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Sample records for low-level rf control

  1. Network Communication for Low Level RF Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Weiqing; Yin Chengke; Zhang Tongxuan; Fu Zechuan; Liu Jianfei

    2009-01-01

    Low Level RF (LLRF) control system for storage ring of Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) has been built by digital technology. The settings of parameters and the feedback loop status are carried out through the network communication interface, and the local oscillation and clock, which is the important component of the digital LLRF control system, are also configured through network communication. NIOS II processor was employed as a core to build the embedded system with a real-time operating system MicroC/OS-II, finally Lightweight TCP/IP (LwIP) was used to achieve the communication interface. The communication network is stable after a long-term operation. (authors)

  2. Design and development of Low Level RF (LLRF) control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandi, T.K.; Suman, S.; Pandey, H.K.; Bandyopadhyay, A.

    2015-01-01

    All the linear accelerator cavities of Radioactive Ion Beam have separate RF power amplifiers. In these accelerators, high stabilities of the order of ± 0.5% in amplitude and ± 0.5° in phase of RF signal inside the cavities are required for proper and efficient acceleration of RIB. For this purpose, a low level RF (LLRF) control system is being designed which includes amplitude and phase controllers to ensure efficient and stable operation of the RF accelerators. The RF output of the LLRF system is finally amplified and fed to the accelerator cavities. The LLRF system is based on IQ (In-phase and Quadrature) modulation-demodulation technique in which an IQ modulator and a demodulator has been used to control the amplitude and phase of the RF carrier signal. The HigH-speed DAC and ADC have been used for processing the in-phase (I) and quadrature-phase (Q) components of the RF signal. This system is a closed-loop feedback control system. The feedback signal is obtained from the pick-up of accelerator cavity. PID control method is used to regulate the amplitude and phase of the RF signal to the desired/set value. The control system is optimized for minimum response time with satisfactory performance. The transfer function of the PID controller and the RF cavity is compared with the transfer function of a first order system and the values of proportional gain (Kp), integral gain (Ti) and derivative gain (Td) are obtained from Matlab- Simulink Simulation. The PID controller has been implemented into a high speed microcontroller (LPC2478) for fast operation. A GUI has been developed in NI LabView software to monitor the Amplitude and Phase of the RF signal and control manually if required. The detailed design and development of the control system will be discussed in this paper. (author)

  3. Low Level RF Control System of J-PARC Synchrotrons

    CERN Document Server

    Tamura, Fumihiko; Ezura, Eizi; Hara, Keigo; Nomura, Masahiro; Ohmori, Chihiro; Schnase, Alexander; Takagi, Akira; Yamamoto, Masanobu; Yoshii, Masahito

    2005-01-01

    We present the concept and the design of the low level RF (LLRF) control system of the J-PARC synchrotrons. The J-PARC synchrotrons are the rapid cycling 3-GeV synchrotron (RCS) and the 50-GeV main ring (MR) which require very precise and stable LLRF control systems to accelerate the ultra-high proton beam current. The LLRF system of the synchrotron is a full-digital system based on the direct digital synthesis (DDS). The functions of the system are (1) the multi-harmonic RF generation for the acceleration and the longitudinal bunch shaping, (2) the feedbacks for stabilizing the beam, (3) the feedforward for compensating the heavy beam loading, and (4) other miscellaneous functions such as the synchronization and chopper timing. The LLRF system of the RCS is now under construction. We present the details of the system. Also, we show preliminary results of performance tests of the control modules.

  4. SNS Low-Level RF Control System Design and Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Hengjie; Crofford, Mark; Doolittle, Lawrence; Kasemir, Kay-Uwe; Piller, Maurice; Ratti, Alessandro

    2005-01-01

    A full digital Low-Level RF controller has been developed for SNS LINAC. Its design is a good example of a modern digital implementation of the classic control theory. The digital hardware for all the control and DSP functionalities, including the final vector modulation, is implemented on a single high-density FPGA. Two models for the digital hardware have been written in VHDL and Verilog respectively, based on a very low latency control algorithm, and both have been being used for supporting the testing and commissioning the LINAC to the date. During the commissioning, the flexibility and ability for precise controls that only digital design on a larger FPGA can offer has proved to be a necessity for meeting the great challenge of a high-power pulsed SCL.

  5. Digital low level rf control system with four different intermediate frequencies for the International Linear Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Sigit Basuki; Matsumoto, Toshihiro; Michizono, Shinichiro; Miura, Takako; Qiu, Feng; Liu, Na

    2017-09-01

    A field programmable gate array-based digital low level rf (LLRF) control system will be used in the International Linear Collider (ILC) in order to satisfy the rf stability requirements. The digital LLRF control system with four different intermediate frequencies has been developed to decrease the required number of analog-to-digital converters in this system. The proof of concept of this technique was demonstrated at the Superconducting RF Test Facility in the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Japan. The amplitude and phase stability has fulfilled the ILC requirements.

  6. General overview of the APS low-level rf control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepp, J.D.; Bridges, J.F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the proposed low-level rf system of the positron accumulator ring (PAR), the injector synchrotron, and the storage ring of the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source. Four rf systems are described since the PAR consists of a fundamental frequency system at 9.8 MHz and a harmonic system at 117 MHz. A block diagram of an accelerating unit is shown and descriptions of various control loops are made (including amplitude control, phase control, and cavity tuning control). Also, a brief overview of the computer interface is given

  7. The LHC Low Level RF

    CERN Document Server

    Baudrenghien, Philippe; Molendijk, John Cornelis; Olsen, Ragnar; Rohlev, Anton; Rossi, Vittorio; Stellfeld, Donat; Valuch, Daniel; Wehrle, Urs

    2006-01-01

    The LHC RF consists of eight 400 MHz superconducting cavities per ring, with each cavity independently powered by a 300 kW klystron, via a circulator. The challenge for the Low Level is to cope with very high beam current (more than 1 A RF component) and achieve excellent beam lifetime (emittance growth time in excess of 25 hours). Each cavity has an associated Cavity Controller rack consisting of two VME crates which implement high gain RF Feedback, a Tuner Loop with a new algorithm, a Klystron Ripple Loop and a Conditioning system. In addition each ring has a Beam Control system (four VME crates) which includes a Frequency Program, Phase Loop, Radial Loop and Synchronization Loop. A Longitudinal Damper (dipole and quadrupole mode) acting via the 400 MHz cavities is included to reduce emittance blow-up due to filamentation from phase and energy errors at injection. Finally an RF Synchronization system implements the bunch into bucket transfer from the SPS into each LHC ring. When fully installed in 2007, the...

  8. Simulation experiment on low-level RF control for dual-harmonic acceleration at CSNS RCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Sirong; Li Xiao; Zhang Chunlin; Sun Hong; Tang Jingyu

    2013-01-01

    The design and test of the low-level RF (LLRF) control system for the dual-harmonic acceleration at the rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) of China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) at phase Ⅰ is introduced. In order to implement the mode switch from the second harmonic to the fundamental during the acceleration cycle for one of the eight RF cavities, the LLRF system for the cavity has been designed differently from the others. Several technical measures such as the opening of the control loops during the mode switch and the reclosing of two tuning circuits of the RF amplifier at different moments, have been taken. The experimental results on the testing platform based on an RF prototype show good dynamic performance of the LLRF system and prove the feasibility of dual-harmonic operation. (authors)

  9. Overview of the Spallation Neutron Source Linac Low-Level RF Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Champion, Mark; Doolittle, Lawrence; Kasemir, Kay-Uwe; Ma, Hengjie; Piller, Maurice; Ratti, Alessandro

    2005-01-01

    The design and production of the Spallation Neutron Source Linac Low-Level RF control system is complete, and installation will be finished in Spring 2005. The warm linac beam commissioning run in Fall 2004 was the most extensive test to date of the LLRF control system, with fourteen (of an eventual 96) systems operating simultaneously. In this paper we present an overview of the LLRF control system, the experience in designing, building and installing the system, and operational results.

  10. Development of a low-level RF control system for PET cyclotron CYCIAE-14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Pengzhan, E-mail: lipengzhan@ciae.ac.cn; Yin, Zhiguo; Ji, Bin; Zhang, Tianjue; Zhao, Zhenlu

    2014-01-21

    The project of a 14 MeV PET cyclotron aiming at medical diagnosis and treatment was proposed and started at CIAE in 2010. The low-level RF system is designed to stabilize acceleration voltage and control the resonance of the cavity. Based on the experience of the existing CRM Cyclotron in CIAE, a new start-up sequence is developed and tested. The frequency sweeping is used to activate the RF system. Before the tuner is put into use, a new state called “DDS tuning” is applied to trace the resonance frequency to the designed value. This new option state helps to cover the tuning range, if a large frequency variation occurs because of a thermal cavity deformation. The logic control unit detects the spark, reflection, Pulse/CW state and the frequency of the RF source to perform all kinds of protection and state operations. The test bench and on-line test are carried out to verify the initial design. -- Highlights: • The low-level RF system is designed and verified for PET cyclotron CYCIAE-14. • The frequency sweeping is used to activate the RF system. • A new state called “DDS tuning” is applied to trace the resonance frequency. • This new option state helps to cover the tuning range. • Protection module allows a quick restart after an alarm and improves cyclotron's efficiency.

  11. Operator interface for the PEP-II low level RF control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, S.; Claus, R.

    1997-05-01

    This paper focuses on the operational aspects of the low level RF control system being built for the PEP-II storage rings at SLAC. Subsystems requiring major operational considerations include displays for monitor and control from UNIX workstations, slow feedback loops and control sequences residing on microprocessors, and various client applications in the existing SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) control system. Since commissioning of PEP-II RF is currently in-progress, only those parts of the control system used during this phase are discussed in detail. Based on past experience with the SLC control system, it is expected that effort expended during commissioning on a solid user interface will result in smoother transition to full reliable 24-hour-a-day operation

  12. The Design and Performance of the Spallation Neutron Source Low-Level RF Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Champion, M; Kasemir, K; Ma, H; Piller, C

    2004-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source linear accelerator low-level RF control system has been developed within a collaboration of Lawrence Berkeley, Los Alamos, and Oak Ridge national laboratories. Three distinct generations of the system, described in a previous publication [1], have been used to support beam commissioning at Oak Ridge. The third generation system went into production in early 2004, with installation in the coupled-cavity and superconducting linacs to span the remainder of the year. The final design of this system will be presented along with results of performance measurements.

  13. A low-level rf control system for a quarter-wave resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongwon; Hwang, Churlkew

    2012-06-01

    A low-level rf control system was designed and built for an rf deflector, which is a quarter wave resonator, and was designed to deflect a secondary electron beam to measure the bunch length of an ion beam. The deflector has a resonance frequency near 88 MHz, its required phase stability is approximately ±1° and its amplitude stability is less than ±1%. The control system consists of analog input and output components and a digital system based on a field-programmable gate array for signal processing. The system is cost effective, while meeting the stability requirements. Some basic properties of the control system were measured. Then, the capability of the rf control was tested using a mechanical vibrator made of a dielectric rod attached to an audio speaker system, which could induce regulated perturbations in the electric fields of the resonator. The control system was flexible so that its parameters could be easily configured to compensate for the disturbance induced in the resonator.

  14. Control Loops for the J-PARC RCS Digital Low-Level RF Control

    CERN Document Server

    Schnase, Alexander; Ezura, Eizi; Hara, Keigo; Nomura, Masahiro; Ohmori, Chihiro; Takagi, Akira; Tamura, Fumihiko; Yamamoto, Masanobu; Yoshii, Masahito

    2005-01-01

    The low-level radiofrequency control for the Rapic Cycling Synchrotron of J-PARC is based on digital signal processing. This system controls the acceleration voltages of 12 magnetic alloy loaded cavities. To achive a short overall delay, mandatory for stable loop operation, the data-processing is based on distributed arithmetics in FPGA. Due to the broadband characteristic of the acceleration cavities, no tuning loop is needed. To handle the large beam current, the RF system operates simultaneously with dual harmonics (h=2) and (h=4). The stability of the amplitude loops is limited by the delay of the FIR filters used after downconversion. The phase loop offers several operation modes to define the phase relation of (h=2) and (h=4) between the longitudinal beam signal and the vector-sum of the cavity voltages. Besides the FIR filters, we provide cascaded CIC filters with smoothly varying coefficients. Such a filter tracks the revolution frequency and has a substantially shorter delay, thereby increasing the s...

  15. Low-level rf control of Spallation Neutron Source: System and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengjie Ma

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The low-level rf control system currently commissioned throughout the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS LINAC evolved from three design iterations over 1 yr intensive research and development. Its digital hardware implementation is efficient, and has succeeded in achieving a minimum latency of less than 150 ns which is the key for accomplishing an all-digital feedback control for the full bandwidth. The control bandwidth is analyzed in frequency domain and characterized by testing its transient response. The hardware implementation also includes the provision of a time-shared input channel for a superior phase differential measurement between the cavity field and the reference. A companion cosimulation system for the digital hardware was developed to ensure a reliable long-term supportability. A large effort has also been made in the operation software development for the practical issues such as the process automations, cavity filling, beam loading compensation, and the cavity mechanical resonance suppression.

  16. Design and development of low level S-Band RF control system for IRFEL injector LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohania, Praveen; Mahawar, Ashish; Singh, Adarsh Pratap; Namdeo, Rajkumar; Baxy, Deodatta; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2015-01-01

    A low level RF system has been designed and developed for phase and amplitude stabilization of S- Band microwave power being fed to fundamental buncher cavity and the injector LINAC structure of the Infra Red Free Electron Laser being developed at RRCAT Indore. The system uses analog phase shifters and voltage variable attenuators to control the phase and amplitude respectively, the control voltages for phase shifters and attenuators are generated using a 12 Bit ADC and is software controlled. The system has a slow feedback to correct phase and amplitude drifts occurring due to thermal variations and a fast feed forward mechanism to vary amplitude and phase of the output pulse to compensate beam loading and to shape the klystron output power. The present paper describes the design aspects of the LLRF system. (author)

  17. Low-Level RF Control of Microphonics in Superconducting Spoke-Loaded Cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conway, Z.A.; Kelly, M.P.; Sharamentov, S.I.; Shepard, K.W.; Davis, G.; Delayen, Jean; Doolittle, Lawrence

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of cw RF frequency control and RF phase-stabilization experiments performed with a piezoelectric fast tuner mechanically coupled to a superconducting, 345 MHz, < = 0.5 triple-spoke-loaded cavity operating at 4.2K. The piezoelectric fast tuner damped low-frequency microphonic-noise by an order of magnitude. Two methods of RF phase-stabilization were characterized: overcoupling with negative phase feedback, and also fast mechanical tuner feedback. The = 0.5 triple-spoke-loaded cavity RF field amplitude and phase errors were controlled to ±0.5% and ±30 respectively.

  18. Low-level RF control system issues for an ADTT accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziomek, C.D.; Regan, A.H.; Lynch, M.T.; Bowling, P.S.

    1994-01-01

    The RF control system for a charged-particle accelerator must maintain the correct amplitude and phase of RF field inside the accelerator cavity in the presence of perturbations, noises, and time varying system components. For an accelerator with heavy beam-loading, fluctuations in the beam current cause large perturbations to the RF field amplitude and phase that must be corrected by the RF control system. The ADTT applications require a high-current, heavily beam-loaded, continuous-wave (CW) accelerator. Additional concerns created by the CW operation include system start-up, beam interruption, and fault recovery. Also, the RF control system for an ADTT facility must include sophisticated automation to reduce the operator interaction and support. This paper describes an RF control system design that addresses these various issues by evaluation a combination of feedback and feed forward control techniques. Experience from the high-current Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) is drawn upon for this RF control system design. Comprehensive computer modeling with the Matrix x software has been used to predict the performance of this RF control system

  19. Digital low level RF control system for the DESY TTF VUV-FEL Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayvazyan, V.; Choroba, S.; Matyushin, A.; Moeller, G.; Petrosyan, G.; Rehlich, K.; Simrock, S.N.; Vetrov, P.

    2005-01-01

    In the RF system for the Vacuum Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (VUV-FEL) Linac each klystron supplies RF power to up to 32 cavities. The superconducting cavities are operated in pulsed mode and high accelerating gradients close to the performance limit. The RF control of the cavity fields to the level of 10 -4 for amplitude and 0.1 degree for phase however presents a significant technical challenge due to the narrow bandwidth of the cavities which results in high sensitivity to perturbations of the resonance frequency by mechanical vibrations (microphonics) and Lorenz force detuning. The VUV-FEL Linac RF control system employs a completely digital feedback system to provide flexibility in the control algorithms, precise calibration of the accelerating field vector-sum, and extensive diagnostics and exception handling capabilities. The RF control algorithm is implemented in DSP (Digital Signal Processor) firmware and DOOCS (Distributed Object Oriented Control System) servers. The RF control system design objectives are discussed. Hardware and software design of the DSP based RF control are presented. (orig.)

  20. Digital low level RF control system for the DESY TTF VUV-FEL Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayvazyan, V.; Choroba, S.; Matyushin, A.; Moeller, G.; Petrosyan, G.; Rehlich, K.; Simrock, S.N.; Vetrov, P.

    2005-07-01

    In the RF system for the Vacuum Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (VUV-FEL) Linac each klystron supplies RF power to up to 32 cavities. The superconducting cavities are operated in pulsed mode and high accelerating gradients close to the performance limit. The RF control of the cavity fields to the level of 10{sup -4} for amplitude and 0.1 degree for phase however presents a significant technical challenge due to the narrow bandwidth of the cavities which results in high sensitivity to perturbations of the resonance frequency by mechanical vibrations (microphonics) and Lorenz force detuning. The VUV-FEL Linac RF control system employs a completely digital feedback system to provide flexibility in the control algorithms, precise calibration of the accelerating field vector-sum, and extensive diagnostics and exception handling capabilities. The RF control algorithm is implemented in DSP (Digital Signal Processor) firmware and DOOCS (Distributed Object Oriented Control System) servers. The RF control system design objectives are discussed. Hardware and software design of the DSP based RF control are presented. (orig.)

  1. Development of Low Level RF Control Systems for Superconducting Heavy Ion Linear Accelerators, Electron Synchrotrons and Storage Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Aminov, Bachtior; Kolesov, Sergej; Pekeler, Michael; Piel, Christian; Piel, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    Since 2001 ACCEL Instruments is supplying low level RF control systems together with turn key cavity systems. The early LLRF systems used the well established technology based on discrete analogue amplitude and phase detectors and modulators. Today analogue LLRF systems can make use of advanced vector demodulators and modulators combined with a fast computer controlled analogue feed back loop. Feed forward control is implemented to operate the RF cavity in an open loop mode or to compensate for predictable perturbations. The paper will introduce the general design philosophy and show how it can be adapted to different tasks as controlling a synchrotron booster nc RF system at 500 MHz, or superconducting storage ring RF cavities, as well as a linear accelerator at 176 MHz formed by a chain of individually driven and controlled superconducting λ/2 cavities.

  2. Low Level RF Including a Sophisticated Phase Control System for CTF3

    CERN Document Server

    Mourier, J; Nonglaton, J M; Syratchev, I V; Tanner, L

    2004-01-01

    CTF3 (CLIC Test Facility 3), currently under construction at CERN, is a test facility designed to demonstrate the key feasibility issues of the CLIC (Compact LInear Collider) two-beam scheme. When completed, this facility will consist of a 150 MeV linac followed by two rings for bunch-interleaving, and a test stand where 30 GHz power will be generated. In this paper, the work that has been carried out on the linac's low power RF system is described. This includes, in particular, a sophisticated phase control system for the RF pulse compressor to produce a flat-top rectangular pulse over 1.4 µs.

  3. Digital Low-Level RF Controls for Future Superconducting Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Simrock, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    The requirements for RF Control Systems of Superconducting Linear Colliders are not only defined in terms of the quality of field control but also with respect to operability, availability, and maintainability of the RF System, and the interfaces to other subsystems. The field control of the vector-sum of many cavities driven by one klystron in pulsed mode at high gradients is a challenging task since severe Lorentz force detuning, microphonics and beam induced field errors must be suppressed by several orders of magnitude. This is accomplished by a combination of local and global feedback and feedforward control. Sensors monitor individual cavity probe signals, and forward and reflected wave as well as the beam properties including beam energy and phase while actuators control the incident wave of the klystron and individual cavity resonance frequencies. The operability of a large llrf system requires a high degree of automation while the high availability requires robust algorithms, redundancy, and extremel...

  4. Development of EPICS Input Output Controller and User Interface for the PEFP Low Level RF Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Young Gi; Kim, Han Sung; Seol, Kyung Tae; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Cho, Yong Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    The Low-Level RF (LLRF) control system of the Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP) was developed for handling the driving frequency for Quadrupole (RFQ) and the Draft Tube Linac (DTL) cavities in 2006. The RF amplitude and phase of the accelerating field were controlled within 1% and 1 degree by stability requirements, respectively. Operators have been using the LLRF control system under the windows based text console mode as an operator interface. The LLRF control system could not be integrated with Experimental Physics Industrial Control System (EPICS) Input Output Controllers (IOC) for each subsection of PEFP facility. The main objective of this study is to supply operators of the LLRF control system with user friendly and convenient operating environment. The new LLRF control system is composed of a Verse Module Eurocard (VME) baseboard, a PCI Mezzanine Card (PMC), Board Support Package (BSP), EPICS software tool and a Real-Time Operating System (RTOS) VxWorks. A test with a dummy cavity of the new LLRF control system shows that operators can control and monitor operation parameters for a desired feedback action by using EPICS Channel Access (CA).

  5. Development of EPICS Input Output Controller and User Interface for the PEFP Low Level RF Control System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Young Gi; Kim, Han Sung; Seol, Kyung Tae; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Cho, Yong Sub

    2010-01-01

    The Low-Level RF (LLRF) control system of the Proton Engineering Frontier Project (PEFP) was developed for handling the driving frequency for Quadrupole (RFQ) and the Draft Tube Linac (DTL) cavities in 2006. The RF amplitude and phase of the accelerating field were controlled within 1% and 1 degree by stability requirements, respectively. Operators have been using the LLRF control system under the windows based text console mode as an operator interface. The LLRF control system could not be integrated with Experimental Physics Industrial Control System (EPICS) Input Output Controllers (IOC) for each subsection of PEFP facility. The main objective of this study is to supply operators of the LLRF control system with user friendly and convenient operating environment. The new LLRF control system is composed of a Verse Module Eurocard (VME) baseboard, a PCI Mezzanine Card (PMC), Board Support Package (BSP), EPICS software tool and a Real-Time Operating System (RTOS) VxWorks. A test with a dummy cavity of the new LLRF control system shows that operators can control and monitor operation parameters for a desired feedback action by using EPICS Channel Access (CA).

  6. Low-level RF LabVIEW reg-sign control software user's manual: Version 1.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    This document details information on the low-level radio frequency (LLRF) software control package. The chapters in this manual cover the following topics: Chapter one describes the general operating principles of the LabVIEW software package, and also discusses the high-level menu panels which allow access to the individual control panels. Chapter two covers the control panels used for conditioning the cavity, and for controlling the accelerator under normal operating conditions. Chapter three provides information on the resonance detection and reflectometer calibration function, including the setup and status panels for each. Chapter four contain instructions on the use of those panels dedicated to controlling the cavity RF field. Chapter five discusses the control panels that provide setup and status information on the diagnostic monitor subsystem. Chapter six outlines those panels used to control the timing functions provided by the LLRF system. Finally, chapter seven describes the control panels used to monitor and adjust the alarm and limit functions of the system. Throughout the document, it is assumed that the reader has a general working knowledge of accelerators, high-power amplifier equipment, and low-level RF (LLRF) control systems. References are listed as footnotes as they occur in the text

  7. Development of digital low level rf system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michizono, Shinichiro; Anami, Shozo; Katagiri, Hiroaki; Fang, Zhigao; Matsumoto, Toshihiro; Miura, Takako; Yano, Yoshiharu; Yamaguchi, Seiya; Kobayashi, Tetsuya

    2008-01-01

    One of the biggest advantages of the digital low level rf (LLRF) system is its flexibility. Owing to the recent rapid progress in digital devices (such as ADCs and DACs) and telecommunication devices (mixers and IQ modulators), digital LLRF system becomes popular in these 10 years. The J-PARC linac LLRF system adopted cPCI crates and FPGA based digital feedback system. Since the LLRF control of the normal conducting cavities are more difficult than super conducting cavities due to its lower Q values, fast processing using the FPGA was the essential to the feedback control. After the successful operation of J-PARC linac LLRF system, we developed the STF (ILC test facility in KEK) LLRF system. Since the klystron drives eight cavities in STF phase 1, we modified the FPGA board. Basic configuration and the performances of these systems are summarized. The future R and D projects (ILC and ERL) is also described from the viewpoints of LLRF. (author)

  8. Architecture design of the application software for the low-level RF control system of the free-electron laser at Hamburg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, Z.; Ayvazyan, V.; Simrock, S.

    2012-01-01

    The superconducting linear accelerator of the Free-Electron Laser at Hamburg (FLASH) provides high performance electron beams to the lasing system to generate synchrotron radiation to various users. The Low-Level RF (LLRF) system is used to maintain the beam stabilities by stabilizing the RF field in the superconducting cavities with feedback and feed forward algorithms. The LLRF applications are sets of software to perform RF system model identification, control parameters optimization, exception detection and handling, so as to improve the precision, robustness and operability of the LLRF system. In order to implement the LLRF applications in the hardware with multiple distributed processors, an optimized architecture of the software is required for good understandability, maintainability and extendibility. This paper presents the design of the LLRF application software architecture based on the software engineering approach for FLASH. (authors)

  9. Design and Calibration of an RF Actuator for Low-Level RF Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Zheqiao; Hong, Bo

    2016-02-01

    X-ray free electron laser (FEL) machines like the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC require high-quality electron beams to generate X-ray lasers for various experiments. Digital low-level RF (LLRF) systems are widely used to control the high-power RF klystrons to provide a highly stable RF field in accelerator structures for beam acceleration. Feedback and feedforward controllers are implemented in LLRF systems to stabilize or adjust the phase and amplitude of the RF field. To achieve the RF stability and the accuracy of the phase and amplitude adjustment, low-noise and highly linear RF actuators are required. Aiming for the upgrade of the S-band Linac at SLAC, an RF actuator is designed with an I/Qmodulator driven by two digital-to-analog converters (DAC) for the digital LLRF systems. A direct upconversion scheme is selected for RF actuation, and an on-line calibration algorithm is developed to compensate the RF reference leakage and the imbalance errors in the I/Q modulator, which may cause significant phase and amplitude actuation errors. This paper presents the requirements on the RF actuator, the design of the hardware, the calibration algorithm, and the implementation in firmware and software and the test results at LCLS.

  10. Development of a multichannel RF field detector for the low-level RF control of the free-electron laser at Hamburg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, Matthias

    2008-10-01

    Modern free electron lasers produce synchrotron radiation with constantly shortening wavelengths of up to 6 nm and pulse widths of up to 100 fs. That requires a constantly increasing stability of the beam energy and arrival time of the electron beam at the undulator entrance which is situated at the end of the accelerator. At the same time, the increasing speed of digital signal processing and data acquisition facilitates new possibilities for the digital radio frequency control and field detection. In this thesis the development of a multichannel radio frequency field detector for the low level radio frequency (LLRF) control of the superconducting cavities of the Free-Electron Laser at Hamburg (FLASH) is described. The applied method of IF sampling is state of the technology and is utilized in many areas of digital communication. It is evaluated concerning its applicability for the LLRF control. Analytical and numerical investigations of the noise behavior and transport in the control loop have been accomplished to define the requirements for the measurement accuracy of the field detector that was to be developed. Therefore, simplified models of the noise behavior of each system component of the control loop, e.g. amplifier, radio frequency mixer and analog-to-digital converter, were established and subsequently assorted to a the model of the control loop. Due to the application of the vector-sum control, where several separately measured field vectors are added to a vector-sum, requirements concerning the allowable compression error of the detector nonlinearity were defined. These were investigated by analytical and numerical methods, as well. Requirements for the hardware that was to be developed were compiled from the simulation results. For the development of the field detector, a modular and EMC-compatible concept with a high-level passive front-end for an improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio was chosen. The following tests in the lab delivered the

  11. Development of a multichannel RF field detector for the low-level RF control of the free-electron laser at Hamburg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Matthias

    2008-10-15

    Modern free electron lasers produce synchrotron radiation with constantly shortening wavelengths of up to 6 nm and pulse widths of up to 100 fs. That requires a constantly increasing stability of the beam energy and arrival time of the electron beam at the undulator entrance which is situated at the end of the accelerator. At the same time, the increasing speed of digital signal processing and data acquisition facilitates new possibilities for the digital radio frequency control and field detection. In this thesis the development of a multichannel radio frequency field detector for the low level radio frequency (LLRF) control of the superconducting cavities of the Free-Electron Laser at Hamburg (FLASH) is described. The applied method of IF sampling is state of the technology and is utilized in many areas of digital communication. It is evaluated concerning its applicability for the LLRF control. Analytical and numerical investigations of the noise behavior and transport in the control loop have been accomplished to define the requirements for the measurement accuracy of the field detector that was to be developed. Therefore, simplified models of the noise behavior of each system component of the control loop, e.g. amplifier, radio frequency mixer and analog-to-digital converter, were established and subsequently assorted to a the model of the control loop. Due to the application of the vector-sum control, where several separately measured field vectors are added to a vector-sum, requirements concerning the allowable compression error of the detector nonlinearity were defined. These were investigated by analytical and numerical methods, as well. Requirements for the hardware that was to be developed were compiled from the simulation results. For the development of the field detector, a modular and EMC-compatible concept with a high-level passive front-end for an improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio was chosen. The following tests in the lab delivered the

  12. Low-level rf system for the AGS Light Ion Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovarik, V.; Ahrens, L.; Barton, D.S.; Frankel, R.; Otis, A.; Pope, D.; Pritsker, M.; Raka, E.; Warkentien, R.

    1987-01-01

    The new low level rf system for the light ion acceleration program features direct digital control of a phase continuous rf synthesizer clocked by finite changes in the B field. The system, its operation and testing are described. The system covers the complete rf frequency range and switches over from single cavity acceleration to multiple cavity acceleration with no beam loss. It also switches from the programmed drive to the normal bootstrap system

  13. Low Level RF System for Jefferson Lab Cryomodule Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasz Plawski; Trent Allison; Jean Delayen; J. Hovater; Thomas Powers

    2003-01-01

    The Jefferson Lab Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) has been upgraded to test and commission SNS and CEBAF Energy Upgrade cryomodules. Part of the upgrade was to modernize the superconducting cavity instrumentation and control. We have designed a VXI based RF control system exclusively for the production testing of superconducting cavities. The RF system can be configured to work either in Phase Locked Loop (PLL) or Self Excited Loop (SEL) mode. It can be used to drive either SNS 805 MHz or CEBAF Energy Upgrade 1497 MHz superconducting cavities and can be operated in pulsed or continuous wave (CW) mode. The base design consists of RF-analog and digital sections. The RF-analog section includes a Voltage Control Oscillator (VCO), phase detector, IandQ modulator and ''low phase shift'' limiter. The digital section controls the analog section and includes ADC, FPGA, and DAC . We will discuss the design of the RF system and how it relates to the support of cavity testing

  14. Intelligent low-level RF system by non-destructive beam monitoring device for cyclotrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi Asadi Malafeh, M. S.; Ghergherehchi, M.; Afarideh, H.; Chai, J. S.; Yoon, Sang Kim

    2016-04-01

    The project of a 10 MeV PET cyclotron accelerator for medical diagnosis and treatment was started at Amirkabir University of Technology in 2012. The low-level RF system of the cyclotron accelerator is designed to stabilize acceleration voltage and control the resonance frequency of the cavity. In this work an Intelligent Low Level Radio Frequency Circuit or ILLRF, suitable for most AVF cyclotron accelerators, is designed using a beam monitoring device and narrow band tunable band-pass filter. In this design, the RF phase detection does not need signal processing by a microcontroller.

  15. New low-level rf system for the Fermilab Booster synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerns, C.; Crisp, J.; Kerns, Q.; Miller, H.

    1987-03-01

    This paper describes the Booster low-level rf system that was constructed to meet these recently added requirements: (1) synthesizer controlled capture frequency at injection, (2) very low-phase noise over the machine cycle, (3) smooth phase-lock of beam to an external reference frequency and (4) ability to accelerate either a full turn or partial turn of beam

  16. Versatile rf controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, D.

    1985-05-01

    The low level rf system developed for the new Bevatron local injector provides precise control and regulation of the rf phase and amplitude for three 200 MHz linac cavities. The main features of the system are: extensive use of inexpensive, off-the-shelf components, ease of maintenance, and adaptability to a wide range of operation frequencies. The system utilizes separate function, easily removed rf printed circuit cards interconnected via the edge connectors. Control and monitoring are available both locally and through the computer. This paper will describe these features as well as the few component changes that would be required to adapt the techniques to other operating frequencies. 2 refs

  17. Commissioning experience with the PEP-II low-level RF system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corredoura, P.; Allison, S.; Claus, R.; Ross, W.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Schwarz, H.D.; Tighe, R.; Yee, C.; Ziomek, C.

    1997-05-01

    The low-level RF system for PEP-II is a modular design housed in a VXI environment and supported by EPICS. All signal processing and control is done at baseband using in-phase and quadrature (IQ) techniques. Remotely configurable RF feedback loops are used to control coupled-bunch instabilities driven by the accelerating mode of the RF cavities. A programmable DSP based feedback loop is implemented to control phase variations across the klystron due to the required adjustment of the cathode voltage to limit cathode power dissipation. The DSP loop also adaptively cancels modulations caused by klystron power supply ripple at selected power line harmonics between 60 Hz and 10 kHz. The system contains a built-in baseband network analyzer which allows remote measurement of the RF feedback loop transfer functions and automated configuration of these loops. This paper presents observations and measured data from the system

  18. Effects of RF low levels electromagnetic fields on Paramecium primaurelia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tofani, S.; Testa, B.; Agnesod, G.; Tartagbino, L.; Bonazzola, G.C.

    1988-01-01

    In the last years many studies have been performed to examine biological effects of prolonged exposure at electric field low levels. This great interest is linked to a specific interaction possibility, also related to the exposure length, between electromagnetic fields and biological systems without remarkable enhancement of organism's temperature. Hence the need to investigate in vitro the possible cellular regulation mechanisms involved in these interactions, varying physical exposure parameters

  19. Timing and low-level rf system for an x-ray laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Otake

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available An x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL, SACLA, designed to open up new science, was constructed for generating coherent x rays with a peak power of more than 10 GW and a very short pulse of below 30 fs. This feature demands a very highly short-term temporal stability of less than 50 fs to the acceleration rf field of SACLA. For this reason, we developed a timing and low-level rf (LLRF system for SACLA based on that of the SPring8 compact SASE source (SCSS test accelerator for verifying the feasibility of an XFEL. The performance of the system using the in-phase and quadrature rf manipulation method was improved from SCSS’s system. Since the facility length of SACLA is 700 m, which is 10 times longer than that of the SCSS test accelerator, a phase-stabilized optical-fiber system designed to transmit time standard rf signals with low loss was also developed and deployed. This optical-fiber system equips fiber optical-length feedback control in order to mitigate environmental effects, such as temperature and humidity changes. On the other hand, the demanded maximum rf temporal stability is less than 50 fs, which is almost 10 times smaller than that of the SCSS test accelerator. Hence, reducing electric noise and increasing the temperature stability around timing and LLRF instruments were necessary and realized with a very low-noise power supply and a hemathermal 19-inch enclosure. The short-term temporal performance of the timing LLRF system finally attained a temporal stability of less than 13.6 fs in rms measured by a beam arrival-time measurement. This stability greatly helps to achieve the stable x-ray lasing of SACLA for routine operation during user experiments.

  20. Participants of the LLRF05 : Workshop on Low Level RF, CERN 10-13 October 2005

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    Sophisticated Low Level RF systems are needed in modern particle accelerators to deal with the characteristics of state-of-the-art RF accelerating structures and their power sources, and to meet unprecedented levels of performance. The goal of the LLRF05 workshop is to share experience between linac and synchrotron projects (SNS, J-PARC, ILC, LHC etc.) and to discuss the best engineering practice.

  1. Lessons learned from positron-electron project low level rf and longitudinal feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fox

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The Positron-Electron Project II (PEP-II B Factory collider ended the final phase of operation at nearly twice the design current and 4X the design luminosity. In the ultimate operation state, eight 1.2 MW radio-frequency (rf klystrons and 12 accelerating cavities were added beyond the original implementation, and the two storage rings were operating with longitudinal instability growth rates roughly 5X in excess of the original design estimates. From initial commissioning there has been continual adaptation of the low level rf (LLRF control strategies, configuration tools, and some new hardware in response to unanticipated technical challenges. This paper offers a perspective on the original LLRF and longitudinal instability control design, and highlights via two examples the system evolution from the original design estimates through to the final machine with 1.2×10^{34} luminosity. The impact of unanticipated signals in the coupled-bunch longitudinal feedback and the significance of nonlinear processing elements in the LLRF systems are presented. We present valuable “lessons learned” which are of interest to designers of next generation feedback and impedance controlled LLRF systems.

  2. Digital Low Level RF Systems for Fermilab Main Ring and Tevatron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, B.; Barnes, B.; Meisner, K.

    1997-05-01

    At Fermilab, a new Low Level RF system is successfully installed and operating in the Main Ring. Installation is proceeding for a Tevatron system. This upgrade replaces aging CAMAC/NIM components for an increase in accuracy, reliability, and flexibility. These VXI systems are based on a custom three channel direct digital synthesizer(DDS) module. Each synthesizer channel is capable of independent or ganged operation for both frequency and phase modulation. New frequency and phase values are computed at a 100kHz rate on the module's Analog Devices ADSP21062 (SHARC) digital signal processor. The DSP concurrently handles feedforward, feedback, and beam manipulations. Higher level state machines and the control system interface are handled at the crate level using the VxWorks operating system. This paper discusses the hardware, software and operational aspects of these LLRF systems.

  3. Controlling low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This series of information sheets describes at a popular level the sources of low-level radioactive wastes, their associated hazards, methods of storage, transportation and disposal, and the Canadian regulations that cover low-level wastes

  4. New digital low-level rf system for heavy-ion synchrotrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Klingbeil

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In the scope of the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR project, several new synchrotrons and storage rings will be built. The existing heavy-ion synchrotron SIS18 has to be upgraded to serve as an injector for the FAIR accelerators. All this imposes new requirements on the low-level rf (LLRF systems. These requirements include fast ramping modes, arbitrary ion species, and complex beam manipulations such as dual-harmonic operation, bunch merging/splitting, barrier bucket operation, or bunch compression. In order to fulfill these tasks, a completely new and unique system architecture has been developed since 2002, and the system is now used in SIS18 operation. The presentation of this novel system architecture is the purpose of this paper. We first describe the requirements and the design of the LLRF system. Afterwards, some key components and key interfaces of the system are summarized followed by a discussion of technological aspects. Finally, we present some beam experiment results that were obtained using the new LLRF system.

  5. Cancer risks related to low-level RF/MW exposures, including cell phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmigielski, Stanislaw

    2013-09-01

    For years, radiofrequency (RF) and microwave (MW) radiations have been applied in the modern world. The rapidly increasing use of cellular phones called recent attention to the possible health risks of RF/MW exposures. In 2011, a group of international experts organized by IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer in Lyon) concluded that RF/MW radiations should be listed as a possible carcinogen (group 2B) for humans. Three meta-analyses of case-control studies have concluded that using cell phones for more than ten years was associated with an increase in the overall risk of developing a brain tumor. The Interphone Study, the largest health-related case-control international study of use of cell phones and head and neck tumors, showed no statistically significant increases in brain cancers related to higher amounts of cell phone use, but excess risk in a small subgroup of more heavily exposed users associated with latency and laterality was reported. So far, the published studies do not show that mobile phones could for sure increase the risk of cancer. This conclusion is based on the lack of a solid biological mechanism, and the fact that brain cancer rates are not going up significantly. However, all of the studies so far have weaknesses, which make it impossible to entirely rule out a risk. Mobile phones are still a new technology and there is little evidence about effects of long-term use. For this reason, bioelectromagnetic experts advise application of a precautionary resources. It suggests that if people want to use a cell phone, they can choose to minimize their exposure by keeping calls short and preferably using hand-held sets. It also advises discouraging children from making non essential calls as well as also keeping their calls short.

  6. Reaction of the immune system to low-level RF/MW exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szmigielski, Stanislaw

    2013-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) and microwave (MW) radiation have been used in the modern world for many years. The rapidly increasing use of cellular phones in recent years has seen increased interest in relation to the possible health effects of exposure to RF/MW radiation. In 2011 a group of international experts organized by the IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer in Lyon) concluded that RF/MW radiations should be listed as a possible carcinogen (group 2B) for humans. The incomplete knowledge of RF/MW-related cancer risks has initiated searches for biological indicators sensitive enough to measure the “weak biological influence” of RF/MWs. One of the main candidates is the immune system, which is able to react in a measurable way to discrete environmental stimuli. In this review, the impacts of weak RF/MW fields, including cell phone radiation, on various immune functions, both in vitro and in vivo, are discussed. The bulk of available evidence clearly indicates that various shifts in the number and/or activity of immunocompetent cells are possible, however the results are inconsistent. For example, a number of lymphocyte functions have been found to be enhanced and weakened within single experiments based on exposure to similar intensities of MW radiation. Certain premises exist which indicate that, in general, short-term exposure to weak MW radiation may temporarily stimulate certain humoral or cellular immune functions, while prolonged irradiation inhibits the same functions

  7. Reaction of the immune system to low-level RF/MW exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szmigielski, Stanislaw, E-mail: szmigielski@wihe.waw.pl

    2013-06-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) and microwave (MW) radiation have been used in the modern world for many years. The rapidly increasing use of cellular phones in recent years has seen increased interest in relation to the possible health effects of exposure to RF/MW radiation. In 2011 a group of international experts organized by the IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer in Lyon) concluded that RF/MW radiations should be listed as a possible carcinogen (group 2B) for humans. The incomplete knowledge of RF/MW-related cancer risks has initiated searches for biological indicators sensitive enough to measure the “weak biological influence” of RF/MWs. One of the main candidates is the immune system, which is able to react in a measurable way to discrete environmental stimuli. In this review, the impacts of weak RF/MW fields, including cell phone radiation, on various immune functions, both in vitro and in vivo, are discussed. The bulk of available evidence clearly indicates that various shifts in the number and/or activity of immunocompetent cells are possible, however the results are inconsistent. For example, a number of lymphocyte functions have been found to be enhanced and weakened within single experiments based on exposure to similar intensities of MW radiation. Certain premises exist which indicate that, in general, short-term exposure to weak MW radiation may temporarily stimulate certain humoral or cellular immune functions, while prolonged irradiation inhibits the same functions.

  8. Operational experience with the new LEIR digital low-level RF System

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, ME

    2010-01-01

    The LEIR Low-Level (LLRF) system is the first all-digital low LLRF system that has been put into operation in a CERN circular machine. It is a very compact system, composed of one VME64x crate and of few NIM modules. System capabilities include typical beam control tasks, such as frequency program, beam phase, radial and extraction synchronization feedback loops, as well as cavity voltage/phase feedback loops. The system is also capable of coping with the large variation of the revolution frequency during an acceleration cycle as well as with the high dynamic range required by the LEIR cavities operation. Extensive diagnostics and observation capabilities are built-in and the system’s control parameters are fully configurable remotely and in-between cycles. Over the various LEIR runs, the LLRF system has proven to be reliable and reproducible as well as extremely flexible and powerful. These characteristics are essential for a LLRF system and LEIR is already profiting from them. Moreover, high beam availabi...

  9. Modeling the interaction of a heavily beam loaded SRF cavity with its low-level RF feedback loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zong-Kai; Wang, Chaoen; Chang, Lung-Hai; Yeh, Meng-Shu; Chang, Fu-Yu; Chang, Mei-Hsia; Chang, Shian-Wen; Chen, Ling-Jhen; Chung, Fu-Tsai; Lin, Ming-Chyuan; Lo, Chih-Hung; Yu, Tsung-Chi

    2018-06-01

    A superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity provides superior stability to power high intensity light sources and can suppress coupled-bunch instabilities due to its smaller impedance for higher order modes. Because of these features, SRF cavities are commonly used for modern light sources, such as the TLS, CLS, DLS, SSRF, PLS-II, TPS, and NSLS-II, with an aggressive approach to operate the light sources at high beam currents. However, operating a SRF cavity at high beam currents may result with unacceptable stability problems of the low level RF (LLRF) system, due to drifts of the cavity resonant frequency caused by unexpected perturbations from the environment. As the feedback loop gets out of control, the cavity voltage may start to oscillate with a current-dependent characteristic frequency. Such situations can cause beam abort due to the activation of the interlock protection system, i.e. false alarm of quench detection. This malfunction of the light source reduces the reliability of SRF operation. Understanding this unstable mechanism to prevent its appearance becomes a primary task in the pursuit of highly reliable SRF operation. In this paper, a Pedersen model, including the response of the LLRF system, was used to simulate the beam-cavity interaction of a SRF cavity under heavy beam loading. Causes for the onset of instability at high beam current will be discussed as well as remedies to assure the design of a stable LLRF system.

  10. RF-Station control crate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuzekom, M.G. van; Es, J.T. van.

    1992-01-01

    This report gives a description of the electronic control-system for the RF-station of AmPS. The electronics form the connection between the computer-system and the hardware of the RF-station. Only the elements of the systems which are not described in the other NIKHEF-reports are here discussed in detail. (author). 7 figs

  11. Control of quality in spectrometry gamma of low level

    CERN Document Server

    Salazar, A

    1997-01-01

    Low level gamma spectrometry is a very precise technique to measure the concentration of nuclides present in different samples in Bq kg sup - sup 1. The quality control of the procedure and method used can be carried out by intercomparison exercises with world recognized institutions. During the last three years the Nuclear Physics Laboratory Of The University of Costa Rica (LAFNA) has been participating in the international quality assessment program (QAP) carried out by the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML), department of Energy, USA. The results show a very good agreement with the rest of the participant laboratories. This provides a very objective evaluation of the high precision of the methods used by LAFNA in low level spectroscopy measurements. (Author)

  12. Control of quality in spectrometry gamma of low level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar, A.; Loria, G.

    1997-01-01

    Low level gamma spectrometry is a very precise technique to measure the concentration of nuclides present in different samples in Bq kg -1 . The quality control of the procedure and method used can be carried out by intercomparison exercises with world recognized institutions. During the last three years the Nuclear Physics Laboratory Of The University of Costa Rica (LAFNA) has been participating in the international quality assessment program (QAP) carried out by the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML), department of Energy, USA. The results show a very good agreement with the rest of the participant laboratories. This provides a very objective evaluation of the high precision of the methods used by LAFNA in low level spectroscopy measurements. (Author) [es

  13. Reliability review of the LHC collimators low level control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masi, A.; Donze, M.; Losito, R.

    2011-01-01

    The LHC collimators' low level control system is responsible for the positioning, with an accuracy of a few um, of more than 500 motor axes located around the entire LHC tunnel and synchronized at us level,The collimators' axes position is verified in Real Time, monitoring at 100 Hz more than 700 LVDT positioning sensors. Apart from the challenging requirements of timing and positioning accuracy, the system is characterized by a high level of reliability since the collimators have the crucial function of machine protection. In this paper we focus on the architectural and technical choices adopted to guarantee the level of reliability required by the application. We also present the tools and solutions developed to manage this huge control system making the support easier and faster for its operation. (authors)

  14. Modeling and simulation of Indus-2 RF feedback control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, D.; Bagduwal, P.S.; Tiwari, N.; Lad, M.; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2012-01-01

    Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source has four RF stations along with their feedback control systems. For higher beam energy and current operation amplitude and phase feedback control systems of Indus-2 are being upgraded. To understand the behaviour of amplitude and phase control loop under different operating conditions, modelling and simulation of RF feedback control system is done. RF cavity baseband I/Q model has been created due to its close correspondence with actual implementation and better computational efficiency which makes the simulation faster. Correspondence between cavity baseband and RF model is confirmed by comparing their simulation results. Low Level RF (LLRF) feedback control system simulation is done using the same cavity baseband I/Q model. Error signals are intentionally generated and response of the closed loop system is observed. Simulation will help us in optimizing parameters of upgraded LLRF system for higher beam energy and current operation. (author)

  15. Low-level feedback control for the phase regulation of CLIC Drive Beam Klystrons

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)752526

    2015-01-01

    The requirement of luminosity loss below 1% raises tight tolerances for the phase and power stability of the CLIC drive beam (DB) klystrons and consequently for the high voltage pulse ripple of the modulators. A low-level RF (LLRF) feedback system needs to be developed and combined with the modulator in order to guarantee the phase and amplitude tolerances. To this aim, three feedback control strategies were investigated, i) Proportional Integral (PI) controller, ii) Linear Quadratic Integral Regulator (LQI) and iii) Model Predictive Controller (MPC). The klystron, as well as the incident phase noise were modelled and used for the design and evaluation of the controllers. First simulation results are presented along with future steps and directions.

  16. EPICS based low-level radio frequency control system in LIPAc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, Julio, E-mail: julio.calvo@ciemat.es [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Ciemat (Spain); Rivers, Mark L. [Department of Geophysical Sciences and Center for Advanced Radiation Sources, The University of Chicago (United States); Patricio, Miguel A. [Departamento de Informatica, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (Spain); Ibarra, Angel [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Ciemat (Spain)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The system proposed can control amplitude and phase of each cavity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rapid diagnostics are refreshed in milliseconds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing control parameters will not increase consumed time neither complexity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IQ demodulation can be achieved thanks to the transformed values at driver level. - Abstract: The IFMIF-EVEDA (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility - Engineering Validation and Engineering Design Activity) linear accelerator, known as Linear IFMIF Prototype Accelerator (LIPAc), will be a 9 MeV, 125 mA continuous wave (CW) deuteron accelerator prototype to validate the technical options of the accelerator design for IFMIF. The primary mission of such facility is to test and verify materials performance when subjected to extensive neutron irradiation of the type encountered in a fusion reactor to prepare for the design, construction, licensing and safe operation of a fusion demonstration reactor (DEMO). The radio frequency (RF) power system of IFMIF-EVEDA consists of 18 RF chains working at 175 MHz with three amplification stages each. The low-level radio frequency (LLRF) controls the amplitude and phase of the signal to be synchronized with the beam and it also controls the resonance frequency of the cavities. The system is based on a commercial compact peripheral component interconnect (cPCI) field programmable gate array (FPGA) board, provided by Lyrtech and controlled by a Windows host PC. For this purpose, it is mandatory to communicate the cPCI FPGA board from EPICS Channel Access [1]. A software architecture on EPICS framework in order to control and monitor the LLRF system is presented.

  17. Regulatory control of low level radiation exposure in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyanda, A.M.; Muhogora, W.E.

    1997-01-01

    In Tanzania, the radiation protection law was issued in 1983. Under this law, the National Radiation Commission is responsible for safe uses of ionizing radiation. The regulatory control of the resulting doses from the uses of radiation sources in medicine, industry, research and teaching is presented. The system of control reflects the existing interactions between the National Radiation Commission and users through the established radiation protection infrastructure. From the national dose registry data, it is found that the highest annual individual doses over 10 years ago, came from less than 5% of total monitored workers and were in the range 10 - 15 mSv y -1 . The experienced radiation levels in uncontrolled areas of potential workplaces is less than 1 μSv h -1 . The possibility for associating such low dose levels to the effectiveness of the existing regulatory dose control framework is discussed. Despite of this achievement, the need to improve further the radiation protection and safety programs is found necessary. (author)

  18. A leading-edge hardware family for diagnostics applications and low-level RF in CERN's ELENA ring

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, M E; Jaussi, M; Leiononen, P; Levens, T E; Molendijk, J C; Sanchez-Quesada, J; Simonin, J

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Extra Low ENergy Antiproton (ELENA) Ring is a new synchrotron that will be commissioned in 2016 to further decelerate the antiprotons transferred from the CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator (AD). The requirements for the acquisition and treatment of signals for longitudinal diagnostics are very demanding, owing to the revolution frequency swing as well as to the digital signal processing required. The requirements for the Low-Level Radio-Frequency (LLRF) system are very demanding as well, especially in terms of revolution frequency swing, dynamic range and low noise required by the cavity voltage control and digital signal processing to be performed. Both sets of requirements will be satisfied by using a leading-edge hardware family, developed to cover the LLRF needs of all synchrotrons in the Meyrin site; it will be first deployed in 2014 in the CERN’s PSB and in the medical machine MedAustron. This paper gives an overview of the main building blocks of the hardware family and of th...

  19. Analog techniques in CEBAF's RF control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovater, C.; Fugitt, J.

    1989-01-01

    Recent developments in high-speed analog technology have progressed into the areas of traditional RF technology. Diode related devices are being replaced by analog IC's in the CEBAF RF control system. Complex phase modulators and attenuators have been successfully tested at 70 MHz. They have three advantages over existing technology: lower cost, less temperature sensitivity, and more linearity. RF signal conditioning components and how to implement the new analog IC's will be covered in this paper. 4 refs., 5 figs

  20. Analog techniques in CEBAF'S RF control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovater, C.; Fugitt, J.

    1989-01-01

    Recent developments in high-speed analog technology have progressed into the areas of traditional rf technology. Diode-related devices are being replaced by analog IC's in the CEBAF rf control system. Complex phase modulators and attenuators have been successfully tested at 70 MHz. They have three advantages over existing technology: lower cost, less temperature sensitivity, and more linearity. Rf signal conditioning components and how to implement the new analog IC's will be covered in this paper. 4 refs., 5 figs

  1. Control system analysis for the perturbed linear accelerator rf system

    CERN Document Server

    Sung Il Kwon

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses the modeling problem of the linear accelerator RF system in SNS. Klystrons are modeled as linear parameter varying systems. The effect of the high voltage power supply ripple on the klystron output voltage and the output phase is modeled as an additive disturbance. The cavity is modeled as a linear system and the beam current is modeled as the exogenous disturbance. The output uncertainty of the low level RF system which results from the uncertainties in the RF components and cabling is modeled as multiplicative uncertainty. Also, the feedback loop uncertainty and digital signal processing signal conditioning subsystem uncertainties are lumped together and are modeled as multiplicative uncertainty. Finally, the time delays in the loop are modeled as a lumped time delay. For the perturbed open loop system, the closed loop system performance, and stability are analyzed with the PI feedback controller.

  2. CONTROL SYSTEM ANALYSIS FOR THE PERTURBED LINEAR ACCELERATOR RF SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SUNG-IL KWON; AMY H. REGAN

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses the modeling problem of the linear accelerator RF system in SNS. Klystrons are modeled as linear parameter varying systems. The effect of the high voltage power supply ripple on the klystron output voltage and the output phase is modeled as an additive disturbance. The cavity is modeled as a linear system and the beam current is modeled as the exogenous disturbance. The output uncertainty of the low level RF system which results from the uncertainties in the RF components and cabling is modeled as multiplicative uncertainty. Also, the feedback loop uncertainty and digital signal processing signal conditioning subsystem uncertainties are lumped together and are modeled as multiplicative uncertainty. Finally, the time delays in the loop are modeled as a lumped time delay. For the perturbed open loop system, the closed loop system performance, and stability are analyzed with the PI feedback controller

  3. Design of electronic modules for the low-level RF systems at CERN. With particular regard to a new trigger unit for the Super Proton Synchrotron.

    CERN Document Server

    Levens, Thomas Edward; Knox, Andrew

    This report presents the work completed while the author was working for the BE-RF-FB group at the European Organization for Nuclear Research during the period of June to December 2010. The placement was completed as part of the University of Glasgow course ‘Industrial Project EE5’ which is requirement during the final year of the Degree of Master of Engineering. The report will pay particular attention to the hardware and firmware design of the ‘Dual Trigger Unit’, a new electronic module for the low-level RF system of the Super Proton Synchrotron accelerator which generates delayed timing pulses in order to trigger other hardware. In addition to this, the report will cover other projects completed during the period, including work on a prototype of the ‘VME Peak Detector’ card for the Large Hadron Collider beam observation system.

  4. Estimate of radiation damage to low-level electronics of the RF system in the LHC cavities arising from beam gas collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterworth, A.; Ferrari, A.; Tsoulou, E.; Vlachoudis, V.; Wijnands, T.

    2005-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to estimate the radiation damage induced by high-energy hadrons in the digital electronics of the RF low-level systems in the LHC cavities. High-energy hadrons are generated when the proton beams interact with the residual gas. The contributions from various elements - vacuum chambers, cryogenic cavities, wideband pickups and cryo-module beam tubes - have been considered individually, with each contribution depending on the gas composition and density. The probability of displacement damage and single event effects (mainly single event upsets) is derived for the LHC start-up conditions. (authors)

  5. Estimate of radiation damage to low-level electronics of the RF system in the LHC cavities arising from beam gas collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterworth, A; Ferrari, A; Tsoulou, E; Vlachoudis, V; Wijnands, T

    2005-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to estimate the radiation damage induced by high-energy hadrons in the digital electronics of the RF low-level systems in the LHC cavities. High-energy hadrons are generated when the proton beams interact with the residual gas. The contributions from various elements-vacuum chambers, cryogenic cavities, wideband pickups and cryomodule beam tubes-have been considered individually, with each contribution depending on the gas composition and density. The probability of displacement damage and single event effects (mainly single event upsets) is derived for the LHC start-up conditions.

  6. RF Control System Upgrade at CAMD

    CERN Document Server

    Suller, Victor P; Jines, Paul; Launey, Daren

    2005-01-01

    A description is given of the new control system for the RF system of the CAMD light source. The new design being implemented brings all RF signals into the data acquisition system via a modular, custom made, RF detector and renders the amplitude and tune control loops in the VME computer. On line calculations ensure monitoring of proper operation and display the information to the user in an efficient way. In addition, an advanced load impedance monitoring diagnostic has been implemented, being displayed as a Smith Chart, which is based on the system used at the SRS in Daresbury, England.

  7. DEMONSTRATION OF AN ATCA BASED RF CONTROL SYSTEM AT FLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Simrock, S N; Jezynski, T; Koprek, W; Butkowski, L; Jablonski, G W; Jalmuzna, W; Makowski, D R; Piotrowski, A; Czuba, K

    2009-01-01

    Future rf control systems will require simultaneous data acquisition of up to 100 fast ADC channels at sampling rates of around 100 MHz and real time signal processing within a few hundred nanoseconds. At the same time the standardization of Low-Level RF systems are common objectives for all laboratories for cost reduction, performance optimization and machine reliability. Also desirable are modularity and scalability of the design as well as compatibility with accelerator instrumentation needs including the control system. All these requirements can be fulfilled with the new telecommunication standard ATCA when adopted to the domain of instrumentation. We describe the architecture and design of an ATCA based LLRF system for the European XFEL. The operation of a prototype capable of controlling the vectorsum of 24-cavities and providing measurements of forward and reflected power are presented.

  8. Design and construction of the advanced photon source 352-MHz rf system switching control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horan, D.; Solita, L.; Reigle, D.; Dimonte, N.

    1997-01-01

    A switching control system has been designed and built to provide the capability of rapidly switching the waveguide and low-level cabling between different klystrons to operate the Advanced Photon Source storage ring in the event of a failure of a klystron system or to perform necessary repairs and preventative maintenance. The twelve possible modes of operation allow for complete redundancy of the booster synchrotron rf system and either a maximum of two storage ring rf systems to be completely off-line or one system to be used as a power source for an rf test stand. A programmable controller is used to send commands to intermediate control panels which interface to WR2300 waveguide switches and phase shifters, rf cavity interlock and low-level rf distribution systems, and klystron power supply controls for rapid reconfiguration of the rf systems in response to a mode-selection command. Mode selection is a local manual operation using a keyswitch arrangement which prevents more than one mode from being selected at a time. The programmable controller also monitors for hardware malfunction and guards against open-quotes hot-switchingclose quotes of the rf systems. The rf switching controls system is monitored via the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) for remote system status check

  9. RF control system of the HIMAC synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, M.; Sato, K.; Itano, A.

    1992-01-01

    An RF control system of the HIMAC synchrotron has been constructed. In this control system we have adopted a digital feed back system with a digital synthesizer (DS). Combining a high power system, performance of the control system have been tested in a factory (Toshiba) with a simulator circuit of the synchrotron oscillation. Following this test, We had beam acceleration test with this control system at TARN-II in INS (Institute for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo). This paper describes the RF control system and its tested results. (author)

  10. Control electronics of the PEP RF system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrin, J.L.; Schwarz, H.

    1981-01-01

    The operation of the major components used for controlling the phase and field level of the PEP RF cavities is described. The control electronics of one RF station is composed of several control loops: each cavity has a tuners' servo loop which maintains the frequency constant and also keeps the fields of each cavity balanced; the total gap voltage developed by a pair of cavities is regulated by a gap voltage controller; finally, the phase variation along the amplification chain, the klystron and the cavities are compensated by a phase lock loop. The design criteria of each loop are set forth and the circuit implementation and test results are presented

  11. RF control hardware design for CYCIAE-100 cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Zhiguo, E-mail: bitbearAT@hotmail.com; Fu, Xiaoliang; Ji, Bin; Zhao, Zhenlu; Zhang, Tianjue; Li, Pengzhan; Wei, Junyi; Xing, Jiansheng; Wang, Chuan

    2015-11-21

    The Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facility project is being constructed by BRIF division of China Institute of Atomic Energy. In this project, a 100 MeV high intensity compact proton cyclotron is built for multiple applications. The first successful beam extraction of CYCIAE-100 cyclotron was done in the middle of 2014. The extracted proton beam energy is 100 MeV and the beam current is more than 20 μA. The RF system of the CYCIAE-100 cyclotron includes two half-wavelength cavities, two 100 kW tetrode amplifiers and power transmission line systems (all above are independent from each other) and two sets of Low Level RF control crates. Each set of LLRF control includes an amplitude control unit, a tuning control unit, a phase control unit, a local Digital Signal Process control unit and an Advanced RISC Machines based EPICS IOC unit. These two identical LLRF control crates share one common reference clock and take advantages of modern digital technologies (e.g. DSP and Direct Digital Synthesizer) to achieve closed loop voltage and phase regulations of the dee-voltage. In the beam commission, the measured dee-voltage stability of RF system is better than 0.1% and phase stability is better than 0.03°. The hardware design of the LLRF system will be reviewed in this paper.

  12. Directions for rf-controlled intelligent microvalve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enderling, Stefan; Varadan, Vijay K.; Abbott, Derek

    2001-03-01

    In this paper, we consider the novel concept of a Radio Frequency (RF) controllable microvalve for different medical applications. Wireless communication via a Surface Acoustic Wave Identification-mark (SAW ID-tag) is used to control, drive and locate the microvalve inside the human body. The energy required for these functions is provided by RF pulses, which are transmitted to the valve and back by a reader/transmitter system outside of the body. These RF bursts are converted into Surface Acoustic Waves (SAWs), which propagate along the piezoelectric actuator material of the microvalve. These waves cause deflections, which are employed to open and close the microvalve. We identified five important areas of application of the microvalve in biomedicine: 1) fertility control; 2) artificial venous valves; 3) flow cytometry; 4) drug delivery and 5) DNA mapping.

  13. Low-level wastewater treatment facility process control operational test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergquist, G.G.

    1996-01-01

    This test report documents the results obtained while conducting operational testing of a new TK 102 level controller and total outflow integrator added to the NHCON software that controls the Low-Level Wastewater Treatment Facility (LLWTF). The test was performed with WHC-SD-CP-OTP 154, PFP Low-Level Wastewater Treatment Facility Process Control Operational Test. A complete test copy is included in appendix A. The new TK 102 level controller provides a signal, hereafter referred to its cascade mode, to the treatment train flow controller which enables the water treatment process to run for long periods without continuous operator monitoring. The test successfully demonstrated the functionality of the new controller under standard and abnormal conditions expected from the LLWTF operation. In addition, a flow totalizer is now displayed on the LLWTF outlet MICON screen which tallies the process output in gallons. This feature substantially improves the ability to retrieve daily process volumes for maintaining accurate material balances

  14. Annual report on the effluent control of low level liquid water in Tokai Works. FY2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeishi, Minoru; Miyagawa, Naoto; Watanabe, Hitoshi

    2005-08-01

    This report was written about the effluent control of low level liquid waste in JNC Tokai Works Fiscal Year 2004, from 1st April 2004 to 31th March 2005. In this period, the quantities and concentrations of radioactivity in liquid waste from Tokai Works were under the discharge limits of 'Safety Regulations for the Tokai Reprocessing Plant' and regulations of government. (author)

  15. Rf beam control for the AGS Booster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    RF beam control systems for hadron synchrotrons have evolved over the past three decades into an essentially standard design. The key difference between hadron and lepton machines is the absence of radiation damping and existence of significant frequency variation in the case of hadrons. Although the motion of the hadron in the potential well of the rf wave is inherently stable it is not strongly damped. Damping must be provided by electronic feedback through the accelerating system. This feedback is typically called the phase loop. The technology of the rf beam control system for the AGS Booster synchrotron is described. First, the overall philosophy of the design is explained in terms of a conventional servo system that regulates the beam horizontal position in the vacuum chamber. The concept of beam transfer functions is fundamental to the mathematics of the design process and is reviewed. The beam transfer functions required for this design are derived from first principles. An overview of the beam signal pick-ups and high level rf equipment is given. The major subsystems, the frequency program, the heterodyne system, and beam feedback loops, are described in detail. Beyond accelerating the beam, the rf system must also synchronize the bunches in the Booster to the buckets in the AGS before transfer. The technical challenge in this process is heightened by the need to accomplish synchronization while the frequency is still changing. Details of the synchronization system are given. This report is intended to serve two purposes. One is to document the hardware and performance of the systems that have been built. The other is to serve as a tutorial vehicle from which the non-expert can not only learn the details of this system but also learn the principles of beam control that have led to the particular design choices made

  16. Rf beam control for the AGS Booster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, J.M.

    1994-09-26

    RF beam control systems for hadron synchrotrons have evolved over the past three decades into an essentially standard design. The key difference between hadron and lepton machines is the absence of radiation damping and existence of significant frequency variation in the case of hadrons. Although the motion of the hadron in the potential well of the rf wave is inherently stable it is not strongly damped. Damping must be provided by electronic feedback through the accelerating system. This feedback is typically called the phase loop. The technology of the rf beam control system for the AGS Booster synchrotron is described. First, the overall philosophy of the design is explained in terms of a conventional servo system that regulates the beam horizontal position in the vacuum chamber. The concept of beam transfer functions is fundamental to the mathematics of the design process and is reviewed. The beam transfer functions required for this design are derived from first principles. An overview of the beam signal pick-ups and high level rf equipment is given. The major subsystems, the frequency program, the heterodyne system, and beam feedback loops, are described in detail. Beyond accelerating the beam, the rf system must also synchronize the bunches in the Booster to the buckets in the AGS before transfer. The technical challenge in this process is heightened by the need to accomplish synchronization while the frequency is still changing. Details of the synchronization system are given. This report is intended to serve two purposes. One is to document the hardware and performance of the systems that have been built. The other is to serve as a tutorial vehicle from which the non-expert can not only learn the details of this system but also learn the principles of beam control that have led to the particular design choices made.

  17. High-power RF controls for the NBS-Los Alamos racetrack microtron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, L.M.; Biddl, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    The high-power rf system for the National Bureau of Standards (NBS)-Los Alamos racetrack microtron (RTM) uses waveguide power splitters and waveguide phase shifters to distribute rf power from a single 500-kw cw klystron to four side-coupled accelerating structures. The amplitude and phase of each structure is controlled by a feedback system that uses the waveguide variable power splitters, waveguide phase shifters, and klystron drive as the active control elements. The feedback controls on the capture section use low-level rf amplitude and phase controls on the rf drive to the klystron. These controls are very fast with an open loop gain bandwidth of approximately 40 kHz. The feedback loop is identical to the feedback loop used in the chopper/buncher system described in another paper at this conference

  18. The Low-Level Control System for the CERN PS Multi-Turn Extraction Kickers

    CERN Document Server

    Schipper, J; Boucly, C; Carlier, E; Fowler, T; Gaudillet, H; Noulibos, R; Sermeus, L

    2010-01-01

    To reduce the beam losses when preparing high intensity proton beam for the CERN Neutrino to Gran Sasso (CNGS) facility, a new Multi-Turn extraction (MTE) scheme has been implemented in the PS, to replace the present Continuous Transfer (CT) to the SPS. Industrial off-the-shelf components have been used for the low-level part of the MTE kicker control system. National Instruments PXI systems are used to control the high voltage pulse generators and a SIEMENS programmable logic controller (PLC) handles the centralised oil cooling and gas insulation sub-systems

  19. Computer control of rf at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, H.D.

    1985-03-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator is presently upgraded for the SLAC Linear Collider project. The energy is to be increased from approximately 31 GeV to 50 GeV. Two electron beams and one positron beam are to be accelerated with high demands on the quality of the beams. The beam specifications are shown. To meet these specifications, all parameters influencing the beams have to be under tight control and continuous surveillance. This task is accomplished by a new computer system implemented at SLAC which has, among many other functions, control over rf accelerating fields. 13 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Low-level alcohol consumption during adolescence and its impact on cognitive control development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurk, Sarah; Mennigen, Eva; Goschke, Thomas; Smolka, Michael N

    2018-01-01

    Adolescence is a critical period for maturation of cognitive control and most adolescents start experimenting with alcohol around that time. On the one hand, recent studies indicate that low control abilities predict future problematic alcohol use. On the other hand, binge drinking during young adulthood can (further) impair cognitive control. However, so far no study examined the effects of low-level alcohol use during adolescence. In the present longitudinal fMRI study, we therefore investigated the development of cognitive control in a community-based sample of 92 adolescents at ages 14, 16 and 18. Two different cognitive control functions, i.e. inhibition of pre-potent responses (operationalized by incongruence effects) and switching between different task sets, were measured within one task. Alcohol use in our sample was low (mean: 54 g/week at age 18). The study revealed that neither behavioural nor neural measures of cognitive control function at age 14 predicted alcohol use at age 18 but confirmed established predictors such as gender and personality. As expected, from age 14 to 18, cognitive control abilities were improving (decreased reaction times and/or errors), and activation of cognitive control networks (dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and pre-supplementary motor area) during incongruent trials increased. Unexpectedly, higher alcohol consumption during adolescence was associated with a more pronounced increase in cognitive performance and a smaller increase of neural activation when incongruent trials afforded inhibitory control. We conclude that low-level alcohol use during adolescence does not severely impair ongoing maturation of cognitive control abilities and networks. © 2016 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  1. Construing Morality at High versus Low Levels Induces Better Self-control, Leading to Moral Acts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Chun Wu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Human morality entails a typical self-control dilemma in which one must conform to moral rules or socially desirable norms while exerting control over amoral, selfish impulses. Extant research regarding the connection between self-control and level of construal suggest that, compared with a low-level, concrete construal (highlighting means and resources, e.g., answering ‘how’ questions, a high-level, abstract construal (highlighting central goals, e.g., answering ‘why’ questions promotes self-control. Hence, construing morality at higher levels rather than lower levels should engender greater self-control and, it follows, promote a tendency to perform moral acts. We conducted two experiments to show that answering “why” (high-level construal vs. “how” (low-level construal questions regarding morality was associated with a situational state of greater self-control, as indexed by less Stroop interference in the Stroop color-naming task (Experiments 1 and 2. Participants exposed to “why” questions regarding morality displayed a greater inclination for volunteerism (Experiment 1, showed a lower tendency toward selfishness in a dictator game (Experiment 2, and were more likely to return undeserved money (Experiment 2 compared with participants exposed to “how” questions regarding morality. In both experiments, self-control mediated the effect of a high-level construal of morality on dependent measures. The current research constitutes a new approach to promoting prosociality and moral education. Reminding people to think abstractly about human morality may help them to generate better control over the temptation to benefit from unethical acts and make it more likely that they will act morally.

  2. Construing Morality at High versus Low Levels Induces Better Self-control, Leading to Moral Acts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Chun; Wu, Wen-Hsiung; Chiou, Wen-Bin

    2017-01-01

    Human morality entails a typical self-control dilemma in which one must conform to moral rules or socially desirable norms while exerting control over amoral, selfish impulses. Extant research regarding the connection between self-control and level of construal suggest that, compared with a low-level, concrete construal (highlighting means and resources, e.g., answering 'how' questions), a high-level, abstract construal (highlighting central goals, e.g., answering 'why' questions) promotes self-control. Hence, construing morality at higher levels rather than lower levels should engender greater self-control and, it follows, promote a tendency to perform moral acts. We conducted two experiments to show that answering "why" (high-level construal) vs. "how" (low-level construal) questions regarding morality was associated with a situational state of greater self-control, as indexed by less Stroop interference in the Stroop color-naming task (Experiments 1 and 2). Participants exposed to "why" questions regarding morality displayed a greater inclination for volunteerism (Experiment 1), showed a lower tendency toward selfishness in a dictator game (Experiment 2), and were more likely to return undeserved money (Experiment 2) compared with participants exposed to "how" questions regarding morality. In both experiments, self-control mediated the effect of a high-level construal of morality on dependent measures. The current research constitutes a new approach to promoting prosociality and moral education. Reminding people to think abstractly about human morality may help them to generate better control over the temptation to benefit from unethical acts and make it more likely that they will act morally.

  3. Study of Control Grid Thermionic Cathode RF Gun

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Jin; Ming, Li; Xinfan, Yang; Xumin, Shen; Yanan, Chen; Zhou, Xu

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the beam loading effect of RF Gun was analyzed. To minimize the energy spread, the grid control RF Gun was introduced. The result shows that the grid congrol RF Gun can increase electron beam within 1% energy spread.

  4. 162.5 MHz digital low-level radio frequency control monitoring system design and implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ruifeng; Wang Xianwu; Xu Zhe; Yi Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    162.5 MHz high-frequency low-level control system self-developed by Institute of Modern Physics for ADS project took digital technology. All parameters' reading and writing, including loop parameter setting, open and close-loop operation, and condition monitoring, were achieved through the monitoring system. The system used lightweight client-server working mode that client running in the PC sent command data, server running on high-frequency digital low level system responded instructions to complete parameter monitoring and control. The system consisted of three parts. Firstly, server hardware system was constructed based on Atera Stratix Ⅲ family of field-programmable gate array (FPGA) development board. Secondly, the server software system was designed based on Micro C/OS Ⅱ real-time operating systems and lightweight TCP/IP protocol stack, and finally a client PC program was designed based on MFC. After a long test, it was indicated that the monitoring system works properly and stably. TCP sends and receives throughput reached 11.931038 Mbps and 8.117624 Mbps. (authors)

  5. Storage of low-level radioactive waste and regulatory control of sealed sources in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahola, T.; Markkanen, M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is concentrated on the non nuclear low-level radioactive waste. The cornerstone for maintaining radioactive sources under control in Finland is that all practices involving sources are subject to authorization and all licensing information, including information on each individual source, are entered into a register which is continuously updated based on applications and notifications received from the licenses. Experiences during the past twenty years have shown that source-specific records of sources combined with regular inspections at the places of use have prevented efficiency losing control over sealed radioactive sources. The current capacity in the interim storage for State owned waste is not adequate for all used sealed sources and other small user waste which are currently kept in the possession of the licensees. Thus, expansion of the storage capacity and other options for taking care of the small user waste is under consideration. (N.C.)

  6. Subjective annoyance caused by indoor low-level and low frequency noise and control method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DI Guo-qing; ZHANG Bang-jun; SHANG Qi

    2005-01-01

    The influence of low-level noise has not been widely noticed. This paper discovered that low-level and low frequency noise(Aweighted equivalent level Leq < 45 dB) causes higher probability of subjective annoyance. The fuzzy mathematic principle was applied to deal with the threshold level of subjective annoyance from noise in this study; there is preferable relationship between the indoor noise and noise annoyance at low frequency noise level. Study indicated at the same centered noise level, the change of annoyance probability is mainly caused by the change of the frequency spectrum characteristic of the indoor noise. Under low noise level environment, without change of the medium-low frequency noise, the slight increase of medium-high frequency noise level with the help of noise sheltering effect can significantly reduce the noise annoyance. This discovery brings a new resolution on how to improve the environmental quality of working or living places. A noise control model is given in this study according to the acoustic analysis.

  7. Fast digital feedback control systems for accelerator RF system using FPGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagduwal, Pritam Singh; Sharma, Dheeraj; Tiwari, Nitesh; Lad, M.; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2012-01-01

    Feedback control system plays important role for proper injection and acceleration of beam in particle accelerators by providing the required amplitude and phase stability of RF fields in accelerating structures. Advancement in the field of digital technology enables us to develop fast digital feedback control system for RF applications. Digital Low Level RF (LLRF) system offers the inherent advantages of Digital System like flexibility, adaptability, good repeatability and reduced long time drift errors compared to analog system. To implement the feedback control algorithm, I/Q control scheme is used. By properly sampling the down converted IF signal using fast ADC we get accurate feedback signal and also eliminates the need of two separate detectors for amplitude and phase detection. Controller is implemented in Vertex-4 FPGA. Codes for control algorithms which controls the amplitude and phase in all four quadrants with good accuracy are written in the VHDL. I/Q modulator works as common actuator for both amplitude and phase correction. Synchronization between RF, LO and ADC clock is indispensable and has been achieved by deriving the clock and LO signal from RF signal itself. Control system has been successfully tested in lab with phase and amplitude stability better then ±1% and ±1° respectively. High frequency RF signal is down converted to IF using the super heterodyne technique. Super heterodyne principal not only brings the RF signal to the Low IF frequency at which it can be easily processed but also enables us to use the same hardware and software for other RF frequencies with some minor modification. (author)

  8. Stealth low-level manipulation of programmable logic controllers I/O by pin control exploitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbasi, A.; Hashemi, M.; Zambon, E.; Etalle, S.; Havarneanu, G.; Setola, R.; Nassopoulos, H.; Wolthusen, S.

    2016-01-01

    Input/OutputisthemechanismthroughwhichProgrammable Logic Controllers (PLCs) interact with and control the outside world. Particularly when employed in critical infrastructures, the I/O of PLCs has to be both reliable and secure. PLCs I/O like other embedded devices are controlled by a pin based

  9. Low-level laser therapy: Case-control study in dogs with sterile pyogranulomatous pododermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Perego

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Low-level laser therapy (LLLT is a therapeutic photobiostimulation with properties in reducing swelling, inflammation, and promoting tissue healing. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate LLLT in sterile pyogranulomatous pododermatitis in five dogs. Materials and Methods: In each dog, one lesion was designated as the control (treated with a 0.0584% hydrocortisone aceponate spray, and one or more other lesions were treated with a gallium aluminum arsenide-laser, daily for 5 days. Lesions were scored before treatment (D0, at the end (D4, 16 days after the last laser treatment (D20, and after 2 months (D65. Results: Comparing the treated lesion group with the control lesion group, the clinical score was similar at D0, whereas there was a statistically significant difference at D4 and D20; in the treated group over time, there was a statistically significant improvement between D0, D4, and D20. Lesion recurrence was absent in more than 50% of the treated lesions at D65. No adverse reactions were reported. Conclusion: Given the positive results of this first clinical study, it would be interesting to extend the study to confirm the validity of this type of therapy in sterile pyogranulomatous pododermatitis in the dog.

  10. Evaluation of Low-Level Laser Therapy on Orthodontic Tooth Movement: A Randomized Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guneet Guram

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fixed orthodontic treatment is time-consuming procedure. Pain is usually associated with orthodontic treatment. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of low-level laser therapy (LLLT on orthodontic tooth movement (OTM duration and pain perception. Materials and Methods: This randomized double-blind splint-mouth controlled clinical study includes 20 (8 males and 12 females orthodontic patients requiring bilateral canine retraction. Time taken for canine retraction with LLLT (Group A over control (Group B quadrant on the same patient was assessed along with pain experience using facial pain scale. The data were tabulated and statistically evaluated using SPSS 20 for windows (Microsoft, Chicago, IL, USA and t-test with P 0.05. There was statistically significant decrease in rate of canine retraction in Group A compared to Group B. There was statistically significant difference for maxillary and mandibular arches in Group A whereas it was not significant in Group B. Pain experience was statistically significant till 2nd day, and after 3rd day, it was not significant between the groups. Conclusion: LLLT can reduce the fixed OTM timing and pain experience.

  11. The system of RF beam control for electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnyakov, A.M.; Levichev, A.E.; Chernousov, Yu.D.; Ivannikov, V.I.; Shebolaev, I.V.

    2015-01-01

    The system of RF control of three-electrode electron gun current is described. It consists of a source of microwave signal, coaxial line, coaxial RF switch and RF antenna lead. The system allows one to get the electron beam in the form of bunches with the frequency of the accelerating section to achieve the capture of particles in the acceleration mode close to 100%. The results of calculation and analysis of the elements of the system are presented. Characteristics of the devices are obtained experimentally. The results of using RF control in three-electrode electron gun at electron linear accelerator are described

  12. Frequency control of RF booster cavity in TRIUMF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, K.; Laverty, M.

    1993-01-01

    A booster is used in the TRIUMF cyclotron to increase the energy gain per turn for beam orbits corresponding to energies greater than 370 MeV. It operates at 92.24 MHz, the 4 th harmonic of the cyclotron main rf, and at a nominal voltage of 150 kV. Excitation is provided by a 90 kW rf system that is phase locked to the main rf. When the main rf is interrupted due to sparking or other causes, a controller built into the low frequency source of the booster rf system disables the phase-locked loop, and reconfigures the source as a temperature stabilized oscillator operating at the last locked frequency. When the cyclotron rf is restored it usually will be at different frequency. The oscillator tunes automatically to this new frequency. The acquisition time is extended by the controller to match the response time of the mechanical tuner in the cavity

  13. Simulations of S-band RF gun with RF beam control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnyakov, A. M.; Levichev, A. E.; Maltseva, M. V.; Nikiforov, D. A.

    2017-08-01

    The RF gun with RF control is discussed. It is based on the RF triode and two kinds of the cavities. The first cavity is a coaxial cavity with cathode-grid assembly where beam bunches are formed, the second one is an accelerating cavity. The features of such a gun are the following: bunched and relativistic beams in the output of the injector, absence of the back bombarding electrons, low energy spread and short length of the bunches. The scheme of the injector is shown. The electromagnetic field simulation and longitudinal beam dynamics are presented. The possible using of the injector is discussed.

  14. Contextual control of audiovisual integration in low-level sensory cortices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Atteveldt, N.; Peterson, Bradley S; Schroeder, Charles E

    Potential sources of multisensory influences on low-level sensory cortices include direct projections from sensory cortices of different modalities, as well as more indirect feedback inputs from higher order multisensory cortical regions. These multiple architectures may be functionally

  15. Infiltration control for low-level radioactive solid waste disposal areas: an assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, H.S.

    1980-11-01

    The primary mode of radionuclide transport from shallow land-disposal sites for low-level wastes can be traced to infiltration of precipitation. This report examines the factors that affect surface water entry and movement in the ground and assesses available infiltration-control technology for solid-waste-disposal sites in the humid eastern portion of the United States. A survey of the literature suggests that a variety of flexible and rigid liner systems are available as barriers for the stored waste and would be effective in preventing water infiltration. Installation of near-surface seals of bentonite clay admixed with dispersive chemicals seem to offer the required durability and low permeability at a reasonable cost. The infiltration rate in a bentonite-sealed area may be further retarded by the application of dispersive chemicals that can be easily admixed with the surface soil. Because the effectiveness of a dispersive chemical for infiltration reduction is influenced by the physico-chemical properties of the soil, appropriate laboratory tests should be conducted prior to field application

  16. Safety analysis and inventory control of transuranic and low-level waste in common storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porten, D.R.; Bonner, A.L.; Joyce, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology developed For the inventory control of low-level waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste, when both are stored in the same location, and both contribute to an inventory constrained by safety considerations. Development of the method arose from the necessity to make safety analysis calculations for the addition of LLW, in quantities greater than existing inventory limits would allow when stored with TRU waste, in the Hanford Central Waste Complex (CWC)-Ensuring that the dose consequences of credible releases are maintained at low-hazard limits or less, was used to allow greater than Type A quantities of LLW into the CWC. Basically, what happens is the original limited amount of TRU allowed is reduced by some equivalent amount of LLW introduced. The total quantity of TRU, and LLW in excess of Type A quantities, must be administratively maintained via curie equivalency Factors to ensure operation as a low-hazard Facility. The ''equivalency'' between TRU and LLW proposed here is specific only to the CWC, but the methodology can be used for other specific applications, such as TRU and LLW storage or handling facilities where inventory limits must be enforced or where a simplified inventory system is required

  17. Case-control study of congenital malformations and occupational exposure to low-level ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sever, L.E.; Gilbert, E.S.; Hessol, N.A.; McIntyre, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    In a case-control study, the authors investigated the association of parental occupational exposure to low-level external whole-body penetrating ionizing radiation and risk of congenital malformations in their offspring. Cases and controls were ascertained from births in two counties in southeastern Washington State, where the Hanford Site has been a major employer. A unique feature of this study was the linking of quantitative individual measurement of external whole-body penetrating ionizing radiation exposure of employees at the Hanford Site, using personal dosimeters, and the disease outcome, congenital malformations. The study population included 672 malformation cases and 977 matched controls from births occurring from 1957 through 1980. Twelve specific malformation types were analyzed for evidence of association with employment of the parents at Hanford and with occupational exposure to ionizing radiation. Two defects, congenital dislocation of the hip and tracheoesophageal fistula, showed statistically significant associations with employment of the parents at Hanford, but not with parental radiation exposure. Neural tube defects showed a significant association with parental preconception exposure, on the basis of a small number of cases. Eleven other defects, including Down syndrome, for which an association with radiation was considered most likely, showed no evidence of such an association. When all malformations were analyzed as a group, there was no evidence of an association with employment of the parents at Hanford, but the relation of parental exposure to radiation before conception was in the positive direction (one-tailed p value between 0.05 and 0.10). Given the number of statistical tests conducted, some or all of the observed positive correlations are likely to represent false positive findings. 30 references

  18. Method of electron emission control in RF guns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khodak, I.V.; Kushnir, V.A.

    2001-01-01

    The electron emission control method for a RF gun is considered.According to the main idea of the method,the additional resonance system is created in a cathode region where the RF field strength could be varied using the external pulse equipment. The additional resonance system is composed of a coaxial cavity coupled with a RF gun cylindrical cavity via an axial hole. Computed results of radiofrequency and electrodynamic performances of such a two-cavity system and results of the RF gun model pilot study are presented in. Results of particle dynamics simulation are described

  19. Method of electron emission control in RF guns

    CERN Document Server

    Khodak, I V

    2001-01-01

    The electron emission control method for a RF gun is considered.According to the main idea of the method,the additional resonance system is created in a cathode region where the RF field strength could be varied using the external pulse equipment. The additional resonance system is composed of a coaxial cavity coupled with a RF gun cylindrical cavity via an axial hole. Computed results of radiofrequency and electrodynamic performances of such a two-cavity system and results of the RF gun model pilot study are presented in. Results of particle dynamics simulation are described.

  20. Rf control system for a rocket-borne accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, M.T.; Sorum, L.N.; Keffeler, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The Beam Experiments Aboard Rockets (BEAR) accelerator experiment imposes several nonstandard requirements on the rf control system. The experiment is entirely hands-off and must operate under local computer control. The rf control system must be extremely reliable, which implies excellence in design and fabrication as well as redundancy whenever possible. This paper describes the design of the frequency-source, frequency-control, and amplitude-control systems for the BEAR experiment

  1. Consideration of post-closure controls for a near surface low level waste disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clegg, R.; Pinner, A.; Smith, A.; Quartermaine, J.

    1997-01-01

    There is currently an ongoing programme of disposal of low level radioactive wastes by British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) at Drigg, Cumbria, and this programme is likely to continue through the first few decades of the 21st century. Although control of the site is anticipated for a period of about 100 years post-closure, eventually restrictions on access will lapse. Thereafter, the possibility of human actions leading to exposure to, and/or exhumation of, the wastes exists and has to be addressed in post-closure radiological performance assessments. Potential modes of intrusion into the Drigg site have been studied using a suite of computer codes developed specifically for this purpose. Required inputs to these codes include information on possible future uses of the site and the various human actions associated with those uses. This information was obtained from a group of experts using formal elicitation procedures. Although the most likely site uses, notably those involving agricultural activities, are unlikely to result in intrusion into the wastes, others, such a urban development, do have the potential to result in such intrusion. In these circumstances, it seemed appropriate to give consideration to the degree to which documentary records and markers could protect the Drigg site against intrusive activities. Overall, it is concluded that provided that a variety of documentary records are established, ranging from local council archives to mass produced maps, then memory of the site can realistically be assumed whilst civilization continues to exist. However, if this first line of defence fails, markers constitute a second warning system. Finally, assessment calculations can be used to demonstrate that, even if these two lines of defence fail, risks from intrusion and radiation doses contingent upon intrusive events having occurred would not be unacceptably large. (author). 10 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  2. A self-adaptive feedforward rf control system for linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Renshan; Ben-Zvi, I.; Xie Jialin

    1993-01-01

    The design and performance of a self-adaptive feedforward rf control system are reported. The system was built for the linac of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Variables of time along the linac macropulse, such as field or phase are discretized and represented as vectors. Upon turn-on or after a large change in the operating-point, the control system acquires the response of the system to test signal vectors and generates a linearized system response matrix. During operation an error vector is generated by comparing the linac variable vectors and a target vector. The error vector is multiplied by the inverse of the system's matrix to generate a correction vector is added to an operating point vector. This control system can be used to control a klystron to produce flat rf amplitude and phase pulses, to control a rf cavity to reduce the rf field fluctuation, and to compensate the energy spread among bunches in a rf linac. Beam loading effects can be corrected and a programmed ramp can be produced. The performance of the control system has been evaluated on the control of a klystron's output as well as an rf cavity. Both amplitude and phase have been regulated simultaneously. In initial tests, the rf output from a klystron has been regulated to an amplitude fluctuation of less than ±0.3% and phase variation of less than ±0.6deg. The rf field of the ATF's photo-cathode microwave gun cavity has been regulated to ±5% in amplitude and simultaneously to ±1deg in phase. Regulating just the rf field amplitude in the rf gun cavity, we have achieved amplitude fluctuation of less than ±2%. (orig.)

  3. Embedded control system for high power RF amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Deepak Kumar; Gupta, Alok Kumar; Jain, Akhilesh; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2011-01-01

    RF power devices are usually very sensitive to overheat and reflected RF power; hence a protective interlock system is required to be embedded with high power solid state RF amplifiers. The solid state RF amplifiers have salient features of graceful degradation and very low mean time to repair (MTTR). In order to exploit these features in favour of lowest system downtime, a real-time control system is embedded with high power RF amplifiers. The control system is developed with the features of monitoring, measurement and network publishing of various parameters, historical data logging, alarm generation, displaying data to the operator and tripping the system in case of any interlock failure. This paper discusses the design philosophy, features, functions and implementation details of the embedded control system. (author)

  4. Regulatory control of solid low level radioactive waste disposal in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newstead, S.; Schwemlein, P.

    1998-01-01

    The following topics are described: (i) regulatory authorities; (ii) inspection; (iii) waste categories; (iv) disposal routes for low level waste; (v) inspection of disposal routes; (vi) waste quality checking; (vii) reporting and application of results; and (viii) European Network activities. (P.A.)

  5. Global voltage control for the LEP RF system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciapala, E.; Butterworth, A.; Peschardt, E.

    1993-01-01

    The LEG RF system is installed as independent 16 cavity units. In addition to the eight copper cavity units originally installed 12 units with super-conducting cavities are being added for the LEP200 energy upgrade. The total RF voltage determines the synchrotron tune (Qs) and must be controlled precisely during energy ramping. Local function generators in each of the RF units are pre-loaded such that when triggered simultaneously by ramp timing events transmitted over the general timing system the total voltage varies to give the Qs function required. A disadvantage is that loss of RF in a unit at any time after the loading process cannot be corrected. As the number of RF units increases automatic control of the total RF voltage and its distribution around LEP becomes desirable. A global voltage control system, based on a central VME controller, has recently been installed. It has direct and rapid access to the RF units over the LEP time division multiplexing system. Initial tests on operation and performance at fixed energy and during energy ramping are described, as well as the implementation of a Qs loop in which Qs can be set directly using on-line synchrotron frequency measurements

  6. Beam test with the HIMAC RF control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, M.; Sato, K.; Itano, A.

    1992-01-01

    RF system of the HIMAC synchrotron has been developed and tested in the factory. With the high power system, we could sweep the acceleration frequency from 1MHz to 8MHz with the acceleration voltage of 6KV. The performance of the RF control system has been confirmed with a developed simulator of the synchrotron oscillation. Following these two tests in the factory, we had a beam test of the RF control system at TARN-II in INS (Institute for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo). This paper describes the beam test and its results. (author)

  7. High-power rf controls for the NBS-Los Alamos racetrack microtron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, L.M.; Biddle, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    The high-power rf system for the National Bureau of Standards (NBS)-Los Alamos racetrack microtron (RTM) uses waveguide power splitters and waveguide phase shifters to distribute rf power from a single 500-kW cw klystron to four side-coupled accelerating structures. The amplitude and phase of each structure is controlled by a feedback system that uses the waveguide variable power splitters, waveguide phase shifters, and klystron drive as the active control elements. A block diagram of this system is shown, as is a subset of the complete system on which the measurements reported in this paper were performed. The feedback controls on the capture section use low-level rf amplitude and phase controls on the rf drive to the klystron. These controls are very fast with an open loop gain bandwidth of approximately 40 kHz. The feedback loop is identical to the feedback loop used in the chopper/buncher system described in another paper at this conference. 4 refs., 8 figs

  8. Low level control of metal belt CVT considering shift dynamics and ratio valve on-off characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tal Chol; Kim, Hyun Soo

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, low level control algorithms of a metal belt CVT are suggested. A feedforward PID control algorithm is adopted for line pressure based on a steady state relationship between the input duty and the line pressure. Experimental results show that feedforward PID control of the line pressure guarantees a fast response while reducing the pressure undershoot which may result in belt slip. For ratio control, a fuzzy logic is suggested by considering the CVT shift dynamics and on-off characteristics of the ratio control valve. It is found from experimental results that a desired speed ratio can be achieved at steady state in spite of the fluctuating primary pressure. It is expected that the low level control algorithms for the line pressure and speed ratio suggested in this study can be implemented in a prototype CVT

  9. Embedded software for the CEBAF RF Control Module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahti, G.; Ashkenazi, I.; West, C.; Morgan, B.

    1991-01-01

    The CEBAF accelerator control system employs a distributed computer strategy. As part of this strategy, the RF control sub-system uses 342 RF Control Modules, one for each of four warm section beam forming cavities (i.e., choppers, buncher, capture) and 338 superconducting accelerating cavities. Each control module has its own microprocessor, which provides local intelligence to automatically control over 100 parameters, while keeping the user interface simple. The microprocessor controls analog and digital I/O, including the phase and gradient section, high power amplifier (HPA), and interlocks. Presently, the embedded code is used to commission the 14 RF control modules in the injector. This paper describes the operational experience of this complex real-time control system

  10. Alternatives to control subsidence at low-level radioactive waste burial sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, S.J.; Carlson, R.A.

    1981-09-01

    A substantial quantity of low-level radioactive and hazardous wastes has been interred in shallow land burial structures throughout the United States. Many of these structures (trenches, pits, and landfills) have experienced geotechnical subsidence problems and may require stabilization. Ground surface manifestations of subsidence include: large cracks, basins, and cave-ins. Subsidence is primarily caused by void filling, and physicochemical degradation and solubilization of buried wastes. These surface features represent a potential for increased contamination transport to the biosphere via water, air, biologic, and direct pathways. Engineering alternatives for the reduction of buried waste and matrix materials voids are identified and discussed. The advantages, disadvantages, and costs of each alternative are evaluated. Falling mass, pile driving and in situ incineration engineering alternatives were selected for further development

  11. Low power RF beam control electronics for the LEB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestha, L.K.; Mangino, J.; Brouk, V.; Uher, T.; Webber, R.C.

    1993-05-01

    Beam Control Electronics for the Low Energy Booster (LEB) should provide a fine reference phase and frequency for the High Power RF System. Corrections applied on the frequency of the rf signal will reduce dipole synchrotron oscillations due to power supply regulation errors, errors in frequency source or errors in the cavity voltage. It will allow programmed beam radial position control throughout the LEB acceleration cycle. Furthermore the rf signal provides necessary connections during, adiabatic capture of the beam as injected into the LEB by the Linac and will guarantee LEB rf phase synchronism with the Medium Energy Booster (MEB) rf at a programmed time in the LEB cycle between a unique LEB bucket and a unique MEB bucket. We show in this paper a design and possible interfaces with other subsystems of the LEB such as the beam instrumentation, High Power RF Stations, global accelerator controls and the precision timing system. The outline of various components of the beam control system is also presented followed by some test results

  12. The New RF Control System for the CERN SPS Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Baudrenghien, P; Linnecar, Trevor Paul R; Marty, H; Molendijk, J C; Pilchen, Y; Wehrle, U; Weierud, F

    1996-01-01

    The old SPS RF control system designed in 1972 has been replaced completely, i.e. both hardware and software. The new system has to control both RF equipment conceived during the last 23 years and future (modern) equipment. Using information analysis methods, we derived a model of an RF command and designed a data base accordingly (ORACLE®). Information from this data base is used for command generation and processing and also for archiving settings. The advantage is purely generic software, i.e. the same computer code is used for switching on an RF amplifier, as for setting a frequency synthesizer. New equipment is added very simply by entering new records in the data base. Additional features include a reservation scheme whereby a user can take private control of any piece of equipment, a reporting facility notifying the user of the simultaneous control activity by other users on RF equipment, and a capability scheme assigning a level of expertise to each user restricting action on the equipment.

  13. RF control at SSCL - an object oriented design approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dohan, D.A.; Osberg, E.; Biggs, R.; Bossom, J.; Chillara, K.; Richter, R.; Wade, D.

    1994-01-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) in Texas, the construction of which was stopped in 1994, would have represented a major challenge in accelerator research and development. This paper addresses the issues encountered in the parallel design and construction of the control systems for the RF equipment for the five accelerators comprising the SSC. An extensive analysis of the components of the RF control systems has been undertaken, based upon the Schlaer-Mellor object-oriented analysis and design (OOA/OOD) methodology. The RF subsystem components such as amplifiers, tubes, power supplies, PID loops, etc. were analyzed to produce OOA information, behavior and process models. Using these models, OOD was iteratively applied to develop a generic RF control system design. This paper describes the results of this analysis and the development of 'bridges' between the analysis objects, and the EPICS-based software and underlying VME-based hardware architectures. The application of this approach to several of the SSCL RF control systems is discussed. ((orig.))

  14. RF field control for Kaon Factory booster cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, S.T.; de Jong, M.S.

    1992-08-01

    A conceptual design is developed for control of the Kaon Factory booster rf accelerating fields. This design addresses control of cavity: tuning, voltage amplitude, and voltage phase angle. Time-domain simulations were developed to evaluate the proposed controllers. These simulations indicate that adequate tuning performance can be obtained with the combination of adaptive feed forward and proportional feedback control. Voltage amplitude and voltage phase can be adequately controlled using non-adaptive feed forward and proportional feedback control. (Author) (figs., tabs.)

  15. RF field control for KAON Factory booster cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, S.T.; de Jong, M.S.

    1990-11-01

    A conceptual design is developed for control of the KAON Factory Booster rf accelerating fields. This design addresses control of cavity: tuning, voltage amplitude, and voltage phase angle. Time-domain simulations were developed to evaluated the proposed controllers. These simulations indicated that adequate tuning performance can be obtained with the combination of adaptive feed-forward and proportional feedback control. Voltage amplitude and voltage phase can be adequately controlled using non-adaptive feedforward and proportional feedback control

  16. Performance of high-level and low-level control for coordination of mobile robots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adinandra, S.; Caarls, J.; Kostic, D.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze performance of different strategies for coordinated control of mobile robots. By considering an environment of a distribution center, the robots should transport goods from place A to place B while maintaining the desired formation and avoiding collisions. We evaluate performance of two

  17. The exemption of regulatory control for the management of low level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, M.T.; Carboneras, P.

    1993-01-01

    A high number of wastes produced in different fields of science and technology, as well as nuclear power plants, contain a significant volume of byproducts contaminated with radioisotopes, having a very low radioactive level. This kind of wastes might be managed as ordinary wastes by conventional methods or even reused. In order to carry out this procedure, a new regulation exempting these products from the regulatory control normatives would be necessary. This paper analyzes the big advantages of introducing these exemptions (costs recycling, radioactive wastes minimization) and how they follow the recommendations of ICRP, IAEA, EC and NRC

  18. SNS Superconducting RF cavity modeling-iterative learning control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S.-I.; Regan, Amy; Wang, Y.-M.

    2002-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Superconducting RF (SRF) linear accelerator is operated with a pulsed beam. For the SRF control system to track the repetitive electromagnetic field reference trajectory, both feedback and feedforward controllers have been proposed. The feedback controller is utilized to guarantee the closed loop system stability and the feedforward controller is used to improve the tracking performance for the repetitive reference trajectory and to suppress repetitive disturbances. As the iteration number increases, the feedforward controller decreases the tracking error. Numerical simulations demonstrate that inclusion of the feedforward controller significantly improves the control system performance over its performance with just the feedback controller

  19. SNS Superconducting RF cavity modeling-iterative learning control

    CERN Document Server

    Kwon, S I; Wang, Y M

    2002-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Superconducting RF (SRF) linear accelerator is operated with a pulsed beam. For the SRF control system to track the repetitive electromagnetic field reference trajectory, both feedback and feedforward controllers have been proposed. The feedback controller is utilized to guarantee the closed loop system stability and the feedforward controller is used to improve the tracking performance for the repetitive reference trajectory and to suppress repetitive disturbances. As the iteration number increases, the feedforward controller decreases the tracking error. Numerical simulations demonstrate that inclusion of the feedforward controller significantly improves the control system performance over its performance with just the feedback controller.

  20. Pc based RF control system for the Vincy cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samardzic, B.J.; Drndarevic, V.R.

    1999-01-01

    The concept and design procedure for the RF control system of the VINCY cyclotron are described. Special attention has been paid to the choice of computer support of this system. The merits and limitations of the chosen solution have been analyzed. A PC type computer has been selected as the platform for performing the functions of initiation, control, and supervision of the RF system. The integration of the hardware is carried out by direct connection to the PC bus via standard communication interfaces. The system software operates under a graphic oriented Windows operating system applying the modern concept of virtual instrumentation. The application of this concept allowed considerable simplification of the operator-RF system interaction and resulted in additional flexibility of the software to further extensions or modifications of the system. The selected open architecture of the computer platform allows a simple and economic upgrading of the realized system in accordance with future requirements. Tests of the realized RF control system prototype are in progress. (authors)

  1. Low-level laser therapy: An experimental design for wound management: A case-controlled study in rabbit model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Hodjati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a wide array of articles in medical literature for and against the laser effect on wound healing but without discrete effect determination or conclusion. This experimental study aims to evaluate the efficacy of low-level laser therapy on wound healing. Materials and Methods: Thirty-four rabbits were randomly enrolled in two groups after creating a full thickness of 3 × 3 cm wound. The intervention group received low density laser exposure (4 J/cm 2 on days 0, 3 and 6 with diode helium-neon low-intensity laser device (wl = 808 nm and in control group moist wound dressing applied. Finally, wound-healing process was evaluated by both gross and pathological assessment. Results: Fibrin formation was the same in the two groups (P = 0.4 but epithelialisation was much more in laser group (P = 0.02. Wound inflammation of the laser group was smaller than that of the control groups but statistical significance was not shown (P = 0.09. Although more smooth muscle actin was found in the wounds of the laser group but it was not statistically significant (P = 0.3. Wound diameter showed significant decrease in wound area in laser group (P = 0.003. Conclusion: According to our study, it seems that low-level laser therapy accelerates wound healing at least in some phases of healing process. So, we can conclude that our study also shows some hopes for low level laser therapy effect on wound healing at least in animal model.

  2. The Digital Feedback RF Control System of the RFQ and DTL1 for 100 MeV Proton Linac of PEFP

    CERN Document Server

    Yu In Ha; Cho, Yong-Sub; Han, Yeung-Jin; Kang Heung Sik; Kim, Sung-Chul; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Park, In-Soo; Tae Kim, Do; Tae Seol, Kyung

    2005-01-01

    The 100 MeV Proton linear accelerator (Linac) for the PEFP (Proton Engineering Frontier Project) will include 1 RFQ and 1 DTL1 at 350 MHz as well as 7 DTL2 cavities at 700 MHz. The low level RF system with the digital feedback RF control provides the field control to accelerate a 20mA proton beam from 50 keV to 20 MeV with a RFQ and a DTL1 at 350M Hz. The FPGA-based digital feedback RF control system has been built and is used to control cavity field amplitude within ± 1% and relative phase within ± 1°. The fast digital processing is networked to the EPICS-based control system with an embedded processor (Blackfin). In this paper, the detailed description of the digital feedback RF control system will be described with the performance test results.

  3. Electronics for the control of the rf system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrin, J.L.; Schwarz, H.

    1980-03-01

    This note describes the operation of the major components used for controlling the phase and the field level of the PEP rf cavities. The block diagram of one rf station is decomposed into several control loops: each cavity has a tuners' servo loop which maintains the frequency constant and also keeps the field of each cell at the same level; the total gap voltage developed by a pair of cavities is obeying the command of the gap voltage controller; finally, the phase variation along the amplification chain and the klystron are compensated by a phase lock loop. The design criteria of each loop are set forth and the circuit implementation and test results are presented. The purpose of this report is to acquaint interested people with the design philosophy and to allow them to evaluate the capabilities of this system and its behavior during operation of the machine. 5 refs., 16 figs

  4. Adaptive feedforward in the LANL rf control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziomek, C.D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes an adaptive feedforward system that corrects repetitive errors in the amplitude and phase of the RF field of a pulsed accelerator. High-frequency disturbances that are beyond the effective bandwidth of the RF field feedback control system can be eliminated with a feedforward system. Many RF field disturbances for a pulsed accelerator are repetitive, occurring at the same relative time in every pulse. This design employs digital signal processing hardware to adaptively determine and track the control signals required to eliminate the repetitive errors in the feedback control system. In order to provide the necessary high-frequency response, the adaptive feedforward hardware provides the calculated control signal prior to the repetitive disturbance that it corrects. This system has been demonstrated to reduce the transient disturbances caused by beam pulses. Furthermore, it has been shown to negate high-frequency phase and amplitude oscillations in a high-power klystron amplifier caused by PFN ripple on the high-voltage. The design and results of the adaptive feedforward system are presented

  5. Adaptive feed forward in the LANL RF control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziomek, C.D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes an adaptive feed forward system that corrects repetitive errors in the amplitude and phase of the RF field of a pulsed accelerator. High-frequency disturbances that are beyond the effective bandwidth of the RF-field feedback control system can be eliminated with a feed forward system. Many RF-field disturbances for a pulsed accelerator are repetitive, occurring at the same relative time in every pulse. This design employs digital signal processing hardware to adaptively determine and track the control signals required to eliminate the repetitive errors in the feedback control system. In order to provide the necessary high-frequency response, the adaptive feed forward hardware provides the calculated control signal prior to the repetitive disturbance that it corrects. This system has been demonstrated to reduce the transient disturbances caused by beam pulses. Furthermore, it has been shown to negate high-frequency phase and amplitude oscillations in a high-power klystron amplifier caused by PFN ripple on the high-voltage. The design and results of the adaptive feed forward system are presented. (Author) 3 figs., 2 refs

  6. Rf system specifications for a linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, A.; Eaton, L.E.

    1992-01-01

    A linear accelerator contains many systems; however, the most complex and costly is the RF system. The goal of an RF system is usually simply stated as maintaining the phase and amplitude of the RF signal within a given tolerance to accelerate the charged particle beam. An RF system that drives a linear accelerator needs a complete system specification, which should contain specifications for all the subsystems (i.e., high-power RF, low-level RF, RF generation/distribution, and automation control). This paper defines a format for the specifications of these subsystems and discusses each RF subsystem independently to provide a comprehensive understanding of the function of each subsystem. This paper concludes with an example of a specification spreadsheet allowing one to input the specifications of a subsystem. Thus, some fundamental parameters (i.e., the cost and size) of the RF system can be determined

  7. The Development of the Electrically Controlled High Power RF Switch and Its Application to Active RF Pulse Compression Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jiquan [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2008-12-01

    In the past decades, there has been increasing interest in pulsed high power RF sources for building high-gradient high-energy particle accelerators. Passive RF pulse compression systems have been used in many applications to match the available RF sources to the loads requiring higher RF power but a shorter pulse. Theoretically, an active RF pulse compression system has the advantage of higher efficiency and compactness over the passive system. However, the key component for such a system an element capable of switching hundreds of megawatts of RF power in a short time compared to the compressed pulse width is still an open problem. In this dissertation, we present a switch module composed of an active window based on the bulk effects in semiconductor, a circular waveguide three-port network and a movable short plane, with the capability to adjust the S-parameters before and after switching. The RF properties of the switch module were analyzed. We give the scaling laws of the multiple-element switch systems, which allow the expansion of the system to a higher power level. We present a novel overmoded design for the circular waveguide three-port network and the associated circular-to-rectangular mode-converter. We also detail the design and synthesis process of this novel mode-converter. We demonstrate an electrically controlled ultra-fast high power X-band RF active window built with PIN diodes on high resistivity silicon. The window is capable of handling multi-megawatt RF power and can switch in 2-300ns with a 1000A current driver. A low power active pulse compression experiment was carried out with the switch module and a 375ns resonant delay line, obtaining 8 times compression gain with a compression ratio of 20.

  8. ACCELERATORS: RF system design and measurement of HIRF-CSRe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhe; Zhao, Hong-Wei; Wang, Chun-Xiao; Xia, Jia-Wen; Zhan, Wen-Long; Bian, Zhi-Bin

    2009-05-01

    An RF system for the CSRe (cooling storage experimental ring) is designed and manufactured domestically. The present paper mainly describes the RF system design in five main sections: ferrite ring, RF cavity, RF generator, low level system and cavity cooling. The cavity is based on a type of coaxial resonator which is shorted at the end with one gap and loaded with domestic ferrite rings. The RF generator is designed in the push-pull mode and the low level control system is based on a DSP+FGPA+DDS+USB interface and has three feedback loops. Finally we give the results of the measurement on our system.

  9. Model-based development of low-level control strategies for transient operation of solid oxide fuel cell systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Marco; Pianese, Cesare

    The exploitation of an SOFC-system model to define and test control and energy management strategies is presented. Such a work is motivated by the increasing interest paid to SOFC technology by industries and governments due to its highly appealing potentialities in terms of energy savings, fuel flexibility, cogeneration, low-pollution and low-noise operation. The core part of the model is the SOFC stack, surrounded by a number of auxiliary devices, i.e. air compressor, regulating pressure valves, heat exchangers, pre-reformer and post-burner. Due to the slow thermal dynamics of SOFCs, a set of three lumped-capacity models describes the dynamic response of fuel cell and heat exchangers to any operation change. The dynamic model was used to develop low-level control strategies aimed at guaranteeing targeted performance while keeping stack temperature derivative within safe limits to reduce stack degradation due to thermal stresses. Control strategies for both cold-start and warmed-up operations were implemented by combining feedforward and feedback approaches. Particularly, the main cold-start control action relies on the precise regulation of methane flow towards anode and post-burner via by-pass valves; this strategy is combined with a cathode air-flow adjustment to have a tight control of both stack temperature gradient and warm-up time. Results are presented to show the potentialities of the proposed model-based approach to: (i) serve as a support to control strategies development and (ii) solve the trade-off between fast SOFC cold-start and avoidance of thermal-stress caused damages.

  10. RF control studies for moderate beamtime coupling between SRF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doolittle, L.R.; Wang, D.X.

    1998-01-01

    When an SRF accelerator is designed, there is motivation to move the cavities close together on the beamline. Assuming the beamline apertures are not shrunk as well, this compaction (which will increase the overall accelerating gradient and/or lower the dynamic cryogenic heat load) increases the inter-cavity coupling. Within certain limits, the control system can compensate for this coupling by retuning each of the cavities. This paper describes constraints on the RF system, tuners, couplers, and control systems that are required to provide stable operation of cavities in the presence of inter-cavity coupling that exceeds the loaded bandwidth of an individual cavity

  11. Designing RF control subsystems using the VXIbus standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepp, J.D.; Vong, F.C.; Bridges, J.F.

    1993-01-01

    Various components are being designed to control the RF system of the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS). The associated control electronics (phase shifters, amplitude modulators, phase detectors, automatic tuning control, and local feedback control) are designed as modular cards with multiple channels for ease of replacement as well as for compact design. Various specifications of the VXIbus are listed and the method used to simplify the design of the control subsystem is shown. A commercial VXI interface board was used to speed the design cycle. Required manpower and actual task times are included. A discussion of the computer architecture and software development of the device drivers which allowed computer control from a VME processor located in a remote crate operating under the Experimental Physics and Industrial Controls Software (EPICS) program is also presented

  12. The role of the meridional sea surface temperature gradient in controlling the Caribbean low-level jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Tito; Rutgersson, Anna; Caballero, Rodrigo; Pausata, Francesco S. R.; Alfaro, Eric; Amador, Jorge

    2017-06-01

    The Caribbean low-level jet (CLLJ) is an important modulator of regional climate, especially precipitation, in the Caribbean and Central America. Previous work has inferred, due to their semiannual cycle, an association between CLLJ strength and meridional sea surface temperature (SST) gradients in the Caribbean Sea, suggesting that the SST gradients may control the intensity and vertical shear of the CLLJ. In addition, both the horizontal and vertical structure of the jet have been related to topographic effects via interaction with the mountains in Northern South America (NSA), including funneling effects and changes in the meridional geopotential gradient. Here we test these hypotheses, using an atmospheric general circulation model to perform a set of sensitivity experiments to examine the impact of both SST gradients and topography on the CLLJ. In one sensitivity experiment, we remove the meridional SST gradient over the Caribbean Sea and in the other, we flatten the mountains over NSA. Our results show that the SST gradient and topography have little or no impact on the jet intensity, vertical, and horizontal wind shears, contrary to previous works. However, our findings do not discount a possible one-way coupling between the SST and the wind over the Caribbean Sea through friction force. We also examined an alternative approach based on barotropic instability to understand the CLLJ intensity, vertical, and horizontal wind shears. Our results show that the current hypothesis about the CLLJ must be reviewed in order to fully understand the atmospheric dynamics governing the Caribbean region.

  13. Efficacy of low-level laser therapy for the treatment of burning mouth syndrome: a randomized, controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanemberg, Juliana Cassol; López, José López; de Figueiredo, Maria Antonia Zancanaro; Cherubini, Karen; Salum, Fernanda Gonçalves

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in the treatment of burning mouth syndrome (BMS). A diode laser was used in 78 BMS patients who were randomly assigned into four groups: IR1W, n=20 (830 nm, 100 mW, 5 J, 176 J/cm2, 50 s, LLLT weekly sessions, 10 sessions); IR3W, n=20 (830 nm, 100 mW, 5 J, 176 J/cm2, 50 s, three LLLT weekly sessions, 9 sessions); red laser, n=19 (685 nm, 35 mW, 2 J, 72 J/cm2, 58 s, three LLLT weekly sessions, 9 sessions); and control-group (CG), n=19. Symptoms were assessed at the end of the treatment and eight weeks later; quality of life related to oral health was assessed using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14). Statistical analysis was carried out using repeated measures analysis of variance followed by the posthoc Tukey test. There was significant reduction of the symptoms in all groups at the end of the treatment, which was maintained in the follow-up. The scores of the IR1W and IR3W laser groups differed significantly from those of the CG. There was also a decrease in the OHIP-14 scores in the four groups. The IR3W laser group scores differed significantly from those of the CG. LLLT reduces the symptoms of BMS and may be an alternative therapeutic strategy for the relief of symptoms in patients with BMS.

  14. Control of water infiltration into near-surface, low-level waste-disposal units in humid regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donnell, E.; Ridky, R.W.; Schulz, R.K.

    1994-01-01

    This study's objective is to assess means for controlling water infiltration through waste-disposal unit covers in humid regions. Experimental work is being performed in large-scale lysimeters (75 ft x 45 ft x 10 ft) at Beltsville, Maryland. Results of the assessment are applicable to disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW), uranium mill tailings, hazardous waste, and sanitary landfills. Three kinds of waste-disposal unit covers or barriers to water infiltration are being investigated: (1) resistive layer barrier, (2) conductive layer barrier, and (3) bioengineering management. The resistive layer barrier consists of compacted earthen material (e.g., clay). The conductive layer barrier consists of a conductive layer in conjunction with a capillary break. As long as unsaturated flow conditions are maintained, the conductive layer will wick water around the capillary break. Below-grade layered covers such as (1) and (2) will fail if there is appreciable subsidence of the cover, and remedial action for this kind of failure will be difficult. A surface cover, called bioengineering management, is meant to overcome this problem. The bioengineering management surface barrier is easily repairable if damaged by subsidence; therefore, it could be the system of choice under active subsidence conditions. The bioengineering management procedure also has been shown to be effective in dewatering saturated trenches and could be used for remedial action efforts. After cessation of subsidence, that procedure could be replaced by a resistive layer barrier or, perhaps even better, by a resistive layer barrier/conductive layer barrier system. The latter system would then give long-term effective protection against water entry into waste without institutional care

  15. 3 GHz digital rf control at the superconducting Darmstadt electron linear accelerator: First results from the baseband approach and extensions for other frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Araz

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The low level rf system for the superconducting Darmstadt electron linear accelerator (S-DALINAC developed 20 years ago and operating since converts the 3 GHz signals from the cavities down to the baseband and not to an intermediate frequency. While designing the new, digital rf control system this concept was kept: the rf module does the I/Q and amplitude modulation/demodulation while the low frequency board, housing an field programmable gate array analyzes and processes the signals. Recently, the flexibility of this concept was realized: By replacing the modulator/demodulators on the rf module, cavities operating at frequencies other than the one of the S-DALINAC can be controlled with only minor modifications: A 6 GHz version, needed for a harmonic bunching system at the S-DALINAC and a 324 MHz solution to be used on a room temperature cavity at GSI, are currently under design. This paper reviews the concept of the digital low level rf control loops in detail and reports on the results gained during first operation with a superconducting cavity.

  16. RF system modeling and controller design for the European XFEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Christian

    2011-06-01

    The European XFEL is being constructed at the Deutsche Elektronen Synchrotron DESY to generate intense, ultrashort pulses of highly coherent and monochromatic X-Rays for material science research. X-ray flashes are generated by accelerating electron bunches within superconducting cavities with radio frequency (RF) fields to energies up to 17.5 GeV. The digital control of these fields requires extremely high quality in order to achieve the physical processes of photon generation. DESY offers with FLASH a pilot test facility, allowing to test and develop most necessary components, even before the XFEL is conducted. Current field control is based on a proportional feedback controller in addition to a constant feedforward drive, which do not meet the high requirements of the XFEL. This thesis shows that a model based controller design can achieve the necessary field regulation requirements. A linear, time invariant ''black box model'' is estimated, which characterizes the essential dynamic behavior. This model is not based on physical assumptions, but describes exclusively the transfer behavior of the plant. The acceleration modules are operated in a pulsed mode, in which the RF field must be kept constant for a finite period. The character of the disturbances and variations from pulse-to-pulse, together with the properties of the system, require a combination of controlled feedforward drive and feedback. Generally unpredictable, low frequency pulse-to-pulse variations are suppressed by the feedback controller. The structural design of the complex multivariable feedback controller is given, which constrains the model based design approach to assign the controller parameters only. Estimation of the parameters, which can not be tuned manually, is done by the method of H loop shaping which is often applied in modern control theory. However, disturbances within a pulse are in a high frequency range concerning the short pulse duration. They are not sufficiently suppressed

  17. RF system modeling and controller design for the European XFEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Christian

    2011-06-15

    The European XFEL is being constructed at the Deutsche Elektronen Synchrotron DESY to generate intense, ultrashort pulses of highly coherent and monochromatic X-Rays for material science research. X-ray flashes are generated by accelerating electron bunches within superconducting cavities with radio frequency (RF) fields to energies up to 17.5 GeV. The digital control of these fields requires extremely high quality in order to achieve the physical processes of photon generation. DESY offers with FLASH a pilot test facility, allowing to test and develop most necessary components, even before the XFEL is conducted. Current field control is based on a proportional feedback controller in addition to a constant feedforward drive, which do not meet the high requirements of the XFEL. This thesis shows that a model based controller design can achieve the necessary field regulation requirements. A linear, time invariant ''black box model'' is estimated, which characterizes the essential dynamic behavior. This model is not based on physical assumptions, but describes exclusively the transfer behavior of the plant. The acceleration modules are operated in a pulsed mode, in which the RF field must be kept constant for a finite period. The character of the disturbances and variations from pulse-to-pulse, together with the properties of the system, require a combination of controlled feedforward drive and feedback. Generally unpredictable, low frequency pulse-to-pulse variations are suppressed by the feedback controller. The structural design of the complex multivariable feedback controller is given, which constrains the model based design approach to assign the controller parameters only. Estimation of the parameters, which can not be tuned manually, is done by the method of H{sub {infinity}} loop shaping which is often applied in modern control theory. However, disturbances within a pulse are in a high frequency range concerning the short pulse duration

  18. Operating experience with the new TRIUMF RF control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, K.; Laverty, M.; Fang, S.

    1995-06-01

    The 23 MHz rf control of the TRIUMF cyclotron has been replaced by a new VXI control system based on digital signal processing. It provides amplitude and phase regulation of the cyclotron dee voltage, as well as other functions such as power-up sequencing, spark and high VSWR protection. Modularity of the hardware is achieved by the VXI architecture, and in the software by Object Oriented Programming. It is expected that this will result in a considerably longer MTBF, and shorter fault diagnosis and repair times, than the equipment it replaces. The new system has now been in operation for over two months. The results of commissioning, testing, and early operating experience are presented. (author). 4 refs., 5 figs

  19. Pulsed rf excited spectrometer having improved pulse width control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    RF excitation for a spectrometer is obtained by pulse width modulating an RF carrier to produce the desired broadband RF exciting spectrum. The RF excitation includes a train of composite RF pulses, each composite pulse having a primary pulse portion of a first RF phase and a second pulse portion of a second RF phase opposite that of the first. In this manner, the finite rise and fall times of the primary pulse portion are compensated for by the corresponding rise and fall times of the secondary pulse portion. The primary pulse portion is lengthened by an amount equal to the secondary pulse portion so that the secondary pulse portion cancels the added primary pulse portion. In a spectrometer, the compensating second pulse component removes certain undesired side bands of the RF excitation caused by the finite rise and fall times of the applied RF pulses. The compensating second pulse component removes certain undesired side bands associated with each of the resonant lines of the excited resonance spectrum of the sample under analysis, particularly for wide band RF excitation

  20. RF control at transient beamloading for high-duty-factor linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernogubovsky, M.A.; Sugimoto, Masayoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-08-01

    An effective RF control with the transient beamloading is the major issue in the operation of the high-duty-factor linacs to suppress the undesirable beam loss. The RF control method is considered to obtain the control principle and the state equation, under the analysis of electrodynamical properties of the excitation in the resonator of the linac due to the transient beamloading. The concept of the directional selective coupling is applied for the RF system to define the main characteristics and to optimize the RF control parameters. (author)

  1. Low level waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, P.R.H.; Wilson, M.A.

    1983-11-01

    Factors in selecting a site for low-level radioactive waste disposal are discussed. South Australia has used a former tailings dam in a remote, arid location as a llw repository. There are also low-level waste disposal procedures at the Olympic Dam copper/uranium project

  2. Large-scale Circulation Control of the Occurrence of Low-level Turbulence at Hong Kong International Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Marco Y. T.; Zhou, Wen; Shun, Chi-Ming; Chan, Pak-Wai

    2018-04-01

    This study identifies the atmospheric circulation features that are favorable for the occurrence of low-level turbulence at Hong Kong International Airport [below 1600 feet (around 500 m)]. By using LIDAR data at the airport, turbulence and nonturbulence cases are selected. It is found that the occurrence of turbulence is significantly related to the strength of the southerly wind at 850 hPa over the South China coast. On the other hand, the east-west wind at this height demonstrates a weak relation to the occurrence. This suggests that turbulence is generated by flow passing Lantau Island from the south. The southerly wind also transports moisture from the South China Sea to Hong Kong, reducing local stability. This is favorable for the development of strong turbulence. It is also noted that the strong southerly wind during the occurrence of low-level turbulence is contributed by an anomalous zonal gradient of geopotential in the lower troposphere over the South China Sea. This gradient is caused by the combination of variations at different timescales. These are the passage of synoptic extratropical cyclones and anticyclones and the intraseasonal variation in the western North Pacific subtropical high. The seasonal variation in geopotential east of the Tibetan Plateau leads to a seasonal change in meridional wind, by which the frequency of low-level turbulence is maximized in spring and minimized in autumn.

  3. Active RF Pulse Compression Using An Electrically Controlled Semiconductor Switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jiquan; Tantawi, Sami; /SLAC

    2007-01-10

    First we review the theory of active pulse compression systems using resonant delay lines. Then we describe the design of an electrically controlled semiconductor active switch. The switch comprises an active window and an overmoded waveguide three-port network. The active window is based on a four-inch silicon wafer which has 960 PIN diodes. These are spatially combined in an overmoded waveguide. We describe the philosophy and design methodology for the three-port network and the active window. We then present the results of using this device to compress 11.4 GHz RF signals with high compression ratios. We show how the system can be used with amplifier like sources, in which one can change the phase of the source by manipulating the input to the source. We also show how the active switch can be used to compress a pulse from an oscillator like sources, which is not possible with passive pulse compression systems.

  4. Practical use of the amplitude and phase modulation of a high-power RF pulse via feed-forward control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawase, Keigo; Kato, Ryukou; Irizawa, Akinori; Isoyama, Goro; Kashiwagi, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    A new feed-forward control system to precisely control the amplitude and phase of the pulsed RF power in an electron linear accelerator (linac) is developed to make the accelerating field constant. Fast variations and ripples in the amplitude and phase in the RF pulses are compensated by modulating the amplitude and phase in the low-level system with a variable attenuator and phase shifter. The system is innovated the overdrive technique, which is commonly used in analog circuits, to speed up the slow response of the phase shifter, while the control signals are digitally processed; thus, the method is a hybrid of analog and digital techniques. By using the new control system, we find that the peak-to-peak variations in the amplitude and phase are reduced from 11.6% to 0.4% and from 6.1 degrees to 0.3 degrees, respectively, in 7.6-μs-long RF pulses for the L-band electron linac at Osaka University. (author)

  5. Short range RF communication for jet engine control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Daniel White (Inventor); Hershey, John Erik (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method transmitting a message over at least one of a plurality of radio frequency (RF) channels of an RF communications network is provided. The method comprises the steps of detecting a presence of jamming pulses in the at least one of the plurality of RF channels. The characteristics of the jamming pulses in the at least one of the plurality of RF channels is determined wherein the determined characteristics define at least interstices between the jamming pulses. The message is transmitted over the at least one of the plurality of RF channels wherein the message is transmitted within the interstices of the jamming pulse determined from the step of determining characteristics of the jamming pulses.

  6. Analgesic effects of preinjection low-level laser/light therapy (LLLT) before third molar surgery: a double-blind randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuk, Jacco G. C.; van Wijk, Arjen J.; Mertens, Ine C.; Keleş, Zühal; Lindeboom, Jérôme A. H.; Milstein, Dan M. J.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the analgesic effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on preinjection sites in patients scheduled for third molar removal. This double-blind randomized controlled trial included 163 healthy patients undergoing third molar extractions. The study participants

  7. An updated overview of the LEB RF system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.D.; Ferrell, J.H.; Curbow, J.E.; Friedrichs, C.

    1992-01-01

    Each of the Low Energy Booster (LEB) rf systems consists of the following major subsystems: a vacuum tube final rf amplifier driven by a solid state rf amplifier, a ferrite-tuned rf cavity used to bunch and accelerate the beam, a low-level rf system including rf feedback systems, a computer-based supervisory control system, and associated power supplies. The LEB rf system is broadband with the exception of the rf cavity, which is electronically tuned from approximately 47.5 MHz to 59.7 MHz in 50 ms. The design and development status of the LEB rf system is presented, with particular emphasis on the cavity and tuner, and the tuner bias power supply

  8. Low level waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthoux, A.

    1985-01-01

    Final disposal of low level wastes has been carried out for 15 years on the shallow land disposal of the Manche in the north west of France. Final participant in the nuclear energy cycle, ANDRA has set up a new waste management system from the production center (organization of the waste collection) to the disposal site including the setting up of a transport network, the development of assessment, additional conditioning, interim storage, the management of the disposal center, records of the location and characteristics of the disposed wastes, site selection surveys for future disposals and a public information Department. 80 000 waste packages representing a volume of 20 000 m 3 are thus managed and disposed of each year on the shallow land disposal. The disposal of low level wastes is carried out according to their category and activity level: - in tumuli for very low level wastes, - in monoliths, a concrete structure, of the packaging does not provide enough protection against radioactivity [fr

  9. Effect of preoperative ibuprofen in controlling postendodontic pain with and without low-level laser therapy in single visit endodontics: A randomized clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahnaz Nabi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of low-level laser irradiation and ibuprofen in reducing the onset and severity of postoperative pain following single visit endodontics. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty patients were recruited for this study. Group A (n = 30 patients were administered 400 mg of ibuprofen orally 1 h before the institution of an endodontic procedure. Group B (n = 30 patients were given irradiation of a low-level laser at 50 Hz for 3 min after the standard endodontic procedure at the periapical region on both buccal and lingual aspect. Group C (n = 30 patients were given preoperative ibuprofen followed with a low-level laser at 50 Hz for 3 min after endodontic treatment. Group D (n = 30 patients were administered no preoperative ibuprofen nor low-level laser irradiation after the endodontic procedure. The patient immediately recorded his/her pain perception on the Heft Parker pain survey after completion of the appointment and at 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48 h postoperatively. Inter group analysis was carried out using the analysis of variances with “least significant difference” post hoc test. For intra group analysis, Student's t-test was used. Chi-square test was applied for nonparametric data. Results: Pain was significantly reduced in all the treatment groups postoperatively. Ibuprofen showed significant pain reduction at 4 h and 8 h period. The combination of low-level laser and ibuprofen showed the best results in terms of postoperative pain reduction. Conclusion: This study proved that low-level laser therapy can be an effective alternative for conventional use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in controlling postendodontic pain thereby eliminating the adverse effects of such drugs on the patients.

  10. Electron dynamics in RF sources with a laser controlled emission

    CERN Document Server

    Khodak, I V; Metrochenko, V V

    2001-01-01

    Photoemission radiofrequency (RF) electron sources are sources of electron beams with extremely high brightness. Beam bunching processes in such devices are well studied in case when laser pulse duration is much lower of rf oscillation period.At the same time photoemission RF guns have some merits when operating in 'long-pulse' mode. In this case the laser pulse duration is much higher of rf oscillation period but much lower of rise time of oscillations in a gun cavity. Beam parameters at the gun output are compared for photoemission and thermoemission cathode applications. The paper presents results of a beam dynamics simulation in such guns with different resonance structures. Questions connected with defining of the current pulse peak value that can be obtained in such guns are discussed.

  11. Electron Beam Energy Compensation by Controlling RF Pulse Shape

    CERN Document Server

    Kii, T; Kusukame, K; Masuda, K; Nakai, Y; Ohgaki, H; Yamazaki, T; Yoshikawa, K; Zen, H

    2005-01-01

    We have studied on improvement of electron beam macropulse properties from a thermionic RF gun. Though a thermionic RF gun has many salient features, there is a serious problem that back-bombardment effect worsens quality of the beam. To reduce beam energy degradation by this effect, we tried to feed non-flat RF power into the gun. As a result, we successfully obtained about 1.5 times longer macropulse and two times larger total charge per macropulse. On the other hand, we calculated transient evolution of RF power considering non-constant beam loading. The beam loading is evaluated from time evolution of cathode temperature, by use of one dimensional heat conduction model and electron trajectories' calculations by a particle simulation code. Then we found good agreement between the experimental and calculation results. Furthermore, with the same way, we studied the electron beam output dependence on the cathode radius.

  12. Emittance control and RF bunch compression in the NSRRC photoinjector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, W.K.; Hung, S.B.; Lee, A.P.; Chou, C.S.; Huang, N.Y.

    2011-01-01

    The high-brightness photoinjector being constructed at the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center is for testing new accelerator and light-source concepts. It is the so-called split photoinjector configuration in which a short solenoid magnet is used for emittance compensation. The UV-drive laser pulses are also shaped to produce uniform cylindrical bunches for further reduction of beam emittance. However, limited by the available power from our microwave power system, the nominal accelerating gradient in the S-band booster linac is set at 18 MV/m. A simulation study with PARMELA shows that the linac operating at this gradient fails to freeze the electron beam emittance at low value. A background solenoid magnetic field is applied for beam emittance control in the linac during acceleration. A satisfactory result that meets our preliminary goal has been achieved with the solenoid magnetic field strength at 0.1 T. RF bunch compression as a means to achieve the required beam brightness for high-gain free-electron laser experiments is also examined. The reduction of bunch length to a few hundred femtoseconds can be obtained.

  13. Control and tracking arrangements for solid low-level waste disposals to the UK Drigg disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elgie, K.G.; Grimwood, P.D.

    1993-01-01

    The Drigg disposal site has been the principal disposal site for solid low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) in the United Kingdom since 1959. It is situated on the Cumbrian coast, some six kilometers to the south of the Sellafield nuclear reprocessing site. The Drigg site receives LLW from a wide range of sources including nuclear power generation, nuclear fuel cycle activities, defense activities, isotope manufacture, universities, hospitals, general industry and clean-up of contaminated sites. This LLW has been disposed of in a series of trenches cut into the underlying clay layer of the site, and, since 1988, also into concrete lined vault. The total volume of LLW disposed of at Drigg is at present in the order of 800,000m 3 , with disposals currently approximately 25,000m 3 per year. British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) owns and operates the Drigg disposal site. To meet operational and regulatory requirements, BNFL needs to ensure the acceptability of the disposed waste and be able to track it from its arising point to its specific disposal location. This paper describes the system that has been developed to meet these requirements

  14. Geomembranes as an interim measure to control water infiltration at a low-level radioactive waste disposal area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weishan, M.R.; Sonntag, T.L.; Shehane, W.D.

    1997-01-01

    Using an exposed geomembrane an interim measure to cover a closed, Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Area requires unique design and construction considerations. In response to a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Administrative Consent Order, the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) used very low-density polyethylene (VLDPE) geomembrane as an interim measure to cover two soil-capped, grass-covered waste trenches to address a rapid increase in water accumulation in the trenches. Two years later, NYSERDA covered the remaining grass-covered trench caps with a reinforced ethylene interpolymer alloy (EIA-R) geomembrane to reduce water accumulation in these trenches. This paper addresses the differences in geomembrane materials and discusses the lessons learned during design, construction, and operation since installation of the covers. Discussed are the successes and obstacles regarding the use of both geomembrane materials as an exposed cover, selecting the geomembrane materials, anchoring the geomembrane from wind uplift, and mitigating the increased surface water runoff from the geomembrane covered area

  15. Effectiveness of low-level laser therapy for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome: design of a randomized single-blinded controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbosa Rafael Inácio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common neuropathy in the upper extremity, resulting from the compression of the median nerve at wrist level. Clinical studies are essentials to present evidence on therapeutic resources use at early restoration on peripheral nerve functionality. Low-level laser therapy has been widely investigated in researches related to nerve regeneration. Therefore, it is suggested that the effect of low-level laser therapy associated with other conservative rehabilitation techniques may positively affect symptoms and overall hand function in compressive neuropathies such as carpal tunnel syndrome. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of low-level laser therapy in addition to orthoses therapy and home orientations in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Methods/Design Patients older than 18 years old will be included, with clinical diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome, excluding comorbidies. A physiotherapist will conduct intervention, with a blinding evaluator. Randomization will be applied to allocate the patients in each group: with association or not to low-level laser therapy. All of them will be submitted to orthoses therapy and home orientations. Outcome will be assessed through: pain visual analogic scale, Semmes Weinstein monofilaments™ threshold sensibility test, Pinch Gauge™, Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire and two point discrimination test. Discussion This paper describes the design of a randomized controlled trial, which aim to assess the effectiveness of conservative treatment added to low-level laser therapy for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Trial registration Brazilian Clinical Trials Registry (ReBec - 75ddtf / Universal Trial Number: U1111-1121-5184

  16. Control of total voltage in the large distributed RF system of LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Ciapala, Edmond

    1995-01-01

    The LEP RF system is made up of a large number of independent RF units situated around the ring near the interaction points. These have different available RF voltages depending on their type and they may be inactive or unable to provide full voltage for certain periods. The original RF voltage control system was based on local RF unit voltage function generators pre-loaded with individual tables for energy ramping. This was replaced this year by a more flexible global RF voltage control system. A central controller in the main control room has direct access to the units over the LEP TDM system via multiplexers and local serial links. It continuously checks the state of all the units and adjusts their voltages to maintain the desired total voltage under all conditions. This voltage is distributed among the individual units to reduce the adverse effects of RF voltage asymmetry around the machine as far as possible. The central controller is a VME system with 68040 CPU and real time multitasking operating syste...

  17. Reconstruction of a whole-body counter into a process computer-controlled low-level whole-body scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamann, C.

    1975-01-01

    A report is given on the state of the research project to reconstruct our whole-body counter with solid geometries into a scanning type one. The object is to develop a process computer controlled 'adaptive system'. The self-built scan mechanics are explained and the advantages and problems of applying stepping motors are gone into. A stepping motor coordinates control is presented. As the planned scanner and the process computer form a digital controlled system, all theoretical and actual values as well as the control orders from the process computer must be directly controllable. A CAMAC system was not used for economical reasons, the process periphery was made controllable by self building of interfaces to and from the computer. As example, the available multi-channel analyzers were converted to external controlling. The price-moderate and relatively simple self-built set-up are outlined and an example is given of how a TELETYPE version is reconstructed into a fast electronic interface. A BUS-MULTIPLEX system was developed which generates all necessary DI/DO interfaces out of one DI and DO address of the process computer only. The essential part of this system is given. (orig./LH) [de

  18. The effects of low level chlorination and chlorine dioxide on biofouling control in a once-through service water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, W.E. Jr.; Laylor, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    Continuous chlorination has been successfully used for the control of Corbicula at a nuclear power plant located on the Chattahoochee River in southeastern Alabama, since 1986. The purpose of this study was to investigate further minimization of chlorine usage and determine if chlorine dioxide is a feasible alternative. Four continuous biocide treatments were evaluated for macro and microfouling control effectiveness, operational feasibility, and environmental acceptability. One semi-continuous chlorination treatment was also evaluated for macrofouling control effectiveness. Higher treatment residuals were possible with chlorine dioxide than with chlorination due to the river discharge limitations. At the levels tested, continuous chlorine dioxide was significantly more effective in providing both macro and microfouling control. Semi-continuous chlorination was just as effective as continuous chlorination for controlling macrofouling. The Corbicula treatment programs that were tested should all provide sufficient control for zebra mussels. Chlorine dioxide was not as cost effective as chlorination for providing macrofouling control. The semi-continuous treatment save 50% on chemical usage and will allow for the simultaneous treatment of two service water systems. Chlorite levels produced during the chlorine dioxide treatments were found to be environmentally acceptable. Levels of trihalomethanes in the chlorinated service water were less than the maximum levels allowed in drinking water

  19. Interaction between beam control and rf feedback loops for high Q cavities an heavy beam loading. Revision A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestha, L.K.; Kwan, C.M.; Yeung, K.S.

    1994-04-01

    An open-loop state space model of all the major low-level rf feedback control loops is derived. The model has control and state variables for fast-cycling machines to apply modern multivariable feedback techniques. A condition is derived to know when exactly we can cross the boundaries between time-varying and time-invariant approaches for a fast-cycling machine like the Low Energy Booster (LEB). The conditions are dependent on the Q of the cavity and the rate at which the frequency changes with time. Apart from capturing the time-variant characteristics, the errors in the magnetic field are accounted in the model to study the effects on synchronization with the Medium Energy Booster (MEB). The control model is useful to study the effects on beam control due to heavy beam loading at high intensities, voltage transients just after injection especially due to time-varying voltages, instability thresholds created by the cavity tuning feedback system, cross coupling between feedback loops with and without direct rf feedback etc. As a special case we have shown that the model agrees with the well known Pedersen model derived for the CERN PS booster. As an application of the model we undertook a detailed study of the cross coupling between the loops by considering all of them at once for varying time, Q and beam intensities. A discussion of the method to identify the coupling is shown. At the end a summary of the identified loop interactions is presented

  20. Quality control in low-level radionuclide analysis. Results of recent intercomparisons and programme for 1979/80 of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suschny, O; Dybczynski, R; Tugsavul, A

    1979-05-01

    Several summary reports on the IAEA's analytical quality control programme have been issued in the past. A report mapping out areas of common interest with the ICRM has been presented to the Paris meeting of ICRM's low-level measurement techniques group in 1976 and subsequently published in environment international. General descriptions of the programme as it has developed in the past 15 years can be found in these publications, in addition detailed results of intercomparisons have been published in IAEA reports and in the open literature (about 30 publications), they are too numerous for citation here. This paper presents discussion of the results of recent intercomparisons of low level radionuclide determinations followed by a presentation of our schedule of distribution of intercomparison and reference materials for 1979 and 80.

  1. Rf stability, control and bunch lengthening in electron synchrotron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachtel, J.M.

    1989-09-01

    A self-consistent theory for nonlinear longitudinal particle motion and rf cavity excitation in a high energy electron storage ring is developed. Coupled first order equations for the motion of an arbitrary number of particles and for the field in several rf cavities are given in the form used in control system theory. Stochastic quantum excitation of synchrotron motion is included, as are the effects of rf control system corrections. Results of computations for double cavity bunch lengthening are given. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  2. An amplitude and phase control system for the TFTR rf heating sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutsogeorge, G.

    1989-04-01

    Feedback loops that control the amplitude and phase of the rf heating sources on TFTR are described. The method for providing arc protection is also discussed. Block diagrams and Bode plots are included. 6 figs

  3. Low-level effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devine, R.T.; Chaput, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Risk assignments can be made to given practices involving exposure to radiation, because sufficient data are available for the effects of high-dose, low-LET radiation and because sufficient exists in the methods of extrapolation to low doses and low dose rates. The confidence in the extrapolations is based on the fact that the risk is not expected to be overestimated, using the assumptions made (as opposed to the possibility that the extrapolations represent an accurate estimate of the risk). These risk estimates have been applied to the selection of permissible exposure levels, to show that various amounts of radiation involve no greater risk to the worker than the risk expected in another industry that is generally considered safe. The setting of standards for protection from exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation is made by expert committees at the national and international levels who weigh social factors as well as scientific factors. Data on low-level effects may be applied when assigning a ''probability of causation'' to a certain exposure of radiation. This has become a prominent method for arriving at an equitable award for damages caused by such exposure. The generation of these tables requires as many (if not more) social and political considerations as does the setting up of protection criteria. It is impossible to extract a purely scientific conclusion solely from the protection standards and other legal decisions. Sufficient information exists on low-LET radiation that safety standards for exposure can be rationally (if not scientifically) agreed upon

  4. Some experiences in controlling contamination of environmental materials during sampling and processing for low-level actinide analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, B.R.; Lovett, M.B.; Boggis, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    Selected experiences in the control of contamination and the threat it poses to the quality of analytical data are discussed in the context of the whole analytical process from collection of marine enviromental samples, through handling and radiochemical separation, to the final interpretation of results. Examples include a demonstration of the contamination introduced during sediment core sectioning, contamination of sea water by a ship's pumping system, and the effect of filtration on the apparent partioning of radionuclides between solid and liquid phases of sea water. (author) 11 refs.; 4 tabs

  5. Some experiences in controlling contamination of environmental materials during sampling and processing for low-level actinide analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, B R; Lovett, M B; Boggis, S J

    1987-10-01

    Selected experiences in the control of contamination and the threat it poses to the quality of analytical data are discussed in the context of the whole analytical process from collection of marine enviromental samples, through handling and radiochemical separation, to the final interpretation of results. Examples include a demonstration of the contamination introduced during sediment core sectioning, contamination of sea water by a ship's pumping system, and the effect of filtration on the apparent partioning of radionuclides between solid and liquid phases of sea water. (author) 11 refs.; 4 tabs.

  6. Transition of RF internal antenna plasma by gas control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamajima, Takafumi; Yamauchi, Toshihiko; Kobayashi, Seiji; Hiruta, Toshihito; Kanno, Yoshinori [Advanced Institute of Industrial Technology, 1-10-40 HigashiOhi, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo, 140-0011 (Japan); Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1195 (Japan)

    2012-07-11

    The transition between the capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) and the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) was investigated with the internal radio frequency (RF) multi-turn antenna. The transition between them showed the hysteresis curve. The radiation power and the period of the self-pulse mode became small in proportion to the gas pressure. It was found that the ICP transition occurred by decreasing the gas pressure from 400 Pa.

  7. Coupled sensor/platform control design for low-level chemical detection with position-adaptive micro-UAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas; Carr, Ryan; Mitra, Atindra K.; Selmic, Rastko R.

    2009-05-01

    We discuss the development of Position-Adaptive Sensors [1] for purposes for detecting embedded chemical substances in challenging environments. This concept is a generalization of patented Position-Adaptive Radar Concepts developed at AFRL for challenging conditions such as urban environments. For purposes of investigating the detection of chemical substances using multiple MAV (Micro-UAV) platforms, we have designed and implemented an experimental testbed with sample structures such as wooden carts that contain controlled leakage points. Under this general concept, some of the members of a MAV swarm can serve as external position-adaptive "transmitters" by blowing air over the cart and some of the members of a MAV swarm can serve as external position-adaptive "receivers" that are equipped with chemical or biological (chem/bio) sensors that function as "electronic noses". The objective can be defined as improving the particle count of chem/bio concentrations that impinge on a MAV-based position-adaptive sensor that surrounds a chemical repository, such as a cart, via the development of intelligent position-adaptive control algorithms. The overall effect is to improve the detection and false-alarm statistics of the overall system. Within the major sections of this paper, we discuss a number of different aspects of developing our initial MAV-Based Sensor Testbed. This testbed includes blowers to simulate position-adaptive excitations and a MAV from Draganfly Innovations Inc. with stable design modifications to accommodate our chem/bio sensor boom design. We include details with respect to several critical phases of the development effort including development of the wireless sensor network and experimental apparatus, development of the stable sensor boom for the MAV, integration of chem/bio sensors and sensor node onto the MAV and boom, development of position-adaptive control algorithms and initial tests at IDCAST (Institute for the Development and

  8. Efficacy of low level electric current (A-C) for controlling quagga mussles in the Welland Canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fears, C. [Delta Applied Technology, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Mackie, G.L. [Water Systems Analysts, Guelph, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-06-01

    The efficacy of systems (for which patents are pending) which use low-voltage A-C currents for preventing settlement and attachment by zebra mussels were tested with steel rods and plates placed near the intake of a pulp and paper plant in the Welland Canal at Thorold, Ontario. Six racks made of 16 ft. (4.9 m), 2x4s (5.1 x 10.2 cm) were placed into the Welland Canal on August 5, 1994. One rack had 1/8th in (3.2 mm) diam x 12 in (30.5 cm) long steel rods, each separated by 2 in (5.1 cm) attached to pressure treated wood and concrete blocks and an A-C current of 16 v (or 8 v/in); rack 2 had steel rods of the same configuration but 12 v (or 6 v/in) was applied; rack 3 was identical to these but no current was applied and was used as a rod control. The remaining three racks had steel plates, each plate being 3 in (7.6 cm) wide X 24 in (61 cm) long X 1/4 in (6.4 mm) thick and separated by 2 in (5.1 cm); one had 12 v applied (or 6 v/in), another had 16 v applied (or 8 v/in), and the third had no current and was used as a plate control. The racks were placed on the upstream and downstream side of the intake at a depth of about 7 ft (2.1 m) where the mussels populations were heaviest (as determined by SCUBA diving). All mussels were quagga mussels (Dreissena bugensis). The racks were pulled in mid November after settlement was complete and the results showed: (1) complete prevention of settlement of both new recruits and translocators at 8 volts/in with steel rods on both wood and concrete surfaces and with steel plate trash bars; (2) partial prevention of settlement at 6 volts/in with steel rods on both wood and concrete surfaces and steel plates; and (3) that, at current kilowatt hr rates, total efficacy at 8 volts/in would cost approximately $10.80/day/1000 sq ft using rods to protect concrete walls and about $16.32/day/1000 sq ft to protect 3 in wide x 1/4 in thick trash bars. These costs can be reduced even further with pulse dosed AC currents.

  9. Changes in reproductive biomarkers in an endangered fish species (bonytail chub, Gila elegans) exposed to low levels of organic wastewater compounds in a controlled experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, David B; Paretti, Nicholas V; Cordy, Gail; Gross, Timothy S; Zaugg, Steven D; Furlong, Edward T; Kolpin, Dana W; Matter, William J; Gwinn, Jessica; McIntosh, Dennis

    2009-11-08

    In arid regions of the southwestern United States, municipal wastewater treatment plants commonly discharge treated effluent directly into streams that would otherwise be dry most of the year. A better understanding is needed of how effluent-dependent waters (EDWs) differ from more natural aquatic ecosystems and the ecological effect of low levels of environmentally persistent organic wastewater compounds (OWCs) with distance from the pollutant source. In a controlled experiment, we found 26 compounds common to municipal effluent in treatment raceways all at concentrations fish. Female bonytail chub in treatment tanks had significantly lower concentrations of 17beta-estradiol than control females (p=0.001). The normally inverse relationship between primary male and female sex hormones, expected in un-impaired fish, was greatly decreased in treatment (r=0.00) versus control (r=-0.66) female fish. We found a similar, but not as significant, trend between treatment (r=-0.45) and control (r=-0.82) male fish. Measures of fish condition showed no significant differences between male or female fish housed in effluent or clean water. Inter-sex condition did not occur and testicular and ovarian cells appeared normal for the respective developmental stage and we observed no morphological alteration in fish. The population-level impacts of these findings are uncertain. Studies examining the long-term, generational and behavioral effects to aquatic organisms chronically exposed to low levels of OWC mixtures are needed.

  10. Control of water infiltration into near surface low-level waste disposal units. Final report on field experiments at a humid region site, Beltsville, Maryland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, R.K.; Ridky, R.W.; O'Donnell, E.

    1997-09-01

    This study''s objective was to assess means for controlling water infiltration through waste disposal unit covers in humid regions. Experimental work was carried out in large-scale lysimeters 21.34 m x 13.72 m x 3.05 m (70 ft x 45 ft x 10 ft) at Beltsville, Maryland. Results of the assessment are applicable to disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW), uranium mill tailings, hazardous waste, and sanitary landfills. Three kinds of waste disposal unit covers or barriers to water infiltration were investigated: (1) resistive layer barrier, (2) conductive layer barrier, and (3) bioengineering management

  11. Progress of the Moscow Meson Factory linac RF phase and amplitude control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharamentov, S.I.; Edachev, V.V.; Kvasha, A.I.; Belov, A.D.; Kuznetsov, V.V.

    1992-01-01

    The updated configuration of the MMF linac rf phase and amplitude control systems are presented. The structure of systems, controlling devices and specific feedback controller with Smith compensation and simulated feed-forward control loop are described. (Author) 2 refs., 5 figs

  12. Low-level radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.K.

    1982-05-01

    It is known that the normal incidence of cancer in human populations is increased by exposure to moderately high doses of ionizing radiation. At background radiation levels or at radiation levels which are 100 times greater, the potential health risks are considered to be directly proportional to the total accumulated dose of radiation. Some of the uncertainties associated with this assumption and with the accepted risk estimates have been critically reviewed in this document. The general scientific consensus at present suggests that the accepted risk estimates may exaggerate the actual risk of low levels of sparsely ionizing radiations (beta-, gamma- or X-rays) somewhat but are unlikely to overestimate the actual risks of densely ionizing radiations (fast neutrons, alpha-particles). At the maximum permissible levels of exposure for radiation workers in nuclear power stations, the potential health hazards in terms of life expectancy would be comparable to those encountered in transportation and public utilities or in the construction industry. At the average radiation exposures received by these workers in practice, the potential health hazards are similar to those associated with safe categories of industries. Uranium mining remains a relativly hazardous occupation. In terms of absolute numbers, the genetic hazards, which are less well established, are thought to be smaller than the carcinogenic hazards of radiation when only the first generation is considered but to be of the same order of magnitude as the carcinogenic hazards when the total number of induced genetic disorders is summed over all generations

  13. Control system for RF-driven negative ion source experimental setup at HUST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dong; Wang, Xiaomin, E-mail: xm_wang@hust.edu.cn; Zhao, Peng; Liu, Kaifeng; Zhang, Lige; Yue, Haikun; Chen, Dezhi; Zuo, Chen

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • The CompactRIO system is reliable and could achieve high-speed data collection. • The queue and event software structure allows the control code to be flexible. • TCP/IP performs better than shared variable method for mass data transmission. • The method for lowering the peak RF reflected power has been discussed and given. - Abstract: An experimental setup of RF-driven negative ion source has been built at the Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST). The control system for this setup is responsible for RF loading, gas feeding, filament heating, filament DC bias, data collection and Langmuir probe triggering during plasma production. To research influences on the plasma ignition of gas puff and RF power loading, the control system should be of flexible operating sequence, high-speed data collection and reliable data transmission. The general control unit (GCU) adopts a CompactRIO system, which performs high-speed data collection for gas pressure and RF power. The host control program adopts a queue and event structure for flexible operation, and TCP/IP method is applied for mass data transmission. The development of the host control program is described in detail. The test results of the shared variable and TCP/IP methods are presented, as well as data showing the advantages of the TCP/IP method. The experiment results with two different sequences of plasma production are given and discussed here.

  14. Digital base-band rf control system for the superconducting Darmstadt electron linear accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Konrad

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The accelerating field in superconducting cavities has to be stabilized in amplitude and phase by a radio-frequency (rf control system. Because of their high loaded quality factor superconducting cavities are very susceptible for microphonics. To meet the increased requirements with respect to accuracy, availability, and diagnostics, the previous analog rf control system of the superconducting Darmstadt electron linear accelerator S-DALINAC has been replaced by a digital rf control system. The new hardware consists of two components: An rf module that converts the signal from the cavity down to the base-band and a field-programmable gate array board including a soft CPU that carries out the signal processing steps of the control algorithm. Different algorithms are used for normal-conducting and superconducting cavities. To improve the availability of the control system, techniques for automatic firmware and software deployment have been implemented. Extensive diagnostic features provide the operator with additional information. The architecture of the rf control system as well as the functionality of its components will be presented along with measurements that characterize the performance of the system, yielding, e.g., an amplitude stabilization down to (ΔA/A_{rms}=7×10^{-5} and a phase stabilization of (Δϕ_{rms}=0.8° for superconducting cavities.

  15. AN INTERNET RACK MONITOR-CONTROLLER FOR APS LINAC RF ELECTRONICS UPGRADE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Hengjie; Smith, Terry; Nassiri, Alireza; Sun, Yine; Doolittle, Lawrence; Ratti, Alex

    2016-06-01

    To support the research and development in APS LINAC area, the existing LINAC rf control performance needs to be much improved, and thus an upgrade of the legacy LINAC rf electronics becomes necessary. The proposed upgrade plan centers on the concept of using a modern, network-attached, rackmount digital electronics platform –Internet Rack Monitor-Controller (or IRMC) to achieve the goal of modernizing the rf electronics at a lower cost. The system model of the envisioned IRMC is basically a 3-tier stack with a high-performance DSP in the mid-layer to perform the core tasks of real-time rf data processing and controls. The Digital Front-End (DFE) attachment layer at bottom bridges the applicationspecific rf front-ends to the DSP. A network communication gateway, together with an embedded event receiver (EVR) in the top layer merges the Internet Rack MonitorController node into the networks of the accelerator controls infrastructure. Although the concept is very much in trend with today’s Internet-of-Things (IoT), this implementation has actually been used in the accelerators for over two decades.

  16. EXCESS RF POWER REQUIRED FOR RF CONTROL OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE (SNS) LINAC, A PULSED HIGH-INTENSITY SUPERCONDUCTING PROTON ACCELERATOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, M.; Kwon, S.

    2001-01-01

    A high-intensity proton linac, such as that being planned for the SNS, requires accurate RF control of cavity fields for the entire pulse in order to avoid beam spill. The current design requirement for the SNS is RF field stability within ±0.5% and ±0.5 o [1]. This RF control capability is achieved by the control electronics using the excess RF power to correct disturbances. To minimize the initial capital costs, the RF system is designed with 'just enough' RF power. All the usual disturbances exist, such as beam noise, klystron/HVPS noise, coupler imperfections, transport losses, turn-on and turn-off transients, etc. As a superconducting linac, there are added disturbances of large magnitude, including Lorentz detuning and microphonics. The effects of these disturbances and the power required to correct them are estimated, and the result shows that the highest power systems in the SNS have just enough margin, with little or no excess margin

  17. Very low level radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaller, K.H.; Linsley, G.; Elert, M.

    1993-01-01

    Man's environment contains naturally occurring radionuclides and doses from exposures to these radionuclides mostly cannot be avoided. Consequently, almost everything may be considered as very low level radioactive material. In practical terms, management and the selection of different routes for low level material is confined to material which was subject to industrial processing or which is under a system of radiological control. Natural radionuclides with concentrations reaching reporting or notification levels will be discussed below; nevertheless, the main body of this paper will be devoted to material, mainly of artificial origin, which is in the system involving notification, registration and licensing of practices and sources. It includes material managed in the nuclear sector and sources containing artificially produced radionuclides used in hospitals, and in industry. Radioactive materials emit ionising radiations which are harmful to man and his environment. National and international regulations provide the frame for the system of radiation protection. Nevertheless, concentrations, quantities or types of radionuclide may be such, that the material presents a very low hazard, and may therefore be removed from regulatory control, as it would be a waste of time and effort to continue supervision. These materials are said to be exempted from regulatory control. Material exempted in a particular country is no longer distinguishable from ''ordinary'' material and may be moved from country to country. Unfortunately, criteria for exempting radioactive materials differ strongly between countries and free trade. Therefore there is a necessity for an international approach to be developed for exemption levels

  18. Performance of RF power and phase control on JT-60 LHRF heating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, T.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, T.; Honda, M.; Kiyono, K.; Maebara, S.; Saigusa, M.; Sakamoto, K.; Sawahata, M.; Seki, M.

    1987-01-01

    The performance of RF power and phase control on the JT-60 LHRFD heating system are presented. The JT-60 LHRF heating system has three units of huge RF source with a total output of 24 MW, each unit consisting of eight amplifier chains. A high power klystron generating 1 MW for 10 s at 2 GHz is used in each chain. Automatic gain control is employed to regulate the output power not only against gain fluctuations in the chain but also against the unstable plasma load without any output circulator for the klystron

  19. RF Beam control system for the Brookhaven relativistic heavy ion collider, RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, J.M.; Campbell, A.; Delong, J.; Hayes, T.; Onillon, E.; Rose, J.; Vetter, K.

    1998-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC, is two counter-rotating rings with six interaction points. The RF Beam Control system for each ring will control two 28 MHz cavities for acceleration, and five 197 MHz cavities for preserving the 5 ns bunch length during 10 hour beam stores. Digital technology is used extensively in: Direct Digital Synthesis of rf signals and Digital Signal Processing for, the realization of state-variable feedback loops, real-time calculation of rf frequency, and bunch-by-bunch phase measurement of the 120 bunches. DSP technology enables programming the parameters of the feedback loops in order to obtain closed-loop dynamics that are independent of synchrotron frequency

  20. RF beam control system for the Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, J.M.; Campbell, A.; DeLong, J.; Hayes, T.; Onillon, E.; Rose, J.; Vetter, K.

    1998-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC, is two counter-rotating rings with six interaction points. The RF Beam Control system for each ring will control two 28 MHz cavities for acceleration, and five 197 MHz cavities for preserving the 5 ns bunch length during 10 hour beam stores. Digital technology is used extensively in: Direct Digital Synthesis of rf signals and Digital Signal Processing for, the realization of state-variable feedback loops, real-time calculation of rf frequency, and bunch-by-bunch phase measurement of the 120 bunches. DSP technology enables programming the parameters of the feedback loops in order to obtain closed-loop dynamics that are independent of synchrotron frequency

  1. Low-level laser therapy with 940 nm diode laser on stability of dental implants: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkzaban, Parviz; Kasraei, Shahin; Torabi, Sara; Farhadian, Maryam

    2018-02-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a non-invasive modality to promote osteoblastic activity and tissue healing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of LLLT for improvement of dental implant stability. This randomized controlled clinical trial was performed on 80 dental implants placed in 19 patients. Implants were randomly divided into two groups (n = 40). Seven sessions of LLLT (940 nm diode laser) were scheduled for the test group implants during 2 weeks. Laser was irradiated to the buccal and palatal sides. The same procedure was performed for the control group implants with laser hand piece in "off" mode. Implant stability was measured by Osstell Mentor device in implant stability quotient (ISQ) value immediately after surgery and 10 days and 3, 6, and 12 weeks later. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare the mean ISQ values (implant stability) in the test and control groups. Statistical test revealed no significant difference in the mean values of implant stability between the test and control groups over time (P = 0.557). Although the mean values of implant stability changed significantly in both groups over time (P laser group in the first weeks and increased from the 6th to 12th week, LLLT had no significant effect on dental implant stability.

  2. Development of an Automatic Frequency Control (AFC) System for RF Electron Linear Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Sungsu; Kim, Yujong; Lee, Byeong-No; Joo, Youngwoo; Lee, Soo Min; Lee, Byung Cheol; Cha, Hyungki; Park, Hyung Dal; Lee, Seung Hyun

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the design, fabrication, and RF power test of the AFC system for the X-band linac are presented. The main function of the AFC system is automatically matching of the resonance frequency of the accelerating structure and the RF frequency of the magnetron. For the frequency tuning, a fine tuning of 10 kHz is possible by rotating the tuning shaft with a rotation of 0.72 degree per pulse. Therefore, the frequency deviation is about 0.01%, and almost full RF power (2.1 MW) transmission was obtained because the reflected power is minimized. The Radiation Equipment Research Division of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute has been developing and upgrading a medical/industrial X-band RF electron linear accelerators. The medical compact RF electron linear accelerator consists of an electron gun, an acceleration tube (accelerating structure), two solenoid magnets, two steering magnets, a magnetron, modulator, an automatic frequency control (AFC) system, and an X-ray generating target. The accelerating structure of the component is composed of oxygen-free high-conductivity copper (OFHC). Therefore, the volume of the structure, hence, its resonance frequency can easily be changeable if the ambient temperature and pressure are changed. If the RF frequency of the 9300 MHz magnetron and the resonance frequency of accelerating structure are not matched, performance of the structure can be degraded. An AFC system is automatically matched with the RF frequency of the magnetron and resonance frequency of the accelerating structure, which obtained a high output power and reliable accelerator operation

  3. Development of an Automatic Frequency Control (AFC) System for RF Electron Linear Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Sungsu; Kim, Yujong; Lee, Byeong-No; Joo, Youngwoo; Lee, Soo Min; Lee, Byung Cheol; Cha, Hyungki [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyung Dal [Radiation Technology eXcellence, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Hyun [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, the design, fabrication, and RF power test of the AFC system for the X-band linac are presented. The main function of the AFC system is automatically matching of the resonance frequency of the accelerating structure and the RF frequency of the magnetron. For the frequency tuning, a fine tuning of 10 kHz is possible by rotating the tuning shaft with a rotation of 0.72 degree per pulse. Therefore, the frequency deviation is about 0.01%, and almost full RF power (2.1 MW) transmission was obtained because the reflected power is minimized. The Radiation Equipment Research Division of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute has been developing and upgrading a medical/industrial X-band RF electron linear accelerators. The medical compact RF electron linear accelerator consists of an electron gun, an acceleration tube (accelerating structure), two solenoid magnets, two steering magnets, a magnetron, modulator, an automatic frequency control (AFC) system, and an X-ray generating target. The accelerating structure of the component is composed of oxygen-free high-conductivity copper (OFHC). Therefore, the volume of the structure, hence, its resonance frequency can easily be changeable if the ambient temperature and pressure are changed. If the RF frequency of the 9300 MHz magnetron and the resonance frequency of accelerating structure are not matched, performance of the structure can be degraded. An AFC system is automatically matched with the RF frequency of the magnetron and resonance frequency of the accelerating structure, which obtained a high output power and reliable accelerator operation.

  4. A Structured, Manual-Based Low-Level Intervention vs. Treatment as Usual Evaluated in a Randomized Controlled Trial for Adolescents with Extreme Obesity - the STEREO Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Mühlig

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: To compare efficacy and safety of a manual-based low-level psychological intervention with treatment as usual (weight loss treatment. Methods: A two-armed randomized controlled trial without blinding and computer-based stratified block randomization included adolescents and young adults (14.0-24.9 years with a BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 at five German university hospitals. Primary outcomes were adherence (participation rate ≥ 5/6 sessions and quality of life (DISABKIDS-37 6 months after randomization. Secondary outcomes included depression, self-esteem, and perceived stress scores. Results: Of 397 screened adolescents, 119 (mean BMI 40.4 ± 7.0 kg/m2, 49.6% female were randomized to the manual-based low-level intervention (n = 59 or treatment as usual (n = 60. We observed no group difference for adherence (absolute risk reduction 0.4%, 95% CI -14.7% to 15.5%; p = 1.0 or health-related quality of life (score difference 8.1, 95% CI -2.1 to 18.3; p = 0.11. Among all secondary outcomes, we detected explorative evidence for an effect on the DISABKIDS-37 ‘social exclusion' subscale (score difference 15.5; 95% CI 1.6-29.4; p = 0.03. 18/19 adverse events occurred in 26 participants, none were classified as serious. Conclusion: Adherence to a coping-oriented intervention was comparable to weight loss treatment, although it was weak in both interventions. Psychological interventions may help to overcome social isolation; further confirmation is required.

  5. Evaluation of a simplified modified Atkins diet for use by parents with low levels of literacy in children with refractory epilepsy: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Suvasini; Goel, Shaiphali; Jain, Puneet; Agarwala, Anuja; Aneja, Satinder

    2016-11-01

    This study was planned to develop and evaluate a simple, easy-to-understand variation of the modified Atkins diet, for use by parents with low levels of literacy in children with refractory epilepsy. This study was conducted in two phases. In the first phase, a simplified version of the modified Atkins diet was developed. In the second phase this was evaluated in children aged 2-14 years who had daily seizures despite the appropriate use of at least two anticonvulsant drugs, in an open-label randomized-controlled-trial. Children were randomized to receive either the simplified modified Atkins diet or no dietary intervention for a period of 3 months with the ongoing anticonvulsant medications being continued unchanged in both the groups. Reduction in seizure frequency was the primary outcome-measure. Data was analyzed using intention to treat approach. Adverse effects were also studied. (Clinical trial identifier NCT0189989). Forty-one children were randomly assigned to the diet-group, and 40 were assigned to the control-group. Two patients discontinued the diet during the study period. The proportion of children with>50% seizure reduction was significantly higher in the diet group as compared to the control group (56.1% vs 7.5%, pliteracy. This diet was found to be feasible, efficacious and well tolerated in children with refractory epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. DDS-based control loops for the RF system at INFN-LNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caruso, A.; Calabretta, L.; Cosentino, G.; Sparta, A.; Speziale, F.

    2005-01-01

    In the last two years a new radio-frequency source generator has been working to synthesize the driving sinusoidal signals of the RF systems at LNS. This device is based on Direct Digital Synthesis (DDS) technique. Every time you need a constant relation of phase between several RF signals, our DDS-based multiple frequencies generator produces these high frequency waveforms. The good results of this DDS synthesizer technique, make us feel confident that we can develop a new DDS control system for the various RF equipment. The AD9852/54 a commercial DDS microchip, will be the core of this new control system. The component allows, through digital ports, the manipulation of the frequency, amplitude and phase of the developed RF-carrier without any interruption to the latter. In this way we would have a complete DDS control system capable of stabilizing amplitude, phase and tuning ensuring the present stability of the analog control loops. The remaining operations, such as turning on/off and protection of the system will be performed at the same time. The prototype of this new DDS control, its technical performances and the experimental results will be presented in this paper. (author)

  7. Fabrication and tests and RF control of the superconducting resonators of the Saclay heavy ion LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cauvin, B.; Coret, M.; Fouan, J.P.; Girard, J.; Girma, J.L.; Leconte, P.; Lussignol, Y.; Moreau, R.; Passerieux, J.P.; Ramstein, G.; Wartski, L.

    1987-01-01

    Two types of niobium superconducting resonators used in the Saclay linac are discussed. The outer cylinder and RF ports are identical for the two designs, but internal structures are different: full wave helix with three gaps behavior; or half wave with two gaps behavior. All cavities (34 full wave, 16 half) were tested for field and mounted in the machine cryostats. Cavity fabrication and performance are summarized. Vibration tests and Rf control are described. It is argued that helix resonators can overcome problems due to vibration. The very low lock out time percentage measured in an acceleration test with 21 cavities supports this confidence

  8. Gallium arsenide digital integrated circuits for controlling SLAC CW-RF systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronan, M.T.; Lee, K.L.; Corredoura, P.; Judkins, J.G.

    1989-01-01

    In order to fill the PEP and SPEAR storage rings with beams from the SLC linac and damping rings, precise control of the linac subharmonic buncher and the damping ring RF is required. Recently several companies have developed resettable GaAs master/slave D-type flip-flops which are capable of operating at frequencies of 3 GHz and higher. Using these digital devices as frequency dividers, one can phase shift the SLAC CW-RF systems to optimize the timing for filling the storage rings. The authors have evaluated the performance of integrated circuits from two vendors for our particular application. Using microstrip circuit techniques, they have built and operated in the accelerator several chassis to synchronize a reset signal from the storage rings to the SLAC 2.856 GHz RF and to phase shift divide-by-four and divide-by-sixteen frequency dividers to the nearest 350 psec bucket required for filling

  9. Low-level waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, G.B.

    1980-01-01

    An overview of the current situation in the United States and a look to the future of low-level waste management are presented. Current problems and challenges are discussed, such as: the need of additional disposal sites in the future; risks and costs involved in transport of low-level wastes; reduction of low-level waste volume through smelting, incineration, and storage for wastes containing nuclides with short half lives; development of a national policy for the management of low-level waste, and its implementation through a sensible system of regulations. Establishing a success with low-level waste management should provide the momentum and public confidence needed to continue on and to resolve the technical and politically more difficult low-level waste problems

  10. Role of Low-Level Laser Therapy as an Adjunct to Initial Periodontal Treatment in Type 2 Diabetic Patients: A Split-Mouth, Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirturk-Gocgun, Oya; Baser, Ulku; Aykol-Sahin, Gokce; Dinccag, Nevin; Issever, Halim; Yalcin, Funda

    2017-02-01

    In this split-mouth clinical trial, we evaluated the clinical benefits of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) as an adjunct to nonsurgical periodontal treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). The impaired wound healing seen in diabetic patients may affect the results of periodontal treatment and may require an additional approach. In total, 22 chronic periodontitis patients with type 2 DM were included. Applying a split-mouth design, two quadrants were treated with only scaling and root planing (SRP) as the control and those in the other two were treated with SRP + LLLT as the test sites in each patient. An 808 nm GaAlAs diode laser was performed in the test sites at the energy density of 4.46 J/cm 2 on days 1, 2, and 7 after SRP. Plaque index (PI), probing depth (PD), bleeding on probing (BOP), and clinical attachment level were measured at baseline and again at 1 and 3 months after treatment. Deep periodontal pockets (PD ≥4 mm) were evaluated separately. Test sites showed significant improvement in PI and BOP in deep pockets at the 1-month follow-up period (p < 0.001 and <0.001, respectively), whereas no difference was found between the control and the test sites in other periodontal parameters. LLLT during periodontal treatment offered minimal short-term additional benefit in deep pocket healing in patients with type 2 DM.

  11. New Control Structure of the 200 MHz RF System in the CERN PS

    CERN Document Server

    Damerau, H; CERN. Geneva. AB Department

    2008-01-01

    The 200 MHz RF system is an essential tool for the preparation of high-intensity beams in the CERN PS. Presently, six RF cavities are operated to control the longitudinal bunch emittance and rebunching of the beam before the transfer to the SPS. Cavities are selected for the various processes with a dedicated hardware matrix, switching the individual timing pulses and voltage programs per cavity. However, the electronics used for the matrix hardware is obsolete and its reliability cannot be guaranteed due to a lack of spare modules and components. Instead of replacing the old hardware matrix by modern hardware, this note describes a new control structure for the 200MHz RF system so that no dedicated hardware will be required anymore. The implementation of the new control structure is based on two main concepts. Firstly, linked timing trees per blow-up or rebunching are used to handle all related timing and to store one row of the matrix. Secondly, as a reflection of the RF signal generation for the 200 MHz sy...

  12. Analysis and software development for controlling RF signal generator proton cyclotron Decy-13 using DDS Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prajitno

    2012-01-01

    Analysis and manufacture of computer programs for controlling the signal generator Radio Frequency (RF) proton cyclotron Decy-13 have been done. Signal generator uses a technique Direct Digital Synthesiser (DDS) which settings must be done with software. Signal generator consists of electronic modules which are: DDS, micro controller ATmega16, amplifier RF.dan ± 12 Vdc power supply. Function of the programs that have been made is to set the DDS module, namely: output frequency, step frequency and phase settings and displays the operating parameters of the DDS and the RF amplifier on the monitor screen. Computer programs created with Visual Basic and has been tested to control the RF signal generator to send data serially to the module ATmega16 and receives data to be displayed on the monitor screen. Testing sending and receiving data is done with a baudrate of 1200 bps to 19200 bps with perfect results. Computer programs that have been made equipped with a Human Machine Interface to provide values parameter input on the DDS operations. (author)

  13. The Drigg low-level waste site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Safe disposal of waste is a vital aspect of any industrial operation whether it be production of plastics, steel or chemicals or handling of radioactive materials. Appropriate methods must be used in every case. Radioactive waste falls into three distinct categories - high, intermediate and low-level. It is the solid low-level waste making up over 90% of the total which this booklet discusses. British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) operates a site for the disposal of solid low-level waste at Driggs, some six kilometres south of Sellafield in West Cumbria. The daily operations and control of the site, the responsibility of the BNFL Waste Management Unit is described. (author)

  14. Effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) and diclofenac (topical and intramuscular) as single and combined therapy in experimental model of controlled muscle strain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paiva Carvalho, Rodrigo Leal; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; Petrellis, Maria Carla; Marcos, Rodrigo Labat; de Carvalho, Maria Helena Catelli; De Nucci, Gilberto; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Alvaro Brandão

    2013-01-01

    Muscle injuries represent ca 30% of sports injuries and excessive stretching of muscle causes more than 90% of injuries. Currently the most used treatments are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), however, in last years, low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is becoming an interesting therapeutic modality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of single and combined therapies (LLLT, topical application of diclofenac and intramuscular diclofenac) on functional and biochemical aspects in an experimental model of controlled muscle strain in rats. Muscle strain was induced by overloading tibialis anterior muscle of rats. Injured groups received either no treatment, or a single treatment with topical or intramuscular diclofenac (TD and ID), or LLLT (3 J, 810 nm, 100 mW) 1 h after injury. Walking track analysis was the functional outcome and biochemical analyses included mRNA expression of COX-1 and COX-2 and blood levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ). All treatments significantly decreased COX-1 and COX-2 gene expression compared with injury group (P levels and walking track analysis (P topical and intramuscular diclofenac in treatment of muscle strain injury in acute stage. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2012 The American Society of Photobiology.

  15. Controlling the dynamics of a self-organized structure using a rf-field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talasman, S.J.; Ignat, M.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the influence of an external rf-field upon a plasma self-organized structure. We show that depending on the intensity of this field, though it is at very low values, the dynamics of the structure can be easily controlled over a wide range of the state parameters values. This could be considered as a non-feedback method of dynamics control

  16. Simplified RF power system for Wideroe-type linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fugitt, J.; Howard, D.; Crosby, F.; Johnson, R.; Nolan, M.; Yuen, G.

    1981-03-01

    The RF system for the SuperHILAC injector linac was designed and constructed for minimum system complexity, wide dynamic range, and ease of maintenance. The final amplifier is close coupled to the linac and operates in an efficient semilinear mode, eliminating troublesome transmission lines, modulators, and high level regulators. The system has been operated at over 250 kW, 23 MHz with good regulation. The low level RF electronics are contained in a single chassis adjacent to the RF control computer, which monitors all important operating parameters. A unique 360 0 phase and amplitude modular is used for precise control and regulation of the accelerating voltage

  17. Improved Controls for Fusion RF Systems. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    We have addressed the specific requirements for the integrated systems controlling an array of klystrons used for Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD). The immediate goal for our design was to modernize the transmitter protection system (TPS) for LHCD on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center (MIT-PSFC). Working with the Alcator C-Mod team, we have upgraded the design of these controls to retrofit for improvements in performance and safety, as well as to facilitate the upcoming expansion from 12 to 16 klystrons. The longer range goals to generalize the designs in such a way that they will be of benefit to other programs within the international fusion effort was met by designing a system which was flexible enough to address all the MIT system requirements, and modular enough to adapt to a large variety of other requirements with minimal reconfiguration

  18. Improved Controls for Fusion RF Systems. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Jeffrey A. [Rockfield Research Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2011-11-08

    We have addressed the specific requirements for the integrated systems controlling an array of klystrons used for Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD). The immediate goal for our design was to modernize the transmitter protection system (TPS) for LHCD on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center (MIT-PSFC). Working with the Alcator C-Mod team, we have upgraded the design of these controls to retrofit for improvements in performance and safety, as well as to facilitate the upcoming expansion from 12 to 16 klystrons. The longer range goals to generalize the designs in such a way that they will be of benefit to other programs within the international fusion effort was met by designing a system which was flexible enough to address all the MIT system requirements, and modular enough to adapt to a large variety of other requirements with minimal reconfiguration.

  19. CONTROL OF BOUNCING IN RF MEMS SWITCHES USING DOUBLE ELECTRODE

    KAUST Repository

    Abdul Rahim, Farhan

    2014-05-01

    MEMS based mechanical switches are seen to be the likely replacements for CMOS based switches due to the several advantages that these mechanical switches have over CMOS switches. Mechanical switches can be used in systems under extreme conditions and also provide more reliability and cause less power loss. A major problem with mechanical switches is bouncing. Bouncing is an undesirable characteristic which increases the switching time and causes damage to the switch structure affecting the overall switch life. This thesis proposes a new switch design that may be used to mitigate bouncing by using two voltage sources using a double electrode configuration. The effect of many switch’s tunable parameters is also discussed and an effective tuning technique is also provided. The results are compared to the current control schemes in literature and show that the double electrode scheme is a viable control option.

  20. NSLS-II Digital RF Controller Logic and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holub, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gao, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kulpin, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Marques, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Oliva, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Rose, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Towne, N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) accelerator consists of the Storage Ring, the Booster Ring and Linac along with their associated cavities. Given the number, types and variety of functions of these cavities, we sought to limit the logic development effort by reuse of parameterized code on one hardware platform. Currently there are six controllers installed in the NSLS-II system. There are two in the Storage ring, two in the Booster ring, one in the Linac and one in the Master Oscillator Distribution system.

  1. Low-level laser in the treatment of patients with hypothyroidism induced by chronic autoimmune thyroiditis: a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfling, Danilo B; Chavantes, Maria Cristina; Juliano, Adriana G; Cerri, Giovanni G; Knobel, Meyer; Yoshimura, Elisabeth M; Chammas, Maria Cristina

    2013-05-01

    Chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (CAT) is the most common cause of acquired hypothyroidism, which requires lifelong levothyroxine replacement therapy. Currently, no effective therapy is available for CAT. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in patients with CAT-induced hypothyroidism by testing thyroid function, thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb), thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb), and ultrasonographic echogenicity. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial with a 9-month follow-up was conducted from 2006 to 2009. Forty-three patients with a history of levothyroxine therapy for CAT-induced hypothyroidism were randomly assigned to receive either 10 sessions of LLLT (830 nm, output power of 50 mW, and fluence of 707 J/cm(2); L group, n=23) or 10 sessions of a placebo treatment (P group, n=20). The levothyroxine was suspended 30 days after the LLLT or placebo procedures. Thyroid function was estimated by the levothyroxine dose required to achieve normal concentrations of T3, T4, free-T4 (fT4), and thyrotropin after 9 months of postlevothyroxine withdrawal. Autoimmunity was assessed by measuring the TPOAb and TgAb levels. A quantitative computerized echogenicity analysis was performed pre- and 30 days postintervention. The results showed a significant difference in the mean levothyroxine dose required to treat the hypothyroidism between the L group (38.59 ± 20.22 μg/day) and the P group (106.88 ± 22.90 μg/day, Phypothyroidism.

  2. Effects of low-level laser therapy applied before or after plyometric exercise on muscle damage markers: randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Carolina Gassen; Dornelles, Maurício Pinto; Severo-Silveira, Lucas; Marques, Vanessa Bernardes; Rosso, Isabele de Albuquerque; Baroni, Bruno Manfredini

    2016-12-01

    Promising effects of phototherapy on markers of exercise-induced muscle damage has been already demonstrated in constant load or isokinetic protocols. However, its effects on more functional situations, such as plyometric exercises, and when is the best moment to apply this treatment (pre- or post-exercise) remain unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) before or after plyometric exercise on quadriceps muscle damage markers. A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial was conducted with 24 healthy men, 12 at pre-exercise treatment group and 12 at post-exercise treatment group. Placebo and LLLT (810 nm, 200 mW per diode, 6 J per diode, 240 J per leg) were randomly applied on right/left knee extensor muscles of each volunteer before/after a plyometric exercise protocol. Muscular echo intensity (ultrasonography images), soreness (visual analogue scale - VAS), and strength impairment (maximal voluntary contraction - MVC) were assessed at baseline, 24, 48, and 72 h post-exercise. Legs treated with LLLT before or after exercise presented significantly smaller increments of echo intensity (values up to 1 %) compared to placebo treatments (increased up to ∼7 %). No significant treatment effect was found for VAS and MVC, although a trend toward better results on LLLT legs have been found for VAS (mean values up to 30 % lesser than placebo leg). In conclusion, LLLT applied before or after plyometric exercise reduces the muscle echo intensity response and possibly attenuates the muscle soreness. However, these positive results were not observed on strength impairment.

  3. New Control Structure of the 10 MHz RF System in the CERN PS

    CERN Document Server

    Damerau, H

    2013-01-01

    The 10MHz cavities comprise the main RF system in the CERN PS and the only one that allows acceleration. In total 11 tunable cavities (10 operational and a hot spare, grouped into 3+1 tuning groups and up to presently 6 voltage program groups) are distributed all around the circumference of the PS ring. Next to the RF drive signal each of the cavities is controlled by a voltage program and timing pulses to open and close the relays to short-circuit the cavity gaps. These control signals are presently generated by a dedicated hardware matrix. It translates voltage functions and relay timing pulses per cavity group into functions and timings per cavity. However, due to its central position in the RF beam control system, the dedicated hardware matrix can cause significant downtime in case of a major hardware failure. Instead of upgrading the existing obsolete hardware, this note suggests a replacement by standard controls hardware and dedicated application software. Thanks to advanced software concepts like “M...

  4. Commissioning of the 400 MHz LHC RF System

    CERN Document Server

    Ciapala, Edmond; Baudrenghien, P; Brunner, O; Butterworth, A; Linnecar, T; Maesen, P; Molendijk, J; Montesinos, E; Valuch, D; Weierud, F

    2008-01-01

    The installation of the 400 MHz superconducting RF system in LHC is finished and commissioning is under way. The final RF system comprises four cryo-modules each with four cavities in the LHC tunnel straight section round IP4. Also underground in an adjacent cavern shielded from the main tunnel are the sixteen 300 kW klystron RF power sources with their high voltage bunkers, two Faraday cages containing RF feedback and beam control electronics, and racks containing all the slow controls. The system and the experience gained during commissioning will be described. In particular, results from conditioning the cavities and their movable main power couplers and the setting up of the low level RF feedbacks will be presented.

  5. Efficacy of pre-exercise low-level laser therapy on isokinetic muscle performance in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Cid André Fidelis de Paula; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; Biasotto-Gonzalez, Daniela Aparecida; El-Hage, Yasmin; Politti, Fabiano; Gonzalez, Tabajara de Oliveira; Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; de Oliveira, Adriano Rodrigues; Frigero, Marcelo; Antonialli, Fernanda Colella; Vanin, Adriane Aver; de Tarso Camillo de Carvalho, Paulo

    2014-04-09

    Type 2 diabetes, also known non-insulin-dependent diabetes, is the most prevalent type of the disease and involves defects in the secretion and action of insulin. The aim of the proposed study is to evaluate the efficacy of pre-exercise low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on muscle performance of the quadriceps femoris in individuals with type 2 diabetes. A double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial will be carried out in two treatment phases. In the first phase, quadriceps muscle performance will be evaluated using an isokinetic dynamometer and the levels of creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase (biochemical markers of muscle damage) will be determined. The participants will then be allocated to four LLLT groups through a randomization process using opaque envelopes: Group A (4 Joules), Group B (6 Joules), Group C (8 Joules) and Group D (0 Joules; placebo). Following the administration of LLLT, the participants will be submitted to an isokinetic eccentric muscle fatigue protocol involving the quadriceps muscle bilaterally. Muscle performance and biochemical markers of muscle damage will be evaluated again immediately after as well as 24 and 48 hours after the experimental protocol. One week after the last evaluation the second phase will begin, during which Groups A, B and C will receive the LLLT protocol that achieved the best muscle performance in phase 1 for a period of 4 weeks. At the end of this period, muscle performance will be evaluated again. The protocol for this study is registered with the World Health Organization under Universal Trial Number U1111-1146-7109. The purpose of this randomized clinical trial is to evaluate the efficacy of pre-exercise LLLT on the performance of the quadriceps muscle (peak torque, total muscle work, maximum power and fatigue index - normalized by body mass) in individuals with DM-2. The study will support the practice of evidence-based to the use of LLLT in improving muscle performance in Individuals with DM-2

  6. Effect of low-level laser therapy on pain, quality of life and sleep in patients with fibromyalgia: study protocol for a double-blinded randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camillo; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; Alves, Ana Carolina Araruna; Rambo, Caroline Sobral de Melo; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosa; Oliveira, Claudia Santos; Albertini, Regiane; de Oliveira, Luis Vicente Franco

    2012-11-21

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been widely used as adjuvant strategy for treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. The light-tissue interaction (photobiostimulation) promotes analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects and improves tissue healing, which could justify the recommendation of this therapy for patients with fibromyalgia, leading to an improvement in pain and possibly minimizing social impact related to this disease. The present study proposes to evaluate the effect of LLLT on tender points in patients with fibromyalgia, correlating this outcome with quality of life and sleep. One hundred and twenty patients with fibromyalgia will be treated at the Integrated Health Center and the Sleep Laboratory of the Post Graduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences of the Nove de Julho University located in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. After fulfilling the eligibility criteria, a clinical evaluation and assessments of pain and sleep quality will be carried out and self-administered quality of life questionnaires will be applied. The 120 volunteers will be randomly allocated to an intervention group (LLLT, n = 60) or control group (CLLLT, n = 60). Patients from both groups will be treated three times per week for four weeks, totaling twelve sessions. However, only the LLLT group will receive an energy dose of 6 J per tender point. A standardized 50-minute exercise program will be performed after the laser application. The patients will be evaluated regarding the primary outcome (pain) using the following instruments: visual analog scale, McGill Pain Questionnaire and pressure algometry. The secondary outcome (quality of life and sleep) will be assessed with the following instruments: Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form Health Survey, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, Berlin Questionnaire, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and polysomnography. ANOVA test with repeated measurements for the time factor will be performed to test between-groups differences (followed by the

  7. Theory and experiments on RF plasma heating, current drive and profile control in TORE SUPRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the main experimental and theoretical achievements related to the study of RF heating and non-inductive current drive and particularly phenomena related to the current density profile control and the potentiality of producing stationary enhanced performance regimes: description of the Lower Hybrid (LH) and Ion Cyclotron Resonant Frequency (ICRF) systems; long pulse coupling performance of the RF systems; observation of the transition to the so-called ''stationary LHEP regime'' in which the (flat) central current density and (peaked) electron temperature profiles are fully decoupled; experiments on ICRF sawtooth stabilization with the combined effect of LHCD modifying the current density profile; diffusion of fast electrons generated by LH waves; ramp-up experiments in which the LH power provided a significant part of the resistive poloidal flux and flux consumption scaling; theory of spectral wave diffusion and multipass absorption; fast wave current drive modelling with the Alcyon full wave code; a reflector LH antenna concept. 18 figs., 48 refs

  8. Low-level Radioactivity Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churtgen, C.

    2007-01-01

    The low-level radioactivity measurements service performs measurements of alpha or beta emitters on various types of low-radioactivity samples (biological and environmental) from internal and external clients. to maintain and develop techniques concerning the measurement of low-level radioactivity of alpha and beta emitting radionuclides in environmental or biological samples; to measure these samples by means of low-background counters (liquid scintillators, proportional counters, ZnS counters and alpha-spectrometers); to support and advise the nuclear and non-nuclear industry on problems of radioactive contamination or low level radioactivity measurements; to maintain the quality assurance system according to the ISO17025 standard for which we obtained the Beltest accreditation in 1998; to assess the internal dose from occupational intakes of radionuclides for workers of the nuclear industry;

  9. Low-level Radioactivity Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurtgen, C.

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of the research performed in the area of low-level radioactivity measurements are (1) to maintain and develop techniques for the measurement of low-level environmental and biological samples, (2) to measure these samples by means of low-background counters (liquid scintillators, proportional counters, ZnS counters, alpha spectrometry), (3) to support and advise the nuclear and non-nuclear industry on problems of radioactive contamination and low-level radioactivity measurements; (4) to maintain and improve the quality assurance system according to the ISO17025 standard; and (5) to assess the internal dose from occupational intakes of radionuclides of workers of the nuclear industry. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are reported

  10. Low-level Radioactivity Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurtgen, C.

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of the research performed in the area of low-level radioactivity measurements are (1) to maintain and develop techniques for the measurement of low-level environmental and biological samples, (2) to measure these samples by means of low-background counters (liquid scintillators, proportional counters, ZnS counters, alpha spectrometry), (3) to support and advice the nuclear and non-nuclear industry in matters concerning radioactive contamination and/or low-level radioactivity measurements; (4) to maintain the quality assurance system according to the EN45001/ISO17025 standard; and (5) to assess the internal dose from occupational intakes of radionuclides of workers of the nuclear industry. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2000 are reported

  11. Gallium arsenide digital integrated circuits for controlling SLAC CW-RF systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronan, M.T.; Lee, K.L.; Corredoura, P.; Judkins, J.G.

    1988-10-01

    In order to fill the PEP and SPEAR storage rings with beams from the SLC linac and damping rings, precise control of the linac subharmonic buncher and the damping ring RF is required. Recently several companies have developed resettable GaAs master/slave D-type flip-flops which are capable of operating at frequencies of 3 GHz and higher. Using these digital devices as frequency dividers, one can phase shift the SLAC CW-RF systems to optimize the timing for filling the storage rings. We have evaluated the performance of integrated circuits from two vendors for our particular application. Using microstrip circuit techniques, we have built and operated in the accelerator several chassis to synchronize a reset signal from the storage rings to the SLAC 2.856 GHz RF and to phase shift divide-by-four and divide-by-sixteen frequency dividers to the nearest 350 psec bucket required for filling. 4 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Control and RF-transmission in the ECW system on TEXTOR-94

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobbe, N.J.; Sterk, A.B.; Kruisbergen, R.P.J.J.M.; Kruyt, O.G.; Bestebreurtje, M.E.; Prins, P.R.; Hoekzema, J.A.; Grift, A.F. van der; Elzendoorn, B.S.Q.

    2001-01-01

    A real-time and multitasking control system has been developed for the new ECW system on the TEXTOR tokamak. It allows the system to be remotely controlled by client/server application. A quasi-optical transmission line has been installed which uses confocal mirrors and can be used for different frequencies (>100 GHz). It is suitable for transmission of up to two RF beams from different sources to the plasma. The launcher is mounted in a main horizontal port and injects a focused beam with a spot size of 2 cm (at 110 GHz) near the plasma axis. The launcher is steerable independently in the toroidal and poloidal directions

  13. Control and RF-transmission in the ECW system on TEXTOR-94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobbe, N.J.; Sterk, A.B. E-mail: sterk@rijnh.nl; Kruisbergen, R.P.J.J.M.; Kruyt, O.G.; Bestebreurtje, M.E.; Prins, P.R.; Hoekzema, J.A.; Grift, A.F. van der; Elzendoorn, B.S.Q

    2001-10-01

    A real-time and multitasking control system has been developed for the new ECW system on the TEXTOR tokamak. It allows the system to be remotely controlled by client/server application. A quasi-optical transmission line has been installed which uses confocal mirrors and can be used for different frequencies (>100 GHz). It is suitable for transmission of up to two RF beams from different sources to the plasma. The launcher is mounted in a main horizontal port and injects a focused beam with a spot size of 2 cm (at 110 GHz) near the plasma axis. The launcher is steerable independently in the toroidal and poloidal directions.

  14. IEN Low-level-radioactive waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, A.C.S. da; Pina, J.L.S.; Silva, S. da; Silva, J.J.G.

    1986-01-01

    The control, treatment and disposal of the low-level radioactive waste produced in the units of IEN-CNEN, in Brazil are presented, in details. These wastes are generated from a particle accelerator (CV-28 cyclotron), radiochemistry laboratories and a nuclear research reactor (Argonaut type). (Author) [pt

  15. Radiological (MRI and Biochemical effects of Low Level LASER therapy in chronic Osteo arthritis in Al-Kharj, Saudi Arabia: A Randomized Control Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Nambi S

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is one of the degenerative diseases and Low level laser therapy (LLLT has been prescribed as nonoperative treatment in physiotherapy. But the available evidences of finding the radiological and biochemical effectiveness of LLLT are very few. So, the purpose of this study is to find the radiological and biochemical effect of Low level laser therapy (LLLT in the treatment of Osteoarthritis. 34 subjects who fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria were divided into two groups (Active Laser group – ALG & Placebo Laser group - PLG with randomized sampling method. ALG was treated with active laser head, whereas PLG treated same like ALG but without emission of energy. Both groups were applied with kinesio tape for 4 weeks. The frequency of the treatment was three times per week for 4 weeks in both groups. Subjects were assessed at baseline, 4th and 8th week. Contact area (mm2 – medial & lateral and cartilage thickness (percentage - medial & lateral was measured by Magnetic resonance image (MRI and CTX-II (μmg/mmol was measured by urine analysis. A statistically significant (p ≤0.05 difference between both groups were noted at the period of 8 week for contact area (lateral and CTX-II and insignificant (p ≥ 0.05 difference in contact area (medial and cartilage thickness (medial & lateral were noted. In conclusion, the low level laser therapy is helpful in modifying the biochemical components and leads to make changes in the cartilage which subsequently improve the quality of life of OA patients.

  16. Dead beat filling and feedforward rf control for the spallation neutron source SNQ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, D.

    1982-01-01

    For the 1.1 GeV-100 mA Spallation Neutron Source SNQ operation costs and beam losses ask for the possible potential of rf control improvements. Two novel methods are investigated. First, in order to increase the overall rf efficiency, the cavity field is built up as fast as possible in the open loop state of feedback control and in detuned position of the cavity in such a manner that the cavity with beam is matched to the generator. It is shown that this requires the simulataneous application of a generator amplitude and a generator phase step. Secondly, a feedforward control system is proposed, which reduces the amplitude and phase control error caused by an arbitrary beam transient into the limits of +-0.1% and +-0.1 0 and maintains these error limits also in the presence of parameter drift. This is done by an adaptive parameter adjustment procedure using a digital model of the control system. The system structure and a promising digital simulation are discussed

  17. Low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaren, L.H.

    1983-03-01

    This bibliography contains information on low-level radioactive waste included in the Department of Energy's Energy Data Base for January through December 1982. The abstracts are grouped by subject category as shown in the table of contents. Entries in the subject index also facilitate access by subject, e.g., Low-Level Radioactive Wastes/Transport. Within each category the arrangement is by report number for reports, followed by nonreports in reverse chronological order. These citations are to research reports, journal articles, books, patents, theses, and conference papers from worldwide sources. Five indexes, each proceded by a brief description, are provided: Corporate Author, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number. 492 references

  18. Low level photoneutron detection equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Changsong; Zhang Yuqin; Li Yuansui

    1991-01-01

    A low level photoneutron detection equipment has been developed. The photoneutrons produced by interaction of 226 Ra gamma quanta and deutron (D) target are detected with n-n discrimination detector made up of 3 He proportional counter array. The D-content information in the target can be obtained from the measured photoneutron counts. The equipment developed is mainly used for nondestructive D-content measurement of D-devices

  19. Experience with the New Digital RF Control System at the CESR Storage Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Liepe, Matthias; Dobbins, John; Kaplan, Roger; Strohman, Charles R; Stuhl, Benjamin K

    2005-01-01

    A new digital control system has been developed, providing great flexibility, high computational power and low latency for a wide range of control and data acquisition applications. This system is now installed in the CESR storage ring and stabilizes the vector sum field of two of the superconducting CESR 500 MHz cavities and the output power from the driving klystron. The installed control system includes in-house developed digital and RF hardware, very fast feedback and feedforward control, a state machine for automatic start-up and trip recovery, cw and pulsed mode operation, fast quench detection, and cavity frequency control. Several months of continuous operation have proven high reliability of the system. The achieved field stability surpasses requirements.

  20. R and D of control system of compact self-bunching RF gun test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang Jian; Pei Yuanji; Huang Guirong; Wang Jinxiang

    2010-01-01

    An experimental device was recently constructed for testing the beam characteristics of a compact self-bunching RF gun at the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. It designs an independent monitor and control system for the experimental device so as not to disturb the operation of 200MeV LINAC. According to the three-level architecture of a general control scheme, the proposed system consists of circuits that execute kernel control, photosignal emission/reception, and switch values input/output, respectively. It performs timing control, device status monitoring as well as interlock protection, and it can be remotely operated with the assistance of PC software. Testing results show that our system achieves the specified performance and meets the requirement of experimental device stably and reliably. Our proposed system can also be applied to control other small-scale accelerators. (authors)

  1. THE Low-level Radio Frequency System for the superconducting cavities of National Synchrotron Light Source II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, H.; Rose, J.; Holub, B.; Cupolo, J.; Oliva, J.; Sikora, R.; Yeddulla, M.

    2011-01-01

    A digital low-level radio frequency (LLRF) field controller has been developed for the storage ring of The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II). The primary performance goal for the LLRF is to support the required RF operation of the superconducting cavities with a beam current of 500mA and a 0.14 degree or better RF phase stability. The digital field controller is FPGA-based, in a standard format 19-inch/I-U chassis. It has an option of high-level control support with MATLAB running on a local host computer through a USB2.0 port. The field controller has been field tested with the high-power superconducting RF (SRF) at Canadian light Source, and successfully stored a high beam current of 250 mA. The test results show that required specifications for the cavity RF field stability are met. This digital field controller is also currently being used as a development platform for other functional modules in the NSLS-II RF systems.

  2. Microprocessor-based control for independently-phased RF linac cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    A microprocessor based system has been built to control the RF amplifiers associated with independently phased linac cavities. The system has an 8080A at each amplifier station, together with associated ROM, RAM, I/O, etc. At a central NOVA 3 computer an additional 8080A system is incorporated in the interface to the NOVA I/O bus. The NOVA interface is connected by a bus of eighteen twisted pairs to each amplifier station, providing bilateral transmission between each station and the NOVA. The system architecture, bus protocol, and operating characteristics are described

  3. The rf control and detection system for PACO the parametric converter detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard, P; Parodi, R; Picasso, Emilio; Bernard, Ph.

    2000-01-01

    In this technical note the rf control and detection system for a detector of small harmonic displacements based on two coupled microwave cavities (PACO) is presented. The basic idea underlying this detector is the principle of parametric power conversion between two resonant modes of the system, stimulated by the (small) harmonic modulation of one system parameter. In this experiment we change the cavity length applying an harmonic voltage to a piezo-electric crystal. The system can achieve a great sensitivity to small harmonic displacements and can be an interesting candidate for the detection of small, mechanically coupled, interactions (e.g. high frequency gravitational waves).

  4. The amplitude and phase control of the ALS Storage Ring RF System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, C.C.; Taylor, B.; Baptiste, K.

    1995-03-01

    A 500MHz, 300KW Klystron power amplifier provides RF power to the ALS Storage Ring. In order to accommodate the amplitude and phase changes during beam stacking and decay, which demand continuously varying power levels from the Klystron, four loops are used to keep the system operating properly, with two of those loops dedicated to keeping the two cavity tuners on tune. Description of the control loops and their performance data will be given. Using the modulation anode of the Klystron in the amplitude loop will be discussed

  5. System control and data acquisition of the two new FWCD RF systems at DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, T.E.; Allen, J.C.; Cary, W.P. Petty, C.C.

    1995-10-01

    The Fast Wave Current Drive (FWCD) system at DIII-D has increased its available radio frequency (RF) power capabilities with the addition of two new high power transmitters along with their associated transmission line systems. A Sun Sparc-10 workstation, functioning as the FWCD operator console, is being used to control transmitter operating parameters and transmission line tuning parameters, along with acquiring data and making data available for integration into the DIII-D data acquisition system. Labview, a graphical user interface application, is used to manage and control the above processes. This paper will discuss the three primary branches of the FWCD computer control system: transmitter control, transmission line tuning control, and FWCD data acquisition. The main control program developed uses VXI, GPIB, CAMAC, Serial, and Ethernet protocols to blend the three branches together into one cohesive system. The control of the transmitters utilizes VXI technology to communicate with the transmitter's digital interface. A GPIB network allows for communication with various instruments and CAMAC crate controllers. CAMAC crates are located at each phase-shifter/stub-tuner station and are used to digitize transmission line parameters along with transmission line fault detection during RF transmission. The phase-shifter/stub-tuner stations are located through out the DIII-D facility and are controlled from the FWCD operator console via the workstation's Serial port. The Sun workstation has an Ethernet connection allowing for the utilization of the DIII-D data acquisition open-quotes Open Systemclose quotes architecture and of course providing communication with the rest of the world

  6. On active disturbance rejection based control design for superconducting RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent, John; Morris, Dan; Usher, Nathan [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Gao, Zhiqiang, E-mail: z.gao@csuohio.edu [Center for Advanced Control Technologies, Fenn College of Engineering, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH 44115-2214 (United States); Zhao Shen; Nicoletti, Achille; Zheng Qinling [Center for Advanced Control Technologies, Fenn College of Engineering, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH 44115-2214 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are key components of modern linear particle accelerators. The National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) is building a 3 MeV/u re-accelerator (ReA3) using SRF cavities. Lightly loaded SRF cavities have very small bandwidths (high Q) making them very sensitive to mechanical perturbations whether external or self-induced. Additionally, some cavity types exhibit mechanical responses to perturbations that lead to high-order non-stationary transfer functions resulting in very complex control problems. A control system that can adapt to the changing perturbing conditions and transfer functions of these systems would be ideal. This paper describes the application of a control technique known as 'Active Disturbance Rejection Control' (ARDC) to this problem.

  7. Low-level Radioactive waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This meeting describes low-level radioactive waste management problems and contains 8 papers: 1 Low-level radioactive waste management: exemption concept and criteria used by international organizations. 2 Low-level radioactive waste management: french and foreign regulations 3 Low-level radioactive waste management in EDF nuclear power plants (FRANCE) 4 Low-level radioactive waste management in COGEMA (FRANCE) 5 Importance of low-level radioactive wastes in dismantling strategy in CEA (FRANCE) 6 Low-level radioactive waste management in hospitals 7 Low-level radioactive waste disposal: radiation protection laws 8 Methods of low-level radioactive materials measurements during reactor dismantling or nuclear facilities demolition (FRANCE)

  8. Low level radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaz, J.; Chren, O.

    2015-01-01

    The Mochovce National Radwaste Repository is a near surface multi-barrier disposal facility for disposal of processed low and very low level radioactive wastes (radwastes) resulting from the operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities situated in the territory of the Slovak Republic and from research institutes, laboratories, hospitals and other institutions (institutional RAW) which are in compliance with the acceptance criteria. The basic safety requirement of the Repository is to avoid a radioactive release to the environment during its operation and institutional inspection. This commitment is covered by the protection barrier system. The method of solution designed and implemented at the Repository construction complies with the latest knowledge and practice of the repository developments all over the world and meets requirements for the safe radwaste disposal with minimum environmental consequences. All wastes are solidified and have to meet the acceptance criteria before disposal into the Repository. They are processed and treated at the Bohunice RAW Treatment Centre and Liquid RAW Final Treatment Facility at Mochovce. The disposal facility for low level radwastes consists of two double-rows of reinforced concrete vaults with total capacity 7 200 fibre reinforced concrete containers (FCCs) with RAW. One double-row contains 40 The operation of the Repository was started in year 2001 and after ten years, in 2011 was conducted the periodic assessment of nuclear safety with positive results. Till the end of year 2014 was disposed to the Repository 11 514 m 3 RAW. The analysis of total RAW production from operation and decommissioning of all nuclear installation in SR, which has been carried out in frame of the BIDSF project C9.1, has showed that the total volume estimation of conditioned waste is 108 thousand m 3 of which 45.5 % are low level waste (LLW) and 54,5 % very low level waste (VLLW). On the base of this fact there is the need to build 7

  9. Evaluation of muscle activity, bite force and salivary cortisol in children with bruxism before and after low level laser applied to acupoints: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgueiro, Mônica da Consolação Canuto; Bortoletto, Carolina Carvalho; Horliana, Anna Carolina RattoTempestini; Mota, Ana Carolina Costa; Motta, Lara Jansiski; Motta, Pamella de Barros; MesquitaFerrari, Raquel Agnelli; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil

    2017-08-08

    Bruxism is a repetitive activity that causes tooth wear, audible sounds, and discomfort. Preventive measures have been studied for conditions that can exert a negative influence on physiological development in children. Low-level laser therapy administered over acupoints is an effective, painless, low-cost treatment option that has achieved good results. Thus, the aim of the proposed study is to evaluate changes in muscle activity, bite force and salivary cortisol in children with bruxism after the application of low-level laser to accupoints. The children will be randomly allocated to four groups of 19 individuals: G1 - low-level laser; G2 - occlusal splint; G3 - placebo laser; and G4 - control (without bruxism). The BTS TMJOINT electromyography will be used to determine muscle activity and a digital gnathodynamometer will be used to measure bite force. Salivary cortisol will be analysed at baseline as well as one and six months after treatment. Two-way ANOVA will be employed and complemented by Tukey's test. Bruxism is a repetitive activity of the masticatory muscles that can have negative consequences if not treated, such as tooth wear, noises, discomfort and anxiety. Thus, control and treatment measures should be taken. Although low-level laser therapy over acupoints has been indicated for children, the effects of this treatment modality have not yet been studied. NCT02757261 on 8 April 2016. This study protocol received a grant from the Brazilian fostering agency São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP: #2015/24731-0).

  10. A digital signal processor based rf control system for the TRIUMF ISAC RFQ prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, K.; Fang, S.; Laverty, M.

    1996-01-01

    A stand alone digital signal processor is used to control the RFQ prototype in the TRIUMF ISAC development program. The advantage of a digital control system over the traditional analogue system is that it offers the higher degree of flexibility necessary for a development system. For this application the system is designed to have the outward appearance of an analogue system, and uses dials, knobs, and switches as the operator interface. The digital signal processor is used as a feedback controller during CW rf operation, with the feedback gain parameters continually adjustable. It is also able to perform the same regulation during pulsed operation, with additional feedforward compensation for initial pulse on duration. Using a low cost analogue-to-digital converter with a sample rate of 100 kHz, a regulation bandwidth of 10 kHz is achieved. (author)

  11. Low level radiation: biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loken, M.K.

    1983-01-01

    It is imperative that physicians and scientists using radiations in health care delivery continue to assess the benefits derived, vs. potential risk, to patients and radiation workers being exposed to radiation in its various forms as part of our health delivery system. Insofar as possible we should assure our patients and ourselves that the benefits outweigh the potential hazards involved. Inferences as to the possible biological effects of low level radiation are generally based on extrapolations from those effects observed and measured following acute exposures to considerably higher doses of radiation. Thus, in order to shed light on the question of the possible biological effects of low level radiation, a wide variety of studies have been carried out using cells in culture and various species of plant and animal life. This manuscript makes reference to some of those studies with indications as to how and why the studies were done and the conclusions that might be drawn there from. In addition reference is made to the handling of this information by scientists, by environmentalists, and by the news media. Unfortunately, in many instances the public has been misled by what has been said and/or written. It is hoped that this presentation will provide an understandable and reasonable perspective on the various appropriate uses of radiation in our lives and how such uses do provide significant improvement in our health and in our quality of life

  12. Low level of regulatory T cells and maintenance of balance between regulatory T cells and TH17 cells in HIV-1-infected elite controllers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Lea; Benfield, Thomas Lars; Mens, Helene

    2011-01-01

    A subgroup of HIV-1-infected individuals, elite controllers, have spontaneous viral control and offer an exceptional opportunity to study virological and immunolocigal factors of possible involvement in control of HIV-1 infection....

  13. Design and development of RF system for vertical test stand for characterization of superconducting RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohania, Praveen; Rajput, Vikas; Baxy, Deodatta; Agrawal, Ankur; Mahawar, Ashish; Adarsh, Kunver; Singh, Pratap; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2011-01-01

    RRCAT is developing a Vertical Test Stand (VTS) to test and qualify 1.3 GHz/650 MHz, SCRF Cavities in collaboration with Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) under Indian Institutions' Fermilab Collaboration. The technical details for VTS is being provided by FNAL, USA. The RF System of VTS needs to provide stable RF power to SCRF cavity with control of amplitude, relative phase and frequency. The incident, reflected, transmitted power and field decay time constant of the cavity are measured to evaluate cavity performance parameters (E, Qo). RF Power is supplied via 500 W Solid State amplifier, 1270-1310 MHz being developed by PHPMS, RRCAT. VTS system is controlled by PXI Platform and National Instruments LabVIEW software. Low Level RF (LLRF) system is used to track the cavity frequency using Phase Locked Loop (PLL). The system is comprised of several integrated functional modules which would be assembled, optimized, and tested separately. Required components and instruments have been identified and procurement for the same is underway. Inhouse development for the Solid State RF amplifier and instrument interfacing is in progress. This paper describes the progress on the development of the RF system for VTS. (author)

  14. Understanding low-level radioactive waste. National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    Chapters are devoted to: background and policymaking for low-level waste management; commercial low-level waste generation; Department of Energy low-level waste generation; low-level waste treatment; packaging and transportation; commercial low-level waste disposal; Department of Energy low-level waste disposal; Department of Energy low-level waste management program; and laws and regulations

  15. Low level laser therapy for concurrent chemoradiotherapy induced oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients – A triple blinded randomized controlled trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautam, Ajay Prashad; Fernandes, Donald J.; Vidyasagar, Mamidipudi S.; Maiya, Arun G.; Vadhiraja, Bejadi M.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: Oral mucositis (OM) is most cumbersome acute side effect of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for head and neck cancer (HNC). OM associated pain affects oral functions and nutrition of the patient that may result in discontinuity of treatment. Several modalities have been tried to prevent and treat OM, but none proved completely successful until date. We used prophylactic low level laser therapy (LLLT) for the prevention and treatment of CCRT induced OM. Materials and methods: In this triple blinded study, 221 HNC patients scheduled to undergo CCRT (Cisplatin (1, 22, 43 day) + RT = 66 Grays (2 Gy/fraction), 33 fractions, 5 fractions/week, for 45 days) were block randomized into laser (n = 111) and placebo (n = 110) group. Laser group received LLLT (HeNe, λ = 632.8 nm, power-density = 24 mW, dosage = 3.0 J/point, total dosage/session = 36–40 J, spot-size = 1 cm 2 , 5 sessions/week) while placebo received sham treatment daily prior to radiation. OM (RTOG/EORTC Scale), oral pain (VAS), dysphagia (FIS), weight loss and CCRT break were assessed. Data were analyzed using frequencies and percentage, generalized estimating equations (GEE) and odds ratio. Results: There was significant reduction in incidence of severe OM (F = 16.64, df = 8876, p < 0.0001) and its associated pain (F = 25.06, df = 8876, p < 0.0001), dysphagia (F = 20.17, df = 8876, p < 0.0001) and opioid analgesics use (p < 0.0001) in laser than placebo group patients. Conclusions: LLLT decreased the incidence of CCRT induced severe OM and its associated pain, dysphagia and opioid analgesics use.

  16. Low-level radwaste solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naughton, M.D.; Miller, C.C.; Nelson, R.A.; Tucker, R.F.

    1983-01-01

    This paper reports on a study of ''Advanced Low-Level Radioactive Waste Treatment Systems'' conducted under an EPRI contract. The object of the study is to identify advanced lowlevel radwaste treatment systems that are commercially available or are expected to be in the near future. The current state-ofthe-art in radwaste solidification technology is presented. Related processing technologies, such as the compaction of dry active waste (DAW), containers available for radwaste disposal, and the regulatory aspects of radwaste transportation and solidification, are described. The chemical and physical properties of the currently acceptable solidification agents, as identified in the Barnwell radwaste burial site license, are examined. The solidification agents investigated are hydraulic cements, thermoplastic polymers, and thermosetting polymers. It is concluded that solidification processes are complex and depend not only on the chemical and physical properties of the binder material and the waste, but also on how these materials are mixed

  17. Real-time cavity simulator-based low-level radio-frequency test bench and applications for accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Feng; Michizono, Shinichiro; Miura, Takako; Matsumoto, Toshihiro; Liu, Na; Wibowo, Sigit Basuki

    2018-03-01

    A Low-level radio-frequency (LLRF) control systems is required to regulate the rf field in the rf cavity used for beam acceleration. As the LLRF system is usually complex, testing of the basic functions or control algorithms of this system in real time and in advance of beam commissioning is strongly recommended. However, the equipment necessary to test the LLRF system, such as superconducting cavities and high-power rf sources, is very expensive; therefore, we have developed a field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based cavity simulator as a substitute for real rf cavities. Digital models of the cavity and other rf systems are implemented in the FPGA. The main components include cavity baseband models for the fundamental and parasitic modes, a mechanical model of the Lorentz force detuning, and a model of the beam current. Furthermore, in our simulator, the disturbance model used to simulate the power-supply ripples and microphonics is also carefully considered. Based on the presented cavity simulator, we have established an LLRF system test bench that can be applied to different cavity operational conditions. The simulator performance has been verified by comparison with real cavities in KEK accelerators. In this paper, the development and implementation of this cavity simulator is presented first, and the LLRF test bench based on the presented simulator is constructed. The results are then compared with those for KEK accelerators. Finally, several LLRF applications of the cavity simulator are illustrated.

  18. Real-time cavity simulator-based low-level radio-frequency test bench and applications for accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Qiu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A Low-level radio-frequency (LLRF control systems is required to regulate the rf field in the rf cavity used for beam acceleration. As the LLRF system is usually complex, testing of the basic functions or control algorithms of this system in real time and in advance of beam commissioning is strongly recommended. However, the equipment necessary to test the LLRF system, such as superconducting cavities and high-power rf sources, is very expensive; therefore, we have developed a field-programmable gate array (FPGA-based cavity simulator as a substitute for real rf cavities. Digital models of the cavity and other rf systems are implemented in the FPGA. The main components include cavity baseband models for the fundamental and parasitic modes, a mechanical model of the Lorentz force detuning, and a model of the beam current. Furthermore, in our simulator, the disturbance model used to simulate the power-supply ripples and microphonics is also carefully considered. Based on the presented cavity simulator, we have established an LLRF system test bench that can be applied to different cavity operational conditions. The simulator performance has been verified by comparison with real cavities in KEK accelerators. In this paper, the development and implementation of this cavity simulator is presented first, and the LLRF test bench based on the presented simulator is constructed. The results are then compared with those for KEK accelerators. Finally, several LLRF applications of the cavity simulator are illustrated.

  19. Low-level radioactive waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishihara, T [Radioactive Waste Management Center, Tokyo (Japan)

    1980-08-01

    In the development and utilization of nuclear energy, variety of radioactive wastes arise. A largest part is low level radioactive wastes. In Japan, they are concentrated and solidified, and stored in drums. However, no low level wastes have yet been finally disposed of; there are now about 260,000 drums of such wastes stored on the sites. In Japan, the land is narrow, and its structure is geologically unstable, so that the sea disposal is sought. On the other hand, the development of technology for the ground disposal has lagged behind the sea disposal until recently because of the law concerned. The following matters are described: for the sea disposal, preparatory technology studies, environment safety assessment, administrative measures, and international control; for the ground disposal, experiments, surveys, disposal site selection, and the concept of island repositories.

  20. RF System description for the ground test accelerator radio-frequency quadrupole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regan, A.H.; Brittain, D.; Rees, D.E.; Ziomek, D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the RF system being used to provide RF power and to control the cavity field for the ground test accelerator (GTA) radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ). The RF system consists of a low-level RF (LLRF) control system, and RF Reference generation subsystem, and a tetrode as a high-power amplifier (HPA) that can deliver up to 300 kW of peak power to the RFQ cavity at a 2% duty factor. The LLRF control system implements in-phase and quadrature (I and Q) control to maintain the cavity field within tolerances of 0.5% in amplitude and 0.5 degrees in phase in the presence of beam-induced instabilities

  1. Low power rf system for the ALS Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, C.C.; Taylor, B.; Lancaster, H.

    1991-05-01

    The Linear Accelerator (Linac) in the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is designed to provide either single or multiple bunchers of 50 MeV electrons for the booster synchrotron. Three cavities are used in the Linac for electron bunching. The two subharmonic bunching cavities operate at 124.914 MHz and 499.654 MHz respectively. The S Band buncher operates at 2.997924 GHz. The low level RF system includes a master signal source, RF burst generators, signal phase control, timing trigger generators and a water temperature control system. The design and performance of the system will be described. 7 refs., 3 figs

  2. Effect of low-frequency ambient magnetic fields on the control unit and RF head of a commercial SQUID magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    The control unit and RF head of the SHE model 330XRFSQUID system are shown to be sensitive to ambient ac magnetic fields below 1 HZ, which cause the appearance of false signals corresponding to a magnetometer signal of 0.000001 phi(0) per gauss of field applied. The control unit shows a sensitivity that is linear with frequency, suggesting that the signal is generated by Faraday induction. In contrast, the RF head response is independent of frequency and shows a strong second-harmonic coversion. This response may be due to the magnetic field sensitivity of the ferrite core inductor in the tuned amplifier of the RF head. These signals induced by ambient fields are a potential source of error in Stanford's Relativity Gyroscope experiment, which uses SQUID's on board a rolling satellite as part of the gyroscope readout system. The extent of the magnetic field sensitivity in these components necessitates the use of additional magnetic shielding aboard the satellite.

  3. Control of hydrocarbon radicals and film deposition by using an RF Whistler wave discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mieno, Tetsu; Shoji, Tatsuo; Kadota, Kiyoshi.

    1991-10-01

    Production of hydrocarbon radicals is controlled by using an RF Whistler wave discharge in a low pressure region (∼0.1 Pa). Plasma density of 10 10 - 10 13 cm -3 , electron temperature of 2-20 eV is obtained for the discharge of admixture of Ar and small content of source gases (CH 4 , C 2 H 2 , CO). Spectroscopic measurement indicates that densities of CH and H radicals and deposition rate of amorphous carbon:H film increase with electron density, electron temperature and source gas pressure. The etching effect of H atoms influences on the deposition rate and a high deposition rate (90 μm/hr for CO/Ar discharge) is obtained even in a low neutral pressure discharge. (author)

  4. Design and development of embedded control system for high power RF test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nageswara Rao, J.; Badapanda, M.K.; Upadhyay, Rinki; Tripathi, Akhilesh; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2013-01-01

    Design and development of an embedded control system for the control, interlock and operation of 1MW, 352.2 MHz TH2089 klystron based RF test facility. The key components of the control system are NI compact Re configurable Input Output (cRIO) system and Windows based PC. The cRIO system's rugged hardware architecture includes a 1.06 GHz Dual-Core embedded controller with Real Time (RT) Operating System, a reconfigurable Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) chassis for custom I/O timing, control and processing; and I/O modules. Windows based Graphical User Interface (GUI) has been developed to guide the user through start-up procedure, to set the operating parameters and also to display the status information of all the signals. The application software for data logging and publishing of the acquired data namely set, read back and status signals of auxiliary power supplies and machine safety interlocks has been developed in LabVIEW RT module and is running on embedded controller. Machine safety interlock logic has been implemented in FPGA to meet the time criticality. (author)

  5. Effect of Low-level LASER Therapy on P6 Acupoint to Control Gag Reflex in Children: A Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himani Goel

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: LLLT on PC6 point was found to be effective in lowering anxiety levels as observed by faces modified anxiety rating scale. Further, it was authenticated as the pulse rates were significantly reduced and oxygen saturation levels were significantly increased. Also, gag reflex was significantly controlled when LASER stimulation was done at PC6.

  6. Effect of low-level laser therapy in the treatment of cochlear tinnitus: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehkordi, Mahboobeh Adami; Einolghozati, Sasan; Ghasemi, Seyyed Mohsen; Abolbashari, Samaneh; Meshkat, Mojtaba; Behzad, Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Many treatments for chronic tinnitus have been attempted, but the condition remains difficult to cure, especially in the case of cochlear tinnitus. We conducted a prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled study to assess the effect of low-dose laser therapy on chronic cochlear tinnitus. Our study population was made up of 66 patients-33 who received active laser treatment (case group) and 33 who received inactive dummy treatment (control group). Patients in the laser group received 5 mV with a wavelength of 650 nm for 20 minutes a day, 5 days a week, for 4 weeks. The controls followed the same schedule, but they were "treated" with an inactive device. The degree of tinnitus was evaluated before and after treatment in each group in three ways: (1) the Tinnitus Severity Index (TSI), (2) a subjective 10-point self-assessment scale for tinnitus loudness, and (3) the Tinnitus Evaluation Test (TET). At study's end, we found no statistically significant differences between the case and control groups in the number of patients who experienced a reduction in TSI values (p = 0.589) or a reduction in subjective self-assessment scores (p = 0.475). Nor did we find any significant reductions in the loudness (p = 0.665) and frequency (p = 0.396) of tinnitus as determined by the TET. We conclude that 5-mV laser therapy with a wavelength of 650 nm is no better than placebo for improving hearing thresholds overall or for treating tinnitus with regard to age, sex, environmental noise level, and the duration of tinnitus.

  7. Low levels of 17-β-oestradiol, oestrone and testosterone correlate with severe evaporative dysfunctional tear syndrome in postmenopausal women: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliano, Caterina; Caruso, Salvatore; Napolitano, Giuseppe; Malaguarnera, Giulia; Cicinelli, Maria Vittoria; Amato, Roberta; Reibaldi, Michele; Incarbone, Giuseppe; Bucolo, Claudio; Drago, Filippo; Avitabile, Teresio

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the role of 17-β-oestradiol, oestrone and total testosterone (TT) deficiency in the pathogenesis of severe evaporative dry eye syndrome (DES), investigating the relationship between tear osmolarity, tear film break-up time (TF-BUT), Schirmer test and serum sex hormones in postmenopausal women. 44 postmenopausal women were recruited for a case-control study: 22 women with severe evaporative DES (Group A) and 22 without DES (Group B). The tests performed included laboratory blood analysis: fasting plasma profile (17-β-oestradiol, oestrone and TT), glucose level and lipid profile. Detailed eye examinations, including corneal and conjunctival staining, tear osmolarity measurement, tear volume and TF-BUT, were performed. The Ocular Surface Disease Index Questionnaire was also administered. Values of Schirmer test and TF-BUT in Group A were significantly lower in comparison with Group B (p<0.001). Serum levels of 17-β-oestradiol, oestrone and TT were significantly lower in Group A compared with Group B (p<0.05). In women with severe evaporative DES, the levels of 17-β-oestradiol, oestrone and TT were inversely correlated with the tear film osmolarity (r=-0.7, -0.88, -0.81, respectively). In postmenopausal women with severe evaporative DES, sex hormone levels are lower than control and that tear osmolarity is negatively correlated with sex hormone levels.

  8. IEN low-level radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, A.C.S. da; Pina, J.L.S.; Silva, S. da; Silva, J.J.G.

    1986-09-01

    The low-level radioactive waste produced in Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear is generated basically from three distinct modes: a particle accelerator (CV-28 Cyclotron), radiochemistry laboratories and the operation of a nuclear research reactor (Argonaut type). In the Cyclotron unit, all water flow from hot labs as well as from the decontamination laundry is retained in special tank with homogenizing system and a remote control, that signalizes when the tank gets a pre-specified level. Samples homogenized from the tank are colected for previous analysis. (Author) [pt

  9. Can low-level radiation cause cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trosko, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    Health in a multicellular organism is maintained by homeostatic processes. Disruption of these homeostatic controls at the molecular, biochemical, cellular, and organ systems levels can be brought about by irreversible changes in the genetic material (mutagenesis), cell death (cytotoxicity), or reversible changes in the expression of genes at the transcriptional, translational, or posttranslational levels (epigenesis). While radiation is known to induce DNA damage/mutations, cell, death and epigenetic changes, in addition to cancers that are found in radiation-exposed animals, experimentally, and in humans, epidemiologically, the question is, At low-level exposure, what is the risk that cancers are open-quotes causedclose quotes by the radiation?

  10. The Spallation Neutron Source RF Reference System

    CERN Document Server

    Piller, Maurice; Crofford, Mark; Doolittle, Lawrence; Ma, Hengjie

    2005-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) RF Reference System includes the master oscillator (MO), local oscillator(LO) distribution, and Reference RF distribution systems. Coherent low noise Reference RF signals provide the ability to control the phase relationships between the fields in the front-end and linear accelerator (linac) RF cavity structures. The SNS RF Reference System requirements, implementation details, and performance are discussed.

  11. Can low-level laser therapy (LLLT) associated with an aerobic plus resistance training change the cardiometabolic risk in obese women? A placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Fernanda Oliveira; Sene-Fiorese, Marcela; de Aquino Junior, Antonio Eduardo; da Silveira Campos, Raquel Munhoz; Masquio, Deborah Cristina Landi; Tock, Lian; Garcia de Oliveira Duarte, Ana Claudia; Dâmaso, Ana Raimunda; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Obesity is one of the most important link factors to coronary artery disease development mainly due to the pro-inflammatory and pro-thrombotic states favoring atherosclerosis progression. The LLLT acts in the cellular metabolism and it is highly effective to improve inflammation. The same occur in response to different kinds of exercise. However, we have not known the associate effects using LLLT therapies with aerobic plus resistance training as strategy specifically with target at human obesity control and its comorbidities. Investigate the effects of the LLLT associated with aerobic plus resistance training on cardiometabolic risk factors in obese women. Women aged 20-40 years (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)), were divided into 2 groups: Phototherapy (PHOTO) and Placebo. They were trained aerobic plus resistance exercises (in a concurrent mode), 1h, 3 times/week during 16 weeks. Phototherapy was applied after each exercise session for 16 min, with infrared laser, wavelength 808 nm, continuous output, power 100 mW, and energy delivery 50 J. The body composition was measured with bioimpedance. Inflammatory mark concentrations were measured using a commercially available multiplex. LLLT associated with aerobic plus resistance training was effective in decrease neck (P=0.0003) and waist circumferences (P=0.02); percentual of fat (P=0.04); visceral fat area (P=0.02); HOMA-IR (P=0.0009); Leptin (P=0.03) and ICAM (P=0.03). Also, the reduction in leptin (P=0.008) and ICAM-1 (0, 05) was much more expressive in the phototherapy group in comparison to placebo group when analyzed by delta values. LLLT associated with concurrent exercise (aerobic plus resistance training) potentiates the exercise effects of decreasing the cardiometabolic risk factors in obese woman. These results suggest the LLLT associated with exercises as a new therapeutic tool in the control of obesity and its comorbidities for obese people, targeting to optimize the strategies to control the cardiometabolic risk

  12. Conversion of a whole-body counter into a low-level whole-body scanning system controlled by a process computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamann, C.M.

    1976-01-01

    The report outlines the status of a research project in which a whole body counter with fixed geometries is converted into a scanning type system. The purpose of the project is the development of an adaptive system controlled by a process computer. The home-made scanning mechanics is explained, and a description is given of the advantages and the problems inherent in the application of step motors. For economic reasons no CAMAC system was purchased; instead, interfaces from and to the computer were designed which allowed the process periphery to be connected and operated. The inexpensive and relatively simple home-made designs are outlined; the example quoted refers to the conversion of a teletype output into a fast electronic data interface. (orig./ORU) [de

  13. Molecular inspired models for prediction and control of directional FSO/RF wireless networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorca, Jaime; Milner, Stuart D.; Davis, Christopher C.

    2010-08-01

    Directional wireless networks using FSO and RF transmissions provide wireless backbone support for mobile communications in dynamic environments. The heterogeneous and dynamic nature of such networks challenges their robustness and requires self-organization mechanisms to assure end-to-end broadband connectivity. We developed a framework based on the definition of a potential energy function to characterize robustness in communication networks and the study of first and second order variations of the potential energy to provide prediction and control strategies for network performance optimization. In this paper, we present non-convex molecular potentials such as the Morse Potential, used to describe the potential energy of bonds within molecules, for the characterization of communication links in the presence of physical constraints such as the power available at the network nodes. The inclusion of the Morse Potential translates into adaptive control strategies where forces on network nodes drive the release, retention or reconfiguration of communication links for network performance optimization. Simulation results show the effectiveness of our self-organized control mechanism, where the physical topology reorganizes to maximize the number of source to destination communicating pairs. Molecular Normal Mode Analysis (NMA) techniques for assessing network performance degradation in dynamic networks are also presented. Preliminary results show correlation between peaks in the eigenvalues of the Hessian of the network potential and network degradation.

  14. Summary of the 3rd workshop on high power RF-systems for accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigg, P.K.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this workshop was to bring together experts from the field of CW and high average power RF systems. The focus was on operational and reliability issues of high-power amplifiers using klystrons and tubes, large power supplies; as well as cavity design and low-level RF and feedback control systems. All these devices are used in synchrotron radiation facilities, high power linacs and collider rings, and cyclotrons. Furthermore, new technologies and their applications were introduced, amongst other: high power solid state amplifiers, IOT amplifiers, and high voltage power supplies employing solid state controllers/crowbars. Numerical methods for complete rf-field modeling of complex RF structures like cyclotrons were presented, as well as integrated RF-cavity designs (electro-magnetic fields and mechanical structure), using numerical methods. (author)

  15. Packaged low-level waste verification system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuite, K.; Winberg, M.R.; McIsaac, C.V. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The Department of Energy through the National Low-Level Waste Management Program and WMG Inc. have entered into a joint development effort to design, build, and demonstrate the Packaged Low-Level Waste Verification System. Currently, states and low-level radioactive waste disposal site operators have no method to independently verify the radionuclide content of packaged low-level waste that arrives at disposal sites for disposition. At this time, the disposal site relies on the low-level waste generator shipping manifests and accompanying records to ensure that low-level waste received meets the site`s waste acceptance criteria. The subject invention provides the equipment, software, and methods to enable the independent verification of low-level waste shipping records to ensure that the site`s waste acceptance criteria are being met. The objective of the prototype system is to demonstrate a mobile system capable of independently verifying the content of packaged low-level waste.

  16. RF Phase Scan for Beam Energy Measurement of KOMAC DTL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hansung; Kwon, Hyeokjung; Kim, Seonggu; Lee, Seokgeun; Cho, Yongsub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The energy gain through the drift tube linac is a function of the synchronous phase, therefore, the output beam energy from DTL can be affected by the RF phase setting in low-level RF (LLRF) system. The DTL at Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC) consists of 11 tanks and the RF phase setting in each tank should be matched for synchronous acceleration in successive tanks. That means a proper setting of RF phase in each DTL tank is critical for efficient and loss-free operation. The matching RF phase can be determined based on the output energy measurement from the DTL tank. The beam energy can be measured by several methods. For example, we can use a bending magnet to determine the beam energy because the higher momentum of beam means the less deflection angle in the fixed magnetic field. By measuring the range of proton beam through a material with known stopping power also can be utilized to determine the beam energy. We used a well-known time-of-flight method to determine the output beam energy from the DTL tank by measuring beam phase with a beam position monitor (BPM). Based on the energy measurement results, proper RF operating point could be obtained. We performed a RF phase scan to determine the output beam energy from KOMAC DTL by using a time-of-flight method and to set RF operating point precisely. The measured beam energy was compared with a beam dynamics simulation and showed a good agreement. RF phase setting is critical issue for the efficient operation of the proton accelerator, we have a plan to implement and integrate the RF phase measurement system into an accelerator control system for future need.

  17. Measured performance of the GTA rf systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denney, P.M.; Jachim, S.P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the performance of the RF systems on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). The RF system architecture is briefly described. Among the RF performance results presented are RF field flatness and stability, amplitude and phase control resolution, and control system bandwidth and stability. The rejection by the RF systems of beam-induced disturbances, such as transients and noise, are analyzed. The observed responses are also compared to computer-based simulations of the RF systems for validation

  18. Development of an automatic frequency control system for an X-band (=9300 MHz) RF electron linear accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Sungsu, E-mail: sscha@kaeri.re.kr [Nuclear Data Center, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yujong; Lee, Byung Cheol [Nuclear Data Center, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyung Dal [Radiation Technology eXcellence(RTX), Daejeon 34025 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Hyun [Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University(SKKU), Suwon 16419 (Korea, Republic of); Buaphad, Pikad [Nuclear Data Center, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Radiation Technology eXcellence(RTX), Daejeon 34025 (Korea, Republic of); Accelerator and Nuclear Fusion Physical Engineering, University of Science and Technology(UST), Daejeon 34113 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-21

    KAERI is developing a 6 MeV X-band radio frequency (RF) electron linear accelerator for medical purposes. The proposed X-band accelerator consists of an e-gun, an accelerating structure, two solenoid magnets, two steering magnets, a magnetron, a modulator, and an automatic frequency control (AFC) system. The accelerating structure of the component consists of oxygen-free high-conductivity copper (OFHC). Therefore, the ambient temperature changes the volume, and the resonance frequency of the accelerating structure also changes. If the RF frequency of a 9300 MHz magnetron and the resonance frequency of the accelerating structure do not match, it can degrade the performance. That is, it will decrease the output power, lower the beam current, decrease the X-ray dose rate, increase the reflection power, and result in unstable operation of the accelerator. Accelerator operation should be possible at any time during all four seasons. To prevent humans from being exposed to radiation when it is operated, the accelerator should also be operable through remote monitoring and remote control. Therefore, the AFC system is designed to meet these requirements; it is configured based on the concept of a phase-locked loop (PLL) model, which includes an RF section, an intermediate frequency (IF) [1-3] section, and a local oscillator (LO) section. Some resonance frequency controllers use a DC motor, chain, and potentiometer to store the position and tune the frequency [4,5]. Our AFC system uses a step motor to tune the RF frequency of the magnetron. The maximum tuning turn number of our magnetron frequency tuning shaft is ten. Since the RF frequency of our magnetron is 9300±25 MHz, it gives 5 MHz (∵±25 MHz/10 turns → 50 MHz/10 turns =5 MHz/turn) frequency tuning per turn. The rotation angle of our step motor is 0.72° per step and the total step number per one rotation is 360°/0.72°=500 steps. Therefore, the tuning range per step is 10 kHz/step (=5 MHz per turn/500 steps per

  19. Development of an automatic frequency control system for an X-band (=9300 MHz) RF electron linear accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Sungsu; Kim, Yujong; Lee, Byung Cheol; Park, Hyung Dal; Lee, Seung Hyun; Buaphad, Pikad

    2017-05-01

    KAERI is developing a 6 MeV X-band radio frequency (RF) electron linear accelerator for medical purposes. The proposed X-band accelerator consists of an e-gun, an accelerating structure, two solenoid magnets, two steering magnets, a magnetron, a modulator, and an automatic frequency control (AFC) system. The accelerating structure of the component consists of oxygen-free high-conductivity copper (OFHC). Therefore, the ambient temperature changes the volume, and the resonance frequency of the accelerating structure also changes. If the RF frequency of a 9300 MHz magnetron and the resonance frequency of the accelerating structure do not match, it can degrade the performance. That is, it will decrease the output power, lower the beam current, decrease the X-ray dose rate, increase the reflection power, and result in unstable operation of the accelerator. Accelerator operation should be possible at any time during all four seasons. To prevent humans from being exposed to radiation when it is operated, the accelerator should also be operable through remote monitoring and remote control. Therefore, the AFC system is designed to meet these requirements; it is configured based on the concept of a phase-locked loop (PLL) model, which includes an RF section, an intermediate frequency (IF) [1-3] section, and a local oscillator (LO) section. Some resonance frequency controllers use a DC motor, chain, and potentiometer to store the position and tune the frequency [4,5]. Our AFC system uses a step motor to tune the RF frequency of the magnetron. The maximum tuning turn number of our magnetron frequency tuning shaft is ten. Since the RF frequency of our magnetron is 9300±25 MHz, it gives 5 MHz (∵±25 MHz/10 turns → 50 MHz/10 turns =5 MHz/turn) frequency tuning per turn. The rotation angle of our step motor is 0.72° per step and the total step number per one rotation is 360°/0.72°=500 steps. Therefore, the tuning range per step is 10 kHz/step (=5 MHz per turn/500 steps per

  20. Development of an automatic frequency control system for an X-band (=9300 MHz) RF electron linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Sungsu; Kim, Yujong; Lee, Byung Cheol; Park, Hyung Dal; Lee, Seung Hyun; Buaphad, Pikad

    2017-01-01

    KAERI is developing a 6 MeV X-band radio frequency (RF) electron linear accelerator for medical purposes. The proposed X-band accelerator consists of an e-gun, an accelerating structure, two solenoid magnets, two steering magnets, a magnetron, a modulator, and an automatic frequency control (AFC) system. The accelerating structure of the component consists of oxygen-free high-conductivity copper (OFHC). Therefore, the ambient temperature changes the volume, and the resonance frequency of the accelerating structure also changes. If the RF frequency of a 9300 MHz magnetron and the resonance frequency of the accelerating structure do not match, it can degrade the performance. That is, it will decrease the output power, lower the beam current, decrease the X-ray dose rate, increase the reflection power, and result in unstable operation of the accelerator. Accelerator operation should be possible at any time during all four seasons. To prevent humans from being exposed to radiation when it is operated, the accelerator should also be operable through remote monitoring and remote control. Therefore, the AFC system is designed to meet these requirements; it is configured based on the concept of a phase-locked loop (PLL) model, which includes an RF section, an intermediate frequency (IF) [1-3] section, and a local oscillator (LO) section. Some resonance frequency controllers use a DC motor, chain, and potentiometer to store the position and tune the frequency [4,5]. Our AFC system uses a step motor to tune the RF frequency of the magnetron. The maximum tuning turn number of our magnetron frequency tuning shaft is ten. Since the RF frequency of our magnetron is 9300±25 MHz, it gives 5 MHz (∵±25 MHz/10 turns → 50 MHz/10 turns =5 MHz/turn) frequency tuning per turn. The rotation angle of our step motor is 0.72° per step and the total step number per one rotation is 360°/0.72°=500 steps. Therefore, the tuning range per step is 10 kHz/step (=5 MHz per turn/500 steps per

  1. RF Energy Compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, Z.D.

    1980-02-01

    The RF Energy Compressor, REC described here, transforms cw rf into periodic pulses using an energy storage cavity, ESC, whose charging is controlled by 180 0 bi-phase modulation, PSK, and external Q switching, βs. Compression efficiency, C/sub e/, of 100% can be approached at any compression factor C/sub f/

  2. Stress-Matched RF and Thermal Control Coatings for Membrane Antennas, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The development of multi-meter diameter radiofrequency (RF) antennas for NASA and DoD will have a significant impact of future space programs. Polymer membrane...

  3. Profile Control by Biased Electrodes in Large Diameter RF Produced Pl asma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Shunjiro; Matsuoka, Norikazu; Yoshinaka, Toshiro

    1998-10-01

    Control of the plasma profile has been carried out, using the voltage biasing method in the large diameter (45 cm) RF (radio frequency) produced plasma in the presence of the uniform magnetic field (less than 1200 G). Under the low filling pressure condition of 0.16 mTorr, changing the biasing voltages to the three individual end plates with concentric circular ring shapes, the radial electron density (about 10^10 cm-3) profile could be changed from the hollow to the peaked one. On the contrary, the nearly flat electron temperature (several eV) profile did not change appreciably. The azimuthal rotation velocity measured by the Mach probe, i.e. directional probe, showed the different radial profiles (but nearly uniform along the axis) depending on the biasing voltage. This velocity became slower with the low magnetic field (less than 200 G) or in the higher pressure regime up to 20 mTorr with the higher electron density. The experimental results by other biasing methods will also be presented.

  4. Controlling the ambipolarity and improvement of RF performance using Gaussian Drain Doped TFET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Kaushal; Gupta, Sarthak; Pandey, Sunil; Kondekar, P. N.; Sharma, Dheeraj

    2018-05-01

    Ambipolar conduction in tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs) has been occurred as an inherent issue due to drain-channel tunneling. It makes TFET less efficient and restricts its application in complementary digital circuits. Therefore, this manuscript reports the application of Gaussian doping profile on nanometer regime silicon channel TFETs to completely eliminate the ambipolarity. For this, Gaussian doping is used in the drain region of conventional gate-drain overlap TFET to control the tunneling of electrons from the valence band of channel to the conduction band of drain. As a result, barrier width at the drain/channel junction increases significantly leading to the suppression of an ambipolar current even when higher doping concentration (1 ? 10 ? cm ?) is considered in the drain region. However, significant improvement in terms of RF figure-of-merits such as cut-off frequency (f ?), gain bandwidth product (GBW), and gate-to-drain capacitance (C ?) is achieved with Gaussian doped gate on drain overlap TFET as compared to its counterpart TFET.

  5. Recent RF Experiments and Application of RF Waves to Real-Time Control of Safety Factor Profile in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, T.; Isayama, A.; Ide, S.; Fujita, T.; Oikawa, T.; Sakata, S.; Sueoka, M.; Hosoyama, H.; Seki, M.

    2005-01-01

    Two topics of applications of RF waves to current profile control in JT-60U are presented; application of lower-hybrid (LH) waves to safety factor profile control and electron cyclotron (EC) waves to neo-classical tearing mode (NTM) control. A real-time control system of safety factor (q) profile was developed. This system, for the first time, enables 1) real time evaluation of q profile using local magnetic pitch angle measurement by motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic and 2) control of current drive (CD) location (ρCD) by controlling the parallel refractive index N parallel of LH waves through control of phase difference (Δφ) of LH waves between multi-junction launcher modules. The method for real-time q profile evaluation was newly developed, without time-consuming reconstruction of equilibrium, so that the method requires less computational time. Safety factor profile by the real-time calculation agrees well with that by equilibrium reconstruction with MSE. The control system controls ρCD through Δφ in such a way to decrease the largest residual between the real-time evaluated q profile q(r) and its reference profile qref(r). The real-time control system was applied to a positive shear plasma (q(0)∼1). The reference q profile was set to monotonic positive shear profile having qref(0)=1.3. The real-time q profile approached to the qref(r) during application of real-time control, and was sustained for 3s, which was limited by the duration of the injected LH power. Temporal evolution of current profile was consistent with relaxation of inductive electric field induced by theoretical LH driven current. An m/n=3/2 NTM that appeared at βN∼3 was completely stabilized by ECCD applied to a fully-developed NTM. Precise ECCD at NTM island was essential for the stabilization. ECCD that was applied to resonant rational surface (q=3/2) before an NTM onset suppressed appearance of NTM. In order to keep NTM intensity below a level, ECCD before the mode onset was

  6. The IPNS second harmonic RF upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middendorf, M.E.; Brumwell, F.R.; Dooling, J.C.; Horan, D.; Kustom, R.L.; Lien, M.K.; McMichael, G.E.; Moser, M.R.; Nassiri, A.; Wang, S.

    2008-01-01

    The intense pulsed neutron source (IPNS) rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) is used to accelerate protons from 50 MeV to 450 MeV, at a repetition rate of 30 Hz. The original ring design included two identical rf systems, each consisting of an accelerating cavity, cavity bias supply, power amplifiers and low-level analog electronics. The original cavities are located 180 degrees apart in the ring and provide a total peak accelerating voltage of ∼21 kV over the 2.21-MHz to 5.14-MHz revolution frequency sweep. A third rf system has been constructed and installed in the RCS. The third rf system is capable of operating at the fundamental revolution frequency for the entire acceleration cycle, providing an additional peak accelerating voltage of up to ∼11 kV, or at the second harmonic of the revolution frequency for the first ∼4 ms of the acceleration cycle, providing an additional peak voltage of up to ∼11 kV for bunch shape control. We describe here the hardware implementation and operation to date of the third rf cavity in the second harmonic mode.

  7. Rf system description for the ground test accelerator radio-frequency quadrupole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regan, A.H.; Brittain, D.; Rees, D.E.; Ziomek, D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the RF system being used to provide RF power and to control the cavity field used for the ground test accelerator (GTA) radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ). The RF system consists of a low-level RF (LLRF) control system that uses a tetrode as a high-power amplifier (HPA) as part of its plant to deliver up to 300 kW of peak power to the RFQ at a 2% duty factor. The LLRF control system implements in-phase and quadrature (I ampersand Q) control to maintain the cavity field within tolerances of 0.5% in amplitude and 0.5 degrees in phase in the presence of beam-induced instabilities. This paper describes the identified components and presents measured performance data. The user interface with the systems is described, and cavity field measurements are included

  8. Low-level therapy in ophthalmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankov, O. P.

    1999-07-01

    Extremely slow introduction of low-level laser therapy into the practice of ophthalmologists is restricted by the lack of good methodological recommendation and modern equipment adopted to the needs of ophthalmology. The most perspective is considered to be further improvement of the methods and the elaboration of the medical equipment, working in several wave bands, combined with magnetotherapy and working with the use of various modes of the modulation of the intensity of the luminous flux. It may be asserted that unlike the mode of continuous radiation, in some cases, the effectiveness of the treatment increases when the modulated light with the frequency of one to a few tens HZ is used. Moreover, the methods are being elaborated, when the modulation frequency of laser light and the biorhythms of man physiologic parameters are synchronized. Very perspective seems the computerization of the treatment process with the simultaneous electrophysiological control of the condition of visual functions.

  9. Development of localized arc filament RF plasma actuators for high-speed and high Reynolds number flow control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.-H.; Nishihara, M.; Adamovich, I.V.; Samimy, M.; Gorbatov, S.V.; Pliavaka, F.V.

    2010-01-01

    Recently developed localized arc filament plasma actuators (LAFPAs) have shown tremendous control authority in high-speed and high Reynolds number flow for mixing enhancement and noise mitigation. Previously, these actuators were powered by a high-voltage pulsed DC plasma generator with low energy coupling efficiency of 5-10%. In the present work, a new custom-designed 8-channel pulsed radio frequency (RF) plasma generator has been developed to power up to 8 plasma actuators operated over a wide range of forcing frequencies (up to 50 kHz) and duty cycles (1-50%), and at high energy coupling efficiency (up to 80-85%). This reduces input electrical power requirements by approximately an order of magnitude, down to 12 W per actuator operating at 10% duty cycle. The new pulsed RF plasma generator is scalable to a system with a large number of channels. Performance of pulsed RF plasma actuators used for flow control was studied in a Mach 0.9 circular jet with a Reynolds number of about 623,000 and compared with that of pulsed DC actuators. Eight actuators were distributed uniformly on the perimeter of a 2.54-cm diameter circular nozzle extension. Both types of actuators coupled approximately the same amount of power to the flow, but with drastically different electrical inputs to the power supplies. Particle image velocimetry measurements showed that jet centerline Mach number decay produced by DC and RF actuators operating at the same forcing frequencies and duty cycles is very similar. At a forcing Strouhal number near 0.3, close to the jet column instability frequency, well-organized periodic structures, with similar patterns and dimensions, were generated in the jets forced by both DC and RF actuators. Far-field acoustic measurements demonstrated similar trends in the overall sound pressure level (OASPL) change produced by both types of actuators, resulting in OASPL reduction up to 1.2-1.5 dB in both cases. We conclude that pulsed RF actuators demonstrate flow

  10. RF transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choroba, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the techniques of transport of high-power radiofrequency (RF) power from a RF power source to the cavities of an accelerator. Since the theory of electromagnetic waves in waveguides and of waveguide components is very well explained in a number of excellent text books it will limit itself on special waveguide distributions and on a number of, although not complete list of, special problems which sometimes occur in RF power transportation systems. (author)

  11. Low-level waste program technical strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bledsoe, K.W.

    1994-01-01

    The Low-Level Waste Technical Strategy document describes the mechanisms which the Low-Level Waste Program Office plans to implement to achieve its mission. The mission is to manage the receipt, immobilization, packaging, storage/disposal and RCRA closure (of the site) of the low-level Hanford waste (pretreated tank wastes) in an environmentally sound, safe and cost-effective manner. The primary objective of the TWRS Low-level waste Program office is to vitrify the LLW fraction of the tank waste and dispose of it onsite

  12. Rf power sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, the author reports on RF power sources for accelerator applications. The approach will be with particular customers in mind. These customers are high energy physicists who use accelerators as experimental tools in the study of the nucleus of the atom, and synchrotron light sources derived from electron or positron storage rings. The author pays close attention to electron- positron linear accelerators since the RF sources have always defined what is possible to achieve with these accelerators. Circular machines, cyclotrons, synchrotrons, etc. have usually not been limited by the RF power available and the machine builders have usually had their RF power source requirements met off the shelf. The main challenge for the RF scientist has been then in the areas of controls. An interesting example of this is in the Conceptual Design Report of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) where the RF system is described in six pages of text in a 700-page report. Also, the cost of that RF system is about one-third of a percent of the project's total cost. The RF system is well within the state of the art and no new power sources need to be developed. All the intellectual effort of the system designer would be devoted to the feedback systems necessary to stabilize beams during storage and acceleration, with the main engineering challenges (and costs) being in the superconducting magnet lattice

  13. Use of low level of continuous heat and Ibuprofen as an adjunct to physical therapy improves pain relief, range of motion and the compliance for home exercise in patients with nonspecific neck pain: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrofsky, Jerrold S; Laymon, Michael; Alshammari, Faris; Khowailed, Iman Akef; Lee, Haneul

    2017-01-01

    It has been well documented at heat reduces pain and increases healing by increasing blood flow in tissue. The purpose of this study was to see if the use of low level continuous heat (LLCH) and Ibuprofen used as a home therapy between physical therapy sessions at a clinic resulted in better therapy outcomes in people with chronic neck pain. Ninety-two patients with chronic nonspecific neck pain were randomly divided into 4 groups; LLCH group, LLCH with Ibuprofen (IP) group, sham LLCH with sham IP group, and controls. All subjects underwent 45 minutes of conventional physical therapy twice a week for 2 weeks. the neck disability index (NDI), subjective pain, range of motion (ROM), strength of the neck, and home exercise compliance were measured. Both LLCH and IP significantly reduced pain and NDI score, and increased ROM (ppain significantly improved pain attenuation and it causes greater compliance for home.

  14. Control Instabilities in a Pulsed Multi-Cavity RF System with Vector Sum Feedback (A Mathematical Analysis)

    CERN Document Server

    Tückmantel, Joachim

    2001-01-01

    Upcoming projects relying on pulsed linear accelerators intend to use superconducting RF systems. Cost reasons suggest driving several cavities by a common transmitter, controlled over a vector sum feedback system, possibly supported by a feed forward system. Numerical simulations hint that such a system may become uncontrollable under certain conditions. In the present paper, for a model very close to reality, we will present a mathematical proof that in fact spontaneous symmetry braking is possible for these configurations, defining also the precise conditions under which it will take place. These can be used as an estimate for the real RF system stability limits. The listing of a small program demonstrating the mechanism numerically for two cavities is attached.

  15. Control Instabilities in a Pulsed Multi-Cavity RF System with Vector Sum Feedback (A Mathematical Analysis) 052

    CERN Document Server

    Tückmantel, Joachim

    2001-01-01

    Upcoming projects relying on pulsed linear accelerators intend to use superconducting RF systems. Cost reasons suggest driving several cavities by a common transmitter, controlled over a vector sum feedback system, possibly supported by a feed forward system. Numerical simulations hint that such a system may become uncontrollable under certain conditions. In the present paper, for a model very close to reality, we will present a mathematical proof that in fact spontaneous symmetry braking is possible for these configurations, defining also the precise conditions under which it will take place. These can be used as an estimate for the real RF system stability limits. The listing of a small program demonstrating the mechanism numerically for two cavities is attached.

  16. Human exposure to low level ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paix, David

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the low-level radiation sources and their effects on human populations, from a global perspective. 'Low-level' means exposures in the range of the natural background to which everybody is exposed. The quoted values are whole-world averages, but individual variations are mentioned in a few cases. (author). 22 refs

  17. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This paper provides highlights from the spring meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics of discussion included: state and compact reports; New York's challenge to the constitutionality of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Amendments Act of 1985; DOE technical assistance for 1993; interregional import/export agreements; Department of Transportation requirements; superfund liability; nonfuel bearing components; NRC residual radioactivity criteria

  18. Low back pain and low level flying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C.F.M. Aghina

    1989-01-01

    textabstractLow level flying is a very good tactical possibility to carry out a mission unseen by a hostile radarsystem. Nowadays, Western Europe in general and the Federal Republic of Germany in particular, decreased . the permissions to low level flying in assigned regions. That's why the

  19. RF MEMS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    At the bare die level the insertion loss, return loss and the isolation ... ing and packaging of a silicon on glass based RF MEMS switch fabricated using DRIE. ..... follows the power law based on the asperity deformation model given by Pattona & ... Surface mount style RF packages (SMX series 580465) from Startedge Corp.

  20. Managing low-level radioactive waste in Massachusetts. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bander, S.R.; Goldstein, M.E.

    1983-12-01

    As one of the country's largest generators of low-level radioactive waste, Massachusetts has begun independently seeking solutions to the questions surrounding low-level waste management issues. The Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Radiation Control Program, obtained funding from the U.S. Department ofEnergy through EG and G, Idaho, Inc. to develop a low-level waste management strategy for the Commonwealth. The Working Group was made up of individuals from various waste generating industries, environmental and public interest groups, medical and academic institutions, and affected state agencies. This final report document contains the following staff project reports: Proposed Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Plan for The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, February 1983 and Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management in Massachusetts - Actions to be Considered for Implementation in 1984-1986, December 1983. These two staff reports represent the completion of the Massachusetts Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Project. The first report provides some of the background material to the issues and some of the alternative courses of action which can be considered by state policy-makers. The second report provides the next phase in the process by delineating specific steps which may be taken before 1986 in order to address the low-level waste problem, and the estimated amount of time needed to complete each step

  1. Use of Low Level of Continuous Heat as an Adjunct to Physical Therapy Improves Knee Pain Recovery and the Compliance for Home Exercise in Patients With Chronic Knee Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrofsky, Jerrold S; Laymon, Michael S; Alshammari, Faris S; Lee, Haneul

    2016-11-01

    Petrofsky, JS, Laymon, MS, Alshammari, FS, and Lee, H. Use of low level of continuous heat as an adjunct to physical therapy improves knee pain recovery and the compliance for home exercise in patients with chronic knee pain: a randomized controlled trial. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3107-3115, 2016-This study examined if the use of low level continuous heat (LLCH) wraps at home between physical therapy sessions at a clinic resulted in better therapy outcomes in patients with chronic knee pain. Fifty individuals with chronic nonspecific knee pain was randomly allocated to 2 groups: the LLCH group and the placebo group. All subjects underwent 1 hour of conventional physical therapy twice per week for 2 weeks at the outpatient clinic and they were asked to accomplish 1 hour of therapeutic exercise at home each day between sessions. The LLCH group applied LLCH knee wraps for 6 hours at home before home exercise while placebo group took a placebo ibuprofen. (This was done since placebo heat is impossible to use since subjects would notice that the wraps were cold) Before, during, and after intervention, pain intensity, active range of motion of the knee (AROM), knee strength, and home exercise compliance were measured. The LLCH group showed pain attenuation after 2 weeks of therapy sessions (p ≤ 0.05). AROM and strength of the knee significantly improved over time compared to the placebo group. Home exercise compliance was significantly higher in the LLCH group than placebo group (p ≤ 0.05). These results indicated that the use of LLCH as an adjunct to conventional physical therapy for chronic knee pain significantly improved pain attenuation and recovery of strength and movement in patients with chronic knee pain.

  2. Polyethylene solidification of low-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalb, P.D.; Colombo, P.

    1985-02-01

    This topical report describes the results of an investigation on the solidification of low-level radioactive waste in polyethylene. Waste streams selected for this study included those which result from advanced volume reduction technologies (dry evaporator concentrate salts and incinerator ash) and those which remain problematic for solidification using contemporary agents (ion exchange resins). Four types of commercially available low-density polyethylenes were employed which encompass a range of processing and property characteristics. Process development studies were conducted to ascertain optimal process control parameters for successful solidification. Maximum waste loadings were determined for each waste and polyethylene type. Property evaluation testing was performed on laboratory-scale specimens to assess the potential behavior of actual waste forms in a disposal environment. Waste form property tests included water immersion, deformation under compressive load, thermal cycling and radionuclide leaching. Recommended waste loadings of 70 wt % sodium sulfate, 50 wt % boric acid, 40 wt % incinerator ash, and 30 wt % ion exchange resins, which are based on process control and waste form performance considerations are reported. 37 refs., 33 figs., 22 tabs

  3. Efficacy and safety of a low-level laser device in the treatment of male and female pattern hair loss: a multicenter, randomized, sham device-controlled, double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Joaquin J; Wikramanayake, Tongyu C; Bergfeld, Wilma; Hordinsky, Maria; Hickman, Janet G; Hamblin, Michael R; Schachner, Lawrence A

    2014-04-01

    Male and female pattern hair loss are common, chronic dermatologic disorders with limited therapeutic options. In recent years, a number of commercial devices using low-level laser therapy have been promoted, but there have been little peer-reviewed data on their efficacy. To determine whether treatment with a low-level laser device, the US FDA-cleared HairMax Lasercomb®, increases terminal hair density in both men and women with pattern hair loss. Randomized, sham device-controlled, double-blind clinical trials were conducted at multiple institutional and private practices. A total of 146 male and 188 female subjects with pattern hair loss were screened. A total of 128 male and 141 female subjects were randomized to receive either a lasercomb (one of three models) or a sham device in concealed sealed packets, and were treated on the whole scalp three times a week for 26 weeks. Terminal hair density of the target area was evaluated at baseline and at 16- and 26-week follow-ups, and analyzed to determine whether the hypothesis formulated prior to data collection, that lasercomb treatment would increase terminal hair density, was correct. The site investigators and the subjects remained blinded to the type of device they dispensed/received throughout the study. The evaluator of masked digital photographs was blinded to which trial arm the subject belonged. Seventy-eight, 63, 49, and 79 subjects were randomized in four trials of 9-beam lasercomb treatment in female subjects, 12-beam lasercomb treatment in female subjects, 7-beam lasercomb treatment in male subjects, and 9- and 12-beam lasercomb treatment in male subjects, compared with the sham device, respectively. Nineteen female and 25 male subjects were lost to follow-up. Among the remaining 122 female and 103 male subjects in the efficacy analysis, the mean terminal hair count at 26 weeks increased from baseline by 20.2, 20.6, 18.4, 20.9, and 25.7 per cm2 in 9-beam lasercomb-treated female subjects, 12-beam

  4. Low-level radioactive waste disposal in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Calvin B.; Kerr, Thomas A.; Williams, R. Eric

    1991-01-01

    Two national systems comprise the low-level radioactive waste management system in the United States of America. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulates low-level radioactive waste produced in the public sector (commercial waste), and the U.S. Department of Energy manages low-level radioactive waste produced by government-sponsored programs. The primary distinction between the two national systems is the source of regulatory control. This paper discusses two issues critical to the success of each system: the site selection process used by the commercial low-level waste disposal system, and the evaluation process used to determine configuration of the DOE waste management system. The two national systems take different approaches to reach the same goals, which are increased social responsibility, protection of public health and safety, and protection of the environment

  5. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sternwheeler, W.D.E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper provides highlights from the 1992 winter meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Wastes Forum. Topics of discussion included: legal information; state and compact reports; freedom of information requests; and storage

  6. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This paper provides highlights from the summer meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics of discussion included: responsibility for nonfuel component disposal; state experiences in facility licensing; and volume projections

  7. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report provides highlights from the 1992 fall meeting of the Low LEvel Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included: disposal options after 1992; interregional agreements; management alternatives; policy; and storage

  8. Landfill disposal of very low level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Shanggeng

    2009-01-01

    The radioactivities of very low level wastes are very low. VLLW can be disposed by simple and economic burial process. This paper describes the significance of segregation of very low level waste (VLLW), the VLLW-definition and its limit value, and presents an introduction of VLLW-disposing approaches operated world wide. The disposal of VLLW in China is also briefly discussed and suggested here. (author)

  9. Microbiological treatment of low level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashley, N.V.; Pugh, S.Y.R.; Banks, C.J.; Humphreys, P.N.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarises the work of an experimental programme investigating the anaerobic digestion of low-level radioactive wastes. The project focused on the selection of the optimum bioreactor design to achieve 95% removal or stabilisation of the biodegradable portion of low-level radioactive wastes. Performance data was obtained for the bioreactors and process scale-up factors for the construction of a full-scale reactor were considered. (author)

  10. Low-level wastes pathways at EDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilmoine, R.; Casseau, L.Ph.

    1999-01-01

    First, what are, for EDF, the main issues dealing with the future management of low level wastes (LLW) will be recalled; and followed by a description of what are the implications of implementing these management principles: areas zoning, set up of pathways, traceability of the wastes and associated controls. The origin of the wastes will then be described using both qualitative and quantitative approaches; the description will specifically address the spreading of wastes production in time. LLW management at EDF will then be envisaged: storage in a specific discharge, pathways for treatment and elimination of wastes with acceptable radiological impact and costs. The example of LLW oils will be developed: particularly as far as hypothesis and results concerning the radiological impacts are concerned. The choice of incineration will then be justified, however expected difficulties to implement it industrially will be pointed out. Other on going studies and their main results will be mentioned: the present time is a turning point on that issue between thought and action; to be on going dismantling must take into account the emerging principles and give rise to good communication. (author)

  11. Low-level-waste-treatment handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinton, S.D.; Goeller, H.E.; Holladay, D.W.; Donaldson, T.L.

    1982-01-01

    The initial draft of the Low-Level Waste Treatment Handbook has been prepared and submitted to the DOE Low-Level Waste Management Program for review and comment. A revised draft is scheduled to be delivered to DOE Headquarters in December 1982. The Handbook is designed to be useful to all individuals and groups concerned with low-level wastes. It is one of several volumes that will ultimately comprise a Low-Level Waste Technology Handbook. The objective of the Low-Level Waste Treatment Handbook is to present an overview of current practices related to the segregation, classification, volume reduction, solidification, handling, packaging, and transportation of LLW for disposal in a shallow land burial facility. The Handbook is intended to serve as a guide to individuals interested in the treatment and handling of low-level radioactive waste. The Handbook will not explicitly tell the user how to design and operate LLW treatment facilities, but rather will identify (1) kinds of information required to evaluate the options, (2) methods that may be used to evaluate these options, and (3) limitations associated with the selection of the treatment options. The focus of the Handbook is providing guidance on how to do waste treatment for disposal by shallow land burial

  12. Characteristics of a high-power RF source of negative hydrogen ions for neutral beam injection into controlled fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdrashitov, G. F.; Belchenko, Yu. I.; Gusev, I. A.; Ivanov, A. A.; Kondakov, A. A.; Sanin, A. L.; Sotnikov, O. Z., E-mail: O.Z.Sotnikov@inp.nsk.su; Shikhovtsev, I. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    An injector of hydrogen atoms with an energy of 0.5–1 MeV and equivalent current of up to 1.5 A for purposes of controlled fusion research is currently under design at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences. Within this project, a multiple-aperture RF surface-plasma source of negative hydrogen ions is designed. The source design and results of experiments on the generation of a negative ion beam with a current of >1 A in the long-pulse mode are presented.

  13. Design and development of 75 MHz 1 kW RF system with micro-controller based protection and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosily, Sherry; Pande, Manjiri; Handu, V.K.

    2011-01-01

    A 75 MHz, 1 kW Radio Frequency (RF) system has been successfully tested on a 50 ohm load, along with a microcontroller based protection circuit for protection of the system against the possible problems that may occur during RF power coupling to Radio Frequency Quadrapole (RFQ) load. This paper describes major challenges faced during the development and methods by which they have been overcome. Measurement of the tube anode temperature which is at 4 kV dc and 1 kW RF power is one of these. Confidence provided by these successful experiences has inspired an exploration of possibilities for further enhancement of the present system. These are also discussed in the paper. (author)

  14. Shallow ground burial of low-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camilleri, A.; Cooper, M.B.; Hargrave, N.J.; Munslow-Davies, L.

    1989-01-01

    Acceptance criteria for the disposal of low-level radioactive wastes are presented for adoption throughout Australia, a continent in which there are readily available areas in arid, sparsely inhabited places, likely to be suitable as sites for shallow ground burial. Drawing upon overseas practices and experiences, criteria have been developed for low-level waste disposal and are intended to be applicable and relevant to the Australian situation. Concentration levels have been derived for a shallow ground burial facility assuming a realistic institutional control period of 200 years. A comparison is made between this period and institutional control for 100 years and 300 years. Longer institutional control periods enable the acceptance of higher concentrations of radionuclides of intermediate half-lives. Scenarios, which have been considered, include current Australian pastoral practices and traditional Aboriginal occupancy. The derived radionuclide concentration levels for the disposal of low level wastes are not dissimilar to those developed in other countries. 17 refs., 6 tabs., 1 fig

  15. Low-level radioactive waste, mixed low-level radioactive waste, and biomedical mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    This document describes the proceedings of a workshop entitled: Low-Level Radioactive Waste, Mixed Low-Level Radioactive Waste, and Biomedical Mixed Waste presented by the National Low-Level Waste Management Program at the University of Florida, October 17-19, 1994. The topics covered during the workshop include technical data and practical information regarding the generation, handling, storage and disposal of low-level radioactive and mixed wastes. A description of low-level radioactive waste activities in the United States and the regional compacts is presented

  16. Use of Ethernet and TCP/IP socket communications library routines for data acquisition and control in the LEP RF system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciapala, E.; Collier, P.; Lienard, P.

    1991-01-01

    A general move is being made at CERN towards the direct connection of intelligent equipment and device controllers to the control room consoles by the use of local Ethernet segments bridged to the main Token Ring networks. Communications is based on standard TCP/IP protocols which allows immediate use of standard software packages. The Data Managers which control the LEP RF accelerating units and transverse feedback systems have recently been connected. The implementation of Ethernet and TCP/IP socket communications routines for RF data acquisition and control is described. The adaptation of almost all of the existing software for RF system control, data acquisition and diagnostics to make use of this means of communication has proved straightforward. Furthermore the transparent transfer of data in the form of 'C' structures from the Data Managers to the control center workstations and other computers has considerably simplified the software required for remote surveillance and data logging with a corresponding increase in speed and reliability

  17. A population-based randomized controlled trial of the effect of combining a pedometer with an intervention toolkit on physical activity among individuals with low levels of physical activity or fitness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Christina Bjørk; Severin, Maria; Hansen, Andreas Wolff

    2012-01-01

    To examine if receiving a pedometer along with an intervention toolkit is associated with increased physical activity, aerobic fitness and better self-rated health among individuals with low levels of physical activity or fitness.......To examine if receiving a pedometer along with an intervention toolkit is associated with increased physical activity, aerobic fitness and better self-rated health among individuals with low levels of physical activity or fitness....

  18. Intermediate quality control tests in the development of a superconducting RF cryomodule for CW operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattalwar, Shrikant; Jones, Thomas; Strachan, John; Bate, Robert; Davies, Phil; McIntosh, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Through an international cryomodule collaboration, ASTeC at Daresbury Laboratory has taken the primary responsibility in leading the development of an optimised Superconducting RF (SRF) cryomodule, operating in CW mode for energy recovery facilities and other high duty cycle accelerators. For high beam current operation, Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorbers are critical components of the SRF Cryomodule, ensuring excessive heating of the accelerating structures and beam instabilities are effectively managed. This paper describes some of the cold tests conducted on the HOM absorbers and other critical components during the construction phase, to ensure that the quality and reliable cryomodule performance is maintained.

  19. Digitally Controlled Envelope Tracking Power Supply for an RF Power Amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lars Tønnes; Andersen, Michael Andreas E.

    2007-01-01

    due to clock frequency quantization. An envelope tracking power supply for an RF Power Amplifier (RFPA) can help improve system efficiency by reducing the power consumption of the RFPA. To show the advantage of the DiSOM over traditional counter based Digital PWM modulators two designs were compared...... in both simulation and by experiment. The results shows that the DiSOM could give an increase in open loop bandwidth by more than a factor of two and an reduce the closed loop output impedance of the power supply by a factor of 5 at the output filter resonance frequency....

  20. Fabrication, tests, and RF control of the 50 superconducting resonators of the Saclay heavy ion linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cauvin, B.; Coret, M.; Fouan, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    Two types of niobium superconducting resonators are currently in use in the linac Outer cylinder and RF ports are identical for both designs but internal structures are different full wave helix (λ) with three gaps behavior or half-wave (λ/2) with two gaps behavior. The λ structure is based on a Karlsruhe design. All cavities (34 λ and 16 λ/2) are now fabricated, tested for field, and mounted in the eight machine cryostats. Resonator characteristics are listed. Frequencies are multiples of the low energy bunching frequency (13.5 MHz). The high magnetic fields arise at the welds joining helix to can (λ/2) or half-helices together (λ)

  1. Low-Level Laser and Light-Emitting Diode Therapy for Pain Control in Hyperglycemic and Normoglycemic Patients Who Underwent Coronary Bypass Surgery with Internal Mammary Artery Grafts: A Randomized, Double-Blind Study with Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Andréa Conceição Gomes; Fernandes, Gilderlene Alves; Gonzaga, Isabel Clarisse; de Barros Araújo, Raimundo; de Oliveira, Rauirys Alencar; Nicolau, Renata Amadei

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) and light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for reducing pain in hyperglycemic and normoglycemic patients who underwent coronary artery bypass surgery with internal mammary artery grafts. This study was conducted on 120 volunteers who underwent elective coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. The volunteers were randomly allocated to four different groups of equal size (n = 30): control, placebo, LLLT [λ = 640 nm and spatial average energy fluence (SAEF) = 1.06 J/cm(2)], and LED (λ = 660 ± 20 nm and SAEF = 0.24 J/cm(2)). Participants were also divided into hyperglycemic and normoglycemic subgroups, according to their fasting blood glucose test result before surgery. The outcome assessed was pain during coughing by a visual analog scale (VAS) and the McGill Pain Questionnaire. The patients were followed for 1 month after the surgery. The LLLT and LED groups showed a greater decrease in pain, with similar results, as indicated by both the VAS and the McGill questionnaire (p ≤ 0.05), on the 6th and 8th postoperative day compared with the placebo and control groups. The outcomes were also similar between hyperglycemic and normoglycemic patients. One month after the surgery, almost no individual reported pain during coughing. LLLT and LED had similar analgesic effects in hyperglycemic and normoglycemic patients, better than placebo and control groups.

  2. Proceedings, CAS - CERN Accelerator School: RF for Accelerators, Ebeltoft, Denmark, 8 - 17 Jun 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, R

    2012-01-01

    These proceedings present the lectures given at the twenty-fourth specialized course organized by the CERN Accelerator School (CAS). The course was held in Ebeltoft, Denmark, from 8-17 June, 2010 in collaboration with Aarhus University, with the topic 'RF for Accelerators' While this topic has been covered by CAS previously, early in the 1990s and again in 2000, it was recognized that recent advances in the field warranted an updated course. Following introductory courses covering the background physics, the course attempted to cover all aspects of RF for accelerators; from RF power generation and transport, through cavity and coupler design, electronics and low level control, to beam diagnostics and RF gymnastics. The lectures were supplemented with several sessions of exercises, which were completed by discussion sessions on the solutions.

  3. Nouvelle application de control des cavités 200 MHz RF du PS (CERN)

    CERN Document Server

    Cotte, D

    2011-01-01

    Le système Radio Fréquence (RF) 200MHz du PS est un outil essentiel pour la préparation des faisceaux haute intensité du PS. Dans l’anneau PS on trouve 6 cavités 200 MHz utilisées pour contrôler : • l’émittance longitudinale des « bunches » • le processus de « Rebunching » du faisceau avant de l’envoyer au SPS. Chaque cavité est pilotée par des événements appelés « timing » et suit une fonction de tension programmée. Cependant, l’électronique utilisée pour piloter les cavités 200 MHz du PS est obsolète et sa fiabilité non garantie pour cause du manque de pièces de rechange. Ce document décrit le fonctionnement du nouveau programme d’application qui fait abstraction de l’ancienne matrice hardware. Elle suit les recommandations décrites dans l’étude d’une nouvelle structure pour le système RF 200MHz du PS. [1

  4. Packaged low-level waste verification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuite, K.T.; Winberg, M.; Flores, A.Y.; Killian, E.W.; McIsaac, C.V.

    1996-01-01

    Currently, states and low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal site operators have no method of independently verifying the radionuclide content of packaged LLW that arrive at disposal sites for disposal. At this time, disposal sites rely on LLW generator shipping manifests and accompanying records to insure that LLW received meets the waste acceptance criteria. An independent verification system would provide a method of checking generator LLW characterization methods and help ensure that LLW disposed of at disposal facilities meets requirements. The Mobile Low-Level Waste Verification System (MLLWVS) provides the equipment, software, and methods to enable the independent verification of LLW shipping records to insure that disposal site waste acceptance criteria are being met. The MLLWVS system was developed under a cost share subcontract between WMG, Inc., and Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies through the Department of Energy's National Low-Level Waste Management Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)

  5. Commercial low-level radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    The goals, objectives and activities of the Department of Energy's Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management program are reviewed. The goal of the overall Program is to support development of an acceptable, nationwide, near surface waste disposal system by 1986. The commercial LLW program has two major functions: (1) application of the technology improvements for waste handling, treatment and disposal, and (2) assistance to states as they carry out their responsibilities under the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980. The priorities for the commercial side of the Low-Level Waste Management Program have been established to meet one goal: to support development of an effective commercial management system by 1986. The first priority is being given to supporting state efforts in forming the institutional structures needed to manage the system. The second priority is the state and industry role in transferring and demonstrating treatment and disposal technologies

  6. The low-level radioactive waste crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bord, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    According to the author, the goals of the 1980 Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act have not been met. That act stipulated that regional disposal sites were to be established by 1986. To date, no new sites have been established and none are anywhere near the construction phase. Congress, responding to existing impasse, has extended the deadline to the end of 1992 with the passage of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act. The reasons for the impasse are no mystery: local intransigence regarding waste of any kind, public fears of radiation hazards, and politicians' anxieties about their constituents' fears. The focus of this paper is the viability of ongoing attempts to overcome public intransigence in the case of disposal siting for low-level radioactive waste (LLRW)

  7. Processing of low-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vance, J.N.

    1986-01-01

    Although low-level wastes have been generated and have required processing for more than two decades now, it is noteworthy that processing methods are continuing to change. The changes are not only attributable to improvements in technology, but are also the result of changing regulations and economics and uncertainties regarding the future availabilities of burial space for disposal. Indeed, because of the changes which have and are taking place in the processing of low-level waste, an overview of the current situation is in order. This presentation is a brief overview of the processing methods generally employed to treat the low-level wastes generated from both fuel cycle and non-fuel cycle sources. The presentation is far too brief to deal with the processing technologies in a comprehensive fashion, but does provide a snapshot of what the current or typical processing methods are and what changes are occurring and why

  8. Low-level waste workshops. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 specifies that each state is responsible for the disposal of the low-level waste which is generated within its boundaries. The Act states that such wastes can be most safely and efficiently managed on a regional basis through compacts. It also defines low-level waste as waste which is not classified as high-level radioactive waste, transuranic waste, spent nuclear fuel, or by-product material as defined in the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. The Policy Act also stipulates that regional agreements or compacts shall not be applicable to the transportation, management, or disposal of low-level radioactive waste from atomic energy defense activities or federal research and development activities. It also specifies that agreements or compacts shall take affect on January 1, 1986, upon Congressional approval. In February 1983, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant to the Council of State Governments' Midwestern Office. The grant was to be used to fund workshops for legislation on low-level radioactive waste issues. The purpose of the workshops was to provide discussion specifically on the Midwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste. Legislators from the states which were eligible to join the compact were invited: Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota and Wisconsin. Virginia, Kansas and Nebraska were also eligible but had joined other compacts. Consequently, they weren't invited to the workshops. The Governor's office of West Virginia expressed interest in the compact, and its legislators were invited to attend a workshop. Two workshops were held in March. This report is a summary of the proceedings which details the concerns of the compact and expresses the reasoning behind supporting or not supporting the compact

  9. Reasons for Low Levels of Interactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Etter, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The interactivity levels of online CSR communication are typically low. This study explores the reasons for the low levels of interactivity in the popular social media tool Twitter. An analysis of 41,864 Twitter messages (tweets) from the thirty most central corporate accounts in a CSR Twitter...... network is conducted. Comparisons (t-test) between CSR tweets and general tweets and between specialized CSR Twitter accounts and general accounts reveal that the low levels of interactivity are due to a reactive interaction approach and a lack of specialization....

  10. Low frequency rf current drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershkowitz, N.

    1992-01-01

    An unshielded antenna for rf heating has been developed and tested during this report period. In addition to design specifications being given, some experimental results are presented utilizing: (1) an unprotected Faraday shield, (2) insulating guard limiters, (3) unshielded antenna experiments, (4) method for detecting small rf driven currents, (5) rf fast wave current drive experiments, (6) alfven wave interactions with electrons, and (7) machine conditioning, impurity generation and density control

  11. Disposal of low-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendee, W.R.

    1986-01-01

    The generation of low-level radioactive waste is a natural consequence of the societal uses of radioactive materials. These uses include the application of radioactive materials to the diagnosis and treatment of human disease and to research into the causes of human disease and their prevention. Currently, low level radioactive wastes are disposed of in one of three shallow land-burial disposal sites located in Washington, Nevada, and South Carolina. With the passage in December 1980 of Public Law 96-573, The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act, the disposal of low-level wastes generated in each state was identified as a responsibility of the state. To fulfill this responsibility, states were encouraged to form interstate compacts for radioactive waste disposal. At the present time, only 37 states have entered into compact agreements, in spite of the clause in Public Law 96-573 that established January 1, 1986, as a target date for implementation of state responsibility for radioactive wastes. Recent action by Congress has resulted in postponement of the implementation date to January 1, 1993

  12. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report contains highlights from the 1991 fall meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included legal updates; US NRC updates; US EPA updates; mixed waste issues; financial assistance for waste disposal facilities; and a legislative and policy report

  13. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This paper provides the results of the winter meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Discussions were held on the following topics: new developments in states and compacts; adjudicatory hearings; information exchange on siting processes, storage surcharge rebates; disposal after 1992; interregional access agreements; and future tracking and management issues

  14. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-12-31

    This paper provides highlights from the October 1990 meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics of discussion included: a special session on liability and financial assurance needs; proposal to dispose of mixed waste at federal facilities; state plans for interim storage; and hazardous materials legislation.

  15. Actively shielded low level gamma - spectrometric system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrdja, D.; Bikit, I.; Forkapic, S.; Slivka, J.; Veskovic, M.

    2005-01-01

    The results of the adjusting and testing of the actively shielded low level gamma-spectrometry system are presented. The veto action of the shield reduces the background in the energy region of 50 keV to the 2800 keV for about 3 times. (author) [sr

  16. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This paper provides highlights from the 1995 summer meeting of the Low Level radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included: new developments in state and compacts; federal waste management; DOE plans for Greater-Than-Class C waste management; mixed wastes; commercial mixed waste management; international export of rad wastes for disposal; scintillation cocktails; license termination; pending legislation; federal radiation protection standards.

  17. Analysis of Low Level DNA Mixtures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slovák, Dalibor; Zvárová, Jana

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2013), s. 63-63 ISSN 1805-8698. [EFMI 2013 Special Topic Conference. 17.04.2013-19.04.2013, Prague] Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : forensic DNA interpretation * low level samples * allele peak heights * dropout probability Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  18. Stochastic Models for Low Level DNA Mixtures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slovák, Dalibor; Zvárová, Jana

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 5 (2012), s. 25-30 ISSN 1801-5603 Grant - others:GA UK(CZ) SVV-2012-264513 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : forensic DNA interpretation * low level samples * allele peak areas * dropout probability Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science http://www.ejbi.org/img/ejbi/2012/5/Slovak_en.pdf

  19. Stochastic Models for Low Level DNA Mixtures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slovák, Dalibor; Zvárová, Jana

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2013), s. 28-28 ISSN 1805-8698. [EFMI 2013 Special Topic Conference. 17.04.2013-19.04.2013, Prague] Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : forensic DNA interpretation * low level samples * allele peak heights * dropout probability Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  20. Siting a low-level waste facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    English, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    In processes to site disposal facilities for low-level radioactive waste, volunteerism and incentives packages hold more promise for attracting host communities than they have for attracting host states. But volunteerism and incentives packages can have disadvantages as well as advantages. This paper discusses their pros and cons and summarizes the different approaches that states are using in their relationships with local governments

  1. Low-level radiation risks in people

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goloman, M.; Filjushkin, V. lgor

    1993-01-01

    Using the limited human data plus the relationships derived from the laboratory, a leukemia risk model has been developed as well as a suggested model for other cancers in people exposed to low levels of radiation. Theoretical experimental and epidemiological evidence will be presented in an integrated stochastic model for projection of radiation-induced cancer risks

  2. Characteristics of monsoon low level jet (MLLJ)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Temperature and wind data are used to describe variation in the strength of the Monsoon Low Level Jet (MLLJ) from an active phase of the monsoon to a break phase. Also estimated are the characteristics of turbulence above and below MLLJ.

  3. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This paper provides highlights from the 1995 summer meeting of the Low Level radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included: new developments in state and compacts; federal waste management; DOE plans for Greater-Than-Class C waste management; mixed wastes; commercial mixed waste management; international export of rad wastes for disposal; scintillation cocktails; license termination; pending legislation; federal radiation protection standards

  4. Low-level radioactive waste management options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmalz, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the non-technical problems associated with the social and political obstacles to the secure disposal of low level radioactive waste. The author reviews thirty years' experience managing non-military wastes. The merits of available options are considered

  5. Low level neutron monitoring using high pressure 3He detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pszona, S.

    1995-01-01

    Three detectors, two spherical proportional counters and an ionisation chamber, all filled with 3 He to pressures of 160 kPa, 325 kPa and 1 MPa respectively have been experimentally studied with respect to their use for low level neutron monitoring. The ambient dose equivalent responses and the energy resolutions of these detectors have been determined. It is shown that spectral analysis of the signals from these detectors not only gives high sensitivity with regard to ambient dose equivalent but also improves the quality of the measurements. A special instrumentation for low level neutron monitoring is described in which a quality control method has been implemented. (Author)

  6. Low-level waste management at the Nuclear Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montanez, O.; Blanco, D.; Vallarino, V.; Calisto, W.

    1986-01-01

    A general overview of low-level radioactive waste management at the Nuclear Investigation Centre (CIN) of Uruguay is presented. The CIN is a pilot centre of research and development of techniques for implementing measurements for radioactive waste storage and control. (M.C.K.) [pt

  7. Incineration of low level and mixed wastes: 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    The University of California at Irvine, in cooperation with the Department of Energy, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and chapters of the Health Physics Society, coordinated this conference on the Incineration of Low-Level Radioactive and Mixed Wastes, with the guidance of professionals active in the waste management community. The conference was held in April 22-25, 1986 at Sheraton airport hotel Charlotte, North Carolina. Some of the papers' titles were: Protection and safety of different off-gas treatment systems in radioactive waste incineration; performance assessment of refractory samples in the Los Alamos controlled-Air incinerator; incineration systems for low-level and mixed wastes; incineration of low-level radioactive waste in Switzerland-operational experience and future activities

  8. Effect of single-dose low-level helium-neon laser irradiation on orthodontic pain: a split-mouth single-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobouti, Farhad; Khatami, Maziar; Chiniforush, Nasim; Rakhshan, Vahid; Shariati, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    Pain is the most common complication of orthodontic treatment. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been suggested as a new analgesic treatment free of the adverse effects of analgesic medications. However, it is not studied thoroughly, and the available studies are quite controversial. Moreover, helium neon (He-Ne) laser has not been assessed before. This split-mouth placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial was performed on 16 male and 14 female orthodontic patients requiring bilateral upper canine retraction. The study was performed at a private clinic in Sari, Iran, in 2014. It was single blind: patients, orthodontist, and personnel were blinded of the allocations, but the laser operator (periodontist) was not blinded. Once canine retractor was activated, a randomly selected maxillary quarter received a single dose of He-Ne laser irradiation (632.8 nm, 10 mw, 6 j/cm(2) density). The other quarter served as the placebo side, treated by the same device but powered off. In the first, second, fourth, and seventh days, blinded patients rated their pain sensed on each side at home using visual analog scale (VAS) questionnaires. There was no harm identified during or after the study. Pain changes were analyzed using two- and one-way repeated-measures ANOVA, Bonferroni, and t-test (α = 0.01, β > 0.99). This trial was not registered. It was self-funded by the authors. Sixteen males and 11 females remained in the study (aged 12-21). Average pain scores sensed in all 4 intervals on control and laser sides were 4.06 ± 2.85 and 2.35 ± 1.77, respectively (t-test P < 0.0001). One-way ANOVA showed significant pain declines over time, in each group (P < 0.0001). Two-way ANOVA showed significant effects for LLLT (P < 0.0001) and time (P = <0.0001). Single-dose He-Ne laser therapy might reduce orthodontic pain caused by retracting maxillary canines.

  9. Lifespan studies on different strains of mice exposed chronically to low levels of whole body gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, L.A.; Klein, A.K.; Cain, G.R.; Rosenblatt, L.S.

    1982-01-01

    Several strains of mice, chosen for their predisposition to immunohematological disorders, were exposed to low levels of 60 irradiation continuously for four weeks. All individuals were subsequently followed throughout their lifetimes. W/W/sup v/ mice, which are tyically subject to a stem cell deficiency, had a lower cumulative survival rate for the irradiated group than for the unirradiated controls. Irradiated RF/sub j/ mice had a dramatically lower cumulative survival rate than their unirradiated controls. Conversely, BXSB mice, which have a lumphoproliferative autoimmune disorder, had a higher cumulative survival rate after chronic irradiation than did unirradiated BXSBs. Irradiation had no effect upon the survival rate curves of the NZB strain, the murine model for Lupus Erythematosus

  10. A low-level needle counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Y.; Taguchi, Y.; Imamura, M.; Inoue, T.; Tanaka, S.

    1977-01-01

    A small end-window type gas-flow counter which has a sharpened needle (anode) against the end-window plane (cathode) was developed for low-level counting of β particles to the amount of less than one count per hour in solid sources of relatively high specific activity. The advantage of the needle counter for low-level work is that being of a conical shape the active volume as against the window area is small. The background count rate of 0.0092+-0.0005 cpm was obtained for a 10 mm dia needle counter operating in GM mode and in anticoincidence with a well-type NaI(Tl) guard crystal with massive shields. The counter design and the counter characteristics are presented in detail. The needle counter is simple in design, low-cost and stable in long time operation. (author)

  11. Low-level radiation waste management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubofcik, K.W.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a low-level radiation waste container set for use in conjunction with an open-topped receptacle. It comprises: a receptacle liner having a closed end and an open end, the receptacle liner sized for deployment as an inserted liner in an open-topped receptacle for collecting low-level radiation waste material within the receptacle liner within the open-topped receptacle; a cover sized and shaped to fit over the open top of the open-topped receptacle and the receptacle liner therein with the cover is in a closed position. The cover having a depending skirt which, when the cover is in the closed position, extends downwardly to overlap the open-topped receptacle adjacent the open top thereof and a portion of the receptacle liner received therein; and the receptacle liner and cover being fabricated of flexible radiation shielding material

  12. IRMM low level underground laboratory in HADES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouchel, D [CEC-JRC, Inst. for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Geel (Belgium); Wordel, R [CEC-JRC, Inst. for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Geel (Belgium)

    1997-03-01

    The operation of low background HPGe detectors at a depth of 225 m, reduced the background by two orders of magnitude; a large amount of the remaining background is still attributable to the cosmic rays. The selection of radiopure materials, the characterization of reference matrices and the measurements of low radioactivities in environmental samples are performed. Coupling the low level spectrometry with additional techniques, e.g. neutron activation, will allow to measure extremely low radioactivities. (orig.)

  13. Low-level waste certification plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhalph, W.O.

    1995-01-01

    This plan describes the organization and methodology for the certification of solid low-level waste (LLW) and mixed-waste (MW) generated at any of the facilities or major work activities of the Engineered Process Application (EPA) organization. The primary LLW and MW waste generating facility operated by EPA is the 377 Building. This plan does not cover the handling of hazardous or non-regulated waste, though they are mentioned at times for completeness

  14. Low-level waste disposal technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, G.B.

    1983-01-01

    A design has been proposed for a low-level radioactive waste disposal site that should provide the desired isolation under all foreseeable conditions. Although slightly more costly than current practices; this design provides additional reliability. This reliability is desirable to contribute to the closure of the fuel cycle and to demonstrate the responsible management of the uranium cycle by reestablishing confidence in the system

  15. State compacts and low-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, H.

    1984-01-01

    In 1979, for the first time, low-level waste (LLW) was brought to the attention of policy makers in most states. For several decades, technical personnel had regulated and managed LLW, but elected officials and their staff had been largely ignorant of the origins and destination of low-level radioactive materials. Events in the fall of 1979 set in motion a sequence of events that has compelled the continuing attention of policy makers in every state in the nation. In December 1979, the Executive Committee of the National Governors' Association appointed an eight-member task force, chaired by Governor Bruce Babbitt of Arizona, to review low-level waste management and to formulate state policy by July 1980. The principal findings were as follows: 1. LLW could be managed most efficiently, both technically and politically, at the state level. 2. Each state should take responsibility for its own waste. 3. The creation of a regional waste management system by means of interstate compacts offered the best promise of creating new disposal capacity. 4. Regions should be allowed to exclude waste generated outside their borders after a specified date

  16. Low-level-waste-disposal methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, M.L.; Dragonette, K.

    1981-01-01

    This report covers the followng: (1) history of low level waste disposal; (2) current practice at the five major DOE burial sites and six commercial sites with dominant features of these sites and radionuclide content of major waste types summarized in tables; (3) site performance with performance record on burial sites tabulated; and (4) proposed solutions. Shallow burial of low level waste is a continuously evolving practice, and each site has developed its own solutions to the handling and disposal of unusual waste forms. There are no existing national standards for such disposal. However, improvements in the methodology for low level waste disposal are occurring on several fronts. Standardized criteria are being developed by both the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and by DOE. Improved techniques for shallow burial are evolving at both commercial and DOE facilities, as well as through research sponsored by NRC, DOE, and the Environmental Protection Agency. Alternatives to shallow burial, such as deeper burial or the use of mined cavities is also being investigated by DOE

  17. Low level waste shipment accident lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rast, D.M.; Rowe, J.G.; Reichel, C.W.

    1995-01-01

    On October 1, 1994 a shipment of low-level waste from the Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Ohio, was involved in an accident near Rolla, Missouri. The accident did not result in the release of any radioactive material. The accident did generate important lessons learned primarily in the areas of driver and emergency response communications. The shipment was comprised of an International Standards Organization (ISO) container on a standard flatbed trailer. The accident caused the low-level waste package to separate from the trailer and come to rest on its top in the median. The impact of the container with the pavement and median inflicted relatively minor damage to the container. The damage was not substantial enough to cause failure of container integrity. The success of the package is attributable to the container design and the packaging procedures used at the Fernald Environmental Management Project for low-level waste shipments. Although the container survived the initial wreck, is was nearly breached when the first responders attempted to open the ISO container. Even though the container was clearly marked and the shipment documentation was technically correct, this information did not identify that the ISO container was the primary containment for the waste. The lessons learned from this accident have DOE complex wide applicability. This paper is intended to describe the accident, subsequent emergency response operations, and the lessons learned from this incident

  18. Update on low-level waste compacts and state agencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenan, M.; Rabbe, D.; Thompson, P.

    1995-01-01

    This article updates information on the following agencies involved in low-level radioactive wastes: Appalachian States Low-Level Radioactive Waste Commission; Central Interstate Low-Level radioactive Waste Commission; Central Midwest Interstate Low-Level radioactive Waste Compact; Massachusetts Low-Level radioactive Waste Management Board; Michigan Low-Level Radioactive Waste Authority; Midwest Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Commission; New York State Low-Level Radioactive Waste Siting Commission; Northeast Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact; Northwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management; Rocky Mountain Low-Level Radioactive Waste Board; Southeast Compact Commission for Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management;Southwest Low-Level Radioactive Waste Commission; Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority

  19. Metallograph for the examination of low-level radioactive samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.H.; Shaffer, D.S.; Petty, W.F.

    1982-01-01

    A new remote-controlled metallograph was built for use in a low-level radiation background. The metallograph is low cost compared to a conventional remote-controlled metallograph. The motors that drive the stage motions and focus are commercially available and attach to the metallograph without modification. The metallograph was installed on a drawer in a blister behind a shielding door. This allows the metallograph to be reached quickly and easily for maintenance and repair

  20. ISR RF cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    In each ISR ring the radiofrequency cavities were installed in one 9 m long straight section. The RF system of the ISR had the main purpose to stack buckets of particles (most of the time protons)coming from the CPS and also to accelerate the stacked beam. The installed RF power per ring was 18 kW giving a peak accelerating voltage of 20 kV. The system had a very fine regulation feature allowing to lower the voltage down to 75 V in a smooth and well controlled fashion.

  1. RF transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James L.; Helenberg, Harold W.; Kilsdonk, Dennis J.

    1979-01-01

    There is provided an improved RF transformer having a single-turn secondary of cylindrical shape and a coiled encapsulated primary contained within the secondary. The coil is tapered so that the narrowest separation between the primary and the secondary is at one end of the coil. The encapsulated primary is removable from the secondary so that a variety of different capacity primaries can be utilized with one secondary.

  2. Who regulates the disposal of low-level radioactive waste under the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostaghel, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    The present existence of immense quantities of low-level nuclear waste, a federal law providing for state or regional control of such waste disposal, and a number of state disposal laws challenged on a variety of constitutional grounds underscore what currently may be the most serious problem in nuclear waste disposal: who is to regulate the disposal of low-level nuclear wastes. This problem's origin may be traced to crucial omissions in the Atomic Energy Act of 1946 and its 1954 amendments (AEA) that concern radioactive waste disposal. Although the AEA states that nuclear materials and facilities are affected with the public interest and should be regulated to provide for the public health and safety, the statute fails to prescribe specific guidelines for any nuclear waste disposal. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 (LLRWPA) grants states some control over radioactive waste disposal, an area from which they were previously excluded by the doctrine of federal preemption. This Comment discusses the question of who regulates low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities by examining the following: the constitutional doctrines safeguarding federal government authority; area of state authority; grants of specific authority delegations under the LLRWPA and its amendment; and finally, potential problems that may arise depending on whether ultimate regulatory authority is deemed to rest with single states, regional compacts, or the federal government

  3. Low-level memory processes in vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnussen, S

    2000-06-01

    Psychophysical studies of the short-term memory for attributes or dimensions of the visual stimulus that are known to be important in early visual processing (spatial frequency, orientation, contrast, motion and color) identify a low-level perceptual memory mechanism. This proposed mechanism is located early in the visual processing stream, prior to the structural description system responsible for shape priming but beyond primary visual cortex (V1); it is composed of a series of parallel, special-purpose perceptual mechanisms with independent but limited processing resources. Each mechanism is devoted to the analysis of a single dimension and is coupled to a memory store.

  4. Adaptive response after low level irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelevina, I I; Afanasjev, G G; JaGotlib, V; Tereschenko, D G; Tronov, V A; Serebrjany, A M [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Institute of Chemical Physics

    1996-02-01

    The experiments conducted on cultured HeLa (tissue culture) cells revealed that there is a limit of dose above which adaptive response was not observed and a limit of dose below which this response was not induced. The exposure of cells in the territories with elevated radiation background leads to genome instability which results in enhanced radiosensitivity. Investigations on the blood lymphocytes of people living in contaminated regions revealed that adaptive response was more significant in children whereas in adults there was slight increase. Acute irradiation serves as a tool revealing the changes that took place in DNA during chronic low level irradiations after Chernobyl disaster. (author).

  5. Applications of low level liquid scintillation counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noakes, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Low level liquid scintillation counting is reviewed in terms of its present use and capabilities for measuring low activity samples. New areas of application of the method are discussed with special interest directed to the food industry and environmental monitoring. Advantages offered in the use of a low background liquid scintillation counter for the nuclear power industry and nuclear navy are discussed. Attention is drawn to the need for commercial development of such instrumentation to enable wider use of the method. A user clientele is suggested as is the required technology to create such a counter

  6. Onsite storage facility for low level radwaste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has designed and constructed an onsite storage facility for low level radwaste (LLRW) at its Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant in northern Alabama. The paper addresses the function of this facility and provides a complete description of the reinforced concrete storage modules which are the principal structural elements of the facility. The loads and loading combinations for the design of the storage modules are defined to include the foundation design parameters. Other aspects of the modules that are addressed are; the structural roof elements that provide access to the modules, shielding requirements for the LLRW, and tornado missile considerations

  7. Solid low-level waste certification strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.A.

    1991-08-01

    The purpose of the Solid Low-Level Waste (SLLW) Certification Program is to provide assurance that SLLW generated at the ORNL meets the applicable waste acceptance criteria for those facilities to which the waste is sent for treatment, handling, storage, or disposal. This document describes the strategy to be used for certification of SLLW or ORNL. The SLLW Certification Program applies to all ORNL operations involving the generation, shipment, handling, treatment, storage and disposal of SLLW. Mixed wastes, containing both hazardous and radioactive constituents, and transuranic wastes are not included in the scope of this document. 13 refs., 3 figs

  8. Low-level siting, Edgemont, South Dakota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    The siting of a low-level radwaste disposal facility and characterization activities to date in Edgemont, South Dakota are discussed. By using past and present experience the author sets forth the major problem, the social and political considerations, community acceptance, media and public officials' attitudes, criteria for acceptance and significance of countywide vote in support of facility. Characterization activities, site selection planning and criteria, above-grade and below-grade technical evaluation, NRC interface, 10 CFR Part 61 related to technical work, as well as community acceptance and license application are covered. The paper deals with specific problems, solutions and ongoing activities

  9. Low-level siting, Edgemont, South Dakota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    The siting of a low-level radwaste disposal facility and characterization activities to date, at Edgemont, South Dakota are given. Using past and present experience setting forth the major problem as viewed by the author, the social and political considerations, community acceptance, media and public officials' attitudes, criteria for acceptance and significance of countywide vote in support of facility are presented. Characterization activities, site selection planning and criteria, above-grade and below-grade technical evaluation, NRC interface, 10 CFR Part 61 related to technical work, as well as community acceptance and license application are included. The paper deals with specific problems, solutions and ongoing activities

  10. Liquid low level waste management expert system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrada, J.J.; Abraham, T.J.; Jackson, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    An expert system has been developed as part of a new initiative for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) systems analysis program. This expert system will aid in prioritizing radioactive waste streams for treatment and disposal by evaluating the severity and treatability of the problem, as well as the final waste form. The objectives of the expert system development included: (1) collecting information on process treatment technologies for liquid low-level waste (LLLW) that can be incorporated in the knowledge base of the expert system, and (2) producing a prototype that suggests processes and disposal technologies for the ORNL LLLW system. 4 refs., 9 figs

  11. Low-level radioactive wastes: Their treatment, handling, disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Conrad P [Robert A. Taft Sanitary Engineering Center, Radiological Health Research Activities, Cincinnati, OH(United States)

    1964-07-01

    The release of low level wastes may result in some radiation exposure to man and his surroundings. This book describes techniques of handling, treatment, and disposal of low-level wastes aimed at keeping radiation exposure to a practicable minimum. In this context, wastes are considered low level if they are released into the environment without subsequent control. This book is concerned with practices relating only to continuous operations and not to accidental releases of radioactive materials. It is written by use for those interested in low level waste disposal problems and particularly for the health physicist concerned with these problems in the field. It should be helpful also to water and sewage works personnel concerned with the efficiency of water and sewage treatment processes for the removal of radioactive materials; the personnel engaged in design, construction, licensing, and operation of treatment facilities; and to student of nuclear technology. After an introduction the following areas are discussed: sources, quantities and composition of radioactive wastes; collection, sampling and measurement; direct discharge to the water, soil and air environment; air cleaning; removal of radioactivity by water-treatment processes and biological processes; treatment on site by chemical precipitation , ion exchange and absorption, electrodialysis, solvent extraction and other methods; treatment on site including evaporation and storage; handling and treatment of solid wastes; public health implications. Appendices include a glossary; standards for protection against radiation; federal radiation council radiation protection guidance for federal agencies; site selection criteria for nuclear energy facilities.

  12. RF applications in digital signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Schilcher, T

    2008-01-01

    Ever higher demands for stability, accuracy, reproducibility, and monitoring capability are being placed on Low-Level Radio Frequency (LLRF) systems of particle accelerators. Meanwhile, continuing rapid advances in digital signal processing technology are being exploited to meet these demands, thus leading to development of digital LLRF systems. The rst part of this course will begin by focusing on some of the important building-blocks of RF signal processing including mixer theory and down-conversion, I/Q (amplitude and phase) detection, digital down-conversion (DDC) and decimation, concluding with a survey of I/Q modulators. The second part of the course will introduce basic concepts of feedback systems, including examples of digital cavity eld and phase control, followed by radial loop architectures. Adaptive feed-forward systems used for the suppression of repetitive beam disturbances will be examined. Finally, applications and principles of system identi cation approaches will be summarized.

  13. Low level tank waste disposal study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullally, J.A.

    1994-09-29

    Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) contracted a team consisting of Los Alamos Technical Associates (LATA), British Nuclear Fuel Laboratories (BNFL), Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and TRW through the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Technical Support Contract to conduct a study on several areas concerning vitrification and disposal of low-level-waste (LLW). The purpose of the study was to investigate how several parameters could be specified to achieve full compliance with regulations. The most restrictive regulation governing this disposal activity is the National Primary Drinking Water Act which sets the limits of exposure to 4 mrem per year for a person drinking two liters of ground water daily. To fully comply, this constraint would be met independently of the passage of time. In addition, another key factor in the investigation was the capability to retrieve the disposed waste during the first 50 years as specified in Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. The objective of the project was to develop a strategy for effective long-term disposal of the low-level waste at the Hanford site.

  14. Health effects of low level radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattori, Sadao [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-12-31

    In 1982, Prof. Thomas Don Luckey of Missouri Univ. asserted `Radiation Hormesis` on the Journal of Health Physics and he published two books. CRIEPI initiated the research program on Radiation Hormesis following his assertion to confirm `is it true or not?` After nearly ten year research activities on data surveys and animal tests with many Universities, we are realizing scientific truth of bio-positive effects by low level radiation exposures. The interesting bio-positive effects we found could be categorized in following five groups. 1) Rejuvenation of cells such as increase of SOD and cell membrane permeability, 2) Moderation of psychological stress through response of key enzymes, 3) Suppression and therapy of adult-diseases such as diabetes and hypertension, 4) Suppression of cancer through enhancement of immune systems such as lymphocytes, 5) Suppression of cancer and ratio-adaptive response by activation of DNA repair and apoptosis. In the responses of many specialists to our initiation of radiation hormesis research program following T.D. Luckey`s claim about low level radiation, I have to pick up for the first, the great success of Prof. Sakamoto. Prof. Sakamoto had been already applying whole body low dose irradiation for ten years before our radiation hormesis research started on the therapy to suppress the cancer reappearing after treatment. He reported about his successful trial to real patients and showed an enhancement of immune system. (author)

  15. Health effects of low level radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Sadao

    1998-01-01

    In 1982, Prof. Thomas Don Luckey of Missouri Univ. asserted 'Radiation Hormesis' on the Journal of Health Physics and he published two books. CRIEPI initiated the research program on Radiation Hormesis following his assertion to confirm 'is it true or not?' After nearly ten year research activities on data surveys and animal tests with many Universities, we are realizing scientific truth of bio-positive effects by low level radiation exposures. The interesting bio-positive effects we found could be categorized in following five groups. 1) Rejuvenation of cells such as increase of SOD and cell membrane permeability, 2) Moderation of psychological stress through response of key enzymes, 3) Suppression and therapy of adult-diseases such as diabetes and hypertension, 4) Suppression of cancer through enhancement of immune systems such as lymphocytes, 5) Suppression of cancer and ratio-adaptive response by activation of DNA repair and apoptosis. In the responses of many specialists to our initiation of radiation hormesis research program following T.D. Luckey's claim about low level radiation, I have to pick up for the first, the great success of Prof. Sakamoto. Prof. Sakamoto had been already applying whole body low dose irradiation for ten years before our radiation hormesis research started on the therapy to suppress the cancer reappearing after treatment. He reported about his successful trial to real patients and showed an enhancement of immune system. (author)

  16. Russian low-level waste disposal program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, L. [L. Lehman and Associates, Inc., Burnsville, MN (United States)

    1993-03-01

    The strategy for disposal of low-level radioactive waste in Russia differs from that employed in the US. In Russia, there are separate authorities and facilities for wastes generated by nuclear power plants, defense wastes, and hospital/small generator/research wastes. The reactor wastes and the defense wastes are generally processed onsite and disposed of either onsite, or nearby. Treating these waste streams utilizes such volume reduction techniques as compaction and incineration. The Russians also employ methods such as bitumenization, cementation, and vitrification for waste treatment before burial. Shallow land trench burial is the most commonly used technique. Hospital and research waste is centrally regulated by the Moscow Council of Deputies. Plans are made in cooperation with the Ministry of Atomic Energy. Currently the former Soviet Union has a network of low-level disposal sites located near large cities. Fifteen disposal sites are located in the Federal Republic of Russia, six are in the Ukraine, and one is located in each of the remaining 13 republics. Like the US, each republic is in charge of management of the facilities within their borders. The sites are all similarly designed, being modeled after the RADON site near Moscow.

  17. Low level tank waste disposal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullally, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) contracted a team consisting of Los Alamos Technical Associates (LATA), British Nuclear Fuel Laboratories (BNFL), Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and TRW through the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Technical Support Contract to conduct a study on several areas concerning vitrification and disposal of low-level-waste (LLW). The purpose of the study was to investigate how several parameters could be specified to achieve full compliance with regulations. The most restrictive regulation governing this disposal activity is the National Primary Drinking Water Act which sets the limits of exposure to 4 mrem per year for a person drinking two liters of ground water daily. To fully comply, this constraint would be met independently of the passage of time. In addition, another key factor in the investigation was the capability to retrieve the disposed waste during the first 50 years as specified in Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. The objective of the project was to develop a strategy for effective long-term disposal of the low-level waste at the Hanford site

  18. Discussion of high brightness rf linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The fundamental aspects of high-brightness rf linacs are outlined, showing the breadth and complexity of the technology and indicating that synergism with advancements in other areas is important. Areas of technology reviewed include ion sources, injectors, rf accelerator structures, beam dynamics, rf power, and automatic control

  19. Heat sink management during CANDU low level operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Liansheng

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces the practice of low-level operation with opening on the main heat transport system during an outage for a Candu-6 nuclear power plant, analyses the risks of losing heat sink during this condition, and points out the safety measures and management requirement for controlling such risks. This paper can be used as a reference for improving and optimizing the heat sink management for the coming outages. (author)

  20. Low-Level Exploitation Mitigation by Diverse Microservices

    OpenAIRE

    Otterstad , Christian; Yarygina , Tetiana

    2017-01-01

    Part 2: Microservices and Containers; International audience; This paper discusses a combination of isolatable microservices and software diversity as a mitigation technique against low-level exploitation; the effectiveness and benefits of such an architecture are substantiated. We argue that the core security benefit of microservices with diversity is increased control flow isolation. Additionally, a new microservices mitigation technique leveraging a security monitor service is introduced t...

  1. Mixed low-level waste form evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl, P.I.; Cheng, Wu-Ching; Wheeler, T.; Waters, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    A scoping level evaluation of polyethylene encapsulation and vitreous waste forms for safe storage of mixed low-level waste was performed. Maximum permissible radionuclide concentrations were estimated for 15 indicator radionuclides disposed of at the Hanford and Savannah River sites with respect to protection of the groundwater and inadvertent intruder pathways. Nominal performance improvements of polyethylene and glass waste forms relative to grout are reported. These improvements in maximum permissible radionuclide concentrations depend strongly on the radionuclide of concern and pathway. Recommendations for future research include improving the current understanding of the performance of polymer waste forms, particularly macroencapsulation. To provide context to these estimates, the concentrations of radionuclides in treated DOE waste should be compared with the results of this study to determine required performance

  2. Low level waste solidification practice in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, S.; Kuribayashi, H.; Kono, Y.

    1981-01-01

    Both sea dumping and land isolation are planned to be accomplished for low level waste disposal in Japan. The conceptual design of land isolation facilities has been completed, and site selection will presently get underway. With respect to ocean dumping, safety surveys are being performed along the lines of the London Dumping Convention and the Revised Definitions and Recommendations of the IAEA, and the review of Japanese regulations and applicable criteria is being expedited. This paper discusses the present approach to waste solidification practices in Japan. It reports that the bitumen solidification process and the plastic solidification process are being increasingly used in Japan. Despite higher investment costs, both processes have advantages in operating cost, and are comparable to the cement solidification process in overall costs

  3. Low-level radioactive biomedical wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casarett, G.W.

    A summary of the management and hazards of low-level radioactive biomedical wastes is presented. The volume, disposal methods, current problems, regulatory agencies, and possible solutions to disposal problems are discussed. The benefits derived from using radioactivity in medicine are briefly described. Potential health risks are discussed. The radioactivity in most of the radioactive biomedical waste is a small fraction of that contained naturally in the human body or in the natural environment. Benefit-risk-cost considerations are presented. The cost of managing these wastes is getting so high that a new perspective for comparison of radioactivity (facts, risks, costs, benefits and trade-offs) and alternate approaches to minimize the risk and cost and maximize the benefits is suggested

  4. Inheritance from low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Kume, Tamikazu; Makuuchi, Keizo; Inoue, Tomio; Komoda, Fumio; Maeda, Mitsuru

    2009-01-01

    A benefit born as an inheritance from low-level radioactive waste is considered. In the present study, a direct economic scale of application of radiation in Japanese industry, agriculture and medicine is taken as parameter for quantifying the size of benefit. In 2006, the economic scale is about 21 billion dollars (b$) for industry, 2.5b$ for agriculture and 14b$ for medicine. Economic scale covered the all fields is totaled 37b$. Due to those benefit, one can drive a car and play an internet, pleasure the dinning food. Diagnosis and treatment by nuclear medicine can possible to survive the millions of lives and resulting in improving the quality of life, decreasing pain and suffering. However, most Japanese (80%>) may not aware those benefits to date. This report is prepared for aiming at disseminating those benefits to our peoples. (author)

  5. Solid low level waste management guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, P.

    1995-01-01

    In the 1980's the nuclear industry began focusing a great deal of attention on minimizing the volume of low level radioactive waste (LLW) that required disposal. This was driven by several factors including rising disposal costs, increased regulatory pressures, and increased pressure from other organizations such as INPO. In the 1990's most utilities are faced with intense competition in the electrical generation market. The survival of a utility is based on their ability to produce electricity by the most efficient and economical means available. Waste management related costs are a substantial portion of most utilities O ampersand M budgets. Disposal site access denial continues to be a major factor in waste management program decision, and the pressures to minimize waste volumes from outside organizations is greater than ever

  6. Low-level radwaste engineering economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, M.H.; Miller, C.C.; Young, L.G.

    1984-07-01

    This topical report on engineering economics for low-level radwaste systems details the methodologies used for economic analyses of radwaste treatment systems and provides examples of radwaste economic evaluations. All of the parameters and cost items used in an evaluation are defined. Examples of the present-value-of-revenue-requirements method, levelized-revenue-requirements method, and the equivalent-capital-investment method are provided. Also, the calculation to determine the maximum justifiable capital expenditure for a radwaste system is illustrated. The report also provides examples of economic evaluations for many current radwaste treatment options. These options include evaporation versus demineralization, dewatering resins versus solidification of resins, and several volume reduction systems. 15 figures, 6 tables

  7. Low level processing of diode spectrometry results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippot, J.C.

    1975-01-01

    Systematic measurements in gamma spectrometry on slightly radioactive samples have led to study low levels existing in the spectra and to develop suitable processing methods. These methods and the advance that they represent in reading sensitivity are now applicable to all types of spectrum. The principles of this automatic reading are briefly summarized, leading to a description of the modifications which proved necessary to increase sensitivity. Three sample spectra are used to illustrate the arguments employed to achieve this result. The conclusions from the corresponding measurements provide a clearer understanding of the quality of the responses obtained during the initial reading. The application of these methods to systematic measurements is considered in the case of atmospheric aerosols. The owerall results obtained since 1969 are presented [fr

  8. Draft low level waste technical summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, W.J.; Benar, C.J.; Certa, P.J.; Eiholzer, C.R.; Kruger, A.A.; Norman, E.C.; Mitchell, D.E.; Penwell, D.E.; Reidel, S.P.; Shade, J.W.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to present an outline of the Hanford Site Low-Level Waste (LLW) disposal program, what it has accomplished, what is being done, and where the program is headed. This document may be used to provide background information to personnel new to the LLW management/disposal field and to those individuals needing more information or background on an area in LLW for which they are not familiar. This document should be appropriate for outside groups that may want to learn about the program without immediately becoming immersed in the details. This document is not a program or systems engineering baseline report, and personnel should refer to more current baseline documentation for critical information

  9. Computer control and data acquisition system for the R.F. Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, K.A.; Burris, R.D.; Mankin, J.B.; Thompson, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    The Radio Frequency Test Facility (RFTF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, used to test and evaluate high-power ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) systems and components, is monitored and controlled by a multicomponent computer system. This data acquisition and control system consists of three major hardware elements: (1) an Allen-Bradley PLC-3 programmable controller; (2) a VAX 11/780 computer; and (3) a CAMAC serial highway interface. Operating in LOCAL as well as REMOTE mode, the programmable logic controller (PLC) performs all the control functions of the test facility. The VAX computer acts as the operator's interface to the test facility by providing color mimic panel displays and allowing input via a trackball device. The VAX also provides archiving of trend data acquired by the PLC. Communications between the PLC and the VAX are via the CAMAC serial highway. Details of the hardware, software, and the operation of the system are presented in this paper

  10. Low-level radioactive waste vitrification: effect of Cs partitioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, W.S.; Ougouag, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    The traditional Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) immobilization options are cementation or bituminization. Either of these options could be followed by shallow-land burial (SLB) or above-ground disposal. These rather simple LLW procedures appeared to be readily available, to meet regulatory requirements, and to satisfy cost constraints. The authorization of State Compacts, the forced closure of half of the six SLB disposal facilities of the nation, and the escalation of transportation/disposal fees diminish the viability of these options. The synergetic combination of these factors led to a reassessment of traditional methods and to an investigation of other techniques. This paper analyzes the traditional LLW immobilization options, reviews the impact of the LLW stream composition on Low-Level Waste Vitrification (LLWV), then proposes and briefly discusses several techniques to control the volatile radionuclides in a Process Improved LLWV system (PILLWV)

  11. Ocean dumping of low-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Templeton, W.L.

    1982-10-01

    Scientific bases, developed internationally over the last 20 years, to control and restrict to acceptable levels the resultant radiation doses that potentially could occur from the dumping of low-level radioactive wastes in the deep oceans were presented. The author concluded that present evaluations of the disposal of radioactive wastes into the oceans, coastal and deep ocean, indicate that these are being conducted within the ICRP recommended dose limits. However, there are presently no international institutions or mechanisms to deal with the long-term radiation exposure at low-levels to large numbers of people on a regional basis if not a global level. Recommendations were made to deal with these aspects through the established mechanisms of NEA/OECD and the London Dumping Convention, in cooperation with ICRP, UNSCEAR and the IAEA

  12. Placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial of the effect two different low-level laser therapies (LLLT)--intraoral and extraoral--on trismus and facial swelling following surgical extraction of the lower third molar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aras, Mutan Hamdi; Güngörmüş, Metin

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the effects of extraoral and intraoral low-level laser therapies (LLLT) on postoperative trismus and oedema following the removal of mandibular third molars. Forty-eight patients who were to undergo surgical removal of their lower third molars were studied. Patients were randomly allocated to one of three groups: extraoral LLLT, intraoral LLLT, or placebo. In the study, a Ga-Al-As diode laser device with a continuous wavelength of 808 nm was used, and the laser therapy was applied by using a 1 x 3-cm handpiece. The flat-top laser beam profile was used in this therapy. For both of the LLLT groups, laser energy was applied at 100 mW (0.1 W) for a total of 120 s (0.1 W x 120 s = 12 J). Patients in the extraoral-LLLT group (n = 16) received 12-J (4 J/cm(2)) low-level laser irradiation, and the laser was applied at the insertion point of the masseter muscle immediately after the operation. Patients in the intraoral-LLLT group (n = 16) received 12-J (4 J/cm(2)) low-level laser irradiation intraorally at the operation site 1 cm from the target tissue. In the placebo group (n = 16), the handpiece was inserted intraorally at the operation site and then was touched extraorally to the masseter muscle for 1 min at each site (120 s total), but the laser was not activated. The size of the interincisal opening and facial swelling were evaluated on the second and seventh postoperative days. At the second postoperative day, trismus (29.0 +/- 7.6 mm [p = 0.010]) and swelling (105.3 +/- 5.0 mm [p = 0.047]) in the extraoral-LLLT group were significantly less than in the placebo group (trismus: 21.1 +/- 7.6 mm, swelling: 109.1 +/- 4.4 mm). Trismus (39.6 +/- 9.0 mm [p = 0.002]) in the extraoral-LLLT group at the seventh postoperative day was also significantly less than in the placebo group (29.0 +/- 6.2 mm). However, at the seventh postoperative day in the intraoral-LLLT group, only trismus (35.6 +/- 8.5 [p = 0.002]) was significantly less than

  13. Behavioural changes in mice exposed to low level microwave fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goiceanu, C.; Gradinaru, F.; Danulescu, R.; Balaceanu, G.; Sandu, D. D.; Avadanei, O. G.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of our study is to point out some changes in mice behaviour due possibly to exposure to low-level microwave fields. Animals spontaneous behaviour were monitored and the exploring behaviour and motor activity were assessed. Ten selected Swiss male mice were exposed to low-level microwave fields of about 1 mW/cm 2 power density for a relatively long period of time (13 weeks), comparing to their lifetime. The exposure system consists in a transverse electromagnetic (TEM) Cell. A control lot of ten Swiss male mice was used. All twenty mice were selected to be of same age and of 202 g initial body weight. Each animal was placed in his own holder. The behaviour of the animals, from both exposed and control lots, was assessed by using a battery of three behavioural tests. The test sessions were performed every two weeks. During exposure period it was recorded a progressive but moderate loss of motor activity for both exposed and controls, probably due to weight gain and aging. Concerning exploratory activity there is a significant difference between control and exposed animals. Control mice had approximately constant performances in time. On the other hand exposed mice showed a progressive decrease in time of their exploratory ability. Motor activity of exposed animals does not seem to be affected by microwave exposure, in spite of moderate loss in time of motor activity in both lots, as long as it was recorded a quite similar evolution. The difference in performances of exposed and controls concerning exploratory activity seem to emphasise an effect of long-term low-level microwave exposure. The progressive loss in time of exploratory activity of exposed mice, in contrast with controls, could be due to the interference of microwaves with central nervous activity. (authors)

  14. Beam physics design strategy for a high-current rf linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, M. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The high average beam power of an rf linac system for transmutation of nuclear waste puts very stringent requirements on beam quality and beam control. Fractional beam losses along the accelerator must be kept at extremely low levels to assure {open_quotes}hands-on{close_quotes} maintenance. Hence, halo formation and large-amplitude tails in the particle distribution due to beam mismatch and equipartitioning effects must be avoided. This implies that the beam should ideally be in near-perfect thermal equilibrium from injection to full energy - in contrast to existing rf linacs in which the transverse temperature, T {sub {perpendicular}}, is higher than the longitudinal temperature, T{sub {parallel}}. The physics and parameter scaling for such a system will be reviewed using the results of recent work on high-intensity bunched beams. A design strategy for a high-current rf linac with equilibrated beam will be proposed.

  15. HELLE: Health Effects of Low Level Exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoten, Eert

    1998-01-01

    The Health Council is closely involved in establishing the scientific foundation of exposure limits for substances and radiation in order to protect public health. Through the years, the Council has contributed to the formulation of principles and procedures, both for carcinogenic and for noncarcinogenic agents. As a rule, the discussion with regard to the derivation of health-based recommended exposure limits centers around the appropriateness of extrapolation methods (What can be inferred from data on high exposure levels and on experimental animals?). Generally speaking, there is a lack of direct information on the health effects of low levels of exposure. Effects at these levels cannot usually be detected by means of traditional animal experiments or epidemiological research. The capacity of these analytical instruments to distinguish between ''signal'' and ''noise'' is inadequate in most cases. Annex B of this report contains a brief outline of the difficulties and the established methods for tackling this problem. In spite of this, the hope exists that the posited weak signals, if they are indeed present, can be detected by other means. The search will have to take place on a deeper level. In other words, effort must be made to discover what occurs at underlying levels of biological organization when organisms are exposed to low doses of radiation or substances. Molecular and cell biology provide various methods and techniques which give an insight into the processes within the cell. This results in an increase in the knowledge about the molecular and cellular effects of exposure to agents, or stated differently, the working mechanisms which form the basis of the health effects. Last year, the Health Council considered that the time was ripe to take stock of the state of knowledge in this field. To this end, an international working conference was held from 19 to 21 October 1997, entitled ''Health Effects of Low Level Exposures: Scientific Developments and

  16. ICH rf system data acquisition and real time control using a microcomputer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cary, W.P.; Allen, J.A.; Pinsker, R.I.; Petty, C.C.

    1993-10-01

    On the basis of the rapidly increasing power, speed, and decreasing cost of the personal computer (microcomputer) it was felt that a real time data acquisition and control system could be configured quickly and very cost effectively. It was further felt that by using a high level or object-oriented programming language that considerable time and expense could be saved and at the same time increase system flexibility. This paper will attempt to address the desired system requirements and performance for both the control of the high power transmitters and for the data acquisition and presentation of the information

  17. 16 kanałowy układ sterownika silników krokowych przesuwników fazy RF 1,3 GHz zasilających nadprzewodzące wnęki rezonansowe lasera na swobodnych elektronach FLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Kielar, E; Wierba, W

    2011-01-01

    The LLRF (Low Level Radio Frequency) System has to control also the RF coupling with the FLASH accelerator cavities. It is done remotely by controlling RF Phase Shifters driven by step motors. It was necessary to design the multichannel stepper motors driver controlled via Ethernet. The driver is built on the basis of low-power CMOS 8-bit AVR RISC microcontroller and the MODBUS protocol. The 16 drivers integrated on a single PCB allow for controlling 16 RF (Radio Frequency) Phase Shifters for the proper adjustment of the waveguides to cavities coupling.

  18. Photomultiplier tubes for Low Level Cerenkov Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strindehag, O.

    1965-03-01

    Tube backgrounds of several 2-inch photomultiplier types having S11, 'S' , S13 and S20 cathodes are compared by measuring signal and background pulse height distributions at pulse heights corresponding to a few photo-electrons. The reference signal is generated by means of a β-source and a plexiglass radiator. It is found that comparatively good results are obtained with selected tubes of the EMI types 6097B and 9514B having equivalent dark current dc values down to 10 -12 input lumens. Special interest is devoted to the correlation between the measured tube backgrounds and the dark current dc values of the tubes, as a good correlation between these parameters simplifies the selection of photomultiplier tubes. The equivalent dark currents of the tested tubes extend over the range 10 -12 to 10 -9 input lumens. Although the investigation deals with photomultiplier tubes intended for use in low level Cerenkov detectors it is believed that the results could be valuable in other fields where photomultiplier tubes are utilized for the detection of weak light pulses

  19. Low level radwaste packaging: why not cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    Over the past several years many words have been expended in a quest to define a variety of competing radioactive waste immobilization technologies. With the more recent recognition of the technical pitfalls of urea-formaldehyde (UF) a liquid chemical binder considered as optimum less than two years ago, utilities, architect-engineers and systems vendors find themselves in a technology void, awaiting the inevitable breakthrough which will identify the perfect immobilization agent. The culmination of these pressures has brought about the introduction of new immobilization technologies including: one which offers both volume reduction and immobilization in yet another new binder agent; the costly development of highly sophisticated volume reduction systems, the highly-concentrated products from which may pose as-yet unknown immobilization problems; and, the marketing of several new more expensive liquid chemical binders which are reputed to have eliminated the kinds of problems associated with urea-formaldehyde. This paper addresses these issues by coming full circle and arriving back at the initial approach employed for low level radwaste immobilization, the use of cement. Based on an evaluation of the three principal competing immobilization approaches, liquid chemical, bitumen and cement, the merits and drawbacks of each is examined. As will be described, an objective assessment of these competing technologies has resulted in a somewhat surprising conclusion that, while none of the approaches is without disadvantages, cement can be shown to offer the most reliable, versatile long-term solution to today's needs

  20. Conditioning characterization of low level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, A. F.

    2010-12-01

    This study has been carried out in the radioactive waste management laboratory Sudan Atomic Energy Commission. The main purpose of this work is method development for treatment and conditioning of low level liquid waste in order to improve radiation protection level in the country. For that purpose a liquid radioactive material containing Cs-137 was treated using the developed method. In the method different type of materials (cement, sands, concrete..etc) were tested for absorption of radiation emitted from the source as well as suitability of the material for storage for long time. It was found that the best material to be used is Smsmia concrete. Where the surface dose reduced from 150 to 3μ/h. Also design of storage container was proposed (with specification: diameter 6.5 cm, height 6 cm, placed in internal cylinder of diameter 10.3 cm, height 12.3 cm) and all are installed on the concrete and cement in the cylinder. Method was used in the process of double-packaging configuration. For more protection it is proposed that a mixed of cement to fill the void in addition to the sand be added to ensure low amount of radiation exposure while transport or storage. (Author)

  1. Photomultiplier tubes for Low Level Cerenkov Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strindehag, O

    1965-03-15

    Tube backgrounds of several 2-inch photomultiplier types having S11, 'S' , S13 and S20 cathodes are compared by measuring signal and background pulse height distributions at pulse heights corresponding to a few photo-electrons. The reference signal is generated by means of a {beta}-source and a plexiglass radiator. It is found that comparatively good results are obtained with selected tubes of the EMI types 6097B and 9514B having equivalent dark current dc values down to 10{sup -12} input lumens. Special interest is devoted to the correlation between the measured tube backgrounds and the dark current dc values of the tubes, as a good correlation between these parameters simplifies the selection of photomultiplier tubes. The equivalent dark currents of the tested tubes extend over the range 10{sup -12} to 10{sup -9} input lumens. Although the investigation deals with photomultiplier tubes intended for use in low level Cerenkov detectors it is believed that the results could be valuable in other fields where photomultiplier tubes are utilized for the detection of weak light pulses.

  2. Solid low-level waste forecasting guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Templeton, K.J.; Dirks, L.L.

    1995-03-01

    Guidance for forecasting solid low-level waste (LLW) on a site-wide basis is described in this document. Forecasting is defined as an approach for collecting information about future waste receipts. The forecasting approach discussed in this document is based solely on hanford's experience within the last six years. Hanford's forecasting technique is not a statistical forecast based upon past receipts. Due to waste generator mission changes, startup of new facilities, and waste generator uncertainties, statistical methods have proven to be inadequate for the site. It is recommended that an approach similar to Hanford's annual forecasting strategy be implemented at each US Department of Energy (DOE) installation to ensure that forecast data are collected in a consistent manner across the DOE complex. Hanford's forecasting strategy consists of a forecast cycle that can take 12 to 30 months to complete. The duration of the cycle depends on the number of LLW generators and staff experience; however, the duration has been reduced with each new cycle. Several uncertainties are associated with collecting data about future waste receipts. Volume, shipping schedule, and characterization data are often reported as estimates with some level of uncertainty. At Hanford, several methods have been implemented to capture the level of uncertainty. Collection of a maximum and minimum volume range has been implemented as well as questionnaires to assess the relative certainty in the requested data

  3. Minnesota multiphasic personality inventory-2 restructured form (MMPI-2-RF) scale score differences in bariatric surgery candidates diagnosed with binge eating disorder versus BMI-matched controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Ryan J; Ben-Porath, Yossef S; Ashton, Kathleen; Heinberg, Leslie J

    2014-04-01

    Binge Eating Disorder (BED) is among the most common psychiatric disorders in bariatric surgery candidates. The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) is a broadband, psychological test that includes measures of emotional and behavioral dysfunction, which have been associated with BED behaviors in bariatric surgery candidates; however these studies have lacked appropriate controls. In the current study, we compared MMPI-2-RF scale scores of bariatric surgery patients diagnosed with BED (BED+) with BMI-matched controls without BED (BED-). Three-hundred and seven BED+ participants (72.64% female and 67.87% Caucasian; mean BMI of 51.36 kg/m(2) [SD = 11.94]) were drawn from a large, database (N = 1304). Three-hundred and seven BED- participants were matched on BMI and demographics (72.64% female, 68.63% Caucasian, and mean BMI of 51.30 kg/m(2) [SD = 11.70]). The BED+ group scored significantly higher on measures of Demoralization, Low Positive Emotions, and Dysfunctional Negative Emotions and scored lower on measures of Antisocial Behaviors, reflecting behavioral constraint. Optimal T-Score cutoffs were below the traditional 65 T score for several MMPI-2-RF scales. MMPI-2-RF externalizing measures also added incrementally to differentiating between the groups beyond the Binge Eating Scale (BES). BED+ individuals produced greater elevations on a number of MMPI-2-RF internalizing scales and externalizing scales. Use of the test in conjunction with a clinical interview and other self-report data can further aid the clinician in guiding patients to appropriate treatment to optimize outcome. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. DOOCS patterns, reusable software components for FPGA based RF GUN field controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pucyk, P.

    2006-01-01

    Modern accelerator technology combines software and hardware solutions to provide distributed, high efficiency digital systems for High Energy Physics experiments. Providing flexible, maintainable software is crucial for ensuring high availability of the whole system. In order to fulfil all these requirements, appropriate design and development techniques have to be used. Software patterns are well known solution for common programming issues, providing proven development paradigms, which can help to avoid many design issues. DOOCS patterns introduces new concepts of reusable software components for control system algorithms development and implementation in DOOCS framework. Chosen patterns have been described and usage examples have been presented in this paper. (orig.)

  5. DOOCS patterns, reusable software components for FPGA based RF GUN field controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pucyk, P. [Institute of Electronic Systems, Warsaw (Poland)

    2006-07-01

    Modern accelerator technology combines software and hardware solutions to provide distributed, high efficiency digital systems for High Energy Physics experiments. Providing flexible, maintainable software is crucial for ensuring high availability of the whole system. In order to fulfil all these requirements, appropriate design and development techniques have to be used. Software patterns are well known solution for common programming issues, providing proven development paradigms, which can help to avoid many design issues. DOOCS patterns introduces new concepts of reusable software components for control system algorithms development and implementation in DOOCS framework. Chosen patterns have been described and usage examples have been presented in this paper. (orig.)

  6. Racetrack microtron rf system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallerico, P.J.; Keffeler, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    The rf system for the National Bureau of Standards (NBS)/Los Alamos cw racetrack microtron is described. The low-power portion consists of five 75-W amplifers that drive two input ports in each of two chopper deflection cavities and one port in the prebuncher cavity. A single 500-kW klystron drives four separate 2380-MHz cavity sections: the two main accelerator sections, a capture section, and a preaccelerator section. The phases and amplitudes in all cavities are controlled by electronic or electromechanical controls. The 1-MW klystron power supply and crowbar system were purchased as a unit; several modifications are described that improve power-supply performance. The entire rf system has been tested and shipped to the NBS, and the chopper-buncher system has been operated with beam at the NBS. 5 refs., 2 figs

  7. In Depth Diagnostics for RF System Operation in the PEP-II B Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Winkle, Daniel; Fox, John; Teytelman, Dmitry; SLAC

    2005-01-01

    The PEP-II RF systems incorporate numerous feedback loops in the low-level processing for impedance control and operating point regulation. The interaction of the multiple loops with the beam is complicated, and the systems incorporate online diagnostic tools to configure the feedback loops as well as to record fault files in the case of an RF abort. Rapid and consistent analysis of the RF-related beam aborts and other failures is critical to the reliable operation of the B-Factory, especially at the recently achieved high beam currents. Procedures and algorithms used to extract diagnostic information from time domain fault files are presented and illustrated via example interpretations of PEP-II fault file data. Example faults presented will highlight the subtle interpretation required to determine the root cause. Some such examples are: abort kicker firing asynchronously, klystron and cavity arcs, beam loss leading to longitudinal instability, tuner read back jumps and poorly configured low-level RF feedback loop

  8. The effect of high-dose vitamin D supplementation on calciotropic hormones and bone mineral density in obese subjects with low levels of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin d: results from a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamberg, Louise; Pedersen, Steen B; Richelsen, Bjørn; Rejnmark, Lars

    2013-07-01

    Low levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) are associated with increased bone turnover and risk of fractures. Plasma 25OHD is inversely related to body mass index, and vitamin D deficiency is common in obesity. We aimed to determine whether vitamin D supplementation affects bone turnover and bone mineral density (BMD) in obese subjects. Fifty-two healthy obese men and women aged 18-50 years with plasma 25OHD levels below 50 nmol/L were randomized to 7,000 IU of cholecalciferol daily or placebo for 26 weeks. We measured plasma levels of 25OHD, parathyroid hormone (PTH), and markers of bone turnover, as well as BMD at the hip, spine, forearm, and whole body. Compared with placebo, treatment with cholecalciferol increased mean plasma 25OHD from 35 to 110 nmol/L (p importance to bone health in young obese subjects as increased levels of 25OHD are associated with a decrease in both PTH and bone turnover and with an increase in BMD at the forearm.

  9. Advanced in-situ control for III-nitride RF power device epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, F.; Zettler, J.-T.; Weyers, M.

    2018-04-01

    In this contribution, the latest improvements regarding wafer temperature measurement on 4H-SiC substrates and, based on this, of film thickness and composition control of GaN and AlGaN layers in power electronic device structures are presented. Simultaneous pyrometry at different wavelengths (950 nm and 405 nm) reveal the advantages and limits of the different temperature measurement approaches. Near-UV pyrometry gives a very stable wafer temperature signal without oscillations during GaN growth since the semi-insulating 4H-SiC substrate material becomes opaque at temperatures above 550 °C at the wavelength of 405 nm. A flat wafer temperature profile across the 100 mm substrate diameter is demonstrated despite a convex wafer shape at AlGaN growth conditions. Based on the precise assignment of wafer temperature during MOVPE we were able to improve the accuracy of the high-temperature n-k database for the materials involved. Consequently, the measurement accuracy of all film thicknesses grown under fixed temperature conditions improved. Comparison of in situ and ex situ determined layer thicknessess indicate an unintended etching of the topmost layer during cool-down. The details and limitations of real-time composition analysis for lower Al-content AlGaN barrier layers during transistor device epitaxy are shown.

  10. Effects of chronic low-level irradiation on Gambusia affinis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.

    1979-01-01

    Since 1944, White Oak Lake (WOL), located on the Oak Ridge Reservation, has served as a final settling basin for low-level radioactive effluents from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Organisms inhabiting the lake have been exposed for many generations to chronic low-level radiation significantly higher than background. During the past decade, studies on Gambusia affinis from WOL have been carried out to relate estimated radiation doses to effects on the fitness of the Gambusia population. Results of studies on fecundity, temperature tolerance, and embryonic mortality have led to the conclusion that the Gambusia population in White Oak Lake has an increased frequency of deleterious and recessive lethal genes which may be attributed to the radiation exposure history. The frequency of nonviable embryos from WOL Gambusia did not change significantly from 1966 to 1978; however, it was still significantly greater than that of a control population. In July 1977, Gambusia from a control population were stocked into a 0.45-ha pond which had served as a low-level waste settling basin. The beta and gamma dose rate in this pond averaged from 37 rad/yr at the water surface, 394 rad/yr at mid-depth, and 1150 rad/yr at the surface of the sediments. Preliminary results from samples taken in August 1978 showed that although the frequency of nonviable embryos increased, the frequency was not significantly greater than that of the control parent population. Additional sampling of future generations of Gambusia in this pond will determine whether the frequency of nonviable embryos increases as succeeding generations are exposed to dose rates that are higher than the dose rates in WOL

  11. Flow proportional sampling of low level liquid effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colley, D.; Jenkins, R.

    1989-01-01

    A flow proportional sampler for use on low level radioactive liquid effluent has been developed for installation on all CEGB nuclear power stations. The sampler, operates by drawing effluent continuously from the main effluent pipeline, through a sampler loop and returning it to the pipeline. The effluent in this loop is sampled by taking small, frequent aliquots using a linear acting shuttle valve. The frequency of operation of this valve is controlled by a flowmeter installed in the effluent line; sampling rate being directly proportional to effluent flowrate. (author)

  12. Low-level radioactive waste treatment technology. Low-level radioactive waste management handbook series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    Each generator of low-level radioactive waste must consider three sequential questions: (1) can the waste in its as-generated form be packaged and shipped to a disposal facility; (2) will the packaged waste be acceptable for disposal; and (3) if so, is it cost effective to dispose of the waste in its as-generated form. These questions are aimed at determining if the waste form, physical and chemical characteristics, and radionuclide content collectively are suitable for shipment and disposal in a cost-effective manner. If not, the waste management procedures will involve processing operations in addition to collection, segregation, packaging, shipment, and disposal. This handbook addresses methods of treating and conditioning low-level radioactive waste for shipment and disposal. A framework is provided for selection of cost-effective waste-processing options for generic categories of low-level radioactive waste. The handbook is intended as a decision-making guide that identifies types of information required to evaluate options, methods of evaluation, and limitations associated with selection of any of the processing options

  13. Issue briefs on low-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This report contains 4 Issue Briefs on low-level radioactive wastes. They are entitled: Handling, Packaging, and Transportation, Economics of LLW Management, Public Participation and Siting, and Low Level Waste Management

  14. DOE low-level waste long term technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barainca, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of the Department of Energy's Low-Level Waste Management Program is to provide a low-level waste management system by 1986. Areas of concentration are defined as: (1) Waste Generation Reduction Technology, (2) Process and Handling Technology, (3) Environmental Technology, (4) Low-Level Waste Disposal Technology. A program overview is provided with specific examples of technical development. 2 figures

  15. Low level radioactive waste management and discharge policies in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezdemir, T.; Oezdemir, C.; Uslu, I.

    2005-01-01

    The legal infrastructure in Turkey for the management of low-level radioactive waste covers the liquid, solid and gaseous wastes. Management of these radioactive wastes is briefly described in this paper. Moreover, delay and decay tank systems that are used to collect and store the low level radioactive wastes as a part of low-level radioactive effluent discharge policy are introduced. (author)

  16. Low-level Battle Management Language

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alstad, A.; Mevassvik, O.M.; Nielsen, M.N.; Løvlid, R.A.; Henderson, H.C.; Jansen, R.E.J.; Reus, N.M. de

    2013-01-01

    TNO (The Netherlands) and FFI (Norway) are cooperating in extending a COTS Computer Generated Forces (CGF) tool with a Coalition Battle Management Language (C-BML) interface for executing C-BML orders and issuing reports. Due to the lack of satisfactory models for command and control (C2)/combat

  17. Genetic effects of low level radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumner, D.

    1988-01-01

    The author outlines the evidence for genetic effects. The incidence of congenital abnormalities, stillbirths and child deaths has been examined in 70,000 pregnancies in Hiroshima and Nagasaki and compared with pregnancies in an unirradiated control group. No difference was detected in incidence of congenital abnormalities of stillbirths, but there was a small insignificant increase in child deaths when both parents were exposed. The number of children born with chromosome aberrations was slightly higher, but insignificant in the exposed group compared with controls. However, surveys of congenital malformations in children of radiologists and in children of Hanford workers suggest a genetic effect of radiation. Absolute and relative methods of calculating risks and the ICRP risk factor is also briefly discussed. (U.K.)

  18. Susceptibility of materials processing experiments to low-level accelerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The types of material processing experiments being considered for shuttle can be grouped into four categories: (1) contained solidification experiment; (2) quasicontainerless experiments; (3) containerless experiments; and (4) fluids experiments. Low level steady acceleration, compensated and uncompensated transient accelerations, and rotation induced flow factors that must be considered in the acceleration environment of a space vehicle whose importance depends on the type of experiment being performed. Some control of these factors may be exercised by the location and orientation of the experiment relative to shuttle and by the orbit vehicle attitude chosen for mission. The effects of the various residual accelerations can have serious consequence to the control of the experiment and must be factored into the design and operation of the apparatus.

  19. Low-level stored waste inspection using mobile robots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, J.S.; Pettus, R.O.

    1996-01-01

    A mobile robot inspection system, ARIES (Autonomous Robotic Inspection Experimental System), has been developed for the U.S. Department of Energy to replace human inspectors in the routine, regulated inspection of radioactive waste stored in drums. The robot will roam the three-foot aisles of drums, stacked four high, making decisions about the surface condition of the drums and maintaining a database of information about each drum. A distributed system of onboard and offboard computers will provide versatile, friendly control of the inspection process. This mobile robot system, based on a commercial mobile platform, will improve the quality of inspection, generate required reports, and relieve human operators from low-level radioactive exposure. This paper describes and discusses primarily the computer and control processes for the system

  20. Incineration systems for low level and mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavruska, J.

    1986-01-01

    A variety of technologies has emerged for incineration of combustible radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes. Evaluation and selection of an incineration system for a particular application from such a large field of options are often confusing. This paper presents several current incineration technologies applicable to Low Level Waste (LLW), hazardous waste, and mixed waste combustion treatment. The major technologies reviewed include controlled-air, rotary kiln, fluidized bed, and liquid injection. Coupled with any incineration technique is the need to select a compatible offgas effluent cleaning system. This paper also reviews the various methods of treating offgas emissions for acid vapor, particulates, organics, and radioactivity. Such effluent control systems include the two general types - wet and dry scrubbing with a closer look at quenching, inertial systems, fabric filtration, gas absorption, adsorption, and various other filtration techniques. Selection criteria for overall waste incineration systems are discussed as they relate to waste characterization

  1. Secondary Low-Level Waste Treatment Strategy Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D.M. LaRue

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this analysis is to identify and review potential options for processing and disposing of the secondary low-level waste (LLW) that will be generated through operation of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). An estimate of annual secondary LLW is generated utilizing the mechanism established in ''Secondary Waste Treatment Analysis'' (Reference 8.1) and ''Secondary Low-Level Waste Generation Rate Analysis'' (Reference 8.5). The secondary LLW quantities are based on the spent fuel and high-level waste (HLW) arrival schedule as defined in the ''Controlled Design Assumptions Document'' (CDA) (Reference 8.6). This analysis presents estimates of the quantities of LLW in its various forms. A review of applicable laws, codes, and standards is discussed, and a synopsis of those applicable laws, codes, and standards and their impacts on potential processing and disposal options is presented. The analysis identifies viable processing/disposal options in light of the existing laws, codes, and standards, and then evaluates these options in regard to: (1) Process and equipment requirements; (2) LLW disposal volumes; and (3) Facility requirements

  2. Modified sulfur cement solidification of low-level wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-10-01

    This topical report describes the results of an investigation on the solidification of low-level radioactive wastes in modified sulfur cement. The work was performed as part of the Waste Form Evaluation Program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Low-Level Waste Management Program. Modified sulfur cement is a thermoplastic material developed by the US Bureau of Mines. Processing of waste and binder was accomplished by means of both a single-screw extruder and a dual-action mixing vessel. Waste types selected for this study included those resulting from advanced volume reduction technologies (dry evaporator concentrate salts and incinerator ash) and those which remain problematic for solidification using contemporary agents (ion exchange resins). Process development studies were conducted to ascertain optimal process control parameters for successful solidification. Maximum waste loadings were determined for each waste type and method of processing. Property evaluation testing was carried out on laboratory scale specimens in order to compare with waste form performance for other potential matrix materials. Waste form property testing included compressive strength, water immersion, thermal cycling and radionuclide leachability. Recommended waste loadings of 40 wt. % sodium sulfate and boric acid salts and 43 wt. % incinerator ash, which are based on processing and performance considerations, are reported. Solidification efficiencies for these waste types represent significant improvements over those of hydraulic cements. Due to poor waste form performance, incorporation of ion exchange resin waste in modified sulfur cement is not recommended.

  3. Properties of slag concrete for low-level waste containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langton, C.A.; Wong, P.B.

    1991-01-01

    Ground granulated blast furnace slag was incorporated in the concrete mix used for construction of low-level radioactive waste disposal vaults. The vaults were constructed as six 100 x 100 x 25 ft cells with each cell sharing internal walls with the two adjacent cells. The vaults were designed to contain a low-level radioactive wasteform called saltstone and to isolate the saltstone from the environment until the landfill is closed. Closure involves backfilling with native soil, installation of clay cap, and run-off control. The design criteria for the slag-substituted concrete included compressive strength, 4000 psi after 28 days; slump, 6 inch; permeability, less than 10 -7 cm/sec; and effective nitrate, chromium and technetium diffusivities of 10 -8 , 10 -12 and 10 -12 cm 2 /sec, respectively. The reducing capacity of the slag resulted in chemically reducing Cr +6 to Cr +3 and Tc +7 to Tc +4 and subsequent precipitation of the respective hydroxides in the alkaline pore solution. Consequently, the concrete vault enhances containment of otherwise mobile waste ions and contributes to the overall protection of the groundwater at the disposal site

  4. Modified sulfur cement solidification of low-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    This topical report describes the results of an investigation on the solidification of low-level radioactive wastes in modified sulfur cement. The work was performed as part of the Waste Form Evaluation Program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Low-Level Waste Management Program. Modified sulfur cement is a thermoplastic material developed by the US Bureau of Mines. Processing of waste and binder was accomplished by means of both a single-screw extruder and a dual-action mixing vessel. Waste types selected for this study included those resulting from advanced volume reduction technologies (dry evaporator concentrate salts and incinerator ash) and those which remain problematic for solidification using contemporary agents (ion exchange resins). Process development studies were conducted to ascertain optimal process control parameters for successful solidification. Maximum waste loadings were determined for each waste type and method of processing. Property evaluation testing was carried out on laboratory scale specimens in order to compare with waste form performance for other potential matrix materials. Waste form property testing included compressive strength, water immersion, thermal cycling and radionuclide leachability. Recommended waste loadings of 40 wt. % sodium sulfate and boric acid salts and 43 wt. % incinerator ash, which are based on processing and performance considerations, are reported. Solidification efficiencies for these waste types represent significant improvements over those of hydraulic cements. Due to poor waste form performance, incorporation of ion exchange resin waste in modified sulfur cement is not recommended

  5. Intercomparison of low-level tritium in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sipka, V.; Zupancic, M.; Hadzisehovic, M.; Bacic, S.; Vukovic, Z.

    1989-01-01

    In 1985 the Section of Isotope Hydrology of the IAEA organized the fourth intercomparison for low-level tritium counting in waters. Four water samples with different 3 H concentration were sent to 85 laboratories willing to participate. The results from the different laboratories were presented in the unified questionnaires and coded. The participation in the intercomparisons for every laboratory doing low-level 3 H measurements in the waters is very important and useful. This is a best way to check the entire procedure and methods of the measurements and the reliability of the standards used. Since our laboratories are doing the natural 3 H concentration measurement in the waters for the environmental control and hydrology reasons it was necessary to take part in this intercomparison. Our standard procedure was applied. The 3 H activity in the samples was measured by liquid scintillation counting after an electrolytic enrichment. The results of our measurements of the four water samples, received from the organizers, are presented on the figures and tables presenting summary of the intercomparison. It is clear that our measurement (procedure and standards) have given satisfactory results (author)

  6. Morphology control of tungsten nanorods grown by glancing angle RF magnetron sputtering under variable argon pressure and flow rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khedir, Khedir R.; Kannarpady, Ganesh K.; Ishihara, Hidetaka; Woo, Justin; Ryerson, Charles; Biris, Alexandru S.

    2010-01-01

    Morphologically novel tungsten nanorods (WNRs) with the co-existence of two crystalline phases, α-W (thermodynamically stable) and β-W, were fabricated by glancing angle RF magnetron sputtering technique under various Ar pressures and flow rates. For these nanorods, a significant variation in their morphology and surface roughness was observed. These structures could be useful in a wide range of applications such as field emission, robust superhydrophobic coatings, energy, and medicine.

  7. Low level diode laser accelerates wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, Munqith S; Salman, Saif Dawood

    2013-05-01

    The effect of wound illumination time by pulsed diode laser on the wound healing process was studied in this paper. For this purpose, the original electronic drive circuit of a 650-nm wavelength CW diode laser was reconstructed to give pulsed output laser of 50 % duty cycle and 1 MHz pulse repetition frequency. Twenty male mice, 3 months old were used to follow up the laser photobiostimulation effect on the wound healing progress. They were subdivided into two groups and then the wounds were made on the bilateral back sides of each mouse. Two sessions of pulsed laser therapy were carried along 15 days. Each mice group wounds were illuminated by this pulsed laser for 12 or 18 min per session during these 12 days. The results of this study were compared with the results of our previous wound healing therapy study by using the same type of laser. The mice wounds in that study received only 5 min of illumination time therapy in the first and second days of healing process. In this study, we found that the wounds, which were illuminated for 12 min/session healed in about 3 days earlier than those which were illuminated for 18 min/session. Both of them were healed earlier in about 10-11 days than the control group did.

  8. Low-level radiation and cancer deaths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, B.S.

    1978-01-01

    It is stated that although the proportion of cancer deaths among males is somewhat higher for Hanford employees with recorded occupational radiation exposure compared with males in the general population of the State of Washington, there is no indication that radiation is the cause of this difference. Statistics are given for mean doses received and for deaths from cancer and other causes for male employees. It is shown that for each year the mean dose level of those who died from cancer is not significantly different from the mean of those who died from other causes. The mean dose level for the majority of those who died in a specific year is lower than the mean for the survivors in the year of death, in the year preceding the year of death, or in the two years preceding the year of death. This is true whether the mean was for those dying from cancer or from other causes. These relationships are similar for female exposed employees and agree with other similar studies. The latest analysis on longevity of exposed male Hanford employees vs those nonexposed and the out-of-plant controls from date of hire to April 1974 are considered and show no firm indication of any lasting adverse health effects among employees attributable to occupational exposure to radiation within permissible limits. (U.K.)

  9. Disposal of low-level and mixed low-level radioactive waste during 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    Isotopic inventories and other data are presented for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed LLW disposed (and occasionally stored) during calendar year 1990 at commercial disposal facilities and Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Detailed isotopic information is presented for the three commercial disposal facilities located near Barnwell, SC, Richland, WA, and Beatty, NV. Less information is presented for the Envirocare disposal facility located near Clive, UT, and for LLW stored during 1990 at the West Valley site. DOE disposal information is included for the Savannah River Site (including the saltstone facility), Nevada Test Site, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Hanford Site, Y-12 Site, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Summary information is presented about stored DOE LLW. Suggestions are made about improving LLW disposal data

  10. Health effects of low-level radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.

    1982-01-01

    Epidemiological surveys have attempted to assess the carcinogenic risk induced by exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation. Such studies are difficult to carry out because the incidence of radiation induced cancers is of only a few per cent, even following relativity large doses, and because there is no way to distinguish radiation induced cancer from the background of natural human cancers; moreover these surveys are exposed to many biases due to relatively small sizes of the populations studied and the difficulties of finding an appropriate control group, of estimating the absorbed doses and of collecting the data. A few national or international expert committees have analysed the available data and evaluated the carcinogenic effects. Their estimations of the risk, are similar and allow one to quantify the carcinogenic risk for doses above 100 rads. The risks of lower doses must be determined by extrapolation from human data at high doses. This extrapolation requires the knowledge of the dose-effect relationship. A linear extrapolation is most common and probably leads to a conservative estimate of the risk. A linear-quadratic function is probably more realistic and in better accordance with most scientific data. However the validity of its use for the estimation of carcinogenic risk is still debated. In experimental animals, the influence of dose-rate is important and some data suggest that this is the same for the carcinogenic effect in human beings. The genetic effects are probably less important than was feared a few years ago. The most important recent observation is the absence of any significant genetic effect in the progeny of the survivors of the A. bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. This allows a conservative estimate of the maximum genetic risk for human beings [fr

  11. Rf Station For Ion Beam Staking In Hirfl-csr

    CERN Document Server

    Arbuzov, V S; Bushuev, A A; Dranichnikov, A N; Gorniker, E I; Kendjebulatov, E K; Kondakov, A A; Kondaurov, M; Kruchkov, Ya G; Krutikhin, S A; Kurkin, G Ya; Mironenko, L A; Motygin, S V; Osipov, V N; Petrov, V M; Pilan, Andrey M; Popov, A M; Rashenko, V V; Selivanov, A N; Shteinke, A R; Vajenin, N F

    2004-01-01

    BINP has developed and produced the RF station for Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Lanzhou, China, for multipurpose accelerator complex with electron cooling. The RF station will be used for accumulation of ion beams in the main ring of the system. It was successfully tested in IMP and installed into the main accelerator ring of the complex. The RF station includes accelerating RF cavity and RF power generator with power supplies. The station works within frequency range 6.0 - 14.0 MHz, maximum voltage across the accelerating gap of the RF cavity - 20 kV. In the RF cavity the 200 VNP ferrite is utilized. A residual gas pressure in vacuum chamber does not exceed 2,5E-11 mbar. Maximum output power of the RF generator 25 kW. The data acquisition and control of the RF station is based on COMPACT - PCI bus and provides all functions of monitoring and control.

  12. Development of batch electrolytic enrichment cells with 100-fold volume reduction, control electronic units and neutralization/distillation unit, to enable better sensitivity to be achieved in low-level tritium measurements when liquid scintillation counting follows the enrichment process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, C.B.

    1980-06-01

    Full details of the batch-cell tritium enrichment system design are provided including electronic control circuits specially developed for these cells. The system incorporates a new type of concentric electrode cell (outer cathode of mild steel, anode of stainless steel, inner cathode of mild steel) with volume reduction capability 1 l to ca 9 ml. Electrolysis of 20 cells is performed in 2 steps. Down to sample volume ca 20 ml, the cells are series connected at constant currents up to 14.5 A, in the 2nd step, each cell is connected to its own individual current supply (2A) and control circuit. Automatic shut-off at the desired final volume is achieved by sensing the drop in current through the inner cathode as the electrolyte level falls below a PTFE insulator. The large electrode surface area and careful dimensioning at the foot of the cell allow operation with low starting electrolyte concentration 1.5 g Na 2 O 2 .l -1 . After electrolysis, quantitative recovery as distilled water of all hydrogen from the enriched residue is achieved by CO 2 -neutralisation and vacuum distillation at 100 0 C in a distillation unit which handles 20 cells simultaneously

  13. RF and microwave microelectronics packaging II

    CERN Document Server

    Sturdivant, Rick

    2017-01-01

    Reviews RF, microwave, and microelectronics assembly process, quality control, and failure analysis Bridges the gap between low cost commercial and hi-res RF/Microwave packaging technologies Engages in an in-depth discussion of challenges in packaging and assembly of advanced high-power amplifiers This book presents the latest developments in packaging for high-frequency electronics. It is a companion volume to “RF and Microwave Microelectronics Packaging” (2010) and covers the latest developments in thermal management, electrical/RF/thermal-mechanical designs and simulations, packaging and processing methods, and other RF and microwave packaging topics. Chapters provide detailed coverage of phased arrays, T/R modules, 3D transitions, high thermal conductivity materials, carbon nanotubes and graphene advanced materials, and chip size packaging for RF MEMS. It appeals to practicing engineers in the electronic packaging and high-frequency electronics domain, and to academic researchers interested in underst...

  14. Development of RF non-IQ sampling module for Helium RFQ LLRF system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Hae-Seong; Ahn, Tae-Sung; Kim, Seong-Gu; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Kim, Han-Sung; Song, Young-Gi; Seol, Kyung-Tae; Cho, Yong-Sub [KOMAC, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    KOMAC (Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex) has a plan to develop the helium irradiation system. This system includes the Ion source, LEBT, RFQ, MEBT systems to transport helium particles to the target. Especially, the RFQ (Radio Frequency Quadrupole) system should receive the 200MHz RF within 1% amplitude error stability. For supplying stable 200MHz RF to the RFQ, the low-level radio frequency (LLRF) should be controlled by control system. The helium RFQ LLRF control system adopted non- IQ sampling method to sample the analog input RF. Sampled input data will be calculated to get the I, Q values. These I, Q values will be used to monitor the amplitude and phase of the RF signal. In this paper, non-IQ sampling logic and amplitude and phase calculating logic of the FPGA will be introduced. Using Xilinx ISE design suite which is tool for developing the FPGA logic module, non-IQ sampling module and amplitude and phase computing module developed. In the future, PI gain module and frequency error computing module will be developed.

  15. Description of the Seibersdorf incineration plant for low level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalupa, G.; Petschnik, G.

    1986-09-01

    After a description of the design and the construction principles of the incinerator building, the furnace and its attached auxilary devices are explained. The incinerator is layed out for low level wastes. It has a vertical furnace, operates with discontinuous feeding for trashes with heat-values between 600 and 10000 kcal/kg waste. The maximum throughput amounts 40 kg/h. The purification of the off-gas is guaranteed by a multistage filter system: 2 stages with ceramic candles, cooling column and a HEPA-filter system. The control of the off-gas cleaning is carried out by a stack instrumentation, consisting of an aerosol-, gas-, Iodine- and Tritium-monitor; the building is surveilled by doserate- and aerosolmonitors. (Author)

  16. Savannah River Plant low-level waste incinerator demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallman, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    A two-year demonstration facility was constructed at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) to incinerate suspect contaminated solid and low-level solvent wastes. Since startup in January 1984, 4460 kilograms and 5300 liters of simulated (uncontaminated) solid and solvent waste have been incinerated to establish the technical and operating data base for the facility. Combustion safeguards have been enhanced, process controls and interlocks refined, some materials handling problems identified and operating experience gained as a result of the 6 month cold run-in. Volume reductions of 20:1 for solid and 25:1 for solvent waste have been demonstrated. Stack emissions (NO 2 , SO 2 , CO, and particulates) were only 0.5% of the South Carolina ambient air quality standards. Radioactive waste processing is scheduled to begin in July 1984. 2 figures, 2 tables

  17. WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox acceptance test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leist, K.J.

    1998-01-01

    In June 28, 1997, the Low Level Waste (LLW) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13031A-85. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, lidder/delidder device and the supercompactor were also conducted. As of November 24, 1997, 2 of the 131 test exceptions that affect the LLW glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test Exceptions are provided as appendices to this report

  18. Effect of interstitial low level laser stimulation in skin density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Seulki; Ha, Myungjin; Lee, Sangyeob; Yu, Sungkon; Park, Jihoon; Radfar, Edalat; Hwang, Dong Hyun; Lee, Han A.; Kim, Hansung; Jung, Byungjo

    2016-03-01

    As the interest in skin was increased, number of studies on skin care also have been increased. The reduction of skin density is one of the symptoms of skin aging. It reduces elasticity of skin and becomes the reason of wrinkle formation. Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been suggested as one of the effective therapeutic methods for skin aging as in hasten to change skin density. This study presents the effect of a minimally invasive laser needle system (MILNS) (wavelength: 660nm, power: 20mW) in skin density. Rabbits were divided into three groups. Group 1 didn't receive any laser stimulation as a control group. Group 2 and 3 as test groups were exposed to MILNS with energy of 8J and 6J on rabbits' dorsal side once a week, respectively. Skin density of rabbits was measured every 12 hours by using an ultrasound skin scanner.

  19. Alternative techniques for low-level waste shallow land burial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, G.B.; Mezga, L.J.

    1983-01-01

    Experience to date relative to the shallow land burial of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) indicates that the physical stability of the disposal unit and the hydrologic isolation of the waste are the two most important factors in assuring disposal site performance. Disposal unit stability can be ensured by providing stable waste packages and waste forms, compacting backfill material, and filling the void spaces between the packages. Hydrologic isolation can be achieved though a combination of proper site selection, subsurface drainage controls, internal trench drainage systems, and immobilization of the waste. A generalized design of a LLW disposal site that would provide the desired long-term isolation of the waste is discussed. While this design will be more costly than current practices, it will provide additional confidence in predicted and reliability and actual site performance

  20. WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox acceptance test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leist, K.J.

    1998-02-17

    In June 28, 1997, the Low Level Waste (LLW) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13031A-85. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, lidder/delidder device and the supercompactor were also conducted. As of November 24, 1997, 2 of the 131 test exceptions that affect the LLW glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test Exceptions are provided as appendices to this report.

  1. Soft-tissue injuries from sports activities and traffic accidents--treatment with low-level laser therapy: a multicenter double-blind placebo-controlled clinical study on 132 patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simunovic, Zlatko; Trobonjaca, Tatjana

    2000-06-01

    The aim of current multicenter clinical study was to assess the efficacy of low energy-level laser therapy (LLLT) in the treatment of soft tissue injuries compared to the placebo and classical phyiotherapeutic procedures. This clinical study was conducted in two centers located in Locarno, Switzerland and Opatija, Croatia. Two types of irradiation techniques were used: (1) direct, skin contact technique for treatment of trigger points where IR diode laser 830 nm continuous wave was applied; and (2) scanning technique for irradiation of larger surface area with use of Helium Neon laser 632.8 nm combined with IR diode laser 904 nm pulsed wave. Results were evaluated according to clinical parameters like: hematoma, swelling, heat, pan and loss of function. The findings were statistically analyzed via chi- square test. Results have demonstrated that the recovery process was accelerated in 85 percent of patients treated with LLLT compared to the control group of patients. The results and advantages obtained proved once again the efficacy of LLLT as a new and successful way to treat soft tissue injuries.

  2. Leaching studies of low-level radioactive waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayal, R.; Arora, H.; Milian, L.; Clinton, J.

    1985-01-01

    A research program has been underway at the Brookhaven National Laboratory to investigate the release of radionuclides from low-level waste forms under laboratory conditions. This paper describes the leaching behavior of Cs-137 from two major low-level waste streams, that is, ion exchange bead resin and boric acid concentrate, solidified in Portland cement. The resultant leach data are employed to evaluate and predict the release behavior of Cs-137 from low-level waste forms under field burial conditions

  3. Twelfth annual US DOE low-level waste management conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The papers in this document comprise the proceedings of the Department of Energy's Twelfth Annual Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Conference, which was held in Chicago, Illinois, on August 28 and 29, 1990. General subjects addressed during the conference included: mixed waste, low-level radioactive waste tracking and transportation, public involvement, performance assessment, waste stabilization, financial assurance, waste minimization, licensing and environmental documentation, below-regulatory-concern waste, low-level radioactive waste temporary storage, current challenges, and challenges beyond 1990

  4. Low-Level Waste (LLW) forum meeting report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties

  5. Assessment of LANL solid low-level waste management documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, R.B.; Jennrich, E.A.; Lund, D.M.; Danna, J.G.; Davis, K.D.; Rutz, A.C.

    1991-04-01

    DOE Order 5820.2A requires that a system performance assessment be conducted to assure efficient and compliant management of all radioactive waste. The objective of this report is to determine the present status of the Radioactive Waste Operations Section's capabilities regarding preparation and maintenance of appropriate criteria, plans and procedures and identify particular areas where these documents are not presently in existence or being fully implemented. DOE Order 5820.2A, Radioactive Waste Management, Chapter III sets forth the requirements and guidelines for preparation and implementation of criteria, plans and procedures to be utilized in the management of solid low-level waste. The documents being assessed in this report are: Solid Low-Level Waste Acceptance Criteria, Solid Low-Level Waste Characterization Plan, Solid Low-Level Waste Certification Plan, Solid Low-Level Waste Acceptance Procedures, Solid Low-Level Waste Characterization Procedures, Solid Low-Level Waste Certification Procedures, Solid Low-Level Waste Training Procedures, and Solid Low-Level Waste Recordkeeping Procedures. Suggested outlines for these documents are presented as Appendix A

  6. Low-Level Waste (LLW) forum meeting report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  7. A nationwide low-level waste management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The National Governors' Association, in conjunction with the Department of Energy's National Low-Level Waste Management Program, invited various representatives of states, regions, and federal agencies to comment on their perceptions of what major features would constitute a nationwide low-level waste management system. Three meetings were conducted and this report summarizes results of those meetings. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 placed primary responsibility on the states for disposal of low-level waste. Although initial efforts of states have been directed toward establishing compacts, it is evident that a successful long term system requires significant cooperation and communication among states, regions, federal agencies, and Congress

  8. Refurbishments of RF systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baelde, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    This document describes the activities of the R.F. System group during the years 1995-1996 in the frame of the refurbishment of the control system at GANIL accelerator. Modifications concerning the following sub-assemblies are mentioned: 1. voltage standards; 2. link card between the step by step motor control and the local control systems; 3. polarization system; 4. computer software for different operations. Also reported is the installation of ECR 4 source for the CO2. In this period the R2 Regrouping system has been installed, tested and put into operation. Several problems concerning the mechanical installation of the coupling loop and other problems related to the electronics operation were solved. The results obtained with the THI machine are presented

  9. Background information on sources of low-level radionuclide emissions to air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbit, C.D.; Herrington, W.N.; Higby, D.P.; Stout, L.A.; Corley, J.P.

    1983-09-01

    This report provides a general description and reported emissions for eight low-level radioactive source categories, including facilties that are licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and Agreement States, and non-Department of Energy (DOE) federal facilities. The eight categories of low-level radioactive source facilities covered by this report are: research and test reactors, accelerators, the radiopharmaceutical industry, source manufacturers, medical facilities, laboratories, naval shipyards, and low-level commercial waste disposal sites. Under each category five elements are addressed: a general description, a facility and process description, the emission control systems, a site description, and the radionuclides released to air (from routine operations)

  10. Background information on sources of low-level radionuclide emissions to air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbit, C.D.; Herrington, W.N.; Higby, D.P.; Stout, L.A.; Corley, J.P.

    1983-09-01

    This report provides a general description and reported emissions for eight low-level radioactive source categories, including facilties that are licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and Agreement States, and non-Department of Energy (DOE) federal facilities. The eight categories of low-level radioactive source facilities covered by this report are: research and test reactors, accelerators, the radiopharmaceutical industry, source manufacturers, medical facilities, laboratories, naval shipyards, and low-level commercial waste disposal sites. Under each category five elements are addressed: a general description, a facility and process description, the emission control systems, a site description, and the radionuclides released to air (from routine operations).

  11. Design and results of the radio frequency quadrupole RF system at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grippe, J.; Marsden, E.; Marrufo, O.; Regan, A.; Rees, D.; Ziomek, C.

    1993-05-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) entered into a joint venture to design and develop a 600 kW amplifier and its low-level controls for use in the Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerating cavity of the SSC. The design and development work has been completed. After being tested separately, the high power amplifier and low level RF control system were integrated and tested on a test cavity. Results of that tests are given. Tests were then carried out on the actual RFQ with and without the presence of the accelerated beam. Results of these tests are also given, along with the phase and amplitude information

  12. Directions in low-level radioactive waste management: A brief history of commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This report presents a history of commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal in the United States, with emphasis on the history of six commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The report includes a brief description of important steps that have been taken during the last decade to ensure the safe disposal of low-level radioactive waste in the 1990s and beyond. These steps include the issuance of comprehensive State and Federal regulations governing the disposal of low-level radioactive waste, and the enactment of Federal laws making States responsible for the disposal of such waste generated within their borders

  13. The semi-empirical low-level background statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Manh Toan; Nguyen Trieu Tu

    1992-01-01

    A semi-empirical low-level background statistics was proposed. The one can be applied to evaluated the sensitivity of low background systems, and to analyse the statistical error, the 'Rejection' and 'Accordance' criteria for processing of low-level experimental data. (author). 5 refs, 1 figs

  14. Responses to the low-level-radiation controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, V.P.

    1981-01-01

    Some data sets dealing with the hazards of low-level radiation are discussed. It is concluded that none of these reports, individually or collectively, changes appreciably or even significantly the evaluations of possible low-level radiation effects that have been made by several authoritative national and international groups

  15. Guidelines for interim storage of low level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornibrook, C.; Castagnacci, A.; Clymer, G.; Kelly, J.; Naughton, M.; Saunders, P.; Stoner, P.; Walker, N.; Cazzolli, R.; Dettenmeier, R.; Loucks, L.; Rigsby, M.; Spall, M.; Strum, M.

    1992-12-01

    This report presents an overview of on-site storage of Low Level Waste while providing guidelines for using the complete Interim On-Site Storage of Low Level Waste report series. Overall, this report provides a methodology for planning and implementing on-site storage

  16. Low level cloud motion vectors from Kalpana-1 visible images

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . In this paper, an attempt has been made to retrieve low-level cloud motion vectors using Kalpana-1 visible (VIS) images at every half an hour. The VIS channel provides better detection of low level clouds, which remain obscure in thermal IR ...

  17. Elementary study on γ analysis software for low level measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruan Guanglin; Huang Xianguo; Xing Shixiong

    2001-01-01

    The difficulty in using fashion γ analysis software in low level measurement is discussed. The ROI report file of ORTEC operation system has been chosen as interface file to write γ analysis software for low-level measurement. The author gives software flowchart and applied example and discusses the existent problems

  18. Control interlock and monitoring system for 80 KW IOT based RF power amplifier system at 505.812 MHz for Indus-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Gautam; Deo, R.K.; Jain, M.K.; Bagre, Sunil; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2013-01-01

    For 80 kW inductive output tube (IOT) based RF power amplifier system at 505.812 MHz for Indus-2, a control, interlock and monitoring system is realized. This is to facilitate proper start-up and shutdown of the amplifier system, monitor various parameters to detect any malfunction during its operation and to bring the system in a safe stage, thereby assuring reliable operation of the amplifier system. This high power amplifier system incorporates interlocks such as cooling interlocks, various voltage and current interlocks and time critical RF interlocks. Processing of operation sequence, cooling interlocks and various voltage and current interlocks have been realized by using Siemens make S7-CPU-315-2DP (CPU) based programmable logic controller (PLC) system. While time critical or fast interlocks have been realized by using Siemens make FPGA based Boolean Co-processor FM-352-5 which operates in standalone mode. Siemens make operating panel OP277 6'' is being used as a human machine interface (HMI) device for command, data, alarm generation and process parameter monitoring. (author)

  19. The Role of Low-Level Laser in Periodontal Surgeries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobouti, Farhad; Khatami, Maziar; Heydari, Mohaddase; Barati, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Treatment protocols with low-level Laser (also called ‘soft laser therapy) have been used in health care systems for more than three decades. Bearing in mind the suitable sub-cellular absorption and the cellular-vascular impacts, low-level laser may be a treatment of choice for soft tissues. Low-level lasers have played crucial and colorful roles in performing periodontal surgeries. Their anti-inflammatory and painless effects have been variously reported in in-vitro studies. In this present review article, searches have been made in Pub Med, Google Scholar, and Science Direct, focusing on the studies which included low-level lasers, flap-periodontal surgeries, gingivectomy, and periodontal graft. The present study has sought to review the cellular impacts of low-level lasers and its role on reducing pain and inflammation following soft tissue surgical treatments. PMID:25987968

  20. Research on near-surface disposal of very low level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shaowei; Yue Huiguo; Hou Jie; Chen Haiying; Zuo Rui; Wang Jinsheng

    2012-01-01

    Radioactive waste disposal is one of the most sensitive environmental problems to control and solve. As the arriving of decommissioning of early period nuclear facilities in China, large amounts of very low level radioactive waste will be produced inevitably. The domestic and abroad definitions about very low level radioactive waste and its disposal were introduced, and then siting principles of near-surface disposal of very low level radioactive waste were discussed. The near- surface disposal siting methods of very low level radioactive waste were analyzed from natural and geographical conditions assessment, geological conditions analysis, hydrogeological conditions analysis, geological hazard assessment and radioactive background investigation; the near-surface disposal sites'natural barriers of very low level radioactive waste were analyzed from the crustal structure and physico-chemical characteristics, the dynamics characteristics of groundwater, the radionuclide adsorption characteristics of natural barriers and so on; the near-surface disposal sites' engineered barriers of very low level radioactive waste were analyzed from the repository design, the repository barrier materials selection and so on. Finally, the improving direction of very low level radioactive waste disposal was proposed. (authors)

  1. Feasibility randomised controlled trial of Recovery-focused Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Older Adults with bipolar disorder (RfCBT-OA): study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Elizabeth; Lobban, Fiona; Sutton, Chris; Depp, Colin; Johnson, Sheri; Laidlaw, Ken; Jones, Steven H

    2016-03-03

    Bipolar disorder is a severe and chronic mental health problem that persists into older adulthood. The number of people living with this condition is set to rise as the UK experiences a rapid ageing of its population. To date, there has been very little research or service development with respect to psychological therapies for this group of people. A parallel two-arm randomised controlled trial comparing a 14-session, 6-month Recovery-focused Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy for Older Adults with bipolar disorder (RfCBT-OA) plus treatment as usual (TAU) versus TAU alone. Participants will be recruited in the North-West of England via primary and secondary mental health services and through self-referral. The primary objective of the study is to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of RfCBT-OA; therefore, a formal power calculation is not appropriate. It has been estimated that randomising 25 participants per group will be sufficient to be able to reliably determine the primary feasibility outcomes (eg, recruitment and retention rates), in line with recommendations for sample sizes for feasibility/pilot trials. Participants in both arms will complete assessments at baseline and then every 3 months, over the 12-month follow-up period. We will gain an estimate of the likely effect size of RfCBT-OA on a range of clinical outcomes and estimate parameters needed to determine the appropriate sample size for a definitive, larger trial to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of RfCBT-OA. Data analysis is discussed further in the Analysis section in the main paper. This protocol was approved by the UK National Health Service (NHS) Ethics Committee process (REC ref: 15/NW/0330). The findings of the trial will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals, national and international conference presentations and local, participating NHS trusts. ISRCTN13875321; Pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  2. Possible effects of RF field near ICRF antenna on density control during long pulse discharge in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, K.; Kumazawa, R.; Mutoh, T.; Seki, T.; Watari, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Sakamoto, M.; Noda, N.; Watanabe, T.; Shoji, M.; Masuzaki, S.; Morita, S.; Goto, M.; Torii, Y.; Takeuchi, N.; Shimpo, F.; Nomura, G.; Yokota, M.; Kato, A.; Zhao, Y.

    2005-01-01

    In the large helical device (LHD), the plasma duration time was extended up to 150 s by ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating. Time-integrated total input power reached 71 MJ. However, this discharge terminated due to radiation collapse accompanied by an increase of electron density. The temperature of the divertor plates and the intensity of H α were locally increased in the same toroidal section, near the ICRF antenna. One of the possible causes of the increase of radiation power is an outgassing from the divertor plates that were heated by particles accelerated in the cyclotron resonance layer near the antenna. Another possible cause is the outgassing from the ICRF antenna itself due to a temperature increase of the ICRF antenna owing to high-energy particles, or the formation of an RF (radio frequency) sheath

  3. Phase calibration strategies for synchrotron RF signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreev, Aleksandr [TEMF, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany); Klingbeil, Harald [TEMF, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Lens, Dieter [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    For the FAIR facility that is currently under construction, the beam quality requirements impose several demands on the low-level RF (LLRF) systems. For example the phase error of the gap voltage of a specific RF cavity must be less than 1 . The RF reference signals for the FAIR synchrotron RF cavity systems are generated by direct digital synthesis modules (DDS) mounted in one crate called Group-DDS. In order to allow performing various multi-harmonic operations, each DDS unit operates at a certain mode defined by the harmonic number that can be changed during the operation. Since the DDS modules generate reference RF signals for different LLRF systems, the precise calibration of units to compensate the different phase response is of importance. The currently used calibration procedure is done with a fixed harmonic number for each module and uses the DDS module configured to the highest harmonic number as a reference. If the harmonic number of the DDS module is changed, one then has to repeat the calibration for the new values. Therefore, a new calibration method with respect to the absolute phases of DDS modules is under development and will be presented.

  4. Low-level laser therapy to treat fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruaro, J A; Fréz, A R; Ruaro, M B; Nicolau, R A

    2014-11-01

    Several clinical treatments have been proposed to manage symptoms of fibromyalgia. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) may be a useful tool to treat this dysfunction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of LLLT in patients with fibromyalgia. A placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial was carried out with 20 patients divided randomly into either an LLLT group (n = 10) or a placebo group (n = 10). The LLLT group was treated with a GaAlAs laser (670 nm, 4 J/cm(2) on 18 tender points) three times a week over 4 weeks. Before and after treatment, patients were evaluated with the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), McGill Pain Questionnaire, and visual analog scale (VAS). Data from the FIQ and McGill questionnaire for the treated and control groups were analyzed by paired t tests, and Wilcoxon tests were used to analyze data from the VAS. After LLLT or sham treatment, the number of tender points was significantly reduced in both groups (LLLT, p fibromyalgia symptoms showed significant improvements after LLLT compared to placebo (FIQ, p = 0.0003; McGill, p = 0.0078; and VAS, p = 0.0020). LLLT provided relief from fibromyalgia symptoms in patients and should be further investigated as a therapeutic tool for management in fibromyalgia.

  5. WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox operational test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kersten, J.K.

    1998-01-01

    The Low Level Waste (LLW) Process Gloveboxes are designed to: receive a 55 gallon drum in an 85 gallon overpack in the Entry glovebox (GBIOI); and open and sort the waste from the 55 gallon drum, place the waste back into drum and relid in the Sorting glovebox (GB 102). In addition, waste which requires further examination is transferred to the LLW RWM Glovebox via the Drath and Schraeder Bagiess Transfer Port (DO-07-201) or sent to the Sample Transfer Port (STC); crush the drum in the Supercompactor glovebox (GB 104); place the resulting puck (along with other pucks) into another 85 gallon overpack in the Exit glovebox (GB 105). The status of the waste items is tracked by the Data Management System (DMS) via the Plant Control System (PCS) barcode interface. As an item is moved from the entry glovebox to the exit glovebox, the Operator will track an items location using a barcode reader and enter any required data on the DMS console. The Operational Test Procedure (OTP) will perform evolution's (described below) using the Plant Operating Procedures (POP) in order to verify that they are sufficient and accurate for controlled glovebox operation

  6. WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox operational test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersten, J.K.

    1998-02-19

    The Low Level Waste (LLW) Process Gloveboxes are designed to: receive a 55 gallon drum in an 85 gallon overpack in the Entry glovebox (GBIOI); and open and sort the waste from the 55 gallon drum, place the waste back into drum and relid in the Sorting glovebox (GB 102). In addition, waste which requires further examination is transferred to the LLW RWM Glovebox via the Drath and Schraeder Bagiess Transfer Port (DO-07-201) or sent to the Sample Transfer Port (STC); crush the drum in the Supercompactor glovebox (GB 104); place the resulting puck (along with other pucks) into another 85 gallon overpack in the Exit glovebox (GB 105). The status of the waste items is tracked by the Data Management System (DMS) via the Plant Control System (PCS) barcode interface. As an item is moved from the entry glovebox to the exit glovebox, the Operator will track an items location using a barcode reader and enter any required data on the DMS console. The Operational Test Procedure (OTP) will perform evolution`s (described below) using the Plant Operating Procedures (POP) in order to verify that they are sufficient and accurate for controlled glovebox operation.

  7. Mixed and Low-Level Treatment Facility Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    This appendix contains the mixed and low-level waste engineering design files (EDFS) documenting each low-level and mixed waste stream investigated during preengineering studies for Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project. The EDFs provide background information on mixed and low-level waste generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. They identify, characterize, and provide treatment strategies for the waste streams. Mixed waste is waste containing both radioactive and hazardous components as defined by the Atomic Energy Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, respectively. Low-level waste is waste that contains radioactivity and is not classified as high-level waste, transuranic waste, spent nuclear fuel, or 11e(2) byproduct material as defined by DOE 5820.2A. Test specimens of fissionable material irradiated for research and development only, and not for the production of power or plutonium, may be classified as low-level waste, provided the concentration of transuranic is less than 100 nCi/g. This appendix is a tool that clarifies presentation format for the EDFS. The EDFs contain waste stream characterization data and potential treatment strategies that will facilitate system tradeoff studies and conceptual design development. A total of 43 mixed waste and 55 low-level waste EDFs are provided

  8. Mixed and Low-Level Treatment Facility Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This appendix contains the mixed and low-level waste engineering design files (EDFS) documenting each low-level and mixed waste stream investigated during preengineering studies for Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project. The EDFs provide background information on mixed and low-level waste generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. They identify, characterize, and provide treatment strategies for the waste streams. Mixed waste is waste containing both radioactive and hazardous components as defined by the Atomic Energy Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, respectively. Low-level waste is waste that contains radioactivity and is not classified as high-level waste, transuranic waste, spent nuclear fuel, or 11e(2) byproduct material as defined by DOE 5820.2A. Test specimens of fissionable material irradiated for research and development only, and not for the production of power or plutonium, may be classified as low-level waste, provided the concentration of transuranic is less than 100 nCi/g. This appendix is a tool that clarifies presentation format for the EDFS. The EDFs contain waste stream characterization data and potential treatment strategies that will facilitate system tradeoff studies and conceptual design development. A total of 43 mixed waste and 55 low-level waste EDFs are provided.

  9. Directions in low-level radioactive waste management: A brief history of commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    This report presents a history of commercial low-level radioactive waste management in the United States, with emphasis on the history of six commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The report includes a brief description of important steps that have been taken during the 1980s to ensure the safe disposal of low-level waste in the 1990s and beyond. These steps include the issuance of Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 61, Licensing Requirements for the Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, and steps taken by states and regional compacts to establish additional disposal sites. 42 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  10. Status of 174 MHz RF system for BEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biryuchevsky, Yu.A.; Gorniker, E.I.; Kendjebulatov, E.K.; Krutikhin, S.A.; Kurkin, G.Ya.; Petrov, V.M.; Pilan, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The new RF system for the BEP storage ring (which is an injector of VEPP-2000 accelerating complex) will increase the particles energy in the BEP from 0.9 to 1 GeV. RF system operates at a frequency of 174 MHz and consists of an accelerating cavity, RF power generator and control system.

  11. Hanford low-level tank waste interim performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, F.M.

    1997-01-01

    The Hanford Low-Level Tank Waste Interim Performance Assessment examines the long-term environmental and human health effects associated with the disposal of the low-level fraction of the Hanford single and double-shell tank waste in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. This report was prepared as a good management practice to provide needed information about the relationship between the disposal system design and performance early in the disposal system project cycle. The calculations in this performance assessment show that the disposal of the low-level fraction can meet environmental and health performance objectives

  12. Twelfth annual US DOE low-level waste management conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The papers in this document comprise the proceedings of the Department of Energy's Twelfth Annual Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Conference, which was held in Chicago, Illinois, on August 28 and 29, 1990. General subjects addressed during the conference included: mixed waste, low-level radioactive waste tracking and transportation, public involvement, performance assessment, waste stabilization, financial assurance, waste minimization, licensing and environmental documentation, below-regulatory-concern waste, low-level radioactive waste temporary storage, current challenges, and challenges beyond 1990.

  13. Treatment of uncertainty in low-level waste performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozak, M.W.; Olague, N.E.; Gallegos, D.P.; Rao, R.R.

    1991-01-01

    Uncertainties arise from a number of different sources in low-level waste performance assessment. In this paper the types of uncertainty are reviewed, and existing methods for quantifying and reducing each type of uncertainty are discussed. These approaches are examined in the context of the current low-level radioactive waste regulatory performance objectives, which are deterministic. The types of uncertainty discussed in this paper are model uncertainty, uncertainty about future conditions, and parameter uncertainty. The advantages and disadvantages of available methods for addressing uncertainty in low-level waste performance assessment are presented. 25 refs

  14. Phase loop bandwidth measurements on the advanced photon source 352 MHz rf systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horan, D.; Nassiri, A.; Schwartz, C.

    1997-01-01

    Phase loop bandwidth tests were performed on the Advanced Photon Source storage ring 352-MHz rf systems. These measurements were made using the HP3563A Control Systems Analyzer, with the rf systems running at 30 kilowatts into each of the storage ring cavities, without stored beam. An electronic phase shifter was used to inject approximately 14 degrees of stimulated phase shift into the low-level rf system, which produced measureable response voltage in the feedback loops without upsetting normal rf system operation. With the PID (proportional-integral-differential) amplifier settings at the values used during accelerator operation, the measurement data revealed that the 3-dB response for the cavity sum and klystron power-phase loops is approximately 7 kHz and 45 kHz, respectively, with the cavities the primary bandwidth-limiting factor in the cavity-sum loop. Data were taken at various PID settings until the loops became unstable. Crosstalk between the two phase loops was measured

  15. New high power 200 MHz RF system for the LANSCE drift tube linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyles, J.; Friedrichs, C.; Lynch, M.

    1998-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) linac provides an 800 MeV direct H + proton beam, and injects H - to the upgraded proton storage ring for charge accumulation for the Short Pulse Spallation Source. Accelerating these interlaced beams requires high average power from the 201.25 MHz drift tube linac (DTL) RF system. Three power amplifiers have operated at up to three Megawatts with 12% duty factor. The total number of electron power tubes in the RF amplifiers and their modulators has been reduced from fifty-two to twenty-four. The plant continues to utilize the original design of a tetrode driving a super power triode. Further increases in the linac duty factor are limited, in part, by the maximum dissipation ratings of the triodes. A description of the system modifications proposed to overcome these limitations includes new power amplifiers using low-level RF modulation for tank field control. The first high power Diacrode reg-sign is being delivered and a new amplifier cavity is being designed. With only eight power tubes, the new system will deliver both peak power and high duty factor, with lower mains power and cooling requirements. The remaining components needed for the new RF system will be discussed

  16. Development of a low-level radon reference chamber; Entwicklung einer Low-Level-Radon-Referenzkammer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linzmaier, Diana

    2013-01-04

    The naturally occurring, radioactive noble gas radon-222 exists worldwide in different activity concentrations in the air. During the decay of radon-222, decay products are generated which are electrically charged and attach to aerosols in the air. Together with the aerosols, the radon is inhaled and exhaled by humans. While the radon is nearly completely exhaled, ca. 20 % of the inhaled aerosols remain in the lungs in one breath cycle. Due to ionizing radiation, in a chain of events, lung cancer might occur. Consequently, radon and its decay products are according to the current findings the second leading cause of lung cancer. At the workplace and in the home measurements of radon activity concentration are performed to determine the radiation exposition of humans. All measurement devices for the determination of radon activity concentration are calibrated above 1000 Bq/m{sup 3}, even though the mean value of the present investigation in Germany shows only 50 Bq/m{sup 3}. For the calibration of measurement devices in the range below 1000 Bq/m{sup 3} over a long time period, the generation of a stable reference atmosphere is presented in this work. Due to a long term calibration (t>5 days) of the measurement devices, smaller uncertainties result for the calibration factor. For the calibration procedure, a so-called low-level radon reference chamber was set up and started operation. The generation of a stable reference atmosphere is effected by means of emanation sources which consist of a radium-226 activity standard. On the basis of {gamma}-spectrometry, the effective emanation coefficient ofthe emanation sources is determined. The traceability of the activity concentration in the reference volume is realized via the activity ofthe radium-226, the emanation coefficient and the volume. With the emanation sources produced, stable reference atmospheres within the range of 150 Bq/m{sup 3} to 1900 Bq/m{sup 3} are achieved. For the realization, maintenance and

  17. Design/installation and structural integrity assessment under the Federal Facility Agreement for Bethel Valley Low-Level Waste Collection and Transfer System upgrade for Building 2026 (High Radiation Level Analytical Laboratory) and Building 2099 (Monitoring and Control Station) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    This document presents a Design/Installation and Structural Integrity Assessment for a replacement tank system for portions of the Bethel Valley Low Level Waste (LLW) System, located at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This issue of the assessment covers the design aspects of the replacement tank system, and certifies that the design has sufficient structural integrity and is acceptable for the storing or treating of hazardous and/or radioactive substances. The present issue identifies specific activities that must be completed during the fabrication, installation, and testing of the replacement tank system in order to provide assurance that the final installation complies with governing requirements. Portions of the LLW system are several decades old, or older, and do not comply with current environmental protection regulations. Several subsystems of the LLW system have been designated to receive a state-of-the-art replacement and refurbishment. One such subsystem serves Building 2026, the High Radiation Level Analytical Laboratory. This assessment focuses on the scope of work for the Building 2026 replacement LLW Collection and Transfer System, including the provision of a new Monitoring and Control Station (Building 2099) to receive, store, and treat (adjust pH) low level radioactive waste

  18. Broadband direct RF digitization receivers

    CERN Document Server

    Jamin, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    This book discusses the trade-offs involved in designing direct RF digitization receivers for the radio frequency and digital signal processing domains.  A system-level framework is developed, quantifying the relevant impairments of the signal processing chain, through a comprehensive system-level analysis.  Special focus is given to noise analysis (thermal noise, quantization noise, saturation noise, signal-dependent noise), broadband non-linear distortion analysis, including the impact of the sampling strategy (low-pass, band-pass), analysis of time-interleaved ADC channel mismatches, sampling clock purity and digital channel selection. The system-level framework described is applied to the design of a cable multi-channel RF direct digitization receiver. An optimum RF signal conditioning, and some algorithms (automatic gain control loop, RF front-end amplitude equalization control loop) are used to relax the requirements of a 2.7GHz 11-bit ADC. A two-chip implementation is presented, using BiCMOS and 65nm...

  19. RF feedback for KEKB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezura, Eizi; Yoshimoto, Shin-ichi; Akai, Kazunori [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the present status of the RF feedback development for the KEK B-Factory (KEKB). A preliminary experiment concerning the RF feedback using a parallel comb-filter was performed through a choke-mode cavity and a klystron. The RF feedback has been tested using the beam of the TRISTAN Main Ring, and has proved to be effective in damping the beam instability. (author)

  20. RF guns: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travier, C.

    1990-06-01

    Free Electron Lasers and future linear colliders require very bright electron beams. Conventional injectors made of DC guns and RF bunchers have intrinsic limitations. The recently proposed RF guns have already proven their capability to produce bright beams. The necessary effort to improve further these performances and to gain reliability is now undertaken by many laboratories. More than twenty RF gun projects both thermionic and laser-driven are reviewed. Their specific characteristics are outlined and their nominal performances are given

  1. Mixed Low-Level Radioactive Waste (MLLW) Primer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwinkendorf, W.E.

    1999-01-01

    This document presents a general overview of mixed low-level waste, including the regulatory definitions and drivers, the manner in which the various kinds of mixed waste are regulated, and a discussion of the waste treatment options

  2. Use of segregation techniques to reduce stored low level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento Viana, R.; Vianna Mariano, N.; Antonio do Amaral, M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the use of segregation techniques in reducing the stored Low Level Waste on Intermediate Waste Repository 1, at Angra Nuclear Power Plant Site, from 1701 to 425 drums of compacted waste. (author)

  3. Performance assessment strategy for low-level waste disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starmer, R.J.; Deering, L.G.; Weber, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff views on predicting the performance of low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. Under the Atomic Energy Act, as amended, and the Low Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act, as amended, the NRC and Agreement States license land disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) using the requirements in 10 CFR Part 61 or comparable state requirements. The purpose of this paper is to briefly describe regulatory requirements for performance assessment in low-level waste licensing, a strategy for performance assessments to support license applications, and NRC staff licensing evaluation of performance assessments. NRC's current activities in developing a performance assessment methodology will provide an overall systems modeling approach for assessing the performance of LLW disposal facilities. NRC staff will use the methodology to evaluate performance assessments conducted by applicants for LLW disposal facilities. The methodology will be made available to states and other interested parties

  4. Conflict resolution in low-level waste facility siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    English, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    Siting a low-level waste facility is only one part of the low-level waste management process. But it is a crucial part, a prism that focuses many of the other issues in low-level waste management. And, as the 1990 and 1992 milestones approach, siting has a urgency that makes the use of alternative dispute resolution (ADR) techniques especially appropriate, to avoid protracted and expensive litigation and to reach creative and durable solutions. Drawing upon literature in the ADR field, this paper discusses ADR techniques as they apply to low-level waste management and the groundwork that must be laid before they can be applied. It also discusses questions that can arise concerning the terms under which negotiations are carried out. The paper then give suggestions for achieving win/win negotiations. Potential objections to negotiated agreements and potential answers to those objections are reviewed, and some requisites for negotiation are given

  5. Mixed Low-Level Radioactive Waste (MLLW) Primer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. E. Schwinkendorf

    1999-04-01

    This document presents a general overview of mixed low-level waste, including the regulatory definitions and drivers, the manner in which the various kinds of mixed waste are regulated, and a discussion of the waste treatment options.

  6. Status of vitrification for DOE low-level mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacher, R.F.; Jantzen, C.M.; Plodinec, M.J.

    1993-04-01

    Vitrification is being considered by the Department of Energy for solidification of many low-level mixed waste streams. Some of the advantages, requirements, and potential problem areas are described. Recommendations for future efforts are presented

  7. Institutional options for state management of low level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, F.A.

    1981-01-01

    This paper concerns ''institutional'' (legal, organizational, and political) aspects of low-level radioactive waste management. Its point of departure is the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980. With federal law and political consensus now behind the policy of state responsibility for low level waste, the question becomes, how is this new policy to be implemented. The questions of policy implementation are essentially institutional: What functions must a regional low level waste management system perform. What entities are capable of performing them. How well might various alternatives or combinations of alternatives work. This paper is a preliminary effort to address these questions. It discusses the basic functions that must be performed, and identifies the entities that could perform them, and discusses the workability of various alternative approaches

  8. Managing low-level radioactive wastes: a proposed approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-08-01

    This document is a consensus report of the Low-Level Waste Strategy Task Force. It covers system-wide issues; generation, treatment, and packaging; transportation; and disposal. Recommendations are made

  9. Low-Level Radioactive Waste siting simulation information package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-12-01

    The Department of Energy's National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program has developed a simulation exercise designed to facilitate the process of siting and licensing disposal facilities for low-level radioactive waste. The siting simulation can be conducted at a workshop or conference, can involve 14-70 participants (or more), and requires approximately eight hours to complete. The exercise is available for use by states, regional compacts, or other organizations for use as part of the planning process for low-level waste disposal facilities. This information package describes the development, content, and use of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Siting Simulation. Information is provided on how to organize a workshop for conducting the simulation. 1 ref., 1 fig

  10. Risks of low-level radiation - the evidence of epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloag, D.

    1980-01-01

    The difficulties involved in estimating risks from very low levels of radiation and the use of dose-response models for cancer incidence are discussed with reference to the third BEIR Committee report on the Effects on Populations of Exposure to low levels of Ionizing Radiation (1980). Cancer risk estimates derived from different epidemiological studies are reviewed. They include atom bomb survivors, medically irradiated groups and occupational groups. (36 references). (author)

  11. Low level waste management at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, A.D.; Truitt, D.J.; Logan, J.A.; Brown, R.M.

    1986-02-01

    EG and G Idaho, Inc. is the lead contractor for the Department of Energy (DOE) National Low Level Waste Management Program, established in 1979. In this role, the company uses its waste management expertise to provide management and technical direction to support the disposal of low-level waste (LLW) in a manner that protects the environment and the public health and safety while improving efficiency and cost-effectiveness. Program activities are divided into two areas: defense-related and commercial nuclear reactor programs. The defense program was established to develop technology improvements, provide technology transfer, and to ensure a more efficient and uniform system for low level waste disposal. To achieve the program's goals, it is necessary to improve, document, and, where necessary, develop new methods for waste generation reduction, waste treatment, shallow-land burial, greater confinement disposal, and measures to correct existing site deficiencies. The commercial low level waste management program provides support to assist the states in developing an effective national low level waste management system and provides technical assistance for siting of regional commercial LLW disposal sites. The program provides technical and informational support to state officials, low level waste generators, managers, and facility operators to resolve low level waste problems and to improve the systems' overall effectiveness. Procedures are developed and documented and made available to commercial users through this program. Additional work is being conducted to demonstrate the stabilization and closure of low level radioactive waste disposal sites and develop the criteria and procedures for acceptance of such sites by the Department of Energy after closure has been completed. 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  12. Assessment of LANL solid low-level mixed waste documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennrich, E.A.; Lund, D.M.; Davis, K.D.; Hoevemeyer, S.S.

    1991-04-01

    DOE Order 5820.2A requires that a system performance assessment be conducted to assure efficient and compliant management of all radioactive waste. The objective of this report is to determine the present status of the Radioactive Waste Operations Section and the Chemical Waste Operations Section capabilities regarding preparation and maintenance of appropriate criteria, plans, and procedures. Additionally, a comparison is made which identifies areas where these documents are not presently in existence or being fully implemented. The documents being assessed in this report are: Solid Low-Level Mixed Waste Acceptance Criteria, Solid Low-Level Mixed Waste Characterization Plan, Solid Low-Level Mixed waste Certification Plan, Solid Low-Level Mixed Waste Acceptance Procedures, Solid Low-Level Mixed Waste characterization Procedures, Solid Low-Level Mixed Waste Certification Procedures, Solid Low-Level Mixed Waste Training Procedures, and Solid Low-Level Mixed Waste Recordkeeping Requirements. This report compares the current status of preparation and implementation, by the Radioactive Waste Operations Section and the Chemical Waste Operations Section, of these documents to the requirements of DOE 5820.2A,. 40 CFR 260 to 270, and to recommended practice. Chapters 2 through 9 of the report presents the results of the comparison in tabular form for each of the documents being assessed, followed by narrative discussion of all areas which are perceived to be unsatisfactory or out of compliance with respect to the availability and content of the documents. The final subpart of each of the following chapters provides recommendations where documentation practices may be improved to achieve compliance or to follow the recommended practice

  13. Mixed low-level waste minimization at Los Alamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starke, T.P.

    1998-01-01

    During the first six months of University of California 98 Fiscal Year (July--December) Los Alamos National Laboratory has achieved a 57% reduction in mixed low-level waste generation. This has been accomplished through a systems approach that identified and minimized the largest MLLW streams. These included surface-contaminated lead, lead-lined gloveboxes, printed circuit boards, and activated fluorescent lamps. Specific waste minimization projects have been initiated to address these streams. In addition, several chemical processing equipment upgrades are being implemented. Use of contaminated lead is planned for several high energy proton beam stop applications and stainless steel encapsulated lead is being evaluated for other radiological control area applications. INEEL is assisting Los Alamos with a complete systems analysis of analytical chemistry derived mixed wastes at the CMR building and with a minimum life-cycle cost standard glovebox design. Funding for waste minimization upgrades has come from several sources: generator programs, waste management, the generator set-aside program, and Defense Programs funding to INEEL

  14. Argobots: A Lightweight Low-Level Threading and Tasking Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Sangmin; Amer, Abdelhalim; Balaji, Pavan; Bordage, Cyril; Bosilca, George; Brooks, Alex; Carns, Philip; Castello, Adrian; Genet, Damien; Herault, Thomas; Iwasaki, Shintaro; Jindal, Prateek; Kale, Laxmikant V.; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Lifflander, Jonathan; Lu, Huiwei; Meneses, Esteban; Snir, Marc; Sun, Yanhua; Taura, Kenjiro; Beckman, Pete

    2018-03-01

    In the past few decades, a number of user-level threading and tasking models have been proposed in the literature to address the shortcomings of OS-level threads, primarily with respect to cost and flexibility. Current state-of-the-art user-level threading and tasking models, however, either are too specific to applications or architectures or are not as powerful or flexible. In this paper, we present Argobots, a lightweight, low-level threading and tasking framework that is designed as a portable and performant substrate for high-level programming models or runtime systems. Argobots offers a carefully designed execution model that balances generality of functionality with providing a rich set of controls to allow specialization by end users or high-level programming models. We describe the design, implementation, and performance characterization of Argobots and present integrations with three high-level models: OpenMP, MPI, and colocated I/O services. Evaluations show that (1) Argobots, while providing richer capabilities, is competitive with existing simpler generic threading runtimes; (2) our OpenMP runtime offers more efficient interoperability capabilities than production OpenMP runtimes do; (3) when MPI interoperates with Argobots instead of Pthreads, it enjoys reduced synchronization costs and better latency-hiding capabilities; and (4) I/O services with Argobots reduce interference with colocated applications while achieving performance competitive with that of a Pthreads approach.

  15. Graphics Processors in HEP Low-Level Trigger Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammendola, Roberto; Biagioni, Andrea; Chiozzi, Stefano; Ramusino, Angelo Cotta; Cretaro, Paolo; Lorenzo, Stefano Di; Fantechi, Riccardo; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Frezza, Ottorino; Lamanna, Gianluca; Cicero, Francesca Lo; Lonardo, Alessandro; Martinelli, Michele; Neri, Ilaria; Paolucci, Pier Stanislao; Pastorelli, Elena; Piandani, Roberto; Pontisso, Luca; Rossetti, Davide; Simula, Francesco; Sozzi, Marco; Vicini, Piero

    2016-01-01

    Usage of Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) in the so called general-purpose computing is emerging as an effective approach in several fields of science, although so far applications have been employing GPUs typically for offline computations. Taking into account the steady performance increase of GPU architectures in terms of computing power and I/O capacity, the real-time applications of these devices can thrive in high-energy physics data acquisition and trigger systems. We will examine the use of online parallel computing on GPUs for the synchronous low-level trigger, focusing on tests performed on the trigger system of the CERN NA62 experiment. To successfully integrate GPUs in such an online environment, latencies of all components need analysing, networking being the most critical. To keep it under control, we envisioned NaNet, an FPGA-based PCIe Network Interface Card (NIC) enabling GPUDirect connection. Furthermore, it is assessed how specific trigger algorithms can be parallelized and thus benefit from a GPU implementation, in terms of increased execution speed. Such improvements are particularly relevant for the foreseen Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade where highly selective algorithms will be essential to maintain sustainable trigger rates with very high pileup

  16. Argobots: A Lightweight Low-Level Threading and Tasking Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Sangmin; Amer, Abdelhalim; Balaji, Pavan; Bordage, Cyril; Bosilca, George

    2017-01-01

    In the past few decades, a number of user-level threading and tasking models have been proposed in the literature to address the shortcomings of OS-level threads, primarily with respect to cost and flexibility. Current state-of-the-art user-level threading and tasking models, however, are either too specific to applications or architectures or are not as powerful or flexible. In this article, we present Argobots, a lightweight, low-level threading and tasking framework that is designed as a portable and performant substrate for high-level programming models or runtime systems. Argobots offers a carefully designed execution model that balances generality of functionality with providing a rich set of controls to allow specialization by the user or high-level programming model. Here, we describe the design, implementation, and optimization of Argobots and present integrations with three example high-level models: OpenMP, MPI, and co-located I/O service. Evaluations show that (1) Argobots outperforms existing generic threading runtimes; (2) our OpenMP runtime offers more efficient interoperability capabilities than production OpenMP runtimes do; (3) when MPI interoperates with Argobots instead of Pthreads, it enjoys reduced synchronization costs and better latency hiding capabilities; and (4) I/O service with Argobots reduces interference with co-located applications, achieving performance competitive with that of the Pthreads version.

  17. Current status of low-level-waste-segregation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.E.; Colombo, P.; Sailor, V.L.

    1982-01-01

    The adoption of improved waste segregation practices by waste generators and burial sites will result in the improved disposal of low-level wastes (LLW) in the future. Many of the problems connected with this disposal mode are directly attributable to or aggravated by the indiscriminate mixing of various waste types in burial trenches. Thus, subsidence effects, contact with ground fluids, movement of radioactivity in the vapor phase, migration of radionuclides due to the presence of chelating agents or products of biological degradation, deleterious chemical reactions, and other problems have occurred. Regulations are currently being promulgated which will require waste segregation to a high degree at LLW burial sites. The state-of-the-art of LLW segregation technology and current practices in the USA have been surveyed at representative facilities. Favorable experience has been reported at various sites following the application of segregation controls. This paper reports on the state-of-the-art survey and addresses current and projected LLW segregation practices and their relationship to other waste management activities

  18. Qualifying concrete for a low-level waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philipose, K.E.

    1990-06-01

    A waste repository for the belowground disposal of low-level radioactive waste, labelled IRUS (Intrusion Resistant Underground Structure), is planned at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories. It relies greatly on the durability of concrete for a minimum of 500 years of service life. A research program based on laboratory testing to design a durable concrete and predict its useful engineered service life is in progress. Durability of concrete depends on its resistance of deterioration from both internal and external causes. Since the rate of degradation depends to a major extent on the rate of ingress of aggressive ions into concrete, laboratory testing is in progress to establish the diffusion rates of ions, especially chlorides, sulphate and carbonate ions. A total of 1000 concrete specimens and 500 paste specimens are being exposed at 22 and 45 degrees C to twenty-five different combinations of corrosive agents, including CO 2 . Procedures to measure the ionic profile and to determine the factors controlling diffusion of ions in the various concretes have been developed. The paper presents the initial results from the research program and the longevity predictions to qualify concretes for the IRUS waste repository, based on twelve months of diffusion testing on laboratory specimens

  19. Shallow land burial of low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    Low-level radioactive waste has been produced since the early 1940's. Most of it has been buried in shallow pits at 11 existing sites. Several of the existing sites have performed poorly. Inability to control flow of surface and ground water into and out of disposal pits has been the most important problem. Lack of attention to design of earthen covers over the waste and improper emplacement of the waste in the pits have also contributed to poor performance. Several steps are recommended for improving disposal practices: (1) Waste settlement can be minimized by stacking wastes neatly into pits rather than dumping them randomly; (2) the earthen cover can be made to perform better by making it thicker and by maintaining it properly; and (3) groundwater contamination can be minimized by siting disposal facilities at locations with favorable geohydrologic characteristics. In addition, improved designs are needed for earthen covers, and technology for predicting ground water contamination in the saturated/unsaturated soils that underlie the waste also needs improvement

  20. Low-level radioactive wastes. Council on Scientific Affairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Under a federal law, each state by January 1, 1993, must provide for safe disposal of its low-level radioactive wastes. Most of the wastes are from using nuclear power to produce electricity, but 25% to 30% are from medical diagnosis, therapy, and research. Exposures to radioactivity from the wastes are much smaller than those from natural sources, and federal standards limit public exposure. Currently operating disposal facilities are in Beatty, Nev, Barnwell, SC, and Richland, Wash. National policy encourages the development of regional facilities. Planning a regional facility, selecting a site, and building, monitoring, and closing the facility will be a complex project lasting decades that involves legislation, public participation, local and state governments, financing, quality control, and surveillance. The facilities will utilize geological factors, structural designs, packaging, and other approaches to isolate the wastes. Those providing medical care can reduce wastes by storing them until they are less radioactive, substituting nonradioactive compounds, reducing volumes, and incinerating. Physicians have an important role in informing and advising the public and public officials about risks involved with the wastes and about effective methods of dealing with them. 18 references

  1. Low-level radioactive wastes. AMA Council on Scientific Affairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    Under a federal law, each state by January 1, 1993, must provide for safe disposal of its low-level radioactive wastes. Most of the wastes are from using nuclear power to produce electricity, but 25% to 30% are from medical diagnosis, therapy, and research. Exposures to radioactivity from the wastes are much smaller than those from natural sources, and federal standards limit public exposure. Currently operating disposal facilities are in Beatty, Nev, Barnwell, SC, and Richland, Wash. National policy encourages the development of regional facilities. Planning a regional facility, selecting a site, and building, monitoring, and closing the facility will be a complex project lasting decades that involves legislation, public participation, local and state governments, financing, quality control, and surveillance. The facilities will utilize geological factors, structural designs, packaging, and other approaches to isolate the wastes. Those providing medical care can reduce wastes by storing them until they are less radioactive, substituting nonradioactive compounds, reducing volumes, and incinerating. Physicians have an important role in informing and advising the public and public officials about risks involved with the wastes and about effective methods of dealing with them

  2. Low-level radioactive waste transportation safety history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClure, J.D.

    1997-01-01

    The Radioactive Materials Incident Report (RMIR) database was developed fin 1981 at the Transportation Technology Center of Sandia National Laboratories to support its research and development activities for the US department of Energy (DOE). This database contains information about radioactive material (RAM) transportation incidents that have occurred in the US since 1971. These data were drawn from the US Department of Transportation's (DOT) Hazardous Materials Incident Report system, from Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) files, and from various agencies including state radiological control offices. Support for the RMIR data base is funded by the US DOE National Transportation Program (NTP). Transportation events in RMIR are classified in one of the following ways: as a transportation accident, as a handling accident, or as a reported incident. This presentation will provide definitions for these classifications and give examples of each. The primary objective of this presentation is to provide information on nuclear materials transportation accident/incident events involving low-level waste (LLW) that have occurred in the US for the period 1971 through 1996. Among the areas to be examined are: transportation accidents by mode, package response during accidents, and an examination of accidents where release of contents has occurred. Where information is available, accident and incident history and package response for LLW packages in transportation accidents will be described

  3. More on direct estimates of low-level radiation risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinsky, R.

    1982-01-01

    In an epidemiologic study of mortality at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard (PNS), the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) found no evidence of excess deaths due to leukemia or other cancers among workers exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation. In a subsequent analysis, Bross and Driscoll identified excess lung cancer mortality in PNS workers with lifetime radiation dose of 1 rem or greater and with more than 15 years' latency since first radiation exposure. Although that observation may be important and is currently being examined through case-control analyses, it must be recognized that Bross and Driscoll extracted their observation from matrices of over 4,000 data cells apparently by recombination of innumerable possible permutations of dosage and latency intervals. For that reason, their finding can be regarded as no more than a suggestion for further study. It certainly does not represent a proper scientific conclusion. Bross and Driscoll's analysis illustrates the hazard of performing multiple statistical comparisons on complex data sets in the absence of a priori hypotheses

  4. Mixed low-level waste minimization at Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starke, T.P.

    1998-12-01

    During the first six months of University of California 98 Fiscal Year (July--December) Los Alamos National Laboratory has achieved a 57% reduction in mixed low-level waste generation. This has been accomplished through a systems approach that identified and minimized the largest MLLW streams. These included surface-contaminated lead, lead-lined gloveboxes, printed circuit boards, and activated fluorescent lamps. Specific waste minimization projects have been initiated to address these streams. In addition, several chemical processing equipment upgrades are being implemented. Use of contaminated lead is planned for several high energy proton beam stop applications and stainless steel encapsulated lead is being evaluated for other radiological control area applications. INEEL is assisting Los Alamos with a complete systems analysis of analytical chemistry derived mixed wastes at the CMR building and with a minimum life-cycle cost standard glovebox design. Funding for waste minimization upgrades has come from several sources: generator programs, waste management, the generator set-aside program, and Defense Programs funding to INEEL.

  5. Wound healing stimulation in mice by low-level light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidova, Tatiana N.; Herman, Ira M.; Salomatina, Elena V.; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2006-02-01

    It has been known for many years that low levels of laser or non-coherent light (LLLT) accelerate some phases of wound healing. LLLT can stimulate fibroblast and keratinocyte proliferation and migration. It is thought to work via light absorption by mitochondrial chromophores leading to an increase in ATP, reactive oxygen species and consequent gene transcription. However, despite many reports about the positive effects of LLLT on wound healing, its use remains controversial. Our laboratory has developed a model of a full thickness excisional wound in mice that allows quantitative and reproducible light dose healing response curves to be generated. We have found a biphasic dose response curve with a maximum positive effect at 2 J/cm2 of 635-nm light and successively lower beneficial effects from 3-25 J/cm2, the effect is diminished at doses below 2J/cm2 and gradually reaches control healing levels. At light doses above 25 J/cm2 healing is actually worse than controls. The two most effective wavelengths of light were found to be 635 and 820-nm. We found no difference between filtered 635+/-15-nm light from a lamp and 633-nm light from a HeNe laser. The strain and age of the mouse affected the magnitude of the effect. Light treated wounds start to contract after illumination while control wounds initially expand for the first 24 hours. Our hypothesis is that a single brief light exposure soon after wounding affects fibroblast cells in the margins of the wound. Cells may be induced to proliferate, migrate and assume a myofibroblast phenotype. Our future work will be focused on understanding the mechanisms underlying effects of light on wound healing processes.

  6. Operational Strategies for Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Site in Egypt - 13513

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Yasser T.

    2013-01-01

    The ultimate aims of treatment and conditioning is to prepare waste for disposal by ensuring that the waste will meet the waste acceptance criteria of a disposal facility. Hence the purpose of low-level waste disposal is to isolate the waste from both people and the environment. The radioactive particles in low-level waste emit the same types of radiation that everyone receives from nature. Most low-level waste fades away to natural background levels of radioactivity in months or years. Virtually all of it diminishes to natural levels in less than 300 years. In Egypt, The Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center has been established since 1983, as a waste management facility for LLW and ILW and the disposal site licensed for preoperational in 2005. The site accepts the low level waste generated on site and off site and unwanted radioactive sealed sources with half-life less than 30 years for disposal and all types of sources for interim storage prior to the final disposal. Operational requirements at the low-level (LLRW) disposal site are listed in the National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control NCNSRC guidelines. Additional procedures are listed in the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility Standards Manual. The following describes the current operations at the LLRW disposal site. (authors)

  7. Low-level laser therapy and Calendula officinalis in repairing diabetic foot ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Flávia Machado de Carvalho

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effects of low-level laser therapy isolated and associated with Calendula officinalis oil in treating diabetic foot ulcers. METHOD An experimental, randomized, controlled, prospective, interventional clinical case study using a quantitative approach. The sample consisted of 32 diabetic patients of both genders. Participants were randomly divided into four groups. Doppler Ultrasound evaluation of the Ankle-Brachial Index, brief pain inventory and analog pain scale were performed at baseline and after 30 days. RESULTS Reduced pain was observed in the Low-level laser therapy and Low-level laser therapy associated with Essential Fatty Acids groups (p<0.01. Regarding the Ankle-Brachial Index and Doppler Ultrasound, all groups remained stable. By analyzing lesion area reduction, Low-level laser therapy associated with Essential fatty acids group showed a significance of p=0.0032, and the Low-level laser therapy group showed p=0.0428. CONCLUSION Low-level laser therapy, performed alone or associated with the Calendula officinalis oil was effective in relieving pain and accelerating the tissue repair process of diabetic foot.

  8. The Dose That Works: Low Level Laser Treatment of Tendinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumilty, Steve; Munn, Joanne; David Baxter, G.; McDonough, Suzanne; Hurley, Deirdre A.; Basford, Jeffrey R.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) is used in the treatment of tendon injuries. However, the clinical effectiveness of this modality remains controversial with limited agreement on the most efficacious dosage and parameter choices. Purpose: To assess the clinical effectiveness of LLLT in the treatment of tendinopathy and the validity of current dosage recommendations for treatment. Method: Medical databases were searched from inception to 1st August 2008. Controlled clinical trials evaluating LLLT as a primary intervention for any tendinopathy were included in the review. Methodological quality was classified using the PEDro scale. Appropriateness of treatment parameters were assessed using established guidelines. Results: Twenty five trials met the inclusion criteria. There was conflicting findings from multiple trials: 12 showed positive effects and 13 were inconclusive or showed no effect. Dosages used in the 12 positive studies support the existence of an effective dosage window that closely resembled current guidelines. Where pooling of data was possible, LLLT showed a positive effect size; in high quality studies of lateral epicondylitis, participants' grip strength was 9.59 Kg higher than the control group; for participants with Achilles tendinopathy, the effect was 13.6 mm less pain on a 100 mm visual analogue scale. Conclusion: This study found conflicting evidence as to the effectiveness of LLLT in the treatment of tendinopathy. However, an effective dosage window emerged showing benefit in the treatment of tendinopathy. Strong evidence exists from the 12 positive studies that positive outcomes are associated with the use of current dosage recommendations for the treatment of tendinopathy.

  9. Low Level Waste Conceptual Design Adaption to Poor Geological Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, J.; Drimmer, D.; Giovannini, A.; Manfroy, P.; Maquet, F.; Schittekat, J.; Van Cotthem, A.; Van Echelpoel, E.

    2002-01-01

    Since the early eighties, several studies have been carried out in Belgium with respect to a repository for the final disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW). In 1998, the Belgian Government decided to restrict future investigations to the four existing nuclear sites in Belgium or sites that might show interest. So far, only two existing nuclear sites have been thoroughly investigated from a geological and hydrogeological point of view. These sites are located in the North-East (Mol-Dessel) and in the mid part (Fleurus-Farciennes) of the country. Both sites have the disadvantage of presenting poor geological and hydrogeological conditions, which are rather unfavorable to accommodate a surface disposal facility for LLW. The underground of the Mol-Dessel site consists of neogene sand layers of about 180 m thick which cover a 100 meters thick clay layer. These neogene sands contain, at 20 m depth, a thin clayey layer. The groundwater level is quite close to the surface (0-2m) and finally, the topography is almost totally flat. The upper layer of the Fleurus-Farciennes site consists of 10 m silt with poor geomechanical characteristics, overlying sands (only a few meters thick) and Westphalian shales between 15 and 20 m depth. The Westphalian shales are tectonized and strongly weathered. In the past, coal seams were mined out. This activity induced locally important surface subsidence. For both nuclear sites that were investigated, a conceptual design was made that could allow any unfavorable geological or hydrogeological conditions of the site to be overcome. In Fleurus-Farciennes, for instance, the proposed conceptual design of the repository is quite original. It is composed of a shallow, buried concrete cylinder, surrounded by an accessible concrete ring, which allows permanent inspection and control during the whole lifetime of the repository. Stability and drainage systems should be independent of potential differential settlements an d subsidences

  10. The Dose That Works: Low Level Laser Treatment of Tendinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumilty, Steve; Munn, Joanne; McDonough, Suzanne; Hurley, Deirdre A.; Basford, Jeffrey R.; David Baxter, G.

    2010-05-01

    Background: Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) is used in the treatment of tendon injuries. However, the clinical effectiveness of this modality remains controversial with limited agreement on the most efficacious dosage and parameter choices. Purpose: To assess the clinical effectiveness of LLLT in the treatment of tendinopathy and the validity of current dosage recommendations for treatment. Method: Medical databases were searched from inception to 1st August 2008. Controlled clinical trials evaluating LLLT as a primary intervention for any tendinopathy were included in the review. Methodological quality was classified using the PEDro scale. Appropriateness of treatment parameters were assessed using established guidelines. Results: Twenty five trials met the inclusion criteria. There was conflicting findings from multiple trials: 12 showed positive effects and 13 were inconclusive or showed no effect. Dosages used in the 12 positive studies support the existence of an effective dosage window that closely resembled current guidelines. Where pooling of data was possible, LLLT showed a positive effect size; in high quality studies of lateral epicondylitis, participants' grip strength was 9.59 Kg higher than the control group; for participants with Achilles tendinopathy, the effect was 13.6 mm less pain on a 100 mm visual analogue scale. Conclusion: This study found conflicting evidence as to the effectiveness of LLLT in the treatment of tendinopathy. However, an effective dosage window emerged showing benefit in the treatment of tendinopathy. Strong evidence exists from the 12 positive studies that positive outcomes are associated with the use of current dosage recommendations for the treatment of tendinopathy.

  11. Low-Level Radioactive Waste temporary storage issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 gave responsibility for the disposal of commercially generated low-level radioactive waste to the States. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 attached additional requirements for specific State milestones. Compact regions were formed and host States selected to establish disposal facilities for the waste generated within their borders. As a result of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, the existing low-level radioactive waste disposal sites will close at the end of 1992; the only exception is the Richland, Washington, site, which will remain open to the Northwest Compact region only. All host States are required to provide for disposal of low-level radioactive waste by January 1, 1996. States also have the option of taking title to the waste after January 1, 1993, or taking title by default on January 1, 1996. Low-level radioactive waste disposal will not be available to most States on January 1, 1993. The most viable option between that date and the time disposal is available is storage. Several options for storage can be considered. In some cases, a finite storage time will be permitted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission at the generator site, not to exceed five years. If disposal is not available within that time frame, other options must be considered. There are several options that include some form of extension for storage at the generator site, moving the waste to an existing storage site, or establishing a new storage facility. Each of these options will include differing issues specific to the type of storage sought

  12. Practical RF system design

    CERN Document Server

    Egan, William F

    2003-01-01

    he ultimate practical resource for today's RF system design professionals Radio frequency components and circuits form the backbone of today's mobile and satellite communications networks. Consequently, both practicing and aspiring industry professionals need to be able to solve ever more complex problems of RF design. Blending theoretical rigor with a wealth of practical expertise, Practical RF System Design addresses a variety of complex, real-world problems that system engineers are likely to encounter in today's burgeoning communications industry with solutions that are not easily available in the existing literature. The author, an expert in the field of RF module and system design, provides powerful techniques for analyzing real RF systems, with emphasis on some that are currently not well understood. Combining theoretical results and models with examples, he challenges readers to address such practical issues as: * How standing wave ratio affects system gain * How noise on a local oscillator will affec...

  13. Low-level radioactive waste management technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Although reviews of disposal practices and site performance indicated that there were no releases to the environment that would affect public health and safety, it became clear that: (a) several burial grounds were not performing as expected; (b) long-term maintenance of closed trenches could be a costly problem, and (c) more cost-effective methods could be developed for the treatment, packing, and disposal of low-level waste. As a result of these reviews, the Department of Energy developed the Low-level Waste Management Program to seek improvements in existing practices, correct obvious deficiencies, and develop site closure techniques that would avoid expensive long-term maintenance and monitoring. Such technology developments provide a better understanding of the physical and technical mechanisms governing low-level waste treatment and disposal and lead to improvement in the performance of disposal sites. The primary means of disposal of low-level waste has been the accepted and regulated practice of shallow land disposal, i.e., placement of low-level waste in trenches 5 to 10 meters deep with several meters of special soil cover. Department of Energy waste is primarily disposed at six major shallow land disposal sites. Commercial waste is currently disposed of at three major sites in the nation - Barnwell, South Carolina; Richland, Washington; and Beatty, Nevada. In the late 1970's public concern arose regarding the management practices of sites operated by the civilian sector and by the Department of Energy

  14. Illinois perspective on low level radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etchison, D.

    1984-01-01

    Illinois is a big generator of low level radioactive waste. It has had extensive experience with controversial waste disposal and storage facilities. This experience makes it difficult for the public and political leaders in Illinois to support the establishment of new disposal facilities in the state. Yet, with extensive debates and discussions concerning the Low Level Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the proposed Midwest Compact, political leaders and the public are facing up to the fact that they must be responsible for the disposal of the low level radioactive waste generated in the state. The Governor and many political leaders from Illinois support the regional approach and believe it can be an innovative and progressive way for the state to deal with the range of low level waste management and disposal problems. A version of the Midwest Interstate Low Level Waste Compact has become Illinois law, but it has significant differences from the one adopted by five other states. Like other states in the midwest and northeast, Illinois is opposed to Congressional consent of the four pending compacts before the remaining two compacts, the northeast and midwest are sent to Washington and interregional agreements are negotiated between the sited and non-sited regions. A new national system must be established before access to existing commercial disposal becomes restricted

  15. The French centralized low level radwaste treatment centre named CENTRACO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, C.; Sixou, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Socodei, a subsidiary company of EdF and Cogema is commissioned to design, finance, build and operate two low level radwaste treatment facilities: a contaminated scrap metal melting unit, and a solid and liquid waste incinerator. These units frame a low level radwaste treatment centre named Centraco, located near Marcoule in the south of France, and will receive in 1998 waste coming from dismantling, maintenance and operating works of French and foreign nuclear sites. The decision to create this centre is due to the low density and large variety of low level radwaste which take a volume out of proportion with their activity, specially in the surface storage centre. Up to now, all low level radwaste were sent and stored with no treatment optimization in surface storage centres. Socodei proposes in one single site, to optimize low level radwaste management and reduce the volume of ultimate waste to be stored: in a ratio of one to ten by casting ingots coming from melting contaminated scrap metals; in a ratio of one to twenty by encapsulating earth ashes and ashes resulting from incineration of solid and liquid waste. This is a centralized treatment centre and that's why Centraco is a new waste management system. Getting together all means in one place reduces costs, avoids mismanagement and risk increase, and allows consistency in safety, environmental impact, transport and personnel radioprotection. (author)

  16. Implementing New Methods of Laser Marking of Items in the Nuclear Material Control and Accountability System at SSC RF-IPPE: An Automated Laser Marking System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regoushevsky, V.I.; Tambovtsev, S.D.; Dvukhsherstnov, V.G.; Efimenko, V.F.; Ilyantsev, A.I.; Russ, G.P. III

    2009-01-01

    For over ten years SSC RF-IPPE, together with the US DOE National Laboratories, has been working on implementing automated control and accountability methods for nuclear materials and other items. Initial efforts to use adhesive bar codes or ones printed (painted) onto metal revealed that these methods were inconvenient and lacked durability under operational conditions. For NM disk applications in critical stands, there is the additional requirement that labels not affect the neutron characteristics of the critical assembly. This is particularly true for the many stainless-steel clad disks containing highly enriched uranium (HEU) and plutonium that are used at SSC RF-IPPE for modeling nuclear power reactors. In search of an alternate method for labeling these disks, we tested several technological options, including laser marking and two-dimensional codes. As a result, the method of laser coloring was chosen in combination with Data Matrix ECC200 symbology. To implement laser marking procedures for the HEU disks and meet all the nuclear material (NM) handling standards and rules, IPPE staff, with U.S. technical and financial support, implemented an automated laser marking system; there are also specially developed procedures for NM movements during laser marking. For the laser marking station, a Zenith 10F system by Telesis Technologies (10 watt Ytterbium Fiber Laser and Merlin software) is used. The presentation includes a flowchart for the automated system and a list of specially developed procedures with comments. Among other things, approaches are discussed for human-factor considerations. To date, markings have been applied to numerous steel-clad HEU disks, and the work continues. In the future this method is expected to be applied to other MC and A items.

  17. Effects of cellulite treatment with RF, IR light, mechanical massage and suction treating one buttock with the contralateral as a control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Carmen; Caballero, Natalia; Herrero, Montse; Ruíz, Raquel; Sadick, Neil S; Trelles, Mario A

    2008-12-01

    A system that combines bipolar radio frequency (RF) and intense infrared light (IR) together with mechanical massage and suction has recently been reported as being efficient for cellulite treatment. The present split study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of such a system through various treatments of cellulite located on the buttocks. Ten patients were enrolled for 12 sessions of 30 minutes each performed over one buttock, the other buttock serving as an untreated control. Sessions were conducted twice a week for a period of 12 weeks. Clinical photography and profilometry were carried out to assess textural changes before (baseline) and 2 months after the final treatment. Histopathology was performed at baseline, 2 hours after the first session, and just before the 12th session and 2 months thereafter. All patients noted improvement in the treated buttock before the final session, which was maintained at the 2-month assessment. Improved skin appearance was noticed after the first session and was maintained throughout the study. All patients were satisfied with the results and requested further treatment in order to balance the results in both buttocks. Random histological analyses suggested dermal firmness, fibre compaction and tightening of skin layers, including the subcutis, as possible reasons for the effects achieved. The authors recognize that the small number of participants limits the statistical power of the study. Treatment sessions with the combined RF, IR light and mechanical massage and suction system were complication free, produced improvements in the overall cellulite appearance and skin condition, suggesting that further treatment sessions for maintenance could sustain patient satisfaction index (SI) and lead to lasting results. Based on the good results in the limited trial population, further studies with larger patient populations are warranted.

  18. USDOE activities in low-level radioactive waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vath, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes current research, development and demonstration (R, D and D) programs sponsored by the US Department of Energy in the area of low-level radioactive waste treatment. During the twelve month period ending September 30, 1981, 14 prime US Department of Energy contractors were involved with over 40 low-level radioactive waste disposal technology projects. Three specific projects or task areas have been selected for discussion to illustrate new and evolving technologies, and application of technology developed in other waste management areas to low-level waste treatment. The areas to be discussed include a microwave plasma torch incinerator, application of waste vitrification, and decontamination of metal waste by melting

  19. Method of processing low-level radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunaga, Ichiro; Sugai, Hiroshi.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively reduce the radioactivity density of low-level radioactive liquid wastes discharged from enriched uranium conversion processing steps or the likes. Method: Hydrazin is added to low-level radioactive liquid wastes, which are in contact with iron hydroxide-cation exchange resins prepared by processing strongly acidic-cation exchange resins with ferric chloride and aqueous ammonia to form hydrorizates of ferric ions in the resin. Hydrazine added herein may be any of hydrazine hydrate, hydrazine hydrochloride and hydranine sulfate. The preferred addition amount is more than 100 mg per one liter of the liquid wastes. If it is less than 100 mg, the reduction rate for the radioactivety density (procession liquid density/original liquid density) is decreased. This method enables to effectively reduce the radioactivity density of the low-level radioactive liquid wastes containing a trace amount of radioactive nucleides. (Yoshihara, H.)

  20. Remote-Handled Low Level Waste Disposal Project Alternatives Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Duncan

    2010-10-01

    This report identifies, evaluates, and compares alternatives for meeting the U.S. Department of Energy’s mission need for management of remote-handled low-level waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory and its tenants. Each alternative identified in the Mission Need Statement for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Treatment Project is described and evaluated for capability to fulfill the mission need. Alternatives that could meet the mission need are further evaluated and compared using criteria of cost, risk, complexity, stakeholder values, and regulatory compliance. The alternative for disposal of remote-handled low-level waste that has the highest confidence of meeting the mission need and represents best value to the government is to build a new disposal facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Site.