to create a material with relaxation properties and behaviour predictable as functions of both the Larmor frequency and temperature. The similarity of the material to in vivo tissues, in terms of its biological and physical NMR characteristics, makes it an excellent tissue-equivalent substance, in addition to being an accurate calibration standard for routine MRI. (author)

  11. MRI-guided robotic system for transperineal prostate interventions: proof of principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Bosch, Michiel R; Moman, Maaike R; Van Vulpen, Marco; Battermann, Jan J; Lagendijk, Jan J W; Moerland, Marinus A; Duiveman, Ed; Van Schelven, Leonard J; De Leeuw, Hendrik

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the proof of principle of the University Medical Center Utrecht (UMCU) robot dedicated to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided interventions in patients. The UMCU robot consists of polymers and non-ferromagnetic materials. For transperineal prostate interventions, it can be placed between the patient's legs inside a closed bore 1.5T MR scanner. The robot can manually be translated and rotated resulting in five degrees of freedom. It contains a pneumatically driven tapping device to automatically insert a needle stepwise into the prostate using a controller unit outside the scanning room. To define the target positions and to verify the needle insertion point and the needle trajectory, a high-resolution 3D balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP) scan that provides a T2/T1-weighted contrast is acquired. During the needle insertion fast 2D bSSFP images are generated to track the needle on-line. When the target position is reached, the radiation oncologist manually places a fiducial gold marker (small seed) at this location. In total two needle trajectories are used to place all markers. Afterwards, a high-resolution 3D bSSFP scan is acquired to visualize the fiducial gold markers. Four fiducial gold markers were placed transperineally into the prostate of a patient with a clinical stage T3 prostate cancer. In the generated scans, it was possible to discriminate the patient's anatomy, the needle and the markers. All markers were delivered inside the prostate. The procedure time was 1.5 h. This study proves that MRI-guided needle placement and seed delivery in the prostate with the UMCU robot are feasible. (note)

  12. Sextant localization of prostate cancer in peripheral zone by MRI: correlation with systemic biopsy pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Rong; Wang Xiaoying; Li Feiyu; Xu Yufeng; Jiang Xuexiang; He Yunfeng; Liu Pengcheng

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy of sextant localization of prostate cancer (PCa) in PZ (peripheral zone) by MR Imaging. Methods: Fifty-one cases of PCa and 29 cases of benign prostate diseases were enrolled in the study. Each peripheral zone was divided into 6 sections (left/right bottom, middle and tip ) in the same fashion for biopsy and the characteristics of each sextant was evaluated separately. Being blinded to clinical data, 2 radiologists with different subspeciahy experience analyzed MR images of the 480 sections of these 80 cases retrospectively. Each sextant region impression of likelihood for cancer was estimated by the rank of a five-point rating scale (1=definite PCa, 2=probable PCa, 3=possible PCa, 4=probably not PCa, 5=definitely not PCa). If definite PCa was considered, then it was staged furthermore. Each diagnosis of sextant region was compared with the pathological result of corresponding biopsy site. Result: (1) Four hundred and seventy sections (205 cancerous and 265 benign) were proved by biopsy. The diagnosis efficacy was best when cutoff point was 2. There was moderate consistency between the results of MRI and pathology with the kappa value of 0.549-0.560. The total accuracy was 78.1%-78.3% with the sensitivity of 69.3%-76.1% and the specificity of 84.9%-80.0%. The positive predictive value was 78.0%-74.6% and the negative predictive value was 78.1%-81.2%. (2) The ROC analysis demonstrated that Az with total impression recorded by two readers had not significant difference(0.829±0.020 vs. 0.840±0.019, U=-0.3988, P>0.05). Conclusion: MRI may be an elementary way to localize PCa in PZ, but the diagnosis efficacy need to be improved furthermore. (authors)

  13. MRI-guided robotic system for transperineal prostate interventions: proof of principle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van den Bosch, Michiel R; Moman, Maaike R; Van Vulpen, Marco; Battermann, Jan J; Lagendijk, Jan J W; Moerland, Marinus A [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX, Utrecht (Netherlands); Duiveman, Ed; Van Schelven, Leonard J [Medical Technology and Clinical Physics, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX, Utrecht (Netherlands); De Leeuw, Hendrik [Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX, Utrecht (Netherlands)], E-mail: M.R.vandenBosch@umcutrecht.nl

    2010-03-07

    In this study, we demonstrate the proof of principle of the University Medical Center Utrecht (UMCU) robot dedicated to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided interventions in patients. The UMCU robot consists of polymers and non-ferromagnetic materials. For transperineal prostate interventions, it can be placed between the patient's legs inside a closed bore 1.5T MR scanner. The robot can manually be translated and rotated resulting in five degrees of freedom. It contains a pneumatically driven tapping device to automatically insert a needle stepwise into the prostate using a controller unit outside the scanning room. To define the target positions and to verify the needle insertion point and the needle trajectory, a high-resolution 3D balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP) scan that provides a T2/T1-weighted contrast is acquired. During the needle insertion fast 2D bSSFP images are generated to track the needle on-line. When the target position is reached, the radiation oncologist manually places a fiducial gold marker (small seed) at this location. In total two needle trajectories are used to place all markers. Afterwards, a high-resolution 3D bSSFP scan is acquired to visualize the fiducial gold markers. Four fiducial gold markers were placed transperineally into the prostate of a patient with a clinical stage T3 prostate cancer. In the generated scans, it was possible to discriminate the patient's anatomy, the needle and the markers. All markers were delivered inside the prostate. The procedure time was 1.5 h. This study proves that MRI-guided needle placement and seed delivery in the prostate with the UMCU robot are feasible. (note)

  14. Head MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hearing aids Pins, hairpins, metal zippers, and similar metallic items Removable dental work How the Test will ... an MRI can make heart pacemakers and other implants not work as well. It can also cause ...

  15. Pediatric MRI

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIH Study of Normal Brain Development is a longitudinal study using anatomical MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS) to map pediatric...

  16. The Multiple-Demand System in the Novelty of Musical Improvisation: Evidence from an MRI Study on Composers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Yang, Hua; He, Hui; Jeon, Seun; Hou, Changyue; Evans, Alan C; Yao, Dezhong

    2017-01-01

    The multiple-demand (MD) system has proven to be associated with creating structured mental programs in comprehensive behaviors, but the functional mechanisms of this system have not been clarified in the musical domain. In this study, we explored the hypothesis that the MD system is involved in a comprehensive music-related behavior known as musical improvisation. Under a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) paradigm, 29 composers were recruited to improvise melodies through visual imagery tasks according to familiar and unfamiliar cues. We found that the main regions of the MD system were significantly activated during both musical improvisation conditions. However, only a greater involvement of the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) within the MD system was shown when improvising with unfamiliar cues. Our results revealed that the MD system strongly participated in musical improvisation through processing the novelty of melodies, working memory, and attention. In particular, improvising with unfamiliar cues required more musical transposition manipulations. Moreover, both functional and structural analyses indicated evidence of neuroplasticity in MD regions that could be associated with musical improvisation training. These findings can help unveil the functional mechanisms of the MD system in musical cognition, as well as improve our understanding of musical improvisation.

  17. Brain unidentified bright objects ("UBO") in systemic lupus erythematosus: sometimes they come back. A study of microembolism by cMRI and Transcranial Doppler ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoluzzi, A; Padovan, M; Azzini, C; De Vito, A; Trotta, F; Govoni, M

    2016-02-01

    The objectives of this report are to assess the occurrence of microembolic signals (MES) detected by transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with (NPSLE) and without (SLE) neuropsychiatric involvement, and to verify the correlation between MES, clinical characteristics, especially the patent foramen ovale (PFO), and the presence of punctuate T2-hyperintense white matter lesions (WMHLs) detected by conventional magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI). A TCD registration to detect MES from the middle cerebral artery was carried out in SLE and NPSLE patients after exclusion of aortic and/or carotid atheromatous disease. In all patients conventional brain magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) and transesophageal echocardiography were performed. Patients were stratified in two groups, with and without WMHLs, and compared. Twenty-three SLE patients (16 NPSLE and seven SLE) were enrolled in the study. Overall MES were detected in 12 patients (52.1%), WHMLs were detectable in 15 patients (13 NPSLE and two SLE) while eight patients had normal cMRI (three NPSLE and five SLE). Matching TCD ultrasound and neuroimaging data, MES were detected in 10 (nine NPSLE and one SLE) out of 15 patients with WHMLs and in only two out of eight patients (two NPSLE and six SLE) with normal cMRI, both with NP involvement. A PFO was confirmed in all cases of MES detection. MES are frequent findings in SLE patients, especially in those with focal WMHLs detected by cMRI and correlating with PFO. These findings should be taken into account and suggest caution in the interpretation of cMRI pictures along with a careful evaluation of MES in patients with cMRI abnormalities that should be included in the workup of SLE patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Repeatability of magnetic resonance fingerprinting T1 and T2 estimates assessed using the ISMRM/NIST MRI system phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yun; Ma, Dan; Keenan, Kathryn E; Stupic, Karl F; Gulani, Vikas; Griswold, Mark A

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate accuracy and repeatability of T 1 and T 2 estimates of a MR fingerprinting (MRF) method using the ISMRM/NIST MRI system phantom. The ISMRM/NIST MRI system phantom contains multiple compartments with standardized T 1 , T 2 , and proton density values. Conventional inversion-recovery spin echo and spin echo methods were used to characterize the T 1 and T 2 values in the phantom. The phantom was scanned using the MRF-FISP method over 34 consecutive days. The mean T 1 and T 2 values were compared with the values from the spin echo methods. The repeatability was characterized as the coefficient of variation of the measurements over 34 days. T 1 and T 2 values from MRF-FISP over 34 days showed a strong linear correlation with the measurements from the spin echo methods (R 2  = 0.999 for T 1 ; R 2  = 0.996 for T 2 ). The MRF estimates over the wide ranges of T 1 and T 2 values have less than 5% variation, except for the shortest T 2 relaxation times where the method still maintains less than 8% variation. MRF measurements of T 1 and T 2 are highly repeatable over time and across wide ranges of T 1 and T 2 values. Magn Reson Med 78:1452-1457, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  19. Parallel processing in the brain’s visual form system: An fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihito eShigihara

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We here extend and complement our earlier time-based, magneto-encephalographic (MEG, study of the processing of forms by the visual brain (Shigihara and Zeki, 2013 with a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study, in order to better localize the activity produced in early visual areas when subjects view simple geometric stimuli of increasing perceptual complexity (lines, angles, rhomboids constituted from the same elements (lines. Our results show that all three categories of form activate all three visual areas with which we were principally concerned (V1, V2, V3, with angles producing the strongest and rhomboids the weakest activity in all three. The difference between the activity produced by angles and rhomboids was significant, that between lines and rhomboids was trend significant while that between lines and angles was not. Taken together with our earlier MEG results, the present ones suggest that a parallel strategy is used in processing forms, in addition to the well-documented hierarchical strategy.

  20. The distributed neural system for top-down letter processing: an fMRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiangang; Feng, Lu; Li, Ling; Tian, Jie

    2011-03-01

    This fMRI study used Psychophysiological interaction (PPI) to investigate top-down letter processing with an illusory letter detection task. After an initial training that became increasingly difficult, participant was instructed to detect a letter from pure noise images where there was actually no letter. Such experimental paradigm allowed for isolating top-down components of letter processing and minimizing the influence of bottom-up perceptual input. A distributed cortical network of top-down letter processing was identified by analyzing the functional connectivity patterns of letter-preferential area (LA) within the left fusiform gyrus. Such network extends from the visual cortex to high level cognitive cortexes, including the left middle frontal gyrus, left medial frontal gyrus, left superior parietal gyrus, bilateral precuneus, and left inferior occipital gyrus. These findings suggest that top-down letter processing contains not only regions for processing of letter phonology and appearance, but also those involved in internal information generation and maintenance, and attention and memory processing.

  1. Predictive value of semi-quantitative MRI-based scoring systems for future knee replacement: data from the osteoarthritis initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Eng, John; Demehri, Shadpour; Zikria, Bashir; Carrino, John A.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate, in a confirmatory fashion, whether baseline and change from baseline to 24-month follow-up in cartilage damage, bone marrow lesions and meniscal damage are predictors of knee replacement (KR) in subjects with a high risk of osteoarthritis (OA), independent of the level of physical activity, symptom severity and radiographic abnormalities. Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative's (OAI) baseline and 24-month follow-up knee MRIs of 115 patients (age range: 45-78 years; 48 % female; BMI: 20.9-48.7) were analyzed. Cartilage, bone marrow and menisci were semi-quantitatively scored according to the Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (WORMS) and Boston-Leeds Osteoarthritis Knee Score (BLOKS) systems in all compartments. Baseline and 24-month interval changes in structural tissue damage assessed by BLOKS and WORMS were used as predictors of KR independent of clinical and radiographic parameters using Cox hazard analysis. Adjustments were performed for age, gender, BMI and physical activity (Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly: PASE), Western Ontario and McMaster Questionnaire (WOMAC) total score and radiographic Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) score. BLOKS and WORMS baseline cartilage scores were predictors of KR independent of the PASE, WOMAC and KL score. One score increase in the average baseline BLOKS full-thickness cartilage defect score was associated with a [hazard ratio (95 % CI)] 13.55 (3.61-50.89) times greater risk of KR independent of the PASE, WOMAC and KL score. Net reclassification improvements (NRIs) of the additional evaluation of 24-month follow-up MRI scores and assessment of changes were not significant for prediction of KR (NRI range: - 7.23 - 24.8 %). The BLOKS cartilage score for full-thickness cartilage defects had the highest hazard for KR. Follow-up MRI changes in structural tissue damage, detected by BLOKS and WORMS cartilage, bone marrow or meniscus scores (up to 24 months) had no significant predictive value in addition

  2. Predictive value of semi-quantitative MRI-based scoring systems for future knee replacement: data from the osteoarthritis initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Eng, John; Demehri, Shadpour [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Musculoskeletal Radiology, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Zikria, Bashir [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Baltimore, MD (United States); Carrino, John A. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Radiology and Imaging, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-11-15

    To evaluate, in a confirmatory fashion, whether baseline and change from baseline to 24-month follow-up in cartilage damage, bone marrow lesions and meniscal damage are predictors of knee replacement (KR) in subjects with a high risk of osteoarthritis (OA), independent of the level of physical activity, symptom severity and radiographic abnormalities. Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative's (OAI) baseline and 24-month follow-up knee MRIs of 115 patients (age range: 45-78 years; 48 % female; BMI: 20.9-48.7) were analyzed. Cartilage, bone marrow and menisci were semi-quantitatively scored according to the Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (WORMS) and Boston-Leeds Osteoarthritis Knee Score (BLOKS) systems in all compartments. Baseline and 24-month interval changes in structural tissue damage assessed by BLOKS and WORMS were used as predictors of KR independent of clinical and radiographic parameters using Cox hazard analysis. Adjustments were performed for age, gender, BMI and physical activity (Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly: PASE), Western Ontario and McMaster Questionnaire (WOMAC) total score and radiographic Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) score. BLOKS and WORMS baseline cartilage scores were predictors of KR independent of the PASE, WOMAC and KL score. One score increase in the average baseline BLOKS full-thickness cartilage defect score was associated with a [hazard ratio (95 % CI)] 13.55 (3.61-50.89) times greater risk of KR independent of the PASE, WOMAC and KL score. Net reclassification improvements (NRIs) of the additional evaluation of 24-month follow-up MRI scores and assessment of changes were not significant for prediction of KR (NRI range: - 7.23 - 24.8 %). The BLOKS cartilage score for full-thickness cartilage defects had the highest hazard for KR. Follow-up MRI changes in structural tissue damage, detected by BLOKS and WORMS cartilage, bone marrow or meniscus scores (up to 24 months) had no significant predictive value in addition

  3. A study of usefulness for the plan based on only MRI using ViewRay MRIdian system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Chang Woo; Lee, Ho Jin; An, Beom Seok; Kim, Chan Young; Lee, Je Hee

    2015-01-01

    By comparing a CT fusion plan based on MRI with a plan based on only MRI without CT, we intended to study usefulness of a plan based on only MRI. And furthermore, we intended to realize a realtime MR-IGRT by MRI image without CT scan during the course of simulation, treatment planning, and radiation treatment. BBB CT (Brilliance Big Bore CT, 16slice, Philips), Viewray MRIdian system (Viewray, USA) were used for CT and MR simulation and Treatment plan of 11 patients (1 Head and Neck, 5 Breast, 1 Lung, 3 Liver, 1 Prostate). When scanning for treatment, Free Breathing was enacted for Head and Neck, Breast, Prostate and Inhalation Breathing Holding for Lung and Liver. Considering the difference of size between CT and Viewray, the patient's position and devices were in the same condition. Using Viewray MRIdian system, two treatment plans were established. The one was CT fusion treatment plan based on MR image. Another was MR treatment plan including electron density that [ICRU 46] recommend for Lung, Air and Bone. For Head and Neck, Breast and Prostate, IMRT was established and for Lung and Liver, Gating treatment plan was established. PTV's Homogeneity Index(HI) and Conformity Index(CI) were use to estimate the treatment plan. And DVH and dose difference of each PTV and OAR were compared to estimate the treatment plan. Between the two treatment plan, each difference of PTV's HI value is 0.089% (Head and Neck), 0.26% (Breast), 0.67% (Lung), 0.2% (Liver), 0.4% (Prostate) and in case of CI, 0.043% (Head and Neck), 0.84% (Breast), 0.68% (Lung), 0.46% (Liver), 0.3% (Prostate). As showed above, it is on Head and Neck that HI and CI's difference value is smallest. Each difference of average dose on PTV is 0.07 Gy (Head and Neck), 0.29 Gy (Breast), 0.18 Gy (Lung), 0.3 Gy (Liver), 0.18 Gy (Prostate). And by percentage, it is 0.06% (Head and Neck), 0.7% (Breast), 0.29% (Lung), 0.69% (Liver), 0.44% (Prostate). Likewise, All is under 1%. In Head and Neck

  4. Case Study of Ecstatic Meditation: fMRI and EEG Evidence of Self-Stimulating a Reward System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Hagerty

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the first neural recording during ecstatic meditations called jhanas and test whether a brain reward system plays a role in the joy reported. Jhanas are Altered States of Consciousness (ASC that imply major brain changes based on subjective reports: (1 external awareness dims, (2 internal verbalizations fade, (3 the sense of personal boundaries is altered, (4 attention is highly focused on the object of meditation, and (5 joy increases to high levels. The fMRI and EEG results from an experienced meditator show changes in brain activity in 11 regions shown to be associated with the subjective reports, and these changes occur promptly after jhana is entered. In particular, the extreme joy is associated not only with activation of cortical processes but also with activation of the nucleus accumbens (NAc in the dopamine/opioid reward system. We test three mechanisms by which the subject might stimulate his own reward system by external means and reject all three. Taken together, these results demonstrate an apparently novel method of self-stimulating a brain reward system using only internal mental processes in a highly trained subject.

  5. Feasibility of a brain-dedicated PET-MRI system using four-layer DOI detectors integrated with an RF head coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikido, F.; Obata, T.; Shimizu, K.; Suga, M.; Inadama, N.; Tachibana, A.; Yoshida, E.; Ito, H.; Yamaya, T.

    2014-01-01

    We are developing a PET-MRI system which consists of PET detectors integrated with the head coil of the MRI in order to realize high spatial resolution and high sensitivity in simultaneous measurements. In the PET-MRI system, the PET detectors which consist of a scintillator block, photo-detectors and front-end circuits with four-layer depth-of-interaction (DOI) encoding capability are placed close to the measured object. Therefore, the proposed system can achieve high sensitivity without degradation of spatial resolution at the edge of the field-of-view due to parallax error thanks to the four-layer DOI capability. In this paper, we fabricated a prototype system which consists of a prototype four-layer DOI-PET detector, a dummy PET detector and a prototype birdcage type head coil. Then we used the prototype system to evaluate the performance of the four-layer DOI-PET detector and the reciprocal influence between the PET detectors and MRI images. The prototype DOI-PET detector consists of six monolithic multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) arrays (S11064-050P), a readout circuit board, two scintillator blocks and a copper shielding box. Each scintillator block consists of four layers of Lu 1.8 Gd 0.2 SiO 5 :Ce (LGSO) scintillators and reflectors are inserted between the scintillation crystals. The dummy detector has all these components except the two scintillator blocks. The head coil is dedicated to a 3.0 T MRI (MAGNETOM Verio, Siemens) and the two detectors are mounted in gaps between head coil elements. Energy resolution and crystal identification performance of the prototype four-layer DOI-PET detector were evaluated with and without MRI measurements by the gradient echo and spin echo methods. We identified crystal elements in all four layers from a 2D flood histogram and energy resolution of 15–18% was obtained for single crystal elements in simultaneous measurements. The difference between the average energy resolutions and photo-peak positions with and

  6. The effect of action observation/execution on mirror neuron system recruitment: an fMRI study in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Roberto; Rocca, Maria A; Fumagalli, Silvia; Cattrysse, Erik; Kerckhofs, Eric; Falini, Andrea; Filippi, Massimo

    2017-04-01

    Action observation and execution activate regions that are part of the motor and mirror neuron systems (MNS). Using functional magnetic resonance (fMRI), we defined the presence and extent of MNS activation during three different motor tasks with the dominant, right-upper limb in healthy individuals. The influence of the modality of task administration (execution, observation, observation and execution) was also investigated. fMRI scans during the execution (E) of a motor task, the observation (O) of a video showing the same task performed by another person and the simultaneous observation and execution (OE) of the task were obtained from three groups of healthy subjects (15 subjects per group) randomized to perform: a simple motor (SM) task, a complex motor (CM) task and a finalistic motor (FM) task. Manual dexterity was assessed using the 9-hole peg test and maximum finger tapping frequency. MNS activation was higher during FM than SM or CM tasks, independently from the modality of administration (E, O, or OE). Inferior frontal gyrus recruitment was more significant during SM than CM tasks in the E and O conditions. Compared to SM and FM, CM task resulted in increased recruitment of brain regions involved in complex motor task performance. Compared to O and E, OE resulted in the recruitment of additional, specific, brain areas in the cerebellum, temporal and parietal lobes. The modality of administration and the type of task modulated MNS recruitment during motor acts. This might have practical implications for the set-up of individualized motor rehabilitation strategies.

  7. Portable MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espy, Michelle A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  8. Portable MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espy, Michelle A.

    2012-01-01

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  9. TU-H-BRA-01: The Physics of High Power Radiofrequency Isolation in a Novel Compact Linear Accelerator Based MRI Guided Radiation Therapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, J; Low, D [University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Mutic, S [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Shvartsman, S; Chmielewski, T; Fought, G; Sharma, A; Dempsey, J [ViewRay, Inc., Oakwood Village, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a method for isolating the radiofrequency waves emanating from linear accelerator components from the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system of an integrated MRI-linac. Methods: An MRI-guided radiation therapy system has been designed that integrates a linear accelerator with simultaneous MR imaging. The radiofrequency waves created by the accelerating process would degrade MR image quality, so a method for containing the radiofrequency waves and isolating the MR imager from them was developed. The linear accelerator radiofrequency modulator was placed outside the room, so a filter was designed to eliminate the radiofrequency corresponding to the proton Larmour frequency of 14.7 MHz. Placing the radiofrequency emitting components in a typical Faraday cage would have reduced the radiofrequency emissions, but the design would be susceptible to small gaps in the shield due to the efficiency of the Faraday cage reflecting internal radiofrequency emissions. To reduce internal radiofrequency reflections, the Faraday cage was lined with carbon fiber sheets. Carbon fiber has the property of attenuating the radiofrequency energy so that the overall radiofrequency field inside the Faraday cage is reduced, decreasing any radiofrequency energy emitted from small gaps in the cage walls. Results: Within a 1.2 MHz band centered on the Larmor frequency, the radiofrequency (RF) leakage from the Faraday cage was measured to be −90 dB with no RF on, −40 dB with the RF on and no shield, returning to −90 dB with the RF on and shields in place. The radiofrequency filter attenuated the linear accelerator modulator emissions in the 14.7 MHz band by 70 dB. Conclusions: One of the major challenges in designing a compact linear accelerator based MRI-guided radiation therapy system, that of isolating the high power RF system from the MRI, has been solved. The measured radiofrequency emissions are sufficiently small to enable system integration. This research was

  10. TU-H-BRA-01: The Physics of High Power Radiofrequency Isolation in a Novel Compact Linear Accelerator Based MRI Guided Radiation Therapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, J; Low, D; Mutic, S; Shvartsman, S; Chmielewski, T; Fought, G; Sharma, A; Dempsey, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a method for isolating the radiofrequency waves emanating from linear accelerator components from the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system of an integrated MRI-linac. Methods: An MRI-guided radiation therapy system has been designed that integrates a linear accelerator with simultaneous MR imaging. The radiofrequency waves created by the accelerating process would degrade MR image quality, so a method for containing the radiofrequency waves and isolating the MR imager from them was developed. The linear accelerator radiofrequency modulator was placed outside the room, so a filter was designed to eliminate the radiofrequency corresponding to the proton Larmour frequency of 14.7 MHz. Placing the radiofrequency emitting components in a typical Faraday cage would have reduced the radiofrequency emissions, but the design would be susceptible to small gaps in the shield due to the efficiency of the Faraday cage reflecting internal radiofrequency emissions. To reduce internal radiofrequency reflections, the Faraday cage was lined with carbon fiber sheets. Carbon fiber has the property of attenuating the radiofrequency energy so that the overall radiofrequency field inside the Faraday cage is reduced, decreasing any radiofrequency energy emitted from small gaps in the cage walls. Results: Within a 1.2 MHz band centered on the Larmor frequency, the radiofrequency (RF) leakage from the Faraday cage was measured to be −90 dB with no RF on, −40 dB with the RF on and no shield, returning to −90 dB with the RF on and shields in place. The radiofrequency filter attenuated the linear accelerator modulator emissions in the 14.7 MHz band by 70 dB. Conclusions: One of the major challenges in designing a compact linear accelerator based MRI-guided radiation therapy system, that of isolating the high power RF system from the MRI, has been solved. The measured radiofrequency emissions are sufficiently small to enable system integration. This research was

  11. Practical aspects of MRI of the prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragoș Cuzino

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the main aspects of sectional anatomy, lymph nodes and adjacent structures as well as MRI examination standard protocol for prostate cancer diagnosis. Using MRI multiparametric examination we succeed in classifying efficiently the malignant prostatic tumors using PI- RADS system. Also, using MRI multiparametric examination we can evaluate the effectiveness of prostate cancer treatment

  12. A practical MRI grading system for osteoarthritis of the knee: Association with Kellgren–Lawrence radiographic scores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hee-Jin, E-mail: parkhiji@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, #108 Pyung-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-746 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Kangwon National University School of Medicine, Baengnyeong-ro 156, Chuncheon-Si, Gangwon-Do Kangwon National University Hospital 200-722 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sam Soo, E-mail: samskim@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Kangwon National University School of Medicine, Baengnyeong-ro 156, Chuncheon-Si, Gangwon-Do Kangwon National University Hospital 200-722 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, So-Yeon, E-mail: parkhiji@kwandong.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, #108 Pyung-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-746 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Noh-Hyuck, E-mail: nhpark904@kwandong.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Myongji Hospital, Kwandong University, College of Medicine, 697-24 Hwajung-dong, Dukyang-ku, Koyang, Kyunggi 412-270 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji-Yeon, E-mail: zzzz3@hanmail.net [Department of Radiology, Myongji Hospital, Kwandong University, College of Medicine, 697-24 Hwajung-dong, Dukyang-ku, Koyang, Kyunggi 412-270 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yoon-Jung, E-mail: yoonchoi99@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, #108 Pyung-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-746 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Hyun-Jun, E-mail: ostrich-13@hanmail.net [Department of Occupational Medicine, Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, 194 Dongsan-Dong, Jung-ku, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To propose a reproducible and constant MR grading system for osteoarthritis of the knee joint that provides high interobserver and intraoberver agreement and that does not require complicated calculation procedures. Materials and methods: This retrospective study sample included 44 men and 65 women who underwent both MRI and plain radiography of the knee at our institution. All patients were older than 50 years of age (mean 57.7) and had clinically suspected osteoarthritis of the knee. The standard of 4 grades on the MR grade scale was based mainly on cartilage injury and additional findings. Kellgren–Lawrence grades were assessed for the same patient group. The relationship between the results was determined. Statistical analyses were performed including kappa statistics, categorical regression analysis and nonparametric correlation analysis. Results: The interobserver and intraoberver agreements between the two readers in the grading of osteoarthritis were found to be almost perfect. Interobserver and intraobserver agreements were slightly lower for the MR grading system than for the Kellgren–Lawrence grading scale. The correlation between the MR grade and Kellgren–Lawrence grade was very high and did not differ with patient age. The MR grades were highly correlated with the Kellgren–Lawrence grades and showed excellent interobserver and intraobserver agreements. Conclusion: This new MR grading system for osteoarthritis of the knee joint is reproducible and may be helpful for the grading of osteoarthritis of the knee without requiring reference to plain radiography.

  13. A practical MRI grading system for osteoarthritis of the knee: Association with Kellgren–Lawrence radiographic scores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hee-Jin; Kim, Sam Soo; Lee, So-Yeon; Park, Noh-Hyuck; Park, Ji-Yeon; Choi, Yoon-Jung; Jeon, Hyun-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To propose a reproducible and constant MR grading system for osteoarthritis of the knee joint that provides high interobserver and intraoberver agreement and that does not require complicated calculation procedures. Materials and methods: This retrospective study sample included 44 men and 65 women who underwent both MRI and plain radiography of the knee at our institution. All patients were older than 50 years of age (mean 57.7) and had clinically suspected osteoarthritis of the knee. The standard of 4 grades on the MR grade scale was based mainly on cartilage injury and additional findings. Kellgren–Lawrence grades were assessed for the same patient group. The relationship between the results was determined. Statistical analyses were performed including kappa statistics, categorical regression analysis and nonparametric correlation analysis. Results: The interobserver and intraoberver agreements between the two readers in the grading of osteoarthritis were found to be almost perfect. Interobserver and intraobserver agreements were slightly lower for the MR grading system than for the Kellgren–Lawrence grading scale. The correlation between the MR grade and Kellgren–Lawrence grade was very high and did not differ with patient age. The MR grades were highly correlated with the Kellgren–Lawrence grades and showed excellent interobserver and intraobserver agreements. Conclusion: This new MR grading system for osteoarthritis of the knee joint is reproducible and may be helpful for the grading of osteoarthritis of the knee without requiring reference to plain radiography

  14. Clinical safety of an MRI conditional implantable cardioverter defibrillator system: A prospective Monocenter ICD-Magnetic resonance Imaging feasibility study (MIMI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kypta, Alexander; Blessberger, Hermann; Hoenig, Simon; Saleh, Karim; Lambert, Thomas; Kammler, Juergen; Fellner, Franz; Lichtenauer, Michael; Steinwender, Clemens

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the Lumax 740(®) Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) system in patients undergoing a defined 1.5 Tesla (T) MRI. Between November 2013 and April 2014, eighteen patients (age range, 41-78 years; mean age, 64 years) implanted with a Lumax 740(®) ICD system for at least 6 weeks before an MRI were enrolled into this single-center feasibility study. The local ethics committee approved the study before patients gave written informed consent. Patients underwent defined MRI 1.5T of the brain and lower lumbar spine with three safety follow-up evaluations obtained during the 3-month study period. Data were analyzed descriptively. Study endpoints were the absence of either MRI and pacing system related serious adverse device effects (SADE), or of a ventricular pacing threshold increase >0.5V, or of an R-wave amplitude attenuation battery status. Sixteen patients completed the MRI and the follow-up period. As no SADE occurred, the SADE free rate was 100%. Freedom from ventricular pacing threshold increase was 100% (16/16; 95%CI: 82.9%; 100.0%). There were no significant differences between baseline and follow-up measurements of sensing amplitudes (-0.58 ± 2.07 mV, P = 0.239, -0.41 ± 1.04 mV, P = 0.133, and -0.25 ± 1.36 mV, P = 0.724, for immediately after, 1 month and 3 months after MRI scan, respectively) and pacing thresholds (-0.047 ± 0.18 V, P = 0.317, -0.019 ± 0.11 V, P = 0.490, and 0.075 ± 0.19 V, P = 0.070, for immediately after, 1 month and 3 months after MRI scan, respectively). Lead impedances after the MRI scan were significantly lower as compared with baseline values (-22.8 ± 21.69 Ω, P = 0.001, -21.62 ± 39.71 Ω, P = 0.040, and -33.68 ± 57.73 Ω, P = 0.018, for immediately after, 1 month and 3 months after MRI scan, respectively). MRI scans in patients with MRI conditional ICD system (Lumax 740(

  15. Combined PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, D. L.; Pichler, B. J.; Gückel, B.

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarises key themes and discussions from the 4th international workshop dedicated to the advancement of the technical, scientific and clinical applications of combined positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems that was held in Tübingen, Germany, from...

  16. Magnetocaloric effect of Gd5 Si2 Ge2 alloys in low magnetic field

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Gd5Si2Ge2 compounds are promising as high-performance magnetic refrigerants working room temperature in relatively low ... 2000) as well as their magnetic properties (Pecharsky ... tron microscope (SEM) with the energy dispersive X-ray.

  17. Magnetocaloric effect of Gd 5 Si 2 Ge 2 alloys in low magnetic field

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The magnetocaloric effect (MCE) is studied by measuring magnetic entropy change ( M) and adiabatic temperature change ( ad) in a magnetic field of 1.5 T using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and a home-made magnetocaloric effect measuring apparatus, respectively. The maximum M of the alloys ...

  18. Imaging and measurement of T1 value by NMR of low magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asai, Hideaki; Izawa, Akira; Furuse, Kazuhiro; Saoi, Katsuyoshi; Nagai, Masahiko.

    1983-01-01

    FONAR QED-80α having two operating mode: the anatomy mode to obtain an image of proton densities and the chemistry mode to measure T 1 value at a region of intenst, was used clinically. The strength of static magnetic field is 0.041T. 32 cases, 18 healthy volunteers and 14 patients were studied. In proton density imaging, high proton density organs such as skin were imaged bright, and low proton density organs such as bones and flowing blood were imaged dark. The merits of NMR imaging are no artifacts caused by bones and air. However, NMR image is required long time for measurement and the image of NMR is unsharp than that of X-ray CT. Concerning with T 1 value, cerebral and cerebellar gray matter had longer T 1 's than that of white matter. Pathological lesions, such as tumor and/or infarct, had also longer T 1 values than these of normal tissue. The value of T 1 was thought to be applicable clinically except for some problems, such as measuring T 1 value of large extent. No side effects were found during and after examinations. (author)

  19. Spin polarization of a non-magnetic high g-factor semiconductor at low magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.; Back, J.; Kim, K.H.; Kim, S.U.; Joo, S.; Rhie, K.; Hong, J.; Shin, K.; Lee, B.C.; Kim, T.

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the spin polarization of HgCdTe by measuring Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations. The magnetic field have been applied in parallel and perpendicular to the current. Relatively long spin relaxation time was observed since only spin conserved transition is allowed by selection rules. The electronic spin is completely polarized when the applied magnetic field is larger than 0.5 Tesla, which can be easily generated by micromagnets deposited on the surface of the specimen. Thus, the spin-manipulation such as spin up/down junction can be realized with this semiconductor. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Alignment of SWNTs by protein-ligand interaction of functionalized magnetic particles under low magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Tae Jung; Park, Jong Pil; Lee, Seok Jae; Jung, Dae-Hwan; Ko, Young Koan; Jung, Hee-Tae; Lee, Sang Yup

    2011-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted considerable attention for applications using their superior mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. A simple method to controllably align single-walled CNTs (SWNTs) by using magnetic particles embedded with superparamagnetic iron oxide as an accelerator under the magnetic field was developed. The functionalization of SWNTs using biotin, interacted with streptavidin-coupled magnetic particles (micro-to-nano in diameter), and layer-by-layer assembly were performed for the alignment of a particular direction onto the clean silicon and the gold substrate at very low magnetic forces (0.02-0.89 T) at room temperature. The successful alignment of the SWNTs with multi-layer film was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). By changing the orientation and location of the substrates, crossed-networks of SWNTs-magnetic particle complex could easily be fabricated. We suggest that this approach, which consists of a combination of biological interaction among streptavidin-biotin and magnetite particles, should be useful for lateral orientation of individual SWNTs with controllable direction.

  1. MR-compatibility assessment of MADPET4: a study of interferences between an SiPM-based PET insert and a 7 T MRI system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidvari, Negar; Topping, Geoffrey; Cabello, Jorge; Paul, Stephan; Schwaiger, Markus; Ziegler, Sibylle I.

    2018-05-01

    Compromises in the design of a positron emission tomography (PET) insert for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system should minimize the deterioration of image quality in both modalities, particularly when simultaneous demanding acquisitions are performed. In this work, the advantages of using individually read-out crystals with high-gain silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) were studied with a small animal PET insert for a 7 T MRI system, in which the SiPM charge was transferred to outside the MRI scanner using coaxial cables. The interferences between the two systems were studied with three radio-frequency (RF) coil configurations. The effects of PET on the static magnetic field, flip angle distribution, RF noise, and image quality of various MRI sequences (gradient echo, spin echo, and echo planar imaging (EPI) at 1H frequency, and chemical shift imaging at 13C frequency) were investigated. The effects of fast-switching gradient fields and RF pulses on PET count rate were studied, while the PET insert and the readout electronics were not shielded. Operating the insert inside a 1H volume coil, used for RF transmission and reception, limited the MRI to T1-weighted imaging, due to coil detuning and RF attenuation, and resulted in significant PET count loss. Using a surface receive coil allowed all tested MR sequences to be used with the insert, with 45–59% signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) degradation, compared to without PET. With a 1H/13C volume coil inside the insert and shielded by a copper tube, the SNR degradation was limited to 23–30% with all tested sequences. The insert did not introduce any discernible distortions into images of two tested EPI sequences. Use of truncated sinc shaped RF excitation pulses and gradient field switching had negligible effects on PET count rate. However, PET count rate was substantially affected by high-power RF block pulses and temperature variations due to high gradient duty cycles.

  2. Bridging the gap between system and cell: The role of ultra-high field MRI in human neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Robert; De Haan, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The volume of published research at the levels of systems and cellular neuroscience continues to increase at an accelerating rate. At the same time, progress in psychiatric medicine has stagnated and scientific confidence in cognitive psychology research is under threat due to careless analysis methods and underpowered experiments. With the advent of ultra-high field MRI, with submillimeter image voxels, imaging neuroscience holds the potential to bridge the cellular and systems levels. Use of these accurate and precisely localized quantitative measures of brain activity may go far in providing more secure foundations for psychology, and hence for more appropriate treatment and management of psychiatric illness. However, fundamental issues regarding the construction of testable mechanistic models using imaging data require careful consideration. This chapter summarizes the characteristics of acceptable models of brain function and provides concise descriptions of the relevant types of neuroimaging data that have recently become available. Approaches to data-driven experiments and analyses are described that may lead to more realistic conceptions of the competences of neural assemblages, as they vary across the brain's complex neuroanatomy. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. First clinical experience with a dedicated MRI-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound system for breast cancer ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merckel, Laura G.; Knuttel, Floor M.; Peters, Nicky H.G.M.; Mali, Willem P.T.M.; Bosch, Maurice A.A.J. van den [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, HP E 01.132, Utrecht (Netherlands); Deckers, Roel; Moonen, Chrit T.W.; Bartels, Lambertus W. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands); Dalen, Thijs van [Diakonessenhuis Utrecht, Department of Surgery, Utrecht (Netherlands); Schubert, Gerald [Philips Healthcare, Best (Netherlands); Weits, Teun [Diakonessenhuis Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Diest, Paul J. van [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pathology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Vaessen, Paul H.H.B. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Anesthesiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Gorp, Joost M.H.H. van [Diakonessenhuis Utrecht, Department of Pathology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2016-11-15

    To assess the safety and feasibility of MRI-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) ablation in breast cancer patients using a dedicated breast platform. Patients with early-stage invasive breast cancer underwent partial tumour ablation prior to surgical resection. MR-HIFU ablation was performed using proton resonance frequency shift MR thermometry and an MR-HIFU system specifically designed for breast tumour ablation. The presence and extent of tumour necrosis was assessed by histopathological analysis of the surgical specimen. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to assess the relationship between sonication parameters, temperature increase and size of tumour necrosis at histopathology. Ten female patients underwent MR-HIFU treatment. No skin redness or burns were observed in any of the patients. No correlation was found between the applied energy and the temperature increase. In six patients, tumour necrosis was observed with a maximum diameter of 3-11 mm. In these patients, the number of targeted locations was equal to the number of areas with tumour necrosis. A good correlation was found between the applied energy and the size of tumour necrosis at histopathology (Pearson = 0.76, p = 0.002). Our results show that MR-HIFU ablation with the dedicated breast system is safe and results in histopathologically proven tumour necrosis. (orig.)

  4. MRI of the fingers in patients with systemic scleroderma. Early results of contrast-enhanced examinations on a dedicated MRI system; MRT der Finger bei systemischer Sklerodermie. Erste Ergebnisse mit kontrastverstaerkten Untersuchungen an einem dedizierten MRT-System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonel, H.; Seemann, M.; Reiser, M. [Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Klinikum Grosshadern, Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Messer, G.; Walchner, M.; Roecken, M. [Dermatologische Klinik und Poliklinik, Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    1997-10-01

    Purpose. To estimate disease activity in patients with systemic sclerosis using contrast-enhanced MRI of the skin. Material and Methods. In a pre-study, sequences of a low-field (0.2 T) scanner (Artoscan, Esaote, Genova, Italy) were optimized for detection of intravenous contrast (0.1 mmol/l Gd-DTPA) in six patients with the autoimmune disease systemic scleroderma. Based on the results of the pre-study, 17 patients with scleroderma (7 sclerotic/10 active inflammatory disease) were scanned using gradient-spoiled 3D GRE sequences (FA 90 , TR 100 ms, TE 18 ms), which had been established as most sensitive for intravenous contrast. Contrast enhancement of the skin was determined quantitatively by contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR), comparing post- to pre-contrast and dynamic scans (for 6 min, 1 acquisition/min). Patients in the chronic state with sclerodactylia and active inflammation of the hands were considered separately and compared to a control group (n=10) matched according to age. Results. CNR increase after intravenous contrast was significantly higher in patients with active disease (86{+-}16% increase) than sclerosing disease (29{+-}3%, p<0.05) and the control group (4{+-}2%, p<0.05). The dynamic examination showed a significantly slower decrease after the peak rise in the first minute in patients with active disease (CNR 15.4{+-}0.7 to 14.2{+-}1.4) than in those with chronic disease (14.1{+-}0.5 to 11.3{+-}0.9, p<0.05). (orig.) [Deutsch] Zielsetzung der Arbeit war die Quantifizierung der Entzuendungsreaktion der Haut bei an systemischer Sklerodermie erkrankten Patienten mittels kontrastverstaerkter MRT. Material und Methoden. In einer Vorstudie mit 6 Patienten wurden die Sequenzen eines dedizierten Niederfeldmagnetresonanztomographen (Artoscan, Esaote, Genua, Italien) fuer den Kontrastmittelnachweis (0,1 mmol/l Gd-DTPA i.v.) optimiert. Basierend auf dieser Sequenzoptimierung wurden 17 Patienten mit systemischer Sklerodermie (7 Patienten mit sklerosierender, 10

  5. Imaging performance of a full-ring prototype PET-MRI system based on four-layer DOI-PET detectors integrated with a RF coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikido, Fumihiko; Tashima, Hideaki [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Suga, Mikio [Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Inadama, Naoko; Eiji, Yoshida; Obata, Takayuki; Yamaya, Taiga [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2015-05-18

    We are developing a PET system integrated with a birdcage RF-coil for PET-MRI in order to realize both high sensitivity and high spatial resolution of the PET image by using the 4-layered depth-of-interaction (DOI) PET detector. We constructed a full-ring prototype system and evaluated performances, especially imaging performance, of the prototype system in simultaneous measurement. The prototype system consists of eight four-layer DOI-PET detectors and a prototype birdcage RF-coil developed for the proposed system. The PET detectors consist of six monolithic multi-pixel photon counter array (S11064-050P), a readout circuit, fourlayer DOI scintillator arrays and a shielding box made of 35 μm thick copper foil. The crystal array consists of 2.0 mm x 2.0 mm x 5.0 mm LYSO crystals arranged in 38 x 6 x 4 layer. The RF-coil has eight coil elements and the eight PET detectors are positioned at each element gap. The diameter of the RF-coil elements is 261 mm. We conducted performance tests of the prototype system with a 3.0 T MRI (MAGNETOM Verio). Only the PET detectors, the RF-coil and the cables were in an MRI room during measurements. A data acquisition system and power supplies for the MPPCs and preamplifiers were outside the MRI room and connected to all the detectors through a penetration panel. As a result, the spatial resolutions of a Na-22 point source in the PET image were lower than 1.6 mm in whole the FOV due to the DOI capability. In addition, the influence of the simultaneous measurements on the PET performance is negligible. On the other hand, the SNR of the phantom image in the magnitude images was degraded from 259.7 to 209.4 due to noise contamination from the power supplies.

  6. Imaging performance of a full-ring prototype PET-MRI system based on four-layer DOI-PET detectors integrated with a RF coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikido, Fumihiko; Tashima, Hideaki; Suga, Mikio; Inadama, Naoko; Eiji, Yoshida; Obata, Takayuki; Yamaya, Taiga

    2015-01-01

    We are developing a PET system integrated with a birdcage RF-coil for PET-MRI in order to realize both high sensitivity and high spatial resolution of the PET image by using the 4-layered depth-of-interaction (DOI) PET detector. We constructed a full-ring prototype system and evaluated performances, especially imaging performance, of the prototype system in simultaneous measurement. The prototype system consists of eight four-layer DOI-PET detectors and a prototype birdcage RF-coil developed for the proposed system. The PET detectors consist of six monolithic multi-pixel photon counter array (S11064-050P), a readout circuit, fourlayer DOI scintillator arrays and a shielding box made of 35 μm thick copper foil. The crystal array consists of 2.0 mm x 2.0 mm x 5.0 mm LYSO crystals arranged in 38 x 6 x 4 layer. The RF-coil has eight coil elements and the eight PET detectors are positioned at each element gap. The diameter of the RF-coil elements is 261 mm. We conducted performance tests of the prototype system with a 3.0 T MRI (MAGNETOM Verio). Only the PET detectors, the RF-coil and the cables were in an MRI room during measurements. A data acquisition system and power supplies for the MPPCs and preamplifiers were outside the MRI room and connected to all the detectors through a penetration panel. As a result, the spatial resolutions of a Na-22 point source in the PET image were lower than 1.6 mm in whole the FOV due to the DOI capability. In addition, the influence of the simultaneous measurements on the PET performance is negligible. On the other hand, the SNR of the phantom image in the magnitude images was degraded from 259.7 to 209.4 due to noise contamination from the power supplies.

  7. Primary central nervous system lymphoma: is absence of intratumoral hemorrhage a characteristic finding on MRI?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Akihiko; Okada, Tomohisa; Yamamoto, Akira; Kanagaki, Mitsunori; Fushimi, Yasutaka; Dodo, Toshiki; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Takahashi, Jun C; Miyamoto, Susumu; Togashi, Kaori

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that intratumoral hemorrhage is a common finding in glioblastoma multi-forme, but is rarely observed in primary central nervous system lymphoma. Our aim was to reevaluate whether intratumoral hemorrhage observed on T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) as gross intratumoral hemorrhage and on susceptibility-weighted imaging as intratumoral susceptibility signal can differentiate primary central nervous system lymphoma from glioblastoma multiforme. A retrospective cohort of brain tumors from August 2008 to March 2013 was searched, and 58 patients (19 with primary central nervous system lymphoma, 39 with glioblastoma multiforme) satisfied the inclusion criteria. Absence of gross intratumoral hemorrhage was examined on T2WI, and an intratumoral susceptibility signal was graded using a 3-point scale on susceptibility-weighted imaging. Results were compared between primary central nervous system lymphoma and glioblastoma multiforme, and values of P central nervous system lymphoma and 23 patients (59%) with glioblastoma multiforme. Absence of gross intratumoral hemorrhage could not differentiate between the two disorders (P = 0.20). However, intratumoral susceptibility signal grade 1 or 2 was diagnostic of primary central nervous system lymphoma with 78.9% sensitivity and 66.7% specificity (P central nervous system lymphoma from glioblastoma multiforme. However, specificity in this study was relatively low, and primary central nervous system lymphoma cannot be excluded based solely on the presence of an intratumoral susceptibility signal.

  8. Development of a Flow-Through SQUID System for Non-Destructive Evaluation of MRI Wire

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wellstood, Frederick C

    2007-01-01

    ...) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) system. The ability to detect small defects in km-long sections of NbTi magnet wire could improve the production yield of high-field magnets for power and medical applications...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... distort images of the facial area or brain, so you should let the radiologist know about them. ... MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not completely surround you. ...

  10. MRI angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poncelet, B.; Baleriiaux, D.; struyven, J.; Segebarth, C.

    1989-01-01

    In MRI angiography two basis images are measured which only differ by the signal intensity of the flowing blood in the vessels. Subtraction of these two images produces a high contrast-to-noise representation of the vessels. Contrast between stationary tissues and flowing blood is changed, for one image compared to the second one, using a selective modification of the phase of the signal from the flowing blood, and/or using a selective modification of its longitudinal magnetization: The macroscopic spin motions along the selection and the measurement gradient directions affect the phase of the nuclear signal; assuming constant velocity, the phase is proportional to the velocity and to the first moment of the gradient waveforms applied. This work concentrates on the generarion of MRI angiograms, following a phase-based approach, of the carotid bifurcation and of different intracranical regions including the carotid syphon and the circle of Willis. (author). 21 refs.; 3 figs

  11. MRI-based radiologic scoring system for extent of brain injury in children with hemiplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiran, S I; Weinstein, M; Sirota-Cohen, C; Myers, V; Ben Bashat, D; Fattal-Valevski, A; Green, D; Schertz, M

    2014-12-01

    Brain MR imaging is recommended in children with cerebral palsy. Descriptions of MR imaging findings lack uniformity, due to the absence of a validated quantitative approach. We developed a quantitative scoring method for brain injury based on anatomic MR imaging and examined the reliability and validity in correlation to motor function in children with hemiplegia. Twenty-seven children with hemiplegia underwent MR imaging (T1, T2-weighted sequences, DTI) and motor assessment (Manual Ability Classification System, Gross Motor Functional Classification System, Assisting Hand Assessment, Jebsen Taylor Test of Hand Function, and Children's Hand Experience Questionnaire). A scoring system devised in our center was applied to all scans. Radiologic score covered 4 domains: number of affected lobes, volume and type of white matter injury, extent of gray matter damage, and major white matter tract injury. Inter- and intrarater reliability was evaluated and the relationship between radiologic score and motor assessments determined. Mean total radiologic score was 11.3 ± 4.5 (range 4-18). Good inter- (ρ = 0.909, P classification systems (ρ = 0.708, P high inter- and intrarater reliability and significant associations with manual ability classification systems and motor evaluations. This score provides a standardized radiologic assessment of brain injury extent in hemiplegic patients with predominantly unilateral injury, allowing comparison between groups, and providing an additional tool for counseling families. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  12. MRI-three dimensional reconstruction of biliary system in choledochal cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaji, Tatsuru; Takamatsu, Hideo; Noguchi, Hiroyuki; Tahara, Hiroyuki; Fukushige, Takahiko; Kajiya, Hiroshi; Kajiya, Yoshiki

    1995-01-01

    We report a trial of MR cholangiography in children with choledochal cyst. Recently, three-dimensional reconstruction using magnetic resolution imaging of biliary system (MR cholangiography) has been reported as the less-invasive diagnostic method for obstructive lesions of biliary system. Forty-eight cases of choledochal cyst were treated at Kagoshima University Hospital in the past ten years. In 22 of them, intrahepatic duct dilatation was revealed by preoperative or operative cholangiogram. We tried MR cholangiography in nine cases of 22 cases pre- and/or post-operatively. Five cases had MR cholangiography preoperatively. Intrahepatic biliary dilatation was revealed in all of them and intrahepatic biliary stenosis was revealed in two cases. These findings were almost the same as those by preoperative or operative cholangiogram. MR cholangiography was applied on seven cases postoperatively: 3 cases had fine construction of biliary system, because they still had intrahepatic biliary dilatation, and no dilatation was seen in 4 cases, because of good operative results. This method has advantages of less-invasive in children, no need of contrast dye, and fair delineation of biliary system as samely as endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC). In cases of huge biliary dilatation, MR cholangiography provides more information concerning intrahepatic biliary than ERCP. (author)

  13. Comparison of PET/CT and PET/MRI hybrid systems using a {sup 68}Ga-labelled PSMA ligand for the diagnosis of recurrent prostate cancer: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afshar-Oromieh, A. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberkorn, U. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Clinical Cooperation Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Schlemmer, H.P.; Fenchel, M.; Roethke, M. [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Eder, M.; Eisenhut, M. [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Department of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Heidelberg (Germany); Hadaschik, B.A. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Urology, Heidelberg (Germany); Kopp-Schneider, A. [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Department of Biostatistics, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    {sup 68}Ga-labelled HBED-CC-PSMA is a highly promising tracer for imaging recurrent prostate cancer (PCa). The intention of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of PET/MRI with this tracer. Twenty patients underwent PET/CT 1 h after injection of the {sup 68}Ga-PSMA ligand followed by PET/MRI 3 h after injection. Data from the two investigations were first analysed separately and then compared with respect to tumour detection rate and radiotracer uptake in various tissues. To evaluate the quantification accuracy of the PET/MRI system, differences in SUVs between PET/CT and corresponding PET/MRI were compared with differences in SUVs between PET/CT 1 h and 3 h after injection in another patient cohort. This cohort was investigated using the same PET/CT system. With PET/MRI, different diagnostic sequences, higher contrast of lesions and higher resolution of MRI enabled a subjectively easier evaluation of the images. In addition, four unclear findings on PET/CT could be clarified as characteristic of PCa metastases by PET/MRI. However, in PET images of the PET/MRI, a reduced signal was observed at the level of the kidneys (in 11 patients) and around the urinary bladder (in 15 patients). This led to reduced SUVs in six lesions. SUV{sub mean} values provided by the PET/MRI system were different in muscles, blood pool, liver and spleen. PCa was detected more easily and more accurately with Ga-PSMA PET/MRI than with PET/CT and with lower radiation exposure. Consequently, this new technique could clarify unclear findings on PET/CT. However, scatter correction was challenging when the specific {sup 68}Ga-PSMA ligand was used. Moreover, direct comparison of SUVs from PET/CT and PET/MR needs to be conducted carefully. (orig.)

  14. MRI of plants and foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van As, Henk; van Duynhoven, John

    2013-04-01

    The importance and prospects for MRI as applied to intact plants and to foods are presented in view of one of humanity's most pressing concerns, the sustainable and healthy feeding of a worldwide increasing population. Intact plants and foods have in common that their functionality is determined by complex multiple length scale architectures. Intact plants have an additional level of complexity since they are living systems which critically depend on transport and signalling processes between and within tissues and organs. The combination of recent cutting-edge technical advances and integration of MRI accessible parameters has the perspective to contribute to breakthroughs in understanding complex regulatory plant performance mechanisms. In food science and technology MRI allows for quantitative multi-length scale structural assessment of food systems, non-invasive monitoring of heat and mass transport during shelf-life and processing, and for a unique view on food properties under shear. These MRI applications are powerful enablers of rationally (re)designed food formulations and processes. Limitations and bottlenecks of the present plant and food MRI methods are mainly related to short T2 values and susceptibility artefacts originating from small air spaces in tissues/materials. We envisage cross-fertilisation of solutions to overcome these hurdles in MRI applications in plants and foods. For both application areas we witness a development where MRI is moving from highly specialised equipment to mobile and downscaled versions to be used by a broad user base in the field, greenhouse, food laboratory or factory.

  15. SU-G-JeP2-03: Automatic Quantification of MLC Positional Accuracy in An MRI Guided Radiotherapy System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X; Studenski, M; Yang, F; Dogan, N; Lamichhane, N; Padgett, K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: MRI-guided-radiotherapy (MRIGRT) systems lack many features of traditional Linac based RT systems and specialized tests need to be developed to evaluate MLC performance. This work describes automatic tools for the analysis of positional accuracy of an MLC equipped MRIGRT system. Methods: This MLC analysis tool was developed for the MRIdian™ RT system which has three Co-60 equipped treatment heads each with a double focused MLC containing 30 leaf pairs, leaf thickness is 1.05cm defined at isocenter (SAD 105 cm). For MLC positional analysis a picket fence test was performed using a 25.4cm × 25.4cm Gafchromic™ RTQA2 film placed between 5cm solidwater and a 30cm × 30cm × 1cm jigwire phantom with seven embedded parallel metal strips 4cm apart. A plan was generated to deliver 2Gy per field and seven 23.1cm × 2cm fields centered over each wire in the phantom. For each leaf pair the center of the radiation profile was determined by fitting the horizontal profile with a Gaussian model and determining the center of the FWHM. This was compared with the metal strip location to determine any deviation. The following metrics were used to evaluate the deviations per gantry angle including maximum, minimum, mean, Kurtosis, and skewness. Results: The identified maximum/mean leaf deviations are, 1.32/0.55 mm for gantry 0°, 1.59/0.76 mm for gantry 90°, and 1.19/0.39 mm for gantry 270°. The percentage of leaf deviation less than 1mm are 90.0% at 0°, 74.6% at 90°, and 97.0% at 270°. Kurtosis/skewness of the leaf deviation are 2.41/0.14 at 0°, 2.53/0.23 at 90°, 3.33/0.83 at 270°, respectively. Conclusion: This work presents an automatic tool for evaluation of the MLC position accuracy of the MRIdian™ radiotherapy system which can be used to benchmark the performance of the MLC system for each treatment head and track the results longitudinally.

  16. An analysis of the gradient-induced electric fields and current densities in human models when situated in a hybrid MRI-LINAC system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Limei; Trakic, Adnan; Sanchez-Lopez, Hector; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    MRI-LINAC is a new image-guided radiotherapy treatment system that combines magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a linear accelerator (LINAC) in a single unit. One drawback is that the pulsing of the split gradient coils of the system induces an electric field and currents in the patient which need to be predicted and evaluated for patient safety. In this novel numerical study the in situ electric fields and associated current densities were evaluated inside tissue-accurate male and female human voxel models when a number of different split-geometry gradient coils were operated. The body models were located in the MRI-LINAC system along the axial and radial directions in three different body positions. Each model had a region of interest (ROI) suitable for image-guided radiotherapy. The simulation results show that the amplitudes and distributions of the field and current density induced by different split x-gradient coils were similar with one another in the ROI of the body model, but varied outside of the region. The fields and current densities induced by a split classic coil with the surface unconnected showed the largest deviation from those given by the conventional non-split coils. Another finding indicated that the distributions of the peak current densities varied when the body position, orientation or gender changed, while the peak electric fields mainly occurred in the skin and fat tissues. (paper)

  17. Japan Meteorological Agency/Meteorological Research Institute-Coupled Prediction System version 2 (JMA/MRI-CPS2): atmosphere-land-ocean-sea ice coupled prediction system for operational seasonal forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaya, Yuhei; Hirahara, Shoji; Yasuda, Tamaki; Matsueda, Satoko; Toyoda, Takahiro; Fujii, Yosuke; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Matsukawa, Chihiro; Ishikawa, Ichiro; Mori, Hirotoshi; Nagasawa, Ryoji; Kubo, Yutaro; Adachi, Noriyuki; Yamanaka, Goro; Kuragano, Tsurane; Shimpo, Akihiko; Maeda, Shuhei; Ose, Tomoaki

    2018-02-01

    This paper describes the Japan Meteorological Agency/Meteorological Research Institute-Coupled Prediction System version 2 (JMA/MRI-CPS2), which was put into operation in June 2015 for the purpose of performing seasonal predictions. JMA/MRI-CPS2 has various upgrades from its predecessor, JMA/MRI-CPS1, including improved resolution and physics in its atmospheric and oceanic components, introduction of an interactive sea-ice model and realistic initialization of its land component. Verification of extensive re-forecasts covering a 30-year period (1981-2010) demonstrates that JMA/MRI-CPS2 possesses improved seasonal predictive skills for both atmospheric and oceanic interannual variability as well as key coupled variability such as the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). For ENSO prediction, the new system better represents the forecast uncertainty and transition/duration of ENSO phases. Our analysis suggests that the enhanced predictive skills are attributable to incremental improvements resulting from all of the changes, as is apparent in the beneficial effects of sea-ice coupling and land initialization on 2-m temperature predictions. JMA/MRI-CPS2 is capable of reasonably representing the seasonal cycle and secular trends of sea ice. The sea-ice coupling remarkably enhances the predictive capability for the Arctic 2-m temperature, indicating the importance of this factor, particularly for seasonal predictions in the Arctic region.

  18. Usefulness of breath-hold cardiac cine MR imaging with a middle field MRI system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, Kentaro; Sato, Kiyoto; Aono, Masaki; Inoshita, Kenji; Utsumi, Naoko [Kagawa Inoshita Hospital, Ohnohara (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    To assess the accuracy of contrast-enhanced, single breath-hold cine MR imaging in calculating left ventricular volume and ejection fraction, we compared MR measurements with those obtained by using cine ventriculography in 60 patients. Fast cine MR images were acquired with a middle field MR system (0.5 T). A breath-hold single slice multi-phase fast gradient-echo (Fast Card) sequence was used to obtain fast cine MR images with the following parameters; TR of 16 ms, TE of 3 ms, flip angle of 30 degree, matrix elements of 256 x 128, view per segment of 6, field of view of 350 x 260 mm and one excitation. Left ventricular end-diastolic volume and ejection fraction obtained with contrast-enhanced Fast Card correlated well with those obtained with cine ventriculography (end-diastolic volume, y=1.00x+14.0, r=0.904, p<0.001; ejection fraction, y=0.961x+2.8, r=0.936, p<0.001). Our results show that contrast enhanced breath-hold cardiac cine MR imaging on horizontal long-axis view using a middle field MR system is an accurate method for evaluating left ventricular volume and ejection fraction. (author)

  19. Intracerebral lesions associated with systemic lupos erythematosus in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poniatowska, R.; Krawczyk, R.; Boguslawska, R.; Palasik, W.; Kuczynska, A.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to assess the involvement of central nervous system in brain magnetic resonance studies in patients with SLE. The MR study of the brain was carried out on 47 patients with these neurological symptoms: hemiparesis (15 cases), seizures (2), headache and vertigo (5), balance disorders (3), nausea (2), vision disorders (6). The MR findings were: in 15 cases single and in 5 multiple small focuses, coexistence of small and large focuses in 4 cases, subtentorial focuses in 3 (2 in cerebellum, 1 in pons), lesions in deep structures in 3 cases. In 1 case occlusion of internal carotid artery siphon with large ischemic focus, in 1 bleeding to choroid plexus occurred. The dominant were disseminated white matter lesions in subcortical and periventricular regions. In 16 case MR examinations showed cortical-subcortical atrophy. MR study allows us to assess severity of CNS involvement in course of SLE and helps to start a correct treatment. (author)

  20. Dopaminergic system and dream recall: An MRI study in Parkinson's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gennaro, Luigi; Lanteri, Olimpia; Piras, Fabrizio; Scarpelli, Serena; Assogna, Francesca; Ferrara, Michele; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the role of the dopamine system [i.e., subcortical-medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) network] in dreaming, by studying patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD) as a model of altered dopaminergic transmission. Subcortical volumes and cortical thickness were extracted by 3T-MR images of 27 PD patients and 27 age-matched controls, who were asked to fill out a dream diary upon morning awakening for one week. PD patients do not substantially differ from healthy controls with respect to the sleep, dream, and neuroanatomical measures. Multivariate correlational analyses in PD patients show that dopamine agonist dosage is associated to qualitatively impoverished dreams, as expressed by lower bizarreness and lower emotional load values. Visual vividness (VV) of their dream reports positively correlates with volumes of both the amygdalae and with thickness of the left mPFC. Emotional load also positively correlates with hippocampal volume. Beside the replication of our previous finding on the role of subcortical nuclei in dreaming experience of healthy subjects, this represents the first evidence of a specific role of the amygdala-mPFC dopaminergic network system in dream recall. The association in PD patients between higher dopamine agonist dosages and impoverished dream reports, however, and the significant correlations between VV and mesolimbic regions, however, provide an empirical support to the hypothesis that a dopamine network plays a key role in dream generation. The causal relation is however precluded by the intrinsic limitation of assuming the dopamine agonist dosage as a measure of the hypodopaminergic state in PD. Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Development of a robust MRI fiducial system for automated fusion of MR-US abdominal images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favazza, Christopher P; Gorny, Krzysztof R; Callstrom, Matthew R; Kurup, Anil N; Washburn, Michael; Trester, Pamela S; Fowler, Charles L; Hangiandreou, Nicholas J

    2018-05-21

    We present the development of a two-component magnetic resonance (MR) fiducial system, that is, a fiducial marker device combined with an auto-segmentation algorithm, designed to be paired with existing ultrasound probe tracking and image fusion technology to automatically fuse MR and ultrasound (US) images. The fiducial device consisted of four ~6.4 mL cylindrical wells filled with 1 g/L copper sulfate solution. The algorithm was designed to automatically segment the device in clinical abdominal MR images. The algorithm's detection rate and repeatability were investigated through a phantom study and in human volunteers. The detection rate was 100% in all phantom and human images. The center-of-mass of the fiducial device was robustly identified with maximum variations of 2.9 mm in position and 0.9° in angular orientation. In volunteer images, average differences between algorithm-measured inter-marker spacings and actual separation distances were 0.53 ± 0.36 mm. "Proof-of-concept" automatic MR-US fusions were conducted with sets of images from both a phantom and volunteer using a commercial prototype system, which was built based on the above findings. Image fusion accuracy was measured to be within 5 mm for breath-hold scanning. These results demonstrate the capability of this approach to automatically fuse US and MR images acquired across a wide range of clinical abdominal pulse sequences. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  2. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... affecting the MRI images, these objects can become projectiles within the MRI scanner room and may cause ... MRI has proven valuable in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and vascular disease, ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open units are especially helpful for examining larger patients or those with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for ...

  4. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... does not completely surround you. Some newer MRI machines have a larger diameter bore which can be ... size patients or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam ... the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Chest Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  8. Play the MRI Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teachers' Questionnaire MRI Play MRI the Magnetic Miracle Game About the game In the MRI imaging technique, strong magnets and ... last will in Paris. Play the Blood Typing Game Try to save some patients and learn about ...

  9. Limbic system perfusion in Alzheimer's disease measured by MRI-coregistered HMPAO SPET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, David J.A.; Black, Sandra E.; Caldwell, Curtis B.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this study was to perform a systematic, semi-quantitative analysis of limbic perfusion in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) using coregistered single-photon emission tomography (SPET) images aligned to magnetic resonance (MR) images. Limbic perfusion in 40 patients with mild to moderate AD was compared with that of 17 age-, sex-, and education-matched normal controls (NC). HMPAO SPET scans and 3D T1-weighted MR images were acquired for each subject. Structures of the limbic system (i.e. hippocampus, amygdala, anterior thalamus, hypothalamus, mamillary bodies, basal forebrain, septal area and cingulate, orbitofrontal and parahippocampal cortices) were traced on the MR images and transferred to the coregistered SPET scans. Perfusion ratios for all limbic regions were calculated relative to cerebellar perfusion. General linear model multivariate analysis revealed that, overall, limbic structures showed significant hypoperfusion (F=7.802, P 2 =0.695) in AD patients compared with NC. Greatest differences (d≥0.8) were found in the hippocampus, as well as all areas of the cingulate cortex. Significant relative hypoperfusion was also apparent in the parahippocampal cortex, amygdala/entorhinal cortex, septal area and anterior thalamus, all of which showed medium to large effect sizes (d=0.6-0.8). No significant relative perfusion differences were detected in the basal forebrain, hypothalamus, mamillary bodies or orbitofrontal cortex. Logistic regression indicated that posterior cingulate cortex perfusion was able to discriminate AD patients from NC with 93% accuracy (95% sensitivity, 88% specificity). The current results suggest that most, but not all, limbic structures show significant relative hypoperfusion in AD. These findings validate previous post-mortem studies and could be useful in improving diagnostic accuracy, monitoring disease progression and evaluating potential treatment strategies in AD. (orig.)

  10. Limbic system perfusion in Alzheimer's disease measured by MRI-coregistered HMPAO SPET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callen, David J.A. [Institute of Medical Science, Research Program in Aging, Imaging, Sunnybrook and Women' s University of Toronto, ON (Canada); Black, Sandra E. [Cognitive Neurology Unit and Research Program in Aging, Sunnybrook and Women' s College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Institute of Medical Science, Research Program in Aging, Imaging, Sunnybrook and Women' s University of Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Medicine (Neurology), University of Toronto, ON (Canada); Caldwell, Curtis B. [Department of Medical Imaging, Sunnybrook and Women' s College Health Sciences Centre and University of Toronto, CN (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    The goal of this study was to perform a systematic, semi-quantitative analysis of limbic perfusion in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) using coregistered single-photon emission tomography (SPET) images aligned to magnetic resonance (MR) images. Limbic perfusion in 40 patients with mild to moderate AD was compared with that of 17 age-, sex-, and education-matched normal controls (NC). HMPAO SPET scans and 3D T1-weighted MR images were acquired for each subject. Structures of the limbic system (i.e. hippocampus, amygdala, anterior thalamus, hypothalamus, mamillary bodies, basal forebrain, septal area and cingulate, orbitofrontal and parahippocampal cortices) were traced on the MR images and transferred to the coregistered SPET scans. Perfusion ratios for all limbic regions were calculated relative to cerebellar perfusion. General linear model multivariate analysis revealed that, overall, limbic structures showed significant hypoperfusion (F=7.802, P<0.00001, {eta}{sup 2}=0.695) in AD patients compared with NC. Greatest differences (d{>=}0.8) were found in the hippocampus, as well as all areas of the cingulate cortex. Significant relative hypoperfusion was also apparent in the parahippocampal cortex, amygdala/entorhinal cortex, septal area and anterior thalamus, all of which showed medium to large effect sizes (d=0.6-0.8). No significant relative perfusion differences were detected in the basal forebrain, hypothalamus, mamillary bodies or orbitofrontal cortex. Logistic regression indicated that posterior cingulate cortex perfusion was able to discriminate AD patients from NC with 93% accuracy (95% sensitivity, 88% specificity). The current results suggest that most, but not all, limbic structures show significant relative hypoperfusion in AD. These findings validate previous post-mortem studies and could be useful in improving diagnostic accuracy, monitoring disease progression and evaluating potential treatment strategies in AD. (orig.)

  11. MRI in ocular drug delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Li, S. Kevin; Lizak, Martin J.; Jeong, Eun-Kee

    2008-01-01

    Conventional pharmacokinetic methods for studying ocular drug delivery are invasive and cannot be conveniently applied to humans. The advancement of MRI technology has provided new opportunities in ocular drug-delivery research. MRI provides a means to non-invasively and continuously monitor ocular drug-delivery systems with a contrast agent or compound labeled with a contrast agent. It is a useful technique in pharmacokinetic studies, evaluation of drug-delivery methods, and drug-delivery de...

  12. An MRI-Conditional External Cardiac Defibrillator for Resuscitation Within the MRI Scanner Bore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Ehud J.; Watkins, Ronald D.; Zviman, Menekhem M.; Guttman, Michael A.; Wang, Wei; Halperin, Henry A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Subjects undergoing cardiac arrest within an MRI scanner are currently removed from the bore and then from the MRI suite, prior to delivery of CPR and defibrillation, potentially increasing risk of mortality. This precludes many higher-risk (acute-ischemic, acute-stroke) patients from undergoing MRI imaging and MRI-guided intervention. An MRI-conditional cardiac defibrillator should enable scanning with defibrillation pads attached and the generator ON, enabling application of defibrillation within the MRI seconds after a cardiac event. An MRI-conditional external defibrillator may improve patient acceptance for MRI procedures. Methods and Results A commercial external defibrillator was rendered 1.5 Tesla MRI-conditional by addition of novel Radio-Frequency (RF) filters between the generator and commercial disposable surface-pads. The RF filters reduced emission into the MRI scanner, and prevented cable/surface-pad heating during imaging, while preserving all the defibrillator’s monitoring and delivery functions. Human volunteers were imaged using high Specific-Absorption-Rate sequences to validate MRI image quality (IQ) and lack of heating. Swine were electrically fibrillated (N=4) and thereafter defibrillated both outside and inside the MRI bore. MRI IQ was reduced by 0.8 or 1.6 dB, with the generator in monitoring mode and operating on battery or AC power, respectively. Commercial surface-pads did not create artifacts deeper than 6mm below the skin surface. RF heating was within FDA guidelines. Defibrillation was completely successful inside and outside the MRI bore. Conclusions A prototype MRI-conditional defibrillation system successfully defibrillated in the MRI without degrading image quality, or increasing the time needed for defibrillation. It can increase patient acceptance for MRI procedures. PMID:27729363

  13. Targeting Accuracy, Procedure Times and User Experience of 240 Experimental MRI Biopsies Guided by a Clinical Add-On Navigation System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Busse

    Full Text Available MRI is of great clinical utility for the guidance of special diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. The majority of such procedures are performed iteratively ("in-and-out" in standard, closed-bore MRI systems with control imaging inside the bore and needle adjustments outside the bore. The fundamental limitations of such an approach have led to the development of various assistance techniques, from simple guidance tools to advanced navigation systems. The purpose of this work was to thoroughly assess the targeting accuracy, workflow and usability of a clinical add-on navigation solution on 240 simulated biopsies by different medical operators.Navigation relied on a virtual 3D MRI scene with real-time overlay of the optically tracked biopsy needle. Smart reference markers on a freely adjustable arm ensured proper registration. Twenty-four operators - attending (AR and resident radiologists (RR as well as medical students (MS - performed well-controlled biopsies of 10 embedded model targets (mean diameter: 8.5 mm, insertion depths: 17-76 mm. Targeting accuracy, procedure times and 13 Likert scores on system performance were determined (strong agreement: 5.0.Differences in diagnostic success rates (AR: 93%, RR: 88%, MS: 81% were not significant. In contrast, between-group differences in biopsy times (AR: 4:15, RR: 4:40, MS: 5:06 min:sec differed significantly (p<0.01. Mean overall rating was 4.2. The average operator would use the system again (4.8 and stated that the outcome justifies the extra effort (4.4. Lowest agreement was reported for the robustness against external perturbations (2.8.The described combination of optical tracking technology with an automatic MRI registration appears to be sufficiently accurate for instrument guidance in a standard (closed-bore MRI environment. High targeting accuracy and usability was demonstrated on a relatively large number of procedures and operators. Between groups with different expertise there were

  14. Targeting Accuracy, Procedure Times and User Experience of 240 Experimental MRI Biopsies Guided by a Clinical Add-On Navigation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Harald; Riedel, Tim; Garnov, Nikita; Thörmer, Gregor; Kahn, Thomas; Moche, Michael

    2015-01-01

    MRI is of great clinical utility for the guidance of special diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. The majority of such procedures are performed iteratively ("in-and-out") in standard, closed-bore MRI systems with control imaging inside the bore and needle adjustments outside the bore. The fundamental limitations of such an approach have led to the development of various assistance techniques, from simple guidance tools to advanced navigation systems. The purpose of this work was to thoroughly assess the targeting accuracy, workflow and usability of a clinical add-on navigation solution on 240 simulated biopsies by different medical operators. Navigation relied on a virtual 3D MRI scene with real-time overlay of the optically tracked biopsy needle. Smart reference markers on a freely adjustable arm ensured proper registration. Twenty-four operators - attending (AR) and resident radiologists (RR) as well as medical students (MS) - performed well-controlled biopsies of 10 embedded model targets (mean diameter: 8.5 mm, insertion depths: 17-76 mm). Targeting accuracy, procedure times and 13 Likert scores on system performance were determined (strong agreement: 5.0). Differences in diagnostic success rates (AR: 93%, RR: 88%, MS: 81%) were not significant. In contrast, between-group differences in biopsy times (AR: 4:15, RR: 4:40, MS: 5:06 min:sec) differed significantly (p<0.01). Mean overall rating was 4.2. The average operator would use the system again (4.8) and stated that the outcome justifies the extra effort (4.4). Lowest agreement was reported for the robustness against external perturbations (2.8). The described combination of optical tracking technology with an automatic MRI registration appears to be sufficiently accurate for instrument guidance in a standard (closed-bore) MRI environment. High targeting accuracy and usability was demonstrated on a relatively large number of procedures and operators. Between groups with different expertise there were

  15. Animal MRI Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Animal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Core develops and optimizes MRI methods for cardiovascular imaging of mice and rats. The Core provides imaging expertise,...

  16. The role of FDG-PET, HMPAO-SPET and MRI in the detection of brain involvement in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao Chiahung [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung (Taiwan, Province of China); Lan Jungliang [Division of Rheumatology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung (Taiwan, Province of China); ChangLai Shengping [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chung-Shan Medical and Dental College, Taichung (Taiwan, Province of China); Liao Kokaung [Electron Microscopic Laboratory, Chung-Shan Medical and Dental College, Taichung (Taiwan, Province of China); Yen Rouhfang; Chieng Poonung [Department of Nuclear Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1999-02-01

    Involvement of the brain is one of the most important complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE); however, its diagnosis is difficult due to the lack of effective imaging methods. We combined three brain imaging modalities - positron emission tomography with fluorine-18 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG-PET), single-photon emission computed tomography with technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO-SPET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) - in order to detect brain involvement in SLE. Thirty-seven SLE patients, aged 22-45 years, were divided into three groups. Group 1 (G1) consisted of ten patients with major neuropsychiatric manifestations; group 2 (G2) consisted of 15 patients with minor manifestations; and group 3 (G3) consisted of 12 patients without manifestations. FDG-PET findings were abnormal in 51% of patients: 90% of G1, 67% of G2 and 0% of G3 patients respectively. HMPAO-SPET findings were abnormal in 62% of patients: 100% of G1, 73% of G2 and 17% of G3 patients respectively. MRI findings were abnormal in 35% of patients: 70% of G1, 40% of G2 and 0% of G3 patients respectively. Grey matter was more commonly involved than white matter; 62% of patients presented with lesions in the cerebral cortex, 27% with lesions in the basal ganglion, 5% with lesions in the cerebellum, and 19% with lesions in white matter. No white matter lesions were found on FDG-PET or HMPAO-SPET. However, in 19% of patients, MRI demonstrated abnormally high signal lesions in white matter. Forty-three percent of cases had positive serum anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA). However, ACA was not related to FDG-PET, HMPAO-SPET or MRI findings. It may be concluding that HMPAO-SPET is a more sensitive tool for detecting brain involvement in SLE patients when compared with FDG-PET or MRI. However, MRI is necessary for detecting lesions in white matter. (orig.) With 3 figs., 2 tabs., 46 refs.

  17. Assessment of the coronary venous system in heart failure patients by blood pool agent enhanced whole-heart MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzke, Robert [University Hospital of Ulm, Department of Internal Medicine II, Ulm (Germany); Philips Research Europe, Clinical Sites Research, Hamburg (Germany); Binner, Ludwig; Bornstedt, Axel; Merkle, Nico; Lutz, Anja; Gradinger, Robert [University Hospital of Ulm, Department of Internal Medicine II, Ulm (Germany); Rasche, Volker [University Hospital of Ulm, Department of Internal Medicine II, Ulm (Germany); Experimental Cardiovascular Imaging, Internal Medicine II, Ulm (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    To investigate the feasibility of MRI for non-invasive assessment of the coronary sinus (CS) and the number and course of its major tributaries in heart failure patients. Fourteen non-ischaemic heart failure patients scheduled for cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) underwent additional whole-heart coronary venography. MRI was performed 1 day before device implantation. The visibility, location and dimensions of the CS and its major tributaries were assessed and the number of potential implantation sites identified. The MRI results were validated by X-ray venography conventionally acquired during the device implantation procedure. The right atrium (RA), CS and mid-cardiac vein (MCV) could be visualised in all patients. 36% of the identified candidate branches were located posterolaterally, 48% laterally and 16% anterolaterally. The average diameter of the CS was quantified as 9.8 mm, the posterior interventricular vein (PIV) 4.6 mm, posterolateral segments 3.3 mm, lateral 2.9 mm and anterolateral 2.9 mm. Concordance with X-ray in terms of number and location of candidate branches was given in most cases. Contrast-enhanced MRI venography appears feasible for non-invasive pre-interventional assessment of the course of the CS and its major tributaries. (orig.)

  18. Assessment of the coronary venous system in heart failure patients by blood pool agent enhanced whole-heart MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzke, Robert; Binner, Ludwig; Bornstedt, Axel; Merkle, Nico; Lutz, Anja; Gradinger, Robert; Rasche, Volker

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of MRI for non-invasive assessment of the coronary sinus (CS) and the number and course of its major tributaries in heart failure patients. Fourteen non-ischaemic heart failure patients scheduled for cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) underwent additional whole-heart coronary venography. MRI was performed 1 day before device implantation. The visibility, location and dimensions of the CS and its major tributaries were assessed and the number of potential implantation sites identified. The MRI results were validated by X-ray venography conventionally acquired during the device implantation procedure. The right atrium (RA), CS and mid-cardiac vein (MCV) could be visualised in all patients. 36% of the identified candidate branches were located posterolaterally, 48% laterally and 16% anterolaterally. The average diameter of the CS was quantified as 9.8 mm, the posterior interventricular vein (PIV) 4.6 mm, posterolateral segments 3.3 mm, lateral 2.9 mm and anterolateral 2.9 mm. Concordance with X-ray in terms of number and location of candidate branches was given in most cases. Contrast-enhanced MRI venography appears feasible for non-invasive pre-interventional assessment of the course of the CS and its major tributaries. (orig.)

  19. Statistical analysis of MRI-only based dose planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, M. E.; Waring, L. W.; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2012-01-01

    . MRIonly based RT eliminates these errors and reduce the time and costs of a CT scan. The aim of this study is to investigate the dosimetric differences of a treatment plan when the dose calculation is based on MRI as compared to CT. Materials and Methods: Four diagnostic groups are investigated; 12...... as a clinically approved treatment plan. The treatment planning software is Eclipse v.10.0 (Varian Medical Systems). The dose calculation based on MRI data is evaluated in two different ways; a homogeneous density assigned MRI (MRI unit), where the entire body is assigned an HU equal to water and a heterogeneous...... density assigned MRI (MRI bulk) where in addition the CT segmented bone is transferred to the MRI and assigned an age dependent HU based on ICRU report 46. The CT based clinical treatment plan and structure set are registered to the corresponding MRI unit and MRI bulk. The body is outlined on both the MRI...

  20. A clinico-MRI study of extrapyramidal symptoms in multiple system atrophy; Linear hyperintensity in the outer margin of the putamen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konagaya, Masaaki; Iida, Mitsuo [Suzuka National Hospital, Mie (Japan); Konagaya, Yoko; Honda, Hitoshi

    1993-06-01

    We studied extrapyramidal symptoms and T2-weighted MRI findings of the putamen in 20 patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA) and 25 with idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Nine of the 20 MSA patients showed extrapyramidal symptoms. We could not observe cerebellar ataxia in two of the 9 patients because of severe rigidity and skinesia. Eight of the 9 MSA patients with extrapyramidal symptoms showed linear hyperintensity in the outer margin of the putamen. This abnormal intensity was bilateral and symmetric in most patients. However, in MSA patients without extrapyramidal symptoms, only one patient showed the linear hyperintensity. We could not find such abnormal intensity in any of the patients with Parkinson's disease. On proton density MRI, the signal intensity in the lesion was higher than that in the gray matter, which leads the speculation that the hyperintensity is gliosis of the putamen or increased extracellular fluid space caused by severe shrinkage of the putamen. These characteristic MRI findings may distinguish MSA with extrapyramidal symptoms from Parkinson's disease. (J.P.N.).

  1. In vivo functional connectome of human brainstem nuclei of the ascending arousal, autonomic, and motor systems by high spatial resolution 7-Tesla fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianciardi, Marta; Toschi, Nicola; Eichner, Cornelius; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Setsompop, Kawin; Brown, Emery N; Hämäläinen, Matti S; Rosen, Bruce R; Wald, Lawrence L

    2016-06-01

    Our aim was to map the in vivo human functional connectivity of several brainstem nuclei with the rest of the brain by using seed-based correlation of ultra-high magnetic field functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. We used the recently developed template of 11 brainstem nuclei derived from multi-contrast structural MRI at 7 Tesla as seed regions to determine their connectivity to the rest of the brain. To achieve this, we used the increased contrast-to-noise ratio of 7-Tesla fMRI compared with 3 Tesla and time-efficient simultaneous multi-slice imaging to cover the brain with high spatial resolution (1.1-mm isotropic nominal resolution) while maintaining a short repetition time (2.5 s). The delineated Pearson's correlation-based functional connectivity diagrams (connectomes) of 11 brainstem nuclei of the ascending arousal, motor, and autonomic systems from 12 controls are presented and discussed in the context of existing histology and animal work. Considering that the investigated brainstem nuclei play a crucial role in several vital functions, the delineated preliminary connectomes might prove useful for future in vivo research and clinical studies of human brainstem function and pathology, including disorders of consciousness, sleep disorders, autonomic disorders, Parkinson's disease, and other motor disorders.

  2. T(2)-weighted microMRI and evoked potential of the visual system measurements during the development of hypomyelinated transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Melanie; Reyes, Samuel D; Hiltner, Timothy D; Givogri, M Irene; Tyszka, J Michael; Fisher, Robin; Campagnoni, Anthony T; Fraser, Scott E; Jacobs, Russell E; Readhead, Carol

    2007-02-01

    Our objective was to follow the course of a dysmyelinating disease followed by partial recovery in transgenic mice using non-invasive high-resolution (117 x 117 x 70 microm) magnetic resonance (microMRI) and evoked potential of the visual system (VEP) techniques. We used JOE (for J37 golli overexpressing) transgenic mice engineered to overexpress golli J37, a product of the Golli-mbp gene complex, specifically in oligodendrocytes. Individual JOE transgenics and their unaffected siblings were followed from 21 until 75-days-old using non-invasive in vivo VEPs and 3D T2-weighted microMRI on an 11.7 T scanner, performing what we believe is the first longitudinal study of its kind. The microMRI data indicated clear, global hypomyelination during the period of peak myelination (21-42 days), which was partially corrected at later ages (>60 days) in the JOE mice compared to controls. These microMRI data correlated well with [Campagnoni AT (1995) "Molecular biology of myelination". In: Ransom B, Kettenmann H (eds) Neuroglia--a Treatise. Oxford University Press, London, pp 555-570] myelin staining, [Campagnoni AT, Macklin WB (1988) Cellular and molecular aspects of myelin protein gene-expression. Mol Neurobiol 2:41-89] a transient intention tremor during the peak period of myelination, which abated at later ages, and [Lees MB, Brostoff SW (1984) Proteins in myelin. In: Morell (ed) Myelin. Plenum Press, New York and London, pp 197-224] VEPs which all indicated a significant delay of CNS myelin development and persistent hypomyelination in JOE mice. Overall these non-invasive techniques are capable of spatially resolving the increase in myelination in the normally developing and developmentally delayed mouse brain.

  3. Passive shimming of the fringe field of a superconducting magnet for ultra-low field hyperpolarized noble gas MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra-Robles, Juan; Cross, Albert R; Santyr, Giles E

    2005-05-01

    Hyperpolarized noble gases (HNGs) provide exciting possibilities for MR imaging at ultra-low magnetic field strengths (superconductive magnets used in clinical MR imaging can provide a stable magnetic field for this purpose. In addition to offering the benefit of HNG MR imaging alongside conventional high field proton MRI, this approach offers the other useful advantage of providing different field strengths at different distances from the magnet. However, the extremely strong field gradients associated with the fringe field present a major challenge for imaging since impractically high active shim currents would be required to achieve the necessary homogeneity. In this work, a simple passive shimming method based on the placement of a small number of ferromagnetic pieces is proposed to reduce the fringe field inhomogeneities to a level that can be corrected using standard active shims. The method explicitly takes into account the strong variations of the field over the volume of the ferromagnetic pieces used to shim. The method is used to obtain spectra in the fringe field of a high-field (1.89 T) superconducting magnet from hyperpolarized 129Xe gas samples at two different ultra-low field strengths (8.5 and 17 mT). The linewidths of spectra measured from imaging phantoms (30 Hz) indicate a homogeneity sufficient for MRI of the rat lung.

  4. Uncertainty in anticipation of uncomfortable rectal distension is modulated by the autonomic nervous system--a fMRI study in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Amandine; Van Oudenhove, Lukas; Pellissier, Sonia; Ly, Huynh Giao; Dupont, Patrick; Lafaye de Micheaux, Hugo; Tack, Jan; Dantzer, Cécile; Delon-Martin, Chantal; Bonaz, Bruno

    2015-02-15

    The human brain responds both before and during the application of aversive stimuli. Anticipation allows the organism to prepare its nociceptive system to respond adequately to the subsequent stimulus. The context in which an uncomfortable stimulus is experienced may also influence neural processing. Uncertainty of occurrence, timing and intensity of an aversive event may lead to increased anticipatory anxiety, fear, physiological arousal and sensory perception. We aimed to identify, in healthy volunteers, the effects of uncertainty in the anticipation of uncomfortable rectal distension, and the impact of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity and anxiety-related psychological variables on neural mechanisms of anticipation of rectal distension using fMRI. Barostat-controlled uncomfortable rectal distensions were preceded by cued uncertain or certain anticipation in 15 healthy volunteers in a fMRI protocol at 3T. Electrocardiographic data were concurrently registered by MR scanner. The low frequency (LF)-component of the heart rate variability (HRV) time-series was extracted and inserted as a regressor in the fMRI model ('LF-HRV model'). The impact of ANS activity was analyzed by comparing the fMRI signal in the 'standard model' and in the 'LF-HRV model' across the different anticipation and distension conditions. The scores of the psychological questionnaires and the rating of perceived anticipatory anxiety were included as covariates in the fMRI data analysis. Our experiments led to the following key findings: 1) the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) is the only activation site that relates to uncertainty in healthy volunteers and is directly correlated to individual questionnaire score for pain-related anxiety; 2) uncertain anticipation of rectal distension involved several relevant brain regions, namely activation of sgACC and medial prefrontal cortex and deactivation of amygdala, insula, thalamus, secondary somatosensory cortex, supplementary

  5. High-resolution small field-of-view magnetic resonance image acquisition system using a small planar coil and a pneumatic manipulator in an open MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Kohei; Masamune, Ken

    2015-10-01

    Low-field open magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently used for performing image-guided neurosurgical procedures. Intraoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images are useful for tracking brain shifts and verifying residual tumors. However, it is difficult to precisely determine the boundary of the brain tumors and normal brain tissues because the MR image resolution is low, especially when using a low-field open MRI scanner. To overcome this problem, a high-resolution MR image acquisition system was developed and tested. An MR-compatible manipulator with pneumatic actuators containing an MR signal receiver with a small radiofrequency (RF) coil was developed. The manipulator had five degrees of freedom for position and orientation control of the RF coil. An 8-mm planar RF coil with resistance and inductance of 2.04 [Formula: see text] and 1.00 [Formula: see text] was attached to the MR signal receiver at the distal end of the probe. MR images of phantom test devices were acquired using the MR signal receiver and normal head coil for signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) testing. The SNR of MR images acquired using the MR signal receiver was 8.0 times greater than that of MR images acquired using the normal head coil. The RF coil was moved by the manipulator, and local MR images of a phantom with a 2-mm grid were acquired using the MR signal receiver. A wide field-of-view MR image was generated from a montage of local MR images. A small field-of-view RF system with a pneumatic manipulator was integrated in a low-field MRI scanner to allow acquisition of both wide field-of-view and high-resolution MR images. This system is promising for image-guided neurosurgery as it may allow brain tumors to be observed more clearly and removed precisely.

  6. Clinical application of functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniwaki, Takayuki

    2010-01-01

    Described is the present state of clinical application of fMRI in the preoperative assessment of brain tumors, and plasticity in and pathophysiology of central diseases. For the tumor resection, fMRI is useful for risk assessment of postoperative nerve dysfunction, for selection of the patient rather suitable for brain mapping at the invasive surgery than at the pre-operation and for guidance of the operation itself. Preoperative fMRI alone can neither distinguish the regions of the primary and secondary functions nor exhibit the relation between the tumor and white matter fibers but there are compensatory means for these drawbacks. Benefit of preoperative fMRI has not yet been based on the evidence on double blind trials. Combination of fMRI imaging and electroencephalography (EEG) finding has shown that, in generalized epilepsy, extensive and stimulated activation occurs in both frontal/occipital regions and in thalamus area, respectively, and that the concomitant lowered activities are conceivably the reflection of burst discharge in normal brain functions. Plasticity in the human brain has been demonstrated by fMRI in cerebral vascular diseases, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Pathogenesis of Parkinson disease and depression has been better understood by fMRI investigations revealing regions with elevated and reduced activities. Studies of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder have shown similar change of activities with functional reductions of the right dorsolateral frontal anterior area and of dorsal frontal cingulate gyrus, together with stimulated wider regions to given tasks. As above, fMRI has greatly contributed to our understanding of diseases of central nervous system and is to be expected to expand wider in this field. (T.T.)

  7. Primary central nervous system lymphoma with lymphomatosis cerebri in an immunocompetent child: MRI and 18F-FDG PET-CT findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Tarun K; Sharma, Punit; Suman, Sudhir K C; Faizi, Nauroze A; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is extremely rare in immunocompetent children. We present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) findings of such a case in a 14-year old immunocompetent boy. In this patient, PCNSL was associated with lymphomatosis cerebri. Familiarity with the findings of this rare condition will improve the diagnostic confidence of the nuclear radiologist and avoid misdiagnosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  8. Designing a compact MRI motion phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmiedel Max

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Even today, dealing with motion artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a challenging task. Image corruption due to spontaneous body motion complicates diagnosis. In this work, an MRI phantom for rigid motion is presented. It is used to generate motion-corrupted data, which can serve for evaluation of blind motion compensation algorithms. In contrast to commercially available MRI motion phantoms, the presented setup works on small animal MRI systems. Furthermore, retrospective gating is performed on the data, which can be used as a reference for novel motion compensation approaches. The motion of the signal source can be reconstructed using motor trigger signals and be utilized as the ground truth for motion estimation. The proposed setup results in motion corrected images. Moreover, the importance of preprocessing the MRI raw data, e.g. phase-drift correction, is demonstrated. The gained knowledge can be used to design an MRI phantom for elastic motion.

  9. Whole-body MRI screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puls, Ralf [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt (Germany). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology; Hosten, Norbert (ed.) [Universitaetsklinikum Greifswald (Germany). Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology

    2014-07-01

    The advent of dedicated whole-body MRI scanners has made it possible to image the human body from head to toe with excellent spatial resolution and with the sensitivity and specificity of conventional MR systems. A comprehensive screening examination by MRI relies on fast image acquisition, and this is now feasible owing to several very recent developments, including multichannel techniques, new surface coil systems, and automatic table movement. The daily analysis of whole-body MRI datasets uncovers many incidental findings, which are discussed by an interdisciplinary advisory board of physicians from all specialties. This book provides a systematic overview of these incidental findings with the aid of approximately 240 high-quality images. The radiologists involved in the project have written chapters on each organ system, presenting a structured compilation of the most common findings, their morphologic appearances on whole-body MRI, and guidance on their clinical management. Chapters on technical and ethical issues are also included. It is hoped that this book will assist other diagnosticians in deciding how to handle the most common incidental findings encountered when performing whole-body MRI.

  10. Whole-body MRI screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puls, Ralf; Hosten, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    The advent of dedicated whole-body MRI scanners has made it possible to image the human body from head to toe with excellent spatial resolution and with the sensitivity and specificity of conventional MR systems. A comprehensive screening examination by MRI relies on fast image acquisition, and this is now feasible owing to several very recent developments, including multichannel techniques, new surface coil systems, and automatic table movement. The daily analysis of whole-body MRI datasets uncovers many incidental findings, which are discussed by an interdisciplinary advisory board of physicians from all specialties. This book provides a systematic overview of these incidental findings with the aid of approximately 240 high-quality images. The radiologists involved in the project have written chapters on each organ system, presenting a structured compilation of the most common findings, their morphologic appearances on whole-body MRI, and guidance on their clinical management. Chapters on technical and ethical issues are also included. It is hoped that this book will assist other diagnosticians in deciding how to handle the most common incidental findings encountered when performing whole-body MRI.

  11. Formal MRI criteria for the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harting, I.; Haehnel, S.; Meyding-Lamade, U.

    2004-01-01

    Multiple scloris (MS) is the most common demyelinating inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, presenting with multifocal, disseminated white matter lesions called plaques. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is very sensitive in detecting white matter abnormalities. By demonstrating the spatial and temporal dissemination in patients presenting with isolated clinical findings suggestive of MS, MRI contributes to estimating the likelihood of the disease. Since MRI is highly sensitive but not specific, it is important to apply formal MRI criteria. This article describes the characteristic MRI changes of MS and the so-called McDonald criteria for an MRI-supported diagnosis of MS. (orig.) [de

  12. A case of brain SLE: MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myung Soon; Kim, Seung Min [Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-01-15

    Systemic lupus erythematosus(SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by multisystem involvement including central nervous system and various neurologic symptoms. The authors experienced a case of brain SLE and report MRI and other neuroimaging findings.

  13. SIMS imaging of gadolinium isotopes in tissue from Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis patients: Release of free Gd from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, Jerrold L. [Department of Pathology, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York (United States); Chandra, Subhash [Cornell SIMS Laboratory, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)], E-mail: sc40@cornell.edu; Thakral, Charu [Department of Pathology, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York (United States); Abraham, Joshua M. [Cornell SIMS Laboratory, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    Recently, Gd-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents (GBMCA) have been linked to a new disease, Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis (NSF), with skin and systemic toxicity and death in certain patients with renal failure. Due to widespread use of GBMCA in diagnostic MRI, it is essential to study their excretion, metabolism, and target sites in cells and tissues. A CAMECA IMS-3f SIMS ion microscope and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were used for imaging Gd isotopes in relation to calcium distributions in histologic sections of human tissues. SIMS imaging revealed two types of Gd localization in skin biopsies of patients who received GBMCA. The Gd was present in micrometer size deposits in association with calcium, and in detectable amounts in a more diffuse cellular distribution. Only the Gd-containing deposits associated with Ca and P were detectable using SEM/EDS. As only insoluble deposits remain in the biopsy tissues after aqueous and organic solvent processing of the tissue, our observations support release of free Gd from the GBMCA and selective localization of insoluble Gd in the target tissue from patients with NSF. This study opens new novel applications of SIMS for characterization of the safety of GBMCA.

  14. Functional MRI of Language Processing and Recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Méndez Orellana (Carolina)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ My thesis describe the utility of implementing fMRI to investigate how the language system is reorganized in brain damaged patients. Specifically for aphasia research fMRI allows to show how specific language treatment methods have the potential to enhance language

  15. Kinematic change of the meniscus and the tibiofemoral joint space in asymptomatic volunteers using a wide bore 3T closed MRI system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eugene; Kim, Yeo Ju; Kim, Mi Young; Cho, Soon Gu [Inha University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Choong-gu, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Jang Gyu [Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dae Hyung [Inha University Hospital, Clinical Trail Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ryuh Sup [Inha University Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To evaluate kinematic changes in menisci and tibiofemoral joint spaces in extension and flexion using asymptomatic volunteers using a wide-bore 3-T closed MRI system. Twenty-two knees from asymptomatic volunteers were examined in knee extension and flexion using a 3-T MRI (sagittal 2D FSE T2-weighted sequence and sagittal 3D isotropic FSE proton density-weighted cube sequence). The meniscal positions, meniscal floating and flounce were evaluated. The widths of the medial and lateral tibiofemoral joint spaces and coronal tibiofemoral angles were measured. In the anteroposterior direction, meniscal extrusion was most frequently seen in the anterior horn of the medial menisci (100 %) in extensions (maximum 6.04 mm). Most of the menisci moved significantly to the posterior side from extension to flexion. The anteroposterior meniscal movement was the greatest for the anterior horn of the medial meniscus and least for the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. In the mediolateral direction, meniscal extrusion was seen in 52 % of the medial menisci in extensions (maximum 1.91 mm) and 29 % of lateral menisci in flexions (maximum 2.36 mm). From the extension to flexion, all medial and lateral menisci moved significantly to the lateral side. Meniscal floating was frequently observed in the posterior horn of medial menisci in extension. Meniscal flounce was frequently seen in lateral menisci in flexion with a widened lateral tibiofemoral joint space gap. The coronal tibiofemoral angle showed medial wedging in flexion, but not in extension. Wide-bore 3-T closed MRI revealed significant kinematic changes in the menisci and tibiofemoral joint spaces in asymptomatic volunteers. (orig.)

  16. WE-B-BRD-00: MRI for Radiation Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    The use of MRI in radiation therapy is rapidly increasing. Applications vary from the MRI simulator, to the MRI fused with CT, and to the integrated MRI+RT system. Compared with the standard MRI QA, a broader scope of QA features has to be defined in order to maximize the benefits of using MRI in radiation therapy. These QA features include geometric fidelity, image registration, motion management, cross-system alignment, and hardware interference. Advanced MRI techniques require a specific type of QA, as they are being widely used in radiation therapy planning, dose calculations, post-implant dosimetry, and prognoses. A vigorous and adaptive QA program is crucial to defining the responsibility of the entire radiation therapy group and detecting deviations from the performance of high-quality treatment. As a drastic departure from CT simulation, MRI simulation requires changes in the work flow of treatment planning and image guidance. MRI guided radiotherapy platforms are being developed and commercialized to take the advantage of the advance in knowledge, technology and clinical experience. This symposium will from an educational perspective discuss the scope and specific issues related to MRI guided radiotherapy. Learning Objectives: Understand the difference between a standard and a radiotherapy-specific MRI QA program. Understand the effects of MRI artifacts (geometric distortion and motion) on radiotherapy. Understand advanced MRI techniques (ultrashort echo, fast MRI including dynamic MRI and 4DMRI, diffusion, perfusion, and MRS) and related QA. Understand the methods to prepare MRI for treatment planning (electron density assignment, multimodality image registration, segmentation and motion management). Current status of MRI guided treatment platforms. Dr. Jihong Wang has a research grant with Elekta-MRL project. Dr. Ke Sheng receives research grants from Varian Medical systems.

  17. Cardiovascular MRI with ferumoxytol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, J.P.; Nguyen, K.-L.; Han, F.; Zhou, Z.; Salusky, I.; Ayad, I.; Hu, P.

    2016-01-01

    The practice of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) has changed significantly in the span of a decade. Concerns regarding gadolinium (Gd)-associated nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in those with severely impaired renal function spurred developments in low-dose CEMRA and non-contrast MRA as well as efforts to seek alternative MR contrast agents. Originally developed for MR imaging use, ferumoxytol (an ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle), is currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia in adults with renal disease. Since its clinical availability in 2009, there has been rising interest in the scientific and clinical use of ferumoxytol as an MR contrast agent. The unique physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of ferumoxytol, including its long intravascular half-life and high r 1 relaxivity, support a spectrum of MRI applications beyond the scope of Gd-based contrast agents. Moreover, whereas Gd is not found in biological systems, iron is essential for normal metabolism, and nutritional iron deficiency poses major public health challenges worldwide. Once the carbohydrate shell of ferumoxytol is degraded, the elemental iron at its core is incorporated into the reticuloendothelial system. These considerations position ferumoxytol as a potential game changer in the field of CEMRA and MRI. In this paper, we aim to summarise our experience with the cardiovascular applications of ferumoxytol and provide a brief synopsis of ongoing investigations on ferumoxytol-enhanced MR applications.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how ... What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a way of obtaining ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... examination poses almost no risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed. If sedation is used, there ... patient story here Images × ... Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials MRI Safety During Pregnancy Images related ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. MRI of the chest gives detailed pictures ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the ... This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a few types. ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... interfere with the magnetic field of the MRI unit, metal and electronic items are not allowed in ... does the equipment look like? The traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by ...

  4. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a ...

  5. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings ... tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms that ...

  6. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... women should not have this exam in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the ... not to have an MRI exam during the first trimester unless medically necessary. MRI may not always ...

  7. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... important to assess the health and function of these structures (heart, valves, great vessels, etc.). top of ... room. In addition to affecting the MRI images, these objects can become projectiles within the MRI scanner ...

  8. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ...

  9. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... heart, valves, great vessels, etc.). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  10. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ... MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has proven valuable in ...

  11. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... used in MRI exams is less likely to produce an allergic reaction than the iodine-based contrast ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played ... the limitations of MRI of the Chest? High-quality images are assured only if you are able ...

  13. MRI of the Chest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ... might be obscured by bone with other imaging methods. The contrast material used in MRI exams is ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that ... risking the side effects of conventional (catheter) angiography . Risks The MRI examination poses almost no risk to ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI examination poses almost no risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed. If ... tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically costs more and may take more time to perform ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... other internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians ... computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of cardiovascular conditions. MRI has ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography ( ...

  20. Canalis basilaris medianus: MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquemin, C.; Bosley, T.M.; Al Saleh, M.; Mullaney, P.

    2000-01-01

    We report the MRI appearances of an developmental anatomical variant of the basiocciput, with neuroimaging findings (CT and MRI). Such variants are commonly asymptomatic, but may be associated with episodes of meningitis. (orig.)

  1. Image correction during large and rapid B(0) variations in an open MRI system with permanent magnets using navigator echoes and phase compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianqi; Wang, Yi; Jiang, Yu; Xie, Haibin; Li, Gengying

    2009-09-01

    An open permanent magnet system with vertical B(0) field and without self-shielding can be quite susceptible to perturbations from external magnetic sources. B(0) variation in such a system located close to a subway station was measured to be greater than 0.7 microT by both MRI and a fluxgate magnetometer. This B(0) variation caused image artifacts. A navigator echo approach that monitored and compensated the view-to-view variation in magnetic resonance signal phase was developed to correct for image artifacts. Human brain imaging experiments using a multislice gradient-echo sequence demonstrated that the ghosting and blurring artifacts associated with B(0) variations were effectively removed using the navigator method.

  2. Grading system to categorize breast MRI using BI-RADS 5th edition: a statistical study of non-mass enhancement descriptors in terms of probability of malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Tatsunori; Yamada, Takayuki; Kanemaki, Yoshihide; Fujiwara, Keishi; Okamoto, Satoko; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2018-03-01

    To analyze the association of breast non-mass enhancement descriptors in the BI-RADS 5th edition with malignancy, and to establish a grading system and categorization of descriptors. This study was approved by our institutional review board. A total of 213 patients were enrolled. Breast MRI was performed with a 1.5-T MRI scanner using a 16-channel breast radiofrequency coil. Two radiologists determined internal enhancement and distribution of non-mass enhancement by consensus. Corresponding pathologic diagnoses were obtained by either biopsy or surgery. The probability of malignancy by descriptor was analyzed using Fisher's exact test and multivariate logistic regression analysis. The probability of malignancy by category was analyzed using Fisher's exact and multi-group comparison tests. One hundred seventy-eight lesions were malignant. Multivariate model analysis showed that internal enhancement (homogeneous vs others, p probability of malignancy (p < 0.0001). The three-grade criteria and categorization by sum-up grades of descriptors appear valid for non-mass enhancement.

  3. MRI-guided procedures in various regions of the body using a robotic assistance system in a closed-bore scanner: preliminary clinical experience and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moche, Michael; Zajonz, Dirk; Kahn, Thomas; Busse, Harald

    2010-04-01

    To present the clinical setup and workflow of a robotic assistance system for image-guided interventions in a conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment and to report our preliminary clinical experience with percutaneous biopsies in various body regions. The MR-compatible, servo-pneumatically driven, robotic device (Innomotion) fits into the 60-cm bore of a standard MR scanner. The needle placement (n = 25) accuracy was estimated by measuring the 3D deviation between needle tip and prescribed target point in a phantom. Percutaneous biopsies in six patients and different body regions were planned by graphically selecting entry and target points on intraoperatively acquired roadmap MR data. For insertion depths between 29 and 95 mm, the average 3D needle deviation was 2.2 +/- 0.7 mm (range 0.9-3.8 mm). Patients with a body mass index of up to approximately 30 kg/m(2) fitted into the bore with the device. Clinical work steps and limitations are reported for the various applications. All biopsies were diagnostic and could be completed without any major complications. Median planning and intervention times were 25 (range 20-36) and 44 (36-68) minutes, respectively. Preliminary clinical results in a standard MRI environment suggest that the presented robotic device provides accurate guidance for percutaneous procedures in various body regions. Shorter procedure times may be achievable by optimizing technical and workflow aspects. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Pre-clinical testing of a phased array ultrasound system for MRI-guided noninvasive surgery of the brain--a primate study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynynen, Kullervo; McDannold, Nathan; Clement, Greg; Jolesz, Ferenc A; Zadicario, Eyal; Killiany, Ron; Moore, Tara; Rosen, Douglas

    2006-08-01

    MRI-guided and monitored focused ultrasound thermal surgery of brain through intact skull was tested in three rhesus monkeys. The aim of this study was to determine the amount of skull heating in an animal model with a head shape similar to that of a human. The ultrasound beam was generated by a 512 channel phased array system (Exablate 3000, InSightec, Haifa, Israel) that was integrated within a 1.5-T MR-scanner. The skin was pre-cooled by degassed temperature controlled water circulating between the array surface and the skin. Skull surface temperature was measured with invasive thermocouple probes. The results showed that by applying surface cooling the skin and skull surface can be protected, and that the brain surface temperature becomes the limiting factor. The MRI thermometry was shown to be useful in detecting the tissue temperature distribution next to the bone, and it should be used to monitor the brain surface temperature. The acoustic intensity values during the 20 s sonications were adequate for thermal ablation in the human brain provided that surface cooling is used.

  5. MRI in acute poliomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornreich, L. [Imaging Department, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Kaplan Street, Petah Tiqva 49202 (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Dagan, O. [The Intensive Care Unit, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Beilinson Medical Campus, Petah Tiqva (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Grunebaum, M. [Imaging Department, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Kaplan Street, Petah Tiqva 49202 (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    1996-05-01

    MRI can be used in the diagnosis of anterior horn infection and for assessing the extent of disease. There are no specific MRI signs to differentiate between the various possible pathogens. This is demonstrated in the present case of poliomyelitis, in which MRI of the spine played an important role in establishing the diagnosis. (orig.). With 1 fig.

  6. MRI in acute poliomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornreich, L.; Dagan, O.; Grunebaum, M.

    1996-01-01

    MRI can be used in the diagnosis of anterior horn infection and for assessing the extent of disease. There are no specific MRI signs to differentiate between the various possible pathogens. This is demonstrated in the present case of poliomyelitis, in which MRI of the spine played an important role in establishing the diagnosis. (orig.). With 1 fig

  7. In-Bore Prostate Transperineal Interventions with an MRI-guided Parallel Manipulator: System Development and Preliminary Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Sohrab; Shang, Weijian; Li, Gang; Patel, Nirav; Fischer, Gregory S.; Tokuda, Junichi; Hata, Nobuhiko; Tempany, Clare M.; Iordachita, Iulian

    2015-01-01

    Background The robot-assisted minimally-invasive surgery is well recognized as a feasible solution for diagnosis and treatment of the prostate cancer in human. Methods In this paper the kinematics of a parallel 4 Degrees-of-Freedom (DOF) surgical manipulator designed for minimally invasive in-bore prostate percutaneous interventions through the patient's perineum. The proposed manipulator takes advantage of 4 sliders actuated by MRI-compatible piezoelectric motors and incremental rotary encoders. Errors, mostly originating from the design and manufacturing process, need to be identified and reduced before the robot is deployed in the clinical trials. Results The manipulator has undergone several experiments to evaluate the repeatability and accuracy of the needle placement which is an essential concern in percutaneous prostate interventions. Conclusion The acquired results endorse the sustainability, precision (about 1 mm in air (in x or y direction) at the needle's reference point) and reliability of the manipulator. PMID:26111458

  8. A new fun and robust version of an fMRI localizer for the frontotemporal language system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Terri L; Gallée, Jeanne; Fedorenko, Evelina

    2017-07-01

    A set of brain regions in the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes supports high-level linguistic processing. These regions can be reliably identified in individual subjects using fMRI, by contrasting neural responses to meaningful and structured language stimuli vs. stimuli matched for low-level properties but lacking meaning and/or structure. We here present a novel version of a language 'localizer,' which should be suitable for diverse populations including children and/or clinical populations who may have difficulty with reading or cognitively demanding tasks. In particular, we contrast responses to auditorily presented excerpts from engaging interviews or stories, and acoustically degraded versions of these materials. This language localizer is appealing because it uses (a) naturalistic and engaging linguistic materials, (b) auditory presentation, (c) a passive listening task, and can be easily adapted to new stimulus materials enabling comparisons of language activation in children and speakers of diverse languages.

  9. Correlation of histology and dynamic MR imaging (MRI) of intracranial meningiomas with a 0.5 Tesla MR system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruiwa, Hikaru; Abe, Toshi; Kojima, Kazuyuki; Nishimura, Hiroshi; Hirohata, Masaru; Shigemori, Minoru

    1996-01-01

    In 33 histologically verified intracranial meningiomas, the correlation between the pattern of the time-signal intensity curve (TIC) from dynamic MR imaging and the histological subtypes were studied. The patterns of TIC for meningiomas were classified into two types: type A with a steep rise to a peak within a short time; type B with a slow rise to a peak followed by a plateau. Of the 16 meningiomas of the meningothelial type, 14 (87%) were type A on the TIC. On the contrary, all of the fibroblastic meningiomas were type B. The others had an almost equal distribution between the two types. These results indicate that dynamic MRI does not always have a predictive value for the histological subtype of an intracranial meningioma or for the histological architecture of the meningothelial or fibroblastic components. (author)

  10. MRI: update on technology diffusion and acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppszallern, S; Hughes, C; Zimmerman, R A

    1991-04-01

    Over the past three years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become accepted as a valuable diagnostic tool, and its applications continue to expand. During this time, the number of units installed in the United States doubled. By 1990 about 2,000 MRI units were in place in the United States and nearly 20 percent of the MRI-installed base was mobile, according to a research study conducted by the Hadley Hart Group (Chicago) and Drew Consultants, Inc. (Concord, MA). With the introduction of the prospective payment system, many hospitals were hesitant to spend limited capital on new technology, such as MRI. At the same time, freestanding diagnostic imaging centers were on the rise. Some hospitals and entrepreneurs who foresaw the potential of MRI in health care pioneered its use in the clinical setting. Hospitals began to examine new partnership arrangements and alternative forms of financing, so that they too could offer MRI services. By the end of 1988, the majority of hospitals offering MRI services did not own their own unit and about 40 percent of the hospitals offering MRI services were in a mobile configuration according to the Hadley Hart Group. While the technology has been diffused into 100-bed hospitals via mobile service vendors in some parts of the country, many medium-sized and large hospitals also have entered the MRI services market in this fashion. In the larger hospitals, the patient demand or need for the service often would justify acquisition of MRI, but the expense of the technology, and in many areas restrictive state health planning policies, modified purchase of MRI systems by hospitals. Mobile service vendors offered hospitals a way to startup MRI services in a limited fashion without a major capital expenditure and its associated risk. As hospitals gain experience with mobile MRI and achieve or exceed their early utilization projections, administrators are reevaluating the need to expand services to a full-time fixed site. Early fixed

  11. MR-guided facet joint injection therapy using an open 1.0-T MRI system: an outcome study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freyhardt, Patrick; Bucourt, Maximilian de; Maurer, Martin; Renz, Diane; Gebauer, Bernhard; Hamm, Bernd; Streitparth, Florian; Hartwig, Tony; Teichgraeber, Ulf K.M.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy, safety and efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided facet joint injection therapy using a 1.0-T open MRI. One hundred and sixty-six facet joint blocks in 45 patients with lower back pain were performed under MR fluoroscopic guidance using a proton-density-weighted turbo-spin-echo sequence. An in-room monitor, wireless MR-mouse for operator-controlled multiplanar navigation, a flexible surface coil and MR-compatible 20-G needle were used. Clinical outcome was evaluated by questionnaire before intervention and after 1 week, 3, 6 and 12 months using a numerical visual analogue scale (VAS). All facet joint blocks were considered technically successful with distribution of the injectant within and/or around the targeted facet joint. No major complications occurred. The final outcome analysis included 38 patients. An immediate effect was reported by 63 % of the patients. A positive mid-/long-term effect was seen in 13 patients (34 %) after 6 months and in 9 patients (24 %) after 12 months. Mean VAS was reduced from 7.1 ± 1.7 (baseline) to 3.5 ± 2.2, 4.1 ± 3.0, 3.8 ± 2.9 and 4.6 ± 2.9 at 1 week, 3, 6 and 12 months (P < 0.01). MR-guided facet joint injection therapy of the lumbosacral spine is accurate, safe and efficient in the symptomatic treatment of lower back pain. (orig.)

  12. Initial clinical experience with a quadrupole butterfly coil for spinal injection interventions in an open MRI system at 1.0 tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonczyk, Martin; Hamm, Bernd; Heinrich, Andreas; Thomas, Andreas; Rathke, Hendrik; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Güttler, Felix; Teichgräber, Ulf K M; de Bucourt, Maximilian

    2014-02-01

    To report our initial clinical experience with a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) quadrupole coil that allows interventions in prone position. Fifteen patients (seven women, eight men; average age, 42.8 years) were treated in the same 1.0-Tesla Panorama High Field Open (HFO) MRI system (Panorama HFO) using a quadrupole butterfly coil (Bfly) and compared with 15 patients matched for sex, age, and MR intervention using the MultiPurposeL coil (MPL), performed in conventional lateral decubitus position (all, Philips Medical Systems, Best, The Netherlands). All interventions were performed with a near-real-time proton density turbo spin echo (PD TSE) sequence (time to repeat/time to echo/flip angle/acquisition time, 600 ms/10 ms/90°/3 s/image). Qualitative and quantitative image analyses were performed, including signal intensity, signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratio (SNR, CNR), contrast, and full width at half maximum (FWHM) measurements. Contrast differed significantly between the needle and muscles (Bfly 0.27/MPL 0.17), as well as the needle and periradicular fat (0.13/0.24) during the intervention (both, p=0.029), as well as the CNR between muscles and the needle (10.61/5.23; p=0.010), although the FWHM values did not (2.4/2.2; p=0.754). The signal intensity of the needle in interventional imaging (1152.9/793.2; p=0.006) and the postinterventional SNR values of subcutaneous fat (15.3/28.6; p=0.007), muscles (6.6/11.8; p=0.011), and the CNR between these tissues (8.7/17.5; p=0.004) yielded significant differences. The new coil is a valid alternative for MR-guided interventions in an open MRI system at 1.0 tesla, especially if patients cannot (or prefer not to) be in a lateral decubitus position or if prone positioning yields better access to the target zone.

  13. IClinfMRI Software for Integrating Functional MRI Techniques in Presurgical Mapping and Clinical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ai-Ling; Hou, Ping; Johnson, Jason M; Wu, Changwei W; Noll, Kyle R; Prabhu, Sujit S; Ferguson, Sherise D; Kumar, Vinodh A; Schomer, Donald F; Hazle, John D; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Liu, Ho-Ling

    2018-01-01

    Task-evoked and resting-state (rs) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) techniques have been applied to the clinical management of neurological diseases, exemplified by presurgical localization of eloquent cortex, to assist neurosurgeons in maximizing resection while preserving brain functions. In addition, recent studies have recommended incorporating cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) imaging into clinical fMRI to evaluate the risk of lesion-induced neurovascular uncoupling (NVU). Although each of these imaging techniques possesses its own advantage for presurgical mapping, a specialized clinical software that integrates the three complementary techniques and promptly outputs the analyzed results to radiology and surgical navigation systems in a clinical format is still lacking. We developed the Integrated fMRI for Clinical Research (IClinfMRI) software to facilitate these needs. Beyond the independent processing of task-fMRI, rs-fMRI, and CVR mapping, IClinfMRI encompasses three unique functions: (1) supporting the interactive rs-fMRI mapping while visualizing task-fMRI results (or results from published meta-analysis) as a guidance map, (2) indicating/visualizing the NVU potential on analyzed fMRI maps, and (3) exporting these advanced mapping results in a Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) format that are ready to export to a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) and a surgical navigation system. In summary, IClinfMRI has the merits of efficiently translating and integrating state-of-the-art imaging techniques for presurgical functional mapping and clinical fMRI studies.

  14. Relations between the distribution of signal strength on dynamic MRI imaging and the effect of primary systemic chemotherapy on breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Koji; Endo, Naoki; Miyanaga, Tamon; Hosokawa, Osamu; Takeda, Takayuki; Kaizaki, Yasuharu

    2009-01-01

    The subjects were 24 patients in whom MRI was performed before and after primary system chemotherapy (PSC). We investigated the pattern of contrast enhancement with respect to treatment responses. We prepared the time-signal intensity in each region of interest (ROI) (small ROI), established by dividing the maximum cut surface of each tumor into 9, and then subdividing them, and examined the distribution of enhancement. We counted small ROIs showing early enhancement and late washout per lesion. Counts were plotted on the longitudinal axis, and the tumor reduction rate on the transverse axis based on data for all tumors. These were also evaluated with respect to subtypes. The complete response (CR) group showed early enhancement and late washout. In addition, the small ROI count was correlated with the tumor reduction rate only in the luminal group. In this group, treatment responses may have more strongly depended on the intra-tumoral vascular density and permeability, because anticancer agent sensitivity was low. (author)

  15. Complex Wavelet transform for MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junor, P.; Janney, P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: There is a perpetual compromise encountered in magnetic resonance (MRl) image reconstruction, between the traditional elements of image quality (noise, spatial resolution and contrast). Additional factors exacerbating this trade-off include various artifacts, computational (and hence time-dependent) overhead, and financial expense. This paper outlines a new approach to the problem of minimizing MRI image acquisition and reconstruction time without compromising resolution and noise reduction. The standard approaches for reconstructing magnetic resonance (MRI) images from raw data (which rely on relatively conventional signal processing) have matured but there are a number of challenges which limit their use. A major one is the 'intrinsic' signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the reconstructed image that depends on the strength of the main field. A typical clinical MRI almost invariably uses a super-cooled magnet in order to achieve a high field strength. The ongoing running cost of these super-cooled magnets prompts consideration of alternative magnet systems for use in MRIs for developing countries and in some remote regional installations. The decrease in image quality from using lower field strength magnets can be addressed by improvements in signal processing strategies. Conversely, improved signal processing will obviously benefit the current conventional field strength MRI machines. Moreover, the 'waiting time' experienced in many MR sequences (due to the relaxation time delays) can be exploited by more rigorous processing of the MR signals. Acquisition often needs to be repeated so that coherent averaging may partially redress the shortfall in SNR, at the expense of further delay. Wavelet transforms have been used in MRI as an alternative for encoding and denoising for over a decade. These have not supplanted the traditional Fourier transform methods that have long been the mainstay of MRI reconstruction, but have some inflexibility. The dual

  16. Robot-assisted biopsies in a high-field MRI system. First clinical results; Roboterunterstuetzte Punktion in einem Hochfeld-Kernspintomografen. Erste klinische Ergebnisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schell, B.; Eichler, K.; Mack, M.G.; Mueller, C.; Kerl, J.M.; Beeres, M.; Thalhammer, A.; Vogl, T.J.; Zangos, S. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Czerny, C. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Unfall-, Hand- und Wiederherstellungschirurgie

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical use of MR-guided biopsies in patients with suspicious lesions using a new MR-compatible assistance system in a high-field MR system. Materials and Methods: Six patients with suspicious focal lesions in various anatomic regions underwent percutanous biopsy in a high-field MR system (1.5 T, Magnetom Espree, Siemens) using a new MR-compatible assistance system (Innomotion). The procedures were planned and guided using T1-weighted FLASH and TrueFISP sequences. A servopneumatic drive then moved the guiding arm automatically to the insertion point. An MRI compatible 15G biopsy system (Somatex) was introduced by a physician guided by the needle holder and multiple biopsies were performed using the coaxial technique. The feasibility, duration of the intervention and biopsy findings were analyzed. Results: The proposed new system allows accurate punctures in a high-field MR system. The assistance device did not interfere with the image quality, and guided the needle virtually exactly as planned. Histological examination could be conducted on every patient. The lesion was malignant in four cases, and an infectious etiology was diagnosed for the two remaining lesions. Regarding the differentiation of anatomical and pathological structures and position monitoring of the insertion needle, TrueFISP images are to be given preference. The average intervention time was 41 minutes. Lesions up to 15.4 cm beneath the skin surface were punctured. Conclusion: The proposed MR-guided assistance system can be successfully utilized in a high-field MR system for accurate punctures of even deep lesions in various anatomic regions. (orig.)

  17. [Fusion of MRI, fMRI and intraoperative MRI data. Methods and clinical significance exemplified by neurosurgical interventions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moche, M; Busse, H; Dannenberg, C; Schulz, T; Schmitgen, A; Trantakis, C; Winkler, D; Schmidt, F; Kahn, T

    2001-11-01

    The aim of this work was to realize and clinically evaluate an image fusion platform for the integration of preoperative MRI and fMRI data into the intraoperative images of an interventional MRI system with a focus on neurosurgical procedures. A vertically open 0.5 T MRI scanner was equipped with a dedicated navigation system enabling the registration of additional imaging modalities (MRI, fMRI, CT) with the intraoperatively acquired data sets. These merged image data served as the basis for interventional planning and multimodal navigation. So far, the system has been used in 70 neurosurgical interventions (13 of which involved image data fusion--requiring 15 minutes extra time). The augmented navigation system is characterized by a higher frame rate and a higher image quality as compared to the system-integrated navigation based on continuously acquired (near) real time images. Patient movement and tissue shifts can be immediately detected by monitoring the morphological differences between both navigation scenes. The multimodal image fusion allowed a refined navigation planning especially for the resection of deeply seated brain lesions or pathologies close to eloquent areas. Augmented intraoperative orientation and instrument guidance improve the safety and accuracy of neurosurgical interventions.

  18. Breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) lexicon for breast MRI: Interobserver variability in the description and assignment of BI-RADS category

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Khoury, Mona, E-mail: monelkhoury@gmail.com [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montréal, Breast Centre, Radiology Department, 3840 Rue Saint Urbain, Montréal, QC H2W1T8 (Canada); Lalonde, Lucie; David, Julie; Labelle, Maude [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montréal, Breast Centre, Radiology Department, 3840 Rue Saint Urbain, Montréal, QC H2W1T8 (Canada); Mesurolle, Benoit [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de McGill, Cedar Breast Centre, Radiology Department, 687 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, QC H3A1A1 (Canada); Trop, Isabelle [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montréal, Breast Centre, Radiology Department, 3840 Rue Saint Urbain, Montréal, QC H2W1T8 (Canada)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • The use of BI-RADS lexicon in interpreting breast MRI examinations is beneficial. • Our study shows: (a) moderate to substantial agreement between observers and (b) better agreement in interpreting mass than non-mass enhancement (NME). • Careful analysis of the NME should be done to help detect cancer as early as possible. - Abstract: Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate interobserver variability between breast radiologists when describing abnormal enhancement on breast MR examinations and assigning a BI-RADS category using the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) terminology. Materials and methods: Five breast radiologists blinded to patients’ medical history and pathologic results retrospectively and independently reviewed 257 abnormal areas of enhancement on breast MRI performed in 173 women. Each radiologist described the focal enhancement using BI-RADS terminology and assigned a final BI-RADS category. Krippendorff's α coefficient of agreement was used to asses interobserver variability. Results: All radiologists agreed on the morphology of enhancement in 183/257 (71%) lesions, yielding a substantial agreement (Krippendorff's α = 0.71). Moderate agreement was obtained for mass descriptors – shape, margins and internal enhancement – (α = 0.55, 0.51 and 0.45 respectively) and NME (non-mass enhancement) descriptors – distribution and internal enhancement – (α = 0.54 and 0.43). Overall substantial agreement was obtained for BI-RADS category assignment (α = 0.71). It was however only moderate (α = 0.38) for NME compared to mass (α = 0.80). Conclusion: Our study shows good agreement in describing mass and NME on a breast MR examination but a better agreement in predicting malignancy for mass than NME.

  19. Breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) lexicon for breast MRI: Interobserver variability in the description and assignment of BI-RADS category

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Khoury, Mona; Lalonde, Lucie; David, Julie; Labelle, Maude; Mesurolle, Benoit; Trop, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The use of BI-RADS lexicon in interpreting breast MRI examinations is beneficial. • Our study shows: (a) moderate to substantial agreement between observers and (b) better agreement in interpreting mass than non-mass enhancement (NME). • Careful analysis of the NME should be done to help detect cancer as early as possible. - Abstract: Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate interobserver variability between breast radiologists when describing abnormal enhancement on breast MR examinations and assigning a BI-RADS category using the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) terminology. Materials and methods: Five breast radiologists blinded to patients’ medical history and pathologic results retrospectively and independently reviewed 257 abnormal areas of enhancement on breast MRI performed in 173 women. Each radiologist described the focal enhancement using BI-RADS terminology and assigned a final BI-RADS category. Krippendorff's α coefficient of agreement was used to asses interobserver variability. Results: All radiologists agreed on the morphology of enhancement in 183/257 (71%) lesions, yielding a substantial agreement (Krippendorff's α = 0.71). Moderate agreement was obtained for mass descriptors – shape, margins and internal enhancement – (α = 0.55, 0.51 and 0.45 respectively) and NME (non-mass enhancement) descriptors – distribution and internal enhancement – (α = 0.54 and 0.43). Overall substantial agreement was obtained for BI-RADS category assignment (α = 0.71). It was however only moderate (α = 0.38) for NME compared to mass (α = 0.80). Conclusion: Our study shows good agreement in describing mass and NME on a breast MR examination but a better agreement in predicting malignancy for mass than NME

  20. Evaluation of the ESUR PI-RADS scoring system for multiparametric MRI of the prostate with targeted MR/TRUS fusion-guided biopsy at 3.0 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roethke, M C; Kuru, T H; Schultze, S; Tichy, D; Kopp-Schneider, A; Fenchel, M; Schlemmer, H-P; Hadaschik, B A

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) proposed by the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) for detection of prostate cancer (PCa) by multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) in a consecutive cohort of patients with magnetic resonance/transrectal ultrasound (MR/TRUS) fusion-guided biopsy. Suspicious lesions on mpMRI at 3.0 T were scored according to the PI-RADS system before MR/TRUS fusion-guided biopsy and correlated to histopathology results. Statistical correlation was obtained by a Mann-Whitney U test. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) and optimal thresholds were calculated. In 64 patients, 128/445 positive biopsy cores were obtained out of 95 suspicious regions of interest (ROIs). PCa was present in 27/64 (42%) of the patients. ROC results for the aggregated PI-RADS scores exhibited higher areas under the curve compared to those of the Likert score. Sensitivity/Specificity for the following thresholds were calculated: 85 %/73 % and 67 %/92 % for PI-RADS scores of 9 and 10, respectively; 85 %/60 % and 56 %/97 % for Likert scores of 3 and 4, respectively [corrected. The standardised ESUR PI-RADS system is beneficial to indicate the likelihood of PCa of suspicious lesions on mpMRI. It is also valuable to identify locations to be targeted with biopsy. The aggregated PI-RADS score achieved better results compared to the single five-point Likert score. • The ESUR PI-RADS scoring system was evaluated using multiparametric 3.0-T MRI. • To investigate suspicious findings, transperineal MR/TRUS fusion-guided biopsy was used. • PI-RADS can guide biopsy locations and improve detection of clinically significant cancer. • Biopsy procedures can be optimised, reducing unnecessary negative biopsies for patients. • The PI-RADS scoring system may contribute to more effective prostate MRI.

  1. MRI of meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshio; Hiraki, Yoshio; Kaji, Mitumasa

    1988-01-01

    MRI has gained a prominent position in the diagnosis of brain tumors. We examined 30 cases of meningiomas and distinguished their subtype according to the criteria of Rubinic histology. We discussed the MRI findings and compared then with X-CT findings so to their intensity, delination of tumors, whether accompanied by peripheral edema, and T 1 values. MRI delinated the tumors as well as CE-CT. No remarkable difference was found between the subtypes. (author)

  2. MRI assessment program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    Usage, cost and efficacy data from the MRI Assessment Program to 30 March 1988 is presented, as a continuation of an earlier analysis. Analysis has been performed on data from 8565 examinations relating to 7997 patients at 4 hospitals. MRI was used mainly for examination of the head and spine. Some details of the follow up studies being conducted on selected patients and disease categories are given. A consensus statement is included which summaries the view of the Technical Committee on the potential applications of MRI in Australia. The MRI unit quench incident at Royal Adelaide Hospital is described. Refs., 10 figs., tabs

  3. Radiation induced currents in MRI RF coils: application to linac/MRI integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, B.; Fallone, B. G.; Rathee, S.

    2010-02-01

    The integration of medical linear accelerators (linac) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems is advancing the current state of image-guided radiotherapy. The MRI in these integrated units will provide real-time, accurate tumor locations for radiotherapy treatment, thus decreasing geometric margins around tumors and reducing normal tissue damage. In the real-time operation of these integrated systems, the radiofrequency (RF) coils of MRI will be irradiated with radiation pulses from the linac. The effect of pulsed radiation on MRI radio frequency (RF) coils is not known and must be studied. The instantaneous radiation induced current (RIC) in two different MRI RF coils were measured and presented. The frequency spectra of the induced currents were calculated. Some basic characterization of the RIC was also done: isolation of the RF coil component responsible for RIC, dependence of RIC on dose rate, and effect of wax buildup placed on coil on RIC. Both the time and frequency characteristics of the RIC were seen to vary with the MRI RF coil used. The copper windings of the RF coils were isolated as the main source of RIC. A linear dependence on dose rate was seen. The RIC was decreased with wax buildup, suggesting an electronic disequilibrium as the cause of RIC. This study shows a measurable RIC present in MRI RF coils. This unwanted current could be possibly detrimental to the signal to noise ratio in MRI and produce image artifacts.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open units are especially helpful for examining larger patients or those with claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... does not completely surround you. Some newer MRI machines have a larger diameter bore which can be ... size patients or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the first three to four months of pregnancy unless the potential benefit from the MRI exam ... the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. If you have claustrophobia (fear of ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information on the chemicals present in the body's cells, may also be performed during the MRI exam ... medically necessary. MRI may not always distinguish between cancer tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically ...

  8. Corroboration of in utero MRI using post-mortem MRI and autopsy in foetuses with CNS abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitby, E.H.; Variend, S.; Rutter, S.; Paley, M.N.J.; Wilkinson, I.D.; Davies, N.P.; Sparey, C.; Griffiths, P.D.

    2004-01-01

    AIMS: To corroborate the findings of in utero magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with autopsy and post-mortem MRI in cases of known or suspected central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities on ultrasound and to compare the diagnostic accuracy of ante-natal ultrasound and in utero MRI. METHODS: Twelve pregnant women, whose foetuses had suspected central nervous system abnormalities underwent in utero MRI. The foetuses were imaged using MRi before autopsy. The data were used to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of in utero MRI when compared with a reference standard of autopsy and post-mortem MRI in 10 cases and post-mortem MRI alone in two cases. RESULTS: The diagnostic accuracy of antenatal ultrasound and in utero MRI in correctly characterizing brain and spine abnormalities were 42 and 100%, respectively. CONCLUSION: In utero MRI provides a useful adjuvant to antenatal ultrasound when assessing CNS abnormalities by providing more accurate anatomical information. Post-mortem MRI assists the diagnosis of macroscopic structural abnormalities

  9. Multiparametric prostate MRI: technical conduct, standardized report and clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, Matteo; Mele, Fabrizio; Garrou, Diletta; Walz, Jochen; Fütterer, Jurgen J; Russo, Filippo; Vassallo, Lorenzo; Villers, Arnauld; Emberton, Mark; Valerio, Massimo

    2018-02-01

    Multiparametric prostate MRI (mp-MRI) is an emerging imaging modality for diagnosis, characterization, staging, and treatment planning of prostate cancer (PCa). The technique, results reporting, and its role in clinical practice have been the subject of significant development over the last decade. Although mp-MRI is not yet routinely used in the diagnostic pathway, almost all urological guidelines have emphasized the potential role of mp-MRI in several aspects of PCa management. Moreover, new MRI sequences and scanning techniques are currently under evaluation to improve the diagnostic accuracy of mp-MRI. This review presents an overview of mp-MRI, summarizing the technical applications, the standardized reporting systems used, and their current roles in various stages of PCa management. Finally, this critical review also reports the main limitations and future perspectives of the technique.

  10. Clinical and MRI evaluation of tuberculous meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Chunjing; Shu Jiner; Chen Jian; Sheng Sanlan; Lu Jinhua; Cai Xiaoxiao; Li Huimin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relationship of clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with tuberculous meningitis (TBM), and to improve the understanding of TBM. Methods: The clinical and MRI findings in 42 patients with confirmed TBM were analyzed retrospectively. MRI examination was performed using a 1 Tesla system, including SE T 1 WI and T 2 WI. Intravenous contrast was injected in 29 patients, and follow-up scans were performed on 17 patients. Results: Of 24 patients with early TBM, MRI was abnormal in 5(21%) with slight Tl-hypointense meningeal (4) or ependymal thickening (1). MRI on 33/35 (94%) patients with late stage TBM was abnormal with T 1 hypointensity and T 2 hyperintensity including meningeal thickening (19), mild surrounding brain edema (10), nodules (11), tuberculoma (5) and abscess (2). There was significant plaque-like, nodular or rim enhancement with surrounding brain edema. Conclusion: Tuberculous meningitis has minimal clinical and MRI findings in the early phase and significant clinical and MRI findings in the late phase. The enhanced scan may help to detect the abnormality. (authors)

  11. A low-cost MRI compatible keyboard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin Snejbjerg; Heggli, Ole Adrian; Alves da Mota, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    , presenting a challenging environment for playing an instrument. Here, we present an MRI-compatible polyphonic keyboard with a materials cost of 850 $, designed and tested for safe use in 3T (three Tesla) MRI-scanners. We describe design considerations, and prior work in the field. In addition, we provide...... recommendations for future designs and comment on the possibility of using the keyboard in magnetoencephalography (MEG) systems. Preliminary results indicate a comfortable playing experience with no disturbance of the imaging process....

  12. MRI in sarcoglycanopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tasca, Giorgio; Monforte, Mauro; Díaz-Manera, Jordi

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To characterise the pattern and spectrum of involvement on muscle MRI in a large cohort of patients with sarcoglycanopathies, which are limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD2C-2F) caused by mutations in one of the four genes coding for muscle sarcoglycans. METHODS: Lower limb MRI sca...

  13. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info About Us News Physician ... absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. ...

  14. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various ... seen by other imaging modalities, such as chest x-ray or CT. A special form of MRI called ...

  15. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fitting and has no metal fasteners. Guidelines about eating and drinking before an MRI exam vary with the specific exam and with the imaging facility. Unless you are told otherwise, you may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ...

  17. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a few types. People with the ...

  18. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various ... seen by other imaging modalities, such as chest x-ray or CT. A special form of MRI called ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... structure of an organ and how it is working. MRI enables the discovery of abnormalities that might be obscured by bone with other imaging methods. The contrast material used in MRI exams is less likely to produce an allergic reaction than the ...

  20. MRI of the Chest

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    Full Text Available ... computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. MRI ... cancer, heart and vascular disease, heart valve abnormalities, bone and other soft tissue abnormalities of the chest. MRI is also useful ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other internal body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to ... computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms that ...

  2. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the MRI Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. ...

  3. Study of the YBa2Cu3O-7-δ superconductor application as a low magnetic field sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, G.L; Shigue, C.Y.; Santos, C.A.M. dos; Machado, A.J.

    2000-01-01

    It has been proposed in the literature a new regime for high critical temperature superconductors labeled as thermally activated flux flow (TAFF). This regime presents a state in which vortex dynamic exhibit a ohmic behavior. The resistivity in this regime is proportional to the applied magnetic field for small current densities. Materials showing this behavior have high disordering and present semiconductor behavior in normal state with broad transition temperature. In this work is presented a systematic study of the magnetoresistance as a function of the applied magnetic field for polycrystalline samples with several thickness. Results of X ray diffraction, resistivity as a function of the temperature, I-V characteristic curves and magnetoresistance are showed. Finally is proposed a calibration curve of the magnetoresistance as a function of the magnetic field, that show the possibility of its use as magnetic field sensor. (author)

  4. Electron Bernstein Wave Heating by OXB-Mode Conversion at Low Magnetic Field in the WEGA Stellarator

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Podoba, Y.Y.; Laqua, H.P.; Warr, G.B.; Schubert, M.; Otte, M.; Marsen, S.; Wagner, F.; Andruczyk, D.; Holzhauer, E.; Preinhaelter, Josef; Urban, Jakub

    -, č. 109 (2007), s. 4-6 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Overdense plasma * Conversion * Emission * Stelarators * Elektron Bernstein waves Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://www.ornl.gov/sci/fed/stelnews

  5. Magnetically modulated microwave absorption (MMMA) measurements at low magnetic fields on the ferromagnetic state of [TDAE]C60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bele, P.; Brunner, H.

    1997-01-01

    The ferromagnetic state and reported superconductivity of [TDAE]C 60 (where TDAE is tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene) are investigated by magnetically modulated microwave absorption (MMMA). The results are compared with those reported using alternative physical measurement techniques, and a hypothesis proposed to explain the observed behavior. No evidence for superconductivity is found. (orig.)

  6. Global and system-specific resting-state fMRI fluctuations are uncorrelated: principal component analysis reveals anti-correlated networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, Felix; Bellec, Pierre; Shmuel, Amir

    2011-01-01

    The influence of the global average signal (GAS) on functional-magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)-based resting-state functional connectivity is a matter of ongoing debate. The global average fluctuations increase the correlation between functional systems beyond the correlation that reflects their specific functional connectivity. Hence, removal of the GAS is a common practice for facilitating the observation of network-specific functional connectivity. This strategy relies on the implicit assumption of a linear-additive model according to which global fluctuations, irrespective of their origin, and network-specific fluctuations are super-positioned. However, removal of the GAS introduces spurious negative correlations between functional systems, bringing into question the validity of previous findings of negative correlations between fluctuations in the default-mode and the task-positive networks. Here we present an alternative method for estimating global fluctuations, immune to the complications associated with the GAS. Principal components analysis was applied to resting-state fMRI time-series. A global-signal effect estimator was defined as the principal component (PC) that correlated best with the GAS. The mean correlation coefficient between our proposed PC-based global effect estimator and the GAS was 0.97±0.05, demonstrating that our estimator successfully approximated the GAS. In 66 out of 68 runs, the PC that showed the highest correlation with the GAS was the first PC. Since PCs are orthogonal, our method provides an estimator of the global fluctuations, which is uncorrelated to the remaining, network-specific fluctuations. Moreover, unlike the regression of the GAS, the regression of the PC-based global effect estimator does not introduce spurious anti-correlations beyond the decrease in seed-based correlation values allowed by the assumed additive model. After regressing this PC-based estimator out of the original time-series, we observed robust anti

  7. TH-AB-BRA-08: Simulated Tumor Tracking in An MRI Linac for Lung Tumor Lesions Using the Monaco Treatment Planning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ward, S; Kim, A; McCann, C; Ruschin, M; Cheung, P; Sahgal, A; Keller, B [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To simulate tumor tracking in an Elekta MRI-linac (MRL) and to compare this tracking method with our current ITV approach in terms of OAR sparing for lung cancer patients. Methods: Five SABR-NSCLC patients with central lung tumors were selected for reasons of potential enhancement of tumor-tissue delineation using MRI. The Monaco TPS was used to compare the current clinical ITV approach to a simulated, novel tracking method which used a 7MV MRL beam in the presence of an orthogonal 1.5 T magnetic field (4D-MRL method). In the simulated tracking scenario, achieved using the virtual couch shift (VCS), the PTV was defined using an isotropic 5mm margin applied to the GTV of each phase, as acquired from an 8-phase amplitude-binned 4DCT. These VCS plans were optimized and weighted on each phase. The dose weighting was performed using the patient-specific breathing traces. The doses were accumulated on the inhale phase. The two methods were compared by assessing the OAR DVHs. Results: The 4D-MRL method resulted in a reduced target volume (by an average of 29% over all patients). The benefits of using an MRL tracking system depended on the tumor motion amplitude and the relative OAR motion (ROM) to the target. The reduction in mean doses to parallel organs was up to 3 Gy for the heart and 2.1 Gy for the lung. The reductions in maximum doses to serial organs were up to 9.4 Gy, 5.6 Gy, and 8.7 Gy for the esophagus, spinal cord, and the trachea, respectively. Serial organs benefited from MRL tracking when the ROM was ≥ 0.3 cm despite small tumor motion amplitude in some cases. Conclusions: This work demonstrated the potential benefit for an MRL tracking system to spare OARs in SABR-NSCLC patients with central tumors. The benefits are embodied in the target volume reduction. This project was made possible with the financial support of Elekta.

  8. MRI in head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jin Kyo [Shin Wha Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-02-15

    In the diagnosis of head injury, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), like CT, is an effective method of distinguishing between intracerebral and extracerebral lesions. In our experience of MRI, early hematomas are almost isointense by Saturation Recovery (SR) method, so these must be performed with Spin Echo (SE) method for better visualization of hematomas. Isodense subdural hematomas, which is a diagnostic dilemma on CT images, are clearly seen on MRI. Delayed hematomas or residual parenchymal lesions are better demonstrated on MRI than on CT. Direct cornal, sagittal images and multiplanar facility of MRI provides excellent visualization of the the location and shape of extracerebral collection of hematoma. For the screening of head traumas, SE method is a technique of choice because of its excellent sensitivity within limited time.

  9. Mobius syndrome: MRI features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markarian, Maria F.; Villarroel, Gonzalo M.; Nagel, Jorge R.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Mobius Syndrome or congenital facial diplegia is associated with paralysis of the lateral gaze movements. This syndrome may include other cranial nerve palsies and be associated to musculoskeletal anomalies. Our objective is to show the MRI findings in Mobius Syndrome. Material and methods: MRI study was performed in 3 patients with clinic diagnosis of Mobius Syndrome. RMI (1.5T); exams included axial FSE (T1 and T2), FLAIR, SE/EPI, GRE/20, sagittal FSE T2 , coronal T1, diffusion, angio MRI and Spectroscopy sequences. Results: The common features of this syndrome found in MRI were: depression or straightening of the floor of the fourth ventricle, brainstem anteroposterior diameter diminution, morphologic alteration of the pons and medulla oblongata and of the hypoglossal nuclei as well as severe micrognathia. Conclusion: The morphologic alterations of Mobius Syndrome can be clearly identified by MRI; this method has proved to be a useful diagnostic examination. (author)

  10. MRI in head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jin Kyo

    1986-01-01

    In the diagnosis of head injury, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), like CT, is an effective method of distinguishing between intracerebral and extracerebral lesions. In our experience of MRI, early hematomas are almost isointense by Saturation Recovery (SR) method, so these must be performed with Spin Echo (SE) method for better visualization of hematomas. Isodense subdural hematomas, which is a diagnostic dilemma on CT images, are clearly seen on MRI. Delayed hematomas or residual parenchymal lesions are better demonstrated on MRI than on CT. Direct cornal, sagittal images and multiplanar facility of MRI provides excellent visualization of the the location and shape of extracerebral collection of hematoma. For the screening of head traumas, SE method is a technique of choice because of its excellent sensitivity within limited time.

  11. Juvenile spondylolysis: a comparative analysis of CT, SPECT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, R.S.D.; Grainger, A.J.; Hide, I.G.; Papastefanou, S.; Greenough, C.G.

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate whether MRI correlates with CT and SPECT imaging for the diagnosis of juvenile spondylolysis, and to determine whether MRI can be used as an exclusive image modality. Juveniles and young adults with a history of extension low back pain were evaluated by MRI, CT and SPECT imaging. All images were reviewed blindly. Correlative analyses included CT vs MRI for morphological grading and SPECT vs MRI for functional grading. Finally, an overall grading system compared MRI vs CT and SPECT combined. Statistical analysis was performed using the kappa statistic. Seventy-two patients (mean age 16 years) were recruited. Forty pars defects were identified in 22 patients (31%), of which 25 were chronic non-union, five acute complete defects and ten acute incomplete fractures. Kappa scores demonstrated a high level of agreement for all comparative analyses. MRI vs SPECT (kappa: 0.794), MRI vs CT (kappa: 0.829) and MRI vs CT/SPECT (kappa: 0.786). The main causes of discrepancy were between MRI and SPECT for the diagnosis of stress reaction in the absence of overt fracture, and distinguishing incomplete fractures from intact pars or complete defects. MRI can be used as an effective and reliable first-line image modality for diagnosis of juvenile spondylolysis. However, localised CT is recommended as a supplementary examination in selected cases as a baseline for assessment of healing and for evaluation of indeterminate cases. (orig.)

  12. Juvenile spondylolysis: a comparative analysis of CT, SPECT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, R.S.D. [Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Grainger, A.J. [Leeds General Infirmary, Department of Radiology, Leeds (United Kingdom); Hide, I.G. [Freeman Hospital, Department of Radiology, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Papastefanou, S. [James Cook University Hospital, Department Radiology, Middlesbrough (United Kingdom); Greenough, C.G. [James Cook University Hospital, Department of Trauma and Orthopaedics, Middlesbrough (United Kingdom)

    2005-02-01

    To evaluate whether MRI correlates with CT and SPECT imaging for the diagnosis of juvenile spondylolysis, and to determine whether MRI can be used as an exclusive image modality. Juveniles and young adults with a history of extension low back pain were evaluated by MRI, CT and SPECT imaging. All images were reviewed blindly. Correlative analyses included CT vs MRI for morphological grading and SPECT vs MRI for functional grading. Finally, an overall grading system compared MRI vs CT and SPECT combined. Statistical analysis was performed using the kappa statistic. Seventy-two patients (mean age 16 years) were recruited. Forty pars defects were identified in 22 patients (31%), of which 25 were chronic non-union, five acute complete defects and ten acute incomplete fractures. Kappa scores demonstrated a high level of agreement for all comparative analyses. MRI vs SPECT (kappa: 0.794), MRI vs CT (kappa: 0.829) and MRI vs CT/SPECT (kappa: 0.786). The main causes of discrepancy were between MRI and SPECT for the diagnosis of stress reaction in the absence of overt fracture, and distinguishing incomplete fractures from intact pars or complete defects. MRI can be used as an effective and reliable first-line image modality for diagnosis of juvenile spondylolysis. However, localised CT is recommended as a supplementary examination in selected cases as a baseline for assessment of healing and for evaluation of indeterminate cases. (orig.)

  13. PET/MRI: Technical challenges and recent advances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Jin Ho; Choi, Yong; Im, Ki Chun

    2016-01-01

    Integrated positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which can provide complementary functional and anatomical information about a specific organ or body system at the molecular level, has become a powerful imaging modality to understand the molecular biology details, disease mechanisms, and pharmacokinetics in animals and humans. Although the first experiment on the PET/MRI was performed in the early 1990s, its clinical application was accomplished in recent years because there were various technical challenges in integrating PET and MRI in a single system with minimum mutual interference between PET and MRI. This paper presents the technical challenges and recent advances in combining PET and MRI along with several approaches for improving PET image quality of the PET/MRI hybrid imaging system

  14. Brain single-photon emission tomography with {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO in neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus: relations with EEG and MRI findings and clinical manifestations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colamussi, P. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Ferrara (Italy); Giganti, M. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Ferrara (Italy); Cittanti, C. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Ferrara (Italy); Dovigo, L. [Inst. of Neurology, Univ. of Ferrara (Italy); Trotta, F. [Inst. of Neurology, Univ. of Ferrara (Italy); Tola, M.R. [Div. of Rheumatology, S. Anna Hospital, Ferrara (Italy); Tamarozzi, R. [Radiology Dept., S. Anna Hospital, Ferrara (Italy); Lucignani, G. [INB-CNR Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, H.S. Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Piffanelli, A. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Ferrara (Italy)

    1995-01-01

    In the reported study the role of single-photon emission tomography (SPET) with technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO) in the evaluation of CNS involvement in SLE was assessed and the relations between SPET perfusion defects, EEG examination, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and clinical presentation were examined. Twenty SLE patients with different NP manifestations were studied. Multiple areas of hypoperfusion, especially in the territory of the middle cerebral artery, were demonstrated by SPET analysis in all 20 patients. The number of hypoperfused areas and the degree of hypoperfusion, expressed by an asymmetry index (AI), were more marked in patients with multiple NP manifestations. MRI and EEG evaluations were positive for 14 of 18 and for 12 of 20 patients, respectively. In the patients with positive SPET and MRI, 87 MRI focal lesions and 63 hypoperfused areas were found, and for 51 of these 63 at least one MRI lesion was found in the same anatomical region. SPET examination of patients with a normal EEG showed fewer hypoperfused areas and a lower degree of asymmetry compared to patients with an abnormal EEG. SPET of patients with focal EEG abnormalities showed more hypoperfused areas (difference not statistically significant) and a higher AI than did SPET of the patients with diffuse EEG abnormalities. Seven of 11 anatomical regions with focal EEG abnormalities. Seven of 11 anatomical regions with focal EEG abnormalities had co-localized hypoperfused areas and in two of these seven no detectable MRI lesions were found. The analysis of SPET and NP manifestations showed that 12 of 20 patients had at least one positive correlation, always involving the areas with the highest AI. In total, 51/88 (58%) hypoperfused areas correlated with the MRI findings and 31/88 (35%) with NP manifestations; for seven of the latter no concurrent MRI lesions were detected in the same anatomical region. (orig.)

  15. Brain single-photon emission tomography with 99mTc-HMPAO in neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus: relations with EEG and MRI findings and clinical manifestations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colamussi, P.; Giganti, M.; Cittanti, C.; Dovigo, L.; Trotta, F.; Tola, M.R.; Tamarozzi, R.; Lucignani, G.; Piffanelli, A.

    1995-01-01

    In the reported study the role of single-photon emission tomography (SPET) with technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO) in the evaluation of CNS involvement in SLE was assessed and the relations between SPET perfusion defects, EEG examination, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and clinical presentation were examined. Twenty SLE patients with different NP manifestations were studied. Multiple areas of hypoperfusion, especially in the territory of the middle cerebral artery, were demonstrated by SPET analysis in all 20 patients. The number of hypoperfused areas and the degree of hypoperfusion, expressed by an asymmetry index (AI), were more marked in patients with multiple NP manifestations. MRI and EEG evaluations were positive for 14 of 18 and for 12 of 20 patients, respectively. In the patients with positive SPET and MRI, 87 MRI focal lesions and 63 hypoperfused areas were found, and for 51 of these 63 at least one MRI lesion was found in the same anatomical region. SPET examination of patients with a normal EEG showed fewer hypoperfused areas and a lower degree of asymmetry compared to patients with an abnormal EEG. SPET of patients with focal EEG abnormalities showed more hypoperfused areas (difference not statistically significant) and a higher AI than did SPET of the patients with diffuse EEG abnormalities. Seven of 11 anatomical regions with focal EEG abnormalities. Seven of 11 anatomical regions with focal EEG abnormalities had co-localized hypoperfused areas and in two of these seven no detectable MRI lesions were found. The analysis of SPET and NP manifestations showed that 12 of 20 patients had at least one positive correlation, always involving the areas with the highest AI. In total, 51/88 (58%) hypoperfused areas correlated with the MRI findings and 31/88 (35%) with NP manifestations; for seven of the latter no concurrent MRI lesions were detected in the same anatomical region. (orig.)

  16. PET/MRI in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Andreas; Loft, Annika; Law, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Combined PET/MRI systems are now commercially available and are expected to change the medical imaging field by providing combined anato-metabolic image information. We believe this will be of particular relevance in imaging of cancer patients. At the Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear...... described include brain tumors, pediatric oncology as well as lung, abdominal and pelvic cancer. In general the cases show that PET/MRI performs well in all these types of cancer when compared to PET/CT. However, future large-scale clinical studies are needed to establish when to use PET/MRI. We envision...... that PET/MRI in oncology will prove to become a valuable addition to PET/CT in diagnosing, tailoring and monitoring cancer therapy in selected patient populations....

  17. Analysis of abnormal findings observed on brain MRI T2 weighted image in a system for the detection of asymptomatic brain disease in 1,200 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiguchi, Takashi; Yoshida, Kazunari; Sato, Syuzo; Kawase, Takeshi; Toya, Shigeo; Mizukami, Masahiro

    1998-01-01

    In this study we described the significance of asymptomatic cerebral infarction (ACI) and periventricular hyperintensity (PVH) observed on brain MRI in a system for detection of asymptomatic brain disease with 1,200 cases. The risk factors (RF), population in each age bracket of ACI and PVH, among groups with hypertension (HTG) and without RF (no-RFG), were investigated. The RF of ACI were hypertension (HT), diabetes mellitus (DM), and aging. Without DM, those are common RF of PVH. The population of PVH and ACI with PVH increased with aging in no-RFG. On the other hand, only the population of ACI with PVH increased with aging in HTG. The rate of these abnormal findings in HTG was significantly higher than that in no-RFG. In addition, HT accelerated the occurrence of these findings by 10-20 years. When patients were over 60 years old, ACI increased rapidly. Accordingly, we concluded that PVH and ACI had a common background. Long term follow up concerning the incidence of ACI in the group with only PVH was necessary. It was desirable that treatment for RF should be effected before the age of sixty. (author)

  18. Analysis of the utility of diffusion-weighted MRI and apparent diffusion coefficient values in distinguishing central nervous system toxoplasmosis from lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, Paul C.; Donovan Post, M. Judith; Bruce-Gregorios, Jocelyn; Oschatz, Elizabeth; Stadler, Alfred; Thurnher, Majda M.

    2006-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis and lymphoma are common lesions of the central nervous system in patients with AIDS. It is often difficult to distinguish between these lesions both clinically and radiographically. Previous research has demonstrated restricted diffusion within cerebral lymphomas and bacterial abscesses. However, little work has been done to evaluate the diffusion characteristics of toxoplasmosis lesions. This study was designed to explore further the utility of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps and values in making the distinction between toxoplasmosis and lymphoma. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of 36 patients, including 22 with toxoplasmosis (all of whom had AIDS) and 14 with lymphoma (8 of whom had AIDS), at two institutions were reviewed retrospectively. The characteristics of the lesions on DWI were evaluated, and the ADC ratios of the lesions were calculated and compared. There was significant overlap of the ADC ratios of toxoplasma and lymphoma, most notably in the intermediate (1.0-1.6) range. There was variability in ADC ratios even among different lesions in the same patient. In only a minority of the lymphoma patients were the ADC ratios low enough to suggest the correct diagnosis. Our study showed that toxoplasmosis exhibits a wide spectrum of diffusion characteristics with ADC ratios which have significant overlap with those of lymphoma. Therefore, in the majority of patients, ADC ratios are not definitive in making the distinction between toxoplasmosis and lymphoma. (orig.)

  19. Analysis of the utility of diffusion-weighted MRI and apparent diffusion coefficient values in distinguishing central nervous system toxoplasmosis from lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Paul C.; Donovan Post, M. Judith; Bruce-Gregorios, Jocelyn [University of Miami, Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Oschatz, Elizabeth; Stadler, Alfred; Thurnher, Majda M. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology Neuroradiology Section, Vienna (Austria)

    2006-10-15

    Toxoplasmosis and lymphoma are common lesions of the central nervous system in patients with AIDS. It is often difficult to distinguish between these lesions both clinically and radiographically. Previous research has demonstrated restricted diffusion within cerebral lymphomas and bacterial abscesses. However, little work has been done to evaluate the diffusion characteristics of toxoplasmosis lesions. This study was designed to explore further the utility of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps and values in making the distinction between toxoplasmosis and lymphoma. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of 36 patients, including 22 with toxoplasmosis (all of whom had AIDS) and 14 with lymphoma (8 of whom had AIDS), at two institutions were reviewed retrospectively. The characteristics of the lesions on DWI were evaluated, and the ADC ratios of the lesions were calculated and compared. There was significant overlap of the ADC ratios of toxoplasma and lymphoma, most notably in the intermediate (1.0-1.6) range. There was variability in ADC ratios even among different lesions in the same patient. In only a minority of the lymphoma patients were the ADC ratios low enough to suggest the correct diagnosis. Our study showed that toxoplasmosis exhibits a wide spectrum of diffusion characteristics with ADC ratios which have significant overlap with those of lymphoma. Therefore, in the majority of patients, ADC ratios are not definitive in making the distinction between toxoplasmosis and lymphoma. (orig.)

  20. MRI of Wolfram syndrome (DIDMOAD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galluzzi, P.; Filosomi, G.; Vallone, I.M.; Venturi, C. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Policlinico ' ' Le Scotte' ' , Siena (Italy); Bardelli, A.M. [Dept. of Ophthalmological Sciences, Unit of Paediatric Ophthalmology, University of Siena (Italy)

    1999-10-01

    Wolfram syndrome (DIDMOAD) is a rare diffuse neurodegenerative disorder characterised by diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, deafness, and a wide variety of abnormalities of the central nervous system, urinary tract and endocrine glands. It may be familial or sporadic. Reported features on MRI of the brain are absence of the physiological high signal of the posterior lobe of the pituitary, shrinkage of optic nerves, chiasm and tracts, atrophy of the hypothalamic region, brain stem, cerebellum, and cerebral cortex. We report a 12-year-old girl with a 5-year history without brain stem, cerebellar or cerebral atrophy. MRI showed an unusual feature: a focus of high signal on PD- and T2-weighted images in the right substantia nigra. This is consistent with previously reported neuropathological post-mortem studies, but has never been reported in vivo. (orig.)

  1. MRI in mucoviscidosis (cystic fibrosis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichinger, M.; Puderbach, M.; Kauczor, H.-U.; Heussel, C.-P.

    2006-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multi-systemic disease with major impact on the lungs. Pulmonary manifestation is crucial for the prognosis and life expectancy of patients. Imaging modalities and lung function tests reflect the pulmonary status in these patients. The standard imaging modality for diagnosis and follow-up of pulmonary changes is chest x-ray. The gold standard for the detection of parenchymal lung changes remains high resolution computed tomography (HRCT), but this is not used routinely for CF-patients due to radiation exposure. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) used to be of no importance in monitoring cystic fibrosis lung disease, as shown in studies from the 1980s and early 1990s. The continuing improvement of MRI techniques, however, has allowed for an adequate application of this non-radiation method in diagnosing the major pulmonary findings in CF, in addition to the assessment of lung function. (orig.) [de

  2. MRI of Wolfram syndrome (DIDMOAD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galluzzi, P.; Filosomi, G.; Vallone, I.M.; Venturi, C.; Bardelli, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (DIDMOAD) is a rare diffuse neurodegenerative disorder characterised by diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, deafness, and a wide variety of abnormalities of the central nervous system, urinary tract and endocrine glands. It may be familial or sporadic. Reported features on MRI of the brain are absence of the physiological high signal of the posterior lobe of the pituitary, shrinkage of optic nerves, chiasm and tracts, atrophy of the hypothalamic region, brain stem, cerebellum, and cerebral cortex. We report a 12-year-old girl with a 5-year history without brain stem, cerebellar or cerebral atrophy. MRI showed an unusual feature: a focus of high signal on PD- and T2-weighted images in the right substantia nigra. This is consistent with previously reported neuropathological post-mortem studies, but has never been reported in vivo. (orig.)

  3. Initial performance evaluation of a preclinical PET scanner available as a clip-on assembly in a sequential PET/MRI system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrigneaud, Jean-Marc; McGrath, John; Courteau, Alan; Pegg, Rosie; Sanchez-Pastor Gomis, Alberto; Camacho, Angela; Martin, Gary; Schramm, Nils; Brunotte, François

    2018-05-15

    We evaluated the performance characteristics of a prototype preclinical PET scanner available as an easy clippable assembly that can dock to an MRI system. The single ring version of the PET system consists of 8 detectors, each of which comprises a 12 × 12 silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) array coupled with a dual layer of offset scintillation crystals to measure depth of interaction. The crystal arrays have 29 × 29 (30 × 30 for the outer layer) 4 mm long LYSO crystals (6 mm for the outer layer). The ring diameter is 119.2 mm and the axial field of view is 50.4 mm. The NEMA NU-4-2008 protocol was followed for studying the PET performance. Temperature stability of SiPMs was also investigated. The peak system absolute sensitivity was 4.70% with an energy window of 250-750 keV. The spatial resolution was 1.28/1.88/1.85 mm FWHM (radial/tangential/axial) at a distance of 5 mm from the center. Peak noise equivalent counting rate (NECR) and scatter fraction for mouse phantom were 61.9 kcps at 14.9 MBq and 21.0%, respectively. The uniformity was 6.3% and the spill-over ratios in the images of the water- and air-filled chambers were 0.07 and 0.17, respectively. Recovery coefficients ranged from 0.13 to 0.96. Change in sensitivity as a function of ambient temperature was 0.3%/°C. These first results indicate excellent spatial resolution performance for use with animal studies. Moreover, the clippable assembly can be upgraded to accept a second ring of SiPMs modules, leading to improved sensitivity and axial coverage. © 2018 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.

  4. Explaining MRI examinations DVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takatsu, Yasuo; Komeda, Takuya

    2010-01-01

    When conducting MRI examinations, there are various things to be careful of. There is often stress related to the MRI examinations, so in order to perform an examination safely and smoothly, sufficient explanation must be given. An explanation of what to do and what not to do during an examination should be outlined in a brochure given to patients before the examination. There may be many patients who have misgivings about their MRI examinations, so to reduce their anxiousness and deepen their understanding of MRI examinations and to improve the safety and effiency of MRI examinations,; we created a DVD about MRI examinations. We gathered MRI-related safety information and instructions, and assessed the effect that the information might have on patients. We started a workgroup for a project to plan and record a video according to the Storyboard. When editing, we reviewed the length of each segment, the amount of information on screen, and the overall length of the DVD. We discussed the issue within the workgroup and had hospital approval. It was possible for us to complete it without depending on the supplier and the cost was kept to a minimum. Finally, we decided on a viewing location. We asked a hospital volunteers to see a complete DVD and we evaluated their responses by questionnaires. As the result, their understanding and anxieties related to MRI examinations were alleviated, as expected. Their anxiety seemed to be eased. Patients also seemed to have a deeper understanding of MRI examinations having seen an examination being conducted. (author)

  5. Dopaminergic modulation of the human reward system: a placebo-controlled dopamine depletion fMRI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    da Silva Alves, Fabiana; Schmitz, Nicole; Figee, Martijn; Abeling, Nico; Hasler, Gregor; van der Meer, Johan; Nederveen, Aart; de Haan, Lieuwe; Linszen, Don; van Amelsvoort, Therese

    2011-01-01

    Reward related behaviour is linked to dopaminergic neurotransmission. Our aim was to gain insight into dopaminergic involvement in the human reward system. Combining functional magnetic resonance imaging with dopaminergic depletion by α-methylparatyrosine we measured dopamine-related brain activity

  6. Multimodal Diffusion-MRI and MEG Assessment of Auditory and Language System Development in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey I Berman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Auditory processing and language impairments are prominent in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD. The present study integrated diffusion MR measures of white-matter microstructure and magnetoencephalography (MEG measures of cortical dynamics to investigate associations between brain structure and function within auditory and language systems in ASD. Based on previous findings, abnormal structure-function relationships in auditory and language systems in ASD were hypothesized. Methods: Evaluable neuroimaging data was obtained from 44 typically developing (TD children (mean age 10.4±2.4years and 95 children with ASD (mean age 10.2±2.6years. Diffusion MR tractography was used to delineate and quantitatively assess the auditory radiation and arcuate fasciculus segments of the auditory and language systems. MEG was used to measure (1 superior temporal gyrus auditory evoked M100 latency in response to pure-tone stimuli as an indicator of auditory system conduction velocity, and (2 auditory vowel-contrast mismatch field (MMF latency as a passive probe of early linguistic processes. Results: Atypical development of white matter and cortical function, along with atypical lateralization, were present in ASD. In both auditory and language systems, white matter integrity and cortical electrophysiology were found to be coupled in typically developing children, with white matter microstructural features contributing significantly to electrophysiological response latencies. However, in ASD, we observed uncoupled structure-function relationships in both auditory and language systems. Regression analyses in ASD indicated that factors other than white-matter microstructure additionally contribute to the latency of neural evoked responses and ultimately behavior. Results also indicated that whereas delayed M100 is a marker for ASD severity, MMF delay is more associated with language impairment. Conclusion: Present findings suggest atypical

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  9. SU-E-J-211: Assessing the Consistency of the ViewRay 0.35 T MRI System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Y; Saenz, D; Bayouth, J; Paliwal, B

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: ViewRay is a novel image-guided radiotherapy approach with an integrated 0.35 T MR unit and three Cobalt-60 heads. In order to continuously ensure the high resolution and high soft tissue contrast available in MR images, we quantified a multitude of relevant imaging parameters over a period of six months to establish its stability and imaging quality. In the assessment process, consideration is also given to the need to establish the number of tests required to have confidence in the performance of the system for radiation therapy planning applications. Methods: Daily, weekly, monthly and annual imaging tests were performed over a period of six months using standardized phantoms (a 24 cm diameter sphere and the ACR phantom) to quantify the performance of the system. In addition to the ACR and NEMA recommended tests, we also included element testing, spatial integrity, Eddy current and magnetic field inhomogeneity measurements. The ACR test is used for assessing the following parameters for T1 and T2: geometric accuracy, high contrast spatial resolution, slice thickness accuracy, slice position accuracy, percent signal ghosting, low contrast object detectability. It also includes percent image uniformity (PIU) for T1. The NEMA test is primarily designed to check SNR and PIU. Results: Over the period of six months, all the parameters were maintained within the recommendations provided in the ACR and NEMA standards. PIU and SNR were found to be sensitive to malfunctions in the components of the multileaf collimators. Details of the findings will be presented. Conclusion: The data suggests that ViewRay imaging system has functioned in a consistent and reliable manner. MR imaging from ViewRay 0.35T system complies with the ACR and NEMA recommended acceptance standards

  10. SU-E-J-211: Assessing the Consistency of the ViewRay 0.35 T MRI System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Y; Saenz, D; Bayouth, J; Paliwal, B [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: ViewRay is a novel image-guided radiotherapy approach with an integrated 0.35 T MR unit and three Cobalt-60 heads. In order to continuously ensure the high resolution and high soft tissue contrast available in MR images, we quantified a multitude of relevant imaging parameters over a period of six months to establish its stability and imaging quality. In the assessment process, consideration is also given to the need to establish the number of tests required to have confidence in the performance of the system for radiation therapy planning applications. Methods: Daily, weekly, monthly and annual imaging tests were performed over a period of six months using standardized phantoms (a 24 cm diameter sphere and the ACR phantom) to quantify the performance of the system. In addition to the ACR and NEMA recommended tests, we also included element testing, spatial integrity, Eddy current and magnetic field inhomogeneity measurements. The ACR test is used for assessing the following parameters for T1 and T2: geometric accuracy, high contrast spatial resolution, slice thickness accuracy, slice position acc